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Sample records for psycinfo psycharticles cinahl

  1. Techniques for searching the CINAHL database using the EBSCO interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Janna C

    2007-04-01

    The cumulative index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) is a useful research tool for accessing articles of interest to nurses and health care professionals. More than 2,800 journals are indexed by CINAHL and can be searched easily using assigned subject headings. Detailed instructions about conducting, combining, and saving searches in CINAHL are provided in this article. Establishing an account at EBSCO further allows a nurse to save references and searches and to receive e-mail alerts when new articles on a topic of interest are published.

  2. What value is the CINAHL database when searching for systematic reviews of qualitative studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kath; Golder, Su; Lewis-Light, Kate

    2015-06-26

    The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) is generally thought to be a good source to search when conducting a review of qualitative evidence. Case studies have suggested that using CINAHL could be essential for reviews of qualitative studies covering topics in the nursing field, but it is unclear whether this can be extended more generally to reviews of qualitative studies in other topic areas. We carried out a retrospective analysis of a sample of systematic reviews of qualitative studies to investigate CINAHL's potential contribution to identifying the evidence. In particular, we planned to identify the percentage of included studies available in CINAHL and the percentage of the included studies unique to the CINAHL database. After screening 58 qualitative systematic reviews identified from the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), we created a sample set of 43 reviews covering a range of topics including patient experience of both illnesses and interventions. For all 43 reviews (21 %) in our sample, we found that some of the included studies were available in CINAHL. For nine of these reviews, all the studies that had been included in the final synthesis were available in the CINAHL database, so it could have been possible to identify all the included studies using just this one database, while for an additional 21 reviews (49 %), 80 % or more of the included studies were available in CINAHL. Consequently, for a total of 30 reviews, or 70 % of our sample, 80 % or more of the studies could be identified using CINAHL alone. 11 reviews, where we were able to recheck all the databases used by the original review authors, had included a study that was uniquely identified from the CINAHL database. The median % of unique studies was 9.09%; while the range had a lowest value of 5.0% to the highest value of 33.0%. [corrected]. Assuming a rigorous search strategy was used and the records sought were accurately indexed, we could

  3. Comparison of CINAHL, EMBASE, and MEDLINE databases for the nurse researcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, J; Shearer, B

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine which of three databases, CINAHL, EMBASE or MEDLINE, should be accessed when researching nursing topics. The three databases were searched for citations on topics selected by three nurse researchers and the results were compared. For the search of nursing care literature on a medical condition, it was helpful to search both CINAHL and MEDLINE. CINAHL provided the majority of relevant articles for the second search, on computers and privacy, but inclusion of MEDLINE and EMBASE enhanced retrieval somewhat. The search on substance abuse in pregnancy, not restricted to nursing literature, retrieved better results when searching both MEDLINE and EMBASE. Due to the nature and distribution of the nursing literature, it is especially important for the searcher to understand and respond to the focus of the researcher.

  4. Identifying randomized controlled trials of cognitive therapy for depression: comparing the efficiency of Embase, Medline and PsycINFO bibliographic databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, R J; Richardson, P H

    1999-12-01

    This study sought to compare the sensitivity and precision of Embase, Medline and PsycINFO bibliographic database searches for randomized controlled trials of cognitive therapy for depression. Searches in each database combined with a hand search in five selected journals formed the total pool against which each search was assessed. Sensitivities of standard searches (index terms only) were 68%, 84% and 38% in Embase, Medline and PsycINFO respectively. Sensitivities of expert searches (index and free text terms) were 76%, 97% and 65% for Embase, Medline and PsycINFO respectively. Medline appears to be the most efficient at identifying articles describing psychological treatment evaluation.

  5. How does age-related macular degeneration affect real-world visual ability and quality of life? A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Deanna J; Hobby, Angharad E; Binns, Alison M; Crabb, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To review systematically the evidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affecting real-world visual ability and quality of life (QoL). To explore trends in specific topics within this body of the literature. Design Systematic review. Methods A systematic literature search was carried out using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PsychARTICLES and Health and Psychosocial Instruments for articles published up to January 2015 for studies including people diagnosed with AMD, ass...

  6. Temas de investigación sobre aspectos psicosociales del deporte a través de la base de datos PSYCINFO (1887-2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Castillo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se analiza el interés y representatividad de los temas de investigación sobre los aspectos psicosociales del deporte, así como las principales revistas científicas en los que se publican. Se ha realizado un análisis bibliométrico de la base de datos PsycINFO con un periodo que abarca desde 1887 hasta octubre de 2001. Los resultados informan de un gran interés por la investigación psicosocial en el ámbito de la psicología del deporte, así como de un incremento constante en el número de trabajos publicados. Entre los temas psicosociales más estudiados destacan los centrados en la participación deportiva, la motivación, el género y sexo, las emociones, los grupos y las actitudes. Más del 60% de los trabajos publicados en las principales revistas científicas del ámbito de la psicología del deporte, versan sobre aspectos psicosociales del deporte, aunque algunos de ellos sean de interés en otros ámbitos de la psicología.

  7. Facebook: A Bibliographic Analysis of the PsycINFO Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of rapidly emerging technologies, researchers need to be cognizant of developments and applications in the area of social media as a topic of investigatory interest. To date, scholarly research on the topic of Facebook, a ubiquitous social media site, is rather extensive. This study on Facebook, using a bibliographic content…

  8. Statistical Measures Alone Cannot Determine Which Database (BNI, CINAHL, MEDLINE, or EMBASE Is the Most Useful for Searching Undergraduate Nursing Topics. A Review of: Stokes, P., Foster, A., & Urquhart, C. (2009. Beyond relevance and recall: Testing new user-centred measures of database performance. Health Information and Libraries Journal, 26(3, 220-231.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Badia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The research project sought to determine which of four databases was the most useful for searching undergraduate nursing topics. Design – Comparative database evaluation. Setting – Nursing and midwifery students at Homerton School of Health Studies (now part of Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, United Kingdom, in 2005-2006. Subjects – The subjects were four databases: British Nursing Index (BNI, CINAHL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE.Methods – This was a comparative study using title searches to compare BNI (BritishNursing Index, CINAHL, MEDLINE and EMBASE.According to the authors, this is the first study to compare BNI with other databases. BNI is a database produced by British libraries that indexes the nursing and midwifery literature. It covers over 240 British journals, and includes references to articles from health sciences journals that are relevant to nurses and midwives (British Nursing Index, n.d..The researchers performed keyword searches in the title field of the four databases for the dissertation topics of nine nursing and midwifery students enrolled in undergraduate dissertation modules. The list of titles of journals articles on their topics were given to the students and they were asked to judge the relevancy of the citations. The title searches were evaluated in each of the databases using the following criteria: • precision (the number of relevant results obtained in the database for a search topic, divided by the total number of results obtained in the database search;• recall (the number of relevant results obtained in the database for a search topic, divided by the total number of relevant results obtained on that topic from all four database searches;• novelty (the number of relevant results that were unique in the database search, which was calculated as a percentage of the total number of relevant results found in the database;• originality (the number of unique relevant results obtained in the

  9. Effectiveness of testing for genetic susceptibility to smoking-related diseases on smoking cessation outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerecnik, Chris; Grispen, Janaica E J; Quaak, Marieke

    2012-05-01

    To examine whether genetic testing for smoking-related diseases benefits smoking cessation. PubMed, EMBASE, ERIC, PsycINFO, PsychArticles, CiNAHL and socINDEX databases, the search engine Google Scholar, and key-author and reference list searches. Study selection Randomised controlled smoking cessation interventions using genetic testing for smoking-related diseases. Consistent with the Cochrane guidelines, two reviewers completed the review process (initial n=139) in three phases, title selection (n=56), abstract selection (n=28) and whole paper selection (n=9). From these nine studies, each reviewer extracted information about outcome measures and statistical and methodological quality. Data synthesis Relevant data were abstracted from included papers and were subsequently subjected to meta-analysis. Interest in genetic testing was relatively high with 60-80% of smokers reporting to be interested. The authors observed positive short-term effects on risk perception, motivation to quit smoking and smoking cessation, but these effects fade at longer follow-ups. Importantly, the authors did not find any evidence of adverse effect of testing negative on the risk-predisposing gene. This systematic review does not provide solid evidence for the proposed beneficial effects of genetic testing for smoking-related diseases on smoking cessation, but does suggest the presence of an immediate motivational effect, such that genetic testing resulted in higher risk perception and more motivation to quit smoking.

  10. Top Cited Scholars in Multicultural Counseling: A Citation Analysis of Journal Articles in PsycINFO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The area of multicultural counseling is a sub-field of the counseling profession and research in this specialty has proliferated at a rapid pace over the past 20 years. In order to gauge emergent trends in multicultural counseling, researchers have conducted content analyses of scholarly documents like journals and books. A related methodology…

  11. Pain in people living with HIV/AIDS: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romy Parker

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pain is one of the most commonly reported symptoms in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA. However, wide ranges of pain prevalence have been reported, making it difficult to determine the relative impact of pain in PLWHA. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to establish the prevalence and characteristics of pain and to explore pain management in PLWHA. Methods: Studies that included cross-sectional data were included in the search, which was conducted in April 2012. Databases searched using a time limit of March 1982 to March 2012 included PubMed, Scopus, Africa-wide: NIPAD, CINAHL, PsychARTICLES, PSYCINFO, PSYCHIATRYONLINE, ScienceDirect and Web of Science. Search terms selected were “pain” and “HIV” or “acquired immune deficiency syndrome.” Two reviewers independently screened all citation abstracts for inclusion. Methodological quality was evaluated using a standardized 11-item critical appraisal tool. Results: After full text review, 61 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Prevalence of pain ranged from a point prevalence of 54% (95%CI 51.14–56.09 to 83% (95%CI 76–88 using a three-month recall period. The reported pain was of moderate-to-severe intensity, and pain was reported in one to two and a half different anatomical sites. Moderate levels of pain interference with function were reported. All nine studies reporting on the adequacy of pain management recorded marked under-treatment of pain. Discussion: The studies reviewed reported that pain commonly presents at multiple pain sites with a range of severity suggesting that there are several differing pathological processes contributing to pain at one time. The interplay of variables associated with pain suggests that the biopsychosocial model of pain is an appropriate paradigm from which to view pain in PLWHA and from which to approach the problem, explore causes and establish effective treatment. Conclusions: The results highlight that

  12. Pain in people living with HIV/AIDS: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Romy; Stein, Dan J; Jelsma, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Pain is one of the most commonly reported symptoms in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). However, wide ranges of pain prevalence have been reported, making it difficult to determine the relative impact of pain in PLWHA. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to establish the prevalence and characteristics of pain and to explore pain management in PLWHA. Studies that included cross-sectional data were included in the search, which was conducted in April 2012. Databases searched using a time limit of March 1982 to March 2012 included PubMed, Scopus, Africa-wide: NIPAD, CINAHL, PsychARTICLES, PSYCINFO, PSYCHIATRYONLINE, ScienceDirect and Web of Science. Search terms selected were "pain" and "HIV" or "acquired immune deficiency syndrome." Two reviewers independently screened all citation abstracts for inclusion. Methodological quality was evaluated using a standardized 11-item critical appraisal tool. After full text review, 61 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Prevalence of pain ranged from a point prevalence of 54% (95%CI 51.14-56.09) to 83% (95%CI 76-88) using a three-month recall period. The reported pain was of moderate-to-severe intensity, and pain was reported in one to two and a half different anatomical sites. Moderate levels of pain interference with function were reported. All nine studies reporting on the adequacy of pain management recorded marked under-treatment of pain. The studies reviewed reported that pain commonly presents at multiple pain sites with a range of severity suggesting that there are several differing pathological processes contributing to pain at one time. The interplay of variables associated with pain suggests that the biopsychosocial model of pain is an appropriate paradigm from which to view pain in PLWHA and from which to approach the problem, explore causes and establish effective treatment. The results highlight that pain is common in PLWHA at all stages of the disease. The prevalence rates for pain in PLWHA

  13. Reconstruction of Network Retrieval System about PsycINFO ( Psychology Abstract)%PsycINFO(心理学文摘)网络检索系统建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹进军

    2006-01-01

    就高校图书馆特色数据库的建设和改造展开论述,介绍PsycINFO(心理学文摘)光盘数据库系统的改造过程.简要论述从PsycINFO的原始结构分析到新的网络系统的构建,以及非标准数据向标准的元数据转换等问题.

  14. Expert searching in health librarianship: a literature review to identify international issues and Australian concerns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lasserre, Kaye

    2012-01-01

    ...:  The search strategy was developed in LISTA and then customised for ten other databases: ALISA, PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, CINAHL, ERIC, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar...

  15. Psychosocial interventions for post-traumatic stress disorder in refugees and asylum seekers resettled in high-income countries: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nosè, Michela; Ballette, Francesca; Bighelli, Irene; Turrini, Giulia; Purgato, Marianna; Tol, Wietse; Priebe, Stefan; Barbui, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    .... This systematic review examined the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for this group. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of randomised trials, CINAHL, EMBASE, PILOTS, PsycINFO, PubMed and Web of Science up to July 2016...

  16. A systematic review of determinants of sedentary behaviour in youth: a DEDIPAC-study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stierlin, Annabel S; De Lepeleere, Sara; Cardon, Greet; Dargent-Molina, Patricia; Hoffmann, Belinda; Murphy, Marie H; Kennedy, Aileen; O'Donoghue, Grainne; Chastin, Sebastien F M; De Craemer, Marieke

    2015-01-01

    .... A systematic review was conducted to identify predictors and determinants of SB in youth. Pubmed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Science were searched, limiting to articles in English, published between January 2000 and May 2014...

  17. Effects of educational interventions on primary dementia care: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perry, M.; Draskovic, I.; Lucassen, P.L.B.J.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Achterberg, T. van; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of educational interventions about dementia, directed at primary care providers (PCPs). DESIGN: We searched Medline, Embase, PsycInfo, Cinahl and the Cochrane library for relevant articles. Two researchers independently assessed the citations identified against

  18. Measurement properties of performance-based measures to assess physical function in hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobson, F; Hinman, R S; Hall, M

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To systematically review the measurement properties of performance-based measures to assess physical function in people with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Electronic searches were performed in MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, and PsycINFO up to the end of June 2012. Two...

  19. [The effectiveness of disease management in diabetes: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elissen, A.M.; Steuten, L.M.; Lemmens, L.C.; Drewes, H.W.; Lemmens, K.M.; Meeuwissen, J.A.; Baan, C.A.; Vrijhoef, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Systematic evaluation of the effectiveness of innovative care concepts for diabetes, taking into account heterogeneity of study results. DESIGN: Systematic review, meta-analysis and meta-regression analysis. METHOD: Medline, CINAHL and PsycINFO were searched for reviews and empirical stud

  20. Meta-analysis of the effectiveness of chronic care management for diabetes: Investigating heterogeneity in outcomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elissen, A.M.; Steuten, L.M.G.; Drewes, H.W.; Lemmens, L.C.; Meeuwissen, J.A.; Baan, C.A.; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The study aims to support decision making on how best to redesign diabetes care by investigating three potential sources of heterogeneity in effectiveness across trials of diabetes care management. Methods Medline, CINAHL and PsycInfo were searched for systematic reviews and empirical stu

  1. Factors promoting staying at work in people with chronic nonspecific musculoskeletal pain : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, H.J.; Reneman, M.F.; Groothoff, J.W.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Brouwer, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify determinants for staying at work (SAW) in workers with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP). Method: A systematic review of factors that promote SAW in workers with CMP. We searched the databases of PubMed, EMBASE, PsycInfo, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library. We included studies

  2. The prevalence of neck pain in the world population: a systematic critical review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejer, René; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of neck pain (NP) in the world population and to identify areas of methodological variation between studies. A systematic search was conducted in five databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, OSH-ROM, and PsycINFO), followed by a screening of...

  3. Effects of educational interventions on primary dementia care: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perry, M.; Draskovic, I.; Lucassen, P.L.B.J.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Achterberg, T. van; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of educational interventions about dementia, directed at primary care providers (PCPs). DESIGN: We searched Medline, Embase, PsycInfo, Cinahl and the Cochrane library for relevant articles. Two researchers independently assessed the citations identified against th

  4. Systematic Review of Intervention Practices for Depression in the Workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furlan, Andrea D.; Gnam, William H.; Carnide, Nancy; Irvin, Emma; Amick, Benjamin C.; DeRango, Kelly; McMaster, Robert; Cullen, Kimberley; Slack, Tesha; Brouwer, Sandra; Bultmann, Ute; Benjamin, C.

    2012-01-01

    Design Systematic Review. Objective To determine which intervention approaches to manage depression in the workplace have been successful and yielded value for employers in developed economies. Data Sources We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Central, PsycINFO, and Business Source Premier up to Jun

  5. Physical Activity and Nutrition Health Promotion Interventions: What Is Working for People with Intellectual Disabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Tamar; McCubbin, Jeffrey A.; Drum, Charles; Peterson, Jana

    2011-01-01

    A scoping review of studies on physical activity and nutrition health promotion interventions for individuals with intellectual disabilities was conducted. Searches included MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases from 1986 through July 2006. The final number included 11 articles comprising 12 studies. Generally, this review indicated some…

  6. Instruments used to assess functional limitations in workers applying for disability benefit : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjer, Jerry; Groothoff, Johan W.; Brouwer, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To systematically review the quality of the psychometric properties of instruments for assessing functional limitations in workers applying for disability benefit. Method. Electronic searches of Medline, Embase, CINAHL and PsycINFO were performed to identify studies focusing on the psychome

  7. Physical Activity Measurement Instruments for Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capio, Catherine M.; Sit, Cindy H. P.; Abernethy, Bruce; Rotor, Esmerita R.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This paper is a systematic review of physical activity measurement instruments for field-based studies involving children with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Database searches using PubMed Central, MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and PEDro located 12 research papers, identifying seven instruments that met the inclusion…

  8. Health-related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents with Psoriasis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randa, Hilde; Todberg, Tanja; Skov, Lone

    2017-01-01

    moderating influences of demographic and clinical variables. Searches were conducted by 2 independent researchers in PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Scopus for papers published between 1995 (the date the first dermatology-specific HRQOL-instrument for children was introduced) and 2016. Eligible studies...

  9. How diaries written for critically ill influence the relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Højager; Angel, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    in patients and relatives. AIM: To explore how relatives perceive reading and writing in the diary and how it affects their well-being. SEARCH STRATEGIES: A systematic search was carried out in the databases PubMed, Embase, CiNAHL and PsycINFO and supplemented by a citation search in Scopus on four...

  10. Lost in translation - the role of family in interventions among adults with diabetes; a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torenholt, Rikke; Schwennesen, Nete; Willaing, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    . Methods The literature search was carried out in four databases (Scopus, CINAHL, PsycINFO and ERIC). Two reviewers independently screened the search results. Only English-language articles about interventions on education, care and/or support of adult individuals with diabetes involving the participation...

  11. Constructing a Validity Argument for the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS): A Systematic Review of Validity Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatala, Rose; Cook, David A.; Brydges, Ryan; Hawkins, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In order to construct and evaluate the validity argument for the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS), based on Kane's framework, we conducted a systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC, Web of Science, Scopus, and selected reference lists through February 2013. Working in duplicate, we selected…

  12. Impaired health, functioning and health-related quality of life in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Nana; Flachs, Esben M.; Christensen, Anne I.

    2016-01-01

    . Methods: The systematic review adhered to the PRISMA guidelines. Literature searches were conducted in PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Scopus for papers published between 01.01.1995 and 01.12.2015. Studies were included if they reported data on HRQOL in children and/or adolescents with psoriasis (

  13. The Clinical Aspects of Mirror Therapy in Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgangel, Andreas Stefan; Braun, Susy M.; Beurskens, Anna J.; Seitz, Rudiger J.; Wade, Derick T.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical aspects of mirror therapy (MT) interventions after stroke, phantom limb pain and complex regional pain syndrome. A systematic literature search of the Cochrane Database of controlled trials, PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, PEDro, RehabTrials and Rehadat, was made by two…

  14. A systematic review of research on autism spectrum disorders in sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abubakar, Amina; Ssewanyana, Derrick; Newton, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is not well known. We carried out a systematic review of the literature to identify published work from SSA. We have systematically searched four databases, namely, Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Child Development &

  15. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risom, Signe S; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Palm Johansen, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE Ovid, Embase Ovid, PsycINFO Ovid, Web of Science Core Collection Thomson Reuters, CINAHL EBSCO, LILACS Bireme, and three clinical trial registers on 14 July 2016. We also checked the bibliographies of relevant...

  16. Patient education in the management of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Brown, James Pr; Clark, Alexander M

    2017-01-01

    of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Cochrane Library, Issue 6, 2016), MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid) and CINAHL (EBSCO) in June 2016. Three trials registries, previous systematic reviews and reference lists of included studies were also searched. No language restrictions were applied. SELECTION...

  17. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, Kirstine Lærum; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Tang, Lars Hermann

    2016-01-01

    : the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE); MEDLINE (Ovid); EMBASE (Ovid); CINAHL (EBSCO); PsycINFO (Ovid); LILACS (Bireme); and Conference Proceedings Citation Index-S (CPCI-S) on Web of Science (Thomson Reuters) on 23 March 2015. We...

  18. Determining the Effectiveness of Alternative Seating Systems for Students with Attention Difficulties: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochenour, Brittany; Poskey, Gail A.

    2017-01-01

    A student's ability to attend in the classroom is an important factor in determining academic success. This systematic review examined the effects of an alternative seating system on improving attention in students with attention difficulties. Databases searched included CINAHL, Medline, PsycINFO, OTSeeker, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar.…

  19. Psychosocial correlates of oral hygiene behaviour in people aged 9 to 19: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerman, J.F.M.; Loveren, C. van; Meijel, B. van; Dusseldorp, E.; Wartewig, E.; Verrips, G.H.W.; Ket, J.C.F.; Empelen, P. van

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This systematic and meta-analytic review aimed to quantify the association of psychosocial correlates with oral hygiene behaviour among 9- to 19-year olds. Methods. A systematic search up to August 2015 was carried out using the following databases: PubMed, PsycInfo, Embase, CINAHL and W

  20. Psychosocial correlates of oral hygiene behaviour in people aged 9 to 19 : a systematic review with meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerman, J.F.M.; van Loveren, C.; van Meijel, B.; Dusseldorp, E.; Wartewig, E.; Verrips, G.H.W.; Ket, J.C.F.; van Empelen, P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This systematic and meta-analytic review aimed to quantify the association of psychosocial correlates with oral hygiene behaviour among 9- to 19-year olds. Methods: A systematic search up to August 2015 was carried out using the following databases: PubMed, PsycInfo, Embase, CINAHL and W

  1. Impact of Environmental Factors on Community Participation of Persons with an Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonschot, Manon M. L.; de Witte, L. P.; Reichrath, E.; Buntinx, W. H. E.; Curfs, L. M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Study Design: A systematic review of the literature. Objectives: To describe which environmental factors have an impact on community participation of persons with an intellectual disability. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted for the period of 1996-2006 in Pubmed, CINAHL and PSYCINFO. Search terms were derived from the…

  2. The Clinical Aspects of Mirror Therapy in Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgangel, Andreas Stefan; Braun, Susy M.; Beurskens, Anna J.; Seitz, Rudiger J.; Wade, Derick T.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical aspects of mirror therapy (MT) interventions after stroke, phantom limb pain and complex regional pain syndrome. A systematic literature search of the Cochrane Database of controlled trials, PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, PEDro, RehabTrials and Rehadat, was made by two…

  3. Prevalence of Chronic Health Conditions in Children With Intellectual Disability : A Systematic Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeseburg, Barth; Dijkstra, Geke J.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Jansen, Danielle E. M. C.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic review of the prevalence rates of chronic health conditions in populations of children with intellectual disability was provided. We identified 2,994 relevant studies by searching Medline, Cinahl, and PsycINFO databases from 1996 to 2008. We included the 31 studies that had sufficient m

  4. Instruments used to assess functional limitations in workers applying for disability benefit : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjer, Jerry; Groothoff, Johan W.; Brouwer, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To systematically review the quality of the psychometric properties of instruments for assessing functional limitations in workers applying for disability benefit. Method. Electronic searches of Medline, Embase, CINAHL and PsycINFO were performed to identify studies focusing on the

  5. The cognitive effects of opioids in cancer: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Lundorff, Lena; Pimenta, Cibele Andrucioli de Mattos

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND METHODS: In order to better understand the effects of opioids on the cognitive function in cancer pain patients, a literature search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycInfo, CINAHL and Lilacs databases. Ten controlled trials were selected and classified according to the study design...

  6. Transcultural Nursing in Scandinavia: the nurses perspective - A qualitative meta-synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Fløe; Haahr, Anita

    2015-01-01

    , it is interesting and important to examine transcultural nursing in that context. Design: The meta-synthesis approach was based on the guidelines by Sandelowski and Barroso. Data sources: Literature searches were conducted in the database SveMed+, CINAHL Complete, PsycInfo, Academic Search Premier, PubMed, covering...

  7. 'Nursing research culture' in the context of clinical nursing practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-01-01

    for efficiency, nurses' barriers to research use and the lack of definition of the concept of nursing research culture make it difficult to establish. DESIGN: Concept analysis. DATA SOURCES: Data were collected through a literature review in PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO during March 2016. METHODS: Walker...

  8. Factors that Promote or Hinder Young Disabled People in Work Participation: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, T.J.; Wind, H.; de Boer, A.G.E.M.; Frings-Dresen, M.H.W.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this systematic review was to study factors which promote or hinder young disabled people entering the labor market. Methods We systematically searched PubMed (by means of MESH and text words), EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science and CINAHL for studies regarding (1) disabled

  9. A systematic review of research on autism spectrum disorders in sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abubakar, Amina; Ssewanyana, Derrick; Newton, Charles R.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is not well known. We carried out a systematic review of the literature to identify published work from SSA. We have systematically searched four databases, namely, Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Child Development & Adolescen

  10. The Effectiveness of Antidepressant Medication in the Management of Behaviour Problems in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohanpal, S. K.; Deb, S.; Thomas, C.; Soni, R.; Lenotre, L.; Unwin, G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: A comprehensive systematic review was performed to establish the current evidence base regarding the effectiveness of antidepressant medication for the management of behaviour problems in adults with intellectual disabilities. Method: An electronic search of PsycInfo, Embase, Medline and Cinahl databases was conducted spanning the time…

  11. Suicide Inside A Systematic Review of Inpatient Suicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Banda, T.

    2010-01-01

    The literature on inpatient suicides was systematically reviewed. English, German, and Dutch articles were identified by means of the electronic databases PsycInfo, Cochrane, Medline, EMBASE psychiatry, CINAHL, and British Nursing Index. In total, 98 articles covering almost 15,000 suicides were

  12. The Use of Errorless Learning Strategies for Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruijie; Liu, Karen P. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the evidence of errorless learning on learning outcomes in patients with early-stage Alzheimer's disease. A computer-aided literature search from 1999 to 2011 was carried out using MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO and PsycArticles. Keywords included…

  13. Educational and Skills-Based Interventions to Prevent Relationship Violence in Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellmeth, Gracia; Heffernan, Catherine; Nurse, Joanna; Habibula, Shakiba; Sethi, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the efficacy of educational and skills-based interventions to prevent relationship and dating violence in adolescents and young adults. Methods: We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and other databases for randomized, cluster-randomized, and quasi-randomized…

  14. Adherence to Self-Care Interventions for Depression or Anxiety: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simco, Russell; McCusker, Jane; Sewitch, Maida

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to synthesise and describe adherence to intervention in published studies of supported self-care for depression or anxiety, and to identify participant characteristics associated with higher adherence. Methods: We searched the databases EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PSYCINFO for the period from January…

  15. Instruments to assess integrated care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Anne Marie; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Høst, Dorte;

    2014-01-01

    to measure the level of integration across health-care sectors and to assess and evaluate the organisational elements within the instruments identified. METHODS: An extensive, systematic literature review in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science for the years 1980-2011. Selected...

  16. Systematic review of the clinical course, natural history, and prognosis for pediatric mild traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hung, Ryan; Carroll, Linda J; Cancelliere, Carol;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence on prognosis after pediatric mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). DATA SOURCES: We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and SPORTDiscus (2001-2012), as well as reference lists of eligible articles, and relevant systematic reviews and meta...

  17. Suicide Inside A Systematic Review of Inpatient Suicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Banda, T.

    2010-01-01

    The literature on inpatient suicides was systematically reviewed. English, German, and Dutch articles were identified by means of the electronic databases PsycInfo, Cochrane, Medline, EMBASE psychiatry, CINAHL, and British Nursing Index. In total, 98 articles covering almost 15,000 suicides were rev

  18. Validity, Reliability And Responsiveness Of Patient-Reported Outcome Questionnaires When Assessing Hip And Groin Disability: A Systematic Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Roos, Ewa; Bartels, Else Marie;

    2010-01-01

    disability based on a systematic review of evidence of validity, reliability and responsiveness of these instruments. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsycINFO, SportsDiscus and Web of Science were all searched up to January 2009. Two reviewers independently...

  19. An integrative review of social and occupational factors influencing health and wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, MaryBeth; Muldoon, Orla T; Pettigrew, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic approaches to health and wellbeing have traditionally assumed that meaningful activity or occupation contributes to health and quality of life. Within social psychology, everyday activities and practices that fill our lives are believed to be shaped by structural and systemic factors and in turn these practices can form the basis of social identities. In occupational therapy these everyday activities are called occupations. Occupations can be understood as a contextually bound synthesis of meaningful doing, being, belonging and becoming that influence health and wellbeing. We contend that an integrative review of occupational therapy and social psychology literature will enhance our ability to understand the relationship between social structures, identity and dimensions of occupation by elucidating how they inform one another, and how taken together they augment our understanding of health and wellbeing This review incorporates theoretical and empirical works purposively sampled from databases within EBSCO including CINAHL, psychINFO, psychArticles, and Web of Science. Search terms included: occupation, therapy, social psychology, occupational science, health, wellbeing, identity, structures and combinations of these terms. In presenting this review, we argue that doing, being and belonging may act as an important link to widely acknowledged relationships between social factors and health and wellbeing, and that interventions targeting individual change may be problematic.

  20. Victim Satisfaction With the Criminal Justice System and Emotional Recovery: A Systematic and Critical Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, Maarten; Popelier, Lieke; Varekamp, Ellen

    2015-07-01

    The current study systematically and critically reviewed the empirical literature to evaluate the association between satisfaction with the criminal justice system and adult crime victims' emotional recovery. Despite the widely accepted notion that involvement in the criminal justice system may impact recovery from crime victimization--either beneficially or maliciously--a systematic review of empirical studies that addresses this topic has never been conducted. Electronic literature databases (ISI Web of Knowledge [including Web of Science and MEDLINE], EBSCO host [including PsychInfo, CINAHL, Criminal Justice Abstracts, ERIC, PsychARTICLES, and Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection], and ProQuest [including PILOTS, Social Services Abstracts, and Sociological Abstracts]) were searched to identify relevant quantitative studies. The Cambridge Quality Checklists were used to evaluate the quality of selected studies. These checklists can be used to assess the quality of risk and protective factors in criminal justice research. In this study they were used to explore the impact of victim satisfaction on crime victims' emotional and cognitive states post-victimization. The review process revealed mixed results, with some studies suggesting a healing impact of victim satisfaction and others not. More consistent were findings regarding the existence of an association between victim satisfaction and (alterations in) positive cognitions. However, since the majority of studies suffered from severe methodological shortcomings, definite conclusions cannot be drawn yet. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Impulsivity and nonsuicidal self-injury: A review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Chloe A; Willoughby, Teena; Heffer, Taylor

    2015-06-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI; direct self-injury without lethal intent) often is thought to be associated with impulse control problems. Recent research, however, offers conflicting results about whether impulsivity is a risk factor for NSSI engagement. To disentangle findings on the link between impulsivity and NSSI, an extensive review of the literature was conducted using several electronic databases (i.e., PsychInfo, PsychArticles, ERIC, CINAHL, and MEDLINE). In total, 27 studies that met the specific inclusion criteria were identified. Results of a meta-analysis revealed that individuals who engaged in NSSI self-reported greater impulsivity than individuals who did not engage in NSSI, and that this effect was most consistent for measures of negative urgency. In contrast, there was little evidence of an association between lab-based measures of impulsivity (e.g., Go/No-Go, Stop/Signal Task) and NSSI. Moreover, the link between impulsivity and NSSI found for self-report measures was sometimes eliminated when other risk factors for NSSI were controlled (e.g., abuse, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder). In addition to integrating findings, the present review provides several explanations for the discrepancies in findings between studies employing self-report versus lab-based measures of impulsivity. To conclude, several specific recommendations for future research directions to extend the literature on impulsivity and NSSI are offered.

  2. An integrative review of social and occupational factors influencing health and wellbeing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaryBeth eGallagher

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic approaches to health and wellbeing have traditionally assumed that meaningful activity or occupation contributes to health and quality of life. Within social psychology, everyday activities and practices that fill our lives are believed to be shaped by structural and systemic factors and in turn these practices can form the basis of social identities. In occupational therapy these everyday activities are called occupations. Occupations can be understood as a contextually bound synthesis of meaningful doing, being, belonging and becoming that influence health and wellbeing. We contend that an integrative review of occupational therapy and social psychology literature will enhance our ability to understand the relationship between social structures, identity and dimensions of occupation by elucidating how they inform one another, and how taken together they augment our understanding of health and wellbeing This review incorporates theoretical and empirical works purposively sampled from databases within EBSCO including CINAHL, psychINFO, psychArticles and Web of Science. Search terms included: occupation, therapy, social psychology, occupational science, health, wellbeing, identity, structures and combinations of these terms. In presenting this review, we argue that doing, being and belonging may act as an important link to widely acknowledged relationships between social factors and health and wellbeing, and that interventions targeting individual change may be problematic.

  3. Music-based interventions in palliative cancer care: a review of quantitative studies and neurobiological literature

    OpenAIRE

    Archie, Patrick; Bruera, Eduardo; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to review quantitative literature pertaining to studies of music-based interventions in palliative cancer care and to review the neurobiological literature that may bare relevance to the findings from these studies. Methods A narrative review was performed, with particular emphasis on RCTs, meta-analyses, and systematic reviews. The Cochrane Library, Ovid, PubMed, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, and ProQuest were searched for the subject headings music, music therapy, cancer, ...

  4. Diffusion and dissemination of evidence-based dietary srategies for the prevention of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Brouwers Melissa; Ellis Peter; Armour Tanya; Robinson Paula; Ciliska Donna; Gauld Mary; Baldassarre Fulvia; Raina Parminder

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Objective The purpose was to determine what strategies have been evaluated to disseminate cancer control interventions that promote the uptake of adult healthy diet? Methods A systematic review was conducted. Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE, PREMEDLINE, Cancer LIT, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, PsycINFO, CINAHL, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists and by contacting technical experts. English-language primary studies were selected if they evaluated ...

  5. Self-care management strategies among individuals living with type 2 diabetes mellitus: nursing interventions

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Caralise W HuntAuburn University School of Nursing, Auburn, AL, USAAbstract: Nurses provide care for individuals living with diabetes in a variety of areas. Nursing interventions assist individuals living with diabetes to manage diabetes and can positively affect outcomes. This article describes an integrated literature review conducted to evaluate and summarize nursing interventions and research in self-management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane databa...

  6. Usikkerhed som følgesvend når børn dør på intensiv afdeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Boier; Aagaard, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    , forældre og familie, når beslutning om behandlingsophør er truffet og barnet dør. Dette studie inkluderer ti empiriske artikler fra perioden 1997–2010. Artiklerne blev udvalgt på baggrund af en systematisk søgning i databaserne: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, PsycINFO og SweMed+. Max van Manens fire...

  7. Usikkerhed som følgesvend når børn dør på intensiv afdeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Boier; Aagaard, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    -ældre og familie, når beslutning om behandlingsophør er truffet og barnet dør. Dette studie inklude-rer ti empiriske artikler fra perioden 1997-2010. Artiklerne blev udvalgt på baggrund af en systema-tisk søgning i databaserne: PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, PsycINFO og SweMed+. Max van Manens 4 eksistentialer...

  8. Systematic review of mental health and well-being outcomes following community-based obesity prevention interventions among adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Hoare, Erin; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Skouteris, Helen; Millar, Lynne; Nichols, Melanie; Allender, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper aimed to systematically evaluate the mental health and well-being outcomes observed in previous community-based obesity prevention interventions in adolescent populations. Setting Systematic review of literature from database inception to October 2014. Articles were sourced from CINAHL, Global Health, Health Source: Nursing and Academic Edition, MEDLINE, PsycARTICLES and PsycINFO, all of which were accessed through EBSCOhost. The Cochrane Database was also searched to id...

  9. The Power of the Web: A Systematic Review of Studies of the Influence of the Internet on Self-Harm and Suicide in Young People

    OpenAIRE

    Kate Daine; Keith Hawton; Vinod Singaravelu; Anne Stewart; Sue Simkin; Paul Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is concern that the internet is playing an increasing role in self-harm and suicide. In this study we systematically review and analyse research literature to determine whether there is evidence that the internet influences the risk of self-harm or suicide in young people. METHODS: An electronic literature search was conducted using the PsycINFO, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, and CINAHL databases. Articles of interest were those that included empirical data on the internet, self-...

  10. Effectiveness of physiotherapy exercise following total knee replacement: systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Artz, Neil; Elvers, Karen T; Lowe, Catherine Minns; Sackley, Cath; Jepson, Paul; Andrew D Beswick

    2015-01-01

    Background Rehabilitation, with an emphasis on physiotherapy and exercise, is widely promoted after total knee replacement. However, provision of services varies in content and duration. The aim of this study is to update the review of Minns Lowe and colleagues 2007 using systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of post-discharge physiotherapy exercise in patients with primary total knee replacement. Methods We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycInfo, CINAHL and Cochrane C...

  11. Psychosocial consequences of mild traumatic brain injury in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keightley, Michelle L; Côté, Pierre; Rumney, Peter

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence regarding psychosocial consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) in children. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus were searched (2001-2012). Inclusion criteria included published peer-reviewed reports......,914 records were screened; 101 of these articles were deemed scientifically admissible, of which 6 investigated the psychosocial consequences of MTBI in children. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers independently extracted data from accepted studies into evidence tables. DATA SYNTHESIS: We conducted a best...

  12. Smoking cessation in adults with diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of data from randomised controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Nagrebetsky, Alexander; Brettell, Rachel; Roberts, Nia; Farmer, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effects of more intensive smoking cessation interventions compared to less intensive interventions on smoking cessation in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Design A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials of smoking cessation interventions was conducted. Electronic searches were carried out on the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO to September 2013. Searches were supplemented by review of trial registries and references...

  13. Concept maps in medical education: an analytical literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Barbara J; Torre, Dario M

    2010-05-01

    OBJECTIVES As the medical profession continues to change, so do the educational methods by which medical students are taught. Various authors have acknowledged the need for alternative teaching and learning strategies that will enable medical students to retain vast amounts of information, integrate critical thinking skills and solve a range of complex clinical problems. Previous research has indicated that concept maps may be one such teaching and learning strategy. This article aims to: (i) review the current research on concept maps as a potential pedagogical approach to medical student learning, and (ii) discuss implications for medical student teaching and learning, as well as directions for future research. METHODS The literature included in this review was obtained by searching library databases including ACADEMIC SEARCH, ERIC, EBSCOHost, PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and EMBASE. This literature review is a summary of both conceptual and empirically published literature on the uses of concept mapping in medical education. RESULTS The 35 studies reviewed here indicate that concept maps function in four main ways: (i) by promoting meaningful learning; (ii) by providing an additional resource for learning; (iii) by enabling instructors to provide feedback to students, and (iv) by conducting assessment of learning and performance. CONCLUSIONS This review provides ideas for medical school faculty staff on the use of concept maps in teaching and learning. Strategies such as fostering critical thinking and clinical reasoning, incorporating concept mapping within problem-based learning, and using concept mapping in group and collaborative learning are identified. New developments in medical education include the use of serial concept maps, concept maps as a methodology to assist learners with lower cognitive competence, and the combination of group concept maps with structured feedback.

  14. A systematic literature review of complementary and alternative medicine prevalence in EU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eardley, Susan; Bishop, Felicity L; Prescott, Philip; Cardini, Francesco; Brinkhaus, Benno; Santos-Rey, Koldo; Vas, Jorge; von Ammon, Klaus; Hegyi, Gabriella; Dragan, Simona; Uehleke, Bernard; Fønnebø, Vinjar; Lewith, George

    2012-01-01

    Studies suggest that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widely used in the European Union (EU). We systematically reviewed data, reporting research quality and the prevalence of CAM use by citizens in Europe; what it is used for, and why. We searched for general population surveys of CAM use by using Ovid MEDLINE (1948 to September 2010), Cochrane Library (1989 to September 2010), CINAHL (1989 to September 2010), EMBASE (1980 to September 2010), PsychINFO including PsychARTICLES (1989 to September 2010), Web of Science (1989 to September 2010), AMED (1985 to September 2010), and CISCOM (1989 to September 2010). Additional studies were identified through experts and grey literature. Cross-sectional, population-based or cohort studies reporting CAM use in any EU language were included. Data were extracted and reviewed by 2 authors using a pre-designed extraction protocol with quality assessment instrument. 87 studies were included. Inter-rater reliability was good (kappa = 0.8). Study methodology and quality of reporting were poor. The prevalence of CAM use varied widely within and across EU countries (0.3-86%). Prevalence data demonstrated substantial heterogeneity unrelated to report quality; therefore, we were unable to pool data for meta-analysis; our report is narrative and based on descriptive statistics. Herbal medicine was most commonly reported. CAM users were mainly women. The most common reason for use was dissatisfaction with conventional care; CAM was widely used for musculoskeletal problems. CAM prevalence across the EU is problematic to estimate because studies are generally poor and heterogeneous. A consistent definition of CAM, a core set of CAMs with country-specific variations and a standardised reporting strategy to enhance the accuracy of data pooling would improve reporting quality.

  15. Diabetes mellitus tipo 1: evidências da literatura para seu manejo adequado, na perspectiva de crianças

    OpenAIRE

    Lucila Castanheira Nascimento; Mariana Junco Amaral; Valéria de Cássia Sparapani; Luciana Mara Monti Fonseca; Michelle Darezzo Rodrigues Nunes; Giselle Dupas

    2011-01-01

    O estudo objetivou identificar as evidências disponíveis, na literatura, que abordem, na perspectiva de crianças, os fatores relevantes para o adequado manejo do diabetes mellitus tipo 1. Realizou-se uma revisão integrativa, nas bases de dados PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS, CUIDEN e PsycINFO, com as palavras-chave diabetes mellitus tipo 1, criança, prevenção e controle, fatores desencadeantes, emergências, autocuidado, aprendizagem e educação em saúde, no período de 1998 a 2008. Dos artigos levantad...

  16. Prevalence of Sleepwalking: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Stallman, Helen M.; Kohler, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Sleepwalking is thought to be a common arousal disorder; however, the epidemiology of this disorder has not yet been systematically examined. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and ScienceDirect was conducted for ‘sleepwalking’ OR ‘somnambulism’ in any field, to identify studies that reported the epidemiology of sleepwalking or sleepwalking disorders. Fifty-one studies assessed the prevalence rates of sleepwalking in a total sample of 100 490. The meta-analysis ...

  17. Revisión narrativa sobre el abordaje y manejo de la vulvodinia desde una perspectiva enfermera

    OpenAIRE

    García Rodríguez, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Trabajo fin de grado en Enfermería Objetivo: analizar la afectación psicosocial en mujeres que padecen vulvodinia y la eficacia de intervenciones enfermeras en el tratamiento de la misma. Material y método: se realizó una revisión narrativa, cuyas búsquedas bibliográficas se llevaron a cabo en las bases de datos Cuiden, Cinahl, Pubmed y PsycINFO. Se establecieron previamente criterios de inclusión y exclusión y se utilizaron términos de lenguaje libre y controlado, combinados mediante o...

  18. Impact of childhood chronic illnesses on siblings: a literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O' Brien, Irene

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood illness can have a significant impact on families, particularly on the ill child\\'s siblings. There is a dearth of published literature focusing on the needs of siblings of ill children. AIM: This literature review aims to provide an overview of the current healthcare literature in relation to the impact of childhood chronic illness or disability on siblings. METHOD: A literature review was undertaken by searching the databases CINAHL, PsycINFO, ProQuest and Cochrane Library for relevant articles in English using the search terms: \\'siblings\\

  19. Is puberty a risk factor for back pain in the young? a systematic critical literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lardon, A.; Leboeuf-Yde, C.; Le Scanff, C.

    2014-01-01

    the increasing stages of puberty and the subsequent prevalence of back pain? 4) Is there a temporal link between puberty and back pain? DESIGN: A systematic critical literature review. METHODS: Systematic searches were made in March 2014 in PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and PsycINFO including longitudinal or cross......BACKGROUND: Back pain is a common condition that starts early in life and seems to increase markedly during puberty. A systematic review was performed in order to investigate the link between puberty and back pain, using some Bradford Hill criteria for causality. OBJECTIVES: We sought to obtain...

  20. Bullying and victimization among African American adolescents: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albdour, Maha; Krouse, Helene J

    2014-05-01

    Bullying among African American adolescents. This article reviews the current literature on bullying and victimization among African American adolescents. It highlights bullying and violence disparity among African American adolescents, associated risk and protective factors, and effects of bullying on adolescent health. Twenty-three English language peer-reviewed articles from CINAHL, Pubmed, and Psyc-INFO databases. African American adolescents have higher rates of bullying and victimization compared to other adolescent populations. This review found strong associations among bullying involvement, substance abuse, and family factors. Bullying also had a significant impact on adolescent health, particularly psychological symptoms and school performance. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Parental divorce and parental death - An integrative systematic review of children’s double bereavement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Poul; Marcussen, Jette; Hounsgaard, Lise;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to identify research on children and adolescents who experience double bereavement, i.e. the experience of loss through parental divorce followed by either parental death or critical illness with imminent death. This knowledge may identify evidence to underpin knowledge...... and practice for nurses and other health professionals, so they can intervene with these children and adolescents more efficaciously. An integrative systematic review was conducted using PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO. The results show four major themes: Complexity in their experiences of double bereavement...

  2. Early and late physical and psychosocial effects of primary surgery in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Annelise; Jarden, Mary

    2016-01-01

    in this review was 3386; of these, 1996 were treated by surgery alone and 1390 with combined surgery and adjuvant radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. The studies showed that because of the nature of their disease, patients are negatively affected by the different types of surgical treatment for oral......The purpose of this systematic review is to explore early and late physical and psychosocial effects of primary surgery for oral and oropharyngeal cancers and to investigate the factors that influence these effects. PubMed, Cinahl, and PsycInfo were searched for studies concerning patients...

  3. A review of executive function deficits and pharmacological management in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosenbocus, Sheik; Chahal, Raj

    2012-08-01

    To review both the functions and dysfunction of the executive system (ES) focusing on the extent of executive function (EF) deficits in most psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents and the possibility of such deficits acting as markers for pharmacological management. A LITERATURE REVIEW WAS CONDUCTED USING MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, CINAHL, PSYCHARTICLES AND PUBMED WITH THE FOLLOWING KEYWORDS: executive function or dysfunction, pediatric or children or adolescents, psychopharmacology, psychotropic medications, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, obsessive compulsive disorder, anxiety disorders, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders (ASD), fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Due to the limited amount of specific information obtained for some childhood disorders, the search was broadened to include relevant adult literature where information was extrapolated. Abundant literature was found on the nature of the ES and the executive dysfunctions in most psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents, but not so much on the use of medication. EF deficits were found to be more consistent in disorders such as ADHD, ASD and FASD than in the other disorders but were not specific enough for use as clinical markers for those disorders. For children with ADHD and ASD there was adequate information on the use of psychotropic medications and impact on some EF domains but information on the impact of medication on EF in the other disorders in children and adolescents was fairly limited. Medications acting on the dopaminergic system also showed positive effects on EF deficits and are commonly used in the treatment of EF disorders such as ADHD, ASD and FASD. Existing literature indicates that EF deficits underlie most psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. However, there are so many executive functions linked to so many activities and circuits in the brain that it is hard to quantify them in a particular disorder

  4. Pornography Addiction in Adults: A Systematic Review of Definitions and Reported Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Athena; Dawson, David L; das Nair, Roshan

    2016-05-01

    Self-perceived pornography addiction (SPPA) has increasingly emerged as a concept in research and popular culture, and commentators warn of the reported negative impact that it has. Despite this, "pornography or porn addiction" is not a formally recognized disorder and there is disagreement among researchers regarding its definition or even its existence. Therefore, how SPPA is operationalized often varies, and this is likely to influence the conclusions made about the impact of SPPA. This review aimed to examine what the supposed impact of SPPA is, and how the concept is operationalized. A systematic review of quantitative and qualitative peer-reviewed journal articles was conducted. The following databases were searched up to November 2015: CINAHL (2001-2015), Embase (1974-2015), Medline (1946-2015), PsychARTICLES (1980), and PsychInfo (1806-2015). Terms used were porn*, sexually explicit material, SEM, erotic*, nonparaphilic, cyberpornography, addict*, problematic, excess*, compul*, impul*, impact, effec*, behav*, and cause. An asterisk after a term means that all terms that begin with that root were included in the search. A review of the the current literature pertaining to SPPA and its reported impact. We found that SPPA is most frequently operationalized as excessive pornography use and negative consequences. As a result, researchers tended to focus on the frequency of pornography use and related impact as determinants of SPPA. SPPA is reported to affect users and their partners in similar ways, such as increased feelings of isolation and relationship breakdowns. However, we found some methodologic limitations of the primary studies, which limit the strength of the conclusions that can be drawn. Limitations include the lack of representative samples and inadequate measurements of SPPA and its impact. There still exist a debate regarding the definition and etiology of SPPA as distinct from self-perceived sex addiction. As such, the research landscape is

  5. Acoustic rhinometry in mouth breathing patients: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Cardoso de Melo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: When there is a change in the physiological pattern of nasal breathing, mouth breathing may already be present. The diagnosis of mouth breathing is related to nasal patency. One way to access nasal patency is by acoustic rhinometry.OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the effectiveness of acoustic rhinometry for the diagnosis of patients with mouth breathing.METHODS: Electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE via PubMed and Bireme, SciELO, Web of Science, Scopus, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and Science Direct, from August to December 2013, were consulted. 11,439 articles were found: 30 from LILACS, 54 from MEDLINE via Bireme, 5558 from MEDLINE via PubMed, 11 from SciELO, 2056 from Web of Science, 1734 from Scopus, 13 from PsycInfo, 1108 from CINAHL, and 875 from Science Direct. Of these, two articles were selected.RESULTS: The heterogeneity in the use of equipment and materials for the assessment of respiratory mode in these studies reveals that there is not yet consensus in the assessment and diagnosis of patients with mouth breathing.CONCLUSION: According to the articles, acoustic rhinometry has been used for almost twenty years, but controlled studies attesting to the efficacy of measuring the geometry of nasal cavities for complementary diagnosis of respiratory mode are warranted.

  6. Acoustic rhinometry in mouth breathing patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Ana Carolina Cardoso de; Gomes, Adriana de Oliveira de Camargo; Cavalcanti, Arlene Santos; Silva, Hilton Justino da

    2015-01-01

    When there is a change in the physiological pattern of nasal breathing, mouth breathing may already be present. The diagnosis of mouth breathing is related to nasal patency. One way to access nasal patency is by acoustic rhinometry. To systematically review the effectiveness of acoustic rhinometry for the diagnosis of patients with mouth breathing. Electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE via PubMed and Bireme, SciELO, Web of Science, Scopus, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and Science Direct, from August to December 2013, were consulted. 11,439 articles were found: 30 from LILACS, 54 from MEDLINE via Bireme, 5558 from MEDLINE via PubMed, 11 from SciELO, 2056 from Web of Science, 1734 from Scopus, 13 from PsycInfo, 1108 from CINAHL, and 875 from Science Direct. Of these, two articles were selected. The heterogeneity in the use of equipment and materials for the assessment of respiratory mode in these studies reveals that there is not yet consensus in the assessment and diagnosis of patients with mouth breathing. According to the articles, acoustic rhinometry has been used for almost twenty years, but controlled studies attesting to the efficacy of measuring the geometry of nasal cavities for complementary diagnosis of respiratory mode are warranted. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Searching for Controlled Trials of Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Comparison of 15 Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Cogo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This project aims to assess the utility of bibliographic databases beyond the three major ones (MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane CENTRAL for finding controlled trials of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. Fifteen databases were searched to identify controlled clinical trials (CCTs of CAM not also indexed in MEDLINE. Searches were conducted in May 2006 using the revised Cochrane highly sensitive search strategy (HSSS and the PubMed CAM Subset. Yield of CAM trials per 100 records was determined, and databases were compared over a standardized period (2005. The Acudoc2 RCT, Acubriefs, Index to Chiropractic Literature (ICL and Hom-Inform databases had the highest concentrations of non-MEDLINE records, with more than 100 non-MEDLINE records per 500. Other productive databases had ratios between 500 and 1500 records to 100 non-MEDLINE records—these were AMED, MANTIS, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Global Health and Alt HealthWatch. Five databases were found to be unproductive: AGRICOLA, CAIRSS, Datadiwan, Herb Research Foundation and IBIDS. Acudoc2 RCT yielded 100 CAM trials in the most recent 100 records screened. Acubriefs, AMED, Hom-Inform, MANTIS, PsycINFO and CINAHL had more than 25 CAM trials per 100 records screened. Global Health, ICL and Alt HealthWatch were below 25 in yield. There were 255 non-MEDLINE trials from eight databases in 2005, with only 10% indexed in more than one database. Yield varied greatly between databases; the most productive databases from both sampling methods were Acubriefs, Acudoc2 RCT, AMED and CINAHL. Low overlap between databases indicates comprehensive CAM literature searches will require multiple databases.

  8. Searching for Controlled Trials of Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Comparison of 15 Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogo, Elise; Sampson, Margaret; Ajiferuke, Isola; Manheimer, Eric; Campbell, Kaitryn; Daniel, Raymond; Moher, David

    2011-01-01

    This project aims to assess the utility of bibliographic databases beyond the three major ones (MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane CENTRAL) for finding controlled trials of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Fifteen databases were searched to identify controlled clinical trials (CCTs) of CAM not also indexed in MEDLINE. Searches were conducted in May 2006 using the revised Cochrane highly sensitive search strategy (HSSS) and the PubMed CAM Subset. Yield of CAM trials per 100 records was determined, and databases were compared over a standardized period (2005). The Acudoc2 RCT, Acubriefs, Index to Chiropractic Literature (ICL) and Hom-Inform databases had the highest concentrations of non-MEDLINE records, with more than 100 non-MEDLINE records per 500. Other productive databases had ratios between 500 and 1500 records to 100 non-MEDLINE records—these were AMED, MANTIS, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Global Health and Alt HealthWatch. Five databases were found to be unproductive: AGRICOLA, CAIRSS, Datadiwan, Herb Research Foundation and IBIDS. Acudoc2 RCT yielded 100 CAM trials in the most recent 100 records screened. Acubriefs, AMED, Hom-Inform, MANTIS, PsycINFO and CINAHL had more than 25 CAM trials per 100 records screened. Global Health, ICL and Alt HealthWatch were below 25 in yield. There were 255 non-MEDLINE trials from eight databases in 2005, with only 10% indexed in more than one database. Yield varied greatly between databases; the most productive databases from both sampling methods were Acubriefs, Acudoc2 RCT, AMED and CINAHL. Low overlap between databases indicates comprehensive CAM literature searches will require multiple databases. PMID:19468052

  9. Searching for religion and mental health studies required health, social science, and grey literature databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Judy M; Cottrell, David J; Mir, Ghazala

    2014-07-01

    To determine the optimal databases to search for studies of faith-sensitive interventions for treating depression. We examined 23 health, social science, religious, and grey literature databases searched for an evidence synthesis. Databases were prioritized by yield of (1) search results, (2) potentially relevant references identified during screening, (3) included references contained in the synthesis, and (4) included references that were available in the database. We assessed the impact of databases beyond MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO by their ability to supply studies identifying new themes and issues. We identified pragmatic workload factors that influence database selection. PsycINFO was the best performing database within all priority lists. ArabPsyNet, CINAHL, Dissertations and Theses, EMBASE, Global Health, Health Management Information Consortium, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Sociological Abstracts were essential for our searches to retrieve the included references. Citation tracking activities and the personal library of one of the research teams made significant contributions of unique, relevant references. Religion studies databases (Am Theo Lib Assoc, FRANCIS) did not provide unique, relevant references. Literature searches for reviews and evidence syntheses of religion and health studies should include social science, grey literature, non-Western databases, personal libraries, and citation tracking activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The advantages of being called NICE: a systematic review of journal article titles using the acronym for the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, David S; Batty, G David

    2009-03-01

    To describe the use of NICE, the acronym for the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, as both an adjective and noun in peer-reviewed journal article titles. Systematic review of titles retrieved by electronic database searches. Ovid databases (MEDLINE, All EBM Reviews, EMBASE, ERIC, CINAHL and PsycINFO) covering the formation of NICE in 1999 to February 2008. Independent review of eligible titles by both authors and resolution of disagreements based on consideration of full text articles. 2274 articles were retrieved that included reference to NICE in their titles. Of these, 167 (7.3%) used NICE as an adjective, most commonly in conjunction with the terms 'work', 'not so' (NICE), 'nasty', 'mess' and 'try'. The work of NICE has been widely referenced in peer-reviewed journal article titles, sometimes with apparent humorous intent when used as an adjective. Well-chosen names may increase the recognizability of public health organizations and help to communicate their roles.

  11. Observer bias in randomized clinical trials with measurement scale outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Clinical trials are commonly done without blinded outcome assessors despite the risk of bias. We wanted to evaluate the effect of nonblinded outcome assessment on estimated effects in randomized clinical trials with outcomes that involved subjective measurement scales. METHODS......:We conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with both blinded and nonblinded assessment of the same measurement scale outcome. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, HighWire Press and Google Scholar for relevant studies. Two......%). Heterogeneity was moderate (I(2) = 46%, p = 0.02) and unexplained by metaregression. INTERPRETATION:We provide empirical evidence for observer bias in randomized clinical trials with subjective measurement scale outcomes. A failure to blind assessors of outcomes in such trials results in a high risk...

  12. Effectiveness of massage therapy on the range of motion of the shoulder: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeun, Young-Ran

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to identify and analyze the degree of effect of massage therapy on the range of motion of the shoulder. [Subjects and Methods] The database search was conducted using PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO, RISS, NDSL, NANET, DBpia, and KoreaMed. The meta-analysis was based on 7 studies, covered a total of 237 participants, and used a random-effects model. [Results] The effect size estimate showed that massage therapy significantly improved the shoulder range of motion, especially the flexion (SMD: 18.21, 95% CI 1.57-34.85) and abduction (SMD: 22.07, 95% CI 5.84-38.30). [Conclusion] The review findings suggest that massage therapy is effective in improving the shoulder flexion and abduction.

  13. Shared decision-making for cancer care among racial and ethnic minorities: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Erin L; Doorenbos, Ardith Z; Javid, Sara H; Haozous, Emily A; Alvord, Lori Arviso; Flum, David R; Morris, Arden M

    2013-12-01

    To assess decision-making for cancer treatment among racial/ethnic minority patients, we systematically reviewed and synthesized evidence from studies of "shared decision-making," "cancer," and "minority groups," using PubMed, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and EMBASE. We identified significant themes that we compared across studies, refined, and organized into a conceptual model. Five major themes emerged: treatment decision-making, patient factors, family and important others, community, and provider factors. Thematic data overlapped categories, indicating that individuals' preferences for medical decision-making cannot be authentically examined outside the context of family and community. The shared decision-making model should be expanded beyond the traditional patient-physician dyad to include other important stakeholders in the cancer treatment decision process, such as family or community leaders.

  14. Health service interventions targeting relatives of heart patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Nina Konstantin; Madsen, Mette; Olsen Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Relatives of heart patients experience anxiety, uncertainty, and low quality of life, and the hospitalization of a heart patient is associated with increased risk of death for the partner. Relatives' physical and mental problems may be rectified by activities established by the health...... systematically reviewed to clarify what the health services do for relatives of heart patients and to assess the effects of interventions. We searched Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL database, CSA and the Cochrane Library from January 2000 to March 2006. RESULTS: Only six scientific articles reported...... on interventions testing health service activities for relatives of heart patients, and one literature review scrutinized earlier studies within the field. All the interventions indicate positive effects on patients' and/or relatives' health and well-being, in accordance with nurses' assessments. Nevertheless...

  15. Diabetes research reported by nurses in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graue, G; Iversen, MM; Sigurdardottir, AK;

    2013-01-01

    New knowledge from research studies is important as a foundation for high-quality care in practice as well as crucial to further stimulate research in the future. The aims of this study were to determine the total number of peer-reviewed articles on diabetes research reported by nurses in four...... Nordic countries (Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) from 1979–2009, and to identify the time periods in which they had been published, different study designs and the number of publications related to nurse authors. We performed an electronic search for potentially relevant scientific articles between...... 1 January 1979 and 31 December 2009 using the MEDLINE, Medline in process, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Cochrane databases. The studies focused either on the diabetes population or on diabetes health care professionals. We included 164 scientific articles; 132 resulting from electronic search and 32...

  16. [e-Health interventions and improvement in treatment adherence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieben, Angelien; Bredie, S J H Bas; van Laarhoven, C J H M Kees; Schoonhoven, Lisette; Burger, David M; van Onzenoort, Hein A W

    2014-01-01

    Poor adherence to medication is one of the most important determinants in the treatment of patients with chronic disorders. e-Health-based interventions may be able to improve treatment adherence. This article gives an overview of the available e-Health interventions and the extent to which they can improve adherence. We searched in the PubMed, Cinahl, PsycInfo, and Embase databases for e-Health interventions that aimed at improving adherence to treatment. Of the 16 included studies, 15 used a website and one used an app. Ten studies showed a significant improvement in treatment adherence by using the intervention. e-Health interventions were generally complex. Simple interventions were the most successful in improving treatment adherence.

  17. Stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peoples, Hanne; Satink, Ton; Steultjens, Esther

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim was to obtain the best available knowledge on stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation. The increase in demands for accountability in health care and acknowledgement of the importance of client participation in health decisions calls for systematic ways of integrating...... this perspective. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A systematic review of qualitative studies was performed. A literature search in MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and EMBASE was conducted. Suitability for inclusion was based on selected criteria: published qualitative studies written in English from 1990 to 2008 on stroke...... needs, 3) Physical and non-physical needs, 4) Being personally valued and treated with respect, 5) Collaboration with health care professionals and 6) Assuming responsibility and seizing control. DISCUSSION: The synthesis showed that stroke survivors' experiences of rehabilitation reflected individual...

  18. Hospital Palliative Care Teams and Post-Acute Care in Nursing Facilities: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joan G

    2017-01-01

    Although palliative care consultation teams are common in U.S. hospitals, follow up and outcomes of consultations for frail older adults discharged to nursing facilities are unclear. To summarize and critique research on the care of patients discharged to nursing facilities following a hospital-based palliative care consult, a systematic search of PubMed, CINAHL, Ageline, and PsycINFO was conducted in February 2016. Data from the articles (N = 12) were abstracted and analyzed. The results of 12 articles reflecting research conducted in five countries are presented in narrative form. Two studies focused on nurse perceptions only, three described patient/family/caregiver experiences and needs, and seven described patient-focused outcomes. Collectively, these articles demonstrate that disruption in palliative care service on hospital discharge and nursing facility admission may result in high symptom burden, poor communication, and inadequate coordination of care. High mortality was also noted. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2017; 10(1):25-34.].

  19. Incidence and prognosis of mid-back pain in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, M. S.; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Hartvigsen, J

    2017-01-01

    the incidence and prognosis of MBP in the general population. The PRISMA Statement guided the study process. DATABASES: A systematic search was conducted in CINAHL, PEDro, PsycINFO and Scopus. RESULTS: Of 3194 unique records identified, seven were included in our qualitative synthesis. The 3-month and 2-year...... incidence proportions of MBP in children and adolescents were approximately 4% and 50%, respectively. In adults, the 1-month incidence proportion was less than 1%. The persistence or recurrence of MBP over a 1- to 4-year period was between 13% and 45% in children and adolescents; a change in spinal pain...... location over time was common. Individuals reporting MBP have an increased risk of future care seeking compared with people without musculoskeletal complaints. No studies assessing adult MBP recovery trajectories or prognostic factors were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge about the incidence...

  20. En kvalitativ metasyntese af psykiatriske sygeplejerskers oplevelser af transitionen fra at være studerende til at være nyuddannet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tingleff, Ellen Boldrup; Rossen, Camilla Blach; Buus, Niels

    2010-01-01

    forward by Sandelowski and Barroso. The studies were interpreted guided by theory from the social science position «symbolic interactionism». Results: Two central themes were identified: 1. Negotiation of roles and norms. 2. Interpretation of the institutional context. The newly educated psychiatric...... nurses felt a lack of formal introduction, had feelings of professional incompetence and were ambivalent towards their new role. Discussion and conclusion: The synthesis was evaluated and theory-guided interpretation could potentially be a significant contribution to qualitative meta-synthesis, which has...... issues related to the particular approach to meta-synthesis. Methods: A systematic literature search was made in CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO and Web of Science. References were critically evaluated and five studies were included in a qualitative meta-synthesis inspired by the methodological outline put...

  1. The effect of exercise in clinically depressed adults: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Nordentoft, Merete; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of exercise in adults with clinical depression. DATA SOURCES: The databases CINAHL, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO were searched (1806-2008) using medical subject headings (Me......SH) and text word terms depression, depressive disorder and exercise, aerobic, non-aerobic, physical activity, physical fitness, walk*, jog*, run*, bicycling, swim*, strength, and resistance. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized trials including adults with clinical depression according to any diagnostic system were...... these, the estimated beneficial effect of exercise was more modest (SMD, -0.19; 95% CI, -0.70 to 0.31) than the pooled result for all 13 studies, with no strong evidence of benefit. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a short-term effect of exercise on depression: on average, depression scores 0...

  2. Enablers and barriers to implementing collaborative care for anxiety and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overbeck, Gritt; Davidsen, Annette Sofie; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm

    2016-01-01

    and reviewed full-text articles. Studies were included if they were published in English and based on the original qualitative data on the implementation of a collaborative care intervention targeted at depression or anxiety in an adult patient population in a high-income country. Our subsequent analysis...... shown significant positive effects for patients suffering from depression, but since collaborative care is a complex intervention, it is important to understand the factors which affect its implementation. We present a qualitative systematic review of the enablers and barriers to implementing...... collaborative care for patients with anxiety and depression. METHODS: We developed a comprehensive search strategy in cooperation with a research librarian and performed a search in five databases (EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, ProQuest, and CINAHL). All authors independently screened titles and abstracts...

  3. The impact of having both cancer and diabetes on patient-reported outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissers, Pauline A J; Falzon, Louise; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This systematic review aims to summarize the current literature regarding potential effects of having both cancer and diabetes on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and to provide directions for future research. METHODS: MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched from...... inception to January 2015. All English peer-reviewed studies that included patients with both cancer and diabetes and assessed PROs were included. All included studies were independently assessed on methodological quality by two investigators. RESULTS: Of the 3553 identified studies, 10 studies were...... such as depression, patient empowerment and self-management. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVOR: Having both cancer and diabetes might result in worse PROs, however, more research is needed as current evidence is scarce....

