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Sample records for ptx filamentous hemagglutinin

  1. Modulation of the NF-kappaB pathway by Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin.

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    Tzvia Abramson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA is a cell-associated and secreted adhesin produced by Bordetella pertussis with pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory activity in host cells. Given the importance of the NF-kappaB transcription factor family in these host cell responses, we examined the effect of FHA on NF-kappaB activation in macrophages and bronchial epithelial cells, both of which are relevant cell types during natural infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exposure to FHA of primary human monocytes and transformed U-937 macrophages, but not BEAS-2B epithelial cells, resulted in early activation of the NF-kappaB pathway, as manifested by the degradation of cytosolic IkappaB alpha, by NF-kappaB DNA binding, and by the subsequent secretion of NF-kappaB-regulated inflammatory cytokines. However, exposure of macrophages and human monocytes to FHA for two hours or more resulted in the accumulation of cytosolic IkappaB alpha, and the failure of TNF-alpha to activate NF-kappaB. Proteasome activity was attenuated following exposure of cells to FHA for 2 hours, as was the nuclear translocation of RelA in BEAS-2B cells. CONCLUSIONS: These results reveal a complex temporal dynamic, and suggest that despite short term effects to the contrary, longer exposures of host cells to this secreted adhesin may block NF-kappaB activation, and perhaps lead to a compromised immune response to this bacterial pathogen.

  2. Identification and regulation of expression of a gene encoding a filamentous hemagglutinin-related protein in Bordetella holmesii

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    Gross Roy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bordetella holmesii is a human pathogen closely related to B. pertussis, the etiological agent of whooping cough. It is able to cause disease in immunocompromised patients, but also whooping cough-like symptoms in otherwise healthy individuals. However, virtually nothing was known so far about the underlying virulence mechanisms and previous attempts to identify virulence factors related to those of B. pertussis were not successful. Results By use of a PCR approach we were able to identify a B. holmesii gene encoding a protein with significant sequence similarities to the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA of B. avium and to a lesser extent to the FHA proteins of B. pertussis, B. parapertussis, and B. bronchiseptica. For these human and animal pathogens FHA is a crucial virulence factor required for successful colonization of the host. Interestingly, the B. holmesii protein shows a relatively high overall sequence similarity with the B. avium protein, while sequence conservation with the FHA proteins of the human and mammalian pathogens is quite limited and is most prominent in signal sequences required for their export to the cell surface. In the other Bordetellae expression of the fhaB gene encoding FHA was shown to be regulated by the master regulator of virulence, the BvgAS two-component system. Recently, we identified orthologs of BvgAS in B. holmesii, and here we show that this system also contributes to regulation of fhaB expression in B. holmesii. Accordingly, the purified BvgA response regulator of B. holmesii was shown to bind specifically in the upstream region of the fhaB promoter in vitro in a manner similar to that previously described for the BvgA protein of B. pertussis. Moreover, by deletion analysis of the fhaB promoter region we show that the BvgA binding sites are relevant for in vivo transcription from this promoter in B. holmesii. Conclusion The data reported here show that B. holmesii is endowed with a

  3. Construction and Virulence of Filamentous Hemagglutinin Protein B1 Mutant of Pasteurella multocida in Chickens

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    GUO Dong-chun; QU Lian-dong; SUN Yan; ZHANG Ai-qin; LIU Jia-sen; LU Yan; LIU Pei-xin; YUAN Dong-wei; JIANG Qian; SI Chang-de

    2014-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida, a Gram-negative nonmotile coccobacillus, is the causative agent of fowl cholera, bovine hemorrhagic septicemia, enzoonotic pneumonia and swine atropic rhinitis. Two iflamentous hemagglutinin genes, fhaB1 and fhaB2, are the potential virulence factors. In this study, an inactivation fhaB1 mutant of P. multocida in avian strain C48-102 was constructed by a kanamycin-resistance cassette. The virulence of the fhaB1 mutant and the wild type strain was assessed in chickens by intranasal and intramuscular challenge. The inactivation of fhaB1 resulted in a high degree of attenuation when the chickens were challenged intranasally and a lesser degree when challenged intramuscularly. The fhaB1 mutant and the wild type strain were investigated their sensitivity to the antibody-dependent classical complement-mediated killing pathway in 90%convalescent chicken serum. The fhaB1 mutant was serum sensitive as the viability has reduced between untreated serum and heat inactivated chicken serum (P<0.007). These results conifrmed that FhaB1 played the critical roles in the bacterial pathogenesis and further studies were needed to investigate the mechanism which caused reduced virulence of the fhaB1 mutant.

  4. The role of filamentous hemagglutinin adhesin in adherence and biofilm formation in Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC19606(T).

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    Darvish Alipour Astaneh, Shakiba; Rasooli, Iraj; Mousavi Gargari, Seyed Latif

    2014-09-01

    Filamentous hemagglutinin adhesins (FHA) are key factors for bacterial attachment and subsequent cell accumulation on substrates. Here an FHA-like Outer membrane (OM) adhesin of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC19606(T) was displayed on Escherichia coli. The candidate autotransporter (AT) genes were identified in A. baumannii ATCC19606(T) genome. The exoprotein (FhaB1) and transporter (FhaC1) were produced independently within the same cell (FhaB1C1). The fhaC1 was mutated. In vitro adherence to epithelial cells of the recombinant FhaB1C1 and the mutant strains were compared with A. baumanni ATCC19606(T). A bivalent chimeric protein (K) composed of immunologically important portions of fhaB1 (B) and fhaC1 (C) was constructed. The mice vaccinated with chimeric protein were challenged with A. baumannii ATCC19606(T) and FhaB1C1 producing recombinant E. coli. Mutations in the fhaC1 resulted in the absence of FhaB1 in the OM. Expression of FhaB1C1 enhanced the adherence of recombinant bacteria to A546 bronchial cell line. The results revealed association of FhaB1 with bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Immunization with a combination of recombinant B and K proteins proved protective against A. baumanni ATCC19606(T). The findings may be applied in active and passive immunization strategies against A. baumannii.

  5. Interaction of Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin with human TLR2: identification of the TLR2-binding domain.

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    Asgarian-Omran, Hossein; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Zeerleder, Sacha; Mahdavi, Marzieh; van Mierlo, Gerard; Solati, Shabnam; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Aarden, Leucien; Shokri, Fazel

    2015-02-01

    Filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) is a major adhesion and virulence factor of Bordetella pertussis and also a main component of acellular pertussis vaccines. Interaction of FHA with different receptors on human epithelial and immune cells facilitates entrance and colonization of bacteria as well as immunomodulation of the host immune response. Three overlapping segments of the FHA gene were cloned in a prokaryotic expression vector and the recombinant proteins were purified. These recombinant fragments along with the native FHA protein were employed to assess their potential Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulatory effects and to localize the TLR binding region. TLR stimulation was monitored by applying HEK293-Blue cell lines cotransfected with TLR2, 4, or 5 and a NF-κB reporter gene. Culture supernatants were checked for secretion of the reporter gene product and IL-8 as indicators of TLR stimulation. Native FHA was found to strongly stimulate TLR2, but not TLR4 or TLR5 transfected cells. Among recombinant FHA fragments only the fragment spanning amino acid residues 1544-1917 was able to exhibit the TLR2 stimulating property of FHA. Interaction of FHA with TLR2 suggests its involvement in induction of the innate immune system against Bordetella pertussis. The TLR2-binding domain of FHA may contribute to immunoprotection against pertussis infection.

  6. Bordetella pertussis filamentous hemagglutinin itself does not trigger anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 production by human dendritic cells.

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    Villarino Romero, Rodrigo; Hasan, Shakir; Faé, Kellen; Holubova, Jana; Geurtsen, Jeroen; Schwarzer, Martin; Wiertsema, Selma; Osicka, Radim; Poolman, Jan; Sebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA) is an important adhesin of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis and is contained in most acellular pertussis vaccines. Recently, FHA was proposed to exert an immunomodulatory activity through induction of tolerogenic IL-10 secretion from dendritic cells. We have re-evaluated the cytokine-inducing activity of FHA, placing specific emphasis on the role of the residual endotoxin contamination of FHA preparations. We show that endotoxin depletion did not affect the capacity of FHA to bind primary human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, while it abrogated the capacity of FHA to elicit TNF-α and IL-10 secretion and strongly reduced its capacity to trigger IL-6 production. The levels of cytokines induced by the different FHA preparations correlated with their residual contents of B. pertussis endotoxin. Moreover, FHA failed to trigger cytokine secretion in the presence of antibodies that block TLR2 and/or TLR4 signaling. The TLR2 signaling capacity appeared to be linked to the presence of endotoxin-associated components in FHA preparations and not to the FHA protein itself. These results show that the endotoxin-depleted FHA protein does not induce cytokine release from human dendritic cells.

  7. Pseudomonas fluorescens filamentous hemagglutinin, an iron-regulated protein, is an important virulence factor that modulates bacterial pathogenicity

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    Yuan-yuan Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common bacterial pathogen to a wide range of aquaculture animals including various species of fish. In this study, we employed proteomic analysis and identified filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA as an iron-responsive protein secreted by TSS, a pathogenic P. fluorescens isolate. In vitro study showed that compared to the wild type, the fha mutant TSSfha (i exhibited a largely similar vegetative growth profile but significantly retarded in the ability of biofilm growth and producing extracellular matrix, (ii displayed no apparent flagella and motility, (iii was defective in the attachment to host cells and unable to form self-aggregation, (iv displayed markedly reduced capacity of hemagglutination and surviving in host serum. In vivo infection analysis revealed that TSSfha was significantly attenuated in the ability of dissemination in fish tissues and inducing host mortality, and that antibody blocking of the natural FHA produced by the wild type TSS impaired the infectivity of the pathogen. Furthermore, when introduced into turbot as a subunit vaccine, recombinant FHA elicited a significant protection against lethal TSS challenge. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that P. fluorescens FHA is a key virulence factor essential to multiple biological processes associated with pathogenicity.

  8. Both CD4+ and CD8+ Lymphocytes Participate in the IFN-γ Response to Filamentous Hemagglutinin from Bordetella pertussis in Infants, Children, and Adults

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    Violette Dirix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infant CD4+ T-cell responses to bacterial infections or vaccines have been extensively studied, whereas studies on CD8+ T-cell responses focused mainly on viral and intracellular parasite infections. Here we investigated CD8+ T-cell responses upon Bordetella pertussis infection in infants, children, and adults and pertussis vaccination in infants. Filamentous hemagglutinin-specific IFN-γ secretion by circulating lymphocytes was blocked by anti-MHC-I or -MHC-II antibodies, suggesting that CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are involved in IFN-γ production. Flow cytometry analyses confirmed that both cell types synthesized antigen-specific IFN-γ, although CD4+ lymphocytes were the major source of this cytokine. IFN-γ synthesis by CD8+ cells was CD4+ T cell dependent, as evidenced by selective depletion experiments. Furthermore, IFN-γ synthesis by CD4+ cells was sometimes inhibited by CD8+ lymphocytes, suggesting the presence of CD8+ regulatory T cells. The role of this dual IFN-γ secretion by CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in pertussis remains to be investigated.

  9. The long pentraxin PTX3 promotes fibrocyte differentiation.

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    Pilling, Darrell; Cox, Nehemiah; Vakil, Varsha; Verbeek, J Sjef; Gomer, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    Monocyte-derived, fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes are associated with fibrotic lesions. The plasma protein serum amyloid P component (SAP; also known as pentraxin-2, PTX2) inhibits fibrocyte differentiation in vitro, and injections of SAP inhibit fibrosis in vivo. SAP is a member of the pentraxin family of proteins that includes C-reactive protein (CRP; PTX1) and pentraxin-3 (PTX3). All three pentraxins are associated with fibrosis, but only SAP and CRP have been studied for their effects on fibrocyte differentiation. We find that compared to SAP and CRP, PTX3 promotes human and murine fibrocyte differentiation. The effect of PTX3 is dependent on FcγRI. In competition studies, the fibrocyte-inhibitory activity of SAP is dominant over PTX3. Binding competition studies indicate that SAP and PTX3 bind human FcγRI at different sites. In murine models of lung fibrosis, PTX3 is present in fibrotic areas, and the PTX3 distribution is associated with collagen deposition. In lung tissue from pulmonary fibrosis patients, PTX3 has a widespread distribution, both in unaffected tissue and in fibrotic lesions, whereas SAP is restricted to areas adjacent to vessels, and absent from fibrotic areas. These data suggest that the relative levels of SAP and PTX3 present at sites of fibrosis may have a significant effect on the ability of monocytes to differentiate into fibrocytes.

  10. The long pentraxin PTX3 promotes fibrocyte differentiation.

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    Darrell Pilling

    Full Text Available Monocyte-derived, fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes are associated with fibrotic lesions. The plasma protein serum amyloid P component (SAP; also known as pentraxin-2, PTX2 inhibits fibrocyte differentiation in vitro, and injections of SAP inhibit fibrosis in vivo. SAP is a member of the pentraxin family of proteins that includes C-reactive protein (CRP; PTX1 and pentraxin-3 (PTX3. All three pentraxins are associated with fibrosis, but only SAP and CRP have been studied for their effects on fibrocyte differentiation. We find that compared to SAP and CRP, PTX3 promotes human and murine fibrocyte differentiation. The effect of PTX3 is dependent on FcγRI. In competition studies, the fibrocyte-inhibitory activity of SAP is dominant over PTX3. Binding competition studies indicate that SAP and PTX3 bind human FcγRI at different sites. In murine models of lung fibrosis, PTX3 is present in fibrotic areas, and the PTX3 distribution is associated with collagen deposition. In lung tissue from pulmonary fibrosis patients, PTX3 has a widespread distribution, both in unaffected tissue and in fibrotic lesions, whereas SAP is restricted to areas adjacent to vessels, and absent from fibrotic areas. These data suggest that the relative levels of SAP and PTX3 present at sites of fibrosis may have a significant effect on the ability of monocytes to differentiate into fibrocytes.

  11. Influence of pentraxin 3 (PTX3 genetic variants on myocardial infarction risk and PTX3 plasma levels.

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    Elisa Barbati

    Full Text Available PTX3 is a long pentraxin of the innate immune system produced by different cell types (mononuclear phagocytes, dendritic cells, fibroblasts and endothelial cells at the inflammatory site. It appears to have a cardiovascular protective function by acting on the immune-inflammatory balance in the cardiovascular system. PTX3 plasma concentration is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI but the influence of PTX3 genetic variants on PTX3 plasma concentration has been investigated very little and there is no information on the association between PTX3 variations and AMI. Subjects of European origin (3245, 1751 AMI survivors and 1494 controls were genotyped for three common PTX3 polymorphisms (SNPs (rs2305619, rs3816527, rs1840680. Genotype and allele frequencies of the three SNPs and the haplotype frequencies were compared for the two groups. None of the genotypes, alleles or haplotypes were significantly associated with the risk of AMI. However, analysis adjusted for age and sex indicated that the three PTX3 SNPs and the corresponding haplotypes were significantly associated with different PTX3 plasma levels. There was also a significant association between PTX3 plasma concentrations and the risk of all-cause mortality at three years in AMI patients (OR 1.10, 95% CI: 1.01-1.20, p = 0.02. Our study showed that PTX3 plasma levels are influenced by three PTX3 polymorphisms. Genetically determined high PTX3 levels do not influence the risk of AMI, suggesting that the PTX3 concentration itself is unlikely to be even a modest causal factor for AMI. Analysis also confirmed that PTX3 is a prognostic marker after AMI.

  12. A comparative in vitro evaluation of self-assembled PTX-PLA and PTX-MPEG-PLA nanoparticles

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    Cui, Fei; Li, Yang; Zhou, Shuifan; Jia, Mengmeng; Yang, Xiangrui; Yu, Fei; Ye, Shefang; Hou, Zhenqing; Xie, Liya

    2013-06-01

    We present a dialysis technique to direct the self-assembly of paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) using methoxypolyethylene glycol-poly( d, l-lactide) (MPEG-PLA) and PLA, respectively. The composition, morphology, particle size and zeta potential, drug loading content, and drug encapsulation efficiency of both PTX-PLA NPs and PTX-MPEG-PLA NPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic light scattering, and high-performance liquid chromatography. The passive targeting effect and in vitro cell viability of the PTX-MPEG-PLA NPs on HeLa cells were demonstrated by comparative cellular uptake and MTT assay of the PTX-PLA NPs. The results showed that the PTX-MPEG-PLA NPs and PTX-PLA NPs presented a hydrodynamic particle size of 179.5 and 441.9 nm, with a polydispersity index of 0.172 and 0.189, a zeta potential of -24.3 and -42.0 mV, drug encapsulation efficiency of 18.3% and 20.0%, and drug-loaded content of 1.83% and 2.00%, respectively. The PTX-MPEG-PLA NPs presented faster release rate with minor initial burst compared to the PTX-PLA NPs. The PTX-MPEG-PLA NPs presented superior cell cytotoxicity and excellent cellular uptake compared to the PTX-PLA NPs. These results suggested that the PTX-MPEG-PLA NPs presented more desirable characteristics for sustained drug delivery compared to PTX-PLA NPs.

  13. A comparative in vitro evaluation of self-assembled PTX-PLA and PTX-MPEG-PLA nanoparticles.

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    Cui, Fei; Li, Yang; Zhou, Shuifan; Jia, Mengmeng; Yang, Xiangrui; Yu, Fei; Ye, Shefang; Hou, Zhenqing; Xie, Liya

    2013-06-27

    We present a dialysis technique to direct the self-assembly of paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded nanoparticles (NPs) using methoxypolyethylene glycol-poly(d,l-lactide) (MPEG-PLA) and PLA, respectively. The composition, morphology, particle size and zeta potential, drug loading content, and drug encapsulation efficiency of both PTX-PLA NPs and PTX-MPEG-PLA NPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic light scattering, and high-performance liquid chromatography. The passive targeting effect and in vitro cell viability of the PTX-MPEG-PLA NPs on HeLa cells were demonstrated by comparative cellular uptake and MTT assay of the PTX-PLA NPs. The results showed that the PTX-MPEG-PLA NPs and PTX-PLA NPs presented a hydrodynamic particle size of 179.5 and 441.9 nm, with a polydispersity index of 0.172 and 0.189, a zeta potential of -24.3 and -42.0 mV, drug encapsulation efficiency of 18.3% and 20.0%, and drug-loaded content of 1.83% and 2.00%, respectively. The PTX-MPEG-PLA NPs presented faster release rate with minor initial burst compared to the PTX-PLA NPs. The PTX-MPEG-PLA NPs presented superior cell cytotoxicity and excellent cellular uptake compared to the PTX-PLA NPs. These results suggested that the PTX-MPEG-PLA NPs presented more desirable characteristics for sustained drug delivery compared to PTX-PLA NPs.

  14. Pathogen Recognition by the Long Pentraxin PTX3

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    Federica Moalli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate immunity represents the first line of defence against pathogens and plays key roles in activation and orientation of the adaptive immune response. The innate immune system comprises both a cellular and a humoral arm. Components of the humoral arm include soluble pattern recognition molecules (PRMs that recognise pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and initiate the immune response in coordination with the cellular arm, therefore acting as functional ancestors of antibodies. The long pentraxin PTX3 is a prototypic soluble PRM that is produced at sites of infection and inflammation by both somatic and immune cells. Gene targeting of this evolutionarily conserved protein has revealed a nonredundant role in resistance to selected pathogens. Moreover, PTX3 exerts important functions at the cross-road between innate immunity, inflammation, and female fertility. Here, we review the studies on PTX3, with emphasis on pathogen recognition and cross-talk with other components of the innate immune system.

  15. Single Amino Acid Polymorphisms of Pertussis Toxin Subunit S2 (PtxB Affect Protein Function.

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    Scott H Millen

    Full Text Available Whooping cough due to Bordetella pertussis is increasing in incidence, in part due to accumulation of mutations which increase bacterial fitness in highly vaccinated populations. Polymorphisms in the pertussis toxin, ptxA and ptxB genes, and the pertactin, prn genes of clinical isolates of Bordetella pertussis collected in Cincinnati from 1989 through 2005 were examined. While the ptxA and prn genotypes were variable, all 48 strains had the ptxB2 genotype; ptxB1 encodes glycine at amino acid 18 of the S2 subunit of pertussis toxin, while ptxB2 encodes serine. We investigated antigenic and functional differences of PtxB1 and PtxB2. The S2 protein was not very immunogenic. Only a few vaccinated or individuals infected with B. pertussis developed antibody responses to the S2 subunit, and these sera recognized both polymorphic forms equally well. Amino acid 18 of S2 is in a glycan binding domain, and the PtxB forms displayed differences in receptor recognition and toxicity. PtxB1 bound better to the glycoprotein, fetuin, and Jurkat T cells in vitro, but the two forms were equally effective at promoting CHO cell clustering. To investigate in vivo activity of Ptx, one μg of Ptx was administered to DDY mice and blood was collected on 4 days after injection. PtxB2 was more effective at promoting lymphocytosis in mice.

  16. Characterization of Hemagglutinin Negative Botulinum Progenitor Toxins

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    Suzanne R. Kalb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a disease involving intoxication with botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, toxic proteins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other clostridia. The 150 kDa neurotoxin is produced in conjunction with other proteins to form the botulinum progenitor toxin complex (PTC, alternating in size from 300 kDa to 500 kDa. These progenitor complexes can be classified into hemagglutinin positive or hemagglutinin negative, depending on the ability of some of the neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs to cause hemagglutination. The hemagglutinin positive progenitor toxin complex consists of BoNT, nontoxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH, and three hemagglutinin proteins; HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17. Hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes contain BoNT and NTNH as the minimally functional PTC (M-PTC, but not the three hemagglutinin proteins. Interestingly, the genome of hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes comprises open reading frames (orfs which encode for three proteins, but the existence of these proteins has not yet been extensively demonstrated. In this work, we demonstrate that these three proteins exist and form part of the PTC for hemagglutinin negative complexes. Several hemagglutinin negative strains producing BoNT/A, /E, and /F were found to contain the three open reading frame proteins. Additionally, several BoNT/A-containing bivalent strains were examined, and NAPs from both genes, including the open reading frame proteins, were associated with BoNT/A. The open reading frame encoded proteins are more easily removed from the botulinum complex than the hemagglutinin proteins, but are present in several BoNT/A and /F toxin preparations. These are not easily removed from the BoNT/E complex, however, and are present even in commercially-available purified BoNT/E complex.

  17. Development and Validation of ELISA Assays for Determination of Serum Antibody against Pertussis Toxin, Filamentous Hemagglutinin, Pertactin of Bordetella Pertussis%百日咳毒素丝状血凝素和百日咳黏附素血清抗体检测方法的建立及验证

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    徐颖华; 骆鹏; 王丽婵; 卫辰; 侯启明; 张庶民

    2011-01-01

    目的 建立定量检测抗百日咳毒素抗体(Antibody to Pertussis Toxin,Anti-PT)、抗丝状血凝素抗体(Antibody to Filamentous Haemagglutinin,Anti-FHA)和抗百日咳黏附素抗体(Antibody to Pertactin,Anti-Prn)的酶联免疫吸附试验(Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay,ELISA)方法.方法 分别应用纯化的百日咳毒素(PT)、丝状血凝素(FHA)和百日咳黏附素(Prn)作为包被抗原,百日咳血清抗体国际参考品为标准品,建立定量检测Anti-PT、Anti-FHA、Anti-Prn的ELISA方法.结果 建立了三种定量检测ELISA方法,并进行方法学验证.结果 显示,定量检测Anti-PT的ELISA方法的最低检测限度为1.31IU/ml(国际单位/毫升),批内和批间变异系数(Coefficient of Variability,CV)分别为9.99%和11.55%,回收率为97.19%;检测Anti-FHA方法的最低检测限度为1.02IU/ml,批内和批间CV分别为11.01%和12.76%,回收率为101.20%;检测Anti-Prn方法的最低检测限度为0.511U/ml,批内和批间CV分别为9.00%和11.18%,回收率为107.83%.用建立的ELISA方法与国外同类方法对30份血清样本进行分析,检测结果差异无统计学意义.应用上述建立的三种ELISA方法,检测分析了三组份无细胞百日咳疫苗(Acellular Pertussis Vaccine,aP)基础免疫后免疫原性.结论 所建立的百日咳血清抗体检测ELISA方法,准确度高和重复性好,无需特殊仪器,适合于一般实验室开展,可用于接种aP后血清学效果观察和百日咳流行病学研究.%Objective To develop three Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA ) methods for quantitative determination of IgG antibody against pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), pertactin(Prn)in human serum, respectively. Method Purified PT, FHA and Prn and international reference pertussis serum were used as coating antigen and standard for development of three ELISA assays. Results Three ELJSA assays had been established for determining anti-PT, FHA and Prn antibody, respectively

  18. Autocatalytic activation of influenza hemagglutinin.

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    Lee, Jeong H; Goulian, Mark; Boder, Eric T

    2006-12-01

    Enveloped viruses contain surface proteins that mediate fusion between the viral and target cell membranes following an activating stimulus. Acidic pH induces the influenza virus fusion protein hemagglutinin (HA) via irreversible refolding of a trimeric conformational state leading to exposure of hydrophobic fusion peptides on each trimer subunit. Herein, we show that cells expressing fowl plague virus HA demonstrate discrete switching behavior with respect to the HA conformational change. Partially activated states do not exist at the scale of the cell, activation of HA leads to aggregation of cell surface trimers, and newly synthesized HA refold spontaneously in the presence of previously activated HA. These observations imply a feedback mechanism involving self-catalyzed refolding of HA and thus suggest a mechanism similar to the autocatalytic refolding and aggregation of prions.

  19. Deficiency of Long Pentraxin PTX3 Promoted Neointimal Hyperplasia after Vascular Injury.

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    Ishino, Mitsunori; Shishido, Tetsuro; Suzuki, Satoshi; Katoh, Shigehiko; Sasaki, Toshiki; Funayama, Akira; Netsu, Shunsuke; Hasegawa, Hiromasa; Honda, Shintaro; Takahashi, Hiroki; Arimoto, Takanori; Miyashita, Takehiko; Miyamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Tetsu; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a novel marker for the primary local activation of innate immunity and inflammatory responses. Although clinical and experimental evidence suggests that PTX3 is associated with atherosclerosis, the relationship between PTX3 and vascular remodeling after wall injury remains to be determined. We investigated the effects of PTX3 on neointimal hyperplasia following wire vascular injury. PTX3 systemic knockout (PTX3-KO) mice and wild-type littermate (WT) mice were subjected to wire-mediated endovascular injury. At four weeks after wire-mediated injury, the areas of neointimal and medial hyperplasia were evaluated. The PTX3-KO mice exhibited higher hyperplasia/media ratios than the WT mice after wire injury, and the degree of Mac-3-positive macrophage accumulation was significantly higher in the PTX3-KO mice than in the WT mice. Furthermore, the PTX3-KO mice showed a much greater increase in the number of PCNA-stained cells in the vascular wall than that observed in the WT mice. A deficiency of PTX3 results in deteriorated neointimal hyperplasia after vascular injury via the effects of macrophage accumulation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration.

  20. Efficacy of PTX3 and Posaconazole Combination in a Rat Model of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis

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    Marra, Emanuele; Sousa, Vitor L.; Gaziano,Roberta; Pacello, M. Lucrezia; Arseni, Brunilde; Aurisicchio, Luigi; De Santis, Rita; Salvatori, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Posaconazole is currently used for the prophylaxis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). Limitations to posaconazole usage are drug-drug interactions and side effects. PTX3 is an innate immunity glycoprotein with opsonic activity, proven to be protective in IPA animal models. This study investigated the combination of posaconazole with PTX3. The results indicate synergy between PTX3 and posaconazole against aspergillosis, suggesting that a combination of reduced doses of posaconazole wit...

  1. Efficacy of PTX3 and posaconazole combination in a rat model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

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    Marra, Emanuele; Sousa, Vitor L; Gaziano, Roberta; Pacello, M Lucrezia; Arseni, Brunilde; Aurisicchio, Luigi; De Santis, Rita; Salvatori, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    Posaconazole is currently used for the prophylaxis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). Limitations to posaconazole usage are drug-drug interactions and side effects. PTX3 is an innate immunity glycoprotein with opsonic activity, proven to be protective in IPA animal models. This study investigated the combination of posaconazole with PTX3. The results indicate synergy between PTX3 and posaconazole against aspergillosis, suggesting that a combination of reduced doses of posaconazole with the immune response enhancer PTX3 might represent a treatment option with a higher therapeutic index than posaconazole.

  2. Helical filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri, Nicholas; Lim, Khan; Durand, Magali; Baudelet, Matthieu; Richardson, Martin [Townes Laser Institute, CREOL—The College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Hosseinimakarem, Zahra; Johnson, Eric [Micro-Photonics Laboratory – Center for Optical Material Science, Clemson, Anderson, South Carolina 29634 (United States)

    2014-06-30

    The shaping of laser-induced filamenting plasma channels into helical structures by guiding the process with a non-diffracting beam is demonstrated. This was achieved using a Bessel beam superposition to control the phase of an ultrafast laser beam possessing intensities sufficient to induce Kerr effect driven non-linear self-focusing. Several experimental methods were used to characterize the resulting beams and confirm the observed structures are laser air filaments.

  3. Recognition of Neisseria meningitidis by the long pentraxin PTX3 and its role as an endogenous adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottazzi, Barbara; Santini, Laura; Savino, Silvana; Giuliani, Marzia M; Dueñas Díez, Ana I; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Beninati, Concetta; Sironi, Marina; Valentino, Sonia; Deban, Livija; Garlanda, Cecilia; Teti, Giuseppe; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino; Mantovani, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a non-redundant component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. The present study was designed to investigate the interaction of PTX3 with Neisseria meningitidis. PTX3 bound acapsular meningococcus, Neisseria-derived outer membrane vesicles (OMV) and 3 selected meningococcal antigens (GNA0667, GNA1030 and GNA2091). PTX3-recognized microbial moieties are conserved structures which fulfil essential microbial functions. Ptx3-deficient mice had a lower antibody response in vaccination protocols with OMV and co-administration of PTX3 increased the antibody response, particularly in Ptx3-deficient mice. Administration of PTX3 reduced the bacterial load in infant rats challenged with Neisseria meningitidis. These results suggest that PTX3 recognizes a set of conserved structures from Neisseria meningitidis and acts as an amplifier/endogenous adjuvant of responses to this bacterium.

  4. Recognition of Neisseria meningitidis by the long pentraxin PTX3 and its role as an endogenous adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Bottazzi

    Full Text Available Long pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is a non-redundant component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. The present study was designed to investigate the interaction of PTX3 with Neisseria meningitidis. PTX3 bound acapsular meningococcus, Neisseria-derived outer membrane vesicles (OMV and 3 selected meningococcal antigens (GNA0667, GNA1030 and GNA2091. PTX3-recognized microbial moieties are conserved structures which fulfil essential microbial functions. Ptx3-deficient mice had a lower antibody response in vaccination protocols with OMV and co-administration of PTX3 increased the antibody response, particularly in Ptx3-deficient mice. Administration of PTX3 reduced the bacterial load in infant rats challenged with Neisseria meningitidis. These results suggest that PTX3 recognizes a set of conserved structures from Neisseria meningitidis and acts as an amplifier/endogenous adjuvant of responses to this bacterium.

  5. Structural characterization of PTX3 disulfide bond network and its multimeric status in cumulus matrix organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inforzato, Antonio; Rivieccio, Vincenzo; Morreale, Antonio P; Bastone, Antonio; Salustri, Antonietta; Scarchilli, Laura; Verdoliva, Antonio; Vincenti, Silvia; Gallo, Grazia; Chiapparino, Caterina; Pacello, Lucrezia; Nucera, Eleonora; Serlupi-Crescenzi, Ottaviano; Day, Anthony J; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto; De Santis, Rita; Salvatori, Giovanni

    2008-04-11

    PTX3 is an acute phase glycoprotein that plays key roles in resistance to certain pathogens and in female fertility. PTX3 exerts its functions by interacting with a number of structurally unrelated molecules, a capacity that is likely to rely on its complex multimeric structure stabilized by interchain disulfide bonds. In this study, PAGE analyses performed under both native and denaturing conditions indicated that human recombinant PTX3 is mainly composed of covalently linked octamers. The network of disulfide bonds supporting this octameric assembly was resolved by mass spectrometry and Cys to Ser site-directed mutagenesis. Here we report that cysteine residues at positions 47, 49, and 103 in the N-terminal domain form three symmetric interchain disulfide bonds stabilizing four protein subunits in a tetrameric arrangement. Additional interchain disulfide bonds formed by the C-terminal domain cysteines Cys(317) and Cys(318) are responsible for linking the PTX3 tetramers into octamers. We also identified three intrachain disulfide bonds within the C-terminal domain that we used as structural constraints to build a new three-dimensional model for this domain. Previously it has been shown that PTX3 is a key component of the cumulus oophorus extracellular matrix, which forms around the oocyte prior to ovulation, because cumuli from PTX3(-/-) mice show defective matrix organization. Recombinant PTX3 is able to restore the normal phenotype ex vivo in cumuli from PTX3(-/-) mice. Here we demonstrate that PTX3 Cys to Ser mutants, mainly assembled into tetramers, exhibited wild type rescue activity, whereas a mutant, predominantly composed of dimers, had impaired functionality. These findings indicate that protein oligomerization is essential for PTX3 activity within the cumulus matrix and implicate PTX3 tetramers as the functional molecular units required for cumulus matrix organization and stabilization.

  6. The tubulin-bound conformation of paclitaxel: T-taxol vs "PTX-NY".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yutao; Alcaraz, Ana A; Snyder, James P

    2009-03-27

    Nearly 35 years after its discovery and 11 years after FDA approval of paclitaxel (PTX) as a breakthrough anticancer drug, the 3-D structure of the agent bound to its beta-tubulin target was proposed to be T-Taxol. The latter bioactive form has recently been challenged by the Ojima group with a structure, "PTX-NY" ("REDOR Taxol"), in which the C-13 side chain is proposed to adopt a different conformation and an alternative hydrogen-bonding pattern in the tubulin binding site. Previously, the two conformers were compared to show that only T-Taxol fits the PTX-derived electron crystallographic density. That work has been extended by molecular mechanics and quantum chemical methods to reveal that the PTX-NY conformation is relatively less stable, on average, by 10-11 kcal/mol. In agreement with NMR studies, an 11 ns molecular dynamics treatment for PTX in an explicit water pool locates T-Taxol along the trajectory, but not PTX-NY. Docking of various PTX conformers into the electron crystallographic binding site of tubulin demonstrates that PTX-NY cannot be accommodated unless the pocket is reorganized in violation of the experimental constraints. Finally, analysis of the structures of T-Taxol and PTX-NY for their capacity to predict the existence of superpotent PTX analogues discloses that only the former forecasts such analogues, as now established by the T-Taxol-inspired synthesis of bridged taxanes. In sum, all empirical criteria support T-Taxol as the bound conformation of PTX on beta-tubulin in microtubules.

  7. CALCIUM REQUIREMENT AFTER PARATHYROIDECTOMY (PTX IN SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM (2° HPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YJ Kwon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available After PTX in 2°HPT, appropriate calcium and calcitriol was supplied to prevent hungry bone syndrome. Duration of admission was variable according to multiple causes. We hypothesized the admission duration was mainly affected by calcium requirement. The aims of this study were to evaluate PTX in 2°HPT in single center and to make equation for calcium requirement. We evaluated 91 patients with 94 PTX from Nov. 2003 to Dec.2011 in Korea Univ. Guro Hospital. We retrieved demographic details including sex, age, body weight, DM, hypertension, mode of renal replacement therapy, duration of dialysis, duration of admission, mode of PTX, method of anesthetics, number of glands removed, the largest gland length, the heaviest gland, and histologic profile of removed gland. We also gathered preoperative and postoperative (12 hrs and 48 hrs after PTX, discharge, 3 mo, 6 mo, 1 yr after PTX laboratory data such as calcium, phosphorus, iPTH, ALP, albumin, and Hb. We summated oral and intravenous calcium supplement during hospitalization after PTX. We prescribed oral calcitriol 2.0 μg/day after PTX. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS ver. 12.0.1. We could find log(calcium total supplement during admission is correlated with preoperative ALP (p=0.000, preoperative iPTH (p+0.037, and Δ phosphorus 48 hrs after PTX (p=0.000 by multiple linear regression. Log (calcium total supplement during admission = 2.576 + 0.001 X preoperative ALP + 3.575 X 10-5 X preoperative iPTH + 0.06 X Δphosphorus 48 hrs after PTX. We believe this equation would be helpful to estimate calcium requirements after 48 hrs PTX and to give a clue about length of hospitalization. We also would evaluate whether this equation is predictable in our patients in the future.

  8. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived PTX3 Promotes Wound Healing via Fibrin Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuzzello, Claudia; Doni, Andrea; Dander, Erica; Pasqualini, Fabio; Nebuloni, Manuela; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto; Biondi, Andrea; Garlanda, Cecilia; D'Amico, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Although mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) can promote wound healing in different clinical settings, the underlying mechanism of MSC-mediated tissue repair has yet to be determined. Because a nonredundant role of pentraxin 3 (PTX3) in tissue repair and remodeling has been recently described, here we sought to determine whether MSC-derived PTX3 might play a role in wound healing. Using a murine model of skin repair, we found that Ptx3-deficient (Ptx3(-/-)) MSCs delayed wound closure and reduced granulation tissue formation compared with wt MSCs. At day 2, confocal microscopy revealed a dramatic reduction in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Ptx3(-/-) MSCs recruited to the wound, where they appeared to be not only poorly organized in bundles but also scattered in the extracellular matrix. These findings were further confirmed by quantitative biochemical analysis of GFP content in wound extracts. Furthermore, Ptx3(-/-) MSC-treated skins displayed increased levels of fibrin and lower levels of D-dimer, suggesting delayed fibrin-rich matrix remodeling compared with control skins. Consistently, both pericellular fibrinolysis and migration through fibrin were found to be severely affected in Ptx3(-/-) MSCs. Overall, our findings identify an essential role of MSC-derived PTX3 in wound repair underscoring the beneficial potential of MSC-based therapy in the management of intractable wounds.

  9. Interactions of the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 with the complement system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doni, Andrea; Garlanda, Cecilia; Bottazzi, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system comprises a cellular and a humoral arm. The long pentraxin PTX3 is a fluid phase pattern recognition molecule, which acts as an essential component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. PTX3 has antibody-like properties including interactions with complement components. ...

  10. The long pentraxin PTX3 as a link among innate immunity, inflammation, and female fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottazzi, Barbara; Bastone, Antonio; Doni, Andrea; Garlanda, Cecilia; Valentino, Sonia; Deban, Livija; Maina, Virginia; Cotena, Alessia; Moalli, Federica; Vago, Luca; Salustri, Antonietta; Romani, Luigina; Mantovani, Alberto

    2006-05-01

    The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is member of a complex superfamily of multifunctional proteins characterized by a cyclic multimeric structure. PTX3 is highly conserved in evolution and is produced by innate-immunity cells in response to proinflammatory signals and Toll-like receptor engagement. PTX3 plays complex, nonredundant functions in vivo, acting as a predecessor of antibodies, recognizing microbes, activating complement, facilitating pathogen recognition by phagocytes, and hence, playing a nonredundant role in resistance against selected pathogens. In addition, PTX3 is essential in female fertility by acting as a nodal point for the assembly of the cumulus oophorus hyaluronan-rich extracellular matrix. Thus, the prototypic long pentraxin PTX3 is a multifunctional, soluble pattern recognition receptor acting as a nonredundant component of the humoral arm of innate immunity and involved in matrix deposition and female fertility.

  11. PTX3, a humoral pattern recognition molecule at the interface between microbe and matrix recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlanda, Cecilia; Jaillon, Sebastien; Doni, Andrea; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Innate immunity consists of a cellular and a humoral arm. PTX3 is a fluid patter recognition molecule (PRM) with antibody-like properties. Gene targeted mice and genetic associations in humans suggest that PTX3 plays a non-redundant role in resistance against selected pathogens (e.g. Aspergillus fumigatus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, uropathogenic Escherichia coli) and in the regulation of inflammation. PTX3 acts as an extrinsic oncosuppressor by taming complement elicited tumor-promoting inflammation. Recent results indicate that, by interacting with provisional matrix components, PTX3 contributes to the orchestration of tissue repair. An acidic pH sets PTX3 in a tissue repair mode, while retaining anti-microbial recognition. Based on these data and scattered information on humoral PRM and matrix components, we surmise that matrix and microbial recognition are related functions in evolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of ptxA and ptxB genes of phosphotransferase system on growth ofStreptococcus mutans%变异链球菌磷酸转移酶系统ptxA、ptxB基因对细菌生长能力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴昕彧; 陈晓丹; 赵望泓; 侯晋; 陈璇

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究变异链球菌(S. mutans)磷酸转移酶系统(PTS)中抗坏血酸家族ptxA、ptxB基因对细菌生长能力的影响。方法构建ptxA、ptxB和ptxAB双重基因缺陷菌株以及ptxAB功能补偿菌株。在仅以抗坏血酸作为唯一碳源时,使用实时荧光定量聚合酶链反应检测野生株中ptxA、ptxB基因的表达情况。连续监测野生株、缺陷株和补偿株的菌液OD600值,比较其生长能力。结果经过聚合酶链反应和测序鉴定,结果证明缺陷株和补偿株构建成功。在以抗坏血酸作为唯一碳源的培养基中,野生株ptxA、ptxB基因的表达量均明显增高(P<0.01)。缺陷株的生长能力较野生株有所下降,但是在补偿株中可以得到补偿。结论ptxA、ptxB基因与S. mutans对抗坏血酸的吸收利用密切相关,缺陷株和补偿株的构建为进一步研究目的基因在S. mutans抗坏血酸代谢中的作用机制提供了理论基础。%Objective This study aims to evaluate the effect of ptxA and ptxB genes, which are important genes in the L-ascorbate phosphotransferase system (PTS) of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). Methods The ptxA-, ptxB-, and ptxABdouble deficient mutant as well as ptxAB-complemented strain were constructed. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to evaluate the expression of the target genes of wild-type S. mutans when L-ascorbate was used as the sole carbohydrate source. The OD600 values of the wild type, deficient, and complemented strains were continuously monitored, and their growth curves were constructed to compare growth capacity. Results Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing analyses suggested that deficient and complemented strains were successfully constructed. The expression levels of ptxA and ptxB significantly increased (P<0.01) when L-ascorbate was used as the sole carbohydrate source. The growth capacity of the deficient mutants decreased compared with

  13. Mechanisms of Hemagglutinin Targeted Influenza Virus Neutralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandenburg, Boerries; Koudstaal, Wouter; Goudsmit, Jaap; Klaren, Vincent; Tang, Chan; Bujny, Miriam V.; Korse, Hans J.W.M.; Kwaks, Ted; Otterstrom, Jason J.; Juraszek, Jarek; Oijen, Antoine M. van; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H.E.

    2013-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have been identified which neutralize broad spectra of influenza A or B viruses. Here, we dissect the mechanisms by which such antibodies interfere with infectivity. We distinguish four mechanisms that link the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) epitopes of broadly neutralizing

  14. An acidic microenvironment sets the humoral pattern recognition molecule PTX3 in a tissue repair mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doni, Andrea; Musso, Tiziana; Morone, Diego; Bastone, Antonio; Zambelli, Vanessa; Sironi, Marina; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Cambieri, Irene; Stravalaci, Matteo; Pasqualini, Fabio; Laface, Ilaria; Valentino, Sonia; Tartari, Silvia; Ponzetta, Andrea; Maina, Virginia; Barbieri, Silvia S; Tremoli, Elena; Catapano, Alberico L; Norata, Giuseppe D; Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a fluid-phase pattern recognition molecule and a key component of the humoral arm of innate immunity. In four different models of tissue damage in mice, PTX3 deficiency was associated with increased fibrin deposition and persistence, and thicker clots, followed by increased collagen deposition, when compared with controls. Ptx3-deficient macrophages showed defective pericellular fibrinolysis in vitro. PTX3-bound fibrinogen/fibrin and plasminogen at acidic pH and increased plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis. The second exon-encoded N-terminal domain of PTX3 recapitulated the activity of the intact molecule. Thus, a prototypic component of humoral innate immunity, PTX3, plays a nonredundant role in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling. Tissue acidification resulting from metabolic adaptation during tissue repair sets PTX3 in a tissue remodeling and repair mode, suggesting that matrix and microbial recognition are common, ancestral features of the humoral arm of innate immunity. © 2015 Doni et al.

  15. The yin-yang of long pentraxin PTX3 in inflammation and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigo, Kenji; Mantovani, Alberto; Bottazzi, Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Pentraxins are a family of multimeric proteins characterized by the presence of a pentraxin signature in their C-terminus region. Based on the primary structure, pentraxins are divided into short and long pentraxin: C-reactive protein (CRP) is the prototype of the short pentraxin subfamily while pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is the prototypic long pentraxin. Despite these two molecules exert similar fundamental actions in the regulation of innate immune and inflammatory responses, several differences exist between CRP and PTX3, including gene organization, protein oligomerization and expression pattern. The pathophysiological roles of PTX3 have been investigated using genetically modified mice since PTX3 gene organization and regulation are well conserved between mouse and human. Such in vivo studies figured out that PTX3 mainly have host-protective effects, even if it could also exert negative effects under certain pathophysiologic conditions. Here we will review the general properties of CRP and PTX3, emphasizing the differences between the two molecules and the regulatory functions exerted by PTX3 in innate immunity and inflammation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Human pentraxin 3 (PTX3 as a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Tamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although inflammation is an important feature of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, the usefulness of local inflammatory markers as biomarkers for PAH is unknown. In this study, we tested whether plasma concentrations of human pentraxin 3 (PTX3, a local inflammatory marker, would be a useful biomarker for detecting PAH. METHODS: Plasma PTX3 concentrations were evaluated in 50 PAH patients (27 with idiopathic PAH, 17 with PAH associated with connective tissue disease (CTD-PAH, and six with congenital heart disease, 100 age and sex-matched healthy controls, and 34 disease-matched CTD patients without PAH. Plasma concentrations of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP and C-reactive protein (CRP were also determined. RESULTS: Mean PTX3 levels were significantly higher in all PAH patients than in the healthy controls (4.40±0.37 vs. 1.94±0.09 ng/mL, respectively; P<0.001. Using a threshold level of 2.84 ng/mL, PTX3 yielded a sensitivity of 74.0% and a specificity of 84.0% for the detection of PAH. In CTD-PAH patients, mean PTX3 concentrations were significantly higher than in CTD patients without PAH (5.02±0.69 vs. 2.40±0.14 ng/mL, respectively; P<0.001. There was no significant correlation between plasma levels of PTX3 and BNP or CRP. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves for screening PAH in patients with CTD revealed that PTX3 (area under the ROC curve 0.866 is superior to BNP. Using a PTX3 threshold of 2.85 ng/mL maximized true-positive and false-negative results (sensitivity 94.1%, specificity 73.5%. CONCLUSION: Plasma concentrations of PTX3 may be a better biomarker of PAH than BNP, especially in patients with CTD.

  17. The role of the acute phase protein PTX3 in the ventilator-induced lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Real

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is an acute phase proinflammatory protein produced by fibroblasts and alveolar epithelial cells. We have previously demonstrated that PTX3 is a key modulator of inflammation. Mechanical ventilation (MV is a life saving therapeutic approach for patients with acute lung injury that, nevertheless could lead to an inflammatory response and tissue injury (ventilator-induced lung injury: VILI, representing a major cause of iatrogenic lung damage in intensive units. Our objective was to investigate the role of PTX3 in VILI. PTX3 transgenic, knockout and Wt control mice (n = 12/group were ventilated (45ml·kg–1 until respiratory system Elastance increased 50% (Ers150%, an indicator of VILI. Histological analysis demonstrated that using a Ers150% was appropriate for our analysis since identical degrees of inflammation were observed in Tg, KO and Wt mice as assessed by leukocyte infiltration, oedema, alveolar collapse and number of breaks in alveolar septa. However, Tg mice reached Ers150% faster than Wt controls (p = 0.0225. We also showed that the lack of PTX3 does not abolish the occurrence of VILI in KOs. Gene expression profile of PTX3, IL-1beta, IL-6, KC, IFNgamma, TGFbeta and PCIII were investigated by QPCR. MV drastically up modulated PTX3 as well as IL-1beta, IL-6, IFNgamma and KC. Alternatively, mice were ventilated for 20, 40 and 60 min. The faster kinetics of Tg mice to reach Ers150% was accompanied by an earlier augmentation of IL-1b and PTX3 expression. The kinetics of local PTX3 expression in the lungs of ventilated mice strongly suggests the involvement of this pentraxin in the pathogenesis of VILI.

  18. Bimetallic PtxCoy nanoparticles with curved faces for highly efficient hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan; Zhao, Yonghui; Wu, Panpan; Yang, Bo; Yang, Nating; Zhu, Yan

    2016-05-01

    The control of the curved structure of bimetallic nanocrystals is a challenge, due to the rate differential for atom deposition and surface diffusion of alien atomic species on specific crystallographic planes of seeds. Herein, we report how to tune the degree of concavity of bimetallic PtxCoy concave nanoparticles using carboxylic acids as surfactants with an oleylamine system, leading to the specific crystallographic planes being exposed. The terminal carboxylic acids with a bridge ring or a benzene ring serving as structure regulators could direct the formation of curved faces with exposed high-index facets, and long-chain saturated fatty acids favored the production of curved faces with exposed low-index facets, while long-chain olefin acids alone benefited the formation of a flat surface with exposed low-index planes. Furthermore, these PtxCoy particles with curved faces displayed superior catalytic behaviour to cinnamaldehyde hydrogenation when compared with PtxCoy with flat faces. PtxCoy nanoparticles with curved faces exhibited over 6-fold increase in catalytic activity compared to PtxNiy nanoparticles with curved faces, and near 40-fold activity increase was observed in comparison with PtxFey nanoparticles with curved faces.The control of the curved structure of bimetallic nanocrystals is a challenge, due to the rate differential for atom deposition and surface diffusion of alien atomic species on specific crystallographic planes of seeds. Herein, we report how to tune the degree of concavity of bimetallic PtxCoy concave nanoparticles using carboxylic acids as surfactants with an oleylamine system, leading to the specific crystallographic planes being exposed. The terminal carboxylic acids with a bridge ring or a benzene ring serving as structure regulators could direct the formation of curved faces with exposed high-index facets, and long-chain saturated fatty acids favored the production of curved faces with exposed low-index facets, while long

  19. Exploring PTX3 expression in Sus scrofa cardiac tissue using RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabiati, Manuela; Caselli, Chiara; Savelli, Sara; Prescimone, Tommaso; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Giannessi, Daniela; Del Ry, Silvia

    2012-02-10

    The prototypic long pentraxin PTX3 is a novel vascular inflammatory marker sharing similarities with the classic short pentraxin (C-reactive protein). PTX3 is rapidly produced and released by several cell types in response to local inflammation of the cardiovascular system. Plasma PTX3 levels are very low in normal conditions and increase in heart failure (HF) patients with advancing NYHA functional class, but its exact role during HF pathogenetic mechanisms is not yet established. No data about PTX3 cardiac expression in normal and pathological conditions are currently available, either in human or in large-size animals. Of the latter, the pig has a central role in "in vivo" clinical settings but its genome has not been completely sequenced and the PTX3 gene sequence is still lacking. The aim of this study was to sequence the PTX3 in Sus scrofa, whose sequence is not yet present in GenBank. Utilizing our knowledge of this sequence, PTX3 mRNA expression was evaluated in cardiac tissue of normal (n=6) and HF pigs (n=5), obtained from the four chambers. To sequence PTX3 gene in S. scrofa, the high homology between Homo sapiens and S. scrofa was exploited. Pig PTX3 mRNA was sequenced using polymerase chain reaction primers designed from human consensus sequences. The DNA, obtained from different RT-PCR reactions, was sequenced using the Sanger method. S. scrofa PTX3 mRNA, 1-336 bp, was submitted to GenBank (ID: GQ412351). The sequence obtained from pig cardiac tissue shared an 84% sequence identity with human homolog. The presence of PTX3 mRNA expression was detected in all the cardiac chambers sharing an increase after 3 weeks of pacing compared to controls (p=0.036 HF right atrium vs. N; p=0.022, HF left ventricle vs. N). Knowledge of the PTX3 sequence could be a useful starting point for future studies devoted to better understanding the specific role of this molecule in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3 expression in allergic asthmatic airways: role in airway smooth muscle migration and chemokine production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is a soluble pattern recognition receptor with non-redundant functions in inflammation and innate immunity. PTX3 is produced by immune and structural cells. However, very little is known about the expression of PTX3 and its role in allergic asthma. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: We sought to determine the PTX3 expression in asthmatic airways and its function in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMC. In vivo PTX3 expression in bronchial biopsies of mild, moderate and severe asthmatics was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. PTX3 mRNA and protein were measured by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. Proliferation and migration were examined using (3H-thymidine incorporation, cell count and Boyden chamber assays. RESULTS: PTX3 immunoreactivity was increased in bronchial tissues of allergic asthmatics compared to healthy controls, and mainly localized in the smooth muscle bundle. PTX3 protein was expressed constitutively by HASMC and was significantly up-regulated by TNF, and IL-1β but not by Th2 (IL-4, IL-9, IL-13, Th1 (IFN-γ, or Th-17 (IL-17 cytokines. In vitro, HASMC released significantly higher levels of PTX3 at the baseline and upon TNF stimulation compared to airway epithelial cells (EC. Moreover, PTX3 induced CCL11/eotaxin-1 release whilst inhibited the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2-driven HASMC chemotactic activity. CONCLUSIONS: Our data provide the first evidence that PTX3 expression is increased in asthmatic airways. HASMC can both produce and respond to PTX3. PTX3 is a potent inhibitor of HASMC migration induced by FGF-2 and can upregulate CCL11/eotaxin-1 release. These results raise the possibility that PTX3 may play a dual role in allergic asthma.

  1. QDP-JIT/PTX: A QDP++ Implementation for CUDA-Enabled GPUs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Frank T. [JLAB; Edwards, Robert G. [JLAB

    2014-11-01

    These proceedings describe briefly the QDP-JIT/PTX framework for lattice field theory calcula- tions on the CUDA architecture. The framework generates compute kernels in the PTX assembler language which can be compiled to efficient GPU machine code by the NVIDIA JIT compiler. A comprehensive memory management was added to the framework so that applications, e.g. Chroma, can run unaltered on GPU clusters and supercomputers.

  2. The enhanced activity of mass-selected PtxGd nanoparticles for oxygen electroreduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velazquez-Palenzuela, Amado Andres; Masini, Federico; Pedersen, Anders Filsøe

    2015-01-01

    , as suggested by the accelerated stability tests under ORR potential cycling. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy measurements confirm that as-prepared PtxGd NPs are compressively strained, relative to pure Pt, and that a PtxGd core/Pt-rich shell structure is adopted after partial Gd......, and their catalytic performance toward the ORR is assessed in acidic media using a half-cell configuration. The PtxGd 8-nm catalyst shows a high activity (3.6A(mgPt)−1), surpassing the highest activity reached so far with PtxY NP catalysts. In addition, the optimum PtxGd catalyst also presents high stability...... leaching. The activity correlates strongly with the compressive strain. On that basis, we propose that the ORR enhancement is due to the compressive strain within the Pt shell induced by the alloy core. The results herein confirm the suitability of PtxGd NPs as cathode nanocatalysts for proton exchange...

  3. Bimetallic PtxCoy nanoparticles with curved faces for highly efficient hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan; Zhao, Yonghui; Wu, Panpan; Yang, Bo; Yang, Nating; Zhu, Yan

    2016-06-07

    The control of the curved structure of bimetallic nanocrystals is a challenge, due to the rate differential for atom deposition and surface diffusion of alien atomic species on specific crystallographic planes of seeds. Herein, we report how to tune the degree of concavity of bimetallic PtxCoy concave nanoparticles using carboxylic acids as surfactants with an oleylamine system, leading to the specific crystallographic planes being exposed. The terminal carboxylic acids with a bridge ring or a benzene ring serving as structure regulators could direct the formation of curved faces with exposed high-index facets, and long-chain saturated fatty acids favored the production of curved faces with exposed low-index facets, while long-chain olefin acids alone benefited the formation of a flat surface with exposed low-index planes. Furthermore, these PtxCoy particles with curved faces displayed superior catalytic behaviour to cinnamaldehyde hydrogenation when compared with PtxCoy with flat faces. PtxCoy nanoparticles with curved faces exhibited over 6-fold increase in catalytic activity compared to PtxNiy nanoparticles with curved faces, and near 40-fold activity increase was observed in comparison with PtxFey nanoparticles with curved faces.

  4. PTX3 binds MD-2 and promotes TRIF-dependent immune protection in aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozza, Silvia; Campo, Silvia; Arseni, Brunilde; Inforzato, Antonio; Ragnar, Lindstedt; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto; Moretti, Silvia; Oikonomous, Vasileios; De Santis, Rita; Carvalho, Agostinho; Salvatori, Giovanni; Romani, Luigina

    2014-09-01

    The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) modulates different effector pathways involved in innate resistance to Aspergillus fumigatus, including complement activation or promotion of phagocytosis by interacting with FcγRs. However, whether and how TLRs modulate PTX3 mediates antifungal resistance is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that PTX3 binds myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) in vitro and exerts its protective antifungal activity in vivo through TLR4/MD-2-mediated signaling. Similar to Tlr4(-/-) mice, Md2(-/-) mice displayed high susceptibility to pulmonary aspergillosis, a phenotype associated with a proinflammatory cytokine profile and impaired antifungal activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Treating Md2(-/-) mice with PTX3 failed to confer immune protection against the fungus, whereas adoptive transfer of MD-2-competent polymorphonuclear neutrophils restored it. Mechanistically, engagement of MD-2 by PTX3-opsonized Aspergillus conidia activated the TLR4/Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β-dependent signaling pathway converging on IL-10. Thus, we have identified a novel receptor mechanism, involving the TLR4/MD-2/Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β-mediated signaling, whereby PTX3 elicits antifungal resistance with limited immunopathology in A. fumigatus infection. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Pentraxins in innate immunity: from C-reactive protein to the long pentraxin PTX3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Alberto; Garlanda, Cecilia; Doni, Andrea; Bottazzi, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Pentraxins are a family of multimeric pattern-recognition proteins highly conserved in evolution. Based on the primary structure of the subunit, the pentraxins are divided into two groups: short pentraxins and long pentraxins. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P-component are classic short pentraxins produced in the liver, whereas the prototype of the long pentraxin family is PTX3. Innate immunity cells and vascular cells produce PTX3 in response to proinflammatory signals and Toll-like receptor engagement. PTX3 interacts with several ligands, including growth factors, extracellular matrix components, and selected pathogens, playing a role in complement activation, facilitating pathogen recognition, and acting as a predecessor of antibodies. In addition, PTX3 is essential in female fertility acting on the assembly of the cumulus oophorus extracellular matrix. Thus, PTX3 is a multifunctional soluble pattern recognition receptor acting as a nonredundant component of the humoral arm of innate immunity and involved in tuning inflammation, in matrix deposition and female fertility. Evidence suggests that PTX3 is a useful new serological marker, rapidly reflecting tissue inflammation and damage under diverse clinical conditions.

  6. Triggering filamentation using turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Eeltink, D; Marchiando, N; Hermelin, S; Gateau, J; Brunetti, M; Wolf, J P; Kasparian, J

    2016-01-01

    We study the triggering of single filaments due to turbulence in the beam path for a laser of power below the filamenting threshold. Turbulence can act as a switch between the beam not filamenting and producing single filaments. This 'positive' effect of turbulence on the filament probability, combined with our observation of off-axis filaments suggests the underlying mechanism is modulation instability caused by transverse perturbations. We hereby experimentally explore the interaction of modulation instability and turbulence, commonly associated with multiple-filaments, in the single-filament regime.

  7. The pentraxins PTX3 and SAP in innate immunity, regulation of inflammation and tissue remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottazzi, Barbara; Inforzato, Antonio; Messa, Massimo; Barbagallo, Marialuisa; Magrini, Elena; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Pentraxins are a superfamily of fluid phase pattern recognition molecules conserved in evolution and characterized by a cyclic multimeric structure. C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P component (SAP) constitute the short pentraxin arm of the superfamily. CRP and SAP are produced in the liver in response to IL-6 and are acute phase reactants in humans and mice respectively. In addition SAP has been shown to affect tissue remodelling and fibrosis by stabilizing all types of amyloid fibrils and by regulating monocyte to fibrocyte differentiation. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is the prototype of the long pentraxin arm. Gene targeted mice and genetic and epigenetic studies in humans suggest that PTX3 plays essential non-redundant roles in innate immunity and inflammation as well as in tissue remodelling. Recent studies have revealed the role of PTX3 as extrinsic oncosuppressor, able to tune cancer-related inflammation. In addition, at acidic pH PTX3 can interact with provisional matrix components promoting inflammatory matrix remodelling. Thus acidification during tissue repair sets PTX3 in a tissue remodelling and repair mode, suggesting that matrix and microbial recognition are common, ancestral features of the humoral arm of innate immunity. Copyright © 2016 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mobilization of Bacillus thuringiensis plasmid pTX14-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrup, L; Bendixen, H H; Jensen, G B

    1995-05-01

    The Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) plasmid pTX14-3 has been reported to contain a gene, mob14-3, with considerable homology to genes encoding mobilization proteins from other gram-positive bacteria. We have used the aggregation-mediated conjugation system recently discovered in Bti to compare the mobilization kinetics of different derivatives of plasmid pTX14-3. Plasmid pTX14-3 has been found to replicate by the rolling-circle mechanism and to contain a locus suppressing the formation of high-molecular-weight DNA. We found that deleting a DNA fragment containing this locus increased the transfer frequency about twofold. The mobilization frequency of the plasmid containing the intact mob14-3 gene did not indicate a mobilization-enhancing activity of the encoded polypeptide. However, the presence of the mob14-3 gene seemed to increase the stability of the plasmid in exponential growth.

