WorldWideScience

Sample records for public engagement projects

  1. Mars Public Engagement Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Mars public engagement goal to understand and protect our home planet, explore the Universe and search for life, and to inspire the next generation of explorers. Teacher workshops, robotics education, Mars student imaging and analysis programs, MARS Student Imaging Project (MSIP), Russian student participation, MARS museum visualization alliance, and commercialization concepts are all addressed in this project.

  2. Stakeholder integration and public engagement of EU and national research projects in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhnau, Meike; Guo, Chenbo; Walter, Anastasia; Schneider, Nadine

    2017-04-01

    The talk addresses the feasibility and difficulties of research projects to reach out and to integrate a sufficient number of stakeholders (vgl. Carrada, 2006; Poulsen, 2007; Zikos et al. 2012; Lee & Belohlav, 2014). With "stakeholders" we understand end-users, policy makers, students for capacity building, administrators and interested general public. The design and later the implementation of stakeholder integration and public engagement strongly depend on the priority-setting and requirements of funding agencies (EU [1], DFG, BMBF and the regional ministries in Germany). They affect the size and constellation of consortia as well as the longevity and continuity of research community; on the other hand they also determine the weighting of communication, dissemination, outreach (and networking) activities within the project. For instance by public engagement of EU funded projects a share of 10% for communication and outreach activities was rated as best practices in 2014 [2]. On the national level there is no such appointment so far. In our talk we will quantify and compare activities among selected EU and nationally funded collaborative projects in Germany, address the hurdles, investigate the communication tools, examine the outreach channels and dissemination tactics, reflect the performances and the results achieved so far, with the objective to answer the following questions: - What tools/channels have been applied so far? Were they efficient and expedient? - What can be count as best practices? - Are such activities sustainable at all? The goal of this talk is to show the complexity of the stakeholder integration and public engagement in research projects, to critically assess our experiences gained in past and running projects, and to subsequently have an interactive exchange with other project professionals at EGU. [1] European Commission (2004, 2008, 2010, 2014). Communicating EU research and innovation guidance for project participants; [2] European

  3. Constituting Public Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    understanding of science to those of public engagement with science and technology (PEST), and the histories, or genealogies, of such models. Data from two qualitative studies-a case study of one of the United Kingdom'ssix Beacons for Public Engagement and a study of contract research staff-are used...... backgrounds, suggesting that multiple and overlapping meanings around PEST are derived from particular histories that have been brought together, through the rubric of public engagement, in assemblages such as the Beacons....

  4. Science, Public Engagement with

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irwin, Alan

    2015-01-01

    regarding their definition in institutional practice. Science and technology studies scholars have been especially active in challenging prevailing policy assumptions in this area and in considering how science–public relations might be reinterpreted and reconstructed. This article presents some of the key......‘Public engagement with science’ evokes a series of long-standing issues concerning the relationship between members of the public (or citizens) and matters of technical expertise. However, each of the terms ‘public,’ ‘engagement,’ and ‘science’ is open to question, and to empirical investigation...

  5. Constituting Public Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    This article uses data from two U.K. studies in order to explore the meanings attached to public engagement. It focuses on two issues of importance to contemporary discussions of science communication: the degree to which there has been a smooth transition, in practice, from models of public unde...... backgrounds, suggesting that multiple and overlapping meanings around PEST are derived from particular histories that have been brought together, through the rubric of public engagement, in assemblages such as the Beacons. © 2013 SAGE Publications....

  6. Public Engagement with Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irwin, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Based on a recent review and a contribution for the 20 years anniversary edition of the scientific journal Public Understanding of Science, reflections are made about the last twenty years of achievements and failures in the theory, practice and policy of Public Engagement with Science (PES......). The ‘deficit theory’ which still today characterize many scientific activities that address citizen can be criticized for ‘one-way communication’, ‘sanctity of expertise’, and treatment of the publics as ‘homogeneous’. When arguing for the need for public engagement with science it is question about...... not problematising ‘the public’, taking values seriously and instead educating ‘the experts’, and recognising both the ‘legitimacy of wider concerns’ and the ‘democratic imperative’. Public Engagement with Science as strategy is building upon a normative commitment to the idea of democratic science policy...

  7. PERARES: Public Engagement with Research and Research Engagement with Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinhaus, Norbert; Mulder, Henk A.J.

    2014-01-01

    PERARES is a four-year project funded by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme which started in 2010. The acronym stands for "Public Engagement with Research and Research Engagement with Society”. The project brings together Science Shops, Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) and Univer

  8. Engaging the public in hydrological observations - first experiences from the CrowdWater project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Jan; Strobl, Barbara; Etter, Simon; Vis, Marc; Ewen, Tracy; (Ilja) van Meerveld, H. J.

    2017-04-01

    The project CrowdWater (www.crowdwater.ch) explores opportunities for citizen scientists in hydrological observations. For data collection in CrowdWater, we use a "geocaching" type approach with the help of a smartphone app. Citizens can participate in the collection of hydrological data using the smartphone app, which allows both the submission of observations for existing sites and to set up new sites. A crucial challenge in any citizen science project is finding ways to connect to enough people who want to participate and to keep them motivation to contribute to the project. Here, we present the approaches that will be used in the CrowdWater project and discuss our first experiences. To connect to the public and recruit participants we use publications in traditional media, social media and a MOOC (massive open online course). In order to keep participant motivated the collected data is immediately shown in the app and online and gamification elements are used in the app.

  9. Research staff and public engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    Public engagement plays an important role in the contemporary UK academy, and is promoted through initiatives such as Beacons of Public Engagement and research grant 'Pathways to Impact'. Relatively little is known, however, about academic experiences of such engagement activities. This study...

  10. PERARES : Public Engagement with Research and Research Engagement with Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Henk; Steinhaus, Norbert; Azman, Azlinda; Arlus, Feri; Jamsari, A; Campbell, James; Steinhaus, Norbert; Ong, Tan Kek; Winyayong, Panom

    2013-01-01

    PERARES is a four years funded project by the European Community's Seventh Framework Program which started in 2010. It brings together Science Shops, Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) and Universities from 16 European countries. The PERARES project aims to strengthen public engagement in research (

  11. Beyond and within public engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cañada, Jose A.; Tupasela, Aaro Mikael; Snell, Karoliina

    2015-01-01

    Social studies on biobanking have traditionally focused on public engagement, that is, engagement with donors, patients and the general public as an important factor of sustainability. In this article, we claim that, in order to fully understand the way biobanks work, it is necessary to pay atten...

  12. Europlanet Prize for Public Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchet, Thierry

    2016-10-01

    The Europlanet Prize for Public Engagement with Planetary Science is awarded annually. Through the Prize, Europlanet aims to recognise achievements in engaging European citizens with planetary science and to raise the profile of outreach within the scientific community. It is awarded to individuals or groups who have developed innovative practices in planetary science communication and whose efforts have significantly contributed to a wider public engagement with planetary science.

  13. Research staff and public engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    Public engagement plays an important role in the contemporary UK academy, and is promoted through initiatives such as Beacons of Public Engagement and research grant 'Pathways to Impact'. Relatively little is known, however, about academic experiences of such engagement activities. This study...... focuses on one staff group, contract researchers, to explore the perceived challenges and opportunities of public engagement. Qualitative and quantitative data-from a web-based survey and three focus groups-are used to show that, while engagement activities are often seen as rewarding, the challenges...... involved in participating in them are profound. While researchers report practical needs, such as for logistical support or communication training, key barriers relate to the conditions of contract research more generally, and specifically to job insecurity, transiency, and lack of autonomy. © 2013...

  14. Geophysicists' views about public engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besley, J. C.; Dudo, A.; Yuan, S.

    2016-12-01

    The proposed talk would present the results of 2016 survey of American Geophysical Union members (n = 2040) about public engagement. This survey took place as part of a broader, NSF funded, study of engagement views across eight different U.S.-based scientific societies. The presentation would include data about geophysicists' past engagement behavior and willingness to engage alongside data about engagement attitudes, perceived norms (i.e. beliefs about whether peers engage and value engagement), and perceived efficacy (i.e., scientists' beliefs about their own communication skills and the impact of engagement). The presentation would also include results that describe scientists' overall goals for engagement (e.g., increasing support for specific policy positions, changing citizen behavior, etc.), as well as their communication-specific objectives (e.g., increasing knowledge, increase excitement, etc.). All of the results would be put in the context of equivalent results from scientists from seven other societies across a variety of fields, including chemistry, biology, and the social sciences. Three themes that would be emphasized in the presentation include (1) the fact that there are substantial commonalities in engagement views across scientific fields, (2) the important role that perceived engagement skill (efficacy) appears to play in predicting engagement willingness, and (3) a lack of evidence that scientists are thinking about engagement in strategic ways. Strategic engagement, in this regard, would involve setting clear goals and then choosing activities that the social science of science communication suggests might allow one to achieve those goals. The presentation would conclude with thoughts about what might be done to improve the effectiveness of science communication training.

  15. The Engaged Campus: Toward a Comprehensive Approach to Public Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furco, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Although civic purposes are implicit in the mission statements of higher education institutions, American colleges and universities have not always embraced public engagement initiatives. This paper explores how the recent emergence of the engaged campus movement has helped move public engagement initiatives from the margins to the mainstream by…

  16. Project studies and engaged scholarship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geraldi, Joana; Söderlund, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    and to rejuvenate these research directions. Design/methodology/approach The authors propose the umbrella term: “project studies” to denote the research related to projects and temporary organizing. Project studies is conceived not only as a body of research, but also as a social process embedded in research...... of research in project studies. Findings The conceptual framework is used to craft future research directions, in the lines proposed by Winter et al. (2006b). Research limitations/implications The authors conclude by proposing for a sixth theme on the practice of theorizing, and call for engaged, ambidextrous...... scholars, who’s “job” goes beyond the writing of articles and research applications, and includes shaping discourses of project research, nurturing new project scholars, contributing to project practice and carefully considering the legacy of projects and project studies in society. Originality...

  17. Project studies and engaged scholarship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geraldi, Joana; Söderlund, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In 2006, the “Rethinking Project Management” network called for a paradigm shift in project research, and proposed five research directions. The directions inspired research and marked a milestone in the development of the field. The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the past decade...... and to rejuvenate these research directions. Design/methodology/approach The authors propose the umbrella term: “project studies” to denote the research related to projects and temporary organizing. Project studies is conceived not only as a body of research, but also as a social process embedded in research...... of research in project studies. Findings The conceptual framework is used to craft future research directions, in the lines proposed by Winter et al. (2006b). Research limitations/implications The authors conclude by proposing for a sixth theme on the practice of theorizing, and call for engaged, ambidextrous...

  18. Public Engagement for Responsible Research and Innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinhaus, Norbert; Mulder, Henk; de Marree, Jozefien; Pratt, Chris

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we will elaborate on the role of Public Engagement in research (PE) as a key approach to achieve RRI. We will use PE as an umbrella term, encompassing Community Engagement and Community-Based Research as well.

  19. Evaluation of NASA's Mars Public Engagement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viotti, M.; Bowman, C.

    2014-12-01

    From 2009-2014, NASA's Mars Public Engagement (MPE) Program developed and implemented project-level logic models and associated impacts and indicators tables using the NSF's "Framework for Evaluating Impacts of Informal Science Education Projects" (Friedman, 2008) as a key guiding document. This Framework was selected given the national-expert-level evaluation committee who synthesized evaluation in a way that allows project-to-project comparisons in key areas of measurable change, while also allowing variation for appropriate project-specific measures and outcomes. These logic models, revisited and refined annually, provide guidance for all measures developed, tested, and implemented with MPE projects, including the Mars Student Imaging Project (MSIP), the Imagine Mars Project, and Mars Educator Professional Development. Project questionnaires were developed, tested, refined, retested, and finalized following standard procedures outlined in Converse & Presser (1986), Dillman, Smyth, & Christian (2009), Krosnick & Presser (2010), and Presser, et al. (2004). Interview questions were drafted, reviewed by project staff, and revised following established interview question development guidelines (e.g., Kvale, 1996; Maxwell, 2005; Maykut & Morehouse, 1994; Strauss & Corbin, 1998). For MSIP final projects, a rubric guided by Lantz (2004) was developed to evaluate systematically the quality and completeness of the final projects. We will discuss our instruments as well as the important issue of nonresponse error, which is relevant to a wide range of NASA programs because most data is collected from customers who are voluntary participants, as opposed to grantees who must report as a condition of their grant. NASA programs that consider data and report results from voluntary samples must be cautious about claims or decisions based on those data. We will discuss the ways in which we consider and address this challenge.

  20. Public engagement on global health challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minhas Gunjeet S

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experience with public engagement activities regarding the risks and benefits of science and technology (S&T is growing, especially in the industrialized world. However, public engagement in the developing world regarding S&T risks and benefits to explore health issues has not been widely explored. Methods This paper gives an overview about public engagement and related concepts, with a particular focus on challenges and benefits in the developing world. We then describe an Internet-based platform, which seeks to both inform and engage youth and the broader public on global water issues and their health impacts. Finally, we outline a possible course for future action to scale up this and similar online public engagement platforms. Results The benefits of public engagement include creating an informed citizenry, generating new ideas from the public, increasing the chances of research being adopted, increasing public trust, and answering ethical research questions. Public engagement also fosters global communication, enables shared experiences and methodology, standardizes strategy, and generates global viewpoints. This is especially pertinent to the developing world, as it encourages previously marginalized populations to participate on a global stage. One of the core issues at stake in public engagement is global governance of science and technology. Also, beyond benefiting society at large, public engagement in science offers benefits to the scientific enterprise itself. Conclusion Successful public engagement with developing world stakeholders will be a critical part of implementing new services and technologies. Interactive engagement platforms, such as the Internet, have the potential to unite people globally around relevant health issues.

  1. Public Engagement and Nanotechnology in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton-Brown, Sally

    2016-07-01

    Upstream engagement is commonly regarded as necessary for the smooth implementation of new technologies, particularly when there is an impact on health. Is the healthcare context in Australia geared toward such public engagement? There are established engagement practices for issues of healthcare resourcing, for example; however, the situation becomes more complex with the introduction of a new technology such as nanomedicine.

  2. Work engagement in the public service context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noesgaard, Mette Strange; Hansen, Jesper Rosenberg

    2016-01-01

    Work engagement has increasingly captured the attention of researchers and practitioners due to its positive impact on employee level outcomes and overall organizational performance (e.g. Bakker and Bal, 2010, Hallberg and Schaufeli, 2006). Therefore, several studies have been conducted in variou...... investigates the role of public service motivation (PSM) in relation to engagement and how it may be used to enhance engagement in a challenging public context characterized by high levels of emotional labor, control and increasing demands for efficiency....

  3. Education and public engagement in observatory operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, Pavel; Mayo, Louis; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2016-07-01

    Education and public engagement (EPE) is an essential part of astronomy's mission. New technologies, remote observing and robotic facilities are opening new possibilities for EPE. A number of projects (e.g., Telescopes In Education, MicroObservatory, Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope and UNC's Skynet) have developed new infrastructure, a number of observatories (e.g., University of Arizona's "full-engagement initiative" towards its astronomy majors, Vatican Observatory's collaboration with high-schools) have dedicated their resources to practical instruction and EPE. Some of the facilities are purpose built, others are legacy telescopes upgraded for remote or automated observing. Networking among institutions is most beneficial for EPE, and its implementation ranges from informal agreements between colleagues to advanced software packages with web interfaces. The deliverables range from reduced data to time and hands-on instruction while operating a telescope. EPE represents a set of tasks and challenges which is distinct from research applications of the new astronomical facilities and operation modes. In this paper we examine the experience with several EPE projects, and some lessons and challenges for observatory operation.

  4. Participant and Public Involvement in Refining a Peer-Volunteering Active Aging Intervention: Project ACE (Active, Connected, Engaged).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withall, Janet; Thompson, Janice L; Fox, Kenneth R; Davis, Mark; Gray, Selena; de Koning, Jolanthe; Lloyd, Liz; Parkhurst, Graham; Stathi, Afroditi

    2016-12-07

    Evidence for the health benefits of a physically active lifestyle among older adults is strong, yet only a small proportion of older people meet physical activity recommendations. A synthesis of evidence identified "best bet" approaches, and this study sought guidance from end-user representatives and stakeholders to refine one of these, a peer-volunteering active aging intervention. Focus groups with 28 older adults and four professional volunteer managers were conducted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 9 older volunteers. Framework analysis was used to gauge participants' views on the ACE intervention. Motives for engaging in community groups and activities were almost entirely social. Barriers to participation were lack of someone to attend with, lack of confidence, fear of exclusion or "cliquiness" in established groups, bad weather, transport issues, inaccessibility of activities, ambivalence, and older adults being "set in their ways". Motives for volunteering included "something to do," avoiding loneliness, the need to feel needed, enjoyment, and altruism. Challenges included negative events between volunteer and recipient of volunteering support, childcare commitments, and high volunteering workload. Peer-volunteering approaches have great potential for promotion of active aging. The systematic multistakeholder approach adopted in this study led to important refinements of the original ACE intervention. The findings provide guidance for active aging community initiatives highlighting the importance of effective recruitment strategies and of tackling major barriers including lack of motivation, confidence, and readiness to change; transport issues; security concerns and cost; activity availability; and lack of social support. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.

  5. Public engagement, knowledge transfer and impact validity

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Public engagement and knowledge transfer are now necessary supplements to academic research and teaching activity for university-based psychologists in the United Kingdom. However, a “deficit model” of public understanding is often assumed by national policies. We argue that bidirectional approaches between researchers and concerned communities are necessary, and that bidirectional transfer recognizes different kinds of expertise and experience. We argue further that researchers working in th...

  6. Engaging the public in biodiversity issues

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    To engage people in biodiversity and other environmental issues, one must provide the opportunity for enhanced understanding that empowers individuals to make choices and take action based on sound science and reliable recommendations. To this end, we must acknowledge some real challenges. Recent surveys show that, despite growing public concern, environmental issues still rank below many other problems, such as terrorism, health care, the economy, and (in the U.S.) family values. Moreover, m...

  7. Engaging Prekindergarten Dual Language Learners in Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Meredith K.; Shue, Pamela L.

    2013-01-01

    In a preschool class where the teachers speak only English and the majority of the children speak only Spanish, it is challenging to choose a topic that is interesting enough to engage all children in project work that supports language development. Luckily for the children, pizza is a delicious, familiar, and easily accessible topic to explore.…

  8. Project: Public School

    OpenAIRE

    Eräpuu, Päivi

    2013-01-01

    Lahden ammattikorkeakoulun Muotoilu- ja taideinstituutin Muoti- ja vaatetussuunnittelun opinnäytetyö Project: Public School pohtii open design -ideologian sovellutusmahdollisuuksia vaatesuunnittelussa. Opinnäytetyö tutkii avoimen suunnittelun käsitettä, sen ilmiöitä ja toimintatapoja lokaalista valmistuksesta, tee-se-itse-ideologiasta ja ekologisista arvoista. Opinnäytemalliston visuaalisena teemana on koulupuku ja sen kaltaisen valmisvaatteen dekonstruktio uuden vaatteen suunni...

  9. Investigating Public trust in Expert Knowledge: Narrative, Ethics, and Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Silvia; Vaccarella, Maria; Davis, Mark

    2017-03-01

    "Public Trust in Expert Knowledge: Narrative, Ethics, and Engagement" examines the social, cultural, and ethical ramifications of changing public trust in the expert biomedical knowledge systems of emergent and complex global societies. This symposium was conceived as an interdisciplinary project, drawing on bioethics, the social sciences, and the medical humanities. We settled on public trust as a topic for our work together because its problematization cuts across our fields and substantive research interests. For us, trust is simultaneously a matter of ethics, social relations, and the cultural organization of meaning. We share a commitment to narrative inquiry across our fields of expertise in the bioethics of transformative health technologies, public communications on health threats, and narrative medicine. The contributions to this symposium have applied, in different ways and with different effects, this interdisciplinary mode of inquiry, supplying new reflections on public trust, expertise, and biomedical knowledge.

  10. Galaxy Zoo: Science and Public Engagement Hand in Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Karen; Lintott, Chris; Feldt, Julie; Keel, Bill; Skibba, Ramin

    2015-08-01

    Galaxy Zoo (www.galaxyzoo.org) is familiar to many as a hugely successful citizen science project. Hundreds of thousands of members of the public have contributed to Galaxy Zoo which collects visual classifications of galaxies in images from a variety of surveys (e.g. the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Hubble Space Telescope surveys, and others) using an internet tool. Galaxy Zoo inspired the creation of "The Zooniverse" (www.zooniverse.org) which is now the world's leading online platform for citizens science, hosting a growing number of projects (at the time of writing ~30) making use of crowdsourced data analysis in all areas of academic research, and boasting over 1.3 million participants.Galaxy Zoo has also shown itself, in a series of (now ~60) peer reviewed papers, to be a fantastic database for the study of galaxy evolution. Participation in citizen science is also fantastic public engagement with scientific research. But what do the participants learn while they are involved in crowdsourced data analysis?In this talk I will discuss how public engagement via citizen science can be an effective means of outreach from data intensive astronomical surveys. A citizen science project (if done right) can and should increase the scientific output of an astronomical project, while at the same time inspiring participants to learn more about the science and techniques of astronomy.

  11. Engaging the public on climate change issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Alice

    2016-03-01

    As a Jefferson Science Fellow from August 2014-August 2015, Alice Bean worked with the Office of Religion and Global Affairs at the U.S. Department of State on climate change and environmental issues. The Office of Religion and Global Affairs works to implement the National Strategy on Religious Leader and Faith Community Engagement which includes building partnerships on environmental issues. With the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference of the Parties meeting 21 in December, 2015 in Paris, there were and continue to be great opportunities for physicists to interact with policy makers and the general public. As an experimental particle physicist, much was learned about climate change science, how the public views scientists, how science can influence policy, but most especially how to communicate about science.

  12. Communicating the Science of Nasa's Maven Mission through Public Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, T.; Peticolas, L. M.; Wood, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    As education, public outreach, and communications professionals, we see the direct benefits of online outreach and other public engagement strategies in communicating complex scientific concepts. While public understanding of science and scientific literacy rates has stagnated at best, online engagement has never been more active. About 40% of Americans receive information about science and technology primarily from online sources; however, the ability to pursue enhanced learning opportunities is directly correlated with higher education and income. The MAVEN E/PO team has recognized an opportunity to bring the science of the mission to a growing, online community of engaged learners and potential supporters of future scientific research and data. We have taken a wide variety of approaches to educate the public—particularly non-traditional audiences—about a mission that is not as "sexy" as many other NASA missions, but is critical to understanding the evolution of Mars over time as part of an ongoing, long-term effort by NASA's Mars Exploration Program. We will highlight some of the tools—including online platforms—that we have used to share the science of MAVEN and will present preliminary evaluation results from our education and public outreach projects.

  13. Research Staff and Public Engagement: A UK Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sarah R.

    2013-01-01

    Public engagement plays an important role in the contemporary UK academy, and is promoted through initiatives such as Beacons of Public Engagement and research grant "Pathways to Impact". Relatively little is known, however, about academic experiences of such engagement activities. This study focuses on one staff group, contract…

  14. Why should we promote public engagement with science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilgoe, Jack; Lock, Simon J; Wilsdon, James

    2014-01-01

    This introductory essay looks back on the two decades since the journal Public Understanding of Science was launched. Drawing on the invited commentaries in this special issue, we can see narratives of continuity and change around the practice and politics of public engagement with science. Public engagement would seem to be a necessary but insufficient part of opening up science and its governance. Those of us who have been involved in advocating, conducting and evaluating public engagement practice could be accused of over-promising. If we, as social scientists, are going to continue a normative commitment to the idea of public engagement, we should therefore develop new lines of argument and analysis. Our support for the idea of public engagement needs qualifying, as part of a broader, more ambitious interest in the idea of publicly engaged science.

  15. Experiments in engagement: Designing public engagement with science and technology for capacity building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selin, Cynthia; Rawlings, Kelly Campbell; de Ridder-Vignone, Kathryn; Sadowski, Jathan; Altamirano Allende, Carlo; Gano, Gretchen; Davies, Sarah R; Guston, David H

    2017-08-01

    Public engagement with science and technology is now widely used in science policy and communication. Touted as a means of enhancing democratic discussion of science and technology, analysis of public engagement with science and technology has shown that it is often weakly tied to scientific governance. In this article, we suggest that the notion of capacity building might be a way of reframing the democratic potential of public engagement with science and technology activities. Drawing on literatures from public policy and administration, we outline how public engagement with science and technology might build citizen capacity, before using the notion of capacity building to develop five principles for the design of public engagement with science and technology. We demonstrate the use of these principles through a discussion of the development and realization of the pilot for a large-scale public engagement with science and technology activity, the Futurescape City Tours, which was carried out in Arizona in 2012.

  16. Astrobiology, Evolution, and Society: Public Engagement Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertka, C. M.

    2009-12-01

    frequently was “my religious beliefs.” A review of religious identification in this country will be presented in the context of offering insights for public engagement on the topic of evolution, and the contribution that astrobiology could make to encouraging a positive relationship between science and religion. A widespread acceptance of evolution in the United States may require that the scientific community go beyond a simple contrast approach to science and religion and be willing to encourage, and participate in, a program of in-depth and long-term engagement with theologians and religious community leaders. Astrobiology as a discipline is particularly burdened, perhaps blessed, with the responsibility to engage this issue. After all, humanity itself may be inherently defined by the ability we collectively posses to ask “Where did we come from?,” “Are we alone?,” and “Where are we going?”

  17. Astronomy in the United States: Workforce Development and Public Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, Chris

    2012-08-01

    Astronomy workforce development and public engagement in the United States are described. The number of professional astronomers has grown by about a third in the past 25 years, to about 4000. Only one in four are faculty in an academic setting; the rest work in a wide range of public and private research institutes. PhD production has remained steady at about 200 per year. Women account for roughly half of BSc degrees and a third of PhD degrees, but their participation declines to about 10% at the level of full professor. Minorities are underrepresented by a substantial factor at all levels of the profession. In terms of public engagement, astronomy has unique advantages associated with its visual appeal and the large and active amateur astronomy community. The are 1400 public planetaria in the US, with another 110 in schools and universities. Astronomers have made good use of new media such as blogs and podcasts and social networks, but the biggest impact has been in the area of citizen science, where people with no technical background contribute directly to a research project by, for example, classifying galaxies. The International Year of Astronomy and the remarkable success of the Galileoscope have inspired large numbers of people to appreciate astronomy, contributing indirectly to the professional vitality of the field.

  18. Doing Dialogue: Genre and Flexibility in Public Engagement with Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2009-01-01

    'Public engagement with science' is an increasingly important but contested practice. In this study of London's Dana Centre I look at dialogue events carried out there as a case study of public engagement, performing a detailed analysis in order to examine their nature and practice. The analysis...

  19. A Blueprint for Public Engagement Appraisal: Supporting Research Careers

    CERN Document Server

    Borrow, Josh

    2015-01-01

    Time spent performing public engagement is severely undervalued by research institutions around the globe. In this article we present one possible system that could be implemented to provide researchers with career recognition for performing this vital work. The framework utilises the supervision system that is already in place at many research institutions, whereby senior researchers mentor their junior colleagues. This would encourage more researchers to engage with the public, as well as increasing the quality of this engagement.

  20. Engaging the public via competitions - lessons learnt from Rosetta

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Karen S.; Baldwin, Emily; Mignone, Claudia; Homfeld, Anne-Mareike; Bauer, Markus; McCaughrean, Mark J.

    2015-04-01

    2014 was an historic and challenging year for the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission as it awoke from a 957-day slumber, arrived at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and deployed a lander on the comet's surface. One of the biggest challenges facing the mission's science communicators was to awaken interest in the mission and generate a sustained engagement in the broadest possible audience in a relatively short time. New and innovative means were adopted alongside traditional approaches to achieve this goal. In this paper, we describe one of these outreach projects: engaging the public with open competitions. We describe three different competitions that were run for three important mission milestones: 'Wake Up Rosetta' - a video competition to celebrate the end of hibernation; 'Rosetta, are we there yet?' - a photo competition to coincide with Rosetta's rendevous with 67P, and 'Name Site J' - to name the landing site chosen for the Philae lander. We discuss our experiences of these competitions: the channels we used to promote them, the audience we reached, the different levels of engagement, the issues that we encountered, and the outcomes, including lessons learnt.

  1. Collaborating with Scientists in Education and Public Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupla, Christine; Shaner, Andrew; Smith Hackler, Amanda

    2016-10-01

    The Education and Public Engagement team at the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) is developing a scientific advisory board, to gather input from planetary scientists for ways that LPI can help them with public engagement, such as connecting them to opportunities, creating useful resources, and providing training. The advisory board will assist in outlining possible roles of scientists in public engagement, provide feedback on LPI scientist engagement efforts, and encourage scientists to participate in various education and public engagement events.LPI's scientists have participated in a variety of education programs, including teacher workshops, family events, public presentations, informal educator trainings, and communication workshops. Scientists have helped conduct hands-on activities, participated in group discussions, and given talks, while sharing their own career paths and interests; these activities have provided audiences with a clearer vision of how science is conducted and how they can become engaged in science themselves.This poster will share the status and current findings of the scientist advisory board, and the lessons learned regarding planetary scientists' needs, abilities, and interests in participating in education and public engagement programs.

  2. Understanding employee engagement in a public service context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Strange

    Employee engagement has long been capturing the attention of researchers and practitioners (Bakker, Albrecht, & Leiter, 2011; Kahn, 1990), due to its positive impact on various measures of organizational performance and individual level outcomes (Gruman & Saks, 2011; Harter, Schmidt, & Hayes, 2002......). To date however, employee engagement has primarily been studied in private manufacturing firms, but since it cannot be assumed that employee engagement models developed in the private sector are applicable to the public sector (Boselie, 2010; Taher & Emmert, 1992), future research is needed. The purpose...... of this paper is therefore to build a research agenda aiming to understand employee engagement in a public service context. The paper begins with a literature review of the main contributions to the study of employee engagement and then follows with a brief review of the public sector, highlighting some...

  3. A typology of public engagement mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rowe, G.; Frewer, L.J.

    2005-01-01

    Imprecise definition of key terms in the "public participation" domain have hindered the conduct of good research and militated against the development and implementation of effective participation practices. In this article, we define key concepts in the domain: public communication, public consult

  4. An Analysis of White Student Engagement at Public HBCUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Joelle Davis; Fountaine, Tiffany Patrice

    2012-01-01

    The steady increase of White undergraduates attending public Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) compels educators to better understand White students' collegiate experiences at HBCUs. One lens to assess these experiences is through examining their engagement on campus. Student engagement is defined as the amount of time and…

  5. Public engagement with CCS: barriers, key issues and ways forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenias, Dimitrios

    2017-04-01

    Although Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is recognised as a crucial transition technology to a low-carbon world, it has not been popular with the public or some governments (e.g. the UK). Also, despite its use in industrial processes for decades, CCS remains and unfamiliar technology for most publics. It is therefore important to foster top-down and bottom-up acceptance of large scale CCS. In an exploratory round of interviews we canvassed the views of British, Dutch, German and Norwegian experts (N=13) with previous experience in public engagement with CCS. They identified barriers and drivers for CCS deployment and public engagement with CCS. Thematic analysis revealed a small number of recurrent issues, including: (a) lack of political leadership on CCS; (b) lack of public knowledge on relevant technologies and (c) difficulty communicating why CCS is necessary. Emphasis on these barriers varied with the level of experts' engagement with the public. More interestingly, although most experts agreed on the importance of public engagement, their views divided between 'why' engage and 'how' best to do this. In a subsequent expert survey (N=99) interview findings were reinforced: public support was seen as important for CCS roll-out (72%), though lower than political support and funding. The survey also showed that local public was expected to experience most risks, while global public will experience most benefits; whereas local business is seen to benefit more than global. Experts were overwhelmingly positive about CCS - risks outweigh benefits, and are confident that CCS will play a major role in climate change mitigation (along with reduced energy demand and renewables). These findings will be expanded on and triangulated in a follow-up public survey which will benefit those involved with public engagement with CCS.

  6. Fostering institutional practices in support of public engagement by scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    Scientists are increasingly called on to communicate the findings of their research outside the scientific sphere, to members of the public, media, and/or policymakers eager for information about topics at the intersections of science and society. While all scientists share a desire for a more informed public, and for the development of evidence-based public policy, there are profound hurdles that prevent most scientists from meaningfully engaging the public. Here, I identify and discuss both internal (i.e. finite time, discomfort in public speaking and interview settings, etc) and external (metrics for promotion and tenure, scholarly reputation, etc) obstacles for public engagement. At the same time, I also discuss how recent trends in scientific practice provide clear, concrete, and compelling rewards for public engagement. Specifically, institutions of higher education have a vested interest in fostering and rewarding greater public engagement by scientists across all academic ranks. I review a variety of innovative mechanisms, both informal and formal, that institutions are employing to achieve this goal, and assess their potential impact on the engagement levels of scientists.

  7. Understanding the Dynamics of EngagingIinteraction in Public Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Peter; Dindler, Christian; Halskov, Kim

    We present an analysis of three interactive installations in public spaces, in terms of their support of engagement as an evolving process. In particular, we focus on how engagement unfolds as a dynamic process that may be understood in terms of evolving relations between cultural, physical......, content-related, and social elements of interactive environments. These elements are explored through the literature on engagement with interaction design, and it is argued that, although valuable contributions have been made towards understanding engagement with interactive environments, the ways...

  8. Toward a model of employee engagement in a public service organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Strange

    Employee engagement has long been capturing the attention of researchers and practitioners, (e.g. Bakker, Albrecht, & Leiter, 2011; Buckingham & Coffman, 1999) due to its positive impact on various measures of organizational performance (Gruman & Saks, 2011; Harter, Schmidt, & Hayes, 2002; Mone...... & London, 2010). To date, however, employee engagement has primarily been studied in private manufacturing firms leaving out a gap of research in a public service organization, such as eldercare organizations, although engagement according to Boselie (2010) is highly relevant in the specific context....... The purpose of the PhD project is to build a model explaining employee engagement in a public service organization. Research on work design theory (e.g. Hackman & Oldham, 1976) will be used, since it has often been applied to identify antecedents associated with engagement (Bakker & Demerouti, 2007; Kahn...

  9. Space Culture: Innovative Cultural Approaches To Public Engagement With Astronomy, Space Science And Astronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Roger F.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years a number of cultural organizations have established ongoing programs of public engagement with astronomy, space science and astronautics. Many involve elements of citizen science initiatives, artists’ residencies in scientific laboratories and agencies, art and science festivals, and social network projects as well as more traditional exhibition venues. Recognizing these programs several agencies and organizations have established mechanisms for facilitating public engagement with astronomy and space science through cultural activities. The International Astronautics Federation has established an Technical Activities Committee for the Cultural Utilization of Space. Over the past year the NSF and NEA have organized disciplinary workshops to develop recommendations relating to art-science interaction and community building efforts. Rationales for encouraging public engagement via cultural projects range from theory of creativity, innovation and invention to cultural appropriation in the context of `socially robust science’ as advocated by Helga Nowotny of the European Research Council. Public engagement with science, as opposed to science education and outreach initiatives, require different approaches. Just as organizations have employed education professionals to lead education activities, so they must employ cultural professionals if they wish to develop public engagement projects via arts and culture. One outcome of the NSF and NEA workshops has been development of a rationale for converting STEM to STEAM by including the arts in STEM methodologies, particularly for K-12 where students can access science via arts and cultural contexts. Often these require new kinds of informal education approaches that exploit locative media, gaming platforms, artists projects and citizen science. Incorporating astronomy and space science content in art and cultural projects requires new skills in `cultural translation’ and `trans-mediation’ and new kinds

  10. Secretly political: Civic engagement in online publics in Kazakhstan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shklovski, Irina; Valtysson, Bjarki

    2012-01-01

    The proliferation of networked forms of communication has captured the attention of media and scholars alike. We have never had quite as many resources for communication as we have today, and such communicative potential has implications for social change. In this article we consider public spheres...... spheres defined through engagement and participation of diverse publics. We consider a range of publics that might emerge, such as mundane-publics, issue-publics, and counter-publics and how these differ in their content and purpose. While the majority of work on networked publics has been situated...... at times result in substantial social change, despite the inability to hold open political discussions online...

  11. The setting of healthcare priorities through public engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meetoo, Danny

    Global fiscal constraints mean that the UK healthcare system of the 21st century can no longer provide all possible services and treatment for all the people it serves. Currently, more than ever, there is a need to set priorities in terms of resources. The allocation of scarce healthcare resources will result in some care programmes being supported while others are not. Decision makers are increasingly engaging the public in policy making and priority-setting processes. Advocates of increased public engagement argue that public services are paid for by the people and, therefore, should be shaped more extensively by them, preferably by a fully representative sample. Central to the concept of public engagement is a desire for open dialogue and debate between groups that might not ordinarily have the channels to understand or speak to one another. Public engagement activities aim to link the healthcare community with the general public, community groups, civil society organisations and any other groups or communities in the outside world where healthcare decision-making gains its relevance. This article, therefore, aims to discuss the importance of promoting public engagement.

  12. Equipping public health professionals for youth engagement: lessons learned from a 2-year pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Tina Binita; Rempel, Benjamin; Lodge, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence of the positive role that youth engagement programs and policies play in creating resiliency and producing positive outcomes among youth populations, such as delaying or avoiding the onset of risk-taking behaviors. Research also suggests that achieving positive outcomes ideally includes influence from the individual, the family, the school, the community, and the field of public health (available in A Research Report and Recommendations for Ontario Public Health Association). The authors conducted a comprehensive evaluation of a 2-year pilot project designed to increase the application of engagement and resiliency theory, knowledge, and skills among public health professionals engaging students from Grades 6, 7, and 8 (11- to 14-year-olds). Qualitative methods assessed public health satisfaction with training, resources, and networking activities, whereas quantitative methods assessed changes in capacity with respect to youth engagement knowledge, awareness, confidence, and skills. The findings have helped shed light on public health professional needs concerning capacity and confidence to undertake youth engagement work. Key lessons learned about making youth engagement possible and effective for public health professionals are presented.

  13. Public Intellectuals vs. New Public Management: The Defeat of Public Engagement in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermeyer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Much is written apropos a rationalization for public engagement in science and technology (PEST). Less copious is a literature that considers PEST in a broader form and operationalized in the specific environment of higher education and the impact of its undertaking on the working lives of academics. This paper considers the status of public…

  14. Engaging Public Space: Art Education Pedagogies for Social Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncum, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Considering social justice to be founded on human rights, which, in turn, are grounded in freedom of thought, expression, and assembly, this essay reviews efforts by art educators to engage with public space as a form of social justice pedagogy. Public space, whether actual or virtual, is understood to be inherently devoted to contestation in the…

  15. Secretly political: Civic engagement in online publics in Kazakhstan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shklovski, Irina; Valtysson, Bjarki

    2012-01-01

    The proliferation of networked forms of communication has captured the attention of media and scholars alike. We have never had quite as many resources for communication as we have today, and such communicative potential has implications for social change. In this article we consider public spheres...... that emerge through communication in the digital realm, paying atten- tion to how networked publics operate within such spheres. We present results from a study of a popular local online discussion forum in Kazakhstan. Steeped in Habermas’s idea of the public sphere, this study focuses on cultural public...... spheres defined through engagement and participation of diverse publics. We consider a range of publics that might emerge, such as mundane-publics, issue-publics, and counter-publics and how these differ in their content and purpose. While the majority of work on networked publics has been situated...

  16. The politics of public engagement – Reclaiming community?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Clancy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the tension between the rhetoric and reality of public engagement, seen through the eyes of a practitioner who has worked in both the arenas of community activism and as a public engagement broker within a UK Russell Group university over the course of the last 15 years. This has coincided with the rise to prominence of public engagement as a means of re-energising the debate about the University as an ‘ethical beacon’ and as an agent of civic and social life. This renewed engagement with ‘the public’ has created many powerful research programmes, conferences, debates, resources and toolkits, has fostered organisations and influenced policy. But has it maintained a focus on ‘community’ as a means of understanding and listening to real people, on the ground, and the issues and concerns that animate and concern them? And how far has ‘community’ been squeezed out because it is no longer part of the prevailing political discourse, supplanted by the more broadly interpreted - and possibly more palatable - concept of ‘public’? Suggestions are offered to counter possible ambivalence on the behalf of universities with regard to engaging in ‘deep’ community engagement through both historical and new articulations of adult education and democracy.

  17. Moving from trust to trustworthiness: Experiences of public engagement in the Scottish Health Informatics Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Mhairi; Cunningham-Burley, Sarah; Pagliari, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    The Scottish Health Informatics Programme (SHIP) was a Scotland-wide research programme exploring ways of collecting, managing and analysing electronic patient records for health research. As part of the SHIP public engagement work stream, a series of eight focus groups and a stakeholder workshop were conducted to explore perceptions of the role, relevance and functions of trust (or trustworthiness) in relation to research practices. The findings demonstrate that the public's relationships of trust and/or mistrust in science and research are not straightforward. This paper aims to move beyond simple descriptions of whether publics trust researchers, or in whom members of the public place their trust, and to explore more fully the bases of public trust/mistrust in science, what trust implies and equally what it means for research/researchers to be trustworthy. This has important implications for public engagement in interdisciplinary projects.

  18. Doing Dialogue: Genre and Flexibility in Public Engagement with Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2009-01-01

    'Public engagement with science' is an increasingly important but contested practice. In this study of London's Dana Centre I look at dialogue events carried out there as a case study of public engagement, performing a detailed analysis in order to examine their nature and practice. The analysis...... traditional genres such as lectures. While it seems there is flexibility in the practice of these informal dialogue events, they are, however, not open to reinvention by all participants equally. The fluidity of practice observed may be due to the newness of these kinds of processes in most people...

  19. European Studies and Public Engagement: A Conceptual Toolbox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Müllerleile

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Contemporary European Research User Username Password Remember me Subscribe... Sign up for issue alerts Follow JCER on Twitter Font Size Make font size smaller Make font size default Make font size larger Journal Content Search Search Scope Browse By Issue By Author By Title Information For Readers For Authors For Librarians Journal Help Keywords CFSP Communication ESDP EU EU enlargement EU trade policy Energy, EU, External Policy Europe European Commission European Parliament European Union European integration Europeanisation First Enlargement Germany Liberty Lisbon Treaty Poland Russia Security teaching European studies The UACES Blog The Commission after the 2014 EP... Power shift? The EU’s pivot to Asia 100 Books on Europe to be Remembered For a Global European Studies? EU Member State Building in the... Open Journal Systems Home About Login Register Search Current Archives Announcements UACES Home > Vol 10, No 4 (2014 > Müllerleile European Studies and Public Engagement: A Conceptual Toolbox Andreas Müllerleile Abstract This article examines public engagement strategies for academics working in the field of European Studies. Should academics engage with the public? What are the most effective outreach strategies? And what are the implications for universities and departments? The article argues that engaging with the public should be considered an integral part for academics working on topics that relate to the European Union or European politics. The article has a theoretical and a practical dimension. The first part of the paper deals with the nature of public engagement, explaining why it is an important issue and how it differs from the mainstream understanding of public engagement. The practical part of the paper presents the idea of building an online presence through which academics can engage with the public debate both during periods of low issue salience and high issue salience. The final section includes a toolbox

  20. Coffee Shops, Classrooms and Conversations: public engagement and outreach in a large interdisciplinary research Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Jennifer A.

    2014-05-01

    Public engagement and outreach activities are increasingly using specialist staff for co-ordination, training and support for researchers, they are also becoming expected for large investments. Here, the experience of public engagement and outreach a large, interdisciplinary Research Hub is described. dot.rural, based at the University of Aberdeen UK, is a £11.8 million Research Councils UK Rural Digital Economy Hub, funded as part of the RCUK Digital Economy Theme (2009-2015). Digital Economy research aims to realise the transformational impact of digital technologies on aspects of the environment, community life, cultural experiences, future society, and the economy. The dot.rural Hub involves 92 researchers from 12 different disciplines, including Geography, Hydrology and Ecology. Public Engagement and Outreach is embedded in the dot.rural Digital Economy Hub via an Outreach Officer. Alongside this position, public engagement and outreach activities are compulsory part of PhD student contracts. Public Engagement and Outreach activities at the dot.rural Hub involve individuals and groups in both formal and informal settings organised by dot.rural and other organisations. Activities in the realms of Education, Public Engagement, Traditional and Social Media are determined by a set of Underlying Principles designed for the Hub by the Outreach Officer. The underlying Engagement and Outreach principles match funding agency requirements and expectations alongside researcher demands and the user-led nature of Digital Economy Research. All activities include researchers alongside the Outreach Officer are research informed and embedded into specific projects that form the Hub. Successful public engagement activities have included participation in Café Scientifique series, workshops in primary and secondary schools, and online activities such as I'm a Scientist Get Me Out of Here. From how to engage 8 year olds with making hydrographs more understandable to members of

  1. Social Site Characterisation for CO2 storage operations to inform public engagement in Poland and Scotland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunsting, S.; Pol, M.; Mastop, J. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Kaiser, M.; Zimmer, R. [UfU - Independent Institute for Environmental Issues, Berlin (Germany); Shackley, S.; Mabon, L.; Howell, R. [The University of Edinburgh - School of Geosciences, Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hepplewhite, F.; Loveridge, R. [Scottish Government, Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Mazurowski, M. [PGNiG - Polskie Gornictwo Naftowe i Gazownictwo SA, Warszawa (Poland); Rybicki, C. [AGH - University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2013-05-01

    Public support has proven crucial to the implementation of CO2 capture and storage (CCS) demonstration projects. Whereas no method exists to guarantee local public acceptability of any project, a constructive stakeholder engagement process does increase the likelihood thereof. Social site characterisation can be used as an instrument to plan and evaluate an approach for actively engaging local stakeholders. Social site characterisation is the process of repeatedly investigating local public awareness and opinions of a specific CCS project, changes therein over time, and underlying factors shaping public opinion as a parallel activity to technical site characterization. This paper presents results from the EU FP7 SiteChar project in which social site characterisation (a.o. surveys) and public participation activities (focus conferences) were conducted by a multidisciplinary team at two prospective CCS sites in in Poland (onshore) and Scotland (offshore). Results demonstrate that social site characterization and focus conferences are powerful tools to raise public awareness about complex issues such as CCS and to initiate local discussion and planning processes with the appropriate type of information, through appropriate media, and involving all relevant stakeholders. Application and the duration of effects in real-life project settings will be discussed.

  2. Creating Student Engagement: The Kickstarter Active Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzon, Elliott

    2017-01-01

    Students can become disengaged from marketing material if they cannot see the direct application. Marketing material needs to be applied to a meaningful business task to engage and motivate students. This article introduces the Kickstarter Active Learning Project--an innovative semester-long project in which students create a Kickstarter…

  3. Projections on museum exhibits - engaging visitors in the museum setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Using animation, text, and visual effects as elements of projections on the Danish rune stone, Mejlbystenen (the Mejlby stone), we have explored approaches to engaging museum visitors. The installation positions itself in the field of previous installations and experiments exploring projection...

  4. Projections on museum exhibits - engaging visitors in the museum setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basballe, Ditte Amund; Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Using animation, text, and visual effects as elements of projections on the Danish rune stone, Mejlbystenen (the Mejlby stone), we have explored approaches to engaging museum visitors. The installation positions itself in the field of previous installations and experiments exploring projection...... on physical objects, but is unique in focusing on fusing the projection and the object in an engaging approach to communicating information at a cultural heritage museum. The Mejlby stone installation is now a permanent installation at a cultural and historical museum, and, based on observation as well...

  5. Scientists' Prioritization of Communication Objectives for Public Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudo, Anthony; Besley, John C

    2016-01-01

    Amid calls from scientific leaders for their colleagues to become more effective public communicators, this study examines the objectives that scientists' report drive their public engagement behaviors. We explore how scientists evaluate five specific communication objectives, which include informing the public about science, exciting the public about science, strengthening the public's trust in science, tailoring messages about science, and defending science from misinformation. We use insights from extant research, the theory of planned behavior, and procedural justice theory to identify likely predictors of scientists' views about these communication objectives. Results show that scientists most prioritize communication designed to defend science from misinformation and educate the public about science, and least prioritize communication that seeks to build trust and establish resonance with the public. Regression analyses reveal factors associated with scientists who prioritize each of the five specific communication objectives. Our findings highlight the need for communication trainers to help scientists select specific communication objectives for particular contexts and audiences.

  6. Rebelling against the brain: public engagement with the 'neurological adolescent'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Suparna; McKinney, Kelly A; Merten, Moritz

    2012-02-01

    The adolescent brain has become a flourishing project for cognitive neuroscience. In the mid 1990s, MRI studies mapped out extended neuro-development in several cortical regions beyond childhood, and during adolescence. In the last ten years, numerous functional MRI studies have suggested that functions associated with these brain regions, such as cognitive control and social cognition undergo a period of development. These changes have been anecdotally and clinically used to account for behavioural changes during adolescence. The interpretation of these data that the "teen brain" is different has gained increasing visibility outside the neuroscience community, among policy makers and in the media, resonating strongly with current cultural conceptions of teenagers in Western societies. In the last two years, a new impetus has been placed on public engagement activities in science and in the popular science genre of the media that specifically attempts to educate children and teenagers about emerging models of the developing brain. In this article, we draw on data from an adolescent focus group and a questionnaire completed by 85 teenage students at a UK school, to show how teens may hold ambivalent and sometimes resistant views of cognitive neuroscience's teen brain model in terms of their own self-understandings. Our findings indicate that new "neuro"-identity formations are more fractured, resisted and incomplete than some of the current social science literature on neuro-subjectivities seem to suggest and that the effects of public policy and popular education initiatives in this domain will be more uneven and complex than currently imagined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Using a Deliberative Exercise to Foster Public Engagement in Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Angela R.; Anderson, Ashley A.; Yeo, Sara K.; Greenberg, Andrew E.; Brossard, Dominique; Moore, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging technology poised to benefit society both technically and socially, but as with any new advance, there is potential risk. This paper describes a novel deliberative exercise involving nanotechnology that engages the public in debate regarding the funding of nanotechnology-related research while also discussing…

  8. Using a Deliberative Exercise to Foster Public Engagement in Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Angela R.; Anderson, Ashley A.; Yeo, Sara K.; Greenberg, Andrew E.; Brossard, Dominique; Moore, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging technology poised to benefit society both technically and socially, but as with any new advance, there is potential risk. This paper describes a novel deliberative exercise involving nanotechnology that engages the public in debate regarding the funding of nanotechnology-related research while also discussing…

  9. Partnering to Enhance Education and Public Engagement Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupla, C.; Bialeschki, D.; Buxner, S.; Felske, L.; Foxworth, S.; Graff, P.; Peticolas, L.; Shaner, A.; Hackler, A. Smith

    2016-01-01

    Collaborating with partners is a fundamental aspect of the Lunar and Planetary Institute's (LPI) educational and public engagement efforts. Such partnerships enable scientists and educators to include members of the audience in program planning and execution. Ultimately, partnerships strengthen programs by providing diverse resources, expertise, and expanding the potential audience.

  10. Campus sustainable food projects: critique and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlett, Peggy F

    2011-01-01

    Campus sustainable food projects recently have expanded rapidly. A review of four components - purchasing goals, academic programs, direct marketing, and experiential learning - shows both intent and capacity to contribute to transformational change toward an alternative food system. The published rationales for campus projects and specific purchasing guidelines join curricular and cocurricular activities to evaluate, disseminate, and legitimize environmental, economic, social justice, and health concerns about conventional food. Emerging new metrics of food service practices mark a potential shift from rhetoric to market clout, and experiential learning builds new coalitions and can reshape relations with food and place. Campus projects are relatively new and their resilience is not assured, but leading projects have had regional, state, and national impact. The emergence of sustainability rankings in higher education and contract-based compliance around purchasing goals suggests that if support continues, higher education's leadership can extend to the broader agrifood system.

  11. Learning from experts on public engagement with CCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenias, Dimitrios; Whitmarsh, Lorraine

    2016-04-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage is a key technology for the transition to a low carbon economy. There are thus strong normative, substantive and instrumental rationales for public acceptance of large scale CCS. In this study, we interviewed 12 experts in CCS from the UK, the Netherlands, and Germany. The experts had previous experience on public engagement on CCS, and were asked to identify barriers and drivers for CCS deployment and public engagement with CCS. Interviews lasted between 40 and 70 minutes. Thematic analysis revealed a small number of recurrent issues, including: (a) lack of political leadership on the matter; (b) lack of public knowledge on relevant technologies, which may not however always be necessary; and (c) difficulty communicating why CCS is not a direct substitute for renewable energy generation. Despite the recent government disengagement from CCS funding in the UK, another surprise finding was that lack of funding and political leadership was a perceived barrier internationally. These emergent views inform a follow-up online survey with the UK public, currently in preparation, which will expand on and triangulate the present findings and lead to development of a toolkit for the benefit of those involved with public engagement with CCS.

  12. Overcoming Barriers to Public Engagement through a Multi-Institution Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, K. F.; Weiss, M.; Garlick, S.