  4. The Importance of Psychological and Social Factors in Influencing the Uptake and Maintenance of Physical Activity after Stroke: A Structured Review of the Empirical Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqui Morris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. People with stroke are not maintaining adequate engagement in physical activity (PA for health and functional benefit. This paper sought to describe any psychological and social factors that may influence physical activity engagement after stroke. Methods. A structured literature review of studies indexed in MEDLINE, CinAHL, P&BSC, and PsycINFO using search terms relevant to stroke, physical disabilities, and PA. Publications reporting empirical findings (quantitative or qualitative regarding psychological and/or social factors were included. Results. Twenty studies from 19 publications (9 surveys, 1 RCT, and 10 qualitative studies were included. Seventeen studies reported findings pertinent to psychological factors and fourteen findings pertinent to social factors. Conclusion. Self-efficacy, physical activity beliefs, and social support appear particularly relevant to physical activity behaviour after stroke and should be included in theoretically based physical interventions. The Transtheoretical Model and the Theory of Planned Behaviour are candidate behavioural models that may support intervention development.

  5. O câncer infantil na perspectiva dos irmãos das crianças doentes: revisão bibliográfica

    OpenAIRE

    Aline Cristiane Cavicchioli; Lucila Castanheira Nascimento; Regina Aparecida Garcia de Lima

    2004-01-01

    O estudo tem como objetivo realizar uma revisão bibliográfica de pesquisas que abordam temáticas relacionadas aos irmãos de crianças com câncer, no período de 1998 até 2003, a fim de identificar os conhecimentos disponíveis na área e fornecer subsídios para o cuidado de enfermagem aos irmãos das crianças com câncer. Utilizamos as bases de dados MEDLINE, LILACS, CINAHL e PsycINFO, também, artigos disponibilizados on line, na íntegra, por meio da editora OVID, com as seguintes combinações de pa...

  6. Self-report of symptoms in children with cancer younger than 8 years of age: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, D; Tigelaar, L; Hyslop, S; Lazor, T; Dupuis, L L; Griener, K; Oliveria, J; Sung, L

    2017-08-01

    The study's objective was to summarize the psychometric evaluation of self-report symptom instruments used in children with cancer younger than 8 years of age. We conducted electronic searches of Ovid Medline, EMBASE, PsycInfo, Science Citation, Social Science Citation (Web of Science), and CINAHL. We included studies of children with cancer in which their self-report symptoms had been quantified and in which results were described for those younger than 8 years of age. The search was restricted to publications in English. Two reviewers screened studies and abstracted all data in duplicate. Descriptive analysis of reliability and validity was performed. Thirteen studies were included. Only one study recruited children report symptoms are reliable or valid specifically for children with cancer younger than 8 years of age. Development of psychometrically robust instruments for younger children should be a priority.

  7. Are parenting interventions effective in improving the relationship between mothers and their preterm infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Tracey; Whittingham, Koa; Sanders, Matthew; Colditz, Paul; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2014-05-01

    To systematically review the efficacy of parenting interventions in improving the quality of the relationship between mothers and preterm infants. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials (RCT) of parenting interventions for mothers of preterm infants where mother-infant relationship quality outcomes were reported. Databases searched: The Cochrane Library, PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Science. Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria, 14 with strong methodological quality. Eight parenting interventions were found to improve the quality of the mother-preterm infant relationship. Heterogeneity of the interventions calls for an integrated new parenting program focusing on cue-based, responsive care from the mother to her preterm infant to improve the quality of the relationship for these mother-preterm infant dyads. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. What Facilitates "Patient Empowerment" in Cancer Patients During Follow-Up: A Qualitative Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Clara R; Thomsen, Thora G; Ross, Lone; Dietz, Susanne M; Therkildsen, Signe; Groenvold, Mogens; Rasmussen, Charlotte L; Johnsen, Anna T

    2017-07-01

    Empowerment is a concept of growing importance in cancer care, but little is known about cancer patients' experiences of empowerment during follow-up. To explore this area, a qualitative systematic literature review was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. A total of 2,292 papers were identified and 38 articles selected and included in the review. The thematic synthesis of the papers resulted in seven analytical themes being identified: empowerment as an ongoing process, knowledge is power, having an active role, communication and interaction between patients and health care professionals, support from being in a group, religion and spirituality, and gender. Very few articles explicitly explored the empowerment of cancer patients during follow-up, and the review identified a lack of attention to patients' own understandings of empowerment, a lack of specific focus on empowerment during follow-up, and insufficient attention to collective empowerment, as well as ethnic, social, and gender differences.

  9. End-of-life expectations and experiences among nursing home patients and their relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosse, Anette; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase; Ruths, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Synthesize research about patients' and relatives' expectations and experiences on how doctors can improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. METHODS: We systematically searched qualitative studies in English in seven databases (Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Ageline, Cochrane...... Systematic Reviews and Cochrane Trials). We included 14 publications in the analysis with meta-ethnography. RESULTS: Patients and families emphasized the importance of health personnel anticipating illness trajectories and recognizing the information and palliation needed. Family members who became proxy....... CONCLUSION: Nursing home patients and their relatives wanted doctors more involved in end-of-life care. They expected doctors to acknowledge their preferences and provide guidance and symptom relief. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: High-quality end-of-life care in nursing homes relies on organization, funding...

  10. Fatigue in adults with traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollayeva, Tatyana; Kendzerska, Tetyana; Mollayeva, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite strong indications that fatigue is the most common and debilitating symptom after traumatic brain injury, little is known about its frequency, natural history, or relation to other factors. The current protocol outlines a strategy for a systematic review that will identify......, assess, and critically appraise studies that assessed predictors for fatigue and the consequences of fatigue on at least two separate time points following traumatic brain injury. METHODS/DESIGN: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, and PsycINFO will be systematically...... searched for relevant peer-reviewed studies. Reference lists of eligible papers will also be searched. All English language studies with a longitudinal design that focus on fatigue in adults with primary-impact traumatic brain injury will be included. Studies on fatigue following brain injury due...

  11. The effect of antenatal education in small classes on obstetric and psycho-social outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixval, Carina Sjöberg; Axelsen, Solveig Forberg; Lauemøller, Stine Glenstrup

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aims of antenatal education are broad and encompass outcomes related to pregnancy, birth, and parenthood. Both form and content of antenatal education have changed over time without evidence of effects on relevant outcomes. The effect of antenatal education in groups......, with participation of a small number of participants, may differ from the effect of other forms of antenatal education due to, for example, group dynamic. The objective of this systematic review is to assess the effects of antenatal education in small groups on obstetric as well as psycho-social outcomes. METHODS......: Bibliographic databases (Medline, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Web of Science, and PsycINFO) were searched. We included randomized and quasi-randomized trials irrespective of language, publication year, publication type, and publication status. Only trials carried out in the Western world were considered...

  12. Video Communication With Cognitively Intact Nursing Home Residents: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Amy M; Hunter, Elizabeth G

    2017-05-01

    Limited research exists examining video communication among cognitively intact nursing home residents to connect with family. This scoping review evaluated existing literature for video communication usage with nursing home residents, family, and nursing homes. A comprehensive search was completed using PubMed and EBSCOhost (including AgeLine, CINAHL, and PsycINFO) between 1972 and 2016 to locate English-language articles. The analysis identified five eligible studies (four involved an intervention, one assessed family views) meeting inclusion criteria. Findings included, seeing family members separated by distance, seeing other parts of their life, and visually monitoring resident's health. Participants described frustration with technology limitations, such as video or audio lag. Current literature does not show a comprehensive assessment of video communication usage for residents, family, and nursing homes. Future studies should address the complexity of the intersection of the person, nursing home, and families in terms of potential benefits and capability of video communication use with residents.

  13. Health Habit: A Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalinski, Andra S; Weglicki, Linda S; Gropper, Sareen S

    2017-05-25

    The aim of this article is to provide clarity of the concept of health habit. Using Walker and Avant's (1983; 2010) method for conducting a concept analysis, the authors identify the attributes and characteristics of health habit, its theoretical and practical application to nursing, and sample cases to further illustrate the concept. Empirical and conceptual literature was used to inform this concept analysis. Articles and one book from 1977 to 2014 were reviewed from PsycINFO, Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing Health Literature (CINAHL), Science Direct, EBSCOhost and Web of Science. Offering a clear definition and conceptual model of health habit provide the foundation to identify/develop appropriate measures of the concept and guide further investigation of understanding the development and sustainability of healthy habits. Additional research is needed to test the conceptual relationships between health habits and outcome variables as they apply to different groups across the age continuum. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for adults after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, Kirstine Lærum; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Tang, Lars Hermann

    2016-01-01

    : the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE); MEDLINE (Ovid); EMBASE (Ovid); CINAHL (EBSCO); PsycINFO (Ovid); LILACS (Bireme); and Conference Proceedings Citation Index-S (CPCI-S) on Web of Science (Thomson Reuters) on 23 March 2015. We...... handsearched Web of Science, bibliographies of systematic reviews and trial registers (ClinicalTrials.gov, Controlled-trials.com, and The World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform). SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised clinical trials that investigated exercise......-based interventions compared with no exercise intervention control. The trial participants comprised adults aged 18 years or older who had undergone heart valve surgery for heart valve disease (from any cause) and received either heart valve replacement, or heart valve repair. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two...

  15. Patient empowerment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Nanna Bjerg; Joergensen, Clara Ruebner; Thomsen, Thora Grothe

    2017-01-01

    assessing empowerment from the user perspective. The aim of this review was to identify questionnaires and subscales measuring empowerment and manifestations of empowerment among cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of the PubMed, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases......BACKGROUND: There is an increased attention to and demand for patient empowerment in cancer treatment and follow-up programs. Patient empowerment has been defined as feeling in control of or having mastery in relation to cancer and cancer care. This calls for properly developed questionnaires....... Empowerment and multiple search terms associated with empowerment were included. We included peer-reviewed articles published in English, which described questionnaires measuring empowerment or manifestations of empowerment in a cancer setting. In addition, the questionnaire had to be a patient...

  16. Military deployment and reintegration: a systematic review of child coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Utu, Cindy F; DeSocio, Janiece E

    2015-02-01

    Child coping with parent military deployment and family reintegration. A systematic review of research literature was conducted to examine the effects of deployment and family reintegration on children in military families. A search of CINAHL, PubMed, Psyc-INFO, and SocINDEX databases was performed using the terms "military family," "military child," "child coping," "deployment," and "reintegration." The search was limited to publications between 2001 and 2014 to focus on the effects of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), and Operation New Dawn (OND). Twenty-seven research reports met inclusion criteria. Three themes were extracted: A child's coping is influenced by (a) the child's age and development, (b) the mental health and coping of the non-deployed parent during deployment, and the mental health of both parents during family reintegration, and (c) the pre-existing resilience/vulnerability, cumulative risks, and resources of the child and family. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. On-the-job training of health professionals for electronic health record and electronic medical record use: A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina L. Younge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of electronic health records (EHRs or electronic medical records (EMRs is well documented in health informatics literature yet, very few studies focus primarily on how health professionals in direct clinical care are trained for EHR or EMR use. Purpose: To investigate how health professionals in direct clinical care are trained to prepare them for EHR or EMR use. Methods: Systematic searches were conducted in CINAHL, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed and ISI WoS and, the Arksey and O’Malley scoping methodological framework was used to collect the data and analyze the results. Results: Training was done at implementation, orientation and post-implementation. Implementation and orientation training had a broader scope while post-implementation training focused on proficiency, efficiency and improvement. The multiplicity of training methods, types and levels of training identified appear to suggest that training is more effective when a combination of training methods are used.

  18. Concept Analysis of Burden in Caregivers of Stroke Survivors During the Early Poststroke Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Eeeseung; Evans, Lois K

    2015-10-01

    It is important to understand burden in caregivers of stroke survivors during the early poststroke period if we are to prevent or decrease the longer-term experience of caregiver burden and its consequences. This article reports a concept analysis of burden in caregivers of stroke survivors during the early poststroke period. A literature review using MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases (1960-2014) identified 32 relevant articles published from 1993 to 2013. Rodgers's evolutionary method of concept analysis was used. Three attributes--objective and subjective aspects, time spent caring for the stroke survivor, and uncertainty about the future for the stroke survivor and caregiver--were identified. Multiple definitions of caregiver burden have been used. In the early poststroke period, burden appears closely interconnected with other factors, some of which may be modifiable. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Evidence for Mental Health Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Hitch

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the evidence for mental health occupational therapy in peer-reviewed journals from 2000 to 2013. Descriptive and inductive methods were used to address this question, with evidence from CINAHL, OTDBase, PSYCInfo, SCOPUS, and Google Scholar® included. Many articles (n = 1,747 were found that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 47 different methods were used to develop evidence for mental health occupational therapy, and evidence appeared in 300 separate peer-reviewed journals. It takes on average 7 months for an article to progress from submission to acceptance, and a further 7 months to progress from acceptance to publication. More than 95% of articles published between 2000 and 2002 were cited at least once in the following decade, and around 70% of these citations were recorded in non-occupational therapy journals. The current evidence base for mental health occupational therapy is both substantial and diverse.

  20. Patient education has a positive effect in patients with a stoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    AIM: A systematic review was performed to assess whether education of patients having stoma formation improves quality of life and whether it is cost effective. METHOD: A literature search was performed to identify studies on the structured education of ostomates and outcome using the following...... databases: MEDLINE, Cinahl, Embase, Cochrane and PsycInfo. Inclusion criteria were: clinical studies reporting effects of educational interventions in relation to patients with a stoma. Commentaries or studies not testing an intervention were excluded. RESULTS: Seven articles met the inclusion criteria...... of having rigorously evaluated an educational programme related to living with a stoma. The programmes were organized in different ways and had explored varous interventions. The results showed an increase in health-related quality of life measured with a Stoma QOL in strument (p=0.00001) and with SF-36 (p...

  1. Effectiveness of massage therapy on the range of motion of the shoulder: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeun, Young-Ran

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to identify and analyze the degree of effect of massage therapy on the range of motion of the shoulder. [Subjects and Methods] The database search was conducted using PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO, RISS, NDSL, NANET, DBpia, and KoreaMed. The meta-analysis was based on 7 studies, covered a total of 237 participants, and used a random-effects model. [Results] The effect size estimate showed that massage therapy significantly improved the shoulder range of motion, especially the flexion (SMD: 18.21, 95% CI 1.57–34.85) and abduction (SMD: 22.07, 95% CI 5.84–38.30). [Conclusion] The review findings suggest that massage therapy is effective in improving the shoulder flexion and abduction. PMID:28265175

  2. Instruments used in the assessment of expectation toward a spine surgery: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Nepomuceno

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify and describe the instruments used to assess patients' expectations toward spine surgery. METHOD An integrative review was carried out in the databases PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS and PsycINFO. RESULTS A total of 4,402 publications were identified, of which 25 met the selection criteria. Of the studies selected, only three used tools that had confirmed validity and reliability to be applied; in five studies, clinical scores were used, and were modified for the assessment of patients' expectations, and in 17 studies the researchers developed scales without an adequate description of the method used for their development and validation. CONCLUSION The assessment of patients' expectations has been methodologically conducted in different ways. Until the completion of this integrative review, only two valid and reliable instruments had been used in three of the selected studies.

  3. Determinants of fruit and vegetable consumption among children and adolescents: a review of the literature. Part II: qualitative studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krølner, Rikke; Rasmussen, Mette; Brug, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Anthropology Plus, Cinahl, CSA illumine, Embase, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Medline, PsycINFO, and Web of Science using combinations of synonyms for FV intake, children/adolescents and qualitative methods as search terms. The literature search was completed by December 1st 2010. Papers......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Large proportions of children do not fulfil the World Health Organization recommendation of eating at least 400 grams of fruit and vegetables (FV) per day. To promote an increased FV intake among children it is important to identify factors which influence their consumption....... Both qualitative and quantitative studies are needed. Earlier reviews have analysed evidence from quantitative studies. The aim of this paper is to present a systematic review of qualitative studies of determinants of children's FV intake. METHODS: Relevant studies were identified by searching...

  4. Instruments to assess integrated care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Anne Marie; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Høst, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    abstracts were independently reviewed by two investigators. RESULTS: We identified 23 measurement instruments and, within these, eight organisational elements were found. No measurement instrument covered all organisational elements, but almost all studies include well-defined structural and process aspects......INTRODUCTION: Although several measurement instruments have been developed to measure the level of integrated health care delivery, no standardised, validated instrument exists covering all aspects of integrated care. The purpose of this review is to identify the instruments concerning how...... to measure the level of integration across health-care sectors and to assess and evaluate the organisational elements within the instruments identified. METHODS: An extensive, systematic literature review in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science for the years 1980-2011. Selected...

  5. Psychosocial factors associated with talent development in football: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Gledhill, A; Harwood, C; Forsdyke, D

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To provide a critical systematic review of recent research into psychosocial factors associated with talent development in football. Design: Systematic review informed by the PRISMA guidelines. Method: Literature was sourced from Science Direct, Sport Discus, Psycharticles and Psychinfo. This was followed by a detailed screening and sifting process to identify literature. Identified literature was independently appraised by multiple reviewers using the mixed-methods Appraisal Tool...

  6. Provision of a surgeon's performance data for people considering elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amanda; Henderson, Simon

    2015-02-09

    A consumer model of health supports that people undergoing elective surgery should be informed about the past operative performance of their surgeon before making two important decisions: 1. to consent to the proposed surgery, and 2. to have a particular doctor perform the surgery. This information arguably helps empower patients to participate in their care. While surgeons' performance data are available in some settings, there continues to be controversy over the provision of such data to patients, and the question of whether consumers should, or want to, be provided with this information. To assess the effects of providing a surgeon's performance data to people considering elective surgery on patient-based and service utilisation outcomes. For the original review, we searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2009, Issue 4); MEDLINE (Ovid) (1950 to 28 September 2009); EMBASE (Ovid) (1988 to 28 September 2009); PsycINFO (Ovid) (1806 to 28 September 2009); CINAHL (EBSCO) (1982 to 20 October 2009); Current Contents (Ovid) (1992 to 23 November 2009); and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (1861 to 20 October 2009).For this update, we searched: CENTRAL (2009 to 3 March 2014); MEDLINE (Ovid) (2009 to 3 March 2014); EMBASE (Ovid) (2009 to 3 March 2014); PsycINFO (Ovid) (2009 to 9 March 2014); CINAHL (EBSCO) (2009 to 9 March 2014), Current Contents (Web of Science) (November 2009 to 21 March 2014), and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (2009 to 21 March 2014). We applied no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster RCTs, quasi-RCTs and controlled before and after studies (CBAs), in which an individual surgeon's performance data were provided to people considering elective surgery. We considered the CBAs for inclusion from 2009 onwards. Two review authors (AH, SH) independently assessed all titles, abstracts, or both of retrieved citations. We identified no studies for inclusion. Consequently, we

  7. Incentivizing blood donation: systematic review and meta-analysis to test Titmuss' hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niza, Claudia; Tung, Burcu; Marteau, Theresa M

    2013-09-01

    Titmuss hypothesized that paying blood donors would reduce the quality of the blood donated and would be economically inefficient. We report here the first systematic review to test these hypotheses, reporting on both financial and nonfinancial incentives. Studies deemed eligible for inclusion were peer-reviewed, experimental studies that presented data on the quantity (as a proxy for efficiency) and quality of blood donated in at least two groups: those donating blood when offered an incentive, and those donating blood with no offer of an incentive. The following were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO using OVID SP, CINAHL via EBSCO and CENTRAL, the Cochrane Library, Econlit via EBSCO, JSTOR Health and General Science Collection, and Google. The initial search yielded 1100 abstracts, which resulted in 89 full papers being assessed for eligibility, of which seven studies, reported in six papers, met the inclusion criteria. The included studies involved 93,328 participants. Incentives had no impact on the likelihood of donation (OR = 1.22 CI 95% 0.91-1.63; p = .19). There was no difference between financial and nonfinancial incentives in the quantity of blood donated. Of the two studies that assessed quality of blood, one found no effect and the other found an adverse effect from the offer of a free cholesterol test (β = 0.011 p < .05). The limited evidence suggests that Titmuss' hypothesis of the economic inefficiency of incentives is correct. There is insufficient evidence to assess their likely impact on the quality of the blood provided. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Utilization of maternal health services among adolescent women in Bangladesh: A scoping review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabuddin, A S M; Delvaux, Thérèse; Abouchadi, Saloua; Sarker, Malabika; De Brouwere, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    To understand the health-seeking behaviour of adolescent women in Bangladesh with respect to the use of maternal health services. Literature review of seven electronic databases: PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, PsycINFO, Embase, CINAHL, POPLINE and Global Health. Studies published in English between 1990 and 2013 which describe Bangladeshi adolescent women's healthcare-seeking behaviour during pregnancy, delivery and post-partum were included. Twelve studies were included in this review. 11 used quantitative methods and one used a mixed-methods approach. All studies included married adolescent women only. Women with lower educational levels are less likely to seek skilled maternal health services than those with higher levels of education. Use of maternal health services is also less common among rural married adolescent women than women in urban areas. Being part of the richest bands of wealth, having had previous experiences of childbirth and higher women's autonomy positively influence the use of skilled maternal health services among married adolescent women in Bangladesh. Antenatal care is a key predictor of the use of skilled birth attendants for delivery and post-natal care. Maternal health-related programmes should be designed targeting rural and uneducated married adolescent women in Bangladesh. More qualitative investigations are required to broaden our understanding on maternal health-seeking behaviour of both married and unmarried adolescent women. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Use of Physical Restraint in Norwegian Adult Psychiatric Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Background. The use of coercion within the psychiatric services is problematic and raises a range of ethical, legal, and clinical questions. "Physical restraint" is an emergency procedure used in psychiatric hospitals to control patients that pose an imminent physical danger. We wished to review the literature published in scientific peer-reviewed journals describing studies on the use of physical restraint in Norway, in order to identify the current state of knowledge and directions for future research. Design. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for studies relating to physical restraint (including holding) in Norwegian psychiatric hospitals, supplemented with hand searches. Results. 28 studies were included. Most of the studies were on rates of restraint, but there were also some studies on perceptions of patients and staff, case studies, and ethnographic studies. There was only one intervention study. There are differences in use between wards and institutions, which in part may be explained by differences in patient populations. Staff appear to be less negative to the use of restraint than patients. Conclusions. The studies that were identified were primarily concerned with rates of use and with patients' and staff's perspectives. More interventional studies are needed to move the field forward.

  10. A review of the scientific literature related to the adverse impact of physical restraint: gaining a clearer understanding of the physiological factors involved in cases of restraint-related death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Richard; Stirling, Chris; Pandyan, Anand D

    2012-07-01

    Deaths occurring during and/or in close proximity to physical restraint have been attributed to positional asphyxia, a conclusion primarily based on opinion and reviews of case studies. This review sought to identify the current scientific evidence available in regard to the aetiology of adverse events or death occurring during or in close proximity to physical restraint. A systematic search of electronic databases (SPORTDiscus, AMED, CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO) for papers published in English, between 1980 and 2011, using keywords that related to restraint, restraint position and cardiovascular function resulted in 11 experimental papers being found for review. The term positional asphyxia as a mechanism for sudden death is poorly understood. The literature shows that restraint position has the ability to impede life-maintaining physiological functions, but that the imposed impediment is not uniform across all restraint positions/techniques. Further research is required to ascertain the risks posed by struggling during restraint for more prolonged periods of time and in different positions using varied techniques of restraint. This research should seek to and rank known or future risk factors of adverse events occurring during restraint, seeking to understand the interactions and if present the cumulative effect of these risk factors. Finally, future research should focus on populations other than apparently healthy male adults.

  11. The Use of Physical Restraint in Norwegian Adult Psychiatric Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Wynn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of coercion within the psychiatric services is problematic and raises a range of ethical, legal, and clinical questions. “Physical restraint” is an emergency procedure used in psychiatric hospitals to control patients that pose an imminent physical danger. We wished to review the literature published in scientific peer-reviewed journals describing studies on the use of physical restraint in Norway, in order to identify the current state of knowledge and directions for future research. Design. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for studies relating to physical restraint (including holding in Norwegian psychiatric hospitals, supplemented with hand searches. Results. 28 studies were included. Most of the studies were on rates of restraint, but there were also some studies on perceptions of patients and staff, case studies, and ethnographic studies. There was only one intervention study. There are differences in use between wards and institutions, which in part may be explained by differences in patient populations. Staff appear to be less negative to the use of restraint than patients. Conclusions. The studies that were identified were primarily concerned with rates of use and with patients’ and staff’s perspectives. More interventional studies are needed to move the field forward.

  12. Promoting the early detection of cancer: a systematic review of community pharmacy-based education and screening interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Laura; Husband, Andy; Nazar, Hamde; Todd, Adam

    2015-10-01

    Given that the burden of cancer is set to increase globally, strategies are needed to improve the early detection of cancer. As such, increasing focus is now placed on promoting the early detection of cancer through education and screening interventions. One healthcare setting that has significant potential in delivering these approaches is the community pharmacy. This study aimed to systematically review the literature to identify and assess the current evidence for the role of community pharmacies in delivering early cancer detection initiatives. A systematic literature search of four databases was undertaken (Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO) from inception to June 2015 to identify peer-reviewed intervention studies. A total of 3711 articles were identified from the search, of which twelve were included in the review. The studies focused on a range of different cancers and showed it is feasible to recruit patients to education and screening interventions within a community pharmacy setting. However, the interventions were poorly described in the literature. There is significant potential for community pharmacy to deliver education and screening-based interventions to promote the early detection of cancer, but more evidence is needed to ascertain how interventions delivered in this setting impact on patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Illness perceptions, mood and quality of life: a systematic review of coronary heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxwell, Rachel; Morley, Chris; Frizelle, Dorothy

    2013-09-01

    To examine published literature investigating the relationship between illness perceptions, mood and quality of life (QoL) in coronary heart disease (CHD) populations. Key databases were systematically searched (CINAHL, Medline, PsycINFO, Scopus and Web of Science) for studies matching the inclusion criteria between November 2011 and February 2012. References of included studies were examined and key authors contacted. Studies were subject to a quality control check. 21 studies met the inclusion criteria. A synthesis of the results found that illness perceptions were correlated to and predicted QoL and mood across CHD diagnoses. Specific illness perceptions (control, coherence and timeline) were found to be important for patients that had experienced an unexpected medical event, such as myocardial infarction. The results of this study provide support that illness perceptions are related to outcomes across CHD populations and disease progression, however the results do not selectively support one particular model. Recommendations are consistent with cardiac rehabilitation guidelines. Further research should focus on the systemic impact of illness perceptions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Illness perception in patients with coronary artery disease: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Smadi, Ahmed Mohammad; Ashour, Ala; Hweidi, Issa; Gharaibeh, Besher; Fitzsimons, Donna

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review that investigates the differences in illness perception with age and gender in patients diagnosed with coronary artery disease. Previous studies show some discrepancies regarding the influence of age and gender on the specific dimensions of coronary artery disease patients' illness perception. A systematic review using a narrative synthesis process included preliminary synthesis, exploration of relationships and assessment of the robustness of the synthesis and findings was conducted. Search terms were used to identify research studies published between 1996 and December 2014 across four key databases: CINAHL, Medline, PsycINFO and Web of Science. A total of 14 studies met the inclusion criteria of the review. The review found that men had a stronger perception that their own behaviour had caused their illness than women. In addition, older patients had lower perceptions of the consequences and chronicity of their illness. This analysis concludes that some dimensions of illness perception vary according to age and gender of patients with coronary artery disease. These differences should be taken into consideration, particularly when providing health education and cardiac rehabilitation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Addressing the crisis of GP recruitment and retention: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Catherine; Peckham, Stephen

    2017-04-01

    The numbers of GPs and training places in general practice are declining, and retaining GPs in their practices is an increasing problem. To identify evidence on different approaches to retention and recruitment of GPs, such as intrinsic versus extrinsic motivational determinants. Synthesis of qualitative and quantitative research using seven electronic databases from 1990 onwards (Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Health Management Information Consortium [HMIC], Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (Cinahl), PsycINFO, and the Turning Research Into Practice [TRIP] database). A qualitative approach to reviewing the literature on recruitment and retention of GPs was used. The studies included were English-language studies from Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development countries. The titles and abstracts of 138 articles were reviewed and analysed by the research team. Some of the most important determinants to increase recruitment in primary care were early exposure to primary care practice, the fit between skills and attributes, and a significant experience in a primary care setting. Factors that seemed to influence retention were subspecialisation and portfolio careers, and job satisfaction. The most important determinants of recruitment and retention were intrinsic and idiosyncratic factors, such as recognition, rather than extrinsic factors, such as income. Although the published evidence relating to GP recruitment and retention is limited, and most focused on attracting GPs to rural areas, the authors found that there are clear overlaps between strategies to increase recruitment and retention. Indeed, the most influential factors are idiosyncratic and intrinsic to the individuals. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  16. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Laura S; Clark, Jodi; Colclough, Janette A; Dale, Elizabeth; McMillan, Dean

    2017-06-01

    Chronic pain places a burden on individuals and the economy. Although there is evidence for the effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy, it is recognized that the effects are limited. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), which aims to increase valued action in the presence of pain, has been suggested as an alternative approach. The objective of this review was to determine the clinical effectiveness of ACT for chronic pain in adults when compared with control conditions and other active treatments. The searches of this systematic review were conducted in the Cochrane library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus (EBSCO), and PsycINFO. Grey literature, reference list, and reverse citation searches were also completed. Eleven trials were included. ACT was favored over controls (no alternative intervention or treatment as usual). Significant, medium to large effect sizes were found for measures of pain acceptance and psychological flexibility, which are typically considered processes of ACT. Significant small to medium effect sizes were found for measures of functioning, anxiety, and depression. Measures of pain intensity and quality of life were not significantly different than zero. Generally effect sizes were smaller at follow-up. ACT was more clinically effective than controls on a number of outcomes. It is possible that methodological limitations, some of which are common to psychological trials, may have led to overestimated effects. Only a few studies compared ACT to active treatments and while the evidence is promising for ACT in the treatment of chronic pain, further methodologically robust trials are required.

  17. Locked doors in acute inpatient psychiatry: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, M; Bowers, L; Jones, J; Simpson, A; Haglund, K

    2009-04-01

    Many acute inpatient psychiatric wards in the UK are permanently locked, although this is contrary to the current Mental Health Act Code of Practice. To conduct a literature review of empirical articles concerning locked doors in acute psychiatric inpatient wards, an extensive literature search was performed in SAGE Journals Online, EBM Reviews, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, EMBASE Psychiatry, International Bibliography of the Social Sciences, Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Google, using the search terms 'open$', 'close$', '$lock$', 'door', 'ward', 'hospital', 'psychiatr', 'mental health', 'inpatient' and 'asylum'. A total of 11 empirical papers were included in the review. Both staff and patients reported advantages (e.g. preventing illegal substances from entering the ward and preventing patients from absconding and harming themselves or others) and disadvantages (e.g. making patients feel depressed, confined and creating extra work for staff) regarding locked doors. Locked wards were associated with increased patient aggression, poorer satisfaction with treatment and more severe symptoms. The limited literature available showed the urgent need for research to determine the real effects of locked doors in inpatient psychiatry.

  18. Homoparentalidade masculina: revisando a produção científica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurín Garcêz de Souza Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve por objetivo compreender de que modo a parentalidade homossexual masculina vem sendo investigada na literatura científica nacional e internacional. Por meio de uma revisão sistemática nas bases MedLine, SciELO, PsycINFO e CINAHL, de 2000 a 2011, foram recuperados 12 artigos. No contexto internacional, os estudos se concentram em delineamentos empíricos focalizando casais homossexuais e seus filhos. No Brasil, predominam estudos teóricos sobre a família homoparental. A Psicanálise emerge como principal referencial teórico. São necessárias pesquisas empíricas no contexto brasileiro, haja vista a aprovação da união estável entre pessoas do mesmo sexo e abertura de jurisprudência para adoção por esses casais. Outras abordagens teóricas são requeridas para que se possa compreender o contexto desenvolvimental das famílias e casais de mesmo sexo com crianças em um cenário social em permanente transformação.

  19. Sexual Abuse of Older Nursing Home Residents: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenche Malmedal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite an increasing literature related to elder abuse, sexual abuse of older persons in general and of vulnerable adults living in nursing homes in particular is still sparsely described. The purpose of this study was to assess the state of knowledge on the subject of sexual abuse against older nursing home residents through a literature review. Systematic searches in reference databases including Cinahl, Medline, OVID Nursing Database, ISI Web of Science, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and SveMed + were conducted. Through several phases of selection of the articles, using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, six articles were chosen for a deeper examination. Findings from the review show that sexual abuse occurs in nursing homes and that both older women and men are victims of sexual abuse. Perpetrators appear mainly to be staff and other residents and mainly to be men, but also women abuse both older men and older women. Findings from the literature review show that there is a need for knowledge and further research on the topic of sexual abuse against older residents in nursing homes. Furthermore, there is a need for good policies and reporting systems, as an important step in seriously addressing sexual abuse against older persons.

  20. Energy balance-related behaviours associated with overweight and obesity in preschool children: a systematic review of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Velde, S J; van Nassau, F; Uijtdewilligen, L; van Stralen, M M; Cardon, G; De Craemer, M; Manios, Y; Brug, J; Chinapaw, M J M

    2012-03-01

    The current review aimed to systematically identify dietary, physical activity and sedentary behaviours in preschool children (4-6 years of age) that are prospectively related to overweight or obesity later in childhood. Prospective studies published between January 1990 and June 2010 were selected from searches in PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Cochrane Library. Studies examining the prospective association between at least one relevant behaviour measured during preschool period (children aged 4-6 years at baseline) in relation to at least one anthropometric measurement at follow-up (age preschool children should focus on promotion of total physical activity and limitation of screen time and that further research is needed to establish whether and which dietary behaviours are important for obesity prevention in this age group. However, despite the lack of evidence for dietary behaviours from the present review, future interventions may already target specific dietary behaviours that are highly prevalent and for which there a clear rationale as well as preliminary evidence that these behaviours are associated with overweight.

  1. Identifying effective behavioural models and behaviour change strategies underpinning preschool- and school-based obesity prevention interventions aimed at 4-6-year-olds: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, C A; Moore, H J; Douthwaite, W; Gibson, E L; Vogele, C; Kreichauf, S; Wildgruber, A; Manios, Y; Summerbell, C D

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this comprehensive systematic review was to identify the most effective behavioural models and behaviour change strategies, underpinning preschool- and school-based interventions aimed at preventing obesity in 4-6-year-olds. Searching was conducted from April 1995 to April 2010 using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and The Cochrane Library. Epidemiological studies relevant to the research question with controlled assignment of participants were included in the review, if they had follow-up periods of 6 months or longer. Outcomes included markers of weight gain; markers of body composition; physical activity behaviour changes and dietary behaviour changes. Twelve studies were included in the review. The most commonly used model was social cognitive theory (SCT)/social learning theory (SLT) either as a single model or in combination with other behavioural models. Studies that used SCT/SLT in the development of the intervention had significant favourable changes in one, or more, outcome measures. In addition, interventions that (i) combined high levels of parental involvement and interactive school-based learning; (ii) targeted physical activity and dietary change; and (iii) included long-term follow-up, appeared most effective. It is suggested that interventions should also be focused on developing children's (and parents') perceived competence at making dietary and physical changes.

  2. Sleep and Cognition in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenna S. Brewster

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in sleep and cognition occur with advancing age. While both may occur independently of each other, it is possible that alterations in sleep parameters may increase the risk of age-related cognitive changes. This review aimed to understand the relationship between sleep parameters (sleep latency, wake after sleep onset, sleep efficiency, sleep duration, general sleep complaints and cognition in community-dwelling adults aged 60 years and older without sleep disorders. Systematic, computer-aided searches were conducted using multiple sleep and cognition-related search terms in PubMed, PsycINFO, and CINAHL. Twenty-nine manuscripts met the inclusion criteria. Results suggest an inconsistent relationship between sleep parameters and cognition in older adults and modifiers such as depressive symptoms, undiagnosed sleep apnea and other medical conditions may influence their association. Measures of sleep and cognition were heterogeneous. Future studies should aim to further clarify the association between sleep parameters and cognitive domains by simultaneously using both objective and subjective measures of sleep parameters. Identifying which sleep parameters to target may lead to the development of novel targets for interventions and reduce the risk of cognitive changes with aging.

  3. Mental health outcomes during colorectal cancer survivorship: a review of the literature.

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    Mosher, Catherine E; Winger, Joseph G; Given, Barbara A; Helft, Paul R; O'Neil, Bert H

    2016-11-01

    This article reviews literature on adults' mental health outcomes during acute and long-term colorectal cancer (CRC) survivorship. We identified articles that included at least one measure of psychological symptoms or mental quality of life or well-being through a search of databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and PsycARTICLES). Articles were published between January 2004 and April 2015. A significant proportion of CRC survivors experience clinically meaningful levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms or reduced mental well-being across the trajectory of the illness. Demographic, medical, and psychosocial predictors of mental health outcomes were identified. However, few studies were theory-driven, and gaps remain in our understanding of risk and protective factors with respect to mental health outcomes, especially during long-term CRC survivorship. Theory-driven longitudinal research with larger samples is required to identify subgroups of CRC survivors with different trajectories of psychological adjustment. Such research would assess adjustment as a function of internal resources (e.g., personality and coping) and external resources (e.g., finances and social support) to inform future interventions for CRC survivors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Non-pharmacological interventions to manage fatigue and psychological stress in children and adolescents with cancer: an integrative review.

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    Lopes-Júnior, L C; Bomfim, E O; Nascimento, L C; Nunes, M D R; Pereira-da-Silva, G; Lima, R A G

    2016-11-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is the most stressful and prevalent symptom in paediatric oncology patients. This integrative review aimed to identify, analyse and synthesise the evidence of non-pharmacological intervention studies to manage fatigue and psychological stress in a paediatric population with cancer. Eight electronic databases were used for the search: PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, LILACS, EMBASE, SCOPUS, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library. Initially, 273 articles were found; after the exclusion of repeated articles, reading of the titles, abstracts and the full articles, a final sample of nine articles was obtained. The articles were grouped into five categories: physical exercise, healing touch, music therapy, therapeutic massage, nursing interventions and health education. Among the nine studies, six showed statistical significance regarding the fatigue and/or stress levels, showing that the use of the interventions led to symptoms decrease. The most frequently tested intervention was programmed physical exercises. It is suggested that these interventions are complementary to conventional treatment and that their use can indicate an improvement in CRF and psychological stress.

  5. Effect of Music Therapy on Postoperative Pain Management in Gynecological Patients: A Literature Review.

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    Sin, Wai Man; Chow, Ka Ming

    2015-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may have a negative impact on the physiological and psychological well-being of patients. Pharmacological methods are currently used to relieve such pain in gynecological patients; however, inadequate pain control is still reported, and the use of nonpharmacological pain-relieving methods is increasingly being advocated, one of which is music therapy. The purpose of this literature review was to identify, summarize, and critically appraise current evidence on music therapy and postoperative pain management among gynecological patients. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, and Allied and Complementary Medicine was conducted using the search terms music, gynecological, pain, surgery, operative, and post-operative to identify relevant articles in English from 1995 to the present. All identified articles were assessed independently for inclusion into review. A total of 7 articles were included after removal of duplicates and exclusion of irrelevant studies. All the included studies assessed the effects of music therapy on postoperative pain intensity, and three of them measured pain-related physiological symptoms. The findings indicated that music therapy, in general, was effective in reducing pain intensity, fatigue, anxiety, and analgesic consumption in gynecological patients during the postoperative period. It is recommended as an adjunct to pharmacological pain-relieving methods in reducing postoperative pain. Future researches on music therapy to identify the most effective application and evaluate its effect by qualitative study are recommended.

  6. Research studies on patients' illness experience using the Narrative Medicine approach: a systematic review

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    Fioretti, Chiara; Mazzocco, Ketti; Oliveri, Serena; Masiero, Marianna; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Objective Since its birth about 30 years ago, Narrative Medicine approach has increased in popularity in the medical context as well as in other disciplines. This paper aims to review Narrative Medicine research studies on patients' and their caregivers' illness experience. Setting and participants MEDLINE, Psycinfo, EBSCO Psychological and Behavioural Science, The Cochrane Library and CINAHL databases were searched to identify all the research studies which focused on the Narrative Medicine approach reported in the title, in the abstract and in the keywords the words ‘Narrative Medicine’ or ‘Narrative-based Medicine’. Primary and secondary outcome measures: number of participants, type of disease, race and age of participants, type of study, dependent variables, intervention methods, assessment. Results Of the 325 titles screened, we identified 10 research articles fitting the inclusion criteria. Our systematic review showed that research on Narrative Medicine has no common specific methodology: narrative in Medicine is used as an intervention protocol as well as an assessment tool. Patients' characteristics, types of disease and data analysis procedures differ among the screened studies. Conclusions Narrative Medicine research in medical practice needs to find clear and specific protocols to deepen the impact of narrative on medical practice and on patients' lives. PMID:27417197

  7. The use of the bispectral index in the detection of pain in mechanically ventilated adults in the intensive care unit: A review of the literature

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    Coleman, Robin Marie; Tousignant-Laflamme, Yannick; Ouellet, Paul; Parenteau-Goudreault, Élizabeth; Cogan, Jennifer; Bourgault, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain assessment is an immense challenge for clinicians, especially in the context of the intensive care unit, where the patient is often unable to communicate verbally. Several methods of pain assessment have been proposed to assess pain in this environment. These include both behavioural observation scales and evaluation of physiological measurements such as heart rate and blood pressure. Although numerous validation studies pertaining to behavioural observation scales have been published, several limitations associated with using these measures for pain assessment remain. Over the past few years, researchers have been interested in the use of the bispectral index monitoring system as a proxy for the evaluation of encephalography readings to assess the level of anesthesia and, potentially, analgesia. OBJECTIVES: To synthesize the main studies exploring the use of the bispectral index monitoring system for pain assessment, to guide future research in adults under sedation in the intensive care unit. METHOD: The EMBASE, Medline, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases were searched for studies published between 1996 and 2013 that evaluated the use of the bispectral index in assessing pain. RESULTS: Most studies conclude that nociceptive stimulation causes a significant increase in the bispectral index and revealed the importance of controlling certain confounding variables such as the level of sedation. DISCUSSION: Further studies are needed to clearly demonstrate the relationship between nociceptive stimuli and the bispectral index, as well as the specificity of the bispectral index in detecting pain. PMID:25050877

  8. The impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Lindekilde, N; Gladstone, B P; Lübeck, M; Nielsen, J; Clausen, L; Vach, W; Jones, A

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to review the obesity literature in order to assess the impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life and the between-study variation by examining the standardized mean magnitude of effect in change in the levels of quality of life. The following databases EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and Web of Science were systematically searched for studies examining change in quality of life in adults receiving bariatric surgery for obesity. Seventy-two studies were included with a total of 9,433 participants treated for obesity with bariatric surgery. The average impact of bariatric surgery on quality of life corresponded to an effect size of 0.88 (95% CI: 0.80-0.96), indicating that bariatric surgery has a significant positive influence on quality of life in general. The impact varied considerably across studies with bariatric surgery showing a significantly greater positive influence on physical quality of life compared to mental quality of life. Bariatric surgery is effective in improving quality of life, especially when looking at physical well-being. Greater focus on the psychological well-being of the person undergoing surgery for obesity may lead to a better post-surgery prognosis for more people.

  9. Gender differences in the learning and teaching of surgery: a literature review

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    Josephson, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore evidence concerning gender differences in teaching and learning in surgery to guide future initiatives. Methods This systematic review was conducted searching in the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC, Web of Science, Scopus and PubMed. All studies related to gender differences in surgical education, teaching or learning of surgery at an undergraduate level were included. Data was extracted and critically appraised. Gender differences in learning, teaching, skills acquisition, perceptions and attitudes, interest on surgery, personality and factors influencing interest in surgical careers were differentiated. Results There is an underrepresentation of women in surgical academia, due to lack of role models and gender awareness. It is not clear whether or not gender itself is a factor that affects the learning of surgical tasks. Female students pursuing a surgical career had experienced sexual harassment and gender discrimination that can have an effect on the professional identity formation and specialty choice. There are differences in personality among female and male students interested in surgery. Gender is a determining factor to choose surgery, with a consistent lower proportion of women compared interested in pursuing a surgical career. Mentoring and personality fit are important in medical student’s specialty selection. Female students are more likely to be discouraged from pursuing a surgical career by a lack of female role models. Conclusions Bias against women in surgery still exists. There is a lack of studies that investigate the role of women in the teaching of surgery. PMID:25341220

  10. Prevalence and factors associated with disturbed sleep in patients with ankylosing spondylitis and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis: a systematic review.

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    Leverment, Shaaron; Clarke, Emily; Wadeley, Alison; Sengupta, Raj

    2017-02-01

    This review explores the prevalence and factors associated with disturbed sleep for patients with ankylosing spondylitis and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis in order to clarify consistent findings in this otherwise disparate research field. The association of physical, demographic and psychological factors correlating with poor sleep was explored, and the effectiveness of interventions assessed. Ten electronic databases were searched: AMED, CINAHL, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, OpenGrey and BASE. Following application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 29 articles were critically assessed on the basis of methodology, experimental design, ethics and quality of sleep data, leading to the selection of 15 studies for final review. Poor sleep was reported in 35-90% of patients with axial spondyloarthritis and is more prevalent within this clinical population compared to healthy control subjects. Disturbed sleep is an important aspect of disease for patients and reflects the severity of disease activity, pain, fatigue and functional disability. However, the direction of this relationship is undetermined. Associations with age, gender, years spent in education, quality of life and depression have also been demonstrated. Anti-TNF medication is effective in reducing poor sleep, and exercise has also produced beneficial results. Future research into poor sleep should take account of its multifactorial nature. There is also a current lack of research investigating non-pharmacological interventions or combination therapies. A standardised, validated measurement of poor sleep, appropriate for regular patient screening, would be a useful first step for future research.

  11. Parents' Attitudes toward Genetic Testing of Children for Health Conditions: A Systematic Review.

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    Lim, Qishan; McGill, Brittany C; Quinn, Veronica F; Tucker, Katherine M; Mizrahi, David; Farkas Patenaude, Andrea; Warby, Meera; Cohn, Richard J; Wakefield, Claire E

    2017-02-07

    This review assessed parents' attitudes toward childhood genetic testing for health conditions, with a focus on perceived advantages and disadvantages. We also evaluated the factors that influence parents' attitudes toward childhood genetic testing. We searched Medline, Medline In-Process, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Social Work Abstracts and CINAHL. We screened 945 abstracts and identified 21 studies representing the views of 3934 parents. Parents reported largely positive attitudes toward childhood genetic testing across different genetic tests with varying medical utility. Parents perceived a range of advantages and disadvantages of childhood genetic testing. Childhood genetic testing was viewed by most as beneficial. Parents' education level, genetic status, sex and socio-demographic status were associated with reported attitudes. This yielded some conflicting findings, indicating the need for further research. Genetic counseling remains essential to support this population in making well-informed decisions. Targeted interventions tailored to specific families with different socio-demographic characteristics may be useful. Further research on the long-term impact of childhood genetic testing on families is warranted.

  12. Immigrant Mental Health, A Public Health Issue: Looking Back and Moving Forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha George

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Mental Health Commission of Canada’s (MHCC strategy calls for promoting the health and wellbeing of all Canadians and to improve mental health outcomes. Each year, one in every five Canadians experiences one or more mental health problems, creating a significant cost to the health system. Mental health is pivotal to holistic health and wellbeing. This paper presents the key findings of a comprehensive literature review of Canadian research on the relationship between settlement experiences and the mental health and well-being of immigrants and refugees. A scoping review was conducted following a framework provided by Arskey and O’Malley (Int J Soc Res Methodol 8:19–32, 2005. Over two decades of relevant literature on immigrants’ health in Canada was searched. These included English language peer-reviewed publications from relevant online databases Medline, Embase, PsycInfo, Healthstar, ERIC and CINAHL between 1990 and 2015. The findings revealed three important ways in which settlement affects the mental health of immigrants and refugees: through acculturation related stressors, economic uncertainty and ethnic discrimination. The recommendations for public health practice and policy are discussed.

  13. Predonation psychosocial evaluation of living kidney and liver donor candidates: a systematic literature review.

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    Duerinckx, Nathalie; Timmerman, Lotte; Van Gogh, Johan; van Busschbach, Jan; Ismail, Sohal Y; Massey, Emma K; Dobbels, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating a person's suitability for living organ donation is crucial, consisting not only of a medical but also of a thorough psychosocial screening. We performed a systematic literature review of guidelines, consensus statements, and protocols on the content and process of psychosocial screening of living kidney and liver donor candidates. We searched PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO until June 22, 2011, following the PRISMA guidelines, complemented by scrutinizing guidelines databases and references of identified publications. Thirty-four publications were identified, including seven guidelines, six consensus statements, and 21 protocols or programs. Guidelines and consensus statements were inconsistent and lacked concreteness for both their content and process, possibly explaining the observed variability in center-specific evaluation protocols and programs. Overall, recommended screening criteria are not evidence-based and an operational definition of the concept "psychosocial" is missing, causing heterogeneity in terminology. Variation also exists on methods used to psychosocially evaluate potential donors. The scientific basis of predonation psychosocial evaluation needs to be strengthened. There is a need for high-quality prospective psychosocial outcome studies in living donors, a uniform terminology to label psychosocial screening criteria, and validated instruments to identify risk factors.

  14. Systematic review: complementary therapies and employee well-being.

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    Ravalier, J M; Wegrzynek, P; Lawton, S

    2016-08-01

    A variety of workplace-based interventions exist to reduce stress and increase productivity. However, the efficacy of these interventions is sometimes unclear. To determine whether complementary therapies offered in the workplace improve employee well-being. We performed a systematic literature review which involved an electronic search of articles published between January 2000 and July 2015 from the databases Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL Plus, EMBASE and PubMed. We also undertook a manual search of all applicable article reference lists to ensure that no relevant studies were missed. We only selected published, full-length, English-language, peer-reviewed journal articles. Articles had to address the research objective using valid and reliable measures. We excluded articles concerning return to work or whose populations had been adversely affected by work resulting in the development of health issues. We included 10 articles in the review from 131 identified. Mindfulness and meditation-based interventions were most effective in improving workplace health and work performance; the latter demonstrating some evidence of maintaining gains up to 3 months later. The evidence for relaxation interventions was inconclusive. Mindfulness and meditation interventions may be helpful in improving both psychosocial workplace health and work performance, but long-term efficacy has yet to be fully determined. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Virtual reality exposure therapy for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder: a methodological review using CONSORT guidelines.

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    Motraghi, Terri E; Seim, Richard W; Meyer, Eric C; Morissette, Sandra B

    2014-03-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) is an extension of traditional exposure therapy and has been used to treat a variety of anxiety disorders. VRET utilizes a computer-generated virtual environment to present fear-relevant stimuli. Recent studies have evaluated the use of VRET for treatment of PTSD; however, a systematic evaluation of the methodological quality of these studies has yet to be conducted. This review aims to (a) identify treatment outcome studies examining the use of VRET for the treatment of PTSD and (b) appraise the methodological quality of each study using the 2010 Consolidating Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) Statement and its 2008 extension for nonpharmacologic interventions. Two independent assessors conducted a database search (PsycINFO, Medline, CINAHL, Google Scholar) of studies published between January 1990 and June 2013 that reported outcome data comparing VRET with another type of treatment or a control condition. Next, a CONSORT quality appraisal of each study was completed. The search yielded nine unique studies. The CONSORT appraisal revealed that the methodological quality of studies examining VRET as a treatment for PTSD was variable. Although preliminary findings suggest some positive results for VRET as a form of exposure treatment for PTSD, additional research using well-specified randomization procedures, assessor blinding, and monitoring of treatment adherence is warranted. Movement toward greater standardization of treatment manuals, virtual environments, and equipment would further facilitate interpretation and consolidation of this literature. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A systematic review and comparison of functional assessments of community-dwelling elderly patients.

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    Roedl, Katie J; Wilson, Lindsay S; Fine, Julie

    2016-03-01

    To provide advanced practice nurses in primary care with information about self-reported functional assessments and physical performance-based functional assessments of geriatric patients living alone within the community at greatest risk of functional decline. Databases searched include CINAHL, Healthsource: Nursing/Academic Edition, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, Cochrane Library, and National Clearinghouse Guidelines. The review was limited to English, research, and the years 2000-2014. Key search words included geriatric, community-dwelling, functional assessment, activities and instrumental activities of daily living, Barthel Index, Katz Index, Lawton Scale, Vulnerable Elders Survey, Timed Up and Go Test, Gait Speed Test, Functional Reach Test, and primary care. Forty-three million individuals, age 65 and older, are currently living in the United States with numbers expected to double by 2050. Nurse practitioners will be at the forefront of assessing for functional decline and can use tools such as the Barthel Index and Gait Speed Test to improve elderly outcomes. Self-reported functional questionnaires and physical functional performance tests can quickly be completed in the office to track the risk of functional decline over time. Interventions, such as physical therapy or other community resources, can be initiated when needed to reduce negative outcomes of functional decline. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  17. [Structured review of activities of daily living measures in older people].

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    Cabañero-Martínez, M José; Cabrero-García, Julio; Richart-Martínez, Miguel; Muñoz-Mendoza, Carmen Luz

    2008-01-01

    the present article evaluates the evidence relating to the conceptual adaptation, applicability and psychometric properties of activities of daily living measures in Spanish elderly people. to obtain original documents, electronic searches were carried out in Spanish (IME and ISOC) and international databases (MEDLINE, PsycInfo, CINAHL and EMBASE). Manual searches and reference searches were also conducted. 34 articles relating to 4 instruments met the inclusion criteria: the Barthel Index, the Katz Index, the Red Cross Scale of Physical Disability and the Subscale of Personal Care Activities from the OARS. Overall, the results show a large number of versions for each instrument with weak transcultural adaptation processes and without standards for their administration or interpretation. The most frequently evaluated reliability measure was interrater reproducibility. The evidence on predictive validity is extensive, but the evidence on concurrent validity and responsiveness is almost nil. one version of the Barthel index and another one of the Katz index are the two versions about which the largest quantity of information has been obtained.

  18. Muscle Strength and Fitness in Pediatric Obesity: a Systematic Review from the European Childhood Obesity Group.

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    Thivel, David; Ring-Dimitriou, Susanne; Weghuber, Daniel; Frelut, Marie-Laure; O'Malley, Grace

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of paediatric obesity and related metabolic complications has been mainly associated with lower aerobic fitness while less is known regarding potential musculoskeletal impairments. The purpose of the present systematic review was to report the evidence regarding muscular fitness in children and adolescents with obesity. A systematic article search was conducted between November 2014 and June 2015 using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL psycINFO, SPORTDiscus and SocINDEX. Articles published in English and reporting results on muscle strength and muscular fitness in children and adolescents aged 6 to 18 years were eligible. Of 548 identified titles, 36 studies were included for analyses. While laboratory-based studies described higher absolute muscular fitness in youth with obesity compared with their lean peers, these differences are negated when corrected for body weight and lean mass, then supporting field-based investigations. All interventional studies reviewed led to improved muscular fitness in youth with obesity. Children and adolescents with obesity display impaired muscular fitness compared to healthy-weight peers, which seems mainly due to factors such as excessive body weight and increased inertia of the body. Our analysis also points out the lack of information regarding the role of age, maturation or sex in the current literature and reveals that routinely used field tests analysing overall daily muscular fitness in children with obesity provide satisfactory results when compared to laboratory-based data.

  19. Muscle Strength and Fitness in Pediatric Obesity: a Systematic Review from the European Childhood Obesity Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Thivel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of paediatric obesity and related metabolic complications has been mainly associated with lower aerobic fitness while less is known regarding potential musculoskeletal impairments. The purpose of the present systematic review was to report the evidence regarding muscular fitness in children and adolescents with obesity. A systematic article search was conducted between November 2014 and June 2015 using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL psycINFO, SPORTDiscus and SocINDEX. Articles published in English and reporting results on muscle strength and muscular fitness in children and adolescents aged 6 to 18 years were eligible. Of 548 identified titles, 36 studies were included for analyses. While laboratory-based studies described higher absolute muscular fitness in youth with obesity compared with their lean peers, these differences are negated when corrected for body weight and lean mass, then supporting field-based investigations. All interventional studies reviewed led to improved muscular fitness in youth with obesity. Children and adolescents with obesity display impaired muscular fitness compared to healthy-weight peers, which seems mainly due to factors such as excessive body weight and increased inertia of the body. Our analysis also points out the lack of information regarding the role of age, maturation or sex in the current literature and reveals that routinely used field tests analysing overall daily muscular fitness in children with obesity provide satisfactory results when compared to laboratory-based data.

  20. A systematic review on the factors associated with positive experiences in carers of someone with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J; Snowden, A

    2016-07-27

    The aim of this review was to identify the factors associated with positive experiences in non-professional carers of someone with a cancer diagnosis. A systematic search of the following electronic databases was undertaken: Cochrane Library, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SocINDEX and Medline. Literature was searched using terms relating to cancer, caring and positive experiences. Additional records were identified through a manual search of relevant reference lists. The search included studies published in English from 1990 to June 2015. Two raters were involved in data extraction, quality appraisal, coding, synthesis and analysis. Evolutionary concept analysis was used as a guiding framework in order to focus on attributes associated with positive experiences. Fifty-two articles were included in this review. Analysis identified four overarching attributes: "gender," "personal resources," "finding meaning" and "social context." Despite the challenges associated with caring, this combination of internal and external factors enabled some carers to report positive experiences related to caring. This knowledge may be clinically helpful when designing supportive interventions. Strengths and limitations of these claims are discussed. Systematic review registration number: CRD42014014129.

  1. Methods of evaluation of smell in victims of subarachnoid hemorrhage patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Sandro Júnior Henrique; Azevedo Filho, Hildo Rocha Cirne de; Silva, Hilton Justino da

    2016-01-01

    To systematically review the methods for evaluation of smell in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage victims and to identify the changes found with the use of these methods. The literature search was performed in PubMed search platform and in the databases Web of Science, Scopus, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and ScienceDirect in August and September 2014. Original articles published in any language, which addressed smell changes in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and addressed to evaluate this function through specific methods were included. Review studies, case studies, book chapters, editorial, and studies that address the nonaneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were excluded. The following variables were considered in data analysis: author/year, country, sample/age, treatment, method, the moment of smell evaluation, and results. The search for articles resulted in 1,763 articles, of which, 9 original articles were selected for this review. It was observed that all articles were from European and Asian countries. Standardized and nonstandardized tests and questionnaires were used in olfactory assessment, and the goals ranged from assessing the smell before and/or after surgery in this population. Heterogeneity was observed in the methods used to evaluate the smell in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and in the methods selected for application of evaluations. In addition, studies have demonstrated the existence of olfactory deficits in patients and the relationship between surgery and olfactory dysfunction.

  2. Dysmobility syndrome: current perspectives

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    Hill, Keith D; Farrier, Kaela; Russell, Melissa; Burton, Elissa

    2017-01-01

    Background A new term, dysmobility syndrome, has recently been described as a new approach to identify older people at risk of poor health outcomes. The aim was to undertake a systematic review of the existing research literature on dysmobility syndrome. Method All articles reporting dysmobility syndrome were identified in a systematic review of Medline (Proquest), CINAHL, PubMed, PsycInfo, EMBASE, and Scopus databases. Key characteristics of identified studies were extracted and summarized. Results The systematic review identified five papers (three cross-sectional, one case control, and one longitudinal study). No intervention studies were identified. Prevalence of dysmobility syndrome varied between studies (22%–34% in three of the studies). Dysmobility syndrome was shown to be associated with reduced function, increased falls and fractures, and a longitudinal study showed its significant association with mortality. Conclusion Early research on dysmobility syndrome indicates that it may be a useful classification approach to identify older people at risk of adverse health outcomes and to target for early interventions. Future research needs to standardize the optimal mix of measures and cut points, and investigate whether balance performance may be a more useful factor than history of falls for dysmobility syndrome. PMID:28144132

  3. A meta-analysis of the Val158Met COMT polymorphism and violent behavior in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay P Singh

    Full Text Available We conducted a meta-analysis of studies examining the association between the Val158Met COMT polymorphism and violence against others in schizophrenia. A systematic search current to November 1, 2011 was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ProQuest, and the National Criminal Justice Reference Service and identified 15 studies comprising 2,370 individuals with schizophrenia for inclusion. Bivariate analyses of study sensitivities and specificities were conducted. This methodology allowed for the calculation of pooled diagnostic odds ratios (DOR. Evidence of a significant association between the presence of a Met allele and violence was found such that men's violence risk increased by approximately 50% for those with at least one Met allele compared with homozygous Val individuals (DOR = 1.45; 95% CI = 1.05-2.00; z = 2.37, p = 0.02. No significant association between the presence of a Met allele and violence was found for women or when outcome was restricted to homicide. We conclude that male schizophrenia patients who carry the low activity Met allele in the COMT gene are at a modestly elevated risk of violence. This finding has potential implications for the pharmacogenetics of violent behavior in schizophrenia.

  4. Understanding the information needs of people with haematological cancers. A meta-ethnography of quantitative and qualitative research.

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    Atherton, K; Young, B; Salmon, P

    2017-02-10

    Clinical practice in haematological oncology often involves difficult diagnostic and treatment decisions. In this context, understanding patients' information needs and the functions that information serves for them is particularly important. We systematically reviewed qualitative and quantitative evidence on haematological oncology patients' information needs to inform how these needs can best be addressed in clinical practice. PsycINFO, Medline and CINAHL Plus electronic databases were searched for relevant empirical papers published from January 2003 to July 2016. Synthesis of the findings drew on meta-ethnography and meta-study. Most quantitative studies used a survey design and indicated that patients are largely content with the information they receive from physicians, however much or little they actually receive, although a minority of patients are not content with information. Qualitative studies suggest that a sense of being in a caring relationship with a physician allows patients to feel content with the information they have been given, whereas patients who lack such a relationship want more information. The qualitative evidence can help explain the lack of association between the amount of information received and contentment with it in the quantitative research. Trusting relationships are integral to helping patients feel that their information needs have been met. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Analyzing the concept of disruptive behavior in healthcare work: an integrative review*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Meneses Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To analyze the concept of disruptive behavior in healthcare work. METHOD An integrative review carried out in the theoretical phase of a qualitative research substantiated by the theoretical framework of the Hybrid Model of Concept Development. The search for articles was conducted in the CINAHL, LILACS, PsycINFO, PubMed and SciVerse Scopus databases in 2013. RESULTS 70 scientific articles answered the guiding question and lead to attributes of disruptive behavior, being: incivility, psychological violence and physical/sexual violence; with their main antecedents (intrapersonal, interpersonal and organizational being: personality characteristics, stress and work overload; and consequences of: workers' moral/mental distress, compromised patient safety, labor loss, and disruption of communication, collaboration and teamwork. CONCLUSION Analysis of the disruptive behavior concept in healthcare work showed a construct in its theoretical stage that encompasses different disrespectful conduct adopted by health workers in the hospital context, which deserve the attention of leadership for better recognition and proper handling of cases and their consequences.

  6. Emotional intelligence and affective events in nurse education: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gillian M; Neville, Christine; Ashkanasy, Neal M

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the current state of knowledge about emotional intelligence and affective events that arise during nursing students' clinical placement experiences. Narrative literature review. CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science, ERIC and APAIS-Health databases published in English between 1990 and 2016. Data extraction from and constant comparative analysis of ten (10) research articles. We found four main themes: (1) emotional intelligence buffers stress; (2) emotional intelligence reduces anxiety associated with end of life care; (3) emotional intelligence promotes effective communication; and (4) emotional intelligence improves nursing performance. The articles we analysed adopted a variety of emotional intelligence models. Using the Ashkanasy and Daus "three-stream" taxonomy (Stream 1: ability models; 2: self-report; 3: mixed models), we found that Stream 2 self-report measures were the most popular followed by Stream 3 mixed model measures. None of the studies we surveyed used the Stream 1 approach. Findings nonetheless indicated that emotional intelligence was important in maintaining physical and psychological well-being. We concluded that developing emotional intelligence should be a useful adjunct to improve academic and clinical performance and to reduce the risk of emotional distress during clinical placement experiences. We call for more consistency in the use of emotional intelligence tests as a means to create an empirical evidence base in the field of nurse education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effective training strategies for teaching communication skills to physicians: an overview of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkhof, Marianne; van Rijssen, H Jolanda; Schellart, Antonius J M; Anema, Johannes R; van der Beek, Allard J

    2011-08-01

    Physicians need good communication skills to communicate effectively with patients. The objective of this review was to identify effective training strategies for teaching communication skills to qualified physicians. PubMED, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and COCHRANE were searched in October 2008 and in March 2009. Two authors independently selected relevant reviews and assessed their methodological quality with AMSTAR. Summary tables were constructed for data-synthesis, and results were linked to outcome measures. As a result, conclusions about the effectiveness of communication skills training strategies for physicians could be drawn. Twelve systematic reviews on communication skills training programmes for physicians were identified. Some focused on specific training strategies, whereas others emphasized a more general approach with mixed strategies. Training programmes were effective if they lasted for at least one day, were learner-centred, and focused on practising skills. The best training strategies within the programmes included role-play, feedback, and small group discussions. Training programmes should include active, practice-oriented strategies. Oral presentations on communication skills, modelling, and written information should only be used as supportive strategies. To be able to compare the effectiveness of training programmes more easily in the future, general agreement on outcome measures has to be established. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Health-related quality of life in patients with cutaneous rosacea: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Mireille M D; van Rappard, Dominique C; Daams, Joost G; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Spuls, Phyllis I; de Korte, John

    2015-04-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of rosacea patients is a relevant outcome measure in research and clinical practice. A review of the literature was systematically carried out regarding levels of HRQoL of patients with rosacea, including associations between HRQoL scores, demographic and clinical characteristics. Searches were performed in Cochrane, PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and LILACS. HRQoL studies in patients with cutaneous rosacea, using validated HRQoL instruments, published between 1991 and 2014, were included. Data extraction was performed independently by 2 authors. Study design, demographics, clinical characteristics and HRQoL scores were summarized per HRQoL questionnaire. Associations between HRQoL, demographic and clinical characteristics were explored. Out of 984 references, 12 studies were included. Three HRQoL instruments were used: Short Form-36 (SF-36), Dermatology Life Questionnaire Index (DLQI) and Rosacea Quality of Life Index (RosaQoL). Because of the heterogeneity of the included studies, data synthesis was hardly feasible. All studies reported a negative impact on HRQoL, which appeared to be associated with disease severity and age. Results regarding the association with sex and subtype were mixed. With regard to the clinical relevance of HRQoL scores of rosacea patients, it seems that rosacea has a small to moderate effect on HRQoL.