  9. Radioimmunoassay of measles virus hemagglutinin protein G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, G.A.; Salmi, A.A. (Turku Univ. (Finland))

    1982-08-01

    Guinea pig and rabbit antisera from animals immunized with purified measles virus hemagglutinin (G) protein were used to establish a solid-phase four-layer radioimmunoassay for quantitative measurement of the G protein. The sensitivity of the assay was 2 ng of purified G protein, and 200 ..mu..g of protein from uninfected Vero cells neither decreased the sensitivity nor reacted non-specifically in the assay. Radioimmunoassay standard dose-response curves were established and unknown values interpolated from these using the logit program of a desktop computer. Using this procedure, a measles virus growth curve in infected Vero cells was determined by measurement of G protein production. Under these same conditions, hemagglutination was not sensitive enough to detect early hemagglutinin production. Viral antigens in canine distemper virus, Newcastle disease virus, parainfluenza viruses 1-4, simian virus 5, and respiratory syncytial virus-infected cell lysates did not cross-react in the radioimmunoassay. A small degree of cross-reactivity was detected with mumps viral antigens, both with Vero cell-derived (wild-type strain) and egg-derived (Enders strain) purified virus preparations and with a cell lysate antigen prepared from wild-type mumps virus-infected Vero cells.

  10. PTX3 is up-regulated in epithelial mammary cells during S. aureus intramammary infection in goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Fernando Soares Filipe

    2015-07-01

    PTX3 was up-regulated in epithelial mammary cells and in milk cells after S. aureus infection, demonstrating that it represents a first line of immune defense in goat udder. No modulation was observed in macrophages, in the secretum and in the ductal epithelial cells. Further experiments are needed to elucidate the role of PTX3 in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infection.

  11. The Long Pentraxin PTX3 Is Crucial for Tissue Inflammation after Intestinal Ischemia and Reperfusion in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Danielle G.; Amaral, Flavio A.; Fagundes, Caio T.; Coelho, Fernanda M.; Arantes, Rosa M.E.; Sousa, Lirlandia P.; Matzuk, Martin M.; Garlanda, Cecília; Mantovani, Alberto; Dias, Adriana A.; Teixeira, Mauro M.

    2009-01-01

    The pentraxin superfamily is a group of evolutionarily conserved proteins that play important roles in the immune system. The long pentraxin PTX3 protein was originally described as able to be induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli in a variety of cell types. In this study, we evaluated the phenotype of Ptx3−/− mice subjected to ischemia followed by reperfusion of the superior mesenteric artery. In reperfused wild-type mice, there was significant local and remote injury as demonstrated by increases in vascular permeability, neutrophil influx, nuclear factor-κB activation, and production of CXCL1 and tumor necrosis factor-α. PTX3 levels were elevated in both serum and intestine after reperfusion. In Ptx3−/− mice, local and remote tissue injury was inhibited, and there were decreased nuclear factor-κB translocation and cytokine production. Intestinal architecture was preserved, and there were decreased neutrophil influx and significant prevention of lethality in Ptx3−/− mice as well. PTX3 given intravenously before reperfusion reversed the protection observed in Ptx3−/− mice in a dose-dependent manner, and PTX3 administration significantly worsened tissue injury and lethality in wild-type mice. In conclusion, our studies demonstrate a major role for PTX3 in determining acute reperfusion-associated inflammation, tissue injury, and lethality and suggest the soluble form of this molecule is active in this system. Therapeutic blockade of PTX3 action may be useful in the control of the injuries associated with severe ischemia and reperfusion syndromes. PMID:19286566

  12. Filamentation in Laser Wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Eva; Trines, Raoul; Silva, Luis; Bingham, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Laser filamentation instability is observed in plasma wakefields with sub-critical densities, and in high density inertial fusion plasmas. This leads to non-uniform acceleration or compression respectively. Here, we present simulation results on laser filamentation in plasma wakefields. The 2-D simulations are carried out using the particle-in-cell code Osiris. The filament intensity was found to increase exponentially before saturating. The maximum amplitude to which the highest intensity filament grew for a specific set of parameters was also recorded, and plotted against a corresponding parameter value. Clear, positively correlated linear trends were established between plasma density, transverse wavenumber k, laser pulse amplitude and maximum filament amplitude. Plasma density and maximum filament amplitude also showed a positive correlation, which saturated after a certain plasma density. Pulse duration and interaction length did not affect either filament intensity or transverse k value in a predictable manner. There was no discernible trend between pulse amplitude and filament width.

  13. Hemagglutinin outer contour detection methods based on regular hexagon bar template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Miaomiao; Jing, Wenbo; Duan, Jin; Wang, Xiaoman

    2014-11-01

    In order to extract hemagglutinin outer contour accurately in the hemagglutinin image, analyzes the hemagglutinin protein content by the size of detected contour, presents a regular hexagon bar circle detection algorithm which uses regular hexagon bar detection template to detect outer contour of the hemagglutinin. Firstly, the hemagglutinin image thresholded by using OTSU adaptive thresholding method; and then using regular hexagon bar detection template method to rough align hemagglutinin after thresholded, intersection of detection template and the hemagglutinin contour area is attained, the noise near hemagglutinin contour is reduced by using the standardization relationship of the hexagon bars, so the hemagglutinin pixels are accurately obtained; finally the hemagglutinin outer contour information is gained by the geometric relationship of pixels, the hemagglutinin position is achieved precisely. The experimental results show that: the contour detection error due to the density uneven and the edge unclearly of hemagglutinin image protein is better reduced, the detection accuracy is increased by a factor of 0.47, detection speed is increased by a factor of 0.56.The hemagglutinin contour can be dected stablely, fastly, accurately and the is significant to the study of the hemagglutinin protein content.

  14. Solar Features - Prominences and Filaments - Filaments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Filaments are formed in magnetic loops that hold relatively cool, dense gas suspended above the surface of the Sun (David Hathaway/NASA)

  15. A self-assembling nanomedicine of conjugated linoleic acid-paclitaxel conjugate (CLA-PTX) with higher drug loading and carrier-free characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ting; Yao, Xin; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Yang; Duan, Xiao-Chuan; Ren, Wei; Dan Huang; Yin, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Xuan

    2016-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to demonstrate the proof-of-principle for the hypothesis that conjugated linoleic acid-paclitaxel conjugate (CLA-PTX), a novel fatty acid modified anti-cancer drug conjugate, could self-assemble forming nanoparticles. The results indicated that a novel self-assembling nanomedicine, CLA-PTX@PEG NPs (about 105 nm), with Cremophor EL (CrEL)-free and organic solvent-free characteristics, was prepared by a simple precipitation method. Being the ratio of CLA-PTX:DSPE-PEG was only 1:0.1 (w/w), the higher drug loading CLA-PTX@PEG NPs (about 90%) possessed carrier-free characteristic. The stability results indicated that CLA-PTX@PEG NPs could be stored for at least 9 months. The safety of CLA-PTX@PEG NPs was demonstrated by the MTD results. The anti-tumor activity and cellular uptake were also confirmed in the in vitro experiments. The lower crystallinity, polarity and solubility of CLA-PTX compared with that of paclitaxel (PTX) might be the possible reason for CLA-PTX self-assembling forming nanoparticles, indicating a relationship between PTX modification and nanoparticles self-assembly. Overall, the data presented here confirm that this drug self-delivery strategy based on self-assembly of a CLA-PTX conjugate may offer a new way to prepare nanomedicine products for cancer therapy involving the relationship between anticancer drug modification and self-assembly into nanoparticles.

  16. Large-Scale Patterns of Filament Channels and Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Duncan

    2016-07-01

    In this review the properties and large-scale patterns of filament channels and filaments will be considered. Initially, the global formation locations of filament channels and filaments are discussed, along with their hemispheric pattern. Next, observations of the formation of filament channels and filaments are described where two opposing views are considered. Finally, the wide range of models that have been constructed to consider the formation of filament channels and filaments over long time-scales are described, along with the origin of the hemispheric pattern of filaments.

  17. The Protective Effect against Extracellular Histones Afforded by Long-Pentraxin PTX3 as a Regulator of NETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigo, Kenji; Takamatsu, Yuichiro; Hamakubo, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a soluble pattern recognition molecule that plays critical roles in innate immunity. Its fundamental functions include recognition of microbes, activation of complement cascades, and opsonization. The findings that PTX3 is one of the component proteins in neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and binds with other NET proteins imply the importance of PTX3 in the NET-mediated trapping and killing of bacteria. As NETs play certain critically important host-protective roles, aberrant NET production results in tissue damage. Extracellular histones, the main source of which is considered to be NETs, are mediators of septic death due to their cytotoxicity toward endothelial cells. PTX3 protects against extracellular histones-mediated cytotoxicity through coaggregation. In addition to the anti-bacterial roles performed in coordination with other NET proteins, PTX3 appears to mitigate the detrimental effect of over-activated NETs. A better understanding of the role of the PTX3 complexes in NETs would be expected to lead to new strategies for maintaining a healthy balance between the helpful bactericidal and undesirable detrimental activities of NETs. PMID:27656184

  18. Semiflexible filamentous composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, E.M.; Heussinger, C.; Storm, C.; Barkema, G.T.

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by the ubiquity of composite filamentous networks in nature, we investigate models of biopolymer networks that consist of interconnected floppy and stiff filaments. Numerical simulations carried out in three dimensions allow us to explore the microscopic partitioning of stresses and strains

  19. Proteomics of Filamentous Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passel, van M.W.J.; Schaap, P.J.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae traditionally have had an important role in providing enzymes and enzyme cocktails that are used in food industry. In recent years the genome sequences of many filamentous fungi have become available. This combined with

  20. Proteomics of Filamentous Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passel, van M.W.J.; Schaap, P.J.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae traditionally have had an important role in providing enzymes and enzyme cocktails that are used in food industry. In recent years the genome sequences of many filamentous fungi have become available. This combined with technologica

  1. Tungsten Filament Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  2. Genetic analysis reveals the identity of the photoreceptor for phototaxis in hormogonium filaments of Nostoc punctiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Elsie L; Hagen, Kari D; Chen, Rui; Risser, Douglas D; Ferreira, Daniela P; Meeks, John C

    2015-02-15

    In cyanobacterial Nostoc species, substratum-dependent gliding motility is confined to specialized nongrowing filaments called hormogonia, which differentiate from vegetative filaments as part of a conditional life cycle and function as dispersal units. Here we confirm that Nostoc punctiforme hormogonia are positively phototactic to white light over a wide range of intensities. N. punctiforme contains two gene clusters (clusters 2 and 2i), each of which encodes modular cyanobacteriochrome-methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) and other proteins that putatively constitute a basic chemotaxis-like signal transduction complex. Transcriptional analysis established that all genes in clusters 2 and 2i, plus two additional clusters (clusters 1 and 3) with genes encoding MCPs lacking cyanobacteriochrome sensory domains, are upregulated during the differentiation of hormogonia. Mutational analysis determined that only genes in cluster 2i are essential for positive phototaxis in N. punctiforme hormogonia; here these genes are designated ptx (for phototaxis) genes. The cluster is unusual in containing complete or partial duplicates of genes encoding proteins homologous to the well-described chemotaxis elements CheY, CheW, MCP, and CheA. The cyanobacteriochrome-MCP gene (ptxD) lacks transmembrane domains and has 7 potential binding sites for bilins. The transcriptional start site of the ptx genes does not resemble a sigma 70 consensus recognition sequence; moreover, it is upstream of two genes encoding gas vesicle proteins (gvpA and gvpC), which also are expressed only in the hormogonium filaments of N. punctiforme. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Soluble trimeric hemagglutinins to study receptor binding and immunogenic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) are important pathogens of animals and man. In humans, IAV is the cause of seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. The pandemics are caused by suddenly appearing IAVs from animal reservoirs, to which most humans have no immunity. The hemagglutinin (HA) protein plays c

  4. Glycan-dependent immunogenicity of recombinant soluble trimeric hemagglutinin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.P.; Smit, C.H.; Bruin, de E.; Rigter, A.; Vries, de E.; Cornelissen, A.H.M.; Eggink, D.; Chung, N.P.Y.; Moore, J.P.; Sanders, R.W.; Hokke, C.H.; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Haan, de C.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant soluble trimeric influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (sHA3) has proven an effective vaccine antigen against IAV. Here, we investigate to what extent the glycosylation status of the sHA3 glycoprotein affects its immunogenicity. Different glycosylation forms of subtype H5 trimeric HA pro

  5. Aberrant methylation of the 3q25 tumor suppressor gene PTX3 in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Xiong Wang; Yuan-Long He; Sheng-Tao Zhu; Shuo Yang; Shu-Tian Zhang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify the novel methylation-silenced gene pentraxin 3 (PTX3) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). METHODS: PTX3 mRNA expression was examined in six human ESCC cell lines, one human immortalized normal esophageal epithelial cell line, primary ESCC tumor tissue, and paired adjacent nontumor tissue using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry was used to examine cellular localisation and protein levels. Methylation specific PCR and bisulphite genomic sequencing were employed to investigate the methylation of the candidate gene. RESULTS: In the majority of ESCC cell lines, we found that PTX3 expression was down-regulated due to gene promoter hypermethylation, which was further confirmed by bisulphite genomic sequencing. Demethyl-ation treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored PTX3 mRNA expression in ESCC cell lines. Methylation was more common in tumor tissues (85%) than in adjacent nontumor tissues (25%) (P < 0 .01). CONCLUSION: PTX3 is down-regulated through promoter hypermethylation in ESCC, and could potentially serve as a biomarker of ESCC.

  6. Magnetic and Langmuir Probe Measurements on the Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelfgen, Syri J.; Eskridge, Richard; Lee, Michael H.; Martin, Adam; Hawk, Clark W.; Fimognan, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The Plasmoid Thruster Experiment (PTX) operates by inductively producing plasmoids in a conical theta-pinch coil and ejecting them at high velocity. A plasmoid is a plasma with an imbedded closed magnetic field structure. The shape and magnetic field structure of the translating plasmoids have been measured with of an array of magnetic field probes. Six sets of two B-dot probes were constructed for measuring B(sub z) and B(sub theta), the axial and azimuthal components of the magnetic field. The probes are wound on a square G10 form, and have an average (calibrated) NA of 9.37 x l0(exp -5) square meters, where N is the number of turns and A is the cross-sectional area. The probes were calibrated with a Helmholtz coil, driven by a high-voltage pulser to measure NA, and by a signal generator to determine the probe's frequency response. The plasmoid electron number density n(sub e) electron temperature T(sub e), and velocity ratio v/c(sub m), (where v is the bulk plasma flow velocity and c(sub m), is the ion thermal speed) have also been measured with a quadruple Langmuir probe. The Langmuir probe tips are 10 mm long, 20-mil diameter stainless steel wire, housed in a 6-inch long 4-bore aluminum rod. Measurements on PTX with argon and hydrogen from the magnetic field probes and quadruple Langmuir probe will be presented in this paper.

  7. Femtosecond Laser Filamentation

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, See Leang

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond Laser Filamentation gives a comprehensive review of the physics of propagation of intense femtosecond laser pulses in optical media (principally air) and the applications and challenges of this new technique. This book presents the modern understanding of the physics of femtosecond laser pulse propagation, including unusual new effects such as the self-transformation of the pulse into a white light laser pulse, intensity clamping, the physics of multiple filamentation and competition, and how filaments’ ability to melt glass leads to wave guide writing. The potential applications of laser filamentation in atmospheric sensing and the generation of other electromagnetic pulses from the UV to the radio frequency are treated, together with possible future challenges in the excitation of super-excited states of molecules. Exciting new phenomena such as filament induced ultrafast birefringence and the excitation of molecular rotational wave packets and their multiple revivals in air (gases) will also ...

  8. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...

  9. Blistering of viscoelastic filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Sattler, R; Wagner, C

    2007-01-01

    When a dilute polymer solution experiences capillary thinning, it forms an almost uniformly cylindrical thread, which we study experimentally. In the last stages of thinning, when polymers have become fully stretched, the filament becomes prone to instabilities, of which we describe two: A novel "breathing" instability, originating from the edge of the filament, and a sinusoidal instability in the interior, which ultimately gives rise to a "blistering" pattern of beads on the filament. We describe the linear instability with a spatial resolution of 80 nm in the disturbance amplitude. For sufficiently high polymer concentrations, the filament eventually separates out into a "solid" phase of entangled polymers, connected by fluid beads. A solid polymer fiber of about 100 nanometer thickness remains, which is essentially permanent.

  10. The long pentraxin PTX3 as a prototypic humoral pattern recognition receptor: interplay with cellular innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia; Cotena, Alessia; Moalli, Federica; Jaillon, Sebastien; Deban, Livija; Mantovani, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system consists of a cellular arm and a humoral arm. Components of humoral immunity include diverse molecular families, which represent functional ancestors of antibodies. They play a key role as effectors and modulators of innate resistance in animals and humans, interacting with cellular innate immunity. The prototypic long pentraxin, pentraxin 3 (PTX3), represents a case in point of this interplay. Gene targeting of this evolutionarily conserved long pentraxin has unequivocally defined its role at the crossroads of innate immunity, inflammation, matrix deposition, and female fertility. Phagocytes represent a key source of this fluid-phase pattern recognition receptor, which, in turn, facilitates microbial recognition by phagocytes acting as an opsonin. Moreover, PTX3 has modulatory functions on innate immunity and inflammation. Here, we review the studies on PTX3 which emphasize the complexity and complementarity of the crosstalk between the cellular and humoral arms of innate immunity.

  11. Antitumor effect of iRGD-modified liposomes containing conjugated linoleic acid–paclitaxel (CLA-PTX on B16-F10 melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du R

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ruo Du,1 Ting Zhong,1 Wei-Qiang Zhang,1 Ping Song,1 Wen-Ding Song,1 Yang Zhao,1 Chao-Wang,1 Yi-Qun Tang,3 Xuan Zhang,1,2 Qiang Zhang1,2 1Department of Pharmaceutics, 2State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: In the present study, we prepared a novel delivery system of iRGD (CRGDK/RGPD/EC-modified sterically stabilized liposomes (SSLs containing conjugated linoleic acid–paclitaxel (CLA-PTX. The anti-tumor effect of iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX was investigated on B16-F10 melanoma in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro targeting effect of iRGD-modified SSLs was investigated in a real-time confocal microscopic analysis experiment. An endocytosis-inhibition assay was used to evaluate the endocytosis pathways of the iRGD-modified SSLs. In addition, the in vitro cellular uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity of iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX were evaluated in B16-F10 melanoma cells. In vivo biodistribution and in vivo antitumor effects of iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX were investigated in B16-F10 tumor-bearing mice. The induction of apoptosis by iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX was evaluated in tumor-tissue sections. Real-time confocal microscopic analysis results indicated that the iRGD-modified SSLs internalized into B16-F10 cells faster than SSLs. The identified endocytosis pathway of iRGD-modified SSLs indicated that energy- and lipid raft-mediated endocytosis played a key role in the liposomes’ cellular uptake. The results of the cellular uptake experiment indicated that the increased cellular uptake of CLA-PTX in the iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX-treated group was 1.9-, 2.4-, or 2.1-fold compared with that in the CLA-PTX group after a 2-, 4-, or 6-hour incubation, respectively. In the biodistribution test, the CLA-PTX level in tumor tissues from iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX-treated mice at 1 hour (1.84±0.17 µg/g and 4 hours (1.17±0

  12. Antitumor effect of iRGD-modified liposomes containing conjugated linoleic acid-paclitaxel (CLA-PTX) on B16-F10 melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ruo; Zhong, Ting; Zhang, Wei-Qiang; Song, Ping; Song, Wen-Ding; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Chao; Tang, Yi-Qun; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we prepared a novel delivery system of iRGD (CRGDK/RGPD/EC)-modified sterically stabilized liposomes (SSLs) containing conjugated linoleic acid-paclitaxel (CLA-PTX). The anti-tumor effect of iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX was investigated on B16-F10 melanoma in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro targeting effect of iRGD-modified SSLs was investigated in a real-time confocal microscopic analysis experiment. An endocytosis-inhibition assay was used to evaluate the endocytosis pathways of the iRGD-modified SSLs. In addition, the in vitro cellular uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity of iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX were evaluated in B16-F10 melanoma cells. In vivo biodistribution and in vivo antitumor effects of iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX were investigated in B16-F10 tumor-bearing mice. The induction of apoptosis by iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX was evaluated in tumor-tissue sections. Real-time confocal microscopic analysis results indicated that the iRGD-modified SSLs internalized into B16-F10 cells faster than SSLs. The identified endocytosis pathway of iRGD-modified SSLs indicated that energy- and lipid raft-mediated endocytosis played a key role in the liposomes' cellular uptake. The results of the cellular uptake experiment indicated that the increased cellular uptake of CLA-PTX in the iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX-treated group was 1.9-, 2.4-, or 2.1-fold compared with that in the CLA-PTX group after a 2-, 4-, or 6-hour incubation, respectively. In the biodistribution test, the CLA-PTX level in tumor tissues from iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX-treated mice at 1 hour (1.84±0.17 μg/g) and 4 hours (1.17±0.28 μg/g) was 2.3- and 2.0-fold higher than that of CLA-PTX solution at 1 hour (0.79±0.06 μg/g) and 4 hours (0.58±0.04 μg/g). The value of the area under the curve for the first 24 hours in the tumors of iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX-treated mice was significantly higher than that in the SSL-CLA-PTX and CLA-PTX solution-treated groups (P<0.01). The in vivo antitumor results indicated that iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX significantly inhibited

  13. Antitumor effect of iRGD-modified liposomes containing conjugated linoleic acid–paclitaxel (CLA-PTX) on B16-F10 melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ruo; Zhong, Ting; Zhang, Wei-Qiang; Song, Ping; Song, Wen-Ding; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Chao; Tang, Yi-Qun; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we prepared a novel delivery system of iRGD (CRGDK/RGPD/EC)-modified sterically stabilized liposomes (SSLs) containing conjugated linoleic acid–paclitaxel (CLA-PTX). The anti-tumor effect of iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX was investigated on B16-F10 melanoma in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro targeting effect of iRGD-modified SSLs was investigated in a real-time confocal microscopic analysis experiment. An endocytosis-inhibition assay was used to evaluate the endocytosis pathways of the iRGD-modified SSLs. In addition, the in vitro cellular uptake and in vitro cytotoxicity of iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX were evaluated in B16-F10 melanoma cells. In vivo biodistribution and in vivo antitumor effects of iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX were investigated in B16-F10 tumor-bearing mice. The induction of apoptosis by iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX was evaluated in tumor-tissue sections. Real-time confocal microscopic analysis results indicated that the iRGD-modified SSLs internalized into B16-F10 cells faster than SSLs. The identified endocytosis pathway of iRGD-modified SSLs indicated that energy- and lipid raft-mediated endocytosis played a key role in the liposomes’ cellular uptake. The results of the cellular uptake experiment indicated that the increased cellular uptake of CLA-PTX in the iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX-treated group was 1.9-, 2.4-, or 2.1-fold compared with that in the CLA-PTX group after a 2-, 4-, or 6-hour incubation, respectively. In the biodistribution test, the CLA-PTX level in tumor tissues from iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX-treated mice at 1 hour (1.84±0.17 μg/g) and 4 hours (1.17±0.28 μg/g) was 2.3- and 2.0-fold higher than that of CLA-PTX solution at 1 hour (0.79±0.06 μg/g) and 4 hours (0.58±0.04 μg/g). The value of the area under the curve for the first 24 hours in the tumors of iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX-treated mice was significantly higher than that in the SSL-CLA-PTX and CLA-PTX solution-treated groups (P<0.01). The in vivo antitumor results indicated that iRGD-SSL-CLA-PTX significantly

  14. Characterization of HI Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubar, Emily; Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2017-01-01

    We characterized the properties of dramatic interstellar HI filaments to learn more about the dynamics and structure of such features. Using Gauss fitting software, we searched the Effelsburg-Bonn HI Survey data for indications of a simple twisting (toroidal) motion across these filaments. Instead, we found that the structure was more complicated than expected. Apparent angular widths of several filaments were measured using the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array HI (GALFA-HI), Bonn, and Leident/Argentine/Bonn (LAB) surveys. Based on filament widths and other parameters, we conclude that magnetism is the dominant force opposing internal motion and maintaining the structure of these filaments. The apparent width as a function of beam width closely follows a relationship reported in 1993 for HI features in general. They tend to subtend an angle two times the beam width, suggesting that the features remain unresolved.The Arecibo Observatory is operated by SRI International under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation (AST-1100968), and in alliance with Ana G. Méndez-Universidad Metropolitana, and the Universities Space Research Association. The Arecibo Observatory REU is funded under grant AST-1559849 to Universidad Metropolitana.

  15. High plasma level of long pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is associated with fatal disease in bacteremic patients: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reetta Huttunen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Long pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is an acute-phase protein secreted by various cells, including leukocytes and endothelial cells. Like C-reactive protein (CRP, it belongs to the pentraxin superfamily. Recent studies indicate that high levels of PTX3 may be associated with mortality in sepsis. The prognostic value of plasma PTX3 in bacteremic patients is unknown. METHODS: Plasma PTX3 levels were measured in 132 patients with bacteremia caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, β-hemolytic streptococcae and Escherichia coli, using a commercial solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Values were measured on days 1-4 after positive blood culture, on day 13-18 and on recovery. RESULTS: The maximum PTX3 values on days 1-4 were markedly higher in nonsurvivors compared to survivors (44.8 vs 6.4 ng/ml, p15 ng/ml was associated with hypotension (MAP 15 ng/ml remained an independent risk factor for case fatality in a logistic regression model adjusted for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: PTX3 proved to be a specific independent prognostic biomarker in bacteremia. PTX3 during the first days after diagnosis showed better prognostic value as compared to CRP, a widely used biomarker in clinical settings. PTX3 measurement offers a novel opportunity for the prognostic stratification of bacteremia patients.

  16. Heterocomplexes of mannose-binding lectin and the pentraxins PTX3 or SAP trigger cross-activation of the complement system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Doni, Andrea; Skjødt, Mikkel-Ole;

    2011-01-01

    The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3), serum amyloid P component (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) belong to the pentraxin family of pattern recognition molecules involved in tissue homeostasis and innate immunity. They interact with C1q from the classical complement pathway. Whether this also occurs via...... the analogous mannose-binding lectin (MBL) from the lectin complement pathway is unknown. Thus, we investigated the possible interaction between MBL and the pentraxins. We report that MBL bound PTX3 and SAP partly via its collagen-like domain, but not CRP. MBL:PTX3 complex formation resulted in recruitment of C......1q, but this was not seen for the MBL:SAP complex. However, both MBL:PTX3 and MBL:SAP complexes enhanced C4 and C3 deposition and opsonophagocytosis of Candida albicans by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Interaction between MBL and PTX3 lead to communication between the lectin and classical complement...

  17. Ficolin-1-PTX3 complex formation promotes clearance of altered self-cells and modulates IL-8 production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Doni, Andrea; Romani, Luigina;

    2013-01-01

    The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) has been shown to be important in maintaining internal tissue homeostasis and in protecting against fungal Aspergillus fumigatus infection. However, the molecular mechanisms of how these functions are elicited are poorly delineated. Ficolin-1 is a soluble pattern recog...

  18. Filaments in Lupus I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Rodon, J.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Plunkett, A.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanisms behind the formation of sub-stellar mass sources are key to determine the populations at the low-mass end of the stellar distribution. Here, we present mapping observations toward the Lupus I cloud in C18O(2-1) and 13CO(2-1) obtained with APEX. We have identified a few velocity-coherent filaments. Each contains several substellar mass sources that are also identified in the 1.1mm continuum data (see also SOLA catalogue presentation). We will discuss the velocity structure, fragmentation properties of the identified filaments, and the nature of the detected sources.

  19. Aerogel-supported filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Craig R.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Johnson, III, Coleman V.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is a thin filament embedded in a low density aerogel for use in radiation detection instruments and incandescent lamps. The aerogel provides a supportive matrix that is thermally and electrically nonconductive, mechanically strong, highly porous, gas-permeable, and transparent to ionizing radiation over short distances. A low density, open-cell aerogel is cast around a fine filament or wire, which allows the wire to be positioned with little or no tension and keeps the wire in place in the event of breakage. The aerogel support reduces the stresses on the wire caused by vibrational, gravitational, electrical, and mechanical forces.

  20. Structures of receptor complexes formed by hemagglutinins from the Asian Influenza pandemic of 1957

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Junfeng; Stevens, David J.; Lesley F Haire; Walker, Philip A.; Coombs, Peter J.; Russell, Rupert J.; Gamblin, Steven J.; John J Skehel

    2009-01-01

    The viruses that caused the three influenza pandemics of the twentieth century in 1918, 1957, and 1968 had distinct hemagglutinin receptor binding glycoproteins that had evolved the capacity to recognize human cell receptors. We have determined the structure of the H2 hemagglutinin from the second pandemic, the “Asian Influenza” of 1957. We compare it with the 1918 “Spanish Influenza” hemagglutinin, H1, and the 1968 “Hong Kong Influenza” hemagglutinin, H3, and show that despite its close over...

  1. Branching of keratin intermediate filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafeey, Soufi; Martin, Ines; Felder, Tatiana; Walther, Paul; Felder, Edward

    2016-06-01

    Keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) are crucial to maintain mechanical stability in epithelial cells. Since little is known about the network architecture that provides this stiffness and especially about branching properties of filaments, we addressed this question with different electron microscopic (EM) methods. Using EM tomography of high pressure frozen keratinocytes, we investigated the course of several filaments in a branching of a filament bundle. Moreover we found several putative bifurcations in individual filaments. To verify our observation we also visualized the keratin network in detergent extracted keratinocytes with scanning EM. Here bifurcations of individual filaments could unambiguously be identified additionally to bundle branchings. Interestingly, identical filament bifurcations were also found in purified keratin 8/18 filaments expressed in Escherichia coli which were reassembled in vitro. This excludes that an accessory protein contributes to the branch formation. Measurements of the filament cross sectional areas showed various ratios between the three bifurcation arms. This demonstrates that intermediate filament furcation is very different from actin furcation where an entire new filament is attached to an existing filament. Instead, the architecture of intermediate filament bifurcations is less predetermined and hence consistent with the general concept of IF formation.

  2. Kilometer range filamentation

    OpenAIRE

    Durand, Magali; Houard, Aurélien; Prade, Bernard; Mysyrowicz, André; Durécu, Anne; Moreau, Bernard; Fleury, Didier; Vasseur, Olivier; Borchert, Hartmut; Diener, Karsten; Schmitt, Rudiger; Théberge, Francis; Chateauneuf, Marc; Daigle, Jean-François; Dubois, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    International audience; We demonstrate for the first time the possibility to generate long plasma channels up to a distance of 1 km, using the terawatt femtosecond T&T laser facility. The plasma density was optimized by adjusting the chirp, the focusing and beam diameter. The interaction of filaments with transparent and opaque targets was studied.

  3. Solar Features - Prominences and Filaments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Prominences and filaments are two manifestations of the same phenomenon. Both prominences and filaments are features formed above the chromosphere by cool dense...

  4. Positrusion Filament Recycling System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TUI proposes a novel process to produce 3d printer feedstock filament out of scrap ABS on the ISS. Currently the plastic filament materials that most 3d printers use...

  5. Properties of twisted ferromagnetic filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belovs, Mihails; Cebers, Andrejs [University of Latvia, Zellu 8, LV-1002 (Latvia)], E-mail: aceb@tesla.sal.lv

    2009-02-01

    The full set of equations for twisted ferromagnetic filaments is derived. The linear stability analysis of twisted ferromagnetic filament is carried out. Two different types of the buckling instability are found - monotonous and oscillatory. The first in the limit of large twist leads to the shape of filament reminding pearls on the string, the second to spontaneous rotation of the filament, which may constitute the working of chiral microengine.

  6. What makes proteins work: exploring life in P-T-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiye, Toshiko

    2016-12-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in the molecular biophysics of proteins, it is still not possible to reliably design an enzyme for a given function. The current understanding of enzyme function is that both structure and flexibility are important. Much attention has been focused recently on protein folding and thus structure, spurred on by insights from the folding funnel concept. For experimental studies of protein folding, variations in temperature (T) and chemical composition (X) of the solution have been traditionally exploited, although more recent studies using variations in pressure (P) made possible through new instrumentation have led to a deeper understanding of the energy landscape of protein folding. Other work has shown that flexibility is also essential for enzymes, although it is still not clear what type is important. Another avenue has been to take advantage of ‘Nature’s laboratory’ by exploring homologous proteins from organisms that live in extreme conditions, or ‘extremophiles’. While the most studied extremophiles live at extremes of T and X, recent exploration of deep-sea environments has led to the discovery of organisms living under high P, or ‘piezophiles’. An exploration of targeted enzymes from organisms with various P-T-X growth conditions coupled with advances in biophysical instrumentation and computer simulations that allow studies of these enzymes at different P-T-X conditions may lead to a better understanding of ‘flexibility’ and to general design criteria for active enzymes. Preface. Kamal Shukla’s great contribution to science has been his vision that physical sciences could bring new insights to biological sciences, and that the marriage of methodologies, particularly theoretical/computational with experimental, was needed to tackle the complexities of biology. Furthermore, his openness to new methods and different ideas outside the current fad has helped make his vision a reality. In my remarks

  7. Filamentous Fungi Fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Anders; Stocks, Stuart; Woodley, John

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi (including microorganisms such as Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae) represent an enormously important platform for industrial fermentation. Two particularly valuable features are the high yield coefficients and the ability to secrete products. However, the filamentous...... morphology, together with non-Newtonian rheological properties (shear thinning), result in poor oxygen transfer unless sufficient energy is provided to the fermentation. While genomic research may improve the organisms, there is no doubt that to enable further application in future it will be necessary...... to match such research with studies of oxygen transfer and energy supply to high viscosity fluids. Hence, the implementation of innovative solutions (some of which in principle are already possible) will be essential to ensure the further development of such fermentations....

  8. Solid friction between soft filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Andrew; Schwenger, Walter; Welch, David; Lau, A W C; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Mahadevan, L; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    Any macroscopic deformation of a filamentous bundle is necessarily accompanied by local sliding and/or stretching of the constituent filaments. Yet the nature of the sliding friction between two aligned filaments interacting through multiple contacts remains largely unexplored. Here, by directly measuring the sliding forces between two bundled F-actin filaments, we show that these frictional forces are unexpectedly large, scale logarithmically with sliding velocity as in solid-like friction, and exhibit complex dependence on the filaments' overlap length. We also show that a reduction of the frictional force by orders of magnitude, associated with a transition from solid-like friction to Stokes' drag, can be induced by coating F-actin with polymeric brushes. Furthermore, we observe similar transitions in filamentous microtubules and bacterial flagella. Our findings demonstrate how altering a filament's elasticity, structure and interactions can be used to engineer interfilament friction and thus tune the prop...

  9. Fundamentals of Filament Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-19

    provide a 1:1 image of the filament profile onto a CCD camera (The Imaging Source DMK72BUC02). Neutral density filters were used to prevent the...thermal velocity, until their momentum was arrested by collisions with neutral air molecules. This results in a short distance, transient current which...Martin Richardson, 3rd ELI-ALPS User Workshop, Szeged, Hungary November 2015 126 “Photonics and the Changing Energy Scene ”, Martin Richardson

  10. PtxGd alloy formation on Pt(111): Preparation and structural characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrikkeholm, Elisabeth T.; Pedersen, Anders F.; Vej-Hansen, Ulrik G.; Escudero-Escribano, Maria; Stephens, Ifan E. L.; Friebel, Daniel; Mehta, Apurva; Schiøtz, Jakob; Feidenhansl', Robert K.; Nilsson, Anders; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2016-10-01

    PtxGd single crystals have been prepared in ultra high vacuum (UHV). This alloy shows promising catalytic properties for the oxygen reduction reaction. The samples were prepared by using vacuum deposition of a thick layer of Gd on a sputter cleaned Pt(111) single crystal, resulting in a ∼63 nm thick alloy layer. Subsequently the surfaces were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of CO. A Pt terminated alloy was observed upon annealing the sample to 600 ∘C. The LEED and synchrotron XRD experiments have shown that a slightly compressed (2 × 2) alloy appear. The alloy film followed the orientation of the Pt(111) substrate half the time, otherwise it was rotated by 30∘. The TPD spectra show a well-defined peak shifted down 200 ∘C in temperature. The crystal structure of the alloy was investigated using ex-situ X-ray diffraction experiments, which revealed an in-plane compression and a complicated stacking sequence. The crystallites in the crystal are very small, and a high degree of twinning by merohedry was observed.

  11. IDENTIFIKASI WASTE PADA WHOLE STREAM PERUSAHAAN ROKOK DI PT.X16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhmawati Rakhmawati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Identify to be done by using method of lean manufacturing. This research aimed at identify waste and formulate effort reduction of waste production process smoke in PT.X. The data were collected from manufacturer records, study to determine processing time, as well as interview and quisioners which were distributed to workers in each department. Big picture mapping and value stream mapping tools (VALSAT were then utilised to process the data.Result of from research got that during once production process can reduce from 152.59 minute become 149.59 time and minute every order 26 day become 19 day. From result of waste workshop known that type extravagance of cause the happening of production process time depth ( 3 highest is defect, waiting time and excessive transportation, so that appliance (tool matching with the extravagance type is mapping filter quality with successive wight 96,6 : 55,86 : and 23,32.According to the result found also cause of extravagance for example, to the number of time used for the activity of inspection between aktifitas so that cause production process time become Ilama, existence of distance which among tobacco warehouse with process of perajangan resulting the happening of movement of bolak return worker so that add production process time become llama. One of the ways to improve it is by applying pull system (Kanban.

  12. 75As NQR and NMR Studies on the Superconducting State of Ca10Pt4As8(Fe1-xPtxAs)10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshiaki; Iida, Takefumi; Suzuki, Kazunori; Kawamata, Takayuki; Itoh, Masayuki; Sato, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    75As NQR and NMR measurements of Ca10Pt4As8(Fe1-xPtxAs)10 with the superconducting transition temperature Tc = 33.4 K have been carried out. The observed 75As NQR spectra can be divided into those from As sites in (Fe1-xPtx)As and PtAs2 layers. From the NQR spectra of 75As in the (Fe1-xPtxAs) layers, x is found to be ~20%, indicating that the superconductivity is robust against nonmagnetic impurities. This contradicts the existence of the sign reversal of the order parameter in the system. The 75As nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rates 1/T1's from the (Fe1-xPtx)As and PtAs2 layers indicate that the PtAs2 layers are in a nonmetallic state and do not contribute to the occurrence of the superconductivity.

  13. Filament Identification through Mathematical Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Eric W

    2015-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for detecting filamentary structure FilFinder. The algorithm uses the techniques of mathematical morphology for filament identification, presenting a complementary approach to current algorithms which use matched filtering or critical manifolds. Unlike other methods, FilFinder identifies filaments over a wide dynamic range in brightness. We apply the new algorithm to far infrared imaging data of dust emission released by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey team. Our preliminary analysis characterizes both filaments and fainter striations. We find a typical filament width of 0.09 pc across the sample, but the brightness varies from cloud to cloud. Several regions show a bimodal filament brightness distribution, with the bright mode (filaments) being an order of magnitude brighter than the faint mode (striations). Using the Rolling Hough Transform, we characterize the orientations of the striations in the data, finding preferred directions that agree with magnetic field direction where dat...

  14. Chaperonin filaments: The archael cytoskeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.; Kagawa, H.K.; Yaoi, Takuro; Olle, E.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Chaperonins are multi-subunit double-ring complexed composed of 60-kDa proteins that are believed to mediate protein folding in vivo. The chaperonins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae are composed of the organism`s two most abundant proteins, which represent 4% of its total protein and have an intracellular concentration of {ge} 3.0 mg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 mg/ml, purified chaperonin proteins aggregate to form ordered filaments. Filament formation, which requires Mg{sup ++} and nucleotide binding (not hydrolysis), occurs at physiological temperatures under conditions suggesting filaments may exist in vivo. If the estimated 4,600 chaperonins per cell, formed filaments in vivo, they could create a matrix of filaments that would span the diameter of an average S. shibatae cell 100 times. Direct observations of unfixed, minimally treated cells by intermediate voltage electron microscopy (300 kV) revealed an intracellular network of filaments that resembles chaperonin filaments produced in vitro. The hypothesis that the intracellular network contains chaperonins is supported by immunogold analyses. The authors propose that chaperonin activity may be regulated in vivo by filament formation and that chaperonin filaments may serve a cytoskeleton-like function in archaea and perhaps in other prokaryotes.

  15. Unique Structural Features of Influenza Virus H15 Hemagglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzarum, Netanel; McBride, Ryan; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Peng, Wenjie; Paulson, James C.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps)

    2017-04-12

    Influenza A H15 viruses are members of a subgroup (H7-H10-H15) of group 2 hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes that include H7N9 and H10N8 viruses that were isolated from humans during 2013. The isolation of avian H15 viruses is, however, quite rare and, until recently, geographically restricted to wild shorebirds and waterfowl in Australia. The HAs of H15 viruses contain an insertion in the 150-loop (loop beginning at position 150) of the receptor-binding site common to this subgroup and a unique insertion in the 260-loop compared to any other subtype. Here, we show that the H15 HA has a high preference for avian receptor analogs by glycan array analyses. The H15 HA crystal structure reveals that it is structurally closest to H7N9 HA, but the head domain of the H15 trimer is wider than all other HAs due to a tilt and opening of the HA1 subunits of the head domain. The extended 150-loop of the H15 HA retains the conserved conformation as in H7 and H10 HAs. Furthermore, the elongated 260-loop increases the exposed HA surface and can contribute to antigenic variation in H15 HAs. Since avian-origin H15 HA viruses have been shown to cause enhanced disease in mammalian models, further characterization and immune surveillance of H15 viruses are warranted.

    IMPORTANCEIn the last 2 decades, an apparent increase has been reported for cases of human infection by emerging avian influenza A virus subtypes, including H7N9 and H10N8 viruses isolated during 2013. H15 is the other member of the subgroup of influenza A virus group 2 hemagglutinins (HAs) that also include H7 and H10. H15 viruses have been restricted to Australia, but recent isolation of H15 viruses in western Siberia suggests that they could be spread more globally via the avian flyways that converge and emanate from this region. Here we report on characterization of the three-dimensional structure and receptor specificity of the H15 hemagglutinin, revealing distinct features and specificities that can

  16. Current filamentation model for the Weibel/Filamentation instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Chang-Mo; Huynh, Cong Tuan; Kim, Chul Min

    2016-10-01

    A current filamentaion model for a nonrelativistic plasma with e +/e- beam has been presented together with PIC simulations, which can explain the mangetic field enhancement during the Weibel/ Filamentation instabilities. This filament model assumes the Hammer-Rostoker equilibrium. In addition, this model predicts preferential acceleration/deceleration for electron-ion plasmas depending on the injected beam to be e +/e-.

  17. 中国百日咳鲍特菌ptxS1和prn基因多态性分析%Polymorphism of ptxS1 and prn Genes of Bordetella pertussis in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张柳; 徐颖华; 赵建宏; 徐运强; 张庶民

    2010-01-01

    目的 分析我国近50年来分离的百日咳鲍特菌抗原百日咳毒素(Pertussis toxin,PT)S1亚基(ptxS1)和百日咳黏附素(Pertactin,prn)基因多态性.方法 收集85株百日咳杆菌,分别进行ptxS1和prn基因的PCR扩增和测序,并对序列进行比较分析.结果 共发现4个ptxS1基因型和6个prn基因型的百日咳杆菌.自20世纪60年代,非疫苗型ptxS1A菌株逐渐取代疫苗型菌株;含有prn2和prn3新基因型的菌株出现在2000年以后.基因的系统进化树显示,菌株ptxS1和prn基因型的核苷酸和氨基酸序列的同源性分别在97%以上.结论 我国近50年流行的百日咳临床分离菌株ptxSl和prn基因存在抗原漂移现象,本研究为加强我国百日咳的流行病学监控与新型无细胞百日咳疫苗的研发奠定了基础.

  18. Human dendritic cell maturation and cytokine secretion upon stimulation with Bordetella pertussis filamentous haemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirix, Violette; Mielcarek, Nathalie; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Willery, Eve; Alonso, Sylvie; Versheure, Virginie; Mascart, Françoise; Locht, Camille

    2014-07-01

    In addition to antibodies, Th1-type T cell responses are also important for long-lasting protection against pertussis. However, upon immunization with the current acellular vaccines, many children fail to induce Th1-type responses, potentially due to immunomodulatory effects of some vaccine antigens, such as filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA). We therefore analysed the ability of FHA to modulate immune functions of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). FHA was purified from pertussis toxin (PTX)-deficient or from PTX- and adenylate cyclase-deficient Bordetella pertussis strains, and residual endotoxin was neutralized with polymyxin B. FHA from both strains induced phenotypic maturation of human MDDC and cytokine secretion (IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-23 and IL-6). To identify the FHA domains responsible for MDDC immunomodulation, MDDC were stimulated with FHA containing a Gly→Ala substitution at its RGD site (FHA-RAD) or with an 80-kDa N-terminal moiety of FHA (Fha44), containing its heparin-binding site. Whereas FHA-RAD induced maturation and cytokine production comparable to those of FHA, Fha44 did not induce IL-10 production, but maturated MDDC at least partially. Nevertheless, Fha44 induced the secretion of IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-23 and IL-6 by MDDC, albeit at lower levels than FHA. Thus, FHA can modulate MDDC responses in multiple ways, and IL-10 induction can be dissociated from the induction of other cytokines.

  19. Metabolomics protocols for filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummer, Joel P A; Krill, Christian; Du Fall, Lauren; Waters, Ormonde D C; Trengove, Robert D; Oliver, Richard P; Solomon, Peter S

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics and transcriptomics are established functional genomics tools commonly used to study filamentous fungi. Metabolomics has recently emerged as another option to complement existing techniques and provide detailed information on metabolic regulation and secondary metabolism. Here, we describe broad generic protocols that can be used to undertake metabolomics studies in filamentous fungi.

  20. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, Seamus D; Hubber, David A

    2016-01-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long, initially sub-critical but accreting filaments. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length scale which is roughly 4 times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multi-wavelength density power spectrum there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispe...

  1. Resonantly enhanced filamentation in gases

    CERN Document Server

    Doussot, J; Billard, F; Béjot, P; Faucher, O

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter, a low-loss Kerr-driven optical filament in Krypton gas is experimentally reported in the ultraviolet. The experimental findings are supported by ab initio quantum calculations describing the atomic optical response. Higher-order Kerr effect induced by three-photon resonant transitions is identified as the underlying physical mechanism responsible for the intensity stabilization during the filamentation process, while ionization plays only a minor role. This result goes beyond the commonly-admitted paradigm of filamentation, in which ionization is a necessary condition of the filament intensity clamping. At resonance, it is also experimentally demonstrated that the filament length is greatly extended because of a strong decrease of the optical losses.

  2. Perturbation growth in accreting filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, S. D.; Whitworth, A. P.; Hubber, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We use smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations to investigate the growth of perturbations in infinitely long filaments as they form and grow by accretion. The growth of these perturbations leads to filament fragmentation and the formation of cores. Most previous work on this subject has been confined to the growth and fragmentation of equilibrium filaments and has found that there exists a preferential fragmentation length-scale which is roughly four times the filament's diameter. Our results show a more complicated dispersion relation with a series of peaks linking perturbation wavelength and growth rate. These are due to gravo-acoustic oscillations along the longitudinal axis during the sub-critical phase of growth. The positions of the peaks in growth rate have a strong dependence on both the mass accretion rate onto the filament and the temperature of the gas. When seeded with a multiwavelength density power spectrum, there exists a clear preferred core separation equal to the largest peak in the dispersion relation. Our results allow one to estimate a minimum age for a filament which is breaking up into regularly spaced fragments, as well as an average accretion rate. We apply the model to observations of filaments in Taurus by Tafalla & Hacar and find accretion rates consistent with those estimated by Palmeirim et al.

  3. Activity Cycle of Solar Filaments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. J. Li; Q. X. Li; P. X. Gao; J. Mu; H. D. Chen; T. W. Su

    2007-06-01

    Long-term variation in the distribution of the solar filaments observed at the Observatorie de Paris, Section de Meudon from March 1919 to December 1989 is presented to compare with sunspot cycle and to study the periodicity in the filament activity, namely the periods of the coronal activity with the Morlet wavelet used. It is inferred that the activity cycle of solar filaments should have the same cycle length as sunspot cycle, but the cycle behavior of solar filaments is globally similar in profile with, but different in detail from, that of sunspot cycles. The amplitude of solar magnetic activity should not keep in phase with the complexity of solar magnetic activity. The possible periods in the filament activity are about 10.44 and 19.20 years. The wavelet local power spectrum of the period 10.44 years is statistically significant during the whole consideration time. The wavelet local power spectrum of the period 19.20 years is under the 95% confidence spectrum during the whole consideration time, but over the mean red-noise spectrum of = 0.72 before approximate Carrington rotation number 1500, and after that the filament activity does not statistically show the period. Wavelet reconstruction indicates that the early data of the filament archive (in and before cycle 16) are more noiseful than the later (in and after cycle 17).

  4. Comparative Biomechanics of Thick Filaments and Thin Filaments with Functional Consequences for Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The scaffold of striated muscle is predominantly comprised of myosin and actin polymers known as thick filaments and thin filaments, respectively. The roles these filaments play in muscle contraction are well known, but the extent to which variations in filament mechanical properties influence muscle function is not fully understood. Here we review information on the material properties of thick filaments, thin filaments, and their primary constituents; we also discuss ways in which mechanical properties of filaments impact muscle performance.

  5. Centromeres of filamentous fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kristina M.; Galazka, Jonathan M.; Phatale, Pallavi A.; Connolly, Lanelle R.; Freitag, Michael

    2012-01-01

    How centromeres are assembled and maintained remains one of the fundamental questions in cell biology. Over the past 20 years the idea of centromeres as precise genetic loci has been replaced by the realization that it is predominantly the protein complement that defines centromere localization and function. Thus, placement and maintenance of centromeres are excellent examples of epigenetic phenomena in the strict sense. In contrast, the highly derived “point centromeres” of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its close relatives are counterexamples for this general principle of centromere maintenance. While we have learned much in the past decade, it remains unclear if mechanisms for epigenetic centromere placement and maintenance are shared amongst various groups of organisms. For that reason it seems prudent to examine species from many different phylogenetic groups with the aim to extract comparative information that will yield a more complete picture of cell division in all eukaryotes. This review addresses what has been learned by studying the centromeres of filamentous fungi, a large, heterogeneous group of organisms that includes important plant, animal and human pathogens, saprobes and symbionts that fulfill essential roles in the biosphere, as well as a growing number of taxa that have become indispensable for industrial use. PMID:22752455

  6. Collisions of Vortex Filament Pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banica, Valeria; Faou, Erwan; Miot, Evelyne

    2014-12-01

    We consider the problem of collisions of vortex filaments for a model introduced by Klein et al. (J Fluid Mech 288:201-248, 1995) and Zakharov (Sov Phys Usp 31(7):672-674, 1988, Lect. Notes Phys 536:369-385, 1999) to describe the interaction of almost parallel vortex filaments in three-dimensional fluids. Since the results of Crow (AIAA J 8:2172-2179, 1970) examples of collisions are searched as perturbations of antiparallel translating pairs of filaments, with initial perturbations related to the unstable mode of the linearized problem; most results are numerical calculations. In this article, we first consider a related model for the evolution of pairs of filaments, and we display another type of initial perturbation leading to collision in finite time. Moreover, we give numerical evidence that it also leads to collision through the initial model. We finally study the self-similar solutions of the model.

  7. Filament Identification through Mathematical Morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Eric W.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for detecting filamentary structure FilFinder. The algorithm uses the techniques of mathematical morphology for filament identification, presenting a complementary approach to current algorithms which use matched filtering or critical manifolds. Unlike other methods, FilFinder identifies filaments over a wide dynamic range in brightness. We apply the new algorithm to far infrared imaging data of dust emission released by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey team. Our prel...

  8. Gnarled-trunk evolutionary model of influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihito Ito

    Full Text Available Human influenza A viruses undergo antigenic changes with gradual accumulation of amino acid substitutions on the hemagglutinin (HA molecule. A strong antigenic mismatch between vaccine and epidemic strains often requires the replacement of influenza vaccines worldwide. To establish a practical model enabling us to predict the future direction of the influenza virus evolution, relative distances of amino acid sequences among past epidemic strains were analyzed by multidimensional scaling (MDS. We found that human influenza viruses have evolved along a gnarled evolutionary pathway with an approximately constant curvature in the MDS-constructed 3D space. The gnarled pathway indicated that evolution on the trunk favored multiple substitutions at the same amino acid positions on HA. The constant curvature was reasonably explained by assuming that the rate of amino acid substitutions varied from one position to another according to a gamma distribution. Furthermore, we utilized the estimated parameters of the gamma distribution to predict the amino acid substitutions on HA in subsequent years. Retrospective prediction tests for 12 years from 1997 to 2009 showed that 70% of actual amino acid substitutions were correctly predicted, and that 45% of predicted amino acid substitutions have been actually observed. Although it remains unsolved how to predict the exact timing of antigenic changes, the present results suggest that our model may have the potential to recognize emerging epidemic strains.

  9. Inhibition of influenza H7 hemagglutinin-mediated entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Antanasijevic

    Full Text Available The recent outbreak of H7N9 influenza in China is of high concern to public health. H7 hemagglutinin (HA plays a critical role in influenza entry and thus HA presents an attractive target for antivirals. Previous studies have suggested that the small molecule tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ inhibits the entry of influenza H3 HA by binding to the stem loop of HA and stabilizing the neutral pH conformation of HA, thereby disrupting the membrane fusion step. Based on amino acid sequence, structure and immunogenicity, H7 is a related Group 2 HA. In this work we show, using a pseudovirus entry assay, that TBHQ inhibits H7 HA-mediated entry, as well as H3 HA-mediated entry, with an IC50 ~ 6 µM. Using NMR, we show that TBHQ binds to the H7 stem loop region. STD NMR experiments indicate that the aromatic ring of TBHQ makes extensive contact with the H7 HA surface. Limited proteolysis experiments indicate that TBHQ inhibits influenza entry by stabilizing the H7 HA neutral pH conformation. Together, this work suggests that the stem loop region of H7 HA is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention and that TBHQ, which is a widely used food preservative, is a promising lead compound.

  10. Intermonomer Interactions in Hemagglutinin Subunits HA1 and HA2 Affecting Hemagglutinin Stability and Influenza Virus Infectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFeo, Christopher J.; Alvarado-Facundo, Esmeralda; Vassell, Russell

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) mediates virus entry by binding to cell surface receptors and fusing the viral and endosomal membranes following uptake by endocytosis. The acidic environment of endosomes triggers a large-scale conformational change in the transmembrane subunit of HA (HA2) involving a loop (B loop)-to-helix transition, which releases the fusion peptide at the HA2 N terminus from an interior pocket within the HA trimer. Subsequent insertion of the fusion peptide into the endosomal membrane initiates fusion. The acid stability of HA is influenced by residues in the fusion peptide, fusion peptide pocket, coiled-coil regions of HA2, and interactions between the surface (HA1) and HA2 subunits, but details are not fully understood and vary among strains. Current evidence suggests that the HA from the circulating pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus [A(H1N1)pdm09] is less stable than the HAs from other seasonal influenza virus strains. Here we show that residue 205 in HA1 and residue 399 in the B loop of HA2 (residue 72, HA2 numbering) in different monomers of the trimeric A(H1N1)pdm09 HA are involved in functionally important intermolecular interactions and that a conserved histidine in this pair helps regulate HA stability. An arginine-lysine pair at this location destabilizes HA at acidic pH and mediates fusion at a higher pH, while a glutamate-lysine pair enhances HA stability and requires a lower pH to induce fusion. Our findings identify key residues in HA1 and HA2 that interact to help regulate H1N1 HA stability and virus infectivity. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is the principal antigen in inactivated influenza vaccines and the target of protective antibodies. However, the influenza A virus HA is highly variable, necessitating frequent vaccine changes to match circulating strains. Sequence changes in HA affect not only antigenicity but also HA stability, which has important implications for vaccine production, as well

  11. Mechanism of macrophage injury following traumatic hemorrhagic shock: through PTX-sensitive G-protein-mediated signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘靖华; 刘良明; 陈惠孙; 胡德耀; 刘怀琼

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the mechanism of macrophage injury after trauma-hemorrhagic shock.   Methods: Wistar male rats underwent trauma (closed bone fracture) and hemorrhage (mean arterial blood pressure of 35 mm Hg±5 mm Hg for 60 minutes, following fluid resuscitation). Rats without trauma, hemorrhage or fluid resuscitation served as controls. Peritoneal macrophages were harvested at 6 hours and 1, 2, 3, 7 days after traumatic hemorrhagic shock to determine the effects of pertussis toxin (PTX, as a specific inhibitor to Giα) and cholera toxin (CTX, as a stimulant to Gsα) on macrophage-Ia expression and TNF-α production and levels of Giα and Gsα.   Results: The macrophages from the injured rats revealed a significant decrease of Ia positive number and TNF-α release in response to LPS. With pretreatment with PTX 10-100 ng/ml Ia positive cells and LPS-induced TNFα production in both control and impaired macrophages populations were dose-dependently increased. Both macrophages populations were not responding to CTX treatment (10-100 ng/ml). Western blot analyses showed that the levels of Giα protein expression increased as much as 116.5%-148.8% of the control level from 6 hours through 7 days after traumatic hemorrhage. The levels of Gsα protein expression were reduced at 6 hours and decreased to the lowest degree; 36% of the control at day 1, began to return at day 2 and returned to the normal level at day 7, following traumatic hemorrhagic shock.   Conclusions: PTX-sensitive G-protein may participate in the modulation of macrophage-Ia expression and TNF-α release following traumatic hemorrhagic shock. Analyses of the alteration of Giα and Gsα protein expressions further supports the concept that G-protein is involved in trauma-induced macrophage signal transduction pathways.

  12. Boolean gates on actin filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siccardi, Stefano; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a globular protein which forms long polar filaments in the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Actin networks play a key role in cell mechanics and cell motility. They have also been implicated in information transmission and processing, memory and learning in neuronal cells. The actin filaments have been shown to support propagation of voltage pulses. Here we apply a coupled nonlinear transmission line model of actin filaments to study interactions between voltage pulses. To represent digital information we assign a logical TRUTH value to the presence of a voltage pulse in a given location of the actin filament, and FALSE to the pulse's absence, so that information flows along the filament with pulse transmission. When two pulses, representing Boolean values of input variables, interact, then they can facilitate or inhibit further propagation of each other. We explore this phenomenon to construct Boolean logical gates and a one-bit half-adder with interacting voltage pulses. We discuss implications of these findings on cellular process and technological applications.

  13. Galaxy pairs align with galactic filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Tempel, Elmo

    2015-01-01

    Context. Gravitational collapse theory and numerical simulations suggest that the velocity field within large-scale galaxy filaments is dominated by motions along the filaments. Aims. Our aim is to check whether observational data reveal any preferred orientation of galaxy pairs with respect to the underlying filaments as a result of the expectedly anisotropic velocity field. Methods. We use galaxy pairs and galaxy filaments identified from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data. For filament extraction, we use the Bisous model that is based the marked point process technique. During the filament detection, we use the centre point of each pair instead of the positions of galaxies to avoid a built-in influence of pair orientation on the filament construction. For pairs lying within filaments (3012 cases), we calculate the angle between the line connecting galaxies of each pair and their host filament. To avoid redshift-space distortions, the angle is measured in the plain of the sky. Results. The alignment analysis...

  14. 78 FR 9355 - Influenza Viruses Containing the Hemagglutinin From the Goose/Guangdong/1/96 Lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 73 Influenza Viruses Containing the Hemagglutinin From the Goose/ Guangdong/1... from the public regarding whether highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses that contain a... concerning highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses that contain a hemagglutinin (HA) from the...

  15. Evaluating the virulence of a Brucella melitensis hemagglutinin gene in the caprine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Quinesha L; Hagius, Sue D; Walker, Joel V; Elzer, Philip H

    2010-10-01

    With the completion of the genomic sequence of Brucella melitensis 16M, a putative hemagglutinin gene was identified which is present in 16M and absent in Brucella abortus. The possibility of this hemagglutinin being a potential virulence factor was evaluated via gene replacement in B. melitensis yielding 16MΔE and expression in trans in B. abortus 2308-QAE. Utilizing the caprine brucellosis model, colonization and pathogenesis studies were performed to evaluate these strains. B. melitensis 16M hemagglutinin gene expression in trans in 2308-QAE revealed a significant (p≤0.05) increase in colonization and abortion rates when compared to B. abortus 2308, mimicking B. melitensis 16M virulence in pregnant goats. The B. melitensis disruption mutant's colonization and abortion rates demonstrated no attenuation in colonization but displayed a 28% reduction in abortions when compared to parental B. melitensis 16M.

  16. Synchrotron Based Structural Investigations of Mass-Selected PtxGd Nanoparticles and a Gd/Pt(111) Single Crystal for Electrochemical Oxygen Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Filsøe; Velazquez-Palenzuela, Amado Andres; Masini, Federico

    2015-01-01

    . 134, 16476–16479 (2012). 3. Velazquez-Palenzuela, A. et al. The enhanced activity of mass-selected PtxGd nanoparticles for oxygen electroreduction. J. Catal. [in press] (2015). doi:10.1016/j.jcat.2014.12.012 4. Perez-Alonso, F. J. et al. The Effect of Size on the Oxygen Electroreduction Activity...

  17. Elevations of inflammatory markers PTX3 and sST2 after resuscitation from cardiac arrest are associated with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and early death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristagno, Giuseppe; Varpula, Tero; Masson, Serge; Greco, Marta; Bottazzi, Barbara; Milani, Valentina; Aleksova, Aneta; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Assandri, Roberto; Tiainen, Marjaana; Vaahersalo, Jukka; Kurola, Jouni; Barlera, Simona; Montanelli, Alessandro; Latini, Roberto; Pettilä, Ville; Bendel, Stepani; Skrifvars, Markus B

    2015-10-01

    A systemic inflammatory response is observed after cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We investigated two novel inflammatory markers, pentraxin 3 (PTX3) and soluble suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2), in comparison with the classic high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), for prediction of early multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), early death, and long-term outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. PTX3, sST2, and hsCRP were assayed at ICU admission and 48 h later in 278 patients. MODS was defined as the 24 h non-neurological Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score ≥ 12. Intensive care unit (ICU) death and 12-month Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) were evaluated. In total, 82% of patients survived to ICU discharge and 48% had favorable neurological outcome at 1 year (CPC 1 or 2). At ICU admission, median plasma levels of hsCRP (2.8 mg/L) were normal, while levels of PTX3 (19.1 ng/mL) and sST2 (117 ng/mL) were markedly elevated. PTX3 and sST2 were higher in patients who developed MODS (p<0.0001). Admission levels of PTX3 and sST2 were also higher in patients who died in ICU and in those with an unfavorable 12-month neurological outcome (p<0.01). Admission levels of PTX3 and sST2 were independently associated with subsequent MODS [OR: 1.717 (1.221-2.414) and 1.340, (1.001-1.792), respectively] and with ICU death [OR: 1.536 (1.078-2.187) and 1.452 (1.064-1.981), respectively]. At 48 h, only sST2 and hsCRP were independently associated with ICU death. Higher plasma levels of PTX3 and sST2, but not of hsCRP, at ICU admission were associated with higher risk of MODS and early death.