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that public engagement with science (PES) can enhance the relevance and impact of science on society. At the same time, advances in our understanding of public engagement suggest that greater skills, resources, and time horizons are often required to create effective programs. Consequently, despite a proliferation of training programs, many scientists still face the challenge of balancing the demands of public engagement with the requirements of their disciplinary research. Novel institutions are emerging that bring together interdisciplinary networks of principle investigators with PES practitioners to overcome barriers to effective and sustained public engagement in the environmental sciences. We will use the Science Policy Exchange (SPE), a consortium housed at the Harvard Forest, Harvard University, to illustrate how PIs and PES practitioners can collaborate to design public engagement processes, conduct policy-relevant scientific syntheses, and implement science communication strategies. Results from two SPE case studies demonstrate how multi-institutional consortia can help scientists overcome barriers such as lack of knowledge of evidence-based PES approaches, limits on time and funding to implement PES projects, and the need to integrate PES activities with research. The case studies also show how SPE strives to achieve credibility, saliency, and legitimacy in different public policy contexts: (1) engagement between scientists and local stakeholders to develop scenarios of landscape change; and (2) engagement between scientists and policy makers to understand the relationship between power plant emission standards, and air quality, human health and ecosystem function. The presentation will conclude with examples of how SPE programs have led to institutional change (staffing and budget), cultural change (attitudes and expectations of senior leaders), and research change (development of research questions, funding proposals

  13. Unusual conversations: A reflection on the mechanics of internationally engaged public scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Damiani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the civic engagement pathways of researchers from the Asia-Pacific and the United States in an effort to see how the principles of what American  scholars consider publicly engaged research and creative practice are being enacted in research sites across the globe. The purpose of this ongoing project is to focus on finding ways of connecting American scholars with a network of higher education and research institutions that hold a commitment and passion for social responsibility and civic engagement as it impacts education, research and service for community development overseas. The narrative includes the voices and perspectives of colleagues dedicated to engaged scholarship from across the new region in which I work (the Asia-Pacific, alongside the voices of some of Imagining America’s (IA 2014 National Conference participants. These conversations serve as a critical reflection on the mechanics of doing public scholarship overseas and frame a new model of internationally engaged scholarship. Keywords: Internationally engaged public scholarship, unusual conversations

  14. Urban High School Student Engagement Through CincySTEM iTEST Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Gulbahar H.; Hemmings, Annette; Maltbie, Catherine; Wright, Kathy; Sherman, Melissa; Sersion, Brian

    2016-12-01

    This paper focuses on the notable heightening of underrepresented students' engagement in STEM education through project-based learning CincySTEM iTEST projects. The projects, funded by an iTEST NSF grant, were designed and facilitated by teachers at a new STEM urban public high school serving low-income African-American students. Student engagement conceptualized as a psychological process involving affective and behavioral participation in classroom activities was evaluated through a mixed-methods approach. Findings indicate that affective and behavioral participation was significantly enhanced when project activities utilized digital devices in hands-on investigations of real-world project activities. Explanations for the success of CincySTEM iTEST projects are presented in the conclusion along with challenges for sustainability.

  15. Urban High School Student Engagement Through CincySTEM iTEST Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Gulbahar H.; Hemmings, Annette; Maltbie, Catherine; Wright, Kathy; Sherman, Melissa; Sersion, Brian

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on the notable heightening of underrepresented students' engagement in STEM education through project-based learning CincySTEM iTEST projects. The projects, funded by an iTEST NSF grant, were designed and facilitated by teachers at a new STEM urban public high school serving low-income African-American students. Student engagement conceptualized as a psychological process involving affective and behavioral participation in classroom activities was evaluated through a mixed-methods approach. Findings indicate that affective and behavioral participation was significantly enhanced when project activities utilized digital devices in hands-on investigations of real-world project activities. Explanations for the success of CincySTEM iTEST projects are presented in the conclusion along with challenges for sustainability.

  16. Physics Public Engagement--Not Just for Kids Anymore!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauncy, Toni

    2012-03-01

    Engaging the community with physics is a way of developing and supporting a vibrant and strong physics department at Angelo State University. The Society of Physics Students chapter has been actively involved in numerous public engagement activities for over 10 years. These efforts claim to focus on ``enhancement of attitudes'' for the audience participants, but the benefits of these public engagement opportunities go well beyond getting the younger students excited about science. The more critical need addressed by outreach programs such as ours is getting the undergraduate student presenters engaged as professional scientists, immersed in the true culture of scientific citizenship, and taking ownership of not only the physics they present, but also the impact that they potentially have on the students with which they interact. As undergraduate physics programs across the nation find themselves facing programmatic cuts, the value of engaging undergraduate students in purposeful service as a means of retention in the major should be considered as a standard part of a successful program curriculum.

  17. Experiences in Engaging the Public on Biotechnology Advances and Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, M Megan; Smith, Joe; Layton, Raymond; Keese, Paul; Agbagala, Ma Lorelie U; Palacpac, Merle B; Ball, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Public input is often sought as part of the biosafety decision-making process. Information and communication about the advances in biotechnology are part of the first step to engagement. This step often relies on the developers and introducers of the particular innovation, for example, an industry-funded website has hosted various authorities to respond to questions from the public. Alternative approaches to providing information have evolved, as demonstrated in sub-Saharan Africa where non-governmental organizations and associations play this role in some countries and subregions. Often times, those in the public who choose to participate in engagement opportunities have opinions about the overall biosafety decision process. Case-by-case decisions are made within defined regulatory frameworks, however, and in general, regulatory consultation does not provide the opportunity for input to the overall decision-making process. The various objectives on both sides of engagement can make the experience challenging; there are no clear metrics for success. The situation is challenging because public input occurs within the context of the local legislative framework, regulatory requirements, and the peculiarities of the fairly recent biosafety frameworks, as well as of public opinion and individual values. Public engagement may be conducted voluntarily, or may be driven by legislation. What can be taken into account by the decision makers, and therefore what will be gathered and the timing of consultation, also may be legally defined. Several practical experiences suggest practices for effective engagement within the confines of regulatory mandates: (1) utilizing a range of resources to facilitate public education and opportunities for understanding complex technologies; (2) defining in advance the goal of seeking input; (3) identifying and communicating with the critical public groups from which input is needed; (4) using a clearly defined approach to gathering and

  18. Experiences in engaging the public on biotechnology advances and regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Mary Quinlan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Public input is often sought as part of the biosafety decision making. Information and communication about the advances in biotechnology are part of the first step to engagement. This step often relies on the developers and introducers of the particular innovation, for example an industry funded website has hosted various authorities to respond to questions from the public. Alternative approaches to providing information have evolved, as demonstrated in Sub Saharan Africa where NGOs and associations play this role in some countries and subregions. Often times those in the public who choose to participate in engagement opportunities have opinions about the overall biosafety decision process. Case by case decisions are made within defined regulatory frameworks, however, and in general regulatory consultation does not provide the opportunity for input to the overall decision making process. The various objectives on both sides of engagement can make the experience challenging; there are no clear metrics for success. The situation is challenging because public input occurs within the context of the local legislative framework, regulatory requirements, and the peculiarities of the fairly recent biosafety frameworks, as well as of public opinion and individual values. Public engagement may be conducted voluntarily, or may be driven by legislation. What can be taken into account by the decision makers, and therefore what will be gathered and the timing of consultation, also may be legally defined. Several practical experiences suggest practices for effective engagement within the confines of regulatory mandates: (1 utilizing a range of resources to facilitate public education and opportunities for understanding complex technologies; (2 defining in advance the goal of seeking input; (3 identifying and communicating with the critical public groups from which input is needed; (4 using a clearly defined approach to gathering and assessing what will be used

  19. Educating Engaged Citizens: Four Projects from Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Joanne; Liddy, Mags; Tansey, Lorraine; Roche, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the four education projects that demonstrate how Irish education provision is adapting to meet social and economic changes: Ubuntu Network working to integrate education for sustainable development (ESD) into teacher education; Community Knowledge Initiative (CKI) facilitating service learning modules at higher…

  20. Ecological validity and the study of publics: The case for organic public engagement methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Pat J

    2014-01-01

    This essay argues for a method of public engagement grounded in the criteria of ecological validity. Motivated by what Hammersly called the responsibility that comes with intellectual authority: "to seek, as far as possible, to ensure the validity of their conclusions and to participate in rational debate about those conclusions" (1993: 29), organic public engagement follows the empirical turn in citizenship theory and in rhetorical studies of actually existing publics. Rather than shaping citizens into either the compliant subjects of the cynical view or the deliberatively disciplined subjects of the idealist view, organic public engagement instead takes Asen's advice that "we should ask: how do people enact citizenship?" (2004: 191). In short, organic engagement methods engage publics in the places where they already exist and through those discourses and social practices by which they enact their status as publics. Such engagements can generate practical middle-range theories that facilitate future actions and decisions that are attentive to the local ecologies of diverse publics.

  1. Bright Lights: Big Experiments! A public engagement activity for international year of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, Jonathan; Morton, Jonathan A. S.; McCoustra, Martin R. S.

    2017-01-01

    The Bright Lights: Big Experiments! public engagement project enabled high school students Scottish S2 to prepare a short, 5 min video using their own words and in their own style to present a scientific experiment on the theme of light to their contemporaries via YouTube. This paper describes the various experiments that we chose to deliver and our experiences in delivering them to our partner schools. The results of pre- and post-activity surveys of both the pupils and teachers are presented in an effort to understand the impact of the project on the students, staff and their schools. The quality of the final video product is shown to be a key factor, increasing the pupils’ likelihood of pursuing science courses and participating in further science engagement activities. Analysis of the evaluation methods used indicate the need for more sensitive tools to provide further insight into the impact of this type of engagement activity.

  2. City project and public space

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The book aims at nurturing theoretic reflection on the city and the territory and working out and applying methods and techniques for improving our physical and social landscapes. The main issue is developed around the projectual dimension, with the objective of visualising both the city and the territory from a particular viewpoint, which singles out the territorial dimension as the city’s space of communication and negotiation. Issues that characterise the dynamics of city development will be faced, such as the new, fresh relations between urban societies and physical space, the right to the city, urban equity, the project for the physical city as a means to reveal civitas, signs of new social cohesiveness, the sense of contemporary public space and the sustainability of urban development. Authors have been invited to explore topics that feature a pluralism of disciplinary contributions studying formal and informal practices on the project for the city and seeking conceptual and operative categories capab...

  3. Assessing public engagement with science in a university primate research centre in a national zoo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T Bowler

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen increasing encouragement by research institutions and funding bodies for scientists to actively engage with the public, who ultimately finance their work. Animal behaviour as a discipline possesses several features, including its inherent accessibility and appeal to the public, that may help it occupy a particularly successful niche within these developments. It has also established a repertoire of quantitative behavioural methodologies that can be used to document the public's responses to engagement initiatives. This kind of assessment is becoming increasingly important considering the enormous effort now being put into public engagement projects, whose effects are more often assumed than demonstrated. Here we report our first attempts to quantify relevant aspects of the behaviour of a sample of the hundreds of thousands of visitors who pass through the 'Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre' in Edinburgh Zoo. This University research centre actively encourages the public to view ongoing primate research and associated science engagement activities. Focal follows of visitors and scan sampling showed substantial 'dwell times' in the Centre by common zoo standards and the addition of new engagement elements in a second year was accompanied by significantly increased overall dwell times, tripling for the most committed two thirds of visitors. Larger groups of visitors were found to spend more time in the Centre than smaller ones. Viewing live, active science was the most effective activity, shown to be enhanced by novel presentations of carefully constructed explanatory materials. The findings emphasise the importance and potential of zoos as public engagement centres for the biological sciences.

  4. Assessing public engagement with science in a university primate research centre in a national zoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Mark T; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M; Whiten, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen increasing encouragement by research institutions and funding bodies for scientists to actively engage with the public, who ultimately finance their work. Animal behaviour as a discipline possesses several features, including its inherent accessibility and appeal to the public, that may help it occupy a particularly successful niche within these developments. It has also established a repertoire of quantitative behavioural methodologies that can be used to document the public's responses to engagement initiatives. This kind of assessment is becoming increasingly important considering the enormous effort now being put into public engagement projects, whose effects are more often assumed than demonstrated. Here we report our first attempts to quantify relevant aspects of the behaviour of a sample of the hundreds of thousands of visitors who pass through the 'Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre' in Edinburgh Zoo. This University research centre actively encourages the public to view ongoing primate research and associated science engagement activities. Focal follows of visitors and scan sampling showed substantial 'dwell times' in the Centre by common zoo standards and the addition of new engagement elements in a second year was accompanied by significantly increased overall dwell times, tripling for the most committed two thirds of visitors. Larger groups of visitors were found to spend more time in the Centre than smaller ones. Viewing live, active science was the most effective activity, shown to be enhanced by novel presentations of carefully constructed explanatory materials. The findings emphasise the importance and potential of zoos as public engagement centres for the biological sciences.

  5. The challenges and rewards of engaging a skeptical public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uscher-Pines, Lori; Kellermann, Arthur L

    2013-03-27

    Findings published in this issue suggest that a substantial subset of the Israeli public generally trusts government, yet is determined to make their own judgments about the need for precautionary action in certain types of public health emergencies. This reflective approach, which may be common in other countries as well, poses a substantial challenge to achieving desired levels of compliance, particularly when the threat requires swift and concerted action. The aim of this commentary is to discuss both the challenges and the rewards of engaging a public that wants to weigh evidence prior to taking action in an emergency, rather than defer to expert judgment. While engaging a skeptical public can be difficult, a reflective public acknowledges that preparedness is a shared responsibility of government and individuals and may be receptive to messages about the need for household and community self-sufficiency in a disaster. This is a commentary on the article "Analysis of Public Responses to Preparedness Policies" by Velan and colleagues.

  6. Public engagement and the changing face of health system planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, John; Sears, Nancy A; Born, Karen

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of the emerging citizens' assembly model of public engagement on health system planning and management. The characteristics that distinguish this model from more traditional approaches such as surveys and town hall meetings are elaborated using the case study of the recent Citizens' Regional Health Assembly. The paper concludes by suggesting the possibility of a new type of relationship between health system decision-makers, providers and the community.

  7. Kepler Education and Public Outreach: Engaging Students and the Public in the Discovery of Other Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, P.; DeVore, E. K.; Gould, A.; Koch, D.

    2003-12-01

    Are we alone? Are there other worlds like our own? Astronomers are discovering Saturn-size planets, but can smaller planets-new Earths-be found? These are powerful and exciting questions that motivate student learning and public interest in the Kepler search for planets. The Kepler Mission Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program capitalizes on the excitement of discovering Earth-size planets in the habitable zone, stimulating student learning and public interest in astronomy and physics. Kepler is a NASA Discovery mission, selected in December 2001, with launch and the search for extra-solar Earths commencing in 2007. This poster describes the breadth of the Kepler EPO programs, projects and activities. Uniquely, the Kepler Mission plans a technology transfer program that will engage college and university undergraduates directly in ground-based observations of extra-solar giant planets discovered by Kepler. Our goal is to engage underserved students and institutions by providing Kepler data, training, technology and support for observers. Doppler spectroscopy will be used to determine their orbits and predict future transits. Ground-based telescopes operated by students as well as amateur astronomers can be used for these observations even well after the end of the mission. As a space-based research mission, Kepler is being developed and will be operated by a team led by William Borucki, PI, at NASA Ames Research Center. The additional team members include Ball Aerospace, Jet Propulsion Laboratories, Lawrence Hall of Science at UC Berkeley, SETI Institute, Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and Space Telescope Science Institute. In addition, scientists from several US, and one Canadian university are participating in the Kepler Mission. The EPO planning engages these scientists to insure the quality as well as the creativity and best application of Kepler results for education and outreach. The Kepler EPO team is led by Alan Gould of the Lawrence Hall of

  8. Defining the Scope of Public Engagement: Examining the "Right Not to Know" in Public Health Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Clarissa; Sénécal, Karine; Avard, Denise

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we explore the concept of a "right not to know" on a population rather than individual level. We argue that a population level "right not to know" is a useful concept for helping to define the appropriate boundaries of public engagement initiatives in the emerging public health genomics context.

  9. Mind the gap: social media engagement by public health researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Brett; Labrique, Alain; Jain, Kriti M; Pekosz, Andrew; Levine, Orin

    2014-01-14

    The traditional vertical system of sharing information from sources of scientific authority passed down to the public through local health authorities and clinicians risks being made obsolete by emerging technologies that facilitate rapid horizontal information sharing. The rise of Public Health 2.0 requires professional acknowledgment that a new and substantive forum of public discourse about public health exists on social media, such as forums, blogs, Facebook, and Twitter. Some public health professionals have used social media in innovative ways: to surveil populations, gauge public opinion, disseminate health information, and promote mutually beneficial interactions between public health professionals and the lay public. Although innovation is on the rise, most in the public health establishment remain skeptical of this rapidly evolving landscape or are unclear about how it could be used. We sought to evaluate the extent to which public health professionals are engaged in these spaces. We conducted a survey of professorial- and scientist-track faculty at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. We asked all available faculty via email to complete a 30-question survey about respondent characteristics, beliefs about social media, and usage of specific technologies, including blogs, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. A total of 181 (19.8%) of 912 professor- and scientist-track faculty provided usable responses. The majority of respondents rarely used major social media platforms. Of these 181 respondents, 97 (53.6%) had used YouTube, 84 (46.4%) had used Facebook, 55 (30.4%) had read blogs, and 12 (6.6%) had used Twitter in the prior month. More recent degree completion was the best predictor of higher usage of social media. In all, 122 (67.4%) agreed that social media is important for disseminating information, whereas only 55 (30.4%) agreed that social media is useful for their research. In all, 43 (23.8%) said social media

  10. Theorizing a public engagement keystone: Seeing fandom's integral connection to civic engagement through the case of the Harry Potter Alliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Hinck

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Harry Potter Alliance (HPA has invited thousands of Harry Potter fans to view politics and activism through the lens of Harry Potter. HPA members have signed petitions, sent letters, made videos, and raised money in efforts to affect laws and public policies. These activities circulate and operate within the public sphere through an engagement with others. If we are to consider the political actions of fans, we must consider how fans insert arguments into the public sphere, constitute publics, and ultimately assert their own public subjectivities. By drawing on social movement and public sphere theory, I first develop the theoretical concept of the "public engagement keystone." I conceptualize the public engagement keystone as a touch point, worldview, or philosophy that makes other people, actions, and institutions intelligible. Next, I use the case of the HPA to demonstrate how the Harry Potter story operates as a public engagement keystone, opening the door to public subjectivities on par with the healthy public formation of John Dewey, Doug McAdam, or Peter Dahlgren. I offer an interdisciplinary approach to how fandom encourages and invites civic engagement. By doing so, public sphere theory can better account for a wider variety of types of civic engagement, including fandom activism.

  11. Educational Designs Supporting Student Engagement Through Networked Project Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche Nielsen, Jørgen; Andreasen, Lars Birch

    2013-01-01

    The chapter discusses how learner engagement can be facilitated through educational designs that make conscious use of various online communication technologies. The discussions will be based on cases from the Danish Master’s programme in ICT and Learning (MIL), where students from all over Denmark...... and interconnected learners, and discuss cases of developing student engagement through educational designs that facilitates group organized project work and learners’ participation in dialogically organized online seminars. Here we will focus on how the dimensions of participation and reification are played out....

  12. Prioritising Project Scope Definition Elements in Public Building Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed K Fageha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A complete definition of the scope of a project upfront during early stages ensures smooth and successful implementation during the project execution. This research identifies and prioritises project scope definition elements for public buildings in Saudi Arabia. Elements that could significantly contribute to complete project scope definition package at pre-project planning stage are identified and their interrelationship determined and prioritised. Using the Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI as a basis, the study uses analytical network process (ANP technique based on data obtained from project managers who have been involved in public sector projects in Saudi Arabia. Data collection and analysis was conducted in three steps. The first step involved identification of scope definition elements while the second involved an investigation into interrelationships among the elements. In the third step, ANP was used to determine the weight of the elements’ importance in terms of contribution to project scope definition completeness. Finally, Pareto analysis was used to prioritise and assess the distribution pattern of the elements. The outcome from this research is the prioritisation of project scope definition elements for public building projects in Saudi Arabia. The prioritised list developed indicates the importance of project scope definition elements. It should help project management teams identify elements to consider when evaluating project scope definition for completeness at the pre-project planning stage. Keywords: Project scope definition, pre-project planning, prioritising, public building projects, Saudi Arabia, Analytical Network Process (ANP

  13. Engaging Scientists in NASA Education and Public Outreach: Tools for Scientist Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, Sanlyn; Meinke, B. K.; Hsu, B.; Shupla, C.; Grier, J. A.; E/PO Community, SMD

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums support the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and its education and public outreach (E/PO) community through a coordinated effort to enhance the coherence and efficiency of SMD-funded E/PO programs. The Forums foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present tools and resources to support astronomers’ engagement in E/PO efforts. Among the tools designed specifically for scientists are a series of one-page E/PO-engagement Tips and Tricks guides, a sampler of electromagnetic-spectrum-related activities, and NASA SMD Scientist Speaker’s Bureau (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/speaker). Scientists can also locate resources for interacting with diverse audiences through a number of online clearinghouses, including: NASA Wavelength, a digital collection of peer-reviewed Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels (http://nasawavelength.org), and EarthSpace (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace), a community website where faculty can find and share teaching resources for the undergraduate Earth and space sciences classroom. Learn more about the opportunities to become involved in E/PO and to share your science with students, educators, and the general public at http://smdepo.org.

  14. A Framework for Project Governance in Major Public IT projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Eva; Harboe, Peter Georg

    2016-01-01

    The rising number of major public IT projects is mirrored by a growing research interest in the management of such projects. Both can benefit from a more complete understanding of project governance that should lead to a practical framework for project governance. The present paper proposes...... such a framework. It was developed from the literature on major and mega-projects, both public and private, that concern infrastructure, engineering and IT. The proposed framework for project governance comprises six major elements: governance structure, management approach, stakeholders, value, systems...... important questions relating to stakeholders and dynamic complexity needed greater attention for the project to be successful....

  15. [Why should clinicians be engaged in research and publication?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoka, Sumio

    2015-01-01

    Why should clinicians be engaged in research and publication? The reason is that they have to deliver comprehensive medical care for patients. Clinicians endeavor to improve their clinical skills by learning updated medical knowledge and new techniques in order to save lives. By taking part in research and publications, clinicians are able to contribute actively to the progress in medicine contrary to passive involvement in it without research and publications. Mission of Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists (JSA), clearly mention that JSA aims to advance high quality research and developing new methods in medicine. JSA also necessitates, as a minimum requirement for Board Certified Anesthesiologists, presentations in annual meeting of JSA or related society meetings and also publications in Journal of Anesthesia, an official journal of JSA, or other related anesthesia journals. By experiencing research and publications, clinicians can obtain knowledge, skills as well as attitudes, which are also useful in everyday clinical work, such as logical way of thinking, how to write papers to be understood, tolerance to peer review and objective evaluation, and maintaining spirit of enterprise in their career.

  16. Solar public engagement: the prospective study on FELDA community in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamiah Tun Jamil, Siti; Azfahani Ahmad, Nur

    2017-05-01

    Malaysia Energy Outlook 2016 has highlighted that Malaysia's electricity generation mix has always been highly dependent on fossil fuels. There is a concern on energy security for Malaysia recently, since the depletion of fossil fuel occurs and its effect increases the price of electricity tariff. Nevertheless, the energy demand continues to increase, which make the non-fossil renewable energy sources is back on demand. Malaysia's highest potential for renewable energy comes from solar energy and the large roofs of rural houses offer potential to contribute solar electricity for the people. Indeed, the engagement of solar energy to the public is very important in allowing this energy to be accepted by the locals. The paper will review the related literature on public engagement for solar energy project. This paper also tries to prospect the potential of implementing solar electricity for a well-known rural organization in Malaysia, known as FELDA.

  17. Public Engagement with the Lunar and Planetary Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Andrew; Shupla, Christine; Smith Hackler, Amanda; Buxner, Sanlyn; Wenger, Matthew; Joseph, Emily C. S.

    2016-10-01

    The Lunar and Planetary Institute's (LPI) public engagement programs target audiences of all ages and backgrounds; in 2016 LPI has expanded its programs to reach wider, more diverse audiences. The status, resources, and findings of these programs, including evaluation results, will be discussed in this poster. LPI's Cosmic Explorations Speaker Series (CESS) is an annual public speaker series to engage the public in space science and exploration. Each thematic series includes four to five presentations held between September and May. Past series' titles have included "Science" on the Silver Screen, The Universe is Out to Get Us and What We Can (or Can't) Do About It, and A User's Guide to the Universe: You Live Here. Here's What You Need to Know. While the presentations are available online after the event, they are now being livestreamed to be accessible to a broader national, and international, audience. Sky Fest events, held four to five times a year, have science content themes and include several activities for children and their parents, night sky viewing through telescopes, and scientist presentations. Themes include both planetary and astronomy topics as well as planetary exploration topics (e.g., celebrating the launch or landing of a spacecraft). Elements of the Sky Fest program are being conducted in public libraries serving audiences underrepresented in STEM near LPI. These programs take place as part of existing hour-long programs in the library. During this hour, young people, typically 6-12 years old, move through three stations where they participate in hands-on activities. Like Sky Fest, these programs are thematic, centered on one over-arching topic such as the Moon or Mars. Beginning in Fall 2016, LPI will present programs at a revitalized park in downtown Houston. Facilities at this park will enable LPI to bring both the Sky Fest and CESS programs into the heart of Houston, which is one of the most diverse cities in the US and the world.

  18. Rethinking the relationship between science and society: Has there been a shift in attitudes to Patient and Public Involvement and Public Engagement in Science in the United Kingdom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaz, Annette; Biri, Despina; McKevitt, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    The policy imperative to engage the public and patients in research can be seen as part of a wider shift in the research environment. This study addresses the question: Has there been a shift in attitudes to Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) and Public Engagement in Science (PES) amongst researchers? Attitudes to PPI and PES within a cluster of three NIHR supported Biomedical Research Centres were explored through in-depth interviews with 19 researchers. Participants distinguished PPI (as an activity involving patients and carers in research projects and programmes) from PES (as an activity that aims to communicate research findings to the public, engage the public with broader issues of science policy or promote a greater understanding of the role of science in society). While participants demonstrated a range of attitudes to these practices, they shared a resistance to sharing power and control of the research process with the public and patients. While researchers were prepared to engage with the public and patients and listed the advantages of engagement, the study revealed few differences in their underlying attitudes towards the role of society in science (and science in society) to those reported in previous studies. To the participants science remains the preserve of scientists, with patients and the public invited to 'tinker at the edges'. © 2014 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A Framework for Project Governance in Major Public IT projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Peter Georg; Riis, Eva

    2016-01-01

    such a framework. It was developed from the literature on major and mega-projects, both public and private, that concern infrastructure, engineering and IT. The proposed framework for project governance comprises six major elements: governance structure, management approach, stakeholders, value, systems......The rising number of major public IT projects is mirrored by a growing research interest in the management of such projects. Both can benefit from a more complete understanding of project governance that should lead to a practical framework for project governance. The present paper proposes...

  20. Public Engagement, Local Policies, and Citizens’ Participation: An Italian Case Study of Civic Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Bartoletti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990s, the theme of participation has come to the fore in international debates regarding at least three critical issues: the relationship between representative democracy and deliberative democracy and the possibility of citizens’ empowerment through their involvement in policy making; the role of communication and of digital media in promoting new forms of participation; the feeling of disaffection toward politics and of democratic deficit. What we observe is a proliferation of experiences of both bottom-up and top-down enhanced forms of civic engagement. Our article focuses on “public engagement.” We analyze the civic collaboration policy promoted by the Municipality of Bologna (Italy in the frame of “collaborative governance” of the commons, based on civic involvement and governance transparency. Civic collaboration is characterized by a mixed communication ecology. We focus on the inclusiveness of this form of public engagement with local policies and on the role of digital media in supporting citizen’s engagement. Civic collaboration emerges as a new, interesting frontier in top-down enhanced participation in local policies. We are currently witnessing some promising changes in the boundaries of participation, in civic practices and competencies. In conclusion, we argue that the concreteness of the projects of civic collaboration can enhance citizens’ trust in the municipal administration, but we wonder whether it is likely to become a substitute for fuller citizen participation in local governance and whether it could also foster a removal of the controversial dimension of the political.

  1. Engaging High School Students in an Engineering Thermodynamics Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Paulino Preciado Babb

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Efforts for recruiting and retaining students in engineering programs are evident in many postsecondary institutions around the world. These efforts include outreach programs at both elementary and secondary school level, as well as projects that develop capacities beyond technical content—often taught as declarative and procedural knowledge. The mandate of the Galileo Education Network Association includes the design of rich learning environments engaging K – 12 students in authentic tasks: tasks that resemble the real work of professionals such as engineers. We describe the experience of enacting a seven-session engineering project in thermodynamics with Grade Ten students. Special attention is paid to formative assessment as an essential support for students' learning along the project. The initial project resulted from the collaboration—as a means for teacher professional development—between this network association and the mathematics and science teachers in a western Canadian high school. We propose that programs for teacher professional development in mathematics and science should include a focus on tasks that resemble the work of engineering in order to design authentic, engaging learning tasks, and assessing strategies that support and enhance student learning.

  2. Sex & Bugs & Rock ‘n Roll - Getting creative about public engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sayer, E.J.; Featherstone, H.C.; Gosling, W.D.

    2014-01-01

    Public engagement is widely recognized as a key priority for achieving societal support for research. We spotlight creativity in public engagement as a way of reaching wider audiences and incentivising researcher involvement, demonstrating some of the possibilities with a recent initiative to engage

  3. Effective dialogue: Enhanced public engagement as a legitimising tool for municipal waste management decision-making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnett, Kenisha, E-mail: k.garnett@cranfield.ac.uk [Institute for Environment, Health, Risks and Futures, School of Environment, Energy and Agri-food, Cranfield University, Cranfield MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Cooper, Tim, E-mail: t.h.cooper@ntu.ac.uk [School of Architecture Design and the Built Environment, Nottingham Trent University, Burton Street, Nottingham NG1 4BU (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A review of public engagement in waste management decision-making is undertaken. • Enhanced public engagement is explored as a means to legitimise waste decisions. • Analytical–deliberative processes are explored as a tool for effective dialogue. • Considerations for integrating public values with technical analysis are outlined. • Insights into the design of appropriate public engagement processes are provided. - Abstract: The complexity of municipal waste management decision-making has increased in recent years, accompanied by growing scrutiny from stakeholders, including local communities. This complexity reflects a socio-technical framing of the risks and social impacts associated with selecting technologies and sites for waste treatment and disposal facilities. Consequently there is growing pressure on local authorities for stakeholders (including communities) to be given an early opportunity to shape local waste policy in order to encourage swift planning, development and acceptance of the technologies needed to meet statutory targets to divert waste from landfill. This paper presents findings from a research project that explored the use of analytical–deliberative processes as a legitimising tool for waste management decision-making. Adopting a mixed methods approach, the study revealed that communicating the practical benefits of more inclusive forms of engagement is proving difficult even though planning and policy delays are hindering development and implementation of waste management infrastructure. Adopting analytical–deliberative processes at a more strategic level will require local authorities and practitioners to demonstrate how expert-citizen deliberations may foster progress in resolving controversial issues, through change in individuals, communities and institutions. The findings suggest that a significant shift in culture will be necessary for local authorities to realise the potential of more inclusive decision

  4. Eliciting Drivers of Community Perceptions of Mining Projects through Effective Community Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable mining has received much attention in recent years as a consequence of the negative impacts of mining and public awareness. The aim of this paper is to provide mining companies guidance on improving the sustainability of their sites through effective community engagement based on recent advances in the literature. It begins with a review of the literature on sustainable development and its relationship to stakeholder engagement. It then uses the literature to determine the dominant factors that affect community perceptions of mining projects. These factors are classified into five categories: environmental, economic, social, governance and demographic factors. Then, we propose a new two-stage method based on discrete choice theory and the classification that can improve stakeholder engagement and be cost-effective. Further work is required to validate the proposed method, although it shows potential to overcome some of the challenges plaguing current approaches.

  5. Educational Designs Supporting Student Engagement Through Network Project Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche

    2016-01-01

    , developed from the traditions of organizing university studies through student-driven project work and problem-driven learning approaches, which have been developed at the Danish universities of Roskilde and Aalborg as early as from the beginning of the 1970s. Specific educational designs integrating...... digital media are discussed, especially focusing on student engagement and the implications of organizing the pedagogical practice as networked project work. The discussions are based on the author’s experiences during 16 years of teaching and supervising at the Danish Master’s Program of ICT and Learning...... (MIL), where students conduct blended learning study in groups within a networked learning structure. In problem-oriented learning and teaching, teachers act as well as teachers and as supervisors of students’ projects. This challenges the traditional teacher role, and it is crucial for a teacher...

  6. Decoupling, re-Engaging: managing trust relationships in implementation projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy; Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup

    2012-01-01

    An important aspect of the successful implementation of large information systems (such as ERP systems) is trust. These implementations impact the legitimate interests of many groups of stakeholders, and trust is a critical factor for success. Trust in the project is contingent upon many factors......, and the complex demands of managing those fluctuations. We investigate evolving trust relationships in a longitudinal case analysis of a large Integrated Hospital System implementation for the Faroe Islands. Trust relationships suffered various breakdowns, but the project was able to recover and eventually meet...... its goals. Based on concepts from Giddens’ later work on modernity, we develop two approaches for managing dynamic trust relationships in implementation projects: decoupling and re-engaging....

  7. From Outreach to Engaged Placemaking: Understanding Public Land-Grant University Involvement with Tourism Planning and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herts, Rolando D.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation research project aimed to identify benefits and drawbacks of public land-grant university involvement with tourism planning and development, an emergent form of university-community engagement. Using qualitative methodology, the study's findings led to the codification of levels of university tourism planning and development…

  8. Citizen Science Initiatives: Engaging the Public and Demystifying Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vliet, Kim; Moore, Claybourne

    2016-03-01

    The Internet and smart phone technologies have opened up new avenues for collaboration among scientists around the world. These technologies have also expanded citizen science opportunities and public participation in scientific research (PPSR). Here we discuss citizen science, what it is, who does it, and the variety of projects and methods used to increase scientific knowledge and scientific literacy. We describe a number of different types of citizen-science projects. These greatly increase the number of people involved, helping to speed the pace of data analysis and allowing science to advance more rapidly. As a result of the numerous advantages of citizen-science projects, these opportunities are likely to expand in the future and increase the rate of novel discoveries.

  9. Antibiotic resistance awareness: a public engagement approach for all pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, David G; Higginson, Paula; Martin, Sandra

    2017-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to promote knowledge about antibiotic resistance development and good stewardship principles amongst the general population through pharmacy student-led public engagement workshops in high schools. Structured questionnaires, based on the Key Stage 4 curriculum were initially used to assess awareness and knowledge of antibiotic resistance issues amongst year 10 and 11 (GCSE stage) high school pupils. A Prezi-style presentation (https://prezi.com/) was subsequently developed to deliver a positive message that the young learners could share with friends and family. Misconceptions still exist regarding the correct and appropriate use of antibiotics. The person-person approach adopted by this study was well received, key antibiotic stewardship messages being delivered to the general population through either educational surveys or hands-on workshops. It is widely acknowledged that antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats facing society today. As healthcare professionals, pharmacists in all sectors have a crucial role to play in educating the public about antibiotics and how to use them effectively. This article describes the different ways by which all pharmacists can help educate the public on key issues, with particular emphasis on the next generation. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Outreach and capacity building activities for engaging youth and public in Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    We report to the COSPAR Panel on Education and relevant community on activities, pilot projects and results relevant for outreach and engagement in exploration. Number of activities were developed in the frame of the International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG) including the participation of students in lunar symposia, space conferences or ICEUM International Conferences on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon* ILEWG with support from various space agencies, universities and institutions has organized events for young professionals with a wide background (including scientist, engineers, humanistic, law, art students) a Moon academy, lunar and planetary students work-shops, technical training workshops, international observe the Moon sessions. ILEWG has organised or sponsored participants to a series of field training and research campaigns in Utah desert research station, Eifel volcanic park, Iceland, Rio Tinto, La Reunion island. Education and outreach projects used space missions data (SMART-1 views of the Moon, Earth views from space, Mars views, Mars crowdsourcing games, astronomy data analysis) to engage the public in citizen science and exploration. Artistic and sociological projects (e.g. "social lunar telescope, lunar zen garden, Moon academy, MoonLife, MoonLife concept store, Moon republic, artscience projects, space science in the arts, artists in residence, artists in MoonMars base") were also initiated with artists to engage the wide public in exploration. A number of projects have been developed with support from ITACCUS IAF committee. We shall discuss how these pilot projects could be expanded for the benefit of future space projects, young professionals, the space community and the public. Acknowledgements: we thank collaborators from ILEWG community and partner institutes for the different projects mentioned http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/ http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/47170-gluc-iceum11-beijing-2010lunar-declaration/ Foing B., Stoker C

  11. Engaging the public in the nascent era of gravitational-wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Martin A.

    2015-08-01

    Within the next few years a global network of ground-based laser interferometers will become fully operational. These ultra-sensitive instruments are confidently expected to directly detect gravitational waves from astrophysical sources before the end of the decade. In anticipation of opening this entirely new window on the Universe, the LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) Scientific Collaboration has recently developed a substantive program of education and public outreach activities that includes exhibitions, documentary films, social media and interactive games - as well as more traditional modes of science communication such as schools and public lectures.As the gravitational wave 'detection era' unfolds over the next decade, it will present exciting challenges for future public engagement by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration and by other gravitational-wave astronomy collaborations around the world. Perhaps the most interesting opportunities will be in the area of citizen science, building upon the infrastructure already being developed through e.g. the LIGO Open Science Center (see arXiv:1410.4839) and the remarkable success of the Einstein@Home project (www.einsteinathome.org).In this presentation I will give an overview of the LSC education and public outreach program, highlighting its goals, major successes and future strategy - particularly in relation to the release of future LIGO and other gravitational wave datasets to the scientific community and to the public, and the opportunities this will present for directly engaging citizen scientists in this exciting new field of observational astronomy.

  12. Educating for Civic Engagement: Public Achievement as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Bernadette Christine

    Over the last four decades there is evidence that citizens are less civically engaged, have less trust in each other and governmental institutions, and are less prepared to participate in deliberative and civic processes. This research studies the importance of acquiring deliberative and civic skills and behaviors as an integral part of civic engagement and developing educational and learning strategies to impart those skills and behaviors in an educational environment. This research uses a civic action program called Public Achievement (PA) as a case study to investigate if participating in a civic and deliberative focused program enables participants to continue to use the skills and behaviors learned in PA in non-PA activities. The research study was focused by a literature review of philosophical frameworks, educational history in the United States, and educational theory. The literature review and examples of learning civic skills and behaviors in secondary and higher educational institutions are examined to frame the analysis of PA. Based on the literature review and the design of PA, constructs and a survey instrument were developed to test the hypothesis that students who participate in PA will be more likely to exhibit civic skills and behaviors than students who did not participate in PA. The research was conducted with two schools in rural Missouri, two schools in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and two schools in St. Paul, Minnesota. The study results show that students who participated in PA were not more likely to exhibit civic skills and behaviors, and in many cases, non-PA students exhibited civic skills and behaviors more often. The findings revealed that there are programmatic, organizational, and societal barriers that may impede the effectiveness of PA. The findings suggest that implementation of civic engagement programs may be more effective when the effort is supported and reinforced by and across all parts of the organization, organizational

  13. Engaging wider publics with studying and protecting the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauen, Cornelia E.

    2015-04-01

    The ocean is dying. The vast scientific literature diagnoses massive reductions in the biomass of fish and invertebrates from overfishing, increasing destruction of coral ecosystems in the tropics from climate change, extensive dead zones from eutrophication and collapse of marine bird populations from ingesting plastic. Even though Darwin suspected already The scale is becoming apparent only from meta-analyses at regional or even global scales as individual studies tend to focus on one fishery or one type of organisms or geographic location. In combination with deep rooted perceptions of the vastness of the ocean the changes are difficult to comprehend for specialists and the general public alike. Even though more than half of humanity is estimated to live in coastal zones as defined by some, urbanisation is removing about half from regular, more direct exposure. Yet, there is much still to be explored, not only in the deep, little studied, parts. The ocean exercises great fascination on many people heightened since the period of discovery and the mystery of far-flung places, but the days, when Darwin's research results were regularly discussed in public spaces are gone. Rachel Carson's prize-winning and best selling book "The Sea Around Us", some serialised chapters in magazines and condensations in "Reader's Digest" transported the poetic rendering of science again to a wider public. But compared to the diversity of scientific inquiry about the ocean and importance for life-support system earth there is much room for engaging ocean science in the broad sense with larger and diverse publics. Developing new narratives rooted in the best available sciences is among the most promising modes of connecting different areas of scientific inquiry and non-specialists alike. We know at latest since Poincaré's famous dictum that "the facts don't speak". However, contextualised information can capture the imagination of the many and thus also reveal unexpected connections

  14. The UCLan community engagement and service user support (Comensus) project: valuing authenticity, making space for emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downe, Soo; McKeown, Mick; Johnson, Eileen; Koloczek, Lidia; Grunwald, Angela; Malihi‐Shoja, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Objective  To develop and evaluate service user, carer and community involvement in health and social care education. Background  Despite the high policy profile of involvement issues, there appear to be no published accounts of schemes that have used a systematic whole‐faculty approach to community engagement in health and social care higher education. Focus of this paper  The set up and early development of a faculty‐wide community engagement project. Setting and participants  Staff from the faculty of health in one University, local service users and carers and community group project workers and local National Health Service (NHS) and public sector staff. Design  Participatory action research including document review, field notes, questionnaires and interviews. Analysis  Thematic analysis. The emerging themes were tested by seeking disconfirming data, and through verification with stake‐holders. Results  Prior to the study, there were examples of community engagement in the participating faculty, but they occurred in specific departments, and scored low on the ‘ladder of involvement’. Some previous attempts at engagement were perceived to have failed, resulting in resistance from staff and the community. Despite this, an advisory group was successfully formed, and project framing and development evolved with all stake‐holders over the subsequent year. The four themes identified in this phase were: building accessibility; being ‘proper’ service users/carers;moving from suspicion to trust: mutually respectful partnerships as a basis for sustainable change; and responses to challenge and emergence. Conclusions  Successful and sustainable engagement requires authenticity. Many problems and solutions arising from authentic engagement are emergent, and potentially challenging to organizations. PMID:17986075

  15. IT PROJECT PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT: MODULARITY PROBLEMS IN A PUBLIC ORGANIZATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kristian; Mengiste, Shegaw Anagaw

    2012-01-01

    As today’s public and private sector organizations heavily rely on Information Technology (IT) to provide faster cycle times and better services, IT Project Portfolio Management (IT PPM) has become a high priority issue. This research adopts engaged scholarship to investigate IT PPM practices...... suggest a model addressing the identified problems by organizing IT PPM in three modules connected by three gateways. These results may be used to inform further research into IT PPM and to help managers improve IT PPM practices in public organizations. Keywords: IT Project Portfolio Management (IT PPM......, and (2) what modularity mechanisms can be recommended to improve IT PPM? By drawing on the theory’s distinction between visible information and Hidden design parameters five modularity problems are identified: (1) Lack of operational levels strategies, (2) No systematic approach to manage IT project...

  16. Engaging Communities using a MOOC combined with Public Library Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, S. A.; Mooney, M. E.; Morrill, J.; Handlos, Z.; Morrill, S.

    2015-12-01

    A massive open online course, or MOOC, is an noncredit education activity that delivers learning content to anyone with access to the Internet. Individual courses are generally free of charge, while a certificate can have small costs. The University of Wisconsin-Madison has exploring the use of MOOC as part of its Wisconsin Idea. In the 2015, a series of MOOCs focusing on the environment were offered via Coursera. One of those MOOCS was "Changing Weather and Climate of the Great Lakes Region." This 4-week course features a new season each week through short lectures and activities covering Great Lakes weather, observed changes in the climate, and societal impacts of climate change. (https://www.coursera.org/course/greatlakesclimate) The MOOC conveyed information from NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Weather-Ready Nation initiative as well as findings from the recent National Climate Assessment and the Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts (WICCI). The course was organized by members of the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies; material included discussion, videos for lectures as well as guest lecturers. There were also weekly visits by the course team to 21 public libraries throughout the state of WI. The library collaboration as facilitated by WiLS (Wisconsin Library Services - wils.org), who organized the application and selection process. The public libraries hosted local residents and course instructors in discussions of course content in the context of their communities as well as strategies to mitigate the climate change impacts. This presentation will discuss the public library discussions experience and the our evaluation of the impact of including a face-to-face component in the MOOC activity on engagement and learning.

  17. Project Documentation as a Risk for Public Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladěna Štěpánková

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the article: The paper presents the different methodologies used for creating documentation and focuses on public projects and their requirements for this documentation. Since documentation is also incorporated in the overall planning of the project and its duration is estimated using expert qualified estimate, can any change in this documentation lead to project delays, or increase its cost as a result of consuming administration, and therefore the documentation is seen as a risk, which may threaten the project as a public contract by which a company trying to achieve and obtains it, and generally any project. Methodology/methods: There are used methods of obtaining information in this paper. These are mainly structured interviews in combination with a brainstorming, furthermore also been used questionnaire for companies dealing with public procurement. As a data processing program was used MS Excel and basic statistical methods based on regression analysis. Scientific aim: The article deals with the construction market in the Czech Republic and examines the impact of changes in project documentation of public projects on their turnover. Findings: In this paper we summarize the advantages and disadvantages of having project documentation. In the case of public contracts and changes in legislation it is necessary to focus on creating documentation in advance, follow the new requirements and try to reach them in the shortest possible time. Conclusions: The paper concludes with recommendations on how to proceed, if these changes and how to reduce costs, which may cause the risk of documentation.

  18. Integrating Public Health and Deliberative Public Bioethics: Lessons from the Human Genome Project Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Karen M; Lee, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Public health policy works best when grounded in firm public health standards of evidence and widely shared social values. In this article, we argue for incorporating a specific method of ethical deliberation--deliberative public bioethics--into public health. We describe how deliberative public bioethics is a method of engagement that can be helpful in public health. Although medical, research, and public health ethics can be considered some of what bioethics addresses, deliberative public bioethics offers both a how and where. Using the Human Genome Project Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications program as an example of effective incorporation of deliberative processes to integrate ethics into public health policy, we examine how deliberative public bioethics can integrate both public health and bioethics perspectives into three areas of public health practice: research, education, and health policy. We then offer recommendations for future collaborations that integrate deliberative methods into public health policy and practice.

  19. Cost overruns in public sector investment projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.; Renneboog, Luc

    2017-01-01

    We analyze cost overruns in a large sample of public infrastructural investment projects in Portugal. The average cost deviation relative to the budgeted costs amounts to 24%. The large projects even have a higher cost deviation and a higher probability of cost overruns, which suggests that the

  20. Work Engagement in the Public Service Context: The Dual Perceptions of Job Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noesgaard, Mette Strange; Hansen, Jesper Rosenberg

    2017-01-01

    Interest in work engagement research has increased significantly due to its positive influence on both employee and organizational performance. Studies show how engagement is explained through job characteristics in the Job Demands-Resource model, yet a more nuanced approach has been proposed...... engagement. Using Public Service Motivation literature, these dual perceptions are discussed...

  1. Public Participation, Education, and Engagement in Drought Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathke, D. J.; Wall, N.; Haigh, T.; Smith, K. H.; Bernadt, T.

    2014-12-01

    Drought is a complex problem that typically goes beyond the capacity, resources, and jurisdiction of any single person, program, organization, political boundary, or sector. Thus, by nature, monitoring, planning for, and reducing drought risk must be a collaborative process. The National Drought Mitigation Center, in partnership with the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) Program Office and others, provides active engagement and education drought professionals, stakeholders, and the general public about managing drought-related risks through resilience planning, monitoring, and education. Using case studies, we discuss recruitment processes, network building, participation techniques, and educational methods as they pertain to a variety of unique audiences with distinct objectives. Examples include collaborative decision-making at a World Meteorological Organization conference; planning, and peer-learning among drought professionals in a community of practice; drought condition monitoring through citizen science networks; research and education dissemination with stakeholder groups; and informal learning activities for all ages. Finally, we conclude with evaluation methods, indicators of success, and lessons learned for increasing the effectiveness of our programs in increasing drought resilience.

  2. 75 FR 1492 - Commission Guidance Regarding Independent Public Accountant Engagements Performed Pursuant to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Parts 276 Commission Guidance Regarding Independent Public Accountant Engagements Performed... publishing interpretive guidance for independent public accountants in connection with the adoption of...: General questions about this release should be referred to Bryan J. Morris, Assistant Chief...

  3. Game Development as Students’ Engagement Project in High School Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan V. Dio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The general expectancies of the enhanced basic education curriculum in the Philippines focuses on the performance standards which can be expressed when students are able to produce products as evidence that they can transfer or use their learning in real-life situations. One way to assess students achievement is through an engaging activities that would require them apply the knowledge and skills acquired in the subject as the outcome of their learning. This descriptive method of research employed content analysis procedures and survey in describing and assessing the significant feature of the mathematical games as potential learning devices developed by the high school students through an engaging task assignment. It utilized purposive sampling techniques in the selection of the respondents and the submitted write-ups of mathematical games for analysis as typical sample in this study. The study revealed that the high school students developed mathematical board games with different objectives and mechanics as inspired by their learning, experiences, hobbies, and interest. Mathematical concepts and processes along numbers and number sense, measurements, algebra, geometry, and probability and statistics were integrated in the game through question card and mechanics of the game itself. The groups of students and teachers have high level of agreement as to the workmanship and usability, mechanics and organization, relevance to instruction/learning, and fun and enjoyment of the game as revealed by their assessment from very satisfactory to excellent level. Results implied that teachers in any subject area may use students’ engagement project as teaching strategy to produce products and performance that would provide evidence of students’ learning. The school curriculum makers may consider the students’ output as subjects of research for further improvements, exhibits, and classroom utilization.

  4. Opportunities for Scientists to Engage the Public & Inspire Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. G.; Worssam, J.; Vaughan, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, research scientists are learning that communicating science to broad, non-specialist audiences, particularly students, is just as important as communicating science to their peers via peer-reviewed scientific publications. This presentation highlights opportunities that scientists in Flagstaff, AZ have to foster public support of science & inspire students to study STEM disciplines. The goal here is to share ideas, personal experiences, & the rewards, for both students & research professionals, of engaging in science education & public outreach. Flagstaff, AZ, "America's First STEM Community," has a uniquely rich community of organizations engaged in science & engineering research & innovation, including the Flagstaff Arboretum, Coconino Community College, Gore Industries, Lowell Observatory, Museum of Northern Arizona, National Weather Service, National Park Service, National Forest Service, Northern Arizona University, Northern Arizona Center for Entrepreneurship & Technology, US Geological Survey, US Naval Observatory, & Willow Bend Environmental Education Center. These organizations connect with the Northern Arizona community during the yearly Flagstaff Festival of Science - the third oldest science festival in the world - a 10 day long, free, science festival featuring daily public lectures, open houses, interactive science & technology exhibits, field trips, & in-school speaker programs. Many research scientists from these organizations participate in these activities, e.g., public lectures, open houses, & in-school speaker programs, & also volunteer as mentors for science & engineering themed clubs in local schools. An example of a novel, innovative program, developed by a local K-12 science teacher, is the "Scientists-in-the-Classroom" mentor program, which pairs all 7th & 8th grade students with a working research scientist for the entire school year. Led by the student & guided by the mentor, they develop a variety of science / technology

  5. 76 FR 34994 - Vaccine To Protect Children From Anthrax-Public Engagement Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Vaccine To Protect Children From Anthrax--Public Engagement Workshop AGENCY: Office of... Biodefense Science Board's (NBSB) Anthrax Vaccine (AV) Working Group (WG) will hold a public engagement workshop on July 7, 2011, to discuss vaccine to protect children from anthrax. This meeting is open to the...

  6. Education and Public Outreach and Engagement at NASA's Analog Missions in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Wendy L.; Janoiko, Barbara A.; Mahoney, Erin; Hermann, Nicole B.

    2013-01-01

    each activity into the mission timeline. In 2012, the AES Analog Missions Project performed three distinct missions - NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO), which simulated a mission to an asteroid using an undersea laboratory; In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Field Test, which simulated a robotic mission to the moon searching and drilling for water; and Research and Technology Studies (RATS) integrated tests, which also simulated a mission to an asteroid. This paper will discuss the education and public engagement that occurred during these missions.

  7. Voluntarism, public engagement and the role of geoscience in radioactive waste management policy-making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilham, Nic

    2014-05-01

    In the UK, as elsewhere in Europe, there has been a move away from previous 'technocratic' approaches to radioactive waste management (RWM). Policy-makers have recognised that for any RWM programme to succeed, sustained engagement with stakeholders and the public is necessary, and any geological repository must be constructed and operated with the willing support of the community which hosts it. This has opened up RWM policy-making and implementation to a wider range of (often contested) expert inputs, ranging across natural and social sciences, engineering and even ethics. Geoscientists and other technical specialists have found themselves drawn into debates about how various types of expertise should be prioritised, and how they should be integrated with diverse public and stakeholder perspectives. They also have a vital role to play in communicating to the public the need for geological disposal of radioactive waste, and the various aspects of geoscience which will inform the process of implementing this, from identifying potential volunteer host communities, to finding a suitable site, developing the safety case, construction of a repository, emplacement of waste, closure and subsequent monitoring. High-quality geoscience, effectively communicated, will be essential to building and maintaining public confidence throughout the many decades such projects will take. Failure to communicate effectively the relevant geoscience and its central role in the UK's radioactive waste management programme arguably contributed to West Cumbria's January 2013 decision to withdraw from the site selection process, and may discourage other communities from coming forward in future. Across countries needing to deal with their radioactive waste, this unique challenge gives an unprecedented urgency to finding ways to engage and communicate effectively with the public about geoscience.