  9. Resilience of primary healthcare professionals: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Helen D; Elliott, Alison M; Burton, Christopher; Iversen, Lisa; Murchie, Peter; Porteous, Terry; Matheson, Catriona

    2016-01-01

    Background Modern demands and challenges among healthcare professionals can be particularly stressful and resilience is increasingly necessary to maintain an effective, adaptable, and sustainable workforce. However, definitions of, and associations with, resilience have not been examined within the primary care context. Aim To examine definitions and measures of resilience, identify characteristics and components, and synthesise current evidence about resilience in primary healthcare professionals. Design and setting A systematic review was undertaken to identify studies relating to the primary care setting. Method Ovid®, Embase®, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Scopus databases were searched in December 2014. Text selections and data extraction were conducted by paired reviewers working independently. Data were extracted on health professional resilience definitions and associated factors. Results Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria: eight were quantitative, four qualitative, and one was an intervention study. Resilience, although multifaceted, was commonly defined as involving positive adaptation to adversity. Interactions were identified between personal growth and accomplishment in resilient physicians. Resilience, high persistence, high self-directedness, and low avoidance of challenges were strongly correlated; resilience had significant associations with traits supporting high function levels associated with demanding health professional roles. Current resilience measures do not allow for these different aspects in the primary care context. Conclusion Health professional resilience is multifaceted, combining discrete personal traits alongside personal, social, and workplace features. A measure for health professional resilience should be developed and validated that may be used in future quantitative research to measure the effect of an intervention to promote it. PMID:27162208

  10. Measuring patient experience: a systematic review to evaluate psychometric properties of patient reported experience measures (PREMs) for emergency care service provision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male, Leanne; Noble, Adam; Atkinson, Jessica; Marson, Tony

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge about patient experience within emergency departments (EDs) allows services to develop and improve in line with patient needs. There is no standardized instrument to measure patient experience. The aim of this study is to identify patient reported experience measures (PREMs) for EDs, examine the rigour by which they were developed and their psychometric properties when judged against standard criteria. Medline, Scopus, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PubMed and Web of Science were searched from inception to May 2015. Studies were identified using specific search terms and inclusion criteria. A total of eight articles, reporting on four PREMs, were included. Data on the development and performance of the four PREMs were extracted from the articles. The measures were critiqued according to quality criteria previously described by Pesudovs K, Burr JM, Harley C, et al. (The development, assessment, and selection of questionnaires. Optom Vis Sci 2007;84:663-74.). There was significant variation in the quality of development and reporting of psychometric properties. For all four PREMs, initial development work included the ascertainment of patient experiences using qualitative interviews. However, instrument performance was poorly assessed. Validity and reliability were measured in some studies; however responsiveness, an important aspect on survey development, was not measured in any of the included studies. PREMS currently available for use in the ED have uncertain validity, reliability and responsiveness. Further validation work is required to assess their acceptability to patients and their usefulness in clinical practice.

  11. Diffusion and dissemination of evidence-based dietary strategies for the prevention of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciliska, D; Robinson, P; Horsley, T; Ellis, P; Brouwers, M; Gauld, M; Baldassarre, F; Raina, P

    2006-08-01

    We used a systematic review to identify strategies that have been evaluated for disseminating cancer control interventions that promote the uptake of a healthy diet in adults. Studies were identified by contacting technical experts and by searching MEDLINE, PreMedline, CANCERLIT, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, Psycinfo, cinahl, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists. English-language primary studies were selected if they evaluated the dissemination of healthy diet interventions to individuals, health care providers, or institutions. Studies involving only children or adolescents were excluded.We retrieved 101 articles for full-text screening, and identified nine reports of seven distinct studies. Four of the studies were randomized trials, one was a cohort design, and three were descriptive studies. Six of the studies were rated methodologically weak, and one was rated moderate. Because of heterogeneity, low methodological quality, and incomplete data reporting, the studies were not pooled for meta-analysis. No beneficial dissemination strategies were found. One strategy involving the use of peer educators at the work site, which led to a short-term increase in fruit and vegetable intake, looks promising.Overall, the quality of the evidence is not strong, and the evidence that exists is more descriptive than evaluative. No clear conclusions can be drawn from these data. Controlled studies are needed to evaluate dissemination strategies and to compare dissemination and diffusion strategies that communicate different messages and target different audiences.

  12. Self-directed interventions to promote weight loss: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jason C H; Abraham, Charles; Greaves, Colin J; Nikolaou, Vasilis

    2016-09-01

    Many self-directed weight-loss interventions have been developed using a variety of delivery formats (e.g., internet and smartphone) and change techniques. Yet, little research has examined whether self-directed interventions can exclusively promote weight loss. MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library were systematically reviewed for randomised controlled trials evaluating self-directed interventions in relation to weight-loss outcomes in adults. Standardised mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a random effects model. Twenty-seven trials incorporating 36 comparisons met our inclusion criteria. Participants using self-directed interventions lost significantly more weight (MD = -1.56 kg, CI -2.25, -0.86 ranging from 0.6 to 5.3 kg) compared to those in the minimal intervention or no-treatment groups (3.1-month follow-up median). The majority of interventions were internet based (18 evaluations) and these were effective at 3 months (MD = -1.74 kg, CI -2.65, -0.82 ranging from 0.6 to 4.8 kg) (SMD = -0.48, 95% CI -0.72, -0.24, I(2) = 82%; p interventions can generate modest weight loss for up to 6 months but may need to be supplemented by other interventions to achieve sustained and clinically meaningful weight loss.

  13. Self-care management strategies among individuals living with type 2 diabetes mellitus: nursing interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunt CW

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Caralise W HuntAuburn University School of Nursing, Auburn, AL, USAAbstract: Nurses provide care for individuals living with diabetes in a variety of areas. Nursing interventions assist individuals living with diabetes to manage diabetes and can positively affect outcomes. This article describes an integrated literature review conducted to evaluate and summarize nursing interventions and research in self-management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane database were searched for the years 2002–2013 using the search terms “diabetes”, “type 2 diabetes”, “self-care”, “self-management”, “diabetes self-management”, “intervention”, and “nursing”. Results from the review indicate that nurses deliver care independently and in conjunction with other health care providers for individuals living with diabetes. A majority of the reviewed studies included a nursing education intervention for patients living with diabetes. Nursing interventions are linked to improvements in diabetes knowledge, self-management behaviors, and physiologic and psychologic outcomes.Keywords: type 2 diabetes mellitus, self-care management, nursing interventions

  14. A model linking uncertainty, post-traumatic stress, and health behaviors in childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Ling; Gau, Bih-Shya; Hsu, Wen-Ming; Chang, Hsiu-Hao

    2009-01-01

    To consolidate the literature and provide a model to explain the links among uncertainty, post-traumatic stress syndrome, and health behaviors in adolescent and young adult childhood cancer survivors. A systemic review of related literature and theory was used for the proposed model. The literature pertaining to the Uncertainty in Illness Theory, childhood cancer late effects, post-traumatic stress, and health behaviors was reviewed and critiqued from three data sets from 1979-2007: MEDLINE, PsycInfo, and CINAHL. Key words used for the search were uncertainty and post-traumatic stress as well as health behaviors, including smoking, alcohol use, unsafe sex, sunscreen use, and physical inactivity. Childhood cancer survivors living with chronic uncertainty may develop a new view of life and, as a result, adopt more health-promotion behaviors and engage in less health-risk behaviors. However, survivors living with chronic uncertainty may generate symptoms similar to post-traumatic stress disorder and, therefore, adopt fewer health-promotion behaviors and engage in more health-risk behaviors. The uncertainty that pervades the childhood cancer experience can lead to the development of symptoms that resemble those of post-traumatic stress. The symptoms can interfere with the adoption of healthy lifestyle behaviors and avoidance of health-risk behaviors. The theoretically derived model outlined in this article can be used to guide clinical interventions and additional research into the health behaviors of childhood cancer survivors.

  15. Psychological treatments for adults with posttraumatic stress disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, Karen; Jonas, Daniel E; Forneris, Catherine A; Wines, Candi; Sonis, Jeffrey; Middleton, Jennifer Cook; Feltner, Cynthia; Brownley, Kimberly A; Olmsted, Kristine Rae; Greenblatt, Amy; Weil, Amy; Gaynes, Bradley N

    2016-02-01

    Numerous guidelines have been developed over the past decade regarding treatments for Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, given differences in guideline recommendations, some uncertainty exists regarding the selection of effective PTSD therapies. The current manuscript assessed the efficacy, comparative effectiveness, and adverse effects of psychological treatments for adults with PTSD. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, PILOTS, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the Web of Science. Two reviewers independently selected trials. Two reviewers assessed risk of bias and graded strength of evidence (SOE). We included 64 trials; patients generally had severe PTSD. Evidence supports efficacy of exposure therapy (high SOE) including the manualized version Prolonged Exposure (PE); cognitive therapy (CT), cognitive processing therapy (CPT), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)-mixed therapies (moderate SOE); eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) and narrative exposure therapy (low-moderate SOE). Effect sizes for reducing PTSD symptoms were large (e.g., Cohen's d ~-1.0 or more compared with controls). Numbers needed to treat (NNTs) were PTSD diagnosis for exposure therapy, CPT, CT, CBT-mixed, and EMDR. Several psychological treatments are effective for adults with PTSD. Head-to-head evidence was insufficient to determine these treatments' comparative effectiveness, and data regarding adverse events was absent from most studies.

  16. Effective lifestyle interventions to improve type II diabetes self-management for those with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cimo Adriana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of type II diabetes among individuals suffering from schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders is more than double that of the general population. By 2005, North American professional medical associations of Psychiatry, Diabetes, and Endocrinology responded by recommending continuous metabolic monitoring for this population to control complications from obesity and diabetes. However, these recommendations do not identify the types of effective treatment for people with schizophrenia who have type II diabetes. To fill this gap, this systematic evidence review identifies effective lifestyle interventions that enhance quality care in individuals who are suffering from type II diabetes and schizophrenia or other schizoaffective disorders. Methods A systematic search from Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Science was conducted. Of the 1810 unique papers that were retrieved, four met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were analyzed. Results The results indicate that diabetes education is effective when it incorporates diet and exercise components, while using a design that addresses challenges such as cognition, motivation, and weight gain that may result from antipsychotics. Conclusions This paper begins to point to effective interventions that will improve type II diabetes management for people with schizophrenia or other schizoaffective disorders.

  17. Systematic Review of Inspiratory Muscle Training After Cerebrovascular Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Valero, Rocío; De La Casa Almeida, Maria; Casuso-Holgado, Maria Jesus; Heredia-Madrazo, Alfonso

    2015-11-01

    This systematic review examines levels of evidence and recommendation grades of various therapeutic interventions of inspiratory muscle training in people who have had a stroke. Benefits from different levels of force and resistance in respiratory muscles are shown in this population. This review was conducted following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) directives and was completed in November 2014. The search limits were studies published in English between 2004 and 2014. Relevant studies were searched for in MEDLINE, PEDro, OAIster, Scopus, PsycINFO, Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, DOAJ, Cochrane, Embase, Academic Search Complete, Fuente Académica, and MedicLatina. Initially, 20 articles were identified. After analyzing all primary documents, 14 studies were excluded. Only 6 studies were relevant to this review. Three different types of interventions were found (maximum inspiratory training, controlled training, and nonintervention) in 3 different groups. One specific study compared 3 inspiratory muscle training groups with a group of breathing exercises (diaphragmatic exercises with pursed lips) and a control group. Future long-term studies with larger sample sizes are needed. It is necessary to apply respiratory muscle training as a service of the national health system and to consider its inclusion in the conventional neurological program.

  18. Governance and mental health: contributions for public policy approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Castro, Lina; Arredondo, Armando; Pelcastre-Villafuerte, Blanca Estela; Hufty, Marc

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the conceptualization of the term governance on public mental health programs. METHODS In this systematic review, we analyzed the scientific literature published in the international scenario during 15 years (from 2000 to 2015). The databases analyzed were: Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO and PubMed. Governance and mental health were the descriptors. We included relevant articles according to our subject of study and levels of analysis: (i) the concept of governance in mental health; (ii) process and decision spaces; (iii) strategic and pertinent actors who operate in the functioning of the health system, and (iv) social regulations. We excluded letters to the editor, news articles, comments and case reports, incomplete articles and articles whose approach did not include the object of study of this review. RESULTS We have found five conceptualizations of the term governance on mental health in the area of provision policies and service organization. The agents were both those who offer and those who receive the services: we identified several social norms. CONCLUSIONS The concept of governance in mental health includes standards of quality and attention centered on the patient, and incorporates the consumers of mental healthcare in the decision-making process. PMID:28146159

  19. Cognitive, language, social and behavioural outcomes in adults with autism spectrum disorders: a systematic review of longitudinal follow-up studies in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiati, Iliana; Tay, Xiang Wei; Howlin, Patricia

    2014-02-01

    Although increasing numbers of children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are now entering adolescence and adulthood, there is limited research on outcomes post childhood. A systematic review of the existing literature was conducted. PsycINFO, PubMed, MedLine and CINAHL were systematically searched using keywords related to ASD and adolescent and adult outcomes. Studies of individuals diagnosed with ASD in childhood and followed up into adulthood were identified and reviewed. Only studies with samples sizes >10, mean age at outcome >16 years and at least one previous assessment in childhood (cognitive ability and language skills remained relatively stable in some studies, others reported deterioration over time. Adaptive functioning tended to improve in most studies. Diagnosis of autism or ASD was generally stable, although severity of autism-related behavioural symptoms was often reported to improve. Childhood IQ and early language ability appeared to be the strongest predictors of later outcome, but few studies examined other early variables associated with adult functioning. Implications of the findings are discussed in relation to methodological challenges in longitudinal outcome research and future research directions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Evidence-based interventions to reduce adverse events in hospitals: a systematic review of systematic reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers, Marieke; Hesselink, Gijs; Geense, Wytske; Vincent, Charles; Wollersheim, Hub

    2016-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of effective interventions aimed at reducing rates of adverse events in hospitals. Design Systematic review of systematic reviews. Data sources PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE were searched for systematic reviews published until October 2015. Study selection English-language systematic reviews of interventions aimed at reducing adverse events in hospitals, including studies with an experimental design and reporting adverse event rates, were included. Two reviewers independently assessed each study's quality and extracted data on the study population, study design, intervention characteristics and adverse patient outcomes. Results Sixty systematic reviews with moderate to high quality were included. Statistically significant pooled effect sizes were found for 14 types of interventions, including: (1) multicomponent interventions to prevent delirium; (2) rapid response teams to reduce cardiopulmonary arrest and mortality rates; (3) pharmacist interventions to reduce adverse drug events; (4) exercises and multicomponent interventions to prevent falls; and (5) care bundle interventions, checklists and reminders to reduce infections. Most (82%) of the significant effect sizes were based on 5 or fewer primary studies with an experimental study design. Conclusions The evidence for patient-safety interventions implemented in hospitals worldwide is weak. The findings address the need to invest in high-quality research standards in order to identify interventions that have a real impact on patient safety. Interventions to prevent delirium, cardiopulmonary arrest and mortality, adverse drug events, infections and falls are most effective and should therefore be prioritised by clinicians. PMID:27687901

  1. A Systematic Review of Research on Autism Spectrum Disorders in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Abubakar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA is not well known. We carried out a systematic review of the literature to identify published work from SSA. We have systematically searched four databases, namely, Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Child Development & Adolescent Studies, through EBSCO and identified studies from across SSA. Based on predefined inclusion criteria, 47 studies were included in this review. Most of the identified studies (74% were conducted in only 2 African countries, that is, South Africa and Nigeria. Additionally, most of these studies (83% were carried out in the last decade. These studies had four major themes: development of measurement tools of ASD in Africa, examining the prevalence of ASD, identifying risk factors and risk markers, and examining psychosocial issues. We identified only a single population level study aimed at documenting the prevalence of ASD and could not identify a single case-control study aimed at examining a comprehensive set of potential risk factors. All intervention studies were based on very small sample sizes. Put together, our findings suggest that current evidence base is too scanty to provide the required information to plan adequately for effective intervention strategies for children with ASD in Africa.

  2. Instruments for the assessment of suicide risk: A systematic review evaluating the certainty of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runeson, Bo; Odeberg, Jenny; Pettersson, Agneta; Edbom, Tobias; Jildevik Adamsson, Ingalill; Waern, Margda

    2017-01-01

    Instruments have been developed to facilitate suicide risk assessment. We aimed to evaluate the evidence for these instruments including assessment of risk of bias and diagnostic accuracy for suicide and suicide attempt. PubMed (NLM), PsycInfo, Embase, Cinahl and the Cochrane Library databases were searched until December 2014. We assessed risk of bias with QUADAS-2. The average sensitivity and specificity of each instrument was estimated and the certainty of the evidence was assessed with GRADE. We considered instruments with a sensitivity > 80% and a specificity > 50% to have sufficient diagnostic accuracy. Thirty-five relevant studies were identified but 14 were considered to have high risk of bias, leaving 21 studies evaluating altogether 15 risk assessment instruments. We could carry out meta-analyses for five instruments. For the outcome suicide attempt SAD PERSONS Scale had a sensitivity of 15% (95% CI 8-24) and specificity of 97% (96-98), and the Manchester Self-Harm Rule (MSHR) a sensitivity of 97% (97-97) and a specificity of 20% (20-21). ReACT, which is a modification of MSHR, had a similar low specificity, as did the Sodersjukhuset Self Harm Rule. For the outcome suicide, the Beck Hopelessness Scale had a sensitivity of 89% (78-95) and specificity of 42% (40-43). Most suicide risk assessment instruments were supported by too few studies to allow for evaluation of accuracy. Among those that could be evaluated, none fulfilled requirements for sufficient diagnostic accuracy.

  3. A systematic review on critical thinking in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2016-04-18

    Critical thinking is the ability to raise discriminating questions in an attempt to search for better ideas, a deeper understanding and better solutions relating to a given issue. This systematic review provides a summary of efforts that have been made to enhance and assess critical thinking in medical education. Nine databases [Ovid MEDLINE(R), AMED, Academic Search Premier, ERIC, CINAHL, Web of Science, JSTOR, SCOPUS and PsycINFO] were searched to identify journal articles published from the start of each database to October 2012. A total of 41 articles published from 1981 to 2012 were categorised into two main themes: (i) evaluation of current education on critical thinking and (ii) development of new strategies about critical thinking. Under each theme, the teaching strategies, assessment tools, uses of multimedia and stakeholders were analysed. While a majority of studies developed teaching strategies and multimedia tools, a further examination of their quality and variety could yield some insights. The articles on assessment placed a greater focus on learning outcomes than on learning processes. It is expected that more research will be conducted on teacher development and students' voices.

  4. Health care provider social network analysis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sung-Heui; Nikolaev, Alexander; Seo, Jin Young; Castner, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in understanding networks, their structure, and their development, little has been known about their effectiveness in the health care setting and their contributions to quality of care and patient safety.The purpose of this study was to examine studies using social network analysis (SNA) in the health care workforce and assess factors contributing to social network and their relationships with care processes and patient outcomes. We identified all published peer-reviewed SNA articles in CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, JSTOR, Medline (OVID), and Web of Science databases up to April 2013. Twenty-nine published articles met the inclusion criteria. Current evidence of the health care workforce's social networks reveals the nature of social ties are related to personal characteristics, practice setting, and types of patients. A few studies also revealed the social network effects adoption and the use of a health information system, patient outcomes, and coordination. Current studies on the social ties of health care workforce professionals include several assessments of inefficiencies. The level of technical sophistication in these studies tended to be low. Future study using enhanced sophistication in study design, analysis, and patient outcome testing are warranted to fully leverage the potential of SNA in health care studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A systematic review of the effectiveness of smartphone applications that encourage dietary self-regulatory strategies for weight loss in overweight and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semper, H M; Povey, R; Clark-Carter, D

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to systematically review the evidence to explore whether smartphone applications that use self-regulatory strategies are beneficial for weight loss in overweight and obese adults over the age of 18 years. Sixteen electronic databases were searched for articles published up to April 2015 including MEDLINE, OVID, Ingenta, PSYCARTICLES and PSYCINFO, CINAHL, Sportdiscus, Science Direct, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Library, JSTOR, EBSCO, Proquest, Wiley and Google Scholar. Twenty nine eligible studies were retrieved of which six studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies that recruited participants under the age of 18 years, adults with a chronic condition or did not report weight loss outcomes were excluded. Study findings were combined using a narrative synthesis. Overall, evidence suggests that smartphone applications may be a useful tool for self-regulating diet for weight loss as participants in the smartphone application group in all studies lost at least some bodyweight. However, when compared to other self-monitoring methods, there was no significant difference in the amount of weight lost. Findings should be interpreted with caution based on the design of the studies and the comparator groups used. Future research needs to be more methodologically rigorous and incorporate measures of whether eating habits become healthier in addition to measuring weight and BMI. © 2016 World Obesity.

  6. Decision Making in Nursing Practice: A Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mary L; O'Brien, Janice L

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to gain an understanding of the concept of decision making as it relates to the nurse practice environment. Rodgers' evolutionary method on concept analysis was used as a framework for the study of the concept. Articles from 1952 to 2014 were reviewed from PsycINFO, Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), JSTOR, PubMed, and Science Direct. Findings suggest that decision making in the nurse practice environment is a complex process, integral to the nursing profession. The definition of decision making, and the attributes, antecedents, and consequences, are discussed. Contextual factors that influence the process are also discussed. An exemplar is presented to illustrate the concept. Decision making in the nurse practice environment is a dynamic conceptual process that may affect patient outcomes. Nurses need to call upon ways of knowing to make sound decisions and should be self-reflective in order to develop the process further in the professional arena. The need for further research is discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Multisource feedback to assess pediatric practice: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samah Al Alawi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The assessment and maintenance of competence for pediatricians has recently received increased attention. The aim of the present study was to investigate further the use of multisource feedback for assessing pediatricians in practice. Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted using the electronic databases EMBASE, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, PUBMED, and CINAHL for English-language articles. Results: 762 articles were identified with the initial search and 756 articles were excluded for a total of six studies that met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. Internal consistency reliability was reported in five studies with α > 0.95 for both subscales and full scales. Generalizability was also reported in two studies with Ep2 generally > 0.78. These adequate Ep2 coefficients were achieved with different numbers of raters. Evidence for content, criterion-related (e.g., Pearson’s r and construct validity (e.g., principal component factor analysis was reported in all 6 studies. Conclusion: Multisource feedback is a feasible, reliable, and valid method to assess pediatricians in practice. The results indicate that multisource feedback system can be used to assess key competencies such as communication skills, interpersonal skills, collegiality, and medical expertise. Further implementation of multisource feedback is desirable.

  8. Behavioral intervention to promote smoking cessation and prevent weight gain: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Bonnie; Howe, Dorothea; Berendsen, Mark; McFadden, H. Gene; Hitchcock, Kristin; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Hitsman, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Aims The prospect of weight gain discourages many cigarette smokers from quitting. Practice guidelines offer varied advice about managing weight gain after quitting smoking, but no systematic review and meta-analysis have been available. We reviewed evidence to determine whether behavioral weight control intervention compromises smoking cessation attempts, and if it offers an effective way to reduce post-cessation weight gain. Methods We identified randomized controlled trials that compared combined smoking treatment and behavioral weight control to smoking treatment alone for adult smokers. English-language studies were identified through searches of PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Of 779 articles identified and 35 potentially relevant RCTs screened, 10 met criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Results Patients who received both smoking treatment and weight treatment showed increased abstinence (OR=1.29, 95% CI=1.01,1.64) and reduced weight gain (g = -0.30, 95% CI=-0.63, -0.04) in the short term (6 months). Conclusions Findings provide no evidence that combining smoking treatment and behavioral weight control produces any harm and significant evidence of short-term benefit for both abstinence and weight control. However, the absence of long-term enhancement of either smoking cessation or weight control by the time-limited interventions studied to date provides insufficient basis to recommend societal expenditures on weight gain prevention treatment for patients who are quitting smoking. PMID:19549058

  9. Systematic review of factors associated with depression and anxiety disorders among older adults with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagna, Atami; Gallo, Joseph J; Pontone, Gregory M

    2014-07-01

    Depression and anxiety disorders have a substantial impact on the quality of life, the functioning and mortality of older adults with Parkinson's disease (PD). The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the factors associated with the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders among individuals with PD aged 60 years and older. Following a literature search in PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and EMBASE, 5 articles met the inclusion criteria (adults aged 60 years and older, individuals with PD, and with depression and anxiety disorders, and English-language peer reviewed articles) and were included in this review. These studies were conducted in the U.S (n = 3), in Italy (n = 1) and the U.K (n = 1). Findings indicated that autonomic symptoms, motor fluctuations, severity and frequency of symptoms, staging of the disease, and PD onset and duration were associated with the prevalence of depression and anxiety disorders among older adults suffering from PD. Despite the limited number of studies included in the review, depression and anxiety disorders are often unrecognized and untreated and the comorbidity greatly exacerbates PD symptoms. The identification of factors associated with the development of depression and anxiety disorders could help in designing preventive interventions that would decrease the risk and burden of depression and anxiety disorders among older adults with PD.

  10. The State of the Science on Sensory Factors and Their Impact on Daily Life for Children: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Winnie; Little, Lauren; Dean, Evan; Robertson, Sara; Evans, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and synthesize research about how sensory factors affect daily life of children. We designed a conceptual model to guide a scoping review of research published from 2005 to October 2014 (10 years). We searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO and included studies about sensory perception/processing; children, adolescents/young adults; and participation. We excluded studies about animals, adults, and review articles. Our process resulted in 261 articles meeting criteria. Research shows that children with conditions process sensory input differently than peers. Neuroscience evidence supports the relationship between sensory-related behaviors and brain activity. Studies suggest that sensory processing is linked to social participation, cognition, temperament, and participation. Intervention research illustrates the importance of contextually relevant practices. Future work can examine the developmental course of sensory processing aspects of behavior across the general population and focus on interventions that support children's sensory processing as they participate in their daily lives. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Awareness Deficits in Children and Adolescents After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Owen; Ownsworth, Tamara; Fleming, Jennifer; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review empirical research on awareness deficits in children and adolescents following traumatic brain injury (TBI). PsycINFO, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), ERIC (Education Resources Information Centre), PsycBITE, and Web of Science were searched from inception to August 8, 2013, using key terms relating to awareness of deficits and brain injury in childhood/adolescence. Studies of children or adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI), systematic measurement of awareness of deficits, and reporting of quantitative data were included. Details of participants, methodology, and findings were summarized for each study, and methodological quality was rated. Review of 12 eligible studies yielded mixed evidence concerning the presence of awareness deficits after childhood TBI. Awareness deficits were most evident both for memory and executive function impairments and for children and adolescents with severe TBI. Methodological variability, including sampling characteristics, objects of awareness, measurement issues, and approach to statistical analysis, contributed to the mixed findings. Further research focusing on factors contributing to awareness deficits following pediatric TBI, the course of recovery, and relation to functional outcomes is warranted.

  12. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Psychiatric Nursing in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Yoshinaga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric nurses have played a significant role in disseminating cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT in Western countries; however, in Japan, the application, practice, efficiency, and quality control of CBT in the psychiatric nursing field are unclear. This study conducted a literature review to assess the current status of CBT practice and research in psychiatric nursing in Japan. Three English databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO and two Japanese databases (Ichushi-Web and CiNii were searched with predetermined keywords. Fifty-five articles met eligibility criteria: 46 case studies and 9 comparative studies. It was found that CBT took place primarily in inpatient settings and targeted schizophrenia and mood disorders. Although there were only a few comparative studies, each concluded that CBT was effective. However, CBT recipients and outcome measures were diverse, and nurses were not the only CBT practitioners in most reports. Only a few articles included the description of CBT training and supervision. This literature review clarified the current status of CBT in psychiatric nursing in Japan and identified important implications for future practice and research: performing CBT in a variety of settings and for a wide range of psychiatric disorders, conducting randomized controlled trials, and establishing pre- and postqualification training system.

  13. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Psychiatric Nursing in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Naoki; Nosaki, Akiko; Hayashi, Yuta; Tanoue, Hiroki; Shimizu, Eiji; Kunikata, Hiroko; Okada, Yoshie; Shiraishi, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric nurses have played a significant role in disseminating cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in Western countries; however, in Japan, the application, practice, efficiency, and quality control of CBT in the psychiatric nursing field are unclear. This study conducted a literature review to assess the current status of CBT practice and research in psychiatric nursing in Japan. Three English databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO) and two Japanese databases (Ichushi-Web and CiNii) were searched with predetermined keywords. Fifty-five articles met eligibility criteria: 46 case studies and 9 comparative studies. It was found that CBT took place primarily in inpatient settings and targeted schizophrenia and mood disorders. Although there were only a few comparative studies, each concluded that CBT was effective. However, CBT recipients and outcome measures were diverse, and nurses were not the only CBT practitioners in most reports. Only a few articles included the description of CBT training and supervision. This literature review clarified the current status of CBT in psychiatric nursing in Japan and identified important implications for future practice and research: performing CBT in a variety of settings and for a wide range of psychiatric disorders, conducting randomized controlled trials, and establishing pre- and postqualification training system. PMID:26798512

  14. Descriptions of memory rehabilitation group interventions for neurological conditions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kristy-Jane; Sinclair, Emma J; dasNair, Roshan

    2016-07-01

    To establish what aspects of group-based cognitive rehabilitation for memory problems are reported, and to develop a checklist for authors, which may to improve reporting of these interventions in future studies. A systematic search was conducted on Web of Knowledge, CINAHL, MEDLINE, AMED, EMBASE and PsycINFO electronic databases (last search: 01/05/2015). Articles were included if the sample were adults with a neurological disorder, the intervention was group-based cognitive rehabilitation for memory problems, and if the study was a randomised controlled trial. Articles were independently screened for inclusion and data extracted by two researchers, with the third researcher arbitrating any disputes. Fourteen studies were included in this review. The reporting of certain aspects of an intervention was found to be poor, particularly in relation to: duration of the programme (6 of 14 studies did not report), the development of the intervention (7 of 14 studies did not discuss), and the content and structure of intervention (7 of the 14 studies did not provide details). This review found that the overall reporting of memory rehabilitation content and format is poor. Refinement and adaption of pre-existing checklists to capture aspects of cognitive rehabilitation programmes may help authors when reporting complex interventions. A draft checklist is provided that could be refined and validated in further research. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Beyond Acute Pain: Understanding Chronic Pain in Infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda DiLorenzo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This topical review presents the current challenges in defining chronic pain in infants, summarizes evidence from animal and human infant studies regarding the biological processes necessary for chronic pain signaling, and presents observational/experiential evidence from clinical experts. A literature search of four databases (CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and MEDLINE was conducted, along with hand searches of reference lists. Evidence from animal studies suggest that important neurophysiological mechanisms, such as the availability of key neurotransmitters needed for maintenance of chronic pain, may be immature or absent in the developing neonate. In some cases, human infants may be significantly less likely to develop chronic pain. However, evidence also points to altered pain perception, such as allodynia and hyperalgesia, with significant injury. Moreover, clinicians and parents in pediatric intensive care settings describe groups of infants with altered behavioral responses to repeated or prolonged painful stimuli, yet agreement on a working definition of chronic pain in infancy remains elusive. While our understanding of infant chronic pain is still in the rudimentary stages, a promising avenue for the future assessment of chronic pain in infancy would be to develop a clinical tool that uses both neurophysiological approaches and clinical perceptions already presented in the literature.

  16. Health care quality improvement publication trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gordon H; MacEachern, Mark P; Perla, Rocco J; Gaines, Jean M; Davis, Matthew M; Shrank, William H

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the extent of academic interest in quality improvement (QI) initiatives in medical practice, annual publication trends for the most well-known QI methodologies being used in health care settings were analyzed. A total of 10 key medical- and business-oriented library databases were examined: PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ABI/INFORM, and Business Source Complete. A total of 13 057 articles were identified that discuss at least 1 of 10 well-known QI concepts used in health care contexts, 8645 (66.2%) of which were classified as original research. "Total quality management" was the only methodology to demonstrate a significant decline in publication over time. "Continuous quality improvement" was the most common topic of study across all publication years, whereas articles discussing Lean methodology demonstrated the largest growth in publication volume over the past 2 decades. Health care QI publication volume increased substantially beginning in 1991.

  17. Ashamed and Afraid: A Scoping Review of the Role of Shame in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Saraiya

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite considerable progress in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, a large percentage of individuals remain symptomatic following gold-standard therapies. One route to improving care is examining affective disturbances that involve other emotions beyond fear and threat. A growing body of research has implicated shame in PTSD’s development and course, although to date no review of this specific literature exists. This scoping review investigated the link between shame and PTSD and sought to identify research gaps. Methods: A systematic database search of PubMed, PsycInfo, Embase, Cochrane, and CINAHL was conducted to find original quantitative research related to shame and PTSD. Results: Forty-seven studies met inclusion criteria. Review found substantial support for an association between shame and PTSD as well as preliminary evidence suggesting its utility as a treatment target. Several design limitations and under-investigated areas were recognized, including the need for a multimodal assessment of shame and more longitudinal and treatment-focused research. Conclusion: This review provides crucial synthesis of research to date, highlighting the prominence of shame in PTSD, and its likely relevance in successful treatment outcomes. The present review serves as a guide to future work into this critical area of study.

  18. Social support networks and eating disorders: an integrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonidas, Carolina; Dos Santos, Manoel Antônio

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the scientific literature about social networks and social support in eating disorders (ED). By combining keywords, an integrative review was performed. It included publications from 2006-2013, retrieved from the MEDLINE, LILACS, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases. The selection of articles was based on preestablished inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 24 articles were selected for data extraction. There was a predominance of studies that used nonexperimental and descriptive designs, and which were published in international journals. This review provided evidence of the fact that fully consolidated literature regarding social support and social networks in patients with ED is not available, given the small number of studies dedicated to the subject. We identified evidence that the family social network of patients with ED has been widely explored by the literature, although there is a lack of studies about other networks and sources of social support outside the family. The evidence presented in this study shows the need to include other social networks in health care. This expansion beyond family networks would include significant others - such as friends, colleagues, neighbors, people from religious groups, among others - who could help the individual coping with the disorder. The study also highlights the need for future research on this topic, as well as a need for greater investment in publications on the various dimensions of social support and social networks.

  19. Defining and measuring health literacy: how can we profit from other literacy domains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Anne-Linda; Camerini, Luca; Diviani, Nicola; Schulz, Peter J

    2012-03-01

    When the antecedents of health-promoting behavior are explored, the concept of health literacy is deemed a factor of major influence. Originally defined as reading, writing and numeracy skills in the health domain, health literacy is now considered a multidimensional concept. The ongoing discussion on health literacy reveals that no agreement exists about which dimensions to include in the concept. To contribute to the development of a consistent and parsimonious concept of health literacy, we conducted a critical review of concepts in other literacy domains. Our review was guided by two research questions: (i) Which dimensions are included in the concepts of other literacy domains? (ii) How can health literacy research profit from other literacy domains? Based on articles collected from PubMed, PsycINFO, Communication & Mass Media Complete, CINAHL, SAGE Full-Text Collection, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar as well as selected monographs and editions, we identified seven distinct dimensions. Some of the dimensions recur across all reviewed literacy domains and first attempts have been made to operationalize the dimensions. Expanding upon these dimensions, the paper discusses how they can prove useful for elaborating a consistent and parsimonious concept of health literacy and foster the development of a more holistic measure.

  20. Prevalence of Sleepwalking: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Sleepwalking is thought to be a common arousal disorder; however, the epidemiology of this disorder has not yet been systematically examined. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and ScienceDirect was conducted for ‘sleepwalking’ OR ‘somnambulism’ in any field, to identify studies that reported the epidemiology of sleepwalking or sleepwalking disorders. Fifty-one studies assessed the prevalence rates of sleepwalking in a total sample of 100 490. The meta-analysis showed the estimated lifetime prevalence of sleepwalking was 6.9% (95% CI 4.6%–10.3%). The current prevalence rate of sleepwalking—within the last 12 months—was significantly higher in children 5.0% (95% CI 3.8%–6.5%) than adults 1.5% (95% CI 1.0%–2.3%). There was no evidence of developmental trends in sleepwalking across childhood. The significant risk of bias across all studies suggests these results should be used cautiously. Further epidemiological research that addresses methodological problems found in studies of sleepwalking to date is needed. PMID:27832078

  1. The effect of music therapy on cognitive functions in patients with dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusar-Poli, Laura; Bieleninik, Łucja; Brondino, Natascia; Chen, Xi-Jing; Gold, Christian

    2017-07-10

    The aim of the present study was to meta-analyze the effect of music therapy (MT) on cognitive functions in patients with dementia. A systematic literature search was performed in Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, CINAHL and RILM up to 8 September 2016. We included all randomized controlled trials that compared MT with standard care, or other non-musical types of intervention, evaluating cognitive outcomes in patients with dementia. Outcomes included global cognition, complex attention, executive function, learning and memory, language, and perceptual-motor skills. From 1089 potentially relevant records, 110 studies were assessed for eligibility, and 7 met the inclusion criteria, of which 6 contained appropriate data for meta-analysis (330 participants, mean age range 78.8-86.3). Overall, random-effects meta-analyses suggested no significant effects of MT on all outcomes. Subgroup analysis found evidence of a beneficial effect of active MT on global cognition (SMD = 0.29, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.57, p = 0.04). Despite the limited evidence of the present review, it is important to continue supporting MT as a complementary treatment for older adults with dementia. RCTs with larger sample sizes are needed to better elucidate the impact of MT on cognitive functions.

  2. Reducing the volume, exposure and negative impacts of advertising for foods high in fat, sugar and salt to children: A systematic review of the evidence from statutory and self-regulatory actions and educational measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Stephanie A; Freeman, Ruth; Anderson, Annie S; MacGillivray, Steve

    2015-06-01

    To identify and review evidence on 1) the effectiveness of statutory and self-regulatory actions to reduce the volume, exposure or wider impact of advertising for foods high in fat, sugar and salt (HFSS) to children, and 2) the role of educational measures. A systematic review of three databases (Medline, CINAHL and PsycINFO) and grey literature was carried out. Relevant evidence included studies evaluating advertising bans and restrictions, advertising literacy programmes and parental communication styles. Relevant media included TV, internet, radio, magazines and newspaper advertising. No studies were excluded based on language or publication date. Forty-seven publications were included: 19 provided evidence for the results of statutory regulation, 25 for self-regulation, and six for educational approaches. Outcome measures varied in approach, quality and results. Findings suggested statutory regulation could reduce the volume of and children's exposure to advertising for foods HFSS, and had potential to impact more widely. Self-regulatory approaches showed varied results in reducing children's exposure. There was some limited support for educational measures. Consistency in measures from evaluations over time would assist the development and interpretation of the evidence base on successful actions and measures to reduce the volume, exposure and impact of advertising for foods HFSS to children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Racial Discrimination and Adverse Birth Outcomes: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhusen, Jeanne L; Bower, Kelly M; Epstein, Elizabeth; Sharps, Phyllis

    2016-11-01

    This article presents an integrative review of the literature examining the relationship between racial discrimination and adverse birth outcomes. Searches for research studies published from 2009 to 2015 were conducted using PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, PsycINFO, Web of Science, and Embase. Articles were assessed for potential inclusion using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) 2009 framework. Fifteen studies met criteria for review. The majority of the studies found a significant relationship between racial discrimination and low birth weight, preterm birth, and small for gestational age. Each of the studies that examined more proximal variables related to birth outcomes such as entry into prenatal care, employment opportunities, neighborhood characteristics, or inflammatory markers found significant associations between the specific variables examined and racial discrimination. Participants in qualitative studies discussed experiences of institutional racism with regard to several components of prenatal care including access and quality of care. Racial discrimination is a significant risk factor for adverse birth outcomes. To best understand the mechanisms by which racial discrimination impacts birth outcomes, and to inform the development of effective interventions that eliminate its harmful effects on health, longitudinal research that incorporates comprehensive measures of racial discrimination is needed. Health care providers must fully acknowledge and address the psychosocial factors that impact health outcomes in minority racial/ethnic women. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  4. Head and Neck Cancer and Sexuality: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoten, Bethany Andrews

    2016-01-01

    Individuals treated for head and neck cancer are at risk of sexual problems, particularly given the probability for disfigurement, body image disturbance, depressive symptoms, and functional difficulties that result from treatment. Because oncology nurses are an important source of information and support for patients, it is important that they be familiar with the current literature as well as opportunities for research. The aim of this study was to present a review of the literature on head and neck cancer and sexuality. PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Ovid databases were searched using the terms "head and neck cancer" and "sexuality." Publications had to be peer-reviewed, empirical studies, written in English, and published within the last 10 years. Selected publications were compared based on study aims, leading investigator, study location, conceptual framework, study design, sample, instruments, and study findings. Nine publications were analyzed in this review. Incidence of individuals reporting a negative effect of head and neck cancer on sexuality varied from 24% to 100% depending on the study. There is a paucity of data regarding sexuality among patients with head and neck cancer. Existing studies indicate that sexuality is of considerable significance, particularly after treatment for head and neck cancer. Holistic care includes information about sexuality during and after treatment for head and neck cancer. Oncology nurses should be aware that this topic is of importance to many patients, and they should familiarize themselves with available resources. It is also important that nurse scientists facilitate research in the area of sexuality.

  5. Functioning in patients with schizophrenia: a systematic review of the literature using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorostiaga, A; Balluerka, N; Guilera, G; Aliri, J; Barrios, M

    2017-03-01

    To identify and quantify the main concepts included in published studies focusing on individuals with schizophrenia using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Searches (limited to those published from 2008 to 2012) were performed in MEDLINE, PsycINFO and CINAHL. Included studies described participants with schizophrenia, were original articles and included only subjects who were at least 18 years of age at study entry. All concepts underlying the measures and the text of the articles were extracted, and they were linked to ICF categories using standardized rules. From the 3584 abstracts retrieved, 348 were randomly selected, and of these, 206 studies met the inclusion criteria. A total of 17,141 concepts were extracted, 84.8% of which could be linked to 491 ICF categories: 222 (45.21%) of the categories referred to Body Functions, 29 (5.91%) to Body Structures, 186 (37.88%) to Activities and Participation and 54 (11%) to Environmental Factors. Seventy second-level categories were reported in at least 5% of all studies: 30 of these categories referred to Body Functions, 2 to Body Structures, 34 to Activities and Participation and 4 to Environmental Factors. The study has allowed us to identify and quantify the main concepts included in studies focusing on people with schizophrenia using the ICF. The majority of the concepts refer to Body Functions and Activities and Participation, rather than to Body Structures and Environmental Factors.

  6. Gender differences in the learning and teaching of surgery: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Carmen M; Josephson, Anna

    2014-06-15

    To explore evidence concerning gender differences in teaching and learning in surgery to guide future initiatives. This systematic review was conducted searching in the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC, Web of Science, Scopus and PubMed. All studies related to gender differences in surgical education, teaching or learning of surgery at an undergraduate level were included. Data was extracted and critically appraised. Gender differences in learning, teaching, skills acquisition, perceptions and attitudes, interest on surgery, personality and factors influencing interest in surgical careers were differentiated. There is an underrepresentation of women in surgical academia, due to lack of role models and gender awareness. It is not clear whether or not gender itself is a factor that affects the learning of surgical tasks. Female students pursuing a surgical career had experienced sexual harassment and gender discrimination that can have an effect on the professional identity formation and specialty choice. There are differences in personality among female and male students interested in surgery. Gender is a determining factor to choose surgery, with a consistent lower proportion of women compared interested in pursuing a surgical career. Mentoring and personality fit are important in medical student's specialty selection. Female students are more likely to be discouraged from pursuing a surgical career by a lack of female role models. Bias against women in surgery still exists. There is a lack of studies that investigate the role of women in the teaching of surgery.

  7. Overweight and obesity in children and adolescents with Down syndrome-prevalence, determinants, consequences, and interventions: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertapelli, Fabio; Pitetti, Ken; Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Guerra-Junior, Gil

    2016-10-01

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) are more likely to be overweight or obese than the general population of youth without DS. To review the prevalence of overweight and obesity and their determinants in youth with DS. The health consequences and the effectiveness of interventions were also examined. A search using MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, LILACS, and COCHRANE was conducted. From a total of 4280 studies, we included 45 original research articles published between 1988 and 2015. The combined prevalence of overweight and obesity varied between studies from 23% to 70%. Youth with DS had higher rates of overweight and obesity than youths without DS. Likely determinants of obesity included increased leptin, decreased resting energy expenditure, comorbidities, unfavorable diet, and low physical activity levels. Obesity was positively associated with obstructive sleep apnea, dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, and gait disorder. Interventions for obesity prevention and control were primarily based on exercise-based programs, and were insufficient to achieve weight or fat loss. Population-based research is needed to identify risk factors and support multi-factorial strategies for reducing overweight and obesity in children and adolescents with DS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of vibration on spasticity in individuals with spinal cord injury: a scoping systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mahsa; Sawatzky, Bonita

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate how whole-body vibration (WBV) or focal vibration (FV) would change spasticity in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). A search was conducted of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO electronic databases. A hand search was conducted of the bibliographies of articles and journals relevant to the research question. The inclusion criteria were three or more individuals, 17 yrs or older, with SCI who experience spasticity, and WBV or FV application. The evidence level of all ten identified studies (195 SCI subjects) was low on the basis of Centre for Evidence Based Medicine level of evidence. WBV (n = 1) and FV (n = 9) were applied to assess the effects of vibration on different measures of spasticity in individuals with SCI. FV application resulted in a short-term spasticity reduction lasting for a maximum of 24 hrs. Neurophysiologic measures showed H-reflex inhibition in individuals with SCI after FV application. WBV resulted in a decrease in spasticity lasting for 6-8 days after the last vibration session. WBV and FV might decrease spasticity for a short period, but no evidence-based recommendation can be drawn from the literature to guide rehabilitation medicine clinicians to manage spasticity with vibration application.

  9. Incentives and disincentives for the treatment of depression and anxiety: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Rachelle; Silveira, Jose; Rush, Brian; Mckenzie, Kwame

    2014-07-01

    There is widespread support for primary care to help address growing mental health care demands. Incentives and disincentives are widely used in the design of health care systems to help steer toward desired goals. The absence of a conceptual model to help understand the range of factors that influence the provision of primary mental health care inspired a scoping review of the literature. Understanding the incentives that promote and the disincentives that deter treatment for depression and anxiety in the primary care context will help to achieve goals of greater access to mental health care. A review of the literature was conducted to answer the question, how are incentives and disincentives conceptualized in studies investigating the treatment of common mental disorders in primary care? A comprehensive search of MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Google Scholar was undertaken using Arksey and O'Malley's 5-stage methodological framework for scoping reviews. We identified 27 studies. A range of incentives and disincentives influence the success of primary mental health care initiatives to treat depression and anxiety. Six types of incentives and disincentives can encourage or discourage treatment of depression and anxiety in primary care: attitudes and beliefs, training and core competencies, leadership, organizational, financial, and systemic. Understanding that there are 6 different types of incentives that influence treatment for anxiety and depression in primary care may help service planners who are trying to promote improved mental health care.

  10. An integrative review of South African cancer nursing research published from 2002–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Maree

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: This integrative review aimed to quantify the publication output of South African cancer nursing research conducted between 2002 and 2012 and to identify key trends relevant to cancer nurse researchers.Objectives: To describe the publication output of cancer nursing research in terms of the journals of publication, authors, focus, participants and methods used, to explore whether the published work was funded and to assess the quality of the studies published.Methods: An integrative review was conducted using the key words South Africa in combination with cancer nursing and oncology nursing to search the databases Pubmed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Sabinet, Web of Science, Medline and OvidSP. A data extraction sheet was developed to document the required information from each paper and all publications were reviewed independently by the authors.Results: A total of 181 publications for potential inclusion were identified and 26 papers were included in this review. Cervical cancer, specifically the prevention of this disease, was the most popular diagnostic focus and theme of investigation. Most of the studies were descriptive and none of the studies met the criteria of the highest quality.Conclusion: Nursing added to the body of knowledge regarding the primary and secondary prevention of cancer. There is a need for work on both men and women diagnosed withthe most common cancers, as well as the family and care giver. There is also a need for multidisciplinary work using complex interventions focusing on symptom management to improve patient outcomes.

  11. Positive psychological functioning in breast cancer: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellas-Grau, Anna; Vives, Jaume; Font, Antoni; Ochoa, Cristian

    2016-06-01

    This integrative review aimed to analyze the research into positive psychological functioning after breast cancer, and to integrate the most relevant findings relating to sociodemographic, medical and psychosocial factors. Relevant outcomes were identified from electronic databases (Medline, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Scopus, Cochrane, CINAHL, and Wiley Online Library) up to July 2015. A Google search was performed to identify unindexed literature. Dissertations and theses were searched on Proquest Dissertations and Theses, DIALNET and TDX. Selection criteria included empirical studies assessing relationships between breast cancer and positive functioning, without restrictions on type of participants. In total, 134 studies met the inclusion criteria. The sociodemographic, medical, and psychosocial characteristics associated with well-being, posttraumatic growth, finding benefit and meaning were being young, undergoing chemotherapy, and having social support. The last two of these characteristics were time-oriented. The culture of the different samples and positive dispositional characteristics like optimism had an influence on the women's coping styles. Socioeconomic status and level of education were also associated with positive psychological functioning. The perceived impact of breast cancer on patient, as well as the perceived support from significant others can result in better functioning in women with breast cancer. The results highlight that oncology health professionals should take into account not only the individual and medical characteristics, but also the stage of the oncological process and the psychosocial environment of patients in order to promote their positive functioning.

  12. Guilt, shame and expressed emotion in carers of people with long-term mental health difficulties: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Mary Gemma; Taylor, Peter James; Brown, Stephen Lloyd; Rigby, Jake Wilfred; Sellwood, William

    2017-03-01

    Expressed emotion (EE) is a global index of familial emotional climate, whose primary components are emotional over-involvement (EOI) and critical comments (CC)/hostility. There is a strong theoretical rationale for hypothesising that carers' guilt and shame may be differentially associated with their EOI and CC/hostility respectively. This systematic review investigates the magnitude of these theorised associations in carers of people with long-term mental health difficulties. Electronic searches (conducted in May 2016 across Medline, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO and ProQuest) were supplemented with iterative hand searches. Ten papers, reporting data from eight studies, were included. Risk of bias was assessed using a standardised checklist. Relevant data were extracted and synthesised narratively. EOI was positively associated with both guilt and shame, whereas CC/hostility was positively associated with shame. The strength of associations varied depending on whether or not guilt and shame were assessed within the context of the caring relationship. Based on these data, an argument can be made for the refinement, development and evaluation of systemic and individual interventions designed to target carers' guilt and shame. However, more research is needed to clarify the strength of these associations and their direction of effect before firm conclusions can be drawn.

  13. Whose "successful ageing"?: lay- and researcher-driven conceptualisations of ageing well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore D Cosco

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: To date, there is no consensus definition of successful ageing (SA. In the literature, conceptualisations of SA are generally researcher-driven operational definitions or layperson perspectives. The current study aims to systematically review and compare quantitative operational definitions of SA with qualitative, layperson perspectives of SA. Methods: PubMed, PsycInfo, ISI Web of Knowledge, EmBase and CINAHL databases were searched using the words "successful ageing" and related terms. Peer-reviewed studies positing quantifiable operational definitions of SA were included, as were studies that conducted exploratory qualitative study of layperson perspectives of SA. Results: Marked differences in the focus of SA conceptualizations between researchers and laypersons were revealed. Qualitative studies demonstrated a greater emphasis on psychosocial aspects of SA, such as attitude whilst quantitative studies were generally biomedically focused, e.g. physical functioning/disability. Conclusions: Little concordance in classification of SA is found across the two perspectives such that an individual may be simultaneously classified as unsuccessfully ageing from a biomedical approach and successfully ageing from a layperson perspective. Most studies have been conducted in North America and the UK using non-clinical populations, resulting in limitations on generalizability. Alternative perspectives of SA must be taken into consideration in the practical application of SA.

  14. A systematic review of controlled interventions to reduce overweight and obesity in people with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Peter; Davidsen, A S; Kilian, R

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Overweight and obesity are generally found among patients with schizophrenia. This may lead to serious implications for health and wellbeing. The aim was to review controlled intervention studies on reducing overweight/obesity and/or reducing physical illness in patients with schizophr......Objective: Overweight and obesity are generally found among patients with schizophrenia. This may lead to serious implications for health and wellbeing. The aim was to review controlled intervention studies on reducing overweight/obesity and/or reducing physical illness in patients...... with schizophrenia. Method: A systematic literature search was carried out in the bibliographic databases PubMed (MEDLINE), Embase (Ovid), PsycInfo (Ovid) and Cinahl (Ebsco). We included all randomised and non-randomised clinically controlled studies that compared a non-pharmacological intervention, aimed at weight...... reduction and/or reducing physical illness, with standard care for patients with schizophrenia. Results: All 1713 references were evaluated for inclusion in the review. Twenty-three met the inclusion criteria and were categorised into four subgroups according to tested interventions: diet, exercise...

  15. Exploring resilience in nursing and midwifery students: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Jennifer E; Murray, Karen

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the concepts of 'resilience' and 'hardiness' in nursing and midwifery students in educational settings and to identify educational interventions to promote resilience. Resilience in healthcare professionals has gained increasing attention globally, yet to date resilience and resilience education in nursing and midwifery students remain largely under-researched. An integrative literature review was planned, however, only quantitative evidence was identified therefore, a review of quantitative studies was undertaken using a systematic approach. A comprehensive search was undertaken using Medline, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO and Maternity and Infant Care databases January 1980-February 2015. Data were extracted using a specifically designed form and quality assessed using an appropriate checklist. A narrative summary of findings and statistical outcomes was undertaken. Eight quantitative studies were included. Research relating to resilience and resilience education in nursing and midwifery students is sparse. There is a weak evidence that resilience and hardiness is associated with slightly improved academic performance and decreased burnout. However, studies were heterogeneous in design and limited by poor methodological quality. No study specifically considered student midwives. A greater understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of resilience in nursing and midwifery students is essential for the development of educational resources. It is imperative that future research considers both nursing and midwifery training cohorts and should be of strong methodological quality. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Facilitators of Attendance and Adherence to Group-Based Physical Activity for Older Adults: A Literature Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lacy-Vawdon, Cassandra J; Schwarzman, Joanna; Nolan, Genevieve; de Silva, Renee; Menzies, David; Smith, Ben J

    2017-05-22

    This review examines program features that influence attendance and adherence to group-based physical activity (PA) by older adults. Medline, PubMed, CINAHL plus, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were searched for studies published from 1995-2016. Quantitative and qualitative studies investigating factors related to PA group attendance or adherence by persons aged 55 years and over, were included. Searching yielded eight quantitative and 13 qualitative studies, from 2044 titles. Quantitative findings identified social factors, instructor characteristics, PA types, class duration and frequency, and perceived PA outcomes as important for attendance and adherence, whilst qualitative studies identified settings, leadership, PA types, observable benefits and social support factors. Studies were predominantly low- to moderate-quality. This review identified design and delivery considerations for group-based PA programs to inform best-practice frameworks and industry capacity-building. Future research should use longitudinal and mixed-methods designs to strengthen evidence about facilitators of program reach and engagement.

  17. User involvement in structured violence risk management within forensic mental health facilities -- a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidhammer, Gunnar; Fluttert, Frans A J; Bjørkly, Stål

    2014-10-01

    To examine empirical literature on user involvement in collaboration between patients and nurses. The scope of the review was limited to structured violence risk management interventions in forensic mental health settings. Violence in forensic mental health settings represents a significant problem for patients and staff. Structured violence risk management interventions in forensic mental health have been reported to ignore patient participation, despite the growing attention on user involvement in clinical practice. A systematic review. Searches were conducted in six databases: the Cochrane Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, CINAHL, ProQuest, ScienceDirect and PsycINFO. Papers were assessed according to a predetermined set of inclusion and exclusion criteria. After searches of the reference lists of retrieved articles were conducted, only three papers met the inclusion criteria. This review has shown that empirical research on the topic of risk management interventions in which patients are involved is scarce. There is barely any research evidence of the clinical effect of user involvement approaches on violence risk management in forensic mental health practice. Therefore, we suggest that clinicians may learn from positive experiences concerning user involvement in general psychiatry and carefully adapt and test them out in the forensic treatment context. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Do racial and ethnic minority patients fare worse after SCI?: a critical review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, Kelli W; Nicholls, Elizabeth; Shamburger, Aisha; Stevens, Lillian F; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan C

    2011-01-01

    A number of researchers have identified differences in SCI outcomes between racial and ethnic groups, but findings have never been synthesized to give clinicians and researchers a coherent picture of the problem. The goals of the current project were to (1) conduct a critical literature review of studies specifically investigating racial and ethnic disparities in spinal cord injury care, services, and outcomes; (2) explore possible causative factors that may explain these disparities; (3) propose strategies that may reduce disparities and improve access, service, and outcomes for minority patients with SCI; and (4) generate ideas for future research in this area. A search using MEDLINE/PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and HealthSource resulted in 49 articles discussing hospital, mental health, physical functioning, employment, quality of life, and family outcomes. Results indicated that after an SCI, racial and ethnic minority groups have shorter hospital lengths of stay, higher rehospitalizations rates, higher levels of depression, more days in poor health, greater degrees of unemployment, more difficulties with mobility, lower self-reported subjective well-being and quality of life and life satisfaction, and greater risk of marital breakup. A variety of causative factors, intervention strategies, and directions for future research are presented.

  19. Persuasive attributes of medication adherence interventions for older adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Anna; Chomutare, Taridzo; Iyengar, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Low adherence to prescribed medications leads to serious negative health consequences in older adults. Effective interventions that improve adherence are often labor-intensive and complex. However, most studies do not analyze the separate effects of the components. Persuasive System Design (PSD) is framework that analyzes the motivations that change behavior. In this paper, we aim to apply the model to changing the pill-taking behaviors of the aging population and determine which persuasive elements in interventions drive improvement in medication adherence. Systematic review using the databases Medline (1977 to February 2012), Cochrane library (2000 to June 2013); Cinahl (1975 to June 2013), and Psycinfo (2002 to June 2012). Inclusion criteria were experimental trials with participants' mean age ⩾ 60 years and had medication adherence as a primary or secondary measure. Meta-analysis (40 studies) demonstrated a significant association of tailoring, or one-on-one counseling, with medication adherence. Interventions with simulation (showing the causal relationship between non-adherence and negative effects) and rehearsal (miming medication-taking behavior) also showed evidence for improved adherence. Future medication adherence interventions might be more effective if they were based on persuasive technology.

  20. Effectiveness of teaching strategies on the development of critical thinking in undergraduate nursing students: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Bertacchini de Oliveira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effectiveness of teaching strategies used for development of critical thinking (CT in undergraduate nursing students. METHOD Systematic review with meta-analysis based on the recommendations of the Joanna Briggs Institute . Searches were conducted in the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science, SCOPUS, LILACS, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsycINFO, ERIC, and a database of theses from four continents. The initial selection and evaluation of studies and assessment of methodological quality was performed by two reviewers independently. RESULTS Twelve randomized clinical trials were included in the study. In the meta-analysis of the four studies included that evaluated the strategy of problem-based learning (PBL, compared to lectures, the effectiveness of PBL was demonstrated with statistical significance (SMD = 0.21 and 95% CI = 0.01 to 0.42; p = 0.0434 for the development of CT in undergraduate nursing students, and the studies were homogeneous (chi-square = 6.10, p = 0.106. CONCLUSION The effectiveness of PBL was demonstrated in the increase of overall CT scores. Further studies need to be conducted in order to develop, implement and evaluate teaching strategies that are guided in high methodological rigor, and supported in theoretical models of teaching and learning.

  1. Metacognitive function poststroke: a review of definition and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Banna, Mona; Redha, Noor Abdulla; Abdulla, Fatema; Nair, Bindhu; Donnellan, Claire

    2016-02-01

    Metacognition is the conscious knowledge individuals have about their own cognitive capacities and the regulation of these activities through self-monitoring. The aim of this review was to identify the definitions and assessment tools used to examine metacognition in relation to stroke studies. A computer database search was conducted using MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Reviews, Scopus and Web of Science. A total of 1412 publications were retrieved from the initial database search. Following the removal of unrelated articles, 34 articles remained eligible. 5 studies examined metacognition in relation to cognitive and/or emotional functioning, 4 examined the concept in relation to memory, while others investigated its relationship to driving, employment or restrictions in daily living. 12 studies examined metacognitive function exclusively in stroke. Only 1 study examined metacognition in the acute phase of stroke. 7 studies adhered to the standard definition of metacognition in line with the neuropsychological literature. The main assessment tools utilised included the Self-Regulation and Skills Interview (SRSI), the Self-Awareness of Deficits Interview (SADI), the Awareness Questionnaire (AQ) and the Patient Competency Rating Scale (PCRS). Assessment of metacognition has tended to focus on traumatic and other acquired brain injury in comparison to stroke. The majority of the studies that examined metacognition in stroke did not assess patients in the acute phase. The heterogeneity of assessment tools was in keeping with the variation in the definition of metacognition. The emergence of a standard metacognitive assessment tool may have important implications for future rehabilitative programmes.

  2. Sleep Disturbances in Individuals with Alcohol-Related Disorders: A Review of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) and Associated Non-Pharmacological Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Alyssa T; Wallen, Gwenyth R

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common among alcohol-dependent individuals and are often associated with relapse. The utility of behavioral therapies for sleep disturbances, including cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), among those with alcohol-related disorders is not well understood. This review systematically evaluates the evidence of CBT-I and related behavioral therapies applied to those with alcohol-related disorders and accompanying sleep disturbances. A search of four research databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase, and CINAHL Plus) yielded six studies that met selection criteria. Articles were reviewed using Cochrane's Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) scoring system. A majority of the studies demonstrated significant improvements in sleep efficiency among behavioral therapy treatment group(s), including but not limited to CBT-I. While behavioral sleep interventions have been successful in varied populations, they may not be utilized to their full potential among those with alcohol-related disorders as evidenced by the low number of studies found. These findings suggest a need for mixed-methods research on individuals' sleep experience to inform interventions that are acceptable to the target population.

  3. Interprofessional Team Training at the Prelicensure Level: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Sioban; White, Catriona F; Hodges, Brian D; Tassone, Maria

    2017-05-01

    The authors undertook a descriptive analysis review to gain a better understanding of the various approaches to and outcomes of team training initiatives in prelicensure curricula since 2000. In July and August 2014, the authors searched the MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase, Business Source Premier, and CINAHL databases to identify evaluative studies of team training programs' effects on the team knowledge, communication, and skills of prelicensure students published from 2000 to August 2014. The authors identified 2,568 articles, with 17 studies meeting the selection criteria for full text review. The most common study designs were single-group, pre/posttest studies (n = 7), followed by randomized controlled or comparison trials (n = 6). The Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation communication tool (n = 5); crisis resource management principles (n = 6); and high-fidelity simulation (n = 4) were the most common curriculum bases used. Over half of the studies (n = 9) performed training with students from more than one health professions program. All but three used team performance assessments, with most (n = 8) using observed behavior checklists created for that specific study. The majority of studies (n = 16) found improvements in team knowledge, communication, and skills. Team training appears effective in improving team knowledge, communication, and skills in prelicensure learners. Continued exploration of the best method of team training is necessary to determine the most effective way to move forward in prelicensure interprofessional team education.

  4. A framework of comfort for practice: An integrative review identifying the multiple influences on patients' experience of comfort in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensley, Cynthia; Botti, Mari; McKillop, Ann; Merry, Alan F

    2017-04-01

    Comfort is central to patient experience but the concept of comfort is poorly defined. This review aims to develop a framework representing patients' complex perspective of comfort to inform practice and guide initiatives to improve the quality of healthcare. CINAHL, MEDLINE Complete, PsycINFO and Google Scholar (November 2016); reference lists of included publications. Qualitative and theoretical studies advancing knowledge about the concept of comfort in healthcare settings. Studies rated for methodological quality and relevance to patients' perspectives. Data on design, methods, features of the concept of comfort, influences on patients' comfort. Data were systematically coded and categorized using Framework method. Sixty-two studies (14 theoretical and 48 qualitative) were included. Qualitative studies explored patient and staff perspectives in varying healthcare settings including hospice, emergency departments, paediatric, medical and surgical wards and residential care for the elderly. From patients' perspective, comfort is multidimensional, characterized by relief from physical discomfort and feeling positive and strengthened in one's ability to cope with the challenges of illness, injury and disability. Different factors are important to different individuals. We identified 10 areas of influence within four interrelated levels: patients' use of self-comforting strategies; family presence; staff actions and behaviours; and environmental factors. Our data provide new insights into the nature of comfort as a highly personal and contextual experience influenced in different individuals by different factors that we have classified into a framework to guide practice and quality improvement initiatives.

  5. Rest and treatment/rehabilitation following sport-related concussion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kathryn J; Leddy, John J; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Seifert, Tad; McCrea, Michael; Silverberg, Noah D; Feddermann-Demont, Nina; Iverson, Grant L; Hayden, Alix; Makdissi, Michael

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence regarding rest and active treatment/rehabilitation following sport-related concussion (SRC). Systematic review. MEDLINE (OVID), CINAHL (EbscoHost), PsycInfo (OVID), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (OVID), SPORTDiscus (EbscoHost), EMBASE (OVID) and Proquest DissertationsandTheses Global (Proquest) were searched systematically. Studies were included if they met the following criteria: (1) original research; (2) reported SRC as the diagnosis; and (3) evaluated the effect of rest or active treatment/rehabilitation. Review articles were excluded. Twenty-eight studies met the inclusion criteria (9 regarding the effects of rest and 19 evaluating active treatment). The methodological quality of the literature was limited; only five randomised controlled trials (RCTs) met the eligibility criteria. Those RCTs included rest, cervical and vestibular rehabilitation, subsymptom threshold aerobic exercise and multifaceted collaborative care. A brief period (24-48 hours) of cognitive and physical rest is appropriate for most patients. Following this, patients should be encouraged to gradually increase activity. The exact amount and duration of rest are not yet well defined and require further investigation. The data support interventions including cervical and vestibular rehabilitation and multifaceted collaborative care. Closely monitored subsymptom threshold, submaximal exercise may be of benefit. PROSPERO 2016:CRD42016039570. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Epidemiology of sport-related spinal cord injuries: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Christie Wl; Eng, Janice J; Tator, Charles H; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Despite the recognition of sports as a significant contributor in the etiology of spinal cord injury (SCI), no studies have systematically explored the epidemiology of SCI caused by sports. This paper aims to give a systematic overview of the epidemiology of sport-related spinal cord injury around the world. A systematic review was conducted to identify published literature reporting the epidemiology of SCI caused by sports. The literature search was conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO and Sportdiscus with date limits 1980 through to July 2015. Data from 54 studies covering 25 countries was extracted and collated. Important findings include identification of 6 countries in which sports accounts for over 13% of SCI (highest to lowest: Russia, Fiji, New Zealand, Iceland, France and Canada); individual sports with high risk for SCI (diving, skiing, rugby, and horseback riding); and the most common level of injury for various sports (almost entirely cervical for hockey, skiing, diving and American football, while over half of horseback riding and snowboarding injuries are thoracic or lumbosacral). This paper identifies countries and sports with higher rates of sport-related SCIs where implementation of prevention programs and reporting systems to track SCI epidemiology may be helpful, and highlights gaps in our current knowledge for further investigation. The comparison of SCI occurrence for each sport across countries, as well as examination of the specific characteristics of SCI incurred for individual sports will assist in directing efforts for prevention.