  18. Temperature Controlled Filamentation in Argon Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Shi-Ying; KONG Wei-Peng; SONG Zhen-Ming; QIN Yu; LI Ru-Xin; WANG Qing-Yue; ZHANG Zhi-Gang

    2008-01-01

    Temperature controlled filamentation is experimentally demonstrated in a temperature gradient gas-filled tube.The proper position of the tube is heated by a furnace and two ends of the tube are cooled by air. The experimental results show that multiple filaments are shrunken into a single fila.ment or no filament only by increasing the temperature at the beginning of the filament. This technique offers another degree of freedom of controlling the filamentation and opens a new way for intense monocycle pulse generation through gradient temperature in a noble gas.

  19. Intermediate Filaments in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuela, Noam; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    More than 70 different genes in humans and 12 different genes in Caenorhabditis elegans encode the superfamily of intermediate filament (IF) proteins. In C. elegans, similar to humans, these proteins are expressed in a cell- and tissue-specific manner, can assemble into heteropolymers and into 5-10nm wide filaments that account for the principal structural elements at the nuclear periphery, nucleoplasm, and cytoplasm. At least 5 of the 11 cytoplasmic IFs, as well as the nuclear IF, lamin, are essential. In this chapter, we will include a short review of our current knowledge of both cytoplasmic and nuclear IFs in C. elegans and will describe techniques used for their analyses.

  20. Synergistic effect of graphene oxide coated nanotised apigenin with paclitaxel (GO-NA/PTX): A ROS dependent mitochondrial mediated apoptosis in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Manish Kumar; Jaiswar, Shyam Pyari; Dwivedi, Ashish; Goyal, Shruti; Dwivedi, Vinay Nand; Pathak, Anumesh Kumar; Kumar, Vinod; Sankhwar, Pushp Lata; Ray, Ratan Singh

    2017-04-24

    Ovarian cancer is most lethal among all gynecologic malignancies. Paclitaxel (PTX) is well used chemotherapeutic regimen for cancer control; however its undesired toxicity has been always a matter of concern for clinicians. Here we used the graphene oxide coated nanotised apigenin (GO-NA) as chemo sensitizing agent to enhance the efficacy of paclitaxel to overcome the limitations of chemotherapy. GO and GO-Apigenin was prepared by modified Hummers method and the nanoparticles were characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy Human ovarian adenocarcinomas (SKOV-3) cells was treated by DMSO, Group I (Control)-McCoy's 5A Medium, Group II-Paclitaxel (5nM) alone, Group III- Nanotised Apigenin (GO-NA-10μM) Group IV- Paclitaxel (5nM) + GO-NA (10μM). Cell viability and IC-50 value were determined by MTT assay, synergism by Compusyn software, ROS by DCFH-DA assay, SOD activity by commercially available kit and MMP were examined by JC-1 and mitotracker/DAPI staining, cell cycle by flow cytometry, mRNA and protein level of apoptotic molecules caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2 were detected by Real Time-PCR and Western blot respectively. Results showed that GO-NA-PTX dramatically enhanced the anti-proliferative effect in synergistic manner as compare to GO-NA and PTX alone. GO-NA-PTX significantly suppressed the SOD activity, promotes the ROS accumulation, mitochondrial depolarization, DNA integrity and cell cycle arrest collectively accord the apoptotic cell death. In addition, results of immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR and western blot also supported the apoptosis by up-regulating the bax, caspase3 and down-regulation of Bcl2. Conclusively, our data showed the GO-NA-PTX may be a promising method for ovarian cancer chemotherapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. SB-T-121205, a next-generation taxane, enhances apoptosis and inhibits migration/invasion in MCF-7/PTX cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaowei; Wang, Changwei; Xing, Yuanming; Chen, Siying; Meng, Ti; You, Haisheng; Ojima, Iwao; Dong, Yalin

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women. Paclitaxel, a mitotic inhibitor, is highly effective in the treatment of breast cancer. However, development of resistance to paclitaxel limits its clinical use. Identifying new compounds and new strategies that are effective against breast cancer, in particular drug-resistant cancer, is of great importance. the aim of the present study was to explore the potential of a next-generation taxoid, SB-T-121205, in modulating the proliferation, migration and invasion of paclitaxel-resistant human breast cancer cells (MCF-7/PTX) and further evaluate the underlying molecular mechanisms. The results of MTT assay showed that SB-T-121205 has much higher potency to human breast cancer cells (MCF-7/S, MCF-7/PTX and MDA-MB-453 cells) than paclitaxel, while that the non-tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were slightly less sensitive to SB-T-121205 than paclitaxel. Flow cytometry and western blot methods revealed that SB-T-121205 induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and apoptosis in MCF-7/PTX cells through accelerating mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, resulting in reduction of Bcl-2/Bax ratio, as well as elevation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) levels. Moreover, SB-T-121205 changed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) property, and suppressed migration and invasion abilities of MCF-7/PTX cells. Additionally, SB-T-121205 exerted antitumor activity by inhibiting the transgelin 2 and PI3K/Akt pathway. These findings indicate that SB-T-121205 is a potent antitumor agent that promotes apoptosis and also recedes migration/invasion abilities of MCF-7/PTX cells by restraining the activity of transgelin 2 and PI3K/Akt, as well as mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Such results suggest a potential clinical value of SB-T-121205 in breast cancer treatment.

  2. Towards filament free semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter; Skovgaard, Peter M. W.

    2000-01-01

    We outline physical models and simulations for suppression of self-focusing and filamentation in large aperture semiconductor lasers. The principal technical objective is to generate multi-watt CW or quasi-CW outputs with nearly diffraction limited beams, suitable for long distance free space...... propagation structures in lasers and amplifiers which suppress lateral reflections....

  3. Capillary thinning of polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Szabo, Peter

    1999-01-01

    The capillary thinning of filaments of a Newtonian polybutene fluid and a viscoelastic polyisobutylene solution are analyzed experimentally and by means of numerical simulation. The experimental procedure is as follows. Initially, a liquid sample is placed between two cylindrical plates. Then, th...... and quantified. (C) 1999 The Society of Rheology. [S0148-6055(99)00103-0]....

  4. Merger of Long Vortex Filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Khandekar, Akshay

    2012-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video demonstrates the merger of long vortex filaments is shown experimentally. Two counter-rotating vortices are generated using in a tank with very high aspect ratio. PIV demonstrates the merger of the vortices within a single orbit.

  5. Picosecond laser filamentation in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-02

    LeibnizUniversityHannover,Welfengarten 1, D-30167Hannover, Germany 3 CEA-DAM,DIF, F-91297Arpajon, France 4 Univ.Bordeaux—CNRS—CEA,Centre Lasers ...optics.arizona.edu Keywords: laser filamentation, picosecond laser pulses, nonlinear propagation, optical ionization Abstract The propagation of intense

  6. Transient filament stretching rheometer II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    1997-01-01

    The Lagrangian sspecification is used to simulate the transient stretching filament rheometer. Simulations are performed for dilute PIB-solutions modeled as a four mode Oldroyd-B fluid and a semidilute PIB-solution modeled as a non-linear single integral equation. The simulations are compared...

  7. Filament Winding. A Unified Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koussios, S.

    2004-01-01

    In this dissertation we have presented an overview and comprehensive treatment of several facets of the filament winding process. With the concepts of differential geometry and the theory of thin anisotropic shells of revolution, a parametric shape generator has been formulated for the design proced

  8. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Margiotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway.

  9. Large-scale Motion of Solar Filaments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pavel Ambrož; Alfred Schroll

    2000-09-01

    Precise measurements of heliographic position of solar filaments were used for determination of the proper motion of solar filaments on the time-scale of days. The filaments have a tendency to make a shaking or waving of the external structure and to make a general movement of whole filament body, coinciding with the transport of the magnetic flux in the photosphere. The velocity scatter of individual measured points is about one order higher than the accuracy of measurements.

  10. Preparation and Characterization of Carbon Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    catalysts gave straight filaments, while the use of nickel and other catalysts resulted in a variety of vermicular forms of filaments. Ferrocene, (C5H5)2Fe...vapor deposition of carbon filaments is presented along with a theory for the vermicular growth of filaments on quartz substrates. I U I I I I I I...one hour. The experimental details of the matrix and results are discussed, also theories for the role of hydrogen and the vermicular growth of

  11. Analysis of a filament stretching rheometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Mette Irene; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Hassager, Ole

    1996-01-01

    A finite element analysis of the stretching filament rheometer of Tirtaadmadja and Sridhar (1993) is presenetd. Simulations of the stretching of a filament of the polymet test solution, fluid A, between two plates are shown.......A finite element analysis of the stretching filament rheometer of Tirtaadmadja and Sridhar (1993) is presenetd. Simulations of the stretching of a filament of the polymet test solution, fluid A, between two plates are shown....

  12. Remote electrical arc suppression by laser filamentation

    CERN Document Server

    Schubert, Elise; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of narrow plasma channels formed in the filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses, with a DC high voltage. The laser filaments prevent electrical arcs by triggering corona that neutralize the high-voltage electrodes. This phenomenon, due to the electric field modulation and free electron release around the filament, opens new prospects to lightning and over-voltage mitigation.

  13. A Miniaturized Glycan Microarray Assay for Assessing Avidity and Specificity of Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McBride, Ryan; Paulson, James C; de Vries, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinins recognize sialic acids on the cell surface as functional receptors to gain entry into cells. Wild waterfowl are the natural reservoir for IAV, but IAV can cross the species barrier to poultry, swine, horses and humans. Avian viruses recognize sialic acid attach

  14. Correlating novel variable and conserved motifs in the Hemagglutinin protein with significant biological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Mark

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in the influenza Hemagglutinin protein contributes to antigenic drift resulting in decreased efficiency of seasonal influenza vaccines and escape from host immune response. We performed an in silico study to determine characteristics of novel variable and conserved motifs in the Hemagglutinin protein from previously reported H3N2 strains isolated from Hong Kong from 1968–1999 to predict viral motifs involved in significant biological functions. Results 14 MEME blocks were generated and comparative analysis of the MEME blocks identified blocks 1, 2, 3 and 7 to correlate with several biological functions. Analysis of the different Hemagglutinin sequences elucidated that the single block 7 has the highest frequency of amino acid substitution and the highest number of co-mutating pairs. MEME 2 showed intermediate variability and MEME 1 was the most conserved. Interestingly, MEME blocks 2 and 7 had the highest incidence of potential post-translational modifications sites including phosphorylation sites, ASN glycosylation motifs and N-myristylation sites. Similarly, these 2 blocks overlap with previously identified antigenic sites and receptor binding sites. Conclusion Our study identifies motifs in the Hemagglutinin protein with different amino acid substitution frequencies over a 31 years period, and derives relevant functional characteristics by correlation of these motifs with potential post-translational modifications sites, antigenic and receptor binding sites.

  15. Correlating novel variable and conserved motifs in the Hemagglutinin protein with significant biological functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendoo, Deena MA; El-Hefnawi, Mahmoud M; Werner, Mark; Siam, Rania

    2008-01-01

    Background Variations in the influenza Hemagglutinin protein contributes to antigenic drift resulting in decreased efficiency of seasonal influenza vaccines and escape from host immune response. We performed an in silico study to determine characteristics of novel variable and conserved motifs in the Hemagglutinin protein from previously reported H3N2 strains isolated from Hong Kong from 1968–1999 to predict viral motifs involved in significant biological functions. Results 14 MEME blocks were generated and comparative analysis of the MEME blocks identified blocks 1, 2, 3 and 7 to correlate with several biological functions. Analysis of the different Hemagglutinin sequences elucidated that the single block 7 has the highest frequency of amino acid substitution and the highest number of co-mutating pairs. MEME 2 showed intermediate variability and MEME 1 was the most conserved. Interestingly, MEME blocks 2 and 7 had the highest incidence of potential post-translational modifications sites including phosphorylation sites, ASN glycosylation motifs and N-myristylation sites. Similarly, these 2 blocks overlap with previously identified antigenic sites and receptor binding sites. Conclusion Our study identifies motifs in the Hemagglutinin protein with different amino acid substitution frequencies over a 31 years period, and derives relevant functional characteristics by correlation of these motifs with potential post-translational modifications sites, antigenic and receptor binding sites. PMID:18681973

  16. Relative contributions of measles virus hemagglutinin- and fusion protein- specific serum antibodies to virus neutralization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. de Swart (Rik); S. Yüksel (Selma); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe relative contribution of measles virus hemagglutinin (H)- or fusion protein (F)-specific antibodies to virus neutralization (VN) has not been demonstrated. We have depleted these specific antibodies from sera collected from young adults, who had been vaccinated during childhood, by

  17. Folding of influenza virus hemagglutinin in insect cells is fast and efficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.; Oers, van M.M.; Vlak, J.M.; Braakman, I.

    2015-01-01

    Folding of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) in the endoplasmic reticulum has been well defined inmammalian cells. In different mammalian cell lines the protein follows the same folding pathway withidentical folding intermediates, but folds with very different kinetics. To examine the effect of cel

  18. Folding of influenza virus hemagglutinin in insect cells is fast and efficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Xin; van Oers, Monique M; Vlak, Just M; Braakman, Ineke

    2015-01-01

    Folding of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) in the endoplasmic reticulum has been well defined in mammalian cells. In different mammalian cell lines the protein follows the same folding pathway with identical folding intermediates, but folds with very different kinetics. To examine the effect of c

  19. Evolution and homologous recombination of the hemagglutinin-esterase gene sequences from porcine torovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of the present study was to gain new insights into the evolution, homologous recombination and selection pressures imposed on the porcine torovirus (PToV), by examining changes in the hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene. The most recent common ancestor of PToV was estimated to have emerge...

  20. Relative contributions of measles virus hemagglutinin- and fusion protein- specific serum antibodies to virus neutralization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. de Swart (Rik); S. Yüksel (Selma); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe relative contribution of measles virus hemagglutinin (H)- or fusion protein (F)-specific antibodies to virus neutralization (VN) has not been demonstrated. We have depleted these specific antibodies from sera collected from young adults, who had been vaccinated during childhood, by p

  1. Picosecond laser filamentation in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Sody, Andreas; Kurz, Heiko G.; Bergé, Luc; Skupin, Stefan; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    The propagation of intense picosecond laser pulses in air in the presence of strong nonlinear self-action effects and air ionization is investigated experimentally and numerically. The model used for numerical analysis is based on the nonlinear propagator for the optical field coupled to the rate equations for the production of various ionic species and plasma temperature. Our results show that the phenomenon of plasma-driven intensity clamping, which has been paramount in femtosecond laser filamentation, holds for picosecond pulses. Furthermore, the temporal pulse distortions in the picosecond regime are limited and the pulse fluence is also clamped. In focused propagation geometry, a unique feature of picosecond filamentation is the production of a broad, fully ionized air channel, continuous both longitudinally and transversely, which may be instrumental for many applications including laser-guided electrical breakdown of air, channeling microwave beams and air lasing.

  2. Picosecond laser filamentation in air

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt-Sody, Andreas; Bergé, L; Skupin, S; Polynkin, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of intense picosecond laser pulses in air in the presence of strong nonlinear self-action effects and air ionization is investigated experimentally and numerically. The model used for numerical analysis is based on the nonlinear propagator for the optical field coupled with the rate equations for the production of various ionic species and plasma temperature. Our results show that the phenomenon of plasma-driven intensity clamping, which is paramount in femtosecond laser filamentation, holds for picosecond pulses. Furthermore, the temporal pulse distortions are limited and the pulse fluence is also clamped. The resulting unique feature of the picosecond filamentation regime is the production of a broad, fully ionized air channel, continuous both longitudinally and transversely, which may be instrumental for numerous applications.

  3. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  4. Dynamics of 3D isolated thermal filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Walkden, N R; Militello, F; Omotani, J T

    2016-01-01

    Simulations have been carried out to establish how electron thermal physics, introduced in the form of a dynamic electron temperature, affects isolated filament motion and dynamics in 3D. It is found that thermal effects impact filament motion in two major ways when the filament has a significant temperature perturbation compared to its density perturbation: They lead to a strong increase in filament propagation in the bi-normal direction and a significant decrease in net radial propagation. Both effects arise from the temperature dependence of the sheath current which leads to a non-uniform floating potential, with the latter effect supplemented by faster pressure loss. The reduction in radial velocity can only occur when the filament cross-section loses angular symmetry. The behaviour is observed across different filament sizes and suggests that filaments with much larger temperature perturbations than density perturbations are more strongly confined to the near SOL region.

  5. Dynamics of 3D isolated thermal filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkden, N. R.; Easy, L.; Militello, F.; Omotani, J. T.

    2016-11-01

    Simulations have been carried out to establish how electron thermal physics, introduced in the form of a dynamic electron temperature, affects isolated filament motion and dynamics in 3D. It is found that thermal effects impact filament motion in two major ways when the pressure perturbation within the filament is supported primarily through a temperature increase as opposed to density: they lead to a strong increase in filament propagation in the bi-normal direction and a significant decrease in net radial propagation. Both effects arise from the temperature dependence of the sheath current which leads to a non-uniform floating potential, with the latter effect supplemented by faster pressure loss. The reduction in radial velocity can only occur when the filament cross-section loses angular symmetry. The behaviour is observed across different filament sizes and suggests that filaments with much larger temperature perturbations than density perturbations are more strongly confined to the near SOL region.

  6. Interaction of CO with PtxAg1-x/Pt(111) surface alloys: More than dilution by Ag atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüttler, K. M.; Mancera, L. A.; Diemant, T.; Groß, A.; Behm, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    We have investigated CO adsorption on structurally well-defined PtxAg1-x/Pt(111) surface alloys, combining temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) as well as density functional theory (DFT) based calculations. This is part of a systematic approach including previous studies of CO adsorption on closely related Pt(111)- and Pd(111)-based surface alloys. Following changes in the adsorption properties with increasing Ag content and correlating them with structural changes allow us to assign desorption features to specific adsorption sites/ensembles identified in previous scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements, and thus to identify and separate contributions from different effects such as geometric ensemble effects and electronic ligand/strain effects. DFT calculations give further insight into the nature of the metal-CO bond on these bimetallic sites. Most prominently, the growth of a new CO desorption feature at higher temperature (~ 550 K) in the TPD spectra of Ag-rich surface alloys, which is unique for the group of Pt(111)- and Pd(111)-based surface alloys, is attributed to CO adsorption on Pt atoms surrounded by a Ag-rich neighborhood. Adsorption on these sites manifests in an IR band down-shifted to significantly lower wave number. Systematic comparison of the present results with previous findings for CO adsorption on the related Pt(111)- and Pd(111)-based surface alloys gains a detailed insight into general trends in the adsorption behavior of bimetallic surfaces.

  7. Force-induced dynamical properties of multiple cytoskeletal filaments are distinct from that of single filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Dipjyoti; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2014-01-01

    How cytoskeletal filaments collectively undergo growth and shrinkage is an intriguing question. Collective properties of multiple bio-filaments (actin or microtubules) undergoing hydrolysis, have not been studied extensively earlier, within simple theoretical frameworks. In this paper, we show that collective properties of multiple filaments under force are very distinct from the properties of a single filament under similar conditions -- these distinctions manifest as follows: (i) the collapse time during collective catastrophe for a multifilament system is much larger than that of a single filament with the same average length, (ii) force-dependence of the cap-size distribution of multiple filaments are quantitatively different from that of single filament, (iii) the diffusion constant associated with the system length fluctuations is distinct for multiple filaments, (iv) switching dynamics of multiple filaments between capped and uncapped states and the fluctuations therein are also distinct. We build a un...

  8. Demonstration of non-infectious hemagglutinating particles of rabies virus and isolation of the hemagglutinin by disruption of the virion with Nonidet P-40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Y T; Kondo, A; Suzuki, K

    1976-01-01

    Non-infectious hemagglutinating particles of rabies virus accumulated in the fluid phase of chick embryo cell cultures at 6 days post-infection, though they were undetectable at 4 days. They were characterized as looped filaments resembling viral envelope as revealed by electron microscopy. Another form of hemagglutinin (HAnin) was obtained by solubilization of partially purified virions with Nonidet P-40 (NP-40) followed by successive high speed and CsCl density gradient centrifugations. The density of the isolated HAnin averaged 1.28 g/cm3. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the HAnin demonstrated that it was mainly composed of a glycoprotein (G) with a molecular weight of 83,000. Electron microscopically, it differed from the above non-infectious hemagglutinating particles, being much smaller in size and showing a star- or rosette-like appearance with a diameter of about 25 nm, composed of a central particle surrounded by particles resembling envelope-spikes. Virus-neutralizing (VN) and hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies were produced in rabbits immunized with the HAnin isolated from virions.

  9. Mechanical properties of branched actin filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Benetatos, Panayotis; Zippelius, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Cells moving on a two dimensional substrate generate motion by polymerizing actin filament networks inside a flat membrane protrusion. New filaments are generated by branching off existing ones, giving rise to branched network structures. We investigate the force-extension relation of branched filaments, grafted on an elastic structure at one end and pushing with the free ends against the leading edge cell membrane. Single filaments are modeled as worm-like chains, whose thermal bending fluctuations are restricted by the leading edge cell membrane, resulting in an effective force. Branching can increase the stiffness considerably; however the effect depends on branch point position and filament orientation, being most pronounced for intermediate tilt angles and intermediate branch point positions. We describe filament networks without cross-linkers to focus on the effect of branching. We use randomly positioned branch points, as generated in the process of treadmilling, and orientation distributions as measur...

  10. Muscle myosin filaments: cores, crowns and couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, John M

    2009-09-01

    Myosin filaments in muscle, carrying the ATPase myosin heads that interact with actin filaments to produce force and movement, come in multiple varieties depending on species and functional need, but most are based on a common structural theme. The now successful journeys to solve the ultrastructures of many of these myosin filaments, at least at modest resolution, have not been without their false starts and erroneous sidetracks, but the picture now emerging is of both diversity in the rotational symmetries of different filaments and a degree of commonality in the way the myosin heads are organised in resting muscle. Some of the remaining differences may be associated with how the muscle is regulated. Several proteins in cardiac muscle myosin filaments can carry mutations associated with heart disease, so the elucidation of myosin filament structure to understand the effects of these mutations has a clear and topical clinical relevance.

  11. Filamentous Biological Entities Obtained from the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Milton; Rose, Christopher E.; Baker, Alexander J.; Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra

    2013-03-01

    We previously reported the presence of large, non-filamentous, biological entities including a diatom fragment in the stratosphere at heights of between 22-27km. Here we report clear evidence for the presence of filamentous entities associated with a relatively large particle mass collected from the stratosphere. Although viable fungi have previously been isolated from the stratosphere, this is the first report of a filamentous microorganism being observed in situ on a stratospheric particle mass.

  12. Solubilization and fractionation of paired helical filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, P J; Correas, I; Avila, J

    1992-09-01

    Paired helical filaments isolated from brains of two different patients with Alzheimer's disease were extensively treated with the ionic detergent, sodium dodecyl sulphate. Filaments were solubilized at different extents, depending on the brain examined, thus suggesting the existence of two types of paired helical filaments: sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble and insoluble filaments. In the first case, the number of structures resembling paired helical filaments greatly decreased after the detergent treatment, as observed by electron microscopy. Simultaneously, a decrease in the amount of sedimentable protein was also observed upon centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-treated paired helical filaments. A sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was isolated as a supernatant after low-speed centrifugation of the sodium dodecyl sulphate-treated paired helical filaments. The addition of the non-ionic detergent Nonidet-P40 to this fraction resulted in the formation of paired helical filament-like structures. When the sodium dodecyl sulphate-soluble fraction was further fractionated by high-speed centrifugation, three subfractions were observed: a supernatant, a pellet and a thin layer between these two subfractions. No paired helical filaments were observed in any of these subfractions, even after addition of Nonidet P-40. However, when they were mixed back together, the treatment with Nonidet P-40 resulted in the visualization of paired helical filament-like structures. These results suggest that at least two different components are needed for the reconstitution of paired helical filaments as determined by electron microscopy. The method described here may allow the study of the components involved in the formation of paired helical filaments and the identification of possible factors capable of blocking this process.

  13. Use of bacteriophage particles displaying influenza virus hemagglutinin for the detection of hemagglutination-inhibition antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domm, William; Brewer, Matthew; Baker, Steven F; Feng, Changyong; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Treanor, John; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Bacteriophage lambda capsids provide a flexible molecular scaffold that can be engineered to display a wide range of exogenous proteins, including full-length viral glycoproteins produced in eukaryotic cells. One application for such particles lies in the detection of virus-specific antibodies, since they may obviate the need to work with infectious stocks of highly pathogenic or emerging viruses that can pose significant biosafety and biocontainment challenges. Bacteriophage lambda capsids were produced that displayed an insect-cell derived, recombinant H5 influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) on their surface. The particles agglutinated red blood cells efficiently, in a manner that could be blocked using H5 HA-specific monoclonal antibodies. The particles were then used to develop a modified hemagglutinination-inhibition (HAI) assay, which successfully identified human sera with H5 HA-specific HAI activity. These results demonstrate the utility of HA-displaying bacteriophage capsids for the detection of influenza virus-specific HAI antibodies.

  14. Equilibrium shapes of twisted magnetic filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belovs, Mihails; Cirulis, Teodors; Cebers, Andrejs [University of Latvia, Zellu 8, LV-1002 (Latvia)], E-mail: aceb@tesla.sal.lv

    2009-06-12

    It is shown that ferromagnetic filaments with free and unclamped ends undergo buckling instabilities under the action of twist. Solutions of nonlinear equations describing the buckled shapes are found, and it is shown that the transition to the buckled shape is subcritical if the magnetization is parallel to the field and supercritical when the magnetization of the straight filament is opposite to the external field. Solutions with the localized curvature distribution are found in the case of long filaments. The class of solutions corresponding to helices is described, and the behavior of coiled ferromagnetic and superparamagnetic filaments is compared.

  15. Hydrodynamic interactions between nearby slender filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Man, Yi; Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Cellular biology abound with filaments interacting through fluids, from intracellular microtubules, to rotating flagella and beating cilia. While previous work has demonstrated the complexity of capturing nonlocal hydrodynamic interactions between moving filaments, the problem remains difficult theoretically. We show here that when filaments are closer to each other than their relevant length scale, the integration of hydrodynamic interactions can be approximately carried out analytically. This leads to a set of simplified local equations, illustrated on a simple model of two interacting filaments, which can be used to tackle theoretically a range of problems in biology and physics.

  16. Probing the Physical Structures of Dense Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    Filament is a common feature in cosmological structures of various scales, ranging from dark matter cosmic web, galaxy clusters, inter-galactic gas flows, to Galactic ISM clouds. Even within cold dense molecular cores, filaments have been detected. Theories and simulations with (or without) different combination of physical principles, including gravity, thermal balance, turbulence, and magnetic field, can reproduce intriguing images of filaments. The ubiquity of filaments and the similarity in simulated ones make physical parameters, beyond dust column density, a necessity for understanding filament evolution. I report three projects attempting to measure physical parameters of filaments. We derive the volume density of a dense Taurus filament based on several cyanoacetylene transitions observed by GBT and ART. We measure the gas temperature of the OMC 2-3 filament based on combined GBT+VLA ammonia images. We also measured the sub-millimeter polarization vectors along OMC3. These filaments were found to be likely a cylinder-type structure, without dynamic heating, and likely accreting mass along the magnetic field lines.

  17. Deep coronal hole associated with quiescent filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesumaningrum, Rasdewita; Herdiwidjaya, Dhani

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the morphology of quiescent filament observed by H-alpha Solar Telescope at Bosscha Observatory in association with coronal hole observed by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument in 193 Å from Solar Dynamics Observatory. H-alpha images were processed by imaging softwares, namely Iris 5.59 and ImageJ, to enhance the signal to noise ratio and to identify the filament features associated with coronal hole. For images observed on October 12, 2011, November 14, 2011 and January 2, 2012, we identified distinct features of coronal holes above the quiescent filaments. This associated coronal holes have filament-like morphology with a thick long thread as it's `spine', defined as Deep Coronal Hole. Because of strong magnetic field of sunspot, these filaments and coronal holes emerged far from active region and lasted for several days. It is interesting as for segmented filament, deep coronal holes above the filaments lasted for a quite long period of time and merged. This association between filament and deep coronal hole can be explained by filament magnetic loop.

  18. Computational design of protein interactions: designing proteins that neutralize influenza by inhibiting its hemagglutinin surface protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Sarel

    2012-02-01

    Molecular recognition underlies all life processes. Design of interactions not seen in nature is a test of our understanding of molecular recognition and could unlock the vast potential of subtle control over molecular interaction networks, allowing the design of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for basic and applied research. We developed the first general method for designing protein interactions. The method starts by computing a region of high affinity interactions between dismembered amino acid residues and the target surface and then identifying proteins that can harbor these residues. Designs are tested experimentally for binding the target surface and successful ones are affinity matured using yeast cell surface display. Applied to the conserved stem region of influenza hemagglutinin we designed two unrelated proteins that, following affinity maturation, bound hemagglutinin at subnanomolar dissociation constants. Co-crystal structures of hemagglutinin bound to the two designed binders were within 1Angstrom RMSd of their models, validating the accuracy of the design strategy. One of the designed proteins inhibits the conformational changes that underlie hemagglutinin's cell-invasion functions and blocks virus infectivity in cell culture, suggesting that such proteins may in future serve as diagnostics and antivirals against a wide range of pathogenic influenza strains. We have used this method to obtain experimentally validated binders of several other target proteins, demonstrating the generality of the approach. We discuss the combination of modeling and high-throughput characterization of design variants which has been key to the success of this approach, as well as how we have used the data obtained in this project to enhance our understanding of molecular recognition. References: Science 332:816 JMB, in press Protein Sci 20:753

  19. Convergent evolution-guided design of antimicrobial peptides derived from influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shunyi; Aumelas, André; Gao, Bin

    2011-02-24

    Antimicrobial activity and solution structures of four 13-amino acid peptides derived from the fusion domain of viral hemagglutinin proteins are presented. The results show that carboxyl-terminal amidation is a key factor to switch a viral fusion domain-derived sequence into an antimicrobial peptide. Optimization of amphiphilic balance on the amidated analogue largely improves efficacy and enlarges antimicrobial spectra of these peptides. Our work indicates that viral fusion domains have potential to be engineered into potent antimicrobial peptides.

  20. Filamentation with nonlinear Bessel vortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukna, V; Milián, C; Xie, C; Itina, T; Dudley, J; Courvoisier, F; Couairon, A

    2014-10-20

    We present a new type of ring-shaped filaments featured by stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions to the laser beam propagation equation. Two different regimes are identified by direct numerical simulations of the nonlinear propagation of axicon focused Gaussian beams carrying helicity in a Kerr medium with multiphoton absorption: the stable nonlinear propagation regime corresponds to a slow beam reshaping into one of the stationary nonlinear high-order Bessel solutions, called nonlinear Bessel vortices. The region of existence of nonlinear Bessel vortices is found semi-analytically. The influence of the Kerr nonlinearity and nonlinear losses on the beam shape is presented. Direct numerical simulations highlight the role of attractors played by nonlinear Bessel vortices in the stable propagation regime. Large input powers or small cone angles lead to the unstable propagation regime where nonlinear Bessel vortices break up into an helical multiple filament pattern or a more irregular structure. Nonlinear Bessel vortices are shown to be sufficiently intense to generate a ring-shaped filamentary ionized channel in the medium which is foreseen as opening the way to novel applications in laser material processing of transparent dielectrics.

  1. An Amphibian Host Defense Peptide Is Virucidal for Human H1 Hemagglutinin-Bearing Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthausen, David J; Lee, Song Hee; Kumar, Vineeth Tv; Bouvier, Nicole M; Krammer, Florian; Ellebedy, Ali H; Wrammert, Jens; Lowen, Anice C; George, Sanil; Pillai, Madhavan Radhakrishna; Jacob, Joshy

    2017-04-18

    Although vaccines confer protection against influenza A viruses, antiviral treatment becomes the first line of defense during pandemics because there is insufficient time to produce vaccines. Current antiviral drugs are susceptible to drug resistance, and developing new antivirals is essential. We studied host defense peptides from the skin of the South Indian frog and demonstrated that one of these, which we named "urumin," is virucidal for H1 hemagglutinin-bearing human influenza A viruses. This peptide specifically targeted the conserved stalk region of H1 hemagglutinin and was effective against drug-resistant H1 influenza viruses. Using electron microscopy, we showed that this peptide physically destroyed influenza virions. It also protected naive mice from lethal influenza infection. Urumin represents a unique class of anti-influenza virucide that specifically targets the hemagglutinin stalk region, similar to targeting of antibodies induced by universal influenza vaccines. Urumin therefore has the potential to contribute to first-line anti-viral treatments during influenza outbreaks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mutation trend of hemagglutinin of influenza A virus: a review from a computational mutation viewpoint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang WU; Shao-min YAN

    2006-01-01

    Since 1999 we have developed two computational mutation approaches to analyze the protein primary structure whose methodology and implications were reviewed in 2002.Our first approach is the calculation of predictable and unpredictable portions of amino-acid pairs in a protein, and the second iS the calculation of amino-acid distribution rank in a protein. Both approaches provide quantitative measures to present a protein, which we have used to study a number of proteins with numerous mutations such as p53 proteins. More recently, we focussed our efforts on analyzing the proteins mutating frequently over time such as hemagglutinins of influenza A viruses. In this review we summarise our findings and their implications for hemagglutinin mutations in combination with some newly available data. Our approaches throw light on the true nature of genetic heterogeneity of influenza virus hemagglutinins; that is, the protein variability is highly relevant to its amino-acid construction. Using these approaches, we can monitor new mutations from influenza virus hemaggtutinins and may predict their mutations in the future.

  3. Filament poisoning at typical carbon nanotube deposition conditions by hot-filament CVD

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the poisoning of tungsten filaments during the hot-filament chemical vapour deposition process at typical carbon nanotube (CNT) deposition conditions and filament temperatures ranging from 1400 to 2000 °C. The morphological...

  4. A Statistical Study of Solar Filament Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanche, Nicole; Aggarwal, Ashna; Reeves, Kathy; Kempton, Dustin James; Angryk, Rafal

    2016-05-01

    Solar filaments are cool, dark channels of partially-ionized plasma that lie above the chromosphere. Their structure follows the neutral line between local regions of opposite magnetic polarity. Previous research (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2013, McCauley et al. 2015) has shown a positive correlation (70-80%) between the occurrence of filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections (CME’s). In this study, we attempt to use properties of the filament in order to predict whether or not a given filament will erupt. This prediction would help to better predict the occurrence of an oncoming CME. To track the evolution of a filament over time, a spatio-temporal algorithm that groups separate filament instances from the Heliophysics Event Knowledgebase (HEK) into filament tracks was developed. Filament features from the HEK metadata, such as length, chirality, and tilt are then combined with other physical features, such as the overlying decay index for two sets of filaments tracks - those that erupt and those that remain bound. Using statistical methods such as the Kolmogrov-Smirnov test and a Random Forest Classifier, we determine the effectiveness of the combined features in prediction. We conclude that there is significant overlap between the properties of filaments that erupt and those that do not, leading to predictions only ~5-10% above chance. However, the changes in features, such as a change in the filament's length over time, were determined to have the highest predictive power. We discuss the possible physical connections with the change in these features."This project has been supported by funding from the Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure within the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering, the Division of Astronomical Sciences within the Directorate for Mathematical and Physical Sciences, and the Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences within the Directorate for Geosciences, under NSF award #1443061.”

  5. Spectral stability of Alfven filament chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmans, J.; Kuvshinov, B. N.; Lakhin, V. P.; Schep, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    The two-fluid model of nonlinear Alfven perturbations has singular solutions in the form of current-vortex filaments. We investigate analytically and numerically the spectral stability of single and double rows of filaments. Staggered and non-staggered double rows (von Karman streets) are studied. I

  6. Spectral stability of Alfven filament configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmans, J.; Kuvshinov, B. N.; Lakhin, V. P.; Schep, T. J.

    2000-01-01

    The two-fluid plasma equations that describe nonlinear Alfven perturbations have singular solutions in the form of current-vortex filaments. These filaments are analogous to point vortices in ideal hydrodynamics and geostrophic fluids. In this work the spectral (linear) stability of current-vortex f

  7. Radial interchange motions of plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.; Fundamenski, W.

    2006-01-01

    reduces the radial velocity of isolated filaments. The results are discussed in the context of convective transport in scrape-off layer plasmas, comprising both blob-like structures in low confinement modes and edge localized mode filaments in unstable high confinement regimes. (c) 2006 American Institute...

  8. Reconstitution of the muscle thin filament from recombinant troponin components and the native thin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Fumiko; Deshimaru, Shungo; Oda, Toshiro; Fujiwara, Satoru

    2010-04-15

    We have developed a technique by which muscle thin filaments are reconstituted from the recombinant troponin components and the native thin filaments. By this technique, the reconstituted troponin complex is exchanged into the native thin filaments in the presence of 20% glycerol and 0.3M KCl at pH 6.2. More than 90% of endogenous troponin complex was replaced with the recombinant troponin complex. Structural integrity and Ca(2+) sensitivity of the reconstituted thin filament prepared by this technique was confirmed by X-ray fiber diffraction measurements and the thin filament-activated myosin subfragment 1 ATPase measurements, respectively.

  9. Solar Filaments as Tracers of Subsurface Processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. M. Rust

    2000-09-01

    Solar filaments are discussed in terms of two contrasting paradigms. The standard paradigm is that filaments are formed by condensation of coronal plasma into magnetic fields that are twisted or dimpled as a consequence of motions of the fields' sources in the photo-sphere. According to a new paradigm, filaments form in rising, twisted flux ropes and are a necessary intermediate stage in the transfer to interplanetary space of dynamo-generated magnetic flux. It is argued that the accumulation of magnetic helicity in filaments and their coronal surroundings leads to filament eruptions and coronal mass ejections. These ejections relieve the Sun of the flux generated by the dynamo and make way for the flux of the next cycle.

  10. Quantifying protein diffusion and capture on filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Reithmann, Emanuel; Frey, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    The functional relevance of regulating proteins is often limited to specific binding sites such as the ends of microtubules or actin-filaments. A localization of proteins on these functional sites is of great importance. We present a quantitative theory for a diffusion and capture process, where proteins diffuse on a filament and stop diffusing when reaching the filament's end. It is found that end-association after one-dimensional diffusion is the main source for tip-localization of such proteins. As a consequence, diffusion and capture is highly efficient in enhancing the reaction velocity of enzymatic reactions, where proteins and filament ends are to each other as enzyme and substrate. We show that the reaction velocity can effectively be described within a Michaelis-Menten framework. Together one-dimensional diffusion and capture beats the (three-dimensional) Smoluchowski diffusion limit for the rate of protein association to filament ends.

  11. Theory of Semiflexible Filaments and Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanlong Meng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We briefly review the recent developments in the theory of individual semiflexible filaments, and of a crosslinked network of such filaments, both permanent and transient. Starting from the free energy of an individual semiflexible chain, models on its force-extension relation and other mechanical properties such as Euler buckling are discussed. For a permanently crosslinked network of filaments, theories on how the network responds to deformation are provided, with a focus on continuum approaches. Characteristic features of filament networks, such as nonlinear stress-strain relation, negative normal stress, tensegrity, and marginal stability are discussed. In the new area of transient filament network, where the crosslinks can be dynamically broken and re-formed, we show some recent attempts for understanding the dynamics of the crosslinks, and the related rheological properties, such as stress relaxation, yield stress and plasticity.

  12. Natural colorants from filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Fábio Aurélio Esteves; Zaccarim, Bruna Regina; de Lencastre Novaes, Letícia Celia; Jozala, Angela Faustino; Dos Santos, Carolina Alves; Teixeira, Maria Francisca Simas; Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria Carvalho

    2016-03-01

    In the last years, there is a trend towards the replacement of synthetic colorants by natural ones, mainly due to the increase of consumer demand for natural products. The natural colorants are used to enhance the appearance of pharmaceutical products, food, and different materials, making them preferable or attractive. This review intends to provide and describe a comprehensive overview of the history of colorants, from prehistory to modern time, of their market and their applications, as well as of the most important aspects of the fermentation process to obtain natural colorants. Focus is given to colorants produced by filamentous fungal species, aiming to demonstrate the importance of these microorganisms and biocompounds, highlighting the production performance to get high yields and the aspects of conclusion that should be taken into consideration in future studies about natural colorants.

  13. Particles trajectories in magnetic filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The motion of a particle in a spatially harmonic magnetic field is a basic problem involved, for example, in the mechanism of formation of a collisionless shock. In such settings, it is generally reasoned that particles entering a Weibel generated turbulence are trapped inside it, provided their Larmor radius in the peak field is smaller than the field coherence length. The goal of this work is to put this heuristic conclusion on firm ground by studying, both analytically and numerically, such motion. A toy model is analyzed, consisting of a relativistic particle entering a region of space occupied by a spatially harmonic field. The particle penetrates the magnetic structure in a direction aligned with the magnetic filaments. Although the conclusions are not trivial, the main result is confirmed.

  14. Filamentous Growth in Eremothecium Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Therese

    , this thesis deals with some of the aspects of hyphal growth, which is an important virulence factor for pathogenic fungi infecting both humans and plants. Hyphal establishment through continuous polar growth is a complex process, requiring the careful coordination of a large subset of proteins involved......-regulatory activity of AgGts1, the protein could have additional actin organizing properties. In the second and third part, this thesis addresses the use of A. gossypii and its relative E. cymbalariae as model organisms for filamentous growth. A series of assays analyzed the capability of Eremothecium genus fungi...... of molecular tools for E. cymbalariae to enable a faster and more efficient approach for genetic comparisons between Eremothecium genus fungi....

  15. Filamentous Growth in Eremothecium Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Therese

    , this thesis deals with some of the aspects of hyphal growth, which is an important virulence factor for pathogenic fungi infecting both humans and plants. Hyphal establishment through continuous polar growth is a complex process, requiring the careful coordination of a large subset of proteins involved......-regulatory activity of AgGts1, the protein could have additional actin organizing properties. In the second and third part, this thesis addresses the use of A. gossypii and its relative E. cymbalariae as model organisms for filamentous growth. A series of assays analyzed the capability of Eremothecium genus fungi...... of molecular tools for E. cymbalariae to enable a faster and more efficient approach for genetic comparisons between Eremothecium genus fungi....

  16. Particles trajectories in magnetic filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2015-07-15

    The motion of a particle in a spatially harmonic magnetic field is a basic problem involved, for example, in the mechanism of formation of a collisionless shock. In such settings, it is generally reasoned that particles entering a Weibel generated turbulence are trapped inside it, provided their Larmor radius in the peak field is smaller than the field coherence length. The goal of this work is to put this heuristic conclusion on firm ground by studying, both analytically and numerically, such motion. A toy model is analyzed, consisting of a relativistic particle entering a region of space occupied by a spatially harmonic field. The particle penetrates the magnetic structure in a direction aligned with the magnetic filaments. Although the conclusions are not trivial, the main result is confirmed.

  17. 正五聚蛋白3与扩张型心肌病的研究进展%Relationship between PTX3 and Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳春

    2013-01-01

    Myocarditis is a disease which causes inflammation of the cardiac muscle. There are two classifications of myocarditis梡rimary and secondary. Myocarditis is classed as secondary when there is a systemic disease at the time of diagnosis, otherwise it is classed as primary. Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy ( DCM ) accounts for 70 to 80 percent of primary myocarditis cases. Possible pathogenic factors of DCM are viral infection, autoimmune response and genetic factor. The inflammatory reaction is the critical factor in DCM. Pentranxin 3 ( PTX3 ) is a new inflammatory marker. This article examines the potential use of PTX3 in DCM.%原发性心肌病是一类原因不明、以心功能障碍为主要特征的心肌病变.扩张型心肌病约占原发性心肌病的70%~80%.目前扩张型心肌病发病机制分为三类:病毒感染、自身免疫炎症反应、遗传因素.炎症反应是介导扩张型心肌病发生的重要机制,正五聚蛋白3(PTX3)是一种新的炎症标志物,与C反应蛋白属于PTX家族.现主要针对穿透素3这种新的炎症标志物与扩张型心肌病关系的研究进展做一综述.

  18. Automatic Detect and Trace of Solar Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cheng; Chen, P. F.; Tang, Yu-hua; Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang

    We developed a series of methods to automatically detect and trace solar filaments in solar Hα images. The programs are able to not only recognize filaments and determine their properties, such as the position, the area and other relevant parameters, but also to trace the daily evolution of the filaments. For solar full disk Hα images, the method consists of three parts: first, preprocessing is applied to correct the original images; second, the Canny edge-detection method is used to detect the filaments; third, filament properties are recognized through the morphological operators. For each Hα filament and its barb features, we introduced the unweighted undirected graph concept and adopted Dijkstra shortest-path algorithm to recognize the filament spine; then, using polarity inversion line shift method for measuring the polarities in both sides of the filament to determine the filament axis chirality; finally, employing connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculating the angle between each barb and spine to indicate the barb chirality. Our algorithms are applied to the observations from varied observatories, including the Optical & Near Infrared Solar Eruption Tracer (ONSET) in Nanjing University, Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) and Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The programs are demonstrated to be effective and efficient. We used our method to automatically process and analyze 3470 images obtained by MLSO from January 1998 to December 2009, and a butterfly diagram of filaments is obtained. It shows that the latitudinal migration of solar filaments has three trends in the Solar Cycle 23: The drift velocity was fast from 1998 to the solar maximum; after the solar maximum, it became relatively slow and after 2006, the migration became divergent, signifying the solar minimum. About 60% filaments with the latitudes larger than 50 degree migrate towards the Polar Regions with relatively high velocities, and the latitudinal migrating

  19. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F. [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Liu, J. H. [Department of Physics, Shijiazhuang University, Shijiazhuang 050035 (China); Xu, C. L. [Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650092 (China)

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  20. Unwinding Motion of a Twisted Active Region Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Liu, J. H.; Kong, D. F.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  1. Striation and convection in penumbral filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruit, H. C.; Scharmer, G. B.; Löfdahl, M. G.

    2010-10-01

    Observations with the 1-m Swedish Solar Telescope of the flows seen in penumbral filaments are presented. Time sequences of bright filaments show overturning motions strikingly similar to those seen along the walls of small isolated structures in the active regions. The filaments show outward propagating striations with inclination angles suggesting that they are aligned with the local magnetic field. We interpret it as the equivalent of the striations seen in the walls of small isolated magnetic structures. Their origin is then a corrugation of the boundary between an overturning convective flow inside the filament and the magnetic field wrapping around it. The outward propagation is a combination of a pattern motion due to the downflow observed along the sides of bright filaments, and the Evershed flow. The observed short wavelength of the striation argues against the existence of a dynamically significant horizontal field inside the bright filaments. Its intensity contrast is explained by the same physical effect that causes the dark cores of filaments, light bridges and “canals”. In this way striation represents an important clue to the physics of penumbral structure and its relation with other magnetic structures on the solar surface. We put this in perspective with results from the recent 3-D radiative hydrodynamic simulations. 4 movies are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Filamentation of Campylobacter in broth cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nacheervan M Ghaffar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The transition from rod to filamentous cell morphology has been identified as a response to stressful conditions in many bacterial species and has been ascribed to confer certain survival advantages. Filamentation of Campylobacter jejuni was demonstrated to occur spontaneously on entry in to stationary phase distinguishing it from many other bacteria where a reduction in size is more common. The aim of this study was to investigate the cues that give rise to filamentation of C. jejuni and C. coli and gain insights into the process. Using minimal medium, augmentation of filamentation occurred and it was observed that this morphological change was wide spread amongst C. jejuni strains tested but was not universal in C. coli strains. Filamentation did not appear to be due to release of diffusible molecules, toxic metabolites, or be in response to oxidative stress in the medium. Separated filaments exhibited greater intracellular ATP contents (2.66 to 17.4 fg than spiral forms (0.99 to 1.7 fg and showed enhanced survival in water at 4oC and 37oC compared to spiral cells. These observations support the conclusion that the filaments are adapted to survive extra-intestinal environments. Differences in cell morphology and physiology need to be considered in the context of the design of experimental studies and the methods adopted for the isolation of campylobacters from food, clinical and environmental sources.

  3. Star forming filaments in warm dark models

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Liang; Springel, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We performed a hydrodynamical cosmological simulation of the formation of a Milky Way-like galaxy in a warm dark matter (WDM) cosmology. Smooth and dense filaments, several co-moving mega parsec long, form generically above z 2 in this model. Atomic line cooling allows gas in the centres of these filaments to cool to the base of the cooling function, resulting in a very striking pattern of extended Lyman-limit systems (LLSs). Observations of the correlation function of LLSs might hence provide useful limits on the nature of the dark matter. We argue that the self-shielding of filaments may lead to a thermal instability resulting in star formation. We implement a sub-grid model for this, and find that filaments rather than haloes dominate star formation until z 6. Reionisation decreases the gas density in filaments, and the more usual star formation in haloes dominates below z 6, although star formation in filaments continues until z=2. Fifteen per cent of the stars of the z=0 galaxy formed in filaments. At hi...

  4. Filamentous Biopolymers on Surfaces: Atomic Force Microscopy Images Compared with Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Filament Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücke, Norbert; Klenin, Konstantin; Kirmse, Robert; Bussiek, Malte; Herrmann, Harald; Hafner, Mathias; Langowski, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Nanomechanical properties of filamentous biopolymers, such as the persistence length, may be determined from two-dimensional images of molecules immobilized on surfaces. For a single filament in solution, two principal adsorption scenarios are possible. Both scenarios depend primarly on the interaction strength between the filament and the support: i) For interactions in the range of the thermal energy, the filament can freely equilibrate on the surface during adsorption; ii) For interactions much stronger than the thermal energy, the filament will be captured by the surface without having equilibrated. Such a ‘trapping’ mechanism leads to more condensed filament images and hence to a smaller value for the apparent persistence length. To understand the capture mechanism in more detail we have performed Brownian dynamics simulations of relatively short filaments by taking the two extreme scenarios into account. We then compared these ‘ideal’ adsorption scenarios with observed images of immobilized vimentin intermediate filaments on different surfaces. We found a good agreement between the contours of the deposited vimentin filaments on mica (‘ideal’ trapping) and on glass (‘ideal’ equilibrated) with our simulations. Based on these data, we have developed a strategy to reliably extract the persistence length of short worm-like chain fragments or network forming filaments with unknown polymer-surface interactions. PMID:19888472

  5. Filamentous biopolymers on surfaces: atomic force microscopy images compared with Brownian dynamics simulation of filament deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Mücke

    Full Text Available Nanomechanical properties of filamentous biopolymers, such as the persistence length, may be determined from two-dimensional images of molecules immobilized on surfaces. For a single filament in solution, two principal adsorption scenarios are possible. Both scenarios depend primarily on the interaction strength between the filament and the support: i For interactions in the range of the thermal energy, the filament can freely equilibrate on the surface during adsorption; ii For interactions much stronger than the thermal energy, the filament will be captured by the surface without having equilibrated. Such a 'trapping' mechanism leads to more condensed filament images and hence to a smaller value for the apparent persistence length. To understand the capture mechanism in more detail we have performed Brownian dynamics simulations of relatively short filaments by taking the two extreme scenarios into account. We then compared these 'ideal' adsorption scenarios with observed images of immobilized vimentin intermediate filaments on different surfaces. We found a good agreement between the contours of the deposited vimentin filaments on mica ('ideal' trapping and on glass ('ideal' equilibrated with our simulations. Based on these data, we have developed a strategy to reliably extract the persistence length of short worm-like chain fragments or network forming filaments with unknown polymer-surface interactions.

  6. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scannapieco, Evan [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253, but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  7. Thermal and Chemical Evolution of Collapsing Filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scannapieco, Evan [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration

    2013-01-15

    Intergalactic filaments form the foundation of the cosmic web that connect galaxies together, and provide an important reservoir of gas for galaxy growth and accretion. Here we present very high resolution two-dimensional simulations of the thermal and chemical evolution of such filaments, making use of a 32 species chemistry network that tracks the evolution of key molecules formed from hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon. We study the evolution of filaments over a wide range of parameters including the initial density, initial temperature, strength of the dissociating UV background, and metallicity. In low-redshift, Z ≈ 0.1Z filaments, the evolution is determined completely by the initial cooling time. If this is sufficiently short, the center of the filament always collapses to form dense, cold core containing a substantial fraction of molecules. In high-redshift, Z = 10-3Z filaments, the collapse proceeds much more slowly. This is due mostly to the lower initial temperatures, which leads to a much more modest increase in density before the atomic cooling limit is reached, making subsequent molecular cooling much less efficient. Finally, we study how the gravitational potential from a nearby dwarf galaxy affects the collapse of the filament and compare this to NGC 5253, a nearby starbusting dwarf galaxy thought to be fueled by the accretion of filament gas. In contrast to our fiducial case, a substantial density peak forms at the center of the potential. This peak evolves faster than the rest of the filament due to the increased rate at which chemical species form and cooling occur. We find that we achieve similar accretion rates as NGC 5253 but our two-dimensional simulations do not recover the formation of the giant molecular clouds that are seen in radio observations.

  8. A hemagglutinin from northeast red beans with immunomodulatory activity and anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities toward tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yau Sang; Wong, Jack Ho; Fang, Evandro Fei; Pan, Wenliang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2013-10-01

    A 64-kDa hemagglutinin from a Phaseolus vulgaris cultivar, the northeast red bean, was purified by a protocol composed of three chromatographic steps involving affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, cation exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose and FPLC-gel filtration on Superdex 75. The purified hemagglutinin appeared as a single 32-kDa band in SDS-PAGE indicating its dimeric nature. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the hemagglutinin resembled the sequences of lectins and hemagglutinins from a number of Phaseolus species. The hemagglutinin manifested moderate thermostability and pH stability. It retained full activity up to 65 °C and in the pH range 2-12. It did not interact with simple sugars such as glucose, mannose and galactose. The hemagglutinin exerted immunostimulatory effects by upregulating the expression of cytokines like interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. It also exhibited antiproliferative activity on a number of tumor cells including MCF7 (breast cancer), HepG2 (liver cancer), CNE1 and CNE2 (nasopharyngeal cancer) cells, with stronger activity toward MCF7 and CNE1 cells. The hemagglutinin induced phophatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial depolarization and DNA condensation in MCF7 cells, indicating initiation of apoptosis. However, at high hemagglutinin concentrations, severe damage to the MCF7 cells was detected.

  9. Circulation of Antibodies Against Influenza Virus Hemagglutinins in the 2014/2015 Epidemic Season in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, D; Szymański, K; Cieślak, K; Brydak, L B

    2017-02-09

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of anti-hemagglutinin antibodies in the serum of people in different age-groups during the 2014/2015 epidemic influenza season in Poland. A total of 1050 sera were tested. The level of anti-hemagglutinin antibodies was determined using the hemagglutinin inhibition test. The results provided information on the incidence of circulating A/California/7/2009(H1N1)pdm09, A/Texas/50/2012(H3N2), and B/Massachusetts/2/2012 viruses. The level of antibodies against influenza differed between age-groups. The protection rate was the highest for the antigen B/Massachusetts/2/2012, with the decreasing order of values in the following age-groups: ≥65 years (76.7 %), 15-25 years (72.7 %), and 0-4 years (62.0 %). The average values of the protection rate in other age-groups were as follows: 43.3 % in 22-64 years, 40% in 5-9 years, and 39.3 % in 45-64 years of age, while the lowest value of 22.7 % was in 10-14 years old subjects. In the 2014/2015 epidemic season in Poland only were 3.6 % of the population vaccinated. That is why the presented results could be interpreted as a response of the immune system of patients after infection caused by influenza virus.

  10. Influenza A virus hemagglutinin antibody escape promotes neuraminidase antigenic variation and drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott E Hensley

    Full Text Available Drugs inhibiting the influenza A virus (IAV neuraminidase (NA are the cornerstone of anti-IAV chemotherapy and prophylaxis in man. Drug-resistant mutations in NA arise frequently in human isolates, limiting the therapeutic application of NA inhibitors. Here, we show that antibody-driven antigenic variation in one domain of the H1 hemagglutinin Sa site leads to compensatory mutations in NA, resulting in NA antigenic variation and acquisition of drug resistance. These findings indicate that influenza A virus resistance to NA inhibitors can potentially arise from antibody driven HA escape, confounding analysis of influenza NA evolution in nature.

  11. Evolution of the receptor binding properties of the influenza A(H3N2) hemagglutinin

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yi Pu; Xiong, Xiaoli; Wharton, Stephen A.; Martin, Stephen R.; Coombs, Peter J.; Vachieri, Sebastien G.; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Walker, Philip A.; Liu, Junfeng; John J Skehel; Gamblin, Steven J.; Hay, Alan J.; Daniels, Rodney S; McCauley, John W.

    2012-01-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A(H3N2) virus responsible for the 1968 influenza pandemic derived from an avian virus. On introduction into humans, its receptor binding properties had changed from a preference for avian receptors (α2,3-linked sialic acid) to a preference for human receptors (α2,6-linked sialic acid). By 2001, the avidity of human H3 viruses for avian receptors had declined, and since then the affinity for human receptors has also decreased significantly. These changes in ...

  12. Can We Determine the Filament Chirality by the Filament Footpoint Location or the Barb-bearing?

    CERN Document Server

    Hao, Q; Fang, C; Chen, P F; Cao, W

    2015-01-01

    We attempt to propose a method for automatically detecting the solar filament chirality and barb bearing. We first introduce the unweighted undirected graph concept and adopt the Dijkstra shortest-path algorithm to recognize the filament spine. Then, we use the polarity inversion line (PIL) shift method for measuring the polarities on both sides of the filament, and employ the connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculate the angle between each barb and the spine to determine the bearing of the barbs, i.e., left or right. We test the automatic detection method with H-alpha filtergrams from the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) H-alpha archive and magnetograms observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Four filaments are automatically detected and illustrated to show the results. The barbs in different parts of a filament may have opposite bearings. The filaments in the southern hemisphere (northern hemisphere) mainly have ...

  13. Tunnel ionization, population trapping, filamentation and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leang Chin, See; Xu, Huailiang

    2016-11-01

    The advances in femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser technology have led to the discovery of a profusion of new physics. This review starts with a brief historical account of the experimental realization of tunnel ionization, followed by high harmonic generation and the prediction of attosecond pulses. Then, the unique phenomenon of dynamic population trapping during the ionization of atoms and molecules in intense laser fields is introduced. One of the consequences of population trapping in the highly excited states is the neutral dissociation into simple molecular fragments which fluoresce. Such fluorescence could be amplified in femtosecond laser filamentation in gases. The experimental observations of filament-induced fluorescence and lasing in the atmosphere and combustion flames are given. Excitation of molecular rotational wave packets (molecular alignment) and their relaxation and revival in a gas filament are described. Furthermore, filament-induced condensation and precipitation inside a cloud chamber is explained. Lastly, a summary and future outlook is given.

  14. Interaction and merging of vortex filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.; Weston, R. P.; Ishii, K.; Ting, L.; Visintainer, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The asymptotic solutions of Navier-Stokes equations for vortex filaments of finite strength with small effective vortical cores are summarized with special emphasis placed on the physical meaning and the practical limit to the applicability of the asymptotic solution. Finite-difference solutions of Navier-Stokes equations for the marging of the filament(s) are described with a focus on the development of the approximate boundary conditions for the computational domain. An efficiency study employing a model problem is used to assess the advantages of the present approximate boundary condition method over previously used techniques. Applications of the present method are presented for the motion and decay of a 3:1 elliptic vortex ring, and for the merging process of a pair of coaxial vortex rings. A numerical procedure for the problem of local merging of vortex filaments, which requires the asymptotic analysis as well as the numerical Navier-Stokes solver, is also presented.

  15. Organizing Filament of Small Amplitude Scroll Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU TianShou; ZHANG SuoChun

    2001-01-01

    We theoretically analyze the organizing filament of small amplitude scroll waves in general excitable media by perturbation method and explicitly give the expressions of coefficients in Keener theory. In particular for the excitable media with equal diffusion, we obtain a close system for the motion of the filament. With an example of the Oregonator model, our results are in good agreement with those simulated by Winfree.``

  16. Flux Cancellation Leading to CME Filament Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Roxana M.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2016-01-01

    Solar filaments are strands of relatively cool, dense plasma magnetically suspended in the lower density hotter solar corona. They trace magnetic polarity inversion lines (PILs) in the photosphere below, and are supported against gravity at heights of up to approx.100 Mm above the chromosphere by the magnetic field in and around them. This field erupts when it is rendered unstable, often by magnetic flux cancellation or emergence at or near the PIL. We have studied the evolution of photospheric magnetic flux leading to ten observed filament eruptions. Specifically, we look for gradual magnetic changes in the neighborhood of the PIL prior to and during eruption. We use Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), both on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), to study filament eruptions and their photospheric magnetic fields. We examine whether flux cancellation or/and emergence leads to filament eruptions. We find that continuous flux cancellation was present at the PIL for many hours prior to each eruption. We present two CME-producing eruptions in detail and find the following: (a) the pre-eruption filament-holding core field is highly sheared and appears in the shape of a sigmoid above the PIL; (b) at the start of the eruption the opposite arms of the sigmoid reconnect in the middle above the site of (tether-cutting) flux cancellation at the PIL; (c) the filaments first show a slow-rise, followed by a fast-rise as they erupt. We conclude that these two filament eruptions result from flux cancellation in the middle of the sheared field, and thereafter evolve in agreement with the standard model for a CME/flare filament eruption from a closed bipolar magnetic field [flux cancellation (van Ballegooijen and Martens 1989 and Moore and Roumelrotis 1992) and runaway tether-cutting (Moore et. al 2001)].

  17. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Middelveen MJ; Stricker RB

    2016-01-01

    Marianne J Middelveen, Raphael B Stricker International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: Morgellons disease (MD) is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they resu...