  8. Wisconsin Partnerships to Educate and Engage Public Audiences on Climate Change Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, M. E.; Ackerman, S.; Rowley, P.; Crowley Conn, K.

    2011-12-01

    The complexity and scale of climate change-related challenges requires more than one strategy to share meaningful information with public audiences. This presentation will discuss a few initiatives to engage the public originating from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. First, a local partnership between the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) and the Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC), an informal learning center with a new climate change "classroom" which recently acquired a Science on a Sphere (SOS) exhibit. Second, an informal education project funded by the NOAA Office of Education coordinated by CIMSS in partnership with the national SOS Network with the goal of helping museum docents share meaningful interpretation of real-time weather and climate data. CIMSS staff has been conducting weather and climate discussions on a Magic Planet display for several years. This "mini-SOS" is powered by a solar panel on the roof, modeling the essential Sun-Earth connection and the first principle of climate literacy. However, the convenient proximity of CIMSS and ALNC provides a perfect opportunity to test "SOS-scale" talking points posted on a weekly docent blog to the benefit of the entire SOS Network. Two other Wisconsin projects of note include the Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts, a partnership between the University and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and a pilot project between CIMSS and NOAA's National Weather Service to engage storm spotters in climate mitigation and stewardship. Ideally, the synergistic benefits and lessons learned from these collaborations can inform similar efforts in order to galvanize meaningful responses to climate change.

  9. The Origins of Kaldor Public Art Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Coates

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s Wrapped Coast – One Million Square Feet, Little Bay, Sydney, Australia (1968-69 remains one of Kaldor Public Art Projects’ (KPAP most significant projects, both artistically and in its impact on the local and international art scene. A private not-for-profit foundation, Kaldor Public Art Projects has presented site-specific temporary art projects by leading international contemporary artists in Australia for over forty years. Some of these projects, such as Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s, were important milestones in the development of contemporary art in Australia. Not-for-profit foundations now play an increasingly important and visible role in the contemporary art world. This essay considers the circumstances that surrounded the inception of one of the earliest of these foundations, Kaldor Public Art Projects. It considers the factors that led to its creation. These include John Kaldor’s upbringing and experience as an émigré in Australia; his mentors, Sir Nicholas Sekers and Claudio Alcorso; and the influences on and of his collecting interests. The essay argues that gallerists such as Ileana Sonnabend played a pivotal role in the development of Kaldor’s collection and artistic interests. Kaldor’s collecting interests also played a key role in the development of the Art Projects. The role of the collector and patron are inextricably linked.

  10. Understanding employee engagement in a public service context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Strange

    Employee engagement has long been capturing the attention of researchers and practitioners (Bakker, Albrecht, & Leiter, 2011; Kahn, 1990), due to its positive impact on various measures of organizational performance and individual level outcomes (Gruman & Saks, 2011; Harter, Schmidt, & Hayes, 200...

  11. Shifting Engagements in Figured Worlds: Middle School Mathematics Students' Participation in an Architectural Design Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurow, A. Susan

    2005-01-01

    Project-based curricula have the potential to engage students' interests. But how do students become interested in the goals of a project? This article documents how a group of 8th-grade students participated in an architectural design project called the Antarctica Project. The project is based on the imaginary premise that students need to design…

  12. Improving Risk Governance of Emerging Technologies through Public Engagement: The Neglected Case of Nano-Remediation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara Deanne; Wickson, Fern; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2012-01-01

    assessment. This paper therefore carries out a literature review to capture and analyse how governance strategies have focused on public engagement for NT and how such engagement relates to processes of risk analysis. To further investigate these issues, we focus on a specific NT application as a case study......: the use of nanoparticles for environmental remediation (nano-remediation). Through our review and analysis we find that the main approaches to incorporating public engagement into governance strategies have been the generation of a better understanding of public perceptions of NT and the setting......While public engagement is internationally considered to be crucial for successful governance of nanotechnologies (NT), it has not necessarily been clear what the relationship is (or should be) between these engagement efforts and the more traditional governance practice of scientific risk...

  13. "Social" Neuroscience: Leveraging Social Media to Increase Student Engagement and Public Understanding of Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Alissa; Kurczek, Jake

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscience is young and still developing. It is quickly adapting to a number of emerging changes in science and education. Not only have neuroscientists been at the forefront of the open access publishing movement, but many prominent neuroscientists continue to push towards making science more accessible and understandable to the broader public. Social media is a global phenomenon that is changing the way that we talk about research and education. Researchers, students, and the public alike can leverage social media to find updates in research and higher education. Social media also provides pathways to connect with experts and non-experts in a way never been seen before. Two major trends are appearing in education and social media: 1) providing more engaging teaching activities, and 2) providing opportunities for community engagement using teaching activities that leverage social media. In this article, we describe a semester long teaching activity that challenged students to use social media in their learning process. We provide initial evaluation and feedback from the students on their social media experience in class, and suggestions for how to improve the project in future implementations.

  14. Engaging All Americans: Innovative Strategies for Reaching the Public with Climate and Environmental Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, S.

    2014-12-01

    From extensive drought and heat waves to floods, tornadoes and Superstorm Sandy, extreme weather and climate events provide teachable moments to help communities prepare for and respond to related environmental, economic and health impacts. The National Environmental Education Foundation (www.neefusa.org) works with the American Meteorological Society, the media and other trusted messengers to provide weather, climate and environmental information to the public in accessible and widely used formats, whether via TV, radio or social media. NEEF will provide an overview of innovative partnerships and projects that are engaging Americans in understanding and using climate and environmental information to make the best choices in their daily lives and improve the health of their communities, including: Assessing knowledge, attitudes and behaviors: NEEF will share results from its national survey research and targeted focus groups on current attitudes and practices relating to our nation's environment. Simplifying and amplifying key messages: NEEF provides a national network of more than 350 meteorologists, radio broadcasters and journalists with the science-based information and resources they need to present climate and environmental topics to their viewers on-air, online and in community outreach. Engaging television viewers in citizen science: Eyes on Central PA, a pilot project of NEEF, Project Noah and WTAJ-TV, harnesses Project Noah's citizen science platform to collect and display photos of wildlife from WTAJ-TV viewers. NEEF and WTAJ provide regular blogs and on-air stories that highlight viewers' photos and link them to local weather conditions and climate trends. Expanding the conversation: NEEF's multimedia strategy in the Mid-Atlantic U.S. is reaching Spanish-speaking audiences with climate and environmental information through regular radio and television broadcasts. We are also exploring ways to reach other non-traditional audiences, including faith

  15. Collaborative Engagement Approaches For Delivering Sustainable Infrastructure Projects In The AEC Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adetola, Alaba

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The public sector has traditionally financed and operated infrastructure projects using resources from taxes and various levies (e.g. fuel taxes, road user charges. However, the rapid increase in human population growth coupled with extended globalisation complexities and associated social/political/economic challenges have placed new demands on the purveyors and operators of infrastructure projects. The importance of delivering quality infrastructure has been underlined by the United Nations declaration of the Millennium Development Goals; as has the provision of ‘adequate’ basic structures and facilities necessary for the well-being of urban populations in developing countries. Thus, in an effort to finance developing countries’ infrastructure needs, most countries have adopted some form of public-private collaboration strategy. This paper critically reviews these collaborative engagement approaches, identifies and highlights 10 critical themes that need to be appropriately captured and aligned to existing business models in order to successfully deliver sustainable infrastructure projects. Research findings show that infrastructure services can be delivered in many ways, and through various routes. For example, a purely public approach can cause problems such as slow and ineffective decision-making, inefficient organisational and institutional augmentation, and lack of competition and inefficiency (collectively known as government failure. On the other hand, adopting a purely private approach can cause problems such as inequalities in the distribution of infrastructure services (known as market failure. Thus, to overcome both government and market failures, a collaborative approach is advocated which incorporates the strengths of both of these polarised positions.

  16. Voluntary Contribution to Multiple Public Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.A.L.; Reijnierse, J.H.; Voorneveld, M.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of financing a set of public goods (facilities, projects) by private contri- butions is studied. The corresponding cooperative game, the realization game, is shown to be convex. For the noncooperative setting we study a realization scheme that induces a strategic game. This contribution

  17. PROJECT BONDS IN FINANCING PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ovsiannykova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical principles concerning the financing of public private partnership' projects are deepened and practical recommendations for improving the procedure of raising funds for projects of public-private partnerships through the use project bonds are substantiated.

  18. PROJECT BONDS IN FINANCING PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS IN UKRAINE

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical principles concerning the financing of public private partnership' projects are deepened and practical recommendations for improving the procedure of raising funds for projects of public-private partnerships through the use project bonds are substantiated.

  19. Collaborations between Multicultural Educators and Archivists: Engaging Students with Multicultural History through Archival Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    When multicultural educators and archivists collaborate to design projects that engage students with multicultural history through archival research, students can learn in-depth research skills with primary source documents, creatively share their knowledge, and, on a broader level, engage with their local community history. The projects shared in…

  20. Collaborations between Multicultural Educators and Archivists: Engaging Students with Multicultural History through Archival Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    When multicultural educators and archivists collaborate to design projects that engage students with multicultural history through archival research, students can learn in-depth research skills with primary source documents, creatively share their knowledge, and, on a broader level, engage with their local community history. The projects shared in…

  1. Public Engagement Through Shared Immersion: Participating in the Processes of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jessica Janice; Maroothynaden, Jason; Bello, Fernando; Kneebone, Roger

    2013-10-01

    Recently, the literature has emphasized the aims and logistics of public engagement, rather than its epistemic and cultural processes. In this conceptual article, we use our work on surgical simulation to describe a process that has moved from the classroom and the research laboratory into the public sphere. We propose an innovative shared immersion model for framing the relationship between engagement activities and research. Our model thus frames the public engagement experience as a participative encounter, which brings visitor and researcher together in a shared (surgical) experience mediated by experts from a range of domains.

  2. Engaging the Public in the Development of Sentencing Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Indermaur

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The issue of the lack of confidence in the courts provides an opportunity for us to consider the question of how sentencing policy is formulated and whether there is room for improvement in the process. It is argued in this paper that the legitimacy of the courts and public satisfaction with sentencing can both be enhanced if we were to carefully provide for the inclusion of an informed and deliberating public into policy formulation. Such a strategy would not only quell the loose and ill-defined ‘public opinion’ that characterises the tabloids; it would also enhance the transparency and the public acceptance of policy. The paper considers the continuum of possibilities for including the public from the gratuitous exploitation of the public voice by populists and media entrepreneurs using top-of-the-head opinion polls through to informed public opinion, public consultation process and ultimately the democratisation of sentencing policy. It is argued that this continuum can be seen as reflecting both the amount of true power given to the public voice as well as the amount of respect given to public input. Much of the fear of public inclusion in elite circles concerns public opinion as depicted in the media which is largely ‘public emotion’. It is argued that, when properly integrated, the inclusion of the public voice in the policy formulation process will have the same salutary effect that the jury has on the criminal trial.

  3. Mars Public Mapping Project: Public Participation in Science Research; Providing Opportunities for Kids of All Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, L. D.; Valderrama Graff, P.; Bandfield, J. L.; Christensen, P. R.; Klug, S. L.; Deva, B.; Capages, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Mars Public Mapping Project is a web-based education and public outreach tool developed by the Mars Space Flight Facility at Arizona State University. This tool allows the general public to identify and map geologic features on Mars, utilizing Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) visible images, allowing public participation in authentic scientific research. In addition, participants are able to rate each image (based on a 1 to 5 star scale) to help build a catalog of some of the more appealing and interesting martian surface features. Once participants have identified observable features in an image, they are able to view a map of the global distribution of the many geologic features they just identified. This automatic feedback, through a global distribution map, allows participants to see how their answers compare to the answers of other participants. Participants check boxes "yes, no, or not sure" for each feature that is listed on the Mars Public Mapping Project web page, including surface geologic features such as gullies, sand dunes, dust devil tracks, wind streaks, lava flows, several types of craters, and layers. Each type of feature has a quick and easily accessible description and example image. When a participant moves their mouse over each example thumbnail image, a window pops up with a picture and a description of the feature. This provides a form of "on the job training" for the participants that can vary with their background level. For users who are more comfortable with Mars geology, there is also an advanced feature identification section accessible by a drop down menu. This includes additional features that may be identified, such as streamlined islands, valley networks, chaotic terrain, yardangs, and dark slope streaks. The Mars Public Mapping Project achieves several goals: 1) It engages the public in a manner that encourages active participation in scientific research and learning about geologic features and processes. 2) It helps to

  4. Counting to Nowhere: Social Media Adoption and Use as an Opportunity for Public Scholarship and Engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, Katy E.

    2015-01-01

    Counting social media site users is popular yet fraught with challenges. Scholars can help illuminate public discussion of social media use. An open access journal like Social Media + Society provides a platform for scholarly public engagement. This essay highlights some of the challenges of understanding social media adoption and suggests opportunities for scholars to become part of public deliberation.

  5. Understanding an Emerging Field of Scholarship: Toward a Research Agenda for Engaged, Public Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Dwight E., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The theme of both "Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement" volume 12 issues 1 and 2 collectively, is "Faculty Motivation for Engagement in Public Scholarship." Herein Dwight Giles, Jr. touches upon each article in issue 2, specifically, noting the variability of the central terminology that is used across authors…

  6. Frontier Fields: Engaging Educators, the Youth, and the Public in Exploring the Cosmic Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Brandon L.; Eisenhamer, Bonnie; Smith, Denise A.; Summers, Frank; Darnell, John A.; Ryer, Holly

    2015-01-01

    The Frontier Fields is a multi-cycle program of six deep-field observations of strong-lensing galaxy clusters that will be taken in parallel with six deep 'blank fields.' The three-year long collaborative program is led by observations from NASA's Great Observatories. The observations allow astronomers to look deeper into the universe than ever before, and potentially uncover galaxies that are as much as 100 times fainter than what the telescopes can typically observe. The Frontier Fields science program is ideal for informing audiences about scientific advances and topics in STEM. The study of galaxy properties, statistics, optics, and Einstein's theory of general relativity naturally leverages off of the science returns of the Frontier Fields program. As a result, the Space Telescope Science Institute's Office of Public Outreach (OPO) has initiated an education and public outreach (EPO) project to follow the progress of the Frontier Fields.For over two decades, the Hubble EPO program has sought to bring the wonders of the universe to the education community, the youth, and the public, and engage audiences in the adventure of scientific discovery. Program components include standards-based curriculum-support materials, exhibits and exhibit components, professional development workshops, and direct interactions with scientists. We are also leveraging our new social media strategy to bring the science program to the public in the form of an ongoing blog. The main underpinnings of the program's infrastructure are scientist-educator development teams, partnerships, and an embedded program evaluation component. OPO is leveraging this existing infrastructure to bring the Frontier Fields science program to the education community and the public in a cost-effective way.The Frontier Fields program has just completed its first year. This talk will feature the goals and current status of the Frontier Fields EPO program. We will highlight OPO's strategies and infrastructure

  7. Mechanisms of Change in Public Management Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Soininen

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article draws conclusions from four separate case evaluations from different development programs in Finland and aims to discuss the role of welfare state values in new public management. The study develops a comprehensive picture of the change in public management since 2000. The synthesis of the four case studies follows the critical realism tradition. This article shows that cooperation forms the key mechanism in all public administration projects and in any changes to their structure. The new structure is the postmodern service production sector that still faces many challenges with regard to the traditional welfare state values. One of these is the conflict between the deep-seated moral imperatives of the old welfare state and the goal-attainment priorities of the new public management. While evaluation research has become one of the operations in public administration that fulfills the control function, the value bases of society, management, and evaluations should be balanced together. Also the objectives of public management and evaluations should be more clearly defined in relation to values other than efficiency. An applied science, like evaluation, needs basic social research to formulate, recognize, and conceptualize the new public management structure. Furthermore, there is an urgent requirement to address those values that underpin society as a whole.

  8. Shifting and Deepening Engagements: Experimental Normativity in Public Participation in Science and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Van Oudheusden, Michiel; Laurent, Brice

    2013-01-01

    Public participation in science, technology, and innovation is a significant trend in contemporary western democracies, which increasingly implicates the social scien-tist in diverse ways. Yet, the question as to how social scientists actually engage in public participation, and how their engagements may be normatively justified, is not the object of systematic consideration in participatory frameworks and in ac-tion-oriented social science. In this article, we ask how social scientists can t...

  9. Public Interaction and Educational Outreach on the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Benson; Y. Riding

    2002-11-14

    In July 2002, the U.S. Congress approved Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the nation's first long-term geologic repository site for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. This major milestone for the country's high-level radioactive waste disposal program comes after more than twenty years of scientific study and intense public interaction and outreach. This paper describes public interaction and outreach challenges faced by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project in the past and what additional communication strategies may be instituted following the July 2002 approval by the U.S. Congress to develop the site as the nation's first long-term geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The DOE public involvement activities were driven by two federal regulations--the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) of 1982, as amended. The NEPA required that DOE hold public hearings at key points in the development of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the NWPA required the agency to conduct public hearings in the vicinity of the site prior to making a recommendation regarding the site's suitability. The NWPA also provided a roadmap for how DOE would interact with affected units of government, which include the state of Nevada and the counties surrounding the site. Because the Department anticipated and later received much public interest in this high-profile project, the agency decided to go beyond regulatory-required public involvement activities and created a broad-based program that implemented far-reaching public interaction and outreach tactics. Over the last two decades, DOE informed, educated, and engaged a myriad of interested local, national, and international parties using various traditional and innovative approaches. The Yucca Mountain Project's intensive public affairs initiatives were instrumental in involving the public

  10. [Project financing in public hospital trusts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contarino, F; Grosso, G; Mistretta, A

    2009-01-01

    The growing debate in recent years over how to finance public works through private capital has progressively highlighted the role of project finance (PF) and publicprivate partnerships (PPP) in general. More and more European countries are turning to PF to finance their public infrastructure development. The UK, which pioneered the adoption of project finance in this field, has been followed by Italy, Spain, France, Portugal and Germany and more recently by Greece, Czech Republic and Poland. Beginning in the late 1990's, Italy has steadily amplified its use of PF and PPPs in key sectors such as healthcare as an alternative way of funding the modernisation of its health facilities and hospitals. The trend reveal an average annual growth of 10.9% since 2002 with peaks of varying intensity over the five year period. Project finance and PPPs represent an effective response to the country's infrastructure gap and support the competitiveness of local systems and the quality of public services. None of this will transpire, however without energetic new planning efforts and adequate policy at the centre.

  11. Footprints of Fascination: Digital Traces of Public Engagement with Particle Physics on CERN's Social Media Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Kate; Sharon, Aviv J; Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet

    2016-01-01

    Although the scientific community increasingly recognizes that its communication with the public may shape civic engagement with science, few studies have characterized how this communication occurs online. Social media plays a growing role in this engagement, yet it is not known if or how different platforms support different types of engagement. This study sets out to explore how users engage with science communication items on different platforms of social media, and what are the characteristics of the items that tend to attract large numbers of user interactions. Here, user interactions with almost identical items on five of CERN's social media platforms were quantitatively compared over an eight-week period, including likes, comments, shares, click-throughs, and time spent on CERN's site. The most popular items were qualitatively analyzed for content features. Findings indicate that as audience size of a social media platform grows, the total rate of engagement with content tends to grow as well. However, per user, engagement tends to decline with audience size. Across all platforms, similar topics tend to consistently receive high engagement. In particular, awe-inspiring imagery tends to frequently attract high engagement across platforms, independent of newsworthiness. To our knowledge, this study provides the first cross-platform characterization of public engagement with science on social media. Findings, although focused on particle physics, have a multidisciplinary nature; they may serve to benchmark social media analytics for assessing science communication activities in various domains. Evidence-based suggestions for practitioners are also offered.

  12. Footprints of Fascination: Digital Traces of Public Engagement with Particle Physics on CERN's Social Media Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet

    2016-01-01

    Although the scientific community increasingly recognizes that its communication with the public may shape civic engagement with science, few studies have characterized how this communication occurs online. Social media plays a growing role in this engagement, yet it is not known if or how different platforms support different types of engagement. This study sets out to explore how users engage with science communication items on different platforms of social media, and what are the characteristics of the items that tend to attract large numbers of user interactions. Here, user interactions with almost identical items on five of CERN's social media platforms were quantitatively compared over an eight-week period, including likes, comments, shares, click-throughs, and time spent on CERN's site. The most popular items were qualitatively analyzed for content features. Findings indicate that as audience size of a social media platform grows, the total rate of engagement with content tends to grow as well. However, per user, engagement tends to decline with audience size. Across all platforms, similar topics tend to consistently receive high engagement. In particular, awe-inspiring imagery tends to frequently attract high engagement across platforms, independent of newsworthiness. To our knowledge, this study provides the first cross-platform characterization of public engagement with science on social media. Findings, although focused on particle physics, have a multidisciplinary nature; they may serve to benchmark social media analytics for assessing science communication activities in various domains. Evidence-based suggestions for practitioners are also offered. PMID:27232498

  13. Work Engagement in the Public Service Context: The Duality of Job Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noesgaard, Mette Strange; Hansen, Jesper Rosenberg

    2016-01-01

    Due to its positive impact on employee level outcomes, financial performance, and overall organizational performance, work engagement has increasingly captured the attention of researchers and practitioners in the fields of organizational behaviour and human resource management (Tims et al., 2013...... that it is highly critical that very limited research considers the impact of public organization theory in relation to work engagement. Consequently this study investigates how public service motivation, the inherent red tape often associated with public service organizations, and the job demands experienced...... and observations were used to understand caregivers’ perceptions of work engagement and how it is influenced by these public sector characteristics. Findings from the study suggest that public service motivation functions as a buffer minimizing the devastating effect of high demands and low resources on work...

  14. Sustaining NASA’S Astrophysics Education And Public Outreach Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Hashima; Smith, Denise A.

    2014-06-01

    Sustaining NASA’s Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) projects has been a critical element of the Science Mission Directorate. Astrophysics E/PO programs have built robust partnerships and publicly accessible repositories of their products, which should enable them to form the bases of new initiatives. The recently released digital library, NASAWavelength, has a wealth of information which educators can use to design their own lessons, and students can use as a learning tool. Partnerships with libraries, science museums and amateur astronomers has led to targeted programs such as Astro4Girls and Night Sky Network. Teachers trained as Educator Ambassadors spread the knowledge gained through participating in NASA programs to other educators and students. These and other projects will be presented in this paper as examples of self -sustaining activities, which have a multiplier effect with high impact. While conveying the excitement of scientific discoveries from NASAs Astrophysics missions, these projects provide a powerful means of engaging students towards science and technology careers.

  15. About the Office of Public Engagement and Environmental Education (OPEEE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    OPEEE leads and coordinates EPA programs to provide national leadership in promoting environmental literacy and establishes and maintains close working relationships with a broad range of public- and private-sector organizations.

  16. Public health accreditation and metrics for ethics: a case study on environmental health and community engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernheim, Ruth Gaare; Stefanak, Matthew; Brandenburg, Terry; Pannone, Aaron; Melnick, Alan

    2013-01-01

    As public health departments around the country undergo accreditation using the Public Health Accreditation Board standards, the process provides a new opportunity to integrate ethics metrics into day-to-day public health practice. While the accreditation standards do not explicitly address ethics, ethical tools and considerations can enrich the accreditation process by helping health departments and their communities understand what ethical principles underlie the accreditation standards and how to use metrics based on these ethical principles to support decision making in public health practice. We provide a crosswalk between a public health essential service, Public Health Accreditation Board community engagement domain standards, and the relevant ethical principles in the Public Health Code of Ethics (Code). A case study illustrates how the accreditation standards and the ethical principles in the Code together can enhance the practice of engaging the community in decision making in the local health department.

  17. Scientific Value and Educational Goals: Balancing Priorities and Increasing Adult Engagement in a Citizen Science Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickler, Jessica; Cherry, Tammy Messick; Allee, Leslie; Smyth, Rebecca Rice; Losey, John

    2014-01-01

    The Lost Ladybug Project is a citizen science project that engages individuals and groups in research and learning about ladybug population dynamics. With a dual purpose of advancing scientists' research about ladybug populations and achieving learning outcomes with participants, the project's summative evaluation led to critical reflection on the…

  18. Scientific Value and Educational Goals: Balancing Priorities and Increasing Adult Engagement in a Citizen Science Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickler, Jessica; Cherry, Tammy Messick; Allee, Leslie; Smyth, Rebecca Rice; Losey, John

    2014-01-01

    The Lost Ladybug Project is a citizen science project that engages individuals and groups in research and learning about ladybug population dynamics. With a dual purpose of advancing scientists' research about ladybug populations and achieving learning outcomes with participants, the project's summative evaluation led to critical reflection on the…

  19. Public engagement as a field of tension between bottom-up and top-down strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsbøl, Anders; Lassen, Inger

    2012-01-01

    In the ongoing debate about climate change, public engagement is given increasing prominence as a possible solution to a general lack of citizen participation in climate change mitigation efforts. Recent years have seen a surge in public engagement initiatives in many countries in the Western world....... These initiatives often have to deal with dilemmas between participatory aspects and other considerations such as planning efficiency, dilemmas that potentially bring about tension between bottom-up and top-down strategies. Literature on climate change issues has addressed the failure of public response, which has...

  20. Public engagement as a field of tension between bottom-up and top-down strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsbøl, Anders; Lassen, Inger

    2012-01-01

    In the ongoing debate about climate change, public engagement is given increasing prominence as a possible solution to a general lack of citizen participation in climate change mitigation efforts. Recent years have seen a surge in public engagement initiatives in many countries in the Western world....... These initiatives often have to deal with dilemmas between participatory aspects and other considerations such as planning efficiency, dilemmas that potentially bring about tension between bottom-up and top-down strategies. Literature on climate change issues has addressed the failure of public response, which has...... knowledge and information about climate change has not significantly changed people’s behaviour towards higher involvement....

  1. Investigating science communication in the information age implications for public engagement and popular media

    CERN Document Server

    Whitelegg, Elizabeth; Scanlon, Eileen; Smidt, Sam; Thomas, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    How are recent policy changes affecting how scientists engage with the public? How are new technologies influencing how scientists disseminate their work and knowledge? How are new media platforms changing the way the public interact with scientific information? Investigating Science Communication in the Information Age is a collection of newly-commissioned chapters by leading science communication scholars. It addresses current theoretical, practical and policy developments in science communication, including recent calls for greater openness and transparency; and engagement and dialogue on the part of professional scientists with members of the public. It provides a timely and wide-ranging review of contemporary issues in science communication, focusing on two broad themes. The first theme critically reviews the recent dialogic turn and ascendant branding of 'public engagement with science' It addresses contemporary theoretical and conceptual issues facing science communication researchers, and draws on a r...

  2. Using Community Forums to Enhance Public Engagement in Environmental Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.C. Monroe; A. Oxarart; L. McDonell; R. Plate

    2009-01-01

    As environmental issues become more complex, the public may be less interested in becoming knowledgeable enough to participate in decision-making. Yet its input can be critically important in some community-based issues. A community forum is one tool designed to provide information, enable participants to ask questions to experts and create an open atmosphere for...

  3. Examining Community-Engaged Scholarship in Public Administration Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvell, Katrina Herndon

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to broaden the understanding of the role that academic professions play in shaping the values and attitudes of faculty toward CES. This study explored faculty perceptions regarding the factors that encourage or dissuade them in the pursuit of CES within public administration programs. As a framework for research, a conceptual…

  4. Engaging Students, Teachers, and the Public with NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Foxworth, S.; Kascak, A.; Luckey, M. K.; Mcinturff, B.; Runco, S.; Willis, K. J.

    2016-01-01

    Engaging students, teachers, and the public with NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) assets, including Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) experts and NASA curation astromaterial samples, provides an extraordinary opportunity to connect citizens with authentic aspects unique to our nation's space program. Effective engagement can occur through both virtual connections such as webcasts and in-person connections at educator workshops and public outreach events. Access to NASA ARES assets combined with adaptable resources and techniques that engage and promote scientific thinking helps translate the science and research being facilitated through NASA exploration, elicits a curiosity that aims to carry over even after a given engagement, and prepares our next generation of scientific explorers.

  5. Footprints of Fascination: Digital Traces of Public Engagement with Particle Physics on CERN's Social Media Platforms

    CERN Document Server

    Kahle, Kate; Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet

    2016-01-01

    Although the scientific community increasingly recognizes that its communication with the public may shape civic engagement with science, few studies have characterized how this communication occurs online. Social media plays a growing role in this engagement, yet it is not known if or how different platforms support different types of engagement. This study sets out to explore how users engage with science communication items on different platforms of social media, and what are the characteristics of the items that tend to attract large numbers of user interactions. Here, user interactions with almost identical items on five of CERN's social media platforms were quantitatively compared over an eight-week period, including likes, comments, shares, click-throughs, and time spent on CERN's site. The most popular items were qualitatively analyzed for content features. Findings indicate that as audience size of a social media platform grows, the total rate of engagement with content tends to grow as well. However...

  6. Design for Thinking: Engagement in an Innovation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Joy; Dresdow, Sally

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the use of design thinking in an undergraduate decision-making course. The spaces of design are linked to the dimensions of liberal learning in a way that allows students to engage in the design of an organization that supports a new product created in a collaborative team. The article provides an overview of how the…

  7. Design for Thinking: Engagement in an Innovation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Joy; Dresdow, Sally

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the use of design thinking in an undergraduate decision-making course. The spaces of design are linked to the dimensions of liberal learning in a way that allows students to engage in the design of an organization that supports a new product created in a collaborative team. The article provides an overview of how the…

  8. Leveraging Social Media to Engage the Public in Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    date information. “Our team knew where we could buy gas, we knew what roads were open and most importantly, we knew who needed help and where they were...more complete warning messages and how the public utilizes social media as an emergency moves into an extended length of time—do their habits ...so that they can define their needs.  You need to get to “Robust Statement of Needs” 84 Enablers  New Generation (The Millennials ) are

  9. Taking Advantage of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) Popularity to Enhance Student/Public Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    For a student group on campus, "the public" can refer to other students on campus or citizens from the community (including children, parents, teenagers, professionals, tradespeople, older people, and others). All of these groups have something to offer that can enrich the experiences of a student group. Our group focuses on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education in K-12 schools, university courses, and outreach activities with the general public. We will discuss the experiences of "All Things STEM" on the University of Colorado-Boulder campus and outreach in Boulder and Weld County, CO. Our experiences include (1) tours and events that offer an opportunity for student/public interaction, (2) grant requests and projects that involve community outreach, and (3) organizing conferences and events with campus/public engagement. Since our group is STEM-oriented, tours of water treatment plants, recycling centers, and science museums are a great way to create connections. Our most successful campus/public tour is our annual tour of the Valmont Station coal power plant near Boulder. We solicit students from all over campus and Boulder public groups with the goal to form a diverse and intimate 8 person group (students, school teachers, mechanics, hotel managers, etc.) that takes a 1.5 hr tour of the plant guided by the Chief Engineer. This includes a 20 minute sit-down discussion of anything the group wants to talk about including energy policy, plant history, recent failures, coal versus other fuels, and environmental issues. The tour concludes with each member placing a welding shield over their face and looking at the flames in the middle of the boiler, a little excitement that adds to the connections the group forms with each other. We have received over 11,000 to work with local K-12 schools and CU-Boulder undergraduate and graduate classes to develop a platform to help students learn and explain water quality concepts in a more practical manner

  10. The National Project as a Public Administration Concept: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Project as a Public Administration Concept: The Problematic of State Building in the ... to be connected with one another in exploring new developmental models. ... Public administration should be an apparatus of the public space in which ...

  11. The Managers’ Influence On The Workers’ Engagement – A Case Study Of Public Sector Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Hawrysz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The workers’ engagement means that they are loyal to their employers, trust both supervisors and co-workers, are not interested in changing their job, are proud of their work for a given company and that the boundary between private and professional life is often blurred. Proponents of the concept highlight the positive influence of engagement on the success of the company measured by workers’ loyalty, productivity, profitability and customers’ satisfaction. This is why, more and more researchers are interested in this concept. Apart from the engagement concept itself and the ways of its measurement, they pay attention to the possibility of affecting the workers’ engagement. However, researchers do not totally agree to the set of factors determining the workers’ engagement. There is though some agreement in their suggestions concerning the way of perceiving managers as one of the key factors determining the workers’ engagement. The aim of this article is to state whether the attitude of managers of the public sector organisations has a positive influence on the workers’ engagement. The article also tries to show differences in the management’s attitudes in Poland and abroad. For the needs of aims verification a survey was carried out among 1716 workers employed in 220 purposefully chosen public sector organisations located mainly in Europe.

  12. Facebook Advertising Across an Engagement Spectrum: A Case Example for Public Health Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Tevah; Platt, Jodyn; Thiel, Daniel B; Kardia, Sharon L R

    2016-05-30

    The interpersonal, dialogic features of social networking sites have untapped potential for public health communication. We ran a Facebook advertising campaign to raise statewide awareness of Michigan's newborn screening and biobanking programs. We ran a Facebook advertising campaign to stimulate public engagement on the complex and sensitive issue of Michigan's newborn screening and biobank programs. We ran an 11-week, US $15,000 Facebook advertising campaign engaging Michigan Facebook users aged 18-64 years about the state's newborn screening and population biobank programs, and we used a novel "engagement spectrum" framework to contextualize and evaluate engagement outcomes ranging from observation to multi-way conversation. The campaign reached 1.88 million Facebook users, yielding a range of engagement outcomes across ad sets that varied by objective, content, budget, duration, and bid type. Ad sets yielded 9009 page likes (US $4125), 15,958 website clicks (US $5578), and 12,909 complete video views to 100% (US $3750). "Boosted posts" yielded 528 comments and 35,966 page post engagements (US $1500). Overall, the campaign led to 452 shares and 642 comments, including 176 discussing newborn screening and biobanking. Facebook advertising campaigns can efficiently reach large populations and achieve a range of engagement outcomes by diversifying ad types, bid types, and content. This campaign provided a population-based approach to communication that also increased transparency on a sensitive and complex topic by creating a forum for multi-way interaction.

  13. Evolutionary Game Analysis of the Supervision Behavior for Public-Private Partnership Projects with Public Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Congdong Li; Xiaoli Li; Yu Wang

    2016-01-01

    The public can directly or indirectly participate in the PPP (public-private partnership) projects and then has an impact on the project profit and public or private behavior. To explore the influence of the public participation of the PPP projects supervision behavior, this paper analyzes the mutual evolutionary regularity of the private sector and government supervision department and the influence of public participation level on public and private behavior based on evolutionary game theor...

  14. Italian parliamentary debates on energy sustainability: How argumentative 'short-circuits' affect public engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondi, Sonia; Sarrica, Mauro; Caramis, Alessandro; Piccolo, Chiara; Mazzara, Bruno M

    2016-08-01

    Public engagement is considered a crucial process in the transition towards sustainable energy systems. However, less space has been devoted to understand how policy makers and stakeholders view citizens and their relationship with energy issues. Nonetheless, together with technological advancements, policies and political debates on energy affect public engagement as well as individual practices. This article aims at tackling this issue by exploring how policy makers and stakeholders have socially constructed sustainable energy in Italian parliamentary debates and consultations during recent years (2009-2012). Results show that societal discourses on sustainable energy are oriented in a manner that precludes public engagement. The political debate is characterised by argumentative 'short-circuits' that constrain individual and community actions to the acceptance or the refusal of top-down decisions and that leave little room for community empowerment and bottom-up innovation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Increasing medical students' engagement in public health: case studies illustrating the potential role of online learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheringham, J; Lyon, A; Jones, A; Strobl, J; Barratt, H

    2016-09-01

    The value of e-learning in medical education is widely recognized but there is little evidence of its value in teaching medical students about public health. Such evidence is needed because medical students' engagement with public health has been low. We present three recent case studies from UK medical schools to illustrate diverse ways in which online approaches can increase medical students' engagement with learning public health. A comparative case study approach was used applying quantitative and qualitative data to examine engagement in terms of uptake/use amongst eligible students, acceptability and perceived effectiveness using an analytic framework based on Seven Principles of Effective Teaching. Across the three case studies, most (67-85%) eligible students accessed online materials, and rated them more favourably than live lectures. Students particularly valued opportunities to use e-learning flexibly in terms of time and place. Online technologies offered new ways to consolidate learning of key public health concepts. Although students found contributing to online discussions challenging, it provided opportunities for students to explore concepts in depth and enabled students that were uncomfortable speaking in face-to-face discussions to participate. E-learning can be applied in diverse ways that increase medical student engagement with public health teaching. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Antimicrobial resistance: moving from professional engagement to public action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashiru-Oredope, D; Hopkins, S

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant infections claim ≥700 000 lives each year globally. It is therefore important that both healthcare professionals and the public know the threat antimicrobial resistance poses and the individual actions they can take to combat antimicrobial resistance. Antibiotic awareness campaigns in England using posters or leaflets have had little or no impact on knowledge, behaviour or prescription rates. Centrally coordinated, multimodal campaigns in two European countries (ongoing for several years and including print and mass media, web site and guidelines, as well as academic detailing and individual feedback to prescribers) have led to reductions in antibiotic use. To change behaviour and reduce antibiotic use in England, a coordinated and comprehensive interdisciplinary and multifaceted (multimodal) approach using behavioural science and targeted at specific groups (both professional and public) is required. Such campaigns should have an integrated evaluation plan using a combination of formative, process and summative measures from the outset to completion of a campaign. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Genetics on stage: public engagement in health policy development on preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Susan M; Kazubowski-Houston, Magdalena; Nisker, Jeff

    2009-04-01

    Arts-based approaches to public engagement offer unique advantages over traditional methods of consultation. Here we describe and assess our use of theatre as a method of public engagement in the development of health policy on preimplantation genetic diagnosis, a controversial method for selecting the genetic characteristics of embryos created through in vitro fertilization. Funding from the Canadian Institutes for Health Research and Health Canada supported 16 performances of the play Orchids in Vancouver, Toronto, and Montréal and post-performance discussion in English and French (with Hubert Doucet) in 2005. A total of 741 individuals attended. The methods used to assess audience engagement and elicit policy-relevant dialogue included in-theatre observation of audience responses, moderated post-performance large audience discussion and focus groups, audience feedback forms and researcher fieldnotes. Emphasizing process and context over emerging outcomes, we reflect on the distinctive contributions of theatre in stimulating public engagement and the need to utilize multiple methods to adequately assess these contributions. We suggest continued dialogue about the possible uses of theatre in health policy development and conclude that greater clarity is needed with regard to citizens' (as well as specific stakeholders, policy makers' and sponsors') desired outcomes if there is to be a suitably nuanced and reflexive basis for assessing the effectiveness of various strategies for public engagement.

  18. Promoting climate literacy through social engagement: the Green Ninja Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, E. C.; Todd, A.

    2012-12-01

    One of the challenges of communicating climate change to younger audiences is the disconnect between global issues and local impacts. The Green Ninja is a climate-action superhero that aims to energize young people about climate science through media and social engagement tools. In this presentation, we'll highlight two of the tools designed to help K-12 students implement appropriate local mitigation strategies. A mobile phone application builds and supports a social community around taking action at local businesses regarding themes such as food, packaging and energy efficiency. An energy efficiency contest in local schools utilizes smart meter technology to provide feedback on household energy use and conservation. These tools are supported by films and lesson plans that link formal and informal education channels. The effectiveness of these methodologies as tools to engage young people in climate science and action will be discussed.

  19. Why would firms engage in urban regeneration projects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob Norvig; Jensen, Jesper Ole

    and group interviews in private and public business firms, observations at local business or neighbourhood meetings, etc. Findings confirm that there is considerable incongruity between the views of public planners and company managers as regards what is at issue in the neighbourhood. Furthermore, corporate...

  20. Vermont EPSCoR Streams Project: Engaging High School and Undergraduate Students in Watershed Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, E.; McCabe, D.; Sheldon, S.; Jankowski, K.; Haselton, L.; Luck, M.; van Houten, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Vermont EPSCoR Streams Project engages a diverse group of undergraduates, high school students, and their teachers in hands-on water quality research and exposes them to the process of science. The project aims to (1) recruit students to science careers and (2) create a water quality database comprised of high-quality data collected by undergraduates and high school groups. The project is the training and outreach mechanism of the Complex Systems Modeling for Environmental Problem Solving research program, an NSF-funded program at the University of Vermont (UVM) that provides computational strategies and fresh approaches for understanding how natural and built environments interact. The Streams Project trains participants to collect and analyze data from streams throughout Vermont and at limited sites in Connecticut, New York, and Puerto Rico. Participants contribute their data to an online database and use it to complete individual research projects that focus on the effect of land use and precipitation patterns on selected measures of stream water quality. All undergraduates and some high school groups are paired with a mentor, who is either a graduate student or a faculty member at UVM or other college. Each year, undergraduate students and high school groups are trained to (1) collect water and macroinvertebrate samples from streams, (2) analyze water samples for total phosphorus, bacteria, and total suspended solids in an analytical laboratory, and/or (3) use geographic information systems (GIS) to assess landscape-level data for their watersheds. After training, high school groups collect samples from stream sites on a twice-monthly basis while undergraduates conduct semi-autonomous field and laboratory research. High school groups monitor sites in two watersheds with contrasting land uses. Undergraduate projects are shaped by the interests of students and their mentors. Contribution to a common database provides students with the option to expand the

  1. NASA's SMD Cross-Forum Resources for Supporting Scientist Engagement in Education and Public Outreach Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.; Hsu, B. C.; Sharma, M.; Peticolas, L. M.; Schwerin, T. G.; Shipp, S. S.; Smith, D.

    2012-12-01

    Sharing the excitement of ongoing scientific discoveries is an important aspect of scientific activity for researchers. Directly engaging scientists in education and public outreach (E/PO) activities has the benefit of directly connecting the public to those who engage in scientific activities. A shortage of training in education methods, public speaking, and working with various public audiences increases barriers to engaging scientists in these types in E/PO activities. NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public forums (astrophysics, earth science, heliophysics, and planetary science) support scientists currently involved in E/PO and who are interested in becoming involved in E/PO through a variety of avenues. Over the past three years, the forums have developed a variety of resources to help engage scientists in education and public outreach. We will showcase the following resources developed through the SMD E/PO cross-forum efforts: Professional development resources for writing NASA SMD E/PO proposals (webinars and other online tools), ongoing professional development at scientific conferences to increase scientist engagement in E/PO activities, toolkits for scientists interested in best practices in E/PO (online guides for K-12 education and public outreach), toolkits to inform scientists of science education resources developed within each scientific thematic community, EarthSpace (a community web space where instructors can find and share about teaching space and earth sciences in the undergraduate classroom, including class materials news and funding opportunities, and the latest education research, http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace/), thematic resources for teaching about SMD science topics, and an online database of scientists interested in connecting with education programs. Learn more about the Forum and find resources at http://smdepo.org/.

  2. Healthy workplaces and teamwork for healthcare workers need public engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Sue; Macdonald-Rencz, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    This response challenges the healthcare system to take full responsibility for the work environments created for health human resources. While the need for healthy work environments and teamwork in healthcare are inarguable, the fact is they are not a reality in today's health system. The authors suggest strategies to address this issue and identify the person or groups that should take responsibility, including governments, organizations, individuals and the public. Strategies include ensuring that policies do not contradict one another and holding each level responsible for the outcomes of a healthy work environment - retention and recruitment of health human resources, better patient/client outcomes and healthcare costs. The need for strong and appropriate leadership for health human resources with "content knowledge" is discussed, along with recommendations for measuring the performance and success of healthy work environments and teamwork. The authors conclude that collaboration at the micro, meso and macro levels is required to facilitate the true change that is needed to improve the work environments of health human resources.

  3. Enhancing Intercultural Communication and Understanding: Team Translation Project as a Student Engagement Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects on a team translation project on Aboriginal culture designed to enhance university students' intercultural communication competence and understanding through engaging in an interactive team translation project funded by the Australia-China Council. A selected group of Chinese speaking translation students participated in the…

  4. Farmers’ Logics in Engaging With Projects Promoting Drip Irrigation Kits in Burkina Faso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanvoeke, Jonas; Venot, Jean Philippe; Zwarteveen, Margreet; Fraiture, de Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Development agencies enthusiastically promote micro-drip irrigation as an affordable water and labor-saving device, yet most farmers stop using it as soon as development projects end. This article analyzes why farmers engage in projects promoting drip irrigation kits, even though they appear not

  5. Engaging Young Adolescents in Social Action through Photovoice: The Youth Empowerment Strategies (YES!) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nance; Dasho, Stefan; Martin, Anna C.; Wallerstein, Nina; Wang, Caroline C.; Minkler, Meredith

    2007-01-01

    The Youth Empowerment Strategies (YES!) project is an afterschool empowerment program and research project for underserved early adolescents. Central to YES! is an empowerment intervention that provides early adolescents with opportunities for civic engagement with other youth around issues of shared concern in their schools and neighborhoods.…

  6. Sequential pivotal mechanisms for public project problems

    CERN Document Server

    Apt, Krzysztof R

    2008-01-01

    It is well-known that for several natural decision problems no budget balanced Groves mechanisms exist. This motivated recent research on designing variants of feasible Groves mechanisms (termed as `redistribution of VCG (Vickrey-Clarke-Groves) payments') that generate reduced deficit. With this in mind, we study sequential Groves mechanisms and consider optimal strategies that can lower the taxes that the players would have to pay under the simultaneous mechanism. We show that in the sequential pivotal mechanism for several variants of public project problems such strategies do exist. These strategies differ from truth-telling. In particular we exhibit an optimal strategy with the property that when each player follows it a maximal social welfare is generated.

  7. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  8. Informing public health policy through deliberative public engagement: perceived impact on participants and citizen-government relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molster, Caron; Potts, Ayla; McNamara, Beverley; Youngs, Leanne; Maxwell, Susannah; Dawkins, Hugh; O'Leary, Peter

    2013-09-01

    Deliberative public engagement has been proposed for policy development, where issues are complex and there are diverse public perspectives and low awareness of competing issues. Scholars suggest a range of potential outcomes for citizens and government agencies from involvement in such processes. Few studies have examined outcomes from the perspective of citizen participants in deliberative processes. To examine participant perceptions of their involvement in and outcomes of a deliberative engagement exercise. A case study using semistructured interviews was conducted with participants following a deliberative forum on biobanking. From their involvement in the deliberative exercise, participants described transformations in their knowledge and beliefs about the policy issues. They reported being more informed to the extent of having confidence to educate others and effectively contribute to public policy development. They had developed greater trust in government policymakers who they believed would take reasonable account of their recommendations. We conclude that the participants were satisfied with the outcomes of the deliberative public engagement process and viewed it as an effective means of citizen involvement in public policy development. Particularly for citizens who participate in deliberative processes, such processes may promote active citizenship, empower citizens to undertake representative and educative roles, and improve relations between citizens and government agencies. Actions taken by policymakers subsequent to the deliberative exercise, whereby the majority of citizen recommendations were incorporated in the policy developed, may have contributed to participants holding sustained levels of trust in the commissioning government agency.

  9. Decoupling, re-Engaging: managing trust relationships in implementation projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy; Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup

    2012-01-01

    , is likely to vary over time, and should not be taken for granted. Previous studies have identified the relationship between trust and project outcomes, and suggested trust-building strategies, but have largely ignored the dynamic quality of trust relations through the life of a major project......An important aspect of the successful implementation of large information systems (such as ERP systems) is trust. These implementations impact the legitimate interests of many groups of stakeholders, and trust is a critical factor for success. Trust in the project is contingent upon many factors......, and the complex demands of managing those fluctuations. We investigate evolving trust relationships in a longitudinal case analysis of a large Integrated Hospital System implementation for the Faroe Islands. Trust relationships suffered various breakdowns, but the project was able to recover and eventually meet...

  10. NASA Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach: Engaging Educators and Students in Exploring the Cosmic Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Brandon L.; Eisenhamer, Bonnie; Smith, Denise Anne; Jirdeh, Hussein; Summers, Frank; Darnell, John T.; Ryer, Holly

    2015-08-01

    NASA’s Frontier Fields is an ambitious three-year Great Observatories program that will expand our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution in the early universe. The program includes six deep-field observations of strong-lensing galaxy clusters that will be taken in parallel with six deep “blank fields.” The observations allow astronomers to look deeper into the universe than ever before, and potentially uncover galaxies that are as much as 100 times fainter than what the telescopes can typically observe. The Frontier Fields science program is ideal for informing audiences about scientific advances and topics in STEM. The study of galaxy properties, statistics, optics, and Einstein’s theory of general relativity naturally leverages off of the science returns of the Frontier Fields program. As a result, the Space Telescope Science Institute’s Office of Public Outreach (OPO) has initiated an E/PO project to follow the progress of the Frontier Fields.For over two decades, the Hubble E/PO program has sought to bring the wonders of the universe to the education community, the youth, and the public, and engage audiences in the adventure of scientific discovery. Program components include standards-based curriculum-support materials, exhibits and exhibit components, professional development workshops, and direct interactions with scientists. We are also leveraging our new social media strategy to bring the science program to the public in the form of an ongoing blog. The main underpinnings of the program’s infrastructure are scientist-educator development teams, partnerships, and an embedded program evaluation component. OPO is leveraging this existing infrastructure to bring the Frontier Fields science program to the education community and the public in a cost-effective way.This talk features the goals and current status of the Frontier Fields E/PO program, with a particular emphasis on our education goals and achievements. We also highlight OPO

  11. Perspectives on engaging the public in the ethics of emerging biotechnologies: from salmon to biobanks to neuroethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secko, David M; Burgess, Michael; O'Doherty, Kieran

    2008-01-01

    In anticipation of increasing interest in public engagement, this article seeks to expand the current discussion in the neuroethics literature concerning what public engagement on issues related to neuroscience might entail and how they could be envisioned. It notes that the small amount of available neuroethics literature related to public engagement has principally discussed only communication/education or made calls for dialogue without exploring what this might entail on a practical level. The article links across three seemingly disparate examples-salmon, biobanks, and neuroethics-to consider and clarify the need for public engagement in neuroscience.

  12. Community views and perspectives on public engagement in health technology assessment decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortley, Sally; Tong, Allison; Howard, Kirsten

    2016-04-07

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to describe community views and perspectives on public engagement processes in Australian health technology assessment (HTA) decision making.Methods Six focus groups were held in Sydney (NSW, Australia) as part of a broad program of work on public engagement and HTA. Eligible participants were aged ≥18 years and spoke English. Participants were asked about their views and perspectives of public engagement in the HTA decision-making process, with responses analysed using a public participation framework.Results Fifty-eight participants aged 19-71 years attended the focus groups. Responses from the public indicated that they wanted public engagement in HTA to include a diversity of individuals, be independent and transparent, involve individuals early in the process and ensure that public input is meaningful and useful to the process. This was consistent with the public participation framework. Perceived shortcomings of the current public engagement process were also identified, namely the lack of awareness of the HTA system in the general population and the need to acknowledge the role different groups of stakeholders or 'publics' can have in the process.Conclusions The public do see a role for themselves in the HTA decision-making process. This is distinct to the involvement of patients and carers. It is important that any future public engagement strategy in this field distinguishes between stakeholder groups and outline approaches that will involve members of the public in the decision-making process, especially if public expectations of involvement in healthcare decision-making continue to increase.What is known about this topic? The views and perspectives of patients and consumers are important in the HTA decision-making process. There is a move to involve the broader community, particularly as decisions become increasingly complex and resources more scarce.What does this paper add? It not been known to what extent

  13. Evaluation of a workplace engagement project for people with younger onset dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jacinta; Evans, David

    2015-08-01

    In 2011, a workplace project was established to provide a small group of people who had younger onset dementia with the opportunity to return to the workplace. The project sought to explore the feasibility and safety of engaging these younger people in workplace activities if an appropriate framework of support was provided. Opportunities to engage in meaningful activities are quite limited for younger people with dementia because services are targeted at an older client population. A qualitative exploratory approach was used for the project evaluation. Participants were people who were 65 years or younger and had a diagnosis of dementia. They attended a large metropolitan hardware store one day per week and worked beside a store employee for a four hour work shift. Evaluation of the project included observation of participant's engagement in the workplace, adverse events and a qualitative analysis that used participant-nominated good project outcomes. Nine people with a mean age of 58·8 years participated in the project. Six of these participants have been engaged at the workplace for more than two years. All participants were able to gain the skills needed to complete their respective work duties. Participants initially assisted with simple work tasks, but over time, they were able to expand their range of duties to include more complex activities such as customer sales. Participants achieved their nominated good outcomes of improved well-being, engaging in worthwhile activities, contributing to society and socialisation. The evaluation has shown that this workplace programme is a viable model of engagement for younger people with dementia. This evaluation offers a practical demonstration that it is feasible and safe to provide opportunities for younger people with dementia to engage in meaningful activities in the community if appropriate support is provided. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The Europlanet Prize for Public Engagement with Planetary Science: three years of honouring outstanding achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchet, T.; Chatzichristou, E.; Heward, A.