  7. Mental Health Interventions in the Workplace and Work Outcomes: A Best-Evidence Synthesis of Systematic Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, S L; Koehn, C; White, M I; Harder, H G; Schultz, I Z; Williams-Whitt, K; Warje, O; Dionne, C E; Koehoorn, M; Pasca, R; Hsu, V; McGuire, L; Schulz, W; Kube, D; Wright, M D

    2016-01-01

    Mental health issues in the workplace are a growing concern among organizations and policymakers, but it remains unclear what interventions are effective in preventing mental health problems and their associated organizational consequences. This synthesis reports on workplace mental health interventions that impact absenteeism, productivity and financial outcomes. To determine the level of evidence supporting mental health interventions as valuable to work outcomes. Databases were searched for systematic reviews between 2000 and 2012: Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and TRIP. Grey literature searches included health-evidence.ca, Rehab+, National Rehabilitation Information Center (NARIC), and Institute for Work and Health. The assessment of articles for inclusion criteria and methodological quality was conducted independently by two or more researchers, with differences resolved through consensus. The search resulted in 3363 titles, of which 3248 were excluded following title/abstract review, with 115 articles retrieved for full-text review. 14 articles finally met the inclusion criteria and are summarized in this synthesis. There is moderate evidence for the effectiveness of workplace mental health interventions on improved workplace outcomes. Certain types of programs, such as those incorporating both mental and physical health interventions, multicomponent mental health and/or psychosocial interventions, and exposure in vivo containing interventions for particular anxiety disorders had a greater level of research evidence to support their effectiveness.

  8. Older adults' perceptions of ageing and their health and functioning: a systematic review of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmoth, Krystal; Tarrant, Mark; Abraham, Charles; Lang, Iain A

    2016-07-01

    Many older people perceive ageing negatively, describing it in terms of poor or declining health and functioning. These perceptions may be related to older adults' health. The aim of this review was to synthesise existing research on the relationship between older adults' perceptions of ageing and their health and functioning. A systematic search was conducted of five electronic databases (ASSIA, CINAHL, IBSS, MEDLINE and PsycINFO). Citations within identified reports were also searched. Observational studies were included if they included perceptions of ageing and health-related measures involving participants aged 60 years and older. Study selection, data extraction and quality appraisal were conducted using predefined criteria. Twenty-eight reports met the criteria for inclusion. Older adults' perceptions of ageing were assessed with a variety of measures. Perceptions were related to health and functioning across seven health domains: memory and cognitive performance, physical and physiological performance, medical conditions and outcomes, disability, care-seeking, self-rated health, quality of life and death. How ageing is perceived by older adults is related to their health and functioning in multiple domains. However, higher quality and longitudinal studies are needed to further investigate this relationship.

  9. Influence of Dosage and Type of Music Therapy in Symptom Management and Rehabilitation for Individuals with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jeehae; Woods-Giscombe, Cheryl

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the influence of dosage, type (active, receptive, or combined), and format (individual or group) of music therapy for individuals with schizophrenia. With the terms "music*" and "schizophreni*," six research databases were searched: CINAHL, EMBASE, Music Index, PsycInfo, Pubmed, and RILM. The search was limited to studies written in English, peer-reviewed, and published between 1991 and 2015. Seventeen articles met the stated criteria. Dosage of music therapy ranged from 20 to 9,720 minutes. Three types of music therapy were delivered: active, receptive, or combined, and therapy was implemented via individual or group format. Depending on the dosage, type, and format, music therapy improved psychotic symptom management, depression and anxiety management, social and cognitive functioning, behavior, and quality of life of the participants. Dosage had a greater impact on the effects of music therapy compared to type and format. Studies that implemented a combination of active and receptive music therapy were more likely to produce significant improvements in outcomes compared to the studies that implemented the other types of music therapy. However, studies using combined type provided higher dosage of the intervention (e.g., more minutes of intervention exposure). This systematic review can be used to guide future research on and clinical applications for music therapy in this population. Future studies might also investigate the interaction of demographic characteristics or severity of illness with dosage and type on effects of music therapy.

  10. An overview of the design and methods for retrieving high-quality studies for clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynes R Brian

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the information explosion, the retrieval of the best clinical evidence from large, general purpose, bibliographic databases such as MEDLINE can be difficult. Both researchers conducting systematic reviews and clinicians faced with a patient care question are confronted with the daunting task of searching for the best medical literature in electronic databases. Many have advocated the use of search filters or "hedges" to assist with the searching process. The purpose of this report is to describe the design and methods of a study that set out to develop optimal search strategies for retrieving sound clinical studies of health disorders in large electronics databases. Objective To describe the design and methods of a study that set out to develop optimal search strategies for retrieving sound clinical studies of health disorders in large electronic databases. Design An analytic survey comparing hand searches of 170 journals in the year 2000 with retrievals from MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO for candidate search terms and combinations. The sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy of unique search terms and combinations of search terms were calculated. Conclusion A study design modeled after a diagnostic testing procedure with a gold standard (the hand search of the literature and a test (the search terms is an effective way of developing, testing, and validating search strategies for use in large electronic databases.

  11. Homelessness and drug use - a narrative systematic review of interventions to promote sexual health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nat M J; Walker, Joy

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this research project was to examine the effectiveness of sexual health promotion interventions in homeless drug using populations. The following databases were searched: Medline (1966 to 2003), EMBASE (1980 to 2003), psycinfo (1985 to 2003), CINAHL (1982 to 2003), web of Science (1981 to 2003) and the Cochrane Library (Evidence Based health). Two independent researchers selected studies for inclusion. Inclusion criteria covered longitudinal studies using comparative statistics examining interventions to promote sexual health amongst homeless drug users. Studies excluding drug users from the study sample or where no mention was made of housing status were excluded. A narrative analysis of the papers was adopted to elicit common themes emerging from the studies. Of 99 papers identified, only 6 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Interventions which seek to effect attitudinal and behavioural change through interactive methods such as role-play, video games and group work led to a self-reported reduction in both risk from drugs and sexual activity. The evidence for maintenance of risk reduction over one year remains unclear. Interventions do not appear to promote risky sexual activity in previously sexually inactive participants.

  12. Health Professionals’ Alcohol-Related Professional Practices and the Relationship between Their Personal Alcohol Attitudes and Behavior and Professional Practices: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savita Bakhshi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Health professionals’ personal health behaviors have been found to be associated with their practices with patients in areas such as smoking, physical activity and weight management, but little is known in relation to alcohol use. This review has two related strands and aims to: (1 examine health professionals’ alcohol-related health promotion practices; and (2 explore the relationship between health professionals’ personal alcohol attitudes and behaviors, and their professional alcohol-related health promotion practices. A comprehensive literature search of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, British Nursing Index, Web of Science, Scopus and Science Direct (2007–2013 identified 26 studies that met the inclusion criteria for Strand 1, out of which six were analyzed for Strand 2. The findings indicate that health professionals use a range of methods to aid patients who are high-risk alcohol users. Positive associations were reported between health professionals’ alcohol-related health promotion activities and their personal attitudes towards alcohol (n = 2, and their personal alcohol use (n = 2. The findings have some important implications for professional education. Future research should focus on conducting well-designed studies with larger samples to enable us to draw firm conclusions and develop the evidence base.

  13. Women with heart failure are at high psychosocial risk: a systematic review of how sex and gender influence heart failure self-care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jody R; Clark, Alexander M

    2011-03-06

    To improve patient support, it is important to understand how people view and experience Heart Failure (HF) self-care. This systematic review of qualitative studies included all published studies that examine the influence of sex and gender on HF self-care. A systematic search was done for papers (1995-2010) indexed in Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Medline, Ovid EMBASE, Ovid PsycINFO, CSA Sociological Abstracts, OVID AARP Ageline, EBSCO Academic Search Complete, EBSCO CINAHL, EBSCO SocINDEX, ISI Web of Science: Social Sciences Citation Index and Science Citation Index Expanded, and Scopus. After screening of 537 citations, six qualitative studies identified that differences existed in perceptions of symptoms with women having less family involvement and psychosocial support around self-care. Moreover, women had considerably more negative views of the future, themselves and their ability to fulfill social self-care roles. Women with HF represent a highly vulnerable population and need more support for psychosocial wellbeing and self-care.

  14. Predictors of quality of life for chronic stroke survivors in relation to cultural differences: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongrong; Langhammer, Birgitta

    2017-09-26

    Stroke survivors might perceive their quality of life (QoL) as being affected even years after onset. The purpose of this review was to go through the literature to identify factors related to QoL for persons with stroke in China and Western countries for possible similarities and differences in their respective cultural views. A narrative literature review was conducted on the papers identified by searching PubMed, EBSCO/CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, China National Knowledge Infrastructure and Wanfang Data that published up to November 2016. Factors predicting QoL after stroke were extracted, and comparisons were made between Chinese and Western studies respecting cultural aspects. A total of 43 articles were included in this review, with 31 conducted in Western countries and 12 in China. Predictors of QoL included Demographic factors: age, gender, marital status, education level, socioeconomic status; Clinically related factors: severity of stroke, physical function, depression/anxiety, cognitive impairment, incontinence and other comorbidities; Environmental factors: residential status, social support, social participation; and Individual factors: coping strategies and self-perception. Being married and resident at home might be associated with the perception of QoL differently between Chinese and Western survivors. Most predictors of QoL in stroke survivors were the same in China and the Western countries. However, their QoL might be predicted differently regarding to the individualistic and collectivistic cultural differences. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Individualized formulation-led interventions for analyzing and managing challenging behavior of people with dementia - an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holle, Daniela; Halek, Margareta; Holle, Bernhard; Pinkert, Christiane

    2017-12-01

    Individualized formulation-led interventions offer a promising approach for analyzing and managing challenging behaviors in people with dementia. Little is known about which individualized formulation-led interventions exist and what effects these interventions have on people with dementia and their caregivers. Therefore, the review aims to describe and examine existing interventions and to review their evidence. An integrative review of individualized formulation-led interventions for managing challenging behavior in people with dementia was conducted. PUBMED, PsycINFO [EBSCO] and CINAHL [EBSCO] databases were searched between February and April 2014 using key terms related to dementia, challenging behavior and individualized formulation- led interventions. The literature search was limited to German and English publications published from 1995. No limitations were placed on the type of paper, type of study design and stage of disease or setting. 37 relevant papers that met the inclusion criteria were included in this review. The literature review provided 14 different individualized formulation-led interventions. The effects on people with dementia were diverse, as only half of the studies showed a significant reduction in behaviors compared with the control group. Family caregivers felt less upset about the challenging behavior and more confident in their ability to manage the behavior. There is a clear need for further research on individualized formulation-led interventions. The results of this review have the potential for developing interventions and for designing methodological robust evaluation studies that take into account the effectiveness of individualized formulation-led interventions on patient and caregiver outcomes.

  16. Nurse manager engagement: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Linda R

    2012-01-01

    This concept analysis examines the visibility of nurse manager engagement in the healthcare work environment. The term employee engagement was derived from studies of morale or the willingness of a group to accomplish objectives in the 1920s. "Following World War II group morale scores were used as predictors of speed, quality, and militancy by US Army researchers. The goal was to identify star, or high performers. A term was needed to describe emotional attachment of an individual to the organization, fellow associates, and the job" ("Employee engagement origins," 2010, p. 1). The CINAHL, MEDLINE, ABI INFORM, PsycINFO, and Ovid databases and the Internet were searched for the period of 2005-2010 for literature published in English with a focus on peer-reviewed journals from disciplines of health sciences, health administration, business, and psychology. The Walker and Avant method was used for this analysis. The experience of the author as a current and previous nurse manager was also used for this analysis. Nurse manager engagement was assumed to be present based indirectly on empirical referents and consequences, such as low or high vacancy rates for staff nurses. Further research is needed to explore the identity of the nurse serving in the role of manager/leader who is able to demonstrate the skills and talents necessary to visibly demonstrate engagement and facilitate a culture of engaged nurse managers. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Self-care management programme for older adults with diabetes: An integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cherry Chay Lee; Cheng, Karis Kin Fong; Wang, Wenru

    2015-05-01

    This paper summarizes evidence on effectiveness of diabetes self-care interventions for older adults with diabetes, and identifies factors influencing self-care behaviours. The search for articles published from 2002 to 2012 was done using electronic databases, namely, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus, PsycINFO and PubMed. Search terms include diabetes, self-management, self-care, barriers and intervention. Out of 261 articles screened, 21 were selected for review. Findings revealed that interventions using concepts of self-efficacy, self-determination and proactive coping, and interventions incorporating information technology were effective in influencing diabetes self-care behaviours with improved health outcomes. Psychosocial factors influencing self-care include motivation, socioeconomic status, literacy, knowledge, social and health-care providers' support, and particularly for older adults, the key factors were their self-efficacy, motor skill and literacy in self-care activities. This review provides important insight for nurse practitioners to address psychosocial issues in developing self-care management programmes for older adults with diabetes.

  18. A review of the literature - The use of interactive puppet simulation in nursing education and children's healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilbrook, Ackland; Dwyer, Trudy; Reid-Searl, Kerry; Parson, Judi A

    2017-01-01

    The use of puppets in health care is emerging as a mode of simulation that combines elements of engaging with the child through play whilst at the same time providing education. This review examines the impact when nurses use play therapy or puppets as a simulation modality in nursing education and in the clinical paediatric nursing environment. Electronic search was conducted using CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and PsycINFO data bases, between 1980 and January 2015 with the combinations of play therapy; puppetry; nursing education; nursing; simulation; health professionals and puppets. Twelve articles were identified that highlight the use of puppet simulation in the education of nursing students and children in the healthcare environment. Puppet modelling and puppet simulation is predominantly adopted in the areas of health education and specifically diabetes education. Identified gaps in the use of puppet simulation in nursing, nurse education and puppet simulation as a three-way communication process; thus identifying the need for further research on puppet simulation and its application and benefits in nursing and nurse education. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Interventions for family members caring for an elder with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, Gayle J; Winter, Mary A

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews 73 published and unpublished research reports of interventions for family members caring for an elder with dementia by nurse researchers and researchers from other disciplines. Reports were identified through searches of MEDLINE, CINAHL, Social Science Index, PsycINFO, ERIC, Social Work Abstracts, American Association of Retired Persons database, CRISP index of the National Institutes of Health, Cochrane Center database, and Dissertation Abstracts using the following search terms: caregiver, caregiving, dementia, Alzheimer's, intervention study, evaluation study, experimental, and quasi-experimental design. Additional keywords were used to narrow or expand the search as necessary. All nursing research was included in the review and nonnursing research was included if published between 1991 and 2001. Studies were included if they used a design that included a treatment and control group or a one-group, pretest-posttest design (ex post facto designs were included if they used a comparison group). Key findings show that approximately 32% of the study outcomes (e.g., burden, depression, knowledge) were changed after intervention in the desired direction. In addition, several problematic issues were identified including small, diverse samples; lack of intervention specificity; diversity in the length, duration, and intensity of the intervention strategies; and problematic outcome measures.

  20. Dysphagia is a common and serious problem for adults with mental illness: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Kristy J; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2012-03-01

    Adults with mental illness may experience a higher incidence of dysphagia and choking due to factors such as medication side effects and behavioural abnormalities. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of dysphagia and the most effective interventions for this population. Studies published up to August 2010 were sought via a comprehensive electronic database search (CINAHL, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase). Studies reporting dysphagia frequency or dysphagia intervention outcomes in adults with mental illness were included. Two reviewers independently assessed study eligibility and quality, and the results were synthesised descriptively. Ten studies were identified, each describing dysphagia frequency or death due to choking asphyxiation. No studies evaluating intervention effectiveness were identified. Study quality was limited by subjective assessment of outcomes. Six studies presented dysphagia frequencies ranging from 9 to 42% in varying subgroups. Four studies presented the frequency of choking asphyxiation death, including a large survey that concluded that adults with organic mental illness were 43 times more likely to die of this cause than the general population. Dysphagia is a common and significant cause of morbidity and mortality in adults with mental illness and our review found that there is a lack of studies evaluating the effectiveness of intervention techniques.

  1. The Efficacy of Art Therapy in Pediatric Oncology Patients: An Integrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Bree A

    Children undergoing cancer treatment experience detrimental adverse side effects that may be addressed with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) such as art therapy. The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of art therapy in pediatric patients living with cancer. An integrative literature review was conducted using the CINAHL, OVID Medline, and PsycINFO databases. Studies were included if they were a primary source utilizing an art therapy intervention in children with cancer age birth to 18years old, was published between the year 2000 and 2016, and written in the English language. Seven primary sources met inclusion criteria. Few studies were reported in this review. Findings of this review suggest that children who participated in various forms of drawing interventions exhibited enhanced communication with family members and healthcare providers. Additionally, children were able to better express underlying emotions, developed more effective coping skills, and experienced a reduction in adverse side effects. Implementing a drawing intervention or other forms of art into the holistic care of a pediatric oncology patient may assist in maximizing quality of life and allow for a more tolerable lifestyle. Acquiring a means of proper communication with children through art allows nurses to gain insight on the needs of this special patient population, resulting in a higher quality plan of care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Managing and mitigating conflict in healthcare teams: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almost, Joan; Wolff, Angela C; Stewart-Pyne, Althea; McCormick, Loretta G; Strachan, Diane; D'Souza, Christine

    2016-07-01

    To review empirical studies examining antecedents (sources, causes, predictors) in the management and mitigation of interpersonal conflict. Providing quality care requires positive, collaborative working relationships among healthcare team members. In today's increasingly stress-laden work environments, such relationships can be threatened by interpersonal conflict. Identifying the underlying causes of conflict and choice of conflict management style will help practitioners, leaders and managers build an organizational culture that fosters collegiality and create the best possible environment to engage in effective conflict management. Integrative literature review. CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Proquest ABI/Inform, Cochrane Library and Joanne Briggs Institute Library were searched for empirical studies published between 2002-May 2014. The review was informed by the approach of Whittemore and Knafl. Findings were extracted, critically examined and grouped into themes. Forty-four papers met the inclusion criteria. Several antecedents influence conflict and choice of conflict management style including individual characteristics, contextual factors and interpersonal conditions. Sources most frequently identified include lack of emotional intelligence, certain personality traits, poor work environment, role ambiguity, lack of support and poor communication. Very few published interventions were found. By synthesizing the knowledge and identifying antecedents, this review offers evidence to support recommendations on managing and mitigating conflict. As inevitable as conflict is, it is the responsibility of everyone to increase their own awareness, accountability and active participation in understanding conflict and minimizing it. Future research should investigate the testing of interventions to minimize these antecedents and, subsequently, reduce conflict. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A systematic review of psychosocial interventions for colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Catherine E; Winger, Joseph G; Given, Barbara A; Shahda, Safi; Helft, Paul R

    2017-07-01

    A significant minority of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients experience clinically meaningful distress that may warrant intervention. The goal of this systematic review was to assess the impact of psychosocial interventions on quality-of-life and psychosocial outcomes for CRC patients. A systematic search of CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and PsycARTICLES was undertaken to obtain relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published through October 2016. Fourteen RCTs of psychosocial interventions for CRC patients were identified. Only three of these RCTs showed significant intervention effects on multiple mental health outcomes. These interventions included written and verbal emotional expression, progressive muscle relaxation training, and a self-efficacy enhancing intervention. Eight of the 14 trials, testing a range of psychoeducational and supportive care interventions, produced little to no effects on study outcomes. An evaluation of RCT quality highlighted the need for greater rigor in study methods and reporting. A limited evidence base supports the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for CRC patients. Large-scale trials are needed before drawing definitive conclusions regarding intervention impact.

  4. Discrimination and resilience and the needs of people who identify as Transgender: A narrative review of quantitative research studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Edward; Brown, Michael

    2017-06-09

    To examine discrimination and resilience experiences of people who identify as transgender and establish potential health service responses. People who identify as transgender face many challenges in society in terms of the knowledge, understanding and acceptance of a person's gender identity. A narrative review of quantitative empirical research. A comprehensive search of CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Sociological Abstracts electronic databases from 2006-2016 was conducted. The search yielded 1,478 papers and following the application of rigorous inclusion and exclusion criteria a total of 19 papers were included in the review. The findings reveal that there is a need to ensure that the needs of transgender people are represented, fully integrated and clearly linked to outcomes that improve their health and quality of life. Discrimination experiences can result in poorer health outcomes; however, many people have developed resilience and positive coping strategies. Nurses need to recognise and respond appropriately to the care and treatment needs of this population. Comprehensive nursing assessments and plans of care that encompass all aspects of the person should be in place supported by clear policy guidelines and evidence-based research. The education requirements of practitioners are outlined. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Applying findings from a systematic review of workplace-based e-learning: implications for health information professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Andrew; Carroll, Christopher; Papaioannou, Diana; Sutton, Anthea; Wong, Ruth

    2009-03-01

    To systematically review the UK published literature on e-learning in the health workplace and to apply the findings to one of the most prolific UK e-learning initiatives in the health sector--the National Library for Health Facilitated Online Learning Interactive Opportunity (FOLIO) Programme. Sensitive searches were conducted across ASSIA, Australian Education Index, British Education Index, cinahl, CSA Abstracts, Dissertation Abstracts, Emerald, ERIC, IBSS, Index to Theses, LISA, MEDLINE, PSYCINFO and Social Science Citation Index. Additional citations were identified from reference lists of included studies and of relevant reviews; citation tracking and contact with experts. Twenty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were coded and analysed using thematic analysis as described by Miles & Huberman (Qualitative Data Analysis: A Sourcebook of New Methods. Newbury Park, CA: Sage, 1984). Five broad themes were identified from the 29 included studies: (i) peer communication; (ii) flexibility; (iii) support; (iv) knowledge validation; and (v) course presentation and design. These broad themes were supported by a total of eleven sub-themes. Components from the FOLIO Programme were analysed and existing and proposed developments were mapped against each sub-theme. This provides a valuable framework for ongoing course development. Librarians involved in delivering and supporting e-learning can benefit from applying the findings from the systematic review to existing programmes, exemplified by the FOLIO Programme. The resultant framework can also be used in developing new e-learning programmes.

  6. Effectiveness of Exercise on Functional Mobility in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Hillary; Hills, Sara; Kline, Nicole; Weems, Kyra; Doty, Antonette

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We identified evidence evaluating the effect of exercise on functional mobility in adults (aged 18 y or older) with cerebral palsy (CP). Method: An exhaustive search was conducted using the electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from the earliest available evidence (1975) to the present (January 2016) for studies whose participants were ambulatory adults with CP receiving conservative treatment to address functional mobility limitations. Two independent reviewers agreed on the eligibility, inclusion, and level of evidence of each study. The Maastricht-Amsterdam List (MAL) was used to assess evidence quality. Results: Five of the six studies included were randomized controlled trials, and one was a pre-post case series. Interventions included whole-body vibration, treadmill training without body-weight support, rhythmic auditory stimulation, dynamic balance and gait activities, progressive resistance training, and interactive serious gaming for balance. All studies were considered high quality, as indicated by their MAL scores. Four studies showed no statistical difference and trivial effect sizes between the intervention and the control group. Rhythmic auditory stimulation and interactive serious gaming were found to be statistically significant in benefiting adults with CP. Conclusions: Evidence of the effect of exercise on functional mobility for ambulatory adults with CP is lacking. A need exists for quality research to determine the best interventions for adults with CP to maximize functional mobility.

  7. The use of errorless learning strategies for patients with Alzheimer's disease: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruijie; Liu, Karen P Y

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this article was to review the evidence of errorless learning on learning outcomes in patients with early-stage Alzheimer's disease. A computer-aided literature search from 1999 to 2011 was carried out using MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO and PsycArticles. Keywords included 'errorless learning or practice' and 'Alzheimer's disease'. Four studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were selected and reviewed. Two of the studies were clinical controlled trials: one was a single-group pretest-post-test trial and the other was a multiple single-participant study. Demographic variables, design, treatment and outcome measures were summarized. Recall trials were used as the primary outcome measure. Results indicate that the use of errorless learning promotes better retention of specific types of information. Errorless learning is effective in memory rehabilitation of older adults with Alzheimer's disease. However, it would require more studies with unified outcome measures to allow for the formulation of standardized clinical protocol and recommendations.

  8. Team-Based Care: A Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Dawon

    2016-12-09

    The purpose of this concept analysis is to clarify and analyze the concept of team-based care in clinical practice. Team-based care has garnered attention as a way to enhance healthcare delivery and patient care related to quality and safety. However, there is no consensus on the concept of team-based care; as a result, the lack of common definition impedes further studies on team-based care. This analysis was conducted using Walker and Avant's strategy. Literature searches were conducted using PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and PsycINFO, with a timeline from January 1985 to December 2015. The analysis demonstrates that the concept of team-based care has three core attributes: (a) interprofessional collaboration, (b) patient-centered approach, and (c) integrated care process. This is accomplished through understanding other team members' roles and responsibilities, a climate of mutual respect, and organizational support. Consequences of team-based care are identified with three aspects: (a) patient, (b) healthcare professional, and (c) healthcare organization. This concept analysis helps better understand the characteristics of team-based care in the clinical practice as well as promote the development of a theoretical definition of team-based care. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Which Health Cares Are Related to the Family Physician? A Critical Interpretive Synthesis of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Shahram; Akbarilakeh, Maryam

    2017-05-01

    This study provided the theoretical basis for program development through a new conceptualization of the concept of family physician related health care. Critical interpretive synthesis (CIS) was used to carry out qualitative analysis and synthesis of the literature from 2006 until 2015. At the beginning of CIS, the search strategy was designed to access electronic databases such as CINAHL, Medline, Cochrane library, PsycINFO, Embase, EBMreviews, and Thomson scientific web of science database. The main review question was the clarification of the health care related to family physician in health system, which produced over related 750 articles; 60 articles related to the research objective were studied by purposive sampling. After identifying the main categories and sub-categories, synthesis of the contradictory findings in different studies was conducted. New concepts and relationships between concepts were created using CIS of documentation related to the place of family physician in health system. To define the original position of family physician in health system, clarify its related health care and determine its boundaries from other health care providers, and its use in the design and development of family physician's educational program, a frame of concepts related to the main concept and question was created. A more useful means of understanding family physician is offered by the synthetic constructs of this framework. The theoretical conceptualization of family physician position and duties in the health system can be an appropriate guide for educational program and curricula in our context.

  10. Experiences of noninvasive ventilation in adults with hypercapnic respiratory failure: a review of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamadziripi Ngandu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive ventilation (NIV has been shown to be beneficial for patients with respiratory failure; however, many patients fail to tolerate it and require other interventions. The objective of this thematic synthesis was to describe the nature of NIV experiences in adults with hypercapnic respiratory failure. A systematic, computerised literature search of English-language databases was undertaken with no restriction on date of publication. A total of 99 papers was identified and screened for eligibility from databases including CINAHL, Medline and PsycINFO, and some were hand searched. 45 papers were critically appraised and 32 met our inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis identified six key themes: benefits of NIV; fear (of various categories, namely, fear of technology/mask, fear of death and dying, and fear of pain and suffering; adaptation to NIV machine; decision making; need for information; and relationship with healthcare professionals. For people using NIV treatment, the experience of being on the NIV machine is unexpected and can be stressful. Findings from this review offer healthcare professionals insights and understanding into the patient experience of NIV. Healthcare professionals may use these findings to implement new strategies in NIV provision and the exploration of the applicability of age-specific supportive care NIV guidelines.

  11. Do psychosocial sleep interventions improve infant sleep or maternal mood in the postnatal period? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempler, Liora; Sharpe, Louise; Miller, Christopher B; Bartlett, Delwyn J

    2016-10-01

    Sleep complaints are common amongst mothers of infants and insufficient, inefficient or fragmented sleep is associated with postnatal depression. The aim of this review is to determine whether psychosocial sleep-focused interventions offered in the perinatal period improve infant sleep or maternal mood. We searched PubMed, PsycInfo, EMBASE and CINAHL with no date restriction. We reviewed 1097 articles, resulting in nine papers (n = 1,656) that fit the eligibility criteria for inclusion in the analyses. The primary outcome was infant sleep, defined as maternal reports of infant nocturnal total sleep time and number of night-time wakes. The secondary outcome was maternal mood. The meta-analysis indicated improvements in reported infant nocturnal total sleep time (Hedge's g = 0.204, p improvements (Hedge's g = 0.152, p = 0.014), however, this could have been influenced by publication bias. Psychosocial sleep interventions appear to impact the amount of sleep that a mother reports her baby to have, although the infants continue to wake as frequently. More research is needed to confirm whether sleep-related improvements can translate into improvements in maternal mood.

  12. Scales for evaluating self-perceived anxiety levels in patients admitted to intensive care units: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perpiñá-Galvañ, Juana; Richart-Martínez, Miguel

    2009-11-01

    To review studies of anxiety in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit to describe the level of anxiety and synthesize the psychometric properties of the instruments used to measure anxiety. The CUIDEN, IME, ISOC, CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PSYCINFO databases for 1995 to 2005 were searched. The search focused on 3 concepts: anxiety, intensive care, and mechanical ventilation for the English-language databases and ansiedad, cuidados intensivos, and ventilación mecánica for the Spanish-language databases. Information was extracted from 18 selected articles on the level of anxiety experienced by patients and the psychometric properties of the instruments used to measure anxiety. Moderate levels of anxiety were reported. Levels were higher in women than in men, and higher in patients undergoing positive pressure ventilation regardless of sex. Most multi-item instruments had high coefficients of internal consistency. The reliability of instruments with only a single item was not demonstrated, even though the instruments had moderate-to-high correlations with other measurements. Midlength scales, such the anxiety subscale of the Brief Symptom Inventory or the shortened state version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory are best for measuring anxiety in critical care patients.

  13. Masculinity, Racism, Social Support, and Colorectal Cancer Screening Uptake Among African American Men: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Charles R; Mitchell, Jamie A; Franta, Gabriel J; Foster, Margaret J; Shires, Deirdre

    2017-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly preventable when CRC screening is utilized, yet CRC screening completion among African American men is relatively low and their mortality rates remain 50% higher juxtaposed to their White counterparts. Since a growing body of literature indicates masculinity, racism, and social support each have strong influences on CRC screening uptake, this systematic review examined the connections between these three sociocultural factors and CRC screening uptake among African American men. Potential studies were retrieved from MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO. Cited reference searching for the final sample was employed to identify and assess additional studies for inclusion using Scopus. The methodological quality of the reviewed evidence was also evaluated. Nineteen studies met inclusion/exclusion criteria. Thirteen studies employed nonexperimental research designs; a quasi-experimental design was present in four, and two utilized experimental designs. Studies were published between 2000 and 2014; the majority between 2009 and 2013. Social support was most frequently addressed (84%) while masculinity and racism were equally studied with paucity (11%) for their influence on CRC screening. After evaluating conceptual and methodological characteristics of the studies, 42% fell below average in quality and rigor. The need for increased attention to the sociocultural correlates of CRC screening for African American men are highlighted in this systematic review, and important recommendations for research and practice are provided. Alongside a call for more rigorous research, further research examining the influence of masculinity and racism on CRC screening completion among African American men is warranted.

  14. Self-weighing in weight management: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yaguang; Klem, Mary Lou; Sereika, Susan M; Danford, Cynthia A; Ewing, Linda J; Burke, Lora E

    2015-02-01

    Regular self-weighing, which in this article is defined as weighing oneself regularly over a period of time (e.g., daily, weekly), is recommended as a weight loss strategy. However, the published literature lacks a review of the recent evidence provided by prospective, longitudinal studies. Moreover, no paper has reviewed the psychological effects of self-weighing. Therefore, the objective is to review the literature related to longitudinal associations between self-weighing and weight change as well as the psychological outcomes. Electronic literature searches in PubMed, Ovid PsycINFO, and Ebscohost CINAHL were conducted. Keywords included overweight, obesity, self-weighing, etc. Inclusion criteria included trials that were published in the past 25 years in English; participants were adults seeking weight loss treatment; results were based on longitudinal data. The results (N=17 studies) revealed that regular self-weighing was associated with more weight loss and not with adverse psychological outcomes (e.g., depression, anxiety). Findings demonstrated that the effect sizes of association between self-weighing and weight change varied across studies and also that the reported frequency of self-weighing varied across studies. The findings from prospective, longitudinal studies provide evidence that regular self-weighing has been associated with weight loss and not with negative psychological outcomes. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  15. The user experience of critical care discharge: a meta-synthesis of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bench, Suzanne; Day, Tina

    2010-04-01

    This review identifies the most significant factors, which impact upon the user experience of progress and recovery from critical illness during the first month after discharge from critical care, and discusses these in relation to the development of effective critical care discharge support strategies. Meta-synthesis of qualitative primary research. Qualitative research published in English between 1990 and 2009 was identified using online databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, British Nursing Index, CDSR, ACP Journal Club, Cochrane library, Social Policy and Practice and PsycInfo. Studies of adult patients, relatives/carers/significant others, which focused on experiences after discharge from an intensive care or high dependency unit to a general ward were retrieved. Following screening against inclusion/exclusion criteria, methodological appraisal of studies was conducted using a published framework. Ten studies met the criteria for inclusion. Five key themes emerged from the meta-synthesis: physical and psychological symptoms; making progress; the need to know; and safety and security. Findings from this meta-synthesis and other related literature supports the existence of physical and psychological problems in the immediate period following discharge from critical care to the ward, and suggests that patients and their families have a desire for more control over their recovery. However, this desire is countered by a need to feel safe and protected, culminating in an expression of dependence on healthcare staff. Any effective support strategy needs to take account of these findings. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of traditional meditation retreats: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Bassam; Knäuper, Bärbel; Schlosser, Marco; Carrière, Kimberly; Chiesa, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of studies are investigating traditional meditation retreats. Very little, however, is known about their effectiveness. To evaluate the effectiveness of meditation retreats on improving psychological outcomes in general population. A systematic review of studies published in journals or as dissertations in PSYCINFO, PUBMED, CINAHL or Web of Science from the first available date until October 22, 2016. A total of 20 papers (21 studies, N=2912) were included. Effect-size estimates of outcomes combined suggested that traditional meditation retreats are moderately effective in pre-post analyses (n=19; Hedge's g=0.45; 95% CI [0.35, 0.54], pmeditation styles. Results suggested large effects on measures of anxiety, depression and stress, and moderate effects on measures of emotional regulation and quality of life. As to potential mechanisms of actions, results showed large effects on measures of mindfulness and compassion, and moderate effects on measures of acceptance. In addition, changes in mindfulness levels strongly moderated clinical effect sizes. However, heterogeneity was significant among trials, probably due to differences in study designs, types and duration of the retreats and assessed outcomes, limiting therefore the implications of the results. Meditation retreats are moderately to largely effective in reducing depression, anxiety, stress and in ameliorating the quality of life of participants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. What is the value and impact of quality and safety teams? A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norris Jill M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to conduct a scoping review of the literature about the establishment and impact of quality and safety team initiatives in acute care. Methods Studies were identified through electronic searches of Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ABI Inform, Cochrane databases. Grey literature and bibliographies were also searched. Qualitative or quantitative studies that occurred in acute care, describing how quality and safety teams were established or implemented, the impact of teams, or the barriers and/or facilitators of teams were included. Two reviewers independently extracted data on study design, sample, interventions, and outcomes. Quality assessment of full text articles was done independently by two reviewers. Studies were categorized according to dimensions of quality. Results Of 6,674 articles identified, 99 were included in the study. The heterogeneity of studies and results reported precluded quantitative data analyses. Findings revealed limited information about attributes of successful and unsuccessful team initiatives, barriers and facilitators to team initiatives, unique or combined contribution of selected interventions, or how to effectively establish these teams. Conclusions Not unlike systematic reviews of quality improvement collaboratives, this broad review revealed that while teams reported a number of positive results, there are many methodological issues. This study is unique in utilizing traditional quality assessment and more novel methods of quality assessment and reporting of results (SQUIRE to appraise studies. Rigorous design, evaluation, and reporting of quality and safety team initiatives are required.

  18. Complementary Medicine, Exercise, Meditation, Diet, and Lifestyle Modification for Anxiety Disorders: A Review of Current Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sarris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of complementary medicines and therapies (CAM and modification of lifestyle factors such as physical activity, exercise, and diet are being increasingly considered as potential therapeutic options for anxiety disorders. The objective of this metareview was to examine evidence across a broad range of CAM and lifestyle interventions in the treatment of anxiety disorders. In early 2012 we conducted a literature search of PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, Web of Science, PsycInfo, and the Cochrane Library, for key studies, systematic reviews, and metaanalyses in the area. Our paper found that in respect to treatment of generalized anxiety or specific disorders, CAM evidence revealed current support for the herbal medicine Kava. One isolated study shows benefit for naturopathic medicine, whereas acupuncture, yoga, and Tai chi have tentative supportive evidence, which is hampered by overall poor methodology. The breadth of evidence does not support homeopathy for treating anxiety. Strong support exists for lifestyle modifications including adoption of moderate exercise and mindfulness meditation, whereas dietary improvement, avoidance of caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine offer encouraging preliminary data. In conclusion, certain lifestyle modifications and some CAMs may provide a beneficial role in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  19. School-based internet obesity prevention programs for adolescents: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, Robin; Chao, Ariana; Popick, Rachel; Grey, Margaret

    2013-03-01

    In response to the childhood obesity epidemic, numerous studies on school-based Internet obesity prevention interventions have been conducted. The purpose of this systematic review is to describe, synthesize, and evaluate the research on school-based Internet obesity prevention programs for adolescents. Medline, CINAHL, and PsycInfo were searched from January 1995 to August 2012 to locate relevant studies. Ninety-one reports were initially identified, with 12 meeting the inclusion criteria. Studies had variable control groups, program content, and sample characteristics. Though few authors reported on implementation processes or body mass index (BMI) outcomes, the majority of studies were effective in improving health behaviors in the short term. Most studies were judged to have a high or unclear risk of bias in at least two domains, thus the quality of evidence for this body of literature is moderate. Further research is needed to examine programs of longer duration, optimal dose and timing of programs, cost-effectiveness, and mediators and moderators of intervention outcomes.

  20. Narrative Review of Dance-based Exercise and Its Specific Impact on Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Marks

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is a chronic condition that results in considerable disability, and particularly in later life, severely impacts the life quality of the individual with this condition. The first aim of this review article was to summarize, synthesize, and evaluate the research base concerning the use of dance-based exercises on health status, in general, and secondly, specifically for reducing depressive symptoms, in older adults. A third was to provide directives for professionals who work or are likely to work with this population in the future. Methods: All English language peer reviewed publications detailing the efficacy of dance therapy as an intervention strategy for older people in general, and specifically for minimizing depression and dependence among the elderly were analyzed. Key words: dance therapy and depression were included. Databases used were Academic Search Complete, Cinahl, PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO, and Web of Science. Results: Collectively, this data reveal dance therapy may be useful as a rehabilitation strategy for older adults, in general, as well as for elders with varying degrees of depression, regardless of strategy employed. Conclusions: Although more research is needed, older individuals with or without chronic depression or depressive symptoms can benefit emotionally from dance based exercise participation. Geriatric clinicians can expect this form of exercise will also heighten the life quality of the older individual with depression or subclinical depression.

  1. Spiritual Care Training Provided to Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paal, Piret; Helo, Yousef; Frick, Eckhard

    2015-03-01

    This systematic review was conducted to assess the outcomes of spiritual care training. It outlines the training outcomes based on participants' oral/written feedback, course evaluation and performance assessment. Intervention was defined as any form of spiritual care training provided to healthcare professionals studying/working in an academic and/or clinical setting. An online search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, ERIC, PsycINFO, ASSIA, CSA, ATLA and CENTRAL up to Week 27 of 2013 by two independent investigators to reduce errors in inclusion. Only peer-reviewed journal articles reporting on training outcomes were included. A primary keyword-driven search found 4912 articles; 46 articles were identified as relevant for final analysis. The narrative synthesis of findings outlines the following outcomes: (1) acknowledging spirituality on an individual level, (2) success in integrating spirituality in clinical practice, (3) positive changes in communication with patients. This study examines primarily pre/post-effects within a single cohort. Due to an average study quality, the reported findings in this review are to be seen as indicators at most. Nevertheless, this review makes evident that without attending to one'the repeliefs and needs, addressing spirituality in patients will not be forthcoming. It also demonstrates that spiritual care training may help to challenge the spiritual vacuum in healthcare institutions.

  2. Maternal obesity in Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onubi, Ojochenemi J.; Marais, Debbi; Aucott, Lorna; Okonofua, Friday; Poobalan, Amudha S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Maternal obesity is emerging as a public health problem, recently highlighted together with maternal under-nutrition as a ‘double burden’, especially in African countries undergoing social and economic transition. This systematic review was conducted to investigate the current evidence on maternal obesity in Africa. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, CINAHL and PsycINFO were searched (up to August 2014) and identified 29 studies. Prevalence, associations with socio-demographic factors, labour, child and maternal consequences of maternal obesity were assessed. Pooled risk ratios comparing obese and non-obese groups were calculated. Results Prevalence of maternal obesity across Africa ranged from 6.5 to 50.7%, with older and multiparous mothers more likely to be obese. Obese mothers had increased risks of adverse labour, child and maternal outcomes. However, non-obese mothers were more likely to have low-birthweight babies. The differences in measurement and timing of assessment of maternal obesity were found across studies. No studies were identified either on the knowledge or attitudes of pregnant women towards maternal obesity; or on interventions for obese pregnant women. Conclusions These results show that Africa's levels of maternal obesity are already having significant adverse effects. Culturally adaptable/sensitive interventions should be developed while monitoring to avoid undesired side effects. PMID:26487702

  3. Pediatric palliative care for youth with HIV/AIDS: systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Megan L; Dallas, Ronald H; Fanone, Kathleen E; Lyon, Maureen E

    2013-01-01

    Improvement in treatment has led to decreased death in youth with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in developed countries. Despite this, youth with HIV are still at risk for increased mortality and morbidity compared with their uninfected counterparts. In developing countries, high numbers of youth die from acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related illnesses due to lack of access to consistent antiretroviral treatment. As a result, pediatric palliative care is a relevant topic for those providing care to youth with HIV. A systematic review was conducted to gather information regarding the status of the literature related to pediatric palliative care and medical decision-making for youth with HIV. The relevant literature published between January 2002 and June 2012 was identified through searches conducted using PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and PSYCInfo databases and a series of key words. Articles were reviewed by thematic analysis using the pillars of palliative care set out by the National Consensus Project. Twenty-one articles were retained after review and are summarized by theme. In general, few empirically based studies evaluating palliative care and medical decision-making in youth with HIV were identified. Articles identified focused primarily on physical aspects of care, with less attention paid to psychological, social, ethical, and cultural aspects of care. We recommend that future research focuses on broadening the evaluation of pediatric palliative care among youth with HIV by directly evaluating the psychological, social, ethical, and cultural aspects of care and investigating the needs of all involved stakeholders.

  4. Cognitive behavioral therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, or anxiety disorders in women and girls living with female genital mutilation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelufosi, Adegoke; Edet, Bassey; Arikpo, Dachi; Aquaisua, Ememobong; Meremikwu, Martin M

    2017-02-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) is associated with psychological consequences such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PSTD), depression, and anxiety disorders. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), an empirically supported form of psychotherapy, may be an effective treatment for these psychological sequelae of FGM. To assess the effectiveness of CBT among individuals living with any type of FGM and diagnosed to have PTSD, depression, or anxiety disorders. CENTRAL, Medline, African Index Medicus, SCOPUS, PILOTS, POPLINE, PsycINFO, WHOLIS, LILACS, ERIC, NYAM Library, CINAHL, Web of Science were searched from inception up to August 10, 2015. Both randomized and nonrandomized studies comparing the efficacy of CBT to other forms of interventions for PTSD, depression, or anxiety disorders in individuals with FGM, were systematically reviewed. We did not identify any studies with eligible design that addressed the objective of the review. There are no included studies. Future studies need to look beyond establishing the prevalence and correlates of FGM to conducting well-designed, randomized controlled studies or well-designed interventional observational studies for the management of the psychological consequences of women and girls living with FGM. CRD42015024458. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. The World Health Organization retains copyright and all other rights in the manuscript of this article as submitted for publication.

  5. End-of-life expectations and experiences among nursing home patients and their relatives--a synthesis of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosse, Anette; Schaufel, Margrethe Aase; Ruths, Sabine; Malterud, Kirsti

    2014-10-01

    Synthesize research about patients' and relatives' expectations and experiences on how doctors can improve end-of-life care in nursing homes. We systematically searched qualitative studies in English in seven databases (Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Ageline, Cochrane Systematic Reviews and Cochrane Trials). We included 14 publications in the analysis with meta-ethnography. Patients and families emphasized the importance of health personnel anticipating illness trajectories and recognizing the information and palliation needed. Family members who became proxy decision-makers reported uncertainty and distress when guidance from health personnel was lacking. They worried about staff shortage and emphasized doctor availability. Relatives and health personnel seldom recognized patients' ability to consent, and patients' preferences were not always recognized. Nursing home patients and their relatives wanted doctors more involved in end-of-life care. They expected doctors to acknowledge their preferences and provide guidance and symptom relief. High-quality end-of-life care in nursing homes relies on organization, funding and skilled staff, including available doctors who are able to recognize illness trajectories and perform individualized Advance Care Planning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nursing challenges for universal health coverage: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Cabral Schveitzer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives to identify nursing challenges for universal health coverage, based on the findings of a systematic review focused on the health workforce' understanding of the role of humanization practices in Primary Health Care. Method systematic review and meta-synthesis, from the following information sources: PubMed, CINAHL, Scielo, Web of Science, PsycInfo, SCOPUS, DEDALUS and Proquest, using the keyword Primary Health Care associated, separately, with the following keywords: humanization of assistance, holistic care/health, patient centred care, user embracement, personal autonomy, holism, attitude of health personnel. Results thirty studies between 1999-2011. Primary Health Care work processes are complex and present difficulties for conducting integrative care, especially for nursing, but humanizing practices have showed an important role towards the development of positive work environments, quality of care and people-centered care by promoting access and universal health coverage. Conclusions nursing challenges for universal health coverage are related to education and training, to better working conditions and clear definition of nursing role in primary health care. It is necessary to overcome difficulties such as fragmented concepts of health and care and invest in multidisciplinary teamwork, community empowerment, professional-patient bond, user embracement, soft technologies, to promote quality of life, holistic care and universal health coverage.

  7. Leading change: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Brantley, Heather V; Ford, Debra J

    2017-04-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of leading change. Nurses have been called to lead change to advance the health of individuals, populations, and systems. Conceptual clarity about leading change in the context of nursing and healthcare systems provides an empirical direction for future research and theory development that can advance the science of leadership studies in nursing. Concept analysis. CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, Health Business Elite and Business Source Premier databases were searched using the terms: leading change, transformation, reform, leadership and change. Literature published in English from 2001 - 2015 in the fields of nursing, medicine, organizational studies, business, education, psychology or sociology were included. Walker and Avant's method was used to identify descriptions, antecedents, consequences and empirical referents of the concept. Model, related and contrary cases were developed. Five defining attributes of leading change were identified: (a) individual and collective leadership; (b) operational support; (c) fostering relationships; (d) organizational learning; and (e) balance. Antecedents were external or internal driving forces and organizational readiness. The consequences of leading change included improved organizational performance and outcomes and new organizational culture and values. A theoretical definition and conceptual model of leading change were developed. Future studies that use and test the model may contribute to the refinement of a middle-range theory to advance nursing leadership research and education. From this, empirically derived interventions that prepare and enable nurses to lead change to advance health may be realized. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Incivility, retention and new graduate nurses: an integrated review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambra, Amanda M; Andrews, Diane R

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the influence of incivility on the new graduate nurse transition experience. Incivility in the work environment is a major source of dissatisfaction and new graduate nurses are especially vulnerable. Incivility contributes to the high levels of turnover associated within the first 2 years of new graduate nurse employment. An integrated review of the literature was conducted using MEDLINE-EBSCOhost, PsycInfo and CINAHL databases. Relevant articles were reviewed for appropriateness related to inclusion/exclusion criteria and for quality using established criteria. Sixteen studies were included in the final analysis. Themes that emerged included workplace incivility, nurse residency programmes, mentoring through preceptors and empowerment/work environment. Findings indicated that incivility in the workplace was a significant predictor of low job satisfaction in new graduate nurses transitioning into practice. While graduate nurse transition programmes are associated with improved satisfaction and retention, they appear to address incivility by acculturating new graduate nurses to the experience of incivility. There is little evidence that the culture of incivility has been addressed. Nurse managers have the responsibility to be aware of the prevalence of incivility, assess for its occurrence, and implement strategies which eliminate workplace incivility and tolerance for uncivil behaviours. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Knowledge tests in patient education: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesänen, Jukka; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Arifulla, Dinah; Siekkinen, Mervi; Valkeapää, Kirsi

    2014-06-01

    This study describes knowledge tests in patient education through a systematic review of the Medline, Cinahl, PsycINFO, and ERIC databases with the guidance of the PRISMA Statement. Forty-nine knowledge tests were identified. The contents were health-problem related, focusing on biophysiological and functional knowledge. The mean number of items was 20, with true-false or multiple-choice scales. Most of the tests were purposely designed for the studies included in the review. The most frequently reported quality assessments of knowledge tests were content validity and internal consistency. The outcome measurements for patient-education needs were comprehensive, validating knowledge tests that cover multidimensional aspects of knowledge. Besides the measurement of the outcomes of patient education, knowledge tests could be used for several purposes in patient education: to guide the content of education as checklists, to monitor the learning process, and as educational tools. There is a need for more efficient content and health problem-specific knowledge-test assessments.

  10. Mental Health Interventions in the Workplace and Work Outcomes: A Best-Evidence Synthesis of Systematic Reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SL Wagner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental health issues in the workplace are a growing concern among organizations and policymakers, but it remains unclear what interventions are effective in preventing mental health problems and their associated organizational consequences. This synthesis reports on workplace mental health interventions that impact absenteeism, productivity and financial outcomes. Objective: To determine the level of evidence supporting mental health interventions as valuable to work outcomes. Methods: Databases were searched for systematic reviews between 2000 and 2012: Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, DARE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and TRIP. Grey literature searches included health-evidence.ca, Rehab+, National Rehabilitation Information Center (NARIC, and Institute for Work and Health. The assessment of articles for inclusion criteria and methodological quality was conducted independently by two or more researchers, with differences resolved through consensus. Results: The search resulted in 3363 titles, of which 3248 were excluded following title/abstract review, with 115 articles retrieved for full-text review. 14 articles finally met the inclusion criteria and are summarized in this synthesis. Conclusion: There is moderate evidence for the effectiveness of workplace mental health interventions on improved workplace outcomes. Certain types of programs, such as those incorporating both mental and physical health interventions, multicomponent mental health and/or psychosocial interventions, and exposure in vivo containing interventions for particular anxiety disorders had a greater level of research evidence to support their effectiveness.

  11. The effectiveness of cultural competence programs in ethnic minority patient-centered health care--a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzaho, A M N; Romios, P; Crock, C; Sønderlund, A L

    2013-07-01

    To examine the effectiveness of patient-centered care (PCC) models, which incorporate a cultural competence (CC) perspective, in improving health outcomes among culturally and linguistically diverse patients. The search included seven EBSCO-host databases: Academic Search Complete, Academic Search Premier, CINAHL with Full Text, Global Health, MEDLINE with Full Text, PsycINFO PsycARTICLES, PsycEXTRA, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection and Pubmed, Web of Knowledge and Google Scholar. The review was undertaken following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and the critical appraisals skill program guidelines, covering the period from January 2000 to July 2011. Data extraction Data were extracted from the studies using a piloted form, including fields for study research design, population under study, setting, sample size, study results and limitations. The initial search identified 1450 potentially relevant studies. Only 13 met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 11 were quantitative studies and 2 were qualitative. The conclusions drawn from the retained studies indicated that CC PCC programs increased practitioners' knowledge, awareness and cultural sensitivity. No significant findings were identified in terms of improved patient health outcomes. PCC models that incorporate a CC component are increased practitioners' knowledge about and awareness of dealing with culturally diverse patients. However, there is a considerable lack of research looking into whether this increase in practitioner knowledge translates into better practice, and in turn improved patient-related outcomes. More research examining this specific relationship is, thus, needed.

  12. Patient's perceptions of chronic kidney disease and their association with psychosocial and clinical outcomes: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Amy L; Yates, Thomas; Smith, Alice C; Chilcot, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) form organized beliefs regarding their illness and treatment. These perceptions influence the coping strategies employed by an individual to manage his/her illness and may act as a predictor for his/her willingness to engage in self-management behaviours. While illness perceptions have been identified as predictors of non-adherence, depression and mortality in dialysis patients, there is a paucity of research in CKD patients not requiring renal replacement therapy. This narrative review synthesizes the existing literature regarding the role of illness perceptions and associated clinical and psychosocial outcomes in non-dialysis CKD patients. Studies were identified following database searches of AMED, BNI, CINAHL, EMBASE, Health Business Elite, HMIC, Medline, PsycINFO and Google Scholar in January 2016. Despite the small evidence base, existing studies indicate that negative illness perceptions are associated with disease progression and a number of psychosocial outcomes in non-dialysis CKD patients. Evidence from other clinical populations suggests that illness perceptions are modifiable through psychological intervention, which may be most effective if delivered early before beliefs have the chance to become more established. Therefore, targeting illness perceptions in the earlier stages of CKD may be optimal. Further studies are now required to ascertain the mechanisms through which illness perceptions predict psychosocial and clinical outcomes in CKD patients and to ultimately test the efficacy of illness perception-based interventions.

  13. [Effectiveness of non-pharmacological interventions in the quality of life of caregivers of Alzheimer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador-Marín, Bárbara; Guerra-Martín, María Dolores

    Explore the effectiveness of non-pharmacological interventions to improve the quality of life of family caregivers of Alzheimer's patients. We conducted a systematic review, in pairs, in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, PsycINFO, WOS, Cochrane Library, IME, Cuiden Plus and Dialnet. Inclusion criteria were: 1. Studies published between 2010-2015. 2. Language: English, Portuguese and Spanish. 3. Randomized controlled clinical trials. 4. Score greater than or equal to 3 on the Jadad scale. 13 studies were included. Four performed a psychosocial intervention with family caregivers, three psychotherapeutic, two psychoeducational, two multicomponent, one educational and another with mutual support groups. The tools to assess quality of life: three studies used the Health Status Questionnaire (HSQ), three EuroQol-5D (two only used the EVA), two health questionnaire SF-36, two WHOQOL-BREF, two Quality of Life SF-12 and one Perceived Quality of Life Scale (PQoL). Regarding the effectiveness of non-pharmacological interventions, five studies obtained favorable results in the quality of life after psychotherapeutic interventions and community-type multicomponent training. The diversity of non-pharmacological interventions used and contents, differences in the number of sessions and hours, and variability of valuation tools used to measure quality of life of family caregivers, leads us to reflect on the appropriateness to standardize criteria, for the sake to improve clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Systematic Review of Screening Instruments for Psychosocial Problems in Children and Adolescents With Long-Term Physical Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabrew, Hiran; McDowell, Heather; Given, Katherine; Murrell, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Children and adolescents with long-term physical conditions (LTPCs) are at greater risk of developing psychosocial problems. Screening for such problems may be undertaken using validated psychometric instruments to facilitate early intervention. A systematic review was undertaken to identify clinically utilized and psychometrically validated instruments for identifying depression, anxiety, behavior problems, substance use problems, family problems, and multiple problems in children and adolescents with LTPCs. Comprehensive searches of articles published in English between 1994 and 2014 were completed via Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Cochrane CENTRAL databases, and by examining reference lists of identified articles and previous related reviews. Forty-four potential screening instruments were identified, described, and evaluated against predetermined clinical and psychometric criteria. Despite limitations in the evidence regarding their clinical and psychometric validity in this population, a handful of instruments, available at varying cost, in multiple languages and formats, were identified to support targeted, but not universal, screening for psychosocial problems in children and adolescents with LTPCs.

  15. Transdisciplinarity in Health Care: A Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bewer, Vanessa

    2017-05-26

    To analyze the concept of transdisciplinarity and provide an enhanced definition of transdisciplinarity in health care. The term transdisciplinarity is increasingly prevalent in health care research and has been identified as important to improving the effectiveness and efficiency in health care. However, the term continues to be misappropriated and poorly understood by researchers and clinicians alike which hinders its potential use and impact. Walker and Avant's (2005) method of concept analysis was used as a framework for the study of the concept. The databases PubMed, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, PsycInfo and ERIC were used searching the terms transdisciplinarity, transdisciplinary, interdisciplinary and interdisciplinarity. Transdisciplinarity in health care involves transcending of disciplinary boundaries, a sharing of knowledge, skills and decision-making, a focus on real-world problems and the inclusion of multiple stakeholders including patients, their families and their communities. An enhanced definition of transdisciplinarity in health care emerged from this concept analysis that may provide clarity and direction for health care providers. Nurses, and other health care providers, can look to this definition to understand transdisciplinary health care teams as opposed to multidisciplinary, and interdisciplinary ones. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Barriers and facilitators of adjuvant hormone therapy adherence and persistence in women with breast cancer: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Zoe; Moss-Morris, Rona; Hunter, Myra S; Carlisle, Sophie; Hughes, Lyndsay D

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Nonadherence to hormone therapy in breast cancer survivors is common and associated with increased risk of mortality. Consistent predictors of nonadherence and nonpersistence are yet to be identified, and little research has examined psychosocial factors that may be amenable to change through intervention. This review aimed to identify predictors of nonadherence and nonpersistence to hormone therapy in breast cancer survivors in order to inform development of an intervention to increase adherence rates. Methods Studies published up to April 2016 were identified through MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, PsycINFO, CINAHL and gray literature. Studies published in English measuring associations between adherence or persistence and any predictor variables were included. Eligible studies were assessed for methodological quality, data were extracted and a narrative synthesis was conducted. Results Sixty-one eligible articles were identified. Most studies focused on clinical and demographic factors with inconsistent results. Some evidence suggested that receiving specialist care and social support were related to increased persistence, younger age and increased number of hospitalizations were associated with nonadherence, and good patient–physician relationship and self-efficacy for taking medication were associated with better adherence. A small amount of evidence suggested that medication beliefs were associated with adherence, but more high-quality research is needed to confirm this. Conclusion Some psychosocial variables were associated with better adherence and persistence, but the results are currently tentative. Future high-quality research should be carried out to identify psychosocial determinants of nonadherence or nonpersistence that are modifiable through intervention. PMID:28260867

  17. The effect of obesity on polycystic ovary syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S S; Norman, R J; Davies, M J; Moran, L J

    2013-02-01

    While many women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are overweight, obese or centrally obese, the effect of excess weight on the outcomes of PCOS is inconsistent. The review aimed to assess the effects of overweight, obesity and central obesity on the reproductive, metabolic and psychological features of PCOS. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and PSYCINFO were searched for studies reporting outcomes according to body mass index categories or body fat distribution. Data were presented as mean difference or risk ratio (95% confidence interval). This review included 30 eligible studies. Overweight or obese women with PCOS had decreased sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), increased total testosterone, free androgen index, hirsutism, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance index and worsened lipid profile. Obesity significantly worsened all metabolic and reproductive outcomes measured except for hirsutism when compared to normal weight women with PCOS. Overweight women had no differences in total testosterone, hirsutism, total-cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol compared to normal weight women and no differences in SHBG and total testosterone compared to obese women. Central obesity was associated with higher fasting insulin levels. These results suggest that prevention and treatment of obesity is important for the management of PCOS. © 2012 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  18. Nurse-family interaction in Malaysian palliative care settings: a focused literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namasivayam, Pathma; O Connor, Margaret; Barnett, Tony; Lee, Susan; Peters, Louise

    2011-10-01

    Palliative care in Malaysia developed in the 1990s to improve the quality of life of people with advanced cancer. Like many other countries, Malaysia faces its own challenges in providing palliative care to patients and their families. In Malaysian culture, families play a significant part in providing care to the dying. Connecting with families in patient care is therefore important. This paper reports a focused literature review evaluating studies on the care of the families of terminally ill people in palliative care environments in Malaysia. The search engines CINAHL, Medline, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar were searched for literature published from January 2000 to April 2010 relating to family care in palliative care environments. Due to a paucity of research on family care in Malaysia, the search was broadened to include relevant studies on family care internationally. Four themes were identified: delivering palliative care in Malaysia, communicating with families, crossing cultural boundaries, and the caring experience of nurses. The studies indicate the importance of the nurse-family interaction in providing optimal and culturally appropriate palliative care. This paper emphasizes the need for research into the nurse's role in family care and for developing a theory appropriate to the Malaysian culture and other countries with cultural diversity.

  19. Application of the Andersen's health care utilization framework to secondary complications of spinal cord injury: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilcher, Sara J T; Craven, B Cathy; McColl, Mary Ann; Lemieux-Charles, Louise; Casciaro, Tiziana; Jaglal, Susan B

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this scoping review was to identify research priority areas related to secondary complications and associated health care use for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Peer-reviewed journals were identified using CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, Social Sciences Abstracts, Social Works Abstract and PsycInfo search engines. Key references were hand searched. A total of 289 abstracts were identified from the initial search strategy. We removed studies that did not measure health care and those that did not involve analytical investigation. The selected 31 studies were reviewed in detail using a coding template based on the domains and sub-components of the Andersen model (i.e. environmental, population characteristics, health behavior and outcome). Most studies measured predisposing characteristics (e.g., age, gender) and need characteristics (e.g., level of injury). There was a notable absence of environmental characteristics (e.g., health system, neighborhood variables), enabling characteristics and health behaviors (beyond diet and nutrition). We identified a gap in the SCI literature. Future research should focus on longitudinal study designs with more representation of non-traumatic spinal cord injury, as well as utilizing more advanced statistical analyses (i.e., multivariate level) to adjust for confounding variables.

  20. The Relationship Between Online Social Networking and Depression: A Systematic Review of Quantitative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David A; Algorta, Guillermo Perez

    2016-11-01

    Online social networking sites (SNSs) such as Facebook, Twitter, and MySpace are used by billions of people every day to communicate and interact with others. There has been increasing interest in the potential impact of online social networking on wellbeing, with a broadening body of new research into factors associated with both positive and negative mental health outcomes such as depression. This systematic review of empirical studies (n = 30) adds to existing research in this field by examining current quantitative studies focused on the relationship between online social networking and symptoms of depression. The academic databases PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE were searched systematically using terms related to online social networking and depression. Reporting quality was critically appraised and the findings discussed with reference to their wider implications. The findings suggest that the relationship between online social networking and symptoms of depression may be complex and associated with multiple psychological, social, behavioral, and individual factors. Furthermore, the impact of online social networking on wellbeing may be both positive and negative, highlighting the need for future research to determine the impact of candidate mediators and moderators underlying these heterogeneous outcomes across evolving networks.

  1. Barriers and facilitators of adjuvant hormone therapy adherence and persistence in women with breast cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Zoe; Moss-Morris, Rona; Hunter, Myra S; Carlisle, Sophie; Hughes, Lyndsay D

    2017-01-01

    Nonadherence to hormone therapy in breast cancer survivors is common and associated with increased risk of mortality. Consistent predictors of nonadherence and nonpersistence are yet to be identified, and little research has examined psychosocial factors that may be amenable to change through intervention. This review aimed to identify predictors of nonadherence and nonpersistence to hormone therapy in breast cancer survivors in order to inform development of an intervention to increase adherence rates. Studies published up to April 2016 were identified through MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, PsycINFO, CINAHL and gray literature. Studies published in English measuring associations between adherence or persistence and any predictor variables were included. Eligible studies were assessed for methodological quality, data were extracted and a narrative synthesis was conducted. Sixty-one eligible articles were identified. Most studies focused on clinical and demographic factors with inconsistent results. Some evidence suggested that receiving specialist care and social support were related to increased persistence, younger age and increased number of hospitalizations were associated with nonadherence, and good patient-physician relationship and self-efficacy for taking medication were associated with better adherence. A small amount of evidence suggested that medication beliefs were associated with adherence, but more high-quality research is needed to confirm this. Some psychosocial variables were associated with better adherence and persistence, but the results are currently tentative. Future high-quality research should be carried out to identify psychosocial determinants of nonadherence or nonpersistence that are modifiable through intervention.