  18. Can we determine the filament chirality by the filament footpoint location or the barb-bearing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qi; Guo, Yang; Fang, Cheng; Chen, Peng-Fei; Cao, Wen-Da

    2016-01-01

    We attempt to propose a method for automatically detecting the solar filament chirality and barb bearing. We first introduce the concept of an unweighted undirected graph and adopt the Dijkstra shortest path algorithm to recognize the filament spine. Then, we use the polarity inversion line (PIL) shift method for measuring the polarities on both sides of the filament, and employ the connected components labeling method to identify the barbs and calculate the angle between each barb and the spine to determine the bearing of the barbs, i.e., left or right. We test the automatic detection method with Hα filtergrams from the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) Hα archive and magnetograms observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Four filaments are automatically detected and illustrated to show the results. The barbs in different parts of a filament may have opposite bearings. The filaments in the southern hemisphere (northern hemisphere) mainly have left-bearing (right-bearing) barbs and positive (negative) magnetic helicity, respectively. The tested results demonstrate that our method is efficient and effective in detecting the bearing of filament barbs. It is demonstrated that the conventionally believed one-to-one correspondence between filament chirality and barb bearing is not valid. The correct detection of the filament axis chirality should be done by combining both imaging morphology and magnetic field observations.

  19. On the nature of star-forming filaments: II. Sub-filaments and velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Rowan J; Klessen, Ralf S; Fuller, Gary A

    2015-01-01

    We show that hydrodynamic turbulent cloud simulations naturally produce large filaments made up of a network of smaller and coherent sub-filaments. Such simulations resemble observations of filaments and fibres in nearby molecular clouds. The sub-filaments are dynamical features formed at the stagnation points of the turbulent velocity field where shocks dissipate the turbulent energy. They are a ubiquitous feature of the simulated clouds, which appear from the beginning of the simulation and are not formed by gradual fragmentation of larger filaments. Most of the sub-filaments are gravitationally sub-critical and do not fragment into cores, however, there is also a significant fraction of supercritical sub-filaments which break up into star-forming cores. The sub-filaments are coherent along their length, and the residual velocities along their spine show that they are subsonically contracting without any ordered rotation on scales of ~0.1 pc. Accretion flows along the sub-filaments can feed material into st...

  20. Actin filament attachments for sustained motility in vitro are maintained by filament bundling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Hu

    Full Text Available We reconstructed cellular motility in vitro from individual proteins to investigate how actin filaments are organized at the leading edge. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of actin filaments, we tested how profilin, Arp2/3, and capping protein (CP function together to propel thin glass nanofibers or beads coated with N-WASP WCA domains. Thin nanofibers produced wide comet tails that showed more structural variation in actin filament organization than did bead substrates. During sustained motility, physiological concentrations of Mg(2+ generated actin filament bundles that processively attached to the nanofiber. Reduction of total Mg(2+ abolished particle motility and actin attachment to the particle surface without affecting actin polymerization, Arp2/3 nucleation, or filament capping. Analysis of similar motility of microspheres showed that loss of filament bundling did not affect actin shell formation or symmetry breaking but eliminated sustained attachments between the comet tail and the particle surface. Addition of Mg(2+, Lys-Lys(2+, or fascin restored both comet tail attachment and sustained particle motility in low Mg(2+ buffers. TIRF microscopic analysis of filaments captured by WCA-coated beads in the absence of Arp2/3, profilin, and CP showed that filament bundling by polycation or fascin addition increased barbed end capture by WCA domains. We propose a model in which CP directs barbed ends toward the leading edge and polycation-induced filament bundling sustains processive barbed end attachment to the leading edge.

  1. Filaments in the Lupus molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Benedettini, M; Pezzuto, S; Elia, D; André, P; Könyves, V; Schneider, N; Tremblin, P; Arzoumanian, D; di Giorgio, A M; Di Francesco, J; Hill, T; Molinari, S; Motte, F; Nguyen-Luong, Q; Palmeirim, P; Rivera-Ingraham, A; Roy, A; Rygl, K L J; Spinoglio, L; Ward-Thompson, D; White, G J

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the filaments extracted from the column density maps of the nearby Lupus 1, 3, and 4 molecular clouds, derived from photometric maps observed with the Herschel satellite. Filaments in the Lupus clouds have quite low column densities, with a median value of $\\sim$1.5$\\times$10$^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ and most have masses per unit length lower than the maximum critical value for radial gravitational collapse. Indeed, no evidence of filament contraction has been seen in the gas kinematics. We find that some filaments, that on average are thermally subcritical, contain dense cores that may eventually form stars. This is an indication that in the low column density regime, the critical condition for the formation of stars may be reached only locally and this condition is not a global property of the filament. Finally, in Lupus we find multiple observational evidences of the key role that the magnetic field plays in forming filaments, and determining their confinement and dynamical evolution.

  2. Filaments in Simulations of Molecular Cloud Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gomez, Gilberto C

    2013-01-01

    We report on the filaments that develop self-consistently in a new numerical simulation of cloud formation by colliding flows. As in previous studies, the forming cloud begins to undergo gravitational collapse because it rapidly acquires a mass much larger than the average Jeans mass. Thus, the collapse is hierarchical in nature, proceeding along its shortest dimension first. This naturally produces filaments in cloud, and clumps within the filaments. The filaments are not in equilibrium at any time, but instead are long-lived flow features, through which the gas flows from the cloud to the clumps. The filaments are long-lived because they accrete from their environment while simultaneously accreting onto the clumps within them; they are essentially the locus where the flow changes from accreting in two dimensions to accreting in one dimension. Moreover, the clumps also exhibit a hierarchical nature: the gas in a filament flows onto a main, central clump, but other, smaller-scale clumps form along the infalli...

  3. Filaments in the Lupus molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedettini, M.; Schisano, E.; Pezzuto, S.; Elia, D.; André, P.; Könyves, V.; Schneider, N.; Tremblin, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; di Giorgio, A. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Hill, T.; Molinari, S.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Palmeirim, P.; Rivera-Ingraham, A.; Roy, A.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Spinoglio, L.; Ward-Thompson, D.; White, G. J.

    2015-10-01

    We have studied the filaments extracted from the column density maps of the nearby Lupus 1, 3, and 4 molecular clouds, derived from photometric maps observed with the Herschel satellite. Filaments in the Lupus clouds have quite low column densities, with a median value of ˜1.5 × 1021 cm-2 and most have masses per unit length lower than the maximum critical value for radial gravitational collapse. Indeed, no evidence of filament contraction has been seen in the gas kinematics. We find that some filaments, that on average are thermally subcritical, contain dense cores that may eventually form stars. This is an indication that in the low column density regime, the critical condition for the formation of stars may be reached only locally and this condition is not a global property of the filament. Finally, in Lupus we find multiple observational evidences of the key role that the magnetic field plays in forming filaments, and determining their confinement and dynamical evolution.

  4. Otomycosis due to filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Agudo, Lidia; Aznar-Marín, Pilar; Galán-Sánchez, Fátima; García-Martos, Pedro; Marín-Casanova, Pilar; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Otomycosis is common throughout the world but barely studied in Spain. Our objective was to determine the microbiological and epidemiological characteristics of this pathology in Cadiz (Spain) between 2005 and 2010. Samples from patients with suspicion of otomycosis underwent a direct microscopic examination and culture on different media for fungi and bacteria. Mycological cultures were incubated at 30°C for at least seven days. Identification of fungi was based on colonial morphology and microscopic examination of fungal structure. From a total of 2,633 samples, microbial growth was present in 1,375 (52.2%) and fungal isolation in 390 (28.4%). We identified 228 yeasts and 184 filamentous fungi (13.4% of positive cultures and 47.2% of otomycosis), associated with yeasts in 22 cases (5.6%). The most frequent species were Aspergillus flavus (42.4%), A. niger (35.9%), A. fumigatus (12.5%), A. candidus (7.1%), A. terreus (1.6%), and Paecilomyces variotii (0.5%). Infection was predominant in men (54.9%) and patients beyond 55 years old (46.8%). The most common clinical symptoms were itching (98.9%), otalgia (59.3%), and hypoacusis (56.0%). Fall season reported the lowest number of cases (20.1%). Incidence of otomycosis and fungi producing otomycosis vary within the distinct geographical areas. In Cadiz, this infection is endemic due to warm temperatures, high humidity, sea bathing, and wind, which contributes to disseminate the conidia. Despite Aspergillus niger has been reported as the main causative agent, A. flavus is predominant in Cadiz. Although infection is usually detected in warm months, we observed a homogeneous occurrence of otomycosis in almost all the seasons.

  5. Hemagglutinin, urease, and hemolysin production by Proteus mirabilis from clinical sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, H L; Chippendale, G R

    1990-03-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a common cause of urinary tract infection, can lead to serious complications including pyelonephritis. Adherence factors, urease, and hemolysin may be virulence determinants. These factors were compared for bacteria cultured from 16 patients with acute pyelonephritis and 35 with catheter-associated bacteriuria and for 20 fecal isolates. Pyelonephritis isolates were more likely (P less than .05) to express the mannose-resistant/Proteus-like (MR/P) hemagglutinin in the absence of mannose-resistant/Klebsiella-like (MR/K) hemagglutinin than were catheter-associated or fecal isolates. Pyelonephritis isolates produced urease activity of 63 +/- 27 (mean +/- SD) mumol of NH3/min/mg of protein, not significantly different from catheter-associated or fecal isolates. Hybridization of Southern blots of P. mirabilis chromosomal DNA with two urease gene probes demonstrated that urease gene sequences were conserved in all isolates. Geometric mean of reciprocal hemolytic titers for pyelonephritis isolates was 27.9; for urinary catheter isolates, 18.0; and for fecal isolates, 55.7 (not significantly different, P greater than .1). Although in vivo expression of urease and hemolysin may not be reliable indexes of virulence, MR/P hemagglutination in the absence of MR/K hemagglutination may be necessary for development of pyelonephritis.

  6. Antitumor Effects of Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase Used as a Molecular Adjuvant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Hui-fan; CHI Bao-rong; HE Dong-yun; LI Chang; HU Ning-ning; WANG Kai; SHENG Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is a potentially powerful tool used in cancer therapy.The strength of immune responses induced by some strategies is usually low,therefore,the development of agents capable of enhancing these responses is highlighted.The authors investigated the potential of an approach based on the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase(HN) of Newcastle disease virus(NDV) as a potential immune adjuvant.It was found that recombinant adenovirus(Ad) infected SGC7901 cells expressing HN exhibited both hemagglutinin(HA) and neuraminidase(NA) activities.It was demonstrated that administration of HN induced higher levels of the effector cytokines TNF-α,IFN-α and IFN-γ and increased natural killer(NK) cell activity.Based on the therapeutic tumor model,the results show that the administration of HN with Apoptin led to improved survival and tumor suppression.In conclusion,this study indicates that HN stimulates innate immune responses to make the activity of NK cells increased,which highlights the potential adjuvant activity of HN in cancer gene therapy.

  7. Accurate Measurement of the Effects of All Amino-Acid Mutations on Influenza Hemagglutinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Doud

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Influenza genes evolve mostly via point mutations, and so knowing the effect of every amino-acid mutation provides information about evolutionary paths available to the virus. We and others have combined high-throughput mutagenesis with deep sequencing to estimate the effects of large numbers of mutations to influenza genes. However, these measurements have suffered from substantial experimental noise due to a variety of technical problems, the most prominent of which is bottlenecking during the generation of mutant viruses from plasmids. Here we describe advances that ameliorate these problems, enabling us to measure with greatly improved accuracy and reproducibility the effects of all amino-acid mutations to an H1 influenza hemagglutinin on viral replication in cell culture. The largest improvements come from using a helper virus to reduce bottlenecks when generating viruses from plasmids. Our measurements confirm at much higher resolution the results of previous studies suggesting that antigenic sites on the globular head of hemagglutinin are highly tolerant of mutations. We also show that other regions of hemagglutinin—including the stalk epitopes targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies—have a much lower inherent capacity to tolerate point mutations. The ability to accurately measure the effects of all influenza mutations should enhance efforts to understand and predict viral evolution.

  8. Potential fields of merging and splitting filaments in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Yuan-Yuan; Lu Xin; Xi Ting-Ting; Hao Zuo-Qiang; Gong Qi-Huang; Zhang Jie

    2007-01-01

    Two interacting light filaments with different initial phases propagating in air are investigated numerically by using a ray tracing method. The evolution of the rays of a filament is governed by a potential field. During propagation, the two potential wells of the two filaments can merge into one or repel each other, depending on the initial phase difference between the two filaments. The study provides a simple description of the interacting filaments.

  9. PDGF induces reorganization of vimentin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valgeirsdóttir, S; Claesson-Welsh, L; Bongcam-Rudloff, E; Hellman, U; Westermark, B; Heldin, C H

    1998-07-30

    In this study we demonstrate that stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) leads to a marked reorganization of the vimentin filaments in porcine aortic endothelial (PAE) cells ectopically expressing the PDGF beta-receptor. Within 20 minutes after stimulation, the well-spread fine fibrillar vimentin was reorganized as the filaments aggregated into a dense coil around the nucleus. The solubility of vimentin upon Nonidet-P40-extraction of cells decreased considerably after PDGF stimulation, indicating that PDGF caused a redistribution of vimentin to a less soluble compartment. In addition, an increased tyrosine phosphorylation of vimentin was observed. The redistribution of vimentin was not a direct consequence of its tyrosine phosphorylation, since treatment of cells with an inhibitor for the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase Src, attenuated phosphorylation but not redistribution of vimentin. These changes in the distribution of vimentin occurred in conjunction with reorganization of actin filaments. In PAE cells expressing a Y740/751F mutant receptor that is unable to bind and activate phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3-kinase), the distribution of vimentin was virtually unaffected by PDGF stimulation. Thus, PI3-kinase is important for vimentin reorganization, in addition to its previously demonstrated role in actin reorganization. The small GTPase Rac has previously been shown to be involved downstream of PI3-kinase in the reorganization of actin filaments. In PAE cells overexpressing dominant negative Rac1 (N17Rac1), no change in the fine fibrillar vimentin network was seen after PDGF-BB stimulation, whereas in PAE cells overexpressing constitutively active Rac1 (V12Rac1), there was a dramatic change in vimentin filament organization independent of PDGF stimulation. These data indicate that PDGF causes a reorganization of microfilaments as well as intermediate filaments in its target cells and suggest an important role for Rac downstream of PI3-kinase in

  10. Filament Activation in Response to Magnetic Flux Emergence and Cancellation in Filament Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ting; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-01-01

    We make a comparative analysis for two filaments that showed quite different activation in response to the flux emergence within the filament channels. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) are carried out to analyze the two filaments on 2013 August 17-20 and September 29. The first event showed that the main body of the filament was separated into two parts when an active region (AR) emerged with a maximum magnetic flux of about 6.4*10^21 Mx underlying the filament. The close neighborhood and common direction of the bright threads in the filament and the open AR fan loops suggest similar magnetic connectivity of these two flux systems. The equilibrium of the filament was not destroyed within 3 days after the start of the emergence of the AR. To our knowledge, similar observations have never been reported before. In the second event, the emerging flux occurred nearby a barb of the filament with a maximum magnetic flux of 4.2*10^20 Mx, about one ...

  11. The molecular determinants of antibody recognition and antigenic drift in the H3 hemagglutinin of swine influenza A virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Influenza A virus (IAV) of the H3 subtype is an important pathogen that affects both humans and swine. The main intervention strategy for preventing infection is vaccination to induce neutralizing antibodies against the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA). However, due to antigenic drift, vaccin...

  12. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Hemagglutinin with Inhibitory Activity toward Osteocarcinoma Cells from Northeast China Black Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Xiuli; Wong, Jack Ho; Fang, Evandro Fei; Chan, Francis Chun Wai; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-04-22

    In the present study, we isolated a novel hemagglutinin from an edible legume and explored its growth-inhibitory effect on osteocarcinoma and liver cancer cells. The protein was purified by liquid chromatography techniques which entailed affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion-exchange chromatography on Mono Q, and gel filtration on Superdex 75 with an FPLC system. The hemagglutinating activity of this hemagglutinin was demonstrated to be ion dependent and stable over a wide range of temperature and pH values. Antiproliferative activity was observed in the tumor cell lines MG-63 and HepG2 but not in the normal cell line WRL 68. Osteocarcinoma cells treated with the hemagglutinin underwent obvious cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and apoptosis. The mRNA expression level of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were found to be up-regulated to different extents after treatment of this hemagglutinin.

  13. 77 FR 63783 - Influenza Viruses Containing the Hemagglutinin from the Goose/Guangdong/1/96 Lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... the Goose/Guangdong/1/96 lineage that have been shown to be transmissible between mammals beyond those... properties of H1, H2, and H3 avian influenza virus hemagglutinins after their introduction into mammals. J... highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. Adv Virus Res. 2009;73:55-97. 12. WHO/OIE/FAO H5N1 Evolution...

  14. Characterization of a novel influenza A virus hemagglutinin subtype (H16) obtained from black-headed gulls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); V.J. Munster (Vincent); A. Wallensten (Anders); T.M. Bestebroer (Theo); S. Herfst (Sander); D.J. Smith (Derek James); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); B. Olsen (Björn); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn wild aquatic birds and poultry around the world, influenza A viruses carrying 15 antigenic subtypes of hemagglutinin (HA) and 9 antigenic subtypes of neuraminidase (NA) have been described. Here we describe a previously unidentified antigenic subtype of HA (H16), detected in viruses

  15. Evaluation of anti-epileptic activity of fresh fruit juice of Moringa oleifera against maximal electroshock (M.E.S and Picrotoxin (PTX induced convulsions in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quazi Emadoddin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Moringa oleifera (Moringaecea are used in Indian traditional medicine and in folklore for many diseases and extensively used as CNS depressant traditionally. The interesting things of this plant are each part of Moringa oleifera is used as medicines. The present work has been carried out to evaluate the anti-epileptic activity of fresh fruit juice of Moringa oleifera against maximal electroshock (M.E.S and Picrotoxin (PTX induced convulsions in mice at different dose level (100ml/kg. p.o & 50ml/kg. p.o. Diazepam (5mg/kg. p.o and Phenytoin (25mg/kg. i.p were used as reference standard drugs. The data obtained indicates that the fresh fruit juice of Moringa oleifera at the dose of (50ml/kg p.o & 100ml/kg p.o shows anticonvulsant activity against Maximal electroshock and Picrotoxin induced convulsion in mice.

  16. Anisotropy of iron-platinum-arsenide Ca10(PtnAs8)(Fe2-xPtxAs2)5 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, F. F.; Sun, Y.; Zhou, W.; Zhou, X.; Ding, Q. P.; Iida, K.; Hühne, R.; Schultz, L.; Tamegai, T.; Shi, Z. X.

    2015-07-01

    The upper critical field Hc2 anisotropy of Ca10(PtnAs8)(Fe2-xPtxAs2)5 (n = 3, 4) single crystals with long FeAs interlayer distance (d) was studied by angular dependent resistivity measurements. A scaling of the angular dependent resistivity was realized for both single crystals using the anisotropic Ginzburg-Landau (AGL) approach with an appropriate anisotropy parameter γ. The AGL scaling parameter γ increases with decreasing temperature and reaches a value of about 10 at 0.8Tc for both single crystals. These values are much larger than those of other iron-based superconductors (FeSCs). Remarkably, the values of γ2 show an almost linear increase with the FeAs/FeSe interlayer distance d for FeSCs. Compared to cuprates, FeSCs are less anisotropic, indicating that two dimensionality of the superconductivity is intrinsically weak.

  17. Drops moving along and across a filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Rakesh P.; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2013-11-01

    The present work is devoted to the experimental study of oil drop motion both along and across a filament due to the air jet blowing. In case of drop moving along the filament, phenomena such as drop stick-slip motion, shape oscillations, shedding of a tail along the filament, the tail capillary instability and drop recoil motion were observed which were rationalized in the framework of simplified models. Experiments with cross-flow of the surrounding gas relative to the filament with an oil drop on it were conducted, with air velocity in the range of 7.23 to 22.7 m s-1. The Weber number varied from 2 to 40 and the Ohnesorge number varied from 0.07 to 0.8. The lower and upper critical Weber numbers were introduced to distinguish between the beginning of the drop blowing off the filament and the onset of the bag-stamen breakup. The range of the Weber number between these two critical values is filled with three types of vibrational breakup: V1 (a balloon-like drop being blown off), V2 (a drop on a single stamen being blown off), and V3 (a drop on a double stamen being blown off). The Weber number/Ohnesorge number plane was delineated into domains of different breakup regimes. The work is supported by the Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center (NCRC).

  18. The hydrodynamic stability of gaseous cosmic filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Birnboim, Yuval; Zinger, Elad

    2016-01-01

    Virial shocks at edges of cosmic-web structures are a clear prediction of standard structure formation theories. We derive a criterion for the stability of the post-shock gas and of the virial shock itself in spherical, filamentary and planar infall geometries. When gas cooling is important, we find that shocks become unstable, and gas flows uninterrupted towards the center of the respective halo, filament or sheet. For filaments, we impose this criterion on self-similar infall solutions. We find that instability is expected for filament masses between $10^{11}-10^{13}M_\\odot Mpc^{-1}.$ Using a simplified toy model, we then show that these filaments will likely feed halos with $10^{10}M_{\\odot}\\lesssim M_{halo}\\lesssim 10^{13}M_{\\odot}$ at redshift $z=3$, as well as $10^{12}M_{\\odot}\\lesssim M_{halo}\\lesssim 10^{15}M_{\\odot}$ at $z=0$. The instability will affect the survivability of the filaments as they penetrate gaseous halos in a non-trivial way. Additionally, smaller halos accreting onto non-stable filam...

  19. Feto-maternal correlation of PTX3, sFlt-1 and PlGF in physiological and pre-eclamptic pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algeri, Paola; Ornaghi, Sara; Bernasconi, Davide Paolo; Cappellini, Fabrizio; Signorini, Stefano; Brambilla, Paolo; Urban, Gabriele; Vergani, Patrizia

    2014-08-01

    PTX3, sFlt-1 and PlGF levels in maternal blood are altered in some obstetric diseases, such as preeclampsia (PE). Nonetheless, only few data on their expression in the fetal compartment have been reported so far. An observational study was performed by prospectively collecting maternal and fetal serum samples in 51 singleton pregnancies divided into two groups: 22 PE women and 29 healthy controls. The relationships between maternal and fetal marker serum levels were evaluated by Spearman correlation. A feto-maternal correlation was neither identified for PTX3 in either PE or control groups (1.1 versus 3.8 ng/ml, p = 0.17 and 0.9 versus 1.3 ng/ml, p = 0.30, respectively), nor for sFlt-1 and PlGF in healthy pregnancies (158.2 versus 3326.0 pg/ml, p = 0.28 and 11.0 versus 230.9 pg/ml, p = 0.51). In contrast, PE patients showed a significant positive feto-maternal correlation for both sFlt-1 and PlGF (324.1 versus 10 825.0 pg/ml and 7.8 versus 31.6 pg/ml, respectively, p = 0.02 for both markers). According to our results, an independent fetal production of the analyzed soluble angiogenic markers can be hypothesized in pregnancies complicated by PE.

  20. Superconducting properties and pseudogap from preformed Cooper pairs in the triclinic (CaFe1-xPtxAs ) 10Pt3As8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmach, M. A.; Brückner, F.; Kamusella, S.; Sarkar, R.; Portnichenko, P. Y.; Park, J. T.; Ghambashidze, G.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Choi, W. J.; Seo, Y. I.; Kwon, Y. S.; Klauss, H.-H.; Inosov, D. S.

    2015-03-01

    Using a combination of muon-spin relaxation (μ SR ) , inelastic neutron scattering (INS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), we investigated the novel iron-based superconductor with a triclinic crystal structure (CaFe1-xPtxAs ) 10Pt3As8 (Tc=13 K), containing platinum-arsenide intermediary layers. The temperature dependence of the superfluid density obtained from the μ SR relaxation-rate measurements indicates the presence of two superconducting gaps, Δ1≫Δ2 . According to our INS measurements, commensurate spin fluctuations are centered at the (π ,0 ) wave vector, like in most other iron arsenides. Their intensity remains unchanged across Tc, indicating the absence of a spin resonance typical for many Fe-based superconductors. Instead, we observed a peak in the spin-excitation spectrum around ℏ ω0=7 meV at the same wave vector, which persists above Tc and is characterized by the ratio ℏ ω0/kBTc≈6.2 , which is significantly higher than typical values for the magnetic resonant modes in iron pnictides (˜4.3 ) . The temperature dependence of magnetic intensity at 7 meV revealed an anomaly around T*=45 K related to the disappearance of this new mode. A suppression of the spin-lattice relaxation rate, 1 /T1T , observed by NMR immediately below T* without any notable subsequent anomaly at Tc, indicates that T* could mark the onset of a pseudogap in (CaFe1-xPtxAs ) 10Pt3As8 , which is likely associated with the emergence of preformed Cooper pairs.

  1. Free-Space Nonlinear Beam Combining Towards Filamentation

    CERN Document Server

    Rostami, Shermineh; Kepler, Daniel; Baudelet, Matthieu; Litchinitser, Natalia M; Richardson, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Multi-filamentation opens new degrees of freedom for manipulating electromagnetic waves in air. However, without control, multiple filament interactions, including attraction, repulsion or fusion often result in formation of complex disordered filament distributions. Moreover, high power beams conventionally used in multi-filament formation experiments often cause significant surface damage. The growing number of applications for laser filaments requires fine control of their formation and propagation. We demonstrate, experimentally and theoretically, that the attraction and fusion of ultrashort beams with initial powers below the critical value enable the eventual formation of a filament downstream. Filament formation is delayed to a predetermined distance in space, avoiding optical damage to external beam optics while still enabling robust filaments with controllable properties as if formed from a single high power beam. This paradigm introduces new opportunities for filament engineering eliminating the nee...

  2. Unwinding motion of a twisted active-region filament

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, X L; Liu, J H; Kong, D F; Xu, C L

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the structures of active-region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active-region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on June 22, 2010. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament is consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5$\\pi$ obtained by using time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active-region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magn...

  3. Relationship between Sustained Reductions in Plasma Lipid and Lipoprotein Concentrations with Apheresis and Plasma Levels and mRNA Expression of PTX3 and Plasma Levels of hsCRP in Patients with HyperLp(alipoproteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Stefanutti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of lipoprotein apheresis (Direct Adsorption of Lipids, DALI (LA on plasma levels of pentraxin 3 (PTX3, an inflammatory marker that reflects coronary plaque vulnerability, and expression of PTX3 mRNA was evaluated in patients with hyperLp(alipoproteinemia and angiographically defined atherosclerosis/coronary artery disease. Eleven patients, aged 55±9.3 years (mean ± SD, were enrolled in the study. PTX3 soluble protein levels in plasma were unchanged by 2 sessions of LA; however, a downregulation of mRNA expression for PTX3 was observed, starting with the first session of LA (p<0.001. The observed reduction was progressively increased in the interval between the first and second LA sessions to achieve a maximum decrease by the end of the second session. A statistically significantly greater treatment-effect correlation was observed in patients undergoing weekly treatments, compared with those undergoing treatment every 15 days. A progressive reduction in plasma levels of C-reactive protein was also seen from the first session of LA, with a statistically significant linear correlation for treatment-effect in the change in plasma levels of this established inflammatory marker (R2=0.99; p<0.001. Our findings suggest that LA has anti-inflammatory and endothelium protective effects beyond its well-established efficacy in lowering apoB100-containing lipoproteins.

  4. Oscillating Filaments: I - Oscillation and Geometrical Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Burkert, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We study the stability of filaments in equilibrium between gravity and internal as well as external pressure using the grid based AMR-code RAMSES. A homogeneous, straight cylinder below a critical line mass is marginally stable. However, if the cylinder is bent, e.g. with a slight sinusoidal perturbation, an otherwise stable configuration starts to oscillate, is triggered into fragmentation and collapses. This previously unstudied behavior allows a filament to fragment at any given scale, as long as it has slight bends. We call this process `geometrical fragmentation'. In our realization the spacing between the cores matches the wavelength of the sinusoidal perturbation, whereas up to now, filaments were thought to be only fragmenting on the characteristical scale set by the mass-to-line ratio. Using first principles, we derive the oscillation period as well as the collapse timescale analytically. To enable a direct comparison with observations, we study the line-of-sight velocity for different inclinations. ...

  5. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manz, P. [Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Müller, S. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego 92093 (United States); Fuchert, G. [Insitut für Grenzflächenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universität Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Stroth, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Assoziation, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department E28, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

  6. Filament velocity scaling laws for warm ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, P.; Carralero, D.; Birkenmeier, G.; Müller, H. W.; Müller, S. H.; Fuchert, G.; Scott, B. D.; Stroth, U.

    2013-10-01

    The dynamics of filaments or blobs in the scrape-off layer of magnetic fusion devices are studied by magnitude estimates of a comprehensive drift-interchange-Alfvén fluid model. The standard blob models are reproduced in the cold ion case. Even though usually neglected, in the scrape-off layer, the ion temperature can exceed the electron temperature by an order of magnitude. The ion pressure affects the dynamics of filaments amongst others by adding up to the interchange drive and the polarisation current. It is shown how both effects modify the scaling laws for filament velocity in dependence of its size. Simplifications for experimentally relevant limit regimes are given. These are the sheath dissipation, collisional, and electromagnetic regime.

  7. Heterologous expression of cellobiohydrolases in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoglowek, Marta; Lübeck, Peter S.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2015-01-01

    Cellobiohydrolases are among the most important enzymes functioning in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose, significantly contributing to the efficient biorefining of recalcitrant lignocellulosic biomass into biofuels and bio-based products. Filamentous fungi are recognized as both well...... into valuable products. However, due to low cellobiohydrolase activities, certain fungi might be deficient with regard to enzymes of value for cellulose conversion, and improving cellobiohydrolase expression in filamentous fungi has proven to be challenging. In this review, we examine the effects of altering...... promoters, signal peptides, culture conditions and host post-translational modifications. For heterologous cellobiohydrolase production in filamentous fungi to become an industrially feasible process, the construction of site-integrating plasmids, development of protease-deficient strains and glycosylation...

  8. Flexible magnetic filaments in a shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebers, Andrejs [Institute of Physics, University of Latvia, Salaspils-1 LV-2169 (Latvia)]. E-mail: aceb@tesla.sal.lv

    2006-05-15

    By flexible magnetic filament model its behavior under the simultaneous action of the shear flow and the magnetic field is investigated. It is found that for magnetoelastic numbers larger as the critical value, which depends on the shear rate, the periodic regime is established. For the values of the magnetoelastic number close to the critical the periodical regime is characterized by a rather slow development of the buckling instability due to the action of magnetic torques with the subsequent stage of the fast straightening of the filament. For the magnetoelastic numbers below the critical slightly bent shape of the filament orientated along the flow is established. The application of the results for the description of the viscoelasticity of the magnetorheological suspensions is discussed.

  9. Production of recombinant proteins by filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Owen P

    2012-01-01

    The initial focus of recombinant protein production by filamentous fungi related to exploiting the extraordinary extracellular enzyme synthesis and secretion machinery of industrial strains, including Aspergillus, Trichoderma, Penicillium and Rhizopus species, was to produce single recombinant protein products. An early recognized disadvantage of filamentous fungi as hosts of recombinant proteins was their common ability to produce homologous proteases which could degrade the heterologous protein product and strategies to prevent proteolysis have met with some limited success. It was also recognized that the protein glycosylation patterns in filamentous fungi and in mammals were quite different, such that filamentous fungi are likely not to be the most suitable microbial hosts for production of recombinant human glycoproteins for therapeutic use. By combining the experience gained from production of single recombinant proteins with new scientific information being generated through genomics and proteomics research, biotechnologists are now poised to extend the biomanufacturing capabilities of recombinant filamentous fungi by enabling them to express genes encoding multiple proteins, including, for example, new biosynthetic pathways for production of new primary or secondary metabolites. It is recognized that filamentous fungi, most species of which have not yet been isolated, represent an enormously diverse source of novel biosynthetic pathways, and that the natural fungal host harboring a valuable biosynthesis pathway may often not be the most suitable organism for biomanufacture purposes. Hence it is expected that substantial effort will be directed to transforming other fungal hosts, non-fungal microbial hosts and indeed non microbial hosts to express some of these novel biosynthetic pathways. But future applications of recombinant expression of proteins will not be confined to biomanufacturing. Opportunities to exploit recombinant technology to unravel the

  10. Heterologous gene expression in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoyun; Schmitz, George; Zhang, Meiling; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac K O

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are critical to production of many commercial enzymes and organic compounds. Fungal-based systems have several advantages over bacterial-based systems for protein production because high-level secretion of enzymes is a common trait of their decomposer lifestyle. Furthermore, in the large-scale production of recombinant proteins of eukaryotic origin, the filamentous fungi become the vehicle of choice due to critical processes shared in gene expression with other eukaryotic organisms. The complexity and relative dearth of understanding of the physiology of filamentous fungi, compared to bacteria, have hindered rapid development of these organisms as highly efficient factories for the production of heterologous proteins. In this review, we highlight several of the known benefits and challenges in using filamentous fungi (particularly Aspergillus spp., Trichoderma reesei, and Neurospora crassa) for the production of proteins, especially heterologous, nonfungal enzymes. We review various techniques commonly employed in recombinant protein production in the filamentous fungi, including transformation methods, selection of gene regulatory elements such as promoters, protein secretion factors such as the signal peptide, and optimization of coding sequence. We provide insights into current models of host genomic defenses such as repeat-induced point mutation and quelling. Furthermore, we examine the regulatory effects of transcript sequences, including introns and untranslated regions, pre-mRNA (messenger RNA) processing, transcript transport, and mRNA stability. We anticipate that this review will become a resource for researchers who aim at advancing the use of these fascinating organisms as protein production factories, for both academic and industrial purposes, and also for scientists with general interest in the biology of the filamentous fungi. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduced filamentation in high power semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Peter M. W.; McInerney, John; O'Brien, Peter

    1999-01-01

    High brightness semiconductor lasers have applications in fields ranging from material processing to medicine. The main difficulty associated with high brightness is that high optical power densities cause damage to the laser facet and thus require large apertures. This, in turn, results in spatio...... in the optical field causes spatial hole-burning and thus filamentation. To reduce filamentation we propose a new, relatively simple design based on inhomogeneous pumping in which the injected current has a gradual transverse profile. We confirm the improved laser performance theoretically and experimentally...

  12. Generation of stable overlaps between antiparallel filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Johann, D; Kruse, K

    2015-01-01

    During cell division, sister chromatids are segregated by the mitotic spindle, a bipolar assembly of interdigitating antiparallel polar filaments called microtubules. Establishing a stable overlap region is essential for maintenance of bipolarity, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a particle-based stochastic model, we find that the interplay of motors and passive cross linkers can robustly generate partial overlaps between antiparallel filaments. Our analysis shows that motors reduce the overlap in a length-dependent manner, whereas passive cross linkers increase it independently of the length. In addition to maintaining structural integrity, passive cross linkers can thus also have a dynamic role for size regulation.

  13. Filament stretching rheometer: inertia compensation revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2003-01-01

    The necessary inertia compensation used in the force balance for the filament stretching rheometer is derived for an arbitrary frame of reference. This enables the force balance to be used to extract correctly the extensional viscosity from measurements of the tensile force at either end of the e......The necessary inertia compensation used in the force balance for the filament stretching rheometer is derived for an arbitrary frame of reference. This enables the force balance to be used to extract correctly the extensional viscosity from measurements of the tensile force at either end...

  14. Nuclear flow in a filamentous fungus

    CERN Document Server

    Hickey, Patrick C; Read, Nick; Glass, N Louise; Roper, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    The syncytial cells of a filamentous fungus consist of a mass of growing, tube-like hyphae. Each extending tip is fed by a continuous flow of nuclei from the colony interior, pushed by a gradient in turgor pressure. The myco-fluidic flows of nuclei are complex and multidirectional, like traffic in a city. We map out the flows in a strain of the model filamentous fungus {\\it N. crassa} that has been transformed so that nuclei express either hH1-dsRed (a red fluorescent nuclear protein) or hH1-GFP (a green-fluorescent protein) and report our results in a fluid dynamics video.

  15. On the nature of star-forming filaments: I. Filament morphologies

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Rowan J; Klessen, Ralf S

    2014-01-01

    We use a suite of high resolution molecular cloud simulations carried out with the moving mesh code Arepo to explore the nature of star-forming filaments. The simulated filaments are identified and categorised from column density maps in the same manner as for recent Herschel observations. When fit with a Plummer-like profile the filaments are in excellent agreement with observations, and have shallow power-law profiles of p~2.2 without the need for magnetic support. The derived filament widths depend on the data range that is fitted. When data within 1 pc of the filament centre is fitted with a Gaussian function, the average FWHM is ~0.3 pc, in agreement with predictions for accreting filaments. However, if the fit is constructed using only data within 0.35 pc of the centre, in order to better match the procedure used to derive filament widths from Herschel observations, the resulting FWHM is only ~0.2 pc. This value is larger than that measured in IC 5146 and Taurus, but is similar to that found in the Plan...

  16. Analytical Core Mass Function (CMF) from Filaments: Under Which Circumstances Can Filament Fragmentation Reproduce the CMF?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yueh-Ning; Hennebelle, Patrick; Chabrier, Gilles

    2017-10-01

    Observations suggest that star formation in filamentary molecular clouds occurs in a two-step process, with the formation of filaments preceding that of prestellar cores and stars. Here, we apply the gravoturbulent fragmentation theory of Hennebelle & Chabrier to a filamentary environment, taking into account magnetic support. We discuss the induced geometrical effect on the cores, with a transition from 3D geometry at small scales to 1D at large ones. The model predicts the fragmentation behavior of a filament for a given mass per unit length (MpL) and level of magnetization. This core mass function (CMF) for individual filaments is then convolved with the distribution of filaments to obtain the final system CMF. The model yields two major results. (i) The filamentary geometry naturally induces a hierarchical fragmentation process, first into groups of cores, separated by a length equal to a few filament Jeans lengths, i.e., a few times the filament width. These groups then fragment into individual cores. (ii) Non-magnetized filaments with high MpL are found to fragment excessively, at odds with observations. This is resolved by taking into account the magnetic field (treated simply as additional pressure support). The present theory suggests two complementary modes of star formation: although small (spherical or filamentary) structures will collapse directly into prestellar cores, according to the standard Hennebelle–Chabrier theory, the large (filamentary) ones, the dominant population according to observations, will follow the aforedescribed two-step process.

  17. Dimerisation and structural integrity of Heparin Binding Hemagglutinin A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: implications for bacterial agglutination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Carla; Carullo, Paola; Pedone, Emilia; Graziano, Giuseppe; Del Vecchio, Pompea; Berisio, Rita

    2010-03-19

    Heparin Binding Hemagglutinin A (HBHA) is hitherto the sole virulence factor associated with tuberculosis dissemination from the lungs, the site of primary infection, to epithelial cells. We have previously reported the solution structure of HBHA, a dimeric and elongated molecule. Since oligomerisation of HBHA is associated with its ability to induce bacterial agglutination, we investigated this process using experimental and modelling techniques. We here identified a short segment of HBHA whose presence is mandatory for the stability of folded conformation, whose denaturation is a reversible two-state process. Our data suggest that agglutination-driven cell-cell interactions do not occur via association of HBHA monomers, nor via association of HBHA dimers and open the scenario to a possible trans-dimerisation process.

  18. Implications of Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius hemagglutinins in the pathogenesis of Brazilian purpuric fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Sônia F C; Hoshino-Shimizu, Sumie; Alkmin, Maria das Graças A; Goto, Hiro

    2003-07-01

    Brazilian purpuric fever (BPF) is an acute disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae biogroup aegyptius; it is characterized by fever, purpura, and hypotensive shock and is usually fatal. The factors responsible for bacterial virulence and pathogenesis are poorly known. Hemagglutinins have been frequently associated with bacterial virulence, and, in the present study, hemagglutinating activity was detected in extracellular products from H. influenzae biogroup aegyptius strains isolated from patients with BPF. A 60-kilodalton (kDa) molecule absorbable by human O-type erythrocytes was identified by an immunoblot assay; a corresponding fraction was chromatographically purified, and its pathogenic effect was evaluated. Rabbits injected intravenously with either the whole bacterial extracellular product or the 60-kDa fraction showed reactions similar to those seen in patients with BPF: purpura, congestion, and fibrin thrombi in the inner organs. We suggest that this hemagglutinating factor is one of the major pathogenic components of BPF.

  19. Domain architecture and oligomerization properties of the paramyxovirus PIV 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ping; Leser, George P; Demeler, Borries; Lamb, Robert A; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2008-09-01

    The mechanism by which the paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein couples receptor binding to activation of virus entry remains to be fully understood, but the HN stalk is thought to play an important role in the process. We have characterized ectodomain constructs of the parainfluenza virus 5 HN to understand better the underlying architecture and oligomerization properties that may influence HN functions. The PIV 5 neuraminidase (NA) domain is monomeric whereas the ectodomain forms a well-defined tetramer. The HN stalk also forms tetramers and higher order oligomers with high alpha-helical content. Together, the data indicate that the globular NA domains form weak intersubunit interactions at the end of the HN stalk tetramer, while stabilizing the stalk and overall oligomeric state of the ectodomain. Electron microscopy of the HN ectodomain reveals flexible arrangements of the NA and stalk domains, which may be important for understanding how these two HN domains impact virus entry.

  20. Computational Design of Proteins Targeting the Conserved Stem Region of Influenza Hemagglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleishman, Sarel J.; Whitehead, Timothy A.; Ekiert, Damian C.; Dreyfus, Cyrille; Corn, Jacob E.; Strauch, Eva-Maria; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker, David (UWASH); (Scripps)

    2011-09-28

    We describe a general computational method for designing proteins that bind a surface patch of interest on a target macromolecule. Favorable interactions between disembodied amino acid residues and the target surface are identified and used to anchor de novo designed interfaces. The method was used to design proteins that bind a conserved surface patch on the stem of the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) from the 1918 H1N1 pandemic virus. After affinity maturation, two of the designed proteins, HB36 and HB80, bind H1 and H5 HAs with low nanomolar affinity. Further, HB80 inhibits the HA fusogenic conformational changes induced at low pH. The crystal structure of HB36 in complex with 1918/H1 HA revealed that the actual binding interface is nearly identical to that in the computational design model. Such designed binding proteins may be useful for both diagnostics and therapeutics.

  1. Structure of the measles virus hemagglutinin bound to its cellular receptor SLAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Takao; Ose, Toyoyuki; Kubota, Marie; Maita, Nobuo; Kamishikiryo, Jun; Maenaka, Katsumi; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2011-02-01

    Measles virus, a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide, predominantly infects immune cells using signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) as a cellular receptor. Here we present crystal structures of measles virus hemagglutinin (MV-H), the receptor-binding glycoprotein, in complex with SLAM. The MV-H head domain binds to a β-sheet of the membrane-distal ectodomain of SLAM using the side of its β-propeller fold. This is distinct from attachment proteins of other paramyxoviruses that bind receptors using the top of their β-propeller. The structure provides templates for antiviral drug design, an explanation for the effectiveness of the measles virus vaccine, and a model of the homophilic SLAM-SLAM interaction involved in immune modulations. Notably, the crystal structures obtained show two forms of the MV-H-SLAM tetrameric assembly (dimer of dimers), which may have implications for the mechanism of fusion triggering.

  2. Role of Positive Selection Pressure on the Evolution of H5N1 Hemagglutinin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Venkata R.S.K. Duwuri; Bhargavi Duvvuri; Wilfred R. Cuff; Gillian E. Wu; Jianhong Wu

    2009-01-01

    The surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) helps the influenza A virus to evade the host immune system by antigenic variation and is a major driving force for viral evolution. In this study, the selection pressure on HA of H5N1 influenza A virus was analyzed using bioinformatics algorithms. Most of the identified positive selection (PS) sites were found to be within or adjacent to epitope sites. Some of the identified PS sites are consistent with previous experimental studies, providing further support to the biological significance of our findings. The highest frequency of PS sites was observed in recent strains isolated during 2005-2007. Phylogenetic analysis was also conducted on HA sequences from various hosts. Viral drift is almost similar in both avian and human species with a progressive trend over the years. Our study reports new mutations in functional regions of HA that might provide markers for vaccine design or can be used to predict isolates of pandemic potential.

  3. Structure-activity relationship of a hemagglutinin from Moringa oleifera seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katre, Uma V; Suresh, C G; Khan, M Islam; Gaikwad, Sushama M

    2008-03-01

    The hemagglutinin from the seeds of Moringa oleifera (MoL) agglutinates human as well as rabbit erythrocytes; the affinity for the latter is almost 250 times more than that for the former. MoL was inhibited by glycoproteins namely thyroglobulin, fetuin and holotransferin indicating the complex sugar specificity of the lectin. The protein is a homodimer with molecular mass of 14kDa, subunits (7.1kDa) linked by the disulfide bond(s). The secondary structure elements of MoL are alpha-helix, 28%; beta-sheet, 23%; turn 20% and unordered 28%. While the activity and secondary structure were not affected at extreme pH and high temperature, they were drastically affected in presence of dithiothreitol at and above pH 7.0, indicating that disulfide linkages hold the active conformation of the protein.

  4. Roll of hemagglutinin gene in the biology of avian inflenza virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Soltanialvar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The hemagglutinin (HA, the major envelope glycoprotein of influenza, plays an important role during the early stage of infection, and changes in the HA gene prior to the emergence of pathogenic avian influenza viruses. The HA protein controls viral entry through membrane fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane and allows the genetic information released to initiate new virus synthesis. Sharp antigenic variation of HA remains the critical challenge to the development of effective vaccines. Therefore, we highlight the role of HA in need of review: structure of HA, the fusion process and the HA receptor binding specificity in interspecies transmission and the impact of multiple mutations at antigenic sites and host antibodies to the parental virus, and the host susceptibility to productive infection by the drift strains.

  5. Heterogeneity within the hemagglutinin genes of canine distemper virus (CDV) strains detected in Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martella, V.; Cirone, F.; Elia, G.;

    2006-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious viral pathogen causing lethal disease in dogs and other mammalians. A high degree of genetic variation is found between recent CDV strains and the old CDV isolates used in the vaccines and such genetic variation is regarded as a possible cause...... of the increasing number of CDV-related diseases in dogs. The H gene shows the greatest extent of genetic variation that allows for distinction of various lineages, according to a geographical pattern of distribution and irrespective of the species of identification. In the present study, hemagglutinin (H) genes...... obtained from field strains detected from clinical specimens of Italian dogs were analyzed genetically. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that a homogeneous group of CDV strains is widespread in Italian dogs, all which are included into the European lineage. Unexpectedly, strains 179/04 and 48/05 clustered...

  6. Modelling the chemistry of star-forming filaments - II. Testing filament characteristics with synthetic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifried, D.; Sánchez-Monge, Á.; Suri, S.; Walch, S.

    2017-06-01

    We present synthetic continuum and 13CO and C18O line emission observations of dense and cold filaments. The filaments are dynamically evolved using 3D-magnetohydrodynamic simulations that include one of the largest on-the-fly chemical networks used to date, which models the detailed evolution of H2 and CO. We investigate the reliability of observable properties, in particular filament mass and width, under different simulation conditions like magnetic field orientation and cosmic ray ionization rate. We find that filament widths of ˜0.1 pc can be probed with both line and continuum emission observations with a high accuracy (deviations ≤20 per cent). However, the width of more narrow filaments can be significantly overestimated by up to a factor of a few. Masses obtained via the dust emission are accurate within a few per cent whereas the masses inferred from molecular line emission observations deviate from the actual mass by up to a factor of 10 and show large differences for different J transitions. The inaccurate estimate of filament masses and widths of narrow filaments using molecular line observations can be attributed to (i) the non-isothermal state of the filaments, (ii) optical depth effects and (iii) the subthermally excited state of CO, while inclination effects and opacity correction only influence the obtained masses and widths by less than 50 per cent. Both, mass and width estimates, can be improved by using two isotopes to correct for the optical depth. Since gas and dust temperatures generally differ (by up to 25 K), the filaments appear more gravitationally unstable if the (too low) dust temperature is used for the stability analysis.

  7. Selective pressure to increase charge in immunodominant epitopes of the H3 hemagglutinin influenza protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Keyao; Long, Jinxue; Sun, Haoxin; Tobin, Gregory J; Nara, Peter L; Deem, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionary speed and the consequent immune escape of H3N2 influenza A virus make it an interesting evolutionary system. Charged amino acid residues are often significant contributors to the free energy of binding for protein-protein interactions, including antibody-antigen binding and ligand-receptor binding. We used Markov chain theory and maximum likelihood estimation to model the evolution of the number of charged amino acids on the dominant epitope in the hemagglutinin protein of circulating H3N2 virus strains. The number of charged amino acids increased in the dominant epitope B of the H3N2 virus since introduction in humans in 1968. When epitope A became dominant in 1989, the number of charged amino acids increased in epitope A and decreased in epitope B. Interestingly, the number of charged residues in the dominant epitope of the dominant circulating strain is never fewer than that in the vaccine strain. We propose these results indicate selective pressure for charged amino acids that increase the affinity of the virus epitope for water and decrease the affinity for host antibodies. The standard PAM model of generic protein evolution is unable to capture these trends. The reduced alphabet Markov model (RAMM) model we introduce captures the increased selective pressure for charged amino acids in the dominant epitope of hemagglutinin of H3N2 influenza (R (2) > 0.98 between 1968 and 1988). The RAMM model calibrated to historical H3N2 influenza virus evolution in humans fit well to the H3N2/Wyoming virus evolution data from Guinea pig animal model studies.

  8. Enhancement of the safety of live influenza vaccine by attenuating mutations from cold-adapted hemagglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yoon Jae [Graduate Program in Biomaterials Science and Engineering, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Vaccine Translational Research Center, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Yo Han [Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Paul; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Young Jae [Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Vaccine Translational Research Center, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Kyusik [Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Baik Lin, E-mail: blseong@yonsei.ac.kr [Graduate Program in Biomaterials Science and Engineering, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Vaccine Translational Research Center, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In our previous study, X-31ca-based H5N1 LAIVs, in particular, became more virulent in mice than the X-31ca MDV, possibly by the introduction of the surface antigens of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, implying that additional attenuation is needed in this cases to increase the safety level of the vaccine. In this report we suggest an approach to further increase the safety of LAIV through additional cold-adapted mutations in the hemagglutinin. The cold-adaptation of X-31 virus resulted in four amino acid mutations in the HA. We generated a panel of 7:1 reassortant viruses each carrying the hemagglutinins with individual single amino acid mutations. We examined their phenotypes and found a major attenuating mutation, N81K. This attenuation marker conferred additional temperature-sensitive and attenuation phenotype to the LAIV. Our data indicate that the cold-adapted mutation in the HA confers additional attenuation to the LAIV strain, without compromising its productivity and immune response. - Highlights: • Cold-adaptation process induced four amino acid mutations in the HA of X-31 virus. • The four mutations in the HA also contributed to attenuation of the X-31ca virus • N81K mutation was the most significant marker for the attenuation of X-31ca virus. • Introduction of N81K mutation into H3N2 LAIV further attenuated the vaccine. • This approach provides a useful guideline for enhancing the safety of the LAIVs.

  9. High-resolution Observations of Sympathetic Filament Eruptions by NVST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yingna; Li, Shangwei; Zhou, Tuanhui; Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan A.; Sun, Xudong; Ji, Haisheng

    2017-08-01

    We investigate two sympathetic filament eruptions observed by the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) on 2015 October 15. The full picture of the eruptions is obtained from the corresponding SDO/AIA observations. The two filaments start from the east border of active region NOAA 12434 in the north and end in one large quiescent filament channel in the south. The left filament erupts firstly, followed by the right filament eruption about 10 minutes later. Clear twist structure and rotating motion are observed in both filaments during the eruption. Both eruptions are failed, since the filaments firstly rise up, then flow towards the south and merge into the southern large quiescent filament. We also observe repeating activations of mini filaments below the right filament after its eruption. Using magnetic field models constructed based on SDO/HMI magnetograms by flux rope insertion method, we find that the left filament eruption is likely to be triggered by kink instability, while weakening of overlying magnetic fields due to magnetic reconnection at an X-point between the two filament systems might play an important role in the onset of the right filament eruption.

  10. The exo-metabolome in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Ulf; Andersen, Birgitte; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are a diverse group of eukaryotic microorganisms that have a significant impact on human life as spoilers of food and feed by degradation and toxin production. They are also most useful as a source of bulk and fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. This chapter focuses on the exo...

  11. The Apis mellifera filamentous virus genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    A complete reference genome of the Apis mellifera Filamentous virus (AmFV) was determined using Illumina Hiseq sequencing. The AmFV genome is a double strand DNA molecule of approximately 498’500 nucleotides with a GC content of 50.8%. It encompasses 251 non overlapping open reading frames (ORFs), e...

  12. Modelling the morphology of filamentous microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1996-01-01

    The rapid development in image analysis techniques has made it possible to study the growth kinetics of filamentous microorganisms in more detail than previously, However, owing to the many different processes that influence the morphology it is important to apply mathematical models to extract...

  13. Conformational phases of membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quint, David A.; Grason, Gregory; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    Membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments found in living cells are employed to carry out many types of activities including cellular division, rigidity and transport. When these biopolymers are bound to a membrane surface they may take on highly non-trivial conformations as compared to when they are not bound. This leads to the natural question; What are the important interactions which drive these polymers to particular conformations when they are bound to a surface? Assuming that there are binding domains along the polymer which follow a periodic helical structure set by the natural monomeric handedness, these bound conformations must arise from the interplay of the intrinsic monomeric helicity and membrane binding. To probe this question, we study a continuous model of an elastic filament with intrinsic helicity and map out the conformational phases of this filament for various mechanical and structural parameters in our model, such as elastic stiffness and intrinsic twist of the filament. Our model allows us to gain insight into the possible mechanisms which drive real biopolymers such as actin and tubulin in eukaryotes and their prokaryotic cousins MreB and FtsZ to take on their functional conformations within living cells.

  14. Filament eruption with apparent reshuffle of endpoints

    CERN Document Server

    Filippov, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Filament eruption on 30 April - 1 May 2010, which shows the reconnection of one filament leg with a region far away from its initial position, is analyzed. Observations from three viewpoints are used for as precise as possible measurements of endpoint coordinates. The northern leg of the erupting prominence loop 'jumps' laterally to the latitude lower than the latitude of the originally southern endpoint. Thus, the endpoints reshuffled their positions in the limb view. Although this behaviour could be interpreted as the asymmetric zipping-like eruption, it does not look very likely. It seems more likely to be reconnection of the flux-rope field lines in its northern leg with ambient coronal magnetic field lines rooted in a quiet region far from the filament. From calculations of coronal potential magnetic field, we found that the filament before the eruption was stable for vertical displacements, but was liable to violation of the horizontal equilibrium. This is unusual initiation of an eruption with combinat...

  15. Morphology and rheology in filamentous cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wucherpfennig, T; Kiep, K A; Driouch, H; Wittmann, C; Krull, R

    2010-01-01

    Because of their metabolic diversity, high production capacity, secretion efficiency, and capability of carrying out posttranslational modifications, filamentous fungi are widely exploited as efficient cell factories in the production of metabolites, bioactive substances, and native or heterologous proteins, respectively. There is, however, a complex relationship between the morphology of these microorganisms, transport phenomena, the viscosity of the cultivation broth, and related productivity. The morphological characteristics vary between freely dispersed mycelia and distinct pellets of aggregated biomass, every growth form having a distinct influence on broth rheology. Hence, the advantages and disadvantages for mycelial or pellet cultivation have to be balanced out carefully. Because of the still inadequate understanding of the morphogenesis of filamentous microorganisms, fungal morphology is often a bottleneck of productivity in industrial production. To obtain an optimized production process, it is of great importance to gain a better understanding of the molecular and cell biology of these microorganisms as well as the relevant approaches in biochemical engineering. In this chapter, morphology and growth of filamentous fungi are described, with special attention given to specific problems as they arise from fungal growth forms; growth and mass transfer in fungal biopellets are discussed as an example. To emphasize the importance of the flow behavior of filamentous cultivation broths, an introduction to rheology is also given, reviewing important rheological models and recent studies concerning rheological parameters. Furthermore, current knowledge on morphology and productivity in relation to the environom is outlined in the last section of this review. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Linear viscoelastic characterization from filament stretching rheometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Sara Lindeblad; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Hassager, Ole

    viscoelasticity well into the nonlinear regime. Therefore at present, complete rheological characterization of a material requires two apparatuses: a shear and an extensional rheometer. This work is focused on developing a linear viscoelastic protocol for the filament stretching rheometer (FSR) in order...

  17. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Results...

  18. Using Drosophila for Studies of Intermediate Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnekamp, Jens; Cryderman, Diane E; Thiemann, Dylan A; Magin, Thomas M; Wallrath, Lori L

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a useful organism for determining protein function and modeling human disease. Drosophila offers a rapid generation time and an abundance of genomic resources and genetic tools. Conservation in protein structure, signaling pathways, and developmental processes make studies performed in Drosophila relevant to other species, including humans. Drosophila models have been generated for neurodegenerative diseases, muscular dystrophy, cancer, and many other disorders. Recently, intermediate filament protein diseases have been modeled in Drosophila. These models have revealed novel mechanisms of pathology, illuminated potential new routes of therapy, and make whole organism compound screens feasible. The goal of this chapter is to outline steps to study intermediate filament function and model intermediate filament-associated diseases in Drosophila. The steps are general and can be applied to study the function of almost any protein. The protocols outlined here are for both the novice and experienced Drosophila researcher, allowing the rich developmental and cell biology that Drosophila offers to be applied to studies of intermediate filaments.

  19. Self-assembly of Artificial Actin Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosenick, Christopher; Cheng, Shengfeng

    Actin Filaments are long, double-helical biopolymers that make up the cytoskeleton along with microtubules and intermediate filaments. In order to further understand the self-assembly process of these biopolymers, a model to recreate actin filament geometry was developed. A monomer in the shape of a bent rod with vertical and lateral binding sites was designed to assemble into single or double helices. With Molecular Dynamics simulations, a variety of phases were observed to form by varying the strength of the binding sites. Ignoring lateral binding sites, we have found a narrow range of binding strengths that lead to long single helices via various growth pathways. When lateral binding strength is introduced, double helices begin to form. These double helices self-assemble into substantially more stable structures than their single helix counterparts. We have found double helices to form long filaments at about half the vertical binding strength of single helices. Surprisingly, we have found that triple helices occasionally form, indicating the importance of structural regulation in the self-assembly of biopolymers.

  20. Filament stretching rheometry of polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Nielsen, Jens Kromann; Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2005-01-01

    The Filament Stretching Rheometry (FSR) method developed by Sridhar, McKinley and coworkers for polymer solutions has been extended to be used also for polymer melts. The design of a melt-FSR will be described and differences to conventional melt elongational rheometers will be pointed out. Results...

  1. Featured Image: A Filament Forms and Erupts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-06-01

    This dynamic image of active region NOAA 12241 was captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in December 2014. Observations of this region from a number of observatories and instruments recently presented by Jincheng Wang (University of Chinese Academy of Sciences) and collaborators reveal details about the formation and eruption of a long solar filament. Wang and collaborators show that the right part of the filament formed by magnetic reconnection between two bundles of magnetic field lines, while the left part formed as a result of shearing motion. When these two parts interacted, the filament erupted. You can read more about the teams results in the article linked below. Also, check out this awesome video of the filament formation and eruption, again by SDO/AIA:http://cdn.iopscience.com/images/0004-637X/839/2/128/Full/apjaa6bf3f1_video.mp4CitationJincheng Wang et al 2017 ApJ 839 128. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa6bf3

  2. Filament Channel Formation, Eruption, and Jet Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Karpen, Judith T.

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism behind filament-channel formation is a longstanding mystery, while that underlying the initiation of coronal mass ejections and jets has been studied intensively but is not yet firmly established. In previous work, we and collaborators have investigated separately the consequences of magnetic-helicity condensation (Antiochos 2013) for forming filament channels (Zhao et al. 2015; Knizhnik et al. 2015, 2017a,b) and of the embedded-bipole model (Antiochos 1996) for generating reconnection-driven jets (Pariat et al. 2009, 2010, 2015, 2016; Wyper et al. 2016, 2017). Now we have taken a first step toward synthesizing these two lines of investigation. Our recent study (Karpen et al. 2017) of coronal-hole jets with gravity and wind employed an ad hoc, large-scale shear flow at the surface to introduce magnetic free energy and form the filament channel. In this effort, we replace the shear flow with an ensemble of local rotation cells, to emulate the Sun’s ever-changing granules and supergranules. As in our previous studies, we find that reconnection between twisted flux tubes within the closed-field region concentrates magnetic shear and free energy near the polarity inversion line, forming the filament channel. Onset of reconnection between this field and the external, unsheared, open field releases stored energy to drive the impulsive jet. We discuss the results of our new simulations with implications for understanding solar activity and space weather.

  3. Filamentous bacteria transport electrons over centimetre distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Christian; Larsen, Steffen; Song, Jie

    2012-01-01

    across centimetre-wide zones. Here we present evidence that the native conductors are long, filamentous bacteria. They abounded in sediment zones with electric currents and along their length they contained strings with distinct properties in accordance with a function as electron transporters. Living...

  4. Interaction of Two Filament Channels of Different Chiralities

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Schmieder, Brigitte; Magara, Tetsuya; Moon, Young-Jae; Uddin, Wahab

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of interactions between the two filament channels of different chiralities and associated dynamics that occurred during 2014 April 18 -- 20. While two flux ropes of different helicity with parallel axial magnetic fields can only undergo a bounce interaction when they are brought together, the observations at the first glance show that the heated plasma is moving from one filament channel to the other. The SDO/AIA 171 A observations and the PFSS magnetic field extrapolation reveal the presence of fan-spine magnetic configuration over the filament channels with a null point located above them. Three different events of filament activations, partial eruptions, and associated filament channel interactions have been observed. The activation initiated in one filament channel seems to propagate along the neighbour filament channel. We believe that the activation and partial eruption of the filaments bring the field lines of flux ropes containing them closer to the null point and trigger the m...

  5. Assembly characteristics of plant keratin intermediate filaments in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵光伟; 杨澄; 佟向军; 翟中和

    1999-01-01

    After selective extraction and purification, plant keratin intermediate filaments were reassembled in vitro. Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs showed that acidic keratins and basic keratins can assemble into dimers and further into 10 nm filaments in vitro. In higher magnification images, it can be seen that fully assembled plant keratin intermediate filaments consist of several thinner filaments of 3 nm in diameter, which indicates the formation of protofilaments in the assembly processes. One of the explicit features of plant keratin intermediate filaments is a 24—25 nm periodic structural repeat alone the axis of beth the 10 nm filaments and protofilaments. The periodic repeat is one of the fundamental characteristic of all intermediate filaments, and demonstrates the half staggered arrangement of keratin molecules within the filaments.