    2012-09-01

    Europlanet launched an annual Prize for Public Engagement with Planetary Sciences at the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) in 2009. At EPSC 2012, the prize will be presented for the third time. To date, the prize has been awarded to: • 2010 - Dr Jean Lilensten of the Laboratoire de Planétologie de Grenoble for his development and dissemination of his 'planeterrella' experiment; • 2011 - The Austrian Space Forum for their coordinated programme of outreach activities, which range from simple classroom presentations to space exhibitions reaching 15 000 visitors; • 2012 - Yaël Nazé, for the diverse outreach programme she has individually initiated over the years, carefully tailored to audiences across the spectrum of society, including children, artists and elderly people. These three prizes cover a spectrum of different approaches to outreach and provide inspiration for anyone wishing to become engaged in public engagement, whether at an individual and institutional level.

  15. Impacts of Chandra X-ray Observatory Public Communications and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcand, Kimberly K.; Watzke, Megan; Lestition, Kathleen; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center runs a multifaceted Public Communications & Engagement program encompassing press relations, public engagement, and education. Our goals include reaching a large and diverse audience of national and international scope, establishing direct connections and working relationships with the scientists whose research forms the basis for all products, creating peer-reviewed materials and activities that evolve from an integrated pipeline design and encourage users toward deeper engagement, and developing materials that target underserved audiences such as women, Spanish speakers, and the sight and hearing impaired. This talk will highlight some of the key features of our program, from the high quality curated digital presence to the cycle of research and evaluation that informs our practice at all points of the program creation. We will also discuss the main impacts of the program, from the tens of millions of participants reached through the establishment and sustainability of a network of science 'volunpeers.'

  16. Best practice in communications training for public engagement with science, technology, engineering and mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Bultitude

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective training in key communications skills is critical for successful public engagement. However, what are the secrets to designing and delivering an effectual training course? This paper outlines key findings from a research study into communication training programmes for public engagement with STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The research focused on training in direct communication methods, (as separate from media training and encompassed both trainers and trainees, the latter group spanning across both scientists and explainers. The findings indicated that training courses are effective at increasing involvement in science communication events and trainees feel more confident and able to engage due to training. An interactive style was found to be a key element of training courses. Demonstrations of good practice followed by own performance with feedback were also important, preferably involving a ‘real’ audience. A list of guidelines on best practice has been developed which offers practical advice.

  17. NASA Astrophysics EPO Community: Increasing and Sustaining Youth and Public Engagement in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, B.; Smith, D. A.; Bartolone, L.; Meinke, B. K.; Schultz, G.; Manning, J.; NASA Astrophysics EPO Community

    2015-11-01

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach (EPO) community and Forum work together to capitalize on the cutting-edge discoveries of NASA Astrophysics missions to enable youth to engage directly in doing Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) inside and outside of school. The NASA SMD Astrophysics EPO community has proven expertise in providing student opportunities that reinforce research skills; exhibits, multimedia shows, and visualizations that inspire and engage; professional development for informal educators; and partnerships that provide local, regional, and national reach. These mission- and grant-based EPO programs are uniquely poised to foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present examples of how the NASA Astrophysics EPO community and Forum support youth and public engagement in STEM in these ways, including associated metrics and evaluation findings.

  18. Social Studies Education and Public Art: The Detroit Billboard Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Julie Anne; Iroha, Okezie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this action-research project was to evaluate the impact of high school students' involvement in community-oriented, art-based work in the social studies. In Detroit, high school students engaged in persuasive writing and design while exploring community issues. The project culminated in the installation of student artwork on a billboard…

  19. The Success Criteria of Public Housing Project in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Mohammed Mukhtar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There is no consensus among researchers of what constitutes projects success; every project type may have different success criteria. Identifying project success criteria at the initial stage of a project can contribute to effective utilization of resources. The aim of this study is to establish the criteria for measuring public housing project success in Nigeria. The data collection was carried out in Nigeria by means of structured interviews with ten experts in housing, a pilot survey and questionnaire survey.  A questionnaire survey was carried out in which 550 questionnaires were administered to construction professionals who involve in public housing projects, in order to elicit their perceptions on success criteria for public housing projects. The sample was drawn using purposive sampling method since there is no sample frame of people with experience in public housing. Two hundred and seventy six questionnaires (276 were returned completed representing 50.2% response rate. The data collected were analysed using structural equation modelling technique. The results reveal six criteria for measuring public housing project management success, these are client’s satisfaction, project completed on time, project completed to specified quality standard, absence of disputes, safety, and completion within budget. The results also reveal four criteria for measuring public housing product success which include meeting the project purpose, end users’ satisfaction, environmental impact and aesthetic appearance of the . Understanding the findings of this study by policy makers and project managers can improve effectiveness and efficiency of public housing projects in Nigeria.

  20. An Eco-Behavioral Analysis of Children's Engagement in Urban Public School Preschool Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Douglas R.; Burchinal, Margaret R.; File, Nancy; Kontos, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to identify particular group configurations and teacher behaviors that co-occurred with children's active engagement in public school early childhood classrooms for 4-year-olds. Children (N=138, 52% boys) were observed using a time sampling method in 12 classrooms in 12 urban schools serving students from…

  1. Problem Solving and Creativity in Public Policy Courses: Promoting Interest and Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukich, Clayton; Siciliano, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the impact of problem-solving and creativity exercises on student interest in public policy making and behavior related to civic engagement. Researchers have long described policy making as a function of problem solving. Creativity has also been identified as an important component of the process. While these skills are…

  2. Innovative Public Engagement Practices and Partnerships: Lifting Stakeholder Voices in Education Accountability Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Monica; Brewer, Curtis; Knoeppel, Robert; Witte, James; Pargas, Roy; Lindle, Jane Clark

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, due to increasing stakeholder dissatisfaction with assessment results and school report cards, South Carolina revised its 1998 Educational Accountability Act and required public engagement with stakeholders including parents/guardians, educators, business and community leaders, and taxpayers. The legislation created partnerships between…

  3. Professionalizing the PTO: Race, Class, and Shifting Norms of Parental Engagement in a City Public School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey-Maddox, Linn

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of parents--particularly middle- and upper-middle-class parents--are working to fill budgetary gaps through their fundraising, grant writing, and volunteerism in urban public schools. Yet little is known about how this may shape norms and practices related to parental engagement within particular schools. Drawing from a case study…

  4. Problem Solving and Creativity in Public Policy Courses: Promoting Interest and Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukich, Clayton; Siciliano, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the impact of problem-solving and creativity exercises on student interest in public policy making and behavior related to civic engagement. Researchers have long described policy making as a function of problem solving. Creativity has also been identified as an important component of the process. While these skills are…

  5. Understanding Public Engagement in Water Conservation Behaviors and Knowledge of Water Policy: Promising Hints for Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pei-wen; Lamm, Alexa J.

    2015-01-01

    Sustaining water resources is a primary issue facing Florida Extension. The study reported here identified how experience with water issues and familiarity with water policies affected individuals' engagement in water conservation behaviors. A public opinion survey was conducted online to capture Florida residents' responses. The findings…

  6. Student-Designed Public Service Announcement (PSA) Videos to Enhance Motivation and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Educators often focus on enhancing student motivation and engagement. This article describes an activity with these aims, in which undergraduates (a) learn about theories and research on means of persuasion and (b) in small groups design and record a public service announcement (PSA) video, write a brief paper that outlines the theories used to…

  7. Work Engagement in the Public Service Context: The Dual Perceptions of Job Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noesgaard, Mette Strange; Hansen, Jesper Rosenberg

    2017-01-01

    . In this qualitative study, home caregivers’ perceptions of job characteristics are investigated. Semi-structured interviews and observations reveal three main themes: Optimization, helping others and emotional work. These show a dual perception of job characteristics consequently influencing the experienced...... engagement. Using Public Service Motivation literature, these dual perceptions are discussed...

  8. What factors determine the choice of public engagement undertaken by health technology assessment decision-making organizations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortley, Sally; Street, Jackie; Lipworth, Wendy; Howard, Kirsten

    2016-09-19

    Purpose Public engagement in health technology assessment (HTA) is increasingly considered crucial for good decision making. Determining the "right" type of engagement activity is key in achieving the appropriate consideration of public values. Little is known about the factors that determine how HTA organizations (HTAOs) decide on their method of public engagement, and there are a number of possible factors that might shape these decisions. The purpose of this paper is to understand the potential drivers of public engagement from an organizational perspective. Design/methodology/approach The published HTA literature is reviewed alongside existing frameworks of public engagement in order to elucidate key factors influencing the choice of public engagement process undertaken by HTAOs. A conceptual framework is then developed to illustrate the factors identified from the literature that appear to influence public engagement choice. Findings Determining the type of public engagement undertaken in HTA is based on multiple factors, some of which are not always explicitly acknowledged. These factors included the: perceived complexity of the policy-making issue, perceived impact of the decision, transparency and opportunities for public involvement in governance, as well as time and resource constraints. The influences of these factors vary depending on the context, indicating that a one size fits all approach to public engagement may not be effective. Originality/value Awareness of the various factors that might influence the type of public engagement undertaken would enable decision makers to reflect on their choices and be more accountable and transparent about their choice of engagement process in eliciting public values and preferences in a HTAO.

  9. Professional Society Resources and Partnerships for Public and K-12 Outreach and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Philip W.

    2011-03-01

    Outreach and public engagement lower the barriers that inhibit broader public appreciation of and participation in physics, and are important for inspiring the next generation of scientists and science-literate citizens. The APS and many other professional societies have made significant and sustained investments in public engagement because of the importance of these activities - APS, for example, has an entire department dedicated to outreach. In addition, professional societies have responded to members who desire resources for enabling and enhancing their own outreach efforts. A key question is always, ``What works?'' Professional societies can help provide the answers. In this talk, I will explore the critical interface played by professional societies as a bridge to the public, as a resource to members, and as a broker of partnerships. I will also feature numerous examples of creative and compelling ways to engage the public, including physicscentral.org, LaserFest, NISE Net, Comic Con, SOCKs, citizen science, and many more. A more important question is, ``Is it fun?'' I will show that the answer is an unqualified, ``Yes!'' The author gratefully acknowledges Rebecca Thompson, Head of APS Public Outreach, for her contributions to this work.

  10. A Public Policy Advocacy Project to Promote Food Security: Exploring Stakeholders' Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkey, Kayla M; Raine, Kim D; Storey, Kate E; Willows, Noreen D

    2016-09-01

    To achieve food security in Canada, comprehensive approaches are required, which involve action at the public policy level. This qualitative study explored the experiences of 14 stakeholders engaging in a 9-month participatory public policy advocacy project to promote community food security in the province of Alberta through the initiation of a campaign to develop a Universal School Food Strategy. Through this exploration, four main themes were identified; a positive and open space to contribute ideas, diversity and common ground, confidence and capacity, and uncertainty. Findings from this study suggest that the participatory advocacy project provided a positive and open space for stakeholders to contribute ideas, through which the group was able to narrow its focus and establish a goal for advocacy. The project also seems to have contributed to the group's confidence and capacity to engage in advocacy by creating a space for learning and knowledge sharing, though stakeholders expressed uncertainty regarding some aspects of the project. Findings from this study support the use of participatory approaches as a strategy for facilitating engagement in public policy advocacy and provide insight into one group's advocacy experience, which may help to inform community-based researchers and advocates in the development of advocacy initiatives to promote community food security elsewhere.

  11. Preferences for engagement in health technology assessment decision-making: a nominal group technique with members of the public

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wortley, Sally; Tong, Allison; Howard, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    To identify characteristics (factors) about health technology assessment (HTA) decisions that are important to the public in determining whether public engagement should be undertaken and the reasons for these choices...

  12. Facebook Advertising Across an Engagement Spectrum: A Case Example for Public Health Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Jodyn; Thiel, Daniel B; Kardia, Sharon L. R

    2016-01-01

    Background The interpersonal, dialogic features of social networking sites have untapped potential for public health communication. We ran a Facebook advertising campaign to raise statewide awareness of Michigan’s newborn screening and biobanking programs. Objective We ran a Facebook advertising campaign to stimulate public engagement on the complex and sensitive issue of Michigan’s newborn screening and biobank programs. Methods We ran an 11-week, US $15,000 Facebook advertising campaign engaging Michigan Facebook users aged 18-64 years about the state’s newborn screening and population biobank programs, and we used a novel “engagement spectrum” framework to contextualize and evaluate engagement outcomes ranging from observation to multi-way conversation. Results The campaign reached 1.88 million Facebook users, yielding a range of engagement outcomes across ad sets that varied by objective, content, budget, duration, and bid type. Ad sets yielded 9009 page likes (US $4125), 15,958 website clicks (US $5578), and 12,909 complete video views to 100% (US $3750). “Boosted posts” yielded 528 comments and 35,966 page post engagements (US $1500). Overall, the campaign led to 452 shares and 642 comments, including 176 discussing newborn screening and biobanking. Conclusions Facebook advertising campaigns can efficiently reach large populations and achieve a range of engagement outcomes by diversifying ad types, bid types, and content. This campaign provided a population-based approach to communication that also increased transparency on a sensitive and complex topic by creating a forum for multi-way interaction. PMID:27244774

  13. Effectively engaging stakeholders and the public in developing violence prevention messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Jennifer A; Wathen, C Nadine; Kothari, Anita

    2017-05-11

    Preventing family violence requires that stakeholders and the broader public be involved in developing evidence-based violence prevention strategies. However, gaps exist in between what we know (knowledge), what we do (action), and the structures supporting practice (policy). We discuss the broad challenge of mobilizing knowledge-for-action in family violence, with a primary focus on the issue of how stakeholders and the public can be effectively engaged when developing and communicating evidence-based violence prevention messages. We suggest that a comprehensive approach to stakeholder and public engagement in developing violence prevention messages includes: 1) clear and consistent messaging; 2) identifying and using, as appropriate, lessons from campaigns that show evidence of reducing specific types of violence; and 3) evidence-informed approaches for communicating to specific groups. Components of a comprehensive approach must take into account the available research evidence, implementation feasibility, and the context-specific nature of family violence. While strategies exist for engaging stakeholders and the public in messaging about family violence prevention, knowledge mobilization must be informed by evidence, dialogue with stakeholders, and proactive media strategies. This paper will be of interest to public health practitioners or others involved in planning and implementing violence prevention programs because it highlights what is known about the issue, potential solutions, and implementation considerations.

  14. PUBLICATION ACTIVITY AND ITS ROLE IN ASSESSMENT OF PROFESSIONAL ENGAGEMENT OF HEI ACADEMIC STAFF (RUSSIAN PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Ardashkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to analyze and summarize the Russian best practices of using the publication activity as a criterion to assess the professional activity of the academic staff; to identify the role of motivational factors as a method to manage and control the publication activity of the academic staff.Methods. The authors address the methodology of comprehensive research based on the method of document analysis, comparative analysis, and method of secondary use of sociological and psychological data.Results and scientific novelty concludes in presenting Russian and international best practices generalized on using the publication activity to assess the engagement of HEI (Higher Educational Institution academic staff; the most appropriate formats of using the publication activity as a criterion to assess the research component of the academic staff engagement are defined. Degree of reliability of this criterion is shown – its strengths and shortcomings. The conclusion is drawn on need of the essential changes in management of publication activity affecting both professional and motivational spheres of scientific and pedagogical staff. The most acceptable options of measurement of staff work efficiency of this category are formulated.Practical significance. The research outcomes can be the corpus for designing the assessment method for the professional engagement of the academic staff.

  15. 37 CFR 381.4 - Performance of musical compositions by PBS, NPR and other public broadcasting entities engaged in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compositions by PBS, NPR and other public broadcasting entities engaged in the activities set forth in 17 U.S.C... NONCOMMERCIAL EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 381.4 Performance of musical compositions by PBS, NPR and other public broadcasting entities engaged in the activities set forth in 17 U.S.C. 118(c). The following schedule of...

  16. 37 CFR 253.4 - Performance of musical compositions by PBS, NPR and other public broadcasting entities engaged in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compositions by PBS, NPR and other public broadcasting entities engaged in the activities set forth in 17 U.S.C... NONCOMMERCIAL EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTING § 253.4 Performance of musical compositions by PBS, NPR and other public broadcasting entities engaged in the activities set forth in 17 U.S.C. 118(d). The following schedule of...

  17. Role of Public Outreach in the University Science Mission: Publishing K-12 Curriculum, Organizing Tours, and Other Methods of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Much attention has been devoted in recent years to the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education in K-12 curriculum for developing a capable workforce. Equally important is the role of the voting public in understanding STEM-related issues that impact public policy debates such as the potential impacts of climate change, hydraulic fracturing in oil and gas exploration, mining impacts on water quality, and science funding. Since voted officials have a major impact on the future of these policies, it is imperative that the general public have an understanding of the basic science behind these issues. By engaging with the public in a more fundamental way, university students can play an important role in educating the public while at the same time enhancing their communication skills and gaining valuable teaching experience. I will talk about my own experiences in (1) evaluating and publishing water chemistry and hazardous waste cleanup curriculum on the K-12 engineering platform TeachEngineering.org, (2) organizing public tours of water and energy sites (e.g., abandoned mine sites, coal power plants, wastewater treatment plants, hazardous waste treatment facilities), and (3) other outreach and communication activities including public education of environmental issues through consultations with customers of a landscaping/lawn mowing company. The main focus of this presentation will be the role that graduate students can play in engaging and educating their local community and lessons learned from community projects (Dittrich, 2014; 2012; 2011). References: Dittrich, T.M. 2014. Adventures in STEM: Lessons in water chemistry from elementary school to graduate school. Abstract ED13E-07 presented at 2014 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 15-19 Dec. Dittrich, T.M. 2012. Collaboration between environmental water chemistry students and hazardous waste treatment specialists on the University of Colorado-Boulder campus. Abstract ED53C

  18. EVALUATION OF THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT ORGANISATIONAL ABILITY OF PUBLIC ORGANISATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florescu Margareta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the results of a project or a public programme, as well as the quality of project management consist in management process performance.This analysis tool promotes the idea of initiating a new organisational/functional policy – organisational tools regarding project management, a new standard concerning the complexity of the project and the associated risk, as well as a new standard concerning the project management organisational/functional ability. Political decision makers, public organisation managers, but project managers as well are the main people in charge of elaborating and taking responsibility for these standards and policies within the organisations they manage and represent.

  19. On being a (modern) scientist: risks of public engagement in the UK interspecies embryo debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, James; Williams, Clare; Wainwright, Steven; Cribb, Alan

    2012-12-01

    In 2006, a small group of UK academic scientists made headlines when they proposed the creation of interspecies embryos - mixing human and animal genetic material. A public campaign was fought to mobilize support for the research. Drawing on interviews with the key scientists involved, this paper argues that engaging the public through communicating their ideas via the media can result in tensions between the necessity of, and inherent dangers in, scientists campaigning on controversial issues. Some scientists believed that communicating science had damaged their professional standing in the eyes of their peers, who, in turn, policed the boundaries around what they believed constituted a "good" scientist. Tensions between promoting "science" versus promotion of the "scientist;" engaging the public versus publishing peer-reviewed articles and winning grants; and building expectations versus overhyping the science reveal the difficult choices scientists in the modern world have to make over the potential gains and risks of communicating science. We conclude that although scientists' participation in public debates is often encouraged, the rewards of such engagement remain. Moreover, this participation can detrimentally affect scientists' careers.

  20. Public preferences for engagement in Health Technology Assessment decision-making: protocol of a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortley, Sally; Tong, Allison; Lancsar, Emily; Salkeld, Glenn; Howard, Kirsten

    2015-07-14

    Much attention in recent years has been given to the topic of public engagement in health technology assessment (HTA) decision-making. HTA organizations spend substantial resources and time on undertaking public engagement, and numerous studies have examined challenges and barriers to engagement in the decision-making process however uncertainty remains as to optimal methods to incorporate the views of the public in HTA decision-making. Little research has been done to ascertain whether current engagement processes align with public preferences and to what extent their desire for engagement is dependent on the question being asked by decision-makers or the characteristics of the decision. This study will examine public preferences for engagement in Australian HTA decision-making using an exploratory mixed methods design. The aims of this study are to: 1) identify characteristics about HTA decisions that are important to the public in determining whether public engagement should be undertaken on a particular topic, 2) determine which decision characteristics influence public preferences for the extent, or type of public engagement, and 3) describe reasons underpinning these preferences. Focus group participants from the general community, aged 18-70 years, will be purposively sampled from the Australian population to ensure a wide range of demographic groups. Each focus group will include a general discussion on public engagement as well as a ranking exercise using a modified nominal group technique (NGT). The NGT will inform the design of a discrete choice study to quantitatively assess public preferences for engagement in HTA decision-making. The proposed research seeks to investigate under what circumstances and how the public would like their views and preferences to be considered in health technology assessments. HTA organizations regularly make decisions about when and how public engagement should occur but without consideration of the public's preferences on

  1. Sciencetogo.Org: Using Humor to Engage a Public Audience with the Serious Issue of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.; Rabkin, D.; Wilson, R.

    2014-12-01

    A team of educators, scientists, and communication experts from multiple universities as well as a Science museum will report on the impact of ScienceToGo.org, which is an Out of Home Multi-Media (OHMM) exhibit targeting adults riding a major subway system. The campaign's goal is to design, implement, and study the efficacy of an OHMM model for free choice science learning about our changing climate. Subway riders represent a diverse and captive audience with most of them spending an average of one hour a day in the subway system. Through the use of specially designed OHMM such as train placards, platform posters, and virtual resources the campaign engages a potential audience of 500,000 riders/day with opportunities to learn climate change science informally. The primary goal of the ScienceToGo.org campaign is to engage, entertain, and educate the adult subway riding community in major U.S. city about climate change as a real, relevant, and solvable local challenge. A naturalistic quasi-experimental inquiry employing a mixed methodology approach best describes our research design with half of the subway system exposed to the project signage (experimental group) and the other half not being exposed to the project signage (control group). To identify possible outcomes, data was collected in the several forms: survey, analytic data associated with website, social media, web app, focus groups, and observations. This campaign is an example of how an individual's daily routine may be enhanced with an informal science learning opportunity. We see an urgent need to improve both the public's engagement with climate change science and to the profile of climate change science in formal education settings. The campaign makes deliberate use of humor and fun to engage a public and diverse audience with the serious issue of climate change. The research that will be presented will reveal some of the strengths and weaknesses of this strategy when communicating science to a diverse

  2. Community-Engaged Public Health Research to Inform Hospital Campus Planning in a Low Socioeconomic Status Urban Neighborhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittin, Jeri; Elijah-Barnwell, Sheila; Nam, Yunwoo; Araz, Ozgur; Friedow, Bethany; Jameton, Andrew; Drummond, Wayne; Huang, Terry T-K

    2015-01-01

    To compare sociodemographic and motivational factors for healthcare use and identify desirable health-promoting resources among groups in a low socioeconomic status (SES) community in Chicago, IL. Disparities in health services and outcomes are well established in low SES urban neighborhoods in the United States and many factors beyond service availability and quality impact community health. Yet there is no clear process for engaging communities in building resources to improve population-level health in such locales. A hospital building project led to a partnership of public health researchers, architects, and planners who conducted community-engaged research. We collected resident data and compared factors for healthcare use and choice and likelihood of engaging new health-promoting services. Neighborhood areas were strongly associated with ethnic groupings, and there were differences between groups in healthcare choice and service needs, such as, proximity to home was more important to Latinos than African Americans in choice of healthcare facility ( p adj = .001). Latinos expressed higher likelihood to use a fitness facility ( p adj = .001). Despite differences in vehicle ownership, >75% of all respondents indicated that nearby public transportation was important in choosing healthcare. Knowledge of community needs and heterogeneity is essential to decision makers of facility and community development plans. Partnerships between public health, urban planning, architecture, and local constituents should be cultivated toward focus on reducing health disparities. Further work to integrate community perspectives through the planning and design process and to evaluate the long-term impact of such efforts is needed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. How to Achieve Transparency in Public-Private Partnerships Engaged in Hunger and Malnutrition Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggersdorfer, Manfred; Bird, Julia K

    2016-01-01

    Multi-stakeholder partnerships are important facilitators of improving nutrition in developing countries to achieve the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals. Often, the role of industry is challenged and questions are raised as to the ethics of involving for-profit companies in humanitarian projects. The Second International Conference on Nutrition placed great emphasis on the role of the private sector, including industry, in multi-stakeholder partnerships to reduce hunger and malnutrition. Governments have to establish regulatory frameworks and institutions to guarantee fair competition and invest in infrastructure that makes investments for private companies attractive, eventually leading to economic growth. Civil society organizations can contribute by delivering nutrition interventions and behavioral change-related communication to consumers, providing capacity, and holding governments and private sector organizations accountable. Industry provides technical support, innovation, and access to markets and the supply chain. The greatest progress and impact can be achieved if all stakeholders cooperate in multi-stakeholder partnerships aimed at improving nutrition, thereby strengthening local economies and reducing poverty and inequality. Successful examples of public-private partnerships exist, as well as examples in which these partnerships did not achieve mutually agreed objectives. The key requirements for productive alliances between industry and civil society organizations are the establishment of rules of engagement, transparency and mutual accountability. The Global Social Observatory performed a consultation on conflicts of interest related to the Scaling Up Nutrition movement and provided recommendations to prevent, identify, manage and monitor potential conflicts of interest. Multi-stakeholder partnerships can be successful models in improving nutrition if they meet societal demand with transparent decision-making and execution. Solutions to

  4. Publics in the making: mediating different methods of engagement and the publics these construct : commentary on: "Technologies of democracy: experiments and demonstrations".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Alison

    2011-12-01

    The potential for public engagement to democratise science has come under increasing scrutiny amid concerns that conflicting motivations have led to confusion about what engagement means to those who mediate science and publics. This raises important yet relatively unexplored questions regarding how publics are constituted by different forms of engagement used by intermediary scholars and other actors. It is possible to identify at least two possible 'rationalities of mediation' that mobilise different versions of the public and the roles they are assumed to play, as 'citizens' or 'users', in discussions around technology. However, combinations of rationalities are found in practice and these have significant implications for the 'new' scientific democracy.

  5. Kerala Public Library Network: A Project Report

    OpenAIRE

    Jayakrishnan, J S

    2013-01-01

    Public library systems in India are not so effective due to lack of efficient resource sharing and networking to achieve optimum utility of resources as well as to provide need based services. The present library system can be improved by application of ICT and enabling participation. A Kerala Public Library Network (KPLNET), and use of an integrated library automation package in all public libraries can achieve this. The web portal of the Public Library Network maintained by Kerala State Lib...

  6. Public health program planning logic model for community engaged type 2 diabetes management and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Joseph F

    2014-02-01

    Diabetes remains a growing epidemic with widening health inequity gaps in disease management, self-management knowledge, access to care and outcomes. Yet there is a paucity of evaluation tools for community engaged interventions aimed at closing the gaps and improving health. The Guide to Community Preventive Services (the Community Guide) developed by the Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends two healthcare system level interventions, case management interventions and disease management programs, to improve glycemic control. However, as a public health resource guide for diabetes interventions a model for community engagement is a glaringly absent component of the Community Guide recommendations. In large part there are few evidence-based interventions featuring community engagement as a practice and system-level focus of chronic disease and Type 2 diabetes management. The central argument presented in this paper is that the absence of these types of interventions is due to the lack of tools for modeling and evaluating such interventions, especially among disparate and poor populations. A conceptual model emphasizing action-oriented micro-level community engagement is needed to complement the Community Guide and serve as the basis for testing and evaluation of these kinds of interventions. A unique logic model advancing the Community Guide diabetes recommendations toward measureable and sustainable community engagement for improved Type 2 diabetes outcomes is presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. IPY: Engaging Antarctica: Bringing Antarctic Geoscience to the Public Through a NOVA Documentary and an Innovative Flexible Exhibit for Informal Science Education Venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, F.; Diamond, J.; Levy, R.; Berg, M.; Dahlman, L.; Jackson, J.

    2006-12-01

    IPY: Engaging Antarctica is an informal science education project designed to increase the general public's understanding of scientific research conducted in Antarctica. The project focuses specifically on the multi- national, NSF-funded Antarctic Drilling Project (ANDRILL). The ANDRILL project is the newest geological drilling program in an ongoing effort to recover stratigraphic records from Antarctica. ANDRILL's primary objectives are to investigate Antarctica's role in global environmental change over the past 65 million years and to better understand its future response to global changes. Additionally, through ANDRILL's Research Immersion for Science Educators program (ARISE), 12 science educators from four countries will work on science research teams in Antarctica and produce educational materials that feature Antarctic geoscience. The Engaging Antarctica project will produce both a NOVA television documentary and an innovative informal learning exhibit. The documentary, Antarctica's Icy Secrets, will provide a geological perspective on how Antarctica continues to play a major role in affecting global climate by altering ocean currents and sea levels. The learning exhibit, one that blends standards- and inquiry-based learning with the latest information technologies, is coined the Flexhibit. The Engaging Antarctica Flexhibit will provide a digital package of high resolution images for banners as well as learning activities and ideas for exhibit stations that can be implemented by youth groups. Flexhibit images will feature ANDRILL scientists at work, and audio files, available as podcasts, will tell scientists' stories in their own words, speaking directly to the public about the joys and challenges of Antarctic geological research.

  8. Participatory and social media to engage youth: from the Obama campaign to public health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jordi; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Springgate, Benjamin F

    2011-01-01

    Barack Obama's successful campaign for the presidency has been widely attributed to the use of social networking sites, mobile devices, and interactive websites to engage previously hard-to-reach populations in political activity. Campaign communication strategies may be applicable for youth health promotion efforts, particularly for the highly stigmatized issue of mental health. In this article, we examine elements of the 2008 Obama presidential campaign's use of social media technologies and content designed to foster effective political participation among youth. We outline how the same social media technologies may be applied to public health efforts focused on reaching and providing services to the 20% of young people who have a diagnosable mental disorder. We discuss the strengths and limitations of the application of these media to date, and raise questions about the future use of these media for engaging hard-to-reach populations in addressing stigmatized public health issues.

  9. Strengthening rural Latinos' civic engagement for health: The Voceros de Salud project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cevallos, Daniel; Dierwechter, Tatiana; Volkmann, Kelly; Patton-López, Megan

    2013-11-01

    This article describes the Latino Health Ambassadors Network (Voceros de Salud ) project created to support and mobilize Latino community leaders to address health inequalities in a rural Oregon county. Voceros de Salud is discussed as a model that other rural communities may implement towards strengthening Latino civic engagement for health.

  10. Engaging the Public in Policy Research: Are Community Researchers the Answer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Richardson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A case has been made for engaging the public in scientific research as co-producers of knowledge. These arguments challenge elite models of policy research and suggest the need for an ambitious expansion of more inclusive scientific public policy research. Enabling the public to be meaningfully involved in complex policy research remains a challenge. This paper explores a range of attempts to involving the public in public policy research. It uses a binary framing to typify some key debates and differences in approaches between community-based participatory research, and citizen science. Approaches to community-based participatory research in the social sciences offer a set of engagement principles which are an alternative to an elite model of policy research. Citizen science offers a focus on the use of scientific methods by lay people, but this approach is currently under-utilized in public policy research and could be expanded. How could the strengths of each be more fully integrated and harnessed? A case study of community policy research is presented, in which an attempt was made to use a more fully integrated approach in a local policy context, identifying the potential and challenges. Based on a framework of three features of democratic and scientific policy research, it argues that more public participation in public policy research would be helped by more attention to the strengths of the democratic potential emphasised by participatory community-based research, alongside the potential of scientific robustness em-phasised by citizen science. One conclusion drawn is that a professional and scientific orientation to public policy re-search can be retained without necessarily being professionally dominated. Research methods and skills are tools to which more people outside the profession could have access, if academics facilitate the process of democratization of policy research.

  11. Solar Access to Public Capital (SAPC) Mock Securitization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lowder, Travis [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Rottman, Mary [Rottman-Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States); Borod, Ronald [DLA Piper, London (United Kingdom); Gabig, Nathan [KPMG, Knoxville, TN (United States); Henne, Stephen [KPMG, Knoxville, TN (United States); Caplin, Conrad [KPMG, Knoxville, TN (United States); Notte, Quentin [Mercatus, Arlington, VA (United States)

    2015-12-21

    In late 2012, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) initiated the Solar Access to Public Capital (SAPC) working group. Backed by a three-year funding facility from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL set out to organize the solar, legal, banking, capital markets, engineering, and other relevant stakeholder communities in order to open lower-cost debt investment for solar asset deployment. SAPC engaged its members to standardize contracts, develop best practices, and comprehend how the rating agencies perceive solar project portfolios as an investment asset class. Rating agencies opine on the future creditworthiness of debt obligations. Issuers often seek investment-grade ratings from the rating agencies in order to satisfy the desires of their investors. Therefore, for the solar industry to access larger pools of capital at a favorable cost, it is critical to increase market participants' understanding of solar risk parameters. The process provided valuable information to address rating agency perceptions of risk that, without such information, could require costly credit enhancement or higher yields to attract institutional investors. Two different securities were developed--one for a hypothetical residential solar portfolio and one for a hypothetical commercial solar portfolio. Five rating agencies (Standard and Poor's, Moody's, KBRA, Fitch, and DBRS) participated and provided extensive feedback, some through conversations that extended several months. The findings represented in this report are a composite summary of that feedback and do not indicate any specific feedback from any single rating agency.

  12. Evaluation of public engagement activities to promote science in a zoo environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Whitehouse

    Full Text Available Scientists are increasing their efforts to promote public engagement with their science, but the efficacy of the methods used is often not scientifically evaluated. Here, we designed, installed and evaluated the educational impact of interactive games on touchscreens at two primate research centres based in zoo environments. The games were designed to promote interest in and understanding of primates and comparative psychology, as a scaffold towards interest in science more generally and with the intention of targeting younger individuals (under 16's. We used systematic observational techniques and questionnaires to assess the impact of the games on zoo visitors. The games facilitated increased interest in psychology and science in zoo visitors, and changed the knowledge of visitors, through demonstration of learning about specific scientific findings nested within the games. The impact of such devices was greatest on younger individuals (under 16's as they were significantly more likely to engage with the games. On the whole, therefore, this study demonstrates that interactive devices can be successful educational tools, and adds to the growing body of evidence that conducting research on public view in zoos can have a tangible impact on public engagement with science.

  13. Evaluation of public engagement activities to promote science in a zoo environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, Jamie; Waller, Bridget M; Chanvin, Mathilde; Wallace, Emma K; Schel, Anne M; Peirce, Kate; Mitchell, Heidi; Macri, Alaina; Slocombe, Katie

    2014-01-01

    Scientists are increasing their efforts to promote public engagement with their science, but the efficacy of the methods used is often not scientifically evaluated. Here, we designed, installed and evaluated the educational impact of interactive games on touchscreens at two primate research centres based in zoo environments. The games were designed to promote interest in and understanding of primates and comparative psychology, as a scaffold towards interest in science more generally and with the intention of targeting younger individuals (under 16's). We used systematic observational techniques and questionnaires to assess the impact of the games on zoo visitors. The games facilitated increased interest in psychology and science in zoo visitors, and changed the knowledge of visitors, through demonstration of learning about specific scientific findings nested within the games. The impact of such devices was greatest on younger individuals (under 16's) as they were significantly more likely to engage with the games. On the whole, therefore, this study demonstrates that interactive devices can be successful educational tools, and adds to the growing body of evidence that conducting research on public view in zoos can have a tangible impact on public engagement with science.

  14. Improving Public Engagement With Climate Change: Five "Best Practice" Insights From Psychological Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Sander; Maibach, Edward; Leiserowitz, Anthony

    2015-11-01

    Despite being one of the most important societal challenges of the 21st century, public engagement with climate change currently remains low in the United States. Mounting evidence from across the behavioral sciences has found that most people regard climate change as a nonurgent and psychologically distant risk-spatially, temporally, and socially-which has led to deferred public decision making about mitigation and adaptation responses. In this article, we advance five simple but important "best practice" insights from psychological science that can help governments improve public policymaking about climate change. Particularly, instead of a future, distant, global, nonpersonal, and analytical risk that is often framed as an overt loss for society, we argue that policymakers should (a) emphasize climate change as a present, local, and personal risk; (b) facilitate more affective and experiential engagement; (c) leverage relevant social group norms; (d) frame policy solutions in terms of what can be gained from immediate action; and (e) appeal to intrinsically valued long-term environmental goals and outcomes. With practical examples we illustrate how these key psychological principles can be applied to support societal engagement and climate change policymaking.

  15. Unbalanced progress: The hard road from science popularisation to public engagement with science in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hepeng; Liu, Li

    2014-01-01

    This article critically traces the development of science communication in China in the past 30 years. While confirming the tremendous progress Chinese science communicators have achieved in popularising science, it argues that the deficit model-based popularisation effort cannot meet the diversifying demands on science in Chinese society. Citing both recent science and technology controversies and active public participation in science pilot initiatives in China, this article concludes that science communication efforts in the country must be focused on constructive dialogues and public engagement with science.

  16. Improving Sustainability Performance for Public-Private-Partnership (PPP Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyin Shen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Improving sustainability performance in developing infrastructure projects is an important strategy for pursuing the mission of sustainable development. In recent years, the business model of public-private-partnership (PPP is promoted as an effective approach in developing infrastructure projects. It is considered that the distribution of the contribution on project investment between private and public sectors is one of the key variables affecting sustainability performance of PPP-type projects. This paper examines the impacts of the contribution distribution between public and private sectors on project sustainability performance. A model named the sustainability performance-based evaluation model (SPbEM is developed for assisting the assessment of the level of sustainability performance of PPP projects. The study examines the possibility of achieving better sustainability through proper arrangement of the investment distribution between the two primary sectors in developing PPP-type infrastructure projects.

  17. The Space Apps Challenge: Using Open Innovation Competitions to Engage The Public in the Scientific Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Space Apps Challenge encourages innovation, creativity and collaborative problem solving by gathering coders, builders, artists, designers, and storytellers in a 48-hour hackathon. Open Innovation competitions such as the Space Apps Challenge bring the scientific world to members of the public, regardless of age, experience, credentials, or expertise. In the past five years, this model of public engagement has been widely employed by government, nonprofit and academic institutions, allowing the building of partnerships between the scientific community and the individuals and communities they serve. Furthermore, advances in technology and challenge models have lowered the barriers and costs to scientific collaboration with and for the public. NASA's Space Apps Challenge, structured as a competition seeking solutions from the public to posed problems, brings together teams and forges collaborations between individuals and groups who would otherwise have never worked together for a short but high intensity problem solving session, Space Apps has has created a pathway to public engagement and innovation that is often faster, cheaper, and more impactful than traditional approaches.

  18. Project Bibliographies: Tracking the Expansion of Knowledge Using JPL Project Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppin, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Library defines a project bibliography as a bibliography of publicly available publications relating to a specific JPL instrument or mission. These bibliographies may be used to share information between distant project team members, as part of the required Education and Public Outreach effort, or as part of…

  19. Evaluation of Public Sector Contributions to Public-Private Partnership Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Mackie, Peter; Nellthorp, John; Laird, James

    2005-01-01

    The Bank requires that any public sector contribution to a collaborative effort between the public sector and private enterprises in the transport sector be analyzed and justified in economic terms. This Note will set out the basis for making such an analysis. The general principles underlying this analysis are that: 1) public contributions to public-private partnership (PPP) projects sho...

  20. A Framework for Project Governance in Major Public IT projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Eva; Harboe, Peter Georg

    2016-01-01

    integration and complexity. Empirical research has identified a number of characteristics for these project governance elements. In the second part of the paper the framework was tested in a case study of the Danish smart card Rejsekort project. The framework was found to be robust, and that in this case...... important questions relating to stakeholders and dynamic complexity needed greater attention for the project to be successful....

  1. myScience—Engaging the public in U.S. Geological Survey science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Sally

    2015-10-19

    myScience (http://txpub.usgs.gov/myscience/) is a Web application developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center through a partnership with the USGS Community for Data Integration to address the need for increasing public awareness and participation in existing USGS citizen science projects. The myScience application contains data for 20 projects available for public participation representing all USGS mission areas. A visitor to the USGS education Web site (http://education.usgs.gov/) can click on the Citizen Science link to search for citizen science projects by topic or location, select a project of interest, and click “Get Involved.” Within the USGS, an internal version of myScience serves to build a community of practice and knowledge sharing among scientists who lead or would like to lead a crowdsourcing project.

  2. Public engagement in health technology assessment and coverage decisions: a study of experiences in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreis, Julia; Schmidt, Harald

    2013-02-01

    In the United States and internationally, the trend for public engagement in health policy and practice is increasing, particularly regarding health technology assessment (HTA), which informs often controversial coverage decisions. However, there is no consensus about which members of the public should be involved in which processes or what the respective rationales and benefits of public engagement are. This article explores operational processes and underlying rationales of public engagement at HTA agencies in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. The analysis is based on website information, legal framework documents, published and gray literature, and semistructured, in-depth interviews with top officials at these agencies. Engagement processes differ across agencies, particularly regarding the areas in which the public is involved, which groups of the public are involved, what weight they have in influencing decisions, how they are recruited and supported, and how potential conflicts of interests are addressed. Different emphases on rationales and drivers behind public engagement partly reflect the respective political environments. Interviewees indicated a range of benefits of engagement and factors influencing success or failure. The results highlight the need to be clear about the purpose and conduct of engagement in order to maximize the benefits of this increasingly widespread policy tool.

  3. Google Under-the-Earth: Seeing Beneath Stonehenge using Google Earth - a Tool for Public Engagement and the Dissemination of Archaeological Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Welham

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the use of Google Earth as a tool to facilitate public engagement and dissemination of data. It examines a case study based around one of the largest archaeological investigations of the Stonehenge landscape, the Stonehenge Riverside Project. A bespoke layer for Google Earth was developed to communicate the discoveries of the research by creating an engaging, interactive and informative multimedia application that could be viewed by users across the world. The article describes the creation of the layer: Google Under-the-Earth: Seeing Beneath Stonehenge, and the public uptake and response to this. The project was supported by a Google Research Award, and working alongside Google enabled a 'free to download' platform for users to view the data within in the form of Google Earth, as well as the integration of a variety of applications including: Google SketchUp, YouTube, and Flickr. In addition, the integration of specialist software, such as Esri ArcGIS, was fundamental to the integration of the spatial data gathered by the project. Methodologies used to create the application are documented here, including how different outputs were integrated such as geophysical survey, 3D reconstructions and landscape tours. The future possibilities for utilising Google Earth for public engagement and understanding in the discipline are examined.

  4. Mechanisms of Change in Public Management Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Tiina Soininen

    2013-01-01

    This article draws conclusions from four separate case evaluations from different development programs in Finland and aims to discuss the role of welfare state values in new public management. The study develops a comprehensive picture of the change in public management since 2000. The synthesis of the four case studies follows the critical realism tradition. This article shows that cooperation forms the key mechanism ...

  5. The UCLan Engagement and Service User Support (Comensus) project: Valuing authenticity making space for emergence.

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Objective  To develop and evaluate service user, carer and community involvement in health and social care education.\\ud \\ud Background  Despite the high policy profile of involvement issues, there appear to be no published accounts of schemes that have used a systematic whole-faculty approach to community engagement in health and social care higher education.\\ud \\ud Focus of this paper  The set up and early development of a faculty-wide community engagement project.\\ud \\ud Setting and partic...

  6. The Moral of the Tale: Stories, Trust, and Public Engagement with Clinical Ethics via Radio and Theatre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Deborah

    2017-03-01

    Trust is frequently discussed with reference to the professional-patient relationship. However, trust is less explored in relation to the ways in which understanding of, and responses to, questions of ethics are discussed by both the "public" and "experts." Public engagement activity in healthcare ethics may invoke "trust" in analysing a moral question or problem but less frequently conceives of trust as integral to "public engagement" itself. This paper explores the relationship between trust and the ways in which questions of healthcare ethics are identified and negotiated by both "experts" and the public. Drawing on two examples from the author's "public engagement" work-a radio programme for the British Broadcasting Corporation and work with a playwright and theatre-the paper interrogates the ways in which "public engagement" is often characterized. The author argues that the common approach to public engagement in questions of ethics is unhelpfully constrained by a systemic disposition which continues to privilege the professional or expert voice at the expense of meaningful exchange and dialogue. By creating space for novel interactions between the "expert" and the "public," authentic engagement is achieved that enables not only the participants to flourish but also contributes to trust itself.

  7. The Future is Now: Reducing Psychological Distance to Increase Public Engagement with Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Charlotte; Hine, Donald W; Marks, Anthony D G

    2017-02-01

    Many people perceive climate change as psychologically distant-a set of uncertain events that might occur far in the future, impacting distant places and affecting people dissimilar to themselves. In this study, we employed construal level theory to investigate whether a climate change communication intervention could increase public engagement by reducing the psychological distance of climate change. Australian residents (N = 333) were randomly assigned to one of two treatment conditions: one framed to increase psychological distance to climate change (distal frame), and the other framed to reduce psychological distance (proximal frame). Participants then completed measures of psychological distance of climate change impacts, climate change concern, and intentions to engage in mitigation behavior. Principal components analysis indicated that psychological distance to climate change was best conceptualized as a multidimensional construct consisting of four components: geographic, temporal, social, and uncertainty. Path analysis revealed the effect of the treatment frame on climate change concern and intentions was fully mediated by psychological distance dimensions related to uncertainty and social distance. Our results suggest that climate communications framed to reduce psychological distance represent a promising strategy for increasing public engagement with climate change.

  8. Science Museum Resources and Partnerships for Public and K-12 Outreach and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Larry

    2011-03-01

    Science museums engage in a wide range of activities not apparent to exhibit hall visitors. Many of them can support research outreach to public and K-12 teachers and students. In addition to exhibits in science centers, and demonstrations on topics like electricity or cryogenics, science museums offer courses for children and adults, out-of-school programs for students, teacher professional development; some do K-12 curriculum development and some run science magnet schools. In recent years science museums have increased their capacity to communicate with the public about current research. The Museum of Science, for instance, created a Current Science and Technology Center in 2001 dedicated to science in the news and current research developments. Through this Center, the Museum partnered with Harvard University to provide a wide range of public engagement activities as part of Harvard's Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center focused on the Science of Nanoscale Systems and their Device Applications. In the past five years a number of new collaborations among science museums have developed, many in partnership with researchers and research centers. Perhaps the largest or these, the Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network (NISE Net) was launched in 2005 with funding from the National Science Foundation. The NISE Net links informal science education organizations together and to university research centers to raise the capacity of all the participant organizations to increase public awareness, understanding, and engagement with nanoscale science, engineering, and technology. Nearly 300 informal educational organizations in every state nationwide make use of NISE Net's educational materials, professional development, national and regional meetings, and online resources. NISE Net is an open source network with all of its materials freely available to everyone.

  9. Civic Engagement as Risk Management and Public Relations: What the Pharmaceutical Industry Can Teach Us about Service-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. Blake

    2009-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry's corporate responsibility reports illustrate how the liberal rhetoric of civic engagement can be reappropriated to serve the market-driven aims of risk management and public relations. Tracing the ideologic linkage of corporate responsibility and service-learning versions of civic engagement, and contextualizing…

  10. Civic Engagement as Risk Management and Public Relations: What the Pharmaceutical Industry Can Teach Us about Service-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J. Blake

    2009-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry's corporate responsibility reports illustrate how the liberal rhetoric of civic engagement can be reappropriated to serve the market-driven aims of risk management and public relations. Tracing the ideologic linkage of corporate responsibility and service-learning versions of civic engagement, and contextualizing…

  11. What do we do with all this video? Better understanding public engagement for image and video annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, C.; Miller, A.; Zykov, V.

    2016-12-01

    Advanced robotic vehicles are increasingly being used by oceanographic research vessels to enable more efficient and widespread exploration of the ocean, particularly the deep ocean. With cutting-edge capabilities mounted onto robotic vehicles, data at high resolutions is being generated more than ever before, enabling enhanced data collection and the potential for broader participation. For example, high resolution camera technology not only improves visualization of the ocean environment, but also expands the capacity to engage participants remotely through increased use of telepresence and virtual reality techniques. Schmidt Ocean Institute is a private, non-profit operating foundation established to advance the understanding of the world's oceans through technological advancement, intelligent observation and analysis, and open sharing of information. Telepresence-enabled research is an important component of Schmidt Ocean Institute's science research cruises, which this presentation will highlight. Schmidt Ocean Institute is one of the only research programs that make their entire underwater vehicle dive series available online, creating a collection of video that enables anyone to follow deep sea research in real time. We encourage students, educators and the general public to take advantage of freely available dive videos. Additionally, other SOI-supported internet platforms, have engaged the public in image and video annotation activities. Examples of these new online platforms, which utilize citizen scientists to annotate scientific image and video data will be provided. This presentation will include an introduction to SOI-supported video and image tagging citizen science projects, real-time robot tracking, live ship-to-shore communications, and an array of outreach activities that enable scientists to interact with the public and explore the ocean in fascinating detail.

  12. Public participation in commercial environments : Critical reflections on community engagement methods used in the Australian plantation forestry industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dare, Melanie (Lain); Vanclay, Frank; Schirmer, Jacki

    2012-01-01

    Social concerns surrounding commercial plantation forest management practices in Australia have resulted in calls for more participatory forms of forest management decision-making. Public participation (or community engagement, CE) processes provide opportunities for affected and interested communit

  13. Cost Underestimation in Public Works Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent; Holm, Mette K. Skamris; Buhl, Søren L.

    This article presents results from the first statistically significant study of cost escalation in transportation infrastructure projects. Based on a sample of 258 transportation infrastructure projects worth $90 billion (U.S.), it is found with overwhelming statistical significance that the cost...... estimates used to decide whether important infrastructure should be built are highly and systematically misleading. The result is continuous cost escalation of billions of dollars. The sample used in the study is the largest of its kind, allowing for the first time statistically valid conclusions regarding...... honest numbers should not trust the cost estimates and cost-benefit analyses produced by project promoters and their analysts. Independent estimates and analyses are needed as are institutional checks and balances to curb deception....

  14. Underestimating Costs in Public Works Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent; Holm, Mette K. Skamris; Buhl, Søren L.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents results from the first statistically significant study of cost escalation in transportation infrastructure projects. Based on a sample of 258 transportation infrastructure projects worth $90 billion (U.S.), it is found with overwhelming statistical significance that the cost...... estimates used to decide whether important infrastructure should be built are highly and systematically misleading. The result is continuous cost escalation of billions of dollars. The sample used in the study is the largest of its kind, allowing for the first time statistically valid conclusions regarding...... honest numbers should not trust the cost estimates and cost-benefit analyses produced by project promoters and their analysts. Independent estimates and analyses are needed as are institutional checks and balances to curb deception....

  15. Cost Underestimation in Public Works Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent; Holm, Mette K. Skamris; Buhl, Søren L.

    This article presents results from the first statistically significant study of cost escalation in transportation infrastructure projects. Based on a sample of 258 transportation infrastructure projects worth $90 billion (U.S.), it is found with overwhelming statistical significance that the cost...... estimates used to decide whether important infrastructure should be built are highly and systematically misleading. The result is continuous cost escalation of billions of dollars. The sample used in the study is the largest of its kind, allowing for the first time statistically valid conclusions regarding...... questions of cost underestimation and escalation for different project types, different geographical regions, and different historical periods. Four kinds of explanation of cost underestimation are examined: technical, economic, psychological, and political. Underestimation cannot be explained by error...

  16. Underestimating Costs in Public Works Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Bent; Holm, Mette K. Skamris; Buhl, Søren L.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents results from the first statistically significant study of cost escalation in transportation infrastructure projects. Based on a sample of 258 transportation infrastructure projects worth $90 billion (U.S.), it is found with overwhelming statistical significance that the cost...... estimates used to decide whether important infrastructure should be built are highly and systematically misleading. The result is continuous cost escalation of billions of dollars. The sample used in the study is the largest of its kind, allowing for the first time statistically valid conclusions regarding...... questions of cost underestimation and escalation for different project types, different geographical regions, and different historical periods. Four kinds of explanation of cost underestimation are examined: technical, economic, psychological, and political. Underestimation cannot be explained by error...

  17. The anonymity paradox in patient engagement: reputation, risk and web-based public feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Ewen; Davison, Charlie; Gunnell, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    The UK National Health Service (NHS) has long espoused patient and public engagement. Recent years have seen increasing use of internet-based methods of collecting feedback about patient experience and public and staff views about NHS services and priorities. Often hailed as a means of facilitating participative democratic patient engagement, these processes raise a number of complex issues. A key aspect of it is the opportunity for comment to be made anonymously. Our research reveals an anonymity paradox whereby patients clearly demonstrate a perception that anonymity is a prerequisite for effective use of these feedback processes, whereas professionals demonstrate a perception that patient anonymity is a barrier to effective use. The risks of anonymity are constructed very differently by patients and professionals. Patient concerns around anonymity were not motivated by a general concern about a loss of privacy, but more that a positive identification might compromise future care. For professionals, concerns were voiced more around risks of reputational damage for specific practitioners or practices (in that anyone could say anything) and also that this anonymous feedback was available publicly and that it might go against the medical opinion of the professional. These concerns pointed to important differences in perceptions of patient and professional vulnerability. In the qualitative analysis that follows the key finding was that while anonymity makes service users feel less vulnerable, it can have the opposite effect on managers and clinical staff. This raises important implications for the use and utility of internet-based methods of collecting patient feedback.