  2. Psychological factors predict adherence to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis; findings from a systematic review of rates, predictors and associations with patient-reported and clinical outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluett, James; Barton, Anne; Hyrich, Kimme L; Cordingley, Lis; Verstappen, Suzanne M M

    2016-01-01

    Treatment response to methotrexate (MTX) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is not universal and non-adherence may partially explain this. The aims of this systematic review were to: (1) summarise existing rates of adherence to MTX, (2) identify predictors of adherence to MTX, and (3) assess the association between non-adherence and patient outcomes. The authors conducted a systematic search of papers published from January 1980 to February 2015 in PubMed, PsycINFO, EMBASE and CINAHL databases. Studies were eligible for inclusion if: (1) MTX was used as monotherapy or in combination with other therapies, (2) MTX was used in an RA or inflammatory polyarthritis population, (3) adherence was defined and measured as the extent to which patients followed their MTX regimen during the period of prescription, and (4) it was an original piece of research. In total, 10 studies met the inclusion criteria and 8 were evaluated as high quality. Rates of adherence ranged from 59% to 107%, and exposed differences in definitions of adherence, study methodologies and sample heterogeneity. A number of potential predictors of MTX adherence were identified; the strongest being related to beliefs in the necessity and efficacy of MTX, absence of low mood, mild disease and MTX monotherapy. Furthermore, 3 studies tested the association of adherence with disease activity as an outcome measure; all 3 found non-adherence associated with poor treatment response. This systematic review shows the importance of adherence to MTX treatment and summarises the associated modifiable factors. PMID:26848403

  3. The relationship between coping style and psychological distress in people with head and neck cancer: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Nicolle; Moghaddam, Nima; Tickle, Anna; Biswas, Sanchia

    2017-07-27

    Individuals diagnosed with head and neck cancer (HNC) are at elevated risk of psychological distress and reduced quality of life. This review aimed to systematically examine and critically assess the quality of empirical evidence for associations between coping mechanisms and psychological distress among people with HNC. CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched. Studies were included if they used reliable and valid measures to investigate the relationship between coping style and psychological distress. Study quality was assessed according to pre-set criteria. Twelve studies (8 cross-sectional and 4 longitudinal designs) involving 1281 patients were reviewed. There was considerable heterogeneity in study samples and coping measures. Moderate-to-large associations between disengagement coping mechanisms (eg, avoidance) and psychological distress were observed. Engagement coping strategies (eg, direct action) were not consistently associated with psychological distress. Several studies observed a significant relationship between coping styles aimed at disengaging and distancing from cancer and increased psychological distress in people with HNC. To understand directionality of these associations and develop understanding of temporal features of the relationship between coping styles and distress, longitudinal designs could be used. This would enable evidence-based recommendations regarding psychological interventions (eg, encouraging helpful coping strategies) for individuals along their HNC care pathway. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Does somatosensation change with age in children and adolescents? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S; McLean, B; Falkmer, T; Carey, L; Girdler, S; Elliott, C; Blair, E

    2016-11-01

    Somatosensory modalities, such as touch, proprioception and haptic ability, greatly influence the achievement of developmental milestones for children. Describing somatosensory impairment, natural variability and typical or expected developmental changes across age groups will help establish frameworks for intervention in clinical populations. This systematic review aimed to determine how different somatosensory modalities develop across childhood into adolescence to use as a point of reference for children at risk of somatosensory impairment. Searches of five electronic databases were undertaken through EBSCO-host (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus and ERIC) for studies measuring at least one somatosensory modality in typically developing individuals between birth and 18 years and analysed by age. Characteristics of studies were collected including country of origin, sample size, demographics and outcome measure used. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed by two independent reviewers. Twenty three cross-sectional studies were included from a total of 188 articles retrieved: 8 examined aspects of touch, 5 proprioception and 10 haptic ability. Variability of study designs and variation in assessment tools precluded any formal meta-analysis. Somatosensation matures through childhood into adolescence; however, the present review found the pattern of somatosensory development varied depending on the assessment tool used and the aspect of somatosensation being measured, making it difficult to describe typical performance. There is a need for comprehensive assessment batteries to measure the somatosensation, including touch, proprioception and haptic ability, of children at risk of somatosensory impairment to aid in the development of effective interventions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Nonphysical effects of exergames on child and adolescent well-being: a comprehensive systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joronen, Katja; Aikasalo, Anna; Suvitie, Anne

    2016-11-16

    Exergames have the potential to promote physical activity among children and adolescents. They also have other important benefits, but knowledge about other than the physical effects of exergaming remains thin. To report the findings of a review of ten studies on the nonphysical effects of exergames on child and adolescent well-being. A broad search strategy was employed to identify relevant studies in CINAHL Ebsco Host, Ovid MEDLINE, Psycinfo ProQuest, Eric ProQuest, Scopus and Cochrane Library. The search timeframe was from January 2004 to April 2015. A comprehensive systematic review without meta-analysis was conducted on 10 quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methods intervention studies. The quality of these studies was assessed following the guidelines of the Joanna Briggs Institute. The data were analysed using a narrative synthesis approach. Exergaming was found to have some positive effects on self-concept, situational interest and motivation, enjoyment, psychological and social well-being, symptomatology and different learning experiences. However, two studies reported no effect on self-efficacy, and one study showed no intervention effect on self-esteem. The only follow-up study indicated that the enjoyment effect lasted for a few months. Most of the studies reviewed found that exergaming had positive effects. However, more research evidence is still needed. In particular, there is a need for better-validated instruments and follow-up research. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. Effects of prenatal childbirth education for partners of pregnant women on paternal postnatal mental health and couple relationship: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Maiko; Takehara, Kenji; Yamane, Yumina; Ota, Erika

    2017-03-01

    Partner education during pregnancy may be able to prevent postnatal mental health problems, and support expectant fathers in their transition to parenthood. The aim of this systematic review is to investigate the effects of prenatal childbirth education among partners of pregnant women, particularly regarding paternal postnatal mental health and couple relationship. We searched Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ERIC, and CENTRAL using terms such as "partners of pregnant women," "education," and "prenatal support." Searches were limited to randomized trials. We included 11 trials out of 13 reports that addressed the following topics: childbirth preparation, couple relationship, infants and parenting, postpartum psychosocial issues, and housework sharing. Overall risk of bias was low or unclear. Study outcomes, including parents' mental health (e.g., anxiety, depression, distress), couple relationship, parents' transition adjustment and parenting stress, and parents' satisfaction with their experience of childbirth and prenatal childbirth education programs were reported. The studies included in this review were very diverse regarding intervention intensity and content, outcome types, measurement tools, and outcome timing. This impeded evaluation of the interventions' effectiveness. No sufficient evidence was identified that prenatal childbirth education for partners of pregnant women protects against paternal postnatal depression and couple relationship; however, paternal postnatal mental health is important to maternal and perinatal healthcare. The results of this review suggest that further research and intervention are required to provide partners of pregnant women with evidence-based information and support whole families during the perinatal period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Web-based physical activity interventions: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiry, Leila; Farhangi, Mahdieh Abbasalizad; Shab-Bidar, Sakineh; Rezaei, Fatemeh; Pashaei, T

    2017-07-20

    It was estimated that approximately 60% of the world's population is classified as inactive or insufficiently active. This meta-analysis investigated the effect of web-based interventions on different types of physical activity (PA) measurements in general population and potential moderating variables. PubMed, CINAHL, EBSCOhost, PsycINFO, Scopus, Ovid, and ScienceDirect literature searches were conducted to identify studies investigating the effect of web-based interventions on PA. Randomized controlled trials on PA changes reported in moderate to vigorous intensity, walking, and step count in the intervention group in comparison with the control group were pooled with a fixed-effects model separately. A total of 22 studies comprising 16,476 and 14,475 subjects in intervention and control groups respectively were included. Web-based interventions had positive and significant effect on increasing PA. Of 14 trials reporting moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), five showed a significant increase in the MVPA level after the intervention. There was significant heterogeneity between studies (P web-based interventions seemed to be influenced by the characteristics of mean age of participants, trial duration, and study quality (P web-based PA interventions had a positive significant effect on increasing all the three types of PA among the general population. However, the effects appear to depend on the design of the study, age, and duration of studies. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Inappropriate prescribing among older persons in primary care: protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cia Sin; Liew, Tau Ming

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Inappropriate prescribing has a significant impact on older persons in primary care. Previous reviews on inappropriate prescribing included a heterogeneous range of populations and may not be generalisable to primary care. In this study we aim to conduct a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of the prevalence, risk factors and adverse outcome associated with inappropriate prescribing, specifically among older persons in primary care. Methods and analysis We will search PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Web of Science, Scopus, PsycINFO and references of other review articles for observational studies related to the keywords ‘older persons’, ‘primary care’ and ‘inappropriate prescribing’. Two reviewers will independently select the eligible articles. For each included article, the two reviewers will independently extract the data and assess the risk of bias using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale. If appropriate, meta-analyses will be performed to pool the data across all the studies. In the presence of heterogeneity, meta-regression and subgroup analyses will also be performed. The quality of the evidence will be assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Ethics and dissemination The results will be disseminated through conference presentations and peer-reviewed publications. They will provide consolidated evidence to support informed actions by policymakers to address inappropriate prescribing in primary care, thus reducing preventable and iatrogenic risk to older persons in primary care. Trial registration number CRD42016048874. PMID:28237963

  9. Resilience and the rehabilitation of adult spinal cord injury survivors: A qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhaber, Rachel; Mclean, Loyola; Betihavas, Vasiliki; Cleary, Michelle

    2017-07-20

    To synthesize the qualitative research evidence that explored how survivors of adult spinal cord injury experience and make sense of resilience. Spinal cord injury is often a sudden and unexpected life-changing event requiring complex and long-term rehabilitation. The development of resilience is essential in determining how spinal cord injury survivors negotiate this injury and rehabilitation. A qualitative systematic review and thematic synthesis of the research evidence. CINAHL, PubMed, Embase, Scopus and PsycINFO were searched, no restriction dates were used. Methodological quality was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme checklist. Thematic synthesis focused on how survivors of adult spinal cord injury experience and make sense of resilience. Six qualitative research articles reported the experiences of 84 spinal cord injury survivors. Themes identified were: uncertainty and regaining independence; prior experiences of resilience; adopting resilient thinking; and strengthening resilience through supports. Recovery and rehabilitation following spinal cord survivors is influenced by the individual's capacity for resilience. Resilience may be influenced by previous life experiences and enhanced by supportive nursing staff encouraging self-efficacy. Survivors identified the need for active involvement in decision-making about their care to enable a sense of regaining control of their lives. This has the potential to have a significant impact on their self-efficacy and in turn health outcomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Parental factors associated with obesity in children with disability: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, J; McVilly, K; Skouteris, H; Boganin, C

    2013-07-01

    The current literature on obesity in typically developing children shows that the family context, and specifically the way parents parent their children are major determinants of childhood obesity. The influence of these factors on obesity in children with disability, however, remains unclear. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken to identify the parental and parenting risk factors associated with obesity in children and adolescents with disability. Articles were identified through Medline, Academic Search Complete, PsycINFO, ProQuest, ISI, CINAHL, Cochrane and Scopus databases. There was no restriction on publication dates. The inclusion criteria were empirical papers that tested associations between parental and parenting risk factors and obesity in children and adolescents with intellectual and other developmental disabilities. Only 11 studies met the selection criteria and subsequently included in this review. Results suggest that obesity in children and adolescents with disability may be associated with socioeconomic status; parents' body mass index, perception and attitude towards their children's weight and physical activity; and levels of activity in both parents and children. Firm conclusions about these associations cannot be reached, however, due to mixed findings and methodological limitations of the studies. Recommendations for future research are provided.

  11. Effects of music therapy on behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Tomomi; Suzukamo, Yoshimi; Sato, Mai; Izumi, Shin-Ichi

    2013-03-01

    Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are common problems for patients and caregivers. Although music therapy is considered a non-pharmacological intervention for the management of BPSD, its effectiveness remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effects of music therapy on BPSD, cognitive function, and activities of daily living in patients with dementia. A literature search was conducted in the following databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Igaku Chuo Zasshi. We selected 20 studies, including randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, cohort studies, and controlled trials, and conducted a meta-analysis using standardized mean differences (SMD). The results showed that music therapy had moderate effects on anxiety [SMD, -0.64; 95% confidence interval (CI), -1.05 - -0.24; p=0.002] and small effects on behavioral symptoms (SMD, -0.49; 95% CI, -0.82 - -0.17; p=0.003). In studies of duration >3 months, music therapy had large effects on anxiety (SMD, -0.93; 95% CI, -1.72 - -0.13; p=0.02). The present systematic review and meta-analysis suggests that music therapy is effective for the management of BPSD.

  12. Is Empirical Research on Periodization Trustworthy? A Comprehensive Review of Conceptual and Methodological Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Afonso, Pantelis T. Nikolaidis, Patrícia Sousa, Isabel Mesquita

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Periodization is a core concept in training. Recently, systematic reviews and meta-analyses have attempted to provide a comprehensive overview of the topic, but theoretical criticisms have arisen with regard to how such research has been conducted. The purpose of the study was to review comprehensively the conceptual and methodological issues surrounding empirical research on periodization in training with human subjects. A search was conducted late in February 2016 on Academic Search Complete, CINAHL Plus, MedicLatina, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, Scielo, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science. Forty-two randomized or randomized controlled trials were retrieved. Problems emerged in three domains: (a Conceptually, periodization and variation were applied differently in research, while no empirical research tested predictions concerning direction, timing or magnitude of the adaptations; (b Study design: More than 95% of papers investigated the ‘physical’ factor (mainly strength. Research on long-term effects was absent (no study lasted more than nine months. Controlling for confounding factors such as nutrition, supplementation and medication was largely ignored; (c Data analysis was biased as dispersion in responsiveness was ignored when discussing the findings. Overall, research on periodization fails to analyze the conceptual premises proposed by these approaches.

  13. What cost components are relevant for economic evaluations of palliative care, and what approaches are used to measure these costs? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Clare; Ingleton, Christine; Ryan, Tony; Ward, Sue; Gott, Merryn

    2017-04-01

    It is important to understand the costs of palliative and end-of-life care in order to inform decisions regarding cost allocation. However, economic research in palliative care is very limited and little is known about the range and extent of the costs that are involved in palliative care provision. To undertake a systematic review of the health and social care literature to determine the range of financial costs related to a palliative care approach and explore approaches used to measure these costs. A systematic review of empirical literature with thematic synthesis. Study quality was evaluated using the Weight of Evidence Framework. The databases CINAHL, Cochrane, PsycINFO and Medline were searched from 1995 to November 2015 for empirical studies which presented data on the financial costs associated with palliative care. A total of 38 papers met our inclusion criteria. Components of palliative care costs were incurred within four broad domains: hospital care, community or home-based care, hospice care and informal care. These costs could be considered from the economic viewpoint of three providers: state or government, insurers/third-party/not-for-profit organisations and patient and family and/or society. A wide variety of costing approaches were used to derive costs. The evidence base regarding the economics of palliative care is sparse, particularly relating to the full economic costs of palliative care. Our review provides a framework for considering these costs from a variety of economic viewpoints; however, further research is required to develop and refine methodologies.

  14. [Ethnography and nursing research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yeu-Hui; Abbey, Jennifer

    2005-12-01

    Ethnography, a qualitative research method developed within the field of anthropology, has been increasingly applied to a variety of fields, including sociology, education, and nursing. Ethnography works to understand the behavior and views of a particular cultural group from that group's own perspective. Traditionally, ethnography has been differentiated into classic ethnography, systematic ethnography, interpretive ethnography, and critical ethnography. A recently developed focused ethnography studies specific issues within a single culture or social situation among a limited number of people within a specific period of time. Focused ethnography is particularly relevant to the field of health sciences and holds significant potential to contribute to nursing knowledge and to help improve nursing practice. A search of Medline, CINAHL, Eric, PsycINFO, and the Index to Chinese Periodical Literature database found that ethnography has seldom been applied or discussed in the nursing literature in Taiwan. Therefore, the aim of this article is focused on introducing ethnography and understanding the applications of ethnography in nursing research. Relevant nursing literature published between 2000 and 2005 is summarized and the authors hope that this paper will give Taiwanese nursing professionals a better appreciation of this methodology and encourage its wider application in nursing research.

  15. Behavioural treatment strategies improve adherence to lifestyle intervention programmes in adults with obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, E; Hassmén, P; Welvaert, M; Pumpa, K L

    2017-04-01

    Poor adherence to lifestyle intervention remains a key factor hindering treatment effectiveness and health outcomes for adults with obesity. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to determine if behavioural treatment strategies (e.g. goal setting, motivational interviewing, relapse prevention, cognitive restructuring etc.) improve adherence to lifestyle intervention programmes in adults with obesity. Randomized controlled trials that investigated the use of behavioural treatment strategies in obesity management were identified by systematically reviewing the literature within Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science from their inception to August 2016. This meta-analysis shows that behavioural treatment interventions have a significant positive effect on session attendance (percentage) and physical activity (total min/week) in adults with obesity (M = 17.63 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 10.77, 24.50), z =5.0337, P obesity. These strategies should be routinely incorporated into lifestyle intervention, obesity management and weight loss programmes with the aim of improving engagement and adherence. If adherence were improved, treatment effectiveness, health outcomes and the ultimate burden of chronic disease could also be improved.

  16. Systematic review of paediatric weight management interventions delivered in the home setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelhans, B M; Moss, O A; Cerwinske, L A

    2016-10-01

    To increase their accessibility, paediatric weight management interventions are increasingly designed to be delivered in the home setting by trained staff. This systematic review summarizes the available evidence for interventions featuring home visitation and identifies key gaps in the literature. PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane and PsycINFO were searched for intervention studies that reported change in objectively measured adiposity outcomes in youth ages 2-18 years. Studies published between 1 January 1995 and 12 February 2016 were analysed. Of 15 eligible studies, nine reported that interventions with home visitation were either superior to a control/comparison condition or achieved significant within-subjects reductions in adiposity. Interventions in which professional staff (e.g. dietitians and exercise trainers) conducted home visits tended to be more efficacious than those delivered by paraprofessional or community-based staff, as were interventions with more frequent contact. Most studies were judged to have low or unclear risk of bias across various domains. As most studies compared interventions with home visits with less intensive and qualitatively different approaches, it remains unclear whether home visitation per se enhances weight loss efficacy. Overall, paediatric weight management interventions that feature home visitation are promising, but the incremental benefit of the home visitation treatment modality remains to be rigorously evaluated. © 2016 World Obesity.

  17. Factors that promote or hinder young disabled people in work participation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, T J; Wind, H; de Boer, A G E M; Frings-Dresen, M H W

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to study factors which promote or hinder young disabled people entering the labor market. We systematically searched PubMed (by means of MESH and text words), EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science and CINAHL for studies regarding (1) disabled patients diagnosed before the age of 18 years and (2) factors of work participation. Out of 1,268 retrieved studies and 28 extended studies from references and four from experts, ten articles were included. Promoting factors are male gender, high educational level, age at survey, low depression scores, high dispositional optimism and high psychosocial functioning. Female and low educational level gives high odds of unemployment just like low IQ, inpatient treatment during follow up, epilepsy, motor impairment, wheelchair dependency, functional limitations, co-morbidity, physical disability and chronic health conditions combined with mental retardation. High dose cranial radiotherapy, type of cancer, and age of diagnosis also interfered with employment. Of the promoting factors, education appeared to be important, and several physical obstructions were found to be hindering factors. The last mentioned factors can be influenced in contrast to for instance age and gender. However, to optimize work participation of this group of young disabled it is important to know the promoting or hindering influence for employment.

  18. Transforming care in nursing: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Calatayud, Mónica; Oroviogoicoechea, Cristina; Saracibar, Maribel; Pumar-Méndez, María J

    2017-04-01

    Although the concept of 'Transforming care' is promising for improving health care, there is no consensus in the field as to its definition. The aim of this concept analysis is to develop a deeper understanding of the term 'Transforming care' within the nursing discipline, in order to facilitate its comprehension, implementation, and evaluation. We performed a comprehensive literature review on electronic databases such as Medline (PubMed), Cinahl (Ebsco), Cochrane Library, PsycINFO (Ovid), Web of Science, Wiley-Blackwell, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink and used Walker and Avant's approach to analyse the concept. From the 20 studies selected for this analysis, 3 main attributes of 'Transforming care' were identified: patient-centredness, evidence-based change, and transformational leadership driven. We suggest an operational definition to facilitate the implementation of the concept in practice. Furthermore, we propose that implementation is guided by the following key ideas: (1) fostering a culture of continuous improvement; (2) encouraging bottom-up initiatives; (3) promoting patient-centred care; and (4) using transformational leadership. Lastly, the evaluation of 'Transforming care' initiatives should assess care processes and professionals' and patients' outcomes.

  19. A Systematic Review of Research on Autism Spectrum Disorders in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssewanyana, Derrick

    2016-01-01

    The burden of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is not well known. We carried out a systematic review of the literature to identify published work from SSA. We have systematically searched four databases, namely, Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Child Development & Adolescent Studies, through EBSCO and identified studies from across SSA. Based on predefined inclusion criteria, 47 studies were included in this review. Most of the identified studies (74%) were conducted in only 2 African countries, that is, South Africa and Nigeria. Additionally, most of these studies (83%) were carried out in the last decade. These studies had four major themes: development of measurement tools of ASD in Africa, examining the prevalence of ASD, identifying risk factors and risk markers, and examining psychosocial issues. We identified only a single population level study aimed at documenting the prevalence of ASD and could not identify a single case-control study aimed at examining a comprehensive set of potential risk factors. All intervention studies were based on very small sample sizes. Put together, our findings suggest that current evidence base is too scanty to provide the required information to plan adequately for effective intervention strategies for children with ASD in Africa. PMID:27872512

  20. Undergraduate Nursing Students' Understandings of Mental Health: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Sinead; Ward, Louise

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this literature review was to identify research and current literature surrounding nursing students' understandings of mental health. The aim is to share findings from an extensive international and national literature review exploring undergraduate nurse education specific to mental health content. Data were collected utilising a comprehensive search of electronic databases including CINAHL (EBSCO), MEDLINE, and PsycINFO 1987-(Ovid) from 2008 to 2016. The initial search terms were altered to include undergraduate, mental health, nursing, education, experience, and knowledge. Three content themes emerged which included: 1. Undergraduate nursing students' knowledge has been considered compromised due to concerns relating to the variation and inconsistencies within the comprehensive nursing curriculums representation of mental health, 2. Undergraduate nursing students knowledge of mental health is thought to be compromised due to the quality of mental health theoretical and experiential learning opportunities, and 3. Research indicates that nursing students' knowledge of mental health was influenced by their experience of undertaking mental health content. Based on these findings greater consideration of students' understandings of mental health is required.

  1. Non-Responsive Feeding Practices, Unhealthy Eating Behaviors, and Risk of Child Overweight and Obesity in Southeast Asia: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Ana Cristina; Sitthisongkram, Somporn; Greaney, Mary L; Wallington, Sherrie F; Ruengdej, Praewrapee

    2017-04-19

    Childhood obesity is increasing dramatically in many Southeast Asian countries, and becoming a significant public health concern. This review summarizes the evidence on associations between parental feeding practices, child eating behaviors, and the risk of overweight and obesity in Southeast Asian children 2-12 years old. We systematically searched five electronic academic/research (PubMed, PsycINFO, ProQuest Nursing, Medline, and CINAHL) databases using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement for peer-reviewed studies published in English between January 2000 and December 2016. Fourteen observational studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Reviewed studies were examined separately for preschool- and school-aged children and revealed that non-responsive parental feeding practices and unhealthy child eating behaviors were associated with a risk of child overweight and obesity in several Southeast Asian countries. Nonetheless, due to the small number of identified studies (n = 14) and because only about half of the Southeast Asian countries (Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore, the Philippines, and Malaysia) were represented (5/11) in the examined studies, additional research is needed to further understand the factors associated with childhood obesity among children in Southeast Asia to develop interventions that are tailored to the specific needs of Southeast Asian countries and designed to address practices and behaviors that may promote childhood obesity.

  2. The relationship between physical activity and depressive symptoms in adolescents: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursnall, Patricia

    2014-12-01

    Depression affects a significant number of adolescents and requires creative treatment planning. Physical activity (PA) as a treatment option for depression has moderate support through repeated systematic reviews in adults, but not in adolescents. The purpose of this work is to present a systematic review of the evidence within the past 5 years regarding the relationship between PA and depressive symptoms (DS) in adolescents, and to determine if the evidence supports PA as a viable treatment option for this age group. An extensive search was conducted through MEDLINE (i.e., Ovid and PubMed), CINAHL, and PsycINFO databases. Ten primary articles were ultimately selected and reviewed for their quality and contributions to the subject. The SORT tool was utilized to grade individual works and the body of evidence as a whole. As of the writing of this review, the author finds only one randomized controlled trial that explores the interaction between PA and DS in the adolescent age group. However, the body of evidence generated from this review indicates a strong inverse correlation between the two variables. Further research must be conducted to determine causation. However, healthcare providers can and must provide both health education and health promotion surrounding the relationship between PA and DS in the adolescent age group to enhance wellness and prevent disease. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  3. Systematic review of intervention practices for depression in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Andrea D; Gnam, William H; Carnide, Nancy; Irvin, Emma; Amick, Benjamin C; DeRango, Kelly; McMaster, Robert; Cullen, Kimberley; Slack, Tesha; Brouwer, Sandra; Bültmann, Ute

    2012-09-01

    Systematic Review. To determine which intervention approaches to manage depression in the workplace have been successful and yielded value for employers in developed economies. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Central, PsycINFO, and Business Source Premier up to June 2010 using search terms in four broad areas: work setting, depression, intervention, and work outcomes. Two independent reviewers selected potential articles that met the following criteria: working age individuals with mild or moderate depression; interventions or programs that were workplace-based or could be implemented and/or facilitated by the employer; inclusion of a comparator group in the analysis; outcomes of prevention, management, and recurrences of work disability or sickness absence, and work functioning. Two reviewers independently reviewed each article for quality and extracted data using standardised forms. Following guidelines from the GRADE Working Group, the quality of evidence addressing each outcome was graded as high, moderate, low, or very low on the basis of six criteria: study design, risk of bias, consistency, generalisability, data precision, and economic benefit. Using this information and following Cochrane Collaboration guidelines, the findings for each intervention were summarised and key messages were developed. We identified ten randomised trials and two non-randomised studies from various countries and jurisdictions that evaluated a wide range of intervention practices. The evidence was graded as "very low" for all outcomes identified. Therefore, no intervention could be recommended. To date, there is insufficient quality of evidence to determine which interventions are effective and yield value to manage depression in the workplace.

  4. Diffusion and dissemination of evidence-based dietary srategies for the prevention of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brouwers Melissa

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The purpose was to determine what strategies have been evaluated to disseminate cancer control interventions that promote the uptake of adult healthy diet? Methods A systematic review was conducted. Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE, PREMEDLINE, Cancer LIT, EMBASE/Excerpta Medica, PsycINFO, CINAHL, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and reference lists and by contacting technical experts. English-language primary studies were selected if they evaluated the dissemination of healthy diet interventions in individuals, healthcare providers, or institutions. Studies of children or adolescents only were excluded. Results One hundred one articles were retrieved for full text screening. Nine reports of seven distinct studies were included; four were randomized trials, one was a cohort design and three were descriptive studies. Six studies were rated as methodologically weak, and one was rated as moderate. Studies were not meta-analyzed because of heterogeneity, low methodological quality, and incomplete data reporting. No beneficial dissemination strategies were found except one that looks promising, the use of peer educators in the worksite, which led to a short-term increase in fruit and vegetable intake. Conclusions and Implications Overall, the quality of the evidence is not strong and is primarily descriptive rather than evaluative. No clear conclusions can be drawn from these data. Controlled studies are needed to evaluate dissemination strategies, and to compare dissemination and diffusion strategies with different messages and different target audiences.

  5. A systematic review of critical thinking in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2013-03-01

    This review aimed to explore how critical thinking is perceived in previous studies of nursing education, and analyse the obstacles and strategies in teaching and learning critical thinking mentioned in these studies. Systematic review. This review was based on the following five databases: The British Nursing Index, Ovid Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Scopus. After the screening process and evaluation through using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool, 17 studies were identified that met the inclusion and quality criteria. The studies were read through several times and analysed through thematic synthesis. A total of three themes were developed. The first theme, components for critical thinkers, suggests the abilities and attitudes that critical thinkers should have. The other two themes, influential factors of critical thinking in nursing education, and strategies to promote critical thinking, describe the obstacles and strategies in teaching and learning critical thinking. The 17 studies illustrated that the definition and concept of critical thinking may change from time to time, and hence there is a need to clarify educators' perspective towards critical thinking. There is also a need to evaluate the efficacy of the new strategies mentioned in several selected studies, such as art-based, questioning, cross-cultural nursing experience, and preceptorship. With a better understanding of critical thinking in nursing education, educators and nursing faculty are able to develop better strategies in enhancing critical thinking development in nursing students, in turn preparing them for future clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Do we know how to design effective health coaching interventions: a systematic review of the state of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Briony; Richardson, Ben; Skouteris, Helen

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review health coaching interventions regarding effectiveness of health coaching for specific outcomes, optimal intervention approaches, and identification of specific techniques associated with effectiveness. Articles were sourced from CINAHL, Global Health, PsycINFO, Academic Search Complete, Health Source, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection, and Medline. Randomized controlled trials were included if the study (1) employed health coaching according to a predefined criterion; (2) clearly reported the use of health coaching; or (3) incorporated the use of coaching. Aims, participants, approach, behavior change techniques (BCTs), and findings pertaining to each study were summarized. BCTs were classified according to the CALO-RE taxonomy. Data were synthesized by cross-tabulation of BCTs with study outcomes. Fifteen of 16 eligible studies reported a positive intervention effect in at least one outcome. Nine studies (56%) did not define health coaching; the number of intervention sessions provided ranged from 2 to 48; and in three studies, one or more intervention details were unclear. It was hence difficult to synthesize the studies to adequately address our research questions. Health coaching is a promising strategy for health improvements; however, future research should ensure clarity in reporting intervention details, clearer definitions of health coaching/theoretical bases, consistency in reporting BCTs, and the inclusion of process variables as outcome measures.

  7. Family-health professional relations in pediatric weight management: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnesi, B C; Ball, G D C; Newton, A S

    2012-06-01

    In this integrative review, we examined contemporary literature in pediatric weight management to identify characteristics that contribute to the relationship between families and health professionals and describe how these qualities can inform healthcare practices for obese children and families receiving weight management care. We searched literature published from 1980 to 2010 in three electronic databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO and CINAHL). Twenty-four articles identified family-health professional relationships were influenced by the following: health professionals' weight-related discussions and approaches to care; and parents' preferences regarding weight-related terminology and expectations of healthcare delivery. There was considerable methodological heterogeneity in the types of reports (i.e. qualitative studies, review articles, commentaries) included in this review. Overall, the findings have implications for establishing a positive clinical relationship between families and health professionals, which include being sensitive when discussing weight-related issues, using euphemisms when talking about obesity, demonstrating a non-judgmental and supportive attitude and including the family (children and parents) in healthcare interactions. Experimental research, clinical interventions and longitudinal studies are needed to build on the current evidence to determine how best to establish a collaborative partnership between families and health professionals and whether such a partnership improves treatment adherence, reduces intervention attrition and enhances pediatric weight management success.

  8. The therapeutic effectiveness of creative activities on mental well-being: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, J

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the literature to ascertain the effectiveness of creative activities on mental well-being within the mental health context. Creative activities have always been evident within the context of mental health and there is increasing recognition that the arts have an important role to play in improving the health and well-being of individuals. Medline, Cinahl and PsycINFO were searched utilizing the keywords art, therap, well-being and mental health. The arts council data base was accessed and the Department of Health review of Arts for Health Working Group. Eleven studies were appraised by one reviewer utilizing the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool. It was difficult to make comparisons of the papers accessed as a result of the majority of studies being evaluative in nature and untaken within local projects therefore lacking in generalization. The evidence suggests that creative activities can have a healing and protective effect on mental well-being. Their therapeutic effects promote relaxation, provide a means of self-expression, reduce blood pressure while boosting the immune system and reducing stress. However, the evidence to support these claims is weak and assumptions were made that lacked reliability and validity. Establishing the benefit of participating in creative arts is difficult because of a lack of consistency of a clear definition, but it is important to identify the potential of creative arts as a therapeutic and transformational tools and not an intervention for therapeutic diversion.

  9. Suicide inside: a systematic review of inpatient suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Len; Banda, Tumi; Nijman, Henk

    2010-05-01

    The literature on inpatient suicides was systematically reviewed. English, German, and Dutch articles were identified by means of the electronic databases PsycInfo, Cochrane, Medline, EMBASE psychiatry, CINAHL, and British Nursing Index. In total, 98 articles covering almost 15,000 suicides were reviewed and analyzed. Rates and demographic features connected to suicides varied substantially between articles, suggesting distinct subgroups of patients committing suicide (e.g., depressed vs. schizophrenic patients) with their own suicide determinants and patterns. Early in the admission is clearly a high-risk period for suicide, but risk declines more slowly for patients with schizophrenia. Suicide rates were found to be associated with admission numbers, and as expected, previous suicidal behavior was found to be a robust predictor of future suicide. The methods used for suicide are linked to availability of means. Timing and location of suicides seem to be associated with absence of support, supervision, and the presence of family conflict. Although there is a strong notion that suicides cluster in time, clear statistical evidence for this is lacking. For prevention of suicides, staff need to engage with patients' family problems, and reduce absconding without locking the door. Future research should take into account the heterogeneous subgroups of patients who commit suicide, with case-control studies addressing these separately.

  10. Contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM): A systematic review of patient reported factors and psychological predictors influencing choice and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, Brittany; Butow, Phyllis; Jansen, Jesse; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Porter, David

    2016-08-01

    Conduct a systematic review of quantitative and qualitative studies exploring patient reported factors and psychological variables influencing the decision to have contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), and satisfaction with CPM, in women with early stage breast cancer. Studies were identified via databases: Medline, CINAHL, Embase and PsycINFO. Data were extracted by one author and crosschecked by two additional authors for accuracy. The quality of included articles was assessed using standardised criteria by three authors. Of the 1346 unique citations identified, 17 were studies that met the inclusion criteria. Studies included were primarily cross-sectional and retrospective. No study utilised a theoretical framework to guide research and few studies considered psychological predictors of CPM. Fear of breast cancer was the most commonly cited reason for CPM, followed by cosmetic reasons such as desire for symmetry. Overall, women appeared satisfied with CPM, however, adverse/diminished body image, poor cosmetic result, complications, diminished sense of sexuality, emotional issues and perceived lack of education regarding alternative surveillance/CPM efficacy were cited as reasons for dissatisfaction. Current literature has begun to identify patient-reported reasons for CPM; however, the relative importance of different factors and how these factors relate to the process underlying the decision to have CPM are unknown. Of women who considered CPM, limited information is available regarding differences between those who proceed with or ultimately decline CPM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Organ and tissue donation in clinical settings: a systematic review of the impact of interventions aimed at health professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In countries where presumed consent for organ donation does not apply, health professionals (HP) are key players for identifying donors and obtaining their consent. This systematic review was designed to verify the efficacy of interventions aimed at HPs to promote organ and tissue donation in clinical settings. CINAHL (1982 to 2012), COCHRANE LIBRARY, EMBASE (1974 to 2012), MEDLINE (1966 to 2012), PsycINFO (1960 to 2012), and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses were searched for papers published in French or English until September 2012. Studies were considered if they met the following criteria: aimed at improving HPs’ practices regarding the donation process or at increasing donation rates; HPs working in clinical settings; and interventions with a control group or pre-post assessments. Intervention behavioral change techniques were analyzed using a validated taxonomy. A risk ratio was computed for each study having a control group. A total of 15 studies were identified, of which only 5 had a control group. Interventions were either educational, organizational or a combination of both, and had a weak theoretical basis. The most common behavior change technique was providing instruction. Two sets of interventions showed a significant risk ratio. However, most studies did not report the information needed to compute their efficacy. Therefore, interventions aimed at improving the donation process or at increasing donation rates should be based on sound theoretical frameworks. They would benefit from more rigorous evaluation methods to ensure good knowledge translation and appropriate organizational decisions to improve professional practices. PMID:24628967

  12. Effect of drug reminder packaging on medication adherence: a systematic review revealing research gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeni, Fabienne; Spinatsch, Esther; Suter, Katja; Hersberger, Kurt E; Arnet, Isabelle

    2014-03-24

    This was a systematic review of the literature in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Evidence mapping was used to reveal the effect of drug reminder packaging on medication adherence, to identify research gaps and to make suggestions for future research. PubMed, Embase, CINAHL and PsycINFO were searched with an end date of September 2013 using the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) term 'medication adherence' and 20 different search terms for 'drug reminder packaging', limited to the English and German languages. Additional references were identified through cross-referencing. All prospective controlled trials with an intervention using drug reminder packaging for patients taking at least one medication without the assistance of a health-care professional were included in the evidence mapping of the effect of drug reminder packaging on adherence and outcomes according to the Economic, Clinical and Humanistic Outcomes (ECHO) model. A total of 30 studies met the inclusion criteria: 10 randomized controlled trials, 19 controlled clinical trials and 1 cohort study. Drug reminder packaging had a significant effect on at least one adherence parameter in 17 studies (57%). The methodological quality was strong in five studies. Two studies provided complete information. Clear research gaps emerged. Overall, the studies showed a positive effect of drug reminder packaging on adherence and clinical outcomes. However, poor reporting and important gaps like missing humanistic and economic outcomes and neglected safety issues limit the drawing of firm conclusions. Suggestions are made for future research.

  13. The nursing profession: public image, self-concept and professional identity. A discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Hoeve, Yvonne; Jansen, Gerard; Roodbol, Petrie

    2014-02-01

    To discuss the actual public image of nurses and other factors that influence the development of nurses' self-concept and professional identity. Nurses have become healthcare professionals in their own right who possess a great deal of knowledge. However, the public does not always value the skills and competences nurses have acquired through education and innovation. Discussion paper. We identified 1216 relevant studies by searching MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases in the period 1997-2010. Finally, 18 studies met our inclusion criteria. The included studies show that the actual public image of nursing is diverse and incongruous. This image is partly self-created by nurses due to their invisibility and their lack of public discourse. Nurses derive their self-concept and professional identity from their public image, work environment, work values, education and traditional social and cultural values. Nurses should work harder to communicate their professionalism to the public. Social media like the Internet and YouTube can be used to show the public what they really do. To improve their public image and to obtain a stronger position in healthcare organizations, nurses need to increase their visibility. This could be realized by ongoing education and a challenging work environment that encourages nurses to stand up for themselves. Furthermore, nurses should make better use of strategic positions, such as case manager, nurse educator or clinical nurse specialist and use their professionalism to show the public what their work really entails. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. 'Nursing research culture' in the context of clinical nursing practice: addressing a conceptual problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-05-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice. Nursing research culture should be valued for its contribution to improving patient care and should be considered as a routine hospital activity. However, the demand for efficiency, nurses' barriers to research use and the lack of definition of the concept of nursing research culture make it difficult to establish. Concept analysis. Data were collected through a literature review in PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO during March 2016. Walker and Avant's eight-step framework for concept analysis. Five defining attributes of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice were identified: strong monodisciplinary nursing professionalism, academic thinking and socialization, research use as a part of daily nursing practice, acceptance by colleagues and management and facilitation of resources from management and organization. Although the method of concept analysis has been criticized and heavily debated, the development of nursing research cultures based on the defining attributes and antecedents of the concept will be important to emphasize evidence-based clinical nursing care. Further research should support the development and the implementation of nursing research culture in clinical nursing practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The effect of adult Early Warning Systems education on nurses' knowledge, confidence and clinical performance: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Mohamad M; McCarthy, Bridie; Andrews, Tom; Savage, Eileen; Drummond, Frances J; Walshe, Nuala; Forde, Mary; Breen, Dorothy; Henn, Patrick; Drennan, Jonathan; Hegarty, Josephine

    2017-04-25

    This review aims to determine the effect of adult Early Warning Systems education on nurses' knowledge, confidence and clinical performance. Early Warning Systems support timely identification of clinical deterioration and prevention of avoidable deaths. Several educational programmes have been designed to help nurses recognize and manage deteriorating patients. Little is known as to the effectiveness of these programmes. Systematic review. Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, Psychology and Behavioral Science Collection, SocINDEX and the UK & Ireland Reference Centre, EMBASE, the Turning Research Into Practice database, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and Grey Literature sources were searched between October and November 2015. This is a quantitative systematic review using Cochrane methods. Studies published between January 2011 - November 2015 in English were sought. The risk of bias, level of evidence and the quality of evidence per outcome were assessed. Eleven articles with 10 studies were included. Nine studies addressed clinical performance, four addressed knowledge and two addressed confidence. Knowledge, vital signs recording and Early Warning Score calculation were improved in the short term. Two interventions had no effect on nurses' response to clinical deterioration and use of communication tools. This review highlights the importance of measuring outcomes using standardized tools and valid and reliable instruments. Using longitudinal designs, researchers are encouraged to investigate the effect of Early Warning Systems educational programmes. These can include interactive e-learning, on-site interdisciplinary Early Warning Scoring systems training sessions and simulated scenarios. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Psychological effects of implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks. A review of study methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Compare, Angelo; Pagnini, Francesco; Essebag, Vidal; Proietti, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Background: The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) saves lives but clinical experience suggests that it may have detrimental effects on mental health. The ICD shock has been largely blamed as the main offender but empirical evidence is not consistent, perhaps because of methodological differences across studies. Objective: To appraise methodologies of studies that assessed the psychological effects of ICD shock and explore associations between methods and results. Data Sources: A comprehensive search of English articles that were published between 1980 and 30 June 2013 was applied to the following electronic databases: PubMed, EMBASE, NHS HTA database, PsycINFO, Sciencedirect and CINAHL. Review Methods: Only studies testing the effects of ICD shock on psychological and quality of life outcomes were included. Data were extracted according to a PICOS pre-defined sheet including methods and study quality indicators. Results: Fifty-four observational studies and six randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. Multiple differences in methods that were used to test the psychological effects of ICD shock were found across them. No significant association with results was observed. Conclusions: Methodological heterogeneity of study methods is too wide and limits any quantitative attempt to account for the mixed findings. Well-built and standardized research is urgently needed. PMID:25698991

  17. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the Pediatrics with Leukemia: A Narrative Review Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Miladinia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFor using of complementary and alternative medicine methods (CAM in the leukemia pediatrics than other types of cancer, we have two great challenges; first challenge is their safety and risks and second challenge is study gaps in this field. Regarding to these challenges, this study is a narrative review of some CAM methods in the leukemia pediatrics from the perspective of their safety, risks and study gaps.Materials and MethodsIn this narrative review study searched both international electronic databases including ISI Web of science, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, ISC, Embase, Scopus, Google Scholar and also, Iranian electronic databases including Magiran, Medlib and SID. Also, searches were performed separately in the specialized journals in the field of leukemia pediatrics and complementary and alternative medicine research.ResultsMusic therapy, gentle yoga movements, gentle massage types are quite safe for leukemia pediatrics. But, use of heavy yoga movements, massages with deep pressure, acupressure and acupuncture can be dangerous for leukemia pediatrics (risks of bleeding and or infection. Also, this study showed that, the number of investigations about the use of CAM in the leukemia pediatrics is very limited; especially in the field of yoga and acupuncture.ConclusionThe results of this study can be a basis both for chose of safe CAM method in these children and a basis for future studies on the basis of identified study gaps in this review study.

  18. Treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder in patients with severe mental illness: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabey, Linda; van Servellen, Gwen

    2014-02-01

    Although the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is high among those with severe mental illness, little is known about the use of interventions to lessen the burden of PTSD in this population. Currently, there are limited data about safe and effective interventions to treat these individuals. This systematic published work review presents the scientific published work reporting studies of psychological treatment approaches for individuals with comorbid PTSD and severe mental illness. A secondary aim of this study was to identify the specific models implemented and tested, and their impact upon patient outcomes. A review of the published work from January 2001 through January 2012 of English-language publications retrieved from the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), MEDLINE, and the American Psychological Association generated abstracts (PsycINFO) databases was conducted. Six studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. The treatment programs described were cognitive-behavioural therapy, psychoeducation, exposure-based cognitive-behavioural therapy, and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing. Evidence of the effectiveness of these programs is examined. Data to support the use of these interventions are limited, indicating the need for further research and efficacy trials. Future areas of research and implications for nursing are discussed.

  19. Rule-based deduplication of article records from bibliographic databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu; Lin, Can; Meng, Weiyi; Yu, Clement; Cohen, Aaron M; Smalheiser, Neil R

    2014-01-01

    We recently designed and deployed a metasearch engine, Metta, that sends queries and retrieves search results from five leading biomedical databases: PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Because many articles are indexed in more than one of these databases, it is desirable to deduplicate the retrieved article records. This is not a trivial problem because data fields contain a lot of missing and erroneous entries, and because certain types of information are recorded differently (and inconsistently) in the different databases. The present report describes our rule-based method for deduplicating article records across databases and includes an open-source script module that can be deployed freely. Metta was designed to satisfy the particular needs of people who are writing systematic reviews in evidence-based medicine. These users want the highest possible recall in retrieval, so it is important to err on the side of not deduplicating any records that refer to distinct articles, and it is important to perform deduplication online in real time. Our deduplication module is designed with these constraints in mind. Articles that share the same publication year are compared sequentially on parameters including PubMed ID number, digital object identifier, journal name, article title and author list, using text approximation techniques. In a review of Metta searches carried out by public users, we found that the deduplication module was more effective at identifying duplicates than EndNote without making any erroneous assignments.

  20. Effectiveness of animal-assisted therapy: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamioka, Hiroharu; Okada, Shinpei; Tsutani, Kiichiro; Park, Hyuntae; Okuizumi, Hiroyasu; Handa, Shuichi; Oshio, Takuya; Park, Sang-Jun; Kitayuguchi, Jun; Abe, Takafumi; Honda, Takuya; Mutoh, Yoshiteru

    2014-04-01

    The objectives of this review were to summarize the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effects of animal-assisted therapy (AAT). Studies were eligible if they were RCTs. Studies included one treatment group in which AAT was applied. We searched the following databases from 1990 up to October 31, 2012: MEDLINE via PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, Ichushi Web, GHL, WPRIM, and PsycINFO. We also searched all Cochrane Database up to October 31, 2012. Eleven RCTs were identified, and seven studies were about "Mental and behavioral disorders". Types of animal intervention were dog, cat, dolphin, bird, cow, rabbit, ferret, and guinea pig. The RCTs conducted have been of relatively low quality. We could not perform meta-analysis because of heterogeneity. In a study environment limited to the people who like animals, AAT may be an effective treatment for mental and behavioral disorders such as depression, schizophrenia, and alcohol/drug addictions, and is based on a holistic approach through interaction with animals in nature. To most effectively assess the potential benefits for AAT, it will be important for further research to utilize and describe (1) RCT methodology when appropriate, (2) reasons for non-participation, (3) intervention dose, (4) adverse effects and withdrawals, and (5) cost.

  1. Technology-enhanced suicide prevention interventions: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuze, Elizabeth; Jenkins, Carolyn; Gregoski, Mathew; York, Janet; Mueller, Martina; Lamis, Dorian A; Ruggiero, Kenneth J

    2017-07-01

    Objective Suicide prevention is a high priority. Scalable and sustainable interventions for suicide prevention are needed to set the stage for population-level impact. This systematic review explores how technology-enhanced interventions target suicide risk and protective factors, using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2015) Risk and Protective Factors Ecological Model. Methods Information databases (PsycINFO, PubMed and CINAHL) were systematically searched and records including technology-enhanced interventions for suicide prevention ( n = 3764) were reviewed. Records with varying technologies and diverse methodologies were integrated into the search. Results Review of the records resulted in the inclusion of 16 studies that utilized technology-enhanced interventions to address determinants of suicidal behaviour. This includes the use of standalone or, in most cases, adjunct technology-enhanced interventions for suicide prevention delivered by mobile phone application, text message, telephone, computer, web, CD-ROM and video. Conclusion Intervention effectiveness was variable, but several technology-enhanced interventions have demonstrated effectiveness in reducing suicidal ideation and mental health co-morbidities. Large-scale research and evaluation initiatives are needed to evaluate the costs and long-term population-level impact of these interventions.

  2. Comparative analysis of print and multimedia health materials: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Elizabeth A H; Makoul, Gregory; Bojarski, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Stacy Cooper; Waite, Katherine R; Rapp, David N; Baker, David W; Wolf, Michael S

    2012-10-01

    Evaluate the evidence regarding the relative effectiveness of multimedia and print as modes of dissemination for patient education materials; examine whether development of these materials addressed health literacy. A structured literature review utilizing Medline, PsycInfo, and the Cumulative Index to the Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), supplemented by reference mining. Of 738 studies screened, 30 effectively compared multimedia and print materials. Studies offered 56 opportunities for assessing the effect of medium on various outcomes (e.g., knowledge). In 30 instances (54%), no difference was noted between multimedia and print in terms of patient outcomes. Multimedia led to better outcomes vs. print in 21 (38%) comparisons vs. 5 (9%) instances for print. Regarding material development, 12 studies (40%) assessed readability and 5 (17%) involved patients in tool development. Multimedia appears to be a promising medium for patient education; however, the majority of studies found that print and multimedia performed equally well in practice. Few studies involved patients in material development, and less than half assessed the readability of materials. Future research should focus on comparing message-equivalent tools and assessing their effect on behavioral outcomes. Material development should include explicit attention to readability and patient input. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Women with Heart Failure Are at High Psychosocial Risk: A Systematic Review of How Sex and Gender Influence Heart Failure Self-Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody R. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve patient support, it is important to understand how people view and experience Heart Failure (HF self-care. This systematic review of qualitative studies included all published studies that examine the influence of sex and gender on HF self-care. A systematic search was done for papers (1995–2010 indexed in Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Medline, Ovid EMBASE, Ovid PsycINFO, CSA Sociological Abstracts, OVID AARP Ageline, EBSCO Academic Search Complete, EBSCO CINAHL, EBSCO SocINDEX, ISI Web of Science: Social Sciences Citation Index and Science Citation Index Expanded, and Scopus. After screening of 537 citations, six qualitative studies identified that differences existed in perceptions of symptoms with women having less family involvement and psychosocial support around self-care. Moreover, women had considerably more negative views of the future, themselves and their ability to fulfill social self-care roles. Women with HF represent a highly vulnerable population and need more support for psychosocial wellbeing and self-care.

  4. Impact of rehabilitation on self-concept following traumatic brain injury: An exploratory systematic review of intervention methodology and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownsworth, Tamara; Haslam, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    To date, reviews of rehabilitation efficacy after traumatic brain injury (TBI) have overlooked the impact on sense of self, focusing instead on functional impairment and psychological distress. The present review sought to address this gap by critically appraising the methodology and efficacy of intervention studies that assess changes in self-concept. A systematic search of PsycINFO, Medline, CINAHL and PubMed was conducted from inception to September 2013 to identify studies reporting pre- and post-intervention changes on validated measures of self-esteem or self-concept in adults with TBI. Methodological quality of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) was examined using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. A total of 17 studies (10 RCTs, 4 non-RCT group studies, 3 case studies) was identified, which examined the impact of psychotherapy, family-based support, cognitive rehabilitation or activity-based interventions on self-concept. The findings on the efficacy of these interventions were mixed, with only 10 studies showing some evidence of improvement in self-concept based on within-group or pre-post comparisons. Such findings highlight the need for greater focus on the impact of rehabilitation on self-understanding with improved assessment and intervention methodology. We draw upon theories of identity reconstruction and highlight implications for the design and evaluation of identity-oriented interventions that can supplement existing rehabilitation programmes for people with TBI.

  5. Association between pornography use and sexual risk behaviors in adult consumers: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Emily L; Mullan, Barbara; Mullan, Barbara M; Blaszczynski, Alex

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this review was to determine whether an association exists between sexual risk behaviors and pornography consumption. Consumption of pornography is common, yet research examining its link with sexual risk behaviors is in its infancy. Indicators of sexual risk behavior, including unsafe sex practices and a higher number of sexual partners, have been linked to poor health outcomes. A systematic literature search was performed using Medline, PsycINFO, Web of Knowledge, Pubmed, and CINAHL. Studies were included if they assessed the association between pornography use and indicators of sexual risk behaviors in an adult population. A total of 17 were included in the review, and all were assessed for research standards using the Quality Index Scale. For both Internet pornography and general pornography, links with greater unsafe sex practices and number of sexual partners were identified. Limitations of the literature, including low external validity and poor study design, restrict the generalizability of the findings. Accordingly, replication and more rigorous methods are recommended for future research.

  6. Intelligence assessments for children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin Foo, Rebecca; Guppy, Max; Johnston, Leanne M

    2013-10-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is defined as a primary disorder of posture and movement; however, approximately 45% of children with CP also have an intellectual impairment. Prevalence estimates are limited by a lack of guidelines for intelligence testing. This systematic review aims to identify and examine intelligence assessments for children with CP. Electronic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL, EMBASE, and ERIC) were searched to identify assessments that (1) measured intellectual function, (2) in children aged 4 to 18 years, (3) with CP, and (4) with psychometrics available. Searches yielded 48 assessments, of which nine provided psychometric data for children with CP. The included tests were the Columbia Mental Maturity Scale, the Leiter International Performance Scale, the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, the Pictorial Test of Intelligence, the Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices, the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, and the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence. Intelligence assessments in children with CP lack reliability data, consensus regarding validity data, and population-specific norms. Research is required to establish psychometrics for children with CP. For children with higher motor involvement and/or communication and/or visual impairments, multiple options are required to assess intelligence appropriately. © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  7. Conservation of resources theory in nurse burnout and patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prapanjaroensin, Aoyjai; Patrician, Patricia A; Vance, David E

    2017-05-24

    To examine how the Conservation of Resources theory explains burnout in the nursing profession. Burnout, which is an accumulation of work-related mental stress in people-oriented occupations, has been an issue of concern for decades for healthcare workers, especially nurses. Yet, few studies have examined a unified theory that explains the aetiology, progression and consequences of nurse burnout. This discussion article integrates current knowledge on nurse burnout using Conservation of Resources theory, which focuses on four resources (i.e., objects, conditions, personal characteristics and energy). The databases that were used in this study included CINAHL, PubMed and PsycINFO. All reviewed articles were published between January 2006 - June 2016. The Conservation of Resources theory explains that burnout will occur as a result of perceived or actual loss of these four resources. Furthermore, nurse burnout could affect work performance, leading to lower alertness and overall quality of care. Healthcare organizations and nursing administration should develop strategies to protect nurses from the threat of resource loss to decrease nurse burnout, which may improve nurse and patient safety. The Conservation of Resources theory can guide interventions to decrease burnout and future research that examines the relationship between professional nurse burnout and patient safety. The Conservation of Resources theory explains the aetiology, progression and consequences of nurse burnout. Future studies must explore whether nurse performance is a mediating factor between nurse burnout and patient safety. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Interventions Using Social Media for Cancer Prevention and Management: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Claire Jungyoun; Lee, Young Ji; Demiris, George

    2017-07-27

    Regarding cancer awareness, social media effectively promotes health and supports self-management. Given the diverse study designs, methodologies, and approaches of social media interventions in oncology, it is difficult to determine the effects of social media on cancer prevention and management. We aim to systematically review intervention studies using social media for cancer care. A systematic search, using 7 electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Scopus, EMBASE, and PsycINFO), was conducted to identify surveys and interventions using contemporary social media tools with a focus on cancer. Of the 18 selected studies, 7 were randomized controlled trials. Most studies were conducted for all types of cancer, and some were conducted for breast cancer in the United States, with mostly white female participants. Facebook was the most frequently used platform. Most studies targeted healthy participants providing cancer prevention education. With social media platforms as part of a larger intervention, or the main component of interventions, interventions were overall feasible and showed a significant improvement in cancer prevention and management. Social media tools have the potential to be effective in delivering interventions for cancer prevention and management. However, there was a dearth of studies with rigorous study methodologies to test social media effects on various cancer-related clinical outcomes. Social media use in cancer care will facilitate improved communication and support among patients, caregivers, and clinicians and, ultimately, improved patient care. Clinicians need to carefully harness social media to enhance patient care and clinical outcomes.

  9. Reducing hospital bed use by frail older people: results from a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Philp

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available  Introduction Numerous studies have been conducted in developed countries to evaluate the impact of interventions designed to reduce hospital admissions or length of stay amongst frail older people. In this study we have undertaken a systematic review of the recent international literature (2007-present to help improve our understanding about the impact of these interventions. Methods We systematically searched the following databases: PubMed / Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, BioMed Central, Kings Fund library. Studies were limited to publications from the period 2007-present and a total of 514 studies were identified. Results A total of 48 studies were included for full review consisting of 11 meta-analyses, 9 systematic reviews, 5 structured literature reviews, 8 randomised controlled trials and 15 other studies. We classified interventions into those which aimed to prevent admission, interventions in hospital, and those which aimed to support early discharge. Conclusions Reducing unnecessary use of acute hospital beds by older people requires an integrated approach across hospital and community settings. A stronger evidence base has emerged in recent years about a broad range of interventions which may be effective. Local agencies need to work together to implement these interventions to create a sustainable healthcare system for older people.  

  10. Is (18)F-FDG-PET suitable to predict clinical response to the treatment of geriatric depression? A systematic review of PET studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Crescenzo, Franco; Ciliberto, Mario; Menghini, Deny; Treglia, Giorgio; Ebmeier, Klaus P; Janiri, Luigi

    2017-09-01

    Geriatric depression is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in later life. It differs from earlier depression in its presentation, etiology, risk factors, protective factors and outcome. Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to detect changes in neural circuitry in neuropsychiatric disorders, and several authors have assessed its role in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with geriatric depression. We reviewed the current evidence on the use of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET) in geriatric depressed patients to find predictors of treatment response. We searched PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, Embase, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and the PsycINFO databases to find relevant peer-reviewed articles on PET in geriatric depression using the search terms ('PET' or 'positron emission tomography') and ('mood' or 'affective disorder' or 'affective disorders' or 'depression' or 'dysthymia' or 'seasonal affective disorder'). Eleven articles comprising 128 patients were included. We extracted data on glucose uptake of depressed patients and controls at baseline and after different types of intervention (total sleep deprivation followed by a recovery sleep and treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). (18)F-FDG-PET showed significant alterations of glucose uptake in several brain areas, in particular the anterior cingulate cortex, which showed reduced metabolism after treatment, and was a predictor of treatment response.

  11. Resilient ageing: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Maxine M; Conner, Norma E

    2014-04-01

    This paper is a report of an analysis of the concept resilient ageing. Unique in comparison with other healthy ageing concepts, resilient ageing can be applied to all older people, regardless of age or affliction. The state of global population expansion in older people over the next 50 years calls for increased health promotion research efforts to ensure the maintenance of health and optimal quality of life for all older people. Literature for this concept analysis was retrieved from several databases, CINAHL, PubMed PsycINFO, for the years 1990-2012. Rodgers's evolutionary method of concept analysis was used because of its applicability to concepts that are still evolving. An integrative research review methodology was applied to peer-reviewed journal articles (n = 46) for an inductive analysis of the concept of resilient ageing. The antecedents, defining attributes, and consequence of resilient ageing were identified. Antecedents to resilient ageing were found to be adversity and protective factors, while the core attributes include coping, hardiness and self-concept. The consequence of the process of resilient ageing was optimal quality of life. Sense of coherence was found to be the surrogate term. The results obtained were further substantiated using Antonovsky's (1979) theory of salutogenesis. A theoretical definition and a model of resilient ageing were developed. In addition, a discussion was provided on the practice, policy and research implications for promoting the development of protective factors and resilient ageing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Text mining applications in psychiatry: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbe, Adeline; Grouin, Cyril; Zweigenbaum, Pierre; Falissard, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    The expansion of biomedical literature is creating the need for efficient tools to keep pace with increasing volumes of information. Text mining (TM) approaches are becoming essential to facilitate the automated extraction of useful biomedical information from unstructured text. We reviewed the applications of TM in psychiatry, and explored its advantages and limitations. A systematic review of the literature was carried out using the CINAHL, Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO and Cochrane databases. In this review, 1103 papers were screened, and 38 were included as applications of TM in psychiatric research. Using TM and content analysis, we identified four major areas of application: (1) Psychopathology (i.e. observational studies focusing on mental illnesses) (2) the Patient perspective (i.e. patients' thoughts and opinions), (3) Medical records (i.e. safety issues, quality of care and description of treatments), and (4) Medical literature (i.e. identification of new scientific information in the literature). The information sources were qualitative studies, Internet postings, medical records and biomedical literature. Our work demonstrates that TM can contribute to complex research tasks in psychiatry. We discuss the benefits, limits, and further applications of this tool in the future. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Diabetes mellitus tipo 1: evidências da literatura para seu manejo adequado, na perspectiva de crianças

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    Lucila Castanheira Nascimento

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O estudo objetivou identificar as evidências disponíveis, na literatura, que abordem, na perspectiva de crianças, os fatores relevantes para o adequado manejo do diabetes mellitus tipo 1. Realizou-se uma revisão integrativa, nas bases de dados PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS, CUIDEN e PsycINFO, com as palavras-chave diabetes mellitus tipo 1, criança, prevenção e controle, fatores desencadeantes, emergências, autocuidado, aprendizagem e educação em saúde, no período de 1998 a 2008. Dos artigos levantados, selecionaram-se 19, e sua análise permitiu a identificação das categorias: vivendo com o diabetes; autocuidado e perfil glicêmico; atuação da família, amigos e profissionais de saúde; e escola. As evidências apontam que a criança aprecia o apoio recebido por seus familiares os quais têm relação direta com o preparo para o autocuidado. Outros membros externos à sua rede também são valorizados. A escola é um espaço que merece atenção, bem como a experiência particular de cada criança e a educação em saúde.

  14. Emergency department-based interventions for women suffering domestic abuse: a critical literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sereena; Boyle, Adrian

    2017-02-01

    Domestic abuse represents a serious public health and human rights concern. Interventions to reduce the risk of abuse include staff training and standardized documentation improving detection and adherence to referral pathways. Interventional studies have been conducted in primary care, maternity and outpatient settings. Women disclosing abuse in emergency departments differ from women attending other healthcare settings, and it is unclear whether these interventions can be transferred to the emergency care setting. This review examines interventional studies to evaluate the effectiveness of emergency department-based interventions in reducing domestic abuse-related morbidity. Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Cochrane Library were searched, according to prespecified selection criteria. Study quality was assessed using the Jadad scale. Of 273 search results, nine were eligible for review. Interventions involving staff training demonstrated benefits in subjective measures, such as staff knowledge regarding abuse, but no changes in clinical practice, based on detection and referral rates. When staff training was implemented in conjunction with supporting system changes - for example, standardized documentation for assessment and referral - clinically relevant improvements were noted. Interventions centred around staff training are insufficient to bring about improvements in the management and, thus, outcome of patients suffering abuse. Instead, system changes, such as standardized documentation and referral pathways, supported by training, may bring about beneficial changes. It remains uncertain whether surrogate outcomes employed by most studies translate to changes in abuse-related morbidity: the ultimate goal.

  15. Effectiveness of Yoga for Hypertension: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Marshall Hagins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To systematically review and meta-analyze the effectiveness of yoga for reducing blood pressure in adults with hypertension and to assess the modifying influences of type and length of yoga intervention and type of comparison group. Methods. Academic Search Premier, AltHealthWatch, BIOSIS/Biological Abstracts, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Embase, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, Natural Standard, and Web of Science databases were screened for controlled studies from 1966 to March 2013. Two authors independently assessed risk of bias using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Results. All 17 studies included in the review had unclear or high risk of bias. Yoga had a modest but significant effect on systolic blood pressure (SBP (4.17 [6.35, 1.99], and diastolic blood pressure (DBP (3.62 [4.92, 1.60], . Subgroup analyses demonstrated significant reductions in blood pressure for (1 interventions incorporating 3 basic elements of yoga practice (postures, meditation, and breathing (SBP: 8.17 mmHg [12.45, 3.89]; DBP: 6.14 mmHg [9.39, 2.89] but not for more limited yoga interventions; (2 yoga compared to no treatment (SBP: 7.96 mmHg [10.65, 5.27] but not for exercise. Conclusion. Yoga can be preliminarily recommended as an effective intervention for reducing blood pressure. Additional rigorous controlled trials are warranted to further investigate the potential benefits of yoga.

  16. Situational Transitions and Military Nurses: A Concept Analysis Using the Evolutionary Method.

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    Chargualaf, Katie A

    2016-04-01

    Situational transitions in nursing remain a significant issue for both new graduates and experienced nurses. Although frequently discussed in current nursing literature, nursing research has exclusively focused on the transition experience of civilian (nonmilitary) nurses. With differing role and practice expectations, altered practice environments, and the risk of deployment, the outcome of negative transition experiences for military nurses is significant. The purpose of this analysis is to clarify the concept of transition, in a situational context, as it relates to military nurses by investigating the attributes, antecedents, and consequences. Rodgers' evolutionary method served as the framework to this study. The sample included 41 studies, published in English, between 2000 and 2013. Data were retrieved from the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Medline, ProQuest, Ovid, and PsycINFO databases. Antecedents of situational transitions include any change in work roles or work environments. Attributes of situational transitions include journey, disequilibrium, finding balance, conditional, and pervasive. Consequences of transition range from successful to unsuccessful. Additional research that investigates the specific needs and challenges unique to nurses practicing in a military environment is needed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in People with Neurological Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Christopher P. Mackay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the effect of aerobic exercise on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in people with neurological disorders. Data Sources. Six electronic databases (CINAHL, PubMed, Cochrane, PsycINFO, SportDiscus, and Web of Science were searched until the end of December 2016. Study Selection. Experimental or observational studies of people with neurological disorders who undertook an exercise intervention with BDNF as an outcome measure. The search strategy yielded 984 articles. Data Extraction. Study data were independently extracted from each article. Methodological quality of studies was assessed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro scale. A meta-analysis was planned based on the assessment of predetermined criteria. Data Synthesis. Eleven articles were included. Studies employed either a program of aerobic exercise, a single bout of aerobic exercise, or both. A meta-analysis of studies comparing a program of aerobic exercise against usual care/nil therapy showed a large effect (SMD: 0.84, 95% CI 0.47–1.20, p<0.001 in favour of aerobic exercise to increase levels of BDNF. Findings for a single bout of aerobic exercise were mixed. Quality of studies was low (PEDro average score 4.3/10. Conclusions. A program of aerobic exercise may contribute to increased levels of BDNF in neurological populations.

  18. Preoperative education interventions to reduce anxiety and improve recovery among cardiac surgery patients: a review of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ping

    2015-01-01

    To update evidence of the effectiveness of preoperative education among cardiac surgery patients. Patients awaiting cardiac surgery may experience high levels of anxiety and depression, which can adversely affect their existing disease and surgery and result in prolonged recovery. There is evidence that preoperative education interventions can lead to improved patient experiences and positive postoperative outcomes among a mix of general surgical patients. However, a previous review suggested limited evidence to support the positive impact of preoperative education on patients' recovery from cardiac surgery. Comprehensive review of the literature. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched for English-language articles published between 2000-2011. Original articles were included reporting randomised controlled trials of cardiac preoperative education interventions. Six trials were identified and have produced conflicting findings. Some trials have demonstrated the effects of preoperative education on improving physical and psychosocial recovery of cardiac patients, while others found no evidence that patients' anxiety is reduced or of any effect on pain or hospital stay. Evidence of the effectiveness of preoperative education interventions among cardiac surgery patients remains inconclusive. Further research is needed to evaluate cardiac preoperative education interventions for sustained effect and in non-Western countries. A nurse-coordinated multidisciplinary preoperative education approach may offer a way forward to provide a more effective and efficient service. Staff training in developing and delivering such interventions is a priority. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Intratympanic therapy in Meniere's syndrome or disease: up to date evidence for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, M I; Ilan, O; Nassar, J; Rutka, J A

    2015-12-01

    Meniere's syndrome or disease (MS/D) is typically characterised by episodic vertigo, aural fullness, tinnitus and fluctuating hearing loss. There are multiple options available for treatment with variation in consensus on the best intervention. To evaluate the evidence on the efficacy of intratympanic therapies [steroids, gentamicin, antivirals and other therapies] on the frequency and severity of vertigo and other symptoms of MS/D. A literature search was performed on AMED, EMBASE, HMIC, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, BNI, CINAHL, HEALTH BUSINESS ELITE, CENTRAL and Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat disorders group trials register using various MeSH. The search was restricted to English and human subjects, and the last date of search was December 2014. Randomised controlled trials of intratympanic therapies [steroids, gentamicin antivirals and latanoprost] versus a placebo or another treatment. We analysed 8 RCT's comparing intratympanic steroids, gentamicin, ganciclovir (antiviral) and latanoprost versus another form of intratympanic treatment or placebo. On the basis of 6 RCT's (n = 242), there is evidence to support the effectiveness of intratympanic steroids and gentamicin to control symptoms of vertigo in MS/D albeit with a risk of hearing loss with gentamicin. However, there was no consensus found on doses or treatment protocols. There was no evidence to support the use of other forms of intratympanic therapy (antivirals and latanoprost) in MS/D. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Person-centred care: clarifying the concept in the context of inpatient psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Sebastian; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Zingmark, Karin

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports an analysis of the concept of person-centred care in the context of inpatient psychiatry. It has been suggested that person-centred care in inpatient psychiatry might differ from person-centred care in other contexts, indicating a need to clarify the concept in this specific context. Scholarly papers from health-related disciplines were identified following a systematic search of the electronic databases CINAHL, PUBMED and PsycINFO, covering records indexed up until March 2014. An evolutionary approach to concept analysis was applied, integrating principles for data extraction and analysis in integrative reviews. The concept of person-centred care was defined as cultural, relational and recovery-oriented. It aspires to improve care and calls for a transformation of inpatient psychiatry. The concept is closely related to the concepts of recovery and interpersonal nursing. The result is described in terms of attributes, antecedents, consequences and related concepts. It is concluded that the further development of the concept needs to consider the contexts of the concept at both conceptual and praxis levels. Further research should explore the nature of and relationships between context, culture, care practice and outcomes in inpatient psychiatry from a perspective of person-centred care. The results of this analysis can provide a framework for such research.