  6. Mechanical heterogeneity favors fragmentation of strained actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cruz, Enrique M; Martiel, Jean-Louis; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2015-05-05

    We present a general model of actin filament deformation and fragmentation in response to compressive forces. The elastic free energy density along filaments is determined by their shape and mechanical properties, which were modeled in terms of bending, twisting, and twist-bend coupling elasticities. The elastic energy stored in filament deformation (i.e., strain) tilts the fragmentation-annealing reaction free-energy profile to favor fragmentation. The energy gradient introduces a local shear force that accelerates filament intersubunit bond rupture. The severing protein, cofilin, renders filaments more compliant in bending and twisting. As a result, filaments that are partially decorated with cofilin are mechanically heterogeneous (i.e., nonuniform) and display asymmetric shape deformations and energy profiles distinct from mechanically homogenous (i.e., uniform), bare actin, or saturated cofilactin filaments. The local buckling strain depends on the relative size of the compliant segment as well as the bending and twisting rigidities of flanking regions. Filaments with a single bare/cofilin-decorated boundary localize energy and force adjacent to the boundary, within the compliant cofilactin segment. Filaments with small cofilin clusters were predicted to fragment within the compliant cofilactin rather than at boundaries. Neglecting contributions from twist-bend coupling elasticity underestimates the energy density and gradients along filaments, and thus the net effects of filament strain to fragmentation. Spatial confinement causes compliant cofilactin segments and filaments to adopt higher deformation modes and store more elastic energy, thereby promoting fragmentation. The theory and simulations presented here establish a quantitative relationship between actin filament fragmentation thermodynamics and elasticity, and reveal how local discontinuities in filament mechanical properties introduced by regulatory proteins can modulate both the severing efficiency

  7. Flexible ferromagnetic filaments and the interface with biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erglis, K.; Belovs, M. [University of Latvia, Zellu 8, Riga LV-1002 (Latvia); Cebers, A. [University of Latvia, Zellu 8, Riga LV-1002 (Latvia)], E-mail: aceb@tesla.sal.lv

    2009-04-15

    Flexible ferromagnetic filaments are studied both theoretically and experimentally. Two main deformation modes of the filament at magnetic field inversion are theoretically described and observed experimentally by using DNA-linked chains of ferromagnetic particles. Anomalous orientation of ferromagnetic filaments perpendicular to AC field with a frequency which is high enough is predicted and confirmed experimentally. By experimental studies of magnetotactic bacteria it is demonstrated how these properties of ferromagnetic filaments may be used to measure the flexibility of the chain of magnetosomes.

  8. Architecture and fine structure of gill filaments in the brown mussel, perna perna

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gregory, MA

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available attention was paid to filament architecture, enervation of filaments, number and type of cells populating filament epithelia and variations in epithelial cell morphotogy and cilia ultra structure. Filament shape was maintained by thickened chitin...

  9. A global phylogenetic analysis in order to determine the host species and geography dependent features present in the evolution of avian H9N2 influenza hemagglutinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Dalby

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A complete phylogenetic analysis of all of the H9N2 hemagglutinin sequences that were collected between 1966 and 2012 was carried out in order to build a picture of the geographical and host specific evolution of the hemagglutinin protein. To improve the quality and applicability of the output data the sequences were divided into subsets based upon location and host species.The phylogenetic analysis of hemagglutinin reveals that the protein has distinct lineages between China and the Middle East, and that wild birds in both regions retain a distinct form of the H9 molecule, from the same lineage as the ancestral hemagglutinin. The results add further evidence to the hypothesis that the current predominant H9N2 hemagglutinin lineage might have originated in Southern China. The study also shows that there are sampling problems that affect the reliability of this and any similar analysis. This raises questions about the surveillance of H9N2 and the need for wider sampling of the virus in the environment.The results of this analysis are also consistent with a model where hemagglutinin has predominantly evolved by neutral drift punctuated by occasional selection events. These selective events have produced the current pattern of distinct lineages in the Middle East, Korea and China. This interpretation is in agreement with existing studies that have shown that there is widespread intra-country sequence evolution.

  10. Extracellular acidification synergizes with PDGF to stimulate migration of mouse embryo fibroblasts through activation of p38MAPK with a PTX-sensitive manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Caiyan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Sciences, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi (Japan); Clinical Medicine Research Center of the Affiliated Hospital, Inner Mongolia Medical University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Sato, Koichi [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi (Japan); Wu, Taoya; Bao, Muqiri; Bao, Liang [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Sciences, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Tobo, Masayuki [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi (Japan); Damirin, Alatangaole, E-mail: bigaole@imu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Life Sciences, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia (China)

    2015-05-01

    The elucidation of the functional mechanisms of extracellular acidification stimulating intracellular signaling pathway is of great importance for developing new targets of treatment for solid tumors, and inflammatory disorders characterized by extracellular acidification. In the present study, we focus on the regulation of extracellular acidification on intracellular signaling pathways in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). We found extracellular acidification was at least partly involved in stimulating p38MAPK pathway through PTX-sensitive behavior to enhance cell migration in the presence or absence of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Statistical analysis showed that the actions of extracellular acidic pH and PDGF on inducing enhancement of cell migration were not an additive effect. However, we also found extracellular acidic pH did inhibit the viability and proliferation of MEFs, suggesting that extracellular acidification stimulates cell migration probably through proton-sensing mechanisms within MEFs. Using OGR1-, GPR4-, and TDAG8-gene knock out technology, and real-time qPCR, we found known proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) were unlikely to be involved in the regulation of acidification on cell migration. In conclusion, our present study validates that extracellular acidification stimulates chemotactic migration of MEFs through activation of p38MAPK with a PTX-sensitive mechanism either by itself, or synergistically with PDGF, which was not regulated by the known proton-sensing GPCRs, TRPV1, or ASICs. Our results suggested that others proton-sensing GPCRs or ion channels might exist in MEFs, which mediates cell migration induced by extracellular acidification in the presence or absence of PDGF. - Highlights: • Acidic pH and PDGF synergize to stimulate MEFs migration via Gi/p38MAPK pathway. • Extracellular acidification inhibits the

  11. Driven transport on open filaments with interfilament switching processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subhadip; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Muhuri, Sudipto

    2017-02-01

    We study a two-filament driven lattice gas model with oppositely directed species of particles moving on two parallel filaments with filament-switching processes and particle inflow and outflow at filament ends. The filament-switching process is correlated with the occupation number of the adjacent site such that particles switch filaments with finite probability only when oppositely directed particles meet on the same filament. This model mimics some of the coarse-grained features observed in context of microtubule-(MT) based intracellular transport, wherein cellular cargo loaded and off-loaded at filament ends are transported on multiple parallel MT filaments and can switch between the parallel microtubule filaments. We focus on a regime where the filaments are weakly coupled, such that filament-switching rate of particles scale inversely as the length of the filament. We find that the interplay of (off-) loading processes at the boundaries and the filament-switching process of particles leads to some distinctive features of the system. These features includes occurrence of a variety of phases in the system with inhomogeneous density profiles including localized density shocks, density difference across the filaments, and bidirectional current flows in the system. We analyze the system by developing a mean field (MF) theory and comparing the results obtained from the MF theory with the Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the dynamics of the system. We find that the steady-state density and current profiles of particles and the phase diagram obtained within the MF picture matches quite well with MC simulation results. These findings maybe useful for studying multifilament intracellular transport.

  12. Concurrent purification of two defense proteins from French bean seeds: a defensin-like antifungal peptide and a hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Edwin H W; Wong, Jack H; Ng, T B

    2008-03-01

    A purification protocol is described herein for concurrent isolation of two defense proteins including a 6-kDa defensin-like antifungal peptide and a 60-kDa dimeric hemagglutinin from seeds of the French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). It involved ion-exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose, affinity chromatography on Affi-gel blue gel, ion-exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose, and gel filtration on Superdex Peptide (for defensin-like antifungal peptide) or Superdex 200 (for hemagglutinin). Both antifungal and hemagglutinating activities were adsorbed on SP-Sepharose and then on Affi-gel blue gel. Hemagglutinin was subsequently unadsorbed and defensin-like antifungal peptide adsorbed on Q-Sepharose. The antifungal activity of the antifungal peptide was stable in the temperature range of 0-90 degrees C for 20 min, in the pH range of 4-10, and after exposure to trypsin (1 mg/ml) at 37 degrees C for 1 h. The hemagglutinin was stable from 10 to 80 degrees C, from pH 1 to 12, and after treatment with trypsin at 37 degrees C for 2 h. It inhibited [methyl-(3)H]thymidine incorporation into breast cancer (MCF-7), leukemia (L1210), hepatoma (HepG2) and human embryonic liver (WRL68) cells with an IC50 of 6.6, 7, 13 and 15 microM, respectively, and elicited maximal mitogenic response from mouse splenocytes at 1 microM concentration. It curtailed HIV-1 reverse transcriptase activity with an IC50 of 1.9 microM, but was devoid of antifungal activity.

  13. Characterization of Influenza Vaccine Hemagglutinin Complexes by Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Image Analyses Reveals Structural Polymorphisms

    OpenAIRE

    McCraw, Dustin M.; Gallagher, John R.; Harris, Audray K.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus afflicts millions of people worldwide on an annual basis. There is an ever-present risk that animal viruses will cross the species barrier to cause epidemics and pandemics resulting in great morbidity and mortality. Zoonosis outbreaks, such as the H7N9 outbreak, underscore the need to better understand the molecular organization of viral immunogens, such as recombinant influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) proteins, used in influenza virus subunit vaccines in order to optimize va...

  14. Targeted disruption of influenza A virus hemagglutinin in genetically modified mice reduces viral replication and improves disease outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Song Wang; Chao Chen; Zhou Yang; Xiaojuan Chi; Jing Zhang; Ji-Long Chen

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus can cause acute respiratory infection in animals and humans around the globe, and is still a major threat to animal husbandry and public health. Due to antigenic drift and antigenic shift of the virus, development of novel anti-influenza strategies has become an urgent task. Here we generated transgenic (TG) mice stably expressing a short-hairpin RNA specifically targeting hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza A virus, and investigated the susceptibility of the mice to influenza v...

  15. Mucosal Immunization with Recombinant Adenovirus Encoding Soluble Globular Head of Hemagglutinin Protects Mice Against Lethal Influenza Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Joo Young; Choi, Youngjoo; Nguyen, Huan H.; Song, Man Ki; Chang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus is one of the major sources of respiratory tract infection. Due to antigenic drift in surface glycoproteins the virus causes annual epidemics with severe morbidity and mortality. Although hemagglutinin (HA) is one of the highly variable surface glycoproteins of the influenza virus, it remains the most attractive target for vaccine development against seasonal influenza infection because antibodies generated against HA provide virus neutralization and subsequent protection agai...

  16. A simple Pichia pastoris fermentation and downstream processing strategy for making recombinant pandemic Swine Origin Influenza a virus Hemagglutinin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athmaram, T N; Singh, Anil Kumar; Saraswat, Shweta; Srivastava, Saurabh; Misra, Princi; Kameswara Rao, M; Gopalan, N; Rao, P V L

    2013-02-01

    The present Influenza vaccine manufacturing process has posed a clear impediment to initiation of rapid mass vaccination against spreading pandemic influenza. New vaccine strategies are therefore needed that can accelerate the vaccine production. Pichia offers several advantages for rapid and economical bulk production of recombinant proteins and, hence, can be attractive alternative for producing an effective influenza HA based subunit vaccine. The recombinant Pichia harboring the transgene was subjected to fed-batch fermentation at 10 L scale. A simple fermentation and downstream processing strategy is developed for high-yield secretory expression of the recombinant Hemagglutinin protein of pandemic Swine Origin Influenza A virus using Pichia pastoris via fed-batch fermentation. Expression and purification were optimized and the expressed recombinant Hemagglutinin protein was verified by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blot and MALDI-TOF analysis. In this paper, we describe a fed-batch fermentation protocol for the secreted production of Swine Influenza A Hemagglutinin protein in the P. pastoris GS115 strain. We have shown that there is a clear relationship between product yield and specific growth rate. The fed-batch fermentation and downstream processing methods optimized in the present study have immense practical application for high-level production of the recombinant H1N1 HA protein in a cost effective way using P. pastoris.

  17. Expression of the hemagglutinin HA1 subunit of the equine influenza virus using a baculovirus expression system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sguazza, Guillermo H; Fuentealba, Nadia A; Tizzano, Marco A; Galosi, Cecilia M; Pecoraro, Marcelo R

    2013-01-01

    Equine influenza virus is a leading cause of respiratory disease in horses worldwide. Disease prevention is by vaccination with inactivated whole virus vaccines. Most current influenza vaccines are generated in embryonated hens' eggs. Virions are harvested from allantoic fluid and chemically inactivated. Although this system has served well over the years, the use of eggs as the substrate for vaccine production has several well-recognized disadvantages (cost, egg supply, waste disposal and yield in eggs). The aim of this study was to evaluate a baculovirus system as a potential method for producing recombinant equine influenza hemagglutinin to be used as a vaccine. The hemagglutinin ectodomain (HA1 subunit) was cloned and expressed using a baculovirus expression vector. The expression was determined by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. A high yield, 20μg/ml of viral protein, was obtained from recombinant baculovirus-infected cells. The immune response in BALB/c mice was examined following rHA1 inoculation. Preliminary results show that recombinant hemagglutinin expressed from baculovirus elicits a strong antibody response in mice; therefore it could be used as an antigen for subunit vaccines and diagnostic tests. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic Predisposition To Acquire a Polybasic Cleavage Site for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nao, Naganori; Yamagishi, Junya; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Igarashi, Manabu; Manzoor, Rashid; Ohnuma, Aiko; Tsuda, Yoshimi; Furuyama, Wakako; Shigeno, Asako; Kajihara, Masahiro; Kishida, Noriko; Yoshida, Reiko; Takada, Ayato

    2017-02-14

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses with H5 and H7 hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes evolve from low-pathogenic precursors through the acquisition of multiple basic amino acid residues at the HA cleavage site. Although this mechanism has been observed to occur naturally only in these HA subtypes, little is known about the genetic basis for the acquisition of the polybasic HA cleavage site. Here we show that consecutive adenine residues and a stem-loop structure, which are frequently found in the viral RNA region encoding amino acids around the cleavage site of low-pathogenic H5 and H7 viruses isolated from waterfowl reservoirs, are important for nucleotide insertions into this RNA region. A reporter assay to detect nontemplated nucleotide insertions and deep-sequencing analysis of viral RNAs revealed that an increased number of adenine residues and enlarged stem-loop structure in the RNA region accelerated the multiple adenine and/or guanine insertions required to create codons for basic amino acids. Interestingly, nucleotide insertions associated with the HA cleavage site motif were not observed principally in the viral RNA of other subtypes tested (H1, H2, H3, and H4). Our findings suggest that the RNA editing-like activity is the key mechanism for nucleotide insertions, providing a clue as to why the acquisition of the polybasic HA cleavage site is restricted to the particular HA subtypes.IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses are divided into subtypes based on the antigenicity of the viral surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase. Of the 16 HA subtypes (H1 to -16) maintained in waterfowl reservoirs of influenza A viruses, H5 and H7 viruses often become highly pathogenic through the acquisition of multiple basic amino acid residues at the HA cleavage site. Although this mechanism has been known since the 1980s, the genetic basis for nucleotide insertions has remained unclear. This study shows the potential role of the viral RNA secondary structure for

  19. Structural determinants for the membrane insertion of the transmembrane peptide of hemagglutinin from influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Bruno L; Baptista, António M; Soares, Cláudio M

    2012-11-26

    Membrane fusion is a process involved in a high range of biological functions, going from viral infections to neurotransmitter release. Fusogenic proteins increase the slow rate of fusion by coupling energetically downhill conformational changes of the protein to the kinetically unfavorable fusion of the membrane lipid bilayers. Hemagglutinin is an example of a fusogenic protein, which promotes the fusion of the membrane of the influenza virus with the membrane of the target cell. The N-terminus of the HA2 subunit of this protein contains a fusion domain described to act as a destabilizer of the target membrane bilayers, leading eventually to a full fusion of the two membranes. On the other hand, the C-terminus of the same subunit contains a helical transmembrane domain which was initially described to act as the anchor of the protein to the membrane of the virus. However, in recent years the study of this peptide segment has been gaining more attention since it has also been described to be involved in the membrane fusion process. Yet, the structural characterization of the interaction of such a protein domain with membrane lipids is still very limited. Therefore, in this work, we present a study of this transmembrane peptide domain in the presence of DMPC membrane bilayers, and we evaluate the effect of several mutations, and the effect of peptide oligomerization in this interaction process. Our results allowed us to identify and confirm amino acid residue motifs that seem to regulate the interaction between the segment peptide and membrane bilayers. Besides these sequence requirements, we have also identified length and tilt requirements that ultimately contribute to the hydrophobic matching between the peptide and the membrane. Additionally, we looked at the association of several transmembrane peptide segments and evaluated their direct interaction and stability inside a membrane bilayer. From our results we could conclude that three independent TM peptide

  20. First-principle investigation of the interactions between PtxRu55-x (x = 0, 13, 42, 55) nanoparticles and [BMIM][PF6] ionic liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ping; Liu, Chuan; Yang, Yongpeng; Huang, Shiping

    2015-05-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to characterize the interactions between [BMIM][PF6] ionic liquid and icosahedral PtxRu55-x (x = 0, 13, 42, 55) nanoparticles. In Ru13Pt42-[BMIM][PF6], only one F atom of the anion form the bond with nanoparticle, resulting in the smallest interaction energy (-0.56 eV). While in Pt13Ru42-[BMIM][PF6], two F atoms of the anion together with two C atoms of cation form the bonds with nanoparticle, resulting in the biggest interaction energy (-10.65 eV). The interaction between [BMIM][PF6] and Pt13Ru42 is so strong that it induces a significant distortion in the original core-shell structure of Pt13Ru42. Moreover, after interacting with [BMIM][PF6], the Pt55, Pt13Ru42 and Ru55 nanoparticles become more stable based on the negative relaxation energy. The d-band centers of Pt13Ru42 and Ru55 shift from -1.90, -1.78 eV up to -1.78, -1.56 eV, suggesting that the catalytic activities of Pt13Ru42 and Ru55 are enhanced.

  1. Intergalactic Filaments as Isothermal Gas Cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Harford, A Gayler

    2010-01-01

    Using a cosmological simulation at redshift 5, we find that the baryon-rich cores of intergalactic filaments radiating from galaxies commonly form isothermal gas cylinders. The central gas density is typically about 500 times the cosmic mean total density, and the temperature is typically 1-2 times 10^4 K, just above the Lyman alpha cooling floor. These findings argue that the hydrodynamic properties of the gas are more important than the dark matter in determining the structure. Filaments form a major pipeline for the transport of gas into the centers of galaxies. Since the temperature and ionization state of the gas completely determine the mass per unit length of an isothermal gas cylinder, our findings suggest a constraint upon gas transport into galaxies by this mechanism.

  2. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Stricker, Raphael B

    2016-01-01

    Morgellons disease (MD) is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they result from proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in epithelial tissue. Culture, histopathological and molecular evidence of spirochetal infection associated with MD has been presented in several published studies using a variety of techniques. Spirochetes genetically identified as Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto predominate as the infective agent in most of the Morgellons skin specimens studied so far. Other species of Borrelia including Borrelia garinii, Borrelia miyamotoi, and Borrelia hermsii have also been detected in skin specimens taken from MD patients. The optimal treatment for MD remains to be determined. PMID:27789971

  3. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelveen, Marianne J; Stricker, Raphael B

    2016-01-01

    Morgellons disease (MD) is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they result from proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in epithelial tissue. Culture, histopathological and molecular evidence of spirochetal infection associated with MD has been presented in several published studies using a variety of techniques. Spirochetes genetically identified as Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto predominate as the infective agent in most of the Morgellons skin specimens studied so far. Other species of Borrelia including Borrelia garinii, Borrelia miyamotoi, and Borrelia hermsii have also been detected in skin specimens taken from MD patients. The optimal treatment for MD remains to be determined.

  4. Merging and energy exchange between optical filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgieva, D. A., E-mail: dgeorgieva@tu-sofia.bg [Faculty of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Sofia, 8 Kliment Ohridski Blvd., 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria); Kovachev, L. M. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradcko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-10-28

    We investigate nonlinear interaction between collinear femtosecond laser pulses with power slightly above the critical for self-focusing P{sub cr} trough the processes of cross-phase modulation (CPM) and degenerate four-photon parametric mixing (FPPM). When there is no initial phase difference between the pulses we observe attraction between pulses due to CPM. The final result is merging between the pulses in a single filament with higher power. By method of moments it is found that the attraction depends on the distance between the pulses and has potential character. In the second case we study energy exchange between filaments. This process is described through FPPM scheme and requests initial phase difference between the waves.

  5. Laser filamentation mathematical methods and models

    CERN Document Server

    Lorin, Emmanuel; Moloney, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    This book is focused on the nonlinear theoretical and mathematical problems associated with ultrafast intense laser pulse propagation in gases and in particular, in air. With the aim of understanding the physics of filamentation in gases, solids, the atmosphere, and even biological tissue, specialists in nonlinear optics and filamentation from both physics and mathematics attempt to rigorously derive and analyze relevant non-perturbative models. Modern laser technology allows the generation of ultrafast (few cycle) laser pulses, with intensities exceeding the internal electric field in atoms and molecules (E=5x109 V/cm or intensity I = 3.5 x 1016 Watts/cm2 ). The interaction of such pulses with atoms and molecules leads to new, highly nonlinear nonperturbative regimes, where new physical phenomena, such as High Harmonic Generation (HHG), occur, and from which the shortest (attosecond - the natural time scale of the electron) pulses have been created. One of the major experimental discoveries in this nonlinear...

  6. In situ ellipsometric study of surface immobilization of flagellar filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurunczi, S., E-mail: kurunczi@mfa.kfki.hu [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Nemeth, A.; Huelber, T. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Kozma, P. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Department of Nanotechnology, Research Institute of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem, H-8200 (Hungary); Petrik, P. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Jankovics, H. [Department of Nanotechnology, Research Institute of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem, H-8200 (Hungary); Sebestyen, A. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Department of Nanotechnology, Research Institute of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem, H-8200 (Hungary); Vonderviszt, F. [Department of Photonics, Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, H-1121, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33, Budapest (Hungary); Department of Nanotechnology, Research Institute of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Information Technology, University of Pannonia, Egyetem u. 10, Veszprem, H-8200 (Hungary); Institute of Enzymology, Karolina ut 29-33, Budapest, H-1113 (Hungary); and others

    2010-10-15

    Protein filaments composed of thousands of subunits are promising candidates as sensing elements in biosensors. In this work in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry is applied to monitor the surface immobilization of flagellar filaments. This study is the first step towards the development of layers of filamentous receptors for sensor applications. Surface activation is performed using silanization and a subsequent glutaraldehyde crosslinking. Structure of the flagellar filament layers immobilized on activated and non-activated Si wafer substrates is determined using a two-layer effective medium model that accounted for the vertical density distribution of flagellar filaments with lengths of 300-1500 nm bound to the surface. The formation of the first interface layer can be explained by the multipoint covalent attachment of the filaments, while the second layer is mainly composed of tail pinned filaments floating upwards with the free parts. As confirmed by atomic force microscopy, covalent immobilization resulted in an increased surface density compared to absorption.

  7. Motion of current filaments in avalanching PIN diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xingrong, Ren; Changchun, Chai; Zhenyang, Ma; Yintang, Yang; Liping, Qiao; Chunlei, Shi; Lihua, Ren

    2013-04-01

    The motion of current filaments in avalanching PIN diodes has been investigated in this paper by 2D transient numerical simulations. The simulation results show that the filament can move along the length of the PIN diode back and forth when the self-heating effect is considered. The voltage waveform varies periodically due to the motion of the filament. The filament motion is driven by the temperature gradient in the filament due to the negative temperature dependence of the impact ionization rates. Contrary to the traditional understanding that current filamentation is a potential cause of thermal destruction, it is shown in this paper that the thermally-driven motion of current filaments leads to the homogenization of temperature in the diode and is expected to have a positive influence on the failure threshold of the PIN diode.

  8. COMPLEX FLARE DYNAMICS INITIATED BY A FILAMENT–FILAMENT INTERACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chunming; McAteer, R. T. James [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, NM 88003 (United States); Liu, Rui [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Alexander, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, TX 77005 (United States); Sun, Xudong, E-mail: czhu@nmsu.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We report on an eruption involving a relatively rare filament–filament interaction on 2013 June 21, observed by SDO and STEREO-B. The two filaments were separated in height with a “double-decker” configuration. The eruption of the lower filament began simultaneously with a descent of the upper filament, resulting in a convergence and direct interaction of the two filaments. The interaction was accompanied by the heating of surrounding plasma and an apparent crossing of a loop-like structure through the upper filament. The subsequent coalescence of the filaments drove a bright front ahead of the erupting structures. The whole process was associated with a C3.0 flare followed immediately by an M2.9 flare. Shrinking loops and descending dark voids were observed during the M2.9 flare at different locations above a C-shaped flare arcade as part of the energy release, giving us unique insight into the flare dynamics.

  9. The Dark Matter filament between Abell 222/223

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Jörg P.; Werner, Norbert; Clowe, Douglas; Finoguenov, Alexis; Kitching, Tom; Miller, Lance; Simionescu, Aurora

    2016-10-01

    Weak lensing detections and measurements of filaments have been elusive for a long time. The reason is that the low density contrast of filaments generally pushes the weak lensing signal to unobservably low scales. To nevertheless map the dark matter in filaments exquisite data and unusual systems are necessary. SuprimeCam observations of the supercluster system Abell 222/223 provided the required combination of excellent seeing images and a fortuitous alignment of the filament with the line-of-sight. This boosted the lensing signal to a detectable level and led to the first weak lensing mass measurement of a large-scale structure filament. The filament connecting Abell 222 and Abell 223 is now the only one traced by the galaxy distribution, dark matter, and X-ray emission from the hottest phase of the warm-hot intergalactic medium. The combination of these data allows us to put the first constraints on the hot gas fraction in filaments.

  10. Topological Aspect of Knotted Vortex Filaments in Excitable Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Ji-Rong; ZHU Tao; DUAN Yi-Shi

    2008-01-01

    Scroll waves exist ubiquitously in three-dimensional excitable media.The rotation centre can be regarded as a topological object called the vortex filament.In three-dimensional space,the vortex filaments usually form closed loops,and can be even linked and knotted.We give a rigorous topological description of knotted vortex filaments.By using the Φ-mapping topological current theory,we rewrite the topological current form of the charge density of vortex filaments,and using this topological current we reveal that the Hopf invariant of vortex filaments is just the sum of the linking and self-linking numbers of the knotted vortex filaments.We think that the precise expression of the Hopf invariant may imply a new topological constraint on knotted vortex filaments.

  11. Formation of magnetic filaments: A kinetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pedrero, F.; Tirado-Miranda, M.; Schmitt, A.; Callejas-Fernández, J.

    2007-07-01

    In order to form magnetic filaments or chains, aqueous suspensions of superparamagnetic colloidal particles were aggregated under the action of an external magnetic field in the presence of different amounts of an indifferent 1:1 electrolyte (KBr). This allowed the influence of the anisotropic magnetic and isotropic electrostatic interactions on the aggregation behavior of these electric double-layered magnetic particles to be studied. Dynamic light scattering was used for monitoring the average diffusion coefficient of the magnetic filaments formed. Hydrodynamic equations were employed for obtaining the average chain lengths from the experimental mean diffusion coefficients. The results show that, for the same exposure time to the magnetic field, the average filament size is monotonously related to the amount of electrolyte added. The chain growth behavior was found to follow a power law with a similar exponent for all electrolyte concentrations used in this work. The time evolution of the average filament size can be rescaled such that all the curves collapse on a single master curve. Since the electrolyte added does not have any effect on the scaling behavior, the mechanism of aggregation seems to be completely controlled by the dipolar interaction. However, electrolyte addition not only controls the range of the total interaction between the particles, but also enhances the growth rate of the aggregation process. Taking into account the anisotropic character of these aggregation processes we propose a kernel that depends explicitly on the range of the dipolar interaction. The corresponding solutions of the Smoluchowski equation combined with theoretical models for the diffusion and light scattering by rigid rods reproduce the measured time evolution of the average perpendicular aggregate diffusion coefficient quite satisfactorily.

  12. Cold Milky Way HI Gas in Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.; Haud, U.; Winkel, B.; Ben Bekhti, N.; Flöer, L.; Lenz, D.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate data from the Galactic Effelsberg-Bonn H i Survey, supplemented with data from the third release of the Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS III) observed at Parkes. We explore the all-sky distribution of the local Galactic H i gas with | {v}{{LSR}}| \\lt 25 km s-1 on angular scales of 11‧-16‧. Unsharp masking is applied to extract small-scale features. We find cold filaments that are aligned with polarized dust emission and conclude that the cold neutral medium (CNM) is mostly organized in sheets that are, because of projection effects, observed as filaments. These filaments are associated with dust ridges, aligned with the magnetic field measured on the structures by Planck at 353 GHz. The CNM above latitudes | b| \\gt 20^\\circ is described by a log-normal distribution, with a median Doppler temperature TD = 223 K, derived from observed line widths that include turbulent contributions. The median neutral hydrogen (H i) column density is NH i ≃ 1019.1 cm-2. These CNM structures are embedded within a warm neutral medium with NH i ≃ 1020 cm-2. Assuming an average distance of 100 pc, we derive for the CNM sheets a thickness of ≲0.3 pc. Adopting a magnetic field strength of Btot = (6.0 ± 1.8) μG, proposed by Heiles & Troland, and assuming that the CNM filaments are confined by magnetic pressure, we estimate a thickness of 0.09 pc. Correspondingly, the median volume density is in the range 14 ≲ n ≲ 47 cm-3. The authors thank the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for support under grant numbers KE757/11-1, KE757/7-3, KE757/7-2, KE757/7-1, and BE4823/1-1.

  13. [Elimination of microscopic filamentous fungi with disinfectants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laciaková, A; Laciak, V

    1994-01-01

    The antifungal effectivity of three single-component (Persteril, Septonex, Glutaraldehyd) and of three combined (Persteril+Septonex, Pesteril+Glutaraldehyd, Glutaraldehyd+Septonex) commercially available disinfectants was monitored by the diffuse method on five fen of the microscopic filamentous fungi Aspergillus alternata, Aspergillus niger, Mucor fragillis, Fusarium moniliforme, Penicillium glabrum. The highest antifungal activity was observed in 2% Persteril while 2% Persteril + 1% Septonex were the most effective among the combined disinfectants. M. fragilis was the most resistant strain.

  14. On viscoelastic instability in polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    1999-01-01

    The 3D Lagrangian Integral Method is used to simulate the effects of surface tension on the viscoelastic end-plate instability, occuring in the rapid extension of some polymeric filaments between parallel plates. It is shovn that the surface tension delays the onset of the instability. Furthermore...... it is demonstrated that surface tension plays a key role in the selection of the most unstable mode...

  15. c9,t11-CLA-PTX与t10,c12-CLA-PTX对MCF-7细胞的体内外抗肿瘤作用%The anti-tumor efficacy of c9, t11-CLA-PTX and t10, c12-CLA-PTX on MCF-7 breast cancer cells: in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨科; 李星火; 李丹; 柯曦宇; 张烜; 张强

    2014-01-01

    在前期研究中,CLA-mixture-PTX展现出了对黑色素瘤与脑胶质瘤一定的抗肿瘤作用.本研究旨在探索c9,t11-CLA-PTX与t10,c12-CLA-PTX对人源乳腺癌MCF-7细胞的体内外抗肿瘤作用.研究中考察了c9,t11-CLA-PTX与t10,c12-CLA-PTX的体外细胞摄取、细胞毒、细胞凋亡,以及细胞周期作用.用荷瘤BALB/c裸鼠研究了c9,t11-CLA-PTX与t10,c12-CLA-PTX的体内抗肿瘤作用.体外细胞毒研究结果表明:t10,c12-CLA-PTX的IC50为(0.17±0.02) μM,显著优于CLA-mixture-PTX(1.08±0.15) μM (P<0.01),后者显著优于c9,t11-CLA-PTX (6.50±1.20)μM (P<0.01).与空白对照组相比,c9,t11-CLA-PTX与t10,c12-CLA-PTX均可使细胞总凋亡比例增加(P<0.01);和CLA-mixture-PTX组相比,t10,c 12-CLA-PTX可使细胞总凋亡比例增加(P<0.01),c9,t11-CLA-PTX则使细胞总凋亡比例降低(P<0.01).与空白对照组相比,c9,t11-CLA-PTX与t10,c12-CLA-PTX均将细胞周期阻滞于S期与G2-M,与CLA-mixture-PTX相同.t10,c12-CLA-PTX的细胞摄取量显著高于CLA-mixture-PTX (P<0.01),后者的细胞摄取量显著高于c9,t11-CLA-PTX (P<0.01).体内抗肿瘤药效研究结果显示,t10,c12-CLA-PTX的抗肿瘤活性显著高于空白对照组和CLA-mixture-PTX组(P<0.01),而c9,t11-CLA-PTX的抗肿瘤活性仅高于空白对照组(P<0.01).上述结果表明,t10,c12-CLA-PTX对MCF-7细胞有显著体内外抗肿瘤作用,可以作为CLA-mixture-PTX的替代药物进行后续研究.

  16. The tidal filament of NGC 4660

    CERN Document Server

    Kemp, S N; Marquez-Lugo, R A; Zepeda-Garcia, D; Franco-Hernandez, R; Nigoche-Netro, A; Ramos-Larios, G; Navarro, S G; Corral, L J

    2016-01-01

    NGC 4660, in the Virgo cluster, is a well-studied elliptical galaxy which has a strong disk component (D/T about 0.2-0.3). The central regions including the disk component have stellar populations with ages about 12-13 Gyr from SAURON studies. However we report the discovery of a long narrow tidal filament associated with the galaxy in deep co-added Schmidt plate images and deep CCD frames, implying that the galaxy has undergone a tidal interaction and merger within the last few Gyr. The relative narrowness of the filament implies a wet merger with at least one spiral galaxy involved, but the current state of the system has little evidence for this. However a 2-component photometric fit using GALFIT shows much bluer B-V colours for the disk component than for the elliptical component, which may represent a residual trace of enhanced star formation in the disk caused by the interaction 1-2 Gyr ago. There are brighter concentrations within the filament which resemble Tidal Dwarf Galaxies, although they are at l...

  17. Mechanical Properties of Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Elisabeth E; Janmey, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Purified intermediate filament (IF) proteins can be reassembled in vitro to produce polymers closely resembling those found in cells, and these filaments form viscoelastic gels. The cross-links holding IFs together in the network include specific bonds between polypeptides extending from the filament surface and ionic interactions mediated by divalent cations. IF networks exhibit striking nonlinear elasticity with stiffness, as quantified by shear modulus, increasing an order of magnitude as the networks are deformed to large strains resembling those that soft tissues undergo in vivo. Individual IFs can be stretched to more than two or three times their resting length without breaking. At least 10 different rheometric methods have been used to quantify the viscoelasticity of IF networks over a wide range of timescales and strain magnitudes. The mechanical roles of different classes of cytoplasmic IFs on mesenchymal and epithelial cells in culture have also been studied by an even wider range of microrheological methods. These studies have documented the effects on cell mechanics when IFs are genetically or pharmacologically disrupted or when normal or mutant IF proteins are exogenously expressed in cells. Consistent with in vitro rheology, the mechanical role of IFs is more apparent as cells are subjected to larger and more frequent deformations.

  18. Oscillating Filaments. I. Oscillation and Geometrical Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Heigl, Stefan; Burkert, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    We study the stability of filaments in equilibrium between gravity and internal as well as external pressure using the grid-based AMR code RAMSES. A homogeneous, straight cylinder below a critical line mass is marginally stable. However, if the cylinder is bent, such as with a slight sinusoidal perturbation, an otherwise stable configuration starts to oscillate, is triggered into fragmentation, and collapses. This previously unstudied behavior allows a filament to fragment at any given scale, as long as it has slight bends. We call this process “geometrical fragmentation.” In our realization, the spacing between the cores matches the wavelength of the sinusoidal perturbation, whereas up to now, filaments were thought to be only fragmenting on the characteristic scale set by the mass-to-line ratio. Using first principles, we derive the oscillation period as well as the collapse timescale analytically. To enable a direct comparison with observations, we study the line-of-sight velocity for different inclinations. We show that the overall oscillation pattern can hide the infall signature of cores.

  19. A first approach to filament dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, P E S; De Abreu, F Vistulo; Dias, R G [Department of Physics, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Simoes, R, E-mail: fva@ua.p [I3N-Institute for Nanostructures, Nanomodelling and Nanofabrication (Portugal)

    2010-11-15

    Modelling elastic filament dynamics is a topic of high interest due to the wide range of applications. However, it has reached a high level of complexity in the literature, making it unaccessible to a beginner. In this paper we explain the main steps involved in the computational modelling of the dynamics of an elastic filament. We first derive equations governing the dynamics of an elastic lament suitable for a computer simulation implementation. The derivation starts from the relation between forces and potential energy in conservative systems in order to derive the equation of motion of any bead in the filament. Only two-dimensional movements are considered, but extensions to three dimensions can follow similar lines. Suggestions for computer implementations are provided in Matlab as well as an example of application related to the generation of musical sounds. This example allows a critical analysis of the numerical results obtained using a cross-disciplinary perspective. Since derivations start from basic physics equations, use simple calculus and computational implementations are straightforward, this paper proposes a different approach to introduce simple molecular dynamics simulations or animations of real systems in undergraduate elasticity or computer modelling courses.

  20. Modelling the chemistry of star forming filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Seifried, D

    2015-01-01

    We present simulations of star forming filaments incorporating - to our knowledge - the largest chemical network used to date on-the-fly in a 3D-MHD simulation. The network contains 37 chemical species and about 300 selected reaction rates. For this we use the newly developed package KROME (Grassi et al. 2014). We combine the KROME package with an algorithm which allows us to calculate the column density and attenuation of the interstellar radiation field necessary to properly model heating and ionisation rates. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using such a complex chemical network in 3D-MHD simulations on modern supercomputers. We perform simulations with different strengths of the interstellar radiation field and the cosmic ray ionisation rate. We find that towards the centre of the filaments there is gradual conversion of hydrogen from H^+ over H to H_2 as well as of C^+ over C to CO. Moreover, we find a decrease of the dust temperature towards the centre of the filaments in agreement with recent...

  1. Molecular Analysis of Hemagglutinin Gene of a Goose Origin Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The hemagglutinin (HA) of avian influenza virus (AIV) plays a key role in determining the pathogenicity, cell receptor-binding property and host range of the virus. A goose origin AIV A/Goose/Guangdong/1/96(H5N1) (GD/96) was confirmed as a highly pathogenic AIV (HPAIV) by the tests of intravenous pathogenic index (IVPI) and the assay of plaque formation. The sequence results of the HA gene cDNA of the isolate reveal that there is an insertion of 6 basic amino acids ( R-R-R-K-K-R-) in the cleavage site between the HA1 and HA2, which is the characterization of the H5 subtype HPAIV. When compared with the lethal A/Hongkong/156/97 (H5N1) (HK/97), there is a homology of 98% at the nucleotide level and 98. 2% at the amino acid level. Furthermore, no difference of nucleotides related to all of the 6 potential glycosylation sites, the 2 receptor-binding sites and the basic amino acid insert within the HA existed between GD/96 and HK/97. These results imply that the GD/96 and HK/97 have a closely related common ancestor and share the same biological properties decided by the HA.

  2. Genetic insight of the H5N1 hemagglutinin cleavage site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The cleavability of the hemagglutinin (HA) plays a major role in virulence of avian influenza viruses. Detailed analyses of the cleavage sequences and their evolution would give insights into the high pathogenicity of the H5N1 virus. HA segments were visually identifiable in the cellular automata (CA) image, and a feature gene segment (FGS) was only found in H5N1 rather than any other subtype. This FGS is a 30-bp gene segment mainly consisting of 'A' and 'G'. When translated into amino acids the FGS converted into a sequence of mainly basic amino acids with positive charges. This feature amino acid segment (FAAS) was located in the cleavage site loop of HA which was potentially cleavable by various proteases. The 3D structure of H5N1 HA was reconstructed using homology modelling. It was found that the cleavage site loop was well exposed to potential proteases. The molecular surfaces were reconstructed to study how mutation and deletion of some amino acids in the FAAS affected the charge distribution. It was found that some mutations had severely changed the landscape of the charge distribution. Statistical analyses of FAAS were made with respect to when and where the H5N1 viruses were found. In 2005, there were less un-mutated FAAS than the other years according to temporal evolution, and more mutated FAAS appeared in China than other regions according to geographic distribution. These results are helpful for exploring the evolution of virus high pathogenicity.

  3. Genetic Predisposition To Acquire a Polybasic Cleavage Site for Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nao, Naganori; Yamagishi, Junya; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Igarashi, Manabu; Manzoor, Rashid; Ohnuma, Aiko; Tsuda, Yoshimi; Furuyama, Wakako; Shigeno, Asako; Kajihara, Masahiro; Kishida, Noriko; Yoshida, Reiko

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses with H5 and H7 hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes evolve from low-pathogenic precursors through the acquisition of multiple basic amino acid residues at the HA cleavage site. Although this mechanism has been observed to occur naturally only in these HA subtypes, little is known about the genetic basis for the acquisition of the polybasic HA cleavage site. Here we show that consecutive adenine residues and a stem-loop structure, which are frequently found in the viral RNA region encoding amino acids around the cleavage site of low-pathogenic H5 and H7 viruses isolated from waterfowl reservoirs, are important for nucleotide insertions into this RNA region. A reporter assay to detect nontemplated nucleotide insertions and deep-sequencing analysis of viral RNAs revealed that an increased number of adenine residues and enlarged stem-loop structure in the RNA region accelerated the multiple adenine and/or guanine insertions required to create codons for basic amino acids. Interestingly, nucleotide insertions associated with the HA cleavage site motif were not observed principally in the viral RNA of other subtypes tested (H1, H2, H3, and H4). Our findings suggest that the RNA editing-like activity is the key mechanism for nucleotide insertions, providing a clue as to why the acquisition of the polybasic HA cleavage site is restricted to the particular HA subtypes. PMID:28196963

  4. The hemagglutinin structure of an avian H1N1 influenza A virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tianwei; Wang, Gengyan; Li, Anzhang; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Caiming; Zhang, Rongfu; Cai, Qixu; Song, Wenjun; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; (U. Hong Kong); (Inter. Inst. Infect. Imm.); (Xiamen)

    2009-09-15

    The interaction between hemagglutinin (HA) and receptors is a kernel in the study of evolution and host adaptation of H1N1 influenza A viruses. The notion that the avian HA is associated with preferential specificity for receptors with Sia{alpha}2,3Gal glycosidic linkage over those with Sia{alpha}2,6Gal linkage is not all consistent with the available data on H1N1 viruses. By x-ray crystallography, the HA structure of an avian H1N1 influenza A virus, as well as its complexes with the receptor analogs, was determined. The structures revealed no preferential binding of avian receptor analogs over that of the human analog, suggesting that the HA/receptor binding might not be as stringent as is commonly believed in determining the host receptor preference for some subtypes of influenza viruses, such as the H1N1 viruses. The structure also showed difference in glycosylation despite the preservation of related sequences, which may partly contribute to the difference between structures of human and avian origin.

  5. Correlation in the sequential evolutionary pattern of influenza hemagglutinin reveals its immunogenic and structural characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The immune system recognizes the hemagglutinin (HA) protein on the surface of the influenza virus. It is this protein that evolves to escape immune recognition. Correlation analysis is performed for all pairs of positions in the alignment of HA sequences collected in history. Spectral decomposition of the resulting matrix yields several independent eigenvectors that clusters those positions into several sectors, each of which corresponds to a subset of the positions and follows a relatively independent evolutionary pattern. Some of the obtained sectors match well with the five experimentally and statistically (using Shannon entropy) determined epitopes that are the sites of antibody binding. This result implies that different immunogenic epitopes of HA have characteristic patterns of escape mutation, arguably due to the distinct structures of the epitopes and properties of corresponding antibodies. In the three dimensional structure of HA, each sector is located in a compact surface region, thus the correlations in the evolution pattern occur locally in the tertiary structure. Novel sectors found, beyond the five known HA epitopes, may also possess certain biophysical functions.

  6. Hemagglutinin from the H5N1 virus activates Janus kinase 3 to dysregulate innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs cause severe disease in humans. There are no effective vaccines or antiviral therapies currently available to control fatal outbreaks due in part to the lack of understanding of virus-mediated immunopathology. In our study, we used hemagglutinin (HA of H5N1 virus to investigate the related signaling pathways and their relationship to dysregulated innate immune reaction. We found the HA of H5N1 avian influenza triggered an abnormal innate immune signalling in the pulmonary epithelial cells, through an unusual process involving activation of Janus kinase 3 (JAK3 that is exclusively associated with γc chain and is essential for signaling via all γc cytokine receptors. By using a selective JAK3 inhibitor and JAK3 knockout mice, we have, for the first time, demonstrated the ability to target active JAK3 to counteract injury to the lungs and protect immunocytes from acute hypercytokinemia -induced destruction following the challenge of H5N1 HA in vitro and in vivo. On the basis of the present data, it appears that the efficacy of selective JAK3 inhibition is likely based on its ability to block multiple cytokines and protect against a superinflammatory response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs attack. Our findings highlight the potential value of selective JAK3 inhibitor in treating the fatal immunopathology caused by H5N1 challenge.

  7. Betacoronavirus Adaptation to Humans Involved Progressive Loss of Hemagglutinin-Esterase Lectin Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkers, Mark J G; Lang, Yifei; Feitsma, Louris J; Hulswit, Ruben J G; de Poot, Stefanie A H; van Vliet, Arno L W; Margine, Irina; de Groot-Mijnes, Jolanda D F; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Langereis, Martijn A; Huizinga, Eric G; de Groot, Raoul J

    2017-03-08

    Human beta1-coronavirus (β1CoV) OC43 emerged relatively recently through a single zoonotic introduction. Like related animal β1CoVs, OC43 uses 9-O-acetylated sialic acid as receptor determinant. β1CoV receptor binding is typically controlled by attachment/fusion spike protein S and receptor-binding/receptor-destroying hemagglutinin-esterase protein HE. We show that following OC43's introduction into humans, HE-mediated receptor binding was selected against and ultimately lost through progressive accumulation of mutations in the HE lectin domain. Consequently, virion-associated receptor-destroying activity toward multivalent glycoconjugates was reduced and altered such that some clustered receptor populations are no longer cleaved. Loss of HE lectin function was also observed for another respiratory human coronavirus, HKU1. This thus appears to be an adaptation to the sialoglycome of the human respiratory tract and for replication in human airways. The findings suggest that the dynamics of virion-glycan interactions contribute to host tropism. Our observations are relevant also to other human respiratory viruses of zoonotic origin, particularly influenza A virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development and characterization of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against canine distemper virus hemagglutinin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Zhenwei; Xia, Xingxia; Wang, Yongshan; Mei, Yongjie

    2015-04-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes a serious multisystemic disease in dogs and other carnivora. Hemagglutinin (H) protein-specific antibodies are mainly responsible for protective immunity against CDV infection. In the present study, six neutralizing MAbs to the H protein of CDV were newly obtained and characterized by immunizing BALB/c mice with a recent Chinese field isolate. Competitive binding inhibition assay revealed that they recognized four distinct antigenic regions of the H protein. Immunofluorescence assay and western blotting showed that all MAbs recognize the conformational rather than the linear epitopes of the H protein. Furthermore, in immunofluorescence and virus neutralization assays, two of the MAbs were found to react only with the recent Chinese field isolate and not with older CDV strains, including vaccine strain Onderstepoort, indicating there are neutralization-related antigenic variations between the recent Chinese field isolate and the older CDV strains examined in this study. The newly established MAbs are useful for differentiating the expanding CDV strains and could be used in immunotherapy and immunodiagnosis against infection with CDV.

  9. Structural Characterization of the Hemagglutinin Receptor Specificity from the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Rui; McBride, Ryan; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Paulson, James C.; Wilson, Ian A. (Scripps)

    2012-02-13

    Influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is the viral envelope protein that mediates viral attachment to host cells and elicits membrane fusion. The HA receptor-binding specificity is a key determinant for the host range and transmissibility of influenza viruses. In human pandemics of the 20th century, the HA normally has acquired specificity for human-like receptors before widespread infection. Crystal structures of the H1 HA from the 2009 human pandemic (A/California/04/2009 [CA04]) in complex with human and avian receptor analogs reveal conserved recognition of the terminal sialic acid of the glycan ligands. However, favorable interactions beyond the sialic acid are found only for {alpha}2-6-linked glycans and are mediated by Asp190 and Asp225, which hydrogen bond with Gal-2 and GlcNAc-3. For {alpha}2-3-linked glycan receptors, no specific interactions beyond the terminal sialic acid are observed. Our structural and glycan microarray analyses, in the context of other high-resolution HA structures with {alpha}2-6- and {alpha}2-3-linked glycans, now elucidate the structural basis of receptor-binding specificity for H1 HAs in human and avian viruses and provide a structural explanation for the preference for {alpha}2-6 siaylated glycan receptors for the 2009 pandemic swine flu virus.

  10. Broadly neutralizing human antibody that recognizes the receptor-binding pocket of influenza virus hemagglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittle, James R.R.; Zhang, Ruijun; Khurana, Surender; King, Lisa R.; Manischewitz, Jody; Golding, Hana; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Walter, Emmanuel B.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med); (Novartis); (US-FDA); (Duke)

    2011-09-20

    Seasonal antigenic drift of circulating influenza virus leads to a requirement for frequent changes in vaccine composition, because exposure or vaccination elicits human antibodies with limited cross-neutralization of drifted strains. We describe a human monoclonal antibody, CH65, obtained by isolating rearranged heavy- and light-chain genes from sorted single plasma cells, coming from a subject immunized with the 2007 trivalent influenza vaccine. The crystal structure of a complex of the hemagglutinin (HA) from H1N1 strain A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 with the Fab of CH65 shows that the tip of the CH65 heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) inserts into the receptor binding pocket on HA1, mimicking in many respects the interaction of the physiological receptor, sialic acid. CH65 neutralizes infectivity of 30 out of 36 H1N1 strains tested. The resistant strains have a single-residue insertion near the rim of the sialic-acid pocket. We conclude that broad neutralization of influenza virus can be achieved by antibodies with contacts that mimic those of the receptor.

  11. Regulation of noncoding region for expression of Sendai virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡建红; 齐义鹏

    1999-01-01

    Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein was expressed in COS-7 cells, indicating that the expression of HN protein driven by SRα promoter is higher than that driven by chicken β-actin promoter. Moreover, with 5’ noncoding region (NCR) of HN gene, the expression was enhanced. Northern blotting demonstrated that this phenomenon was caused by the difference of HN mRNA transcription. To know the regulatory function of 5’ NCR, HN gene 5’ NCR was replaced by 5’ NCR of keratin gene or cytochrome P-450 gene and the 3’ NCR was deleted by site-directed mutagenesis. By using CAT gene as a reporter, S1 nuclease assay was done to quantitate the HN mRNA transcript in the COS-7 cells co-transfected with the reporter and mutated plasmids, indicating that 5’ NCR is non-specific to the enhancement of HN protein expression, and the 3’ NCR also has a special regulatory function.

  12. Computational design of trimeric influenza-neutralizing proteins targeting the hemagglutinin receptor binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauch, Eva-Maria; Bernard, Steffen M.; La, David; Bohn, Alan J.; Lee, Peter S.; Anderson, Caitlin E.; Nieusma, Travis; Holstein, Carly A.; Garcia, Natalie K.; Hooper, Kathryn A.; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Nelson, Jorgen W.; Sheffler, William; Bloom, Jesse D.; Lee, Kelly K.; Ward, Andrew B.; Yager, Paul; Fuller, Deborah H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker , David (UWASH); (Scripps); (FHCRC)

    2017-06-12

    Many viral surface glycoproteins and cell surface receptors are homo-oligomers1, 2, 3, 4, and thus can potentially be targeted by geometrically matched homo-oligomers that engage all subunits simultaneously to attain high avidity and/or lock subunits together. The adaptive immune system cannot generally employ this strategy since the individual antibody binding sites are not arranged with appropriate geometry to simultaneously engage multiple sites in a single target homo-oligomer. We describe a general strategy for the computational design of homo-oligomeric protein assemblies with binding functionality precisely matched to homo-oligomeric target sites5, 6, 7, 8. In the first step, a small protein is designed that binds a single site on the target. In the second step, the designed protein is assembled into a homo-oligomer such that the designed binding sites are aligned with the target sites. We use this approach to design high-avidity trimeric proteins that bind influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) at its conserved receptor binding site. The designed trimers can both capture and detect HA in a paper-based diagnostic format, neutralizes influenza in cell culture, and completely protects mice when given as a single dose 24 h before or after challenge with influenza.

  13. Structures and receptor binding of hemagglutinins from human-infecting H7N9 influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Fei; Qi, Jianxun; Wu, Ying; Song, Hao; Gao, Feng; Bi, Yuhai; Zhang, Yanfang; Fan, Zheng; Qin, Chengfeng; Sun, Honglei; Liu, Jinhua; Haywood, Joel; Liu, Wenjun; Gong, Weimin; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong; Wang, Yu; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F

    2013-10-11

    An avian-origin human-infecting influenza (H7N9) virus was recently identified in China. We have evaluated the viral hemagglutinin (HA) receptor-binding properties of two human H7N9 isolates, A/Shanghai/1/2013 (SH-H7N9) (containing the avian-signature residue Gln(226)) and A/Anhui/1/2013 (AH-H7N9) (containing the mammalian-signature residue Leu(226)). We found that SH-H7N9 HA preferentially binds the avian receptor analog, whereas AH-H7N9 HA binds both avian and human receptor analogs. Furthermore, an AH-H7N9 mutant HA (Leu(226) → Gln) was found to exhibit dual receptor-binding property, indicating that other amino acid substitutions contribute to the receptor-binding switch. The structures of SH-H7N9 HA, AH-H7N9 HA, and its mutant in complex with either avian or human receptor analogs show how AH-H7N9 can bind human receptors while still retaining the avian receptor-binding property.

  14. Recombinant Hemagglutinin and Virus-Like Particle Vaccines for H7N9 Influenza Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Pushko, Peter; Tretyakova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Cases of H7N9 human infection were caused by a novel, avian-origin H7N9 influenza A virus that emerged in eastern China in 2013. Clusters of human disease were identified in many cities in China, with mortality rates approaching 30%. Pandemic concerns were raised, as historically, influenza pandemics were caused by introduction of novel influenza A viruses into immunologically naïve human population. Currently, there are no approved human vaccines for H7N9 viruses. Recombinant protein vaccine approaches have advantages in safety and manufacturing. In this review, we focused on evaluation of the expression of recombinant hemagglutinin (rHA) proteins as candidate vaccines for H7N9 influenza, with the emphasis on the role of oligomeric and particulate structures in immunogenicity and protection. Challenges in preparation of broadly protective influenza vaccines are discussed, and examples of broadly protective vaccines are presented including rHA stem epitope vaccines, as well as recently introduced experimental multi-HA VLP vaccines. PMID:26523241

  15. Antigenicity and Hemaglutination Activity of a Recombinant Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase of Paramyxovirus Tianjin Strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei LI; Li-jun YUAN; Li-ying SHI; Xiao-mian LI; Qing WANG; Wen-xiu WANG

    2008-01-01

    Paramyxovirus Tianjin strain, a new genotype of Sendal virus, was isolated from the lungs of common cotton-eared marmoset that died of severe respiratory infection in the marmoset colonies. The 19.28% IgM positive rate in the young children with acute respiratory tract infection suggested a close relationship between Tianjin strain and humans. Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) is its major transmembrane glycoprotein responsible for viral attachment, penetration and release. To clear the relationship between HN structure and function of paramyxovirus Tianjin strain, rHN1, rHN2 and rHN3 overlapping the ectodomain of HN protein were expressed. Their antigenicity and hemaglutination activity, as well as cross reactivity to standard antisera against influenza virus type A, type B were analyzed. The results indicated expressed rHNs have the natural antigenicity.The segment rHN2 possesses more linear epitopes exposed on the surface of the native I-IN protein than found in segments rHN3 and rHN1. The hemagglutination activity of segment rHN3 is higher than that of segments rHN2 and rHN1, and partially dependent on the three-dimensional conformation of HN3 protein. Cross-reactivity between rHNs and standard antisera against influenza virus type A, type B suggested that rHNs might not be the best alternative as specific antigens to detect virus in clinicalserum specimens.

  16. Antigenic validation of recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of Newcastle disease virus expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khulape, S A; Maity, H K; Pathak, D C; Mohan, C Madhan; Dey, S

    2015-09-01

    The outer membrane glycoprotein, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is important for virus infection and subsequent immune response by host, and offers target for development of recombinant antigen-based immunoassays and subunit vaccines. In this study, the expression of HN protein of NDV is attempted in yeast expression system. Yeast offers eukaryotic environment for protein processing and posttranslational modifications like glycosylation, in addition to higher growth rate and easy genetic manipulation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to be better expression system for HN protein than Pichia pastoris as determined by codon usage analysis. The complete coding  sequence of HN gene was amplified with the histidine tag, cloned in pESC-URA under GAL10 promotor and transformed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recombinant HN (rHN) protein was characterized by western blot, showing glycosylation heterogeneity as observed with other eukaryotic expression systems. The recombinant protein was purified by affinity column purification. The protein could be further used as subunit vaccine.

  17. 3DFlu: database of sequence and structural variability of the influenza hemagglutinin at population scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocco, Giovanni; Lazniewski, Michal; Migdał, Piotr; Szczepińska, Teresa; Radomski, Jan P.; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    The influenza virus type A (IVA) is an important pathogen which is able to cause annual epidemics and even pandemics. This fact is the consequence of the antigenic shifts and drifts capabilities of IVA, caused by the high mutation rate and the reassortment capabilities of the virus. The hemagglutinin (HA) protein constitutes the main IVA antigen and has a crucial role in the infection mechanism, being responsible for the recognition of host-specific sialic acid derivatives. Despite the relative abundance of HA sequence and serological studies, comparative structure-based analysis of HA are less investigated. The 3DFlu database contains well annotated HA representatives: 1192 models and 263 crystallographic structures. The relations between these proteins are defined using different metrics and are visualized as a network in the provided web interface. Moreover structural and sequence comparison of the proteins can be explored. Metadata information (e.g. protein identifier, IVA strain, year and location of infection) can enhance the exploration of the presented data. With our database researchers gain a useful tool for the exploration of high quality HA models, viewing and comparing changes in the HA viral subtypes at several information levels (sequence, structure, ESP). The complete and integrated view of those relations might be useful to determine the efficiency of transmission, pathogenicity and for the investigation of evolutionary tendencies of the influenza virus. Database URL: http://nucleus3d.cent.uw.edu.pl/influenza PMID:27694207

  18. PAR-1 mediated apoptosis of breast cancer cells by V. cholerae hemagglutinin protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Tanusree; Pal, Amit

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial toxins have emerged as promising agents in cancer treatment strategy. Hemagglutinin (HAP) protease secreted by Vibrio cholerae induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells and regresses tumor growth in mice model. The success of novel cancer therapies depends on their selectivity for cancer cells with limited toxicity for normal tissues. Increased expression of Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1) has been reported in different malignant cells. In this study we report that HAP induced activation and over expression of PAR-1 in breast cancer cells (EAC). Immunoprecipitation studies have shown that HAP specifically binds with PAR-1. HAP mediated activation of PAR-1 caused nuclear translocation of p50-p65 and the phosphorylation of p38 which triggered the activation of NFκB and MAP kinase signaling pathways. These signaling pathways enhanced the cellular ROS level in malignant cells that induced the intrinsic pathway of cell apoptosis. PAR-1 mediated apoptosis by HAP of malignant breast cells without effecting normal healthy cells in the same environment makes it a good therapeutic agent for treatment of cancer.

  19. Structure-function analysis of two variants of mumps virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Santos-López

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A point mutation from guanine (G to adenine (A at nucleotide position 1081 in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN gene has been associated with neurovirulence of Urabe AM9 mumps virus vaccine. This mutation corresponds to a glutamic acid (E to lysine (K change at position 335 in the HN glycoprotein. We have experimentally demonstrated that two variants of Urabe AM9 strain (HN-A1081 and HN-G1081 differ in neurotropism, sialic acidbinding affinity and neuraminidase activity. In the present study, we performed a structure-function analysis of that amino acid substitution; the structures of HN protein of both Urabe AM9 strain variants were predicted. Based on our analysis, the E/K mutation changes the protein surface properties and to a lesser extent their conformations, which in turn reflects in activity changes. Our modeling results suggest that this E/K interchange does not affect the structure of the sialic acid binding motif; however, the electrostatic surface differs drastically due to an exposed short alpha helix. Consequently, this mutation may affect the accessibility of HN to substrates and membrane receptors of the host cells. Our findings appear to explain the observed differences in neurotropism of these vaccine strains.

  20. The Protection Efficacity of DNA Vaccine Encoding Hemagglutinin of H5 Subtype Avian Influenza Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yong-ping; YU Kang-zhen; DENG Guo-hua; TIAN Guo-bin; QIAO Chuan-ling; CHEN Hua-lan

    2004-01-01

    The DNA vaccine pCIHA5 encoding hemagglutinin can protect SPF chicken against lethal H5N1 avian influenza virus challenge. The more characters about its protection efficacity were studied. The protective rates in 10, 40, 70, 100 and 150μg groups immunized with pCIHA5 were 12.5 (1/8), 58.3 (7/12), 72.7 (8/11), 50.0 (6/12) and 66.7% (8/12), respectively. The protective rates in 5, 20, 35 and 50μg groups were 145.5 (5/11), 58.3 (7/12), 58.3 (7/12) and 91.7% (11/12), respectively. The 70, 100 and 5μg groups have virus shedding of 1/8, 2/6 and 1/5. Though the inactived oil-emulsion vaccine has high HI antibody titers and 100% protective rate, the AGP antibody could be detected after vaccination. Results show that the pCIHA5 is fit to boost by intramuscular injection. This would be useful to the study on gene engineering vaccine of avian influenza virus.

  1. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Memczak

    Full Text Available Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing.