  18. Active Earth Display: Using Real-Time Data, Interactivity, and Storylines to Engage the Public in Polar Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, C. R.; Carroll, K. P.; Wilson, T. J.

    2008-12-01

    The Polar Earth Observation Network (POLENET) and UNAVCO are collaborating to develop new educational materials for the public focused on polar-based research. Polenet is a consortium that aims to dramatically improve the coverage of many different kinds of geophysical data sets across the polar regions of Earth. The data from Polenet will enable new research into the interaction between the atmosphere, oceans, polar ice-sheets, and the Earth's crust and mantle. It is important that this research is disseminated to the public in an engaging and accurate matter while avoiding oversimplification. The Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology's (IRIS) Active Earth Display (AED), a touch screen web-based kiosk, was originally designed to highlight real-time seismic data, and therefore provides a useful format for showing real-time data from the poles. The new polar pages for the AED will highlight real-time data from Antarctica and Greenland, and provide a way for the public to learn about POLENET research. The polar AED pages aim to engage users through teaching about the importance of polar-based research using a rich interactive multimedia environment. The pages are organized around four storylines: equipment, ice movement through time, life on the ice, and what ice in Antarctica has to do with you. The pages present complex scientific concepts in a way that is accessible and engaging to the general public by using simplified text, real-time data, videos, interactive games, and a set of coherent storylines. For example, one interactive feature will be an energy game, where users adjust various sources to power a GPS unit through the polar night. Another interactive feature will be a map of Polar Regions with clickable hotspots that will show videos of calving glaciers and collapsing ice sheets from around the world. The AED maintains a constant Internet connection, so the storylines are flexible and can be changed to conform to the location of the kiosk and

  19. Social Studies Education and Public Art: The Detroit Billboard Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Anne TAYLOR

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this action-research project was to evaluate the impact of high school students’ involvement in community-oriented, art-based work in the social studies. In Detroit, high school students engaged in persuasive writing and design while exploring community issues. The project culminated in the installation of student artwork on a billboard in the city’s cultural center. Mixed methods were employed to evaluate the project; forty-seven students completed surveys at its conclusion. The findings suggest that creative projects with real-world applications are motivational, and they promote civic education. The majority of the students reported that their awareness of community issues had increased. This study has implications for the implementation of projects for democratic education and service learning, arts integration in the social studies, and the use of authentic assessments in contextual, culturally responsive teaching

  20. The Blue Button Project: Engaging Patients in Healthcare by a Click of a Button.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, Mona Omar; Aziz, Hassan A

    2015-01-01

    The Blue Button project has become a way for many Americans to download their health records by just a click in any way that suits them, such as in print, on a thumb drive, or on their mobile devices and smartphones. Several organizations have developed and applied Blue Buttons on their websites to allow beneficiaries to securely access and view personal medical information and claims. The purpose of this literature review is to highlight the significance of the Blue Button project in the field of health information management. Findings suggest that the project could empower and engage consumers and patients in a healthcare system by allowing access to medical records, thereby promoting better management and overall improvement of their healthcare. To date, the project has gained wide support from insurers, technology companies, and health providers despite the challenges of standardization and interoperability.

  1. Proposing methodology pattern for measuring public value of IT projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinko Kancijan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of the acceptability and the value of IT projects in the public sector, especially when the projects feature the qualitative value along with the monetary one, is a complex problem. There are certain methodologies in the world though that help various organizations in decision-making process when projects are being chosen. The paper surveys the three IT projects public value assessing methodologies: the American Value Measuring Methodology, the French MAREVA, and the German WiBe. A comparison of the approaches to solving the problem of assessing public value of IT projects was thus made. The Analytic Hierarchy Process – a method of a multicriteria analysis of alternatives-was briefly presented. By the use of the Hierarchy Criteria Model in the way that respects all the basic characteristics that a methodology of the kind should feature in accordance with Gartner, a proposition of an IT project public value measurement methodology pattern was presented. The selection of projects with little value contribution if compared to the existing situation, the assessment of the acceptability of risk through the hierarchy structure of the value of a project and the aggregation of the value of separate PVIT dimensions is a contribution related to the methodology patterns that were surveyed.

  2. Nuestra Tierra: A University/Public School Technology Integration Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiburg, Karin M.; Montoya, Nidelia; Sandin, John

    1999-01-01

    Describes a university/public school project to integrate technology with teaching and learning in a Southwest border school district. Discusses how the project was collaboratively designed, implemented, and evaluated by university faculty and school teachers and administrators. Findings demonstrated the potential of university researchers working…

  3. Geothermal environmental projects publication list with abstracts 1975-1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricker, Y.E.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1979-05-15

    This report contains 119 abstracts of publication resulting from or closely related to geothermal environmental projects conducted by the Environmental Sciences Division at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Publications are listed chronologically from 1975 through 1978. The main entries are numbered sequentially, and include the full citation, an abstract, and selected keywords. This section is followed by an author index, and a keyword index.

  4. Geothermal environmental projects publication list with abstracts 1975-1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricker, Y.E.; Anspaugh, L.R.

    1979-05-15

    This report contains 119 abstracts of publication resulting from or closely related to geothermal environmental projects conducted by the Environmental Sciences Division at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Publications are listed chronologically from 1975 through 1978. The main entries are numbered sequentially, and include the full citation, an abstract, and selected keywords. This section is followed by an author index, and a keyword index.

  5. IGY@50: A Revolution in Opportunities for Public Engagement and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.; Rabello-Soares, C.

    2006-05-01

    The International Geophysical Year of 1957-1958 revolutionized Earth and Space science. But the "official" IGY films, sponsored by the National Academies, debuted almost two years after field research was completed. For 2007-2009, communications revolutions such as the Internet and satellite voice and video enable contemporaneous public engagement via media, at science centers, and at home, and opportunities at all levels of formal education impossible in 1957. Real-time communication to both Poles, video podcasts from explorers of ice sheets and near-Earth space, and inquiry-based educational modules for schools and community centers, provide practical but inspirational ways to engage, inform and inspire millions across Earth in new ways, supporting the outreach goals of all four International Science Years. Examples of live video connections to NSF's Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, and to an Alaskan sounding rocket range, together with evaluation data on a rock-concert inspired "tour" of science centers, schools and community venues by NASA researchers and engineers, provide possible models for the upcoming ISY's. A calendar of polar field campaigns, NASA launches and events (such as arrival of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter at the Moon in Fall 2008, and the landing of Mars Phoenix in Spring 2008), and earth and space science related anniversaries - such as the launch of Explorer 1 on January 31, 1958 - offer a framework for integrating outreach, engagement and education strategies common to all four Science Years.

  6. Evidence of public engagement with science: visitor learning at a zoo-housed primate research centre.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget M Waller

    Full Text Available Primate behavioural and cognitive research is increasingly conducted on direct public view in zoo settings. The potential of such facilities for public engagement with science is often heralded, but evidence of tangible, positive effects on public understanding is rare. Here, the effect of a new zoo-based primate research centre on visitor behaviour, learning and attitudes was assessed using a quasi-experimental design. Zoo visitors approached the primate research centre more often when a scientist was present and working with the primates, and reported greater awareness of primates (including conservation compared to when the scientist was not present. Visitors also reported greater perceived learning when the scientist was present. Installation of information signage had no main effect on visitor attitudes or learning. Visitors who interacted with the signage, however, demonstrated increased knowledge and understanding when asked about the specific information present on the signs (which was related to the ongoing facial expression research at the research centre. The findings show that primate behaviour research centres on public view can have a demonstrable and beneficial effect on public understanding of science.

  7. Understanding attitudes towards the use of animals in research using an online public engagement tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppli, Catherine A; Molento, Carla F M; Weary, Daniel M

    2015-04-01

    Using an online public engagement experiment, we probed the views of 617 participants on the use of pigs as research animals (to reduce agricultural pollution or to improve organ transplant success in humans) with and without genetic modification and using different numbers of pigs. In both scenarios and across demographics, level of opposition increased when the research required the use of GM corn or GM pigs. Animal numbers had little effect. A total of 1037 comments were analyzed to understand decisions. Participants were most concerned about the impact of the research on animal welfare. Genetic modification was viewed as an intervention in nature and there was worry about unpredictable consequences. Both opponents and supporters sought assurances that concerns were addressed. Governing bodies for animal research should make efforts to document and mitigate consequences of GM and other procedures, and increase efforts to maintain a dialogue with the public around acceptability of these procedures.

  8. The four cultures: Public engagement with science only, art only, neither, or both museums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shein, Paichi Pat; Li, Yuh-Yuh; Huang, Tai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    This study uses an art-and-science comparative lens to understand the science culture, particularly the public engagement with science museums. A representational Taiwanese sample of 1863 subjects was categorized into "four cultures," who visit science only, art only, neither, or both museums, resulting in six multivariate logistic regression models. Knowledge of science, interests in scientific and social issues, and socio-demographic variables were considered in the models. Adults with children and males prefer science museums, females prefer art museums, and the young and urban intellects show no strong preference, appearing to be open to both science and art museums. The findings show the complex decisions the public make in visiting museums. It is no longer a strictly science or art decision, as framed by Snow's "The Two Cultures" argument; rather, the possibility of visiting both museums has emerged, a phenomenon we describe as cognitive polyphasia.

  9. Shaping the future of nursing: developing an appraisal framework for public engagement with nursing policy reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Ann

    2015-03-01

    It is accepted that research should be systematically examined to judge its trustworthiness and value in a particular context. No such appraisal is required of reports published by organizations that have possibly even greater influence on policy that affects the public. This paper explores a philosophical framework for appraising reports. It gives the reasons why informed engagement is important, drawing on Popper's concept of the open society, and it suggests a method for appraisal. Gadamer's concept of the two horizons and Jauss's reception theory offer a methodological framework to enable the individual citizen, whether professional or lay, to engage in debate about policy that affects him or her. By way of a worked example, the framework is applied to two international reports on nursing. Conclusions suggest that nursing policy should be subjected to robust interrogatory appraisal by both profession and public for a democratic debate and creative discourse. Although this analysis is related to international nursing policy, it has a wider relevance and application beyond nursing.

  10. Education and Public Outreach for the Cascadia Initiative--Engaging communities in their own Geologic Back Yards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livelybrooks, D.; Toomey, D. R.; Brennan, D.; Mulder, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Cascadia Initiative is a four-year, amphibious project employing arrays of seismometers, pressure gauges, and GPS monitors. Its goals are to study the structure of the Juan de Fuca and Gorda plates, deformation of the leading edge of the North American plate, the nature of the locked zone between plates where large earthquakes occur, and inboard slow slip events. For the past three summers, members of the Cascadia Initiative Expedition Team (CIET), Oregon community college students and faculty, and other undergraduate and graduate students have participated in 3-6 cruises annually to deploy and recover ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) off the coast of California, Oregon, Washington and Vancouver Island. Additionally, Oregon K-12 educators have engaged in using low-cost and research-grade seismometers to characterize school site shaking hazards as a way to influence school leadership and address seismic hazards. As part of CIET's unique ';CC@Sea' program, community college students and instructors have developed videos, talks and posters based on their experiences, and present these to CC core science classes and other campus groups (e.g. ROV clubs) to help catalyze interest in geoscience and other STEM careers. These presentations include both scientific goals and experiential impressions, and serve to capture the teamwork and multiple skill sets found among ship and scientific crews at sea. As part of a Title IIb math-science partnership program, a team of middle- and high-school teachers is developing classroom projects around school seismic hazards, a very real possibility for we who live near the Cascadia subduction zone. Students will analyze data, report their findings, and provide recommendations focused on mitigating hazards to school administrators and school boards. This presentation will summarize how CIET's K-14 EPO efforts support student, teacher and the broader community engagement at the nexus of the geosciences and public policy. A K-12 teacher

  11. Detroit Works Long-Term Planning Project: Engagement Strategies for Blending Community and Technical Expertise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toni L. Griffin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In January 2013, civic leaders, community stakeholders, and residents came together to release Detroit Future City: 2012 Detroit Strategic Framework Plan, a guiding blueprint for transforming Detroit from its current state of population loss and excessive vacancy into a model for the reinvention of post-industrial American cities. Three years prior, the U.S. Census had reported that the city had lost 24% of its population over the last decade and had experienced a 20% increase in vacant and abandoned property, bringing total vacancy to roughly the size of Manhattan. In addition to physical and economic challenges, Detroiters had also acknowledged significant barriers to effective civic engagement. Foremost among these barriers were a profound sense of immobilization, planning fatigue, and a general perception of cynicism about planning and engagement efforts. These challenges were compounded by historic racial dynamics and tension. This case study elaborates on the comprehensive and innovative civic engagement executed in a citywide planning process called the Detroit Works Project, which took place from late 2010 through late 2012. For the citywide planning process to be successful and sustainable, civic leaders and project funders committed to a planning initiative that would be different from previous efforts, in large part because the “owners” of the process would be diverse and inclusive across all community sectors. The case study, written by three of the key consultants from the project, describes four key civic engagement strategies deployed in the creation of the strategic framework: (1 addressing profound challenges of culture, race, and politics by deliberately building trust; (2 elevating community expertise by fostering a sense of ownership of the process; (3 blending technical and community expertise; and (4 viewing civic engagement as an ongoing two-way conversation rather than a series of large-scale episodic events. This

  12. German Muslims and their engagement in participatory culture: reflections on civic and artistic contributions to the public sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Asmaa

    2017-09-01

    This paper examines publics of young German Muslims. Case studies include the singer Huelya Kandemir, the theatre group Uma Lamo and the social network Zahnräder. By focusing on spiritual music publics, theatrical comedy publics and social publics, it tries a new approach to the way in which we understand minority public engagement. In addition to examining the concept of counterpublics, it utilizes the concept of participatory culture, which offers a relevant complement. The study argues that the publics of young German Muslims display multifaceted artistic and civic engagement, which can best be understood in terms of participation in cultural or civic productions and contribution to the wider German public. Features or effects of counterpublics, such as the countering of mainstream representations of minority identities and the offering of alternative discourses, are occasionally reflected in their activities. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  13. Managing IT Projects in Public Companies: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouras, A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As part of its public sector modernization effort, a North African government has put a lot of effort and allocated significant budgets since 1997 to modernize one of its main public sector companies. Consequently, this company, that mainly offers postal services, initiated many IT-based projects to computerize all paper-based ongoing services offered through its branches and to present new products to customers. This company was aiming to improve service quality and to diversify the range of its services. However, some of these IT-based projects inevitably faced problems. Some projects were either not completed successfully, cancelled, over-budget or taking more time than scheduled. As a result, many employees and customers of this company were dissatisfied and complained about bad planning, slowness and significant disruptions in these projects, an event that affected adversely the quality of service. This study aims at determining the causes of these project disruptions, failures or delays. To achieve this aim, 30 experienced project developers and engineers working in that company’s IT department volunteered to respond to a detailed questionnaire specifically developed for this purpose. The questionnaire included questions about project vision clarity, time/cost management, project quality assurance, risk management and human resources management. Results show that the main reasons for disruptions, failure or delays in IT projects are lack of business plan and poor documentation during and after finishing projects, lack of clear quality assurance criteria, standards and reviews, and poor project risk management practices. Ramifications of such results in terms of improving IT project management practices in the public service sector are finally presented.

  14. Plants, Pollution and Public Engagement with Atmospheric Chemistry: Sharing the TEMPO Story Through Ozone Garden Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, L. G.; Pippin, M. R.; Malick, E.; Summers, D.; Dussault, M. E.; Wright, E. A.; Skelly, J.

    2016-12-01

    What do a snap-bean plant and a future NASA satellite instrument named TEMPO have in common? They are both indicators of the quality of the air we breathe. Scientists, educators, and museum and student collaborators of the Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring Pollution (TEMPO) instrument team are developing a program model to engage learners of all ages via public ozone garden exhibits and associated activities. TEMPO, an ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy instrument due for launch on a geostationary host satellite between 2019 and 2021, will scan North America hourly to measure the major elements in the tropospheric ozone chemistry cycle, providing near real-time data with high temporal and spatial resolution. The TEMPO mission provides a unique opportunity to share the story of the effects of air quality on living organisms. A public ozone garden exhibit affords an accessible way to understand atmospheric science through a connection with nature, while providing a visual representation of the impact of ozone pollution on living organisms. A prototype ozone garden exhibit was established at the Virginia Living Museum in partnership with NASA Langley, and has served as a site to formatively evaluate garden planting and exhibit display protocols, hands-on interpretive activities, and citizen science data collection protocols for learners as young as 3 to 10 as well as older adults. The fun and engaging activities, optimized for adult-child interaction in informal or free-choice learning environments, are aimed at developing foundational science skills such as observing, comparing, classifying, and collecting and making sense of data in the context of thinking about air quality - all NGSS-emphasized scientific practices, as well as key capabilities for future contributing members of the citizen science community. As the launch of TEMPO approaches, a major public engagement effort will include disseminating this ozone garden exhibit and program model to a network of

  15. Project Management in Development Aid Industry – Public vs. Private

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simović Dragana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the relationship between the type of a development aid implementing organisation (public or private and the quality of project management in development aid. The author begins with main public administration considerations - how public aid administration is different from private and furthermore, how particular sectoral characteristics of organisations influence the quality of the management process. The article combines empirical findings on the differences between the public and private sector with a complex setting of development aid and main success factors in development aid activity, in order to determine whether for-profit or public companies are more likely to achieve better project management processes. The article identifies some indices that favorise private companies, and outlines further necessary steps that should be taken in order to broaden the argumentation and confirm or reject this assertion

  16. "What Happened to Our Sense of Justice?" Tracing Agency and Critical Engagement in a Youth Participatory Action Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo-García, Regina J.; Galletta, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Tracing the nature of critical engagement and agency among youth in a participatory action research (PAR) collective, the study attends to the manner in which critical engagement and agency developed over time for the youth researchers. The focus of the project was to conduct a survey among ninth grade students concerning their early high school…

  17. The Elwha Science Education Project (ESEP): Engaging an Entire Community in Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. S.; Kinner, F.

    2008-12-01

    Native Americans are poorly represented in all science, technology and engineering fields. This under- representation results from numerous cultural, economic, and historical factors. The Elwha Science Education Project (ESEP), initiated in 2007, strives to construct a culturally-integrated, geoscience education program for Native American young people through engagement of the entire tribal community. The ESEP has developed a unique approach to informal geoscience education, using environmental restoration as a centerpiece. Environmental restoration is an increasingly important goal for tribes. By integrating geoscience activities with community tradition and history, project stakeholders hope to show students the relevance of science to their day-to-day lives. The ESEP's strength lies in its participatory structure and unique network of partners, which include Olympic National Park; the non-profit, educational center Olympic Park Institute (OPI); a geologist providing oversight and technical expertise; and the Lower Elwha Tribe. Lower Elwha tribal elders and educators share in all phases of the project, from planning and implementation to recruitment of students and discipline. The project works collaboratively with tribal scientists and cultural educators, along with science educators to develop curriculum and best practices for this group of students. Use of hands-on, place-based outdoor activities engage students and connect them with the science outside their back doors. Preliminary results from this summer's middle school program indicate that most (75% or more) students were highly engaged approximately 90% of the time during science instruction. Recruitment of students has been particularly successful, due to a high degree of community involvement. Preliminary evaluations of the ESEP's outcomes indicate success in improving the outlook of the tribe's youth towards the geosciences and science, in general. Future evaluation will be likewise participatory

  18. Getting research to the policy table: a qualitative study with public health researchers on engaging with policy makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Jennifer J; Dodson, Elizabeth A; Fleischhacker, Sheila; Siddiqi, Sameer; Quinn, Emilee L

    2015-04-30

    Little attention has been given to how researchers can best provide evidence to policy makers so that it informs policy making. The objectives of this study were to increase understanding about the current state of public health nutrition and obesity researcher practices, beliefs, barriers, and facilitators to communicating and engaging with policy makers, and to identify best practices and suggest improvements. Eighteen semistructured interviews were conducted from 2011 to 2013 with public health nutrition and obesity researchers who were highly involved in communicating research to policy makers. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, coded, and analyzed to identify common themes. Study participants described wide variation in practices for communicating and engaging with policy makers and had mixed beliefs about whether and when researchers should engage. Besides a lack of formal policy communication training, barriers noted were promotion and tenure processes and a professional culture that does not value communicating and engaging with policy makers. Study participants cited facilitators to engaging with policy makers as ranging from the individual level (eg, desire to make a difference, relationships with collaborators) to the institutional level (eg, training/mentorship support, institutional recognition). Other facilitators identified were research- and funding-driven. Promising strategies suggested to improve policy engagement were more formal training, better use of intermediaries, and learning how to cultivate relationships with policy makers. Study findings provide insights into the challenges that will need to be overcome and the strategies that might be tried to improve communication and engagement between public health researchers and policy makers.

  19. Project H.O.P.E.: Effective University Engagement with Community Afterschool Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara C. Jentleson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Implemented in 2002 by the Duke-Durham Neighborhood Partnership, Project H.O.P.E. has improved the quantity and quality of afterschool programs for the youth of Durham, NC. Project H.O.P.E. provides tutoring programs, enrichment resources, and evaluation support to non-profit community partner organizations located in the low income Durham neighborhoods surrounding Duke University. Duke University undergraduates who provide tutoring services to the Durham youth in the afterschool programs gain from valuable reciprocal service learning experiences. Project H.O.P.E. is an effective model of the mutual benefits that can be gained from effective university and community engagement in the service of at-risk students.

  20. Youth Arts, Media, and Critical Literacies as Forms of Public Engagement in the Local/Global Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a reanalysis of a multisited case study of youth arts, media, and critical literacy to theorize the role of networked and physical "publics" within which youth engage with issues they care about, making claims about their lived experiences. An understanding of the nature and role of publics is crucial to productive…

  1. 29 CFR 553.213 - Public agency employees engaged in both fire protection and law enforcement activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... law enforcement activities. 553.213 Section 553.213 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued... EMPLOYEES OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Fire Protection and Law Enforcement Employees of Public Agencies Exemption Requirements § 553.213 Public agency employees engaged in both fire protection and law enforcement...

  2. Enhancing Teacher and Student Engagement and Understanding of Marine Science Through Classroom Citizen Science Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    Overview This paper presentation shares findings from a granted funded project that sought to expand teacher content knowledge and pedagogy within the fields of marine science and coastal resource management through the implementation of classroom citizen science projects. A secondary goal was to increase middle and high school student interest and participation in marine science and natural resources research. Background A local science & engineering fair has seen a rapid decline in secondary student participants in the past four years. Research has demonstrated that when students are a part of a system of knowledge production (citizen science) they become much more aware, involved and conscious of scientific concepts compared to traditional school laboratory and nature of science activities. This project's primary objectives were to: (a) enhance teacher content expertise in marine science, (b) enrich teacher professional learning, (c) support citizen science classroom projects and inspire student activism and marine science engagement. Methods Project goals were addressed through classroom and meaningful outdoor educational experiences that put content knowledge into field based practices. Teachers learned to apply thier expanded content knowlege through classroom citizen science projects that focus on marine resource conservation issues such as fisheries management, water quality, turtle nesting and biodiversity of coastal ecosystems. These projects would eventually become potential topics of citizen science research topics for their students to pursue. Upon completion of their professional development, participants were urged to establish student Marine Science clubs with the goal of mentoring student submissions into the local science fair. Supplemental awards were possible for the students of project participants. Findings Based on project measures participants significantly increased their knowledge and awareness of presented material marine science and

  3. STEM-related, Student-led Service Learning / Community Engagement Projects: Examples and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swap, R. J.; Wayland, K.

    2015-12-01

    Field-based, STEM-related service learning / community engagement projects present an opportunity for undergraduate students to demonstrate proficiencies related to the process of inquiry. These proficiencies include: appreciation of the larger project context, articulation of an informed question/hypothesis, project proposal development, interdisciplinary collaboration, project management (including planning, implementation reconfiguration and synthesis) and lastly the generation and handing off of acquired knowledge. Calls for these types of proficiencies have been expressed by governmental, non-governmental as well as the private sector. Accordingly, institutions of higher learning have viewed such activities as opportunities for enriching the learning experience for undergraduate students and for making such students more marketable, especially those from STEM-related fields. This institutional interest has provided an opportunity to support and expand field-based learning. Here we present examples of student-led/faculty-mentored international service learning and community engagement projects along the arc of preparation, implementation and post-field process. Representative examples that draw upon environmental science and engineering knowledge have been selected from more than 20 international undergraduate student projects over past decade and include: slow-sand water filtration, rainwater harvesting, methane biodigesters, water reticulation schemes and development and implementation of rocket stoves for communal cooking. We discuss these efforts in terms of the development of the aforementioned proficiencies, the utility of such proficiencies to the larger enterprise of STEM and the potential for transformative student learning outcomes. We share these experiences and lessons learned with the hope that others may intelligently borrow from our approach in a manner appropriate for their particular context.

  4. Evolutionary Game Analysis of the Supervision Behavior for Public-Private Partnership Projects with Public Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congdong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The public can directly or indirectly participate in the PPP (public-private partnership projects and then has an impact on the project profit and public or private behavior. To explore the influence of the public participation of the PPP projects supervision behavior, this paper analyzes the mutual evolutionary regularity of the private sector and government supervision department and the influence of public participation level on public and private behavior based on evolutionary game theory. The results show that the supervision strategy is not chosen when the supervision cost of government supervision department is greater than the supervision benefit; it can make private sector consciously provide the high-quality public products/services with the improvement of public participation level. Therefore, the government should reduce the cost of public participation and improve the public participation level and influence through the application of the Internet, big data, and other advanced technologies, in order to restrain the behavior of the private sector and improve the supervision efficiency.

  5. How to create a public-private partnership: a replicable project associated with business continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Daniel

    2010-07-01

    In an age of political turmoil and mistrust of governments, having an outlet for creative problem solving that involves all aspects of communities during disasters is critical. Additionally, there is a need for outlets that save taxpayer money for particular projects, such as road construction or infrastructure protection. Public-private partnerships are one way to accomplish these goals. Utilised correctly, a public-private partnership is a win-win situation for all participants. This paper will make the case for the continued support from all sectors for public-private partnerships. A description of public-private partnerships will be given to show the broad spectrum of opportunities for such a partnership. In addition, a case study of a public-private partnership called SAFER Santa Rosa is explored as the programme is oriented towards disasters, but keeps the community engaged all year round. Finally, an example is presented of an initiative that not only exemplifies the spirit of public-private partnerships, but has attracted international recognition because it is simple, replicable, cost-effective and valuable to both the private sector and the public sector. The Business Emergency Response Toolkit bag is a true public-private success story. It is hoped that the reader will be able to replicate the ideas discussed herein in their own community.

  6. Tools for Engaging Scientists in Education and Public Outreach: Resources from NASA's Science Mission Directorate Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Grier, J.; Meinke, B. K.; Gross, N. A.; Woroner, M.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Forums support the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and its E/PO community by enhancing the coherency and efficiency of SMD-funded E/PO programs. The Forums foster collaboration and partnerships between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We will present tools to engage and resources to support scientists' engagement in E/PO efforts. Scientists can get connected to educators and find support materials and links to resources to support their E/PO work through the online SMD E/PO community workspace (http://smdepo.org) The site includes resources for scientists interested in E/PO including one page guides about "How to Get Involved" and "How to Increase Your Impact," as well as the NASA SMD Scientist Speaker's Bureau to connect scientists to audiences across the country. Additionally, there is a set of online clearinghouses that provide ready-made lessons and activities for use by scientists and educators: NASA Wavelength (http://nasawavelength.org/) and EarthSpace (http://www.lpi.usra.edu/earthspace/). The NASA Forums create and partner with organizations to provide resources specifically for undergraduate science instructors including slide sets for Earth and Space Science classes on the current topics in astronomy and planetary science. The Forums also provide professional development opportunities at professional science conferences each year including AGU, LPSC, AAS, and DPS to support higher education faculty who are teaching undergraduate courses. These offerings include best practices in instruction, resources for teaching planetary science and astronomy topics, and other special topics such as working with diverse students and the use of social media in the classroom. We are continually soliciting ways that we can better support scientists' efforts in effectively engaging in E/PO. Please contact Sanlyn Buxner (buxner@psi.edu) or Jennifer Grier (jgrier@psi.edu) to

  7. A Picture Really is Worth a Thousand Words: Public Engagement with the National Cancer Institute on Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalova, Yulia A; Krieger, Janice L

    2017-03-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) provides pertinent information about cancer prevention, treatment, and research advancements that is considered objective and accurate. NCI's presence on social media is an example of a growing effort in promoting and facilitating audience engagement with evidence-based information about health and cancer. However, it is unknown what strategies are most effective for engaging audiences via this communication platform. To evaluate this important question, we analyzed data on posts, associated comments, and meta-data from official NCI Facebook page between July 2010 and February 2015 (end of data collection). Results show that audience engagement is associated with the format of cancer-related social media posts. Specifically, posts with photos received significantly more likes, comments, and shares than videos, links, and status updates. The findings have important implications for how social media can be more effectively utilized to promote public engagement with important public health issues.

  8. Project-Based Learning in a STEM Academy: Student Engagement and Interest in STEM Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misher, Pamela Henry

    This case study explored the utilization of project-based learning (PBL) and how it affected student engagement and interest in STEM careers. Sixty-seven students and nine teachers participated in this case study. Three research questions addressed student engagement, perceptions, and challenges during PBL implementation. This study was designed to understand the experiences teachers and students had when they participated in a PBL environment. This research investigated how to develop a globally skilled workforce utilizing a PBL approach and the challenges teachers encountered during implementation. The survey data and informal focus-group sessions with staff and students were utilized, analyzed, and summarized in order to obtain insight on perceptions, challenges, and implementation of PBL. PBL is an instructional approach that was designed to encourage more engaged learning. This approach was built upon realistic learning activities that stimulated student interest and motivation. This research discovered that PBL did teach content and 21st century skills as students worked collaboratively toward a common goal while responding to a question or problem. This study revealed that rigorous projects were carefully planned to aid students in learning important academic content. This study displayed how PBL allowed students to reflect on their projects and ideas with the opportunity to voice their decisions and findings. This instructional approach provided opportunities for students to investigate and strengthen interest in future STEM careers. The driving force of America's future economy and maintaining the competitive edge will be through more innovation, mainly derived from advances in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) careers. As business and industry leaders stressed the importance of improving STEM education, there continued to be a need to better prepare students to fill STEM-related careers. This research adds to the current body of research

  9. The broad challenge of public engagement in science: commentary on: "Constitutional moments in governing science and technology".

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Est, Rinie

    2011-12-01

    Timely public engagement in science presents a broad challenge. It includes more than research into the ethical, legal and social dimensions of science and state-initiated citizen's participation. Introducing a public perspective on science while safeguarding its public value involves a diverse set of actors: natural scientists and engineers, technology assessment institutes, policy makers, social scientists, citizens, interest organisations, artists, and last, but not least, politicians.

  10. Selecting Large Portfolios of Social Projects in Public Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Litvinchev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the portfolio selection of social projects in public organizations considering interdependencies (synergies affecting project funds requirements and tasks. A mixed integer linear programming model is proposed incorporating the most relevant aspects of the problem found in the literature. The model supports both complete (all or nothing and partial (a certain amount from a given interval of funding resource allocation policies. Numerical results for large-scale problem instances are presented.

  11. Public engagement with information on renewable energy developments: The case of single, semi-urban wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, J M; Theobald, K S

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores perceptions of public engagement with information on renewable energy developments. It draws on a case study of proposals by a major supermarket chain to construct single wind turbines in two semi-urban locations in the UK, analysing data from interviews with key actors in the planning process and focus groups with local residents. The paper concludes that key actors often had high expectations of how local people should engage with information, and sometimes implied that members of the public who were incapable of filtering or processing information in an organised or targeted fashion had no productive role to play in the planning process. It shows how the specific nature of the proposals (single wind turbines in semi-urban locations proposed by a commercial private sector developer) shaped local residents' information needs and concerns in a way that challenged key actors' expectations of how the public should engage with information.

  12. The Worldviews Network: Digital Planetariums for Engaging Public Audiences in Global Change Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, R. J.; Koontz, K.; Yu, K.; Gardiner, N.; Connolly, R.; Mcconville, D.

    2013-12-01

    Utilizing the capabilities of digital planetariums, the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, the California Academy of Sciences, NOVA/WGBH, The Elumenati, and affiliates of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration formed the Worldviews Network. The network's mission is to place Earth in its cosmic context to encourage participants to explore connections between social & ecological issues in their backyards. Worldviews launched with informal science institution partners: the American Museum of Natural History, the Perot Museum of Nature & Science, the Journey Museum, the Bell Museum of Natural History, the University of Michigan Natural History Museum, and the National Environmental Modeling & Analysis Center. Worldviews uses immersive visualization technology to engage public audiences on issues of global environmental change at a bioregional level. An immersive planetarium show and dialogue deepens public engagement and awareness of complex human-natural system interactions. People have altered the global climate system. Our communities are increasingly vulnerable to extreme weather events. Land use decisions that people make every day put both human lives and biodiversity at risk through direct and indirect effects. The Worldviews programs demonstrate the complex linkages between Earth's physical and biological systems and their relationship to human health, agriculture, infrastructure, water resources, and energy. We have focused on critical thresholds, such as freshwater use, biodiversity loss, land use change, and anthropogenic changes to the nitrogen and phosphorus cycles. We have been guided by environmental literacy principles to help our audiences understand that humans drive current trends in coupled human-natural systems--and that humans could choose to play an important role in reversing these trends. Museum and planetarium staff members join the Worldviews Network team and external advisers to produce programs that span cosmic, global, and

  13. IT PROJECT PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT: MODULARITY PROBLEMS IN A PUBLIC ORGANIZATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kristian; Mengiste, Shegaw Anagaw

    2012-01-01

    information across units and sub units, (3) No standard processes for submitting IT projects proposals, (4) No centralized IT project selection process, and (5) Lack of centralized follow up process on IT Projects across units and subunits. Based on data and by using recommendations from Modularity theory, we...... within a large local government. The investigation applies Modularity theory to analyze rich data from the local government covering several units with quite diverse functions to address the following two questions (1) which modularity problems does a public organization have in its IT PPM practices...

  14. [Participatory Quality Development: Engaging Community Members in All Phases of Project Planning and Implementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M T; Kilian, H; Block, M; von Unger, H; Brandes, S; Ziesemer, M; Gold, C; Rosenbrock, R

    2015-09-01

    Community participation, recognised as a central feature of successful health promotion and prevention, is often difficult to implement. In this research project internationally recognised methods of participatory health research were applied to demonstrate ways in which community members can be engaged. Participatory health research is characterised by a close collaboration between academic researchers, practitioners and community members in order to generate common knowledge. It is not a question of translating knowledge from research into practice, but rather a question of promoting a collective learning process on the part of all participants for the purpose of developing solutions which address the interests and needs of local people. The result of the project is a new approach for strengthening the quality of prevention and health promotion interventions: participatory quality development (PQD).

  15. Engage the Public in Phenology Monitoring: Lessons Learned from the USA National Phenology Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, T. M.; Lebuhn, G.; Miller-Rushing, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN) is a recently established network that brings together citizen scientists, government agencies, non-profit groups, educators and students of all ages to monitor the impacts of climate change on plants and animals in the United States. Though a handful of observers participated in the USA-NPN monitoring program in 2008, 2009 was the first truly operational year for the program. With a goal of 100,000 observers for this nationwide effort, we are working to engage participants both directly and through established organizations and agencies. The first year of operational monitoring and program advertisement has yielded many insights that are shaping how we move forward. In this presentation, we will highlight some of our most prominent “lessons learned” from our experience engaging participants, mainly through partnerships with organizations and agencies. One successful partnership that the USA-NPN established in 2009 was with the Great Sunflower Project, a citizen science effort focused on tracking bee activity. By piggy-backing on this established program, we were able to invite tens of thousands of self-selected individuals to learn about plant phenology and to contribute to the program. A benefit to the Great Sunflower Project was that monitoring phenology of their sunflowers gave observers something to do while waiting for the plant to attract bees. Observers’ experiences, data, and comments from the 2009 season are yielding insights into how this partnership can be strengthened and USA-NPN and GSP goals can more effectively be met. A second partnership initiated in 2009 was with the US National Park Service (NPS). Partnering with federal and state agencies offers great opportunities for data collection and education. In return, agencies stand to gain information that can directly influence management decisions. However, such efforts necessitate careful planning and execution. Together the USA-NPN and NPS drafted

  16. City of Huntsville Public Housing Areas STEM Initiative Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Tomeka; Smith, Cydale; Pugh, Marcus; Budak, Satilmis; Muntele, Claudiu

    2012-02-01

    Students in high-poverty and high-minority schools are entering the classroom without the knowledge and skills they need to succeed. In order to bridge the gaps in opportunity and achievement that separate low-income students and students of color from other young Americans, we have introduced elementary and middle school students to the basic concepts of biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering. Within the project, we have provided students with excellent learning opportunities, engaging hands-on experiences, and outstanding advising and mentoring. We have assessed student development and impact before, during, and after the program.

  17. Communication in a Human biomonitoring study: Focus group work, public engagement and lessons learnt in 17 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Karen; Cano, Noemi; Aerts, Dominique; Biot, Pierre; Casteleyn, Ludwine; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; Schwedler, Gerda; Castaño, Argelia; Angerer, Jürgen; Koch, Holger M; Esteban, Marta; Schoeters, Greet; Den Hond, Elly; Horvat, Milena; Bloemen, Louis; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Joas, Reinhard; Joas, Anke; Dewolf, Marie-Christine; Van de Mieroop, Els; Katsonouri, Andromachi; Hadjipanayis, Adamos; Cerna, Milena; Krskova, Andrea; Becker, Kerstin; Fiddicke, Ulrike; Seiwert, Margarete; Mørck, Thit A; Rudnai, Peter; Kozepesy, Szilvia; Cullen, Elizabeth; Kellegher, Anne; Gutleb, Arno C; Fischer, Marc E; Ligocka, Danuta; Kamińska, Joanna; Namorado, Sónia; Reis, M Fátima; Lupsa, Ioana-Rodica; Gurzau, Anca E; Halzlova, Katarina; Jajcaj, Michal; Mazej, Darja; Tratnik, Janja Snoj; Huetos, Olga; López, Ana; Berglund, Marika; Larsson, Kristin; Sepai, Ovnair

    2015-08-01

    A communication strategy was developed by The Consortium to Perform Human Biomonitoring on a European Scale (COPHES), as part of its objectives to develop a framework and protocols to enable the collection of comparable human biomonitoring data throughout Europe. The framework and protocols were tested in the pilot study DEMOCOPHES (Demonstration of a study to Coordinate and Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale). The aims of the communication strategy were to raise awareness of human biomonitoring, encourage participation in the study and to communicate the study results and their public health significance. It identified the audiences and key messages, documented the procedure for dissemination of results and was updated as the project progressed. A communication plan listed the tools and materials such as press releases, flyers, recruitment letters and information leaflets required for each audience with a time frame for releasing them. Public insight research was used to evaluate the recruitment material, and the feedback was used to improve the documents. Dissemination of results was coordinated in a step by step approach by the participating countries within DEMOCOPHES, taking into account specific national messages according to the needs of each country. Participants received individual results, unless they refused to be informed, along with guidance on what the results meant. The aggregate results and policy recommendations were then communicated to the general public and stakeholders, followed by dissemination at European level. Several lessons were learnt that may assist other future human biomonitoring studies. Recruitment took longer than anticipated and so social scientists, to help with community engagement, should be part of the research team from the start. As a European study, involving multiple countries, additional considerations were needed for the numerous organisations, different languages, cultures, policies and priorities

  18. Equitable Financial Evaluation Method for Public-Private Partnership Projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Yongjian; LIU Xinping; WANG Shouqing

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility study of a public-private partnership (PPP) project is regarded as one of the critical factors for successful implementation,but unfortunately the common financial evaluation methods currently used only represent the benefits of the private sector.There is,therefore,an urgent need to develop an equitable financial evaluation method for PPP projects.This paper presents a comprehensive literature review that examines international practices.An equitable financial evaluation method was then developed taking into account the inherent characteristics of PPP projects using six separate indicators and Monte Carlo simulations.The result for a bridge project in Romania shows that the method combines the viewpoints of all the relevant stakeholders to achieve an equitable financial evaluation of PPP projects.

  19. Class Participation in an Aboriginal Theatre Project: An Exemplar of Undergraduate Student Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginny R. Ratsoy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st Century, Canadian universities are increasingly emphasizing the importance of student engagement. This research paper, by analyzing the reflections of undergraduate students on their experiences in a co-curricular service learning assignment – integrated into a course that included more traditional assignments -in the context of situated learning theory, advocates for a community-focused assignment as a component in a “traditional” lecture-and-discussion based course as a tool for enhanced engagement through active, collaborative learning. While the case study explored is a drama course, the anticipated audience is pan-disciplinary, as the article casts more broadly by providing brief, general guidelines on implementing an experiential learning assignment and encouraging all professors to reflect on their classroom theory and praxis to the end of augmenting student engagement.Au 21e siècle, les universités canadiennes accordent une place de plus en plus importante à l’engagement des étudiants. Les auteurs de ce rapport de recherche analysent les réflexions des étudiants de premier cycle à propos d’un travail pratique (TP qu’ils ont effectué dans le cadre de l’apprentissage par le service communautaire– intégré à un cours qui comprenait des TP plus traditionnels – dans le contexte de la théorie de l’apprentissage situé. Les auteurs préconisent des TP axés sur la collectivité en tant que composants d’un cours « traditionnel » comportant des exposés magistraux et des discussions. Ce type de TP est un outil permettant d’améliorer l’engagement grâce à l’apprentissage actif et collaboratif. L’étude de cas porte sur un cours d’art dramatique, mais le public visé par le présent article est multidisciplinaire. En effet, les auteurs de l’article considèrent les choses plus largement en fournissant de brèves directives générales sur la mise en œuvre d’un devoir dans le cadre de

  20. A Case Study of Framing and Project Design Impacts on Participant Identity, Views, and Trust of Science in a Phenology Public Participatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, A. E.; Jordan, R.

    2016-12-01

    Recent literature has suggested public participatory research models (e.g., citizen science and similar) as a key opportunity for scientists to meaningfully engage and communicate with the public to increase support for science and encourage pro-science behavior. In this, there has been an inherent assumption that all models of engagement yield similar participant results with few examples of assessment of these programs. While many of these programs do share superficial similarities in their modes of participant engagement and participant motivation, there is a large disparity in participant engagement between them. This disparity suggests that framing of these projects (e.g., citizen science versus crowd sourcing) also plays an important role in decisions about participation. Additionally, participant outcomes, in terms of beliefs about scientific practices and scientific trust, between these two project types has not yet been investigated. To investigate the impact of framing, participants were recruited to a web-based tree phenology public participatory research program where half the participants were engaged in a citizen science framed program and the other were engaged in a crowdsourced framed project. The participants in each frame were engaged in the same task (reporting leaf budding/leaf drop), but the way the projects were framed differed. Post-participation we see that there are indeed statistically significant differences in participant outcomes between individuals who participated as a citizen scientist versus as a crowdsourcer. Particularly we see differences in terms of their views of science, identity, and trust of science. This work is the first to the authors' knowledge that aims to evaluate if projects can be treated synonymously when discussing potential for public engagement and broader trust and literacy outcomes.

  1. [The current importance of veterinary public health: the SAPUVET project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, C; de Meneghi, D; de Balogh, K; de Rosa, M; Estol, L; Leguia, G; Fonseca, A; Torres, M; Caballero-Castillo, M

    2004-12-01

    The authors propose reviewing the current needs for implementing veterinary public health programmes, from both the teaching and professional standpoints. This is warranted by the fact that veterinary public health has become extremely important in various fields of work, beyond conventional food inspection. The article discusses the public health role which veterinarians must play and the interactions between their activities and those of other groups such as doctors, epidemiologists, ecologists, chemists, or even sociologists and anthropologists. The authors also study and assess the basic working tool in veterinary public health--epidemiological surveillance--and how it operates on the basis of diagnosis and risk analysis. The second part of the article discusses the need to unify criteria for veterinary public health training and the role which the SAPUVET network is playing in doing so (SAPUVET is a European Union-supported project within the ALFA programme that is designed to establish links between Latin American and European veterinary faculties).

  2. West Valley Demonstration Project: Public information plan: Objectives, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, W. D.

    1987-09-30

    This report describes the objectives and proposed activities of the public information program. Included are statements of purpose, goals, approach, and methods of implementation. This office deals with local, state, and federal agencies to inform them on the status of this demonstration project. (TEM)

  3. Leveraging design activism to guide public projects towards citizen inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casciola, Lara; Götzen, Amalia De; Morelli, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores a case wherein design activism was leveraged to guide the governance of a public project towards greater citizen inclusion. This exploration, part of a master’s thesis in Service Design at Aalborg university, centres on Copenhagen’s Street Lab – a living lab where technological...

  4. Synthetic Evaluation on Decision of Public Bidding for Construction Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙涛; 颜秋许

    2002-01-01

    Public bidding is the international current practice to contract construction project. But the decision on the bidding often is made according to the qualitative evaluation based on the subjective opinion of specialists. Therefore, the fuzzy mathematics principle was applied and a synthetic evaluation model was established to provide an effective method for the development of quantitative bidding decision in this paper.

  5. WEpods project: finding the potential for automated road public transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homem De Almeida Rodriguez Correia, G.

    2016-01-01

    Vehicle automation is developing rapidly, nevertheless a lot of wor k is still lacking, as we are not yet at a point where vehicles are able to drive themselves on a road without a human behind the wheel. One of the possibilities of automation is its use as public transport. In theWEpods project,

  6. Public Outreach at RAL: Engaging the Next Generation of Scientists and Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, G.; Ryall, G.; Palmer, S.; Collier, I. P.; Adams, J.; Appleyard, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) is part of the UK's Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC). As part of the Royal Charter that established the STFC, the organisation is required to generate public awareness and encourage public engagement and dialogue in relation to the science undertaken. The staff at RAL firmly support this activity as it is important to encourage the next generation of students to consider studying Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) subjects, providing the UK with a highly skilled work-force in the future. To this end, the STFC undertakes a variety of outreach activities. This paper will describe the outreach activities undertaken by RAL, particularly focussing on those of the Scientific Computing Department (SCD). These activities include: an Arduino based activity day for 12-14 year-olds to celebrate Ada Lovelace day; running a centre as part of the Young Rewired State - encouraging 11-18 year-olds to create web applications with open data; sponsoring a team in the Engineering Education Scheme - supporting a small team of 16-17 year-olds to solve a real world engineering problem; as well as the more traditional tours of facilities. These activities could serve as an example for other sites involved in scientific computing around the globe.

  7. International Observe the Moon Night: An Effective Model for Public Engagement with NASA Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleacher, L. V.; Jones, A. J. P.; Shaner, A.; Day, B.; Buxner, S.; Wegner, M.

    2015-01-01

    International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) is an annual world-wide public engagement event designed with the goal of inspiring the public to want to learn more about NASAs contributions to planetary science and exploration, using the Earths Moon as an entryway, and to provide connections to do so [1,2,3]. InOMN will celebrate its 6th anniversary on September 19, 2015.Registration statistics from the past five years show an average of 500 InOMN events are held in 50 countries and 45 U.S. states per year (Figure 1), with over half of the events occurring outside the U.S. Host survey data indicate that approximately 55,000 to 75,000people participate in InOMN events each year. The consistent hosting of InOMN events across the U.S. and around the world indicates an interest by hosts in sharing lunar and planetary science with their local communities, as well as connecting with a larger international group of fellow space enthusiasts on an annual basis.

  8. Engaging Non-traditional User Communities Through NVO Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, N.; Demorest, P.; Spitz, R.; Malina, R.; Schultz, G.; Hawkins, I.

    2002-05-01

    The National Virtual Observatory (NVO) can establish an effective and highly visible Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program that builds upon existing NASA EPO activities. The success of the NVO EPO program will be dependent on identifying potential users and their needs. There are a number of user communities that go beyond the traditional audiences served by NASA and NSF data-driven initiatives. We are exploring how NVO imagery, information, and tools can best engage a variety of non-traditional user communities including SETI@home teachers, educators in teacher preparation programs, and the art and entertainment communities. We are investigating the most appropriate methods of assessing the needs of the various communities, including computer usability labs, focus groups, surveys, interviews, etc. Implementing the results of user requirements research will maximize the likelihood that NVO resources will actually be used and will be of benefit to the largest possible number of people. We will discuss results from a survey of SETI@home educators who were asked to identify the most useful resources that a program such as NVO could provide. In addition, we will present our strategy and plans for assessing the needs of the arts community. This research will inform future prototyping of NVO interfaces for the public at large, and tailored tools such as automated systems on the Web that utilize user-profile defining technology.

  9. A Framework Approach to Evaluate Cross-Cultural Adaptation of Public Engagement Strategies for Radioactive Waste Management - 13430

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Laura [Potomac Communications Group, 1133 20th St NW Washington DC 20035 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The complex interplay of politics, economics and culture undermines attempts to define universal best practices for public engagement in the management of nuclear materials. In the international context, communicators must rely on careful adaptation and creative execution to make standard communication techniques succeed in their local communities. Nuclear professionals need an approach to assess and adapt culturally specific public engagement strategies to meet the demands of their particular political, economic and social structures. Using participant interviews and public sources, the Potomac Communications Group reviewed country-specific examples of nuclear-related communication efforts to provide insight into a proposed approach. The review considered a spectrum of cultural dimensions related to diversity, authority, conformity, proximity and time. Comparisons help to identify cross-cultural influences of various public engagement tactics and to inform a framework for communicators. While not prescriptive in its application, the framework offers a way for communicators to assess the salience of outreach tactics in specific situations. The approach can guide communicators to evaluate and tailor engagement strategies to achieve localized public outreach goals. (authors)

  10. Failure to engage the public in issues related to inland fishes and fisheries: strategies for building public and political will to promote meaningful conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, S J; Lapointe, N W R; Martins, E G; Thiem, J D; Raby, G D; Taylor, M K; Beard, T D; Cowx, I G

    2013-10-01

    Generating awareness of environmental conservation issues among the public is essential if there is an expectation of them to alter their behaviour, facilitate informed decisions and engage governments or regulatory authorities to take action. There are, however, exceedingly few public engagement success stories related to inland fishes and fisheries policy and resource allocation decisions. Inland aquatic resources and their associated fisheries provide employment, recreation, culture and, in developing regions, a considerable proportion of human nutrition and food security. Freshwater fishes are incredibly diverse but are among the most endangered organisms globally. Many threats to inland fisheries are driven largely by externalities to inland fisheries. The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the role and plight of inland fishes and fisheries, and the need to generate the public and political will necessary to promote meaningful conservation. With this paper, the extent to which the scientific and environmental management communities have failed to engage the public in issues related to inland fishes and fisheries is characterized. Next, the barriers or factors that serve as the basis for the problem with public engagement are identified. The paper concludes by identifying strategies, including those focused on environmental education initiatives, for building the public and political will necessary to promote meaningful conservation of inland fishes and fisheries in developed and developing countries. Scientists, environmental managers, non-governmental organizations, politicians, regulatory authorities and the media all have important roles to play in overcoming challenges to inland fisheries. Failure to engage the public in freshwater conservation and management issues will impede efforts to stem the loss of freshwater habitats, fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. Thankfully, there are opportunities to learn from success stories related to other

  11. Earned media and public engagement with CDC's "Tips from Former Smokers" campaign: an analysis of online news and blog coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfield, Rachel; Smith, Katherine Clegg; Szczypka, Glen; Vera, Lisa; Emery, Sherry

    2015-01-20

    In March 2012, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched the first-ever paid national tobacco education campaign. At a cost of US $54 million, "Tips from Former Smokers" (Tips) ran for 3 months across multiple media, depicting the suffering experienced by smokers and their families in graphic detail. The potential impact and reach of the Tips campaign was not limited to that achieved through paid media placements. It was also potentially extended through "earned media", including news and blog coverage of the campaign. Such coverage can shape public understanding of and facilitate public engagement with key health issues. To better understand the contribution of earned media to the public's engagement with health issues in the current news media environment, we examined the online "earned media" and public engagement generated by one national public health campaign. We constructed a purposive sample of online media coverage of the CDC's 2012 Tips from Former Smokers television campaign, focusing on 14 influential and politically diverse US news outlets and policy-focused blogs. We identified relevant content by combining campaign and website-specific keywords for 4 months around the campaign release. Each story was coded for content, inclusion of multimedia, and measures of audience engagement. The search yielded 36 stories mentioning Tips, of which 27 were focused on the campaign. Story content between pieces was strikingly similar, with most stories highlighting the same points about the campaign's content, cost, and potential impact. We saw notable evidence of audience engagement; stories focused on Tips generated 9547 comments, 8891 Facebook "likes", 1027 tweets, and 505 story URL shares on Facebook. Audience engagement varied by story and site, as did the valence and relevance of associated audience comments. Comments were most oppositional on CNN and most supportive on Yahoo. Comment coding revealed approximately equal levels of

  12. To engage or not to engage: Public discussion of climate science in the age of the blogosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, W.; Stroeve, J. C.; Leitzell, K.

    2010-12-01

    While science is ideally an objective and unbiased endeavor, in practice it often intersects with policy, ethics, and personal beliefs. It is clear that climate science today is at the nexus of objective science and subjective beliefs. Unfortunately, in today’s world, with the plethora of information resources, people can increasing obtain information, including scientific information, from potentially biased or uninformed sources that reinforce personal beliefs instead of accurately conveying scientific conclusions. Nowhere is this truer than in the blogosphere, where numerous climate blogs address climate science issues. Many such blog are run by people without a climate science background, or any formal science background at all. The recent scientific controversies (e.g., IPCC errors, CRU emails), even though they are much ado about nothing, have further entrenched viewpoints. Many people seem to be viewing only blog sites that support their viewpoint, even if the sites provide misleading, incomplete, or biased information. Thus good science is falling on deaf ears of people who are the most misinformed. The question for scientist is whether to engage with blogs that are misinformed or have a clear agenda. Do scientists ignore the slings and arrows that often come from such sites, or do they take up the arms of scientific information to battle misconceptions and erroneous information? There opportunities and pitfalls to either choice. The pitfalls are (1) it is unlikely to change entrenched viewpoints, (2) it takes time away from doing real science, and (3) it may lend an air of legitimacy to sites that are providing an unscientific view. On the other hand, since many people no longer seem to be accepting or even looking at legitimate science information, the only way to engage some people is through these “non-scientific” blog sites. Such an approach also addresses a common criticism of climate scientists by many people: that scientists are a cabal that

  13. Eyes wide open: an essay on developing an engaged awareness in global medicine and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventres, William B; Fort, Meredith P

    2014-10-28

    There is a growing understanding of the role social determinants such as poverty, gender discrimination, racial prejudice, and economic inequality play on health and illness. While these determinants and effects may be challenging to identify in parts of high-income countries, they are patently obvious in many other areas of the world. How we react to these determinants and effects depends on what historical, cultural, ideological, and psychological characteristics we bring to our encounters with inequity, as well as how our feelings and thoughts inform our values and actions. To address these issues, we share a series of questions we have asked ourselves-United States' citizens with experience living and working in Central America-in relation to our encounters with inequity. We offer a conceptual framework for contemplating responses in hopes of promoting among educators and practitioners in medicine and public health an engaged awareness of how our every day work either perpetuates or breaks down barriers of social difference. We review key moments in our own experiences as global health practitioners to provide context for these questions. Introspective reflection can help professionals in global medicine and public health recognize the dynamic roles that they play in the world. Such reflection can bring us closer to appreciating the forces that have worked both for and in opposition to global health, human rights, and well-being. It can help us recognize how place, time, environment, and context form the social determination of health. It is from this holistic perspective of social relations that we can work to effect fair, equitable, and protective environments as they relate to global medicine and public health.

  14. Sense of Place and Student Engagement among Undergraduate Students at a Major Public Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoli, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between sense of place and student engagement among undergraduate students, in order to influence how higher education institutions view the role of the physical environment in fostering student engagement, learning, and personal development. Student engagement, a very important predictor…

  15. Understanding factors affecting patient and public engagement and recruitment to digital health interventions: a systematic review of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Hanlon, Peter; O'Donnell, Catherine A; Garcia, Sonia; Glanville, Julie; Mair, Frances S

    2016-09-15

    Numerous types of digital health interventions (DHIs) are available to patients and the public but many factors affect their ability to engage and enrol in them. This systematic review aims to identify and synthesise the qualitative literature on barriers and facilitators to engagement and recruitment to DHIs to inform future implementation efforts. PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus and the ACM Digital Library were searched for English language qualitative studies from 2000 - 2015 that discussed factors affecting engagement and enrolment in a range of DHIs (e.g. 'telemedicine', 'mobile applications', 'personal health record', 'social networking'). Text mining and additional search strategies were used to identify 1,448 records. Two reviewers independently carried out paper screening, quality assessment, data extraction and analysis. Data was analysed using framework synthesis, informed by Normalization Process Theory, and Burden of Treatment Theory helped conceptualise the interpretation of results. Nineteen publications were included in the review. Four overarching themes that affect patient and public engagement and enrolment in DHIs emerged; 1) personal agency and motivation; 2) personal life and values; 3) the engagement and recruitment approach; and 4) the quality of the DHI. The review also summarises engagement and recruitment strategies used. A preliminary DIgital Health EnGagement MOdel (DIEGO) was developed to highlight the key processes involved. Existing knowledge gaps are identified and a number of recommendations made for future research. Study limitations include English language publications and exclusion of grey literature. This review summarises and highlights the complexity of digital health engagement and recruitment processes and outlines issues that need to be addressed before patients and the public commit to digital health and it can be implemented effectively. More work is needed to create successful engagement strategies and better

  16. Why people attend science festivals: Interests, motivations and self-reported benefits of public engagement with research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric; Buckley, Nicol

    2014-07-01

    As a form of public engagement, science festivals have rapidly expanded in size and number over recent years. However, as with other domains of informal public engagement that are not linked to policy outcomes, existing research .does not fully address science festivals' impacts and popularity. This study adduces evidence from surveys and focus groups to elucidate the perspectives of visitors at a large UK science festival. Results show that visitors value the opportunities afforded by the science festival to interact with scientific researchers and to encounter different types of science engagement aimed at adults, children and families. The most significant self-reported impact of attending a science festival is the development of increased interest in and curiosity about new areas of scientific knowledge within a socially stimulating and enjoyable setting.

  17. Space Scientists in Education and Public Outreach: A Summary of NASA Resources for Effective Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Jennifer A.; Buxner, Sanlyn; Schneider, Nick; Meinke, Bonnie; Shipp, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    The NASA Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Forums developed and provided resources for scientists through a five-year cooperative agreement. Through this work, the Fourms have supported scientists who are involved in E/PO and who wish to become involved. Forums have conducted interviews, facilitated education oral and poster sessions, provided ‘Help Desks’ for more information, curated activities, as well as produced guides, pamphlets, and tips sheets. Our interviews with over 30 planetary scientists allowed us to identify needs and target gaps in resources, ensuring we could provide scientists with effective support and products. Interviews were conducted in collaboration with the AAS Division of Planetary Sciences, with the goal of better understanding scientists’ requirements, barriers, attitudes, and perception of education and outreach work. We collected information about how scientists were engaged in E/PO activities (or not), what support they did or did not have, what resources they used in their efforts, and what resources they would like to have to support and improve their E/PO engagement. The Forums have convened and/or supported E/PO oral and poster sessions at a variety of annual meetings. These sessions allowed scientists to network, share lessons learned, and become aware of new resources and products. These meetings included the DPS, AAS, LPSC, AGU, ASP, IAU, and more. ‘Help Desks’ were offered to allow scientists the chance to have extended one-on-one conversations with E/PO providers in order to share their programs, and learn how to become involved. These have been particularly popular with early career scientists looking to extend their E/PO efforts. A host of education activities developed by the space science community have been archived at the NASA site “Wavelength” (nasawavelength.org). Special lists have been curated to allow scientists to easily target those activities that fit their particular needs, from engineering to

  18. Strategies for Public Engagement on Environmental Matters: You Can Lead a Horse to Water, but Can You Make It Drink?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmojieje, Josephine

    2015-01-01

    With no tangible evidence of widespread public engagement in the UK on matters relating to the environment, this article assesses the benefits of adopting the principles of key theoretical models on learning (e.g., Kolb's Experiential Model) in environmental campaigns. In addition, in order to facilitate the transition from environmental…

  19. Enhancing Evidence-Informed Decision Making: Strategies for Engagement between Public Health Faculty and Policymakers in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessani, Nasreen; Kennedy, Caitlin; Bennett, Sara

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the complex interactions and strategies for engagement--both existing as well as desired--between academic Knowledge Brokers (KBs) and national health policymakers in Kenya. Based on semi-structured interviews with academic KBs and university leaders from six Schools of Public Health (SPHs) as well as national policymakers,…

  20. Collective Memory of Violence of the Female Brown Body: A Decolonial Feminist Public Pedagogy Engagement with the Feminicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinidad Galván, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Feminists have consistently engaged with ontological and epistemological issues about what counts as knowledge, based on whose worldview, and what knowledge and worldviews remain unrecognised or ignored. Utilising Mexicana and Chicana fictional and conceptual writings and public art installations on the Juárez feminicides, the article focuses on…

  1. Public Relations Models and Dialogic Communication in the Twitterverse: An Analysis of How Colleges and Universities Are Engaging Their Public through Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beverly, Jason Antwuan

    2013-01-01

    Colleges and universities throughout this world are realizing the importance of engaging in and building mutually-beneficial relationships with their key publics through social media. The introduction of the microblogging tool known as Twitter extends the use of social media in higher education, beyond the classroom, and into the realm of public…

  2. Public Relations Models and Dialogic Communication in the Twitterverse: An Analysis of How Colleges and Universities Are Engaging Their Public through Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beverly, Jason Antwuan

    2013-01-01

    Colleges and universities throughout this world are realizing the importance of engaging in and building mutually-beneficial relationships with their key publics through social media. The introduction of the microblogging tool known as Twitter extends the use of social media in higher education, beyond the classroom, and into the realm of public…

  3. Initiating community engagement in an ecohealth research project in Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musesengwa, Rosemary; Chimbari, Moses J; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2017-03-07

    Community Engagement (CE) in health research ensures that research is consistent with the socio-cultural, political and economic contexts where the research is conducted. The greatest challenges for researchers are the practical aspects of CE in multicentre health research. This study describes the CE in an ecohealth community-based research project focusing on two vulnerable and research naive rural communities. A qualitative, longitudinal multiple case study approach was used. Data was collected through Participatory Rural Appraisals, Focus Group Discussions, In-depth Interviews, and observations. The two sites had different cultural values, research literacy levels, and political and administrative structures. The engagement process included 1) introductions to the administrative and political leaders of the area; 2) establishing a community advisory mechanism; 3) community empowerment and 4) initiating sustainable post-study activities. In both sites the study employed community liaison officers to facilitate the community entry and obtaining letters of permission. Both sites opted to form Community Advisory Boards as their main advisory mechanism together with direct advice from community leaders. Empowerment was achieved through the education of ordinary community members at biannual meetings, employment of community research assistants and utilising citizen science. Through the research assistants and the citizen science group, the study has managed to initiate activities that the community will continue to utilise after the study ends. General strategies developed are similar in principle, but implementation and emphasis of various aspects differed in the two communities. We conclude that it is critical that community engagement be consistent with community values and attitudes, and considers community resources and capacity. A CE strategy fully involving the community is constrained by community research literacy levels, time and resources, but creates a

  4. Engaging stakeholder communities as body image intervention partners: The Body Project as a case example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Carolyn Black; Perez, Marisol; Kilpela, Lisa Smith; Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Trujillo, Eva; Stice, Eric

    2016-03-11

    Despite recent advances in developing evidence-based psychological interventions, substantial changes are needed in the current system of intervention delivery to impact mental health on a global scale (Kazdin & Blase, 2011). Prevention offers one avenue for reaching large populations because prevention interventions often are amenable to scaling-up strategies, such as task-shifting to lay providers, which further facilitate community stakeholder partnerships. This paper discusses the dissemination and implementation of the Body Project, an evidence-based body image prevention program, across 6 diverse stakeholder partnerships that span academic, non-profit and business sectors at national and international levels. The paper details key elements of the Body Project that facilitated partnership development, dissemination and implementation, including use of community-based participatory research methods and a blended train-the-trainer and task-shifting approach. We observed consistent themes across partnerships, including: sharing decision making with community partners, engaging of community leaders as gatekeepers, emphasizing strengths of community partners, working within the community's structure, optimizing non-traditional and/or private financial resources, placing value on cost-effectiveness and sustainability, marketing the program, and supporting flexibility and creativity in developing strategies for evolution within the community and in research. Ideally, lessons learned with the Body Project can be generalized to implementation of other body image and eating disorder prevention programs.

  5. Community engagement and informed consent in the International HapMap project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotimi, Charles; Leppert, Mark; Matsuda, Ichiro; Zeng, Changqing; Zhang, Houcan; Adebamowo, Clement; Ajayi, Ike; Aniagwu, Toyin; Dixon, Missy; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Macer, Darryl; Marshall, Patricia; Nkwodimmah, Chibuzor; Peiffer, Andy; Royal, Charmaine; Suda, Eiko; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Vivian Ota; McEwen, Jean

    2007-01-01

    The International HapMap Consortium has developed the HapMap, a resource that describes the common patterns of human genetic variation (haplotypes). Processes of community/public consultation and individual informed consent were implemented in each locality where samples were collected to understand and attempt to address both individual and group concerns. Perceptions about the research varied, but we detected no critical opposition to the research. Incorporating community input and responding to concerns raised was challenging. However, the experience suggests that approaching genetic variation research in a spirit of openness can help investigators better appreciate the views of the communities whose samples they seek to study and help communities become more engaged in the science.

  6. Authentic leadership as a source of optimism, trust in the organisation and work engagement in the public health care sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick W. Stander

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The orientation of this study is towards authentic leadership (AL and its influence on optimism, trust in the organisation and work engagement of employees in the public health care sector.Research purpose: The objectives of this study were to determine whether the leadership style of AL could predict optimism, trust in the organisation and work engagement amongst a large sample of employees from various functions in public hospitals and clinics in Gauteng and to establish whether optimism and trust in the organisation could mediate the relationship between AL and work engagement.Research approach, design and method: A convenience sample of 633 public health employees from various functions within 27 public hospitals and clinics in the province was used in this research. A cross-sectional research design was implemented. Structural equation modelling was utilised to investigate the Authentic Leadership Inventory (ALI, and the validity and fit of the measurement model, to position AL as a job resource within the nomological net and to test its mediating effects.Main findings: The statistical analysis revealed that AL was a significant predictor of optimism and trust in the organisation and that optimism and trust in the organisation mediated the relationship between AL and work engagement.Practical/managerial implications: The research results suggested that organisations in the public health care sector should encourage their managers to adopt a more authentic leadership style. This will lead to higher levels of optimism, trust in the organisation and eventually work engagement. This will greatly assist employees in the domain of public health care to manage their demanding working environment.Contribution: This study provides evidence that the ALI can be used reliably within the South African context and specifically within the public health care sector. It further substantiates for the implementation of AL as a leadership style in

  7. IMPROVING CLIENT INTERNAL CAPABILITY TO MONITOR PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS PROJECTS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi Ahmed Umar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Public-Private Partnerships (PPP or Private Finance Initiatives (PFI are increasingly becoming very popular with governments across the globe for the provision of public infrastructure and services. When contracted, the public sector client believing the private sector will act in accordance with ‘bounded rationality’, ignores the constant monitoring and review process which is an integral part of any project. However, the failures of some of these partnerships and the social and economic costs incurred due to laxity in monitoring reminds us of the need to develop the permanent bureaucratic machinery of government, who share the government’s unique objectives of end-users satisfaction rather than shareholders’, to perform the monitoring of these projects. Though the public sector has been delivering projcets for dacades, the complexities associated with the PFI strategy has opened up new challenges for its staff. Most failures and moral harzards are only discovered after scandals evoke investigations like the case of Enron or when public criticisms force the government to reverse their decision as in the case of the Skye toll bridge by which time a lot of damage would have be done. Literature has shown that when employees are trained and engaged in organisational decisions and policy planning they make policy executions easier. Therefore, considering the Theoretical ideology behind the PFI of the asset being returned to the Public sector at the end of the concession, it becomes pertinent for proper training of the public sector staff. Public sector officials, if adequately trained and motivated can perform the tasks being contracted out to private consultants thereby re-affirming government’s commitment to its Value for Money (VFM proposition. Though the public sector staff strength has been depleted due to the adoption of New Public Management (NPM, however the remaining qualified staff can be pooled to create an

  8. The Wudapt Project: Engaging a Global Community to Map and Characterize Cities Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddema, J. J.; Mills, G.; See, L. M.; Bechtel, B.; Ching, J.

    2016-12-01

    Over 50% of the world's population lives is urban areas that occupy about 2-4% of the terrestrial surface. These human built environments account for approximately 70% of anthropogenic carbon emissions and within these locations we observe some of the most extreme human altered climates with direct impacts on human health and air quality. Counterintuitively, while most humans live in urban spaces, there is a dearth of knowledge about the true nature of these urban spaces. Within human settlements there are significant variations in building types, building materials, energy management systems, transport systems, water and air quality management systems and socio-economic activities. For most of the world's cities there are few if any observations of these systems, and little knowledge of urban extent and distribution of urban types within cities. The World Urban Database and Portal Tools (WUDAPT), aims to fill this knowledge gap. This project merges local expert knowledge with open source remote sensing tools, Landsat data and GIS software to classify cities into 10 major neighborhood scale classes based on urban morphology characteristics. Known as Local Climate Zones (LCZs), these classes represent relatively homogeneous urban areas that can give a first approximation to typical urban climate and environmental impacts regardless of location or temporal occurrence. This project is designed to engage scientists and citizens in the mapping process, but also to provide participants (citizens, scientists, planners and policy makers) with output products. To date this project has classified about 200 cities worldwide. This presentation illustrates the process and products of the WUDAPT project and its potential benefits for local and global science. A next step will develop methods for linking LCZ areas to socioeconomic information and local building characteristics and uses.

  9. The role of Facilities in Engaging and Informing the Public of EarthScope Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlevoix, D. J.; Taber, J. J.; Berg, M.; Dorr, P. M.; McQuillan, P.; Olds, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    The IRIS and UNAVCO facilities play an important role in support of EarthScope through joint and independent education and outreach activities. These activities are focused on providing data and data products to a wide range of audiences, disseminating EarthScope science results through formal and informal venues, and informing the public of the broader impacts of EarthScope. The facilities are particularly well-suited for sustained engagement of multiple audiences over the decade-long course of EarthScope. One such example of a long-term effort was the Transportable Array student siting program, where over an 8 year period, students from about 55 institutions across the US and Canada conducted site reconnaissance and talked to landowners about EarthScope. Another activity focused on students was the development of a student intern program to support field engineering efforts during the construction of the Plate Boundary Observatory. Other ongoing activities include developing and maintaining relationships with media representatives and annual training of National Parks staff throughout the western U.S. The UNAVCO-IRIS partnership has been particularly valuable for EarthScope-related activities, where UNAVCO and IRIS work closely with the EarthScope National Office (ESNO) to bring EarthScope science to national, regional and local audiences within the EarthScope footprint. Collaborations have ranged across each group's products and services, including: EarthScope-focused teacher workshops, participation in EarthScope interpretive workshops for informal educators (led by ESNO), development of content for the IRIS Active Earth Monitor, preparing PBO-, USArray- and EarthScope-focused materials on topics such as Episodic Tremor and Slip for wider distribution through print, web, and mobile information technologies, and organizing research experiences for undergraduates on EarthScope-related topics. Other collaborations have focused on social media, and the development

  10. Achieving Sustainable Value Planning For Malaysian Public Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Faudzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is the central development issue in the modern economy. Through sustainable development, quality of life can be improved or maintained over time. Since Malaysia is targeting to become a high-income nation by the year 2020, financial investment in public projects should be planned comprehensively so that it will generate immediate and long-term benefits to the country and the people. Within the currently tight financial environment, achieving value for money in public spending is seen as one of the enablers to maintain the right momentum of economic growth. Previous studies have established the importance of integrating sustainability consideration into Value Planning protocol in order to achieve value for money, underpinned by the sustainable development agenda. Despite the establishment of the framework for the integration, the opportunity of such integration within the Malaysian Value Planning protocol for public projects remains unclear. The present state of sustainability consideration within the Value Planning practice should be first evaluated, so that potential interventions to enhance the integration can be introduced. Responding to the gap, this exploratory study was conducted. The data was collected by means of document analysis, interviews and observations; subsequently analysed using the Template Analysis technique. Based on the current practice of Value Planning in Malaysia, ten interventions are proposed to transform the present practice into Sustainable Value Planning. Sustainable Value Planning is seen as a comprehensive concept in achieving value for money in public spending underpinned by the overarching concept of sustainability

  11. Public Engagement with the Criminal Justice System in the Age of Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Katherine Larson Rose

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Exemplified by the landmark trial of O.J. Simpson, news media coverage of criminal cases in the United States is now regularly dominated by tabloid style coverage, complete with fixation on the victims and accused in criminal cases. Investigators have shown that such coverage of criminal proceedings is linked to decreasing levels of public trust and confidence in the criminal justice system. What is not yet understood is how rapid changes to the media universe in terms of online news sources and social networking are impacting coverage of criminal proceedings and public understanding of the criminal justice system. By surveying the American public on their news consumption habits, participation in social networking, knowledge and opinions of highly publicized criminal cases, and perceptions of the legitimacy of the justice system, we offer one of the first analyses of social media’s impact on public interaction with the criminal justice system. Ultimately we find little evidence that social media is enhancing citizen knowledge about or confidence in the criminal justice system, but we do uncover strong evidence that social media engagement with criminal trials leads to a greater desire for vengeance and encouragement of vigilante attitudes and behavior. Como demostró el emblemático juicio a O.J. Simpson, la cobertura mediática de los casos penales en los Estados Unidos está dominada de forma regular por una cobertura de estilo sensacionalista, centrando su atención en las víctimas y acusados de los casos criminales. Investigaciones han demostrado que esta cobertura de los procesos criminales está relacionada con un menor nivel de confianza del público en el sistema de justicia criminal. Todavía no se conoce con qué rapidez están impactando los cambios en el universo de los medios de comunicación que han llegado de la mano de las fuentes de información en línea y las redes sociales, en la cobertura de los procesos criminales y la

  12. Student Engagement in Public Universities in the Context of University of Raparin Kurdistan Region--Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Paiman Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge this is the first attempt to investigate student engagement in learning within the Kurdistan region in general and at University of Raparin in particular. Student engagement, self-learning, faculty-student interaction and promoting personal responsibility, besides environment of learning are the components for this…

  13. Managing Projects with the Public, -bringing Partnering, Contracts and Financing together in Building Public Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    2004-01-01

    of projects have had trouble to develop. The paper views PPP as an interaction between an emergent governance frame and operational activities in the project. PPP is an element of a networked public sector and the paper takes a network and political process approach to the shaping of PPP in Denmark....... It is analysed how the governance frame for these type of projects constituted a window of opportunity in the late nineties for “sale and lease back” arrangements, combined with partnering and more traditional design-build contracts. A case of a municipality renewing its school services, exploiting this window...... of opportunity shows that on the operational level the contractual, financial and skill basis for the project has to be mobilized, negotiated, partly stabilized and renegotiated. The participating actors thus have to develop a new set of skills in dealing with municipalities and managing operations in PPPs....

  14. The Engagement of Engineers in Education and Public Outreach: Beginning the Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, J.; Buxner, S.; Vezino, B.; Shipp, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are a new set of K-12 science standards that have been developed through a collaborative, state-led process. Based on the National Research Council (NRC) 'Framework for K-12 Education,' the NGSS are designed to provide all students with a coherent education possessing both robust content and rigorous practice. Within these standards is an enhanced emphasis on the intersection between science and engineering. The focus is not only on asking questions and finding answers (science) but also in identifying and designing solution to problems (engineering.) The NASA SMD (Science Mission Directorate) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Forums have been working with space scientists for many years to assist with their engagement in E/PO efforts, thus supporting the needs of previous science standards. In order to properly address the needs of NGSS, this conversation is being expanded to include engineers. Our initial efforts include a series of semi-structured interviews with a dozen engineers involved in different aspects of space science and mission development. We will present the responses from the survey and compare this information to our knowledge base about space scientists, their needs, attitudes, and understandings of E/PO. In addition to a new emphasis on engineering in the NGSS, we also consider engineering habits of mind such as systems thinking, creativity, optimism, collaboration, communication, and attention to ethical considerations as described by an NRC policy document for engineering education. Using the overall results, we will consider strategies, further ideas for investigation, and possible steps for going forward with this important aspect of including engineering in education and outreach programming.

  15. Developing an Engaged Institution: South Dakota State University's 2+2+2 Project and American Indian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayongo-Male, Diane; Nichols, Laurie Stenberg; Nichols, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    The authors examine South Dakota's 2+2+2 Project, a collaborative effort between South Dakota State University (SDSU) and the state's tribal colleges designed to enhance educational opportunities for American Indians, through the W. K. Kellogg Foundation's indicators of an engaged institution. Indicators include responsiveness, respect for…

  16. The politics of buzzwords at the interface of technoscience, market and society: the case of 'public engagement in science'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaude Vincent, Bernadette

    2014-04-01

    Emerging technologies such as genomics, nanotechnology, and converging technologies are surrounded by a constellation of fashionable stereotyped phrases such as 'public engagement in science', 'responsible innovation', 'green technology', or 'personalised medicine'. Buzzwords are ubiquitous and used ad libitum by science policy makers, industrial companies in their advertisements, scientists in their research proposals, and journalists. Despite their proliferation in the language of scientific and technological innovation, these buzzwords have attracted little attention among science studies scholars. The purpose of this paper is to try to understand if, and how buzzwords shape the technoscientific landscape. What do they perform? What do they reveal? What do they conceal? Based on a case study of the phrase 'public engagement in science', this paper describes buzzwords as linguistic technologies, capable of three major performances: buzzwords generate matters of concern and play an important role in trying to build consensus; they set attractive goals and agendas; they create unstable collectives through noise.

  17. The Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project - a community-level, public health initiative to build community disaster resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, David; Chandra, Anita; Fogleman, Stella; Magana, Aizita; Hendricks, Astrid; Wells, Ken; Williams, Malcolm; Tang, Jennifer; Plough, Alonzo

    2014-08-19

    Public health officials need evidence-based methods for improving community disaster resilience and strategies for measuring results. This methods paper describes how one public health department is addressing this problem. This paper provides a detailed description of the theoretical rationale, intervention design and novel evaluation of the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project (LACCDR), a public health program for increasing community disaster resilience. The LACCDR Project utilizes a pretest-posttest method with control group design. Sixteen communities in Los Angeles County were selected and randomly assigned to the experimental community resilience group or the comparison group. Community coalitions in the experimental group receive training from a public health nurse trained in community resilience in a toolkit developed for the project. The toolkit is grounded in theory and uses multiple components to address education, community engagement, community and individual self-sufficiency, and partnerships among community organizations and governmental agencies. The comparison communities receive training in traditional disaster preparedness topics of disaster supplies and emergency communication plans. Outcome indicators include longitudinal changes in inter-organizational linkages among community organizations, community member responses in table-top exercises, and changes in household level community resilience behaviors and attitudes. The LACCDR Project is a significant opportunity and effort to operationalize and meaningfully measure factors and strategies to increase community resilience. This paper is intended to provide public health and academic researchers with new tools to conduct their community resilience programs and evaluation research. Results are not yet available and will be presented in future reports.

  18. ENCOAL mild coal gasification project public design and construction report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This Public Design Report describes the 1000 ton per day ENCOAL mild coal gasification demonstration plant now in operation at the Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming. The objective of the project is to demonstrate that the proprietary Liquids From Coal (LFC) technology can reliably and economically convert low Btu PRB coal into a superior, high-Btu solid fuel (PDF), and an environmentally attractive low-sulfur liquid fuel (CDL). The Project`s plans also call for the production of sufficient quantities of PDF and CDL to permit utility companies to carry out full scale burn tests. While some process as well as mechanical design was done in 1988, the continuous design effort was started in July 1990. Civil construction was started in October 1990; mechanical erection began in May 1991. Virtually all of the planned design work was completed by July 1991. Most major construction was complete by April 1992 followed by plant testing and commissioning. Plant operation began in late May 1992. This report covers both the detailed design and initial construction aspects of the Project.

  19. Involving the public into HEP through IT challenges and projects

    CERN Document Server

    Adam Bourdarios, Claire; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has recently setup three outreach projects and global challenges which have a strong IT component and could not have been envisaged without the growth of general public computing resources and network connectivity. HEP has exciting and difficult problems like the extraction of the Higgs boson signal, and at the same time data scientists have advanced algorithms. The goal of the Higgs Machine Learning (HiggsML) project was to bring the two together by a “challenge”: machine learning experts could compete online to obtain the best Higgs→ττ signal significance on a set of ATLAS fully simulated Monte Carlo signal and background events. The first challenge of this kind ran from May to September 2014, drawing considerable attention, and new projects followed in the context of the CERN open data initiative. Higgs Hunters is the only physics-related project hosted on a web-based citizen science platform called Zooniverse. Volunteers usually contributing to space, natural world and huma...

  20. Identifying like-minded audiences for global warming public engagement campaigns: an audience segmentation analysis and tool development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward W Maibach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Achieving national reductions in greenhouse gas emissions will require public support for climate and energy policies and changes in population behaviors. Audience segmentation--a process of identifying coherent groups within a population--can be used to improve the effectiveness of public engagement campaigns. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Fall 2008, we conducted a nationally representative survey of American adults (n = 2,164 to identify audience segments for global warming public engagement campaigns. By subjecting multiple measures of global warming beliefs, behaviors, policy preferences, and issue engagement to latent class analysis, we identified six distinct segments ranging in size from 7 to 33% of the population. These six segments formed a continuum, from a segment of people who were highly worried, involved and supportive of policy responses (18%, to a segment of people who were completely unconcerned and strongly opposed to policy responses (7%. Three of the segments (totaling 70% were to varying degrees concerned about global warming and supportive of policy responses, two (totaling 18% were unsupportive, and one was largely disengaged (12%, having paid little attention to the issue. Certain behaviors and policy preferences varied greatly across these audiences, while others did not. Using discriminant analysis, we subsequently developed 36-item and 15-item instruments that can be used to categorize respondents with 91% and 84% accuracy, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In late 2008, Americans supported a broad range of policies and personal actions to reduce global warming, although there was wide variation among the six identified audiences. To enhance the impact of campaigns, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and businesses seeking to engage the public can selectively target one or more of these audiences rather than address an undifferentiated general population. Our screening instruments

  1. The impact of sustained engagement on cognitive function in older adults: the Synapse Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Denise C; Lodi-Smith, Jennifer; Drew, Linda; Haber, Sara; Hebrank, Andrew; Bischof, Gérard N; Aamodt, Whitley

    2014-01-01

    In the research reported here, we tested the hypothesis that sustained engagement in learning new skills that activated working memory, episodic memory, and reasoning over a period of 3 months would enhance cognitive function in older adults. In three conditions with high cognitive demands, participants learned to quilt, learned digital photography, or engaged in both activities for an average of 16.51 hr a week for 3 months. Results at posttest indicated that episodic memory was enhanced in these productive-engagement conditions relative to receptive-engagement conditions, in which participants either engaged in nonintellectual activities with a social group or performed low-demand cognitive tasks with no social contact. The findings suggest that sustained engagement in cognitively demanding, novel activities enhances memory function in older adulthood, but, somewhat surprisingly, we found limited cognitive benefits of sustained engagement in social activities.

  2. Public engagement as a means of restoring public trust in science--hitting the notes, but missing the music?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyses the recent widespread moves to 'restore' public trust in science by developing an avowedly two-way, public dialogue with science initiatives. Noting how previously discredited and supposedly abandoned public deficit explanations of 'mistrust' have actually been continually reinvented, it argues that this is a symptom of a continuing failure of scientific and policy institutions to place their own science-policy institutional culture into the frame of dialogue, as possible contributory cause of the public mistrust problem.

  3. Media art and the urban environment engendering public engagement with urban ecology

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This illuminating text formally appraises the innovative ways new media artists engage urban ecology. Highlighting the role of artists as agents of technological change, the work reviews new modes of seeing, representing, and connecting within the urban setting. Across fourteen chapters, the book describes how state-of-the-art technology can be exploited in order to create artworks that transcend the technology’s original purpose, thus expanding the language of environmental engagement whilst also demonstrating a clear understanding of the societal issues and values being addressed. Topics and features: Explores urban ecology and its engagement, surveying a diverse range of artists, artworks and performances Assesses how data from smart cities may be used to create artworks that can recast residents’ understanding of urban space Examines dynamic transformations of urban space through the reimagining of urban information Discusses the engagement of urban residents with street art, including collaborative c...

  4. The Managers’ Influence On The Workers’ Engagement – A Case Study Of Public Sector Workers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liliana Hawrysz

    2015-01-01

    The workers’ engagement means that they are loyal to their employers, trust both supervisors and co-workers, are not interested in changing their job, are proud of their work for a given company and that the...

  5. The Managers' Influence On The Workers' Engagement-A Case Study Of Public Sector Workers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liliana Hawrysz

    2015-01-01

      The workers' engagement means that they are loyal to their employers, trust both supervisors and co-workers, are not interested in changing their job, are proud of their work for a given company...

  6. Public opinion and communicative action around renewable energy projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Stewart

    This thesis investigates how rural communities negotiate the development of renewable energy projects. Public and local community acceptance of these new technologies in rural areas around the world is uncertain and spatially uneven and represents an area of emerging public policy interest and one where scholarly theory is rapidly developing. This thesis uses Habermasian concepts of public sphere, communicative action and deliberative democracy, as well as the concept of "wicked problems" from the planning studies literature combined with geographical concepts of place and scale to advance theoretical and empirical understanding of how public opinion on renewable energy technologies is formed in place. It documents energy use patterns, attitudes and socio-political relations at a time when considerable state and business efforts are directed at the construction of solar, wind, biomass and small-hydro technologies in rural regions. These concepts and theories are applied in a case study of rural communities in the Eastern Ontario Highlands, an impoverished area undergoing rapid restructuring driven by centralization of services and amenity migration but with abundant natural resources in form of forests, numerous waterways and open space which have attracted a broad range of new energy developments. Overall high levels of support for alternative energy development particularly for solar power were found, albeit for reasons of local energy security and not for reasons of preventing climate change. There was some evidence that seasonal residents are less supportive of hydro and biomass projects than permanent residents possibly reflecting broader trends in rural economies away from productive uses of land to consumptive appreciation of rural landscapes. The thesis suggests that collective action to advance energy projects in the case study area require agreement along three world-claims (truth, rightness and truthfulness) and that communication leading to discourse

  7. Plans, Projections and Practitioners: Engaging with Communities to Explore Adaptation Strategies for Transportation Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picketts, I. M.

    2015-12-01

    Transportation infrastructure is a significant climate change adaptation concern because it is: costly; designed for long operational lives; susceptible to both episodic and seasonal deterioration; and a significant safety concern. While examples of adaptation exist in transportation design, many communities do not have the capacity to incorporate climate change considerations into infrastructure planning and management. This presentation will overview the process and outcomes of research conducted in collaboration with the communities of Prince George and Squamish, both located in British Columbia (BC), Canada. Previous research in Prince George (in northern BC) involved applying downscaled climate projection information to assess local climate impacts, and identified transportation infrastructure as the top priority for ongoing study. In Prince George the adaptation process was oriented toward determining how the City could plan, design, and maintain roads and other structures to account for climate change. A local steering committee was formed, and created and evaluated 23 potential research topics. Two focus areas were selected for further investigation and explored during a workshop with practitioners, researchers, consultants and other representatives. The workshop precipitated additional modelling of projected impacts of climate change on road maintenance and road safety, and plans to explore the viability of alternative paving techniques. Outcomes of the case study provide insights regarding how researchers can 'combine' top down and bottom up approaches by using modelling information as part of an engagement process with local experts to explore adaptation. Ongoing research in Squamish seeks to apply lessons learned from the Prince George case study (both related to process and the application of modelling information) to a more temperate coastal region with a more climate-concerned population. In Squamish there also lies an opportunity to explicitly focus

  8. From Communicate to Educate - how a project structure and philosophy leads to engagement that influences organisational behaviours and decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Suzie; Corney, Stuart; Ling, Fiona; Bindoff, Nathan

    2010-05-01

    Climate Futures for Tasmania is an interdisciplinary and inter-institutional collaboration of twelve core participating partners (both national and state organisations) who are contributing more than 7.5 million in cash and in-kind over the three-year life of the project. The project is led by the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre at the University of Tasmania, with significant contributions by CSIRO, Australia's national research organisation, Tasmania's major power generation company, Hydro Tasmania and the Tasmanian State government, through the Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and the Environment. The coordination, community interaction and management of the project are unique within the university environment. The project has required multiple levels of engagement to achieve end-user driven research that delivers highly practical and usable outcomes to stakeholders who are relatively new to climate change concepts. The project is generating new information on climate change in the 21st century for local communities in Tasmania, by dynamically downscaling global climate models. It focuses on the information interests of Tasmanian communities, businesses, industries and governments through analysis of general climate, agriculture, water and catchments, and extreme events. We are engaging with more than 50 end user organisations and to date have been involved in more than 700 engagement activities. The governance structure provides purpose to our stakeholders and given us opportunity to communicate and educate. From this opportunity has come invites and introductions to take our science further into the stakeholders' organisations and to new organisations. From these invites and introductions has come new partnerships and more opportunity to educate and influence organisational behaviour. Our approach to engagement and communication fosters a learning environment that encompasses adult education principles. We have

  9. Public concerns regarding the storage and secondary uses of residual newborn bloodspots: an analysis of print media, legal cases, and public engagement activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Shannon; O'Doherty, Kieran C; Sénécal, Karine; Secko, David; Avard, Denise

    2015-04-01

    Recently, public concerns have been expressed regarding the non-consented storage and secondary research uses of residual newborn bloodspot (RBS) samples. The purpose of this paper is to examine public responses to the storage and secondary uses of RBS that can be identified through analysis of media, legal cases, and documented public engagement activities. Coverage in the examined print media confirmed the importance of RBS to journalists and those people who expressed their concerns to these journalists. Several lawsuits, brought by parents concerned about the storage of newborn bloodspots, placed the practice of storing NBS into the spotlight. This resulted in controversial debates and the mandatory destruction of millions of samples. Analysis of public engagement activities across several jurisdictions indicated that across (inter)national boundaries there are common elements to what is perceived as inappropriate governance of RBS. Public concerns were grouped into five main themes: trust, transparency, confidentiality, ownership, and stigmatization/discrimination. The results of our analysis help to make a compelling case for placing citizens at the center of the debate and developing policy about the storage and secondary uses of newborn bloodspots.

  10. Redesigning a Neuroscience Laboratory Course for Multiple Sections: An Action Research Project to Engage Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Hsiao-Wei; Jones, Brett D

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of our action research project was to improve students' motivation in a multi-section introductory neuroscience laboratory course. In this paper, we present: (a) how we collected data related to students' motivation and engagement, (b) how we analyzed and used the data to make modifications to the courses, (c) the results of the course modifications, and (d) some possible explanations for our results. Our aim is not only to provide the results of our study, but also to explain the process that we used, with the hopes that other instructors can use similar approaches to improve students' motivation in their courses. Our attempts to improve students' motivation-related perceptions were successful in some instances, but not in others. Of particular note was our finding that some of the students' perceptions varied even though the course syllabus was the same across sections. We attributed this variation to the learning environment developed by the teaching assistants (TAs) who taught the different sections. We provide some strategies that faculty instructors can use to redesign courses with high enrollments and help TAs motivate their students.

  11. Greenridge Multi-Pollutant Control Project Preliminary Public Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connell, Daniel P

    2009-01-12

    the commercial readiness of an emissions control system that is specifically designed to meet the environmental compliance requirements of these smaller coal-fired EGUs. The multi-pollutant control system is being installed and tested on the AES Greenidge Unit 4 (Boiler 6) by a team including CONSOL Energy Inc. as prime contractor, AES Greenidge LLC as host site owner, and Babcock Power Environmental Inc. as engineering, procurement, and construction contractor. All funding for the project is being provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, through its National Energy Technology Laboratory, and by AES Greenidge. AES Greenidge Unit 4 is a 107 MW{sub e} (net), 1950s vintage, tangentially-fired, reheat unit that is representative of many of the 440 smaller coal-fired units identified above. Following design and construction, the multi-pollutant control system will be demonstrated over an approximately 20-month period while the unit fires 2-4% sulfur eastern U.S. bituminous coal and co-fires up to 10% biomass. This Preliminary Public Design Report is the first in a series of two reports describing the design of the multi-pollutant control facility that is being demonstrated at AES Greenidge. Its purpose is to consolidate for public use all available nonproprietary design information on the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project. As such, the report includes a discussion of the process concept, design objectives, design considerations, and uncertainties associated with the multi-pollutant control system and also summarizes the design of major process components and balance of plant considerations for the AES Greenidge Unit 4 installation. The Final Public Design Report, the second report in the series, will update this Preliminary Public Design Report to reflect the final, as-built design of the facility and to incorporate data on capital costs and projected operating costs.

  12. Data Publication in the Meteorological Sciences: the OJIMS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Sarah; Hewer, Fiona; Pepler, Sam; Hardaker, Paul; Gadian, Alan

    2010-05-01

    Historically speaking, scientific publication has mainly focussed on the analysis, interpretation and conclusions drawn from a given dataset, as these are the information that can be easily published in hard copy text format with the aid of diagrams. Examining the raw data that forms the dataset is often difficult to do, as datasets are usually stored in digital media, in a variety of (often proprietary or non-standard) formats. This means that the peer-review process is generally only applied to the methodology and final conclusions of a piece of work, and not the underlying data itself. Yet for the conclusions to stand, the data must be of good quality, and the peer-review process must be used to judge the data quality. Data publication, involving the peer-review of datasets, would be of benefit to many sectors of the academic community. For the data scientists, who often spend considerable time and effort ensuring that their data and metadata is complete, valid and stored in an accredited data repository, this would provide academic credit in the form of extra publications and citations. Data publication would benefit the wider community, allowing discovery and reuse of useful datasets, ensuring their curation and providing the best possible value for money. Overlay journals are a technology which is already being used to facilitate peer review and publication on-line. The Overlay Journal Infrastructure for Meteorological Sciences (OJIMS) Project aimed to develop the mechanisms that could support both a new (overlay) Journal of Meteorological Data and an Open-Access Repository for documents related to the meteorological sciences. The OJIMS project was conducted by a partnership between the UK's Royal Meteorological Society (RMetS) and two members of the National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS), the British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC) and the University of Leeds. Conference delegates at the NCAS Conference in Bristol of 8-10 December 2008 were invited to

  13. Engaged scholarship in construction management research: the adoption of information and communications technology in construction projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voordijk, Johannes T.; Adriaanse, Adriaan Maria

    2016-01-01

    The objective is to explore what engaged scholarship (ES) could mean for construction management research in facilitating interactions between practice and theory. ES aims to develop knowledge that advances both science and practice through engagement of scholars with practice. Three types of ES are

  14. Impact of social media as an instructional component on content knowledge, attitudes, and public engagement related to global climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Sallie E.

    Social media (SM) are considered important avenues to reach citizens and engage them in social change. Given the widespread use of SM and their potential to enhance communication, they could also have significant influence when used as an educational tool. Educators are exploring whether classroom SM use has instructional benefits, such as enhancing interactivity and engagement. It is critical to understand the potential of SM for creating meaningful learning environments and public engagement pathways. Much work remains to understand the use of SM in this context and how to use them effectively. This study draws on active learning theory to examine the impact of SM as an instructional component with community college students learning to make connections among science, social responsibility, and global understanding in an environmental biology course (the Course). Using global climate change as a theme, the Course included a Facebook instructional component. A pretest--posttest, nonrandomized comparison group design was used to measure the impact of Facebook as an integrated component of the Course. The treatment and comparison groups were determined to be comparable based on demographics, access and ownership of digital devices, and SM use despite non-random assignment. No statistically significant differences were found between groups on these factors. The intervention consisted of semester-long required use of Facebook for the treatment group. The impact of the SM intervention was measured in three areas: (a) content knowledge, (b) attitudes toward climate change, and (c) public engagement actions and intentions to act. At the conclusion of the Course, no discernable difference was measured in content knowledge gains between the two groups. However, students who used Facebook experienced statistically significant differences in attitude, becoming increasingly concerned about global climate change. The comparison group demonstrated statistically significant

  15. Engaging youth of color in applied science education and public health promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague Martinez, Linda; Bowers, Edmond; Reich, Amanda J.; Ndulue, Uchenna J.; Le, Albert An; Peréa, Flavia C.

    2016-03-01

    Participation in inquiry-based science education, which focuses on student-constructed learning, has been linked to academic success. Whereas the benefits of this type of science education are evident, access to such high-quality science curriculum and programming is not equitable. Black and Latino students in particular have less access to supplementary science programming, and fewer opportunities to engage in inquiry-based education. This paper describes outcomes associated with an inquiry-based out-of-school time science education program, Nuestro Futuro: Applied Science Education to Engage Black and Latino Youth (NFASE), which sought to build the capacity of middle school students of color to 'think' like health scientists from diverse disciplinary perspectives. The program was designed with the intent of (1) improving student attitudes toward and motivation for science and (2) increasing active and engaged citizenship (AEC). NFASE students explored health inequity and the social determinants of health locally and engaged in developing health promotion, outreach and education efforts targeted to their peers, parents/families, and community. Interest in the program was high overall, but implementation was not without challenges. Although evaluation outcomes indicate that there were no statistically significant changes in science-related attitudes or motivation, students reported significant increases in neighborhood social connection, as well as overall AEC.

  16. Beyond Borders: Innovating from Conflict to Community in Public Art Engagement in Holon, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Ziva Haller

    2012-01-01

    The story of the Center for Digital Art in Holon is a story of innovation in the face of adversity. At key points of escalation in the Middle East conflict, this small-scale arts center managed to rise above and beyond the larger and more traditional museums in Israel to create new models for arts engagement. This article will present the critical…

  17. Belonging and Work Control in Two Suburban Public High Schools and Their Effects on Teacher Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyree, Alexander K., Jr.

    This paper shows how, in two suburban high schools, Cherry Glen and Pinehill, teachers' work control interacted with normative and social integration in their effect upon teachers' engagement with their work. In each school, a two-person team initially observed, and later interviewed, eight teachers in English, math, foreign language, social…

  18. Toward a model of employee engagement in a public service organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Strange

    Employee engagement has long been capturing the attention of researchers and practitioners, (e.g. Bakker, Albrecht, & Leiter, 2011; Buckingham & Coffman, 1999) due to its positive impact on various measures of organizational performance (Gruman & Saks, 2011; Harter, Schmidt, & Hayes, 2002; Mone...

  19. University-Community Engagement in Australia: Practice, Policy and Public Good

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Alexandra; Wiseman, John; Muirhead, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    The rise of a community engagement movement offers a range of possibilities for universities to function as "sites of citizenship". These include contributing to community social and economic infrastructure, supporting equity and diversity within higher education, and education for democratic citizenship. This article provides an…

  20. Reality-Based Learning: Outbreak, an Engaging Introductory Course in Public Health and Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calonge, David Santandreu; Grando, Danilla

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To develop a totally online reality-based course that engages students and enables the development of enhanced teamwork and report-writing skills. Setting: Outbreaks of infectious diseases impacts upon commerce, trade and tourism as well as placing strains on healthcare systems. A general course introducing university students to…

  1. Students Engaging the Public in Exciting Discoveries by NASA's MESSENGER Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallau, K. G.; Morison, J.; Schuele, H.

    2012-12-01

    In March 2011, NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft entered into orbit around Mercury, the closest planet to the Sun. As the first mission to orbit and study Mercury in depth, MESSENGER sought to answer six primary scientific questions: why is Mercury so dense; what is the geologic history of Mercury; what is the nature of Mercury's magnetic field; what is the structure of Mercury's core; what are the unusual materials at Mercury's poles; and what volatiles are important at Mercury? In the first year of orbit, MESSENGER answered all of these questions, and also made several surprising discoveries. Student interns working with the MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach (EPO) team are using MESSENGER Mosaic Postcards (MPC) in both print and digital formats to present this new information to a broad audience. These MPCs, in conjunction with the rest of the MESSENGER EPO tools, present a unified and global resource for the public. By creating this resource in a variety of media, from printable cards to interactive features on the EPO website (http://www.messenger-education.org/), the EPO team can reach a larger audience, further the goal of the MPC project to share newly discovered features and phenomena with the general public, and thereby generate increased interest in and excitement about science and planetary exploration. One side of each MPC shows a MESSENGER image of a portion of Mercury's surface, and together the postcards can be arranged to form a complete image of the planet. On the reverse side of some cards is information pertaining to an item of interest in view on the image-side. One of us (physics undergraduate JEM) researches interesting features on the surface of Mercury and creates descriptions for the informational side of the postcards, and another (computer science undergraduate HCS) creates the digital versions of cards and associated resources for the Surface Interactive, an interactive tool on the MESSENGER EPO website. Postcards already in distribution

  2. The Reflexive Scientist: enabling more effective science communication and public engagement through deeper reflection and engagement between physical and social scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, R. A.; Priestley, R. K.; Goven, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Scientists, policymakers and science communicators generally work from an assumption that science communication, or 'outreach', is good and often work from a primarily practice-based knowledge. Meanwhile, the science, technology and society (STS) community, which is strongly grounded in theory and critical analysis, is critical of certain aspects of science communication, particularly in controversial areas of science. Unfortunately, these two groups rarely speak to each other, and when they do they don't necessarily understand one another. Much of this confusion relates to different assumptions around the goals of science communication, as well as differing understandings of the various roles and responsibilities in both science and society. The result, unfortunately, is a lack of science communication practice and theory informing each other. This research is a collaboration between a scientist communicator with a positive attitude to outreach, who works in the field of climate change; a political theorist with expertise in public dialogue around biotechnology and has been critical of motivations for engaging the public with science; and a science historian and science communicator who has uncovered surprising and significant changes in public attitudes towards nuclear science and technology in New Zealand. By exploring our understanding of science communication through these diverse disciplinary lenses, and considering three fields of science that are or have been highly controversial for different reasons, we have identified several subtleties in both the politics of communicating different areas of controversial science, and the difficulties of finding a common language across social and physical sciences. We conclude that greater reflexivity about our own roles and assumptions, and increased efforts at enhanced understanding across disciplines, is central to applying the theories in STS to the practice of communication by scientists.

  3. The Danish Rejsekortet ( Smart Card for Public Transportation ): Project Governance for Failure or Success ?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Peter Georg; Riis, Eva

    infrastructural projects, not IT projects. The authors will close this gap by exploring how project governance affects the life-cycle of a major public IT project and forms the basis of its success evaluation. The analysis of governance in the case study projects – i.e. governance structure, decision processes......The authors examine a project regarded as a major failure in Danish public investments: The Smart Card for Public Transportation whose introduction was delayed for 9 years with an estimated cost overrun of 125 million EURO. After 3 years of operation, the Smart Card system only covers seven...... of the nine Danish regions and the discussion about giving up the system is continuing. The authors explore the overall conditions set up for these types of projects in the project governance - how project governance conditions a major public IT project and forms the success evaluation. The focus...

  4. Student Engagement, Alumni Satisfaction, and Alumni Donations at a Public Four Year Institution: An Analysis of How the Undergraduate Experience Influences Alumni Donations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew-Branch, Vanessa L.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation study examined the relationships between undergraduate student engagement, alumni satisfaction and alumni willingness to make donations of time and/or money. The research site was an Eastern, public, Master's Colleges and Universities and was considered a larger institution. The "Student Engagement and Alumni Satisfaction…

  5. Project management educational curriculum for public health professionals: development and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sabapathy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Successful completion of public health projects is critical to achieving population health objectives. However project execution can be challenging due to scarce time and resources, rapidly changing environments and complex stakeholder requirements. To address these challenges physicians and other professionals working in public health need to learn the practical skills of project management. However curricula tailored to project management skill development for public health professionals is not widely available. A one-week curriculum on project management for public health professionals has been developed enabling participants to independently lead small-scale public health projects. This course adapts a private-sector curriculum for use in public health practice and incorporates a unique skill-building teaching method. Evaluation of the initial curriculum delivery at the Weill-Bugando University, Tanzania indicated the majority of students intended to use project management upon return to their positions in public health. Students indicated a lack of a critical mass of public health professionals with required knowledge and skills represents the greatest barrier to integration of project management into public health practice. A unique one-week curriculum in project management has been developed and is being made publicly available. The course will enable physicians and other professionals working in public health to rapidly learn and apply the methodology to the front lines of public health.

  6. Public broadcasting, media engagement, and 2-1-1: using mass communication to increase the use of social services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhavan V; McLeod, Douglas M; Rojas, Hernando; Sayre, Benjamin G; Vraga, Emily; Scholl, Rosanne M; Jones, Clive; Shaw, Amy

    2012-12-01

    The 2008-2009 subprime mortgage crisis was catastrophic, not only for the global economy but for families across the social spectrum. The resultant economic upheaval threatened the livelihoods, well-being, and health of many citizens, who were often unsure where to turn for help. At this critical juncture, public broadcasting stations worked to connect viewers to support resources through 2-1-1. This study was designed to evaluate the ability of public broadcasting to increase the use of information and referral services. Autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) modeling and regression analysis document the relationship between public broadcasting initiatives and 2-1-1 call volume in 35 highly affected U.S. markets. Time-series data from St. Louis MO were collected and analyzed in 2008. Station-level data from across the nation were collected during 2009-2010 and analyzed in 2010. ARIMA results show a distinct linkage between the timing and duration of Channel 9 in St. Louis MO (KETC) programming and a subsequent (approximately 400%) increase in 2-1-1 calls regarding financial services and assistance. Regression path analysis not only found evidence of this same effect nationally but also showed that differences in the broadcaster's orientation and approach mediated effects. Specifically, stations' orientations toward engagement were mediated through strong outreach strategies to increase 2-1-1 use. This study documents the ability of public broadcasting to help citizens in need connect with social resources through 2-1-1 services. By focusing attention on the mortgage crisis and its attendant consequences, and by publicizing 2-1-1 services as a gateway to supportive resources, public broadcasters fostered linkages between those in need and social resources. Moreover, the level of a station's commitment to engaging citizens had a strong bearing on the success of its programming initiatives and community partnerships with organizations such as 2

  7. Using Roving Cloud Observations from the S'COOL Project to Engage Citizen Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, P. M.; Oostra, D.; Moore, S. W.; Rogerson, T. M.; Crecelius, S. A.; Chambers, L. H.

    2011-12-01

    Students' Clouds Observations On-Line (S'COOL) is a hands-on project, which supports NASA research on the Earth's climate. Through their observations, participants are engaged in identifying cloud-types and levels and sending that information to NASA. The two main groups of S'COOL observers are permanent locations such as regularly participating classrooms, and non-permanent locations or Rovers. These non-permanent locations can be a field trip, vacation, or just an occasional observation from a backyard. S'COOL welcomes participation from any interested observers, especially from places where official weather observations are few and far between. This program is offered to citizen scientists all over the world. They are participating in climate research by reporting cloud types and levels within +/- 15 minutes of a satellite overpass and sending that information back to NASA. When a participant's cloud observation coincides with a satellite overpass, the project sends them an email with a MODIS image of the overpass location, and a comparison of the satellite's cloud data results next to their ground-based report. This allows for the students and citizen scientists to participate in ground-truthing the CERES satellite data, to determine the level of agreement/disagreement. A new tool slated for future use in cloud identification, developed by the S'COOL team, is a mobile application. The application is entitled "Cloud Identification for Students" or "CITRUS". The mobile application utilizes a cloud dichotomous key with images to help with cloud identification. Also included in the application is a link to the project's cloud-reporting page to help with data submission in the field. One of the project's recent and most unique roving observers is a solo ocean rower who has traversed many of the world's ocean basins alone in a rowboat. While rowing across the oceans, she has recently been making cloud observations, which she sends back to us for analysis. In doing so

  8. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  9. Bari, a public mediterranean city: new projects to valorise public heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spartaco Paris

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The metropolitan area of Bari today has one million inhabitants. New regional legislation and the institution of a Strategic Plan have begun a process of urban transformation based on an innovative model of a compact, integrated and sustainable city. After the framework agreement with ENEA (the Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development in 2010 to implement projects to upgrade its building heritage, Bari is a candidate for the «Smart Cities & Communities» project and will launch its candidature for European Capital of Culture 2019. This text will analyse examples of valorisation of Bari’s public building heritage with a focus on case studies of major strategic importance, with the aim of identifying possible ethical-aesthetic values in the relationship between the dynamics of urban transformation and architectural quality.

  10. Elisabeth Tauber, Dorothy Zinn, eds, The Public Value of Anthropology: Engaging Critical Social Issues Through Ethnography, Bozen/Bolzano University Press, 2015, pp. 174

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Pawlak

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Book review of Elisabeth Tauber, Dorothy Zinn, eds, The Public Value of Anthropology: Engaging Critical Social Issues Through Ethnography, Bozen/Bolzano University Press, 2015, pp. 174.

  11. The LIFE Project “Monitoring of insects with public participation” (MIPP: aims, methods and conclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maria Carpaneto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Life Project “Monitoring of insects with public participation” (LIFE11 NAT/IT/000252 had as the main objective to develop and test methods for the monitoring of five beetle species listed in the Annexes of the Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC: Osmoderma eremita (hermit beetle, Scarabaeidae, Lucanus cervus (European stag beetle, Lucanidae, Cerambyx cerdo (great capricorn beetle, Cerambycidae, Rosalia alpina (rosalia longicorn, Cerambycidae and Morimus asper/funereus (morimus longicorn, Cerambycidae. The data gathered represent an important contribution to the monitoring of these target species in Italy. The methods developed for monitoring of the target species are intended for use by the local management authorities and staff of protected areas. These developed methods are the result of extensive fieldwork and ensure scientific validity, ease of execution and limited labour costs. The detailed description of methods and the results for each species are published in separate articles of this special issue of Nature Conservation. A second objective of the project was to gather faunistic data with a Citizen Science approach, using the web and a mobile application software (app specifically built for mobile devices. The validation of the records collected by the citizens was carried out by experts, based on photographs, which were obligatory for all records. Dissemination activities represented the principal way to contact and engage citizens for the data collection and also offered the possibility of providing information on topics such as Natura 2000, the Habitats Directive, the role of monitoring in nature conservation, the importance of forest ecosystems and the ecological role of the saproxylic insects. An innovative method tested during the project was the training of a dog for searching and monitoring the elusive hermit beetle; the trained dog also added a “curiosity” factor to attract public attention towards this rare insect and

  12. 78 FR 22948 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer...

  13. 78 FR 41193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer...

  14. 78 FR 78516 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer...

  15. 25 CFR 170.436 - How are public hearings for IRR planning and projects funded?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Planning, Design, and Construction of Indian Reservation Roads Program Facilities Public Hearings § 170.436 How are public hearings for IRR planning and projects funded... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How are public hearings for IRR planning and projects...

  16. Meeting people where they are: engaging public housing residents for integrated pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammell, Madeleine K; Duro, Laurie; Litonjua, Emily; Berry, Lilly; Reid, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    In a unique partnership, the Boston Public Health Commission, the Boston Housing Authority (BHA), Boston University School of Public Health, the Committee for Boston Public Housing, and the West Broadway Task Force (WBTF) led an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) intervention in Boston's public housing developments. Key to the success of the program was recruiting residents to participate. Residents who were trained as Community Health Advocates (CHAs) at the West Broadway Development in South Boston, Massachusetts, recruited over 300 homes to participate in the IPM intervention (out of 484 living units). This article describes the recruitment strategy and success from the perspective of CHAs at the West Broadway development.

  17. Using Virtual and In-Person Engagement Opportunities to Connect K-12 Students, Teachers, and the Public With NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Assets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P.; Foxworth, S.; Luckey, M. K.; McInturff, B.; Mosie, A.; Runco, S.; Todd, N.; Willis, K. J.; Zeigler, R.

    2017-01-01

    Engaging K-12 students, teachers, and the public with NASA Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) assets provides an extraordinary opportunity to connect audiences with authentic aspects unique to our nation's space program. NASA ARES has effectively engaged audiences with 1) Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) experts, 2) NASA specialized facilities, and 3) NASA astromaterial samples through both virtual and in-person engagement opportunities. These engagement opportunities help connect local and national audiences with STEM role models, promote the exciting work being facilitated through NASA's Science Mission Directorate, and expose our next generation of scientific explorers to science they may be inspired to pursue as a future STEM career.

  18. Understanding perspectives on major system change: A comparative case study of public engagement and the implementation of urgent and emergency care system reconfiguration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Conor; Droog, Elsa; Healy, Orla; McHugh, Sheena; Buckley, Claire; Browne, John Patrick

    2017-07-01

    Major changes have been made to how emergency care services are configured in several regions in the Republic of Ireland. This study investigated the hypothesis that engagement activities undertaken prior to these changes influenced stakeholder perspectives on the proposed changes and impacted on the success of implementation. A comparative case-study approach was used to explore the changes in three regions. These regions were chosen for the case study as the nature of the proposals to reconfigure care provision were broadly similar but implementation outcomes varied considerably. Documentary analysis of reconfiguration planning reports was used to identify planned public engagement activities. Semi-structured interviews with 74 purposively-sampled stakeholders explored their perspectives on reconfiguration, engagement activities and public responses to reconfiguration. Framework analysis was used, integrating inductive and deductive approaches. Approaches to public engagement and success of implementation differed considerably across the three cases. Regions that presented the public with the reconfiguration plan alone reported greater public opposition and difficulty in implementing changes. Engagement activities that included a range of stakeholders and continued throughout the reconfiguration process appeared to largely address public concerns, contributing to smoother implementation. The presentation of reconfiguration reports alone is not enough to convince communities of the case for change. Genuine, ongoing and inclusive engagement offers the best opportunity to address community concerns about reconfiguration. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Making YOHKOH SXT Images Available to the Public: The YOHKOH Public Outreach Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, M. B.; McKenzie, D.; Slater, T.; Acton, L.; Alexander, D.; Freeland, S.; Lemen, J.; Metcalf, T.

    1999-05-01

    The NASA funded Yohkoh Public Outreach Project (YPOP) provides public access to high quality Yohkoh SXT data via the World Wide Web. The products of this effort are available to the scientific research community, K-12 schools, and informal education centers including planetaria, museums, and libraries. The project utilizes the intrinsic excitement of the SXT data, and in particular the SXT movies, to develop science learning tools and classroom activities. The WWW site at URL: http://solar.physics.montana.edu/YPOP/ uses a movie theater theme to highlight available Yohkoh movies in a format that is entertaining and inviting to non-scientists. The site features informational tours of the Sun as a star, the solar magnetic field, the internal structure and the Sun's general features. The on-line Solar Classroom has proven very popular, showcasing hand-on activities about image filtering, the solar cycle, satellite orbits, image processing, construction of a model Yohkoh satellite, solar rotation, measuring sunspots and building a portable sundial. The YPOP Guestbook has been helpful in evaluating the usefulness of the site with over 300 detailed comments to date.

  20. The Impact of Sustained Engagement on Cognitive Function in Older Adults: The Synapse Project

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Denise C.; Lodi-Smith, Jennifer; Drew, Linda; Haber, Sara; Hebrank, Andrew; Bischof, Gérard N.; Aamodt, Whitley

    2013-01-01

    In the research reported here, we tested the hypothesis that sustained engagement in learning new skills that activated working memory, episodic memory, and reasoning over a period of 3 months would enhance cognitive function in older adults. In three conditions with high cognitive demands, participants learned to quilt, learned digital photography, or engaged in both activities for an average of 16.51 hr a week for 3 months. Results at posttest indicated that episodic memory was enhanced in ...

  1. Engaging Communities through Vision Development: A Systems Approach to Public Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Patty L.

    2005-01-01

    The implementation of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) federal legislation in 2001 exemplifies extreme reaction to an escalating public unrest with educational systems over the past several decades of "educational reform." Effective public relations and communication with stakeholders is threatened during this time of increased public…

  2. Museum-University Partnerships as a New Platform for Public Engagement with Scientific Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jamie; Chesebrough, David; Cryan, Jason; Koster, Emlyn

    2016-01-01

    A growing trend in natural history museums, science museums, and science centers is the establishment of innovative new partnerships with universities to bring scientific research to the public in compelling and transformative ways. The strengths of both kinds of institutions are leveraged in effective and publicly visible programs, activities,…

  3. Radiation by the numbers: developing an on-line Canadian radiation dose calculator as a public engagement and education tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalzell, M.T.J. [Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Concerns arising from misunderstandings about radiation are often cited as a main reason for public antipathy towards nuclear development and impede decision-making by governments and individuals. A lack of information about everyday sources of radiation exposure that is accessible, relatable and factual contributes to the problem. As part of its efforts to be a fact-based source of information on nuclear issues, the Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation has developed an on-line Canadian Radiation Dose Calculator as a tool to provide context about common sources of radiation. This paper discusses the development of the calculator and describes how the Fedoruk Centre is using it and other tools to support public engagement on nuclear topics. (author)

  4. A review of water quality policies in relation to public good benefits and community engagement in rural Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daly Karen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines current recreational water use in the rural landscape in Ireland and reviews current EU policies and national regulations aimed at protecting water quality and the wider environment under agri-environmental schemes. Specifically, we review policy instruments that protect water for recreational use, their impacts and the challenges they pose for rural development against current requirements to increase public awareness and participation. In Ireland, there is limited experience in public participation in water quality protection and restoration and we highlight how this can be addressed by focussing on the specific contribution of water quality in rural areas in relation to the provision of recreational ecosystem services. These services provide the infrastructure for much of Ireland’s rural tourism sector. In this context, emerging participatory approaches to policy implementation are also assessed as national and local government prioritise community engagement for the second cycle under the EU Water Framework Directive.

  5. From Climate Advocacy to Public Engagement: An Exploration of the Roles of Environmental Non-Governmental Organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Szarka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of non-governmental organisations (NGOs to encourage public engagement with climate protection is analysed through a conceptual framework focused on six advocacy functions: issue framing, knowledge generation and dissemination, attribution of responsibility, lobbying, public mobilisation and agenda setting. This framework is used to organise and interpret the results of a fieldwork study of environmental NGOs, conducted in France, Germany and the UK. Key findings include the importance of the cross-linkage of climate with other categories of issue, NGO stress on knowledge as a precursor to action, a ‘politics of accountability’ in which the attribution of responsibility paves the way for making political demands, a preference for multi-layered lobbying, where process can be as important as product, and the need to adjust NGO mobilisation and agenda setting strategies in the aftermath of the 2009 Copenhagen negotiations and the financial crisis.

  6. Policy Brief: Engagement with Sustainability Concerns in Public Procurement in India: Why and How

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goswami, Anandajit; Diljun, Gaurang Meher; Scrivastava, Nidhi

    2013-08-15

    A major part of the Indian GDP is spent on public procurement. Owing to large spending on procurement, Indian public sector can push towards a process of sustainable production and consumption through sustainable public procurement. Once such a process is implemented with specific contexts, it can create social, economic and environmental benefits. With this background, the policy brief explores why there is a need to promote sustainable public procurement within India. Further, it highlights how such a procurement process can be implemented within India by drawing from international experiences. This policy brief charts out an action plan to implement the procurement process with an analysis of roles and responsibilities of different agencies involved in the implementation. While laying down this action plan, the brief also indicates about the existing status of sustainable public procurement in India. Therefore, this policy brief creates a way forward for public sector agencies, policy and decision makers to implement sustainable public procurement within India by understanding the current context of the issue within the nation and abroad.

  7. The NASA SMD Science Education and Public Outreach Forums: Engaging Scientists in NASA Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise A.; Peticolas, L.; Schwerin, T.; Shipp, S.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) program provides a direct return on the public’s investment in NASA’s science missions and research programs through a comprehensive suite of educational resources and opportunities for students, educators, and the public. Four Science Education and Public Outreach Forums work with SMD-funded missions, research programs, and grantees to organize individual E/PO activities into a coordinated, effective, and efficient nationwide effort, with easy entry points for scientists, educators, and the public. We outline the Forums’ role in 1) facilitating communication and collaboration among SMD E/PO programs, scientists, and educators; 2) supporting utilization of best practices and educational research; 3) creating clear paths of involvement for scientists interested in SMD E/PO; and, 4) enabling efficient and effective use of NASA content and education products. Our work includes a cross-Forum collaboration to inventory existing SMD education materials; identify and analyze gaps; and interconnect and organize materials in an accessible manner for multiple audiences. The result is NASAWavelength.org, a one-stop-shop for all NASA SMD education products, including tools to help users identify resources based upon their needs and national education standards. The Forums have also collaborated with the SMD E/PO community to provide a central point of access to metrics, evaluation findings, and impacts for SMD-funded E/PO programs (http://smdepo.org/page/5324). We also present opportunities for the astronomy community to participate in collaborations supporting NASA SMD efforts in the K - 12 Formal Education, Informal Education and Outreach, Higher Education and Research Scientist communities. See Bartolone et al., Lawton et al., Meinke et al., and Buxner et al. (this conference), respectively, to learn about Forum resources and opportunities specific to each of these communities.

  8. Perceptions of and willingness to engage in public health precautions to prevent 2009 H1N1 influenza transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozlowski Lynn T

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recommendations about precautionary behaviors are a key part of public health responses to infectious disease threats such as the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Individuals' interpretation of recommendations, willingness to comply, and factors predicting willingness were examined. Methods A telephone survey of adult residents of New York State was conducted (N = 807. Respondents reported how they interpreted recommendations, willingness to engage in recommended actions, risk perceptions for H1N1 infection, and perceived efficacy of recommendations. Demographic characteristics were used to calculate sampling weights to obtain population-representative estimates. Results There was substantial variability in interpretation of preventive actions. Willingness to engage in preventive actions also varied substantially; vaccination willingness was substantially lower than other preventive actions. No pattern of demographic characteristics consistently predicted willingness. Perceived efficacy was associated with willingness for all recommendations, and perceived severity was associated with willingness for some recommendations. Conclusions Results suggest that individual interpretation of actions differ widely. The results suggest that current recommendations are not clear to laypeople and are open to different interpretations. These varying interpretations should be considered in crafting public health messages about precautionary behaviors.

  9. Information Literacy in Practice: engaging public library workers in rural South Africa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Jager, Karin; Nassimbeni, Mary

    2007-01-01

    .... The campaign, a first of its kind in Mpumalanga (and South Africa), gave public library workers the opportunity to develop their information literacy skills and to apply them in their libraries...

  10. Engagement of National Board of Examinations in strengthening public health education in India: present landscape, opportunities and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anjali; Zodpey, Sanjay; Batra, Bipin

    2014-01-01

    A trained and adequate heath workforce forms the crux in designing, implementing and monitoring health programs and delivering quality health services. Education is recognized as a critical instrument for creating such trained health professionals who can effectively address the 21 st century health challenges. At present, the Public Health Education in India is offered through medical colleges and also outside the corridors of medical colleges which was not the scenario earlier. Traditionally, Public Health Education has been a domain of medical colleges and was open for medical graduates only. In order to standardize the Postgraduate Medical Education in India, the National Board of Examinations (NBE) was set up as an independent autonomous body of its kind in the country in the field of medical sciences with the prime objective of improving the quality of the medical education. NBE has also played a significant role in enhancing Public Health Education in India through its Diplomat of National Board (DNB) Programs in Social and Preventive Medicine, Health and Hospital Administration, Maternal and Child Health, Family Medicine and Field Epidemiology. It envisions creating a cadre of skilled and motivated public health professionals and also developing a roadmap for postgraduate career pathways. However, there still exists gamut of opportunities for it to engage in expanding the scope of Public Health Education. It can play a key role in accreditation of public health programs and institutions which can transform the present landscape of education of health professionals. It also needs to revisit and re-initiate programs like DNB in Tropical Medicine and Occupational Health which were discontinued. The time is imperative for NBE to seize these opportunities and take necessary actions in strengthening and expanding the scope of Public Health Education in India.

  11. Engagement of national board of examinations in strengthening public health education in India: Present landscape, opportunities and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A trained and adequate heath workforce forms the crux in designing, implementing and monitoring health programs and delivering quality health services. Education is recognized as a critical instrument for creating such trained health professionals who can effectively address the 21 st century health challenges. At present, the Public Health Education in India is offered through medical colleges and also outside the corridors of medical colleges which was not the scenario earlier. Traditionally, Public Health Education has been a domain of medical colleges and was open for medical graduates only. In order to standardize the Postgraduate Medical Education in India, the National Board of Examinations (NBE was set up as an independent autonomous body of its kind in the country in the field of medical sciences with the prime objective of improving the quality of the medical education. NBE has also played a significant role in enhancing Public Health Education in India through its Diplomat of National Board (DNB Programs in Social and Preventive Medicine, Health and Hospital Administration, Maternal and Child Health, Family Medicine and Field Epidemiology. It envisions creating a cadre of skilled and motivated public health professionals and also developing a roadmap for postgraduate career pathways. However, there still exists gamut of opportunities for it to engage in expanding the scope of Public Health Education. It can play a key role in accreditation of public health programs and institutions which can transform the present landscape of education of health professionals. It also needs to revisit and re-initiate programs like DNB in Tropical Medicine and Occupational Health which were discontinued. The time is imperative for NBE to seize these opportunities and take necessary actions in strengthening and expanding the scope of Public Health Education in India.

  12. More Bang for the Buck: Integrating Green Infrastructure into Existing Public Works Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    shares lessons learned from municipal and county officials experienced in coordinating green infrastructure applications with scheduled street maintenance, park improvements, and projects on public sites.

  13. The Art Of Planetary Science: An Exhibition - Bringing Together The Art And Science Communities To Engage The Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaro, Jamie; Keane, Jamies; Peacock, Sarah; Schaefer, Ethan; Tanquary, Hannah

    2014-11-01

    The University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory (LPL) presents the 2nd Annual The Art of Planetary Science: An Exhibition (TAPS) on 17-19 October 2014. This art exhibition and competition features artwork inspired by planetary science, alongside works created from scientific data. It is designed to connect the local art and science communities of Tucson, and engage the public together in celebration of the beauty and elegance of the universe. The exhibition is organized by a team of volunteer graduate students, with the help of LPL’s Space Imaging Center, and support from the LPL administration. Last year’s inaugural event featured over 150 works of art from 70 artists and scientists. A variety of mediums were represented, including paintings, photography, digital prints, sculpture, glasswork, textiles, film, and written word. Over 300 guests attended the opening. Art submission and event attendance are free, and open to anyone.The primary goal of the event is to present a different side of science to the public. Too often, the public sees science as dull or beyond their grasp. This event provides scientists the opportunity to demonstrate the beauty that they find in their science, by creating art out of their scientific data. These works utilized, for example, equations, simulations, visual representations of spacecraft data, and images of extra-terrestrial material samples. Viewing these works alongside more traditional artwork inspired by those same scientific ideas provided the audience a more complex, multifaceted view of the content that would not be possible viewing either alone. The event also provides a way to reach out specifically to the adult community. Most science outreach is targeted towards engaging children in STEM fields. While this is vital for the long term, adults have more immediate control over the perception of science and public policy that provides funding and research opportunities to scientists. We hope this event raises

  14. Single-Sex Education. A Public Policy Issue. Project Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Abbe; And Others

    This article reports a study of the public policy implications of publicly supported primary and secondary single-sex education in the United States. Twenty-two public intellectuals concerned with educational issues were interviewed. Subjects were either academic researchers, government officials and legislators, directors of public interest…

  15. Using Twitter to Understand Public Perceptions Regarding the #HPV Vaccine: Opportunities for Public Health Nurses to Engage in Social Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim-Malpass, Jessica; Mitchell, Emma M; Sun, Emily; Kennedy, Christine

    2017-07-01

    Given the degree of public mistrust and provider hesitation regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, it is important to explore how information regarding the vaccine is shared online via social media outlets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the content of messaging regarding the HPV vaccine on the social media and microblogging site Twitter, and describe the sentiment of those messages. This study utilized a cross-sectional descriptive approach. Over a 2-week period, Twitter content was searched hourly using key terms "#HPV and #Gardasil," which yielded 1,794 Twitter posts for analysis. Each post was then analyzed individually using an a priori coding strategy and directed content analysis. The majority of Twitter posts were written by lay consumers and were sharing commentary about a media source. However, when actual URLs were shared, the most common form of share was linking back to a blog post written by lay users. The vast majority of content was presented as polarizing (either as a positive or negative tweet), with 51% of the Tweets representing a positive viewpoint. Using Twitter to understand public sentiment offers a novel perspective to explore the context of health communication surrounding certain controversial issues. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A Review of the Social Research on Public Perception and Engagement Practices in Urban Air Pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltra, C.; Sala, R.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the state of public information in the field of air pollution in Spain. We conducted semi-structured interviews with members of public agencies, technical experts, scientists, and members of non governmental associations together with a documentary analysis of air pollution documents (plans, reports, etc.). We tried to characterize the information actions on air quality carried out in Spanish cities during the last years. In the results section we first analyze the ideas, concerns and considerations that underlie the actions of public information on air pollution, as well as the main challenges of public communication on this subject, according to the documents and the different experts consulted. We analyze the various contents of information transmitted nowadays (on levels of pollution, health impacts and mitigation or protection actions), as well as the mechanisms by which it is communicated, both continuously and in the case of threshold overcoming episodes. We also review the different media used to communicate air pollution information (Internet, mobile applications and other forms) and other issues such as information audiences, or the perceived impacts of information provided. Finally, the implications for more diverse and effective public involvement strategies in air pollution are discussed. (Author)

  17. "If We Only Told Our Story Better...": Re-Envisioning State-University Relations through the Lens of Public Engagement. WISCAPE Viewpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerts, David J.

    2011-01-01

    A prevailing notion among higher education leaders is that public relations and marketing efforts must be intensified to boost legislative support for colleges and universities. However, this view fails to consider whether the academy might increase its standing among legislators and the general public by becoming more productively engaged in…

  18. Engaging Students in Learning: Findings from a Study of Project-Led Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sandra; Mesquita, Diana; Flores, Maria Assunção; Lima, Rui M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from a three-year study of project-based learning implemented in the first year of the Industrial Engineering and Management programme, at the University of Minho, Portugal. This particular model was inspired on project-led education (PLE), following Powell and Weenk's [2003. "Project-Led Engineering…

  19. Engaging Students in Learning: Findings from a Study of Project-Led Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sandra; Mesquita, Diana; Flores, Maria Assunção; Lima, Rui M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from a three-year study of project-based learning implemented in the first year of the Industrial Engineering and Management programme, at the University of Minho, Portugal. This particular model was inspired on project-led education (PLE), following Powell and Weenk's [2003. "Project-Led Engineering…

  20. Tweeting as Health Communication: Health Organizations' Use of Twitter for Health Promotion and Public Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyojung; Reber, Bryan H; Chon, Myoung-Gi

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how major health organizations use Twitter for disseminating health information, building relationships, and encouraging actions to improve health. The sampled organizations were the American Heart Association, American Cancer Society, and American Diabetes Association. A content analysis was conducted on 1,583 tweets to examine these organizations' use of Twitter's interactive features and to understand the message functions and topics of their tweets. The numbers of retweets and favorites were also measured as engagement indicators and compared by different message functions. The results revealed that all of the organizations posted original tweets most, but they differed in the degree to which they used the retweet and reply functions. Hashtags and hyperlinks were the most frequently used interactive tools. The majority of the tweets were about organization-related topics, whereas personal health-related tweets represented a relatively small portion of the sample. Followers were most likely to like and retweet personal health action-based messages.

  1. Developing a Forest Health Index for public engagement and decision support using local climatic, ecological, and socioeconomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, J. C.; Katzenberger, J.; Cundiff, J.

    2013-12-01

    Forest health is an oft-used term without a generally accepted definition. Nonetheless, the concept of forest health continues to permeate scientific, resource management, and public discourse, and it is viewed as a helpful communication device for engagement on issues of concern to forests and their surrounding communities. Notwithstanding the challenges associated with defining the concept of 'forest health,' we present a model for assessing forest health at a watershed scale. Utilizing the Roaring Fork Valley, Colorado--a mountain watershed of 640,000 forested acres--as a case study, we have created a Forest Health Index that integrates a range of climatic, ecological, and socioeconomic data into an assessment organized along a series of public goals including, 1) Ecosystem Services, 2) Public Health & Safety, 3) Sustainable Use & Management, and 4) Ecological Integrity. Methods for this index were adopted from an earlier effort called the Ocean Health Index by Halpern et al, 2012. Indicators that represent drivers of change, such as temperature and precipitation, as well as effects of change, such as primary productivity and phenology, were selected. Each indicator is assessed by comparing a current status of that indicator to a reference scenario obtained through one of the following methods: a) statistical analysis of baseline data from the indicator record, b) commonly accepted normals, thresholds, limits, concentrations, etc., and c) subjective expert judgment. The result of this assessment is a presentation of graphical data and accompanying ratings that combine to form an index of health for the watershed forest ecosystem. We find this product to have potential merit for communities working to assess the range of conditions affecting forest health as well as making sense of the outcomes of those affects. Here, we present a description of the index methodology, data results from engagement with forest watershed stakeholders, example results of data

  2. Making a Fun Cartesian Diver: A Simple Project to Engage Kinaesthetic Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Nazir; Subramaniam, R.

    2007-01-01

    Students in the normal technical stream are generally less academically inclined. Teaching physics to them can be a challenge. A possible way to engage such kinaesthetic learners is to encourage them to fabricate physics-based toys. The activity described in this article shows how a group of three students were able to come up with a creative…

  3. Youth Engagement in Electoral Activities: A Collaborative Evaluation of a Civic Education Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, Michael J.; Rodríguez-Campos, Liliana; Walker-Egea, Connie; Owens, Corina; Bellara, Aarti

    2014-01-01

    Youth civic engagement is recognized as an essential component necessary for the preservation of democratic practices; however, inadequate levels of civic participation persist among young people. Past research has shown that young people are more likely to participate in politics when they are informed. We present survey data collected from…

  4. Noninstructional Influences on Adolescent Engagement and Achievement. Final Report: Project 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, B. Bradford; Steinberg, Laurence

    The impact of four influences--family, peers, part-time employment, and school-sponsored extracurricular activities--on the achievement patterns of high school students is examined in this research study. The main purpose of the study was to identify the specific processes in each of the four areas by which students' academic engagement and school…

  5. Effect of Peer Evaluation Format on Student Engagement in a Group Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    Active participation in classrooms often involves group work. In order to examine the effect of using peer evaluations as part of that experience, this study measured the influence of four formats of peer evaluation on students' perceptions of fairness of the peer evaluation method, its impact on peer engagement, and peer evaluation scores. The…

  6. How do ICT project managers manage project knowledge in the public sector? An empirical enquiry from the Victorian Public Sector in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakub Karagoz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Projects are temporal organisation forms that are highly knowledge-intensive and play an important role in modern public (and private sector organisations. The effective and efficient creation, dissemination, application and conservation of relevant knowledge are a critical success factor in the management of projects. Yet, project management (PM and knowledge management (KM are two distinct disciplines. This paper explores the relationship between PM and KM by analysing the literature at the intersection of those disciplines and presenting the empirical results of a case study of the Victorian Public Sector (VPS in Australia. A series of 14 interviews were conducted to explore how ICT project managers manage project knowledge across the departments of the VPS. Findings show a strong preference among the participants for informal, face-to-face interactions and agile approaches to facilitate knowledge transfer and creation in ICT project environments.

  7. Quantifying and Understanding Effects from Wildlife, Radar, and Public Engagement on Future Wind Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2017-05-24

    This presentation provides an overview of findings from a report published in 2016 by researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, An Initial Evaluation of Siting Considerations on Current and Future Wind Deployment. The presentation covers the background for research, the Energy Department's Wind Vision, research methods, siting considerations, the wind project deployment process, and costs associated with siting considerations.

  8. Contracts, Choice, and Customer Service: Marketization and Public Engagement in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiara, Maia Bloomfield; Gold, Eva; Simon, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: Market models of school reform are having a major impact on school districts across the country. While scholars have examined many aspects of this process, we know far less about the general effects of marketization on public participation in education and local education politics. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of…

  9. Contracts, Choice, and Customer Service: Marketization and Public Engagement in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiara, Maia Bloomfield; Gold, Eva; Simon, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Background/Context: Market models of school reform are having a major impact on school districts across the country. While scholars have examined many aspects of this process, we know far less about the general effects of marketization on public participation in education and local education politics. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of…

  10. 78 FR 4295 - Engaging in Public Health Research on the Causes and Prevention of Gun Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... Prevention of Gun Violence Memorandum for the Secretary of Health and Human Services In addition to being a law enforcement challenge, gun violence is also a serious public health issue that affects thousands... strides can be made by assessing the causes of gun violence and the successful efforts in place for...

  11. Full-Service Community Schools: Cause and Outcome of Public Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Richard

    2005-01-01

    As the federal No Child Left Behind law places increased pressure on schools to improve the academic performance of all children--notably those who have been historically underserved--many educators are realizing that they cannot do the work alone. Now more than ever, the public schools need parents and other community leaders to work with them,…

  12. Relationship of Instructional Methods to Student Engagement in Two Public High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lisa S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the argument that schools that emphasize relational learning are better able to serve the motivational needs of adolescents. Matched-pair samples (n=80) from two public secondary schools were compared using the experience sampling method (ESM). Students attending a "non-traditional" school (which employed group decision…

  13. A Narrative Inquiry Exploring How College Communication Professors Engage Students with Public Speaking Apprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to discover how communication professors at four-year private universities help students who exhibit public speaking apprehension (PSA) learn to cope with their anxiety. The research was framed in the narrative inquiry paradigm, interviewing eight college communication professors about their experiences…

  14. Translating Science to Benefit Diverse Publics : Engagement Pathways for Linking Climate Risk, Uncertainty, and Agricultural Identities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leith, Peat; Vanclay, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We argue that for scientists and science communicators to build usable knowledge for various publics, they require social and political capital, skills in boundary work, and ethical acuity. Drawing on the context of communicating seasonal climate predictions to farmers in Australia, we detail four k

  15. Engaging academia to advance the science and practice of environmental public health tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strosnider, Heather; Zhou, Ying; Balluz, Lina; Qualters, Judith

    2014-10-01

    Public health agencies at the federal, state, and local level are responsible for implementing actions and policies that address health problems related to environmental hazards. These actions and policies can be informed by integrating or linking data on health, exposure, hazards, and population. The mission of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention׳s National Environmental Public Health Tracking Program (Tracking Program) is to provide information from a nationwide network of integrated health, environmental hazard, and exposure data that drives actions to improve the health of communities. The Tracking Program and federal, state, and local partners collect, integrate, analyze, and disseminate data and information to inform environmental public health actions. However, many challenges exist regarding the availability and quality of data, the application of appropriate methods and tools to link data, and the state of the science needed to link and analyze health and environmental data. The Tracking Program has collaborated with academia to address key challenges in these areas. The collaboration has improved our understanding of the uses and limitations of available data and methods, expanded the use of existing data and methods, and increased our knowledge about the connections between health and environment. Valuable working relationships have been forged in this process, and together we have identified opportunities and improvements for future collaborations to further advance the science and practice of environmental public health tracking. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Translating Science to Benefit Diverse Publics : Engagement Pathways for Linking Climate Risk, Uncertainty, and Agricultural Identities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leith, Peat; Vanclay, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We argue that for scientists and science communicators to build usable knowledge for various publics, they require social and political capital, skills in boundary work, and ethical acuity. Drawing on the context of communicating seasonal climate predictions to farmers in Australia, we detail four k

  17. My Space- a collaboration between Arts & Science to create a suite of informal interactive public engagement initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Niamh, , Dr.; McSweeney, Clair; Smith, Niall, , Dr.; O'Neill, Stephanie; Foley, Cathy; Crawley, Joanna; Phelan, Ronan; Colley, Dan; Henderson, Clare; Conroy, Lorraine

    2015-04-01

    A suite of informal interactive public engagement initiatives, entitled 'MySpace' was created, to promote the importance of Earth science and Space exploration, to ignite curiosity and discover new and engaging platforms for science in the Arts & in STEM Education, and to increase awareness of careers in Ireland's Space and Earth Science industries. Site visits to research centres in Ireland & abroad, interviews with scientists, engineers, and former astronauts were conducted over a 6 month period. A suite of performance pieces emerged from this development phase, based on Dr. Shaw's personal documented journey and the dissemination of her research. These included: 1. 'To Space'- A live multimedia theatre performance aimed at the general public & young adult. Initially presented as a 'Work In Progress' event at The Festival of Curiosity, the full theatre show 'To Space' premiered at Science Gallery, Dublin as part of Tiger Dublin Fringe Arts Festival. Response to the piece was very strong, indicated by audience response, box office sales and theatre reviews in national press and online. A national and international tour is in place for 2015. To Space was performed a total of 10 times and was seen by 680 audiences. 2. An adapted piece for 13-17 year old students -'ToSpace for Secondary Schools'- to increase awareness of Ireland's involvement in Space Exploration & to encourage school leavers to dream big. This show toured nationally as part of World Space week and Science week events in conjunction with ESERO Ireland, CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory, Cork, Armagh Planetarium & Dunsink Observatory. It was performed 12 times and was seen by 570 students. 3. 'My Place in Space', created for families from the very old (60 +) to the very young (3yrs +), this highly interactive workshop highlighted the appeal of science through the wonders of our planet and its place in Space. Presented at Festival of Curiosity, the Mallow Science Fair and at Science week 2014, this

  18. Time for a paradigm shift in how we transfer knowledge? Making the case for translational science and public engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Barron

    2015-04-01

    transfer, the false assumptions that result, and the ramifications for the methods employed the vast majority of the time by the scientific community. The case for public engagement and participatory approaches will be made, followed by a brief survey of the theories, methods and tools that make engagement possible and effective. Successful adaptation to environmental change requires a much stronger link between science and society. While science communication and awareness raising are necessary, they are much more effective when coupled with robust, formative, and participatory approaches to stakeholder engagement. This is necessary for successful land-based adaptation to environmental change.

  19. Strategies for Engaging NASA Earth Scientists in K-12 Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeson, Blanche W.; Gabrys, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    Engagement of the Earth Science research community in formal education at the kindergarten through high school level and in various aspects of informal education and in professional development of practitioners in related fields has been and continues to be a challenge. A range of approaches is being used and new ones are constantly being tried. Fundamental to our strategies is an understanding of the priorities, skills, academic experiences, motivation, rewards and work experiences of most scientists. It is within this context that efforts to engage a scientist in education efforts are attempted. A key strategy is to limit our requests to activities where the scientist's contribution of time and expertise can have the most impact. Don't waste the scientist's time! Time is one of their most prized resources, it is extremely valuable to you, and to them, we treat their time like a treasured resource. The clearer a scientist's role, their unique contribution and the finite nature of their effort, the more likely they are to participate. It is critical that commitments made to scientists are kept. If they want and can do more, great! Don't expect or assume more will be forthcoming. Another approach that we use is to create periodic venues that, among other things, serve to identify individuals who have an interest or inclination to con , tribute to education efforts. Once identified we strive to determine their interests so that we can make the best match between their interests and the needs of the education program or efforts. In this way, we try to make the best use of their time while engaging them in efforts which will be personally rewarding, and will further the overall education objectives. In addition, we try to make it easier for scientists to participate by providing focused training, such as development of their interviewing skills, and exposure to key concepts, knowledge and skills which are well known among educators but are not common knowledge among

  20. Strategies for Engaging NASA Earth Scientists in K-12 Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeson, B. W.; Gabrys, R. E.

    2001-05-01

    Engagement of the Earth Science research community in formal education at the kindergarten through high school level and in various aspects of informal education and in professional development of practitioners in related fields has been and continues to be a challenge. A range of approaches is being used and new ones are constantly being tried. Fundamental to our strategies is an understanding of the priorities, skills, academic experiences, motivation, rewards and work experiences of most scientists. It is within this context that efforts to engage a scientist in education efforts are attempted. A key strategy is to limit our requests to activities where the scientist's contribution of time and expertise can have the most impact. Don't waste the scientist's time! Time is one of their most prized resources, it is extremely valuable to you, and to them - we treat their time like a treasured resource. The clearer a scientist's role, their unique contribution and the finite nature of their effort, the more likely they are to participate. It is critical that commitments made to scientists are kept. If they want and can do more -great! Don't expect or assume more will be forthcoming. Another approach that we use is to create periodic venues that, among other things, serve to identify individuals who have an interest or inclination to contribute to education efforts. Once identified we strive to determine their interests so that we can make the best match between their interests and the needs of the education program or efforts. In this way, we try to make the best use of their time while engaging them in efforts which will be personally rewarding, and will further the overall education objectives. In addition, we try to make it easier for scientists to participate by providing focused training, such as development of their interviewing skills, and exposure to key concepts, knowledge and skills which are well known among educators but are not common knowledge among

  1. A community's response to suicide through public art: stakeholder perspectives from the Finding the Light Within project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohatt, Nathaniel V; Singer, Jonathan B; Evans, Arthur C; Matlin, Samantha L; Golden, Jane; Harris, Cathy; Burns, James; Siciliano, Catherine; Kiernan, Guy; Pelleritti, Margaret; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2013-09-01

    Suicide is a preventable public health problem and a leading cause of death in the United States. Despite recognized need for community-based strategies for suicide prevention, most suicide prevention programs focus on individual-level change. This article presents seven first person accounts of Finding the Light Within, a community mobilization initiative to reduce the stigma associated with suicide through public arts participation that took place in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from 2011 through 2012. The stigma associated with suicide is a major challenge to suicide prevention, erecting social barriers to effective prevention and treatment and enhancing risk factors for people struggling with suicidal ideation and recovery after losing a loved one to suicide. This project engaged a large and diverse audience and built a new community around suicide prevention through participatory public art, including community design and production of a large public mural about suicide, storytelling and art workshops, and a storytelling website. We present this project as a model for how arts participation can address suicide on multiple fronts-from raising awareness and reducing stigma, to promoting community recovery, to providing healing for people and communities in need.

  2. A Community’s Response to Suicide Through Public Art: Stakeholder Perspectives from the Finding the Light Within Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jonathan B.; Evans, Arthur C.; Matlin, Samantha L.; Golden, Jane; Harris, Cathy; Burns, James; Siciliano, Catherine; Kiernan, Guy; Pelleritti, Margaret; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is a preventable public health problem and a leading cause of death in the United States. Despite recognized need for community-based strategies for suicide prevention, most suicide prevention programs focus on individual-level change. This article presents seven first person accounts of Finding the Light Within, a community mobilization initiative to reduce the stigma associated with suicide through public arts participation that took place in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from 2011 through 2012. The stigma associated with suicide is a major challenge to suicide prevention, erecting social barriers to effective prevention and treatment and enhancing risk factors for people struggling with suicidal ideation and recovery after losing a loved one to suicide. This project engaged a large and diverse audience and built a new community around suicide prevention through participatory public art, including community design and production of a large public mural about suicide, storytelling and art workshops, and a storytelling website. We present this project as a model for how arts participation can address suicide on multiple fronts—from raising awareness and reducing stigma, to promoting community recovery, to providing healing for people and communities in need. PMID:23743604

  3. Making the invisible visible - blending data with film, CGI and intuitive apps in environmental education and public engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Ravi

    2015-04-01

    Comprehending the scale of our current environmental challenges and the possible impacts of alternative policy pathways and decisions, is a very human problem, at all levels of society. For everyone from policy negotiators to school children, the invisibility of the processes of environmental change (e.g. the increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere), and the timeframes over which impacts are felt, exacerbate the difficulty of both understanding and communicating about the challenge. By unleashing real environmental data and imagery in a form easily usable by educators and non-technical audiences, it is possible to greatly address this problem, whilst also engaging potential new contributors in solution-finding. The combination of real data, innovative data visualisation techniques, film, animation and apps can help to connect with the public, empower teachers and learners, and create new business opportunities. This presentation will look at these opportunities principally through two current case-study initiatives: a) New methods of presenting and enabling access to earth observation data through art, film and apps (including work led by Imperative Space); and b) The use of high-end animation to enable more intuitive understanding of climate change related data (including work led by Carbon Visuals). Through this work, we will consider the importance of 'emotional engagement' and personal impact of environmental imagery and data when presented appropriately. Our aim should be to ensure the next generation of policy and decision-makers have grown up with a routine, embedded, and day-to-day exposure to environmental data and imagery, so that they are equipped with a deep-seated understanding of the majesty, vulnerability and fragility of our environment. Emotional engagement can be derived from clear communication about the context of the imagery and data, but also through high 'production values', the quality of apps and tools, the way in which stories are

  4. Engaging Scientists in NASA Education and Public Outreach: K - 12 Formal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolone, Lindsay; Smith, D. A.; Eisenhamer, B.; Lawton, B. L.; Universe Professional Development Collaborative, Multiwavelength; NASA Data Collaborative, Use of; SEPOF K-12 Formal Education Working Group; E/PO Community, SMD

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Science Education and Public Outreach Forums support the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and its education and public outreach (E/PO) community through a coordinated effort to enhance the coherence and efficiency of SMD-funded E/PO programs. The Forums foster collaboration between scientists with content expertise and educators with pedagogy expertise. We present opportunities for the astronomy community to participate in collaborations supporting the NASA SMD efforts in the K - 12 Formal Education community. Members of the K - 12 Formal Education community include classroom educators, homeschool educators, students, and curriculum developers. The Forums’ efforts for the K - 12 Formal Education community include a literature review, appraisal of educators’ needs, coordination of audience-based NASA resources and opportunities, professional development, and support with the Next Generation Science Standards. Learn how to join in our collaborative efforts to support the K - 12 Formal Education community based upon mutual needs and interests.

  5. Financing U.S. Renewable Energy Projects Through Public Capital Vehicles: Qualitative and Quantitative Benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Feldman, D.

    2013-04-01

    This paper explores the possibility of financing renewable energy projects through raising capital in the public markets. It gives an overview of the size, structure, and benefits of public capital markets, as well as showing how renewable energy projects might take advantage of this source of new funds to lower the cost of electricity.

  6. 28 CFR 512.20 - Publication of results of research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Publication of results of research project. 512.20 Section 512.20 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION RESEARCH Research § 512.20 Publication of results of research project. (a)...

  7. Balancing between feasibility and relationship. Interventions to prevent dysfunctionality of conflict in public private partnership projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lousberg, L.H.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research shows that there are many bottle-necks in Public Private Partnership (PPP) Projects in Dutch spatial development. Due to the specific properties of Public Private Partnerships, these bottle-necks can lead to dysfunctional conflicts which are damaging the project. Hence the question is: how

  8. Balancing between feasibility and relationship : interventions to prevent dysfunctionality of conflict in public private partnership projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lousberg, L.H.M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Research shows that there are many bottle-necks in Public Private Partnership (PPP) Projects in Dutch spatial development. Due to the specific properties of Public Private Partnerships, these bottle-necks can lead to dysfunctional conflicts which are damaging the project. Hence the question is: how

  9. Public Role and Engagement in Counterterrorism Efforts: Implications of Israeli Practices for the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-02

    catastrophic events. This system offers a complex tradeoff of advantages and disadvantages . In a large country such as the United States, this federal...shifted to attacking lesser protected “soft” targets, including public transportation, restaurants, hotels , schools, office buildings, and shopping...Communities establishes kiosks for the blind to access around cities in the event of an emergency. The kiosks use brail and vocal directions to guide

  10. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Engaging K-12 Educators, Students, and the General Public in Space Science Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Engaging K-12 Educators, Students, and the General Public in Space Science Exploration" included the following reports:Training Informal Educators Provides Leverage for Space Science Education and Public Outreach; Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education: K-12 Teacher Retention, Renewal, and Involvement in Professional Science; Telling the Tale of Two Deserts: Teacher Training and Utilization of a New Standards-based, Bilingual E/PO Product; Lindstrom M. M. Tobola K. W. Stocco K. Henry M. Allen J. S. McReynolds J. Porter T. T. Veile J. Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets: Space Science Applications of Physics and Chemistry for High School and College Classes -- Update; Utilizing Mars Data in Education: Delivering Standards-based Content by Exposing Educators and Students to Authentic Scientific Opportunities and Curriculum; K. E. Little Elementary School and the Young Astronaut Robotics Program; Integrated Solar System Exploration Education and Public Outreach: Theme, Products and Activities; and Online Access to the NEAR Image Collection: A Resource for Educators and Scientists.

  11. Improving Science Communication and Engaging the Public in Astronomy and Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arion, Douglas N.

    2016-01-01

    A partnershipship between Carthage College and the Appalachian Mountain Club has delivered a successful public education and outreach program that merges natural environment topics and astronomy. Over the four years of activity, over 25,000 people have received programming. The effort has trained nature educators, permanent and seasonal AMC staff, and undergraduate physics and astronomy students to integrate diverse topical material and deliver high quality programming to the lay public. Unique to the program is the holistic nature of the material delivered - an 'atypical' astronomy program. Linking observable characteristics of the natural world with astronomical history and phenomena, and emphasizing the unique sequence of events that have led to human life on Earth, the program has changed attitudes and behaviors among the public participants. Successful interventions have included hands-on observing programs (day and night) that link nature content to the observed objects; table-talk presentations on nature/astronomy topics; dark skies preservation workshops; and hands-on activities developed for younger audiences, including schools, camps, and family groups. An extensive evaluation and assessment effort managed by a leading sociologist has demonstrated the effectiveness of the approach, and contributed to continuous improvement in the program content and methods. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant 1432662.

  12. Enhancing Faculty Engagement and Student Learning in Foundational STEM Courses at a Large Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Howard; Koenig, Kathleen

    2015-03-01

    Enhancing student learning requires both the strong involvement of the faculty member and the student. We present preliminary efforts of an NSF-supported multi-disciplinary program to enhance learning in foundational STEM courses. A central theme, supported by evidenced-based research across the STEM disciplines, is that active leaning engages students in ways that enhance student learning. A secondary theme is that sustained use of active learning techniques by faculty needs a supportive local culture. We describe our initial efforts with the use of Teaching and Learning Liaisons, faculty members trained in research-based instructional strategies in order to lower the barriers for faculty to try new (to them) active learning strategies, and to increase the probability that these faculty carry out the strategies with fidelity. We have assembled a collection of faculty across the STEM disciplines of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics to participate and will compare initial activities by these departments. Efforts to create a supportive culture for these faculty was also provided by tangible department head efforts We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation (DUE-1022563).

  13. CosmoQuest - Scientist Engagement with the Public and Schools via a Virtual Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob; Buxner, Sanlyn; Gay, Pamela L.; Grier, Jennifer A.; Lehan, Cory; CosmoQuest Team

    2016-06-01

    CosmoQuest is a virtual research facility where science data can be analyzed by teams of interested citizen scientists from across the world. Scientists can apply to have their data analyzed through crowdsourcing in our online observatory, which generates validated and publishable results (Robbins et al 2014). Scientists have the opportunity to provide connections to teachers in classrooms so that students can analyze original data and understand the process that astronomers go through from image to result. Scientists can also teach online classes for different audiences including formal classroom teachers, informal educators, and lifelong learners to further the broader impacts of their work and increase engagement in their scientific endeavors. We provide training, through online and in-person workshops, on how to incorporate your datasets into the observatory and how to deliver online classes through our CosmoAcademy. This work is funded in part by NASA Cooperative Agreement Notice number NNX16AC68A. For more information, visit http://cosmoquest.org/.

  14. Implementation of Service Learning and Civic Engagement for Computer Information Systems Students through a Course Project at the Hashemite University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khasawneh, Ahmad; Hammad, Bashar K.

    2013-01-01

    Service learning methodologies provide information systems students with the opportunity to create and implement systems in real-world, public service-oriented social contexts. This paper presents a case study of integrating a service learning project into an undergraduate Computer Information Systems course titled "Information Systems"…

  15. Starting a Conversation: Engaging Scientists with the Public through Interactive Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, B. A.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    While demonstrations are a handy tool, research shows conversations are an even more effective way to have a lasting impact. UNAVCO joined the Portal to the Public Network (PoPNet) in March 2016 to offer PoPNet-style hands-on communication training to the geodetic scientific community. Portal to the Public is a system of professional development tools designed to better connect scientists and the public in positive dialogue, in informal education settings such as museums. The framework focuses not on one-way messaging, but on conversations. PoPNet is the network of museums and other institutions implementing PoP training. UNAVCO developed and launched a pilot program in summer 2016 with a cohort of graduate students. In the PoPNet model, museums bring local scientists to the museum to learn about and practice science communication to the general public. UNAVCO does not have a museum but rather is an international community of geoscientists who can receive training on informal communications and then practice their skills at a museum local to them. The skills learned are useful in communicating science not only to the public, but also to policy makers, funders, and anyone outside the immediate scientific discipline. Developing communications skills also encourages scientists to think more holistically about their research and its impacts.In the 2016 pilot program, UNAVCO offered a seven-week workshop to UNAVCO Student Internship Program (USIP) interns. The students spent two hours per week working on communication skills through hands-on activities and discussions, and developed tabletop activities based on their research. These tabletop activities are hands-on demonstrations of scientific concepts such as tsunami early warning and volcano deformation designed for interaction rather than one-way show-and-tell. The program culminated in an evening with the tabletop activities at the Boulder County Farmers Market. All six participating interns indicated on the exit

  16. Challenges in Implementing FP7 Projects in the Public Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel VULTURESCU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available National Authority for Scientific Research (ANCS and Executive Unit for Higher Education, Research and Development and Innovation Funding (UEFISCDI participate to several projects funded under the Framework Programmes, since 1998. The staff from each the two organisations participating in projects are merely the same, typically from “international cooperation” departments. In each of the two organisations, dedicated teams were set and a distinct specialization emerged. In this respect, dedicated procedures and good practices in project management were developed. Even the Framework Programs had different structures and the focused was different (e.g. knowledge creation, EU problem solving, scientific support for policies and programs, etc., the funding instruments (projects were not radically different from a Framework Program to another, so the staff could gain experience in managing this type of projects. Experience and expertise gained during this long period of time led to definition of a general framework within the two institutions and setting up of a general guideline for participation to this type of projects. The main dimensions of this framework are: project team organization, project management process, managing results and risk, organisational framework, good practices, factors which ensure success in project implementation.The paper presents a specific framework for FP 7 project implementation and how this framework is applied by both organisations, a set of rules and procedures that should be followed by any organisation, in particular governmental ones, participating in FP 7 projects and a set of good practices developed by ANCS and UEFISCDI.

  17. A Collectibles Project: Engaging Students in Authentic Multimodal Research and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Karen E.

    2007-01-01

    High school teacher Karen E. Moynihan creates a multimodal project inspired by the creative nonfiction style of "The Orchid Thief" by Susan Orlean. Students choose a collectible item and immerse themselves in the subculture of the collectors. The project includes participation in library and field research, interviews, photography and graphic…

  18. Engaging, critical, entertaining: Transforming public service television for children in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Christa Lykke

    2013-01-01

    of children’s television can be identified, leading up to today’s competitive period. The article shows how Danish public service children’s TV has played an important role in the modernization of the view of children, serving as an experimental platform for putting the perspective of active and independent...... children on the agenda. The argument is that this agenda has been contested by the increased demands for entertaining content due to increased competition among TV channels and due to obeying demands for ever more content to complete programming schedules....

  19. Evaluation of Story Maps to Enhance Public Engagement and Communication at Legacy Management Sites – 17334

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Darina [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Carpenter, Cliff [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Linard, Joshua [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Picel, Mary [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-03-05

    Story Maps are being used in both public and private sectors to convey information to stakeholders, create enterprise platforms, and assist in decision making. Story Maps are web applications that combine maps, narrative text, images, and multimedia content to provide information. These applications provide a user-friendly platform to share the remarkable history of our sites, the complexity of their contamination and remediation, successes we achieve in our LTS&M activities, and even the challenges we face as we aim to fulfill our mission.

  20. Risk Allocation in Public Private Partnership (PPP) Project: A Review on Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Nur Alkaf Abd Karim

    2011-01-01

    It is important for the public and private sectors to establish effective risk allocation strategies for Public-Private Partnership (PPP) projects. According to Malaysia’s PPP Guideline, one of the key feature or characteristics is to optimal sharing of risk whereby risk is allocated to the party who is the best able to manage. This mean that in PPP itself, it emphasis risk allocation in construction project. This paper presents on reviewing the risk factors of PPP construction project by map...

  1. Science Hack Day: an opportunity for public engagement, art/science mash-ups, and inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellis, Matthew

    2013-04-01

    The idea of a Science Hack Day (http://sciencehackday.com/) is to put non-scientists (designers, web developers, artists, interested enthusiasts) in a room with scientists and some good ideas, and see what science-themed project they can create in a weekend (about 24 hours of real hacking). The motto of the organizers is ``Get Excited and Make Things with Science!'' I have participated in several of these events including the first one held in the United State in Palo Alto in 2010 and as a remote advisor to participants in Nairobi, Kenya. To these events I have brought particle physics data from both the BaBar and the CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) experiments, data from the CoGeNT dark matter direct-detection experiment, and my expertise and enthusiasm. The experience has been transformative for me as both a scientist and a science advocate. This talk will recount my experiences with Science Hack Day events in general and detail some projects that have come out of these days, including the Particle Physics Wind Chime (http://www.mattbellis.com/windchime/) and the Standard Model of Cocktail Physics (http://www.physicsdavid.net/2012/11/standard-model-of-cocktail-physics/). Opportunities for other scientists to take part in similar events will be discussed.

  2. Social Mobilization and Community Engagement Central to the Ebola Response in West Africa: Lessons for Future Public Health Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Amaya M; Obregon, Rafael; El Asawi, Rania; Richey, Catherine; Manoncourt, Erma; Joshi, Kshiitij; Naqvi, Savita; Pouye, Ade; Safi, Naqibullah; Chitnis, Ketan; Quereshi, Sabeeha

    2016-12-23

    Following the World Health Organization (WHO) declaration of a Public Health Emergency of International Concern regarding the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in July 2014, UNICEF was asked to co-lead, in coordination with WHO and the ministries of health of affected countries, the communication and social mobilization component-which UNICEF refers to as communication for development (C4D)-of the Ebola response. For the first time in an emergency setting, C4D was formally incorporated into each country's national response, alongside more typical components such as supplies and logistics, surveillance, and clinical care. This article describes the lessons learned about social mobilization and community engagement in the emergency response to the Ebola outbreak, with a particular focus on UNICEF's C4D work in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. The lessons emerged through an assessment conducted by UNICEF using 4 methods: a literature review of key documents, meeting reports, and other articles; structured discussions conducted in June 2015 and October 2015 with UNICEF and civil society experts; an electronic survey, launched in October and November 2015, with staff from government, the UN, or any partner organization who worked on Ebola (N = 53); and key informant interviews (N = 5). After triangulating the findings from all data sources, we distilled lessons under 7 major domains: (1) strategy and decentralization: develop a comprehensive C4D strategy with communities at the center and decentralized programming to facilitate flexibility and adaptation to the local context; (2) coordination: establish C4D leadership with the necessary authority to coordinate between partners and enforce use of standard operating procedures as a central coordination and quality assurance tool; (3) entering and engaging communities: invest in key communication channels (such as radio) and trusted local community members; (4) messaging: adapt messages and strategies continually as patterns

  3. Determination of Death: A Discussion on Responsible Scholarship, Clinical Practices, and Public Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Eric; Jox, Ralf J; Bernat, James L; Dabrock, Peter; Gardiner, Dale; Marckmann, Georg; Rid, Annette; Rodriguez-Arias, David; Schmitten, Rgen In; Schöne-Seifert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    The concept and determination of death by neurological or cardio-circulatory criteria play a crucial role for medical practice, society, and the law. Academic debates on death determination have regained momentum, and recent cases involving the neurological determination of death ("brain death") in the United States have sparked sustained public debate. The determination of death by neurological criterion (irreversible cessation of the whole brain or of the brain stem) is medically practiced in at least 80 countries. However, academic debates persist about the conceptual and scientific validity of death determined by neurological criterion. The cardio-circulatory criterion, which permits organ donation following cardio-circulatory arrest, has also recently been challenged. Given the presence of academic debates, several questions ensue about the responsible conduct of clinicians and scholars involved in clinical practices and academic research. This article identifies tension points for responsible practices in the domains of scholarship, clinical practice, and public discourse and formulates suggestions to stimulate further dialogue on responsible practices and to identify questions in need of further research.

  4. The Danish Rejsekortet (Smart Card for Public Transportation); Project Governance for Failure or Success?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Peter Georg; Riis, Eva

    2015-01-01

    . A framework for project governance in major public IT projects is developed based on a review of the relevant literature on major projects like analysis of deviations of forecasts and optimism bias (Budzier & Flyvbjerg, 2011; Flyvbjerg, 2006), and how to manage structural and dynamic complexity (Brady...

  5. 23 CFR 810.308 - Approval of urban system nonhighway public mass transit projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Administrator will execute a grant contract covering implementation of the project. ... projects. 810.308 Section 810.308 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION MASS TRANSIT AND SPECIAL USE HIGHWAY PROJECTS Federal-Aid Urban System Nonhighway...

  6. "POLAR-PALOOZA" and "International POLAR-PALOOZA": Taking Researchers on the Road to Engage Public Audiences across America, and Around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.; Akuginow, E.

    2010-12-01

    POLAR-PALOOZA and its companion project, "International POLAR-PALOOZA" shared the same central premise: that polar researchers, speaking for themselves, could be powerful communicators about the science and mission of the 4th International Polar Year, and could successfully engage a wide variety of public audiences across America and around the world. Supported for the US tour by NSF and NASA, and internationally by NSF alone, the project enlisted more than forty American researchers, and 14 polar scientists from Brazil, China and Australia, to participate in events at science centers and natural history museums, universities, public libraries and schools, and also for targeted outreach to special audiences such as young female researchers in Oklahoma, or the Downtown Rotary in San Diego. Evaluations by two different ISE groups found similar results domestically and internationally. When supported by HD video clips and presenting informally in teams of 3, 4, 5 and sometimes even 6 researchers as part of a fast-paced "show," the scientists themselves were almost always rated as among the most important aspects of the program. Significant understandings about polar science and global climate change resulted, along with a positive impression of the research undertaken during IPY. This presentation at Fall AGU 2010 will present results from the Summative Evaluation of both projects, show representative video clips of the public presentations, share photographs of some of the most dramatically varied venues and candid behind-the-scenes action, and share "Lessons Learned" that can be broadly applied to the dissemination of Earth and space science research. These include: collaboration with partner institutions is never easy. (Duh.) Authentic props (such as ice cores, when not trashed by TSA) make a powerful impression on audiences, and give reality to remote places and complex science. And, most importantly, that since 85% of Americans have never met a scientist, that

  7. An Examination of the Implementation of the Intel Essentials Project-Based Learning Model on Middle and Secondary Reading and Language Arts FCAT Student Achievement and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jeremy R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify (1) the effectiveness of the Intel Essentials model of project-based learning based on student Florida Comprehensive Assessment test (FCAT) reading scores; (2) the differences in student engagement between students in classes with teachers trained in the Intel Essentials model of project-based learning and…

  8. How the public engages with global warming: A social representations approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas; Joffe, Helene

    2013-01-01

    The present study utilises social representations theory to explore common sense conceptualisations of global warming risk using an in-depth, qualitative methodology. Fifty-six members of a British, London-based 2008 public were initially asked to draw or write four spontaneous "first thoughts or feelings" about global warming. These were then explored via an open-ended, exploratory interview. The analysis revealed that first thoughts, either drawn or written, often mirrored the images used by the British press to depict global warming visually. Thus in terms of media framings, it was their visual rather than their textual content that was spontaneously available for their audiences. Furthermore, an in-depth exploration of interview data revealed that global warming was structured around three themata: self/other, natural/unnatural and certainty/uncertainty, reflecting the complex and often contradictory nature of common sense thinking in relation to risk issues.

  9. Engaging with Comparative Risk Appraisals: Public Views on Policy Priorities for Environmental Risk Governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocks, Sophie A; Schubert, Iljana; Soane, Emma; Black, Edgar; Muckle, Rachel; Petts, Judith; Prpich, George; Pollard, Simon J

    2017-03-17

    Communicating the rationale for allocating resources to manage policy priorities and their risks is challenging. Here, we demonstrate that environmental risks have diverse attributes and locales in their effects that may drive disproportionate responses among citizens. When 2,065 survey participants deployed summary information and their own understanding to assess 12 policy-level environmental risks singularly, their assessment differed from a prior expert assessment. However, participants provided rankings similar to those of experts when these same 12 risks were considered as a group, allowing comparison between the different risks. Following this, when individuals were shown the prior expert assessment of this portfolio, they expressed a moderate level of confidence with the combined expert analysis. These are important findings for the comprehension of policy risks that may be subject to augmentation by climate change, their representation alongside other threats within national risk assessments, and interpretations of agency for public risk management by citizens and others.

  10. How NASA's Space Science Support Network Can Assist DPS Members in Their Public Engagement Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, E. D.; Lowes, L. L.

    2003-12-01

    In her Carl Sagan Medal lecture last year, Heidi Hammel talked of the dos and don'ts of education and public outreach efforts by DPS members. She pointed out a number of misconceptions about what does and does not constitute "good EPO" and encouraged members to consult with "the experts" if they would like to improve their EPO effectiveness and reach. She named the DPS Education and Public Outreach Officer, Larry Lebofsky, his Deputy, Lou Mayo, and the DPS Press Officer, Ellis Miner, who also co-directs NASA's Solar System Exploration EPO Forum with Leslie Lowes. NASA's Space Science Support Network has been in existence for about six years. It has been directed by DPS member Jeff Rosendhal and is now serving as a model for NASA's new Education Enterprise. Members of the Support Network are prepared to assist (and haves been assisting) space scientists throughout the US and abroad in deciding where to spend their EPO efforts most effectively. The service is provided free of cost and includes, among other services, the following: (1) helping to establish partnerships between educators and scientists, (2) helping to link scientists and professional EPO organizations, (3) helping to link scientists to national youth and community groups, (4) providing ready access to EPO electronic and hardcopy products, (5) providing advice and direction in the preparation of EPO proposals to NASA, (6) helping to maintain several national networks of EPO volunteers, (7) encouraging (at home institutions) the broadening of scientist EPO efforts, (8) maintaining self-help websites for scientists interested in EPO.

  11. Public Opinion Regarding Financial Incentives to Engage in Advance Care Planning and Complete Advance Directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriemma, Catherine L; Chen, Lucy; Olorunnisola, Michael; Delman, Aaron; Nguyen, Christina A; Cooney, Elizabeth; Gabler, Nicole B; Halpern, Scott D

    2017-09-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently instituted physician reimbursements for advance care planning (ACP) discussions with patients. To measure public support for similar programs. Cross-sectional online and in-person surveys. English-speaking adults recruited at public parks in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from July to August 2013 and online through survey sampling international Web-based recruitment platform in July 2015. Participants indicated support for 6 programs designed to increase advance directive (AD) completion or ACP discussion using 5-point Likert scales. Participants also indicated how much money (US$0-US$1000) was appropriate to incentivize such behaviors, compared to smoking cessation or colonoscopy screening. We recruited 883 participants: 503 online and 380 in-person. The status quo of no systematic approach to motivate AD completion was supported by 67.0% of participants (63.9%-70.1%). The most popular programs were paying patients to complete ADs (58.0%; 54.5%-61.2%) and requiring patients to complete ADs or declination forms for health insurance (54.1%; 50.8%-57.4%). Participants more commonly supported paying patients to complete ADs than paying physicians whose patients complete ADs (22.6%; 19.8%-25.4%) or paying physicians who document ACP discussions (19.1%; 16.5%-21.7%; both P < .001). Participants supported smaller payments for AD completion and ACP than for obtaining screening colonoscopies or stopping smoking. Americans view payments for AD completion or ACP more skeptically than for other health behaviors and prefer that such payments go to patients rather than physicians. The current CMS policy of reimbursing physicians for ACP conversations with patients was the least preferred of the programs evaluated.

  12. Public-private partnerships for long-term success. Implementation of public construction projects in public-private partnerships; Mit PPP zu nachhaltigem Erfolg. Partnerschaftliche Realisierung oeffentlicher Bauaufgaben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simsch, Gerd; Glock, Christian; Herzog, Kati [Bilfinger Berger Hochbau GmbH, Frankfurt (Germany); Prein, Sascha [bauperformance GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Public private partnerships necessitate a comprehensive life cycle assessment, which makes them increasingly important as models of sustainability for public building owners. This is proved by the advantages in terms of efficiency and by the fact that two PPP projects received an award (''Guetesiegel nachhaltiges Bauen''). (orig.)

  13. TRI Community Engagement: Four New EPA Pilot Projects Challenge Us to Communicate More Effectively with Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview of pilot projects conducted to test new approaches for raising awareness about TRI at the community level, including discussion of the results, lessons learned, and responses from communities

  14. 77 FR 5750 - Major Capital Investment Projects (NPRM); Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-06

    ... Federal Transit Administration 49 CFR Part 611 RIN 2132-AB02 Major Capital Investment Projects (NPRM... Major Capital Investment Projects at 49 CFR 611. The docket for comments on the NPRM is open through... Transit Administration (FTA) for its discretionary Major Capital Investments program (``New Starts'' and...

  15. Engaging the broader community in biodiversity research: the concept of the COMBER pilot project for divers in ViBRANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Arvanitidis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the design and implementation of a citizen science pilot project, COMBER (Citizens’ Network for the Observation of Marine BiodivERsity, http://www.comber.hcmr.gr, which has been initiated under the ViBRANT EU e-infrastructure. It is designed and implemented for divers and snorkelers who are interested in participating in marine biodiversity citizen science projects. It shows the necessity of engaging the broader community in the marine biodiversity monitoring and research projects, networks and initiatives. It analyses the stakeholders, the industry and the relevant markets involved in diving activities and their potential to sustain these activities. The principles, including data policy and rewards for the participating divers through their own data, upon which this project is based are thoroughly discussed. The results of the users analysis and lessons learned so far are presented. Future plans include promotion, links with citizen science web developments, data publishing tools, and development of new scientific hypotheses to be tested by the data collected so far.

  16. Engaging cultural resources to promote mental health in Dutch LSES neighborhoods: study of a community-based participatory media project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knibbe, Mare; de Vries, Marten; Horstman, Klasien

    2015-09-28

    Community-based participatory media projects form a promising new strategy for mental health promotion that can help address the mental health-gap identified by the World Health Organization. (2008b) mhGAP, Mental Health Gap Action Programme: Scaling Up Care for Mental, Neurological and Substance Use Disorders. World Health Organization, Geneva. In this article we present an ethnographic study about a participatory media project that was developed to promote mental health in selected Dutch low socio-economic status neighborhoods. Through narrowcastings (group film viewings), participant observation and interviews we mapped the ways in which the media project effected and facilitated the collective sense-making process of the audience with regard to sources of stress impacting mental health and opportunities for action. These determinants of mental health are shaped by cultural dimensions, since the cultural context shapes everyday experiences of stress as well as the resources and skills to manage them. Our analysis shows that the media project engaged cultural resources to challenge stressful social scripts. We conclude that more attention should be paid to cultural narratives in a community to understand how health promotion strategies can support social resilience.

  17. Angelo State Society of Physics Students Peer Pressure Team Public Engagement Efforts -- Do we make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremy; Sauncy, Toni

    2011-10-01

    The Angelo State Society of Physics Students Peer Pressure Team travels throughout West-CentralTexas for a week following the spring semester. The goals of this activity are two-fold. First the group seeks to engage undergraduate presenters in public servive; the second goal is to enhance attitudes about science and encourage students in K-12 public schools to study science. Many of the schools we choose for our outreach visits are geographically isolated and populated with socioeconomically disadvantaged students, and/or groups underrepresented in physics. Over the week, the Peer Pressure Team visited over 1300 students, teachers and administrators. At each visit, surveys were collected to gauge the program's effectiveness. Student responses indicate a strong desire to study more science in their regular school curriculum. In addition, results are used to determine which demonstrations leave the most lasting impression on the audience participants. The 2011 Road Tour was dedicated to the 100^th anniversary of the discovery of the nucleus by Rutherford.

  18. National Laboratory Resources and Partnerships for Public and K-12 Outreach and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risbud, Aditi

    2011-03-01

    Nanoscale science and engineering draws upon aspects of chemistry, physics, biology and engineering to address scientific problems in energy, healthcare, security and technology. Scientists in this field often work in a multidisciplinary setting, which suggests a need for educational content unlike that currently offered in single-discipline high school and college science courses. Instructors are faced with the daunting task of accurately describing nanoscience in the context of their discipline, while inspiring students to explore careers in nanoscale science and engineering. The Molecular Foundry, a Department of Energy nanoscience user facility located at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, offers opportunities for high school and college students, along with science and engineering educators interested in learning basic concepts and research developments in nanoscience. Successful partnering with the Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network also provides opportunities for scientists to interact informally with the general public. These interactions convey the role of national laboratories in helping lay audiences understand the breakthroughs, potential issues and societal impact of nanoscience.

  19. A decision support system framework to improve design-construction integration and project performance on public sector underground utility projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrig, Gary Bruce

    One of the noted difficulties with the traditional public works project development process is the lack of integration and sharing of information between engineering and construction entities that results in a decrease in project performance. To improve project performance on public sector underground utility projects, the research develops a decision support system framework that enhances the exchange and integration of relevant information and knowledge between entities on such projects by incorporating a lessons-learned database to document, organize and disseminate lessons-learned on a project. To identify the critical activities within the project development process that could be linked to the decision support system, the Integration Definition for Functioning Modeling (IDEFO) technique was used to create a representative model of the public works project development process. The resultant model demonstrated the repeatable nature of the process both across project phases and from project-to-project and identified the decision-making activities of generating and evaluating alternatives as key opportunities for construction-related input that could be linked to a decision support system. An inspection of current industry practices was conducted through interviews with knowledgeable industry sources to determine the scope of the decision support system framework. Results revealed the type of critical decisions on underground utility projects that could benefit from construction-related input and identified the documentation of lessons-learned as a major industry weakness. A prototype decision support system incorporating a lessons-learned database was developed and the framework integrated into common project management reporting mechanisms found in the industry. The actual decision-maker can retrieve lessons-learned according to predetermined categories of critical decisions, compare and evaluated retrieved alternatives, and document the rationale behind the

  20. Magnitude of Construction Cost and Schedule Overruns in Public Work Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Pramen P. Shrestha; Burns, Leslie A.; Shields, David R.

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed 363 Clark County Department of Public Works (CCDPW) projects to determine construction cost and schedule overruns in various types and sizes of the projects. The sample projects were constructed from 1991 to 2008, with a total construction cost of $1.85 billion, equivalent to 2012 cost. A one-factor ANOVA test was conducted to determine whether construction cost and schedule overruns significantly varied based on types and sizes of the projects. The study showed that lar...

  1. Governance Factors Affecting Community Participation In Public Development Projects In Meru District In Arusha In Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Estomih Muro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to have a fresh look at the local governance status through exploring governance factors affecting community participation in public development projects. The study also has investigated the actors and factors shaping participation as well as causes for non-participation. For the purpose of the study six wards within two divisions of Poli and Mbuguni and Meru district headquarters were selected. In the wards a total of 80 respondents from among the community members were interviewed through a structured questionnaire. Others were Village chairman Village Executive Officers Ward Executive Officers and Councilors were also interviewed and involved in the FGD. Data were analyzed using SPSS. Simple descriptive statistics and cross tabulation and figures were used in the analysis. The analysis showed that the communities were participated in the public development projects and people were participating through financial material and labor contribution to the public development projects. The analysis also showed that the government supported the ongoing public development projects including through provision of fund and expertise. The study showed the benefit of community participation in the development projects or programs like ownership of the projects and enjoying the benefits accrued from the projects. The study also indicated that there is significant change in terms of governance as influencers of community participation in public development projects. Despite the fortunes study showed some challenges found in wards and villages being the incidence of corruptions and misuse of public resources which were mentioned to slow community participation in public development projects. It was therefore concluded that adhering to the good governance principles contribute positively towards community participation in public development projects.

  2. Magnitude of Construction Cost and Schedule Overruns in Public Work Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramen P. Shrestha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed 363 Clark County Department of Public Works (CCDPW projects to determine construction cost and schedule overruns in various types and sizes of the projects. The sample projects were constructed from 1991 to 2008, with a total construction cost of $1.85 billion, equivalent to 2012 cost. A one-factor ANOVA test was conducted to determine whether construction cost and schedule overruns significantly varied based on types and sizes of the projects. The study showed that large, long-duration projects had significantly higher cost and schedule overruns than smaller, short-duration projects.

  3. Public private partnership in free trade zone project of Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卓拉

    2014-01-01

    Free trade zone is a commonly used method in developing countries to generate economic growth, to at ract foreign direct investment, to increase employment and to improve living conditions. The progres of Mongolian FTZ projects is far behind schedule due to lack of financial resources. This paper analyses the pos ibility of private sector participation and gives some suggestions for finding an appropriate model of private sector participation on FTZ projects in Mongolia.

  4. Disinvestment policy and the public funding of assisted reproductive technologies: outcomes of deliberative engagements with three key stakeholder groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgetts, Katherine; Hiller, Janet E; Street, Jackie M; Carter, Drew; Braunack-Mayer, Annette J; Watt, Amber M; Moss, John R; Elshaug, Adam G

    2014-05-05

    Measures to improve the quality and sustainability of healthcare practice and provision have become a policy concern. In addition, the involvement of stakeholders in health policy decision-making has been advocated, as complex questions arise around the structure of funding arrangements in a context of limited resources. Using a case study of assisted reproductive technologies (ART), deliberative engagements with a range of stakeholder groups were held on the topic of how best to structure the distribution of Australian public funding in this domain. Deliberative engagements were carried out with groups of ART consumers, clinicians and community members. The forums were informed by a systematic review of ART treatment safety and effectiveness (focusing, in particular, on maternal age and number of treatment cycles), as well as by international policy comparisons, and ethical and cost analyses. Forum discussions were transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. Each forum demonstrated stakeholders' capacity to understand concepts of choice under resource scarcity and disinvestment, and to countenance options for ART funding not always aligned with their interests. Deliberations in each engagement identified concerns around 'equity' and 'patient responsibility', culminating in a broad preference for (potential) ART subsidy restrictions to be based upon individual factors rather than maternal age or number of treatment cycles. Community participants were open to restrictions based upon measures of body mass index (BMI) and smoking status, while consumers and clinicians saw support to improve these factors as part of an ART treatment program, as distinct from a funding criterion. All groups advocated continued patient co-payments, with measures in place to provide treatment access to those unable to pay (namely, equity of access). Deliberations yielded qualitative, socially-negotiated evidence required to inform ethical, accountable policy decisions in the specific

  5. Science Students Creating Hybrid Spaces When Engaging in an Expo Investigation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnarain, Umesh; de Beer, Josef

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the experiences of three 9th-grade South African students (13-14 years) in doing open science investigation projects for a science expo. A particular focus of this study was the manner in which these students merge the world of school science with their social world to create a hybrid space by appropriating knowledge…

  6. Conscious Engagement in Undergraduate Male Nursing Students: Facilitating Voice through an Action Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maykut, Colleen A.; Lee, Andrew; Argueta, Nelson Garcia; Grant, Sean; Miller, Cole

    2016-01-01

    Although women have made significant progress into traditionally male-dominated professions, such as medicine and engineering, the same cannot be said of men in the nursing profession. Utilizing a critical social theory perspective, an action research project was designed to encourage participants, current male nursing students and alumni of…

  7. Increase Student Engagement through Project-Based Learning. Best Practices Newsletter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2015

    2015-01-01

    We learn by doing. This simple philosophy is at the heart of project-based learning in the 21st-century classroom. It is grounded in the belief that the stand and lecture approach to teaching, worksheets and rote memorization are not enough to move students down a path to the deep learning necessary for success in college and careers. Essential…

  8. Sparking Passion: Engaging Student Voice through Project-Based Learning in Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Christy L.

    2016-01-01

    How do we confront entrenched educational practices in higher education that lead to student demotivation, poor retention, and low persistence? This article argues that project-based learning that situates student voice and capacity at the center of culturally-responsive curriculum has the potential to spark student passion for problem-solving…

  9. Using Elephant's Toothpaste as an Engaging and Flexible Curriculum Alignment Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing focus across all educational sectors to ensure that learning objectives are aligned with learning activities and assessments. An attractive approach previously published is that of curriculum alignment projects. This paper discusses the use of the fun and famous "Elephant's Toothpaste" experiment as a customizable…

  10. Science Students Creating Hybrid Spaces When Engaging in an Expo Investigation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnarain, Umesh; de Beer, Josef

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the experiences of three 9th-grade South African students (13-14 years) in doing open science investigation projects for a science expo. A particular focus of this study was the manner in which these students merge the world of school science with their social world to create a hybrid space by appropriating knowledge…

  11. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, R.

    1996-05-01

    Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2.

  12. Understanding, promoting and protecting geodiversity and geoheritage of the Piemonte region (Italy) through innovative techniques and public engagement in Earth Science studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Marco; Lozar, Francesca; Perotti, Luigi; Palomba, Mauro; Groppo, Chiara; Natalicchio, Marcello; Ghiraldi, Luca; Beltramo, Riccardo; Lombardo, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    The onset of Antropocene demonstrates the importance of considering both 1) geodiversity and 2) geoheritage as parts of the landscape "interfaces" where relationships between natural and socio-economic systems can be studied and interpreted. By definition: 1) is the variety, recognizable in nature ("diversity"), of geological features (rocks, minerals, fossils…), of geomorphological environments (and related forms and processes) and of soil characteristics; 2) is an integral part of the global natural heritage focusing on unique, special and representative sites of geological interests (geosites l.s.). In the Antropocene, both 1) and 2) hold a dynamic character, as the result of actions and interactions of natural and/or human factors. Therefore, geodiversity and geoheritage studies are essential for breaking down geological environments and human territories into their main parts and to understand the variables and mechanisms that control their changes. In this perspective, results of the multidisciplinary project PROGEO-Piemonte ("PROactive management of GEOlogical heritage in the Piemonte Region") are presented here: an innovative approach for assessing geodiversity in order to select areas of high potential value of geoheritage to be enhanced by targeted management actions. Since the geodiversity of Piemonte is materialized by elements of high scientific, educational, tourism, etc. value, the geosites where this geoheritage is preserved have been comprehensively analysed and characterized for encompassing both public and private interests. 9 strategic geothematic areas have been selected in the Piemonte Region to test this approach, and to improve social engagement aimed at protecting and promoting geodiversity ad geoheritage. The investigated areas represent the multifaceted geodiversity of Piemonte; each area is characterized by high potential for scientific studies, enhancement of public understanding of science, recreation activities and for economic

  13. Engaging Key Stakeholders in Climate Change: A Community-Based Project for Youth-Led Participatory Climate Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Carlie D.

    Few studies have examined how youth think about, and take action on climate change and far fewer have sought to facilitate their engagement using participatory methods. This dissertation evaluated the impacts of Science, Camera, Action! (SCA), a novel after-school program that combined climate change education with participatory action through photovoice. The specific aims of this study were to: (1) Evaluate the impacts of SCA on youth participants' climate change knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors; (2) Examine how SCA participation served to empower youth agency; and (3) Explore SCA's influence on youths' science engagement. Participants were 55 youths (ages 10 to 12) across three Boys and Girls Club sites in Northern Colorado. SCA's Science component used interactive activities to demonstrate the interrelationships between Earth's changing climate, ecosystems, and sustainable actions within communities. Photovoice, SCA's Camera component, was used to explore youths' climate change perspectives and to identify opportunities for their active engagement. Finally, SCA's Action component aimed to cultivate youth potential as agents of change in their families and communities through the development and implementation of youth-led action projects. Action projects included local policy advocacy, a tree-planting campaign, a photo gallery opening, development of a website, and the establishment of a Boys and Girls Club community garden. To evaluate SCA impacts, a combination of survey and focus group methods were used. Following the program, youth demonstrated increased knowledge of the scientific and social dimensions of the causes and consequences of climate change, as well as its solutions through human action. Though participants expressed a mix of positive (e.g., hope) and negative (e.g., sadness) emotions about climate change, they left the program with an increased sense of respect for nature, an enhanced sense of environmental responsibility, and a greater sense

  14. Barriers and facilitators to patient and public engagement and recruitment to digital health interventions: protocol of a systematic review of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Hanlon, Peter; O'Donnell, Catherine A; Garcia, Sonia; Glanville, Julie; Mair, Frances S

    2016-09-02

    Patients and the public are beginning to use digital health tools to assist in managing chronic illness, support independent living and self-care, and remain connected to health and care providers. However, engaging with and enrolling in digital health interventions, such as telehealth systems, mobile health applications, patient portals and personal health records, in order to use them varies considerably. Many factors affect people's ability to engage with and sign up to digital health platforms. The primary aim is to identify the barriers and facilitators patients and the public experience to engagement and recruitment to digital health interventions. The secondary aim is to identify engagement and enrolment strategies, leading if possible to a taxonomy of such approaches, and a conceptual framework of digital health engagement and recruitment processes. A systematic review of qualitative studies will be conducted by searching six databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus and the ACM Digital Library for papers published between 2000 and 2015. Titles and abstracts along with full-text papers will be screened by two independent reviewers against predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. A data extraction form will be used to provide details of the included studies. Quality assessment will be conducted using the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research checklist. Any disagreements will be resolved through discussion with an independent third reviewer. Analysis will be guided by framework synthesis and informed by normalization process theory and burden of treatment theory, to aid conceptualisation of digital health engagement and recruitment processes. This systematic review of qualitative studies will explore factors affecting engagement and enrolment in digital health interventions. It will advance our understanding of readiness for digital health by examining the complex factors that affect patients' and the public's ability to

  15. Examining the Interrelationship among Critical Success Factors of Public Private Partnership Infrastructure Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiying Shi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Examining the interrelationships among critical success factors (CSFs for public private partnership (PPP projects is of importance for improving PPP project performance and maintaining the sustainability of PPP project implementation. Previous studies mostly focused on the identification of the CSFs for PPP projects; limited studies investigated the interrelationships among CSFs. Hence, the research objectives are (a to determine the interrelationships among CSFs of PPP projects taking into account the public and (b to identify influence paths contributing to take advantage of CSFs in the process of PPP implementation. A literature review and expert interviews were adopted to construct the CSFs framework; nine hypotheses were constructed and tested by the structural equation modelling (SEM based on the data collected from a questionnaire survey. This research reveals that the relationship between public and private partners is the leader-follower relationship, not the partnership relationship, in PPP projects, indicating that the responsibilities, power or resources existing among partners are very unequal. It also highlights that public involvement has a negative effect on the process of service provisions, and costs and risks exist in the process of public involvement in PPP projects. The determined interrelationships among CSFs will contribute to the sustainability and success of a PPP project.

  16. Wabash River coal gasification repowering project: Public design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project (the Project), conceived in October of 1990 and selected by the US Department of Energy as a Clean Coal IV demonstration project in September 1991, is expected to begin commercial operations in August of 1995. The Participants, Destec Energy, Inc., (Destec) of Houston, Texas and PSI Energy, Inc., (PSI) of Plainfield, Indiana, formed the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Joint Venture (the JV) to participate in the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program by demonstrating the coal gasification repowering of an existing 1950`s vintage generating unit affected by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The Participants, acting through the JV, signed the Cooperative Agreement with the DOE in July 1992. The Participants jointly developed, and separately designed, constructed, own, and will operate an integrated coal gasification combined cycle (CGCC) power plant using Destec`s coal gasification technology to repower Unit {number_sign}1 at PSI`s Wabash River Generating Station located in Terre Haute, Indiana. PSI is responsible for the new power generation facilities and modification of the existing unit, while Destec is responsible for the coal gasification plant. The Project demonstrates integration of the pre-existing steam turbine generator, auxiliaries, and coal handling facilities with a new combustion turbine generator/heat recovery steam generator tandem and the coal gasification facilities.

  17. Lost in the "Third Space": The Impact of Public Engagement in Higher Education on Academic Identity, Research Practice and Career Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermeyer, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Public engagement (PE) is habitually recognized and advocated across the higher education (HE) community--especially by regulator and funder constituencies--as an intrinsically good thing. In the UK, a number of initiatives focused on embedding a culture of PE within universities have sought to further this claim, yet have done so without…

  18. Public-private partnerships in urban regeneration projects: Organizational form or managerial capacity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.B. Kort (Michiel); E-H. Klijn (Erik-Hans)

    2011-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Urban regeneration companies (URCs) are public-private entities appearing across Europe. They are created specifically to manage and implement more effectively urban regeneration projects. Core ideas behind the establishment of these newly emerging partnerships aim to

  19. Scientists and Science Museums: Forging New Collaborations to Interpret the Environment and Engage Public Audiences in Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Bartels, D.; Schwartzenberg, S.; Andrews, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    The Exploratorium engages Americans on issues of climate change, and energy use and production in a distinctive way; using a multilayered approach emphasizing all of the Exploratorium's strengths, not simply exhibitions. Specifically, the institution gives people access to the latest science research and researchers, provides the inquiry skills and basic science needed to make sense of this research, studies perception and cognition and how we come to believe what we believe, and sets up social communities and spaces for people to test their ideas and understandings with others. Using exhibits, the web and other media, visualization technology, building architecture, physical spaces, classes and professional education the Exploratorium achieves this multilayered approach. This powerful combination enhances people's own ability to make sound, evidence-based decisions for themselves, their families, and their communities. In 2013, the Exploratorium will move from its current home in the Palace of Fine Arts in San Francisco to a waterfront campus with access to the bay and outdoor platforms for instrumentation and observation. This will allow program and exhibit development in the environmental sciences that focuses on natural phenomena and physical and biological systems. Some current and planned Exploratorium projects with an emphasis on global climate change and potential for further development in the new location: 1. An Observatory building, where visitors can investigate Bay waters and climate. 2. Wired Pier, a suite of environmental sensors that will track local conditions over time and connect to larger observing networks regionally and globally 3. NOAA education and climate science partnership, including a scientist-in-residence program for training front-line staff 4. Global Climate Change Research Explorer website enabling visitors to observe current climate data or analyze evidence. 5. The Ice Stories project which trained polar scientists in media

  20. Community-based participatory research projects and policy engagement to protect environmental health on St Lawrence Island, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela K. Miller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives . This article synthesizes discussion of collaborative research results, interventions and policy engagement for St Lawrence Island (SLI, Alaska, during the years 2000–2012. Methods . As part of on-going community-based participatory research (CBPR studies on SLI, 5 discrete exposure-assessment projects were conducted: (a a biomonitoring study of human blood serum; (b–d 3 investigations of levels of contaminants in environmental media at an abandoned military site at Northeast Cape – using sediment cores and plants, semi-permeable membrane devices and blackfish, respectively; and (e a study of traditional foods. Results . Blood serum in residents of SLI showed elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs with higher levels among those exposed to the military site at Northeast Cape, an important traditional subsistence-use area. Environmental studies at the military site demonstrated that the site is a continuing source of PCBs to a major watershed, and that clean-up operations at the military site generated PCB-contaminated dust on plants in the region. Important traditional foods eaten by the people of SLI showed elevated concentrations of PCBs, which are primarily derived from the long-range transport of persistent pollutants that are transported by atmospheric and marine currents from more southerly latitudes to the north. Interventions . An important task for all CBPR projects is to conduct intervention strategies as needed in response to research results. Because of the findings of the CBPR projects on SLI, the CBPR team and the people of the Island are actively engaging in interventions to ensure cleanup of the formerly used military sites; reform chemicals policy on a national level; and eliminate persistent pollutants internationally. The goal is to make the Island and other northern/Arctic communities safe for themselves and future generations. Conclusions . As part of the CBPR projects conducted from 2000 to 2012

  1. Influence of External Environmental Factors on the Success of Public Housing Projects in Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    External environmental factors, which include political environment, economic environment and social environment, affect the success of public housing projects in developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to establish the effect of these factors on public housing project success using structural equation modelling (SEM) techniques.  The study was conducted in Nigeria by means of interviews, a pilot study and a main survey. Five hundred and fifty (550) questionnaires were administered...

  2. Are School Absences Correlated with Influenza Surveillance Data in England? Results from Decipher My Data-A Research Project Conducted through Scientific Engagement with Schools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Aldridge

    Full Text Available School aged children are a key link in the transmission of influenza. Most cases have little or no interaction with health services and are therefore missed by the majority of existing surveillance systems. As part of a public engagement with science project, this study aimed to establish a web-based system for the collection of routine school absence data and determine if school absence prevalence was correlated with established surveillance measures for circulating influenza.We collected data for two influenza seasons (2011/12 and 2012/13. The primary outcome was daily school absence prevalence (weighted to make it nationally representative for children aged 11 to 16. School absence prevalence was triangulated graphically and through univariable linear regression to Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP influenza like illness (ILI episode incidence rate, national microbiological surveillance data on the proportion of samples positive for influenza (A+B and with Rhinovirus, RSV and laboratory confirmed cases of Norovirus.27 schools submitted data over two respiratory seasons. During the first season, levels of influenza measured by school absence prevalence and established surveillance were low. In the 2012/13 season, a peak of school absence prevalence occurred in week 51, and week 1 in RCGP ILI surveillance data. Linear regression showed a strong association between the school absence prevalence and RCGP ILI (All ages, and 5-14 year olds, laboratory confirmed cases of influenza A & B, and weak evidence for a linear association with Rhinovirus and Norovirus.This study provides initial evidence for using routine school illness absence prevalence as a novel tool for influenza surveillance. The network of web-based data collection platforms we established through active engagement provides an innovative model of conducting scientific research and could be used for a wide range of infectious disease studies in the future.

  3. Kemper County IGCC (tm) Project Preliminary Public Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Matt; Rush, Randall; Madden, Diane; Pinkston, Tim; Lunsford, Landon

    2012-07-01

    The Kemper County IGCC Project is an advanced coal technology project that is being developed by Mississippi Power Company (MPC). The project is a lignite-fueled 2-on-1 Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) facility incorporating the air-blown Transport Integrated Gasification (TRIG™) technology jointly developed by Southern Company; Kellogg, Brown, and Root (KBR); and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama. The estimated nameplate capacity of the plant will be 830 MW with a peak net output capability of 582 MW. As a result of advanced emissions control equipment, the facility will produce marketable byproducts of ammonia, sulfuric acid, and carbon dioxide. 65 percent of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) will be captured and used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR), making the Kemper County facility’s carbon emissions comparable to those of a natural-gas-fired combined cycle power plant. The commercial operation date (COD) of the Kemper County IGCC plant will be May 2014. This report describes the basic design and function of the plant as determined at the end of the Front End Engineering Design (FEED) phase of the project.

  4. Strategizing for Public Policy: The Information Literacy State Proclamation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Sharon A.; Jackman, Lana W.; Prause, Emily

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a project designed to raise the awareness of policymakers about the importance of information literacy to achieve societal goals. Issues benefit from the governmental support, prioritization, mandates, and funding that can result when there is policy behind them. Studies indicate that many people lack the ability to draw on…

  5. Communication training improves sense of performance expectancy of public health nurses engaged in long-term elderly prevention care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Motoko; Suzukamo, Yoshimi; Tsuji, Ichiro; Izumi, Sin-Ichi

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a communication skill training based on a coaching theory for public health nurses (PHNs) who are engaged in Japan's long-term care prevention program. The participants in this study included 112 PHNs and 266 service users who met with these PHNs in order to create a customized care plan within one month after the PHNs' training. The participants were divided into three groups: a supervised group in which the PHNs attended the 1-day training seminar and the follow-up supervision; a seminar group attended only the 1-day training seminar; a control group. The PHNs' sense of performance expectancy, and user's satisfaction, user's spontaneous behavior were evaluated at the baseline (T1), at one month (T2), and at three months (T3) after the PHNs' training. At T3, the PHNs performed a recalled evaluation (RE) of their communication skills before the training. The PHNs' sense of performance expectancy increased significantly over time in the supervised group and the control group (F = 11.28, P < 0.001; F = 4.03, P < 0.05, resp.). The difference score between T3-RE was significantly higher in the supervised group than the control group (P < 0.01). No significant differences in the users' outcomes were found.

  6. Public engagement in Malawi through a health-talk radio programme 'Umoyo nkukambirana': A mixed-methods evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirenda, Deborah; Makawa, Tamara Chipasula; Chapita, Greyson; Mdalla, Chisomo; Nkolokosa, Mzati; O'byrne, Thomasena; Heyderman, Robert; Desmond, Nicola

    2016-06-30

    Radio is an effective source of health information in many resource poor countries. In Malawi, 53% of households own radios however few radio programmes in Malawi focus on health issues in the context of medical research. An interactive health-talk radio programme 'Umoyo nkukambirana' was introduced by Malawi-Liverpool-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme on a national radio station. The aim was to increase awareness of health and medical research, and improve engagement between researchers, healthcare workers and the public. The content and presentation were developed through participatory community consultations. Focus Group Discussions were conducted with established Radio Listening Clubs whilst quantitative data was collected using toll free FrontlineSMS to explore national response. A total of 277 to 695 SMS (Median: 477) were received per theme. The majority of SMS were received from men (64%) and mainly from rural areas (54%). The programme improved knowledge of medical research, health and dispelled misconceptions. This study suggests that the radio may be an effective means of increasing the exposure of men to health information in resource poor settings.

  7. Evaluating Public Participation Process in Development Projects in Thailand: A Case Study of the Hin Krut Power Plant Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chutarat Chompunth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Public participation has become a vital element of environmental decision-making. Although public participation has grown tremendously in Thailand due to a rising pressure from the public, this practice often fails to solve environmental problems and conflicts. There is a keen for a systematic evaluation of the public participation process to investigate whether the participation process is effective and what works or does not work in this respect. Approach: This study evaluates the effectiveness of the public participation process of the Hin Krut power plant project through an evaluation model developed from relevant literatures. Results: It was found that the public participation process of the case study was not completely effective when tested against the evaluation criteria. The affected people had no chance to present any comments at the very beginning. The public participation process started too late, after a decision had been made and conflicts among stakeholders already occurred. Conclusion: The public participation process is not yet properly established in the Thai context. There is an urgent need to find a working model and conditions of public participation which can assist in resolving environmental problems. Finally, a set of recommendations for improving public participation process are suggested.

  8. Project management success in health : the need of additional research in public health projects

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Carolina; Santos, Vitor; Tavares, António J.; Varajão, João

    2014-01-01

    PROJMAN 2014 - International Conference on Project MANagement, Procedia Technology The research about the factors that are linked to project management performance and project management success, has been developed for several years, so the literature about this subject is relatively extensive. After a literature review about project success factors, it was found that the current research effort is mainly focused on information technology, engineering and software development proj...

  9. The how and why of societal publications for citizen science projects and scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Arnold J. H.; Bron, Wichertje A.; Mulder, Sara

    2014-05-01

    In the scientific community, the importance of communication to society is often underestimated. Scientists and scientific organisations often lack the skills to organise such communication effectively. The Dutch citizen science phenology network Nature's Calendar has been successful in communicating to the general public via numerous newspaper articles, television appearances, presentations, websites and social media. We refer to these publications as societal publications. Due to active communication to mass media, we frequently reach millions of people. This communication helped us to involve thousands of volunteers in recording the timing of phenological events like the start of flowering, leaf unfolding and bird migration, but also several health-related events like hay fever symptoms and tick bites. In this paper, we analyse and present our experiences with the Nature's Calendar project regarding societal publications. Based on this analysis, we explain the importance of societal publications for citizen science projects and scientists in general, and we show how scientists can increase the newsworthiness of scientific information and what factors and activities can increase the chances of media paying attention to this news. We show that societal publications help phenological networks by facilitating the recruitment, retention and instruction of observers. Furthermore, they stimulate the generation of new ideas and partners that lead to an increase in knowledge, awareness and behavioural change of the general public or specific stakeholders. They make projects, and scientists involved, better known to the public and increase their credibility and authority. Societal publications can catalyse the production of new publications, thereby enforcing the previous mentioned points.

  10. Implications of Project-Based Funding of Research on Budgeting and Financial Management in Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudla, Ringa; Karo, Erkki; Valdmaa, Kaija; Kattel, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of the paper is to explore--both theoretically and empirically--the implications of project-based research funding for budgeting and financial management at public universities. The theoretical contribution of the paper is to provide a synthesized discussion of the possible impacts of project-based funding on university financial…

  11. Implications of Project-Based Funding of Research on Budgeting and Financial Management in Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudla, Ringa; Karo, Erkki; Valdmaa, Kaija; Kattel, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of the paper is to explore--both theoretically and empirically--the implications of project-based research funding for budgeting and financial management at public universities. The theoretical contribution of the paper is to provide a synthesized discussion of the possible impacts of project-based funding on university financial…

  12. How Will Teachers Fare in Rhode Island's New Hybrid Pension Plan? Public Pension Project Brief 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.; Butrica, Barbara A.; Haaga, Owen; Southgate, Benjamin G.

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid retirement plans that combine defined benefit pensions with 401(k) type, defined contribution accounts can play important roles in the reform of public-sector pensions. Summarizing results from our longer report ["How Will Rhode Island's New Hybrid Pension Plan Affect Teachers? A Report of the Public Pension Project" (2014)], this…

  13. 49 CFR 30.13 - Restrictions on Federal public works projects: Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... WORKS CONTRACTS TO SUPPLIERS OF GOODS AND SERVICES OF COUNTRIES THAT DENY PROCUREMENT MARKET ACCESS TO U.S. CONTRACTORS § 30.13 Restrictions on Federal public works projects: Certification. As prescribed... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on Federal public works...

  14. 49 CFR 30.15 - Restrictions on Federal public works projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... those that are set forth in 49 CFR 30.7-30.9 (b) General. This clause implements the procurement... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on Federal public works projects. 30.15 Section 30.15 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation DENIAL OF PUBLIC...

  15. Democratizing Human Genome Project Information: A Model Program for Education, Information and Debate in Public Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Miriam

    The "Mapping the Human Genome" project demonstrated that librarians can help whomever they serve in accessing information resources in the areas of biological and health information, whether it is the scientists who are developing the information or a member of the public who is using the information. Public libraries can guide library…

  16. Public Transportation System at the Southern Cone: New projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Schweitzer

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the international restructuration of the economy and the regional integration process, according to the claim of accelerating the trade circulation, there is emerging a kind of transporting subestructure project with different characteristics from other times, which are producing a new territorial configuration.The present study has the objective to analyze the evolution of the transportation system in the South Cone and, in the context of the integration process and the economic restructuration, the new demans and which are the transformations of the involved territories since the concretion of this new actions. It is analyzed the regional transportation system related to the territory estructuration in those countries integrating the Mercosur (Argentina, Brasil, Uruguay and Paraguay, as well as in the associated nations (Bolivia and Chile.Based on the relief and diagnosis of the situation, and considering those new projects, we make a reflection about the tendency to reconcentrate the subestructure and the inversions, with the following territorial inequality that gets deeper and reproduces the territorial fragmentation in regions that receive the new projects obeying to external goals without considering the global impact in the territories’ group.

  17. Projection scenarios of body mass index (2013-2030) for Public Health Planning in Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ernest; Hamel, Denis; Jen, Yun; Lamontagne, Patricia; Martel, Sylvie; Steensma, Colin; Blouin, Chantal; Steele, Russell

    2014-09-25

    Projection analyses can provide estimates of the future health burden of increasing BMI and represent a relevant and useful tool for public health planning. Our study presents long-term (2013-2030) projections of the prevalence and numbers of individuals by BMI category for adult men and women in Quebec. Three applications of projections to estimate outcomes more directly pertinent to public health planning, as well as an in-depth discussion of limits, are provided with the aim of encouraging greater use of projection analyses by public health officers. The weighted compositional regression method is applied to prevalence time series derived from sixteen cross-sectional survey cycles, for scenarios of linear change and deceleration. Estimation of the component of projected change potentially amenable to intervention, future health targets and the projected impact on type 2 diabetes, were done. Obesity prevalence in Quebec is projected to rise steadily from 2013 to 2030 in both men (from 18.0-19.4% to 22.2-30.4%) and women (from 15.5-16.3% to 18.2-22.4%). Corresponding projected numbers of obese individuals are (579,000-625,000 to 790,000-1,084,000) in men and (514,000-543,000 to 661,000-816,000) in women. These projected increases are found to be primarily an 'epidemiologic' rather than 'demographic' phenomenon and thus potentially amenable to public health intervention. Assessment of obesity targets for 2020 illustrates the necessity of using projected rather than current prevalence; for example a targeted 2% drop in obesity prevalence relative to 2013 translates into a 3.6-5.4% drop relative to 2020 projected levels. Type 2 diabetes is projected to increase from 6.9% to 9.2-10.1% in men and from 5.7% to 7.1-7.5% in women, from 2011-2012 to 2030. A substantial proportion of this change (25-44% for men, and 27-43% for women) is attributable to the changing BMI distribution. Obesity in Quebec is projected to increase and should therefore continue to be a public

  18. Public Value Creation Enabled by Healthcare IS Projects – a resource-based-view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup; Svejvig, Per; Laursen, Markus

    in a public HIS setting to create value. The framework consists of Professional- , Organisational-, Patient Perceived- and Employee Perceived-Value dimensions. HIS is partly overlooked in the public management literature and the aspect of emergence and (personal as well as organisational) learning plays......Creation of value from IT projects is a recurring theme that has diffused into healthcare information sys-tems (HIS). By applying a resource-based-view on findings from a study on the optimisation project of an integrated health information system (HIS) we develop a framework of capabilities needed...... an important role in the creation value in HIS-projects....

  19. Engaging Non-Science Majors Through Citizen Science Projects In Inquiry-Based Introductory Geoscience Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, R. R.; Hall, C.; Colgan, M. W.; Rhodes, E.

    2010-12-01

    Although inquiry-based/problem-based methods have been successfully incorporated in undergraduate lecture classes, a survey of commonly used laboratory manuals indicates that few non-major geoscience laboratory classes use these strategies. The Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences faculty members have developed a successful introductory Environmental Geology Laboratory course for undergraduate non-majors that challenges traditional teaching methodology as illustrated in most laboratory manuals. The Environmental Geology lab activities employ active learning methods to engage and challenge students. Crucial to establishing an open learning environment is capturing the attention of non-science majors from the moment they enter the classroom. We use catastrophic ‘gloom and doom’ current events to pique the imagination with images, news stories, and videos. Once our students are hooked, we can further the learning process with use of other teaching methods: an inquiry-based approach that requires students take control of their own learning, a cooperative learning approach that requires the participation of all team members in peer learning, and a problem/case study learning approach that primarily relies on activities distilled from current events. The final outcome is focused on creating innovative methods to communicate the findings to the general public. With the general public being the audience for their communiqué, students are less intimated, more focused, and more involved in solving the problem. During lab sessions, teams of students actively engage in mastering course content and develop essential communication skills while exploring real-world scenarios. These activities allow students to use scientific reasoning and concepts to develop solutions for scenarios such as volcanic eruptions, coastal erosion/sea level rise, flooding or landslide hazards, and then creatively communicate their solutions to the public. For example, during a two

  20. The Solutions Project: Educating the Public and Policy Makers About Solutions to Global Warming, Air Pollution, and Energy Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Three major global problems of our times are global warming, air pollution mortality and morbidity, and energy insecurity. Whereas, policy makers with the support of the public must implement solutions to these problems, it is scientists and engineers who are best equipped to evaluate technically sound, optimal, and efficient solutions. Yet, a disconnect exists between information provided by scientists and engineers and policies implemented. Part of the reason is that scientific information provided to policy makers and the public is swamped out by information provided by lobbyists and another part is the difficulty in providing information to the hundreds of millions of people who need it rather than to just a few thousand. What other ways are available, aside from issuing press releases on scientific papers, for scientists to disseminate information? Three growing methods are through social media, creative media, and storytelling. The Solutions Project is a non-profit non-governmental organization whose goal is to bring forth scientific information about 100% clean, renewable energy plans to the public, businesses, and policy makers using these and related tools. Through the use of social media, the development of engaging internet and video content, and storytelling, the group hopes to increase the dissemination of information for social good. This talk discusses the history and impacts to date of this group and its methods. Please see www.thesolutionsproject.org and 100.org for more information.