  1. Combination of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy in the treatment of chronic depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis

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    von Wolff Alessa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic depression represents a substantial portion of depressive disorders and is associated with severe consequences. This review examined whether the combination of pharmacological treatments and psychotherapy is associated with higher effectiveness than pharmacotherapy alone via meta-analysis; and identified possible treatment effect modifiers via meta-regression-analysis. Methods A systematic search was conducted in the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, BIOSIS, PsycINFO, and CINAHL. Primary efficacy outcome was a response to treatment; primary acceptance outcome was dropping out of the study. Only randomized controlled trials were considered. Results We identified 8 studies with a total of 9 relevant comparisons. Our analysis revealed small, but statistically not significant effects of combined therapies on outcomes directly related to depression (BR = 1.20 with substantial heterogeneity between studies (I² = 67%. Three treatment effect modifiers were identified: target disorders, the type of psychotherapy and the type of pharmacotherapy. Small but statistically significant effects of combined therapies on quality of life (SMD = 0.18 were revealed. No differences in acceptance rates and the long-term effects between combined treatments and pure pharmacological interventions were observed. Conclusions This systematic review could not provide clear evidence for the combination of pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. However, due to the small amount of primary studies further research is needed for a conclusive decision.

  2. 21st Century Parent-Child Sex Communication in the United States: A Process Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Dalmacio; Barroso, Julie

    2017-01-06

    Parent-child sex communication results in the transmission of family expectations, societal values, and role modeling of sexual health risk-reduction strategies. Parent-child sex communication's potential to curb negative sexual health outcomes has sustained a multidisciplinary effort to better understand the process and its impact on the development of healthy sexual attitudes and behaviors among adolescents. This review advances what is known about the process of sex communication in the United States by reviewing studies published from 2003 to 2015. We used the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, SocINDEX, and PubMed, and the key terms "parent child" AND "sex education" for the initial query; we included 116 original articles for analysis. Our review underscores long-established factors that prevent parents from effectively broaching and sustaining talks about sex with their children and has also identified emerging concerns unique to today's parenting landscape. Parental factors salient to sex communication are established long before individuals become parents and are acted upon by influences beyond the home. Child-focused communication factors likewise describe a maturing audience that is far from captive. The identification of both enduring and emerging factors that affect how sex communication occurs will inform subsequent work that will result in more positive sexual health outcomes for adolescents.

  3. Health Behavior Change Interventions for Teenage and Young Adult Cancer Survivors: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Gemma; Gravestock, Helen L; Hough, Rachael E; King, Wendy M; Wardle, Jane; Fisher, Abigail

    2016-06-01

    It is important that teenage and young adult (TYA) cancer survivors adopt a healthy lifestyle, since health vulnerabilities associated with their diagnosis and treatment may be exacerbated by poor health behaviors. This review aims to synthesize the current literature on health behavior change interventions created specifically for TYA-aged cancer survivors. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases were searched for studies investigating interventions targeting one or more health behaviors, including: physical activity, diet, smoking cessation, and alcohol consumption. Studies were eligible for review if the study population were defined as TYA cancer survivors and the mean age of the sample was younger than 30 years of age. Twelve studies were identified, of which nine were randomized controlled trials. Physical activity was the most commonly targeted health behavior. Six of the 12 interventions included within this review were successful in changing health behavior. Due to the heterogeneity of intervention characteristics, the relationship between intervention efficacy or outcome and intervention content, delivery mode, or theoretical framework was not discernible. Nevertheless, trends emerged relating to the delivery and content of health behavior interventions designed specifically for TYA cancer survivors. More research is required to identify the most effective means of promoting health behavior change among the TYA cancer survivor population. Specifically, future research should focus on providing evidence of the efficiency and feasibility of interventions that use online technologies to facilitate remote intervention delivery and peer support.

  4. Physiotherapy secretion removal techniques in people with spinal cord injury: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, W Darlene; Brown, Jennifer A; Konnyu, Kristin J; Rurak, Jennifer M E; Sakakibara, Brodie M

    2010-01-01

    To address whether secretion removal techniques increase airway clearance in people with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched from inception to May 2009 for population keywords (spinal cord injury, paraplegia, tetraplegia, quadriplegia) paired with secretion removal-related interventions and outcomes. Inclusion criteria for articles were a research study, irrespective of design, that examined secretion removal in people with chronic SCI published in English. Two reviewers determined whether articles met the inclusion criteria, abstracted information, and performed a quality assessment using PEDro or Downs and Black criteria. Studies were then given a level of evidence based on a modified Sackett scale. Of 2416 abstracts and titles retrieved, 24 met the inclusion criteria. Subjects were young (mean, 31 years) and 84% were male. Most evidence was level 4 or 5 and only 2 studies were randomized controlled trials. Three reports described outcomes for secretion removal techniques in addition to cough, whereas most articles examined the immediate effects of various components of cough. Studies examining insufflation combined with manual assisted cough provided the most consistent, high-level evidence. Compelling recent evidence supports the use of respiratory muscle training or electrical stimulation of the expiratory muscles to facilitate airway clearance in people with SCI. Evidence supporting the use of secretion removal techniques in SCI, while positive, is limited and mostly of low level. Treatments that increase respiratory muscle force show promise as effective airway clearance techniques.

  5. Is there evidence for the use of art therapy in treatment of psychosomatic disorders, eating disorders and crisis? A comparative study of two different systems for evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmqvist, Gärd; Lundqvist Persson, Cristina

    2012-02-01

    A comparative study of two different systems for evaluation. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology 53, 47-53. As with any type of treatment the requirement for evidence based practice (EBP) has also affected art therapy (AT) when used as an intervention. This review evaluates the available evidence for using AT for psychosomatic disorders, eating disorders and crisis. The search in Cochrane, Best Practice, AMED, CINAHL, PION, PsycINFO and PubMed from 1987 until now resulted in a huge number of articles but only 32 articles met our criteria for evaluations. The articles were assessed with two evaluation systems, the GRADE system used by the Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment (SBU) and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF/Task Force). When comparing the results we found that the GRADE evaluation system rejected the quality in 84% of the 32 studies and the USPSTF/Task Force 41% of these studies. An evidence base for AT was found only according to the criteria of USPSTF/Task Force. Hence, the evidence concept is not explicit, which means that effective treatments run a risk of not being implemented in health care. We suggest a broader view of what constitutes evidence in order to make it possible to include different types of research designs and methods.

  6. Cyberbullying Prevalence among United States Middle and High School Aged Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Quality Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkie, Ellen M.; Fales, Jessica L.; Moreno, Megan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cyberbullying has established links to physical and mental health problems including depression, suicidality, substance use, and somatic symptoms. Quality reporting of cyberbullying prevalence is essential to guide evidence-based policy and prevention priorities. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate study quality and reported prevalence among cyberbullying research studies conducted in populations of US adolescents of middle and high school age. Methods Searches of peer-reviewed literature published through June 2015 for “cyberbullying” and related terms were conducted using PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL Plus, and Web of Science. Included manuscripts reported cyberbullying prevalence in general populations of U.S. adolescents between the ages of 10 and 19. Using a review tool based on the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement, reviewers independently scored study quality on study methods, results reporting, and reported prevalence. Results Search results yielded 1,447 manuscripts; 81 manuscripts representing 58 unique studies were identified as meeting inclusion criteria. Quality scores ranged between 12 and 37 total points out of a possible 42 points (M = 26.7, SD = 4.6). Prevalence rates of cyberbullying ranged as follows: perpetration, 1% to 41%; victimization, 3% to 72%; and overlapping perpetration and victimization, 2.3% to 16.7%. Conclusions Literature on cyberbullying in US middle and high school aged students is robust in quantity but inconsistent in quality and reported prevalence. Consistent definitions and evidence-based measurement tools are needed. PMID:26576821

  7. Experience of hypoglycaemia and strategies used for its management by community-dwelling adults with diabetes mellitus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Pamela; Chen, Hui-Chen; Taylor, Beverley; Hegney, Desley

    2012-09-01

    To synthesise the evidence on how community-dwelling adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus experience hypoglycaemia and the strategies they use to control it. Using a three-step search strategy, all published and unpublished qualitative studies in English from January 2000 to August 2010 were retrieved. Participants diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, experienced in self-managing their hypoglycaemia, and who lived independently in the community and attended primary care or outpatient clinics were included. An initial limited search was conducted in MEDLINE and CINAHL to identify keywords and index terms, which were then used in a second search across the CINAHL, PUBMED, SCOPUS, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, Web of Science, JSTOR, EMBASE and MEDNAR databases. Additionally, the reference lists of all retrieved papers were hand-searched for additional studies. Retrieved studies were assessed for methodological validity using the standardised Joanna Briggs Institute-Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-QARI). Data, in terms of research findings, were extracted from included studies using the standardised JBI-QARI data extraction tool. Five studies (six papers) were included in the review. The 20 findings from the six papers were grouped into three categories, which were then synthesised into one overall finding - that is 'People with diabetes mellitus can self-manage their diabetes and thus prevent hypoglycaemic episodes more effectively when health professionals provide psychological, physiological and spiritual support, and an individually targeted education programme'. Within the constraints of this review, it appears that the patient-identified priority is to maintain normality in blood glucose self-management. There is also evidence that some people lack the knowledge to identify and self-manage hypoglycaemia. To enable community-dwelling adults with diabetes mellitus to self-manage hypoglycaemia, healthcare professionals should

  8. Desafíos en la divulgación del conocimiento científico de Enfermería producido en Brasil Challenges in the dissemination of scientific Nursing knowledge produced in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Palucci Marziale

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available El producto y el proceso de la actividad científica son dependientes de la comunicación eficaz y las revistas son importantes vehículos para divulgación del conocimiento. Una estrategia utilizada por las revistas científicas para ganar prestigio y reconocimiento internacional es la indexación en bases de datos, fuente de diseminación y control bibliográfico de la producción científica. El objetivo de esta investigación fue identificar entre las revistas brasileras de enfermería, cuáles están indexadas en bases de datos internacionales e identificar junto a sus editores los problemas encontrados para esas indexaciones. Los resultados mostraron que de 21 revistas evaluadas ninguna está indexada en el ISI ni en el Journal Citation Report, 4,8% está indexada en la SciELO, 4,8% en la PsycINFO, 4,8% en la CAB HEALTH y CAB ABSTRACT, 4,8% en la Linguist and Language Behavior Abstract, 4,8% en Periodicals Tables of American Contents, 19% en CUIDEN, 19% en MEDLINE, 19% en CINAHL, 66,7% en LILACS y 100% en ULRICh'S. Las dificultades encontradas por los editores para la inclusión de revistas en las bases de datos internacionales son: manutención de la puntualidad debido a falta de recursos financieros, adopción de normas nacionales de publicación, déficit de citaciones bibliográficas en inglés y contenido editorial de las revistas. Sin embargo, han sido esfuerzos direccionados para la mejoría de la calidad editorial y la universalización del conocimiento producido por la Enfermería brasilera.The product and process of scientific activity are dependent on an efficacious communication and the journals are important means for the dissemination of knowledge. A strategy used by the scientific journals to meet excellence patterns and to achieve an international visibility is the indexation in data bases. The aim of this investigation was to identify, among the Brazilian Nursing journals, the ones indexed in international data bases and

  9. Governance and mental health: contributions for public policy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Castro, Lina; Arredondo, Armando; Pelcastre-Villafuerte, Blanca Estela; Hufty, Marc

    2017-01-30

    To analyze the conceptualization of the term governance on public mental health programs. In this systematic review, we analyzed the scientific literature published in the international scenario during 15 years (from 2000 to 2015). The databases analyzed were: Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO and PubMed. Governance and mental health were the descriptors. We included relevant articles according to our subject of study and levels of analysis: (i) the concept of governance in mental health; (ii) process and decision spaces; (iii) strategic and pertinent actors who operate in the functioning of the health system, and (iv) social regulations. We excluded letters to the editor, news articles, comments and case reports, incomplete articles and articles whose approach did not include the object of study of this review. We have found five conceptualizations of the term governance on mental health in the area of provision policies and service organization. The agents were both those who offer and those who receive the services: we identified several social norms. The concept of governance in mental health includes standards of quality and attention centered on the patient, and incorporates the consumers of mental healthcare in the decision-making process. Analizar la conceptualización del término gobernanza en las políticas de salud mental. En esta revisión sistemática se analizó literatura científica publicada en el ámbito internacional durante 15 años (de 2000 hasta 2015). Las bases de datos analizadas fueron: Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO y PubMed. Los descriptores fueron gobernanza y salud mental. Fueron incluidos artículos relevantes de acuerdo a nuestro objeto de estudio y niveles de análisis: (i) concepto de gobernanza en salud mental; (ii) proceso y espacios de decisión; (iii) actores estratégicos y de interés que intervienen en el funcionamiento del sistema de salud, y (iv) normas sociales. Se excluyeron cartas al editor, noticias, comentarios y reporte de caso

  10. Follow-up strategies after treatment (large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ)) for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN): Impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Esther; Lopes, Alberto D; Bryant, Andrew; Bekkers, Ruud; Galaal, Khadra

    2015-01-06

    Development of cancer of the cervix is a multi-step process as before cervical cancer develops, cervical cells undergo changes and become abnormal. These abnormalities are called cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and are associated with increased risk of subsequent invasive cancer of the cervix. Oncogenic high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV), the causative agent of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions, is present in up to one-third of women following large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) treatment and is associated with increased risk of residual disease and disease recurrence. HPV testing may serve as a surveillance tool for identifying women at higher risk of recurrence. High-risk human papillomavirus testing will enable us to identify women at increased risk of residual or recurrent CIN and therefore will allow us to offer closer surveillance and early treatment, when indicated. • To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of hrHPV testing after large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) treatment• To determine optimal follow-up management strategies following LLETZ treatment according to hrHPV status We searched the Cochrane Gynacological Cancer Review Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed and PsycINFO up to August 2013. We searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings and reference lists of included studies, and we contacted experts in the field. We searched for randomised control trials (RCTs) that compared follow-up management strategies following LLETZ treatment for CIN. Two review authors independently assessed whether potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria. No trials were found; therefore no data were analysed. The search identified 813 references on MEDLINE, 418 on EMBASE, 22 on CINAHL, 666 on PubMed, 291 on PsycINFO and

  11. Combining qualitative and quantitative research within mixed method research designs: a methodological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östlund, Ulrika; Kidd, Lisa; Wengström, Yvonne; Rowa-Dewar, Neneh

    2011-03-01

    It has been argued that mixed methods research can be useful in nursing and health science because of the complexity of the phenomena studied. However, the integration of qualitative and quantitative approaches continues to be one of much debate and there is a need for a rigorous framework for designing and interpreting mixed methods research. This paper explores the analytical approaches (i.e. parallel, concurrent or sequential) used in mixed methods studies within healthcare and exemplifies the use of triangulation as a methodological metaphor for drawing inferences from qualitative and quantitative findings originating from such analyses. This review of the literature used systematic principles in searching CINAHL, Medline and PsycINFO for healthcare research studies which employed a mixed methods approach and were published in the English language between January 1999 and September 2009. In total, 168 studies were included in the results. Most studies originated in the United States of America (USA), the United Kingdom (UK) and Canada. The analytic approach most widely used was parallel data analysis. A number of studies used sequential data analysis; far fewer studies employed concurrent data analysis. Very few of these studies clearly articulated the purpose for using a mixed methods design. The use of the methodological metaphor of triangulation on convergent, complementary, and divergent results from mixed methods studies is exemplified and an example of developing theory from such data is provided. A trend for conducting parallel data analysis on quantitative and qualitative data in mixed methods healthcare research has been identified in the studies included in this review. Using triangulation as a methodological metaphor can facilitate the integration of qualitative and quantitative findings, help researchers to clarify their theoretical propositions and the basis of their results. This can offer a better understanding of the links between theory and

  12. Nurses' decision-making in cases of physical restraint: a synthesis of qualitative evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goethals, Sabine; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Gastmans, Chris

    2012-06-01

      This article is a report of a review that aimed to synthesize the available qualitative evidence on nurses' decision-making in cases of physical restraint.   The use of physical restraint in acute and residential healthcare facilities is a widespread practice in many countries. Decisions about the use of physical restraints are complex and ethically laden. The lack of evidence supporting the use of physical restraints, the negative consequences of restraint for patients, and the low availability of alternatives obviously complicate the decision-making.   Research papers published between January 1990 and January 2010 were identified in Cinahl, Embase, Medline, PsycInfo and Web of Science.   A systematic review was carried out to obtain a meta-synthesis of qualitative evidence. The process of meta-synthesis was supported by the Joanna Briggs Institute's guidelines.   The decision-making of nurses dealing with the use of physical restraints is a complex trajectory primarily focused on safety. However, thoughtful decision-making requires nurses to carefully balance different options and associated ethical values. The decision-making process of nurses is influenced by both nurse- and context-related factors.   This review provides a deeper understanding of nurses' decision-making process on the use of physical restraints. Context- and nurse-related factors can hinder nurses from making an ethical decision on the appropriate use of physical restraints. There is an urgent need to stimulate and educate nurses to arrive at an appropriate decision about the use of physical restraints. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. A scoping review of mental health issues and concerns among immigrant and refugee youth in Canada: Looking back, moving forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruge, Sepali; Butt, Hissan

    2015-02-03

    Youth comprise a significant portion of the total immigrant population in Canada. Immigrant and refugee youth often have different migration trajectories and experiences, which can result in different mental health outcomes. Research is emerging in this area, but study findings have not yet been consolidated. What is known from the existing literature about mental health issues and concerns among immigrant and refugee youth in Canada? We searched Embase, Health Star, Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Social Science Abstracts databases for the period 1990-2013 for Canadian studies related to the mental health of youth born outside Canada. Seventeen studies met inclusion criteria. Determinants of mental illness included pre-migration experiences, number of years since immigration to Canada, post-migration family and school environment, in- and out-group problems, discrimination, and lack of equitable access to health care. Only a few common categories of mental illness were identified, and the burden of mental illness was shared differently across gender and immigration status, with female youth experiencing more mental health problems than male youth. Some studies identified fewer emotional and behavioural problems among refugee youth; others reported higher rates of psychopathology among refugee youth compared with their Canadian-born provincial counterparts. Pre-migration experiences and the kinds of trauma experienced were important for refugee youth's mental health. Findings also indicated the importance of family involvement, school settings as points of care and services, and in terms of timing, focusing on the first year of arrival in Canada. Professionals must work across health, social, and settlement sectors to address the various pre- and post-migration determinants of mental health and illness, and provide more timely and effective services based on how and when these determinants affect different groups of youth.

  14. Interventions to prevent and manage overweight or obesity in preschool children: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jiying; Robbins, Lorraine B; Wen, Fujun

    2016-01-01

    The preschool period is a pivotal time for lifestyle interventions to begin the establishment of long-term physical activity and healthy eating habits. This systematic review sought to (a) examine the effects of prevention and management interventions on overweight/obesity among children aged 2-5 years, and (b) explore factors that may influence intervention effects. A systematic review of randomized controlled studies was conducted. Six databases, including PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, ERIC, and Cochrane library, were searched for relevant studies. Data were extracted and checked by two reviewers. Each study was appraised based on 4 quality indicators adapted from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. A narrative summary technique was used to describe the review findings. Thirty-seven articles describing 32 randomized controlled trials and 29 unique interventions were retained. Eight of 23 prevention and 4 of 6 management interventions resulted in significant weight loss, with 3 prevention and 5 management interventions showing sustained effects over 6 to 24 months. Of the 12 efficacious interventions, 10 included physical activity and nutrition components, 9 actively involved parents, and only 4 were theory-based. Interactive education was the most common strategy used for parents in prevention interventions, compared to behavioral therapy techniques in management interventions. For children, interactive education and hands-on experiences involving physical activity and healthy eating were equally used. Management interventions showed greater effects in weight loss compared to prevention interventions. Future prevention interventions in preschool children should target both parents and children, and focus on physical activity and nutrition through interactive education and hands-on experiences, although intervention effects were less than optimal. Management interventions should focus on parents as the "agents of change" for physical

  15. Applications of direct-to-consumer hearing devices for adults with hearing loss: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchaiah, Vinaya; Taylor, Brian; Dockens, Ashley L; Tran, Nicole R; Lane, Kayla; Castle, Mariana; Grover, Vibhu

    2017-01-01

    Background This systematic literature review is aimed at investigating applications of direct-to-consumer hearing devices for adults with hearing loss. This review discusses three categories of direct-to-consumer hearing devices: 1) personal sound amplification products (PSAPs), 2) direct-mail hearing aids, and 3) over-the-counter (OTC) hearing aids. Method A literature review was conducted using EBSCOhost and included the databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO. After applying prior agreed inclusion and exclusion criteria, 13 reports were included in the review. Results Included studies fell into three domains: 1) electroacoustic characteristics, 2) consumer surveys, and 3) outcome evaluations. Electroacoustic characteristics of these devices vary significantly with some meeting the stringent acoustic criteria used for hearing aids, while others producing dangerous output levels (ie, over 120-dB sound pressure level). Low-end (or low-cost) devices were typically poor in acoustic quality and did not meet gain levels necessary for most adult and elderly hearing loss patterns (eg, presbycusis), especially in high frequencies. Despite direct-mail hearing aids and PSAPs being associated with lower satisfaction when compared to hearing aids purchased through hearing health care professionals, consumer surveys suggest that 5%–19% of people with hearing loss purchase hearing aids through direct-mail or online. Studies on outcome evaluation suggest positive outcomes of OTC devices in the elderly population. Of note, OTC outcomes appear better when a hearing health care professional supports these users. Conclusion While some direct-to-consumer hearing devices have the capability to produce adverse effects due to production of dangerously high sound levels and internal noise, the existing literature suggests that there are potential benefits of these devices. Research of direct-to-consumer hearing devices is limited, and current published studies are of weak quality. Much

  16. Mindfulness-based interventions for the treatment of depressive rumination: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilisbeth Perestelo-Perez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes/Objetivo: Revisión sistemática para evaluar el efecto de las inter- venciones basadas en la atención plena y/o en el proceso de aceptación de pensamientos rumiativos en la depresión. Método: Búsquedas sistemáticas en Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central, PsycInfo y Cinahl hasta diciembre 2016 y búsquedas manuales identificaron once estu- dios. Resultados: Un metanálisis que comparó el efecto de la intervención basada en Mindfulness con la atención habitual mostró una reducción significativa y moderada de pensamientos rumia- tivos. Los hallazgos sugieren que los procesos de atención/aceptación producen cambios en las rumiaciones e influyen en el efecto clínico de las intervenciones. Otro metanálisis con estudios que compararon la intervención basada en Mindfulness con otros tratamientos activos (medi- cación, activación conductual y terapia cognitivo-conductual, respectivamente no mostraron diferencias significativas ( g = − 0,02, 95% CI: − 0,39, 0,35; I 2 = 0%. Conclusiones: Mindfulness en comparación con la atención habitual, produce una reducción significativa y moderada en la rumia. Este efecto parece independiente de la fase de tratamiento o del número de episodios depresivos pasados, y se mantuvo un mes después del final del tratamiento. Sin embargo, se necesitan más estudios controlados con pacientes reales que comparen las técnicas cognitivo- conductuales más utilizadas para tratar los pensamientos rumiativos con técnicas de aceptación y atención plena.

  17. Barriers and facilitators to recruitment of South Asians to health research: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quay, Teo Aw; Frimer, Leora; Janssen, Patricia A; Lamers, Yvonne

    2017-06-01

    People of South Asian ethnicity are under-represented in health research studies. The objectives of this scoping review were to examine the barriers and facilitators to recruitment of South Asians to health research studies and to describe strategies for improving recruitment. Scoping review METHODS: Using the Arksey and O'Malley framework for scoping reviews, we comprehensively searched electronic databases (MEDLINE via PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and PsycINFO). Studies that identified barriers and facilitators to recruitment, or recruitment strategies for South Asian populations were included. Recruitment barriers, facilitators and strategies were grouped thematically and summarised narratively. Of 1846 potentially relevant articles, 15 met the inclusion criteria and were included in the thematic synthesis. Multiple facilitators and barriers to enrolment of South Asians in health research studies were identified; these most commonly related to logistical challenges, language and cultural barriers, concerns about adverse consequences of participating and mistrust of research. Several actionable strategies were discussed, the most common being engagement of South Asian communities, demonstration of cultural competency, provision of incentives and benefits, language sensitivity through the use of translators and translated materials and the development of trust and personal relationships. There is a growing awareness of the barriers and facilitators to recruitment of South Asian participants to health research studies. Knowledge of effective recruitment strategies and implementation during the grant funding stages may reduce the risk of poor recruitment and representation of South Asians. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Systematic review of the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability scale for assessing pain in infants and children: is it reliable, valid, and feasible for use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crellin, Dianne J; Harrison, Denise; Santamaria, Nick; Babl, Franz E

    2015-11-01

    The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability (FLACC) scale is one of the most widely used behavioural observation pain scales. However, the psychometrics of the scale have not been adequately summarised and evaluated to provide clear recommendations regarding its use. The aim of this study was to rigorously evaluate the reliability, validity, feasibility, and utility of the scale for clinical and research purposes and provide recommendations regarding appropriate use of the scale. Databases searched were MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO (using the Ovid, PubMed, and Ebscohost platforms), The Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews and Cochrane Controlled Trials, and Google Scholar. Psychometric evaluation studies reporting feasibility, reliability, validity, or utility data for the FLACC scale applied to children (birth to 18 years) and randomised controlled trials (RCT) using the FLACC scale to measure a study outcome in infants and children. Data extraction included study design, population demographics, and psychometric data. Analysis involved in this study are quality assessment of the psychometric evaluation studies and the RCTs using the COSMIN checklist and the Jadad scale, respectively, and narrative synthesis of all results. Twenty-five psychometric evaluations studies and 52 RCTs were included. The study population, circumstances, and quality of the studies varied greatly. Sufficient data addressing postoperative pain assessment in infants and children exist. Some positive data support the psychometrics of the scale used to assess postoperative pain in children with cognitive impairment. Limited and conflicting data addressing procedural pain assessment exist. Content validity and scale feasibility have had limited psychometric evaluation. There are insufficient data to support the FLACC scale for use in all circumstances and populations to which is currently applied.

  19. Prevalencia bayesiana y niveles de burnout en enfermería de urgencias. Una revisión sistemática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Albendín

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo tiene como objetivos conocer los niveles de burnout, estimar la prevalencia del trastorno así como analizar las relaciones entre algunos factores de riesgo y el síndrome en profesionales de enfermería que trabajan en servicios de urgencias. Se ha realizado una revisión sistemática de estudios primarios cuantitativos que midiesen el síndrome de burnout en enfermeros del servicio de urgencias. La búsqueda se realizó en octubre de 2014 en las siguientes bases: CINAHL, CUIDEN, IBECS, LILACS, Pubmed, Proquest, Psycinfo, Scielo, Scopus y la Biblioteca Cochrane. Siguiendo los criterios de inclusión y exclusión se obtuvo una muestra final de 27 estudios. Se han encontrado mayoritariamente niveles medios y altos en la dimensión cansancio emocional. En la dimensión despersonalización los valores han sido principalmente de nivel intermedio aunque también se han encontrado estudios que informan de niveles altos. En la dimensión realización personal no existe consenso en la literatura revisada sobre un nivel más prevalente. Variables como el género, el turno de trabajo y la carga horaria, entre otras, son factores de riesgo de burnout. Los trabajos revisados informan de niveles intermedios y altos en todas las dimensiones del burnout y concluyen que la prevalencia de burnout en enfermeros de servicios de urgencias es alta. Algunos factores de riesgo sociodemográficos, como edad y sexo, otros laborales como antigüedad en la profesión y servicio, y alguno psicológico, como ansiedad, juegan un papel importante por su relación con el burnout.

  20. A systematic review of childhood maltreatment assessments in population-representative surveys since 1990.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Hovdestad

    Full Text Available Population-representative surveys that assess childhood maltreatment and health are a valuable resource to explore the implications of child maltreatment for population health. Systematic identification and evaluation of such surveys is needed to facilitate optimal use of their data and to inform future research.To inform researchers of the existence and nature of population-representative surveys relevant to understanding links between childhood maltreatment and health; to evaluate the assessment of childhood maltreatment in this body of work.We included surveys that: 1 were representative of the non-institutionalized population of any size nation or of any geopolitical region ≥ 10 million people; 2 included a broad age range (≥ 40 years; 3 measured health; 4 assessed childhood maltreatment retrospectively; and 5 were conducted since 1990. We used Internet and database searching (including CINAHL, Embase, ERIC, Global Health, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Scopus, Social Policy and Practice: January 1990 to March 2014, expert consultation, and other means to identify surveys and associated documentation. Translations of non-English survey content were verified by fluent readers of survey languages. We developed checklists to abstract and evaluate childhood maltreatment content.Fifty-four surveys from 39 countries met inclusion criteria. Sample sizes ranged from 1,287-51,945 and response rates from 15%-96%. Thirteen surveys assessed neglect, 15 emotional abuse; 18 exposure to family violence; 26 physical abuse; 48 sexual abuse. Fourteen surveys assessed more than three types; six of these were conducted since 2010. In nine surveys childhood maltreatment assessments were detailed (+10 items for at least one type of maltreatment. Seven surveys' assessments had known reliability and/or validity.Data from 54 surveys can be used to explore the population health relevance of child maltreatment. Assessment of childhood maltreatment is not comprehensive but

  1. The effect of Tai Chi on psychosocial well-being: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei Chun; Zhang, Anthony Lin; Rasmussen, Bodil; Lin, Li-Wei; Dunning, Trisha; Kang, Seung Wan; Park, Byung-Joo; Lo, Sing Kai

    2009-09-01

    This systematic review aimed to critically appraise published clinical trials designed to assess the effect of Tai Chi on psychosocial well-being. Databases searched included MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, HEALT, PsycINFO, CISCOM, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials of the Cochrane Library, and dissertations and conference proceedings from inception to August 2008. Methodological quality was assessed using a modified Jadad scale. A total of 15 studies met the inclusion criteria (i.e. English publications of randomized controlled trials with Tai Chi as an intervention and psychological well-being as an outcome measure), of which eight were high quality trials. The psychosocial outcomes measured included anxiety (eight studies), depression (eight studies), mood (four studies), stress (two studies), general mental health three studies), anger, positive and negative effect, self-esteem, life satisfaction, social interaction and self-rated health (one study each). Tai Chi intervention was found to have a significant effect in 13 studies, especially in the management of depression and anxiety. Although the results seemed to suggest Tai Chi is effective, they should be interpreted cautiously as the quality of the trials varied substantially. Furthermore, significant findings were shown in only six high quality studies. Moreover, significant between group differences after Tai Chi intervention was demonstrated in only one high quality study (the other three significant results were observed in non-high quality studies). Two high quality studies in fact found no significant Tai Chi effects. It is still premature to make any conclusive remarks on the effect of Tai Chi on psychosocial well-being.

  2. Risk factors for violence in psychosis: systematic review and meta-regression analysis of 110 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Katrina; van Dorn, Richard; Fazel, Seena

    2013-01-01

    Previous reviews on risk and protective factors for violence in psychosis have produced contrasting findings. There is therefore a need to clarify the direction and strength of association of risk and protective factors for violent outcomes in individuals with psychosis. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis using 6 electronic databases (CINAHL, EBSCO, EMBASE, Global Health, PsycINFO, PUBMED) and Google Scholar. Studies were identified that reported factors associated with violence in adults diagnosed, using DSM or ICD criteria, with schizophrenia and other psychoses. We considered non-English language studies and dissertations. Risk and protective factors were meta-analysed if reported in three or more primary studies. Meta-regression examined sources of heterogeneity. A novel meta-epidemiological approach was used to group similar risk factors into one of 10 domains. Sub-group analyses were then used to investigate whether risk domains differed for studies reporting severe violence (rather than aggression or hostility) and studies based in inpatient (rather than outpatient) settings. There were 110 eligible studies reporting on 45,533 individuals, 8,439 (18.5%) of whom were violent. A total of 39,995 (87.8%) were diagnosed with schizophrenia, 209 (0.4%) were diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and 5,329 (11.8%) were diagnosed with other psychoses. Dynamic (or modifiable) risk factors included hostile behaviour, recent drug misuse, non-adherence with psychological therapies (p valuesviolence, these associations did not change materially. In studies investigating inpatient violence, associations differed in strength but not direction. Certain dynamic risk factors are strongly associated with increased violence risk in individuals with psychosis and their role in risk assessment and management warrants further examination.

  3. The intersection of culture in the provision of dementia care: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Joanne; Cronin, Camille; Stiell, Marlon; Ojo, Omorogieva

    2017-08-09

    To understand the intersection of healthcare professionals' and care workers' culture and their provision of person-centred care for people with dementia. Due to the nature of global immigration and recruitment strategies, healthcare is provided by a culturally diverse workforce. Consequently, there is a need to understand healthcare professionals' and care workers' cultural values of illness, disease and dementia. Cultural values and beliefs regarding dementia and care of the older person differ, and currently there is a lack of clarity regarding the intersection of culture in the provision of person-centred dementia care. A search of the following databases was completed: Medline, CINAHL, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences, PsycINFO and PubMed for papers published from 1(st) January 2006 to 31(st) July 2016. A total of seven qualitative studies met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, all explored the impact of healthcare professionals' and care workers' culture in relation to their provision of person-centred dementia care. A meta-synthesis of the data from these studies identified four themes: cultural perceptions of dementia, illness and older people, impact of cultural perceptions on service use, acculturation of the workforce, and cross cultural communication. Limited evidence was found on the impact of healthcare professionals' and care workers' culture on their provision of person-centred dementia care. The intersection of culture and dementia included the understanding of dementia, care and family roles. Acculturation of migrant healthcare workers to the culture of the host country, workplace, and support with the communication was identified as necessary for the provision of person-centred dementia care. Open access education and training to support communication is required, alongside the development of robust interventions to support the process of acculturation of migrant healthcare professionals and care workers to provide culturally competent

  4. Recognition and treatment of muscle dysmorphia and related body image disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, James E; Sedory, Edward J; Gray, Kimberly A

    2005-01-01

    To present the reader with various psychobehavioral characteristics of muscle dysmorphia, discuss recognition of the disorder, and describe treatment and referral options. We conducted a comprehensive review of the relevant literature in CINAHL, MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, EBSCO, PsycINFO, and PubMed. All years from 1985 to the present were searched for the terms muscle dysmorphia, bigorexia, and reverse anorexia. The incidence of muscle dysmorphia is increasing, both in the United States and in other regions of the world, perhaps because awareness and recognition of the condition have increased. Although treatment options are limited, therapy and medication do work. The primary issue is identifying the disorder, because it does not present like other psychobehavioral conditions such as anorexia or bulimia nervosa. Not only do patients see themselves as healthy, most look very healthy from an outward perspective. The causes of muscle dysmorphia are not well understood, which reinforces the need for continued investigation. Muscle dysmorphia is an emerging phenomenon in society. Pressure on males to appear more muscular and lean has prompted a trend in the area of psychobehavioral disorders often likened to anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Athletes are particularly susceptible to developing body image disorders because of the pressures surrounding sport performance and societal trends promoting muscularity and leanness. Health care professionals need to become more familiar with the common signs and symptoms of muscle dysmorphia, as well as the treatment and referral options, in order to assist in providing appropriate care. In the future, authors should continue to properly measure and document the incidence of muscle dysmorphia in athletic populations, both during and after participation.

  5. Protocol for a mixed studies systematic review on the implementation of the recovery approach in adult mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piat, Myra; Sofouli, Eleni; Sabetti, Judith; Lambrou, Angella; Chodos, Howard; Briand, Catherine; Vachon, Brigitte; Curran, Janet

    2017-08-30

    Recovery is integral to mental health planning in G-8 countries including Canada. A recovery-oriented approach to care aims to promote personal empowerment, illness self-management and a life beyond services for people with serious mental illness (SMI), while reducing the financial burden associated with mental illness. Although there is a growing body of literature on recovery, no synthesis of research on the implementation of recovery into mental health services exists. The objective is to conduct a mixed studies systematic review on the operationalisation of recovery into mental health services for adults with SMI. It will inform the transformation of Canadian services to a recovery orientation, but may be applicable to other countries. Seven databases including PubMed, Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase, Ovid PsycInfo, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and Scopus will be searched for peer-reviewed empirical studies published from 1998 to December 2016. Systematic reviews and studies using quantitative, qualitative and mixed methodologies will be included. Secondary searches will be conducted in reference lists of all selected full text articles. Handsearches will also be performed in the tables of contents of three recovery-focused journals for the last 5 years. International experts in the field will be contacted for comments and advice. Data extraction will include identification and methodological synthesis of each study; definition of recovery; information on recovery implementation; facilitators and barriers and study outcomes. A quality assessment will be conducted on each study. The data will be synthesised and a stepwise thematic analysis performed. Ethics approval is not required for this knowledge synthesis. Findings will be disseminated through knowledge translation activities including: (1) a 1-day symposium; (2) presentations in national and international conferences and to local stakeholders; (3) publications in peer-reviewed journals; (4) posts on the

  6. Constipation is casting a shadow over everyday life - a systematic review on older people's experience of living with constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvistholm, Nina; Munch, Lene; Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard

    2017-04-01

    To explore and summarise best evidence of how constipation affects the daily living of older people from their own perspective. Furthermore, to assess how interventions aimed at treating constipation in older people affect patient-reported outcome such as quality of life. Constipation is a common and overlooked problem with an impact on everyday life, especially among older people. Older people seem to have individual preconceptions on constipation which can influence the strategies used to prevent and treat constipation. A systematic review, integrating findings from both qualitative and quantitative studies. Systematic searches were carried out in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO and EMBASE on the 31st of July 2014. A search strategy was constructed with key concepts identified using PICO to identify quantitative studies and PIC(o) to identify qualitative studies. Search terms included constipation, elderly, aged, elderly people, aged people, quality of life, patient experience, patient perspective, meaning, emotion, psychological. Reference lists were searched manually. A total of nine studies were included in the review, five quantitative and four qualitative. Three main themes crystallised from the results of the included studies: bodily experiences, everyday life shadowed by constipation and adverse psychological effects. Constipation among older people was connected to subjective and comprehensive experiences. It had a negative impact on physical and mental well-being as well as the social life of older people. The review also showed that older people had individual and personal strategies, based on their own beliefs. Healthcare professionals need to be aware of the experiences of living with constipation as well as the range of strategies used by patients to prevent and treat constipation. The patient perspective on constipation needs to be integrated in the strategies and actions carried out by healthcare professionals. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Teenage and Young Adult Cancer-Related Fatigue Is Prevalent, Distressing, and Neglected: It Is Time to Intervene. A Systematic Literature Review and Narrative Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Sara; Grove, Sarah; Hatcher, Helen; Kuhn, Isla; Barclay, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Cancer-related fatigue in adults has been the subject of considerable recent research, confirming its importance as a common and debilitating symptom, and establishing a number of evidence-based interventions. There has, however, been limited focus on the fatigue suffered by teenagers and young adults with cancer, a group recognized as having unique experiences and developmental needs. We have undertaken a systematic review of the literature to provide a comprehensive overview of studies evaluating fatigue in this younger patient group in order to guide clinical practice and future research. Method: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases for literature containing data relating to any aspect of fatigue in patients aged 13–24 at cancer diagnosis or treatment. Results: Sixty articles were identified, of which five described interventional clinical trials. Cancer-related fatigue was consistently one of the most prevalent, severe, and distressing symptoms, and it persisted long-term in survivors. It was associated with a number of factors, including poor sleep, depression, and chemotherapy. There was little evidence for the effectiveness of any intervention, although exercise appears to be the most promising. Importantly, fatigue was itself a significant barrier to physical and social activities. Conclusion: Cancer-related fatigue is a major and disabling problem in young cancer patients. Effective management strategies are needed to avoid compounding the dependence and social isolation of this vulnerable patient group. Future research should focus on providing evidence for the effectiveness of interventions, of which activity promotion and management of concurrent symptoms are the most promising. PMID:25852970

  8. Skin cancer prevention practices among malignant melanoma survivors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Vinayak K; Allison Ford, M; Brodell, Robert T; Boyas, Javier F; Jacks, Stephanie K; Biviji-Sharma, Rizwana; Haskins, Mary A; Bass, Martha A

    2016-06-01

    This systematic review was conducted to evaluate and summarize the existing literature on prevalence of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure, sun protection, and screening behaviors among individuals diagnosed with malignant melanoma (MM). The search was performed in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ScienceDirect, EMBASE, and ERIC from inception of each database through July 2014. Studies were included if (1) individuals diagnosed with MM were the primary sample, (2) measured UVR exposure, primary and secondary preventive behaviors, (3) original research communication that constitutes an entire set of empirical data, (4) observational design, and (5) English peer-reviewed. Studies were excluded if (1) all of the inclusion criteria were not met and (2) duplicates, conference abstracts, editorials, news, letters to the editor, comments, reviews, feature articles, white papers, and guidelines. The search resulted in 255 articles that were screened for relevance; however, only 15 articles met all of the inclusion criteria. Most of the studies were cross-sectional (n = 10), used self-administered surveys (n = 8), and were conducted in North America (n = 10). The sample sizes ranged considerably, but were mostly Caucasian (n = 6) and included a higher proportion of women (n = 8). Evidence demonstrated that individuals with MM still engaged in sunbathing, indoor tanning, and reported sunburns. Moreover, survivors reported inadequate levels of both sun protection and skin self-examinations. The findings highlight the need for intensifying intervention strategies to reduce the risk of new primary MMs in this group. Future research should increase in rigor and include more diverse populations and regions.

  9. Selecting a measure for assessing secondary trauma in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Jenny; Robertson, Noelle

    2015-11-01

    To summarise the usefulness of available psychometric tools in assessing secondary trauma in nursing staff and examine their limitations, as well as their strengths, to enable researchers to select the most suitable measures. Secondary trauma is an extreme persistent reaction that can be experienced by nursing staff following exposure to a potentially life-threatening situation. This relatively new concept is increasingly used to explore staff distress, but is complicated by various definitions. In this growing and popular field, few rigorously tested measures are used. Therefore, it is timely to examine the measures available and their robustness. In March 2014 the following databases were used: BNI, CINAHL, EMBASE, PILOTS, Medline, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library. A systematic search of nurse and health research databases was conducted from 1980 to 2014 using the terms nurs* AND PTSD OR Posttraumatic Stress Disorder OR secondary trauma OR secondary traumatic stress OR STS OR compassion fatigue. To strengthen confidence in research findings and make the most useful contribution to practice, researchers should use the most rigorous measures available. Of the assessment tools used, the only one subject to robust peer review is the Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale (STSS). The scale most frequently used to assess secondary traumatic stress is the Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL); its lack of psychometric evaluation is a potential weakness. CONCLUSION The STSS is the only validated tool reported in the peer-reviewed, published literature and the authors suggest greater application when secondary trauma is a suspected consequence of nursing work. Validated tools such as the HADS and GHQ-28 are more useful in assessing broader-based psychological morbidity. The authors suggest greater application of the STSS when secondary trauma is a suspected consequence of nursing work. Researchers interested in assessing more than trauma responses are advised to use HADS

  10. Managing Acute Behavioural Disturbances in the Emergency Department Using the Environment, Policies and Practices: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Tracey J; Ivory, Sean; Hutton, Jennie

    2017-06-01

    Effective strategies for managing acute behavioural disturbances (ABDs) within emergency departments (EDs) are needed given their rising occurrence and negative impact on safety, psychological wellbeing, and staff turnover. Non-pharmacological interventions for ABD management generally fall into four categories: environmental modifications; policies; practice changes; and education. Our objective was to systematically review the efficacy of strategies for ABD management within EDs that involved changes to environment, architecture, policy and practice. We performed systematic searches of CINAHL Plus with Full Text, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, and EMBASE, as well as reference lists of relevant review articles to identify relevant studies published between January 1985 - April 2016. We included studies written in English, which reported management of behavioural disturbances in adults associated with the ED through the use of environmental modifiers (including seclusion, restraint, specialised rooms, architectural changes), policy, and practice-based interventions excepting education-only interventions. Efficacy outcomes of interest included incidence, severity, and duration of ABD, incidence of injuries, staff absenteeism, restraint use, restraint duration, and staff and patient perceptions. Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts, and assessed the relevancy and eligibility of studies based on full-text articles. Two authors independently appraised included studies. A narrative synthesis of findings was undertaken. Studies reporting interventions for managing ABDs within the ED are limited in number and quality. The level of evidence for efficacy is low, requiring caution in conclusions. While there is preliminary evidence for environmental change in the form of specialised behavioural rooms, security upgrades and ED modifications, these are not supported by evidence from controlled studies. Many of these "common sense" environmental changes recommended in

  11. Review article: Effectiveness of ultra-brief interventions in the emergency department to reduce alcohol consumption: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnes, Rosemary A; Hutton, Jennie E; Weiland, Tracey J; Fatovich, Daniel M; Egerton-Warburton, Diana

    2016-12-01

    To assess the effectiveness of ultra-brief interventions (ultra-BI) or technology-involved preventive measures in the ED to reduce alcohol harm and risky drinking. Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL and EBM reviews were searched for articles published between 1996 and 2015. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials, which compared an ultra-BI with screening, standard care or minimal intervention for adults and adolescents at risk for alcohol-related harm presenting to an ED, were included. Outcomes of interest were frequency of alcohol consumption, quantity of alcohol consumed, binge drinking and ED representation. Thirteen studies (nine single centre and four multicentre) were included. Six studies showed a significant reduction in the quantity consumed with intermediate effect size at 3 months (d = -0.40) and small effect size at 12 months (d = -0.15). Two studies showed a significant reduction in binge drinking with small effect size at 3 months (d = -0.12) and 12 months (d = -0.09). No studies showed an effect on frequency of alcohol consumption or ED representation. Heterogeneity in study design, definition of risky, harmful or hazardous alcohol use, intervention types, outcomes, outcome timeframes and outcome measures prevented the performance of quantitative meta-analysis. Despite its limited effectiveness in reducing alcohol use in the short-term, with the large number of people attending EDs with risky drinking, the use of an effective ultra-BI would have the potential to have a measurable population effect. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  12. Reduced patient anxiety as a result of radiation therapist-led psychosocial support: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Kelly; Naehrig, Diana; Halkett, Georgia K B; Dhillon, Haryana M

    2017-02-03

    Up to 49% of patients attending radiation therapy appointments may experience anxiety and distress. Anxiety is heightened during the first few visits to radiation oncology. Radiation therapists (RT) are the only health professionals in direct daily contact with patients during treatment, placing them in a unique position to explore patients' psychosocial needs. This review aims to synthesise literature regarding the effect of RT-led psychosocial support on patient anxiety. In May 2015, we searched the following electronic databases: Medline, PsycINFO, Embase, CINAHL, PubMed and Cochrane library. Radiation therapy-specific journals were hand-searched, and reference lists of identified studies searched. This review complies with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The search identified 263 articles, of which 251 were excluded based on non-English language, duplicate article or relevance. A total of 12 articles involving 1363 patients were included and categorised into three broad themes: 'Patient Perspectives' 3 articles, 'Patient Information and Education' 5 articles and 'Screening and Needs Assessment' 4 articles. Two publications referred to the same sample and data. Quality ratings were mixed, with one study rated 'high' quality, seven 'moderate' and four 'low'. Methodological weaknesses were identified in relation to workflow, sample size and responder bias. RTs have a role in psychosocial support through increased communication and information sharing, which can benefit both patients and staff. RT-led practices such as relationship building, patient education sessions and screening and needs assessments are feasible and can reduce anxiety. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  13. Perceptions and experiences of the implementation, management, use and optimisation of electronic prescribing systems in hospital settings: protocol for a systematic review of qualitative studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farre, Albert; Bem, Danai; Heath, Gemma; Shaw, Karen; Cummins, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is increasing evidence that electronic prescribing (ePrescribing) or computerised provider/physician order entry (CPOE) systems can improve the quality and safety of healthcare services. However, it has also become clear that their implementation is not straightforward and may create unintended or undesired consequences once in use. In this context, qualitative approaches have been particularly useful and their interpretative synthesis could make an important and timely contribution to the field. This review will aim to identify, appraise and synthesise qualitative studies on ePrescribing/CPOE in hospital settings, with or without clinical decision support. Methods and analysis Data sources will include the following bibliographic databases: MEDLINE, MEDLINE In Process, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Social Policy and Practice via Ovid, CINAHL via EBSCO, The Cochrane Library (CDSR, DARE and CENTRAL databases), Nursing and Allied Health Sources, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts via ProQuest and SCOPUS. In addition, other sources will be searched for ongoing studies (ClinicalTrials.gov) and grey literature: Healthcare Management Information Consortium, Conference Proceedings Citation Index (Web of Science) and Sociological abstracts. Studies will be independently screened for eligibility by 2 reviewers. Qualitative studies, either standalone or in the context of mixed-methods designs, reporting the perspectives of any actors involved in the implementation, management and use of ePrescribing/CPOE systems in hospital-based care settings will be included. Data extraction will be conducted by 2 reviewers using a piloted form. Quality appraisal will be based on criteria from the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme checklist and Standards for Reporting Qualitative Research. Studies will not be excluded based on quality assessment. A postsynthesis sensitivity analysis will be undertaken. Data analysis will follow the thematic synthesis method. Ethics and

  14. Identifying and classifying quality-of-life tools for assessing pressure ulcers after spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzig, Sander L.; Balioussis, Christina; Nussbaum, Ethne; McGillivray, Colleen F.; Catharine Craven, B.; Noreau, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Context Although pressure ulcers may negatively influence quality of life (QoL) post-spinal cord injury (SCI), our understanding of how to assess their impact is confounded by conceptual and measurement issues. To ensure that descriptions of pressure ulcer impact are appropriately characterized, measures should be selected according to the domains that they evaluate and the population and pathologies for which they are designed. Objective To conduct a systematic literature review to identify and classify outcome measures used to assess the impact of pressure ulcers on QoL after SCI. Methods Electronic databases (Medline/PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycInfo) were searched for studies published between 1975 and 2011. Identified outcome measures were classified as being either subjective or objective using a QoL model. Results Fourteen studies were identified. The majority of tools identified in these studies did not have psychometric evidence supporting their use in the SCI population with the exception of two objective measures, the Short-Form 36 and the Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique, and two subjective measures, the Life Situation Questionnaire-Revised and the Ferrans and Powers Quality of Life Index SCI-Version. Conclusion Many QoL outcome tools showed promise in being sensitive to the presence of pressure ulcers, but few of them have been validated for use with SCI. Prospective studies should employ more rigorous methods for collecting data on pressure ulcer severity and location to improve the quality of findings with regard to their impact on QoL. The Cardiff Wound Impact Schedule is a potential tool for assessing impact of pressure ulcers-post SCI. PMID:24090238

  15. Non-participation in population-based disease prevention programs in general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koopmans Berber

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of people with a chronic disease will strongly increase in the next decades. Therefore, prevention of disease becomes increasingly important. The aim of this systematic review was to identify factors that negatively influence participation in population-based disease prevention programs in General Practice and to establish whether the program type is related to non-participation levels. Methods We conducted a systematic review in Pubmed, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO, covering 2000 through July 6th 2012, to identify publications including information about characteristics of non-participants or reasons for non-participation in population-based disease prevention programs in General Practice. Results A total of 24 original studies met our criteria, seven of which focused on vaccination, eleven on screening aimed at early detection of disease, and six on screening aimed at identifying high risk of a disease, targeting a variety of diseases and conditions. Lack of personal relevance of the program, younger age, higher social deprivation and former non-participation were related to actual non-participation. No differences were found in non-participation levels or factors related to non-participation between the three program types. The large variation in non-participation levels within the program types may be partly due to differences in recruitment strategies, with more active, personalized strategies resulting in higher participation levels compared to an invitation letter. Conclusions There is still much to be gained by tailoring strategies to improve participation in those who are less likely to do so, namely younger individuals, those living in a deprived area and former non-participants. Participation may increase by applying more active recruitment strategies.

  16. Evidence-based interventions in primary care following acute coronary syndrome in Australia and New Zealand: a systematic scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Manavi M; Woods, John A; Dronavalli, Mithilesh; Hamilton, Sandra J; Thompson, Sandra C

    2016-11-09

    Coronary artery disease has a significant disease burden, but there are many known barriers to management of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). General practitioners (GPs) bear considerable responsibility for post-discharge management of ACS in Australia and New Zealand (NZ), but knowledge about the extent and efficacy of such management is limited. This systematic review summarises published evidence from Australia and New Zealand regarding management in primary care after discharge following ACS. A search of PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL-Plus and PSYCINFO databases in August 2015 was supplemented by citation screening and hand-searching. Literature was selected based on specified criteria, and assessed for quality using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT). Extracted data was related to evidence-based interventions specified by published guidelines. The search yielded 19 publications, most of which reported on quantitative and observational studies from Australia. The majority of studies scored at least 75 % on the MMAT. Diverse aspects of management by GPs are presented according to categories of evidence-based guidelines. Data suggests that GPs are more likely to prescribe ACS medications than to assist in lifestyle or psychological management. GP referral to cardiac rehabilitation varied, and one study showed an improvement in the number of ACS patients with documented ACS management plans. Few studies described successful interventions to improve GP management, though some quality improvement efforts through education and integration of care with hospitals were beneficial. Limited data was published about interventions effective in rural, minority, and Indigenous populations. Research reflects room for improvement in GP post-discharge ACS management, but little is known about effective methods for improvement. Additional research, both observational and interventional, would assist GPs in improving the quality of post-discharge ACS care.

  17. The maternal health outcomes of paid maternity leave: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Zoe; Garrett, Cameryn C; Hewitt, Belinda; Keogh, Louise; Hocking, Jane S; Kavanagh, Anne M

    2015-04-01

    Paid maternity leave has become a standard benefit in many countries throughout the world. Although maternal health has been central to the rationale for paid maternity leave, no review has specifically examined the effect of paid maternity leave on maternal health. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of studies that examine the association between paid maternity leave and maternal health. We conducted a comprehensive search of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Sociological Abstracts) and Google Scholar. We searched websites of relevant organisations, reference lists of key papers and journals, and citation indices for additional studies including those not in refereed journals. There were no language restrictions. Studies were included if they compared paid maternity leave versus no paid maternity leave, or different lengths of paid leave. Data were extracted and an assessment of bias was performed independently by authors. Seven studies were identified, with participants from Australia, Sweden, Norway, USA, Canada, and Lebanon. All studies used quantitative methodologies, including cohort, cross-sectional, and repeated cross-sectional designs. Outcomes included mental health and wellbeing, general health, physical wellbeing, and intimate partner violence. The four studies that examined leave at an individual level showed evidence of maternal health benefits, whereas the three studies conducting policy-level comparisons reported either no association or evidence of a negative association. The synthesis of the results suggested that paid maternity leave provided maternal health benefits, although this varied depending on the length of leave. This has important implications for public health and social policy. However, all studies were subject to confounding bias and many to reverse causation. Given the small number of studies and the methodological limitations of the evidence, longitudinal studies are

  18. Systematic review: Do patient expectations influence treatment outcomes in total knee and total hip arthroplasty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haanstra Tsjitske M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This systematic review aims to summarise all the available evidence related to the association between pre-operative patient expectations (outcome expectations, process expectations and self efficacy expectations and 5 different treatment outcomes (overall improvement, pain, function, stiffness and satisfaction in patients with total knee or total hip arthroplasty at three different follow-op periods (>6 weeks; >6 weeks- ≤6 months; >6 months. Methods English and Dutch language articles were identified through PubMed, EMBASE.com, PsycINFO, CINAHL and The Cochrane Library from inception to September 2012. Articles assessing the association between pre-operative patient expectations and treatment outcomes for TKA/THA in either adjusted or unadjusted analysis were included. Two reviewers, working independently, determined eligibility, rated methodological quality and extracted data on study design, population, expectation measurements, outcome measurements and strength of the associations. Methodological quality was rated by the same reviewers on a 19 item scale. The scores on the quality assessment were taken into account when drawing final conclusions. Results The search strategy generated 2252 unique references, 18 articles met inclusion criteria. Scores on the methodological quality assessment ranged between 6% and 79%. Great variety was seen in definitions and measurement methods of expectations. No significant associations were found between patient expectations and overall improvement, satisfaction and stiffness. Both significant positive and non-significant associations were found for the association between expectations and pain and function. Conclusions There was no consistency in the association between patients’ pre-operative expectations and treatment outcomes for TKA and THA indentified in this systematic review. There exists a need for a sound theoretical framework underlying the construct of

  19. The Effects of Pay-for-Performance Programs on Health, Health Care Use, and Processes of Care: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Aaron; Kondo, Karli; Damberg, Cheryl; Low, Allison; Motúapuaka, Makalapua; Freeman, Michele; O'Neil, Maya; Relevo, Rose; Kansagara, Devan

    2017-03-07

    The benefits of pay-for-performance (P4P) programs are uncertain. To update and expand a prior review examining the effects of P4P programs targeted at the physician, group, managerial, or institutional level on process-of-care and patient outcomes in ambulatory and inpatient settings. PubMed from June 2007 to October 2016; MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Business Economics and Theory, Business Source Elite, Scopus, Faculty of 1000, and Gartner Research from June 2007 to February 2016. Trials and observational studies in ambulatory and inpatient settings reporting process-of-care, health, or utilization outcomes. Two investigators extracted data, assessed study quality, and graded the strength of the evidence. Among 69 studies, 58 were in ambulatory settings, 52 reported process-of-care outcomes, and 38 reported patient outcomes. Low-strength evidence suggested that P4P programs in ambulatory settings may improve process-of-care outcomes over the short term (2 to 3 years), whereas data on longer-term effects were limited. Many of the positive studies were conducted in the United Kingdom, where incentives were larger than in the United States. The largest improvements were seen in areas where baseline performance was poor. There was no consistent effect of P4P on intermediate health outcomes (low-strength evidence) and insufficient evidence to characterize any effect on patient health outcomes. In the hospital setting, there was low-strength evidence that P4P had little or no effect on patient health outcomes and a positive effect on reducing hospital readmissions. Few methodologically rigorous studies; heterogeneous population and program characteristics and incentive targets. Pay-for-performance programs may be associated with improved processes of care in ambulatory settings, but consistently positive associations with improved health outcomes have not been demonstrated in any setting. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

  20. Rehabilitation interventions for postintensive care syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlhorn, Juliane; Freytag, Antje; Schmidt, Konrad; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Graf, Juergen; Troitzsch, Ute; Schlattmann, Peter; Wensing, Michel; Gensichen, Jochen

    2014-05-01

    An increasing number of ICU patients survive and develop mental, cognitive, or physical impairments. Various interventions support recovery from this postintensive care syndrome. Physicians in charge of post-ICU patients need to know which interventions are effective. Systematic literature search in databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, PsycInfo, CINAHL; 1991-2012), reference lists, and hand search. We included comparative studies of rehabilitation interventions in adult post-ICU patients if they considered health-related quality of life, frequency/severity of postintensive care syndrome symptoms, functional recovery, need for care, autonomy in activities of daily living, mortality, or hospital readmissions. Two reviewers extracted data and assessed risk of bias independently. From 4,761 publications, 18 studies with 2,510 patients were included. Studies addressed 20 outcomes, using 45 measures, covering inpatient (n = 4 trials), outpatient (n = 9), and mixed (n = 5) healthcare settings. Eight controlled trials with moderate to high quality were considered for evaluation of effectiveness. They investigated inpatient geriatric rehabilitation, ICU follow-up clinic, outpatient rehabilitation, disease management, and ICU diaries. Five of these trials assessed posttraumatic stress disorder, with four trials showing positive effects: first, ICU diaries reduced new-onset posttraumatic stress disorder (5% vs 13%, p = 0.02) after 3 months and second showed a lower mean Impact of Event Scale-Revised score (21.0 vs 32.1, p = 0.03) after 12 months. Third, aftercare by ICU follow-up clinic reduced Impact of Event Scale for women (20 vs 31; p ICU patients are rare. Positive effects were seen for ICU-diary interventions for posttraumatic stress disorder. More interventions for the growing number of ICU survivors are needed.

  1. Virtual reality therapy for adults post-stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis exploring virtual environments and commercial games in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Keith R; Hilderman, Courtney G E; Cheung, Katharine L; Tatla, Sandy; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this analysis was to systematically review the evidence for virtual reality (VR) therapy in an adult post-stroke population in both custom built virtual environments (VE) and commercially available gaming systems (CG). MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC, PSYCInfo, DARE, PEDro, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were systematically searched from the earliest available date until April 4, 2013. Controlled trials that compared VR to conventional therapy were included. Population criteria included adults (>18) post-stroke, excluding children, cerebral palsy, and other neurological disorders. Included studies were reported in English. Quality of studies was assessed with the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale (PEDro). Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. For body function outcomes, there was a significant benefit of VR therapy compared to conventional therapy controls, G = 0.48, 95% CI = [0.27, 0.70], and no significant difference between VE and CG interventions (P = 0.38). For activity outcomes, there was a significant benefit of VR therapy, G = 0.58, 95% CI = [0.32, 0.85], and no significant difference between VE and CG interventions (P = 0.66). For participation outcomes, the overall effect size was G = 0.56, 95% CI = [0.02, 1.10]. All participation outcomes came from VE studies. VR rehabilitation moderately improves outcomes compared to conventional therapy in adults post-stroke. Current CG interventions have been too few and too small to assess potential benefits of CG. Future research in this area should aim to clearly define conventional therapy, report on participation measures, consider motivational components of therapy, and investigate commercially available systems in larger RCTs. Prospero CRD42013004338.

  2. Variation in use of antipsychotic medications in nursing homes in the United States: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioltan, Hannah; Alshehri, Samah; Howe, Carol; Lee, Jeannie; Fain, Mindy; Eng, Howard; Schachter, Kenneth; Mohler, Jane

    2017-01-26

    The use of antipsychotic medications (APMs) in nursing home residents in the U.S. is an increasingly prominent issue and has been associated with increased risk of hospitalization, cardiovascular events, hip fractures, and mortality, among other adverse health events. The Food and Drug Administration has placed a black box warning on these drugs, specifying that they are not meant for residents with dementia, and has asked providers to review their treatment plans. The purpose of this systematic PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses)-based review was to summarize original research studies on facility level characteristics contributing to the use of antipsychotics in nursing homes across the United States, in order to investigate the variation of use. We searched Ovid Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and Sociological Abstracts. Articles were selected according to the following criteria: (1) Population of interest: older adults (≥60 years of age) residing in nursing homes (not home-based or inpatient hospital settings) in the U.S. (2) Receiving APMs, typical and/or atypical. Specifically excluded were studies of psychotropic medications such as antidepressants, benzodiazepines, anxiolytics, hypnotics, mood stabilizers, and stimulants. All study designs were considered, though reviews, editorials, letters to the editor and opinion pieces were excluded. An expert consultant panel was consulted to categorize facility characteristics into domains and determine possible etiologies of APM use based upon each characteristic. Nineteen observational studies, both quantitative and qualitative, published from 2000 to 2015, met full inclusion criteria and were included in this review. APM use varied based on multiple facility characteristics across several domains: 1) physical, 2) staffing, 3) occupancy, 4) market, and 5) quality. Variation in use of APMs in U.S. nursing homes based upon facility

  3. The measurement of disability in the elderly: a systematic review of self-reported questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Ding, Xiang; Dong, Birong

    2014-02-01

    To analyze the contents and formats of general self-reported questionnaires on disability that are designed for and/or are widely applied in the elderly population to depict a complete picture of this field and help researchers to choose proper tools more efficiently. A broad systematic literature search was performed in September 2013 and included the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and PROQOLID. The publication language was limited to English and Chinese. Two review authors independently performed the study selection and data extraction. All of the included instruments were extracted and classified using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health framework. Of 5569 articles retrieved from the searches and 156 articles retrieved from the pearling, 22 studies (including 24 questionnaires) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. From these, 42 different domains and 458 items were extracted. The most frequently used questionnaire was the Barthel Index followed by the Lawton and Brody Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale and the Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living, respectively. The contents and formats of the questionnaires varied considerably. Activities and participation were the most commonly assessed dimensions. In addition, the Activities of Daily Living, mobility and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale were the most common domains assessed among the included questionnaires. Among the 24 included questionnaires, the most frequently used questionnaires were the Barthel Index, Lawton and Brody Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale, and Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living. The content and format of the questionnaires varied considerably, but none of the questionnaires covered all essential dimensions of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health framework. Copyright © 2014 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  4. Limitations in Activities of Daily Living in Community-Dwelling People Aged 75 and Over: A Systematic Literature Review of Risk and Protective Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra, G. A. Rixt; Witte, Nico De; Duppen, Daan; Stuck, Andreas E.; Kempen, Gertrudis I. J. M.; Schols, Jos M. G. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Most older people wish to age in place, for which functional status or being able to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) is an important precondition. However, along with the substantial growth of the (oldest) old, the number of people who develop limitations in ADLs or have functional decline dramatically increases in this part of the population. Therefore, it is important to gain insight into factors that can contribute to developing intervention strategies at older ages. As a first step, this systematic review was conducted to identify risk and protective factors as predictors for developing limitations in ADLs in community-dwelling people aged 75 and over. Methods Four electronic databases (CINAHL (EBSCO), EMBASE, PsycINFO and PubMed) were searched systematically for potentially relevant studies published between January 1998 and March 2016. Results After a careful selection process, 6,910 studies were identified and 25 were included. By far most factors were examined in one study only, and most were considered risk factors. Several factors do not seem to be able to predict the development of limitations in ADLs in people aged 75 years and over, and for some factors ambiguous associations were found. The following risk factors were found in at least two studies: higher age, female gender, diabetes, hypertension, and stroke. A high level of physical activity and being married were protective in multiple studies. Notwithstanding the fact that research in people aged 65 years and over is more extensive, risk and protective factors seem to differ between the ‘younger’ and ‘older’ olds. Conclusion Only a few risk and protective factors in community-dwelling people aged 75 years and over have been analysed in multiple studies. However, the identified factors could serve both detection and prevention purposes, and implications for future research are given as well. PMID:27760234

  5. What is known about the subjective needs of people with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia? A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinand, Claudia; Nover, Sabine Ursula; Holle, Daniela; Zischka, Matthias; Halek, Margareta

    2016-07-01

    Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is an early-onset and progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with strong changes in judgement, behaviour, personality and emotions. These changes can cause significant problems in everyday life for people with bvFTD and their families, and have implications for health and society. Currently, there are no suitable evidence-based specific interventions for people with bvFTD. This scoping review aims to identify the self-expressed needs, demands and coping strategies of people with bvFTD. Identifying these issues is the first step towards the development of need-based psycho-social interventions for people with bvFTD. A comprehensive literature research was conducted of German and English scientific articles published between January 2000 and October 2014 using the databases MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PSYNDEX, SocINDEX, GeroLit, the Cochrane Library, ProQuest, the German National Library and additional search strategies in terms of a scoping review. Articles were identified by combining search terms related to 'frontotemporal dementia' with terms related to 'self-expressions', 'needs/demands' and 'coping'. After excluding duplicates, two independent reviewers screened the titles and abstracts of 2317 records for eligibility. Because eligibility could not be assessed from the titles or abstracts of 28 articles, those articles were assessed using the full text. One poster abstract met our research question and a few articles were related, but no article met all of the inclusion criteria. This lack of scientifically based knowledge concerning the perspective of people with bvFTD is discussed with reference to the search strategy and the research questions, disease-related aspects such as changes in behaviour or language and emotions and the difficulties in researching this topic. Recommendations are formulated for future research considering the perspective of people with bvFTD and that will involve the

  6. Psychology of behaviour change is key to effective oral health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard D

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesAMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, PsycARTICLES, ScienceDirect, SocINDEX, ASSIA, Social Policy and Practice, HMIC (Health Management Information Consortium), The Knowledge Network, Intute, MedNar, Copac, EPPI-Centre, EThOS, OpenGrey and TRIP databases. Searches were limited to publications in the English language published after 1994.Study selectionStudies set in general practice that investigated promoting good oral health in adult or child patients were considered. Study quality was assessed using NICE public health guidance checklists.Data extraction and synthesisStudies were grouped according to the evidence they offered in relation to the research questions and key findings and themes identified. No meta-analysis was conducted. Qualitative studies underwent thematic analysis. The evidence was synthesised after considering the studies' homogeneity, quality and applicability and studying the evidence tables.ResultsForty-four studies reported in 52 papers were considered. Fifteen studies were randomised controlled trials (RCTs), two cluster RCTs and one controlled trial. Five quasi-experimental studies, two before and after studies without controls, three surveys, 11 qualitative studies, three mixed methods studies, one audit and one pilot study were included.The studies were very heterogeneous; the quality of reporting highly variable with many using patient reported behaviours rather than objective measures. Follow-up periods were also short. Narrative summaries of psychological and behavioural models, verbal advice, written advice, other methods of conveying advice, message content, sender characteristics, receiver factors, 'framing' of advice, barriers and facilitators and patient satisfaction were provided.ConclusionsThe results of this review suggest that the psychology of behaviour change is the key to oral health promotion, and greater emphasis on teaching oral health professionals about health psychology would make

  7. GPs’ perspectives on the management of patients with multimorbidity: systematic review and synthesis of qualitative research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Carol; Mc Hugh, Sheena; Browne, John; Bradley, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Objective To synthesise the existing published literature on the perceptions of general practitioners (GPs) or their equivalent on the clinical management of multimorbidity and determine targets for future research that aims to improve clinical care in multimorbidity. Design Systematic review and metaethnographic synthesis of primary studies that used qualitative methods to explore GPs’ experiences of clinical management of multimorbidity or multiple chronic diseases. Data sources EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycInfo, Academic Search Complete, SocIndex, Social Science Full Text and digital theses/online libraries (database inception to September 2012) to identify literature using qualitative methods (focus groups or interviews). Review methods The 7-step metaethnographic approach described by Noblit and Hare, which involves cross-interpretation between studies while preserving the context of the primary data. Results Of 1805 articles identified, 37 were reviewed in detail and 10 were included, using a total of 275 GPs in 7 different countries. Four areas of difficulty specific to the management of multimorbidity emerged from these papers: disorganisation and fragmentation of healthcare; the inadequacy of guidelines and evidence-based medicine; challenges in delivering patient-centred care; and barriers to shared decision-making. A ‘line of argument’ was drawn which described GPs’ sense of isolation in decision-making for multimorbid patients. Conclusions This systematic review shows that the problem areas for GPs in the management of multimorbidity may be classified into four domains. There will be no ‘one size fits all’ intervention for multimorbidity but these domains may be useful targets to guide the development of interventions that will assist and improve the provision of care to multimorbid patients. PMID:24038011

  8. “Can nurse work environment influence readmission risk?” – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma C

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chenjuan Ma,1 Jingjing Shang,2 Patricia W Stone3 1The National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, 2Columbia University School of Nursing, 3Center for Health Policy, Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, NY, USA Background: Readmissions have been targeted as events that can improve quality of care while reducing health care expenditures. While increasing evidence has linked nurse work environment to various patient outcomes, no systematic review has assessed evidence examining nurse work environment in relation to readmission. Methods: This review was guided by the Institute of Medicine's Standards for Systematic Reviews. Comprehensive searches were conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, and were complemented by hand searching. Two reviewers independently completed full-text review and quality assessment using a validated tool. Results: Ten studies met the inclusion criteria and were included for final review. Various methods were used to measure readmission and nurse work environment, and analyses were conducted at both the patient and hospital levels. Overall, associations between nurse work environment and readmission emerged, and better nurse work environments (particularly higher levels of nurse staffing were associated with fewer readmissions. Discussion: The interpretation of results from each study was limited by the differences in variable measures across studies and methodological flaws. The relationship between nurse work environment and readmission needs to be further confirmed by stronger evidence from studies using standardized measures and more rigorous research design. Keywords: nurse work environment, nurse staffing, readmission, nursing, patient outcome

  9. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Antenatal Depression in the United States: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Soumyadeep; Trepka, Mary Jo; Pierre-Victor, Dudith; Bahelah, Raed; Avent, Tenesha

    2016-09-01

    Objectives More than 10 % of pregnant women in the United States (U.S.) suffer from depression, which has far-reaching consequences on maternal and fetal well-being. There is conflicting evidence regarding the prevalence of antenatal depression among different race and ethnic groups. This systematic review aimed to summarize the existing literature concerning racial/ethnic disparities in the prevalence and correlates of antenatal depression in the U.S. Methods PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases were searched online for research studies published in English in peer-reviewed journals until March 2015, using a pre-designed search strategy. Eligibility was determined using pre-specified criteria; and quality was assessed. Results Forty-one (41) articles met the criteria; 13 were cross-sectional, and 21 were longitudinal studies. Overall, the prevalence of antenatal depression was 10-30 %; it was higher among non-Hispanic blacks (NHBs) and Hispanics, compared to non-Hispanic whites (NHWs). Few studies looked at the correlates of depression by race/ethnicity. Among employed women, higher depression scores were observed among NHBs, compared to NHWs; while there was no racial difference among unemployed women. Racial difference and race-employment interaction disappeared once discrimination was accounted for. In another study, higher parity, higher stress, and lower self-esteem were significant correlates of depression among NHBs, while less satisfaction with social support, and higher stress predicted higher depression scores among NHWs and Hispanics respectively. Conclusions The findings of our review suggest that not only is antenatal depression a major public health issue that needs to be addressed, but different racial/ethnic groups seem to differ in their vulnerability and risk factors.