  2. Heptapeptide ligands against receptor-binding sites of influenza hemagglutinin toward anti-influenza therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Onishi, Ai; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Sato, Toshinori

    2016-03-01

    The initial attachment of influenza virus to cells is the binding of hemagglutinin (HA) to the sialyloligosaccharide receptor; therefore, the small molecules that inhibit the sugar-protein interaction are promising as HA inhibitors to prevent the infection. We herein demonstrate that sialic acid-mimic heptapeptides are identified through a selection from a primary library against influenza virus HA. In order to obtain lead peptides, an affinity selection from a phage-displayed random heptapeptide library was performed with the HAs of the H1 and H3 strains, and two kinds of the HA-binding peptides were identified. The binding of the peptides to HAs was inhibited in the presence of sialic acid, and plaque assays indicated that the corresponding N-stearoyl peptide strongly inhibited infections by the A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2) strain of the virus. Alanine scanning of the peptides indicated that arginine and proline were responsible for binding. The affinities of several mutant peptides with single-amino-acid substitutions against H3 HA were determined, and corresponding docking studies were performed. A Spearman analysis revealed a correlation between the affinity of the peptides and the docking study. These results provide a practicable method to design of peptide-based HA inhibitors that are promising as anti-influenza drugs.

  3. Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin(HA)/protease: an extracellular metalloprotease with multiple pathogenic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Jorge A.; Silva, Anisia J.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae of serogroup O1 and O139, the etiological agent of the diarrheal disease cholera, expresses the extracellular Zn-dependent metalloprotease hemagglutinin (HA)/protease also reported as vibriolysin. This enzyme is also produced by non-O1/O139 (non-cholera) strains that cause mild, sporadic illness (i.e. gastroenteritis, wound or ear infections). Orthologs of HA/protease are present in other members of the Vibrionaceae family pathogenic to humans and fish. HA/protease belongs to the M4 neutral peptidase family and displays significant amino acid sequence homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (LasB) and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus thermolysin. It exhibits a broad range of potentially pathogenic activities in cell culture and animal models. These activities range from the covalent modification of other toxins, the degradation of the protective mucus barrier and disruption of intestinal tight junctions. Here we review (i) the structure and regulation of HA/protease expression, (ii) its interaction with other toxins and the intestinal mucosa and (iii) discuss the possible role(s) of HA/protease in the pathogenesis of cholera. PMID:26952544

  4. Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin Neuraminidase as a Potential Cancer Targeting Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradaran, Ali; Yusoff, Khatijah; Shafee, Norazizah; Rahim, Raha Abdul

    2016-01-01

    The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with its immunotherapeutic activities and sialic acid binding abilities is a promising cancer adjuvant. The HN was surfaced displayed on Lactococcus lactis and its cancer targeting ability was investigated via attachment to the MDA-MB231 breast cancers. To surface display the HN protein on the bacterial cell wall, HN was fused to N-acetylmuraminidase (AcmA) anchoring motif of L. lactis and expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The expressed recombinant fusion proteins were purified and mixed with a culture of L. lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum. Immunofluorescence assay showed the binding of the recombinant HN-AcmA protein on the surface of the bacterial cells. The bacterial cells carrying the HN-AcmA protein interacted with the MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells. Direct and fluorescent microscopy confirmed that L. lactis and Lb. plantarum surface displaying the recombinant HN were attached to the breast cancer MDA-MB231 cells, providing evidence for the potential ability of HN in targeting to cancer cells.

  5. Lactobacillus plantarum vaccine vector expressing hemagglutinin provides protection against H9N2 challenge infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shao-Hua; Yang, Wen-Tao; Yang, Gui-Lian; Zhang, Xu-Ke; Liu, Yu-Ying; Zhang, Li-Jiao; Ye, Li-Ping; Hu, Jing-Tao; Xing, Xin; Qi, Chong; Li, Yu; Wang, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) has been demonstrated as an effective candidate vaccine antigen against AIVs. Dendritic cell-targeting peptide (DCpep) can enhance the robustness of immune responses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether DCpep could enhance the immune response against H9N2 AIV when utilizing Lactobacillus plantarum NC8 (NC8) to present HA-DCpep in mouse and chicken models. To accomplish this, a mucosal vaccine of a recombinant NC8 strain expressing HA and DCpep that was constructed in a previous study was employed. Orally administered NC8-pSIP409-HA-DCpep elicited high serum titers of hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibodies in mice and also induced robust T cell immune responses in both mouse and chicken models. Orally administered NC8-pSIP409-HA-DCpep elicited high serum titers of hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibodies in mice and also induced robust T cell immune responses in both mouse and chicken models. These results revealed that recombinant L. plantarum NC8-pSIP409-HA-DCpep is an effective vaccine candidate against H9N2 AIVs.

  6. Isolation of recombinant phage antibodies targeting the hemagglutinin cleavage site of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Dong

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses, which have emerged in poultry and other wildlife worldwide, contain a characteristic multi-basic cleavage site (CS in the hemagglutinin protein (HA. Because this arginine-rich CS is unique among influenza virus subtypes, antibodies against this site have the potential to specifically diagnose pathogenic H5N1. By immunizing mice with the CS peptide and screening a phage display library, we isolated four antibody Fab fragment clones that specifically bind the antigen peptide and several HPAI H5N1 HA proteins in different clades. The soluble Fab fragments expressed in Escherichia coli bound the CS peptide and the H5N1 HA protein with nanomolar affinity. In an immunofluorescence assay, these Fab fragments stained cells infected with HPAI H5N1 but not those infected with a less virulent strain. Lastly, all the Fab clones could detect the CS peptide and H5N1 HA protein by open sandwich ELISA. Thus, these recombinant Fab fragments will be useful novel reagents for the rapid and specific detection of HPAI H5N1 virus.

  7. The clinical effection of the treament of PTX and LFP in late esophagus carcinoma%PTX与LFP方案治疗晚期食管癌的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋士军; 申家辉

    2008-01-01

    目的 观察紫杉醇(PTX)联合LFP方案治疗晚期食管癌的近期疗效及毒反应.方法 46例晚期食管癌采用PTX+LFP方案,PTX按周剂量给药,即PTX 80 mg/m2,静脉滴注,1次/周,连续2周,LFP方案常规给药.21 d为1个周期,至少完成两周期评价.结果 全组46例均可评价疗效,28例初治有效率67 8%,18例复治有效率50 0%,总有效率60 8%,主要毒副作用为骨髓抑制.结论 PLFP方案治疗晚期食管癌疗效较好,毒反应可以耐受,可作为治疗晚期食管癌的有效方案.

  8. Patterns of molecular motors that guide and sort filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Beat; Nédélec, François

    2012-11-21

    Molecular motors can be immobilized to transport filaments and loads that are attached to these filaments inside a nano-device. However, if motors are distributed uniformly over a flat surface, the motility is undirected, and the filaments move equally in all directions. For many applications it is important to control the direction in which the filaments move, and two strategies have been explored to achieve this: applying external forces and confining the filaments inside channels. In this article, we discuss a third strategy in which the topography of the sample remains flat, but the motors are distributed non-uniformly over the surface. Systems of filaments and patterned molecular motors were simulated using a stochastic engine that included Brownian motion and filament bending elasticity. Using an evolutionary algorithm, patterns were optimized for their capacity to precisely control the paths of the filaments. We identified patterns of motors that could either direct the filaments in a particular direction, or separate short and long filaments. These functionalities already exceed what has been achieved with confinement. The patterns are composed of one or two types of motors positioned in lines or along arcs and should be easy to manufacture. Finally, these patterns can be easily combined into larger designs, allowing one to precisely control the motion of microscopic objects inside a device.

  9. Connectin filaments in stretched skinned fibers of frog skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of highly stretched skinned frog semi-tendinous muscle fibers revealed that connectin, an elastic protein of muscle, is located in the gap between actin and myosin filaments and also in the region of myosin filaments except in their centers. Electron microscopic observations showed that there were easily recognizable filaments extending from the myosin filaments to the I band region and to Z lines in the myofibrils treated with antiserum against connectin. In thin sections prepared with tannic acid, very thin filaments connected myosin filaments to actin filaments. These filaments were also observed in myofibrils extracted with a modified Hasselbach-Schneider solution (0.6 M KCl, 0.1 M phosphate buffer, pH 6.5, 2 mM ATP, 2 mM MgCl2, and 1 mM EGTA) and with 0.6 M Kl. SDS PAGE revealed that connectin (also called titin) remained in extracted myofibrils. We suggest that connectin filaments play an important role in the generation of tension upon passive stretch. A scheme of the cytoskeletal structure of myofibrils of vertebrate skeletal muscle is presented on the basis of our present information of connectin and intermediate filaments. PMID:6384237

  10. Degradation of thin tungsten filaments at high temperature in HWCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigeri, P.A., E-mail: pfrigeri@phys.ethz.ch; Nos, O.; Bertomeu, J.

    2015-01-30

    The degradation of the filaments is usually studied by checking the silicidation or carbonization status of the refractory metal used as catalysts, and their effects on the structural stability of the filaments. In this paper, it will be shown that the catalytic stability of a filament heated at high temperature is much shorter than its structural lifetime. The electrical resistance of a thin tungsten filament and the deposition rate of the deposited thin film have been monitored during the filament aging. It has been found that the deposition rate drops drastically once the quantity of dissolved silicon in the tungsten reaches the solubility limit and the silicides start precipitating. This manuscript concludes that the catalytic stability is only guaranteed for a short time and that for sufficiently thick filaments it does not depend on the filament radius. - Highlights: • A model for the electrical resistance of a tungsten filament during aging is presented. • Catalytic activity of the filament drops when W5Si3 precipitation takes place at its surface. • The catalytic stability of the filament does not depend on its radius in most practical situations.

  11. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition.

  12. Hydrophobin fusion of an influenza virus hemagglutinin allows high transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana, easy purification and immune response with neutralizing activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Jacquet

    Full Text Available The expression of recombinant hemagglutinin in plants is a promising alternative to the current egg-based production system for the influenza vaccines. Protein-stabilizing fusion partners have been developed to overcome the low production yields and the high downstream process costs associated with the plant expression system. In this context, we tested the fusion of hydrophobin I to the hemagglutinin ectodomain of the influenza A (H1N1pdm09 virus controlled by the hybrid En2PMA4 transcriptional promoter to rapidly produce high levels of recombinant antigen by transient expression in agro-infiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. The fusion increased the expression level by a factor of ∼ 2.5 compared to the unfused protein allowing a high accumulation level of 8.6% of the total soluble proteins. Hemagglutinin was located in ER-derived protein bodies and was successfully purified by combining an aqueous-two phase partition system and a salting out step. Hydrophobin interactions allowed the formation of high molecular weight hemagglutinin structures, while unfused proteins were produced as monomers. Purified protein was shown to be biologically active and to induce neutralizing antibodies after mice immunization. Hydrophobin fusion to influenza hemagglutinin might therefore be a promising approach for rapid, easy, and low cost production of seasonal or pandemic influenza vaccines in plants.

  13. Filament Eruptions, Jets, and Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald; Sterling, Alphonse; Robe, Nick; Falconer, David; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Previously, from chromospheric H alpha and coronal X-ray movies of the Sun's polar coronal holes, it was found that nearly all coronal jets (greater than 90%) are one or the other of two roughly equally common different kinds, different in how they erupt: standard jets and blowout jets (Yamauchi et al 2004, Apl, 605, 5ll: Moore et all 2010, Apj, 720, 757). Here, from inspection of SDO/AIA He II 304 A movies of 54 polar x-ray jets observed in Hinode/XRT movies, we report, as Moore et al (2010) anticipated, that (1) most standard x-ray jets (greater than 80%) show no ejected plasma that is cool enough (T is less than or approximately 10(exp 5K) to be seen in the He II 304 A movies; (2) nearly all blownout X-ray jets (greater than 90%) show obvious ejection of such cool plasma; (3) whereas when cool plasma is ejected in standard X-ray jets, it shows no lateral expansion, the cool plasma ejected in blowout X-ray jets shows strong lateral expansion; and (4) in many blowout X-ray jets, the cool plasma ejection displays the erupting-magnetic-rope form of clasic filament eruptions and is thereby seen to be a miniature filament eruption. The XRT movies also showed most blowout X-ray jets to be larger and brighter, and hence to apparently have more energy, than most standard X-ray jets. These observations (1) confirm the dichotomy of coronal jets, (2) agree with the Shibata model for standard jets, and (3) support the conclusion of Moore et al (2010) that in blowout jets the magnetic-arch base of the jet erupts in the manner of the much larger magnetic arcades in which the core field, the field rooted along the arcade's polarity inversion line, is sheared and twisted (sigmoid), often carries a cool-plasma filament, and erupts to blowout the arcade, producing a CME. From Hinode/SOT Ca II movies of the polar limb, Sterling et al (2010, ApJ, 714, L1) found that chromospheric Type-II spicules show a dichotomy of eruption dynamics similar to that found here for the cool

  14. Heterocyst placement strategies to maximize growth of cyanobacterial filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Aidan I

    2012-01-01

    Under conditions of limited fixed-nitrogen, some filamentous cyanobacteria develop a regular pattern of heterocyst cells that fix nitrogen for the remaining vegetative cells. We examine three different heterocyst placement strategies by quantitatively modelling filament growth while varying both external fixed-nitrogen and leakage from the filament. We find that there is an optimum heterocyst frequency which maximizes the growth rate of the filament; the optimum frequency decreases as the external fixed-nitrogen concentration increases but increases as the leakage increases. In the presence of leakage, filaments implementing a local heterocyst placement strategy grow significantly faster than filaments implementing random heterocyst placement strategies. With no extracellular fixed-nitrogen, consistent with recent experimental studies of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the modelled heterocyst spacing distribution using our local heterocyst placement strategy is qualitatively similar to experimentally observed patterns...

  15. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Protein Filament Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Thomas C T; Cohen, Samuel I A; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2016-01-22

    We establish the Hamiltonian structure of the rate equations describing the formation of protein filaments. We then show that this formalism provides a unified view of the behavior of a range of biological self-assembling systems as diverse as actin, prions, and amyloidogenic polypeptides. We further demonstrate that the time-translation symmetry of the resulting Hamiltonian leads to previously unsuggested conservation laws that connect the number and mass concentrations of fibrils and allow linear growth phenomena to be equated with autocatalytic growth processes. We finally show how these results reveal simple rate laws that provide the basis for interpreting experimental data in terms of specific mechanisms controlling the proliferation of fibrils.

  16. Intermediate filaments: from cell architecture to nanomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Harald; Bär, Harald; Kreplak, Laurent; Strelkov, Sergei V; Aebi, Ueli

    2007-07-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) constitute a major structural element of animal cells. They build two distinct systems, one in the nucleus and one in the cytoplasm. In both cases, their major function is assumed to be that of a mechanical stress absorber and an integrating device for the entire cytoskeleton. In line with this, recent disease mutations in human IF proteins indicate that the nanomechanical properties of cell-type-specific IFs are central to the pathogenesis of diseases as diverse as muscular dystrophy and premature ageing. However, the analysis of these various diseases suggests that IFs also have an important role in cell-type-specific physiological functions.

  17. Semiflexible biopolymers: Microrheology and single filament condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnurr, Bernhard

    Polymers and their elementary subunits, called monomers, come in an immense variety of structures and sizes, and are of great importance for their material properties as well as a multitude of biological functions. The emphasis here is on semiflexible polymers, which are identified by their intermediate degree of stiffness. Their individual as well as their collective properties when assembled into entangled networks is a topic of great interest to polymer physics, materials science, and biology. Some of the most important semiflexible polymers are biopolymers, with such prominent examples as DNA, F-actin, and microtubules. Their functions range from their use as structural elements in the cytoskeleton of most plant and animal cells, to their role as transport tracks for molecular motors, and the storage of genetic information in their linear sequence. The two parts of this experimental and theoretical thesis address single filament aspects as well as network properties of solutions of semiflexible polymers. In the first part, we describe an optical technique for measuring the bulk properties of soft materials at the local scale. We apply it to a solution of entangled, filamentous actin, a particularly difficult material to characterize with conventional techniques. Beyond a description of measurements and apparatus, we also discuss, from a theoretical point of view, the interpretation and fundamental limitations of this and other microrheological techniques. In the second part, we describe the condensation dynamics of a single, semiflexible filament, induced by changing solvent conditions. A biologically important example of this phenomenon is the condensation of DNA into toroidal structures, which occurs, for instance, in viral capsids. Our observations of a molecular simulation motivate an unexpected pathway of collapse via a series of metastable intermediates we call ``racquet'' states. The analysis of the conformational energies of these structures in the

  18. Langmuir wave filamentation in the kinetic regime

    CERN Document Server

    Silantyev, Denis A; Rose, Harvey A

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear Langmuir wave in the kinetic regime $k\\lambda_D\\gtrsim0.2$ has a transverse instability, where $k$ is the wavenumber and $\\lambda_D$ is the Debye length. The nonlinear stage of that instability development leads to the filamentation of Langmuir waves. Here we study the linear stage of transverse instability of both Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) modes and dynamically prepared BGK-like initial conditions to find the same instability growth rate suggesting the universal mechanism for the kinetic saturation of stimulated Raman scatter in laser-plasma interaction experiments. Multidimensional Vlasov simulations results are compared to the theoretical predictions.

  19. Filament winding cylinders. I - Process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Yong; Springer, George S.

    1990-01-01

    A model was developed which describes the filament winding process of composite cylinders. The model relates the significant process variables such as winding speed, fiber tension, and applied temperature to the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior of the composite cylinder and the mandrel. Based on the model, a user friendly code was written which can be used to calculate (1) the temperature in the cylinder and the mandrel, (2) the degree of cure and viscosity in the cylinder, (3) the fiber tensions and fiber positions, (4) the stresses and strains in the cylinder and in the mandrel, and (5) the void diameters in the cylinder.

  20. Filamentous bacteria transport electrons over centimetre distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Christian; Larsen, Steffen; Song, Jie

    2012-01-01

    across centimetre-wide zones. Here we present evidence that the native conductors are long, filamentous bacteria. They abounded in sediment zones with electric currents and along their length they contained strings with distinct properties in accordance with a function as electron transporters. Living......Oxygen consumption in marine sediments is often coupled to the oxidation of sulphide generated by degradation of organic matter in deeper, oxygen-free layers. Geochemical observations have shown that this coupling can be mediated by electric currents carried by unidentified electron transporters......, electrical cables add a new dimension to the understanding of interactions in nature and may find use in technology development....

  1. Numerical simulations of a filament in a flowing soap film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnell, D. J. J.; David, T.; Barton, D. C.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments concerning the properties of soap films have recently been carried out and these systems have been proposed as experimental versions of theoretical two-dimensional liquids. A silk filament introduced into a flowing soap film, was seen to demonstrate various stable modes, and these were, namely, a mode in which the filament oscillates and one in which the filament is stationary and aligns with the flow of the liquid. The system could be forced from the oscillatory mode into the non- oscillatory mode by varying the length of the filament. In this article we use numerical and computational techniques in order to simulate the strongly coupled behaviour of the filament and the fluid. Preliminary results are presented for the specific case in which the filament is seen to oscillate continuously for the duration of our simulation. We also find that the filament oscillations are strongly suppressed when we reduce the effective length of the filament. We believe that these results are reminiscent of the different oscillatory and non-oscillatory modes observed in experiment. The numerical solutions show that, in contrast to experiment, vortices are created at the leading edge of the filament and are preferentially grown in the curvature of the filament and are eventually released from the trailing edge of the filament. In a similar manner to oscillating hydrofoils, it seems that the oscillating filaments are in a minimal energy state, extracting sufficient energy from the fluid to oscillate. In comparing numerical and experimental results it is possible that the soap film does have an effect on the fluid flow especially in the boundary layer where surface tension forces are large.

  2. Characterization of osmotically induced filaments of Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Zachary L; Chen, Bingming; Czuprynski, Charles J; Wong, Amy C L; Kaspar, Charles W

    2012-09-01

    Salmonella enterica forms aseptate filaments with multiple nucleoids when cultured in hyperosmotic conditions. These osmotic-induced filaments are viable and form single colonies on agar plates even though they contain multiple genomes and have the potential to divide into multiple daughter cells. Introducing filaments that are formed during osmotic stress into culture conditions without additional humectants results in the formation of septa and their division into individual cells, which could present challenges to retrospective analyses of infectious dose and risk assessments. We sought to characterize the underlying mechanisms of osmotic-induced filament formation. The concentration of proteins and chromosomal DNA in filaments and control cells was similar when standardized by biomass. Furthermore, penicillin-binding proteins in the membrane of salmonellae were active in vitro. The activity of penicillin-binding protein 2 was greater in filaments than in control cells, suggesting that it may have a role in osmotic-induced filament formation. Filaments contained more ATP than did control cells in standardized cell suspensions, though the levels of two F(0)F(1)-ATP synthase subunits were reduced. Furthermore, filaments could septate and divide within 8 h in 0.2 × Luria-Bertani broth at 23°C, while nonfilamentous control cells did not replicate. Based upon the ability of filaments to septate and divide in this diluted broth, a method was developed to enumerate by plate count the number of individual, viable cells within a population of filaments. This method could aid in retrospective analyses of infectious dose of filamented salmonellae.

  3. Automated image analysis for quantification of filamentous bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredborg, M.; Rosenvinge, F. S.; Spillum, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antibiotics of the beta-lactam group are able to alter the shape of the bacterial cell wall, e.g. filamentation or a spheroplast formation. Early determination of antimicrobial susceptibility may be complicated by filamentation of bacteria as this can be falsely interpreted as growth...... displaying different resistant profiles and differences in filamentation kinetics were used to study a novel image analysis algorithm to quantify length of bacteria and bacterial filamentation. A total of 12 beta-lactam antibiotics or beta-lactam-beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations were analyzed...

  4. Dynamics of Actin Filament Ends in a Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Le; Sept, David; Carlsson, Anders

    2004-03-01

    The formation of filopodia-like bundles in vitro from a dendritic actin network has been observed(D. Vignjevic et al, J. Cell Biol. 160, 951 (2003)) to occur as a result of a nucleation process. We study the dynamics of the actin filament ends in such a network in order to evaluate the dynamics of the bundle nucleation process. Our model treats two semiflexible actin filaments fixed at one end and free at the other, moving according to Brownian dynamics. The initial filament positions are chosen according to a thermal distribution, and we evaluate the time for the filaments to come close enough to each other to interact and bind. The capture criterion is based either on the distance between filaments, or on a combination of distance and relative orientation. We evaluate the dependence of the capture time on the filament length and radius, and the distance between the filament bases. Since treating the movement of the individual monomers in filaments is computationally unwieldy, we treat the filament motion using a normal mode analysis which permits use of a much longer timestep. We find that this method yields rapid convergence even when only the few longest-wavelength modes are included.

  5. Formation and evolution of an active region filament

    CERN Document Server

    Kuckein, C; Pillet, V Martínez

    2013-01-01

    Several scenarios explaining how filaments are formed can be found in literature. In this paper, we analyzed the observations of an active region filament and critically evaluated the observed properties in the context of current filament formation models. This study is based on multi-height spectropolarimetric observations. The inferred vector magnetic field has been extrapolated starting either from the photosphere or from the chromosphere. The line-of-sight motions of the filament, which was located near disk center, have been analyzed inferring the Doppler velocities. We conclude that a part of the magnetic structure emerged from below the photosphere.

  6. Material Supply and Magnetic Configuration of an Active Region Filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, P.; Fang, C.; Chen, P. F.; Yang, K.; Hao, Q.; Cao, Wenda

    2016-11-01

    It is important to study the fine structures of solar filaments with high-resolution observations, since it can help us understand the magnetic and thermal structures of the filaments and their dynamics. In this paper, we study a newly formed filament located inside the active region NOAA 11762, which was observed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory from 16:40:19 UT to 17:07:58 UT on 2013 June 5. As revealed by the Hα filtergrams, cool material is seen to be injected into the filament spine with a speed of 5-10 km s-1. At the source of the injection, brightenings are identified in the chromosphere, which are accompanied by magnetic cancellation in the photosphere, implying the importance of magnetic reconnection in replenishing the filament with plasmas from the lower atmosphere. Counter-streamings are detected near one endpoint of the filament, with the plane-of-the-sky speed being 7-9 km s-1 in the Hα red-wing filtergrams and 9-25 km s-1 in the blue-wing filtergrams. The observations are indicative that this active region filament is supported by a sheared arcade without magnetic dips, and the counter-streamings are due to unidirectional flows with alternative directions, rather than due to the longitudinal oscillations of filament threads as in many other filaments.

  7. Controlling multiple filaments by relativistic optical vortex beams in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, L. B.; Huang, T. W.; Xiao, K. D.; Wu, G. Z.; Yang, S. L.; Li, R.; Yang, Y. C.; Long, T. Y.; Zhang, H.; Wu, S. Z.; Qiao, B.; Ruan, S. C.; Zhou, C. T.

    2016-09-01

    Filamentation dynamics of relativistic optical vortex beams (OVBs) propagating in underdense plasma is investigated. It is shown that OVBs with finite orbital angular momentum (OAM) exhibit much more robust propagation behavior than the standard Gaussian beam. In fact, the growth rate of the azimuthal modulational instability decreases rapidly with increase of the OVB topological charge. Thus, relativistic OVBs can maintain their profiles for significantly longer distances in an underdense plasma before filamentation occurs. It is also found that an OVB would then break up into regular filament patterns due to conservation of the OAM, in contrast to a Gaussian laser beam, which in general experiences random filamentation.

  8. Plutonium ion emission from carburized rhenium mass spectrometer filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, J.M.; Robertson, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Physicochemical processes important to the application of thermal emission mass spectrometry were identified and clarified. Effects of filament carbon concentration and temperature on plutonium ion emissions from a carburized rhenium filament were determined. Filament carbon concentration profoundly affected the appearance and duration of an ion signal. A useful ion signal was produced only when the carbon saturation temperature of the filament was exceeded, at which point first-order kinetics were either achieved or closely approached. This paper explains observed ion emission behavior in terms of pausible carbothermic reduction reactions and carbon diffusion processes that direct the course of those reactions. 31 references, 5 figures.

  9. Frenet algorithm for simulations of fluctuating continuous elastic filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kats, Yevgeny; Kessler, David A.; Rabin, Yitzhak

    2002-02-01

    We present an algorithm for generating the equilibrium configurations of fluctuating continuous elastic filaments, based on a combination of statistical mechanics and differential geometry. We use this to calculate the distribution function of the end-to-end distance of filaments with nonvanishing spontaneous curvature and show that for small twist and large bending rigidities there is an intermediate temperature range in which the filament becomes nearly completely stretched. We show that volume interactions can be incorporated into our algorithm, demonstrating this through the calculation of the effect of excluded volume on the end-to-end distance of the filament.

  10. Plasma temperature clamping in filamentation laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-10-19

    Ultrafast laser filament induced breakdown spectroscopy is a very promising method for remote material detection. We present characteristics of plasmas generated in a metal target by laser filaments in air. Our measurements show that the temperature of the ablation plasma is clamped along the filamentation channel due to intensity clamping in a filament. Nevertheless, significant changes in radiation intensity are noticeable, and this is essentially due to variation in the number density of emitting atoms. The present results also partly explains the reason for the occurrence of atomic plume during fs LIBS in air compared to long-pulse ns LIBS.

  11. Generation and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Specific to Avian Influenza H5N1 Hemagglutinin Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ankita; Mallajosyula, V Vamsee Aditya; Mishra, Nripendra Nath; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus has in the past breached the species barrier from infected domestic poultry to humans in close contact. Although human-to-human transmission has previously not been reported, HPAI H5N1 virus has pandemic potential owing to gain of function mutation(s) and/or genetic reassortment with human influenza A viruses. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been used for diagnosis as well as specific therapeutic candidates in several disease conditions including viral infections in humans. In this study, we describe the preliminary characterization of four murine MAbs developed against recombinant hemagglutinin (rHA) protein of avian H5N1 A/turkey/Turkey/1/2005 virus that are either highly specific or broadly reactive against HA from other H5N1 subtype viruses, such as A/Hong Kong/213/03, A/Common magpie/Hong Kong/2256/2006, and A/Barheaded goose/Quinghai/14/2008. The antibody binding is specific to H5N1 HAs, as none of the antibodies bound H1N1, H2N2, H3N2, or B/Brisbane/60/2008 HAs. Out of the four MAbs, one of them (MA-7) also reacted weakly with the rHA protein of H7N9 A/Anhui/1/2013. All four MAbs bound H5 HA (A/turkey/Turkey/1/2005) with high affinity with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) ranging between 0.05 and 10.30 nM. One of the MAbs (MA-1) also showed hemagglutination inhibition activity (HI titer; 31.25 μg/mL) against the homologous A/turkey/Turkey/1/2005 H5N1 virus. These antibodies may be useful in developing diagnostic tools for detection of influenza H5N1 virus infection.

  12. Epitope mapping of neutralizing monoclonal antibody in avian influenza A H5N1 virus hemagglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Takashi; Kikuchi, Yuji; Kono, Naoko; Itamura, Shigeyuki; Komase, Katsuhiro; Momose, Fumitaka; Morikawa, Yuko

    2012-02-03

    The global spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza A H5N1 viruses raises concerns about more widespread infection in the human population. Pre-pandemic vaccine for H5N1 clade 1 influenza viruses has been produced from the A/Viet Nam/1194/2004 strain (VN1194), but recent prevalent avian H5N1 viruses have been categorized into the clade 2 strains, which are antigenically distinct from the pre-pandemic vaccine. To understand the antigenicity of H5N1 hemagglutinin (HA), we produced a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb12-1G6) using the pre-pandemic vaccine. Analysis with chimeric and point mutant HAs revealed that mAb12-1G6 bound to the loop (amino acid positions 140-145) corresponding to an antigenic site A in the H3 HA. mAb12-1G6 failed to bind to the mutant VN1194 HA when only 3 residues were substituted with the corresponding residues of the clade 2.1.3.2 A/Indonesia/5/05 strain (amino acid substitutions at positions Q142L, K144S, and S145P), suggesting that these amino acids are critical for binding of mAb12-1G6. Escape mutants of VN1194 selected with mAb12-1G6 carried a S145P mutation. Interestingly, mAb12-1G6 cross-neutralized clade 1 and clade 2.2.1 but not clade 2.1.3.2 or clade 2.3.4 of the H5N1 virus. We discuss the cross-reactivity, based on the amino acid sequence of the epitope.

  13. Quantitative characterization of glycan-receptor binding of H9N2 influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunya Srinivasan

    Full Text Available Avian influenza subtypes such as H5, H7 and H9 are yet to adapt to the human host so as to establish airborne transmission between humans. However, lab-generated reassorted viruses possessing hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes from an avian H9 isolate and other genes from a human-adapted (H3 or H1 subtype acquired two amino acid changes in HA and a single amino acid change in NA that confer respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets. We previously demonstrated for human-adapted H1, H2 and H3 subtypes that quantitative binding affinity of their HA to α2→6 sialylated glycan receptors correlates with respiratory droplet transmissibility of the virus in ferrets. Such a relationship remains to be established for H9 HA. In this study, we performed a quantitative biochemical characterization of glycan receptor binding properties of wild-type and mutant forms of representative H9 HAs that were previously used in context of reassorted viruses in ferret transmission studies. We demonstrate here that distinct molecular interactions in the glycan receptor-binding site of different H9 HAs affect the glycan-binding specificity and affinity. Further we show that α2→6 glycan receptor-binding affinity of a mutant H9 HA carrying Thr-189→Ala amino acid change correlates with the respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets conferred by this change. Our findings contribute to a framework for monitoring the evolution of H9 HA by understanding effects of molecular changes in HA on glycan receptor-binding properties.

  14. Molecular Evolution and Characterization of Hemagglutinin (H in Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus.

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    Zhongxiang Liang

    Full Text Available Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR is an acute, highly contagious, and febrile viral disease that affects both domestic and wild small ruminants. The disease has become a major obstacle to the development of sustainable Agriculture. Hemagglutinin (H, the envelope glycoprotein of Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus (PPRV, plays a crucial role in regulating viral adsorption and entry, thus determining pathogenicity, and release of newly produced viral particles. In order to accurately understand the epidemic of the disease and the interactions between the virus and host, we launch the work. Here, we examined H gene from all four lineages of the PPRV to investigate evolutionary and epidemiologic dynamics of PPRV by the Bayesian method. In addition, we predicted positive selection sites due to selective pressures. Finally, we studied the interaction between H protein and SLAM receptor based on homology model of the complex. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that H gene can also be used to investigate evolutionary and epidemiologic dynamics of PPRV. Positive selection analysis identified four positive selection sites in H gene, in which only one common site (aa246 was detected by two methods, suggesting strong operation structural and/or functional constraint of changes on the H protein. This target site may be of interest for future mutagenesis studies. The results of homology modeling showed PPRVHv-shSLAM binding interface and MVH-maSLAM binding interface were consistent, wherein the groove in the B4 blade and B5 of the head domain of PPRVHv bound to the AGFCC' β-sheets of the membrane-distal ectodomain of shSLAM. The binding regions could provide insight on the nature of the protein for epitope vaccine design, novel drug discovery, and rational drug design against PPRV.

  15. Cloning, expression and characterization of potential immunogenic recombinant hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein of Porcine rubulavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas-Romero, Julieta Sandra; Rivera-Benítez, José Francisco; Hernández-Baumgarten, Eliseo; Hernández-Jaúregui, Pablo; Vega, Marco; Blomström, Anne-Lie; Berg, Mikael; Baule, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Blue eye disease caused by Porcine rubulavirus (PorPV) is an endemic viral infection of swine causing neurological and respiratory disease in piglets, and reproductive failure in sows and boars. The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein of PorPV is the most abundant component in the viral envelope and the main target of the immune response in infected animals. In this study, we expressed the HN-PorPV-recombinant (rHN-PorPV) protein in an Escherichia coli system and analyzed the immune responses in mice. The HN gene was cloned from the reference strain PorPV-La Piedad Michoacan Virus (GenBank accession number BK005918), into the pDual expression vector. The expressed protein was identified at a molecular weight of 61.7 kDa. Three-dimensional modeling showed that the main conformational and functional domains of the rHN-PorPV protein were preserved. The antigenicity of the expressed protein was confirmed by Western blot with a monoclonal antibody recognizing the HN, and by testing against serum samples from pigs experimentally infected with PorPV. The immunogenicity of the rHN-PorPV protein was tested by inoculation of BALB/c mice with AbISCO-100(®) as adjuvant. Analysis of the humoral immune responses in mice showed an increased level of specific antibodies 14 days after the first immunization, compared to the control group (P < 0.0005). The results show the ability of the rHN-PorPV protein to induce an antibody response in mice. Due to its immunogenic potential, the rHN-PorPV protein will be further evaluated in pig trials for its suitability for prevention and control of blue eye disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Host shifts and molecular evolution of H7 avian influenza virus hemagglutinin

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    Stallknecht David E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Evolutionary consequences of host shifts represent a challenge to identify the mechanisms involved in the emergence of influenza A (IA viruses. In this study we focused on the evolutionary history of H7 IA virus in wild and domestic birds, with a particular emphasis on host shifts consequences on the molecular evolution of the hemagglutinin (HA gene. Based on a dataset of 414 HA nucleotide sequences, we performed an extensive phylogeographic analysis in order to identify the overall genetic structure of H7 IA viruses. We then identified host shift events and investigated viral population dynamics in wild and domestic birds, independently. Finally, we estimated changes in nucleotide substitution rates and tested for positive selection in the HA gene. A strong association between the geographic origin and the genetic structure was observed, with four main clades including viruses isolated in North America, South America, Australia and Eurasia-Africa. We identified ten potential events of virus introduction from wild to domestic birds, but little evidence for spillover of viruses from poultry to wild waterbirds. Several sites involved in host specificity (addition of a glycosylation site in the receptor binding domain and virulence (insertion of amino acids in the cleavage site were found to be positively selected in HA nucleotide sequences, in genetically unrelated lineages, suggesting parallel evolution for the HA gene of IA viruses in domestic birds. These results highlight that evolutionary consequences of bird host shifts would need to be further studied to understand the ecological and molecular mechanisms involved in the emergence of domestic bird-adapted viruses.

  17. Heparin-binding Hemagglutinin of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is an Inhibitor of Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qing; Li, Zhi; Zhou, Shan; Zhang, Qian; Zhou, Lei; Fu, Xiaorui; Yang, Liu; Ma, Yueyun; Hao, Xiaoke

    2017-01-01

    Airway epithelial cell is often the initial site of attack by pathogens, and cell death is commonly caused by internalization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, the mechanism of interaction between epithelial cells and Mtb is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the role of the heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA) protein of Mtb in the function of epithelial cells. In particular, the autophagy of A549 cells was determined based on microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 alpha (LC3) activity. Autophagosome formation was detected by Monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining and immune fluorescence staining of LC3. Autophagy could be significantly suppressed by HBHA protein. In addition, the LDH assay results showed that HBHA treatment could induce death on A549 cells. To explore the form of cell death, we detected the activity of caspase-3 and LDH release of A549 cells in the presence or absence of caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Results demonstrated that HBHA treatment could induce apoptosis of A549 cells. To further confirm these results, we constructed the recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis (MS) expressing HBHA (rMS-HBHA) and explored the influence of rMS-HBHA on the function of A549 cells. rMS-HBHA infection significantly inhibited LC3 expression and the maturation of autophagosomes in A549 cells. Subsequently, we infected A549 cells with MS and detected the viability of intracellular MS by CFU counts. rMS-HBHA showed higher survival and replication capacity in A549 cells than those of the wild-type MS. Finally, infection of A549 cells with rMS-HBHA caused further apoptosis. These findings suggested that rMS-HBHA could inhibit autophagy, promote its survival and replication within A549 cells, and subsequently induce apoptosis on infected cells to facilitate infection.

  18. Impact of host cell line adaptation on quasispecies composition and glycosylation of influenza A virus hemagglutinin.

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    Jana Verena Roedig

    Full Text Available The genome of influenza A viruses is constantly changing (genetic drift resulting in small, gradual changes in viral proteins. Alterations within antibody recognition sites of the viral membrane glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA result in an antigenetic drift, which requires the seasonal update of human influenza virus vaccines. Generally, virus adaptation is necessary to obtain sufficiently high virus yields in cell culture-derived vaccine manufacturing. In this study detailed HA N-glycosylation pattern analysis was combined with in-depth pyrosequencing analysis of the virus genomic RNA. Forward and backward adaptation from Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK cells to African green monkey kidney (Vero cells was investigated for two closely related influenza A virus PR/8/34 (H1N1 strains: from the National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC or the Robert Koch Institute (RKI. Furthermore, stability of HA N-glycosylation patterns over ten consecutive passages and different harvest time points is demonstrated. Adaptation to Vero cells finally allowed efficient influenza A virus replication in Vero cells. In contrast, during back-adaptation the virus replicated well from the very beginning. HA N-glycosylation patterns were cell line dependent and stabilized fast within one (NIBSC-derived virus or two (RKI-derived virus successive passages during adaptation processes. However, during adaptation new virus variants were detected. These variants carried "rescue" mutations on the genomic level within the HA stem region, which result in amino acid substitutions. These substitutions finally allowed sufficient virus replication in the new host system. According to adaptation pressure the composition of the virus populations varied. In Vero cells a selection for "rescue" variants was characteristic. After back-adaptation to MDCK cells some variants persisted at indifferent frequencies, others slowly diminished and even

  19. Activity of T Cells Stimulated by Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase of Newcastle Disease Virus in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PIAO Bing-guo; SUN Jiu-hua; PIAO Yun-feng; JIN Ning-yi; LI Xiao; SUN Li-li; KAN Shi-fu; LIU Lei; HUANG Hai-yan; YANG Guo-hua; WANG Yu-hang; WANG Zhuo-yue

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the stimulated activity of T cells and the anti-tumor properties of hemagglutinin-neuraminidase(HN) of Newcastle disease virus(NDV) strain Changchun(NDVcc), the expression of HN gene in hepatoma cells(human HepG-2 and mouse H22 cells) infected with the recombinant adenovirus(Ad-HN) was identified by Western blot analysis and flow cytometry. Sialidase activity of NDVcc HN expressed by Ad-HN was assayed by the periodate-resorcinol method. The in vivo anti-tumor effects of NDVcc HN were evaluated in the H22 solid tumor model. Regional lymph nodes of the mouse model treated with Ad-HN were removed to harvest T lymphocytes and evaluating the specific cytotoxicity of cytotoxic T lymphocyte(CTL) and natural killer(NK) cells by an L-lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) assay, in the mean time, the secretion of cytokines was analyzed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assays(ELISA). The results show that NDVcc HN was effectively expressed by Ad-HN in HepG-2 and H22 cells.The sialidase activity assay showed that Ad-HN significantly reduced sialic acid level of the hepatoma cells compared with the cells infected the empty adenovirus vector(Ad-mock). When treated with Ad-HN, the growth of subcutaneous H22 primary tumors in C57BL/6 mice was suppressed, and the mean mice survival increased. In addition, the treatment of Ad-HN elicited strong NK and CTL responses, and high levels of Thl cytokines, such as IL-2 and IFN-γ.In conclusion, NDVcc HN effectively elicits T cell-mediate anti-tumor cytotoxicity via sialidase activity and may be a novel strategy for cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Molecular Evolution and Characterization of Hemagglutinin (H) in Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhongxiang; Yuan, Ruyi; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Xueliang; Dou, Yongxi

    2016-01-01

    Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) is an acute, highly contagious, and febrile viral disease that affects both domestic and wild small ruminants. The disease has become a major obstacle to the development of sustainable Agriculture. Hemagglutinin (H), the envelope glycoprotein of Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus (PPRV), plays a crucial role in regulating viral adsorption and entry, thus determining pathogenicity, and release of newly produced viral particles. In order to accurately understand the epidemic of the disease and the interactions between the virus and host, we launch the work. Here, we examined H gene from all four lineages of the PPRV to investigate evolutionary and epidemiologic dynamics of PPRV by the Bayesian method. In addition, we predicted positive selection sites due to selective pressures. Finally, we studied the interaction between H protein and SLAM receptor based on homology model of the complex. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that H gene can also be used to investigate evolutionary and epidemiologic dynamics of PPRV. Positive selection analysis identified four positive selection sites in H gene, in which only one common site (aa246) was detected by two methods, suggesting strong operation structural and/or functional constraint of changes on the H protein. This target site may be of interest for future mutagenesis studies. The results of homology modeling showed PPRVHv-shSLAM binding interface and MVH-maSLAM binding interface were consistent, wherein the groove in the B4 blade and B5 of the head domain of PPRVHv bound to the AGFCC' β-sheets of the membrane-distal ectodomain of shSLAM. The binding regions could provide insight on the nature of the protein for epitope vaccine design, novel drug discovery, and rational drug design against PPRV.

  1. An Influenza A/H1N1/2009 Hemagglutinin Vaccine Produced in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Yáñez, José M.; Portillo-Lara, Roberto; Mendoza-Ochoa, Gonzalo I.; García-Echauri, Sergio A.; López-Pacheco, Felipe; Bulnes-Abundis, David; Salgado-Gallegos, Johari; Lara-Mayorga, Itzel M.; Webb-Vargas, Yenny; León-Angel, Felipe O.; Rivero-Aranda, Ramón E.; Oropeza-Almazán, Yuriana; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M.; Zertuche-Guerra, Manuel I.; DuBois, Rebecca M.; White, Stephen W.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Russell, Charles J.; Alvarez, Mario M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The A/H1N1/2009 influenza pandemic made evident the need for faster and higher-yield methods for the production of influenza vaccines. Platforms based on virus culture in mammalian or insect cells are currently under investigation. Alternatively, expression of fragments of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein in prokaryotic systems can potentially be the most efficacious strategy for the manufacture of large quantities of influenza vaccine in a short period of time. Despite experimental evidence on the immunogenic potential of HA protein constructs expressed in bacteria, it is still generally accepted that glycosylation should be a requirement for vaccine efficacy. Methodology/Principal Findings We expressed the globular HA receptor binding domain, referred to here as HA63–286-RBD, of the influenza A/H1N1/2009 virus in Escherichia coli using a simple, robust and scalable process. The recombinant protein was refolded and purified from the insoluble fraction of the cellular lysate as a single species. Recombinant HA63–286-RBD appears to be properly folded, as shown by analytical ultracentrifugation and bio-recognition assays. It binds specifically to serum antibodies from influenza A/H1N1/2009 patients and was found to be immunogenic, to be capable of triggering the production of neutralizing antibodies, and to have protective activity in the ferret model. Conclusions/Significance Projections based on our production/purification data indicate that this strategy could yield up to half a billion doses of vaccine per month in a medium-scale pharmaceutical production facility equipped for bacterial culture. Also, our findings demonstrate that glycosylation is not a mandatory requirement for influenza vaccine efficacy. PMID:20661476

  2. Molecular Evolution and Characterization of Hemagglutinin (H) in Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Zhu, Xueliang; Dou, Yongxi

    2016-01-01

    Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR) is an acute, highly contagious, and febrile viral disease that affects both domestic and wild small ruminants. The disease has become a major obstacle to the development of sustainable Agriculture. Hemagglutinin (H), the envelope glycoprotein of Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus (PPRV), plays a crucial role in regulating viral adsorption and entry, thus determining pathogenicity, and release of newly produced viral particles. In order to accurately understand the epidemic of the disease and the interactions between the virus and host, we launch the work. Here, we examined H gene from all four lineages of the PPRV to investigate evolutionary and epidemiologic dynamics of PPRV by the Bayesian method. In addition, we predicted positive selection sites due to selective pressures. Finally, we studied the interaction between H protein and SLAM receptor based on homology model of the complex. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that H gene can also be used to investigate evolutionary and epidemiologic dynamics of PPRV. Positive selection analysis identified four positive selection sites in H gene, in which only one common site (aa246) was detected by two methods, suggesting strong operation structural and/or functional constraint of changes on the H protein. This target site may be of interest for future mutagenesis studies. The results of homology modeling showed PPRVHv-shSLAM binding interface and MVH-maSLAM binding interface were consistent, wherein the groove in the B4 blade and B5 of the head domain of PPRVHv bound to the AGFCC′ β-sheets of the membrane-distal ectodomain of shSLAM. The binding regions could provide insight on the nature of the protein for epitope vaccine design, novel drug discovery, and rational drug design against PPRV. PMID:27035347

  3. Technology transfer and scale-up of the Flublok recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) influenza vaccine manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Barry; Boulanger, Robert; Fino, Mireli; Srivastava, Indresh; Holtz, Kathy; Khramtsov, Nikolai; McPherson, Clifton; Meghrous, Jamal; Kubera, Paul; Cox, Manon M J

    2014-09-22

    Multiple different hemagglutinin (HA) protein antigens have been reproducibly manufactured at the 650L scale by Protein Sciences Corporation (PSC) based on an insect cell culture with baculovirus infection. Significantly, these HA protein antigens were produced by the same Universal Manufacturing process as described in the biological license application (BLA) for the first recombinant influenza vaccine approved by the FDA (Flublok). The technology is uniquely designed so that a change in vaccine composition can be readily accommodated from one HA protein antigen to another one. Here we present a vaccine candidate to combat the recently emerged H7N9 virus as an example starting with the genetic sequence for the required HA, creation of the baculovirus and ending with purified protein antigen (or vaccine component) at the 10L scale accomplished within 38 days under GMP conditions. The same process performance is being achieved at the 2L, 10L, 100L, 650L and 2500L scale. An illustration is given of how the technology was transferred from the benchmark 650L scale facility to a retrofitted microbial facility at the 2500L scale within 100 days which includes the time for facility engineering changes. The successful development, technology transfer and scale-up of the Flublok process has major implications for being ready to make vaccine rapidly on a worldwide scale as a defense against pandemic influenza. The technology described does not have the same vulnerability to mutations in the egg adapted strain, and resulting loss in vaccine efficacy, faced by egg based manufacture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. An influenza A/H1N1/2009 hemagglutinin vaccine produced in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M Aguilar-Yáñez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The A/H1N1/2009 influenza pandemic made evident the need for faster and higher-yield methods for the production of influenza vaccines. Platforms based on virus culture in mammalian or insect cells are currently under investigation. Alternatively, expression of fragments of the hemagglutinin (HA protein in prokaryotic systems can potentially be the most efficacious strategy for the manufacture of large quantities of influenza vaccine in a short period of time. Despite experimental evidence on the immunogenic potential of HA protein constructs expressed in bacteria, it is still generally accepted that glycosylation should be a requirement for vaccine efficacy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We expressed the globular HA receptor binding domain, referred to here as HA(63-286-RBD, of the influenza A/H1N1/2009 virus in Escherichia coli using a simple, robust and scalable process. The recombinant protein was refolded and purified from the insoluble fraction of the cellular lysate as a single species. Recombinant HA(63-286-RBD appears to be properly folded, as shown by analytical ultracentrifugation and bio-recognition assays. It binds specifically to serum antibodies from influenza A/H1N1/2009 patients and was found to be immunogenic, to be capable of triggering the production of neutralizing antibodies, and to have protective activity in the ferret model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Projections based on our production/purification data indicate that this strategy could yield up to half a billion doses of vaccine per month in a medium-scale pharmaceutical production facility equipped for bacterial culture. Also, our findings demonstrate that glycosylation is not a mandatory requirement for influenza vaccine efficacy.

  5. Molecular Characterizations of Surface Proteins Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase from Recent H5Nx Avian Influenza Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hua; Carney, Paul J.; Mishin, Vasiliy P.; Guo, Zhu; Chang, Jessie C.; Wentworth, David E.; Gubareva, Larisa V.; Stevens, James; Schultz-Cherry, S.

    2016-04-06

    ABSTRACT

    During 2014, a subclade 2.3.4.4 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N8) virus caused poultry outbreaks around the world. In late 2014/early 2015, the virus was detected in wild birds in Canada and the United States, and these viruses also gave rise to reassortant progeny, composed of viral RNA segments (vRNAs) from both Eurasian and North American lineages. In particular, viruses were found with N1, N2, and N8 neuraminidase vRNAs, and these are collectively referred to as H5Nx viruses. In the United States, more than 48 million domestic birds have been affected. Here we present a detailed structural and biochemical analysis of the surface antigens of H5N1, H5N2, and H5N8 viruses in addition to those of a recent human H5N6 virus. Our results with recombinant hemagglutinin reveal that these viruses have a strict avian receptor binding preference, while recombinantly expressed neuraminidases are sensitive to FDA-approved and investigational antivirals. Although H5Nx viruses currently pose a low risk to humans, it is important to maintain surveillance of these circulating viruses and to continually assess future changes that may increase their pandemic potential.

    IMPORTANCEThe H5Nx viruses emerging in North America, Europe, and Asia pose a great public health concern. Here we report a molecular and structural study of the major surface proteins of several H5Nx influenza viruses. Our results improve the understanding of these new viruses and provide important information on their receptor preferences and susceptibilities to antivirals, which are central to pandemic risk assessment.

  6. Inhibition of influenza virus infection and hemagglutinin cleavage by the protease inhibitor HAI-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Chung, Changik; Cyphers, Soreen Y.; Rinaldi, Vera D.; Marcano, Valerie C.; Whittaker, Gary R., E-mail: grw7@cornell.edu

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza HA cleavage activation. • Biochemical and cell biological analysis of HAI-2 as an inhibitor of influenza virus infection. • Comparative analysis of HAI-2 for vesicular stomatitis virus and human parainfluenza virus type-1. • Analysis of the activity of HAI-2 in a mouse model of influenza. - Abstract: Influenza virus remains a significant concern to public health, with the continued potential for a high fatality pandemic. Vaccination and antiviral therapeutics are effective measures to circumvent influenza virus infection, however, multiple strains have emerged that are resistant to the antiviral therapeutics currently on the market. With this considered, investigation of alternative antiviral therapeutics is being conducted. One such approach is to inhibit cleavage activation of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), which is an essential step in the viral replication cycle that permits viral-endosome fusion. Therefore, targeting trypsin-like, host proteases responsible for HA cleavage in vivo may prove to be an effective therapeutic. Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor 2 (HAI-2) is naturally expressed in the respiratory tract and is a potent inhibitor of trypsin-like serine proteases, some of which have been determined to cleave HA. In this study, we demonstrate that HAI-2 is an effective inhibitor of cleavage of HA from the human-adapted H1 and H3 subtypes. HAI-2 inhibited influenza virus H1N1 infection in cell culture, and HAI-2 administration showed protection in a mouse model of influenza. HAI-2 has the potential to be an effective, alternative antiviral therapeutic for influenza.

  7. Quantitative description of glycan-receptor binding of influenza A virus H7 hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karunya Srinivasan

    Full Text Available In the context of recently emerged novel influenza strains through reassortment, avian influenza subtypes such as H5N1, H7N7, H7N2, H7N3 and H9N2 pose a constant threat in terms of their adaptation to the human host. Among these subtypes, it was recently demonstrated that mutations in H5 and H9 hemagglutinin (HA in the context of lab-generated reassorted viruses conferred aerosol transmissibility in ferrets (a property shared by human adapted viruses. We previously demonstrated that the quantitative binding affinity of HA to α2→6 sialylated glycans (human receptors is one of the important factors governing human adaptation of HA. Although the H7 subtype has infected humans causing varied clinical outcomes from mild conjunctivitis to severe respiratory illnesses, it is not clear where the HA of these subtypes stand in regard to human adaptation since its binding affinity to glycan receptors has not yet been quantified. In this study, we have quantitatively characterized the glycan receptor-binding specificity of HAs from representative strains of Eurasian (H7N7 and North American (H7N2 lineages that have caused human infection. Furthermore, we have demonstrated for the first time that two specific mutations; Gln226→Leu and Gly228→Ser in glycan receptor-binding site of H7 HA substantially increase its binding affinity to human receptor. Our findings contribute to a framework for monitoring the evolution of H7 HA to be able to adapt to human host.

  8. Jatropha curcas hemagglutinin is similar to a 2S albumin allergen from the same source and has unique sugar affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Divya N; Singh, Vijay; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Singh, Desh Deepak

    2012-11-01

    We have previously reported the purification and preliminary X-ray characterization of a hemagglutinin from the seeds of Jatropha curcas and, with the detailed sequencing information available now, we find that it is similar to a 2S albumin allergen isolated from the same source. Through a search of Jatropha genome database (http://www.kazusa.or.jp/jatropha/), we map it to the sequence id JcCA0234191 (now referred to as Jcr4S00619.70 in the new version, release 4.5) which has a conserved alpha amylase inhibitor/seed storage protein domain found in the 2S albumin allergens. The putative sequence of the small and large chains of the protein is assigned and the total mass of the two subunits matches with the intact mass 10 kDa determined through MALDI. The protein retains hemagglutination activity between pH 6-9 and up to 60 °C on heat treatment and its hemagglutination activity is inhibited by sialic acid and fetuin. Bioinformatics studies show that the isolated protein sequence clusters in close association with a 2S albumin from Ricinus communis in phylogeny analysis and has a conservation of the characteristic four disulfide linkage pattern. Hemagglutinins and lectins are known to have allergenic effects through their interaction with immunoglobulin E and histamine release and earlier studies have shown that this interaction can be inhibited by lectin-specific sugars. We hope this report bridges the plant allergens and hemagglutinins further for exploring possible mediation of allergenic activity through sialic acid and complex sugar interactions and generates further interest in the area.

  9. Characterising Radio Emissions in Cosmic Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. O.

    2014-02-01

    A growing number of radio studies probe galaxy clusters into the low-power regime in which star formation is the dominant source of radio emission. However, at the time of writing no comparably deep observations have focused exclusively on the radio populations of cosmic filaments. This thesis describes the ATCA 2.1 GHz observations and subsequent analysis of two such regions - labelled Zone 1 (between clusters A3158 and A3125/A3128) and Zone 2 (between A3135 and A3145) - in the Horologium-Reticulum Supercluster (HRS). Source count profiles of both populations are discussed and a radio luminosity function for Zone 1 is generated. While the source counts of Zone 2 appear to be consistent with expected values, Zone 1 exhibits an excess of counts across a wide flux range (1 mJy< S_1.4 < 200 mJy). An excess in radio activity at the lower extent of this range (log P_1.4 < 22.5; within the SF-dominated regime) is also suggested by the radio luminosity function for that region, and brief colour analysis suggests that such an excess is indeed predominantly associated with a starforming population. The differences between the two filamentary zones is attributed to cosmic variation. The regions are both small (~ 1 degree square), and are significantly separated in the HRS. Further radio observations of filaments are required and the results combined into a larger sample size in order to arrive at a generalised model filamentary population.

  10. Laser filament-induced aerosol formation

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    H. Saathoff

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Using the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA, we investigated the laser filament induced particle formation in ambient air, humid synthetic air, humid nitrogen, argon–oxygen mixture, and pure argon in order to simulate the particle formation under realistic atmospheric conditions as well as to investigate the influence of typical gas-phase atmospheric constituents on the particle formation. Terawatt laser plasma filaments generated new particles in the size range 3 to 130 nm with particle production rates ranging from 1 × 107 to 5 × 109 cm−3 plasma s−1 for the given experimental conditions. In all cases the particle formation rates increased exponentially with the water content of the gas mixture. Furthermore, the presence of a few ppb of trace gases like SO2 and α-pinene clearly enhanced the particle yield by number, the latter also by mass. Our findings suggest that new particle formation is efficiently supported by oxidized species like acids generated by the photoionization of both major and minor components of the air, including N2, NH3, SO2 and organics.

  11. Laser filament-induced aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Saathoff

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Using the aerosol and cloud simulation chamber AIDA we investigated the laser filament induced particle formation in ambient air, humid synthetic air, humid nitrogen, argon-oxygen mixture, and pure argon in order to simulate the particle formation under realistic atmospheric conditions as well as to investigate the influence of typical gas-phase atmospheric constituents on the particle formation. Terawatt laser plasma filaments generated new particles in the size range 3 to 130 nm with particle production rates ranging from 1 × 107 to 5 × 109 cm−3 plasma s−1. In all cases the particle formation rates increased exponentially with the water content of the gas mixture. Furthermore, the presence of a few ppb of trace gases like SO2 and α-pinene clearly enhanced the particle yield by number, the latter also by mass. Our findings suggest that new particle formation is efficiently supported by acids generated by the photo-ionization of both major and minor components of the air, including N2, NH3, SO2 and organics.

  12. The Golgi apparatus: insights from filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazopoulou, Areti

    2016-01-01

    Cargo passage through the Golgi, albeit an undoubtedly essential cellular function, is a mechanistically unresolved and much debated process. Although the main molecular players are conserved, diversification of the Golgi among different eukaryotic lineages is providing us with tools to resolve standing controversies. During the past decade the Golgi apparatus of model filamentous fungi, mainly Aspergillus nidulans, has been intensively studied. Here an overview of the most important findings in the field is provided. Golgi architecture and dynamics, as well as the novel cell biology tools that were developed in filamentous fungi in these studies, are addressed. An emphasis is placed on the central role the Golgi has as a crossroads in the endocytic and secretory-traffic pathways in hyphae. Finally the major advances that the A. nidulans Golgi biology has yielded so far regarding our understanding of key Golgi regulators, such as the Rab GTPases RabC(Rab6) and RabE(Rab11), the oligomeric transport protein particle, TRAPPII, and the Golgi guanine nucleotide exchange factors of Arf1, GeaA(GBF1/Gea1) and HypB(BIG/Sec7), are highlighted.

  13. Morgellons disease: a filamentous borrelial dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Middelveen MJ

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Marianne J Middelveen, Raphael B Stricker International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: Morgellons disease (MD is a dermopathy characterized by multicolored filaments that lie under, are embedded in, or project from skin. Although MD was initially considered to be a delusional disorder, recent studies have demonstrated that the dermopathy is associated with tickborne infection, that the filaments are composed of keratin and collagen, and that they result from proliferation of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in epithelial tissue. Culture, histopathological and molecular evidence of spirochetal infection associated with MD has been presented in several published studies using a variety of techniques. Spirochetes genetically identified as Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto predominate as the infective agent in most of the Morgellons skin specimens studied so far. Other species of Borrelia including Borrelia garinii, Borrelia miyamotoi, and Borrelia hermsii have also been detected in skin specimens taken from MD patients. The optimal treatment for MD remains to be determined. Keywords: Morgellons disease, dermatitis, Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, spirochetes

  14. Filamentation and supercontinuum generation in lanthanum glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxia; Liao, Meisong; Li, Xia; Bi, Wanjun; Ohishi, Yasutake; Cheng, Tonglei; Fang, Yongzheng; Zhao, Guoying; Gao, Weiqing

    2017-01-01

    A broadband supercontinuum (SC) covering 400-2800 nm in a 20 dB dynamic range is reported in a piece of highly nonlinear, low-dispersion bulk lanthanum glass without employing any lens to focus the pump pulse. The spectrum width obtained in this study is broader than the maximum spectrum width obtained in silica photonic crystal fibers. The filaments and bright conical visible emission patterns of the SC are analyzed. Under optimum pump conditions, an SC conversion efficiency of 75% is obtained. The SC conversion efficiency is confirmed to be stable. Additionally, the relationship between the input peak intensity and the output beam radius is elucidated by simulating the propagation of a Gaussian beam in the bulk lanthanum glass. A 0.20 mm stable laser beam radius at the end of the propagation domain is demonstrated in a certain input peak intensity range. This small value of the beam radius indicates that most of the output power is localized over a small region because of the Kerr focusing effect despite the existence of conical emission in the SC generation by filamentation. The findings of this study are of significance for the development of ultra-broadband SC sources based on bulk glasses and high peak power lasers.

  15. The mutation network for the hemagglutinin gene from the novel influenza A (H1N1) virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE YunGang; DING GuoHui; BIAN Chao; HUANG Zhong; LAN Ke; SUN Bing; WANG XueCai; LI YiXue; WANG HongYan; WANG XiaoNing; YANG Zhong; ZHONG Yang; JIN WeiRong; XIONG Hui; DAI JianXin; GUO YaJun; WANG Hao; CHE XiaoYan; WU Fan; YUAN ZhenAn; ZHANG Xi; CAO ZhiWei; ZHOU XiaoNong; ZHOU JiaHai; MA ZhiYong; TONG GuangZhi; ZHAO GuoPing; JIN Li

    2009-01-01

    A mutation network for the hemagglutinin gene (HA) of the novel type A (H1N1) influenza virus was constructed.Sequence homology analysis indicated that one HA sequence type from the viruses mainly isolated from Mexico was likely the original type in this epidemic.Based on the 658A and 1408T mutations in HA,the viruses evolving into this epidemic were divided into three categories,the Mexico,the transitional and the New York type.The three groups of viruses presented distinctive clustering features in their geographic distributions.

  16. The isolation of the ectodomain of the alphavirus E1 protein as a soluble hemagglutinin and its crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengler, G; Wengler, G; Rey, F A

    1999-05-10

    Alphaviruses are isometric enveloped viruses approximately 70 nm in diameter. The viral surface contains 80 glycoprotein spikes arranged in a T = 4 lattice. Each of these spikes consists of three heterodimers of the viral membrane proteins E1 (approximately 49 kDa) and E2 (approximately 51 kDa). Cryoelectron microscopic analyses have shown that the spikes form a protein shell on the viral surface. We have made an attempt to isolate biologically active protein fragments from this surface and to grow crystals from such fragments. To this end membrane proteins were extracted with Nonidet-P40 from the Semliki Forest alphavirus and the proteins were separated from detergent by centrifugation. A protein complex containing the E1 and E2 molecules in quantitative yield was obtained by this procedure. This complex has the following properties: It sediments at approximately 30S, it chromatographs with an apparent molecular mass of approximately 580,000 Da during gel filtration, it cannot be dissociated by either nonionic detergents or 6 M urea, and at acid pH it is a highly active hemagglutinin. The data indicate that this 30S hemagglutinin complex, which has not been hitherto described for alphaviruses, may represent a variant form of the protein lattice present on the alphavirus surface. Cleavage of this complex by subtilisin selectively removes carboxy-terminal sequences from the E1 and E2 proteins, which contain the cytoplasmic and transmembrane segments of the proteins and a small part of their ectodomain. The remaining ectodomains are called E1DeltaS and E2DeltaS. This proteolysis also leads to dissociation of the 30S complex. The cleavage products accumulate in the form of a heterodimer of the E1DeltaS and E2DeltaS proteins. Treatment of the heterodimer with PNGase F leads to rapid removal of carbohydrate from the E2DeltaS protein and a dissociation of the complex into the constituent molecules, which can be separated by chromatography. The finding that the

  17. Vectors based on modified vaccinia Ankara expressing influenza H5N1 hemagglutinin induce substantial cross-clade protective immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Hessel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses are continuing to evolve with a potential threat for an influenza pandemic. So far, the H5N1 influenza viruses have not widely circulated in humans and therefore constitute a high risk for the non immune population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cross-protective potential of the hemagglutinins of five H5N1 strains of divergent clades using a live attenuated modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA vector vaccine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The replication-deficient MVA virus was used to express influenza hemagglutinin (HA proteins. Specifically, recombinant MVA viruses expressing the HA genes of the clade 1 virus A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (VN/1203, the clade 2.1.3 virus A/Indonesia/5/2005 (IN5/05, the clade 2.2 viruses A/turkey/Turkey/1/2005 (TT01/05 and A/chicken/Egypt/3/2006 (CE/06, and the clade 2.3.4 virus A/Anhui/1/2005 (AH1/05 were constructed. These experimental live vaccines were assessed in a lethal mouse model. Mice vaccinated with the VN/1203 hemagglutinin-expressing MVA induced excellent protection against all the above mentioned clades. Also mice vaccinated with the IN5/05 HA expressing MVA induced substantial protection against homologous and heterologous AH1/05 challenge. After vaccination with the CE/06 HA expressing MVA, mice were fully protected against clade 2.2 challenge and partially protected against challenge of other clades. Mice vaccinated with AH1/05 HA expressing MVA vectors were only partially protected against homologous and heterologous challenge. The live vaccines induced substantial amounts of neutralizing antibodies, mainly directed against the homologous challenge virus, and high levels of HA-specific IFN-γ secreting CD4 and CD8 T-cells against epitopes conserved among the H5 clades and subclades. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The highest level of cross-protection was induced by the HA derived from the VN/1203 strain, suggesting that pandemic H5 vaccines

  18. Functional balance between the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of influenza A(H1N1pdm09 HA D222 variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Sébastien Casalegno

    Full Text Available D222G/N substitutions in A(H1N1pdm09 hemagglutinin may be associated with increased binding of viruses causing low respiratory tract infections and human pathogenesis. We assessed the impact of such substitutions on the balance between hemagglutinin binding and neuraminidase cleavage, viral growth and in vivo virulence.Seven viruses with differing polymorphisms at codon 222 (2 with D, 3 G, 1 N and 1 E were isolated from patients and characterized with regards hemagglutinin binding affinity (Kd to α-2,6 sialic acid (SAα-2,6 and SAα-2,3 and neuraminidase enzymatic properties (Km, Ki and Vmax. The hemagglutination assay was used to quantitatively assess the balance between hemagglutinin binding and neuraminidase cleavage. Viral growth properties were compared in vitro in MDCK-SIAT1 cells and in vivo in BALB/c mice. Compared with D222 variants, the binding affinity of G222 variants was greater for SAα-2,3 and lower for SAα-2,6, whereas that of both E222 and N222 variants was greater for both SAα-2,3 and SAα-2,6. Mean neuraminidase activity of D222 variants (16.0 nmol/h/10(6 was higher than that of G222 (1.7 nmol/h/10(6 viruses and E/N222 variants (4.4 nmol/h/10(6 viruses. The hemagglutination assay demonstrated a deviation from functional balance by E222 and N222 variants that displayed strong hemagglutinin binding but weak neuraminidase activity. This deviation impaired viral growth in MDCK-SIAT1 cells but not infectivity in mice. All strains but one exhibited low infectious dose in mice (MID50 and replicated to high titers in the lung; this D222 strain exhibited a ten-fold higher MID50 and replicated to low titers. Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase balance status had a greater impact on viral replication than hemagglutinin affinity strength, at least in vitro, thus emphasizing the importance of an optimal balance for influenza virus fitness. The mouse model is effective in assessing binding to SAα-2,3 but cannot differentiate SAα-2,3- from SA

  19. Functional balance between the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 HA D222 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalegno, Jean-Sébastien; Ferraris, Olivier; Escuret, Vanessa; Bouscambert, Maude; Bergeron, Corinne; Linès, Laetitia; Excoffier, Thierry; Valette, Martine; Frobert, Emilie; Pillet, Sylvie; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lina, Bruno; Ottmann, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    D222G/N substitutions in A(H1N1)pdm09 hemagglutinin may be associated with increased binding of viruses causing low respiratory tract infections and human pathogenesis. We assessed the impact of such substitutions on the balance between hemagglutinin binding and neuraminidase cleavage, viral growth and in vivo virulence.Seven viruses with differing polymorphisms at codon 222 (2 with D, 3 G, 1 N and 1 E) were isolated from patients and characterized with regards hemagglutinin binding affinity (Kd) to α-2,6 sialic acid (SAα-2,6) and SAα-2,3 and neuraminidase enzymatic properties (Km, Ki and Vmax). The hemagglutination assay was used to quantitatively assess the balance between hemagglutinin binding and neuraminidase cleavage. Viral growth properties were compared in vitro in MDCK-SIAT1 cells and in vivo in BALB/c mice. Compared with D222 variants, the binding affinity of G222 variants was greater for SAα-2,3 and lower for SAα-2,6, whereas that of both E222 and N222 variants was greater for both SAα-2,3 and SAα-2,6. Mean neuraminidase activity of D222 variants (16.0 nmol/h/10(6)) was higher than that of G222 (1.7 nmol/h/10(6) viruses) and E/N222 variants (4.4 nmol/h/10(6) viruses). The hemagglutination assay demonstrated a deviation from functional balance by E222 and N222 variants that displayed strong hemagglutinin binding but weak neuraminidase activity. This deviation impaired viral growth in MDCK-SIAT1 cells but not infectivity in mice. All strains but one exhibited low infectious dose in mice (MID50) and replicated to high titers in the lung; this D222 strain exhibited a ten-fold higher MID50 and replicated to low titers. Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase balance status had a greater impact on viral replication than hemagglutinin affinity strength, at least in vitro, thus emphasizing the importance of an optimal balance for influenza virus fitness. The mouse model is effective in assessing binding to SAα-2,3 but cannot differentiate SAα-2,3- from SAα-2

  20. Amino Acid Substitutions That Affect Receptor Binding and Stability of the Hemagglutinin of Influenza A/H7N9 Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauwen, Eefje J. A.; Burke, David F.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; Herfst, Sander; Fouchier, Ron A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-binding preference and stability of hemagglutinin have been implicated as crucial determinants of airborne transmission of influenza viruses. Here, amino acid substitutions previously identified to affect these traits were tested in the context of an A/H7N9 virus. Some combinations of substitutions, most notably G219S and K58I, resulted in relatively high affinity for α2,6-linked sialic acid receptor and acid and temperature stability. Thus, the hemagglutinin of the A/H7N9 virus may adopt traits associated with airborne transmission. PMID:26792744

  1. THE APPARATUS FOR ALIGNMENT OF THE PHOTOMETRIC LAMP FILAMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Dlugunovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During photometric measurements involving the use of photometric lamps it is necessary that the filament of lamp takes a strictly predetermined position with respect to the photodetector and the optical axis of the photometric setup. The errors in positioning of alignment filament with respect to the optical axis of the measuring system lead to increase the uncertainty of measurement of the photometric characteristics of the light sources. A typical method for alignment of filament of photometric lamps is based on the use a diopter tubes (telescopes. Using this method, the mounting of filament to the required position is carried out by successive approximations, which requires special concentration and a lot of time. The aim of this work is to develop an apparatus for alignment which allows simultaneous alignment of the filament of lamps in two mutually perpendicular planes. The method and apparatus for alignment of the photometric lamp filament during measurements of the photometric characteristics of light sources based on two digital video cameras is described in this paper. The apparatus allows to simultaneously displaying the image of lamps filament on the computer screen in two mutually perpendicular planes. The apparatus eliminates a large number of functional units requiring elementwise alignment and reduces the time required to carry out the alignment. The apparatus also provides the imaging of lamps filament with opaque coated on the bulb. The apparatus is used at the National standard of light intensity and illuminance units of the Republic of Belarus. 

  2. Motion of a Vortex Filament in the Half Space

    CERN Document Server

    Aiki, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    A model equation for the motion of a vortex filament immersed in three dimensional, incompressible and inviscid fluid is investigated as a humble attempt to model the motion of a tornado. We solve an initial-boundary value problem in the half space where we impose a boundary condition in which the vortex filament is allowed to move on the boundary.

  3. Remote Sub-Diffraction Imaging with Femtosecond Laser Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    from low-density plasma . Hence the size of the filaments is not limited by the aperture of an optical system [1] which would ordinarily determine the...The diameter of the filament is around 40 μm (estimated by knife -edge transmission measurements; not shown), which together with the scan step

  4. Fossil evidence for spin alignment of SDSS galaxies in filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Bernard J.T.; Weygaert, Rien van de; Arag´on-Calvo, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    We search for and find fossil evidence that the distribution of the spin axes of galaxies in cosmic web filaments relative to their host filaments are not randomly distributed. This would indicate that the action of large scale tidal torques effected the alignments of galaxies located in cosmic fila

  5. Physical principles of filamentous protein self-assembly kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Liu, Lucie X.; Meisl, Georg; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2017-04-01

    The polymerization of proteins and peptides into filamentous supramolecular structures is an elementary form of self-organization of key importance to the functioning biological systems, as in the case of actin biofilaments that compose the cellular cytoskeleton. Aberrant filamentous protein self-assembly, however, is associated with undesired effects and severe clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, which, at the molecular level, are associated with the formation of certain forms of filamentous protein aggregates known as amyloids. Moreover, due to their unique physicochemical properties, protein filaments are finding extensive applications as biomaterials for nanotechnology. With all these different factors at play, the field of filamentous protein self-assembly has experienced tremendous activity in recent years. A key question in this area has been to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms through which filamentous aggregates emerge from dispersed proteins with the goal of uncovering the underlying physical principles. With the latest developments in the mathematical modeling of protein aggregation kinetics as well as the improvement of the available experimental techniques it is now possible to tackle many of these complex systems and carry out detailed analyses of the underlying microscopic steps involved in protein filament formation. In this paper, we review some classical and modern kinetic theories of protein filament formation, highlighting their use as a general strategy for quantifying the molecular-level mechanisms and transition states involved in these processes.

  6. Filament Shape Versus Coronal Potential Magnetic Field Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Filippov, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Solar filament shape in projection on disc depends on the structure of the coronal magnetic field. We calculate the position of polarity inversion lines (PILs) of coronal potential magnetic field at different heights above the photosphere, which compose the magnetic neutral surface, and compare with them the distribution of the filament material in H$\\alpha$ chromospheric images. We found that the most of the filament material is enclosed between two polarity inversion lines (PILs), one at a lower height close to the chromosphere and one at a higher level, which can be considered as a height of the filament spine. Observations of the same filament on the limb by the {\\it STEREO} spacecraft confirm that the height of the spine is really very close to the value obtained from the PIL and filament border matching. Such matching can be used for filament height estimations in on-disk observations. Filament barbs are housed within protruding sections of the low-level PIL. On the base of simple model, we show that th...

  7. A Filament-Associated Halo Coronal Mass Ejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    There are only a few observations published so far that show the initiation of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and illustrate the magnetic changes in the surface origin of a CME. Any attempt to connect a CME with its local solar activities is meaningful. In this paper we present a clear instance of a halo CME initiation. A careful analysis of magnetograms shows that the only obvious magnetic changes in the surface region of the CME is a magnetic flux cancellation underneath a quiescent filament. The early disturbance was seen as the slow upward motion in segments of the quiescent filament. Four hours later, the filament was accelerated to about 50 km s-1 and erupted. While a small part of the material in the filament was ejected into the upper corona, most of the mass was transported to a nearby region. About forty minutes later, the transported mass was also ejected partially to the upper corona. The eruption of the filament triggered a two-ribbon flare, with post-flare loops connecting the flare ribbons. A halo CME, which is inferred to be associated with the eruptive filament, was observed from LASCO/C2 and C3. The halo CME contained two CME events, each event corresponded to a partial mass ejection of the filament. We suggest that the magnetic reconnection at the lower atmosphere is responsible for the filament eruption and the halo CME.

  8. Calibration and Temperature Profile of a Tungsten Filament Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles; Gitton, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament…

  9. Role of (p)ppGpp in biofilm formation and expression of filamentous structures in Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisaki, Kentaro; Hanawa, Tomoko; Yonezawa, Hideo; Osaki, Takako; Fukutomi, Toshiyuki; Kawakami, Hayato; Yamamoto, Tomoko; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2013-07-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, is highly adapted to cause human infection. The production of virulence factors, such as adhesins and toxins, is just part of an array of mechanisms by which B. pertussis causes infection. The stringent response is a global bacterial response to nutritional limitation that is mediated by the accumulation of cellular ppGpp and pppGpp [termed together as (p)ppGpp]. Here, we demonstrate that production of (p)ppGpp was controlled by RelA and SpoT proteins in B. pertussis, and that mutation-induced loss of both proteins together caused deficiencies in (p)ppGpp production. The (p)ppGpp-deficient mutants also exhibited defects in growth regulation, decreases in viability under nutritionally limited conditions, increases in susceptibility to oxidative stress and defects in biofilm formation. Analysis of the secreted proteins and the respective transcripts showed that lack of (p)ppGpp led to decreased expression of fim3 and bsp22, which encode a fimbrial subunit and the self-polymerizing type III secretion system tip protein, respectively. Moreover, electron microscopic analysis also indicated that (p)ppGpp regulated the formation of filamentous structures. Most virulence genes - including fim3 and bsp22 - were expressed in the Bvg(+) phase during which the BvgAS two-component system was activated. Although fim3 and bsp22 were downregulated in a (p)ppGpp-deficient mutant, normal expression of fhaB, cyaA and ptxA persisted. Lack of coherence between virulence gene expression and (p)ppGpp production indicated that (p)ppGpp did not modulate the Bvg phase. Taken together, our data indicate that (p)ppGpp may govern an as-yet-unrecognized system that influences B. pertussis pathogenicity.

  10. Biophysics of filament length regulation by molecular motors

    CERN Document Server

    Kuan, Hui-Shun

    2013-01-01

    Regulating physical size is an essential problem that biological organisms must solve from the subcellular to the organismal scales, but it is not well understood what physical principles and mechanisms organisms use to sense and regulate their size. Any biophysical size-regulation scheme operates in a noisy environment and must be robust to other cellular dynamics and fluctuations. This work develops theory of filament length regulation inspired by recent experiments on kinesin-8 motor proteins, which move with directional bias on microtubule filaments and alter microtubule dynamics. Purified kinesin-8 motors can depolymerize chemically-stabilized microtubules. In the length-dependent depolymerization model, the rate of depolymerization tends to increase with filament length, because long filaments accumulate more motors at their tips and therefore shorten more quickly. When balanced with a constant filament growth rate, this mechanism can lead to a fixed polymer length. However, the mechanism by which kines...

  11. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A; Parilla, Megan; Annibale, Paolo; Cruz, Christina M; Laster, Kyle; Gratton, Enrico; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T; Gottardi, Cara J; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2016-09-15

    Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin-RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II.

  12. Conformations, hydrodynamic interactions, and instabilities of sedimenting semiflexible filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Saggiorato, G; Winkler, R G; Gompper, G

    2015-01-01

    The conformations and dynamics of semiflexible filaments subject to a homogeneous external (gravitational) field, e.g., in a centrifuge, are studied numerically and analytically. The competition between hydrodynamic drag and bending elasticity generates new shapes and dynamical features. We show that the shape of a semiflexible filament undergoes instabilities as the external field increases. We identify two transitions that correspond to the excitation of higher bending modes. In particular, for strong fields the filament stabilizes in a non-planar shape, resulting in a sideways drift or in helical trajectories. For two interacting filaments, we find the same transitions, with the important consequence that the new non-planar shapes have an effective hydrodynamic repulsion, in contrast to the planar shapes which attract themselves even when their osculating planes are rotated with respect to each other. For the case of planar filaments, we show analytically and numerically that the relative velocity is not n...

  13. Sedimentation of slender elastic filaments in a viscous liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspa, Veronica; Lindner, Anke; Du Roure, Olivia; Duprat, Camille

    2016-11-01

    We explore experimentally the dynamics of slender flexible filaments sedimenting in a viscous fluid at low Reynolds number. The observed deformations and dynamics result from a balance between viscous, elastic and gravitational forces on the slender body and thus are characterized by a dimensionless elasto-gravity number. We present measurements of the filaments stationary shape, velocities and trajectories for different initial conditions and filament characteristics (i.e: density, bending rigidity, size). In particular, we observe bending and reorientation of the filament, and investigate the conditions under which the filament can buckle. The introduction of elasticity broadens the spectrum of accessible sedimentation stationary states, compared to those appearing for their rigid counterparts where nor bending or buckling are allowed.

  14. Hemagglutinin gene shuffling among Clostridium botulinum serotypes C and D yields distinct sugar recognition of the botulinum toxin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Keita; Suzuki, Tomonori; Hayashi, Shintaro; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa

    2015-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum strains produce a large-sized toxin complex (TC) that is composed of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), non-toxic non-hemagglutinin and three different hemagglutinins (HA-70, HA-33 and HA-17). HA components enhance toxin delivery across the intestinal cell wall in a sugar chain-dependent manner. Here we characterized the sugar recognition of serotype D strain 1873 (D-1873) botulinum L-TC. Most L-TCs produced by serotype C and D strains bind to cells via interactions between HA-33 and cell surface sialo-oligosaccharides. However, like the previously reported L-TC produced by serotype C strain Yoichi (C-Yoichi), D-1873 L-TC binds only to cells that have been treated with neuraminidase, indicating that they recognize asialo-oligosaccharides. The D-1873 HA-33 amino acid sequence is similar to that of C-Yoichi, but had lower similarity to the majority of serotype C and D HA-33s. A comparison of TC component primary structures for 12 serotype C and D strains suggested that at least three types of HA-33 genes exist, and these are shuffled among the serotype C and D strains independently of BoNT serotype. This shuffling produces the distinct sugar recognition of serotype C and D botulinum TCs.

  15. An induced pocket for the binding of potent fusion inhibitor CL-385319 with H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runming Li

    Full Text Available The influenza glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA plays crucial roles in the early stage of virus infection, including receptor binding and membrane fusion. Therefore, HA is a potential target for developing anti-influenza drugs. Recently, we characterized a novel inhibitor of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, CL-385319, which specifically inhibits HA-mediated viral entry. Studies presented here identified the critical binding residues for CL-385319, which clustered in the stem region of the HA trimer by site-directed mutagenesis. Extensive computational simulations, including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM_GBSA calculations, charge density and Laplacian calculations, have been carried out to uncover the detailed molecular mechanism that underlies the binding of CL-385319 to H5N1 influenza virus HA. It was found that the recognition and binding of CL-385319 to HA proceeds by a process of "induced fit" whereby the binding pocket is formed during their interaction. Occupation of this pocket by CL-385319 stabilizes the neutral pH structure of hemagglutinin, thus inhibiting the conformational rearrangements required for membrane fusion. This "induced fit" pocket may be a target for structure-based design of more potent influenza fusion inhibitors.

  16. An O-glycoside of Sialic Acid Derivative that inhibits Both Hemagglutinin and Sialidase Activities of Influenza Viruses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuoChao-Tan; SunXue-Long; Osamukanie; KennedyFrancisShortridge; TakashiSuzuki; KazuyaI.-P.JwaHidari; Chi-HueyWong; YasuoSuzuki

    2005-01-01

    The compound Neu5Ac3αF-DSPE (4), in which the C-3 position was modified with an axial fluorine atom, inhibited the catalytic hydrolysis of influenza virus sialidase and the binding activity of hemagglutinin. The inhibitory activities to sialidases were independent of virus isolates examined.With the positive results obtained for inhibition of hemagglutination and hemolysis induced by A/Aichi/2/68 virus,the inhibitory effect of Neu5Ac3αFDSPE (4) against MDCK cells was examined, and it was found that 4 inhibits the viral infection with IC50 value of 5.6 μM based on the cytopathic effects. The experimental results indicate that compound 4 not only inhibits the attachment of virus to the cell surface receptor but also disturbs the release of the progeny viruses from infected cells by inhibiting both hemagglutinin and sialidase of the influenza viruses.The study suggested that the compound is a new class of bifunctional drug candidates for the future chemotherapy of influenza.

  17. Domestic dog origin of canine distemper virus in free-ranging wolves in Portugal as revealed by hemagglutinin gene characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Alexandra; Silva, Eliane; Santos, Nuno; Thompson, Gertrude

    2011-07-01

    Serologic evidence for canine distemper virus (CDV) has been described in grey wolves but, to our knowledge, virus strains circulating in wolves have not been characterized genetically. The emergence of CDV in several non-dog hosts has been associated with amino acid substitutions at sites 530 and 549 of the hemagglutinin (H) protein. We sequenced the H gene of wild-type canine distemper virus obtained from two free-ranging Iberian wolves (Canis lupus signatus) and from one domestic dog (Canis familiaris). More differences were found between the two wolf sequences than between one of the wolves (wolf 75) and the dog. The latter two had a very high nucleotide similarity resulting in identical H gene amino acid sequences. Possible explanations include geographic and especially temporal proximity of the CDV obtained from wolf 75 and the domestic dog, taken in 2007-2008, as opposed to that from wolf 3 taken more distantly in 1998. Analysis of the deduced amino acids of the viral hemagglutinin revealed a glycine (G) and a tyrosine (Y) at amino acid positions 530 and 549, respectively, of the partial signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-receptor binding region which is typically found in viral strains obtained from domestic dogs. This suggests that the CDV found in these wolves resulted from transmission events from local domestic dogs rather than from wildlife species.

  18. High-level expression, purification and characterization of codon-optimized recombinant hemagglutinin 5 proteins in mammalian cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jing-lin; WANG Hong-liang; WANG Shun-xin; YANG Peng; LIU Kang-tai; JIANG Cheng-yu

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerous Asian cases of avian influenza virus infection, especially the highly pathogenic strain H5N1, in humans have raised the concern that another influenza pandemic is close. However, there are no effective therapeutic drugs or preventative vaccines available. Hemagglutinin is the membrane glycoprotein of avian influenza virus responsible for receptor binding to human cells and the main immunogenic protein that elicits a strong immune response. Although this protein is of great importance to the study of pathogenesis and vaccine development, its expression and purification are difficult due to high levels of glycosylation.Methods In this study, we expressed codon-optimized, full-length hemagglutinin 5 (H5) protein fused with a human IgG Fc tag (H5-Fc) in HEK293 cells. To enhance secretion of this protein, we also deleted the transmembrane domain and the intracellular domain of the H5 protein (H5ΔTM-Fc). Purified proteins were obtained using a protein A column. Results ELISA revealed that the yield of soluble H5ATM-Fc protein in the supernatant was about 20 mg/L. Western blotting and fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) indicated that the purified H5 protein was correctly folded and biologically active.Conclusion Purification of H5 proteins from mammalian cells could be used for large-scale production of recombinant H5 protein for basic scientific research or the development of vaccines.

  19. Functional dissection of the Clostridium botulinum type B hemagglutinin complex: identification of the carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Sugawara

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT inhibits neurotransmitter release in motor nerve endings, causing botulism, a condition often resulting from ingestion of the toxin or toxin-producing bacteria. BoNTs are always produced as large protein complexes by associating with a non-toxic protein, non-toxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH, and some toxin complexes contain another non-toxic protein, hemagglutinin (HA, in addition to NTNH. These accessory proteins are known to increase the oral toxicity of the toxin dramatically. NTNH has a protective role against the harsh conditions in the digestive tract, while HA is considered to facilitate intestinal absorption of the toxin by intestinal binding and disruption of the epithelial barrier. Two specific activities of HA, carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding, appear to be involved in these processes; however, the exact roles of these activities in the pathogenesis of botulism remain unclear. The toxin is conventionally divided into seven serotypes, designated A through G. In this study, we identified the amino acid residues critical for carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding in serotype B HA. We constructed mutants defective in each of these two activities and examined the relationship of these activities using an in vitro intestinal cell culture model. Our results show that the carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding activities are functionally and structurally independent. Carbohydrate binding potentiates the epithelial barrier-disrupting activity by enhancing cell surface binding, while E-cadherin binding is essential for the barrier disruption.

  20. Energetic protons from a disappearing solar filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahler, S.W.; Cliver, E.W.; Cane, R.E.; McGuire, H.V.; Stone, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    A solar energetic (E> 50MeV) particle (SEP) event observed at 1 AU began about 1500 UT on 1981 December 5. This event was associated with a fast coronal mass ejection observed with the Solwind coronagraph on the P78-1 satellite. No metric type II or type IV burst was observed, but a weak interplanetary type II burst was observed with the low-frequency radio experimentation ISEE-3 satellite. The mass ejection was associated with the eruption of a large solar quiescent filament that lay well away from any active regions. The eruption resulted in a H-alpha double-ribbon structure which straddled the magnetic inversion line. No impulsive phase was obvious in either the H-alpha or the microwave observations. The event indicates that neither a detectable impulsive phase nor a strong or complex magnetic field is necessary for the production of energetic ions.

  1. Filament wound data base development, revision 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, R. Scott; Braddock, William F.

    1985-01-01

    The objective was to update the present Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) baseline reentry aerodynamic data base and to develop a new reentry data base for the filament wound case SRB along with individual protuberance increments. Lockheed's procedures for performing these tasks are discussed. Free fall of the SRBs after separation from the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle is completely uncontrolled. However, the SRBs must decelerate to a velocity and attitude that is suitable for parachute deployment. To determine the SRB reentry trajectory parameters, including the rate of deceleration and attitude history during free-fall, engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center are using a six-degree-of-freedom computer program to predict dynamic behavior. Static stability aerodynamic coefficients are part of the information required for input into this computer program. Lockheed analyzed the existing reentry aerodynamic data tape (Data Tape 5) for the current steel case SRB. This analysis resulted in the development of Data Tape 7.

  2. Bending artificial muscle from nylon filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirvakili, Seyed M.; Hunter, Ian W.

    2016-04-01

    Highly oriented nylon and polyethylene fibers shrink in length and expand in diameter when heated. Using this property, in this work, for the first time we are introducing a type of bending artificial muscle from nylon filaments such as fishing line. Reversible radius of curvature of 0.23 mm-1 was achieved with maximum reversible bending amplitude of 115 mm for the nylon bending actuator. Peak force of up to 2040 mN was measured with a catch-state force of up to 40% of the active force. A 3 dB roll-off frequency of around 0.7 Hz was observed in the frequency response of the bending actuator in water.

  3. Radial interchange motions of plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.; Fundamenski, W.

    2006-01-01

    Radial convection of isolated filamentary structures due to interchange motions in magnetized plasmas is investigated. Following a basic discussion of vorticity generation, ballooning, and the role of sheaths, a two-field interchange model is studied by means of numerical simulations...... on a biperiodic domain perpendicular to the magnetic field. It is demonstrated that a blob-like plasma structure develops dipolar vorticity and electrostatic potential fields, resulting in rapid radial acceleration and formation of a steep front and a trailing wake. While the dynamical evolution strongly depends...... as the acoustic speed times the square root of the structure size relative to the length scale of the magnetic field. The plasma filament eventually decelerates due to mixing and collisional dissipation. Finally, the role of sheath dissipation is investigated. When included in the simulations, it significantly...

  4. Validation of the filament winding process model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calius, Emilo P.; Springer, George S.; Wilson, Brian A.; Hanson, R. Scott

    1987-01-01

    Tests were performed toward validating the WIND model developed previously for simulating the filament winding of composite cylinders. In these tests two 24 in. long, 8 in. diam and 0.285 in. thick cylinders, made of IM-6G fibers and HBRF-55 resin, were wound at + or - 45 deg angle on steel mandrels. The temperatures on the inner and outer surfaces and inside the composite cylinders were recorded during oven cure. The temperatures inside the cylinders were also calculated by the WIND model. The measured and calculated temperatures were then compared. In addition, the degree of cure and resin viscosity distributions inside the cylinders were calculated for the conditions which existed in the tests.

  5. Introduction to vortex filaments in equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Timothy D

    2014-01-01

    This book presents fundamental concepts and seminal results to the study of vortex filaments in equilibrium. It also presents new discoveries in quasi-2D vortex structures with applications to geophysical fluid dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics in plasmas.  It fills a gap in the vortex statistics literature by simplifying the mathematical introduction to this complex topic, covering numerical methods, and exploring a wide range of applications with numerous examples. The authors have produced an introduction that is clear and easy to read, leading the reader step-by-step into this topical area. Alongside the theoretical concepts and mathematical formulations, interesting applications are discussed. This combination makes the text useful for students and researchers in mathematics and physics.

  6. Natural Fiber Filament Wound Composites: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ansari Suriyati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent development, natural fibers have attracted the interest of engineers, researchers, professionals and scientists all over the world as an alternative reinforcement for fiber reinforced polymer composites. This is due to its superior properties such as high specific strength, low weight, low cost, fairly good mechanical properties, non-abrasive, eco-friendly and bio-degradable characteristics. In this point of view, natural fiber-polymer composites (NFPCs are becoming increasingly utilized in a wide variety of applications because they represent an ecological and inexpensive alternative to conventional petroleum-derived materials. On the other hand, considerable amounts of organic waste and residue from the industrial and agricultural processes are still underutilized as low-value energy sources. This is a comprehensive review discussing about natural fiber reinforced composite produced by filament winding technique.

  7. Acid Stability of the Hemagglutinin Protein Regulates H5N1 Influenza Virus Pathogenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuBois, Rebecca M.; Zaraket, Hassan; Reddivari, Muralidhar; Heath, Richard J.; White, Stephen W.; Russell, Charles J. (Tennessee-HSC); (SJCH)

    2012-12-10

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of the H5N1 subtype continue to threaten agriculture and human health. Here, we use biochemistry and x-ray crystallography to reveal how amino-acid variations in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein contribute to the pathogenicity of H5N1 influenza virus in chickens. HA proteins from highly pathogenic (HP) A/chicken/Hong Kong/YU562/2001 and moderately pathogenic (MP) A/goose/Hong Kong/437-10/1999 isolates of H5N1 were found to be expressed and cleaved in similar amounts, and both proteins had similar receptor-binding properties. However, amino-acid variations at positions 104 and 115 in the vestigial esterase sub-domain of the HA1 receptor-binding domain (RBD) were found to modulate the pH of HA activation such that the HP and MP HA proteins are activated for membrane fusion at pH 5.7 and 5.3, respectively. In general, an increase in H5N1 pathogenicity in chickens was found to correlate with an increase in the pH of HA activation for mutant and chimeric HA proteins in the observed range of pH 5.2 to 6.0. We determined a crystal structure of the MP HA protein at 2.50 {angstrom} resolution and two structures of HP HA at 2.95 and 3.10 {angstrom} resolution. Residues 104 and 115 that modulate the acid stability of the HA protein are situated at the N- and C-termini of the 110-helix in the vestigial esterase sub-domain, which interacts with the B loop of the HA2 stalk domain. Interactions between the 110-helix and the stalk domain appear to be important in regulating HA protein acid stability, which in turn modulates influenza virus replication and pathogenesis. Overall, an optimal activation pH of the HA protein is found to be necessary for high pathogenicity by H5N1 influenza virus in avian species.

  8. Positive Selection on Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase Genes of H1N1 Influenza Viruses

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Li, Wenfu

    2011-04-21

    Abstract Background Since its emergence in March 2009, the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus has posed a serious threat to public health. To trace the evolutionary path of these new pathogens, we performed a selection-pressure analysis of a large number of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences of H1N1 influenza viruses from different hosts. Results Phylogenetic analysis revealed that both HA and NA genes have evolved into five distinct clusters, with further analyses indicating that the pandemic 2009 strains have experienced the strongest positive selection. We also found evidence of strong selection acting on the seasonal human H1N1 isolates. However, swine viruses from North America and Eurasia were under weak positive selection, while there was no significant evidence of positive selection acting on the avian isolates. A site-by-site analysis revealed that the positively selected sites were located in both of the cleaved products of HA (HA1 and HA2), as well as NA. In addition, the pandemic 2009 strains were subject to differential selection pressures compared to seasonal human, North American swine and Eurasian swine H1N1 viruses. Conclusions Most of these positively and\\/or differentially selected sites were situated in the B-cell and\\/or T-cell antigenic regions, suggesting that selection at these sites might be responsible for the antigenic variation of the viruses. Moreover, some sites were also associated with glycosylation and receptor-binding ability. Thus, selection at these positions might have helped the pandemic 2009 H1N1 viruses to adapt to the new hosts after they were introduced from pigs to humans. Positive selection on position 274 of NA protein, associated with drug resistance, might account for the prevalence of drug-resistant variants of seasonal human H1N1 influenza viruses, but there was no evidence that positive selection was responsible for the spread of the drug resistance of the pandemic H1N1 strains.

  9. Diagnostic potential of recombinant scFv antibodies generated against hemagglutinin protein of influenza A virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopali eRajput

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human influenza A viruses have been the cause of enormous socio-economic losses worldwide. In order to combat such a notorious pathogen, hemagglutinin protein (HA has been a preferred target for generation of neutralizing-antibodies, as potent therapeutic/ diagnostic agents. In the present study, recombinant anti-HA single chain variable fragment (scFv antibodies were constructed using the phage display technology to aid in diagnosis and treatment of human influenza A virus infections. Spleen cells of mice hyper-immunized with A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1 virus were used as the source for recombinant antibody (rAb production. The antigen-binding phages were quantified after 6 rounds of bio-panning against A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1, A/California/07/2009 (H1N1-like, or A/Udorn/307/72(H3N2 viruses. The phage yield was maximum for the A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1, however, considerable cross-reactivity was observed for the other virus strains as well. The HA-specific polyclonal rAb preparation was subjected to selection of single clones for identification of high reactive relatively conserved epitopes. The high affinity rAbs were tested against certain known conserved HA epitopes by peptide ELISA. Three recombinant mAbs showed reactivity with both the H1N1 strains and one (C5 showed binding with all the three viral strains. The C5 antibody was thus used for development of an ELISA test for diagnosis of influenza virus infection. Based on the sample size in the current analysis, the ELISA test demonstrated 83.9% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Thus, the ELISA, developed in our study, may prove as a cheaper alternative to the presently used real time RT-PCR test for detection of human influenza A viruses in clinical specimens, which will be beneficial, especially in the developing countries. Since, the two antibodies identified in this study are reactive to conserved HA epitopes; these may prove as potential therapeutic agents as well.

  10. Characterization of the immune responses elicited by baculovirus-based vector vaccines against influenza virus hemagglutinin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-peng HU; Juan YIN; Yuan-yuan ZHANG; Shu-ya JIA; Zuo-jia CHEN; Jiang ZHONG

    2012-01-01

    Aim:To compare the specific immune responses elicited by different baculovirus vectors in immunized mice.Methods:We constructed and characterized two recombinant baculoviruses carrying the expression cassette for the H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) gene driven by either an insect cell promoter (vAc-HA) or a dual-promoter active both in insect and mammalian cells (vAc-HA-DUAL).Virus without the HA gene (vAc-EGFP) was used as a control.These viruses were used to immunize mice subcutaneously and intraperitoneally.The production of total and specific antibodies was determined by ELISA and competitive ELISA.Cytokine production by the spleen cells of immunized mice was studied using the ELISPOT assay.Results:Both the vAc-HA and vAc-HA-DUAL vectors expressed HA proteins in insect Sf9 cells,and HA antigen was present in progeny virions.The vAc-HA-DUAL vector also mediated HA expression in virus-transduced mammalian cell lines (BHK and A547).Both vAo-HA and vAc-HA-DUAL exhibited higher transduction efficiencies than vAc-EGFP in mammalian cells,as shown by the expression of the reporter gene egfp.Additionally,both vAc-HA and vAc-HA-DUAL induced high levels of HA-specific antibody production in immunized mice; vAc-HA-DUAL was more efficient in inducing IFN-Y and IL-2 upon stimulation with specific antigen,whereas vAc-HA was more efficient in inducing IL-4 and IL-6.Conclusion:Baculovirus vectors elicited efficient,specific immune responses in immunized mice.The vector displaying the HA antigen on the virion surface (vAc-HA) elicited a Th2-biased immune response,whereas the vector displaying HA and mediating HA expression in the cell (vAc-HA-DUAL) elicited a Th1-biased immune response.

  11. Molecular signatures of hemagglutinin stem-directed heterosubtypic human neutralizing antibodies against influenza A viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Avnir

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown high usage of the IGHV1-69 germline immunoglobulin gene for influenza hemagglutinin stem-directed broadly-neutralizing antibodies (HV1-69-sBnAbs. Here we show that a major structural solution for these HV1-69-sBnAbs is achieved through a critical triad comprising two CDR-H2 loop anchor residues (a hydrophobic residue at position 53 (Ile or Met and Phe54, and CDR-H3-Tyr at positions 98±1; together with distinctive V-segment CDR amino acid substitutions that occur in positions sparse in AID/polymerase-η recognition motifs. A semi-synthetic IGHV1-69 phage-display library screen designed to investigate AID/polη restrictions resulted in the isolation of HV1-69-sBnAbs that featured a distinctive Ile52Ser mutation in the CDR-H2 loop, a universal CDR-H3 Tyr at position 98 or 99, and required as little as two additional substitutions for heterosubtypic neutralizing activity. The functional importance of the Ile52Ser mutation was confirmed by mutagenesis and by BCR studies. Structural modeling suggests that substitution of a small amino acid at position 52 (or 52a facilitates the insertion of CDR-H2 Phe54 and CDR-H3-Tyr into adjacent pockets on the stem. These results support the concept that activation and expansion of a defined subset of IGHV1-69-encoded B cells to produce potent HV1-69-sBnAbs does not necessarily require a heavily diversified V-segment acquired through recycling/reentry into the germinal center; rather, the incorporation of distinctive amino acid substitutions by Phase 2 long-patch error-prone repair of AID-induced mutations or by random non-AID SHM events may be sufficient. We propose that these routes of B cell maturation should be further investigated and exploited as a pathway for HV1-69-sBnAb elicitation by vaccination.

  12. Subtype- and antigenic site-specific differences in biophysical influences on evolution of influenza virus hemagglutinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stray Stephen J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus undergoes rapid evolution by both antigenic shift and antigenic drift. Antibodies, particularly those binding near the receptor-binding site of hemagglutinin (HA or the neuraminidase (NA active site, are thought to be the primary defense against influenza infection, and mutations in antibody binding sites can reduce or eliminate antibody binding. The binding of antibodies to their cognate antigens is governed by such biophysical properties of the interacting surfaces as shape, non-polar and polar surface area, and charge. Methods To understand forces shaping evolution of influenza virus, we have examined HA sequences of human influenza A and B viruses, assigning each amino acid values reflecting total accessible surface area, non-polar and polar surface area, and net charge due to the side chain. Changes in each of these values between neighboring sequences were calculated for each residue and mapped onto the crystal structures. Results Areas of HA showing the highest frequency of pairwise changes agreed well with previously identified antigenic sites in H3 and H1 HAs, and allowed us to propose more detailed antigenic maps and novel antigenic sites for H1 and influenza B HA. Changes in biophysical properties differed between HAs of different subtypes, and between different antigenic sites of the same HA. For H1, statistically significant differences in several biophysical quantities compared to residues lying outside antigenic sites were seen for some antigenic sites but not others. Influenza B antigenic sites all show statistically significant differences in biophysical quantities for all antigenic sites, whereas no statistically significant differences in biophysical quantities were seen for any antigenic site is seen for H3. In many cases, residues previously shown to be under positive selection at the genetic level also undergo rapid change in biophysical properties. Conclusions The biophysical

  13. Lemna (duckweed) expressed hemagglutinin from avian influenza H5N1 protects chickens against H5N1 high pathogenicity avian influenza virus challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the last two decades, transgenic plants have been explored as safe and cost effective alternative expression platforms for producing recombinant proteins. In this study, a synthetic hemagglutinin (HA) gene from the high pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus A/chicken/Indonesia/7/2003 (H5N1)...

  14. Rescue of a H3N2 Influenza Virus Containing a Deficient Neuraminidase Protein by a Hemagglutinin with a Low Receptor-Binding Affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Mathilde; Erny, Alexandra; Caré, Bertrand; Traversier, Aurélien; Barthélémy, Mendy; Hay, Alan; Lin, Yi Pu; Ferraris, Olivier; Lina, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses possess at their surface two glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin and the neuraminidase, of which the antagonistic functions have to be well balanced for the virus to grow efficiently. Ferraris et al. isolated in 2003–2004 viruses lacking both a NA gene and protein (H3NA- viruses) (Ferraris O., 2006, Vaccine, 24(44–46):6656-9). In this study we showed that the hemagglutinins of two of the H3NA- viruses have reduced affinity for SAα2.6Gal receptors, between 49 and 128 times lower than that of the A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2) virus and no detectable affinity for SAα2.3Gal receptors. We also showed that the low hemagglutinin affinity of the H3NA- viruses compensates for the lack of NA activity and allows the restoration of the growth of an A/Moscow/10/99 virus deficient in neuraminidase. These observations increase our understanding of H3NA- viruses in relation to the balance between the functional activities of the neuraminidase and hemagglutinin. PMID:22563453

  15. Rescue of a H3N2 influenza virus containing a deficient neuraminidase protein by a hemagglutinin with a low receptor-binding affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Richard

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses possess at their surface two glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin and the neuraminidase, of which the antagonistic functions have to be well balanced for the virus to grow efficiently. Ferraris et al. isolated in 2003-2004 viruses lacking both a NA gene and protein (H3NA- viruses (Ferraris O., 2006, Vaccine, 24(44-46:6656-9. In this study we showed that the hemagglutinins of two of the H3NA- viruses have reduced affinity for SAα2.6Gal receptors, between 49 and 128 times lower than that of the A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2 virus and no detectable affinity for SAα2.3Gal receptors. We also showed that the low hemagglutinin affinity of the H3NA- viruses compensates for the lack of NA activity and allows the restoration of the growth of an A/Moscow/10/99 virus deficient in neuraminidase. These observations increase our understanding of H3NA- viruses in relation to the balance between the functional activities of the neuraminidase and hemagglutinin.

  16. A computationally optimized broadly reactive H5 hemagglutinin vaccine provides protection against homologous and heterologous H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since its emergence in 1996 in China, H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus has continuously evolved into different genetic clades that have created challenges to maintaining antigenically relevant H5N1 vaccine seeds. Therefore, a universal (multi-hemagglutinin [HA] subtype) or more c...

  17. Glycosylation Characterization of an Influenza H5N7 Hemagglutinin Series with Engineered Glycosylation Patterns : Implications for Structure-Function Relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parsons, Lisa M; An, Yanming; de Vries, Robert P; de Haan, Cornelis A M; Cipollo, John F

    2017-01-01

    The glycosylation patterns of four recombinant H5 hemagglutinins (HAs) derived from A/Mallard/Denmark/64650/03 (H5N7) have been characterized. The proteins were expressed in (i) HEK293T cells to produce complex glycoforms, (ii) HEK293T cells treated with Vibrio cholera neuraminidase to provide asial

  18. Interaction of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) spike glycoprotein with receptor glycoprotein MHVR is required for infection with an MHV strain that expresses the hemagglutinin-esterase glycoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagneten, S; Gout, O; Dubois-Dalcq, M; Rottier, P; Rossen, J; Holmes, K V

    1995-01-01

    In addition to the spike (S) glycoprotein that binds to carcinoembryonic antigen-related receptors on the host cell membrane, some strains of mouse coronavirus (mouse hepatitis virus [MHV]) express a hemagglutinin esterase (HE) glycoprotein with hemagglutinating and acetylesterase activity. Virions

  19. An Immunosensor Based on Antibody Binding Fragments Attached to Gold Nanoparticles for the Detection of Peptides Derived from Avian Influenza Hemagglutinin H5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Jarocka

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the development of an immunosensor for detection of peptides derived from avian influenza hemagglutinin H5. Its preparation consists of successive gold electrode modification steps: (i modification with 1,6-hexanedithiol and gold colloidal nanoparticles; (ii immobilization of antibody-binding fragments (Fab’ of anti-hemagglutinin H5 monoclonal antibodies Mab 6-9-1 via S-Au covalent bonds; and (iii covering the remaining free space on the electrode surfaces with bovine serum albumin. The interactions between Fab’ fragments and hemagglutinin (HA variants have been explored with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS in the presence of [Fe(CN6]3−/4− as an electroactive marker. The immunosensor was able to recognize three different His-tagged variants of recombinant hemagglutinin from H5N1 viruses: H1 subunit (17–340 residues of A/swan/Poland/305-135V08/2006, the long HA (17–530 residues A/Bar-headed Goose/Qinghai/12/2005 and H1 subunit (1–345 residues of A/Vietnam/1194/2004. The strongest response has been observed for the long variant with detection limit of 2.2 pg/mL and dynamic range from 4.0 to 20.0 pg/mL.

  20. Fossil evidence for spin alignment of SDSS galaxies in filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Bernard J T; Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A

    2010-01-01

    We search for and find fossil evidence that the distribution of the spin axes of galaxies in cosmic web filaments relative to their host filaments are not randomly distributed. This would indicate that the action of large scale tidal torques effected the alignments of galaxies located in cosmic filaments. To this end, we constructed a catalogue of clean filaments containing edge-on galaxies. We started by applying the Multiscale Morphology Filter (MMF) technique to the galaxies in a redshift-distortion corrected version of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR5. From that sample we extracted those 426 filaments that contained edge-on galaxies (b/a < 0.2). These filaments were then visually classified relative to a variety of quality criteria. Statistical analysis using "feature measures" indicates that the distribution of orientations of these edge-on galaxies relative to their parent filament deviate significantly from what would be expected on the basis of a random distribution of orientations. The interpretat...

  1. An observational detection of the bridge effect of void filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Shim, Junsup; Hoyle, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    The bridge effect of void filaments is a phrase coined by Park & Lee (2009b) to explain the correlations found in a numerical experiment between the luminosity of the void galaxies and the degree of the straightness of their host filaments. Their numerical finding implies that a straight void filament provides a narrow channel for the efficient transportation of gas and matter particles from the surroundings into the void galaxies. To observationally confirm the presence of the bridge effect of void filaments, we identify the filamentary structures from the Sloan void catalog and determine the specific size of each void filament as a measure of its straightness. Using both classical and Bayesian statistics, we indeed detect a strong tendency that the void galaxies located in the more straight filaments are on average more luminous, which is in agreement with the numerical prediction. It is also shown that the strength of correlation increases with the spatial extent of the void filaments, which can be phy...

  2. Structure and assembly of calf hoof keratin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Z; Michon, A M; Sicre, P; Koch, M H

    1990-05-01

    Keratin filament polypeptides were purified from calf hoof stratum corneum with the aim of studying the in vitro assembly process and determining structural parameters of reconstituted filaments. Anion exchange chromatography was used to obtain the most complete fractionation and identification of the acidic and basic components in the purified polypeptide mixture to date. The reassembly products of the fractionated components were investigated by electron microscopy. Fully reconstituted filaments yield homogeneous solutions, and values of 9.8 nm for the filament diameter and 25 kDa/nm for the mass per unit length (M/L) were obtained by X-ray solution scattering. The structures formed in solution at various stages of filament assembly were not sufficiently homogeneous to be studied by this technique. X-ray diffraction patterns from native stratum corneum display strong maxima at 3.6 and 5.4 nm. Contrary to previous reports, these maxima do not appear to be due to lipids since they are also observed with delipidated rehydrated specimens. A series of weak maxima is also detected in the patterns of dry tissue. The absence of these features in the patterns of reconstituted filaments suggests that, in contrast to some electron microscopic observations, there are no prominent regularities in the structure of calf hoof keratin filaments.

  3. MUSE discovers perpendicular arcs in Cen A inner filament

    CERN Document Server

    Hamer, Stephen; Combes, Francoise; Salomé, Quentin

    2014-01-01

    Evidence of AGN interaction with the intergalactic medium is observed in some galaxies and many cool core clusters. Radio-jets are suspected to dig large cavities into the surrounding gas. In most cases, very large optical filaments (several kpc) are also seen all around the central galaxy. The origin of these filaments is still not understood. Star forming regions are sometimes observed inside the filaments and are interpreted as evidence of positive feedback (AGN-triggered star formation). Cen A is a very nearby galaxy with huge optical filaments aligned with AGN radio-jet direction. Here, we search for line ratio variations along the filaments, kinematic evidence of shock-broadend line widths and large scale dynamical structures. We observe a 1'x1' region around the inner filament of Cen A with MUSE on the VLT during the Science Verification period. The brightest lines are the Halpha, [NII], [OIII] and [SII]. MUSE shows that the filaments are made of clumpy structures inside a more diffuse medium aligned w...

  4. Origin of the dense core mass function in contracting filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Philip C

    2013-01-01

    Mass functions of starless dense cores (CMFs) may arise from contraction and dispersal of core-forming filaments. In an illustrative model, a filament contracts radially by self-gravity, increasing the mass of its cores. During this contraction, FUV photoevaporation and ablation by shocks and winds disperse filament gas and limit core growth. The stopping times of core growth are described by a waiting-time distribution. The initial filament column density profile and the resulting CMF each match recent Herschel observations in detail. Then low-mass cores have short growth ages and arise from the innermost filament gas, while massive cores have long growth ages and draw from more extended filament gas. The model fits the initial density profile and CMF best for mean core density 2 10^4 cm^-3 and filament dispersal time scale 0.5 Myr. Then the typical core mass, radius, mean column density, and contraction speed are respectively 0.8 solar masses, 0.06 pc, 6 10^21 cm^-2, and 0.07 km s^-1, also in accord with ob...

  5. Is Gravitational Lensing by Intercluster Filaments Always Negligible?

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Dong; Shan, HuanYuan; Famaey, Benoit; Limousin, Marceau; Zhao, HongSheng

    2007-01-01

    Intercluster filaments negligibly contribute to the weak lensing signal in General Relativity (GR), $\\gamma_{N}\\sim 10^{-4}-10^{-3}$. In the context of relativistic Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) (Bekenstein 2004), however, a single filament inclined by $\\approx 45^\\circ$ from the line of sight can cause substantial distortion of background sources pointing towards the filament's axis ($\\kappa=\\gamma=(1-A^{-1})/2\\sim 0.01$); this is rigourous for infinitely long uniform filaments, but also qualitatively true for short filaments ($\\sim 30$Mpc), and even in regions where the projected matter density of the filament equals to zero. Since galaxies and galaxy clusters are generally embedded in filaments or are projected on such structures, this contribution complicates the interpretation of the weak lensing shear map in the context of MOND. While our analysis is of mainly theoretical interest providing order-of-magnitude estimates only, it seems safe to conclude that when modeling systems with anomalous weak l...

  6. The supramolecular organization of the C. elegans nuclear lamin filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Harush, Kfir; Wiesel, Naama; Frenkiel-Krispin, Daphna; Moeller, Dorothee; Soreq, Eyal; Aebi, Ueli; Herrmann, Harald; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Medalia, Ohad

    2009-03-13

    Nuclear lamins are involved in most nuclear activities and are essential for retaining the mechano-elastic properties of the nucleus. They are nuclear intermediate filament (IF) proteins forming a distinct meshwork-like layer adhering to the inner nuclear membrane, called the nuclear lamina. Here, we present for the first time, the three-dimensional supramolecular organization of lamin 10 nm filaments and paracrystalline fibres. We show that Caenorhabditis elegans nuclear lamin forms 10 nm IF-like filaments, which are distinct from their cytoplasmic counterparts. The IF-like lamin filaments are composed of three and four tetrameric protofilaments, each of which contains two partially staggered anti-parallel head-to-tail polymers. The beaded appearance of the lamin filaments stems from paired globular tail domains, which are spaced regularly, alternating between 21 nm and 27 nm. A mutation in an evolutionarily conserved residue that causes Hutchison-Gilford progeria syndrome in humans alters the supramolecular structure of the lamin filaments. On the basis of our structural analysis, we propose an assembly pathway that yields the observed 10 nm IF-like lamin filaments and paracrystalline fibres. These results serve also as a platform for understanding the effect of laminopathic mutations on lamin supramolecular organization.

  7. Investigating the Global Collapse of Filaments Using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, Seamus D

    2015-01-01

    We use Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic simulations of cold, uniform density, self-gravitating filaments, to investigate their longitudinal collapse timescales; these timescales are important because they determine the time available for a filament to fragment into cores. A filament is initially characterised by its line-mass, $\\mu$, its radius, $R$ (or equivalently its density $\\rho\\!=\\!\\mu/\\pi R^2$), and its aspect ratio, $A\\;\\,(\\equiv Z/R$, where $Z$ is its half-length). The gas is only allowed to contract longitudinally, i.e. parallel to the symmetry axis of the filament (the $z$-axis). Pon et al. (2012) have considered the global dynamics of such filaments analytically. They conclude that short filaments ($A\\! \\!5$) undergo end-dominated collapse, i.e. two dense clumps form at the ends of the filament and converge on the centre sweeping up mass as they go, on a time-scale $t_{_{\\rm END}} \\sim 0.98\\,A^{1/2}\\,(G\\rho)^{-1/2}$. Our simulations do not corroborate these predictions. First, for all $A\\! > \\!2$, ...

  8. Formation of interstellar filaments: the role of magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntormousi, Evangelia; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2014-07-01

    The filamentary structure of interstellar matter and its potential link to star formation has been brought back into focus recently by high resolution observational surveys. The densest of these filaments host pre-stellar and star forming cores, so explaining their properties is tightly correlated to revealing the initial conditions for star formation. To that end, in this work we employ high-resolution, 3D MHD simulations performed with the AMR code RAMSES to investigate two filament formation mechanisms: turbulence and sheet fragmentation. The first series of simulations has as a particular aim to address the origin of the characteristic filament thickness found in observations. Starting from the hypothesis that diffusive processes are responsible, our numerical experiments consist of (driven or decaying) ideal and non-ideal MHD turbulence, at a resolution that greatly exceeds the reported 0.1pc thickness. The comparison points to ion-neutral friction as an excellent candidate for setting a characteristic scale. In this picture dense filaments are the diffusive end of the turbulent cascade, an interpretation with important implications for our understanding of the dynamical behavior of the ISM. A second series of simulations investigates filament formation by the fragmentation of supershells, a scenario inspired by the analytical work of Nagai (1998). We find a striking difference between hydrodynamical and MHD runs as in the first case the sheets fragment into small cores, while in the latter they produce large filaments. In addition though, we see that low-density filaments preferentially form along the dominant component of the magnetic field. In this scenario filaments are prominent features in the ISM, but their fate is still determined by the local magnetic field. A detailed comparison of the filament properties between the two runs is work in progress and will reveal the physical mechanisms responsible for shaping the ISM and setting the initial conditions

  9. Magnetic Structure of a Filament during its Phase of Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, C.; Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.

    2008-09-01

    We analyze and interpret spectropolarimetric observations of an active region filament located close to the solar disc center, during its phase of activity. The observations are obtained in the chromospheric He I lines at 1083.0 nm. We provide novel observational results on the magnetic field measurements in solar filaments to give constraints to the theoretical models of their support in the solar corona. Our main goal is to interpret the behavior of the atmospheric parameters retrieved from the spectropolarimetric data to give a picture of the magnetic structure of the observed filament. The analysis of the observed polarization of the He I 1083.0 nm multiplet in the filament, carried out by inverting the Stokes profiles, reveals the presence of different unresolved atmospheric components of the He lines, coexisting within the resolution element (1.2 arcsec). The different components, belonging to different magnetic field lines, show supersonic up- and downflows, sometimes within the same resolution element. The He blueshifted components belong to mostly transversal field lines in the body of the filament. These field lines are found to be curving upwards on both sides. This picture suggests the presence of dipped field lines that are moving upward, carrying with them the filament material. During this movement, we also observe filament material flowing down along field lines having the same polarity as the photospheric field (i.e. they have the opposite inclination with respect to the dipped field lines). These downflows are faster at the filament end points and can reach values close to 10 times the speed of sound. The field lines are found to be almost parallel to the filament axis in the plane perpendicular to the line of sight. We use the two main theoretical models of prominence support (dip or flux rope models) to interpret the results obtained.

  10. HIERARCHICAL FRAGMENTATION OF THE ORION MOLECULAR FILAMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.; Su, Yu-Nung [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Teixeira, Paula S. [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Wien, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180, Wien (Austria); Zapata, Luis A., E-mail: satoko_t@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia, Michoacan 58090 (Mexico)

    2013-01-20

    We present a high angular resolution map of the 850 {mu}m continuum emission of the Orion Molecular Cloud-3 (OMC 3) obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA); the map is a mosaic of 85 pointings covering an approximate area of 6.'5 Multiplication-Sign 2.'0 (0.88 Multiplication-Sign 0.27 pc). We detect 12 spatially resolved continuum sources, each with an H{sub 2} mass between 0.3-5.7 M {sub Sun} and a projected source size between 1400-8200 AU. All the detected sources are on the filamentary main ridge (n{sub H{sub 2}}{>=}10{sup 6} cm{sup -3}), and analysis based on the Jeans theorem suggests that they are most likely gravitationally unstable. Comparison of multi-wavelength data sets indicates that of the continuum sources, 6/12 (50%) are associated with molecular outflows, 8/12 (67%) are associated with infrared sources, and 3/12 (25%) are associated with ionized jets. The evolutionary status of these sources ranges from prestellar cores to protostar phase, confirming that OMC-3 is an active region with ongoing embedded star formation. We detect quasi-periodical separations between the OMC-3 sources of Almost-Equal-To 17''/0.035 pc. This spatial distribution is part of a large hierarchical structure that also includes fragmentation scales of giant molecular cloud ( Almost-Equal-To 35 pc), large-scale clumps ( Almost-Equal-To 1.3 pc), and small-scale clumps ( Almost-Equal-To 0.3 pc), suggesting that hierarchical fragmentation operates within the Orion A molecular cloud. The fragmentation spacings are roughly consistent with the thermal fragmentation length in large-scale clumps, while for small-scale cores it is smaller than the local fragmentation length. These smaller spacings observed with the SMA can be explained by either a helical magnetic field, cloud rotation, or/and global filament collapse. Finally, possible evidence for sequential fragmentation is suggested in the northern part of the OMC-3 filament.

  11. Organic Acid Production by Filamentous Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnuson, Jon K.; Lasure, Linda L.

    2004-05-03

    Many of the commercial production processes for organic acids are excellent examples of fungal biotechnology. However, unlike penicillin, the organic acids have had a less visible impact on human well-being. Indeed, organic acid fermentations are often not even identified as fungal bioprocesses, having been overshadowed by the successful deployment of the β-lactam processes. Yet, in terms of productivity, fungal organic acid processes may be the best examples of all. For example, commercial processes using Aspergillus niger in aerated stirred-tank-reactors can convert glucose to citric acid with greater than 80% efficiency and at final concentrations in hundreds of grams per liter. Surprisingly, this phenomenal productivity has been the object of relatively few research programs. Perhaps a greater understanding of this extraordinary capacity of filamentous fungi to produce organic acids in high concentrations will allow greater exploitation of these organisms via application of new knowledge in this era of genomics-based biotechnology. In this chapter, we will explore the biochemistry and modern genetic aspects of the current and potential commercial processes for making organic acids. The organisms involved, with a few exceptions, are filamentous fungi, and this review is limited to that group. Although yeasts including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, species of Rhodotorula, Pichia, and Hansenula are important organisms in fungal biotechnology, they have not been significant for commercial organic acid production, with one exception. The yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, and related yeast species, may be in use commercially to produce citric acid (Lopez-Garcia, 2002). Furthermore, in the near future engineered yeasts may provide new commercial processes to make lactic acid (Porro, Bianchi, Ranzi, Frontali, Vai, Winkler, & Alberghina, 2002). This chapter is divided into two parts. The first contains a review of the commercial aspects of current and potential large

  12. Failure and nonfailure of fluid filaments in extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Kolte, Mette Irene; Renardy, Michael

    1998-01-01

    fluid filaments do not exhibit ductile failure without surface tension; (2) some viscoelastic fluids form stable filaments while other fluids exhibit ductile failure as a result of an elastic instability; (3) for large Deborah numbers, the Considere condition may be used to predict the Hencky strain......The phenomenon of ductile failure of Newtonian and viscoelastic fluid filaments without surface tension is studied by a 2D finite element method and by ID non-linear analysis. The viscoelastic fluids are described by single integral constitutive equations. The main conclusions are: (1) Newtonian...

  13. Is the periplasm continuous in filamentous multicellular cyanobacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia; Wolk, C Peter; Maldener, Iris

    2006-10-01

    Filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria are multicellular organisms in which individual cells exchange nutrients and, presumably, regulatory molecules. Unknown mechanisms underlie this exchange. Classical electron microscopy shows that filamentous cyanobacteria bear a Gram-negative cell wall comprising a peptidoglycan layer and an outer membrane that are external to the cytoplasmic membrane, and that the outer membrane appears to be continuous along the filament of cells. This implies that the periplasmic space between the cytoplasmic and outer membranes might also be continuous. We propose that a continuous periplasm could constitute a communication conduit for the transfer of compounds, which is essential for the performance of these bacteria as multicellular organisms.

  14. Forced motion of an elastic filament through a narrow tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, L. B.

    2015-12-01

    A polymer filament consisting of many similar molecules linked in a one-dimensional array is very flexible. As a result, shapes with a relatively large curvature can be accommodated elastically. When loosely confined in a thermal environment, such a flexible strand may become tangled owing to its flexibility. When confined within a narrow "tube" over its full length, a flexible molecule may behave quite differently. Here, we consider the qualitative nature of deformation of an individual filament when confined within a tube. Commonly the tube is formed within the cluster by a large number of surrounding filaments of the same type.

  15. A Comparison Study of a Solar Active-Region Eruptive Filament and a Neighboring Non-Eruptive Filament

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Chaowei; Feng, Xueshang; Hu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Solar active region (AR) 11283 is a very magnetically complex region and it has produced many eruptions. However, there exists a non-eruptive filament in the plage region just next to an eruptive one in the AR, which gives us an opportunity to perform a comparison analysis of these two filaments. The coronal magnetic field extrapolated using a CESE-MHD-NLFFF code (Jiang & Feng 2013) reveals that two magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) exist in the same extrapolation box supporting these two filaments, respectively. Analysis of the magnetic field shows that the eruptive MFR contains a bald-patch separatrix surface (BPSS) co-spatial very well with a pre-eruptive EUV sigmoid, which is consistent with the BPSS model for coronal sigmoids. The magnetic dips of the non-eruptive MFRs match H{\\alpha} observation of the non-eruptive filament strikingly well, which strongly supports the MFR-dip model for filaments. Compared with the non-eruptive MFR/filament (with a length of about 200 Mm), the eruptive MFR/filament is much ...

  16. The Apis mellifera Filamentous Virus Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Gauthier

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A complete reference genome of the Apis mellifera Filamentous virus (AmFV was determined using Illumina Hiseq sequencing. The AmFV genome is a double stranded DNA molecule of approximately 498,500 nucleotides with a GC content of 50.8%. It encompasses 247 non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs, equally distributed on both strands, which cover 65% of the genome. While most of the ORFs lacked threshold sequence alignments to reference protein databases, twenty-eight were found to display significant homologies with proteins present in other large double stranded DNA viruses. Remarkably, 13 ORFs had strong similarity with typical baculovirus domains such as PIFs (per os infectivity factor genes: pif-1, pif-2, pif-3 and p74 and BRO (Baculovirus Repeated Open Reading Frame. The putative AmFV DNA polymerase is of type B, but is only distantly related to those of the baculoviruses. The ORFs encoding proteins involved in nucleotide metabolism had the highest percent identity to viral proteins in GenBank. Other notable features include the presence of several collagen-like, chitin-binding, kinesin and pacifastin domains. Due to the large size of the AmFV genome and the inconsistent affiliation with other large double stranded DNA virus families infecting invertebrates, AmFV may belong to a new virus family.

  17. Cold Milky Way Hi gas in filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Kalberla, P M W; Haud, U; Winkel, B; Bekhti, N Ben; Floeer, L; Lenz, D

    2016-01-01

    We investigate data from the Galactic Effelsberg--Bonn HI Survey (EBHIS), supplemented with data from the third release of the Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS III) observed at Parkes. We explore the all sky distribution of the local Galactic HI gas with $|v_{\\rm LSR}| 20^\\circ$ is described by a log-normal distribution, with a median Doppler temperature $T_{\\rm D} = 223$ K, derived from observed line widths that include turbulent contributions. The median neutral hydrogen (HI) column density is $N_{\\rm HI} \\simeq 10^{19.1}\\,{\\rm cm^{-2}}$. These CNM structures are embedded within a warm neutral medium (WNM) with $N_{\\rm HI} \\simeq 10^{20} {\\rm cm^{-2}}$. Assuming an average distance of 100 pc, we derive for the CNM sheets a thickness of $< 0.3$ pc. Adopting a magnetic field strength of $B_{\\rm tot} = (6.0 \\pm 1.8)\\mu$G, proposed by Heiles & Troland 2005, and assuming that the CNM filaments are confined by magnetic pressure, we estimate a thickness of 0.09 pc. Correspondingly the median volume density is ...

  18. Enhancing Nonribosomal Peptide Biosynthesis in Filamentous Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Alexandra A; Keller, Nancy P; Wiemann, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are historically known as rich sources for production of biologically active natural products, so-called secondary metabolites. One particularly pharmaceutically relevant chemical group of secondary metabolites is the nonribosomal peptides synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). As most of the fungal NRPS gene clusters leading to production of the desired molecules are not expressed under laboratory conditions, efforts to overcome this impediment are crucial to unlock the full chemical potential of each fungal species. One way to activate these silent clusters is by overexpressing and deleting global regulators of secondary metabolism. The conserved fungal-specific regulator of secondary metabolism, LaeA, was shown to be a valuable target for sleuthing of novel gene clusters and metabolites. Additionally, modulation of chromatin structures by either chemical or genetic manipulation has been shown to activate cryptic metabolites. Furthermore, NRPS-derived molecules seem to be affected by cross talk between the specific gene clusters and some of these metabolites have a tissue- or developmental-specific regulation. This chapter summarizes how this knowledge of different tiers of regulation can be combined to increase production of NRPS-derived metabolites in fungal species.

  19. Molecular phylogeny of metazoan intermediate filament proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erber, A; Riemer, D; Bovenschulte, M; Weber, K

    1998-12-01

    We have cloned cytoplasmic intermediate filament (IF) proteins from a large number of invertebrate phyla using cDNA probes, the monoclonal antibody IFA, peptide sequence information, and various RT-PCR procedures. Novel IF protein sequences reported here include the urochordata and nine protostomic phyla, i.e., Annelida, Brachiopoda, Chaetognatha, Echiura, Nematomorpha, Nemertea, Platyhelminthes, Phoronida, and Sipuncula. Taken together with the wealth of data on IF proteins of vertebrates and the results on IF proteins of Cephalochordata, Mollusca, Annelida, and Nematoda, two IF prototypes emerge. The L-type, which includes 35 sequences from 11 protostomic phyla, shares with the nuclear lamins the long version of the coil 1b subdomain and, in most cases, a homology segment of some 120 residues in the carboxyterminal tail domain. The S-type, which includes all four subfamilies (types I to IV) of vertebrate IF proteins, lacks 42 residues in the coil 1b subdomain and the carboxyterminal lamin homology segment. Since IF proteins from all three phyla of the chordates have the 42-residue deletion, this deletion arose in a progenitor prior to the divergence of the chordates into the urochordate, cephalochordate, and vertebrate lineages, possibly already at the origin of the deuterostomic branch. Four phyla recently placed into the protostomia on grounds of their 18S rDNA sequences (Brachiopoda, Nemertea, Phoronida, and Platyhelminthes) show IF proteins of the L-type and fit by sequence identity criteria into the lophotrochozoic branch of the protostomia.

  20. Enhancing Nonribosomal Peptide Biosynthesis in Filamentous Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Alexandra A.; Keller, Nancy P.; Wiemann, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are historically known as rich sources for production of biologically active natural products, so-called secondary metabolites. One particularly pharmaceutically relevant chemical group of secondary metabolites is the nonribosomal peptides synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). As most of the fungal NRPS gene clusters leading to production of the desired molecules are not expressed under laboratory conditions, efforts to overcome this impediment are crucial to unlock the full chemical potential of each fungal species. One way to activate these silent clusters is by overexpressing and deleting global regulators of secondary metabolism. The conserved fungal-specific regulator of secondary metabolism, LaeA, was shown to be a valuable target for sleuthing of novel gene clusters and metabolites. Additionally, modulation of chromatin structures by either chemical or genetic manipulation has been shown to activate cryptic metabolites. Furthermore, NRPS-derived molecules seem to be affected by cross talk between the specific gene clusters and some of these metabolites have a tissue- or developmental-specific regulation. This chapter summarizes how this knowledge of different tiers of regulation can be combined to increase production of NRPS-derived metabolites in fungal species. PMID:26831707

  1. Equilibrium theory for braided elastic filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Gert

    Motivated by supercoiling of DNA and other filamentous structures, we formulate a theory for equilibria of 2-braids, i.e., structures formed by two elastic rods winding around each other in continuous contact and subject to a local interstrand interaction. Unlike in previous work no assumption is made on the shape of the contact curve. Rather, this shape is found as part of the solution. The theory is developed in terms of a moving frame of directors attached to one of the strands with one of the directors pointing to the position of the other strand. The constant-distance constraint is automatically satisfied by the introduction of what we call braid strains. The price we pay is that the potential energy involves arclength derivatives of these strains, thus giving rise to a second-order variational problem. The Euler-Lagrange equations for this problem give balance equations for the overall braid force and moment referred to the moving frame as well as differential equations that can be interpreted as effective constitutive relations encoding the effect that the second strand has on the first as the braid deforms under the action of end loads. Simple analytical cases are discussed first and used as starting solutions in parameter continuation studies to compute classes of both open and closed (linked or knotted) braid solutions.

  2. The Apis mellifera Filamentous Virus Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Laurent; Cornman, Scott; Hartmann, Ulrike; Cousserans, François; Evans, Jay D; de Miranda, Joachim R; Neumann, Peter

    2015-07-09

    A complete reference genome of the Apis mellifera Filamentous virus (AmFV) was determined using Illumina Hiseq sequencing. The AmFV genome is a double stranded DNA molecule of approximately 498,500 nucleotides with a GC content of 50.8%. It encompasses 247 non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs), equally distributed on both strands, which cover 65% of the genome. While most of the ORFs lacked threshold sequence alignments to reference protein databases, twenty-eight were found to display significant homologies with proteins present in other large double stranded DNA viruses. Remarkably, 13 ORFs had strong similarity with typical baculovirus domains such as PIFs (per os infectivity factor genes: pif-1, pif-2, pif-3 and p74) and BRO (Baculovirus Repeated Open Reading Frame). The putative AmFV DNA polymerase is of type B, but is only distantly related to those of the baculoviruses. The ORFs encoding proteins involved in nucleotide metabolism had the highest percent identity to viral proteins in GenBank. Other notable features include the presence of several collagen-like, chitin-binding, kinesin and pacifastin domains. Due to the large size of the AmFV genome and the inconsistent affiliation with other large double stranded DNA virus families infecting invertebrates, AmFV may belong to a new virus family.

  3. Structural Studies of the Parainfluenza Virus 5 Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Tetramer in Complex with Its Receptor, Sialyllactose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Ping; Thompson, Thomas B.; Wurzburg, Beth A.; Paterson, Reay G.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jardetzky, Theodore S. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    The paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) functions in virus attachment to cells, cleavage of sialic acid from oligosaccharides, and stimulating membrane fusion during virus entry into cells. The structural basis for these diverse functions remains to be fully understood. We report the crystal structures of the parainfluenza virus 5 (SV5) HN and its complexes with sialic acid, the inhibitor DANA, and the receptor sialyllactose. SV5 HN shares common structural features with HN of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and human parainfluenza 3 (HPIV3), but unlike the previously determined HN structures, the SV5 HN forms a tetramer in solution, which is thought to be the physiological oligomer. The sialyllactose complex reveals intact receptor within the active site, but no major conformational changes in the protein. The SV5 HN structures do not support previously proposed models for HN action in membrane fusion and suggest alternative mechanisms by which HN may promote virus entry into cells.

  4. Dynamic clustered distribution of hemagglutinin resolved at 40 nm in living cell membranes discriminates between raft theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Samuel T.; Gould, Travis J.; Gudheti, Manasa V.; Maas, Sarah A.; Mills, Kevin D.; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2007-01-01

    Organization in biological membranes spans many orders of magnitude in length scale, but limited resolution in far-field light microscopy has impeded distinction between numerous biomembrane models. One canonical example of a heterogeneously distributed membrane protein is hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza virus, which is associated with controversial cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. Using fluorescence photoactivation localization microscopy, we are able to image distributions of tens of thousands of HA molecules with subdiffraction resolution (≈40 nm) in live and fixed fibroblasts. HA molecules form irregular clusters on length scales from ≈40 nm up to many micrometers, consistent with results from electron microscopy. In live cells, the dynamics of HA molecules within clusters is observed and quantified to determine an effective diffusion coefficient. The results are interpreted in terms of several established models of biological membranes. PMID:17959773

  5. Label-free detection and characterization of the binding of hemagglutinin protein and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies using terahertz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yiwen; Zhong, Junlan; Zhang, Cunlin; Zuo, Jian; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2015-03-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) is the main surface glycoprotein of the influenza A virus. The H9N2 subtype influenza A virus is recognized as the most possible pandemic strain as it has crossed the species barrier, infecting swine and humans. We use terahertz spectroscopy to study the hydration shell formation around H9 subtype influenza A virus's HA protein (H9 HA) as well as the detection of antigen binding of H9 HA with the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody. We observe a remarkable concentration dependent nonlinear response of the H9 HA, which reveals the formation process of the hydration shell around H9 HA molecules. Furthermore, we show that terahertz dielectric properties of the H9 HA are strongly affected by the presence of the monoclonal antibody F10 and that the terahertz dielectric loss tangent can be used to detect the antibody binding at lower concentrations than the standard ELISA test.

  6. Persistence of strain in motor-filament assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Gopinath, Arvind; Mahadevan, L

    2015-01-01

    Crosslinked semi-flexible and flexible filaments that are actively deformed by molecular motors occur in various natural settings, such as the ordered eukaryotic flagellum, and the disordered cytoskeleton. The deformation of these composite systems is driven by active motor forces and resisted by passive filament elasticity, and structural constraints due to permanent cross-links. Using a mean field theory for a one-dimensional ordered system, we show that the combination of motor activity and finite filament extensibility yields a characteristic persistence length scale over which active strain decays. This decay length is set by the ability of motors to respond to combination of the weak extensional elasticity, passive shear resistance and the viscoelastic properties of the motor assembly, and generalizes the notion of persistence in purely thermal filaments to active systems.

  7. Collective alignment of polar filaments by molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebert, F; Vershinin, M; Gross, S P; Aranson, I S

    2009-04-01

    We study the alignment of polar biofilaments, such as microtubules and actin, subject to the action of multiple molecular motors attached simultaneously to more than one filament. Focusing on a paradigm model of only two filaments interacting with multiple motors, we were able to investigate in detail the alignment dynamics. While almost no alignment occurs in the case of a single motor, the filaments become rapidly aligned due to the collective action of the motors. Our analysis shows that the alignment time is governed by the number of bound motors and the magnitude of the motors' stepping fluctuations. We predict that the time scale of alignment is in the order of seconds, much faster than that reported for passive crosslink-induced bundling. In vitro experiments on the alignment of microtubules by multiple-motor covered beads are in qualitative agreement. We also discuss another mode of fast alignment of filaments, namely the cooperation between motors and passive crosslinks.

  8. Spin alignment of dark matter haloes in filaments and walls

    CERN Document Server

    Arag'on-Calvo, M A; Jones, B J T; Van der Hulst, T; Arag\\'on-Calvo, Miguel A.; Weygaert, Rien van de; Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2006-01-01

    The MMF technique is used to segment the cosmic web as seen in a cosmological N-body simulation into wall-like and filament-like structures. We find that the spins and shapes of dark matter haloes are significantly correlated with each other and with the orientation of their host structures. The shape orientation is such that the halo minor axes tend to lie perpendicular to the host structure, be it a wall or filament. The orientation of the halo spin vector is mass dependent. Low mass haloes in walls and filaments have a tendency to have their spins oriented within the parent structure, while higher mass haloes in filaments have spins that tend to lie perpendicular to the parent structure.

  9. The comparison study of diagnostics of light filaments in air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO; Zuoqiang; ZHANG; Jie; YU; Jin; ZHENG; Zhiyuan; YUAN; Xiaohui; ZHANG; Zhe; LI; Yutong; WANG; Zhaohua; LING; Weijun; WEI; Zhiyi

    2006-01-01

    Long plasma channels in air induced by femtosecond laser pulses are investigated using three different methods, including the cross-section imaging, resistivity measuring and acoustic diagnostics. These methods are based on different properties of the light filaments. A comparison of the three diagnostics shows that the imaging method is the most precise one in studying the filaments distribution and evolution, that the sonographic method is the most convenient approach to detecting long plasma channels by detecting the acoustic wave generation, and that the resistivity measurement can only be applied for giving a rough estimate. The diagnostics of filaments allow us to choose appropriate detecting methods and provide further insight into the dynamic evolution of the light filaments in air.

  10. Filamentous Phages As a Model System in Soft Matter Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogic, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous phages have unique physical properties, such as uniform particle lengths, that are not found in other model systems of rod-like colloidal particles. Consequently, suspensions of such phages provided powerful model systems that have advanced our understanding of soft matter physics in general and liquid crystals in particular. We described some of these advances. In particular we briefly summarize how suspensions of filamentous phages have provided valuable insight into the field of colloidal liquid crystals. We also describe recent experiments on filamentous phages that have elucidated a robust pathway for assembly of 2D membrane-like materials. Finally, we outline unique structural properties of filamentous phages that have so far remained largely unexplored yet have the potential to further advance soft matter physics and material science.

  11. Health Risks Associated with Exposure to Filamentous Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbuta, Mary Augustina; Mwanza, Mulunda

    2017-01-01

    Filamentous fungi occur widely in the environment, contaminating soil, air, food and other substrates. Due to their wide distribution, they have medical and economic implications. Regardless of their use as a source of antibiotics, vitamins and raw materials for various industrially important chemicals, most fungi and filamentous fungi produce metabolites associated with a range of health risks, both in humans and in animals. The association of filamentous fungi and their metabolites to different negative health conditions in humans and animals, has contributed to the importance of investigating different health risks induced by this family of heterotrophs. This review aims to discuss health risks associated with commonly occurring filamentous fungal species which belong to genera Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium, as well as evaluating their pathogenicity and mycotoxic properties. PMID:28677641

  12. Biofilms from a Brazilian water distribution system include filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, V M; Oliveira, H M B; Santos, C; Paterson, R R M; Gusmão, N B; Lima, N

    2013-03-01

    Filamentous fungi in drinking water can block water pipes, can cause organoleptic biodeterioration, and are a source of pathogens. There are increasing reports of the involvement of the organisms in biofilms. This present study describes a sampling device that can be inserted directly into pipes within water distribution systems, allowing biofilm formation in situ. Calcofluor White M2R staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization with morphological analyses using epifluorescent microscopy were used to analyse biofilms for filamentous fungi, permitting direct observation of the fungi. DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) was applied to detect bacteria. Filamentous fungi were detected in biofilms after 6 months on coupons exposed to raw water, decanted water and at the entrance of the water distribution system. Algae, yeast, and bacteria were also observed. The role of filamentous fungi requires further investigations.

  13. Elastic response of filamentous networks with compliant crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A; Sheinman, M; Heidemann, K M; MacKintosh, F C

    2013-11-01

    Experiments have shown that elasticity of disordered filamentous networks with compliant crosslinks is very different from networks with rigid crosslinks. Here, we model and analyze filamentous networks as a collection of randomly oriented rigid filaments connected to each other by flexible crosslinks that are modeled as wormlike chains. For relatively large extensions we allow for enthalpic stretching of crosslink backbones. We show that for sufficiently high crosslink density, the network linear elastic response is affine on the scale of the filaments' length. The nonlinear regime can become highly nonaffine and is characterized by a divergence of the elastic modulus at finite strain. In contrast to the prior predictions, we do not find an asymptotic regime in which the differential elastic modulus scales linearly with the stress, although an approximate linear dependence can be seen in a transition from entropic to enthalpic regimes. We discuss our results in light of recent experiments.

  14. Elastic response of filamentous networks with compliant crosslinks

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, A; Heidemann, K M; MacKintosh, F C

    2013-01-01

    Experiments have shown that elasticity of disordered filamentous networks with compliant crosslinks is very different from networks with rigid crosslinks. Here, we model and analyze filamentous networks as a collection of randomly oriented rigid filaments connected to each other by flexible crosslinks that are modeled as worm-like chains. For relatively large extensions we allow for enthalpic stretching of crosslinks' backbones. We show that for sufficiently high crosslink density, the network linear elastic response is affine on the scale of the filaments' length. The nonlinear regime can become highly nonaffine and is characterized by a divergence of the elastic modulus at finite strain. In contrast to the prior predictions, we do not find an asymptotic regime in which the differential elastic modulus scales linearly with the stress, although an approximate linear dependence can be seen in a transition from entropic to enthalpic regimes. We discuss our results in light of the recent experiments.

  15. Bright Prospect for the Polyester Industrial Filament Sector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Some large companies from Americaand Europe have constructed plantsin China or established long-termstable cooperation relationship withChinese enterprises. A bright devel-opment prospect has therefore beenbrought to the polyester industrial fila-ment sector in China.

  16. Myosin and Actin Filaments in Muscle: Structures and Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, John M; Paul, Danielle M; Morris, Edward P

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, improvements in electron microscopy and image processing have permitted significantly higher resolutions to be achieved (sometimes <1 nm) when studying isolated actin and myosin filaments. In the case of actin filaments the changing structure when troponin binds calcium ions can be followed using electron microscopy and single particle analysis to reveal what happens on each of the seven non-equivalent pseudo-repeats of the tropomyosin α-helical coiled-coil. In the case of the known family of myosin filaments not only are the myosin head arrangements under relaxing conditions being defined, but the latest analysis, also using single particle methods, is starting to reveal the way that the α-helical coiled-coil myosin rods are packed to give the filament backbones.

  17. Tropomyosin diffusion over actin subunits facilitates thin filament assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Fischer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coiled-coil tropomyosin binds to consecutive actin-subunits along actin-containing thin filaments. Tropomyosin molecules then polymerize head-to-tail to form cables that wrap helically around the filaments. Little is known about the assembly process that leads to continuous, gap-free tropomyosin cable formation. We propose that tropomyosin molecules diffuse over the actin-filament surface to connect head-to-tail to partners. This possibility is likely because (1 tropomyosin hovers loosely over the actin-filament, thus binding weakly to F-actin and (2 low energy-barriers provide tropomyosin freedom for 1D axial translation on F-actin. We consider that these unique features of the actin-tropomyosin interaction are the basis of tropomyosin cable formation.

  18. Eruptive filament of May 31, 1997, observed by SOHO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, B.; Heinzel, P.; Vial, J.-C.; Delaboudinière, J.-P.; Delannée, C.

    In the frame of the SUMER/CDS Joint Programme (JOP 17) the authors have detected the four Lyman lines in an erupting filament. The strong self-absorption in these lines, already reported for quiescent filaments, is still present in this highly dynamical event, but the authors observe a significant red asymmetry in the intensities of the two peaks. They ascribe it to an upward bulk motion of the filament, which they can actually see on a series of EIT images taken in the Fe XII line. Both sets of observations can lead to a determination of the velocity vector. The Doppler velocities are also derived from other lines detected by SUMER/CDS and can be correlated with the observations of the Pic-du-Midi MSDP obtained for this event. The filament eruption was also well observed by other GBO instruments in the Hα line (Meudon and Ondřejov).

  19. Successive filament eruptions within one solar breakout event

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yuandeng

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic breakout model has been widely used to explain solar eruptive activities. Here, we apply it to explain successive filament eruptions occurred in a quadrupolar magnetic source region. Based on the high temporal and spatial resolution, multi-wavelengths observations taken by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO), we find some signatures that support the occurrence of breakout-like external reconnection just before the start of the successive filament eruptions. Furthermore, the extrapolated three-dimensional coronal field also reveals that the magnetic topology above the quadrupolar source region resembles that of the breakout model. We propose a possible mechanism within the framework of the breakout model to interpret the successive filament eruptions, in which the so-called magnetic implosion mechanism is firstly introduced to be the physical linkage of successive filament eruptions. We conclude that the structural properties of coronal fields are im...

  20. Measurement of Reversed Extension Flow using the Filament Stretch Rheometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Skov, Anne Ladegaard; Nielsen, Jens Kromann;

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of material functions with reversed extension flow is demonstrated using the Filament Stretching Rheometer (FSR). This includes startup of uniaxial elongational flow (potentially until steady state) followed by biaxial squeezing, and large amplitude oscillatory elongation (LAOE). ...

  1. Actin filaments on myosin beds: The velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, L.; Magnasco, M. O.; Winkelmann, D. A.; Libchaber, A.

    1995-12-01

    In vitro studies of actin filaments sliding on a myosin-coated surface are analyzed, filament by filament, at a sampling rate of 30 per second. For each filament, the mean arc length coordinate is computed and histograms of instantaneous velocities, along the arc length, are established. Two types of motion are observed, depending on the experimental conditions. The first one is characterized by a homogeneous flow, with well defined velocities. In this regime, specific defects are a constitutive part of the flow. It is observed at high temperature, at high myosin coverage, and with a particular mode of attachment of myosin to the surface. The second regime shows no clear velocity selection, but a broadband distribution. It is characterized by high friction and is observed at low temperature or low myosin density. (c) 1995 The American Physical Society

  2. Dynamics of wave fronts and filaments in anisotropic cardiac tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Dierckx, Hans J F M

    2015-01-01

    The heartbeat is mediated between cardiac cells by waves of electrical depolarisation. During cardiac arrhythmias, electrical activity was found to be organised in scroll waves which rotate around a dynamical filament curve. In this thesis, a curved-space approach is used to mathematically capture anisotropy of wave propagation. We derive for the first time the covariant laws of motion for traveling wave fronts and scroll wave filaments in anisotropic excitable media such as cardiac tissue. We show that locally varying anisotropy yields non-zero Riemann tensor components, which may alter the stability of scroll wave filaments. The instability of scroll wave filaments has been linked to transition from ventricular tachycardia to fibrillation.

  3. Filament propagation length of femtosecond pulses with different transverse modes

    CERN Document Server

    Kaya, N; Kaya, G; Strohaber, J; Kolomenskii, A A; Schuessler, H A

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally studied intense femtosecond pulse filamentation and propagation in water for Gaussian, Laguerre-Gaussian, and Bessel-Gaussian incident beams. These different transverse modes for incident laser pulses were created from an initial Gaussian beam by using a computer generated hologram technique. We found that the length of the filament induced by the Bessel-Gaussian incident beam was longer than that for the other transverse modes under the conditions of the same peak intensity, pulse duration, and the size of the central part of the beam. To better understand the Bessel-Gaussian beam propagation, we performed a more detailed study of the filament length as a function of the number of radial modal lobes. The length increased with the number of lobes, implying that the radial modal lobes serve as an energy reservoir for the filament formed by the central intensity peak.

  4. Calibration and temperature profile of a tungsten filament lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Izarra, Charles [Groupe de Recherche sur l' Energetique des Milieux Ionises, UMR6606 Universite d' Orleans, CNRS, Faculte des Sciences, Site de Bourges, rue Gaston Berger, BP 4043, 18028 Bourges Cedex (France); Gitton, Jean-Michel, E-mail: Charles.De_Izarra@univ-orleans.f [College Littre, 10 rue Littre, Bourges (France)

    2010-07-15

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament lamp (lamp used in automotive lighting) and then tested on a standard tungsten ribbon lamp. The calibration procedure developed was checked by determining the calibration point of the tungsten ribbon lamp with an accuracy of 2%. In addition, for low current intensity, it was observed that the temperature of the filament was not uniform; an explanation is proposed by considering a simple heat transfer model.

  5. FILAMENTATION INSTABILITY OF LASER BEAMS IN NONLOCAL NONLINEAR MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文双春; 范滇元

    2001-01-01

    The filamentation instability of laser beams propagating in nonlocal nonlinear media is investigated. It is shown that the filamentation instability can occur in weakly nonlocal self-focusing media for any degree of nonlocality, and in defocusing media for the input light intensity exceeding a threshold related to the degree of nonlocality. A linear stability analysis is used to predict the initial growth rate of the instability. It is found that the nonlocality tends to suppress filamentation instability in self-focusing media and to stimulate filamentation instability in self-defocusing media. Numerical simulations confirm the results of the linear stability analysis and disclose a recurrence phenomenon in nonlocal self-focusing media analogous to the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem.

  6. Health Risks Associated with Exposure to Filamentous Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Augustina Egbuta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous fungi occur widely in the environment, contaminating soil, air, food and other substrates. Due to their wide distribution, they have medical and economic implications. Regardless of their use as a source of antibiotics, vitamins and raw materials for various industrially important chemicals, most fungi and filamentous fungi produce metabolites associated with a range of health risks, both in humans and in animals. The association of filamentous fungi and their metabolites to different negative health conditions in humans and animals, has contributed to the importance of investigating different health risks induced by this family of heterotrophs. This review aims to discuss health risks associated with commonly occurring filamentous fungal species which belong to genera Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium, as well as evaluating their pathogenicity and mycotoxic properties.

  7. Tropomyosin diffusion over actin subunits facilitates thin filament assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Stefan; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Lehman, William

    2016-01-01

    Coiled-coil tropomyosin binds to consecutive actin-subunits along actin-containing thin filaments. Tropomyosin molecules then polymerize head-to-tail to form cables that wrap helically around the filaments. Little is known about the assembly process that leads to continuous, gap-free tropomyosin cable formation. We propose that tropomyosin molecules diffuse over the actin-filament surface to connect head-to-tail to partners. This possibility is likely because (1) tropomyosin hovers loosely over the actin-filament, thus binding weakly to F-actin and (2) low energy-barriers provide tropomyosin freedom for 1D axial translation on F-actin. We consider that these unique features of the actin-tropomyosin interaction are the basis of tropomyosin cable formation. PMID:26798831

  8. Yeast expressed recombinant Hemagglutinin protein of Novel H1N1 elicits neutralising antibodies in rabbits and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athmaram TN

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently available vaccines for the pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 2009 produced in chicken eggs have serious impediments viz limited availability, risk of allergic reactions and the possible selection of sub-populations differing from the naturally occurring virus, whereas the cell culture derived vaccines are time consuming and may not meet the demands of rapid global vaccination required to combat the present/future pandemic. Hemagglutinin (HA based subunit vaccine for H1N1 requires the HA protein in glycosylated form, which is impossible with the commonly used bacterial expression platform. Additionally, bacterial derived protein requires extensive purification and refolding steps for vaccine applications. For these reasons an alternative heterologous system for rapid, easy and economical production of Hemagglutinin protein in its glycosylated form is required. The HA gene of novel H1N1 A/California/04/2009 was engineered for expression in Pichia pastoris as a soluble secreted protein. The full length HA- synthetic gene having α-secretory tag was integrated into P. pastoris genome through homologous recombination. The resultant Pichia clones having multiple copy integrants of the transgene expressed full length HA protein in the culture supernatant. The Recombinant yeast derived H1N1 HA protein elicited neutralising antibodies both in mice and rabbits. The sera from immunised animals also exhibited Hemagglutination Inhibition (HI activity. Considering the safety, reliability and also economic potential of Pichia expression platform, our preliminary data indicates the feasibility of using this system as an alternative for large-scale production of recombinant influenza HA protein in the face of influenza pandemic threat.

  9. The hemagglutinin of the influenza A(H1N1pdm09 is mutating towards stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castelán-Vega JA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Juan A Castelán-Vega, Anastasia Magaña-Hernández, Alicia Jiménez-Alberto, Rosa María Ribas-AparicioDepartamento de Microbiología, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Mexico City, MexicoAbstract: The last influenza A pandemic provided an excellent opportunity to study the adaptation of the influenza A(H1N1pdm09 virus to the human host. Particularly, due to the availability of sequences taken from isolates since the beginning of the pandemic until date, we could monitor amino acid changes that occurred in the hemagglutinin (HA as the virus spread worldwide and became the dominant H1N1 strain. HA is crucial to viral infection because it binds to sialidated cell-receptors and mediates fusion of cell and viral membranes; because antibodies that bind to HA may block virus entry to the cell, this protein is subjected to high selective pressure. Multiple alignment analysis of sequences of the HA from isolates taken since 2009 to date allowed us to find amino acid changes that were positively selected as the pandemic progressed. We found nine changes that became prevalent: HA1 subunits D104N, K166Q, S188T, S206T, A259T, and K285E; and HA2 subunits E47K, S124N, and E172K. Most of these changes were located in areas involved in inter- and intrachain interactions, while only two (K166Q and S188T were located in known antigenic sites. We conclude that selective pressure on HA was aimed to improve its functionality and hence virus fitness, rather than at avoidance of immune recognition.Keywords: influenza A, hemagglutinin evolution, virus fitness

  10. Motility patterns of filamentous sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunker, Rita; Røy, Hans; Kamp, Anja;

    2011-01-01

    was constructed based on our observations. The model was applied to virtual filaments in the oxygen- and sulfide-free zone of the sediment, which is a main habitat of Beggiatoa in the natural environment. The model predicts a long residence time of the virtual filament in the suboxic zone and explains why...... Beggiatoa accumulate high nitrate concentrations in internal vacuoles as an alternative electron acceptor to oxygen....

  11. Nucleus-associated intermediate filaments from chicken erythrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Chicken erythrocyte nuclei prepared by isolation in isotonic KCl and Nonidet P-40 detergent were found to contain numerous attached filaments with a mean diameter of 11.0 nm. In polypeptide content and solubility properties, they resembled the vimentin type of intermediate filament found in cells of mesenchymal origin. Examination of their association with the nucleus suggests that more than a simple membrane attachment is involved.

  12. Scrape Off Layer profiles interpreted with filament dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Militello, F

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to link the density profiles in the Scrape Off Layer (SOL) with the fluctuations (filaments) that generate them. The framework is based on the dynamics of independent filaments and their statistical behaviour and can be used to rigorously understand the mechanisms that lead to flattening and broadening of the SOL profiles as well as the radial increase of the relative fluctuation amplitude.

  13. Riemannian geometrical constraints on magnetic vortex filaments in plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrade, L. C. Garcia

    2005-01-01

    Two theorems on the Riemannian geometrical constraints on vortex magnetic filaments acting as dynamos in (MHD) flows are presented. The use of Gauss-Mainard-Codazzi equations allows us to investigate in detail the influence of curvature and torsion of vortex filaments in the MHD dynamos. This application follows closely previous applications to Heisenberg spin equation to the investigations in magnetohydrostatics given by Schief (Plasma Physics J. 10, 7, 2677 (2003)). The Lorentz force on vor...

  14. Scrape off layer profiles interpreted with filament dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militello, F.; Omotani, J. T.

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to link the density profiles in the scrape off layer (SOL) with the fluctuations (filaments) that generate them. The framework is based on the dynamics of independent filaments and their statistical behaviour and can be used to rigorously understand the mechanisms that lead to flattening and broadening of the SOL profiles as well as the radial increase of the relative fluctuation amplitude.

  15. The Hβ Chromospheric Magnetic Field in a Quiescent Filament

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    We observed the line-of-sight magnetic field in the chromosphereandphotosphere of a large quiescent filament on the solar disk on September 6, 2001using the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope in Huairou Solar Observing Station. Thechromospheric and photospheric magnetograms together with Hβ filtergrams of thefilament were examined. The filament was located on the neutral line of the largescale longitudinal magnetic field in the photosphere and the chromosphere. Thelateral feet of the filament .were found to be related to magnetic structures with op-posite polarities. Two small lateral feet are linked to weak parasitic polarity. Thereis a negative magnetic structure in the photosphere under a break of the filament.At the location corresponding to the filament in the chromospheric magnetograms,the magnetic strength is found to be about 40-70 Gauss (measuring error about 39Gauss). The magnetic signal indicates the amplitude and orientation of the internalmagnetic field in the filament. We discuss several possible causes which may pro-duce such a measured signal. A twisted magnetic configuration inside the filamentis suggested .

  16. Force-velocity measurements of a few growing actin filaments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coraline Brangbour

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization of actin in filaments generates forces that play a pivotal role in many cellular processes. We introduce a novel technique to determine the force-velocity relation when a few independent anchored filaments grow between magnetic colloidal particles. When a magnetic field is applied, the colloidal particles assemble into chains under controlled loading or spacing. As the filaments elongate, the beads separate, allowing the force-velocity curve to be precisely measured. In the widely accepted Brownian ratchet model, the transduced force is associated with the slowing down of the on-rate polymerization. Unexpectedly, in our experiments, filaments are shown to grow at the same rate as when they are free in solution. However, as they elongate, filaments are more confined in the interspace between beads. Higher repulsive forces result from this higher confinement, which is associated with a lower entropy. In this mechanism, the production of force is not controlled by the polymerization rate, but is a consequence of the restriction of filaments' orientational fluctuations at their attachment point.

  17. Force-Velocity Measurements of a Few Growing Actin Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brangbour, Coraline; du Roure, Olivia; Helfer, Emmanuèle; Démoulin, Damien; Mazurier, Alexis; Fermigier, Marc; Carlier, Marie-France; Bibette, Jérôme; Baudry, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The polymerization of actin in filaments generates forces that play a pivotal role in many cellular processes. We introduce a novel technique to determine the force-velocity relation when a few independent anchored filaments grow between magnetic colloidal particles. When a magnetic field is applied, the colloidal particles assemble into chains under controlled loading or spacing. As the filaments elongate, the beads separate, allowing the force-velocity curve to be precisely measured. In the widely accepted Brownian ratchet model, the transduced force is associated with the slowing down of the on-rate polymerization. Unexpectedly, in our experiments, filaments are shown to grow at the same rate as when they are free in solution. However, as they elongate, filaments are more confined in the interspace between beads. Higher repulsive forces result from this higher confinement, which is associated with a lower entropy. In this mechanism, the production of force is not controlled by the polymerization rate, but is a consequence of the restriction of filaments' orientational fluctuations at their attachment point. PMID:21541364

  18. Filament Fragmentation in High-Mass Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Beuther, H; Johnston, K; Henning, Th; Hacar, A; Kainulainen, J T

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We resolve the length-scales for filament formation and fragmentation (res. <=0.1pc), in particular the Jeans length and cylinder fragmentation scale. Methods: We observed the prototypical high-mass star-forming filament IRDC18223 with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) in the 3.2mm continuum and N2H+(1-0) line emission in a ten field mosaic at a spatial resolution of ~4'' (~14000AU). Results: The dust continuum emission resolves the filament into a chain of at least 12 relatively regularly spaced cores. The mean separation between cores is ~0.40(+-0.18)pc. While this is approximately consistent with the fragmentation of an infinite, isothermal, gravitationally bound gas cylinder, a high mass-to-length ratio of M/l~1000M_sun/pc requires additional turbulent and/or magnetic support against radial collapse of the filament. The N2H+(1-0) data reveal a velocity gradient perpendicular to the main filament. Although rotation of the filament cannot be excluded, the data are also consistent with the m...

  19. Mid-infrared laser filaments in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanov, A. V.; Voronin, A. A.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Pugžlys, A.; Stepanov, E. A.; Andriukaitis, G.; Flöry, T.; Ališauskas, S.; Fedotov, A. B.; Baltuška, A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in the atmosphere offers unique opportunities for long-range transmission of high-power laser radiation and standoff detection. With the critical power of self-focusing scaling as the laser wavelength squared, the quest for longer-wavelength drivers, which would radically increase the peak power and, hence, the laser energy in a single filament, has been ongoing over two decades, during which time the available laser sources limited filamentation experiments in the atmosphere to the near-infrared and visible ranges. Here, we demonstrate filamentation of ultrashort mid-infrared pulses in the atmosphere for the first time. We show that, with the spectrum of a femtosecond laser driver centered at 3.9 μm, right at the edge of the atmospheric transmission window, radiation energies above 20 mJ and peak powers in excess of 200 GW can be transmitted through the atmosphere in a single filament. Our studies reveal unique properties of mid-infrared filaments, where the generation of powerful mid-infrared supercontinuum is accompanied by unusual scenarios of optical harmonic generation, giving rise to remarkably broad radiation spectra, stretching from the visible to the mid-infrared. PMID:25687621

  20. The interaction of a magnetohydrodynamical shock with a filament

    CERN Document Server

    Goldsmith, K J A

    2016-01-01

    We present 3D magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of the adiabatic interaction of a shock with a dense, filamentary cloud. We investigate the effects of various filament lengths and orientations on the interaction using different orientations of the magnetic field, and vary the Mach number of the shock, the density contrast of the filament, and the plasma beta, in order to determine their effect on the evolution and lifetime of the filament. We find that in a parallel magnetic field filaments have longer lifetimes if they are orientated more 'broadside' to the shock front, and that an increase in the density contrast hastens the destruction of the cloud, in terms of the modified cloud-crushing time-scale, tcs. The combination of a mild shock and a perpendicular or oblique field provides the best condition for extending the life of the filament, with some filaments able to survive almost indefinitely since they are cocooned by the magnetic field. A high value for the density contrast does not initiate la...

  1. Formation of a solar Ha filament from orphan penumbrae

    CERN Document Server

    Buehler, D; van Noort, M; Solanki, S K

    2016-01-01

    The formation of an Ha filament in active region (AR) 10953 is described. Observations from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode satellite starting on 27th April 2007 until 1st May 2007 were analysed. 20 scans of the 6302A Fe I line pair recorded by SOT/SP were inverted using the SPINOR code. The inversions were analysed together with SOT/BFI G-band and Ca II H and SOT/NFI Ha observations. Following the disappearance of an initial Ha filament aligned along the polarity inversion line (PIL) of the AR, a new Ha filament formed in its place some 20 hours later, which remained stable for at least 1.5 days. The creation of the new Ha filament was driven by the ascent of horizontal magnetic fields from the photosphere into the chromosphere at three separate locations along the PIL. The magnetic fields at two of these locations were situated directly underneath the initial Ha filament and formed orphan penumbrae already aligned along the Ha filament channel. The 700 G orphan penumbrae were stable and ...

  2. Appearance of Dusty Filaments at Different Viewing Angles

    CERN Document Server

    Chira, R -A; Henning, Th; Kainulainen, J

    2016-01-01

    Context: In the last years, there have been many studies on the omnipresence and structures of filaments in star-forming regions, as well as their role in the process of star formation. Those filaments are normally identified as elongated fibres across the plane of the sky. But how would we detect filaments that are inclined? Aims: We aim to learn more about whether, and how, total column density or dust temperature change with respect to the line of sight. Such variations would enable observers to use dust observations to identify and study filaments at any inclination and gain more insight on the distribution and orientations of filaments within the Galactic plane. Methods: As a first step, we perform numerical calculations on simple cylindrical models to evaluate the influence of filament geometry on the average flux density. After that, we apply our three-dimensional Monte Carlo dust radiative transfer code on two models of star-forming regions and derive maps of effective total column density and dust te...

  3. SDC13 infrared dark clouds: Longitudinally collapsing filaments?

    CERN Document Server

    Peretto, N; André, Ph; Arzoumanian, D; Rivilla, V M; Bardeau, S; Puertas, S Duarte; Fernandez, J P Guzman; Lenfestey, C; Li, G -X; Olguin, F A; Röck, B R; de Villiers, H; Williams, J

    2013-01-01

    Formation of stars is now believed to be tightly linked to the dynamical evolution of interstellar filaments in which they form. In this paper we analyze the density structure and kinematics of a small network of infrared dark filaments, SDC13, observed in both dust continuum and molecular line emission with the IRAM 30m telescope. These observations reveal the presence of 18 compact sources amongst which the two most massive, MM1 and MM2, are located at the intersection point of the parsec-long filaments. The dense gas velocity and velocity dispersion observed along these filaments show smooth, strongly correlated, gradients. We discuss the origin of the SDC13 velocity field in the context of filament longitudinal collapse. We show that the collapse timescale of the SDC13 filaments (from 1 Myr to 4 Myr depending on the model parameters) is consistent with the presence of Class I sources in them, and argue that, on top of bringing more material to the centre of the system, collapse could generate additional k...

  4. Photospheric flows around a quiescent filament and CALAS first results .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondi, S.; Roudier, Th.; Molodij, G.; Bommier, V.; Malherbe, J. M.; Schmieder, B.; Meunier, N.; Rieutord, M.; Beigbeder., F.

    The horizontal photospheric flows below and around a filament are one of the components in the formation and evolution of filaments. Few studies have been done so far because this requires multiwalength time sequences with high spatial resolution. We present observations obtained in 2004 during the international JOP 178 campaign in which eleven instruments were involved, from space and ground based observatories. Several supergranulation cells are crossing the Polarity Inversion Line (PIL) allowing the transport of magnetic flux through the PIL, in particular the parasitic polarities. Before the filament eruptive phase, parasitic and normal polarities are swept by a continuous diverging horizontal flow located in the filament gap where the disappearance of the filament starts. In the future, observations at high spatial resolution on a large field-of-view would be very useful to study filaments, as they are very large structures. We also present the first images obtained with the use of our new 14 MPixel camera CALAS (CAmera for the LArge Scales of the Solar Surface) (10 arcmin× 6.7 arcmin) . These are the first large-scale and high-resolution images of the solar surface ever made.

  5. Large scale filaments associated with Milky Way spiral arms

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ke; Ginsburg, Adam; Walmsley, C Malcolm; Molinari, Sergio; Schisano, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquity of filamentary structure at various scales through out the Galaxy has triggered a renewed interest in their formation, evolution, and role in star formation. The largest filaments can reach up to Galactic scale as part of the spiral arm structure. However, such large scale filaments are hard to identify systematically due to limitations in identifying methodology (i.e., as extinction features). We present a new approach to directly search for the largest, coldest, and densest filaments in the Galaxy, making use of sensitive Herschel Hi-GAL data complemented by spectral line cubes. We present a sample of the 9 most prominent Herschel filaments, including 6 identified from a pilot search field plus 3 from outside the field. These filaments measure 37-99 pc long and 0.6-3.0 pc wide with masses (0.5-8.3)$\\times10^4 \\, M_\\odot$, and beam-averaged ($28"$, or 0.4-0.7 pc) peak H$_2$ column densities of (1.7-9.3)$\\times 10^{22} \\, \\rm{cm^{-2}}$. The bulk of the filaments are relatively cold (17-21 K), whi...

  6. Topology of magnetic helicity of torsioned filaments in Hall plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L C Garcia

    2007-01-01

    A solution of magnetic Hall equations for plasma filaments in the Coulomb gauge is obtained in the non-holonomic frame. Some physical features of the solution include, the non-conservation of the magnetic helicity and the decay of the magnetic field in the filaments. From the mathematical point of view,the presence of Frenet torsion in the filament is actually shown to be fundamental for the breaking of conservation of magnetic helicity in the case of helicoidal filaments. Since the magnetic helicity is not conserved even in the Coulomb gauge, and the magnetic field decays, one can say that the dynamo action fails. Actually the presence of torsion enhances the breaking of magnetic field helicity conservation. A similar formula of the one obtained here without considering the Hall effect has been obtained by Moffatt and Ricca (PRSA-1992) in the case of holonomic filaments. It is shown that unknotted magnetic filaments may place a lower bound on the magnetic energy. Discussions on the writhe number are also dis...

  7. Properties of Cosmological Filaments extracted from Eulerian Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Gheller, Claudio; Favre, Jean; Brüggen, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Using a new parallel algorithm implemented within the VisIt framework, we analysed large cosmological grid simulations to study the properties of baryons in filaments. The procedure allows us to build large catalogues with up to $\\sim 3 \\cdot 10^4$ filaments per simulated volume and to investigate the properties of cosmic filaments for very large volumes at high resolution (up to $300^3 ~\\rm Mpc^3$ simulated with $2048^3$ cells). We determined scaling relations for the mass, volume, length and temperature of filaments and compared them to those of galaxy clusters. The longest filaments have a total length of about $200 ~\\rm Mpc$ with a mass of several $10^{15} M_{\\odot}$. We also investigated the effects of different gas physics. Radiative cooling significantly modifies the thermal properties of the warm-hot-intergalactic medium of filaments, mainly by lowering their mean temperature via line cooling. On the other hand, powerful feedback from active galactic nuclei in surrounding halos can heat up the gas in ...

  8. Sympathetic Solar Filament Eruptions on 2015 March 15

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Rui; Zimovets, Ivan; Hu, Huidong; Dai, Xinghua; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 March 15 coronal mass ejection as one of the two that together drove the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24 so far was associated with sympathetic filament eruptions. We investigate the relations between the different filaments involved in the eruption. A surge-like small-scale filament motion is confirmed as the trigger that initiated the erupting filament with multi-wavelength observations and using a forced magnetic field extrapolation method. When the erupting filament moved to an open magnetic field region, it experienced an obvious acceleration process and was accompanied by a C-class flare and the rise of another larger filament that eventually failed to erupt. We measure the decay index of the background magnetic field, which presents a critical height of 118 Mm. Combining with a potential field source surface extrapolation method, we analyze the distributions of the large-scale magnetic field, which indicates that the open magnetic field region may provide a favorable condition for ...

  9. Geometrical and mechanical properties control actin filament organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Letort

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The different actin structures governing eukaryotic cell shape and movement are not only determined by the properties of the actin filaments and associated proteins, but also by geometrical constraints. We recently demonstrated that limiting nucleation to specific regions was sufficient to obtain actin networks with different organization. To further investigate how spatially constrained actin nucleation determines the emergent actin organization, we performed detailed simulations of the actin filament system using Cytosim. We first calibrated the steric interaction between filaments, by matching, in simulations and experiments, the bundled actin organization observed with a rectangular bar of nucleating factor. We then studied the overall organization of actin filaments generated by more complex pattern geometries used experimentally. We found that the fraction of parallel versus antiparallel bundles is determined by the mechanical properties of actin filament or bundles and the efficiency of nucleation. Thus nucleation geometry, actin filaments local interactions, bundle rigidity, and nucleation efficiency are the key parameters controlling the emergent actin architecture. We finally simulated more complex nucleation patterns and performed the corresponding experiments to confirm the predictive capabilities of the model.

  10. Giant quiescent solar filament observed with high-resolution spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckein, C.; Verma, M.; Denker, C.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: An extremely large filament was studied in various layers of the solar atmosphere. The inferred physical parameters and the morphological aspects are compared with smaller quiescent filaments. Methods: A giant quiet-Sun filament was observed with the high-resolution Echelle spectrograph at the Vacuum Tower Telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain, on 2011 November 15. A mosaic of spectra (ten maps of 100″ × 182″) was recorded simultaneously in the chromospheric absorption lines Hα and Na i D2. Physical parameters of the filament plasma were derived using cloud model (CM) inversions and line core fits. The spectra were complemented with full-disk filtergrams (He i λ10830 Å, Hα, and Ca ii K) of the Chromospheric Telescope (ChroTel) and full-disk magnetograms of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). Results: The filament had extremely large linear dimensions (~817 arcsec), which corresponds to about 658 Mm along a great circle on the solar surface. A total amount of 175119 Hα contrast profiles were inverted using the CM approach. The inferred mean line-of-sight (LOS) velocity, Doppler width, and source function were similar to previous works of smaller quiescent filaments. However, the derived optical thickness was higher. LOS velocity trends inferred from the Hα line core fits were in accord but weaker than those obtained with CM inversions. Signatures of counter-streaming flows were detected in the filament. The largest brightening conglomerates in the line core of Na i D2 coincided well with small-scale magnetic fields as seen by HMI. Mixed magnetic polarities were detected close to the ends of barbs. The computation of photospheric horizontal flows based on HMI magnetograms revealed flow kernels with a size of 5-8 Mm and velocities of 0.30-0.45 km s-1 at the ends of the filament. Conclusions: The physical properties of extremely large filaments are similar to their smaller counterparts, except for the optical thickness, which in

  11. Attractive interactions among intermediate filaments determine network mechanics in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Pawelzyk

    Full Text Available Mechanical and structural properties of K8/K18 and vimentin intermediate filament (IF networks have been investigated using bulk mechanical rheometry and optical microrheology including diffusing wave spectroscopy and multiple particle tracking. A high elastic modulus G0 at low protein concentration c, a weak concentration dependency of G0 (G0 ∼ c(0.5 ± 0.1 and pronounced strain stiffening are found for these systems even without external crossbridgers. Strong attractive interactions among filaments are required to maintain these characteristic mechanical features, which have also been reported for various other IF networks. Filament assembly, the persistence length of the filaments and the network mesh size remain essentially unaffected when a nonionic surfactant is added, but strain stiffening is completely suppressed, G0 drops by orders of magnitude and exhibits a scaling G0 ∼ c(1.9 ± 0.2 in agreement with microrheological measurements and as expected for entangled networks of semi-flexible polymers. Tailless K8Δ/K18ΔT and various other tailless filament networks do not exhibit strain stiffening, but still show high G0 values. Therefore, two binding sites are proposed to exist in IF networks. A weaker one mediated by hydrophobic amino acid clusters in the central rod prevents stretched filaments between adjacent cross-links from thermal equilibration and thus provides the high G0 values. Another strong one facilitating strain stiffening is located in the tail domain with its high fraction of hydrophobic amino acid sequences. Strain stiffening is less pronounced for vimentin than for K8/K18 due to electrostatic repulsion forces partly compensating the strong attraction at filament contact points.

  12. Expression of hemagglutinin protein from the avian influenza virus H5N1 in a baculovirus/insect cell system significantly enhanced by suspension culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer Lynn

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevention of a possible avian influenza pandemic necessitates the development of rapid diagnostic tests and the eventual production of a vaccine. Results For vaccine production, hemagglutinin (HA1 from avian influenza H5N1 was expressed from a recombinant baculovirus. Recombinant HA1 was expressed in monolayer or suspension culture insect cells by infection with the recombinant baculovirus. The yield of rHA1 from the suspension culture was 68 mg/l, compared to 6 mg/l from the monolayer culture. Immunization of guinea pigs with 50 μg of rHA1 yielded hemagglutinin inhibition and virus neutralization titers of 1:160 after two times vaccination with rHA1 protein. Conclusion Thus, the production of rHA1 using an insect suspension cell system provides a promising basis for economical production of a H5 antigen.

  13. Impact of Chronic Renal Failure on Safety and Effectiveness of Paclitaxel-Eluting Stents for Femoropopliteal Artery Disease: Subgroup Analysis from Zilver PTX Post-Market Surveillance Study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yukihisa; Yokoi, Hiroyoshi; Ohki, Takao; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Nakamura, Masato; Komori, Kimihiro; Nanto, Shinsuke; O'Leary, Erin E; Lottes, Aaron E; Saunders, Alan T; Dake, Michael D

    2017-05-09

    Favorable long-term outcomes of the Zilver PTX drug-eluting stent (DES) in femoropopliteal lesions have been demonstrated. Chronic renal failure (CRF) has been shown to be a risk factor for restenosis and decreased limb salvage. The results of the DES in patients with CRF have not previously been reported. This study compares the results with the DES in patients with CRF and those without CRF. This retrospective analysis from the Zilver PTX Japan Post-Market Surveillance Study included 321 patients with CRF and 584 patients without CRF. Outcomes included freedom from target lesion revascularization (TLR) and patency. Of the patients included in this subgroup analysis, 2-year data were available for 209 patients in the CRF group and 453 patients in the non-CRF group. The two groups were similar in terms of lesion length and the frequency of in-stent restenosis. Critical limb ischemia, severe calcification, and diabetes were more common in patients with CRF, whereas total occlusion was more common in patients without CRF. Freedom from TLR rates were 81.4 versus 84.9% (p = 0.24), and patency rates were 70.7 versus 70.3% (p = 0.95) in patients with and without CRF at 2 years, respectively. This is the first comparative study of the DES in femoropopliteal artery lesions in patients with and without CRF. These results indicate that the DES placed in femoropopliteal artery lesions of CRF patients is safe and effective with similar patency and TLR rates to patients without CRF. Level 3, Post-Market Surveillance Study.

  14. Dynamic Star Formation in the Massive DR21 Filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, N.; /Saclay; Csengeri, T.; /Saclay; Bontemps, S.; /OASU, Floirac; Motte, F.; /Saclay; Simon, R.; /Cologne U.; Hennebelle, P.; /Paris Observ.; Federrath, C.; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Klessen, R.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-25

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. We use molecular line data from our {sup 13}CO 1 {yields} 0, CS 2 {yields} 1, and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 1 {yields} 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and CO, CS, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO data obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO{sup +} and {sup 12}CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of {approx}0.6 km s{sup -1} and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10{sup -3} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1} for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M{sub {circle_dot}} at densities of around 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting. The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. Conclusions. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows

  15. Disappearance of a coronal hole induced by a filament activation

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Ma; Xiao-Li, Yan; Zhi-Ke, Xue

    2014-01-01

    We present a rare observation of direct magnetic interaction between an activating filament and a coronal hole (CH). The filament was a quiescent one located at the northwest of the CH. It underwent a nonradial activation, during which filament material constantly fell and intruded into the CH. As a result, the CH was clearly destroyed by the intrusion. Brightenings appeared at the boundaries and in the interior of the CH, meanwhile, its west boundaries began to retreat and the area gradually shrank. It is noted that the CH went on shrinking after the end of the intrusion and finally disappeared entirely. Following the filament activation, three coronal dimmings (D1-D3) were formed, among which D1 and D2 persisted throughout the complete disappearance of the CH. The derived coronal magnetic configuration shows that the filament was located below an extended loop system which obviously linked D1 to D2. By comparison with this result of extrapolation, our observations imply that the interaction between the fila...

  16. Rapid Formation and Disappearance of a Filament Barb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anand D.; Srivastava, Nandita; Mathew, Shibu K.; Martin, Sara F.

    2013-11-01

    We present observations of an activated quiescent filament obtained in Hα from the high-resolution Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) on 20 August 2010. The filament developed a barb in 10 min, which disappeared within the next 35 min. A data set from the DOT spanning 2 h was used to analyse this event. Line-of-sight velocity maps were constructed from the Doppler images, which reveal flows in filament spine during this period. Photospheric magnetograms were used from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to determine the changes in magnetic flux in the region surrounding the barb location. The analysis shows flows in the filament spine towards the barb location preceding its formation, and flows in the barb towards the spine during its disappearance. Magnetograms reveal patches of minority polarity flux close to the end of the barb at its greatest elongation. The flows in the spine and barbs are along numerous threads that compose these typical filament structures. The flows are consistent with field-aligned threads and demonstrate that the replacement time of the mass in barbs, and by inference, in the spine is very rapid.

  17. Manipulation of flow around bluff bodies by flexible slender filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidyeganeh, Mohammad; Pinelli, Alfredo

    2016-11-01

    Manipulation of bluff bodies wakes to control the intensity of fluid forces and the induced solid vibrations is of paramount importance. A biomimetic passive control based on the use of flexible slender appendages protruding from the body into the separated region has shown promising achievements in drag reduction and moderating force fluctuations. The present research aimed at understating and optimizing the physical properties and the arrangement of elongated flexible filaments to delay the 3D transition of the wake in terms of Reynolds number, mean drag reduction, and mitigation of the force fluctuations. The numerical campaign unveiled the role of flexural stiffness of the filaments: matching the natural frequency with the vortex shedding frequency enhances the mixing at the lee side. However, softer filaments (i.e. larger time scales) lock-in on either side of mid plane breaking the symmetry of the flow field (inducing a net lift force). In addition to 2D effects, the presence of filaments can interfere with the 3D bifurcation process resulting in a delay of the spanwise destabilization of the wake. The most effective parameter for this transitional interference is the spacing between filaments that should be smaller than the wavelength of the dominant 3D unstable mode.

  18. Semiflexible filament networks viewed as fluctuating beam frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tianxiang; Purohit, Prashant

    2012-02-01

    We present a new method combining structural and statistical mechanics to study the entropic elasticity of semiflexible filament networks. We view a filament network as a frame structure and use structural mechanics to determine its static equilibrium configuration under applied loads in the first step. To account for thermal motion around this static equilibrium state, we then approximate the potential energy of the deformed frame structure up to the second order in kinematic variables and obtaina deformation-dependent stiffness matrix characterizing the flexibility of the network. Using statistical mechanics, we then evaluate the partition function, free energy and thermo-mechanical properties of the network in terms of the stiffness matrix. We show that penalty methods commonly used in finite elements to account for constraints, are applicable even when statistical and structural mechanics are combined in our method. We apply our framework to understand the expansion, shear, uniaxial tension and compression behavior of some simple filament networks. We are able to capture the stress-stiffening behavior due to filament reorientation and stretching out of thermal fluctuations, as well as the reversible stress-softening behavior due to filament buckling.

  19. Local stability of a gravitating filament: a dispersion relation

    CERN Document Server

    Freundlich, Jonathan; Combes, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Filamentary structures are ubiquitous in astrophysics and are observed at various scales. On a cosmological scale, matter is usually distributed along filaments, and filaments are also typical features of the interstellar medium. Within a cosmic filament, matter can contract and form galaxies, whereas an interstellar gas filament can clump into a series of bead-like structures which can then turn into stars. To investigate the growth of such instabilities, we derive a local dispersion relation for an idealized self-gravitating filament, and study some of its properties. Our idealized picture consists of an infinite self-gravitating and rotating cylinder with pressure and density related by a polytropic equation of state. We assume no specific density distribution, treat matter as a fluid, and use hydrodynamics to derive the linearized equations that govern the local perturbations. We obtain a dispersion relation for axisymmetric perturbations and study its properties in the (k_R, k_z) phase space, where k_R a...

  20. A filament of dark matter between two clusters of galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Jörg P; Werner, Norbert; Clowe, Douglas; Finoguenov, Alexis; Kitching, Tom; Miller, Lance; Simionescu, Aurora

    2012-07-12

    It is a firm prediction of the concordance cold-dark-matter cosmological model that galaxy clusters occur at the intersection of large-scale structure filaments. The thread-like structure of this 'cosmic web' has been traced by galaxy redshift surveys for decades. More recently, the warm–hot intergalactic medium (a sparse plasma with temperatures of 10(5) kelvin to 10(7) kelvin) residing in low-redshift filaments has been observed in emission and absorption. However, a reliable direct detection of the underlying dark-matter skeleton, which should contain more than half of all matter, has remained elusive, because earlier candidates for such detections were either falsified or suffered from low signal-to-noise ratios and unphysical misalignments of dark and luminous matter. Here we report the detection of a dark-matter filament connecting the two main components of the Abell 222/223 supercluster system from its weak gravitational lensing signal, both in a non-parametric mass reconstruction and in parametric model fits. This filament is coincident with an overdensity of galaxies and diffuse, soft-X-ray emission, and contributes a mass comparable to that of an additional galaxy cluster to the total mass of the supercluster. By combining this result with X-ray observations, we can place an upper limit of 0.09 on the hot gas fraction (the mass of X-ray-emitting gas divided by the total mass) in the filament.