  10. MODELOS DE DIGNIDAD EN EL CUIDADO: CONTRIBUCIONES PARA EL FINAL DE LA VIDA

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    Begoña Errasti-Ibarrondo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La dignidad social, que se fundamenta en la dignidad ontológica y que es consecuen cia de su reconocimiento, se está convirtiendo en un aspecto fundamental del cuidado, tanto para los profesionales como para los propios pacientes. De forma más señalada al final de la vida, periodo en el que la persona es más vulnerable. Objetivo: explorar los distintos modelos de dignidad que han sido elaborados en diferentes contextos de la práctica clínica. Método: revisión de la literatura en las bases de datos PubMed, CINAHL y PsycInfo introduciendo “Dignity Model” como palabra clave. El único límite fue que el idioma de publicación fuese el inglés o el español. Resultados: se han identificado siete modelos de dignidad que han sido elaborados desde perspectivas diferentes y en contextos diversos. Todos ellos consideran la dignidad como un rasgo intrínseco del ser humano, pero al mismo tiempo contemplan una dimensión subjetiva que depende de la experiencia de la persona. Esta dimensión subjetiva de la dignidad está influenciada por la visión que tiene la propia persona sobre sí misma, la repercusión que tiene la enfermedad sobre ella, el contexto o incluso el comportamiento de los profesionales de la salud. Conclusiones: todos los modelos incluidos en esta revisión proporcionan a los profesionales de la salud un punto de partida para la reflexión e incorporación de prácticas que traten de preservar la dignidad social de los pacientes con enfermedad terminal. Uno de los modelos identificados ha sido aplicado a la práctica clínica con resultados positivos.

  11. A review of undergraduate interprofessional simulation-based education (IPSE).

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    Gough, Suzanne; Hellaby, Mark; Jones, Neal; MacKinnon, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Interprofessional simulation-based education (IPSE) is becoming an increasingly popular educational strategy worldwide within undergraduate healthcare curricular. The purpose of the literature review was to examine qualitative, quantitative and mixed/multi-method research studies featuring undergraduate IPSE. A literature review was conducted using CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO databases from January 1999 to September 2011 and pre-set criteria. The criteria used to screen all 120 abstracts included: (a) the article pertained to both simulation and undergraduate IPE and (b) the article reported a research study. Eighteen articles which met the pre-set criteria were included in the literature review. All studies featured outcome measures; many were purposely designed and lacked psychometric development and evaluation. Key IPSE drivers included capacity planning, preparedness for disaster management and improving patient care through the evaluation of teambuilding, teamwork skills or communicating within inter-disciplinary teams. Studies evaluated/explored either student or teacher perspectives of learning within the context of IPSE or both. The IPSE learning processes varied considerably in relation to duration, fidelity and professions involved. The scenarios ranged from managing adults admitted to hospital settings, mass casualty/mock disaster patient management to the use of training wards. The majority of the articles identified common IPSE outcomes relating to increased confidence, knowledge, leadership, teamwork, and communication skills. Based on the findings of this review, the authors suggest that further multi-site, longitudinal research studies are required to provide evidence of the transferability of skills developed during IPSE and their overall impact on both undergraduate education and healthcare.

  12. Health Care Needs and Support for Patients Undergoing Treatment for Prosthetic Joint Infection following Hip or Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, Andrew D.; Peters, Tim J.; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael; Whitehouse, Michael R.; Blom, Ashley W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Hip and knee arthroplasty are common interventions for the treatment of joint conditions, most notably osteoarthritis. Although many patients benefit from surgery, approximately 1% of patients develop infection afterwards known as deep prosthetic joint infection (PJI), which often requires further major surgery. Objective To assess support needs of patients undergoing treatment for PJI following hip or knee arthroplasty and to identify and evaluate what interventions are routinely offered to support such patients. Design Systematic review Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, PsycINFO, Cinahl, Social Science Citation Index, The Cochrane Library, and reference lists of relevant studies from January 01, 1980 to October 05, 2016. Selection criteria Observational (prospective or retrospective cohort, nested case-control or case-control) studies, qualitative studies, or clinical trials conducted in patients treated for PJI and/or other major adverse occurrences following hip or knee arthroplasty. Review methods Data were extracted by two independent investigators and consensus was reached with involvement of a third. Given the heterogeneous nature of study designs, methods, and limited number of studies, a narrative synthesis is presented. Results Of 4,213 potentially relevant citations, we identified one case-control, one prospective cohort and two qualitative studies for inclusion in the synthesis. Patients report that PJI and treatment had a profoundly negative impact affecting physical, emotional, social and economic aspects of their lives. No study evaluated support interventions. Conclusion The findings demonstrate that patients undergoing treatment for PJI have extensive physical, psychological, social and economic support needs. The interpretation of study results is limited by variation in study design, outcome measures and the small number of relevant eligible studies. However, our review highlights a lack of evidence about support

  13. Role of Environmental Factors on Resuming Valued Activities Poststroke: A Systematic Review of Qualitative and Quantitative Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellema, Sandra; van der Sande, Rob; van Hees, Suzanne; Zajec, Jana; Steultjens, Esther M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W

    2016-06-01

    To investigate how reengagement in valued activities poststroke is influenced by environmental factors. PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched to June 2015 using multiple search terms for stroke, activities, disability, and home and community environments, with the following constraints: English, humans, and adults. Studies were included that contained data on how reengagement in valued activities of community-dwelling stroke survivors was influenced by the environment. Two reviewers independently selected the studies. The search yielded 3726 records; 39 studies were eventually included. Findings were extracted from qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-design studies. Two reviewers independently assessed study quality using the Oxford Critical Appraisal Skills Programme lists and independently extracted results. Thematic analysis was conducted on qualitative data, revealing 9 themes related to the iterative nature of the process of reengagement and the associated environmental factors. During the process of reengagement, environmental factors interact with personal and disease-related factors in a gradual process of shaping or abandoning valued activities. The sociocultural context in this case determines what activities are valued and can be resumed by stroke survivors. Social support; activity opportunities and obligations; familiar and accessible environments; resources and reminders; and a step-by-step return facilitate stroke survivors to explore, adapt, resume, and maintain their activities. Social support is helpful at all stages of the process and particularly is important in case stroke survivors are fearful to explore their activity possibilities. The quantitative data identified largely endorsed these findings. No quantitative data were found in respect to the iterative nature of the process, familiar environments, or accessibility. Reengagement in valued activities is a gradual process. In each stage of the process, several environmental factors

  14. Teamwork assessment in internal medicine: a systematic review of validity evidence and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havyer, Rachel D A; Wingo, Majken T; Comfere, Nneka I; Nelson, Darlene R; Halvorsen, Andrew J; McDonald, Furman S; Reed, Darcy A

    2014-06-01

    Valid teamwork assessment is imperative to determine physician competency and optimize patient outcomes. We systematically reviewed published instruments assessing teamwork in undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education in general internal medicine and all medical subspecialties. We searched MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-process, CINAHL and PsycINFO from January 1979 through October 2012, references of included articles, and abstracts from four professional meetings. Two content experts were queried for additional studies. Included studies described quantitative tools measuring teamwork among medical students, residents, fellows, and practicing physicians on single or multi-professional (interprofessional) teams. Instrument validity and study quality were extracted using established frameworks with existing validity evidence. Two authors independently abstracted 30 % of articles and agreement was calculated. Of 12,922 citations, 178 articles describing 73 unique teamwork assessment tools met inclusion criteria. Interrater agreement was intraclass correlation coefficient 0.73 (95 % CI 0.63-0.81). Studies involved practicing physicians (142, 80 %), residents/fellows (70, 39 %), and medical students (11, 6 %). The majority (152, 85 %) assessed interprofessional teams. Studies were conducted in inpatient (77, 43 %), outpatient (42, 24 %), simulation (37, 21 %), and classroom (13, 7 %) settings. Validity evidence for the 73 tools included content (54, 74 %), internal structure (51, 70 %), relationships to other variables (25, 34 %), and response process (12, 16 %). Attitudes and opinions were the most frequently assessed outcomes. Relationships between teamwork scores and patient outcomes were directly examined for 13 (18 %) of tools. Scores from the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire and Team Climate Inventory have substantial validity evidence and have been associated with improved patient outcomes. Review is limited to quantitative assessments of teamwork in internal

  15. Psychometric properties of 2-minute walk test: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pin, Tamis W

    2014-09-01

    To systematically review the psychometric evidence on the 2-minute walk test (2MWT). Electronic searches of databases including MEDLINE, CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and DARE were done until February 2014 using a combination of subject headings and free texts. Studies were included if psychometric properties of the 2MWT were (1) evaluated; (2) written as full reports; and (3) published in English language peer-reviewed journals. A modified consensus-based standard for the selection of health measurement instruments checklist was used to rate the methodological quality of the included studies. A quality assessment for statistical outcomes was used to assess the measurement properties of the 2MWT. Best-evidence synthesis was collated from 25 studies of 14 patient groups. Only 1 study was found that examined the 2MWT in the pediatric population. The testing procedures of the 2MWT varied across the included studies. Reliability, validity (construct and criterion), and responsiveness of the 2MWT also varied across different patient groups. Moderate to strong evidence was found for reliability, convergent validity, discriminative validity, and responsiveness of the 2MWT in frail elderly patients. Moderate to strong evidence for reliability, convergent validity, and responsiveness was found in adults with lower limb amputations. Moderate to strong evidence for validity (convergent and discriminative) was found in adults who received rehabilitation after hip fractures or cardiac surgery. Limited evidence for the psychometric properties of the 2MWT was found in other population groups because of methodological flaws. There is inadequate breadth and depth of psychometric evidence of the 2MWT for clinical and research purposes-specifically, minimal clinically important changes and responsiveness. More good-quality studies are needed, especially in the pediatric population. Consensus on standardized testing procedures of

  16. Evaluating the Psychometric Quality of Social Skills Measures: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, Reinie; Speyer, Renée; Chen, Yu-Wei; Wilkes-Gillan, Sarah; Brown, Ted; Bourke-Taylor, Helen; Doma, Kenji; Leicht, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Impairments in social functioning are associated with an array of adverse outcomes. Social skills measures are commonly used by health professionals to assess and plan the treatment of social skills difficulties. There is a need to comprehensively evaluate the quality of psychometric properties reported across these measures to guide assessment and treatment planning. To conduct a systematic review of the literature on the psychometric properties of social skills and behaviours measures for both children and adults. A systematic search was performed using four electronic databases: CINAHL, PsycINFO, Embase and Pubmed; the Health and Psychosocial Instruments database; and grey literature using PsycExtra and Google Scholar. The psychometric properties of the social skills measures were evaluated against the COSMIN taxonomy of measurement properties using pre-set psychometric criteria. Thirty-Six studies and nine manuals were included to assess the psychometric properties of thirteen social skills measures that met the inclusion criteria. Most measures obtained excellent overall methodological quality scores for internal consistency and reliability. However, eight measures did not report measurement error, nine measures did not report cross-cultural validity and eleven measures did not report criterion validity. The overall quality of the psychometric properties of most measures was satisfactory. The SSBS-2, HCSBS and PKBS-2 were the three measures with the most robust evidence of sound psychometric quality in at least seven of the eight psychometric properties that were appraised. A universal working definition of social functioning as an overarching construct is recommended. There is a need for ongoing research in the area of the psychometric properties of social skills and behaviours instruments.

  17. Systematic review of the psychometric properties and theoretical grounding of instruments evaluating self-care in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro-Bautista, Jorge; Martín-Santos, Francisco Javier; Morales-Asencio, Jose Miguel

    2014-06-01

    To determine the psychometric properties and theoretical grounding of instruments that evaluate self-care behaviour or barriers in people with type 2 diabetes. There are many instruments designed to evaluate self-care behaviour or barriers in this population, but knowledge about their psychometric validation processes is lacking. Systematic review. We conducted a search for psychometric or validation studies published between January 1990-December 2012. We carried out searches in Pubmed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ProQuolid, BibliPRO and Google SCHOLAR to identify instruments that evaluated self-care behaviours or barriers to diabetes self-care. We conducted a systematic review with the following inclusion criteria: Psychometric or clinimetric validation studies that included patients with type 2 diabetes (exclusively or partially) and which analysed self-care behaviour or barriers to self-care and proxies like self-efficacy or empowerment, from a multidimensional approach. Language: Spanish or English. Two authors independently assessed the quality of the studies and extracted data using Terwee's proposed criteria: psychometrics properties, dimensionality, theoretical ground and population used for validation through each included instrument. Sixteen instruments achieved the inclusion criteria for the review. We detected important methodological flaws in many of the selected instruments. Only the Self-management Profile for Type 2 Diabetes and Problem Areas in Diabetes Scale met half of Terwee's quality criteria. There are no instruments for identifying self-care behaviours or barriers elaborated with a strong validation process. Further research should be carried out to provide patients, clinicians and researchers with valid and reliable instruments that are methodologically solid and theoretically grounded. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Systematic Review of Health-Related Work Outcome Measures and Quality Criteria-Based Evaluations of Their Psychometric Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Bilal Akhter; Doogan, Catherine; Hayward, Kate; Hourihan, Susan; Hurford, Joanne; Playford, E Diane

    2017-03-01

    To examine the state of psychometric validation in the health-related work outcome literature. We searched PubMed, PubMed Central, CINAHL, Embase (plus Embase Classic), and PsycINFO from inception to January 2016 using the following search terms: stroke, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, spinal cord injury, brain injury, musculoskeletal disease, work, absenteeism, presenteeism, occupation, employment, job, outcome measure, assessment, work capacity evaluation, scale, and questionnaire. From the 22,676 retrieved abstracts, 597 outcome measures were identified. Inclusion was based on content analysis. There were 95 health-related work outcome measures retained; of these, 2 were treated as outliers and therefore are discussed separately. All 6 authors individually organized the 93 remaining scales based on their content. A follow-up search using the same sources, and time period, with the name of the outcome measures and the terms psychometric, reliability, validity, and responsiveness, identified 263 unique classical test theory psychometric property datasets for the 93 tools. An assessment criterion for psychometric properties was applied to each article, and where consensus was not achieved, the rating delivered by most of the assessors was reported. Of the articles reported, 18 reporting psychometric data were not accessible and therefore could not be assessed. There were 39 that scored 80%. The 3 outcome measures associated with the highest scoring datasets were the Sheehan Disability Scale, the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, and the assessment of the Subjective Handicap of Epilepsy. Finally, only 2 psychometric validation datasets reported the complete set of baseline psychometric properties. This systematic review highlights the current limitations of the health-related work outcome measure literature, including the limited number of robust tools available. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. A systematic review evaluating the psychometric properties of measures of social inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, Reinie; Milbourn, Ben; Martin, Robyn; Buchanan, Angus; Chung, Donna; Speyer, Renée

    2017-01-01

    Improving social inclusion opportunities for population health has been identified as a priority area for international policy. There is a need to comprehensively examine and evaluate the quality of psychometric properties of measures of social inclusion that are used to guide social policy and outcomes. To conduct a systematic review of the literature on all current measures of social inclusion for any population group, to evaluate the quality of the psychometric properties of identified measures, and to evaluate if they capture the construct of social inclusion. A systematic search was performed using five electronic databases: CINAHL, PsycINFO, Embase, ERIC and Pubmed and grey literature were sourced to identify measures of social inclusion. The psychometric properties of the social inclusion measures were evaluated against the COSMIN taxonomy of measurement properties using pre-set psychometric criteria. Of the 109 measures identified, twenty-five measures, involving twenty-five studies and one manual met the inclusion criteria. The overall quality of the reviewed measures was variable, with the Social and Community Opportunities Profile-Short, Social Connectedness Scale and the Social Inclusion Scale demonstrating the strongest evidence for sound psychometric quality. The most common domain included in the measures was connectedness (21), followed by participation (19); the domain of citizenship was covered by the least number of measures (10). No single instrument measured all aspects within the three domains of social inclusion. Of the measures with sound psychometric evidence, the Social and Community Opportunities Profile-Short captured the construct of social inclusion best. The overall quality of the psychometric properties demonstrate that the current suite of available instruments for the measurement of social inclusion are promising but need further refinement. There is a need for a universal working definition of social inclusion as an overarching

  20. Cultural adaptations to augment health and mental health services: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Priscilla; Stager, Megan L; Woodmass, Kyler; Dettlaff, Alan J; Vergara, Andrew; Janke, Robert; Wells, Susan J

    2017-01-05

    Membership in diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural groups is often associated with inequitable health and mental health outcomes for diverse populations. Yet, little is known about how cultural adaptations of standard services affect health and mental health outcomes for service recipients. This systematic review identified extant themes in the research regarding cultural adaptations across a broad range of health and mental health services and synthesized the most rigorous experimental research available to isolate and evaluate potential efficacy gains of cultural adaptations to service delivery. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE, and grey literature sources were searched for English-language studies published between January 1955 and January 2015. Cultural adaptations to any aspect of a service delivery were considered. Outcomes of interest included changes in service provider behavior or changes in the behavioral, medical, or self-reported experience of recipients. Thirty-one studies met the inclusion criteria. The most frequently tested adaptation occurred in preventive services and consisted of modifying the content of materials or services delivered. None of the included studies focused on making changes in the provider's behavior. Many different populations were studied but most research was concerned with the experiences and outcomes of African Americans. Seventeen of the 31 retained studies observed at least one significant effect in favor of a culturally adapted service. However there were also findings that favored the control group or showed no difference. Researchers did not find consistent evidence supporting implementation of any specific type of adaptation nor increased efficacy with any particular cultural group. Conceptual frameworks to classify cultural adaptations and their resultant health/mental health outcomes were developed and applied in a variety of ways. This review synthesizes the most rigorous research in the field and identifies

  1. Symptomatology associated with accommodative and binocular vision anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Muñoz, Ángel; Carbonell-Bonete, Stela; Cacho-Martínez, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    To determine the symptoms associated with accommodative and non-strabismic binocular dysfunctions and to assess the methods used to obtain the subjects' symptoms. We conducted a scoping review of articles published between 1988 and 2012 that analysed any aspect of the symptomatology associated with accommodative and non-strabismic binocular dysfunctions. The literature search was performed in Medline (PubMed), CINAHL, PsycINFO and FRANCIS. A total of 657 articles were identified, and 56 met the inclusion criteria. We found 267 different ways of naming the symptoms related to these anomalies, which we grouped into 34 symptom categories. Of the 56 studies, 35 employed questionnaires and 21 obtained the symptoms from clinical histories. We found 11 questionnaires, of which only 3 had been validated: the convergence insufficiency symptom survey (CISS V-15) and CIRS parent version, both specific for convergence insufficiency, and the Conlon survey, developed for visual anomalies in general. The most widely used questionnaire (21 studies) was the CISS V-15. Of the 34 categories of symptoms, the most frequently mentioned were: headache, blurred vision, diplopia, visual fatigue, and movement or flicker of words at near vision, which were fundamentally related to near vision and binocular anomalies. There is a wide disparity of symptoms related to accommodative and binocular dysfunctions in the scientific literature, most of which are associated with near vision and binocular dysfunctions. The only psychometrically validated questionnaires that we found (n=3) were related to convergence insufficiency and to visual dysfunctions in general and there no specific questionnaires for other anomalies. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  2. Is there any evidence for the validity of diagnostic criteria used for accommodative and nonstrabismic binocular dysfunctions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho-Martínez, Pilar; García-Muñoz, Ángel; Ruiz-Cantero, María Teresa

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the diagnostic criteria used in the scientific literature published in the past 25 years for accommodative and nonstrabismic binocular dysfunctions and to explore if the epidemiological analysis of diagnostic validity has been used to propose which clinical criteria should be used for diagnostic purposes. We carried out a systematic review of papers on accommodative and non-strabic binocular disorders published from 1986 to 2012 analysing the MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and FRANCIS databases. We admitted original articles about diagnosis of these anomalies in any population. We identified 839 articles and 12 studies were included. The quality of included articles was assessed using the QUADAS-2 tool. The review shows a wide range of clinical signs and cut-off points between authors. Only 3 studies (regarding accommodative anomalies) assessed diagnostic accuracy of clinical signs. Their results suggest using the accommodative amplitude and monocular accommodative facility for diagnosing accommodative insufficiency and a high positive relative accommodation for accommodative excess. The remaining 9 articles did not analyze diagnostic accuracy, assessing a diagnosis with the criteria the authors considered. We also found differences between studies in the way of considering patients' symptomatology. 3 studies of 12 analyzed, performed a validation of a symptom survey used for convergence insufficiency. Scientific literature reveals differences between authors according to diagnostic criteria for accommodative and nonstrabismic binocular dysfunctions. Diagnostic accuracy studies show that there is only certain evidence for accommodative conditions. For binocular anomalies there is only evidence about a validated questionnaire for convergence insufficiency with no data of diagnostic accuracy. Copyright © 2012 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Standardised assessment of patients' capacity to manage medications: a systematic review of published instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Rohan A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older people are commonly prescribed complex multi-drug regimens while also experiencing declines in the cognitive and physical abilities required for medication management, leading to increased risk of medication errors and need for assisted living. The purpose of this study was to review published instruments designed to assess patients' capacity to self-administer medications. Methods Searches of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Health and Psychosocial Instruments, Google, and reference lists of identified publications were conducted to identify English-language articles describing development and validation of instruments designed to assess patients' capacity to self-administer medications. Methodological quality of validation studies was rated independently against published criteria by two reviewers and reliability and validity data were reviewed. Results Thirty-two instruments were identified, of which 14 met pre-defined inclusion criteria. Instruments fell into two categories: those that used patients' own medications as the basis for assessment and those that used a simulated medication regimen. The quality of validation studies was generally low to moderate and few instruments were subjected to reliability testing. Most instruments had some evidence of construct validity, through associations with tests of cognitive function, health literacy, activities of daily living or measures of medication management or adherence. Only one instrument had sensitivity and specificity data with respect to prediction of medication-related outcomes such as adherence to therapy. Only three instruments had validity data from more than one independent research group. Conclusion A number of performance-based instruments exist to assess patients' capacity to manage their own medications. These may be useful for identifying physical and cognitive barriers to successful medication management, but

  4. A systematic review of interventions to improve knowledge and self-management skills concerning contraception, pregnancy and breastfeeding in people with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Ilana N; Ngian, Gene-Siew; Van Doornum, Sharon; Briggs, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to determine the effectiveness of interventions for improving knowledge and/or self-management skills concerning contraception, pregnancy and breastfeeding in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We searched four databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Cochrane Trials, PsycINFO) using a comprehensive search strategy. Studies were eligible if they were prospective, published in English from 2004 to 2015, included participants with RA and tested an intervention designed to improve knowledge and/or self-management skills relating to family planning, pregnancy or breastfeeding. As no studies met the latter criterion, the search strategy was expanded to include all prospective studies evaluating RA educational and/or self-management interventions. Data on study characteristics, participant characteristics and programme content were extracted to summarise the evidence base for interventions to support people with RA during their reproductive years. Expanded literature searches identified 2290 papers, of which 68 were eligible. Of these, nine papers (13%) specifically excluded pregnant women/breastfeeding mothers or recruited only older people. Only one study (1%) explicitly evaluated pregnancy-focused education via a motherhood decision aid, while eight studies (12%) incorporated relevant (albeit minor) components within broader RA educational or self-management interventions. Of these, three studies provided methotrexate education in relation to conception/pregnancy/breastfeeding; three incorporated discussions on RA and relationships, impact of RA on the family or sexual advice; one provided information regarding contraception and fertility; and one issued a warning regarding use of biologic therapy in pregnancy/breastfeeding. In conclusion, information regarding family planning, pregnancy or breastfeeding represents a negligible part of published RA educational interventions, with scope to develop targeted resources.

  5. What is known about community pharmacy supply of naloxone? A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Suzanne; Van Hout, Marie Claire

    2016-06-01

    There is growing evidence that expanded supply of take-home naloxone to prevent opioid overdose deaths is needed. Potential routes for expansion of naloxone provision include through community pharmacies. The aim of this scoping review is to establish what is known about community pharmacy supply of naloxone, in light of unique challenges and opportunities present in pharmacy settings. A scoping review methodology was employed using the six stage iterative process advocated by Arksey and O'Malley (2005) and Levac et al. (2010). Searches used key words and terms such as 'naloxone'; 'overdose prevention/drug overdose/opiate overdose'; 'community/retail pharmacy'; 'pharmacist/pharmacy/community pharmacy/pharmaceutical services'; 'professional practice/role'; 'community care'; attitude of health personnel'; 'training/supply/cost'. Appropriate search terms were selected for each database. After initial exploratory searches, comprehensive searches were conducted with Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Medline, Medline in Process, Embase, PsycINFO and CINAHL. Eligibility criteria centered on whether studies broadly described supply of naloxone in community pharmacy or had content relating to community pharmacy supply. The search identified 95 articles, of which 16 were related to pharmacy supply of naloxone. Five themes were presented after initial review of the data and consultation with the project Expert Group, and are; 'Pharmacists Perceptions of Naloxone: Facilitators and Barriers', 'Patient Populations: Identification and Recruitment', 'Supply Systems and Cost', 'Legal Issues', and 'Training of Pharmacists and Community Pharmacy Naloxone Recipients'. Findings from this scoping review suggest that community pharmacy based supply of take-home naloxone warrants the community pharmacy based route for distribution of take home naloxone provision warrants further consideration and development. Existing strengths include a range of established supply models, and

  6. An integrative review on coping skills in nursing students: implications for policymaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrague, L J; McEnroe-Petitte, D M; Al Amri, M; Fronda, D C; Obeidat, A A

    2017-06-30

    This study critically appraised both quantitative and qualitative studies describing coping strategies utilized by nursing students when faced with stress. Stress in nursing students during clinical training is well documented in the nursing literature. The need to utilize positive-coping strategies is necessary to effectively deal with stress and its accompanying stressors. An integrative review method was used in this review. PsycINFO, PubMed, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), MEDLINE and Scopus were the databases used in searching for relevant literature using the following search terms; 'coping', 'nursing students', clinical training', 'ways of coping' and 'clinical practice'. A total of 27 studies published from 2001 to 2016 were included in this review. Findings demonstrated that nursing students utilized problem-focused coping strategies rather than emotion-focused coping strategies. Specific coping behaviours utilized included problem-solving behaviours, self-confident approaches and seeking of support from family and friends. The review contributes to the growing literature on coping strategies in nursing students and may have implications on nursing education and nursing policy. This review also demonstrated a scarcity of studies that links specific coping strategies to nursing school stressors and examines predictors of coping skills in nursing students. Institutionalization of structured student orientation programme, implementation of well-planned mentoring programmes and establishment of support unit/centres may be helpful in supporting nursing students during their clinical placement. By developing empirically based interventions, nursing faculty can assist nursing students in strengthening their positive-coping skills to effectively deal with various stressors encountered. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  7. Personality factors and medical training: a review of the literature.

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    Doherty, Eva M; Nugent, Emmeline

    2011-02-01

    it has been acknowledged that certain personality characteristics influence both medical students' and doctors' performance. With regard to medical students, studies have been concerned with the role of personality, and performance indicators such as academic results and clinical competence. In addition, the link between personality and vulnerability to stress, which has implications for performance, has been investigated at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Most of the studies cited in the literature were published before the year 2000. The authors therefore undertook a literature search to determine whether any prospective systematic studies have been published since 2000. a review of the literature for 2000-2009 was performed, using the databases MEDLINE, PsycINFO and CINAHL. The search terms used were 'personality', 'performance', 'stress' and 'medical student'. Specific inclusion criteria required studies to be cohort studies carried out over a minimum period of 2 years, which measured medical student scores on valid and reliable personality tests, and used objective measures of performance and stress. the authors identified seven suitable studies. Four of these looked at personality factors and academic success, one looked at personality factors and clinical competence, and two looked at personality factors and stress. The main personality characteristic repeatedly identified in the literature was conscientiousness. the personality trait known as conscientiousness has been found to be a significant predictor of performance in medical school. The relationship between personality and performance becomes increasingly significant as learners advance through medical training. Additional traits concerning sociability (i.e. extraversion, openness, self-esteem and neuroticism) have also been identified as relevant, particularly in the applied medical environment. A prospective national study with the collaboration of all medical schools would make it

  8. Impact of health literacy in patients with chronic musculoskeletal disease--systematic review.

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    Yoon K Loke

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To estimate the prevalence of low health literacy, and evaluate the impact of low health literacy on outcomes in patients with chronic musculoskeletal conditions. DATA SOURCES: We searched Embase, Pubmed, PsycInfo, and CINAHL in January 2011 for relevant studies, restricted to English-language articles. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: Studies were included if they measured health literacy and/or reported on the link between outcomes and health literacy levels in patients with osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis. We assessed risk of bias from participant selection, methods of measuring health literacy and functional outcomes, missing data, and potential for confounding. DATA SYNTHESIS: We reviewed 1863 citations and judged 8 studies to be relevant. Most were cross-sectional in nature, and five were based in the United States. Diversity in measurements, participant characteristics, and settings meant that results had to be synthesized narratively. Prevalence of low health literacy varied from 7% to 42%. Of the five studies that reported on musculoskeletal outcomes, only one showed an association (unadjusted between low health literacy and greater pain and limitations in physical functioning. However, other studies, including those with multivariate analyses, found no significant relationship between health literacy and measures of pain or disease specific questionnaires. One clinical trial found short-term improvements in the mental health of patients with musculoskeletal conditions after an intervention to improve health literacy. LIMITATIONS: Most of the studies were cross-sectional in nature, which precludes interpretation of a causal relationship. The sample sizes may not have been sufficiently large to enable detection of significant associations. CONCLUSIONS: The current evidence does not show a consistent association between low health literacy and poorer functional outcomes in patients with chronic

  9. Smoke-free homes: what are the barriers, motivators and enablers? A qualitative systematic review and thematic synthesis.

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    Passey, Megan E; Longman, Jo M; Robinson, Jude; Wiggers, John; Jones, Laura L

    2016-03-17

    To thematically synthesise primary qualitative studies of the barriers, motivators and enablers of smoke-free homes (SFHs). Systematic review and thematic synthesis. Searches of MEDLINE, EBM Reviews (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews), PsycINFO, Global Health, CINAHL, Web of Science, Informit and EMBASE, combining terms for families, households and vulnerable populations; SFH and secondhand smoke; and qualitative research, were supplemented by searches of PhD theses, key authors, specialist journals and reference lists. We included 22 articles, reporting on 18 studies, involving 646 participants. peer-reviewed; English language; published from 1990 onwards (to week 3 of April 2014); used qualitative data collection methods; explored participants' perspectives of home smoking behaviours; and the barriers, motivators and enablers to initiating and/or maintaining a SFH. 1 of 3 authors extracted data with checking by a second. A thematic synthesis was performed to develop 7 core analytic themes: (1) knowledge, awareness and risk perception; (2) agency and personal skills/attributes; (3) wider community norms and personal moral responsibilities; (4) social relationships and influence of others; (5) perceived benefits, preferences and priorities; (6) addiction and habit; (7) practicalities. This synthesis highlights the complexity faced by many households in having a SFH, the practical, social, cultural and personal issues that need to be addressed and balanced by households, and that while some of these are common across study settings, specific social and cultural factors play a critical role in shaping household smoking behaviours. The findings can inform policy and practice and the development of interventions aimed at increasing SFHs. CRD42014014115. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. A crisis of faith? A review of simulation in teaching team-based, crisis management skills to surgical trainees.

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    Doumouras, Aristithes G; Keshet, Itay; Nathens, Avery B; Ahmed, Najma; Hicks, Christopher M

    2012-01-01

    Team-based training using crisis resource management (CRM) has gained popularity as a strategy to minimize the impact of medical error during critical events. The purpose of this review was to appraise and summarize the design, implementation, and efficacy of peer-reviewed, simulation-based CRM training programs for postgraduate trainees (residents). Two independent reviewers conducted a structured literature review, querying multiple medical and allied health databases from 1950 to May 2010 (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, EBM, and PsycINFO). We included articles that (1) were written in English, (2) were published in peer-reviewed journals, (3) included residents, (4) contained a simulation component, and (5) included a team-based component. Peer-reviewed articles describing the implementation of CRM instruction were critically appraised using the Kirkpatrick framework for evaluating training programs. Fifteen studies involving a total of 404 residents met inclusion criteria; most studies reported high resident satisfaction for CRM training. In several CRM domains, residents demonstrated significant improvements after training, which did not decay over time. With regard to design, oral feedback may be equivalent to video feedback and single-day interventions may be as efficacious as multiple-day interventions for residents. No studies demonstrated a link between simulation-based CRM training and performance during real-life critical events. The findings support the utility of CRM programs for residents. A high degree of satisfaction and perceived value reflect robust resident engagement. The iteration of themes from our review provides the basis for the development of best practices in curricula design. A dearth of well-designed, randomized studies preclude the quantification of impact of simulation-based training in the clinical environment. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An international review of the patterns and determinants of health service utilisation by adult cancer survivors

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    Treanor Charlene

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need to review factors related to health service utilisation by the increasing number of cancer survivors in order to inform care planning and the organisation and delivery of services. Methods Studies were identified via systematic searches of Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Social Science Citation Index and the SEER-MEDICARE library. Methodological quality was assessed using STROBE; and the Andersen Behavioural Model was used as a framework to structure, organise and analyse the results of the review. Results Younger, white cancer survivors were most likely to receive follow-up screening, preventive care, visit their physician, utilise professional mental health services and least likely to be hospitalised. Utilisation rates of other health professionals such as physiotherapists were low. Only studies of health service use conducted in the USA investigated the role of type of health insurance and ethnicity. There appeared to be disparate service use among US samples in terms of ethnicity and socio-demographic status, regardless of type of health insurance provision s- this may be explained by underlying differences in health-seeking behaviours. Overall, use of follow-up care appeared to be lower than expected and barriers existed for particular groups of cancer survivors. Conclusions Studies focussed on the use of a specific type of service rather than adopting a whole-system approach and future health services research should address this shortcoming. Overall, there is a need to improve access to care for all cancer survivors. Studies were predominantly US-based focussing mainly on breast or colorectal cancer. Thus, the generalisability of findings to other health-care systems and cancer sites is unclear. The Andersen Behavioural Model provided an appropriate framework for studying and understanding health service use among cancer survivors. The active involvement of physicians and use of personalised care plans are

  12. Mental Health Consequences of Childhood Physical Abuse in Chinese Populations: A Meta-Analysis.

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    Ip, Patrick; Wong, Rosa S; Li, Sophia L; Chan, Ko Ling; Ho, Frederick K; Chow, Chun-Bong

    2016-12-01

    Childhood physical abuse (CPA) can lead to adverse mental health outcomes in adulthood, but its potential impact on Chinese populations is still unclear. This meta-analysis is the first to examine the association between CPA and mental health outcomes in Chinese populations. Studies published before December 31, 2014 were identified from Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure databases. Studies with data on the association between CPA and mental health outcomes from Chinese subjects were included. Twenty-four studies were initially identified but two were excluded because of poor quality. Two reviewers independently extracted data to generate summary effect sizes using a random-effects meta-analytic model. A priori subgroup and sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate heterogeneity and bias in these studies. Our meta-analysis of 22 studies found a significant positive association between CPA and overall mental health outcomes among all Chinese subjects (pooled effect size: odds ratio [OR] = 2.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.87, 2.49]) and among community samples (pooled effect size: OR = 2.06, 95% CI [1.71, 2.48]). Based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, diagnostic criteria, CPA was more strongly associated with Axis II (OR = 2.62, 95% CI [2.13, 3.22]) than Axis I disorders (OR = 1.85, 95% CI [1.58, 2.17]). The detrimental effects of CPA on mental health outcomes in Chinese populations were comparable to, if not more than, the West. Contrary to the Chinese belief that physical punishment is a safe way to discipline children, our findings highlight the potential harm to mental health and the need to change this parenting practice. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Evaluating the effectiveness of exercise training on elderly patients who require haemodialysis: study protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Ryota; Hoshi, Keika; Yoneki, Kei; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As the average age of haemodialysis patients rapidly increases around the world, the number of frail, elderly patients has increased. Frailty is well known to be an indicator of disability and a poor prognosis for haemodialysis patients. Exercise interventions have been safely and successfully implemented for middle-aged or younger patients undergoing haemodialysis. However, the benefits of exercise interventions on elderly patients undergoing haemodialysis remain controversial. The main objective of this study is to systematically review the effects of exercise training on the physical function, exercise capacity and quality of life of elderly patients undergoing haemodialysis, and to provide an update on the relevant evidence. Methods and analyses Published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the effectiveness of exercise training on haemodialysis patients with respect to physical function, exercise tolerance and quality of life will be included. Bibliographic databases include MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, Web of Science, PsycINFO and PEDro. The risk of bias of the included RCTs will be assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool and TESTEX. The primary outcome will be physical function and exercise tolerance. This review protocol is reported according to the PRISMA-P 2015 checklist. Statistical analysis will be performed using review manager software (RevMan V.5.3, Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, England). Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required because this study does not include confidential personal data nor does it perform interventions on patients. This review is expected to inform readers on the effectiveness of exercise training in elderly patients undergoing haemodialysis. Findings will be presented at conferences and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. PROSPERO registration number CRD42015020701

  14. A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Interventions for Sexual Health Promotion Involving Serious Digital Games.

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    DeSmet, Ann; Shegog, Ross; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri; Crombez, Geert; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse

    2015-04-01

    Serious games may be effective in promoting sexual health behavior. Their confidential nature may encourage users to discuss sensitive sexuality topics. Furthermore, they can tailor messages to the individual's needs and may be intrinsically motivating. This meta-analysis investigates the effectiveness of interventions for sexual health promotion that use serious games. A database search was conducted in PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, and PsycINFO for publications before the end of July 2013. Serious digital games studies measuring effects on behavior or its determinants, using a control condition, allowing the calculation of an effect size (Hedges' g, random-effects model) were included. Seven game studies for sexual health promotion were included. These showed positive effects on determinants (g=0.242; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.129, 0.356), albeit of small effect size. The effects on behavior, measured in only two studies, were not significant (g=0.456; 95 percent confidence interval, -0.649, 1.561). Most games did not use many game features that are considered to be immersive or enhancing flow. Instead, there was a strong reliance on pure gamification features, such as rewards and feedback. The effectiveness of the next generation of games may be enhanced by building on the behavioral change and educational gaming literatures (e.g., using role-play and simulation game formats, individual tailoring, offering adaptation in the difficulty of the challenge, and amount and timing of the feedback). There is a need for studies with rigorous evaluations of game effectiveness, longer-term follow-up, and using measures of behavior rather than merely their determinants.

  15. Non-adherence in patients on peritoneal dialysis: a systematic review.

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    Konstadina Griva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been increasingly recognized that non-adherence is an important factor that determines the outcome of peritoneal dialysis (PD therapy. There is therefore a need to establish the levels of non-adherence to different aspects of the PD regimen (dialysis procedures, medications, and dietary/fluid restrictions. METHODS: A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature was performed in PubMed, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases using PRISMA guidelines in May 2013. Publications on non-adherence in PD were selected by two reviewers independently according to predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Relevant data on patient characteristics, measures, rates and factors associated with non-adherence were extracted. The quality of studies was also evaluated independently by two reviewers according to a revised version of the Effective Public Health Practice Project assessment tool. RESULTS: The search retrieved 204 studies, of which a total of 25 studies met inclusion criteria. Reported rates of non-adherence varied across studies: 2.6-53% for dialysis exchanges, 3.9-85% for medication, and 14.4-67% for diet/fluid restrictions. Methodological differences in measurement and definition of non-adherence underlie the observed variation. Factors associated with non-adherence that showed a degree of consistency were mostly socio-demographical, such as age, employment status, ethnicity, sex, and time period on PD treatment. CONCLUSION: Non-adherence to different dimensions of the dialysis regimen appears to be prevalent in PD patients. There is a need for further, high-quality research to explore these factors in more detail, with the aim of informing intervention designs to facilitate adherence in this patient population.

  16. Sociodemographic and clinical predictors of compliance with antidepressants for depressive disorders: systematic review of observational studies

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    Rivero-Santana A

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Amado Rivero-Santana,1 Lilisbeth Perestelo-Perez,2,3 Jeanette Pérez-Ramos,1 Pedro Serrano-Aguilar,2,3 Carlos De las Cuevas2,4 1Canary Islands Foundation of Health and Research, 2Red de Investigacion en Servicios de Salud en Enfermedades Cronicas (REDISSEC, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, 3Evaluation Unit, Canary Islands Health Service, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, 4Department of Psychiatry, University of La Laguna, Canary Islands, Spain Background: The literature shows that compliance with antidepressant treatment is unsatisfactory. Several personal and disease-related variables have been shown to be related to compliance behavior. The objective of this study was to review the literature about sociodemographic and clinical predictors of compliance in patients with depressive disorders. Methods: The Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central, PsycInfo, and Cinahl databases were searched until May 2012. Studies that analyzed sociodemographic and clinical predictors or correlates of compliance in patients with depressive disorder were included. A quantitative synthesis was not performed because of the heterogeneity and availability of the data reported. For similar reasons, the results were not classified according to the different phases of treatment. The search was limited to studies published in English and Spanish. Results: Thirty-two studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The most consistent associations with compliance were found for age (older patients showed more compliance and race (white patients were more likely to adhere to treatment than minority ethnic groups. Few studies assessed clinical factors, and the most plausible predictors of compliance were certain comorbidities and substance abuse. Severity of depression did not play an important role in predicting compliance. Conclusion: The impact of the variables studied on compliance behavior appeared to be inconsistent. Identifying potential predictors of compliance with antidepressant treatment is

  17. Interventions to improve cultural competency in healthcare: a systematic review of reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cultural competency is a recognized and popular approach to improving the provision of health care to racial/ethnic minority groups in the community with the aim of reducing racial/ethnic health disparities. The aim of this systematic review of reviews is to gather and synthesize existing reviews of studies in the field to form a comprehensive understanding of the current evidence base that can guide future interventions and research in the area. Methods A systematic review of review articles published between January 2000 and June 2012 was conducted. Electronic databases (including Medline, Cinahl and PsycINFO), reference lists of articles, and key websites were searched. Reviews of cultural competency in health settings only were included. Each review was critically appraised by two authors using a study appraisal tool and were given a quality assessment rating of weak, moderate or strong. Results Nineteen published reviews were identified. Reviews consisted of between 5 and 38 studies, included a variety of health care settings/contexts and a range of study types. There were three main categories of study outcomes: patient-related outcomes, provider-related outcomes, and health service access and utilization outcomes. The majority of reviews found moderate evidence of improvement in provider outcomes and health care access and utilization outcomes but weaker evidence for improvements in patient/client outcomes. Conclusion This review of reviews indicates that there is some evidence that interventions to improve cultural competency can improve patient/client health outcomes. However, a lack of methodological rigor is common amongst the studies included in reviews and many of the studies rely on self-report, which is subject to a range of biases, while objective evidence of intervention effectiveness was rare. Future research should measure both healthcare provider and patient/client health outcomes, consider organizational factors, and utilize more

  18. How Effective is Cultural Competence Training of Healthcare Providers on Improving Patient Satisfaction of Minority Groups? A Systematic Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govere, Linda; Govere, Ephraim M

    2016-12-01

    With the rapid growth of minority populations in the United States, the need to train healthcare providers to give culturally competent care has never been greater. Extensive research on cultural competence of healthcare providers has been conducted, but no systematic review specifically focused on the effect of cultural competence training on patient satisfaction of clients from minority groups. To search and critically appraise published research articles that evaluated the effectiveness of cultural competence training of healthcare providers on improving patient satisfaction of clients from minority groups. Using MeSH entry terms: Competency, Cultural; Cultural Competencies; Cultural Competence; Competence, Cultural; Satisfaction, Patient; and non-MeSh text words: Cultural Awareness, Cultural Sensitivity, Cultural Competence Training, Cultural Sensitivity Training, and Cultural Awareness Training, a comprehensive literature search of peer-reviewed articles from 2002 to 2014 in CINAHL, Cochrane, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Web of Science databases was conducted. Original studies that reported cultural competence training and measured its impact on patient satisfaction were included. Quality of the reviewed studies was assessed on the basis of methodological limitations related to experimental design, sample size and sampling approaches, and ethnic spread of the participants. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Six studies revealed that cultural competence training intervention significantly increased the cultural competence level of healthcare providers. Five studies demonstrated that cultural competence training of healthcare providers was significantly associated with increased patient satisfaction. Cultural competence training is an effective intervention that enables healthcare providers to give culturally competent care that increases satisfaction of patients from minority groups. However, more research with better research designs, large sample sizes, and

  19. Does cultural competency training of health professionals improve patient outcomes? A systematic review and proposed algorithm for future research.

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    Lie, Désirée A; Lee-Rey, Elizabeth; Gomez, Art; Bereknyei, Sylvia; Braddock, Clarence H

    2011-03-01

    Cultural competency training has been proposed as a way to improve patient outcomes. There is a need for evidence showing that these interventions reduce health disparities. The objective was to conduct a systematic review addressing the effects of cultural competency training on patient-centered outcomes; assess quality of studies and strength of effect; and propose a framework for future research. The authors performed electronic searches in the MEDLINE/PubMed, ERIC, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Web of Science databases for original articles published in English between 1990 and 2010, and a bibliographic hand search. Studies that reported cultural competence educational interventions for health professionals and measured impact on patients and/or health care utilization as primary or secondary outcomes were included. Four authors independently rated studies for quality using validated criteria and assessed the training effect on patient outcomes. Due to study heterogeneity, data were not pooled; instead, qualitative synthesis and analysis were conducted. Seven studies met inclusion criteria. Three involved physicians, two involved mental health professionals and two involved multiple health professionals and students. Two were quasi-randomized, two were cluster randomized, and three were pre/post field studies. Study quality was low to moderate with none of high quality; most studies did not adequately control for potentially confounding variables. Effect size ranged from no effect to moderately beneficial (unable to assess in two studies). Three studies reported positive (beneficial) effects; none demonstrated a negative (harmful) effect. There is limited research showing a positive relationship between cultural competency training and improved patient outcomes, but there remains a paucity of high quality research. Future work should address challenges limiting quality. We propose an algorithm to guide educators in designing and evaluating curricula, to rigorously

  20. The effects of training mental health practitioners in medication management to address nonadherence: a systematic review of clinician-related outcomes

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    Bressington D

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Bressington,1 Esther Coren,1 Douglas MacInnes21Department of Health, Well-Being and Family, 2Centre for Health and Social Care Research, Canterbury Christ Church University, Canterbury, UKBackground: Nonadherence with medicine prescribed for mental health is a common problem that results in poor clinical outcomes for service users. Studies that provide medication management-related training for the mental health workforce have demonstrated that improvements in the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of staff can help to address nonadherence. This systematic review aims to establish the effectiveness of these training interventions in terms of clinician-related outcomes.Methods: Five electronic databases were systematically searched: PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, PsycInfo, and Google Scholar. Studies were included if they were qualitative or quantitative in nature and were primarily designed to provide mental health clinicians with knowledge and interventions in order to improve service users' experiences of taking psychotropic medications, and therefore potentially address nonadherence issues.Results: A total of five quantitative studies were included in the review. All studies reported improvements in clinicians' knowledge, attitudes, and skills immediately following training. The largest effect sizes related to improvements in clinicians' knowledge and attitudes towards nonadherence. Training interventions of longer duration resulted in the greatest knowledge- and skills-related effect sizes.Conclusion: The findings of this review indicate that training interventions are likely to improve clinician-related outcomes; however, due to the methodological limitations of the current evidence base, future research in this area should aim to conduct robust randomized controlled trials with follow-up and consider collecting qualitative data to explore clinicians' experiences of using the approaches in clinical practice.Keywords: staff training

  1. Effectiveness of Non-Pharmacological Interventions to Prevent Falls in Older People: A Systematic Overview. The SENATOR Project ONTOP Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimland, Joseph M.; Abraha, Iosief; Dell’Aquila, Giuseppina; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso; Soiza, Roy; Gudmusson, Adalsteinn; Petrovic, Mirko; O’Mahony, Denis; Todd, Chris; Cherubini, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Falls are common events in older people, which cause considerable morbidity and mortality. Non-pharmacological interventions are an important approach to prevent falls. There are a large number of systematic reviews of non-pharmacological interventions, whose evidence needs to be synthesized in order to facilitate evidence-based clinical decision making. Objectives To systematically examine reviews and meta-analyses that evaluated non-pharmacological interventions to prevent falls in older adults in the community, care facilities and hospitals. Methods We searched the electronic databases Pubmed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PEDRO and TRIP from January 2009 to March 2015, for systematic reviews that included at least one comparative study, evaluating any non-pharmacological intervention, to prevent falls amongst older adults. The quality of the reviews was assessed using AMSTAR and ProFaNE taxonomy was used to organize the interventions. Results Fifty-nine systematic reviews were identified which consisted of single, multiple and multifactorial non-pharmacological interventions to prevent falls in older people. The most frequent ProFaNE defined interventions were exercises either alone or combined with other interventions, followed by environment/assistive technology interventions comprising environmental modifications, assistive and protective aids, staff education and vision assessment/correction. Knowledge was the third principle class of interventions as patient education. Exercise and multifactorial interventions were the most effective treatments to reduce falls in older adults, although not all types of exercise were equally effective in all subjects and in all settings. Effective exercise programs combined balance and strength training. Reviews with a higher AMSTAR score were more likely to contain more primary studies, to be updated and to perform meta-analysis. Conclusions The aim of this overview of

  2. Quality of the tools used to assess aerobic capacity in persons with multiple sclerosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valet, Maxime; Lejeune, Thierry; Hakizimana, Jean C; Stoquart, Gaëtan

    2017-05-31

    Assessments of physical fitness, including exercise tolerance functions, are valuable in persons with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Many tools with widely varying advantages and disadvantages have been used to assess physical fitness in research and clinical practice. To date, there are no recommendations regarding the best tools to use for this purpose in persons with MS. This study aimed to systematically review the psychometric properties of the tools used to assess exercise tolerance functions in persons with MS and to propose recommendations regarding the best test to use. Systematic review. All settings. Persons with MS. The literature was searched (PubMed, SPORTdiscus, PEDro, MEDLINE, Embase (via Scopus), CINAHL and PsycInfo) to identify the tools most frequently used to assess exercise tolerance functions. These tools were systematically analysed. Forty-eight articles were selected. Six tools or categories of tools concerning exercise tolerance functions were identified. Whole-body exercise tests combined with gas exchange analysis had the best psychometric properties (e.g., validity, reliability) for assessing aerobic capacity in pwMS with mild to moderate disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) ≤ 6.5). Although sometimes used for this purpose, walk tests seemed to assess walking performance rather than exercise tolerance functions. The psychometric properties of other tests had scarcely been studied. The tools vary widely in quality. Whole-body exercise testing combined with gas exchange analysis has the best psychometric properties of the reviewed tools. If gas exchange analysis is feasible, whole-body exercise tests combined with gas exchange analysis, with maximal exercise effort for pwMS with EDSS ≤ 4 and submaximal exercise effort for pwMS with EDSS ≥ 4.5, should be recommended to assess exercise tolerance, both in research and in clinical practice. A selection algorithm is proposed.

  3. Smoking cessation care among patients with head and neck cancer: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarter, Kristen; Martínez, Úrsula; Britton, Ben; Baker, Amanda; Bonevski, Billie; Carter, Gregory; Beck, Alison; Wratten, Chris; Guillaumier, Ashleigh; Halpin, Sean A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions in improving cessation rates and smoking related behaviour in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Design A systematic review of randomised and non-randomised controlled trials. Methods We searched the following data sources: CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL up to February 2016. A search of reference lists of included studies and Google Scholar (first 200 citations published online between 2000 and February 2016) was also undertaken. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the Effective Public Health Practice Project Quality Assessment Tool (EPHPP). 2 study authors independently screened and extracted data with disagreements resolved via consensus. Results Of the 5167 studies identified, 3 were eligible and included in the review. Trial designs of included studies were 2 randomised controlled trials and 1 non-randomised controlled trial. 2 studies received a weak methodological rating and 1 received a moderate methodological rating. The trials examine the impact of the following interventions: (1) nurse delivered cognitive–behaviour therapy (CBT) via telephone and accompanied by a workbook, combined with pharmacotherapy; (2) nurse and physician brief advice to quit and information booklets combined with pharmacotherapy; and (3) surgeon delivered enhanced advice to quit smoking augmented by booster sessions. Only the trial of the nurse delivered CBT and pharmacotherapy reported significant increases in smoking cessation rates. 1 study measured quit attempts and the other assessed consumption of cigarettes per day and readiness to change. There was no significant improvement in quit attempts or cigarettes smoked per day among patients in the intervention groups, relative to control. Conclusions There are very few studies evaluating the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions that report results specific to the HNC

  4. Theory-based self-management educational interventions on patients with type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang-Fang; Suhonen, Riitta; Koskinen, Sanna; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-04-01

    To synthesize the effects of theory-based self-management educational interventions on patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in randomized controlled trials. Type 2 diabetes is a common chronic disease causing complications that put a heavy burden on society and reduce the quality of life of patients. Good self-management of diabetes can prevent complications and improve the quality of life of T2DM patients. Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials following Cochrane methods. A literature search was carried out in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PSYCINFO, and Web of Science databases (1980-April 2015). The risk of bias of these eligible studies was assessed independently by two authors using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool. The Publication bias of the main outcomes was examined. Statistical heterogeneity and random-effects model were used for meta-analysis. Twenty studies with 5802 participants met the inclusion criteria. The interventions in the studies were based on one or more theories which mostly belong to mid-range theories. The pooled main outcomes by random-effects model showed significant improvements in HbA1c, self-efficacy, and diabetes knowledge, but not in BMI. As for quality of life, no conclusions can be drawn as the pooled outcome became the opposite with reduced heterogeneity after one study was excluded. No significant publication bias was found in the main outcomes. To get theory-based interventions to produce more effects, the role of patients should be more involved and stronger and the education team should be trained beyond the primary preparation for the self-management education program. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The effectiveness of hydrotherapy in the treatment of social and behavioral aspects of children with autism spectrum disorders: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortimer R

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rachel Mortimer, Melinda Privopoulos, Saravana Kumar International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA, Australia Background: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are increasing in prevalence. Children with ASDs present with impairments in social interactions; communication; restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests, or activities; as well as motor delays. Hydrotherapy is used as a treatment for children with disabilities and motor delays. There have been no systematic reviews conducted on the effectiveness of hydrotherapy in children with ASDs. Aim: We aimed to examine the effectiveness of hydrotherapy on social interactions and behaviors in the treatment of children with ASDs. Methods: A systematic search of Cochrane, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Embase, MEDLINE®, and Academic Search Premier was conducted. Studies of participants, aged 3–18 years, with ASDs at a high-functioning level were included if they utilized outcome measures assessing social interactions and behaviors through questionnaire or observation. A critical appraisal, using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies, was performed to assess methodological quality. Results: Four studies of varying research design and quality met the inclusion criteria. The participants in these studies were aged between 3–12 years of age. The duration of the intervention ranged from 10–14 weeks, and each study used varied measures of outcome. Overall, all the studies showed some improvements in social interactions or behaviors following a Halliwick-based hydrotherapy intervention. Interpretation: Few studies have investigated the effect of hydrotherapy on the social interactions and behaviors of children with ASDs. While there is an increasing body of evidence for hydrotherapy for children with ASDs, this is constrained by small sample size, lack of comparator, crude sampling methods, and

  6. Systematic Review of the Measurement Properties of Tools Used to Measure Behaviour Problems in Young Children with Autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hanratty

    Full Text Available Behaviour problems are common in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. There are many different tools used to measure behavior problems but little is known about their validity for the population.To evaluate the measurement properties of behaviour problems tools used in evaluation of intervention or observational research studies with children with ASD up to the age of six years.Behaviour measurement tools were identified as part of a larger, two stage, systematic review. First, sixteen major electronic databases, as well as grey literature and research registers were searched, and tools used listed and categorized. Second, using methodological filters, we searched for articles examining the measurement properties of the tools in use with young children with ASD in ERIC, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. The quality of these papers was then evaluated using the COSMIN checklist.We identified twelve tools which had been used to measure behaviour problems in young children with ASD, and fifteen studies which investigated the measurement properties of six of these tools. There was no evidence available for the remaining six tools. Two questionnaires were found to be the most robust in their measurement properties, the Child Behavior Checklist and the Home Situations Questionnaire-Pervasive Developmental Disorders version.We found patchy evidence on reliability and validity, for only a few of the tools used to measure behaviour problems in young children with ASD. More systematic research is required on measurement properties of tools for use in this population, in particular to establish responsiveness to change which is essential in measurement of outcomes of intervention.CRD42012002223.

  7. Conceptual framework of acute care nurse practitioner role enactment, boundary work, and perceptions of team effectiveness.

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    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Lamothe, Lise; Ritchie, Judith A; Doran, Diane

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a new conceptual framework for acute care nurse practitioner role enactment, boundary work and perceptions of team effectiveness. Acute care nurse practitioners contribute positively to patient care by enacting an expanded scope of practise. Researchers have found both positive and negative reactions to the introduction of acute care nurse practitioners in healthcare teams. The process of role enactment, shifting role boundaries, and perceptions of team effectiveness has been studied disparately. A framework linking team structures and processes to desirable outcomes is needed. Literature was obtained by searching CINAHL, PsycInfo, MedLine, PubMed, British Nursing Index, Cochrane Library, JSTOR Archive, Web of Science, and Google Scholar from 1985-2010. A descriptive multiple-case study was completed from March 2009-May 2009. A new conceptual framework describing how role enactment and boundary work affect perceptions of team effectiveness was developed by combining theoretical and empirical sources. The framework proposes proximal indicators used by team members to assess their team's performance. The framework identifies the inter-related dimensions and concepts that different stakeholders need to consider when introducing nurse practitioners in healthcare teams. Further study is needed to identify team-level outcomes that reflect the contributions of all providers to quality patient care, and explore the patients' and families' perceptions of team effectiveness following the introduction of acute care nurse practitioners. The new framework can guide decision-making and research related to the structures, processes, and outcomes of nurse practitioner roles in healthcare teams. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Integrative review: salutogenesis and health in older people over 65 years old.

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    Tan, Khoon-Kiat; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi

    2014-03-01

    To synthesize the evidence in published studies that used a salutogenic framework to explore the relationship between generalized resistance resources, a sense of coherence, health and the quality of life in people aged 65 years and over. Since 1979, increasing interest has been shown in salutogenesis and the relationship of generalized resistance resources and a sense of coherence with health and quality of life. With populations ageing, it is important to explore how older people can advance in years successfully and continue to enjoy good health and an acceptable quality of life. Integrative review. CINAHL Plus with full text, JSTOR, PsycInfo, PubMed, SCOPUS, Sociological Abstracts and Web of Science were searched for studies published from 1979-2011. The integrative review adopted a five-stage approach - problem identification, literature search, data evaluation, data analysis and presentation. Eight studies - one qualitative and seven cross-sectional quantitative studies - from Western countries were included in the review. In general, a strong sense of coherence among older people was correlated with better physical, social and mental health. The use of generalized resistance resources, such as appraisal, coping strategies and social support, was correlated with their sense of coherence, perceived holistic health and quality of life. In communities, older people who have access to generalized resistance resources are more likely to have a strong sense of coherence, relatively good health and an acceptable quality of life. Further intervention studies should address how older people can develop and employ generalized resistance resources. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effect of exercise on cognitive function in chronic disease patients: a meta-analysis and systematic review of randomized controlled trials

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    Cai H

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hong Cai,* Guichen Li,* Shanshan Hua, Yufei Liu, Li Chen School of Nursing, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis and systematic review to assess the effect of exercise on cognitive function in people with chronic diseases.Methods: PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and three Chinese databases were electronically searched for papers that were published until September 2016. This meta-analysis and systematic review included randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effect of exercise on cognitive function compared with control group for people with chronic diseases.Results: Totally, 35 studies met the inclusion criteria, with 3,113 participants. The main analysis revealed a positive overall random effect of exercise intervention on cognitive function in patients with chronic diseases. The secondary analysis revealed that aerobic exercise interventions and aerobic included exercise interventions had a positive effect on cognition in patients with chronic diseases. The intervention offering low frequency had a positive effect on cognitive function in patients with chronic diseases. Finally, we found that interventions offered at both low exercise intensity and moderate exercise intensity had a positive effect on cognitive function in patients with chronic diseases. The secondary analysis also revealed that exercise interventions were beneficial in Alzheimer’s disease patients when grouped by disease type.Conclusion: This meta-analysis and systematic review suggests that exercise interventions positively influence cognitive function in patients with chronic diseases. Beneficial effect was independent of the type of disease, type of exercise, frequency, and the intensity of the exercise intervention. Keywords: exercise, cognitive function, physical activity

  10. Smoke-free homes: what are the barriers, motivators and enablers? A qualitative systematic review and thematic synthesis

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    Robinson, Jude; Wiggers, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective To thematically synthesise primary qualitative studies of the barriers, motivators and enablers of smoke-free homes (SFHs). Design Systematic review and thematic synthesis. Data sources Searches of MEDLINE, EBM Reviews (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews), PsycINFO, Global Health, CINAHL, Web of Science, Informit and EMBASE, combining terms for families, households and vulnerable populations; SFH and secondhand smoke; and qualitative research, were supplemented by searches of PhD theses, key authors, specialist journals and reference lists. Study selection We included 22 articles, reporting on 18 studies, involving 646 participants. Inclusion criteria: peer-reviewed; English language; published from 1990 onwards (to week 3 of April 2014); used qualitative data collection methods; explored participants’ perspectives of home smoking behaviours; and the barriers, motivators and enablers to initiating and/or maintaining a SFH. Data extraction 1 of 3 authors extracted data with checking by a second. Data synthesis A thematic synthesis was performed to develop 7 core analytic themes: (1) knowledge, awareness and risk perception; (2) agency and personal skills/attributes; (3) wider community norms and personal moral responsibilities; (4) social relationships and influence of others; (5) perceived benefits, preferences and priorities; (6) addiction and habit; (7) practicalities. Conclusions This synthesis highlights the complexity faced by many households in having a SFH, the practical, social, cultural and personal issues that need to be addressed and balanced by households, and that while some of these are common across study settings, specific social and cultural factors play a critical role in shaping household smoking behaviours. The findings can inform policy and practice and the development of interventions aimed at increasing SFHs. Trial registration number CRD42014014115. PMID:26988351

  11. Outcomes of interventions for nurse leaders' well-being at work: A quantitative systematic review.

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    Häggman-Laitila, Arja; Romppanen, Johanna

    2017-08-03

    The aim of this study was to gather, assess and synthesize current research knowledge on interventions that aimed to improve nurse leaders' well-being at work. The research evidence on interventions for nurse leaders' well-being at work has been sporadic and there are a lack of evidence-based recommendations for effective interventions that inform practice, future studies and education. A quantitative systematic review, in accordance with the Cochrane Collaboration procedures and the reporting guidance in the PRISMA statement. CINAHL, Cochrane, EBSCO, PubMed, PsycInfo and Scopus databases were searched from 2009 - December 2016. The final data consisted of five studies, which were assessed with the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. The data were summarized narratively. The interventions were mainly concerned with stress management and were targeted at individuals. Four of the five interventions examined produced statistically significant outcomes on well-being at work. Stress management interventions that included mental exercises were the most successful. Interventions primarily reduced the stress experienced by participants, but the evidence on the stability of these outcomes was poor because of the short follow-up periods. The certainty of evidence was low, indicating that the use of these interventions among nurse leaders might be beneficial. Further studies are needed to provide more reliable recommendations for their use. As the performance of nurse leaders influences organizations, through interpersonal relationships, it is important to pay more attention in the future to the development of organization- and person-directed interventions and their combinations. A structural empowerment approach should also be considered. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Challenges faced by health-care providers offering infant-feeding counseling to HIV-positive women in sub-Saharan Africa: a review of current research.

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    Tuthill, Emily L; Chan, Jessica; Butler, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) has been identified as the optimal nutrition and critical behavior in attaining human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-free infant survival in resource-limited settings. Health-care providers (HCPs) in clinic- and community-settings throughout sub-Saharan Africa (sSA) provide infant-feeding counseling. However, rates of EBF at 6 months of age are suboptimal. HCPs are uniquely positioned to educate HIV-positive mothers and provide support by addressing known barriers to EBF. However, limited evidence exists on the experiences faced by HCPs in providing counseling on infant feeding to HIV-positive women. Our objective is to describe experiences faced by HCPs when delivering infant-feeding counseling in the context of HIV in program settings in sSA. We searched a range of electronic databases, including PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO from January 1990 to February 2013, in addition to hand-searching, cross-reference searching, and personal communications. The search was limited to publications in English. Empirical studies of HCP experiences providing infant-feeding counseling in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV programs in sSA were selected. We identified 10 peer-reviewed articles reporting HCP challenges in infant-feeding counseling that met inclusion criteria. Articles included qualitative, cross-sectional and mixed-method studies, and cumulatively reported 31 challenges faced by HCPs. Among the challenges identified, the most commonly reported were personal beliefs held by the HCPs toward infant feeding in the context of HIV, contradictory messages, staff workload, directive counseling styles, and a lack of practical strategies to offer mothers, often leading to improvised counseling approaches. Counseling strategies need to be developed that are relevant, meaningful, and responsive to the needs of both HCPs and mothers.

  13. Interventions to Prevent Unintended and Repeat Pregnancy Among Young People in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review of the Published and Gray Literature.

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    Hindin, Michelle J; Kalamar, Amanda M; Thompson, Terri-Ann; Upadhyay, Ushma D

    2016-09-01

    Adolescent pregnancy, particularly unintended pregnancy, can have lasting social, economic, and health outcomes. The objective of this review is to identify high-quality interventions and evaluations to decrease unintended and repeat pregnancy among young people in low- and middle-income countries. PubMed, Embase, PsycInfo, Cinahl Plus, Popline, and the Cochrane Databases were searched for all languages for articles published through November 2015. Gray literature was searched by hand. Reference tracing was utilized, as well as unpacking systematic reviews. Selected articles were those that were evaluated as having high-quality interventions and evaluations using standardized scoring. Twenty-one high-quality interventions and evaluations were abstracted. Nine reported statistically significant declines in pregnancy rates (five cash transfer programs, one education curriculum, two life-skills curricula, and a provision of contraception intervention), seven reported increases in contraceptive use (three provision of contraception interventions, two life-skills curricula, a peer education program, and a mass media campaign), two reported decreases in sexual activity (a cash transfer program and an education and life-skills curriculum), and two reported an increase in age of sexual debut (both cash transfer programs). The selected high quality, effective interventions included in this review can inform researchers, donors, and policy makers about where to make strategic investments to decrease unintended pregnancy during young adulthood. Additionally, this review can assist with avoiding investments in interventions that failed to produce significant impact on the intended outcomes. The diversity of successful high-quality interventions, implemented in a range of venues, with a diversity of young people, suggests that there are multiple strategies that can work to prevent unintended pregnancy.

  14. Women-specific HIV/AIDS services: identifying and defining the components of holistic service delivery for women living with HIV/AIDS

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    Allison J Carter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increasing proportion of women living with HIV has evoked calls for tailored services that respond to women's specific needs. The objective of this investigation was to explore the concept of women-specific HIV/AIDS services to identify and define what key elements underlie this approach to care. Methods: A comprehensive review was conducted using online databases (CSA Social Service Abstracts, OvidSP, Proquest, Psycinfo, PubMed, CINAHL, augmented with a search for grey literature. In total, 84 articles were retrieved and 30 were included for a full review. Of these 30, 15 were specific to HIV/AIDS, 11 for mental health and addictions and four stemmed from other disciplines. Results and discussion: The review demonstrated the absence of a consensual definition of women-specific HIV/AIDS services in the literature. We distilled this concept into its defining features and 12 additional dimensions (1 creating an atmosphere of safety, respect and acceptance; (2 facilitating communication and interaction among peers; (3 involving women in the planning, delivery and evaluation of services; (4 providing self-determination opportunities; (5 providing tailored programming for women; (6 facilitating meaningful access to care through the provision of social and supportive services; (7 facilitating access to women-specific and culturally sensitive information; (8 considering family as the unit of intervention; (9 providing multidisciplinary integration and coordination of a comprehensive array of services; (10 meeting women “where they are”; (11 providing gender-, culture- and HIV-sensitive training to health and social care providers; and (12 conducting gendered HIV/AIDS research. Conclusions: This review highlights that the concept of women-specific HIV/AIDS services is a complex and multidimensional one that has been shaped by diverse theoretical perspectives. Further research is needed to better understand this emerging concept and

  15. Concordance of adherence measurement using self-reported adherence questionnaires and medication monitoring devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lizheng; Liu, Jinan; Koleva, Yordanka; Fonseca, Vivian; Kalsekar, Anupama; Pawaskar, Manjiri

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this review was to identify and examine the literature on the association between medication adherence self-reported questionnaires (SRQs) and medication monitoring devices. The primary literature search was performed for 1980-2009 using PubMed, PubMed In Process and Non-Indexed, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process, PsycINFO (EBSCO), CINAHL (EBSCO), Ovid HealthStar, EMBASE (Elsevier) and Cochrane Databases and using the following search terms: 'patient compliance', 'medication adherence', 'treatment compliance', 'drug monitoring', 'drug therapy', 'electronic', 'digital', 'computer', 'monitor', 'monitoring', 'drug', 'drugs', 'pharmaceutical preparations', 'compliance' and 'medications'. We identified studies that included SRQs and electronic monitoring devices to measure adherence and focused on the SRQs that were found to be moderately to highly correlated with the monitoring devices. Of the 1679 citations found via the primary search, 41 full-text articles were reviewed for correlation between monitoring devices and SRQs. A majority (68%) of articles reported high (27%), moderate (29%) or significant (12%) correlation between monitoring devices (37 using Medication Event Monitoring System [MEMS®] and four using other devices) and SRQs (11 identified and numerous other unnamed SRQs). The most commonly used SRQs were the Adult/Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trial Group (AACTG/PACTG; 24.4%, 10/41) followed by the 4-item Morisky (9.8%, 4/41), Brief Medication Questionnaire (9.8%, 4/41) and visual analogue scale (VAS; 7.3%, 3/41). Although study designs differed across the articles, SRQs appeared to report a higher rate of medication adherence (+14.9%) than monitoring devices. In conclusion, several medication adherence SRQs were validated using electronic monitoring devices. A majority of them showed high or moderate correlation with medication adherence measured using monitoring devices, and could be considered for measuring patient

  16. Effects of Physical Exercise Combined with Nutritional Supplements on Aging Brain Related Structures and Functions: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schättin, Alexandra; Baur, Kilian; Stutz, Jan; Wolf, Peter; de Bruin, Eling D

    2016-01-01

    Age-related decline in gray and white brain matter goes together with cognitive depletion. To influence cognitive functioning in elderly, several types of physical exercise and nutritional intervention have been performed. This paper systematically reviews the potential additive and complementary effects of nutrition/nutritional supplements and physical exercise on cognition. The search strategy was developed for EMBASE, Medline, PubMed, Cochrane, CINAHL, and PsycInfo databases and focused on the research question: "Is the combination of physical exercise with nutrition/nutritional supplementation more effective than nutrition/nutritional supplementation or physical exercise alone in effecting on brain structure, metabolism, and/or function?" Both mammalian and human studies were included. In humans, randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of nutrition/nutritional supplements and physical exercise on cognitive functioning and associated parameters in healthy elderly (>65 years) were included. The systematic search included English and German language literature without any limitation of publication date. The search strategy yielded a total of 3129 references of which 67 studies met the inclusion criteria; 43 human and 24 mammalian, mainly rodent, studies. Three out of 43 human studies investigated a nutrition/physical exercise combination and reported no additive effects. In rodent studies, additive effects were found for docosahexaenoic acid supplementation when combined with physical exercise. Although feasible combinations of physical exercise/nutritional supplements are available for influencing the brain, only a few studies evaluated which possible combinations of nutrition/nutritional supplementation and physical exercise might have an effect on brain structure, metabolism and/or function. The reason for no clear effects of combinatory approaches in humans might be explained by the misfit between the combinations of nutritional methods with

  17. Factors affecting the use of prenatal care by non-western women in industrialized western countries: a systematic review.

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    Boerleider, Agatha W; Wiegers, Therese A; Manniën, Judith; Francke, Anneke L; Devillé, Walter L J M

    2013-03-27

    Despite the potential of prenatal care for addressing many pregnancy complications and concurrent health problems, non-western women in industrialized western countries more often make inadequate use of prenatal care than women from the majority population do. This study aimed to give a systematic review of factors affecting non-western women's use of prenatal care (both medical care and prenatal classes) in industrialized western countries. Eleven databases (PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, Cochrane, Sociological Abstracts, Web of Science, Women's Studies International, MIDIRS, CINAHL, Scopus and the NIVEL catalogue) were searched for relevant peer-reviewed articles from between 1995 and July 2012. Qualitative as well as quantitative studies were included. Quality was assessed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Factors identified were classified as impeding or facilitating, and categorized according to a conceptual framework, an elaborated version of Andersen's healthcare utilization model. Sixteen articles provided relevant factors that were all categorized. A number of factors (migration, culture, position in host country, social network, expertise of the care provider and personal treatment and communication) were found to include both facilitating and impeding factors for non-western women's utilization of prenatal care. The category demographic, genetic and pregnancy characteristics and the category accessibility of care only included impeding factors.Lack of knowledge of the western healthcare system and poor language proficiency were the most frequently reported impeding factors. Provision of information and care in women's native languages was the most frequently reported facilitating factor. The factors found in this review provide specific indications for identifying non-western women who are at risk of not using prenatal care adequately and for developing interventions and appropriate policy aimed at improving their prenatal care utilization.

  18. Building the capacity of policy-makers and planners to strengthen mental health systems in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynejad, Roxanne; Semrau, Maya; Toynbee, Mark; Evans-Lacko, Sara; Lund, Crick; Gureje, Oye; Ndyanabangi, Sheila; Courtin, Emilie; Abdulmalik, Jibril O; Alem, Atalay; Fekadu, Abebaw; Thornicroft, Graham; Hanlon, Charlotte

    2016-10-21

    Little is known about the interventions required to build the capacity of mental health policy-makers and planners in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We conducted a systematic review with the primary aim of identifying and synthesizing the evidence base for building the capacity of policy-makers and planners to strengthen mental health systems in LMICs. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Knowledge, Web of Science, Scopus, CINAHL, LILACS, ScieELO, Google Scholar and Cochrane databases for studies reporting evidence, experience or evaluation of capacity-building of policy-makers, service planners or managers in mental health system strengthening in LMICs. Reports in English, Spanish, Portuguese, French or German were included. Additional papers were identified by hand-searching references and contacting experts and key informants. Database searches yielded 2922 abstracts and 28 additional papers were identified. Following screening, 409 full papers were reviewed, of which 14 fulfilled inclusion criteria for the review. Data were extracted from all included papers and synthesized into a narrative review. Only a small number of mental health system-related capacity-building interventions for policy-makers and planners in LMICs were described. Most models of capacity-building combined brief training with longer term mentorship, dialogue and/or the establishment of networks of support. However, rigorous research and evaluation methods were largely absent, with studies being of low quality, limiting the potential to separate mental health system strengthening outcomes from the effects of associated contextual factors. This review demonstrates the need for partnership approaches to building the capacity of mental health policy-makers and planners in LMICs, assessed rigorously against pre-specified conceptual frameworks and hypotheses, utilising longitudinal evaluation and mixed quantitative and qualitative approaches.

  19. Skin cleansing practices for older people: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdell, Fiona; Steventon, Katerina

    2015-03-01

    To locate, summarise and critically analyse current knowledge about skin hygiene practices for older people. Maintaining personal hygiene for patients is one of the core elements of care in all fields of nursing. However, it is a subject that has been neglected in both research and education. Skin integrity is essential to the health and well-being of older people. Skin cleansing practices can contribute to the maintenance and promotion of skin integrity. It is therefore essential to have a robust evidence base for such practices. Literature review by searches of the electronic databases Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Academic Search Premier, psycINFO, Web of Science, SCOPUS and the Cochrane Library, using firstly key words and exclusion criteria, then citations and reference searches. An integrative review method was used. Studies included were alternative bathing protocol or bathing product interventions. Seven studies met the methodological requirements for inclusion. There is a significant lack of high-quality research studies to provide a framework for guiding evidence-based skin cleansing practice. Current guidance is based on clinical expertise rather than on robust trial evidence. A research agenda has been developed which may become the basis for developing evidence-based, best practice guidelines. Future research must move beyond descriptive studies to include more robust methods of investigation. The lack of intervention studies limits the practice-guiding implications that can be gained from the current body of research. Skin cleansing is one of the cornerstones of nursing practice, however, in the absence of a robust evidence base most such care is currently based on 'custom and practice'. There is a need to conduct further research into cleansing practices that will maintain or enhance skin health and skin integrity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Moral distress: a review of the argument-based nursing ethics literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Joan; Gastmans, Chris

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this review is to examine the ways in which the concept of moral distress has been delineated and deployed in the argument-based nursing ethics literature. It adds to what we already know about moral distress from reviews of the qualitative and quantitative research. CINAHL, PubMed, Web of Knowledge, EMBASE, Academic Search Complete, PsycInfo, Philosophers' Index and Socindex. A total of 20 argument-based articles published between January 1984 and December 2013 were analysed. We found that like the empirical literature, most authors in this review draw on Jameton's original definition and describe moral distress in psychological-emotional-physiological terms. They also agree that moral distress is linked to the presence of some kind of constraint on nurses' moral agency, and that it is best understood as a two-staged process that can intensify over time. There is also consensus that moral distress has an important normative meaning, although different views concerning the normative meaning of moral distress are expressed. Finally, the authors generally agree that moral distress arises from a number of different sources and that it (mostly) affects negatively on nurses' personal and professional lives and, ultimately, harms patients. However, despite this consensus, many authors take issue with the way in which moral distress is conceptualized and operationalized. Moreover, while some worry that identifying nurses as a group of health professionals whose voices are ignored or marginalized might disempower nurses and encourage them to avoid their moral responsibilities, others take situations involving moral distress as indicative of more fundamental, structural inequities at the heart of contemporary healthcare provision. We conclude that research on moral distress in nursing is timely and important because it highlights the specifically moral labour of nurses. However, we suggest that significant concerns about the conceptual fuzziness and

  1. Strategies to Modify the Risk of Heart Failure Readmission

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    Thomas T. H. Wan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human factors play an important role in health-care outcomes of heart failure (HF patients. A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trial studies on HF hospitalization may yield positive proofs of the beneficial effect of specific care management strategies. Purpose: To investigate how the 8 guiding principles of choice, rest, environment, activity, trust, interpersonal relationships, outlook, and nutrition reduce HF readmissions. Basic Procedures: Appropriate keywords were identified related to the (1 independent variable of hospitalization and treatment, (2 the moderating variable of care management principles, (3 the dependent variable of readmission, and (4 the disease of HF to conduct searches in 9 databases. Databases searched included CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ERIC, MEDLINE, PubMed, PsycInfo, Science Direct, and Web of Science. Only prospective studies associated with HF hospitalization and readmissions, published in English, Chinese, Spanish, and German journals between January 1, 1990, and August 31, 2015, were included in the systematic review. In the meta-analysis, data were collected from studies that measured HF readmission for individual patients. Main Findings: The results indicate that an intervention involving any human factor principles may nearly double an individual’s probability of not being readmitted. Participants in interventions that incorporated single or combined principles were 1.4 to 6.8 times less likely to be readmitted. Principal Conclusions: Interventions with human factor principles reduce readmissions among HF patients. Overall, this review may help reconfigure the design, implementation, and evaluation of clinical practice for reducing HF readmissions in the future.

  2. Systematic review of control groups in nutrition education intervention research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Wu, FanFan; Spaccarotella, Kim; Quick, Virginia; Martin-Biggers, Jennifer; Zhang, Yingting

    2017-07-11

    Well-designed research trials are critical for determining the efficacy and effectiveness of nutrition education interventions. To determine whether behavioral and/or cognition changes can be attributed to an intervention, the experimental design must include a control or comparison condition against which outcomes from the experimental group can be compared. Despite the impact different types of control groups can have on study outcomes, the treatment provided to participants in the control condition has received limited attention in the literature. A systematic review of control groups in nutrition education interventions was conducted to better understand how control conditions are described in peer-reviewed journal articles compared with experimental conditions. To be included in the systematic review, articles had to be indexed in CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, WoS, and/or ERIC and report primary research findings of controlled nutrition education intervention trials conducted in the United States with free-living consumer populations and published in English between January 2005 and December 2015. Key elements extracted during data collection included treatment provided to the experimental and control groups (e.g., overall intervention content, tailoring methods, delivery mode, format, duration, setting, and session descriptions, and procedures for standardizing, fidelity of implementation, and blinding); rationale for control group type selected; sample size and attrition; and theoretical foundation. The search yielded 43 publications; about one-third of these had an inactive control condition, which is considered a weak study design. Nearly two-thirds of reviewed studies had an active control condition considered a stronger research design; however, many failed to report one or more key elements of the intervention, especially for the control condition. None of the experimental and control group treatments were sufficiently detailed to permit replication of the

  3. Interventions to reduce and prevent obesity in pre-conceptual and pregnant women: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliha Agha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increasing prevalence of obesity in pregnant women is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, and increased costs to healthcare, the economy and broader society. OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy of behavioural interventions for managing gestational weight gain (GWG in the pre-conceptual and pregnancy period in overweight, obese and morbidly obese women. SEARCH METHODS: A search was performed for published studies in the English language, from date? 2000-31 December 2012 in five electronic databases; PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and PsycINFO. SELECTION CRITERIA: Studies were included if they compared the efficacy or effectiveness of a particular behavioural intervention in pregnant or pre-conceptual women with standard maternity care. Studies that included women with co-morbid conditions such as diabetes mellitus and polycystic ovarian syndrome were excluded to help isolate the effect of the intervention. RESULTS: Fifteen studies involving 3,426 participants were included. One study (n = 692 focused on the pre-conceptual period and the remaining 14 (n = 2,734 in the pregnancy period. Pooled mean difference for GWG indicated a lower GWG in the intervention groups when compared to standard maternity care groups (n = 1771, mean difference (MD -1.66 kg, 95% CI -3.12 to -0.21 kg. With respect to the types of participants, considerable heterogeneity between studies was shown in the obese subgroup [Tau(2 = 15.61; Chi(2 = 40.80, df = 3 (P<0.00001; I(2 = 93%]. CONCLUSIONS: Behavioural interventions in pregnancy may be effective in reducing GWG in obese women without comorbid conditions, but not overweight or morbidly obese women. Behavioural interventions had no effect on postpartum weight loss or retention, gestation week of delivery and infant birth weight in overweight, obese and morbidly obese women.

  4. Exploring and explaining low participation in physical activity among children and young people with asthma: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoskins Gaylor

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is the most common chronic illness among children and accounts for 1 in 5 of all child GP consultations. This paper reviews and discusses recent literature outlining the growing problem of physical inactivity among young people with asthma and explores the psychosocial dimensions that may explain inactivity levels and potentially relevant interventions and strategies, and the principles that should underpin them. Methods A narrative review based on an extensive and documented search of search of CinAHL, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library. Results & Discussion Children and young people with asthma are generally less active than their non-asthmatic peers. Reduced participation may be influenced by organisational policies, family illness beliefs and behaviours, health care advice, and inaccurate symptom perception and attribution. Schools can be reluctant to encourage children to take part in physical education or normal play activity due to misunderstanding and a lack of clear corporate guidance. Families may accept a child's low level of activity if it is perceived that breathlessness or the need to take extra inhalers is harmful. Many young people themselves appear to accept sub-optimal control of symptoms and frequently misinterpret healthy shortness of breath on exercising with the symptoms of an impending asthma attack. Conclusion A multi-faceted approach is needed to translate the rhetoric of increasing activity levels in young people to the reality of improved fitness. Physical activity leading to improved fitness should become part of a goal orientated management strategy by schools, families, health care professionals and individuals. Exercise induced asthma should be regarded as a marker of poor control and a need to increase fitness rather as an excuse for inactivity. Individuals' perceptual accuracy deserves further research attention.

  5. Religion, Spirituality, and Physical Health in Cancer Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jim, Heather S.L.; Pustejovsky, James; Park, Crystal L.; Danhauer, Suzanne C.; Sherman, Allen C.; Fitchett, George; Merluzzi, Thomas V.; Munoz, Alexis R.; George, Login; Snyder, Mallory A.; Salsman, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whereas religion/spirituality (R/S) is important in its own right for many cancer patients, a large body of research has examined whether R/S is also associated with better physical health outcomes. This literature has been characterized by heterogeneity in sample composition, measures of R/S, and measures of physical health. In an effort to synthesize previous findings, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relationship between R/S and patient-reported physical health in cancer patients. Methods A search of PubMed, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library yielded 2,073 abstracts, which were independently evaluated by pairs of raters. Meta-analysis was conducted on 497 effect sizes from 101 unique samples encompassing over 32,000 adult cancer patients. R/S measures were categorized into affective, behavioral, cognitive, and ‘other’ dimensions. Physical health measures were categorized into physical well-being, functional well-being, and physical symptoms. Average estimated correlations (Fisher's z) were calculated using generalized estimating equations with robust variance estimation. Results Overall R/S was associated with overall physical health (z=.153, p<.001); this relationship was not moderated by sociodemographic or clinical variables. Affective R/S was associated with physical well-being (z=.167, p<.001), functional well-being (z=.343, p<.001), and physical symptoms (z=.282, p<.001). Cognitive R/S was associated with physical well-being (z=.079, p<.05) and functional well-being (z=.090, p<.01). ‘Other’ R/S was associated with functional well-being (z=.100, p<.05). Conclusions Results of the current meta-analysis suggest that greater R/S is associated with better patient-reported physical health. These results underscore the importance of attending to patients’ religious and spiritual needs as part of comprehensive cancer care. PMID:26258868

  6. Influência familiar na anorexia nervosa: em busca das melhores evidências científicas

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    Élide Dezoti Valdanha

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar as evidências científicas sobre a influência do grupo familiar na sintomatologia da anorexia nervosa (AN. MÉTODOS: Revisão sistemática da literatura no período de 2000 a 2012, utilizando as bases PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Lilacs e os descritores: "transtornos da alimentação", "relações familiares", "relação entre gerações" e "relação mãe-filho". RESULTADOS: Com base nos critérios de inclusão e exclusão, foram selecionadas e analisadas 20 publicações na íntegra. A maior parte dessas publicações focaliza mulheres diagnosticadas com transtornos alimentares (TA ou com comportamento alimentar de risco, tem delineamento quantitativo e utiliza escalas padronizadas para coleta de dados. Predominou o Nível de Evidência 4, que corresponde a estudos de desenho não experimental, como pesquisa descritiva correlacional e qualitativa, ou estudos de caso. As evidências encontradas indicam que os relacionamentos familiares exercem impacto significativo tanto no desenvolvimento como na manutenção de sintomas de TA. Padrões relacionados à alimentação e ao alimento são transmitidos entre as gerações, bem como aspectos não elaborados do funcionamento psíquico materno. CONCLUSÕES: Os estudos sugerem a necessidade de ampliar o foco da atenção para incluir os familiares no tratamento, bem como incorporar os achados de transmissão psíquica intergeracional como subsídios norteadores do planejamento e qualificação do cuidado oferecido nos TA.

  7. The Impact of Regular Self-weighing on Weight Management: A Systematic Literature Review

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    Welsh Ericka M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular self-weighing has been a focus of attention recently in the obesity literature. It has received conflicting endorsement in that some researchers and practitioners recommend it as a key behavioral strategy for weight management, while others caution against its use due to its potential to cause negative psychological consequences associated with weight management failure. The evidence on frequent self-weighing, however, has not yet been synthesized. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the evidence regarding the use of regular self-weighing for both weight loss and weight maintenance. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted using the MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO online databases. Reviewed studies were broken down by sample characteristics, predictors/conditions, dependent measures, findings, and evidence grade. Results Twelve studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria, but nearly half received low evidence grades in terms of methodological quality. Findings from 11 of the 12 reviewed studies indicated that more frequent self-weighing was associated with greater weight loss or weight gain prevention. Specifically, individuals who reported self-weighing weekly or daily, typically over a period of several months, held a 1 to 3 kg/m2 (current advantage over individuals who did not self-weigh frequently. The effects of self-weighing in experimental studies, especially those where self-weighing behaviors could be isolated, were less clear. Conclusion Based on the consistency of the evidence reviewed, frequent self-weighing, at the very least, seems to be a good predictor of moderate weight loss, less weight regain, or the avoidance of initial weight gain in adults. More targeted research is needed in this area to determine the causal role of frequent self-weighing in weight loss/weight gain prevention programs. Other open questions to be pursued include the optimal dose of self-weighing, as well as the

  8. Virtual reality in assessment and treatment of schizophrenia: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Macedo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To conduct a systematic review about the use of virtual reality (VR for evaluation, treatment and/or rehabilitation of patients with schizophrenia, focused on: areas, fields and objectives; methodological issues; features of the VR used; viability and efficiency of this resource. Methods Searches were performed about schizophrenia and virtual reality in PsycINFO, Academic Search Complete, MEDLINE Complete, CINAHL with Full Text, Web of Science and Business Source Premier databases, using the following keywords: [“schizophrenia”] AND [“virtual reality” OR “serious game”] AND [“treatment” OR “therapy” OR “rehabilitation”]. The search was carried out between November 2013 and June 2014 without using any search limiters. Results A total of 101 papers were identified, and after the application of exclusion criteria, 33 papers remained. The studies analysed focused on the use of VR for the evaluation of cognitive, social, perceptual and sensory skills, and the vast majority were experimental studies, with virtual reality specifically created for them. All the reviewed papers point towards a reliable and safe use of VR for evaluating and treating cognitive and social deficits in patients with schizophrenia, with different results in terms of generalisation, motivation, assertiveness and task participation rate. Some problems were highlighted, such as its high cost and a constant need for software maintenance. Conclusion The studies show that using the virtual reality may streamline traditional evaluation/rehabilitation programmes, allowing to enhance the results achieved, both in the cognitive and in the social field, helping for the legitimisation of this population’s psycho-social inclusion.

  9. Review of Articles Related to Responsiveness as a Characteristic of Quality of Life Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rostam Jalali

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Responsiveness is a concept introduced in the mid-eighties by bio-medical researchers. It is considered as a fundamental feature of health-related quality of life questionnaires, which was different from reliability and validity. Responsiveness is defined as the ability of an instrument to detect the minimal clinically important differences. Most authors agree that responsiveness focuses on the ability of a criterion in measuring changes, but there is a wide variety of opinions about the nature of quantified change. This review study was performed to determine the responsiveness by using the valid and available articles. Methods: Keywords of "responsiveness" and "quality of life" were searched in Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, ProQuest, PsycINFO, Science Direct, Scopus, and Medline databases. Results: Multiple definitions for responsiveness and different procedures for calculating it were investigated in various studies. A total of 30 articles were used as references. Responsiveness has been divided into two groups: External and internal. “Internal responsiveness” is defined as the ability of a measure to change over a specified time frame. “External responsiveness” reflects the extent to which changes in a measure over a specified time frame relate to corresponding changes in a reference measure of health status. Conclusion: Despite the fact that some authors consider the responsiveness as the most basic characteristics for assessment of a tool, its measurement methodology is different. Meanwhile, there are different methods to assess responsiveness, but the researchers used one of them, and in development and validation of quality of life questionnaires must be regarded.

  10. Adaptation in families of children with Down syndrome in East Asian countries: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunkyung; Van Riper, Marcia

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this integrative literature review was to understand the experiences of East Asian families of children with Down syndrome and identify factors affecting their adaptation in the Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment and Adaptation. Socio-cultural factors influence how well families adapt following the birth of a child with Down syndrome. Existing literature in this area has focused primarily on families from Western cultures. This is problematic because nurses care for families from all over the world. Therefore, the focus of this review is on families of children with Down syndrome living in East Asia, where Confucianism is dominant. Integrative literature review. Online databases (i.e. PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO) and a public search engine (i.e. Google Scholar) were used along with manual searches of reference lists and major journals. Studies were limited to original publications written in English and published between 1990-2014. Two authors independently performed integrative review processes proposed by Whittemore and Knafl and a quality assessment using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Like families in Western cultures, some East Asian families of children with Down syndrome adapted well and even thrived while others struggled. Various socio-cultural factors, including some associated with Confucianism, played a role in how individuals, dyads and families adapted. An understanding of socio-cultural influences can help nurses implement culturally sensitive family-centred interventions with families of children with Down syndrome. It may also facilitate policy changes concerning resources for these families. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Kind of blue: A systematic review and meta-analysis of music interventions in cancer treatment.

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    Bro, Margrethe Langer; Jespersen, Kira Vibe; Hansen, Julie Bolvig; Vuust, Peter; Abildgaard, Niels; Gram, Jeppe; Johansen, Christoffer

    2017-06-18

    Music may be a valuable and low-cost coping strategy for cancer patients. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify the psychological and physical effects of music interventions in cancer treatment. We included randomized, controlled trials with adult patients in active cancer treatment exposed to different music interventions versus control conditions. Qualitative studies and systematic reviews were excluded. We identified a total of 2624 records through 2 systematic searches (June 2015 and September 2016) in PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Cinahl, Web of Science, Cochrane, and PsycINFO and used Risk of Bias Assessment, GRADE and Checklist for Reporting Music-Based Interventions to evaluate the music applied and quality of the studies. We conducted meta-analyses using Review Manager (version 5.3). PROSPERO reg. no. CRD42015026024. We included 25 RCT's (N = 1784) of which 20 were eligible for the meta-analysis (N = 1565). Music reduced anxiety (SMD -0·80 [95% CI, -1.35 to -0.25]), pain (SMD -0.88 [95% CI -1.45 to -0.32]), and improved mood (SMD -0.55 [95% CI, -0.98 to -0.13]). However, studies were hampered by heterogeneity with I(2) varying between 54% and 96%. Quality of the studies ranged from very low to low. The most effective mode of music intervention appeared to be passive listening to self-selected, recorded music in a single session design. Music may be a tool in reducing anxiety, pain, and improving mood among patients with cancer in active treatment. However, methodological limitations in the studies conducted so far prevent firm conclusions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Stimulant Medications and Sleep for Youth With ADHD: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Katherine M; Van Dyk, Tori R; Lundahl, Alyssa; Nelson, Timothy D

    2015-12-01

    Mixed findings exist on whether stimulant medications alter youth sleep. To determine the effect of stimulant medications on sleep. Studies published through March 2015 were collected via CINAHL, PsycINFO, and PubMed. References of retrieved articles were reviewed. Eligibility criteria included studies with children/adolescents who had attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), random assignment to stimulants, and objective sleep measurement. Studies that did not include information about key variables were excluded. Study-level, child-level, and sleep data were extracted by 2 independent coders. Effect sizes were calculated by using random effects models. Potential moderators were examined by using mixed effect models. A total of 9 articles (N = 246) were included. For sleep latency, the adjusted effect size (0.54) was significant, indicating that stimulants produce longer sleep latencies. Frequency of dose per day was a significant moderator. For sleep efficiency, the adjusted effect size (-0.32) was significant. Significant moderators included length of time on medication, number of nights of sleep assessed, polysomnography/actigraphy, and gender. Specifically, the effect of medication was less evident when youth were taking medication longer. For total sleep time, the effect size (-0.59) was significant, such that stimulants led to shorter sleep duration. Limitations include few studies, limited methodologic variability, and lack of unpublished studies. Stimulant medication led to longer sleep latency, worse sleep efficiency, and shorter sleep duration. Overall, youth had worse sleep on stimulant medications. It is recommended that pediatricians carefully monitor sleep problems and adjust treatment to promote optimal sleep. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. A systematic review evaluating the psychometric properties of measures of social inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbourn, Ben; Martin, Robyn; Buchanan, Angus; Chung, Donna; Speyer, Renée

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Improving social inclusion opportunities for population health has been identified as a priority area for international policy. There is a need to comprehensively examine and evaluate the quality of psychometric properties of measures of social inclusion that are used to guide social policy and outcomes. Objective To conduct a systematic review of the literature on all current measures of social inclusion for any population group, to evaluate the quality of the psychometric properties of identified measures, and to evaluate if they capture the construct of social inclusion. Methods A systematic search was performed using five electronic databases: CINAHL, PsycINFO, Embase, ERIC and Pubmed and grey literature were sourced to identify measures of social inclusion. The psychometric properties of the social inclusion measures were evaluated against the COSMIN taxonomy of measurement properties using pre-set psychometric criteria. Results Of the 109 measures identified, twenty-five measures, involving twenty-five studies and one manual met the inclusion criteria. The overall quality of the reviewed measures was variable, with the Social and Community Opportunities Profile-Short, Social Connectedness Scale and the Social Inclusion Scale demonstrating the strongest evidence for sound psychometric quality. The most common domain included in the measures was connectedness (21), followed by participation (19); the domain of citizenship was covered by the least number of measures (10). No single instrument measured all aspects within the three domains of social inclusion. Of the measures with sound psychometric evidence, the Social and Community Opportunities Profile-Short captured the construct of social inclusion best. Conclusions The overall quality of the psychometric properties demonstrate that the current suite of available instruments for the measurement of social inclusion are promising but need further refinement. There is a need for a universal working

  14. Thematic synthesis of qualitative studies on patient and caregiver perspectives on end-of-life care in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Allison; Cheung, Katharine L; Nair, Sumi Sukumaran; Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Craig, Jonathan C; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2014-06-01

    Although dialysis prolongs life for patients with end-stage kidney disease, 20% of deaths in this population are preceded by dialysis therapy withdrawal. Recently, there has been more focus on conservative (nondialytic) care as a legitimate option, particularly for elderly patients. This study aims to describe patients' and caregivers' perspectives on conservative treatment and end-of-life care in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative studies. Patients with CKD and caregivers. MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and reference lists were searched to May 2013. Thematic synthesis was used to analyze the findings. 26 studies involving more than 711 patients (non-dialysis dependent [n=41], hemodialysis [n=544], peritoneal dialysis [n=9]; unspecified dialysis modality [n=31], conservative management [n=86]) and 178 caregivers were included. We identified 5 themes: invasive suffering (bodily deterioration, loss of freedom and independence, unyielding fatigue and pain, resignation, treatment burden and harm, financial strain), personal vulnerability (imminence of death, misunderstanding and judgment, autonomy and dignity, medical abandonment, trust and safety), relational responsibility (being a burden, demonstrating loyalty, protecting others from grief), negotiating existential tensions (accepting natural course of life, disrupted aging, worthlessness, living on borrowed time, respecting sanctity of life, life satisfaction, preserving self-identity), and preparedness (decisional clarity, informational power, spirituality and hope). Non-English articles were excluded; therefore, the transferability of findings to other populations is unclear. Some patients with CKD experience physical and psychosocial frailty and feel ambivalent about prolonging life. Some caregivers believe in providing relief from suffering, but are uncertain about making decisions regarding dialysis therapy initiation and discontinuation. We suggest that

  15. Deep friction massage to treat tendinopathy: a systematic review of a classic treatment in the face of a new paradigm of understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Michael F; Taft, Kathryn; Moskwa, Maria; Denegar, Craig R

    2012-11-01

    Systematic literature review. To assess the efficacy of deep friction massage (DFM) in the treatment of tendinopathy. Anecdotal evidence supports the efficacy of DFM for the treatment of tendinopathy. An advanced understanding of the etiopathogenesis of tendinopathy and the resultant paradigm shift away from an active inflammatory model has taken place since the popularization of the DFM technique by Cyriax for the treatment of "tendinitis." However, increasing mechanical load to the tendinopathic tissue, as well as reducing molecular cross-linking during the healing process via transverse massage, offers a plausible explanation for observed responses in light of the contemporary understanding of tendinopathy. The authors surveyed research articles in all languages by searching PubMed, Scopus, Pedro, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library using the terms deep friction massage, deep tissue massage, deep transverse massage, Cyriax, soft tissue mobilization, soft tissue mobilisation, cross friction massage, and transverse friction massage. They included 4 randomized comparison trials, 3 at the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and 1 supraspinatus outlet tendinopathy; 2 nonrandomized comparison trials, both receiving DFM at the ECRB; and 3 prospective noncomparison trials-supraspinatus, ECRB, and Achilles tendons. Articles meeting inclusion criteria were assessed based on PEDro and Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine rating scales. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. The heterogeneity of dependent measures did not allow for meta-analysis. The varied locations, study designs, etiopathogenesis, and outcome tools used to examine the efficacy of DFM make a unified conclusion tenuous. There is some evidence of benefit at the elbow in combination with a Mills manipulation, as well as for supraspinatus tendinopathy in the presence of outlet impingement and along with joint mobilization. The examination of DFM as a single modality of treatment in comparison with

  16. A comprehensive scoping review of ability and disability in ADHD using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-Children and Youth Version (ICF-CY).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Schipper, Elles; Lundequist, Aiko; Wilteus, Anna Löfgren; Coghill, David; de Vries, Petrus J; Granlund, Mats; Holtmann, Martin; Jonsson, Ulf; Karande, Sunil; Levy, Florence; Al-Modayfer, Omar; Rohde, Luis; Tannock, Rosemary; Tonge, Bruce; Bölte, Sven

    2015-08-01

    This is the first in a series of four empirical investigations to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The objective here was to use a comprehensive scoping review approach to identify the concepts of functional ability and disability used in the scientific ADHD literature and link these to the nomenclature of the ICF-CY. Systematic searches were conducted using Medline/PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC and Cinahl, to extract the relevant concepts of functional ability and disability from the identified outcome studies of ADHD. These concepts were then linked to ICF-CY by two independent researchers using a standardized linking procedure. Data from identified studies were analysed until saturation of ICF-CY categories was reached. Eighty studies were included in the final analysis. Concepts contained in these studies were linked to 128 ICF-CY categories. Of these categories, 68 were considered to be particularly relevant to ADHD (i.e., identified in at least 5 % of the studies). Of these, 32 were related to Activities and participation, 31 were related to Body functions, and five were related to environmental factors. The five most frequently identified categories were school education (53 %), energy and drive functions (50 %), psychomotor functions (50 %), attention functions (49 %), and emotional functions (45 %). The broad variety of ICF-CY categories identified in this study underlines the necessity to consider ability and disability in ADHD across all dimensions of life, for which the ICF-CY provides a valuable and universally applicable framework. These results, in combination with three additional preparatory studies (expert survey, focus groups, clinical study), will provide a scientific basis to define the ICF Core Sets for ADHD for multi-purpose use in basic and applied research, and every day clinical practice.

  17. Dying with dignity: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemati, Zeinab; Ashouri, Elaheh; AllahBakhshian, Maryam; Pourfarzad, Zahra; Shirani, Farimah; Safazadeh, Shima; Ziyaei, Marziyeh; Varzeshnejad, Maryam; Hashemi, Maryam; Taleghani, Fariba

    2016-05-01

    This article is a report of an analysis of the concept of dying with dignity. Dignity is an important component of providing care for dying patients and their families. Nevertheless, given that this concept is poorly defined, concept analysis is one of the best ways to define and clarify the concept of death with dignity with the aim to enhance its application in clinical practice, research and education. A search of multiple nursing and social sciences databases was undertaken, including Academic Search Complete, Science Direct, ProQuest, Scopus, Medline, PubMed, EBSCO, Ovid, Noormage, Cinahl, Magiran, PsycINFO and SID. After an extensive review of the literature from 1998-2014, about 14 related articles were included in the study. Based on these articles, the applications, attributes and experimental results of and references to death with dignity were recorded. Based on this analysis, the most important attributes of this concept included respect for privacy, respect, spiritual peace and hope. The antecedents of this concept included consideration of moral values during caregiving, preservation of human dignity as a patient right and professional ethics, and belief in the dignity of self and others, consideration of culture in providing end-of-life care. The consequences of this concept included a sense of peace in the patient and their family, peaceful death and provision of patient privacy and comfort. The concept of patient dignity has been referred to in many contexts. However, considering the dignity of dying patients commensurate with their culture is the most important component of care provided by nurses to facilitate a peaceful death. Respecting the dignity of the patient results in the reduction of her/his suffering and prepares her/him for a comfortable death. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Reconstructive surgery for hypospadias: A systematic review of long-term patient satisfaction with cosmetic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Julie; Bracka, Aivar

    2016-01-01

    Research on long-term results of hypospadias has focused on surgical techniques and functional outcomes, and it is only recently that patient satisfaction with appearance and psychosocial outcomes have been considered. The aim of this study was to provide an evidence-based systematic review of adolescent and adult patient perceptions of cosmetic outcomes following childhood surgery for hypospadias. A systematic review was performed in accordance with the PRISMA and PICO guidelines, and studies assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine system. MEDLINE, PsycInfo, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases were searched from 1974 to 2014 for clinical studies containing patient perceptions of appearance, deformity, and social embarrassment following hypospadias surgery. A total of 495 publications were retrieved, of which 28 met the inclusion criteria. Due to study design/outcome measure, heterogeneity data were synthesized narratively. Results indicate (i) patient perceptions of penile size do not differ greatly from the norm; (ii) perceptions of appearance findings are inconsistent, partially due to improving surgical techniques; (iii) patients who are approaching, or have reached, sexual maturity hold more negative perceptions and are more critical about the cosmetic outcomes of surgery than their prepubertal counterparts; (iv) patients report high levels of perceptions of deformity and social embarrassment; and (v) there is a lack of data using validated measurement tools assessing long-term patient perceptions of cosmetic outcomes, particularly with patients who have reached genital maturity. Protocols for clinical postpuberty follow-up and methodologically sound studies, using validated assessment tools, are required for the accurate assessment of cosmetic and psychological outcomes of hypospadias surgery.

  19. Patient-derived measures of GI endoscopy: a meta-narrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sally; Bevan, Roisin; Rubin, Greg; Nixon, Catherine; Dunn, Simon; Panter, Simon; Rees, Colin J

    2015-05-01

    GI endoscopy (GIE) is widely performed, with 1 in 3 people requiring an endoscopic procedure at some point. Patient experience of medical procedures is important, but, to date, experience measures of GIE are derived from clinician opinion rather than from patients themselves. In this meta-narrative review, the literature on methods of assessing patient experience in GIE is reported. ScienceDirect, MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge, Web of Science, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched to November 2013 using meta-narrative standards. Search terms included those related to endoscopic procedures, combined with those related to patient experience. A total of 3688 abstracts were identified and reviewed for relevance. A total of 3549 were excluded, leaving 139 for full-text review. We subsequently included 48 articles. Three sub-groups of studies were identified--those developing original measures of endoscopy-specific patient experience (27 articles), those modifying existing measures (10 articles), and those testing existing measures for reliability or validity (11 articles). Most measures focused on pain, discomfort, anxiety, and embarrassment. Three studies explored wider aspects of experience, including preparation, unit organization, and endoscopist preference. Likert scales, visual analog scale scores, and questionnaires were used most commonly. The Global Rating Scale was validated for use in 2 studies, confirming that those domains cover all aspects of endoscopy experience. Other measures were modified to assess endoscopic experience, such as the modified Group Health Association of America survey (mGHAA-9) (modified by 5 studies). No patient-derived and validated endoscopy-specific experience measures were found. Patient-derived and validated experience measures should be developed and used to model optimal healthcare delivery. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Difficult embryo transfers or blood on catheter and assisted reproductive outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James A S; Martins, Wellington P; Nastri, Carolina O; Raine-Fenning, Nicholas J

    2013-06-01

    We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine whether a difficult embryo transfer or the presence of blood on the transfer catheter affects assisted reproduction outcomes. We searched the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), and Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS). We aimed to determine the risk ratio (RR) associated with difficult embryo transfer or the presence of blood on the transfer catheter for the following outcomes: live birth, clinical pregnancy, and miscarriage. We identified 3066 papers, of which 194 were reviewed and nine were included. The outcome of live birth was not reported in any of the included studies and the effect on miscarriage was too imprecise for any conclusions. Pooled analysis of five studies demonstrated lower clinical pregnancy rates following a non-easy embryo transfer (RR=0.75; 95% CI=0.66-0.86). This included three studies showing subjectively difficult transfers reducing clinical pregnancies (RR=0.67; 95% CI=0.51-0.87) and two studies in which the need for additional manoeuvers reduced clinical pregnancies (RR=0.78; 95% CI=0.67-0.91). The presence of blood on the transfer catheter did not affect clinical pregnancy rates (RR=0.96; 95% CI=0.82-1.14) in five studies. We concluded that low quality evidence suggests that a difficult embryo transfer but not a bloody catheter reduces the chance of achieving a clinical pregnancy. More good quality studies are needed to evaluate the effect of difficult embryo transfer and the presence of blood on the catheter on the main outcomes of assisted reproduction.

  1. Quality of life domains affected in children with developmental coordination disorder: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, J G; Harris, S R; Klassen, A F

    2013-07-01

    The quality of life (QOL) of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) is largely unknown, but evidence suggests that multiple QOL domains are affected by the disorder. While DCD is primarily considered a motor disorder, multiple studies have reported psychological and social concerns in children with this condition. Our primary aim was to present the current state of the evidence regarding the physical, psychological, and social QOL domains that can be affected in children with DCD. Systematic review of articles from seven databases through November 2010 (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ERIC, CDSR, DARE) was conducted. Search terms included developmental coordination disorder, dyspraxia, quality of life, life satisfaction, well-being, activities of daily living, and participation. Two independent reviewers screened titles, abstracts, and full-text articles. Studies meeting the following criteria were selected: (1) sample comprised solely of individuals with coordination difficulties consistent with DCD; (2) outcome measures related to physical, psychological, or socials domains of QOL; and (3) articles published in English. Data were extracted by one author and verified by a second. Outcomes were categorized according to physical, psychological and social domains of QOL and study quality was rated by case definitions of DCD based on diagnostic criteria as per the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual - 4th edition. Forty-one articles were included. Most studies reported significantly poorer results in physical, psychological and social functioning in children with DCD compared with peers. Despite the impact of DCD on multiple domains, only one study used a QOL measure as an outcome. Although DCD impacts several QOL domains, the QOL of children with this disorder remains largely unknown. The next critical step is for clinicians and researchers to use QOL measures to gather information on how DCD may affect the QOL of children with this disorder.

  2. Protocol for a scoping review study to identify and classify patient-centred quality indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, Rachel J; Lorenzetti, Diane L; Manalili, Kimberly; Lu, Mingshan; Santana, Maria J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The concept of patient-centred care (PCC) is changing the way healthcare is understood, accepted and delivered. The Institute of Medicine has defined PCC as 1 of its 6 aims to improve healthcare quality. However, in Canada, there are currently no nationwide standards in place for measuring and evaluating healthcare from a patient-centred approach. In this paper, we outline our scoping review protocol to systematically review published and unpublished literature specific to patient-centred quality indicators that have been implemented and evaluated across various care settings. Methods and analysis Arksey and O'Malley's scoping review methodology framework will guide the conduct of this scoping review. We will search electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, Social Work Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts), grey literature sources and the reference lists of key studies to identify studies appropriate for inclusion. 2 reviewers will independently screen all abstracts and full-text studies for inclusion. We will include any study which focuses on quality indicators in the context of PCC. All bibliographic data, study characteristics and indicators will be collected and analysed using a tool developed through an iterative process by the research team. Indicators will be classified according to a predefined conceptual framework and categorised and described using qualitative content analysis. Ethics and dissemination The scoping review will synthesise patient-centred quality indicators and their characteristics as described in the literature. This review will be the first step to formally identify what quality indicators have been used to evaluate PCC across the healthcare continuum, and will be used to inform a stakeholder consensus process exploring the development of a generic set of patient-centred quality indicators applicable to multiple care settings. The

  3. Mind-body interventions for chronic pain in older adults: a structured review.

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    Morone, Natalia E; Greco, Carol M

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a structured review of eight mind-body interventions for older adults with chronic nonmalignant pain. To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and evidence for pain reduction in older adults with chronic nonmalignant pain in the following mind-body therapies: biofeedback, progressive muscle relaxation, meditation, guided imagery, hypnosis, tai chi, qi gong, and yoga. Relevant studies in the MEDLINE, PsycINFO, AMED, and CINAHL databases were located. A manual search of references from retrieved articles was also conducted. Of 381 articles retrieved through search strategies, 20 trials that included older adults with chronic pain were reviewed. Fourteen articles included participants aged 50 years and above, while only two of these focused specifically on persons aged >or=65 years. An additional six articles included persons aged >or=50 years. Fourteen articles were controlled trials. There is some support for the efficacy of progressive muscle relaxation plus guided imagery for osteoarthritis pain. There is limited support for meditation and tai chi for improving function or coping in older adults with low back pain or osteoarthritis. In an uncontrolled biofeedback trial that stratified by age group, both older and younger adults had significant reductions in pain following the intervention. Several studies included older adults, but did not analyze benefits by age. Tai chi, yoga, hypnosis, and progressive muscle relaxation were significantly associated with pain reduction in these studies. The eight mind-body interventions reviewed are feasible in an older population. They are likely safe, but many of the therapies included modifications tailored for older adults. There is not yet sufficient evidence to conclude that these eight mind-body interventions reduce chronic nonmalignant pain in older adults. Further research should focus on larger, clinical trials of mind-body interventions to answer this question.

  4. An evaluation of the effectiveness of self-management interventions for people with type 2 diabetes after an acute coronary syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanash, Mu'ath Ibrahim; Fitzsimons, Donna; Coates, Vivien; Deaton, Christi

    2017-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes is highly prevalent in patients with acute coronary syndrome and impacts negatively on health outcomes and self-management. Both conditions share similar risk factors. However, there is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness of combined interventions to promote self-management behaviour for people with diabetes and cardiac problems. Identifying critical features of successful interventions will inform future integrated self-management programmes for patients with both conditions. To assess the evidence on the effectiveness of existing interventions to promote self-management behaviour for patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome and type 2 diabetes in secondary care settings and postdischarge. We searched MEDLINE, PubMed, CINAHL Plus, PsycInfo, Cochrane Library and AMED for randomised controlled trials published between January 2005-December 2014. The search was performed using the following search terms of 'acute coronary syndrome', 'type 2 diabetes' and 'self-management intervention' and their substitutes combined. Of 4275 articles that were retrieved, only four trials met all the inclusion criteria (population, intervention, comparison and outcome) and were analysed. Overall, the results show that providing combined interventions for patients with both conditions including educational sessions supported by multimedia or telecommunication technologies was partially successful in promoting self-management behaviours. Implementation of these combined interventions during patient's hospitalisation and postdischarge was feasible. Intervention group subjects reported a significant improvement in self-efficacy, level of knowledge, glycated haemoglobin, blood pressure and fasting glucose test. However, there are many threats have been noticed around internal validity of included studies that could compromise the conclusions drawn. With limited research in this area, there was no final evidence to support effectiveness of combined

  5. Tools to Assess Behavioral and Social Science Competencies in Medical Education: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Patricia A.; Palmer, Ryan T.; Miller, Marissa Fuqua; Thayer, Erin K.; Estroff, Sue E.; Litzelman, Debra K.; Biagioli, Frances E.; Teal, Cayla R.; Lambros, Ann; Hatt, William J.; Satterfield, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Behavioral and social science (BSS) competencies are needed to provide quality health care, but psychometrically validated measures to assess these competencies are difficult to find. Moreover, they have not been mapped to existing frameworks, like those from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). This systematic review aimed to identify and evaluate the quality of assessment tools used to measure BSS competencies. Method The authors searched the literature published between January 2002 and March 2014 for articles reporting psychometric or other validity/reliability testing, using OVID, CINAHL, PubMed, ERIC, Research and Development Resource Base, SOCIOFILE, and PsycINFO. They reviewed 5,104 potentially relevant titles and abstracts. To guide their review, they mapped BSS competencies to existing LCME and ACGME frameworks. The final, included articles fell into three categories: instrument development, which were of the highest quality; educational research, which were of the second highest quality; and curriculum evaluation, which were of lower quality. Results Of the 114 included articles, 33 (29%) yielded strong evidence supporting tools to assess communication skills, cultural competence, empathy/compassion, behavioral health counseling, professionalism, and teamwork. Sixty-two (54%) articles yielded moderate evidence and 19 (17%) weak evidence. Articles mapped to all LCME standards and ACGME core competencies; the most common was communication skills. Conclusions These findings serve as a valuable resource for medical educators and researchers. More rigorous measurement validation and testing and more robust study designs are needed to understand how educational strategies contribute to BSS competency development. PMID:26796091

  6. Quality of life and symptoms in pediatric brain tumor survivors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macartney, Gail; Harrison, Margaret B; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth; Stacey, Dawn; McCarthy, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the quality of life of children and youth under the age of 20 who have completed treatment for a pediatric brain tumor. This systematic review was conducted to (a) describe the health-related quality of life (HRQL) outcomes in pediatric brain tumor survivors, (b) identify instruments used to measure HRQL, and (c) determine the relationship between symptoms and HRQL. Using a systematic search and review methodology, databases searched included CINAHL, Medline, Embase, and PsycInfo. No date restrictions were used. Search results elicited 485 articles, of which16 met the inclusion criteria. Compared with their healthy peers, pediatric brain tumor survivors did worse on most measures of physical, psychosocial, social, and cognitive domains of HRQL. Compared with other cancer patients, survivors scored themselves significantly lower on the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) social functioning scale, and parents of brain tumor survivors reported lower PedsQL social and total functioning scores for their children. Other variables that were associated with decreased HRQL were degree of hypothalamic tumor involvement, osteopenia, need for special education, older age at diagnosis, greater than 1 year since treatment, and radiation treatment. In these studies, pediatric brain tumor survivors fared worse compared with other cancer survivors or healthy peers on several HRQL domains. Only 3 studies explored the relationship between symptoms, including pain or fatigue, and HRQL in pediatric brain tumor survivors. The relationship between symptoms and HRQL was not well elucidated. More research is needed to explore the multidimensional symptom experience and HRQL outcomes in pediatric brain tumor survivors.

  7. A systematic review of the impact of stigma and nihilism on lung cancer outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chambers Suzanne K

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study systematically reviewed the evidence on the influence of stigma and nihilism on lung cancer patterns of care; patients’ psychosocial and quality of life (QOL outcomes; and how this may link to public health programs. Methods Medline, EMBASE, ProQuest, CINAHL, PsycINFO databases were searched. Inclusion criteria were: included lung cancer patients and/or partners or caregivers and/or health professionals (either at least 80% of participants had lung cancer or were partners or caregivers of lung cancer patients, or there was a lung cancer specific sub-group focus or analysis, assessed stigma or nihilism with respect to lung cancer and published in English between 1st January 1999 and 31st January 2011. Trial quality and levels of evidence were assessed. Results Eighteen articles describing 15 studies met inclusion criteria. The seven qualitative studies were high quality with regard to data collection, analysis and reporting; however most lacked a clear theoretical framework; did not address interviewer bias; or provide a rationale for sample size. The eight quantitative studies were generally of low quality with highly selected samples, non-comparable groups and low participation rates and employed divergent theoretical and measurement approaches. Stigma about lung cancer was reported by patients and health professionals and was related to poorer QOL and higher psychological distress in patients. Clear empirical explorations of nihilism were not evident. There is qualitative evidence that from the patients’ perspectives public health programs contribute to stigma about lung cancer and this was supported by published commentary. Conclusions Health-related stigma presents as a part of the lung cancer experience however there are clear limitations in the research to date. Future longitudinal and multi-level research is needed and this should be more clearly linked to relevant theory.

  8. Fatigue, psychological and cognitive impairment following transient ischaemic attack and minor stroke: a systematic review.

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    Moran, G M; Fletcher, B; Feltham, M G; Calvert, M; Sackley, C; Marshall, T

    2014-10-01

    Transient ischaemic attack (TIA) and minor stroke are characterized by short-lasting symptoms; however, anecdotal and empirical evidence suggests that these patients experience ongoing cognitive/psychological impairment for which they are not routinely treated. The aims were (i) to investigate the prevalence and time course of fatigue, anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder(PTSD) and cognitive impairment following TIA/minor stroke; (ii) to explore the impact on quality of life (QoL), change in emotions and return to work; and (iii) to identify where further research is required and potentially inform an intervention study. A systematic review of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PSYCINFO, CINAHL, the Cochrane libraries and the grey literature between January 1993 and April 2013 was undertaken. Literature was screened and data were extracted by two independent reviewers. Studies were included of adult TIA/minor stroke participants with any of the outcomes of interest: fatigue, anxiety, depression, PTSD, cognitive impairment, QoL, change in emotions and return to work. Random-effects meta-analysis pooled outcomes by measurement tool. Searches identified 5976 records, 289 were assessed for eligibility and 31 studies were included. Results suggest high levels of cognitive impairment and depression post-TIA/minor stroke which decreased over time. However, frequencies varied between studies. Limited information was available on anxiety, PTSD and fatigue. Meta-analysis revealed that the measurement tool administered influenced the prevalence of cognitive impairment: Mini-Mental State Examination 17% [95% confidence interval (CI) 7, 26]; neuropsychological test battery 39% (95% CI 28, 50); Montreal Cognitive Assessment 54% (95% CI 43, 66). There is evidence to suggest that TIA/minor stroke patients may experience residual impairments; however, results should be interpreted with caution because of the few high quality studies. Notwithstanding, it is important to raise awareness

  9. Approach to risk identification in undifferentiated mental disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, José; Rockman, Patricia; Fulford, Casey; Hunter, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide primary care physicians with a novel approach to risk identification and related clinical decision making in the management of undifferentiated mental disorders. Sources of information We conducted a review of the literature in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar using the search terms diagnostic uncertainty, diagnosis, risk identification, risk assessment/methods, risk, risk factors, risk management/methods, cognitive biases and psychiatry, decision making, mental disorders/diagnosis, clinical competence, evidence-based medicine, interviews as topic, psychiatry/education, psychiatry/methods, documentation/methods, forensic psychiatry/education, forensic psychiatry/methods, mental disorders/classification, mental disorders/psychology, violence/prevention and control, and violence/psychology. Main message Mental disorders are a large component of practice in primary care and often present in an undifferentiated manner, remaining so for prolonged periods. The challenging search for a diagnosis can divert attention from risk identification, as diagnosis is commonly presumed to be necessary before treatment can begin. This might inadvertently contribute to preventable adverse events. Focusing on salient aspects of the patient presentation related to risk should be prioritized. This article presents a novel approach to organizing patient information to assist risk identification and decision making in the management of patients with undifferentiated mental disorders. Conclusion A structured approach can help physicians to manage the clinical uncertainty common to risk identification in patients with mental disorders and cope with the common anxiety and cognitive biases that affect priorities in risk-related decision making. By focusing on risk, functional impairments, and related symptoms using a novel framework, physicians can meet their patients’ immediate needs while continuing the search for diagnostic clarity and long

  10. Pain Experience in Dementia Subtypes: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnekade, Tarik T; Van Kooten, Janime; Lobbezoo, Frank; Rhebergen, Didi; Van der Wouden, J C; Smalbrugge, Martin; Scherder, Erik J A

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the number of studies focusing on pain in dementia has increased considerably. Still, little attention has been paid to the influence of the neuropathology of different dementia subtypes on pain experience. In 2003, a review identified several studies that indicated a relation between dementia subtype and pain experience. Now, ten years later, an update is warranted. We conducted a systematic review to identify studies that assessed pain experience and dementia subtypes by searching PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library. Inclusion criteria were: (1) major dementia subtype diagnosis i.e. Alzheimer's dementia (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB); (2) age ≥60 years; and (3) pain experience. We identified twelve studies that addressed AD, three studies VaD, one study FTD, and no studies DLB. In AD, studies on clinical pain indicate a reduced pain experience compared to controls, whereas experimental studies show inconsistent findings. In VaD, clinical studies found that primary caregivers rated pain equal to cognitively intact controls, although more painful locations were reported. During self-report, elderly with VaD reported higher pain levels than cognitively intact controls. In FTD, a significantly lower pain sensitivity to experimental pain was found. Considering the limited number of studies, these findings should be considered with caution. Existing literature provides some evidence that dementia subtype affects pain experience. Further research is needed to clarify the relation between dementia subtype and pain experience as it could serve as basis for improving the assessment and management of pain in people with dementia. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Development of a questionnaire encompassing indicators of distress: a tool for use with women in surgical continuity of care for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, L; Garne, J P; Søgaard, M; Laursen, B S

    2015-04-01

    Women with breast cancer often experience significant distress. Currently, there are no questionnaires aimed at identifying women's unique and possible changing indicators for distress in surgical continuity of care for breast cancer. We developed and tested three questionnaires specifically for this use. We first searched PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO to retrieve information on previously described indicators. Next, we conducted a focus group interview with 6 specialised nurses, who have extensive experience about consequences of breast cancer for women in surgical continuity of care. The questionnaire was tested on 18 women scheduled for breast cancer surgery. Subsequently, the women were debriefed to gain knowledge about comprehensibility, readability and relevance of items, and the time needed to complete the questionnaire. After adjustment, the questionnaires were field-tested concomitantly with a clinical study, which both consisted of a survey and an interview study. Three multi-item questionnaires were developed specific to different time points in surgical continuity of care. The questionnaires share a core of statements divided into seven sub-scales: emotional and physical situation, social condition, sexuality, body image, religion and organisational factors. Besides the core of statements, each questionnaire has different statements depending on the time point of surgical continuity of care when it was to be responded to. The questionnaires contain comprehensive items that can identify indicators for distress in individual women taking part in surgical continuity of care. The items were understandable and the time used for filling in the questionnaires was reasonable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Quality of life and leisure participation in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities: a thematic analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan-Oliel, Noemi; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Majnemer, Annette

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to document evidence of the association between leisure participation and quality of life (QoL) in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities, and to identify the main factors that further clarify this relationship. An electronic search of the literature was conducted using Medline, Embase, PsycInfo, CINAHL, ERIC, OT Seeker, and the Cochrane library using relevant MESH heading and key words. An inductive thematic analysis was used to synthesize main findings from the studies. The mixed methods appraisal tool (MMAT) was used to assess the methodological quality of the included studies. Nineteen studies were included in this systematic review. All 19 studies fulfilled most of the criteria outlined by the MMAT for each study design (quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods). Mixed methods studies had the lowest MMAT scores. Seven themes were identified that further elucidate the important relationships between leisure participation and QoL: active physical leisure participation and physical well-being; leisure participation and self; leisure participation and emotional well-being; leisure participation and social well-being; leisure participation and cognition; leisure preferences and well-being; and negative aspects of leisure participation. The use of thematic analysis enabled the synthesis of findings from quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods study designs. Participating in both naturally occurring, spontaneous forms of leisure activities and participating in more structured types of leisure and therapeutic programs that focus on leisure contribute to improving the QoL of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities. A key aspect to consider is the child's ability to participate in his/her preferred leisure activities. Environmental adaptations may be required to ensure that the leisure opportunities meet the children's capabilities and contribute positively to their QoL.

  13. Safety risks associated with physical interactions between patients and caregivers during treatment and care delivery in Home Care settings: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hignett, Sue; Edmunds Otter, Mary; Keen, Christine

    2016-07-01

    To explore the safety risks associated with physical interactions between patients and caregivers during treatment and care delivery in Home Care settings. Seven-stage framework from the PRISMA statement for research question, eligibility (definition), search, identification of relevant papers from title and abstract, selection and retrieval of papers, appraisal and synthesis. British Nursing Index (BNI), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts (ASSIA), Cinahl, Cochrane Library, Embase, Ergonomics Abstracts, Health Business Elite, Health Management Information Consortium (HMIC), Medline, PsycInfo, Scopus, Social Care online, Social Science Citation Index. The included references (n=42) were critically appraised using a modified version of Downs and Black checklist and the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. The risk factors are reported using the modified model of human factors of health care in the home to represent the roles of both patients and caregivers in the system. The results are grouped as environment (health policy, physical and social), artefacts (equipment and technology), tasks (procedures and work schedules) and care recipient/provider. These include permanent and temporary building design and access, communication and lone working, provision of equipment and consumables, and clinical tasks. The topics with strong evidence from at least 2 papers relate to risks associated with awkward working positions, social environment issues (additional tasks and distractions), abuse and violence, inadequate team (peer) support, problems with workload planning, needle stick injuries and physical workload (moving and handling patients). As home care increases, there is a need to ensure the safety of both patients and caregivers with an understanding of the physical interactions and tasks to manage safety risks and plan safer care delivery systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Barriers and facilitators of adjuvant hormone therapy adherence and persistence in women with breast cancer: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Z

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Zoe Moon, Rona Moss-Morris, Myra S Hunter, Sophie Carlisle, Lyndsay D Hughes Health Psychology Section, Department of Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry,