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Sample records for psychroactive methanogenic consortium

  1. Multiple Syntrophic Interactions in a Terephthalate-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium

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    Lykidis, Athanasios; Chen, Chia-Lung; Tringe, Susannah G.; McHardy, Alice C.; Copeland, Alex 5; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2010-08-05

    Terephthalate (TA) is one of the top 50 chemicals produced worldwide. Its production results in a TA-containing wastewater that is treated by anaerobic processes through a poorly understood methanogenic syntrophy. Using metagenomics, we characterized the methanogenic consortium tinside a hyper-mesophilic (i.e., between mesophilic and thermophilic), TA-degrading bioreactor. We identified genes belonging to dominant Pelotomaculum species presumably involved in TA degradation through decarboxylation, dearomatization, and modified ?-oxidation to H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and acetate. These intermediates are converted to CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} by three novel hyper-mesophilic methanogens. Additional secondary syntrophic interactions were predicted in Thermotogae, Syntrophus and candidate phyla OP5 and WWE1 populations. The OP5 encodes genes capable of anaerobic autotrophic butyrate production and Thermotogae, Syntrophus and WWE1 have the genetic potential to oxidize butyrate to COsub 2}/H{sub 2} and acetate. These observations suggest that the TA-degrading consortium consists of additional syntrophic interactions beyond the standard H{sub 2}-producing syntroph ? methanogen partnership that may serve to improve community stability.

  2. Adaptation of a methanogenic consortium to arsenite inhibition.

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    Rodriguez-Freire, Lucia; Moore, Sarah E; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous metalloid known for its adverse effects to human health. Microorganisms are also impacted by As toxicity, including methanogenic archaea, which can affect the performance of process in which biological activity is required (i.e. stabilization of activated sludge in wastewater treatment plants). The novel ability of a mixed methanogenic granular sludge consortium to adapt to the inhibitory effect of arsenic (As) was investigated by exposing the culture to approximately 0.92 mM of As(III) for 160 d in an arsenate (As(V)) reducing bioreactor using ethanol as the electron donor. The results of shaken batch bioassays indicated that the original, unexposed sludge was severely inhibited by arsenite (As(III)) as evidenced by the low 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) determined, i.e., 19 and 90 μM for acetoclastic- and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, respectively. The tolerance of the acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the sludge to As(III) increased 47-fold (IC50 = 910 μM) and 12-fold (IC50= 1100 μM), respectively, upon long-term exposure to As. In conclusion, the methanogenic community in the granular sludge demonstrated a considerable ability to adapt to the severe inhibitory effects of As after a prolonged exposure period.

  3. Molecular characterization of a toluene-degrading methanogenic consortium.

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    Ficker, M; Krastel, K; Orlicky, S; Edwards, E

    1999-12-01

    A toluene-degrading methanogenic consortium enriched from creosote-contaminated aquifer material was maintained on toluene as the sole carbon and energy source for 10 years. The species in the consortium were characterized by using a molecular approach. Total genomic DNA was isolated, and 16S rRNA genes were amplified by using PCR performed with kingdom-specific primers that were specific for 16S rRNA genes from either members of the kingdom Bacteria or members of the kingdom Archaea. A total of 90 eubacterial clones and 75 archaeal clones were grouped by performing a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Six eubacterial sequences and two archaeal sequences were found in the greatest abundance (in six or more clones) based on the RFLP analysis. The relative abundance of each putative species was estimated by using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and the presence of putative species was determined qualitatively by performing slot blot hybridization with consortium DNA. Both archaeal species and two of the six eubacterial species were detected in the DNA and FISH hybridization experiments. A phylogenetic analysis of these four dominant organisms suggested that the two archaeal species are related to the genera Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum. One of the eubacterial species is related to the genus Desulfotomaculum, while the other is not related to any previously described genus. By elimination, we propose that the last organism probably initiates the attack on toluene.

  4. Precipitation of low-temperature dolomite from an anaerobic microbial consortium: the role of methanogenic Archaea.

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    Kenward, P A; Goldstein, R H; González, L A; Roberts, J A

    2009-12-01

    Here we report precipitation of dolomite at low temperature (30 degrees C) mediated by a mixed anaerobic microbial consortium composed of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB), fermenters, and methanogens. Initial solution geochemistry is controlled by DIRB, but after 90 days shifts to a system dominated by methanogens. In live experiments conditions are initially saturated with respect to dolomite (Omega(dol) = 19.40) and increase by two orders of magnitude (Omega(dol) = 2 330.77) only after the onset of methanogenesis, as judged by the increasing [CH(4)] and the detection of methanogenic micro-organisms. We identify ordered dolomite in live microcosms after 90 days via powder X-ray diffraction, while sterile controls precipitate only calcite. Scanning electron microscopy and transmitted electron microscopy demonstrate that the precipitated dolomite is closely associated with cell walls and putative extra-cellular polysaccharides. Headspace gas measurements and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis confirm the presence of both autotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens and exclude the presence of DIRB and sulfate-reducing bacteria after dolomite begins forming. Furthermore, the absence of dolomite in the controls and prior to methanogenesis confirm that methanogenic Archaea are necessary for the low-temperature precipitation of dolomite under the experimental conditions tested.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Methanobacterium sp. Maddingley, Reconstructed from Metagenomic Sequencing of a Methanogenic Microbial Consortium Enriched from Coal-Seam Gas Formation Water.

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    Rosewarne, Carly P; Greenfield, Paul; Li, Dongmei; Tran-Dinh, Nai; Midgley, David J; Hendry, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The draft genome of Methanobacterium sp. Maddingley was reconstructed from metagenomic sequencing of a methanogenic microbial consortium enriched from coal-seam gas formation water. It is a hydrogenotrophic methanogen predicted to grow using hydrogen and carbon dioxide.

  6. The contribution of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea to azo dye reduction by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Cervantes, F.J.; Madrid, de M.P.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    The contribution of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea to azo dye reduction by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium was studied. Additionally, the effects of different electron-donating substrates and the redox mediator riboflavin on dye reduction were assessed by using either a methanoge

  7. Field and laboratory studies of methane oxidation in an anoxic marine sediment: Evidence for a methanogen-sulfate reducer consortium

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    Hoehler, Tori M.; Alperin, Marc J.; Albert, Daniel B.; Martens, Christopher S.

    1994-12-01

    Field and laboratory studies of anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, suggest that anaerobic methane oxidation is mediated by a consortium of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A seasonal survey of methane oxidation and CO2 reduction rates indicates that methane production was confined to sulfate-depleted sediments at all times of year, while methane oxidation occurred in two modes. In the summer, methane oxidation was confined to sulfate-depleted sediments and occurred at rates lower than those of CO2 reduction. In the winter, net methane oxidation occurred in an interval at the base of the sulfate-containing zone. Sediment incubation experiments suggest both methanogens and sulfate reducers were responsible for the observed methane oxidation. In one incubation experiment both modes of oxidation were partially inhibited by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (a specific inhibitor of methanogens). This evidence, along with the apparent confinement of methane oxidation to sulfate-depleted sediments in the summer, indicates that methanogenic bacteria are involved in methane oxidation. In a second incubation experiment, net methane oxidation was induced by adding sulfate to homogenized methanogenic sediments, suggesting that sulfate reducers also play a role in the process. We hypothesize that methanogens oxidize methane and produce hydrogen via a reversal of CO2 reduction. The hydrogen is efficiently removed and maintained at low concentrations by sulfate reducers. Pore water H2 concentrations in the sediment incubation experiments (while net methane oxidation was occurring) were low enough that methanogenic bacteria could derive sufficient energy for growth from the oxidation of methane. The methanogen-sulfate reducer consortium is consistent not only with the results of this study, but may also be a feasible mechanism for previously documented anaerobic methane oxidation in both freshwater and marine environments.

  8. Anaerobic degradation of toluene and o-xylene by a methanogenic consortium.

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    Edwards, E A; Grbić-Galić, D

    1994-01-01

    Toluene and o-xylene were completely mineralized to stoichiometric amounts of carbon dioxide, methane, and biomass by aquifer-derived microorganisms under strictly anaerobic conditions. The source of the inoculum was creosote-contaminated sediment from Pensacola, Fla. The adaptation periods before the onset of degradation were long (100 to 120 days for toluene degradation and 200 to 255 days for o-xylene). Successive transfers of the toluene- and o-xylene-degrading cultures remained active. Cell density in the cultures progressively increased over 2 to 3 years to stabilize at approximately 10(9) cells per ml. Degradation of toluene and o-xylene in stable mixed methanogenic cultures followed Monod kinetics, with inhibition noted at substrate concentrations above about 700 microM for o-xylene and 1,800 microM for toluene. The cultures degraded toluene or o-xylene but did not degrade m-xylene, p-xylene, benzene, ethylbenzene, or naphthalene. The degradative activity was retained after pasteurization or after starvation for 1 year. Degradation of toluene and o-xylene was inhibited by the alternate electron acceptors oxygen, nitrate, and sulfate. Degradation was also inhibited by the addition of preferred substrates such as acetate, H2, propionate, methanol, acetone, glucose, amino acids, fatty acids, peptone, and yeast extract. These data suggest that the presence of natural organic substrates or contaminants may inhibit anaerobic degradation of pollutants such as toluene and o-xylene at contaminated sites.

  9. Methanogens Consortium Analysis in Low-temperature Biogas Functional Microflora%低温沼气功能菌群的产甲烷菌分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁建南; 田晓娟; 张国华; 黄黄; 黄江丽

    2012-01-01

    运用16s rDNA PCR和实时荧光qPCR技术,对选育的低温沼气功能菌群中的产甲烷菌种群结构和数量进行了研究,并与常温沼气功能菌群进行了比较分析。在总共33个产甲烷菌分类单元中低温沼气功能菌群占有20个,低温沼气功能菌群的产甲烷菌多样性远高于常温沼气功能菌群。低温沼气功能菌群以对温度要求较低的中低温产甲烷菌为主,而常温沼气功能菌群则以中高温产甲烷菌占优。虽然两类菌群的产甲烷菌在多样性和种群结构方面存在着较大差异,但在产甲烷菌数量方面并没有明显的不同,这表明选育的低温沼气功能菌群和常温沼气功能菌群一样,已经形成了稳定的产甲烷菌种群。%Methanogens populations in low and normal temperature biogas functional microfloras were respectively investigated using 16s rDNA PCR and real-time qPCR techniques.The 16s rDNA clone library of methanogens showed a great difference in methanogens consortium diversity and structure between the two microfloras.A total of 33 OUTs of methanogens were identified,including 20 in low-temperature microflora and 13 in normal temperature microflora.Methanogens requiring low-medium temperature were found prevalent in low-temperature microflora and those active at moderate-high temperature occurred mainly in normal temperature microflora.However,the results of real-time qPCR showed that there was no significant difference in methanogen quantity between the two studied microfloras,indicating a stable methanogenic community had been built in both microfloras.

  10. Classes of organic molecules targeted by a methanogenic microbial consortium grown on sedimentary rocks of various maturities

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    Margaux eMesle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Organic-rich shales are populated by methanogenic consortia that are able to degrade the fossilized organic matter into methane gas. To identify the organic fraction effectively degraded, we have sequentially depleted two types of organic-rich rocks, shales and coal, at two different maturities, by successive solvent extractions to remove the most soluble fractions (maltenes and asphaltenes and isolate kerogen. We show the ability of the consortia to produce methane from all rock samples, including those containing the most refractory organic matter, i.e. the kerogen. Shales yielded higher methane production than lignite and coal. Mature rocks yielded more methane than immature rocks. Surprisingly, the efficiency of the consortia was not influenced by the removal of the easily biodegradable fractions contained in the maltenes and asphaltenes. This suggests that one of the limitations of organic matter degradation in situ may be the accessibility of the carbon and energy source. Indeed, bitumen has a colloidal structure that may limit the accessibility to asphaltenes in the bulk rock. Solvent extractions might favor the access to asphaltenes and kerogen by modifying the spatial organization of the molecules in the rock matrix.

  11. Classes of organic molecules targeted by a methanogenic microbial consortium grown on sedimentary rocks of various maturities

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    Meslé, Margaux; Dromart, Gilles; Haeseler, Frank; Oger, Philippe M.

    2015-01-01

    Organic-rich shales are populated by methanogenic consortia that are able to degrade the fossilized organic matter into methane gas. To identify the organic fraction effectively degraded, we have sequentially depleted two types of organic-rich sedimentary rocks, shale, and coal, at two different maturities, by successive solvent extractions to remove the most soluble fractions (maltenes and asphaltenes) and isolate kerogen. We show the ability of the consortia to produce methane from all rock samples, including those containing the most refractory organic matter, i.e., the kerogen. Shales yielded higher methane production than lignite and coal. Mature rocks yielded more methane than immature rocks. Surprisingly, the efficiency of the consortia was not influenced by the removal of the easily biodegradable fractions contained in the maltenes and asphaltenes. This suggests that one of the limitations of organic matter degradation in situ may be the accessibility to the carbon and energy source. Indeed, bitumen has a colloidal structure that may prevent the microbial consortia from reaching the asphaltenes in the bulk rock. Solvent extractions might favor the access to asphaltenes and kerogen by modifying the spatial organization of the molecules in the rock matrix. PMID:26136731

  12. Analyses of n-alkanes degrading community dynamics of a high-temperature methanogenic consortium enriched from production water of a petroleum reservoir by a combination of molecular techniques.

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    Zhou, Lei; Li, Kai-Ping; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2012-08-01

    Despite the knowledge on anaerobic degradation of hydrocarbons and signature metabolites in the oil reservoirs, little is known about the functioning microbes and the related biochemical pathways involved, especially about the methanogenic communities. In the present study, a methanogenic consortium enriched from high-temperature oil reservoir production water and incubated at 55 °C with a mixture of long chain n-alkanes (C(15)-C(20)) as the sole carbon and energy sources was characterized. Biodegradation of n-alkanes was observed as methane production in the alkanes-amended methanogenic enrichment reached 141.47 μmol above the controls after 749 days of incubation, corresponding to 17 % of the theoretical total. GC-MS analysis confirmed the presence of putative downstream metabolites probably from the anaerobic biodegradation of n-alkanes and indicating an incomplete conversion of the n-alkanes to methane. Enrichment cultures taken at different incubation times were subjected to microbial community analysis. Both 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and DGGE profiles showed that alkanes-degrading community was dynamic during incubation. The dominant bacterial species in the enrichment cultures were affiliated with Firmicutes members clustering with thermophilic syntrophic bacteria of the genera Moorella sp. and Gelria sp. Other represented within the bacterial community were members of the Leptospiraceae, Thermodesulfobiaceae, Thermotogaceae, Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes and Candidate Division OP1. The archaeal community was predominantly represented by members of the phyla Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Corresponding sequences within the Euryarchaeota were associated with methanogens clustering with orders Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales and Methanobacteriales. On the other hand, PCR amplification for detection of functional genes encoding the alkylsuccinate synthase α-subunit (assA) was positive in the enrichment cultures. Moreover, the appearance of a new ass

  13. Gratuitous dechlorination of chloroethanes by methanogenic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekert, van M.H.A.; Stams, A.J.M.; Field, J.A.; Schraa, G.

    1999-01-01

    The dechlorinating activity of a methanogenic granular sludge from a methanol-fed upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor was investigated with chlorinated ethanes. This unadapted methanogenic consortium degraded all chloroethanes tested. The product formation rates decreased with the number of chlo

  14. Syntrophy in Methanogenic Degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worm, P.; Müller, N.; Plugge, C.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Schink, B.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter deals with microbial communities of bacteria and archaea that closely cooperate in methanogenic degradation and perform metabolic functions in this community that neither one of them could carry out alone. The methanogenic degradation of fatty acids, alcohols, most aromatic compounds, a

  15. Methanogenic toluene metabolism: community structure and intermediates.

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    Fowler, S Jane; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Suflita, Joseph M; Gieg, Lisa M

    2012-03-01

    Toluene is a model compound used to study the anaerobic biotransformation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Reports indicate that toluene is transformed via fumarate addition to form benzylsuccinate or by unknown mechanisms to form hydroxylated intermediates under methanogenic conditions. We investigated the mechanism(s) of syntrophic toluene metabolism by a newly described methanogenic enrichment from a gas condensate-contaminated aquifer. Pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA revealed that the culture was comprised mainly of Clostridiales. The predominant methanogens affiliated with the Methanomicrobiales. Methane production from toluene ranged from 72% to 79% of that stoichiometrically predicted. Isotope studies using (13)C(7) toluene showed that benzylsuccinate and benzoate transiently accumulated revealing that members of this consortium can catalyse fumarate addition and subsequent reactions. Detection of a BssA gene fragment in this culture further supported fumarate addition as a mechanism of toluene activation. Transient formation of cresols, benzylalcohol, hydroquinone and methylhydroquinone suggested alternative mechanism(s) for toluene metabolism. However, incubations of the consortium with (18)O-H(2)O showed that the hydroxyl group in these metabolites did not originate from water and abiotic control experiments revealed abiotic formation of hydroxylated species due to reactions of toluene with sulfide and oxygen. Our results suggest that toluene is activated by fumarate addition, presumably by the dominant Clostridiales. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Immunology of methanogenic bacteria

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    Macario, A.J.L.; Macario, E.C. de (New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Wadsworth Center for Labs. and Research School of Public Health, Albany, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this brief review is to highlight some findings using immunologic methods and antibody probes developed for analysis of methanogens directly in samples from bioreactors, avoiding culture isolation. A considerable diversity of methanogens was revealed by antigenic fingerprinting in bioreactors, larger than previously suspected. It was also found that the number and immunologic characteristics of the methanogenic subpopulations form a pattern distinctive of bioreactor type, feedstocks and operating conditions. This pattern changed in response to perturbations and to temperature shifts. Time course quantitative measurements of methanogenic subpopulations demonstrated that these subpopulations undergo sequential changes during bioreactor operation. Parallel microbiologic, physiologic, and chemical determinations demonstrated the reliability of the immunologic methods and their potential for bioreactor monitoring and for manipulating microprobes (e.g. to exclude a strain from a bioreactor). (author)

  17. Nickel isotopes and methanogens

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    Neubeck, A.; Ivarsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Methanogens require Ni for their growth and as a consequence the microbial fractionation of Ni isotopes can be used as a biomarker for activity of methanogenic communities1. Anaerobic laboratory experiments was performed using methanogens to investigate methanogenic growth in a modified nutrient media2 with olivine Fo91 (5g/l) added as an additional mineral nutrient source and as the only H2 provider. One of the investigated methanogens showed an increased growth in the experiments with added olivine. There were also a close relationship between the mobilized Ni and the growth of the methanogen. Ni is an element that previously has been neglected in the study of fossilized microorganisms and their interaction with mineral substrates and, thus, there are no records or published data of Ni in association with microfossils. However, we have detected enrichments of Ni in fossilized microorganisms and ichno-fossils, respectively, from three separate locations. Ni is not present in the host rock in any of the samples. Thus, Ni is present in association with fossilized microorganisms from environments and more extensive analysis is required to understand the magnitude, uptake, preservation and fractionation of Ni in microfossils. In order to analyze Ni isotope fractionation from microbe-mineral interaction, we plan to use a high-resolution Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LMS)3. In situ profile ablation will provide detailed and localized data on fractionation patterns between microfossils and their host rock. Also, this technique will allow us to identify the change in Ni isotopic fractionation in rock samples caused by abiotic and biogenic processes in a faster and easier way and with less risk for contamination compared to the wet chemistry analyses of Ni isotopes. 1. Cameron, V., Vance, D., Archer, C. & House, C. H. A biomarker based on the stable isotopes of nickel. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106, 10944-10948 (2009). 2. Schn

  18. The Geobiochemistry of Methanogen Proteins

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    Prasad, A.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    A principle of geobiochemistry is that adaptation over evolutionary time includes a thermodynamic drive to minimize costs of making biomolecules like proteins and lipids. If so, then biomolecule abundances will reflect, at least in part, their relative stabilities at the conditions imposed by external environments. We tested this hypothesis by comparing relative stabilities of 138 orthologous proteins between a representative lake-sediment methanogen (Methanoculleus marisnigri) and a representative rumen methanogen (Methanospirillum hungatei) at the compositional constraints of their respective environments. Chemical affinities of the proteins were calculated based on pH, temperature, and concentrations of dissolved hydrogen, bicarbonate, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide, together with standard Gibbs energies of formation of proteins from the elements predicted with a group additivity algorithm for unfolded proteins [1]. Methanogens were chosen as they are chemoautotrophs and their metabolism proceeds at relatively small affinities. Also, they are found in a variety of compositionally varying habitats like rumen, sediments, hydrothermal systems and sewage. The methanogens selected belong to the same order of taxonomy and are closely related. Preliminary results show that a majority of the proteins belonging to the rumen methanogen (66%) are more stable in the rumen environment, while a majority of the proteins belonging to the lake-sediment methanogen (58%) are more stable at sediment conditions. In a separate observation, it was noted that while the complete protein ';proteasome subunit alpha' of another rumen methanogen (Methanobrevibacter smithii) was less stable in its more reducing habitat as compared to a sewage methanogen (Methanothermobacter thermoautotophicus), its first 26 amino acid residues (N terminal) were in fact more stable in its own environment. These 26 residues are reported to be unique as compared to other proteasome proteins and are suggested to

  19. Role for acetotrophic methanogens in methanogenic biodegradation of vinyl chloride

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    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    Under methanogenic conditions, stream-bed sediment microorganisms rapidly degraded [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride to 14CH4 and 14CO2. Amendment with 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid eliminated 14CH4 production and decreased 14CO2 recovery by an equal molar amount. Results obtained with [14C]ethene, [14C]acetate, or 14CO2 as substrates indicated that acetotrophic methanogens were responsible for the production of 14CH4 during biodegradation of [1,2-14C]VC.Under methanogenic conditions, stream-bed sediment microorganisms rapidly degraded [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride to 14CH4 and 14CO2. Amendment with 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid eliminated 14CH4 production and decreased 14CO2 recovery by an equal molar amount. Results obtained with [14C]-ethene, [14C]acetate, or 14CO2 as substrates indicated that acetotrophic methanogens were responsible for the production of 14CH4, during biodegradation of [1,2-14C]VC.

  20. Methanogenic paraffin degradation proceeds via alkane addition to fumarate by 'Smithella' spp. mediated by a syntrophic coupling with hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

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    Wawrik, Boris; Marks, Christopher R; Davidova, Irene A; McInerney, Michael J; Pruitt, Shane; Duncan, Kathleen E; Suflita, Joseph M; Callaghan, Amy V

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic microbial biodegradation of recalcitrant, water-insoluble substrates, such as paraffins, presents unique metabolic challenges. To elucidate this process, a methanogenic consortium capable of mineralizing long-chain n-paraffins (C28 -C50 ) was enriched from San Diego Bay sediment. Analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated the dominance of Syntrophobacterales (43%) and Methanomicrobiales (26%). Metagenomic sequencing allowed draft genome assembly of dominant uncultivated community members belonging to the bacterial genus Smithella and the archaeal genera Methanoculleus and Methanosaeta. Five contigs encoding homologs of the catalytic subunit of alkylsuccinate synthase (assA) were detected. Additionally, mRNA transcripts for these genes, including a homolog binned within the 'Smithella' sp. SDB genome scaffold, were detected via RT-PCR, implying that paraffins are activated via 'fumarate addition'. Metabolic reconstruction and comparison with genome scaffolds of uncultivated n-alkane degrading 'Smithella' spp. are consistent with the hypothesis that syntrophically growing 'Smithella' spp. may achieve reverse electron transfer by coupling the reoxidation of ETFred to a membrane-bound FeS oxidoreductase functioning as an ETF:menaquinone oxidoreductase. Subsequent electron transfer could proceed via a periplasmic formate dehydrogenase and/or hydrogenase, allowing energetic coupling to hydrogenotrophic methanogens such as Methanoculleus. Ultimately, these data provide fundamental insight into the energy conservation mechanisms that dictate interspecies interactions salient to methanogenic alkane mineralization. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Methanogenic inhibition by arsenic compounds.

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    Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Cortinas, Irail; Yenal, Umur; Field, Jim A

    2004-09-01

    The acute acetoclastic methanogenic inhibition of several inorganic and organic arsenicals was assayed. Trivalent species, i.e., methylarsonous acid and arsenite, were highly inhibitory, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 9.1 and 15.0 microM, respectively, whereas pentavalent species were generally nontoxic. The nitrophenylarsonate derivate, roxarsone, displayed moderate toxicity.

  2. Adaptation of Methanogenic Inocula to Anaerobic Digestion of Maize Silage

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    Martyna Wojcieszak

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A well-balanced microbial consortium is crucial for efficient biogas production. In turn, one of a major factor that influence on the structure of anaerobic digestion (AD consortium is a source of microorganisms which are used as an inoculum. This study evaluated the influence of inoculum sources (with various origin on adaptation of a biogas community and the efficiency of the biomethanization of maize silage. As initial inocula for AD of maize silage the samples from: (i an agricultural biogas plant (ABP which utilizes maize silage as a main substrate, (ii cattle slurry (CS, which contain elevated levels of lignocelluloses materials, and (iii raw sewage sludge (RSS with low content of plant origin materials were used. The adaptation of methanogenic consortia was monitored during a series of passages, and the functionality of the adapted consortia was verified through start-up operation of AD in two-stage reactors. During the first stages of the adaptation phase, methanogenic consortia occurred very slowly, and only after several passages did the microbial community adapts to allow production of biogas with high methane content. The ABP consortium revealed highest biogas production in the adaptation and in the start-up process. The biodiversity dynamics monitored during adaptation and start-up process showed that community profile changed in a similar direction in three studied consortia. Native communities were very distinct to each other, while at the end of the Phase II of the start-up process microbial diversity profile was similar in all consortia. All adopted bacterial communities were dominated by representatives of Porphyromonadaceae, Rikenellaceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Synergistaceae. A shift from low acetate-preferring acetoclastic Methanosaetaceae (ABP and RSS and/or hydrogenotrophic Archaea, e.g., Methanomicrobiaceae (CS prevailing in the inoculum samples to larger populations of high acetate-preferring acetoclastic

  3. Pathways of methanol conversion in a thermophilic anaerobic (55 degrees C) sludge consortium

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    Paulo, P.L.; Stams, A.J.M.; Field, J.A.; Dijkema, C.; Lier, van J.B.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    The pathway of methanol conversion by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium was elucidated by recording the fate of carbon in the presence and absence of bicarbonate and specific inhibitors. Results indicated that about 50% of methanol was directly converted to methane by the methylotrophic methanogen

  4. Methanogens, Methane and Gastrointestinal Motility

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    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Chang, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic fermentation of the undigested polysaccharide fraction of carbohydrates produces hydrogen in the intestine which is the substrate for methane production by intestinal methanogens. Hydrogen and methane are excreted in the flatus and in breath giving the opportunity to indirectly measure their production using breath testing. Although methane is detected in 30%-50% of the healthy adult population worldwide, its production has been epidemiologically and clinically associated with constipation related diseases, like constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation. While a causative relation is not proven yet, there is strong evidence from animal studies that methane delays intestinal transit, possibly acting as a neuromuscular transmitter. This evidence is further supported by the universal finding that methane production (measured by breath test) is associated with delayed transit time in clinical studies. There is also preliminary evidence that antibiotic reduction of methanogens (as evidenced by reduced methane production) predicts the clinical response in terms of symptomatic improvement in patients with constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome. However, we have not identified yet the mechanism of action of methane on intestinal motility, and since methane production does not account for all constipation associated cases, there is need for high quality clinical trials to examine methane as a biomarker for the diagnosis or as a biomarker that predicts antibiotic treatment response in patients with constipation related disorders. PMID:24466443

  5. Influence of the addition of sulphate and ferric ions in a methanogenic anaerobic packed-bed reactor treating gasoline-contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, B S; Chinalia, F A; Sarti, A; Silva, A J; Foresti, E; Zaiat, M

    2006-01-01

    Benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) are relatively soluble aromatic compounds of gasoline. Gasoline storage tank leakages generally lead to an extensive contamination of groundwater. In the natural environment for instance, these compounds might be biodegraded under a variety of reducing potentials. The objective of this work was to examine the influence of the addition of sulphate and Fe(OH)3 in a methanogenic horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized-biomass reactor treating gasoline-contaminated water. Three different conditions were evaluated: methanogenic, sulphidogenic and sulphidogenic with the addition of ferric ions. Methanogenic condition showed the higher BTX degradation rates and the addition of sulphate negatively affected BTX removal rates with the production of H2S. However, the addition of ferric ions resulted in the precipitation of sulphur, improving BTX degradation by the consortium. Metanosphaera sp., Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanosaeta concilii were identified in the consortium by means of 16S and directly related to the addition of ferric ions.

  6. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  7. Microbiological aspects of granular methanogenic sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolfing, J.

    1987-01-01

    The settling characteristics of anaerobic sludge are enhanced by the formation of microbial conglomerates. Various types of conglomerates having different structures, were distinguished in the present study, viz. granules, pellets and flocs (chapter 1). Granular methanogenic sludge, often

  8. Enrichment of high ammonia tolerant methanogenic culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Proietti, Nicolas

    plants. The methods used today to counteract ammonia inhibition are slow and costexpensive. A new biological approach to avoid or counteract ammonia inhibition by using ammonia tolerant methanogens, could provide a sustainable solution for cost-effective digestion of abundant ammonia-rich wastes. The aim...... of the current study was to isolate and identify methanogenic cultures tolerant to high ammonia concentrations. A mixed methanogenic population was stepwise exposed to ammonia concentrations (1 to 9.26 g NH4+-N L-1) during an enrichment process with successive batch cultivations. The methanogenic population...... was derived from a full scale biogas reactor (Hashøj, Denmark), fed with 75% animal manure and 25% food industries organic waste. Basal anaerobic medium was used for the enrichment along with sodium acetate (1 g HAc L-1) as a carbon source. Fluorescence insitu hybridization (FISH) was used to determine...

  9. Structure and stability of methanogenic granular sludge.

    OpenAIRE

    Grotenhuis, J.T.C.

    1992-01-01

    Immobilization of anaerobic bacteria was essential for the development of high rate anaerobic systems for the treatment of waste waters. The most widely applied anaerobic reactor type in which solids retention time is uncoupled from the hydraulic retention time is the Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor. In this reactor type methanogenic granular sludge is formed by self-immobilization of methanogenic consortia. The aim of the work presented in this thesis was to study microbiologi...

  10. Radiogenomics Consortium (RGC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Radiogenomics Consortium's hypothesis is that a cancer patient's likelihood of developing toxicity to radiation therapy is influenced by common genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

  11. Molecular analysis of methanogens involved in methanogenic degradation of tetramethylammonium hydroxide in full-scale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whang, Liang-Ming; Hu, Tai-Ho; Liu, Pao-Wen Grace; Hung, Yu-Ching; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Wu, Yi-Ju; Chang, Shao-Hsiung

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated methanogenic communities involved in degradation of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) in three full-scale bioreactors treating TMAH-containing wastewater. Based on the results of terminal-restriction fragment-length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and quantitative PCR analyses targeting the methyl-coenzyme M reductase alpha subunit (mcrA) genes retrieved from three bioreactors, Methanomethylovorans and Methanosarcina were the dominant methanogens involved in the methanogenic degradation of TMAH in the bioreactors. Furthermore, batch experiments were conducted to evaluate mcrA messenger RNA (mRNA) expression during methanogenic TMAH degradation, and the results indicated that a higher level of TMAH favored mcrA mRNA expression by Methansarcina, while Methanomethylovorans could only express considerable amount of mcrA mRNA at a lower level of TMAH. These results suggest that Methansarcina is responsible for methanogenic TMAH degradation at higher TMAH concentrations, while Methanomethylovorans may be important at a lower TMAH condition.

  12. Ammonia effect on hydrogenotrophic methanogens and syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Han; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-rich substrates can cause inhibition on anaerobic digestion process. Syntrophic acetate oxidizing bacteria (SAOB) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens are important for the ammonia inhibitory mechanism on anaerobic digestion. The roles and interactions of SAOB and hydrogenotrophic methanogens...

  13. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic...

  14. Quantifying electron fluxes in methanogenic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junicke, H.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a widely applied process in which close interactions between different microbial groups result in the formation of renewable energy in the form of biogas. Nevertheless, the regulatory mechanisms of the electron transfer between acetogenic bacteria and methanogenic archaea in t

  15. The BADER Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    officials and UD Alumni. Senators Coons and Carper and Representative Carney also attended. Dr. Stanhope travelled to Capitol Hill to visit the...offices of Senators Coons (D-DE) and Carper (D-DE). The briefing meetings resulted in plans for a spring BADER Consortium event on the Hill and a visit...Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital Davis, Samuel, PhD BADER Consortium Affiliate Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) de Lateur, Barbara J., MD, MS

  16. Response of Methanogens in Arctic Sediments to Temperature and Methanogenic Substrate Availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Lynsay I; Tveit, Alexander; Øvreås, Lise; Head, Ian M; Gray, Neil D

    2015-01-01

    Although cold environments are major contributors to global biogeochemical cycles, comparatively little is known about their microbial community function, structure, and limits of activity. In this study a microcosm based approach was used to investigate the effects of temperature, and methanogenic substrate amendment, (acetate, methanol and H2/CO2) on methanogen activity and methanogen community structure in high Arctic wetlands (Solvatnet and Stuphallet, Svalbard). Methane production was not detected in Stuphallet sediment microcosms (over a 150 day period) and occurred within Solvatnet sediments microcosms (within 24 hours) at temperatures from 5 to 40°C, the maximum temperature being at far higher than in situ maximum temperatures (which range from air temperatures of -1.4 to 14.1°C during summer months). Distinct responses were observed in the Solvatnet methanogen community under different short term incubation conditions. Specifically, different communities were selected at higher and lower temperatures. At lower temperatures (5°C) addition of exogenous substrates (acetate, methanol or H2/CO2) had no stimulatory effect on the rate of methanogenesis or on methanogen community structure. The community in these incubations was dominated by members of the Methanoregulaceae/WCHA2-08 family-level group, which were most similar to the psychrotolerant hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanosphaerula palustris strain E1-9c. In contrast, at higher temperatures, substrate amendment enhanced methane production in H2/CO2 amended microcosms, and played a clear role in structuring methanogen communities. Specifically, at 30°C members of the Methanoregulaceae/WCHA2-08 predominated following incubation with H2/CO2, and Methanosarcinaceaeand Methanosaetaceae were enriched in response to acetate addition. These results may indicate that in transiently cold environments, methanogen communities can rapidly respond to moderate short term increases in temperature, but not

  17. Response of Methanogens in Arctic Sediments to Temperature and Methanogenic Substrate Availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynsay I Blake

    Full Text Available Although cold environments are major contributors to global biogeochemical cycles, comparatively little is known about their microbial community function, structure, and limits of activity. In this study a microcosm based approach was used to investigate the effects of temperature, and methanogenic substrate amendment, (acetate, methanol and H2/CO2 on methanogen activity and methanogen community structure in high Arctic wetlands (Solvatnet and Stuphallet, Svalbard. Methane production was not detected in Stuphallet sediment microcosms (over a 150 day period and occurred within Solvatnet sediments microcosms (within 24 hours at temperatures from 5 to 40°C, the maximum temperature being at far higher than in situ maximum temperatures (which range from air temperatures of -1.4 to 14.1°C during summer months. Distinct responses were observed in the Solvatnet methanogen community under different short term incubation conditions. Specifically, different communities were selected at higher and lower temperatures. At lower temperatures (5°C addition of exogenous substrates (acetate, methanol or H2/CO2 had no stimulatory effect on the rate of methanogenesis or on methanogen community structure. The community in these incubations was dominated by members of the Methanoregulaceae/WCHA2-08 family-level group, which were most similar to the psychrotolerant hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanosphaerula palustris strain E1-9c. In contrast, at higher temperatures, substrate amendment enhanced methane production in H2/CO2 amended microcosms, and played a clear role in structuring methanogen communities. Specifically, at 30°C members of the Methanoregulaceae/WCHA2-08 predominated following incubation with H2/CO2, and Methanosarcinaceaeand Methanosaetaceae were enriched in response to acetate addition. These results may indicate that in transiently cold environments, methanogen communities can rapidly respond to moderate short term increases in temperature, but

  18. Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eSherry

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5-nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene and xylenes were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12-nC34 and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 µmol CH4/g sediment/day with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12-nC34. For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 µmol CH4/g sediment/day. This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers.

  19. Different cultivation methods to acclimatise ammonia-tolerant methanogenic consortia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis; Mancini, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    Bioaugmentation with ammonia tolerant-methanogenic consortia was proposed as a solution to overcome ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion process recently. However, appropriate technology to generate ammonia tolerant methanogenic consortia is still lacking. In this study, three basic...... reactors (i.e. batch, fed-batch and continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR)) operated at mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions were assessed, based on methane production efficiency, incubation time, TAN/FAN (total ammonium nitrogen/free ammonia nitrogen) levels and maximum methanogenic....... Meanwhile, CSTR reactors were inhibited at lower ammonia levels. Finally, specific methanogenic activity test showed that hydrogenotrophic methanogens were more active than aceticlastic methanogens in all FAN levels above 540 mg NH3-N L-1....

  20. Methanopyrus kandleri: an archaeal methanogen unrelated to all other known methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggraf, S.; Stetter, K. O.; Rouviere, P.; Woese, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of its 16S rRNA sequence shows that the newly discovered hyperthermophilic methanogen, Methanopryus kandleri, is phylogenetically unrelated to any other known methanogen. The organism represents a separate lineage originating near the root of the archaeal tree. Although the 16S rRNA sequence of Mp. kandleri resembles euryarchaeal 16S rRNAs more than it does crenarchaeal, it shows more crenarchaeal signature features than any known euryarchaeal rRNA. Attempts to place it in relation to the root of the archaeal tree show that the Mp. kandleri lineage likely arises from the euryarchaeal branch of the tree. While the existence of so deeply branching a methanogenic lineage brings into question the thesis that methanogenesis evolved from an earlier metabolism similar to that seen in Thermococcus, it at the same time reinforces the notion that the aboriginal [correction of aborginal] archaeon was a thermophile.

  1. Methanopyrus kandleri: an archaeal methanogen unrelated to all other known methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burggraf, S.; Stetter, K. O.; Rouviere, P.; Woese, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of its 16S rRNA sequence shows that the newly discovered hyperthermophilic methanogen, Methanopryus kandleri, is phylogenetically unrelated to any other known methanogen. The organism represents a separate lineage originating near the root of the archaeal tree. Although the 16S rRNA sequence of Mp. kandleri resembles euryarchaeal 16S rRNAs more than it does crenarchaeal, it shows more crenarchaeal signature features than any known euryarchaeal rRNA. Attempts to place it in relation to the root of the archaeal tree show that the Mp. kandleri lineage likely arises from the euryarchaeal branch of the tree. While the existence of so deeply branching a methanogenic lineage brings into question the thesis that methanogenesis evolved from an earlier metabolism similar to that seen in Thermococcus, it at the same time reinforces the notion that the aboriginal [correction of aborginal] archaeon was a thermophile.

  2. Metabolic Pathways in Methanococcus jannaschii and Other Methanogenic Bacteria †

    OpenAIRE

    Sprott, G. Dennis; Ekiel, Irena; Patel, Girishchandra B

    1993-01-01

    Eleven strains of methanogenic bacteria were divided into two groups on the basis of the directionality (oxidative or reductive) of their citric acid pathways. These pathways were readily identified for most methanogens from the patterns of carbon atom labeling in glutamate, following growth in the presence of [2-13C]acetate. All used noncyclic pathways, but members of the family Methanosarcinaceae were the only methanogens found to use the oxidative direction. Methanococcus jannaschii failed...

  3. Microbial composition and characterization of prevalent methanogens and acetogens isolated from syntrophic methanogenic granules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Weimin (Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing, MI (United States) Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States) Dept. of Biochemistry, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States)); Jain, M.K. (Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing, MI (United States) Dept. of Animal Science, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)); Conway de Macario, E. (Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and Research, New York State Dept. of Health, and School of Public Health, State Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Thiele, J.H. (Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing, MI (United States) Dept. of Biochemistry, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)); Zeikus, J.G. (Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing, MI (United States) Dept. of Biochemistry, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States) Dept. of Microbiology and Public Health, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States))

    1992-11-01

    The microbial species composition of methanogenic granules developed on an acetate-propionate-butyrate mixture was characterized. The granules contained high numbers of adhesive methanogens (10[sup 12]/g dry weight) and butyrate-, isobutyrate-, and propionate-degrading synthrophic acetogens (10[sup 11]/g dry weight), but low numbers of hydrolytic-fermentative bacteria (10[sup 9]/g dry weight). Prevalent methanogens in the granules included: Methanobacterium formicicum strain T1N and RF, Methanosarcina mazei strain T18, Methanospirillum hungatei strain BD, and a non-filamentous, bamboo-shaped rod species, Methanothrix/Methanosaeta-like strain M7. Prevalent syntrophic acetogens included: A butyrate-degrading Syntrophospora bryantii-like strain BH, a butyrate-isobutyrate degrading non-spore-forming rod, strain IB, a propionate-degrading spore-forming oval-shaped species, strain PT, and a propionate-degrading non-spore-forming sulfate-reducing rod species, strain PW, which was able to grow syntrophically with an H[sub 2]-utilizing methanogen. Sulfate-reducing bacteria did not play a significant role in the metabolism of H[sub 2], formate, acetate and butyrate but they were involved in propionate degradation. (orig.).

  4. Effect of ammonium and acetate on methanogenic pathway and methanogenic community composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Kotsopoulos, T. A.

    2013-01-01

    exposure to different ammonia concentrations. The methanogenic pathway was determined by following the production of (14) CH(4) and (14) CO(2) from acetate labeled in the methyl group (C-2). Microbial communities' composition was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Upon acclimatization...

  5. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenbacher, Don [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  6. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke E.; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Hooper, Sean D.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William B.; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-05-01

    Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  7. Phosphate inhibition on thermophilic acetoclastic methanogens: a warning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, P.L.; Santos, dos A.B.; Ide, C.N.; Lettinga, G.

    2005-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of phosphate on acetoclastic-methanogens was investigated for three different thermophilic (55 degrees C) anaerobic consortia. When 70 mM of phosphate was tested, acetoclastic methanogens was completely inhibited in "Eerbeek" sludge which is dominated by Methanosaeta-like metha

  8. Genomic Characterization of Methanomicrobiales Reveals Three Classes of Methanogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ulrich, Luke [ORNL; Lupa, Boguslaw [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Susanti, Dwi [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Porat, I. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Hooper, Sean [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lykidis, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Goltsman, Eugene [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Whitman, William [ORNL; Woese, Carl [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Background Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  9. Classification of methanogenic bacteria by 16S ribosomal RNA characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, G.E.; Magrum, L.J.; Balch, W.E.; Wolfe, R.S.; Woese, C.R.

    1977-10-01

    The 16S ribosomal RNAs from 10 species of methanogenic bacteria have been characterized in terms of the oligonucleotides produced by T/sub 1/ RNase digestion. Comparative analysis of these data reveals the methanogens to constitute a distinct phylogenetic group containing two major divisions. These organisms appear to be only distantly related to typical bacteria.

  10. Genomic characterization of methanomicrobiales reveals three classes of methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iain; Ulrich, Luke E; Lupa, Boguslaw; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Hooper, Sean D; Lykidis, Athanasios; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Dharmarajan, Lakshmi; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Saunders, Elizabeth; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Lucas, Susan; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Whitman, William B; Woese, Carl; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-06-04

    Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II), and the Methanosarcinales (Class III).

  11. Genomic characterization of methanomicrobiales reveals three classes of methanogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Anderson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methanomicrobiales is the least studied order of methanogens. While these organisms appear to be more closely related to the Methanosarcinales in ribosomal-based phylogenetic analyses, they are metabolically more similar to Class I methanogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to improve our understanding of this lineage, we have completely sequenced the genomes of two members of this order, Methanocorpusculum labreanum Z and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1, and compared them with the genome of a third, Methanospirillum hungatei JF-1. Similar to Class I methanogens, Methanomicrobiales use a partial reductive citric acid cycle for 2-oxoglutarate biosynthesis, and they have the Eha energy-converting hydrogenase. In common with Methanosarcinales, Methanomicrobiales possess the Ech hydrogenase and at least some of them may couple formylmethanofuran formation and heterodisulfide reduction to transmembrane ion gradients. Uniquely, M. labreanum and M. hungatei contain hydrogenases similar to the Pyrococcus furiosus Mbh hydrogenase, and all three Methanomicrobiales have anti-sigma factor and anti-anti-sigma factor regulatory proteins not found in other methanogens. Phylogenetic analysis based on seven core proteins of methanogenesis and cofactor biosynthesis places the Methanomicrobiales equidistant from Class I methanogens and Methanosarcinales. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that Methanomicrobiales, rather than being similar to Class I methanogens or Methanomicrobiales, share some features of both and have some unique properties. We find that there are three distinct classes of methanogens: the Class I methanogens, the Methanomicrobiales (Class II, and the Methanosarcinales (Class III.

  12. [Community Structure and Succession of Methanogens in Beishenshu Landfill, Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li-na; Wang, Lei; Xia, Meng-jing; Su, Yue; Li, Zhen-shan

    2015-09-01

    Methanogens are the key microorganisms for landfill stabilization. RT-PCR and qPCR detecting system were employed to determine the types and abundance of methanogens in 2-15 year-old solid wastes that sampled from Beishenshu Landfill, Beijing. The organic components were almost stable and the pH values were in alkaline range, which indicated that the landfill was in the methanogenic process. Methanobacterials, Methanosaeta, and Methanosarcina were detected, among which Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina are acetoclastic, and Methanobacterials are hydrogenotrophic. As landfill processing, within this time range, although the bacterial abundance was significantly decreased, the amount of methanogens was first increased and then decreased, and finally became stable after being landfilled for 9 years. Methanosarcina was the dominate taxa. Significant correlations were found between the methanogens and the volatile fatty acids, but the correlations between methanogens and larger molecular organic matters were relatively weak or even absent. Taken together, our study revealed that the amount of methanogens were affected by substrates, but hardly influenced by the conversion of large molecules in these wastes landfilled for more than 2 years.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of methanogens from the bovine rumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forster Robert J

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in methanogens from ruminants has resulted from the role of methane in global warming and from the fact that cattle typically lose 6 % of ingested energy as methane. Several species of methanogens have been isolated from ruminants. However they are difficult to culture, few have been consistently found in high numbers, and it is likely that major species of rumen methanogens are yet to be identified. Results Total DNA from clarified bovine rumen fluid was amplified using primers specific for Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences (rDNA. Phylogenetic analysis of 41 rDNA sequences identified three clusters of methanogens. The largest cluster contained two distinct subclusters with rDNA sequences similar to Methanobrevibacter ruminantium 16S rDNA. A second cluster contained sequences related to 16S rDNA from Methanosphaera stadtmanae, an organism not previously described in the rumen. The third cluster contained rDNA sequences that may form a novel group of rumen methanogens. Conclusions The current set of 16S rRNA hybridization probes targeting methanogenic Archaea does not cover the phylogenetic diversity present in the rumen and possibly other gastro-intestinal tract environments. New probes and quantitative PCR assays are needed to determine the distribution of the newly identified methanogen clusters in rumen microbial communities.

  14. Identification of toluene degraders in a methanogenic enrichment culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, S Jane; Gutierrez-Zamora, Maria-Luisa; Manefield, Mike; Gieg, Lisa M

    2014-09-01

    Methanogenic biodegradation involves the cooperative metabolism of syntrophic bacteria that catalyse the initial attack and subsequent degradation of hydrocarbons, and methanogens that convert intermediates such as hydrogen and carbon dioxide, formate, and/or acetate to methane. The identity of syntrophic microbes and the nature of their interactions with other syntrophs and methanogens are not well understood. Furthermore, it is difficult to isolate the organisms responsible for the initial activation and subsequent degradation of hydrocarbon substrates under methanogenic conditions due to the thermodynamic relationships that exist among microbes in methanogenic communities. We used time-resolved RNA stable isotope probing and RT-qPCR to identify the organisms involved in the initial attack on toluene and subsequent degradation reactions in a highly enriched toluene-degrading methanogenic culture. Our results reveal the importance of a Desulfosporosinus sp. in anaerobic toluene activation in the culture. Other organisms that appear to play roles in toluene degradation include Syntrophaceae, Desulfovibrionales and Chloroflexi. The high bacterial diversity observed in this culture and the extensive labelling of different phylogenetic groups over the course of the stable isotope probing experiment highlight the complexity of the relationships that exist in methanogenic ecosystems. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Different cultivation methods to acclimatise ammonia-tolerant methanogenic consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hailin; Fotidis, Ioannis A; Mancini, Enrico; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-05-01

    Bioaugmentation with ammonia tolerant-methanogenic consortia was proposed as a solution to overcome ammonia inhibition during anaerobic digestion process recently. However, appropriate technology to generate ammonia tolerant methanogenic consortia is still lacking. In this study, three basic reactors (i.e. batch, fed-batch and continuous stirred-tank reactors (CSTR)) operated at mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions were assessed, based on methane production efficiency, incubation time, TAN/FAN (total ammonium nitrogen/free ammonia nitrogen) levels and maximum methanogenic activity. Overall, fed-batch cultivation was clearly the most efficient method compared to batch and CSTR. Specifically, by saving incubation time up to 150%, fed-batch reactors were acclimatised to nearly 2-fold higher FAN levels with a 37%-153% methanogenic activity improvement, compared to batch method. Meanwhile, CSTR reactors were inhibited at lower ammonia levels. Finally, specific methanogenic activity test showed that hydrogenotrophic methanogens were more active than aceticlastic methanogens in all FAN levels above 540mgNH3-NL(-1). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Diphytanyl and dibiphytanyl glycerol ether lipids of methanogenic archaebacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornabene, T.G. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins); Langworthy, T.A.

    1979-01-05

    The lipids of nine different methanogenic bacterial strains are comprised of diphytanyl glycerol diethers, previously known only in extremely halophilic bacteria, as well as dibiphytanyl diglycerol tetraethers, known formerly only in the extremely thermoacidophilic bacteria Thermoplasma and Sulfolobus. Of the methanogens examined from four representative taxonomic groups, Methanobacterium and Methanospirillum contained both types of isopranyl ethers in nearly equal proportions, whereas the coccal forms, Methanosarcina and Methanococcus, possessed diphytanyl glycerol diethers, but with only a trace of or no dibiphytanyl diglycerol tetraethers. The occurrence of both types of isopranyl glycerol ethers in methanogenic bacteria supports the proposal that they have a close genealogical relationship to the extremely halophilic and thermoacidophilic bacteria.

  17. Methanogenic Conversion of CO2 Into CH4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, S.H., Ferry, J.G., Schoell, M.

    2012-05-06

    This SBIR project evaluated the potential to remediate geologic CO2 sequestration sites into useful methane gas fields by application of methanogenic bacteria. Such methanogens are present in a wide variety of natural environments, converting CO2 into CH4 under natural conditions. We conclude that the process is generally feasible to apply within many of the proposed CO2 storage reservoir settings. However, extensive further basic R&D still is needed to define the precise species, environments, nutrient growth accelerants, and economics of the methanogenic process. Consequently, the study team does not recommend Phase III commercial application of the technology at this early phase.

  18. The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maunsell John HR

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium (NPRC ends its first year, it is worth looking back to see how the experiment has worked. In order to encourage dissemination of the details outlined in this Editorial, it will also be published in other journals in the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium.

  19. Hawaii Space Grant Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Luke P.

    2005-01-01

    The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the University of Hawai'i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges spread over the 4 main Hawaiian islands. Geographic separation is not the only obstacle that we face as a Consortium. Hawai'i has been mired in an economic downturn due to a lack of tourism for almost all of the period (2001 - 2004) covered by this report, although hotel occupancy rates and real estate sales have sky-rocketed in the last year. Our challenges have been many including providing quality educational opportunities in the face of shrinking State and Federal budgets, encouraging science and technology course instruction at the K-12 level in a public school system that is becoming less focused on high technology and more focused on developing basic reading and math skills, and assembling community college programs with instructors who are expected to teach more classes for the same salary. Motivated people can overcome these problems. Fortunately, the Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium (HSGC) consists of a group of highly motivated and talented individuals who have not only overcome these obstacles, but have excelled with the Program. We fill a critical need within the State of Hawai'i to provide our children with opportunities to pursue their dreams of becoming the next generation of NASA astronauts, engineers, and explorers. Our strength lies not only in our diligent and creative HSGC advisory board, but also with Hawai'i's teachers, students, parents, and industry executives who are willing to invest their time, effort, and resources into Hawai'i's future. Our operational philosophy is to FACE the Future, meaning that we will facilitate, administer, catalyze, and educate in order to achieve our objective of creating a highly technically capable workforce both here in Hawai'i and for NASA. In addition to administering to programs and

  20. A hydrogen-based subsurface microbial community dominated by methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, Francis H; O'Neill, Kathleen; Bradley, Paul M; Methé, Barbara A; Ciufo, Stacy A; Knobel, LeRoy L; Lovley, Derek R

    2002-01-17

    The search for extraterrestrial life may be facilitated if ecosystems can be found on Earth that exist under conditions analogous to those present on other planets or moons. It has been proposed, on the basis of geochemical and thermodynamic considerations, that geologically derived hydrogen might support subsurface microbial communities on Mars and Europa in which methanogens form the base of the ecosystem. Here we describe a unique subsurface microbial community in which hydrogen-consuming, methane-producing Archaea far outnumber the Bacteria. More than 90% of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequences recovered from hydrothermal waters circulating through deeply buried igneous rocks in Idaho are related to hydrogen-using methanogenic microorganisms. Geochemical characterization indicates that geothermal hydrogen, not organic carbon, is the primary energy source for this methanogen-dominated microbial community. These results demonstrate that hydrogen-based methanogenic communities do occur in Earth's subsurface, providing an analogue for possible subsurface microbial ecosystems on other planets.

  1. Polyphasic Analyses of Methanogenic Archaeal Communities in Agricultural Biogas Plants▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nettmann, E.; Bergmann, I.; Pramschüfer, S.; Mundt, K; Plogsties, V.; Herrmann, C.; Klocke, M.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the microbial consortia participating in the generation of biogas, especially in methane formation, is still limited. To overcome this limitation, the methanogenic archaeal communities in six full-scale biogas plants supplied with different liquid manures and renewable raw materials as substrates were analyzed by a polyphasic approach. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was carried out to quantify the methanogenic Archaea in the reactor samples. In addition, quantitative r...

  2. IPD-Work consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Virtanen, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    to advance research on associations between work-related psychosocial risk factors and health; (ii) demonstrate as unfounded Choi et al's assertion that IPD-Work has underestimated associations between job strain and health endpoints; these include the dichotomous measurement of job strain, potential......Established in 2008 and comprising over 60 researchers, the IPD-Work (individual-participant data meta-analysis in working populations) consortium is a collaborative research project that uses pre-defined meta-analyses of individual-participant data from multiple cohort studies representing a range......-Work's findings have also generated disagreement as they challenge the importance of job strain as a major target for coronary heart disease (CHD) prevention, this is reflected in the critical discussion paper by Choi et al (1). In this invited reply to Choi et al, we aim to (i) describe how IPD-Work seeks...

  3. The Genomic Standards Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Field

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A vast and rich body of information has grown up as a result of the world's enthusiasm for 'omics technologies. Finding ways to describe and make available this information that maximise its usefulness has become a major effort across the 'omics world. At the heart of this effort is the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC, an open-membership organization that drives community-based standardization activities, Here we provide a short history of the GSC, provide an overview of its range of current activities, and make a call for the scientific community to join forces to improve the quality and quantity of contextual information about our public collections of genomes, metagenomes, and marker gene sequences.

  4. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  5. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  6. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  7. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  8. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, Stephen [EWI, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  9. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens dominate in biogas reactors fed with defined substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampmann, K; Ratering, S; Baumann, R; Schmidt, M; Zerr, W; Schnell, S

    2012-09-01

    Methanogenic communities in 200L biogas reactors containing liquid manure were investigated for 33 d. The reactors were consecutively fed with casein, starch and cream. Real-time PCR with primers targeting the gene for methyl coenzyme-M reductase (mcrA) resulted in copy numbers of up to 2.1×10(9) g dry mass(-1). Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis revealed a stable community consisting of few hydrogenotrophic methanogens. One of the two most abundant species was closely related to Methanospirillum hungatei, whereas the other one was only distantly related to other methanogens, with Methanopyrus kandleri being the closest cultivated relative. Most probable number (MPN) cultivations were accomplished with a sample from a 600 m(3) reactor from which all manures used in the experiments originated, and equal cell counts of ca. 10(9) g dry mass(-1) were found for cultivations with acetate, H(2) and methanol. SSCP analysis of these samples and sequencing of the DNA bands identified different hydrogenotrophic methanogens in all samples, and acetoclastic methanogens closely related to Methanosarcina mazei in the samples cultivated with acetate and methanol. As the acetoclastic species were not found in any other SSCP sample, it was supposed that the ammonia values in the manure of the laboratory biogas reactor, which ranged from 2.48 to 3.61 g NH(4)-NL(-1), inhibited the growth of the acetoclastic methanogens.

  10. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to

  11. Field Evidence for Magnetite Formation by a Methanogenic Microbial Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossbach, S.; Beaver, C. L.; Williams, A.; Atekwana, E. A.; Slater, L. D.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Lund, A.

    2015-12-01

    The aged, subsurface petroleum spill in Bemidji, Minnesota, has been surveyed with magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements. High MS values were found in the free-product phase around the fluctuating water table. Although we had hypothesized that high MS values are related to the occurrence of the mineral magnetite resulting from the activity of iron-reducing bacteria, our microbial analysis pointed to the presence of a methanogenic microbial community at the locations and depths of the highest MS values. Here, we report on a more detailed microbial analysis based on high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of sediment samples from four consecutive years. In addition, we provide geochemical data (FeII/FeIII concentrations) to refine our conceptual model of methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation at aged petroleum spills and demonstrate that the microbial induced changes of sediment properties can be monitored with MS. The methanogenic microbial community at the Bemidji site consisted mainly of the syntrophic, hydrocarbon-degrading Smithella and the hydrogenotrophic, methane-generating Methanoregula. There is growing evidence in the literature that not only Bacteria, but also some methanogenic Archaea are able to reduce iron. In fact, a recent study reported that the methanogen Methanosarcina thermophila produced magnetite during the reduction of ferrihydrite in a laboratory experiment when hydrogen was present. Therefore, our finding of high MS values and the presence of magnetite in the methanogenic zone of an aged, subsurface petroleum spill could very well be the first field evidence for magnetite formation during methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation.

  12. The International Human Epigenome Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Hirst, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) coordinates the generation of a catalog of high-resolution reference epigenomes of major primary human cell types. The studies now presented (see the Cell Press IHEC web portal at http://www.cell.com/consortium/IHEC) highlight the coordinated ac...... achievements of IHEC teams to gather and interpret comprehensive epigenomic datasets to gain insights in the epigenetic control of cell states relevant for human health and disease. PAPERCLIP.......The International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) coordinates the generation of a catalog of high-resolution reference epigenomes of major primary human cell types. The studies now presented (see the Cell Press IHEC web portal at http://www.cell.com/consortium/IHEC) highlight the coordinated...

  13. Atlantic Coast Environmental Indicators Consortium

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — n 2000, the US EPA granted authority to establish up to five Estuarine Indicator Research Programs. These Programs were designed to identify, evaluate, recommend and...

  14. The Pittsburgh Breast Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Protein Autovac in Patients with Brest Cancer CPharmexa). This trial was initiated in June 2003. The PBCC accrued 5 of the planned 11 patients. This...AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-01-1-0374 TITLE: The Pittsburgh Breast Cancer Consortium...3. DATES COVERED 1 AUG 2001 - 31 JUL 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Pittsburgh Breast Cancer Consortium 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  15. Snapshot of methanogen sensitivity to temperature in Zoige wetland from Tibetan plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eFu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Zoige wetland in Tibetan plateau represents a cold environment at high altitude where significant methane emission has been observed. However, it remains unknown how the production and emission of CH4 from Zoige wetland will respond to a warming climate. Here we investigated the temperature sensitivity of methanogen community in a Zoige wetland soil under the laboratory incubation conditions. One soil sample was collected and the temperature sensitivity of the methanogenic activity, the structure of methanogen community and the methanogenic pathways were determined. We found that the response of methanogenesis to temperature could be separated into two phases, a high sensitivity in the low temperature range and a modest sensitivity under mesophilic conditions, respectively. The aceticlastic methanogens Methanosarcinaceae were the main methanogens at low temperatures, while hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and Methanocellales were more abundant at higher temperatures. The total abundance of mcrA genes increased with temperature indicating that the growth of methanogens was stimulated. The growth of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, however, was faster than aceticlastic ones resulting in the shift of methanogen community. Determination of carbon isotopic signatures indicated that methanogenic pathway was also shifted from mainly aceticlastic methanogenesis to a mixture of hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic methanogenesis with the increase of temperature. Collectively, the shift of temperature responses of methanogenesis was in accordance with the changes in methanogen composition and methanogenic pathway in this Zoige wetland sample. It appears that the aceticlastic methanogenesis dominated at low temperatures is more sensitive than the hydrogenotrophic one at higher temperatures.

  16. The ocean sampling day consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate...... the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our...

  17. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  18. Syntrophic degradation of fatty acids by methanogenic communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Worm, P.; Sousa, D.Z.; Alves, M.M.; Plugge, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    In methanogenic environments degradation of fatty acids is a key process in the conversion of organic matter to methane and carbon dioxide. For degradation of fatty acids with three or more carbon atoms syntrophic communities are required. This chapter describes the general features of syntrophic de

  19. Dynamics of the Methanogenic Archaea in Tropical Estuarine Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Alvarado, María del Rocío; Fernández, Francisco José; Ramírez Vives, Florina; Varona-Cordero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Methanogenesis may represent a key process in the terminal phases of anaerobic organic matter mineralization in sediments of coastal lagoons. The aim of the present work was to study the temporal and spatial dynamics of methanogenic archaea in sediments of tropical coastal lagoons and their relationship with environmental changes in order to determine how these influence methanogenic community. Sediment samples were collected during the dry (February, May, and early June) and rainy seasons (July, October, and November). Microbiological analysis included the quantification of viable methanogenic archaea (MA) with three substrates and the evaluation of kinetic activity from acetate in the presence and absence of sulfate. The environmental variables assessed were temperature, pH, Eh, salinity, sulfate, solids content, organic carbon, and carbohydrates. MA abundance was significantly higher in the rainy season (106–107 cells/g) compared with the dry season (104–106 cells/g), with methanol as an important substrate. At spatial level, MA were detected in the two layers analyzed, and no important variations were observed either in MA abundance or activity. Salinity, sulfate, solids, organic carbon, and Eh were the environmental variables related to methanogenic community. A conceptual model is proposed to explain the dynamics of the MA. PMID:23401664

  20. Dynamics of the Methanogenic Archaea in Tropical Estuarine Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Rocío Torres-Alvarado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenesis may represent a key process in the terminal phases of anaerobic organic matter mineralization in sediments of coastal lagoons. The aim of the present work was to study the temporal and spatial dynamics of methanogenic archaea in sediments of tropical coastal lagoons and their relationship with environmental changes in order to determine how these influence methanogenic community. Sediment samples were collected during the dry (February, May, and early June and rainy seasons (July, October, and November. Microbiological analysis included the quantification of viable methanogenic archaea (MA with three substrates and the evaluation of kinetic activity from acetate in the presence and absence of sulfate. The environmental variables assessed were temperature, pH, Eh, salinity, sulfate, solids content, organic carbon, and carbohydrates. MA abundance was significantly higher in the rainy season (106–107 cells/g compared with the dry season (104–106 cells/g, with methanol as an important substrate. At spatial level, MA were detected in the two layers analyzed, and no important variations were observed either in MA abundance or activity. Salinity, sulfate, solids, organic carbon, and Eh were the environmental variables related to methanogenic community. A conceptual model is proposed to explain the dynamics of the MA.

  1. THE ENERGETIC CONSEQUENCES OF HYDROGEN GRADIENTS IN METHANOGENIC ECOSYSTEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOLFING, J

    1992-01-01

    In the dense microbial aggregates usually found in methanogenic waste water treatment systems, hydrogen has to diffuse from producers to consumers at considerable rates. The ensuing hydrogen gradients dissipate part of the potential energy that would otherwise be available to the hydrogen-consuming

  2. Syntrophic degradation of amino acids by thermophilic methanogenic consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plugge, C.M.

    2001-01-01

    Waste water usually contains large amounts of different organic compounds. A variety of microbial processes are involved in the anaerobic methanogenic treatment of waste water, such as hydrolysis of lipids, polysaccharides and proteins, fermentation of sugars and amino acids, acetogenic conversion o

  3. Taxonomic, phylogenetic, and ecological diversity of methanogenic Archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, J.-L.; Ollivier, B. [Universite de Provence, Marseille (France). Laboratoire de Microbiologist; Patel, B.K.C. [Griffith University, Brisbane (Australia). Microbial Discovery Research Unit

    2000-07-01

    Methanogens are strict anaerobes which share a complex biochemistry for methane synthesis as part of their energy metabolism. The discovery of the unique biochemical and genetic properties of these organisms led to the concept of Archaebacteria at the end of the seventies and the proposal in 1990 for the domain Archaea. A number of studies have provided evidence that they are of economic value. The successive petroleum crisis since 1973 has led to great interest in alternative forms of energy, including recovery of methane via anaerobic digestion of wastes. Improvements in the design of digestors have been made possible by advances in understanding the ecology and physiology of methanogens. In the cattle industry, the knowledge of the fermentation processes in the rumen demonstrated a net loss of energy via the methanogenesis, and inhibitors such as Rumensin have been developed to enhance meat yields. Oil companies try to distinguish between natural gas produced by methanogens or by the thermocatalytic reactions associated with petroleum generation. Finally, studies on the global distribution of methane in the earth's atmosphere are increasing due to the sudden awareness of its possible role in the enhancement of the greenhouse effect from CO-2 accumulation, and on the reversal of stratospheric ozone depletion. This paper summarizes the recent knowledge of methanogenic Archaea with emphasis on their taxonomy and ecology. (author)

  4. Conversion and toxicity characteristics of formaldehyde in acetoclastic methanogenic sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Kleerebezem, R.; Lettinga, G.

    2002-01-01

    An unadapted mixed methanogenic sludge transformed formaldehyde into methanol and formate. The methanol to formate ratio obtained was 1:1. Formaldehyde conversion proceeded without any lag phase, suggesting the constitutive character of the formaldehyde conversion enzymes involved. Because the rate

  5. The dechlorination of cyclodiene pesticides by methanogenic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baczynski, T.H.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Knipscheer, P.

    2004-01-01

    Cyclodiene pesticides: aldrin, isodrin, dieldrin and endrin were dechlorinated by methanogenic granular sludge in spiked batch tests. Initial pesticides concentration was 7 or 9 mg1(-1). Two monodechlorinated analogues were formed during the conversions of aldrin and isodrin. Dieldrin was

  6. The Statewide Energy Consortium: A California Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, G. Cleve; Giacosie, Robert V.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the formation and organization of a statewide energy consortium consisting of faculty from 19 campuses of the California State University and Colleges system. Also describes three major consortium activities and reasons for its success. (SK)

  7. The Statewide Energy Consortium: A California Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, G. Cleve; Giacosie, Robert V.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the formation and organization of a statewide energy consortium consisting of faculty from 19 campuses of the California State University and Colleges system. Also describes three major consortium activities and reasons for its success. (SK)

  8. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  9. A vaccine against rumen methanogens can alter the composition of archaeal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Yvette J; Popovski, Sam; Rea, Suzanne M; Skillman, Lucy C; Toovey, Andrew F; Northwood, Korinne S; Wright, André-Denis G

    2009-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to formulate a vaccine based upon the different species/strains of methanogens present in sheep intended to be immunized and to determine if a targeted vaccine could be used to decrease the methane output of the sheep. Two 16S rRNA gene libraries were used to survey the methanogenic archaea in sheep prior to vaccination, and methanogens representing five phylotypes were found to account for >52% of the different species/strains of methanogens detected. A vaccine based on a mixture of these five methanogens was then formulated, and 32 sheep were vaccinated on days 0, 28, and 103 with either a control or the anti-methanogen vaccine. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis revealed that each vaccination with the anti-methanogen formulation resulted in higher specific immunoglobulin G titers in plasma, saliva, and rumen fluid. Methane output levels corrected for dry-matter intake for the control and treatment groups were not significantly different, and real-time PCR data also indicated that methanogen numbers were not significantly different for the two groups after the second vaccination. However, clone library data indicated that methanogen diversity was significantly greater in sheep receiving the anti-methanogen vaccine and that the vaccine may have altered the composition of the methanogen population. A correlation between 16S rRNA gene sequence relatedness and cross-reactivity for the methanogens (R(2) = 0.90) also exists, which suggests that a highly specific vaccine can be made to target specific strains of methanogens and that a more broad-spectrum approach is needed for success in the rumen. Our data also suggest that methanogens take longer than 4 weeks to adapt to dietary changes and call into question the validity of experimental results based upon a 2- to 4-week acclimatization period normally observed for bacteria.

  10. Corn in consortium with forages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Maria de Paula Garcia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic premises for sustainable agricultural development with focus on rural producers are reducing the costs of production and aggregation of values through the use crop-livestock system (CLS throughout the year. The CLS is based on the consortium of grain crops, especially corn with tropical forages, mainly of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The study aimed to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn crop intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The experiment was conducted at the Fazenda de Ensino, Pesquisa e Extensão – FEPE  of the Faculdade de Engenharia - UNESP, Ilha Solteira in an Oxisol in savannah conditions and in the autumn winter of 2009. The experimental area was irrigated by a center pivot and had a history of no-tillage system for 8 years. The corn hybrid used was simple DKB 390 YG at distances of 0.90 m. The seeds of grasses were sown in 0.34 m spacing in the amount of 5 kg ha-1, they were mixed with fertilizer minutes before sowing  and placed in a compartment fertilizer seeder and fertilizers were mechanically deposited in the soil at a depth of 0.03 m. The experimental design used was a randomized block with four replications and five treatments: Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CTD of the corn; Panicum maximum cv. Mombaça sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CMD of the corn; Urochloa brizantha cv. Xaraés sown during the occasion of nitrogen fertilization (CBD of the corn; Urochloa ruziziensis cv. Comumsown during the nitrogen fertilization (CRD of the corn and single corn (control. The production components of corn: plant population per hectare (PlPo, number of ears per hectare (NE ha-1, number of rows per ear (NRE, number of kernels per row on the cob (NKR, number of grain in the ear (NGE and mass of 100 grains (M100G were not influenced by consortium with forage. Comparing grain yield (GY single corn and maize intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum

  11. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program is a collaborative University-Industry R&D Consortium that is managed and administered by the South Carolina Energy R&D Center. AGTSR is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry-defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. The consortium is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation and is sponsored by the U.S. DOE - Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The program is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. At present, there are 78 performing member universities representing 36 states, and six cost-sharing U.S. gas turbine corporations. Three RFP`s have been announced and the fourth RFP is expected to be released in December, 1995. There are 31 research subcontracts underway at performing member universities. AGTSR has also organized three workshops, two in combustion and one in heat transfer. A materials workshop is in planning and is scheduled for February, 1996. An industrial internship program was initiated this past summer, with one intern positioned at each of the sponsoring companies. The AGTSR consortium nurtures close industry-university-government collaboration to enhance synergism and the transition of research results, accelerate and promote evolutionary-revolutionary R&D, and strives to keep a prominent U.S. industry strong and on top well into the 21st century. This paper will present the objectives and benefits of the AGTSR program, progress achieved to date, and future planned activity in fiscal year 1996.

  12. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  13. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A&E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton`s initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force.

  14. Polyphasic analyses of methanogenic archaeal communities in agricultural biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettmann, E; Bergmann, I; Pramschüfer, S; Mundt, K; Plogsties, V; Herrmann, C; Klocke, M

    2010-04-01

    Knowledge of the microbial consortia participating in the generation of biogas, especially in methane formation, is still limited. To overcome this limitation, the methanogenic archaeal communities in six full-scale biogas plants supplied with different liquid manures and renewable raw materials as substrates were analyzed by a polyphasic approach. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was carried out to quantify the methanogenic Archaea in the reactor samples. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) was used to support and complete the FISH analysis. Five of the six biogas reactors were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The average values were between 60 to 63% of archaeal cell counts (FISH) and 61 to 99% of archaeal 16S rRNA gene copies (Q-PCR). Within this order, Methanoculleus was found to be the predominant genus as determined by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis. The aceticlastic family Methanosaetaceae was determined to be the dominant methanogenic group in only one biogas reactor, with average values for Q-PCR and FISH between 64% and 72%. Additionally, in three biogas reactors hitherto uncharacterized but potentially methanogenic species were detected. They showed closest accordance with nucleotide sequences of the hitherto unclassified CA-11 (85%) and ARC-I (98%) clusters. These results point to hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis as a predominant pathway for methane synthesis in five of the six analyzed biogas plants. In addition, a correlation between the absence of Methanosaetaceae in the biogas reactors and high concentrations of total ammonia (sum of NH(3) and NH(4)(+)) was observed.

  15. Threshold Acetate Concentrations for Acetate Catabolism by Aceticlastic Methanogenic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Westermann, Peter; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Mah, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Marked differences were found for minimum threshold concentrations of acetate catabolism by Methanosarcina barkeri 227 (1.180 mM), Methanosarcina mazei S-6 (0.396 mM), and a Methanothrix sp. (0.069 mM). This indicates that the aceticlastic methanogens responsible for the conversion of acetate to methane in various ecosystems might be different, depending on the prevailing in situ acetate concentrations.

  16. An intertwined evolutionary history of methanogenic archaea and sulfate reduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Susanti

    Full Text Available Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and dissimilatory sulfate reduction, two of the oldest energy conserving respiratory systems on Earth, apparently could not have evolved in the same host, as sulfite, an intermediate of sulfate reduction, inhibits methanogenesis. However, certain methanogenic archaea metabolize sulfite employing a deazaflavin cofactor (F(420-dependent sulfite reductase (Fsr where N- and C-terminal halves (Fsr-N and Fsr-C are homologs of F(420H(2 dehydrogenase and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr, respectively. From genome analysis we found that Fsr was likely assembled from freestanding Fsr-N homologs and Dsr-like proteins (Dsr-LP, both being abundant in methanogens. Dsr-LPs fell into two groups defined by following sequence features: Group I (simplest, carrying a coupled siroheme-[Fe(4-S(4] cluster and sulfite-binding Arg/Lys residues; Group III (most complex, with group I features, a Dsr-type peripheral [Fe(4-S(4] cluster and an additional [Fe(4-S(4] cluster. Group II Dsr-LPs with group I features and a Dsr-type peripheral [Fe(4-S(4] cluster were proposed as evolutionary intermediates. Group III is the precursor of Fsr-C. The freestanding Fsr-N homologs serve as F(420H(2 dehydrogenase unit of a putative novel glutamate synthase, previously described membrane-bound electron transport system in methanogens and of assimilatory type sulfite reductases in certain haloarchaea. Among archaea, only methanogens carried Dsr-LPs. They also possessed homologs of sulfate activation and reduction enzymes. This suggested a shared evolutionary history for methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, and Dsr-LPs could have been the source of the oldest (3.47-Gyr ago biologically produced sulfide deposit.

  17. The nif Gene Operon of the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Peter S.; Blank, Carrine; Leigh, John A.

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation occurs in two domains, Archaea and Bacteria. We have characterized a nif (nitrogen fixation) gene cluster in the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis. Sequence analysis revealed eight genes, six with sequence similarity to known nif genes and two with sequence similarity to glnB. The gene order, nifH, ORF105 (similar to glnB), ORF121 (similar to glnB), nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, and nifX, was the same as that found in part in other diazotrophic methanogens and except for the presence of the glnB-like genes, also resembled the order found in many members of the Bacteria. Using transposon insertion mutagenesis, we determined that an 8-kb region required for nitrogen fixation corresponded to the nif gene cluster. Northern analysis revealed the presence of either a single 7.6-kb nif mRNA transcript or 10 smaller mRNA species containing portions of the large transcript. Polar effects of transposon insertions demonstrated that all of these mRNAs arose from a single promoter region, where transcription initiated 80 bp 5′ to nifH. Distinctive features of the nif gene cluster include the presence of the six primary nif genes in a single operon, the placement of the two glnB-like genes within the cluster, the apparent physical separation of the cluster from any other nif genes that might be in the genome, the fragmentation pattern of the mRNA, and the regulation of expression by a repression mechanism described previously. Our study and others with methanogenic archaea reporting multiple mRNAs arising from gene clusters with only a single putative promoter sequence suggest that mRNA processing following transcription may be a common occurrence in methanogens. PMID:9515920

  18. Polyphasic Analyses of Methanogenic Archaeal Communities in Agricultural Biogas Plants▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettmann, E.; Bergmann, I.; Pramschüfer, S.; Mundt, K.; Plogsties, V.; Herrmann, C.; Klocke, M.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the microbial consortia participating in the generation of biogas, especially in methane formation, is still limited. To overcome this limitation, the methanogenic archaeal communities in six full-scale biogas plants supplied with different liquid manures and renewable raw materials as substrates were analyzed by a polyphasic approach. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was carried out to quantify the methanogenic Archaea in the reactor samples. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) was used to support and complete the FISH analysis. Five of the six biogas reactors were dominated by hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales. The average values were between 60 to 63% of archaeal cell counts (FISH) and 61 to 99% of archaeal 16S rRNA gene copies (Q-PCR). Within this order, Methanoculleus was found to be the predominant genus as determined by amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis. The aceticlastic family Methanosaetaceae was determined to be the dominant methanogenic group in only one biogas reactor, with average values for Q-PCR and FISH between 64% and 72%. Additionally, in three biogas reactors hitherto uncharacterized but potentially methanogenic species were detected. They showed closest accordance with nucleotide sequences of the hitherto unclassified CA-11 (85%) and ARC-I (98%) clusters. These results point to hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis as a predominant pathway for methane synthesis in five of the six analyzed biogas plants. In addition, a correlation between the absence of Methanosaetaceae in the biogas reactors and high concentrations of total ammonia (sum of NH3 and NH4+) was observed. PMID:20154117

  19. Cometabolic Enzymatic Transformation of Organic Micropollutants under Methanogenic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gil, Lorena; Carballa, Marta; Lema, Juan M

    2017-02-23

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been shown to have the biological potential to decrease concentrations of several organic micropollutants (OMPs) in sewage sludge. However, the mechanisms and factors behind these biotransformations, which are essential for elucidating the possible transformation products and to foster the complete removal of OMPs via operational strategies, remain unclear. Therefore, this study investigated the transformation mechanisms of 20 OMPs during the methanogenic step of AD with a focus on the role of acetate kinase (AK), which is a key enzyme in methane production. The results from lab-scale methanogenic reactors showed that this step accounts for much of the reported OMP biotransformation in AD. Furthermore, enzymatic assays confirmed that AK transforms galaxolide, naproxen, nonylphenol, octylphenol, ibuprofen, diclofenac, bisphenol A, and triclosan. Except for galaxolide, for which further studies are required to refine conclusions, the OMP's chemical structure was a determinant for AK action because only compounds that contain a carboxyl or hydroxyl group and have moderate steric hindrance were enzymatically transformed, likely by phosphorylation. For these seven compounds, this enzymatic mechanism accounts for 10-90% of the measured methanogenic biotransformation, suggesting that other active enzymes of the AD process are also involved in OMP biotransformation.

  20. Environmental selection of planktonic methanogens in permafrost thaw ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevecoeur, Sophie; Vincent, Warwick F.; Lovejoy, Connie

    2016-08-01

    The warming and thermal erosion of ice-containing permafrost results in thaw ponds that are strong emitters of methane to the atmosphere. Here we examined methanogens and other Archaea, in two types of thaw ponds that are formed by the collapse of either permafrost peat mounds (palsas) or mineral soil mounds (lithalsas) in subarctic Quebec, Canada. Using high-throughput sequencing of a hypervariable region of 16S rRNA, we determined the taxonomic structure and diversity of archaeal communities in near-bottom water samples, and analyzed the mcrA gene transcripts from two sites. The ponds at all sites were well stratified, with hypoxic or anoxic bottom waters. Their archaeal communities were dominated by Euryarchaeota, specifically taxa in the methanogenic orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales, indicating a potentially active community of planktonic methanogens. The order Methanomicrobiales accounted for most of the mcrA transcripts in the two ponds. The Archaeal communities differed significantly between the lithalsa and palsa ponds, with higher alpha diversity in the organic-rich palsa ponds, and pronounced differences in community structure. These results indicate the widespread occurrence of planktonic, methane-producing Archaea in thaw ponds, with environmental selection of taxa according to permafrost landscape type.

  1. Hydrogen consumption by methanogens on the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, T. A.; Brink, K. M.; Miller, S. L.; McKay, C. P.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    It is possible that the first autotroph used chemical energy rather than light. This could have been the main source of primary production after the initial inventory of abiotic organic material had been depleted. The electron acceptor most readily available for use by this first chemoautotroph would have been CO2. The most abundant electron donor may have been H2 that would have been outgassing from volcanoes at a rate estimated to be as large as 10(12) moles yr-1, as well as from photo-oxidation of Fe+2. We report here that certain methanogens will consume H2 down to partial pressures as low as 4 Pa (4 x 10(-5) atm) with CO2 as the sole carbon source at a rate of 0.7 ng H2 min-1 microgram-1 cell protein. The lower limit of pH2 for growth of methanogens can be understood on the basis that the pH2 needs to be high enough for one ATP to be synthesized per CO2 reduced. The pH2 values needed for growth measured here are consistent with those measured by Stevens and McKinley for growth of methanogens in deep basalt aquifers. H2-consuming autotrophs are likely to have had a profound effect on the chemistry of the early atmosphere and to have been a dominant sink for H2 on the early Earth after life began rather than escape from the Earth's atmosphere to space.

  2. Methanogenic biodegradation of two-ringed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdugo-Clavijo, Carolina; Dong, Xiaoli; Soh, Jung; Sensen, Christoph W; Gieg, Lisa M

    2012-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are widespread in methane-rich subsurface environments, such as oil reservoirs and fuel-contaminated aquifers; however, little is known about the biodegradation of these compounds under methanogenic conditions. To assess the metabolism of PAH in the absence of electron acceptors, a crude oil-degrading methanogenic enrichment culture was tested for the ability to biodegrade naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN), 2-methylnaphthalene (2-MN), and 2, 6-dimethylnaphthalene (2, 6-diMN). When methane was measured as an indicator of metabolism, nearly 400 μmol of methane was produced in the 2-MN- and 2, 6-diMN-amended cultures relative to substrate-unamended controls, which is close to the amount of methane stoichiometrically predicted based on the amount of substrate added (51-56 μmol). In contrast, no substantial methane was produced in the naphthalene- and 1-MN-amended enrichments. In time course experiments, metabolite analysis of enrichments containing 2-MN and 2, 6-diMN revealed the formation of 2-naphthoic acid and 6-methyl-2-naphthoic acid, respectively. Microbial community analysis by 454 pyrosequencing revealed that these PAH-utilizing enrichments were dominated by archaeal members most closely affiliated with Methanosaeta and Methanoculleus species and bacterial members most closely related to the Clostridiaceae, suggesting that these organisms play an important role in the methanogenic metabolism of the substituted naphthalenes in these cultures.

  3. Genetics and molecular biology of methanogen genes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konisky, J.

    1997-10-07

    Adenylate kinase has been isolated from four related methanogenic members of the Archaea. For each the optimum temperature for enzyme activity was similar to the temperature for optimal microbial growth and was approximately 30 C for Methanococcus voltage, 70 C for Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus, 80 C for Methanococcus igneus and 80--90 C for Methanococcus jannaschii. The enzymes were sensitive to the adenylate kinase inhibitor, Ap{sub 5}A [P{sup 1}, P{sup 5}-di(adenosine-5{prime}) pentaphosphate], a property that was exploited to purify the enzymes by CIBACRON Blue affinity chromatography. The enzymes had an estimated molecular weight (approximately 23--25 kDa) in the range common for adenylate kinases. Each of the enzymes had a region of amino acid sequence close to its N-terminus that was similar to the canonical P-loop sequence reported for all adenylate kinases. However, the methanogen sequences lacked a lysine residue that has previously been found to be invariant in adenylate kinases including an enzyme isolated from the Archeon, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. If verified as a nucleotide binding domain, the methanogen sequence would represent a novel nucleotide binding motif. There was no correlation between amino acid abundance and the optimal temperature for enzyme activity.

  4. Metabolic Pathways in Methanococcus jannaschii and Other Methanogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprott, G D; Ekiel, I; Patel, G B

    1993-04-01

    Eleven strains of methanogenic bacteria were divided into two groups on the basis of the directionality (oxidative or reductive) of their citric acid pathways. These pathways were readily identified for most methanogens from the patterns of carbon atom labeling in glutamate, following growth in the presence of [2-C]acetate. All used noncyclic pathways, but members of the family Methanosarcinaceae were the only methanogens found to use the oxidative direction. Methanococcus jannaschii failed to incorporate carbon from acetate despite transmembrane equilibration comparable to other weak acids. This organism was devoid of detectable activities of the acetate-incorporating enzymes acetyl coenzyme A synthetase, acetate kinase, and phosphotransacetylase. However, incorporation of [1-C]-, [2-C]-, or [3-C]pyruvate during the growth of M. jannaschii was possible and resulted in labeling patterns indicative of a noncyclic citric acid pathway operating in the reductive direction to synthesize amino acids. Carbohydrates were labeled consistent with glucogenesis from pyruvate. Leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, lysine, formate, glycerol, and mevalonate were incorporated when supplied to the growth medium. Lysine was preferentially incorporated into the lipid fraction, suggesting a role as a phytanyl chain precursor.

  5. Methane production potentials, pathways, and communities of methanogens in vertical sediment profiles of river Sitka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Václav; Blaser, Martin B; Claus, Peter; Chaudhary, Prem P; Rulík, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Biological methanogenesis is linked to permanent water logged systems, e.g., rice field soils or lake sediments. In these systems the methanogenic community as well as the pathway of methane formation are well-described. By contrast, the methanogenic potential of river sediments is so far not well-investigated. Therefore, we analyzed (a) the methanogenic potential (incubation experiments), (b) the pathway of methane production (stable carbon isotopes and inhibitor studies), and (c) the methanogenic community composition (terminal restriction length polymorphism of mcrA) in depth profiles of sediment cores of River Sitka, Czech Republic. We found two depth-related distinct maxima for the methanogenic potentials (a) The pathway of methane production was dominated by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (b) The methanogenic community composition was similar in all depth layers (c) The main TRFs were representative for Methanosarcina, Methanosaeta, Methanobacterium, and Methanomicrobium species. The isotopic signals of acetate indicated a relative high contribution of chemolithotrophic acetogenesis to the acetate pool.

  6. Energetic and hydrogen limitations of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, L. C.; Holden, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are a unique ecosystem, based ultimately not on photosynthesis but chemosynthetic primary production. This makes them an excellent analog environment for the early Earth, and for potential extraterrestrial habitable environments, such as those on Mars and Europa. The habitability of given vent systems for chemoautotrophic prokaryotes can be modeled energetically by estimating the available Gibbs energy for specific modes of chemoautotrophy, using geochemical data and mixing models for hydrothermal fluids and seawater (McCollom and Shock, 1997). However, modeling to date has largely not taken into account variation in organisms' energy demands in these environments. Controls on maintenance energies are widely assumed to be temperature-dependent, rising with increasing temperature optima (Tijhuis et al., 1993), and species-independent. The impacts of other environmental stressors and particular energy-gathering strategies on maintenance energies have not been investigated. We have undertaken culture-based studies of growth and maintenance energies in thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogenic (hydrogenotrophic) archaea from deep-sea hydrothermal vents to investigate potential controls on energy demands in hydrothermal vent microbes, and to quantify their growth and maintenance energies for future bioenergetic modeling. We have investigated trends in their growth energies over their full temperature range and a range of nitrogen concentrations, and in their maintenance energies at different hydrogen concentrations. Growth energies in these organisms appear to rise with temperature, but do not vary between hyperthermophilic and thermophilic methanogens. Nitrogen availability at tested levels (40μM - 9.4 mM) does not appear to affect growth energies in all but one tested organism. In continuous chemostat culture, specific methane production varied with hydrogen availability but was similar between a thermophilic and a hyperthermophilic

  7. Methylotrophic methanogenic Thermoplasmata implicated in reduced methane emissions from bovine rumen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten; Schwab, Clarissa; Jensen, Bent Borg

    2013-01-01

    Rumen methanogens are major sources of anthropogenic methane emissions, and these archaea are targets in strategies aimed at reducing methane emissions. Here we show that the poorly characterised Thermoplasmata archaea in bovine rumen are methylotrophic methanogens and that they are reduced upon...... potential as target in future strategies to mitigate methane emissions from ruminant livestock. Our findings and the findings of others also indicate a wider distribution of methanogens than previously anticipated....

  8. Community Structure in Methanogenic Enrichments Provides Insight into Syntrophic Interactions in Hydrocarbon-Impacted Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fowler, Jane; Toth, Courtney R. A.; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    -impacted environments. In this study, a methanogenic crude oil-degrading enrichment culture was successively transferred onto the single long chain fatty acids palmitate or stearate followed by their parent alkanes, hexadecane or octadecane, respectively, in order to assess the impact of different substrates......, indicate that many syntrophic interactions are stable over time despite changes in substrate pressure, and show that syntrophic interactions amongst bacteria themselves are as important as interactions between bacteria and methanogens in complex methanogenic communities....

  9. Using archaeol to investigate the location of methanogens in the ruminant digestive tract

    OpenAIRE

    McCartney, Christine A.; Bull, Ian D.; Dewhurst, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    The quantification of archaeol, a methanogen membrane lipid, may provide an alternative method to estimate methanogen abundance. The focus of this study was to determine thelocation of methanogens in the ruminant digestive tract using this biomarker. Archaeol was quantified in samples obtained from four lactating cows with rumen cannulae that grazed on either white clover (WC) or perennial ryegrass (PRG) in a changeover design study with three 3-week periods. Faeces were collected over the fi...

  10. Conversion of Crude Oil to Methane by a Microbial Consortium Enriched From Oil Reservoir Production Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina eBerdugo-Clavijo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil is an important process occurring in petroleum reservoirs and other oil-containing environments such as contaminated aquifers. In this process, syntrophic bacteria degrade hydrocarbon substrates to products such as acetate, and/or H2 and CO2 that are then used by methanogens to produce methane in a thermodynamically dependent manner. We enriched a methanogenic crude oil-degrading consortium from production waters sampled from a low temperature heavy oil reservoir. Alkylsuccinates indicative of fumarate addition to C5 and C6 n-alkanes were identified in the culture (above levels found in controls, corresponding to the detection of an alkyl succinate synthase gene (assA in the culture. In addition, the enrichment culture was tested for its ability to produce methane from residual oil in a sandstone-packed column system simulating a mature field. Methane production rates of up 5.8 μmol CH4/g of oil/day were measured in the column system. Amounts of produced methane were in relatively good agreement with hydrocarbon loss showing depletion of more than 50% of saturate and aromatic hydrocarbons. Microbial community analysis revealed that the enrichment culture was dominated by members of the genus Smithella, Methanosaeta, and Methanoculleus. However, a shift in microbial community occurred following incubation of the enrichment in the sandstone columns. Here, Methanobacterium sp. were most abundant, as were bacterial members of the genus Pseudomonas and other known biofilm forming organisms. Our findings show that microorganisms enriched from petroleum reservoir waters can bioconvert crude oil components to methane both planktonically and in sandstone-packed columns as test systems. Further, the results suggest that different organisms may contribute to oil biodegradation within different phases (e.g., planktonic versus sessile within a subsurface crude oil reservoir.

  11. Methane production and methanogenic Archaea in the digestive tracts of millipedes (Diplopoda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Šustr

    Full Text Available Methane production by intestinal methanogenic Archaea and their community structure were compared among phylogenetic lineages of millipedes. Tropical and temperate millipedes of 35 species and 17 families were investigated. Species that emitted methane were mostly in the juliform orders Julida, Spirobolida, and Spirostreptida. The irregular phylogenetic distribution of methane production correlated with the presence of the methanogen-specific mcrA gene. The study brings the first detailed survey of methanogens' diversity in the digestive tract of millipedes. Sequences related to Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and some unclassified Archaea were detected using molecular profiling (DGGE. The differences in substrate preferences of the main lineages of methanogenic Archaea found in different millipede orders indicate that the composition of methanogen communities may reflect the differences in available substrates for methanogenesis or the presence of symbiotic protozoa in the digestive tract. We conclude that differences in methane production in the millipede gut reflect differences in the activity and proliferation of intestinal methanogens rather than an absolute inability of some millipede taxa to host methanogens. This inference was supported by the general presence of methanogenic activity in millipede faecal pellets and the presence of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens in all tested taxa in the two main groups of millipedes, the Helminthophora and the Pentazonia.

  12. Methane production and methanogenic Archaea in the digestive tracts of millipedes (Diplopoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šustr, Vladimír; Chroňáková, Alica; Semanová, Stanislava; Tajovský, Karel; Šimek, Miloslav

    2014-01-01

    Methane production by intestinal methanogenic Archaea and their community structure were compared among phylogenetic lineages of millipedes. Tropical and temperate millipedes of 35 species and 17 families were investigated. Species that emitted methane were mostly in the juliform orders Julida, Spirobolida, and Spirostreptida. The irregular phylogenetic distribution of methane production correlated with the presence of the methanogen-specific mcrA gene. The study brings the first detailed survey of methanogens' diversity in the digestive tract of millipedes. Sequences related to Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and some unclassified Archaea were detected using molecular profiling (DGGE). The differences in substrate preferences of the main lineages of methanogenic Archaea found in different millipede orders indicate that the composition of methanogen communities may reflect the differences in available substrates for methanogenesis or the presence of symbiotic protozoa in the digestive tract. We conclude that differences in methane production in the millipede gut reflect differences in the activity and proliferation of intestinal methanogens rather than an absolute inability of some millipede taxa to host methanogens. This inference was supported by the general presence of methanogenic activity in millipede faecal pellets and the presence of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens in all tested taxa in the two main groups of millipedes, the Helminthophora and the Pentazonia.

  13. Shifts in methanogenic community composition and methane fluxes along the degradation of discontinuous permafrost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebner, Susanne; Ganzert, Lars; Kiss, Andrea; Yang, Sizhong; Wagner, Dirk; Svenning, Mette M

    2015-01-01

    The response of methanogens to thawing permafrost is an important factor for the global greenhouse gas budget. We tracked methanogenic community structure, activity, and abundance along the degradation of sub-Arctic palsa peatland permafrost. We observed the development of pronounced methane production, release, and abundance of functional (mcrA) methanogenic gene numbers following the transitions from permafrost (palsa) to thaw pond structures. This was associated with the establishment of a methanogenic community consisting both of hydrogenotrophic (Methanobacterium, Methanocellales), and potential acetoclastic (Methanosarcina) members and their activity. While peat bog development was not reflected in significant changes of mcrA copy numbers, potential methane production, and rates of methane release decreased. This was primarily linked to a decline of potential acetoclastic in favor of hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Although palsa peatland succession offers similarities with typical transitions from fen to bog ecosystems, the observed dynamics in methane fluxes and methanogenic communities are primarily attributed to changes within the dominant Bryophyta and Cyperaceae taxa rather than to changes in peat moss and sedge coverage, pH and nutrient regime. Overall, the palsa peatland methanogenic community was characterized by a few dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs). These OTUs seem to be indicative for methanogenic species that thrive in terrestrial organic rich environments. In summary, our study shows that after an initial stage of high methane emissions following permafrost thaw, methane fluxes, and methanogenic communities establish that are typical for northern peat bogs.

  14. Biomarker evidence for widespread anaerobic methane oxidation in Mediterranean sediments by a consortium of methanogenic archae and bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Pancost, R.D.; Lint, S. de; Maarel, M.J.E.C. van der; Gottschal, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Although abundant geochemical data indicate that anaerobic methane oxidation occurs in marine sediments, the linkage to specific microorganisms remains unclear. In order to examine processes of methane consumption and oxidation, sediment samples from mud volcanoes at two distinct sites on the Medite

  15. Consortium for Health and Military Performance (CHAMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center's work addresses a wide scope of trauma exposure from the consequences of combat, operations other than war, terrorism, natural and humanmade disasters,...

  16. Methanogenic activity tests by Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Cruz, Karla; Sepulveda-Jauregui, Armando; Escobar-Orozco, Nayeli; Thalasso, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    Methanogenic activity (MA) tests are commonly carried out to estimate the capability of anaerobic biomass to treat effluents, to evaluate anaerobic activity in bioreactors or natural ecosystems, or to quantify inhibitory effects on methanogenic activity. These activity tests are usually based on the measurement of the volume of biogas produced by volumetric, pressure increase or gas chromatography (GC) methods. In this study, we present an alternative method for non-invasive measurement of methane produced during activity tests in closed vials, based on Infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (MA-TDLAS). This new method was tested during model acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity tests and was compared to a more traditional method based on gas chromatography. From the results obtained, the CH(4) detection limit of the method was estimated to 60 ppm and the minimum measurable methane production rate was estimated to 1.09(.)10(-3) mg l(-1) h(-1), which is below CH(4) production rate usually reported in both anaerobic reactors and natural ecosystems. Additionally to sensitivity, the method has several potential interests compared to more traditional methods among which short measurements time allowing the measurement of a large number of MA test vials, non-invasive measurements avoiding leakage or external interferences and similar cost to GC based methods. It is concluded that MA-TDLAS is a promising method that could be of interest not only in the field of anaerobic digestion but also, in the field of environmental ecology where CH(4) production rates are usually very low. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Anaerobic degradation of citrate under sulfate reducing and methanogenic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, Victor M; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Waltz, Rebecca J; Field, James A

    2009-07-01

    Citrate is an important component of metal processing effluents such as chemical mechanical planarization wastewaters of the semiconductor industry. Citrate can serve as an electron donor for sulfate reduction applied to promote the removal of metals, and it can also potentially be used by methanogens that coexist in anaerobic biofilms. The objective of this study was to evaluate the degradation of citrate with sulfate-reducing and methanogenic biofilms. During batch bioassays, the citrate, acetate, methane and sulfide concentrations were monitored. The results indicate that independent of the biofilm or incubation conditions used, citrate was rapidly fermented with specific rates ranging from 566 to 720 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD) consumed per gram volatile suspended solids per day. Acetate was found to be the main fermentation product of citrate degradation, which was later degraded completely under either methanogenic or sulfate reducing conditions. However, if either sulfate reduction or methanogenesis was infeasible due to specific inhibitors (2-bromoethane sulfonate), absence of sulfate or lack of adequate microorganisms in the biofilm, acetate accumulated to levels accounting for 90-100% of the citrate-COD consumed. Based on carbon balances measured in phosphate buffered bioassays, acetate, CO(2) and hydrogen are the main products of citrate fermentation, with a molar ratio of 2:2:1 per mol of citrate, respectively. In bicarbonate buffered bioassays, acetogenesis of H(2) and CO(2) increased the yield of acetate. The results taken as a whole suggest that in anaerobic biofilm systems, citrate is metabolized via the formation of acetate as the main metabolic intermediate prior to methanogenesis or sulfate reduction. Sulfate reducing consortia must be enriched to utilize acetate as an electron donor in order to utilize the majority of the electron-equivalents in citrate.

  18. Degradation of hydrocarbons under methanogenic conditions in different geosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straaten, Nontje; Jiménez García, Núria; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Krueger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    With increasing energy demand the search for new resources is becoming increasingly important for the future energy supply. Therefore the knowledge about fossil fuels like oil or natural gas and their extraction should be expanded. Biodegraded oil is found in many reservoirs worldwide. Consequently, it is very important to get insight in the microbial communities and metabolic processes involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Due to the lack of alternative electron acceptors in hydrocarbon-rich geosystems, degradation often takes place under methanogenic conditions. The aim of the present study is to identify the microorganisms and mechanisms involved in the degradation of complex hydrocarbons, like BTEX and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, using culture dependent and independent techniques. For this purpose enrichment cultures from marine sediments, shales, coal and oil reservoirs are monitored for their capability to degrade alkanes and aromatic compounds. Moreover the environmental samples of these different geosystems analysed for evidence for the in situ occurrence of methanogenic oil degradation. The gas geochemical data provided in several cases hints for a recent biological origin of the methane present. First results of the microbial community analysis showed in environmental samples and enrichment cultures the existence of Bacteria known to degrade hydrocarbons. Also a diverse community of methanogenic Archaea could be found in the clone libraries. Additionally, in oil and coal reservoir samples the degradation of model hydrocarbons, e.g. methylnaphthalene, hexadecane and BTEX, to CH4 was confirmed by 13C-labeling. To explore the mechanisms involved in biodegradation, the enrichments as well as the original environmental samples are further analysed for the presence of respective functional genes.

  19. Trace elements induce predominance among methanogenic activity in anaerobic digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babett Wintsche

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Trace elements play an essential role in all organisms due to their functions in enzyme complexes. In anaerobic digesters, control and supplementation of trace elements lead to stable and more efficient methane production processes while trace element deficits cause process imbalances. However, the underlying metabolic mechanisms and the adaptation of the affected microbial communities to such deficits are not yet fully understood. Here, we investigated the microbial community dynamics and resulting process changes induced by trace element deprivation. Two identical lab-scale continuous stirred tank reactors fed with distiller’s grains and supplemented with trace elements (cobalt, molybdenum, nickel, tungsten and a commercial iron additive were operated in parallel. After 72 weeks of identical operation, the feeding regime of one reactor was changed by omitting trace element supplements and reducing the amount of iron additive. Both reactors were operated for further 21 weeks. Various process parameters (biogas production and composition, total solids and volatile solids, trace element concentration, volatile fatty acids, total ammonium nitrogen, total organic acids/alkalinity ratio, and pH and the composition and activity of the microbial communities were monitored over the total experimental time. While the methane yield remained stable, the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, total ammonia nitrogen, and acetate increased in the trace element-depleted reactor compared to the well-supplied control reactor. Methanosarcina and Methanoculleus dominated the methanogenic communities in both reactors. However, the activity ratio of these two genera was shown to depend on trace element supplementation explainable by different trace element requirements of their energy conservation systems. Methanosarcina dominated the well-supplied anaerobic digester, pointing to acetoclastic methanogenesis as the dominant methanogenic pathway. Under trace element

  20. Introduction to Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium is an alliance of neuroscience journals that have agreed to accept manuscript reviews from other members of the Consortium.Its goals are to support efficient and thorough peer review of original research in neuroscience, speed the publication of research reports, and reduce the burden on peer reviewers.

  1. Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Methanomassiliicoccus intestinalis" Issoire-Mx1, a Third Thermoplasmatales-Related Methanogenic Archaeon from Human Feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrel, Guillaume; Harris, Hugh M B; Parisot, Nicolas; Gaci, Nadia; Tottey, William; Mihajlovski, Agnès; Deane, Jennifer; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Bardot, Olivier; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre; O'Toole, Paul W; Brugère, Jean-François

    2013-07-11

    "Candidatus Methanomassiliicoccus intestinalis" Issoire-Mx1 is a methanogenic archaeon found in the human gut and is a representative of the novel order of methanogens related to Thermoplasmatales. Its complete genome sequence is presented here.

  2. Spatial Variations of the Methanogenic Communities in the Sediments of Tropical Mangroves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Hongmei; Cheung, Shunyan; Zhou, Zhi; Wu, Chen; Nagarajan, Sanjay; Liu, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Methane production by methanogens in mangrove sediments is known to contribute significantly to global warming, but studies on the shift of methanogenic community in response to anthropogenic contaminations were still limited. In this study, the effect of anthropogenic activities in the mangrove sediments along the north and south coastlines of Singapore were investigated by pyrosequencing of the mcrA gene. Our results showed that hydrogenotrophic, acetoclastic and methylotrophic methanogens coexist in the sediments. The predominance of the methylotrophic Methanosarcinales reflects the potential for high methane production as well as the possible availability of low acetate and high methylated C-1 compounds as substrates. A decline in the number of acetoclastic/methylotrophic methanogens in favor of hydrogenotrophic methanogens was observed along a vertical profile in Sungei Changi, which was contaminated by heavy metals. The diversity of methanogens in the various contaminated stations was significantly different from that in a pristine St. John’s Island. The spatial variation in the methanogenic communities among the different stations was more distinct than those along the vertical profiles at each station. We suggest that the overall heterogeneity of the methanogenic communities residing in the tropical mangrove sediments might be due to the accumulated effects of temperature and concentrations of nitrate, cobalt, and nickel. PMID:27684479

  3. Chasing the elusive Euryarchaeota class WSA2: genomes reveal a uniquely fastidious methyl-reducing methanogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobu, Masaru Konishi; Narihiro, Takashi; Kuroda, Kyohei; Mei, Ran; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-10-01

    The ecophysiology of one candidate methanogen class WSA2 (or Arc I) remains largely uncharacterized, despite the long history of research on Euryarchaeota methanogenesis. To expand our understanding of methanogen diversity and evolution, we metagenomically recover eight draft genomes for four WSA2 populations. Taxonomic analyses indicate that WSA2 is a distinct class from other Euryarchaeota. None of genomes harbor pathways for CO2-reducing and aceticlastic methanogenesis, but all possess H2 and CO oxidation and energy conservation through H2-oxidizing electron confurcation and internal H2 cycling. As the only discernible methanogenic outlet, they consistently encode a methylated thiol coenzyme M methyltransferase. Although incomplete, all draft genomes point to the proposition that WSA2 is the first discovered methanogen restricted to methanogenesis through methylated thiol reduction. In addition, the genomes lack pathways for carbon fixation, nitrogen fixation and biosynthesis of many amino acids. Acetate, malonate and propionate may serve as carbon sources. Using methylated thiol reduction, WSA2 may not only bridge the carbon and sulfur cycles in eutrophic methanogenic environments, but also potentially compete with CO2-reducing methanogens and even sulfate reducers. These findings reveal a remarkably unique methanogen 'Candidatus Methanofastidiosum methylthiophilus' as the first insight into the sixth class of methanogens 'Candidatus Methanofastidiosa'.

  4. Early Methanogenic Colonisation in the Faeces of Meishan and Yorkshire Piglets as Determined by Pyrosequencing Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Y.; Bian, G.R.; Zhu, Z.G.; Smidt, H.; Zhu, W.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Gut methanogenic archaea of monogastric animals are considered to be related to energy metabolism and adipose deposition of the host; however, information on their development in young piglets is limited. Thus, to investigate early methanogenic colonisation in the faeces of Meishan and Yorkshire pig

  5. Detection of methanogenic archaea in seawater particles and the digestive tract of a marine fish species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Maarel, MJEC; Sprenger, W; Haanstra, R; Forney, LJ

    1999-01-01

    A methanogen-specific nested PCR approach was used to detect methanogenic archaea in seawater particles of the North Sea and the feces and the digestive tract of flounder (Platichthys flesus), a fish found in the North Sea. A number of 16S rDNA sequences with 97.6-99.5% similarity to

  6. Methanogenic degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in subsurface environments remediation, heavy oil formation, and energy recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, N D; Sherry, A; Hubert, C; Dolfing, J; Head, I M

    2010-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are common constituents of surface, shallow, and deep-subsurface environments. Under anaerobic conditions, hydrocarbons can be degraded to methane by methanogenic microbial consortia. This degradation process is widespread in the geosphere. In comparison with other anaerobic processes, methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation is more sustainable over geological time scales because replenishment of an exogenous electron acceptor is not required. As a consequence, this process has been responsible for the formation of the world's vast deposits of heavy oil, which far exceed conventional oil assets such as those found in the Middle East. Methanogenic degradation is also a potentially important component of attenuation in hydrocarbon contamination plumes. Studies of the organisms, syntrophic partnerships, mechanisms, and geochemical signatures associated with methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation have identified common themes and diagnostic markers for this process in the subsurface. These studies have also identified the potential to engineer methanogenic processes to enhance the recovery of energy assets as biogenic methane from residual oils stranded in petroleum systems.

  7. Presence of an unusual methanogenic bacterium in coal gasification waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, F A; Rouse, D; Maki, J S; Mitchell, R

    1988-12-01

    Methanogenic bacteria growing on a pilot-scale, anaerobic filter processing coal gasification waste were enriched in a mineral salts medium containing hydrogen and acetate as potential energy sources. Transfer of the enrichments to methanol medium resulted in the initial growth of a strain of Methanosarcina barkeri, but eventually small cocci became dominant. The cocci growing on methanol produced methane and exhibited the typical fluorescence of methanogenic bacteria. They grew in the presence of the cell wall synthesis-inhibiting antibiotics d-cycloserine, fosfomycin, penicillin G, and vancomycin as well as in the presence of kanamycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis in eubacteria. The optimal growth temperature was 37 degrees C, and the doubling time was 7.5 h. The strain lysed after reaching stationary phase. The bacterium grew poorly with hydrogen as the energy source and failed to grow on acetate. Morphologically, the coccus shared similarities with Methanosarcina sp. Cells were 1 mum wide, exhibited the typical thick cell wall and cross-wall formation, and formed tetrads. Packets and cysts were not formed.

  8. Glycine betaine as a direct substrate for methanogens (Methanococcoides spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Andrew J; Roussel, Erwan G; Parkes, R John; Sass, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Nine marine methanogenic Methanococcoides strains, including the type strains of Methanococcoides methylutens, M. burtonii, and M. alaskense, were tested for the utilization of N-methylated glycines. Three strains (NM1, PM2, and MKM1) used glycine betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) as a substrate for methanogenesis, partially demethylating it to N,N-dimethylglycine, whereas none of the strains used N,N-dimethylglycine or sarcosine (N-methylglycine). Growth rates and growth yields per mole of substrate with glycine betaine (3.96 g [dry weight] per mol) were similar to those with trimethylamine (4.11 g [dry weight] per mol). However, as glycine betaine is only partially demethylated, the yield per methyl group was significantly higher than with trimethylamine. If glycine betaine and trimethylamine are provided together, trimethylamine is demethylated to dimethyl- and methylamine with limited glycine betaine utilization. After trimethylamine is depleted, dimethylamine and glycine betaine are consumed rapidly, before methylamine. Glycine betaine extends the range of substrates that can be directly utilized by some methanogens, allowing them to gain energy from the substrate without the need for syntrophic partners.

  9. Recovery of palladium(II) by methanogenic granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat-Espadas, Aurora M; Field, James A; Otero-Gonzalez, Lila; Razo-Flores, Elías; Cervantes, Francisco J; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2016-02-01

    This is the first report that demonstrates the ability of anaerobic methanogenic granular sludge to reduce Pd(II) to Pd(0). Different electron donors were evaluated for their effectiveness in promoting Pd reduction. Formate and H2 fostered both chemically and biologically mediated Pd reduction. Ethanol only promoted the reduction of Pd(II) under biotic conditions and the reduction was likely mediated by H2 released from ethanol fermentation. No reduction was observed in biotic or abiotic assays with all other substrates tested (acetate, lactate and pyruvate) although a large fraction of the total Pd was removed from the liquid medium likely due to biosorption. Pd(II) displayed severe inhibition towards acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, as indicated by 50% inhibiting concentrations as low as 0.96 and 2.7 mg/L, respectively. The results obtained indicate the potential of utilizing anaerobic granular sludge bioreactor technology as a practical and promising option for Pd(II) reduction and recovery offering advantages over pure cultures.

  10. Methanobacterium Dominates Biocathodic Archaeal Communities in Methanogenic Microbial Electrolysis Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael

    2015-07-06

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Methane is the primary end product from cathodic current in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) in the absence of methanogenic inhibitors, but little is known about the archaeal communities that develop in these systems. MECs containing cathodes made from different materials (carbon brushes, or plain graphite blocks or blocks coated with carbon black and platinum, stainless steel, nickel, ferrihydrite, magnetite, iron sulfide, or molybdenum disulfide) were inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and acclimated at a set potential of -600 mV (versus a standard hydrogen electrode). The archaeal communities on all cathodes, except those coated with platinum, were predominated by Methanobacterium (median 97% of archaea). Cathodes with platinum contained mainly archaea most similar to Methanobrevibacter. Neither of these methanogens were abundant (<0.1% of archaea) in the inoculum, and therefore their high abundance on the cathode resulted from selective enrichment. In contrast, bacterial communities on the cathode were more diverse, containing primarily δ-Proteobacteria (41% of bacteria). The lack of a consistent bacterial genus on the cathodes indicated that there was no similarly selective enrichment of bacteria on the cathode. These results suggest that the genus Methanobacterium was primarily responsible for methane production in MECs when cathodes lack efficient catalysts for hydrogen gas evolution. (Figure Presented).

  11. Taxonomic status and ecologic function of methanogenic bacteria isolated from the oral cavity of humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    The detection of methane gas in samples of dental plaque and media inoculated with dental plaque was attributed to the presence of methane-producing bacteria in the plaque microbiota. The results of a taxonomic analysis of the 12 methanogenic isolates obtained from human dental plaque, (ABK1-ABK12), placed the organisms in the genus Methanobrevibacter. A DNA-DNA hybridization survey established three distinct genetic groups of oral methanogens based on percent homology values. The groups exhibited less than 32% homology between themselves and less than 17% homology with the three known members of the genus methanobrevibacter. The ecological role of the oral methanogens was established using mixed cultures of selected methanogenic isolates (ABK1, ABK4, ABK6, or ABK7) with oral heterotrophic bacteria. Binary cultures of either Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguis, Veillonella rodentium, Lactobacillus casei, or Peptostreptococcus anaerobius together with either methanogenic isolates ABK6 or ABK7 were grown to determine the effect of the methanogens on the distribution of carbon end products produced by the heterotrophs. Binary cultures of S. mutans and ABK7 exhibited a 27% decrease in lactic acid formation when compared to pure culture of S. mutans. The decrease in lactic acid production was attributed to the removal of formate by the methanogen, (ABK7), which caused an alteration in the distribution of carbon end products by S. mutans.

  12. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A consortium designed to enhance collaboration among epidemiologists studying lymphoma, to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas, and to create a framework for collaborating on analyses that pool data from multiple studies

  13. NASA Space Radiation Transport Code Development Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Lawrence W

    2005-01-01

    Recently, NASA established a consortium involving the University of Tennessee (lead institution), the University of Houston, Roanoke College and various government and national laboratories, to accelerate the development of a standard set of radiation transport computer codes for NASA human exploration applications. This effort involves further improvements of the Monte Carlo codes HETC and FLUKA and the deterministic code HZETRN, including developing nuclear reaction databases necessary to extend the Monte Carlo codes to carry out heavy ion transport, and extending HZETRN to three dimensions. The improved codes will be validated by comparing predictions with measured laboratory transport data, provided by an experimental measurements consortium, and measurements in the upper atmosphere on the balloon-borne Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB). In this paper, we present an overview of the consortium members and the current status and future plans of consortium efforts to meet the research goals and objectives of this extensive undertaking.

  14. International Radical Cystectomy Consortium: A way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Johar Raza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC is an emerging operative alternative to open surgery for the management of invasive bladder cancer. Studies from single institutions provide limited data due to the small number of patients. In order to better understand the related outcomes, a world-wide consortium was established in 2006 of patients undergoing RARC, called the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC. Thus far, the IRCC has reported its findings on various areas of operative interest and continues to expand its capacity to include other operative modalities and transform it into the International Radical Cystectomy Consortium. This article summarizes the findings of the IRCC and highlights the future direction of the consortium.

  15. The LBNL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses the 11 year of accomplishments of the science consortium of minority graduates from Jackson State University and Ana G. Mendez University at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  16. Methane production from coal by a single methanogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayumi, Daisuke; Mochimaru, Hanako; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Suzuki, Yuichiro; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sakata, Susumu

    2016-10-01

    Coal-bed methane is one of the largest unconventional natural gas resources. Although microbial activity may greatly contribute to coal-bed methane formation, it is unclear whether the complex aromatic organic compounds present in coal can be used for methanogenesis. We show that deep subsurface-derived Methermicoccus methanogens can produce methane from more than 30 types of methoxylated aromatic compounds (MACs) as well as from coals containing MACs. In contrast to known methanogenesis pathways involving one- and two-carbon compounds, this “methoxydotrophic” mode of methanogenesis couples O-demethylation, CO2 reduction, and possibly acetyl-coenzyme A metabolism. Because MACs derived from lignin may occur widely in subsurface sediments, methoxydotrophic methanogenesis would play an important role in the formation of natural gas not limited to coal-bed methane and in the global carbon cycle.

  17. Methanogenic burst in the end-Permian carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Daniel H; Fournier, Gregory P; French, Katherine L; Alm, Eric J; Boyle, Edward A; Cao, Changqun; Summons, Roger E

    2014-04-15

    The end-Permian extinction is associated with a mysterious disruption to Earth's carbon cycle. Here we identify causal mechanisms via three observations. First, we show that geochemical signals indicate superexponential growth of the marine inorganic carbon reservoir, coincident with the extinction and consistent with the expansion of a new microbial metabolic pathway. Second, we show that the efficient acetoclastic pathway in Methanosarcina emerged at a time statistically indistinguishable from the extinction. Finally, we show that nickel concentrations in South China sediments increased sharply at the extinction, probably as a consequence of massive Siberian volcanism, enabling a methanogenic expansion by removal of nickel limitation. Collectively, these results are consistent with the instigation of Earth's greatest mass extinction by a specific microbial innovation.

  18. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. PMID:25428369

  20. A mechanistic model of hydrogen-methanogen dynamics in the rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuancheng; Janssen, Peter H; Lynch, Tammy A; Brunt, Bruce van; Pacheco, David

    2016-03-21

    Existing mathematical models to estimate methane production in the rumen are based on calculation of hydrogen balances without considering the presence of methanogens. In this study, a mechanistic model of methane production is proposed that depicts the interaction between hydrogen concentration and methanogens in the rumen. Analytical results show that it meets biological expectations, namely increased fractional passage rate leads to a greater growth rate of methanogens, and a greater steady state hydrogen concentration. This model provides a basis on which to develop a more comprehensive model of methane production in the rumen that includes thermodynamics and feed fermentation pathways.

  1. A comprehensive study into the molecular methodology and molecular biology of methanogenic Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, M.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    Methanogens belong to the kingdom of Euryarchaeota in the domain of Archaea. The Archaea differ from Bacteria in many aspects important to molecular work. Among these are cell wall composition, their sensitivity to antibiotics, their translation and transcription machinery, and their very strict...... demands to anaerobic culture conditions. These differences may, at least partly, be responsible for the delay in availability of genetic research tools for methanogens. At present, however, the research within genetics of methanogens and their gene regulation and expression is in rapid progress. Two...

  2. Growth of methylaminotrophic, acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic bacteria on artificial supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, H; Vidal, R; Baeza, M; Reyes, J E; Aspe, E

    1997-06-01

    The efficiency of organic matter degradation in attached biomass reactors depends on the suitable selection of artificial support for the retention of bacterial communities. We have studied the growth on glass and clay beads of methylaminotrophic, acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic bacterial communities isolated from anaerobic reactors. Bacterial counts were performed by the standard MPN technique. Experiments were performed in 50 ml vials for 12 days at 35 degrees C. Increase in the counts of methylaminotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens occurred on both glass and clay beads. The latter support material also stimulated the growth rate of methylaminotrophic methanogens.

  3. The Effects of Desiccation on Methanogens Under Aerobic and Anaerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C.; Kral, T. A.

    2010-04-01

    Survival of methanogens following desiccation depends on whether they are maintained under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. Cells maintained in a desiccated state in the presence of oxygen did not survive as well as those maintained anaerobically.

  4. Assessing the Ecophysiology of Methanogens in the Context of Recent Astrobiological and Planetological Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth-Sophie Taubner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Among all known microbes capable of thriving under extreme and, therefore, potentially extraterrestrial environmental conditions, methanogens from the domain Archaea are intriguing organisms. This is due to their broad metabolic versatility, enormous diversity, and ability to grow under extreme environmental conditions. Several studies revealed that growth conditions of methanogens are compatible with environmental conditions on extraterrestrial bodies throughout the Solar System. Hence, life in the Solar System might not be limited to the classical habitable zone. In this contribution we assess the main ecophysiological characteristics of methanogens and compare these to the environmental conditions of putative habitats in the Solar System, in particular Mars and icy moons. Eventually, we give an outlook on the feasibility and the necessity of future astrobiological studies concerning methanogens.

  5. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shcherbakova, Viktoria; Oshurkova, Viktoria; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    .... The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which...

  6. Effect of sorption kinetics on nickel toxicity in methanogenic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartacek, J.; Fermoso, F.G.; Catena, A.B.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of nickel speciation and its equilibrium kinetics on the nickel toxicity to methylotrophic methanogenic activity. Toxicity tests were done with anaerobic granular sludge in three different media containing variable concentrations of complexing ligands. A correlatio

  7. Ammonia tolerant enriched methanogenic cultures as bioaugmentation inocula to alleviate ammonia inhibition in continuous anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Angelidaki, Irini

    tolerant methanogenic culture as potential bioaugmentation inoculum in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operating under “inhibited steady-state”, triggered by high ammonia levels (5 g NH4+-N L-1). The results of the current study established for the first time that bioaugmentation of an enriched...... ammonia tolerant methanogen in a CSTR reactor could completely alleviate the ammonia inhibitory effect. Furthermore, it was found that bioaugmentation with the enriched culture resulted in 25% higher methane production compared to when the bioaugmentation was achieved with pure methanogenic strains....... The bioaugmentation was performed without pausing the continuous operation of the CSTR reactor and without excluding the ammonia-rich substrate from the feedstock. Thus, bioaugmentation with mixed methanogenic cultures could potentially support the development of an efficient and cost-effective biomethanation process...

  8. Ammonia tolerant enriched methanogenic cultures as bioaugmentation inocula to alleviate ammonia inhibition in continuous anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Angelidaki, Irini

    Ammonia is the most common inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process, resulting in suboptimal exploitation of the biogas potential of the feedstocks, causing significant economic losses to the biogas plants. Ammonia is mainly inhibiting the aceticlastic methanogens, while the hydrogenotrophic...... of ammonia-rich organic waste in full-scale continuous reactors.......Ammonia is the most common inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process, resulting in suboptimal exploitation of the biogas potential of the feedstocks, causing significant economic losses to the biogas plants. Ammonia is mainly inhibiting the aceticlastic methanogens, while the hydrogenotrophic...... methanogens are more robust to ammonia toxicity effect. It has been shown that bioaugmentation of a pure strain of a hydrogenotrophic methanogen (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis) in an ammonia inhibited continuous anaerobic reactor can improve methane production more than 30%. Nevertheless, cultivation...

  9. Analysis of methanogenic activity in a thermophilic-dry anaerobic reactor: use of fluorescent in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, B; García-Morales, J L; Sales, D; Solera, R

    2009-03-01

    Methanogenic activity in a thermophilic-dry anaerobic reactor was determined by comparing the amount of methane generated for each of the organic loading rates with the size of the total and specific methanogenic population, as determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization. A high correlation was evident between the total methanogenic activity and retention time [-0.6988Ln(x)+2.667] (R(2) 0.8866). The total methanogenic activity increased from 0.04x10(-8) mLCH(4) cell(-1)day(-1) to 0.38x10(-8) mLCH(4) cell(-1)day(-1) while the retention time decreased, augmenting the organic loading rates. The specific methanogenic activities of H(2)-utilizing methanogens and acetate-utilizing methanogens increased until they stabilised at 0.64x10(-8) mLCH(4) cell(-1)day(-1) and 0.33x10(-8) mLCH(4) cell(-1)day(-1), respectively. The methanogenic activity of H(2)-utilizing methanogens was higher than acetate-utilizing methanogens, indicating that maintaining a low partial pressure of hydrogen does not inhibit the acetoclastic methanogenesis or the anaerobic process.

  10. Methanogenic Inhibition by Roxarsone (4-Hydroxy-3-nitrophenylarsonic acid) and Related Aromatic Arsenic Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Roxarsone (4-hydroxy-3-nitro-phenylarsonic acid) and p-arsanilic acid (4-aminophenylarsonic acid) are feed additives widely used in the broiler and swine industry. This study evaluated the inhibitory effect of roxarsone, p-arsanilic, and other phenylarsonic compounds on the activity of acetate- and H2-utilizing methanogenic microorganisms. Roxarsone, p-arsanilic, and 4-hydroxy-3-aminophenylarsonic acid (HAPA) inhibited acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens when supplemented at concent...

  11. Sensitivity and adaptability of methanogens to perchlorates: Implications for life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Timothy A.; Goodhart, Timothy H.; Harpool, Joshua D.; Hearnsberger, Christopher E.; McCracken, Graham L.; McSpadden, Stanley W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, the Mars Phoenix Lander discovered perchlorate at its landing site, and in 2012, the Curiosity rover confirmed the presence of perchlorate on Mars. The research reported here was designed to determine if certain methanogens could grow in the presence of three different perchlorate salt solutions. The methanogens tested were Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum and Methanococcus maripaludis. Media were prepared containing 0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 2%, 5% and 10% wt/vol magnesium perchlorate, sodium perchlorate, or calcium perchlorate. Organisms were inoculated into their respective media followed by incubation at each organism's growth temperature. Methane production, commonly used to measure methanogen growth, was measured by gas chromatography of headspace gas samples. Methane concentrations varied with species and perchlorate salt tested. However, all four methanogens produced substantial levels of methane in the presence of up to 1.0% perchlorate, but not higher. The standard procedure for growing methanogens typically includes sodium sulfide, a reducing agent, to reduce residual molecular oxygen. However, the sodium sulfide may have been reducing the perchlorate, thus allowing for growth of the methanogens. To investigate this possibility, experiments were conducted where stainless steel nails were used instead of sodium sulfide as the reducing agent. Prior to the addition of perchlorate and inoculation, the nails were removed from the liquid medium. Just as in the prior experiments, the methanogens produced methane at comparable levels to those seen with sodium sulfide as the reductant, indicating that sodium sulfide did not reduce the perchlorate to any significant extent. Additionally, cells metabolizing in 1% perchlorate were transferred to 2%, cells metabolizing in 2% were transferred to 5%, and finally cells metabolizing in 5% were transferred to 10%. All four species produced methane at 2% and 5%, but not 10

  12. Comparative study of fermentation and methanogen community structure in the digestive tract of goats and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abecia, L; Fondevila, M; Rodríguez-Romero, N; Martínez, G; Yáñez-Ruiz, D R

    2013-05-01

    Methane is the most important anthropogenic contribution to climate change after carbon dioxide and represents a loss of feed energy for the animal, mainly for herbivorous species. However, our knowledge about the ecology of Archaea, the microbial group responsible for methane synthesis in the gut, is very poor. Moreover, it is well known that hindgut fermentation differs from rumen fermentation. The composition of archaeal communities in fermentation compartments of goats and rabbits were investigated using DGGE to generate fingerprints of archaeal 16S rRNA gene. Ruminal contents and faeces from five Murciano-Granadina goats and caecal contents of five commercial White New Zealand rabbits were compared. Diversity profile of methanogenic archaea was carried out by PCR-DGGE. Quantification of methanogenic archaea and the abundance relative to bacteria was determined by real-time PCR. Methanogenic archaeal species were relatively constant across species. Dendrogram from DGGE of the methanogen community showed one cluster for goat samples with two sub-clusters by type of sample (ruminal and faeces). In a second cluster, samples from rabbit were grouped. No differences were found either in richness or Shannon index as diversity indexes. Although the primer sets used was developed to investigate rumen methanogenic archaeal community, primers specificity did not affect the assessment of rabbit methanogen community structure. Rumen content showed the highest number or methanogenic archaea (log₁₀ 9.36), followed by faeces (log₁₀ 8.52) and showing rabbit caecum the lower values (log₁₀ 5.52). DGGE profile showed that pre-gastric and hindgut fermenters hold a very different methanogen community. Rabbits hold a microbial community of similar complexity than that in ruminants but less abundant, which agrees with the type of fermentation profile.

  13. Community Structure in Methanogenic Enrichments Provides Insight into Syntrophic Interactions in Hydrocarbon-Impacted Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, S Jane; Toth, Courtney R A; Gieg, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil involves the conversion of hydrocarbons to methanogenic substrates by syntrophic bacteria and subsequent methane production by methanogens. Assessing the metabolic roles played by various microbial species in syntrophic communities remains a challenge, but such information has important implications for bioremediation and microbial enhanced energy recovery technologies. Many factors such as changing environmental conditions or substrate variations can influence the composition and biodegradation capabilities of syntrophic microbial communities in hydrocarbon-impacted environments. In this study, a methanogenic crude oil-degrading enrichment culture was successively transferred onto the single long chain fatty acids palmitate or stearate followed by their parent alkanes, hexadecane or octadecane, respectively, in order to assess the impact of different substrates on microbial community composition and retention of hydrocarbon biodegradation genes. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that a reduction in substrate diversity resulted in a corresponding loss of microbial diversity, but that hydrocarbon biodegradation genes (such as assA/masD encoding alkylsuccinate synthase) could be retained within a community even in the absence of hydrocarbon substrates. Despite substrate-related diversity changes, all communities were dominated by hydrogenotrophic and acetotrophic methanogens along with bacteria including Clostridium sp., members of the Deltaproteobacteria, and a number of other phyla. Microbial co-occurrence network analysis revealed a dense network of interactions amongst syntrophic bacteria and methanogens that were maintained despite changes in the substrates for methanogenesis. Our results reveal the effect of substrate diversity loss on microbial community diversity, indicate that many syntrophic interactions are stable over time despite changes in substrate pressure, and show that syntrophic interactions amongst

  14. Community structure in methanogenic enrichments provides insight into syntrophic interactions in hydrocarbon-impacted environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jane eFowler

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil involves the conversion of hydrocarbons to methanogenic substrates by syntrophic bacteria and subsequent methane production by methanogens. Assessing the metabolic roles played by various microbial species in syntrophic communities remains a challenge, but such information has important implications for bioremediation and microbial enhanced energy recovery technologies. Many factors such as changing environmental conditions or substrate variations can influence the composition and biodegradation capabilities of syntrophic microbial communities in hydrocarbon-impacted environments. In this study, a methanogenic crude oil-degrading enrichment culture was successively transferred onto the single long chain fatty acids palmitate or stearate followed by their parent alkanes, hexadecane or octadecane, respectively, in order to assess the impact of different substrates on microbial community composition and retention of hydrocarbon biodegradation genes. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that a reduction in substrate diversity resulted in a corresponding loss of microbial diversity, but that hydrocarbon biodegradation genes (such as assA/masD encoding alkylsuccinate synthase could be retained within a community even in the absence of hydrocarbon substrates. Despite substrate-related diversity changes, all communities were dominated by hydrogenotrophic and acetotrophic methanogens along with bacteria including Clostridium sp., members of the Deltaproteobacteria, and a number of other phyla. Microbial co-occurrence network analysis revealed a dense network of interactions amongst syntrophic bacteria and methanogens that were maintained despite changes in the substrates for methanogenesis. Our results reveal the effect of substrate diversity loss on microbial community diversity, indicate that many syntrophic interactions are stable over time despite changes in substrate pressure, and show that syntrophic

  15. Methanogens at the top of the world: occurrence and potential activity of methanogens in newly deglaciated soils in high-altitude cold deserts in the Western Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbach, Katrin; Conrad, Ralf; Reháková, Klára; Doležal, Jiří; Janatková, Kateřina; Angel, Roey

    2013-01-01

    Methanogens typically occur in reduced anoxic environments. However, in recent studies it has been shown that many aerated upland soils, including desert soils also host active methanogens. Here we show that soil samples from high-altitude cold deserts in the western Himalayas (Ladakh, India) produce CH4 after incubation as slurry under anoxic conditions at rates comparable to those of hot desert soils. Samples of matured soil from three different vegetation belts (arid, steppe, and subnival) were compared with younger soils originating from frontal and lateral moraines of receding glaciers. While methanogenic rates were higher in the samples from matured soils, CH4 was also produced in the samples from the recently deglaciated moraines. In both young and matured soils, those covered by a biological soil crust (biocrust) were more active than their bare counterparts. Isotopic analysis showed that in both cases CH4 was initially produced from H2/CO2 but later mostly from acetate. Analysis of the archaeal community in the in situ soil samples revealed a clear dominance of sequences related to Thaumarchaeota, while the methanogenic community comprised only a minor fraction of the archaeal community. Similar to other aerated soils, the methanogenic community was comprised almost solely of the genera Methanosarcina and Methanocella, and possibly also Methanobacterium in some cases. Nevertheless, ~10(3) gdw(-1) soil methanogens were already present in the young moraine soil together with cyanobacteria. Our results demonstrate that Methanosarcina and Methanocella not only tolerate atmospheric oxygen but are also able to survive in these harsh cold environments. Their occurrence in newly deglaciated soils shows that they are early colonizers of desert soils, similar to cyanobacteria, and may play a role in the development of desert biocrusts.

  16. Methanogens at the top of the world: occurrence and potential activity of methanogens in newly deglaciated soils in high-altitude cold deserts in the Western Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eAschenbach

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Methanogens typically occur in reduced anoxic environments. However, in recent studies it has been shown that many aerated upland soils, including desert soils also host active methanogens. Here we show that soil samples from high–altitude cold deserts in the western Himalayas (Ladakh, India produce CH4 after incubation as slurry under anoxic conditions at rates comparable to those of hot desert soils. Samples of matured soil from three different vegetation belts (arid, steppe, and subnival were compared with younger soils originating from frontal and lateral moraines of receding glaciers. While methanogenic rates were higher in the samples from matured soils, CH4 was also produced in the samples from the recently deglaciated moraines. In both young and matured soils, those covered by a biological soil crust (biocrust were more active than their bare counterparts. Isotopic analysis showed that in both cases CH4 was initially produced from H2/CO2 but later mostly from acetate. Analysis of the archaeal community in the in situ soil samples revealed a clear dominance of sequences related to Thaumarchaeota, while the methanogenic community comprised only a minor fraction of the archaeal community. Similar to other aerated soils, the methanogenic community was comprised almost solely of the genera Methanosarcina and Methanocella, and possibly also Methanobacterium in some cases. Nevertheless, approximately 103 gdw-1 soil methanogens were already present in the young moraine soil together with cyanobacteria. Our results demonstrate that Methanosarcina and Methanocella not only tolerate atmospheric oxygen but are also able to survive in these harsh cold environments. Their occurrence in newly deglaciated soils shows that they are early colonisers of desert soils, similar to cyanobacteria, and may play a role in the development of desert biocrusts.

  17. Stereochemical studies of acyclic isoprenoids-XII. Lipids of methanogenic bacteria and possible contributions to sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risatti, J.B.; Rowland, S.J.; Yon, D.A.; Maxwell, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Abundant volatile lipids of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and Methanosarcina barkeri include isoprenoid hydrocarbons (??? C30), and C15, C20 and C25 isoprenoid alcohols. M. barkeri contains 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethyleicosane, whose relative stereochemistry is the same as found in marine sediments, indicating that it is a marker of methanogenic activity. The C20, C30 and C25 alkenes in M. thermoautotrophicum also have a preferred sterochemistry; the latter have the 2,6,10,14,18-pentamethyleicosanyl skeleton, suggesting that the alkane in marine sediments may derive from methanogens. The stereochemistry of squalane in a marine sediment is also compatible with an origin in methanogens; in contrast, the stereochemistry of pristane in M. thermoautotrophicum indicates a fossil fuel contaminant origin, suggesting that this and certain other alkanes reported in archaebacteria might also be of contaminant origin. There is, therefore, little evidence at present that the pristane in immature marine sediments originates in methanogens. The C15 and C20 saturated alcohols in M. thermoautotrophicum have mainly the all-R configuration. If this is generally true for methanogens, the C20 alcohol in the Messel shale may originate mainly from methanogens, whereas that in the Green River shale may originate mainly from photosynthetic organisms. ?? 1984.

  18. Reduction of Fe(III) oxides by phylogenetically and physiologically diverse thermophilic methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Chihaya; Kato, Souichiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2014-09-01

    Three thermophilic methanogens (Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, Methanosaeta thermophila, and Methanosarcina thermophila) were investigated for their ability to reduce poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides (ferrihydrite) and the inhibitory effects of ferrihydrite on their methanogenesis. This study demonstrated that Fe(II) generation from ferrihydrite occurs in the cultures of the three thermophilic methanogens only when H2 was supplied as the source of reducing equivalents, even in the cultures of Mst. thermophila that do not grow on and produce CH4 from H2/CO2. While supplementation of ferrihydrite resulted in complete inhibition or suppression of methanogenesis by the thermophilic methanogens, ferrihydrite reduction by the methanogens at least partially alleviates the inhibitory effects. Microscopic and crystallographic analyses on the ferrihydrite-reducing Msr. thermophila cultures exhibited generation of magnetite on its cell surfaces through partial reduction of ferrihydrite. These findings suggest that at least certain thermophilic methanogens have the ability to extracellularly transfer electrons to insoluble Fe(III) compounds, affecting their methanogenic activities, which would in turn have significant impacts on materials and energy cycles in thermophilic anoxic environments. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of active methanogenic archaea in a methanol-fed upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrillo, Míriam; Morey, Lluís; Viñas, Marc; Bonmatí, August

    2016-12-01

    Methanogenic archaea enrichment of a granular sludge was undertaken in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor fed with methanol in order to enrich methylotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic populations. A microbial community assessment, in terms of microbial composition and activity-throughout the different stages of the feeding process with methanol and acetate-was performed using specific methanogenic activity (SMA) assays, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and high-throughput sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes from DNA and complementary DNA (cDNA). Distinct methanogenic enrichment was revealed by qPCR of mcrA gene in the methanol-fed community, being two orders of magnitude higher with respect to the initial inoculum, achieving a final mcrA/16S rRNA ratio of 0.25. High-throughput sequencing analysis revealed that the resulting methanogenic population was mainly composed by methylotrophic archaea (Methanomethylovorans and Methanolobus genus), being also highly active according to the RNA-based assessment. SMA confirmed that the methylotrophic pathway, with a direct conversion of methanol to CH4, was the main step of methanol degradation in the UASB. The biomass from the UASB, enriched in methanogenic archaea, may bear great potential as additional inoculum for bioreactors to carry out biogas production and other related processes.

  20. Seryl-tRNA Synthetases from Methanogenic Archaea: Suppression of Bacterial Amber Mutation and Heterologous Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drasko Boko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic archaea possess unusual seryl-tRNA synthetases (SerRS, evolutionarily distinct from the SerRSs found in other archaea, eucaryotes and bacteria. Our recent X-ray structural analysis of Methanosarcina barkeri SerRS revealed an idiosyncratic N-terminal domain and catalytic zinc ion in the active site. To shed further light on substrate discrimination by methanogenic-type SerRS, we set up to explore in vivo the interaction of methanogenic-type SerRSs with their cognate tRNAs in Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of various methanogenic-type SerRSs was toxic for E. coli, resulting in the synthesis of erroneous proteins, as revealed by β-galactosidase stability assay. Although SerRSs from methanogenic archaea recognize tRNAsSer from all three domains of life in vitro, the toxicity presumably precluded the complementation of endogenous SerRS function in both, E. coli and S. cerevisiae. However, despite the observed toxicity, coexpression of methanogenic-type SerRS with its cognate tRNA suppressed bacterial amber mutation.

  1. Metabolic characteristics of an aerobe isolated from a methylotrophic methanogenic enrichment culture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stephen V Rapheal; K R Swaminathan; K Lalitha

    2003-03-01

    An anaerobic methylotrophic methanogenic enrichment culture, with sustained metabolic characteristics, including that of methanation for over a decade, was the choice of the present study on interspecies interactions. Growth and methanation by the enrichment were suppressed in the presence of antibiotics, and no methanogen grown on methanol could be isolated using stringent techniques. The present study confirmed syntrophic metabolic interactions in this enrichment with the isolation of a strain of Pseudomonas sp. The organism had characteristic metabolic versatility in metabolizing a variety of substrates including alcohols, aliphatic acids, amino acids, and sugars. Anaerobic growth was favoured with nitrate in the growth medium. Cells grown anaerobically with methanol, revealed maximal nitrate reductase activity. Constitutive oxidative activity of the membrane system emerged from the high-specific oxygen uptake and nitrate reductase activities of the aerobically and anerobically grown cells respectively. Cells grown anaerobically on various alcohols effectively oxidized methanol in the presence of flavins, cofactor FAD and the methanogenic cofactor F420, suggesting a constitutive alcohol oxidizing capacity. In cells grown anaerobically on methanol, the rate of methanol oxidation with F420 was three times that of FAD. Efficient utilization of alcohols in the presence of F420 is a novel feature of the present study. The results suggest that utilization of methanol by the mixed culture would involve metabolic interactions between the Pseudomonas sp. and the methanogen(s). Methylotrophic, methanogenic partnership involving an aerobe is a novel feature hitherto unreported among anaerobic syntrophic associations and is of ecological significance.

  2. Methanogenic Oil Degradation in the Dagang Oil Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Núria; Cai, Minmin; Straaten, Nontje; Yao, Jun; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Krüger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation is one of the main in situ oil transformation processes in subsurface oil reservoirs. Recent studies have provided evidence of biodegradation of residual oil constituents under methanogenic conditions. Methane, like other biogenic gases, may contribute to reduce the viscosity of oil and enhance its flow characteristics (making it more available) but it can also be used as a energy source. So the aim of the present study was to provide reliable information on in situ biotransformation of oil under methanogenic conditions, and to assess the feasibility of implementing a MEOR strategy at this site. For this reason, chemical and isotopic analyses of injection and production fluids of the Dagang oil field (Hebei province, China) were performed. Microbial abundances were assessed by qPCR, and clone libraries were performed to study the diversity. In addition, microcosms with either oil or 13C-labelled hydrocarbons were inoculated with injection or production waters to characterize microbial processes in vitro. Geochemical and isotopic data were consistent with in situ biogenic methane production linked to aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation: GC-MS profiles of petroleum samples were nearly devoid of n-alkanes, linear alkylbenzenes, and alkyltoluenes, and light PAH, confirming that Dagang oil is mostly highly weathered. In addition, carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures of methane (δ13CCH4 and δDCH4, respectively), and the bulk isotopic discrimination (Δδ13C) between methane and CO2 (between 32 and 65 ) were in accordance with previously reported values for methane formation during hydrocarbon degradation. Furthermore, methane-producing Archaea and hydrocarbon-degrading Bacteria were abundant in produced oil-water samples. On the other hand, our laboratory degradation experiments revealed that autochthonous microbiota are capable of significantly degrade oil within several months, with biodegradation patterns resembling those

  3. Methane production improvement by modulation of solid phase immersion in dry batch anaerobic digestion process: Dynamic of methanogen populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, L; Ndiaye, M; Pernier, M; Lespinard, O; Pauss, A; Lamy, E; Ribeiro, T

    2016-05-01

    Several 60L dry batch anaerobic digestion (AD) reactors were implemented with or without liquid reserve on cattle manure. The immersed part modulation of cattle manure increased the methane flow of about 13%. The quantitative real time PCR and the optimized DNA extraction were implemented and validated to characterize and quantify the methanogen dynamic in dry batch AD process. Final quantities of methanogens converged toward the same level in several inocula at the end of AD. Methanogen dynamic was shown by dominance of Methanosarcinaceae for acetotrophic methanogens and Methanobacteriales for the hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Overall, methanogens populations were stabilized in liquid phase, except Methanosaetaceae. Solid phase was colonized by Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinaceae populations giving a support to biofilm development. The methane increase could be explained by a raise of Methanosarcinaceae population in presence of a total contact between solid and liquid phases. Methanosarcinaceae was a bio-indicator of the methane production.

  4. Relation between methanogenic archaea and methane production potential in selected natural wetland ecosystems across China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D. Y.; Ding, W. X.; Jia, Z. J.; Cai, Z. C.

    2011-02-01

    Methane (CH4) emissions from natural wetland ecosystems exhibit large spatial variability at regional, national, and global levels related to temperature, water table, plant type and methanogenic archaea etc. To understand the underlying factors that induce spatial differences in CH4 emissions, and the relationship between the population of methanogenic archaea and CH4 production potential in natural wetlands around China, we measured the CH4 production potential and the abundance of methanogenic archaea in vertical soil profiles sampled from the Poyang wetland in the subtropical zone, the Hongze wetland in the warm temperate zone, the Sanjiang marsh in the cold temperate zone, and the Ruoergai peatland in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in the alpine climate zone. The top soil layer had the highest population of methanogens (1.07-8.29 × 109 cells g-1 soil) in all wetlands except the Ruoergai peatland and exhibited the maximum CH4 production potential measured at the mean in situ summer temperature. There is a significant logarithmic correlation between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the soil organic carbon (R2 = 0.72, P nitrogen concentrations (R2 = 0.76, P affect the population of methanogens in wetland ecosystems. While the CH4 production potential is not significantly related to methanogen population (R2 = 0.01, P > 0.05, n = 13), it is related to the dissolved organic carbon concentration (R2 = 0.31, P = 0.05, n = 13). This suggests that the methanogen population might be not an effective index for predicting the CH4 production in wetland ecosystems. The CH4 production rate of the top soil layer increases with increasing latitude, from 273.64 μg CH4 kg-1 soil d-1 in the Poyang wetland to 664.59 μg CH4 kg-1 soil d-1 in the Carex lasiocarpa marsh of the Sanjiang Plain. We conclude that CH4 production potential in the freshwater wetlands of Eastern China is mainly affected by the supply of methanogenic substrates rather than temperature; in contrast

  5. Cultivating microbial dark matter in benzene-degrading methanogenic consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fei; Devine, Cheryl E; Edwards, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    The microbes responsible for anaerobic benzene biodegradation remain poorly characterized. In this study, we identified and quantified microbial populations in a series of 16 distinct methanogenic, benzene-degrading enrichment cultures using a combination of traditional 16S rRNA clone libraries (four cultures), pyrotag 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing (11 cultures), metagenome sequencing (1 culture) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR; 12 cultures). An operational taxonomic unit (OTU) from the Deltaproteobacteria designated ORM2 that is only 84% to 86% similar to Syntrophus or Desulfobacterium spp. was consistently identified in all enrichment cultures, and typically comprised more than half of the bacterial sequences. In addition to ORM2, a sequence belonging to Parcubacteria (candidate division OD1) identified from the metagenome data was the only other OTU common to all the cultures surveyed. Culture transfers (1% and 0.1%) were made in the presence and absence of benzene, and the abundance of ORM2, OD1 and other OTUs was tracked over 415 days using qPCR. ORM2 sequence abundance increased only when benzene was present, while the abundance of OD1 and other OTUs increased even in the absence of benzene. Deltaproteobacterium ORM2 is unequivocally the benzene-metabolizing population. This study also hints at laboratory cultivation conditions for a member of the widely distributed yet uncultivated Parcubacteria (OD1).

  6. Thermodynamics and H2 Transfer in a Methanogenic, Syntrophic Community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J Hamilton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms in nature do not exist in isolation but rather interact with other species in their environment. Some microbes interact via syntrophic associations, in which the metabolic by-products of one species serve as nutrients for another. These associations sustain a variety of natural communities, including those involved in methanogenesis. In anaerobic syntrophic communities, energy is transferred from one species to another, either through direct contact and exchange of electrons, or through small molecule diffusion. Thermodynamics plays an important role in governing these interactions, as the oxidation reactions carried out by the first community member are only possible because degradation products are consumed by the second community member. This work presents the development and analysis of genome-scale network reconstructions of the bacterium Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans and the methanogenic archaeon Methanospirillum hungatei. The models were used to verify proposed mechanisms of ATP production within each species. We then identified additional constraints and the cellular objective function required to match experimental observations. The thermodynamic S. fumaroxidans model could not explain why S. fumaroxidans does not produce H2 in monoculture, indicating that current methods might not adequately estimate the thermodynamics, or that other cellular processes (e.g., regulation play a role. We also developed a thermodynamic coculture model of the association between the organisms. The coculture model correctly predicted the exchange of both H2 and formate between the two species and suggested conditions under which H2 and formate produced by S. fumaroxidans would be fully consumed by M. hungatei.

  7. Thermodynamics and H2 Transfer in a Methanogenic, Syntrophic Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Joshua J; Calixto Contreras, Montserrat; Reed, Jennifer L

    2015-07-01

    Microorganisms in nature do not exist in isolation but rather interact with other species in their environment. Some microbes interact via syntrophic associations, in which the metabolic by-products of one species serve as nutrients for another. These associations sustain a variety of natural communities, including those involved in methanogenesis. In anaerobic syntrophic communities, energy is transferred from one species to another, either through direct contact and exchange of electrons, or through small molecule diffusion. Thermodynamics plays an important role in governing these interactions, as the oxidation reactions carried out by the first community member are only possible because degradation products are consumed by the second community member. This work presents the development and analysis of genome-scale network reconstructions of the bacterium Syntrophobacter fumaroxidans and the methanogenic archaeon Methanospirillum hungatei. The models were used to verify proposed mechanisms of ATP production within each species. We then identified additional constraints and the cellular objective function required to match experimental observations. The thermodynamic S. fumaroxidans model could not explain why S. fumaroxidans does not produce H2 in monoculture, indicating that current methods might not adequately estimate the thermodynamics, or that other cellular processes (e.g., regulation) play a role. We also developed a thermodynamic coculture model of the association between the organisms. The coculture model correctly predicted the exchange of both H2 and formate between the two species and suggested conditions under which H2 and formate produced by S. fumaroxidans would be fully consumed by M. hungatei.

  8. Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium - Testing and Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, Benjamin; Skare, Paul; Pratt, Rob; Kim, Tom; Ellis, Abraham

    2017-05-11

    This paper highlights some of the unique testing capabilities and projects being performed at several national laboratories as part of the U. S. Department of Energy Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium. As part of this effort, the Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium Testing Network isbeing developed to accelerate grid modernization by enablingaccess to a comprehensive testing infrastructure and creating a repository of validated models and simulation tools that will be publicly available. This work is key to accelerating thedevelopment, validation, standardization, adoption, and deployment of new grid technologies to help meet U. S. energy goals.

  9. The COPD Biomarker Qualification Consortium (CBQC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casaburi, Richard; Celli, Bartolome; Crapo, James

    2013-01-01

    , and no interested party has been in a position to undertake such a process. In order to facilitate the development of novel tools to assess new treatments, the Food and Drug Administration, in collaboration with the COPD Foundation, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute and scientists from the pharmaceutical...... industry and academia conducted a workshop to survey the available information that could contribute to new tools. Based on this, a collaborative project, the COPD Biomarkers Qualification Consortium, was initiated. The Consortium in now actively preparing integrated data sets from existing resources...... that can address the problem of drug development tools for COPD....

  10. Human methanogen diversity and incidence in healthy and diseased colonic groups using mcrA gene analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scanlan Pauline D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence and diversity of human methanogens are insufficiently characterised in the gastrointestinal tract of both health and disease. A PCR and clone library methodology targeting the mcrA gene was adopted to facilitate the two-fold aim of surveying the relative incidence of methanogens in health and disease groups and also to provide an overview of methanogen diversity in the human gastrointestinal tract. Results DNA faecal extracts (207 in total from a group of healthy controls and five gastrointestinal disease groups were investigated. Colorectal cancer, polypectomised, irritable bowel syndrome and the control group had largely equivalent numbers of individuals positive for methanogens (range 45–50%. Methanogen incidence in the inflammatory bowel disease groups was reduced, 24% for ulcerative colitis and 30% for Crohn's disease. Four unique mcrA gene restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were identified and bioinformatic analyses revealed that the majority of all sequences (94% retrieved from libraries were 100% identical to Methanobrevibacter smithii mcrA gene. In addition, mcrA gene sequences most closely related to Methanobrevibacter oralis and members of the order Methanosarcinales were also recovered. Conclusion The mcrA gene serves as a useful biomarker for methanogen detection in the human gut and the varying trends of methanogen incidence in the human gut could serve as important indicators of intestinal function. Although Methanobrevibacter smithii is the dominant methanogen in both the distal colon of individuals in health and disease, the diversity of methanogens is greater than previously reported. In conclusion, the low incidence of methanogens in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, the functionality of the methanogens and impact of methane production in addition to competitive interactions between methanogens and other microbial groups in the human gastrointestinal tract warrants further

  11. COAL ASH RESOURCES RESEARCH CONSORTIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC, pronounced �cars�) is the core coal combustion by-product (CCB) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCBs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. CARRC continued the partnership of industry partners, university researchers, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) addressing needs in the CCB industry through technical research and development projects. Technology transfer also continued through distribution and presentation of the results of research activities to appropriate audiences, with emphasis on reaching government agency representatives and end users of CCBs. CARRC partners have evolved technically and have jointly developed an understanding of the layers of social, regulatory, legal, and competition issues that impact the success of CCB utilization as applies to the CCB industry in general and to individual companies. Many CARRC tasks are designed to provide information on CCB performance including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC activities from 1993�1998 included a variety of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. The tasks summarized in this report are 1) The Demonstration of CCB Use in Small Construction Projects, 2) Application of CCSEM (computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy) for Coal Combustion By-Product Characterization, 3) Development of a Procedure to Determine Heat of Hydration for Coal Combustion By-Products, 4) Investigation of the Behavior of High

  12. Methanogenic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria co-cultured on acetate: teamwork or coexistence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuolmez, Derya; Na, Hyunsoo; Lever, Mark A; Kjeldsen, Kasper U; Jørgensen, Bo B; Plugge, Caroline M

    2015-01-01

    Acetate is a major product of fermentation processes and an important substrate for sulfate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea. Most studies on acetate catabolism by sulfate reducers and methanogens have used pure cultures. Less is known about acetate conversion by mixed pure cultures and the interactions between both groups. We tested interspecies hydrogen transfer and coexistence between marine methanogens and sulfate reducers using mixed pure cultures of two types of microorganisms. First, Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris (DSM 1744), a hydrogenotrophic sulfate reducer, was cocultured together with the obligate aceticlastic methanogen Methanosaeta concilii using acetate as carbon and energy source. Next, Methanococcus maripaludis S2, an obligate H2- and formate-utilizing methanogen, was used as a partner organism to M. concilii in the presence of acetate. Finally, we performed a coexistence experiment between M. concilii and an acetotrophic sulfate reducer Desulfobacter latus AcSR2. Our results showed that D. vulgaris was able to reduce sulfate and grow from hydrogen leaked by M. concilii. In the other coculture, M. maripaludis was sustained by hydrogen leaked by M. concilii as revealed by qPCR. The growth of the two aceticlastic microbes indicated co-existence rather than competition. Altogether, our results indicate that H2 leaking from M. concilii could be used by efficient H2-scavengers. This metabolic trait, revealed from coculture studies, brings new insight to the metabolic flexibility of methanogens and sulfate reducers residing in marine environments in response to changing environmental conditions and community compositions. Using dedicated physiological studies we were able to unravel the occurrence of less obvious interactions between marine methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  13. The quantitative significance of Syntrophaceae and syntrophic partnerships in methanogenic degradation of crude oil alkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, N D; Sherry, A; Grant, R J; Rowan, A K; Hubert, C R J; Callbeck, C M; Aitken, C M; Jones, D M; Adams, J J; Larter, S R; Head, I M

    2011-11-01

    Libraries of 16S rRNA genes cloned from methanogenic oil degrading microcosms amended with North Sea crude oil and inoculated with estuarine sediment indicated that bacteria from the genera Smithella (Deltaproteobacteria, Syntrophaceace) and Marinobacter sp. (Gammaproteobacteria) were enriched during degradation. Growth yields and doubling times (36 days for both Smithella and Marinobacter) were determined using qPCR and quantitative data on alkanes, which were the predominant hydrocarbons degraded. The growth yield of the Smithella sp. [0.020 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)], assuming it utilized all alkanes removed was consistent with yields of bacteria that degrade hydrocarbons and other organic compounds in methanogenic consortia. Over 450 days of incubation predominance and exponential growth of Smithella was coincident with alkane removal and exponential accumulation of methane. This growth is consistent with Smithella's occurrence in near surface anoxic hydrocarbon degrading systems and their complete oxidation of crude oil alkanes to acetate and/or hydrogen in syntrophic partnership with methanogens in such systems. The calculated growth yield of the Marinobacter sp., assuming it grew on alkanes, was [0.0005 g(cell-C)/g(alkane-C)] suggesting that it played a minor role in alkane degradation. The dominant methanogens were hydrogenotrophs (Methanocalculus spp. from the Methanomicrobiales). Enrichment of hydrogen-oxidizing methanogens relative to acetoclastic methanogens was consistent with syntrophic acetate oxidation measured in methanogenic crude oil degrading enrichment cultures. qPCR of the Methanomicrobiales indicated growth characteristics consistent with measured rates of methane production and growth in partnership with Smithella.

  14. Higher-level classification of the Archaea: evolution of methanogenesis and methanogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Bapteste

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a phylogenetic approach to analyze the evolution of methanogenesis and methanogens. We show that 23 vertically transmitted ribosomal proteins do not support the monophyly of methanogens, and propose instead that there are two distantly related groups of extant archaea that produce methane, which we have named Class I and Class II. Based on this finding, we subsequently investigated the uniqueness of the origin of methanogenesis by studying both the enzymes of methanogenesis and the proteins that synthesize its specific coenzymes. We conclude that hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis appeared only once during evolution. Genes involved in the seven central steps of the methanogenic reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 are ubiquitous in methanogens and share a common history. This suggests that, although extant methanogens produce methane from various substrates (CO2, formate, acetate, methylated C-1 compounds, these archaea have a core of conserved enzymes that have undergone little evolutionary change. Furthermore, this core of methanogenesis enzymes seems to originate (as a whole from the last ancestor of all methanogens and does not appear to have been horizontally transmitted to other organisms or between members of Class I and Class II. The observation of a unique and ancestral form of methanogenesis suggests that it was preserved in two independent lineages, with some instances of specialization or added metabolic flexibility. It was likely lost in the Halobacteriales, Thermoplasmatales and Archaeoglobales. Given that fossil evidence for methanogenesis dates back 2.8 billion years, a unique origin of this process makes the methanogenic archaea a very ancient taxon.

  15. The Effects of Perchlorates on the Permafrost Methanogens: Implication for Autotrophic Life on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Shcherbakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial permafrost represents a range of possible cryogenic extraterrestrial ecosystems on Earth-like planets without obvious surface ice, such as Mars. The autotrophic and chemolithotrophic psychrotolerant methanogens are more likely than aerobes to function as a model for life forms that may exist in frozen subsurface environments on Mars, which has no free oxygen, inaccessible organic matter, and extremely low amounts of unfrozen water. Our research on the genesis of methane, its content and distribution in permafrost horizons of different ages and origin demonstrated the presence of methane in permanently frozen fine-grained sediments. Earlier, we isolated and described four strains of methanogenic archaea of Methanobacterium and Methanosarcina genera from samples of Pliocene and Holocene permafrost from Eastern Siberia. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. In this paper we study the effect of sodium and magnesium perchlorates on the growth of permafrost and nonpermafrost methanogens, and present evidence that permafrost hydogenotrophic methanogens are more resistant to the chaotropic agent found in Martian soil. Furthermore, as shown in the studies strain M2T M. arcticum, probably can use perchlorate anion as an electron acceptor in anaerobic methane oxidation. Earth’s subzero subsurface environments are the best approximation of environments on Mars, which is most likely to harbor methanogens; thus, a biochemical understanding of these pathways is expected to provide a basis for designing experiments to detect autotrophic methane-producing life forms on Mars.

  16. Methanogenic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria co-cultured on acetate: teamwork or coexistence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya eOzuolmez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acetate is a major product of fermentation processes and an important substrate for sulfate reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea. Most studies on acetate catabolism by sulfate reducers and methanogens have used pure cultures. Less is known about acetate conversion by mixed pure cultures and the interactions between both groups. We tested interspecies hydrogen transfer and coexistence between marine methanogens and sulfate reducers using mixed pure cultures of two types of microorganisms. First, Desulfovibrio vulgaris subsp. vulgaris (DSM 1744, a hydrogenotrophic sulfate reducer, was cocultured together with the obligate aceticlastic methanogen Methanosaeta concilii using acetate as carbon and energy source. Next, Methanococcus maripaludis S2, an obligate H2- and formate-utilizing methanogen, was used as a partner organism to M. concilii in the presence of acetate. Finally, we performed a coexistence experiment between M. concilii and an acetotrophic sulfate reducer Desulfobacter latus AcSR2. Our results showed that D. vulgaris was able to reduce sulfate and grow from hydrogen leaked by M. concilii. In the other coculture, M. maripaludis was sustained by hydrogen leaked by M. concilii as revealed by qPCR. The growth of the two aceticlastic microbes indicated co-existence rather than competition. Altogether, our results indicate that H2 leaking from M. concilii could be used by efficient H2-scavengers. This metabolic trait, revealed from coculture studies, brings new insight to the metabolic flexibility of methanogens and sulfate reducers residing in marine environments in response to changing environmental conditions and community compositions. Using dedicated physiological studies we were able to unravel the occurrence of less obvious interactions between marine methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  17. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Griffith (Linda); M. Cowan (Morton); L.D. Notarangelo (Luigi Daniele); R. Kohn (Robert); J. Puck (Jennifer); S.-Y. Pai (Sung-Yun); B. Ballard (Barbara); S.C. Bauer (Sarah); J. Bleesing (Jack); M. Boyle (Marcia); R.W. Brower (Ronald); R.H. Buckley (Rebecca); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); L.M. Burroughs (Lauri); F. Candotti (Fabio); A. Cant (Andrew); T. Chatila (Talal); C. Cunningham-Rundles (Charlotte); M.C. Dinauer (Mary); J. Dvorak (Jennie); A. Filipovich (Alexandra); L.A. Fleisher (Lee); H.B. Gaspar (Bobby); T. Gungor (Tayfun); E. Haddad (Elie); E. Hovermale (Emily); F. Huang (Faith); A. Hurley (Alan); M. Hurley (Mary); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.M. Kang (Elizabeth); B.R. Logan (Brent); J.R. Long-Boyle (Janel); H. Malech (Harry); S.A. McGhee (Sean); S. Modell (Sieglinde); S. Modell (Sieglinde); H.D. Ochs (Hans); R.J. O'Reilly (Richard); R. Parkman (Robertson); D. Rawlings (D.); J.M. Routes (John); P. Shearer (P.); T.N. Small (Trudy); H. Smith (H.); K.E. Sullivan (Kathleen); P. Szabolcs (Paul); A.J. Thrasher (Adrian); D. Torgerson; P. Veys (Paul); K. Weinberg (Kenneth); J.C. Zuniga-Pflucker (Juan Carlos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SC

  18. Microbial Degradation of Aniline by Bacterial Consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN-LONG WANG; ZE-YU MAO; WEI-ZHONG WU

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics of microbial degradation of aniline by a stable bacterial consortium. Methods The bacterial consortium was isolated from activated sludge treating chemical wastewater using aniline as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen by enrichment and isolation technique. The biomass was measured as optical density (OD) at 510 nm using a spectrophotometer. Aniline concentrations were determined by spectrophotometer. The intermediates of aniline degradation were identified by GC/MS method. Results The bacterial consortium could grow at a range of aniline concentrations between 50 and 500 mg/L. The optimal pH and temperature for aniline degradation were determined to be 7.0 and 30, respectively. The presence of NH4NO3 as an additional nitrogen source (100-500 mg/L) had no adverse effect on bacterial growth and aniline degradation. The presence of heavy metal ions, such as Co2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Mn2+ and Cu2+ had an inhibitory effect on aniline degradation. Conclusions The isolated bacterial consortium candegrade aniline up to 500 mg/L effectively and tolerate some heavy metal ions that commonly exist in chemical wastewater. It has a potential to be applied in the practical treatment of aniline-containingwastewater.

  19. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    TBI Translational Research Consortium Executive Committee Steering Committee Model of Injury Working Group Neuroprotection Working Group Regeneration ...Report, Holcomb Page 22 Specific aim #3.1: To study neuroprotection and enhanced neurological recovery with erythropoietin ( Epo ) and Epo ...derivatives after MTBI. - #3.1.1 To study the effects of Epo and Epo derivatives on neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and outcome after experimental MTBI

  20. The Digital Preservation Consortium: Mission and Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Donald J.; Kenney, Anne

    The development of the National Information Infrastructure (NII) and the growing use of the Internet are creating a rapidly-changing environment for collaborative preservation and access. Within this environment, the Digital Preservation Consortium (DPC) seeks to advance the use and utility of digital technology for the preservation of and access…

  1. Transduction-like gene transfer in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, G.

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 x 10(-5) (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10(-3) (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae.

  2. Inhibitory effect of ammonia nitrogen on specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A series of batch experiments were conducted in 125 mL serum bottles to assess the toxicity of different concentrations of ammonia nitrogen to the specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge from upflow anaerobic sludge bed(UASB) and expanded granular sludge bed(EGSB) reactors. The effects of pH value and temperature on toxicity of ammonia nitrogen to anaerobes were investigated. The results show that the specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge suffers inhibition from ammonia nitrogen, the concentrations of ammonia nitrogen that produce 50% inhibition of specific methanogenic activity for sludge from UASB and EGSB reactor are 2.35 and 2.75 g/L, respectively. Hydrogen utilizing methanogens suffers less inhibition from ammonia nitrogen than that of acetate utilizing methanogens. Hydrogen-producing acetogens that utilize propionate and butyrate as substrates suffer serious inhibition from ammonia nitrogen. The toxicity of ammonia nitrogen to anaerobic granular sludge enhances when pH value and temperature increase. Anaerobic granular sludge can bear higher concentrations of ammonia nitrogen after being acclimated by ammonia nitrogen for 7 d.

  3. Geographical Distribution of Methanogenic Archaea in Nine Representative Paddy Soils in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Qianhui; Zhong, Linghao; Deng, Ye; Shi, Yu; Wang, Baozhan; Jia, Zhongjun; Lin, Xiangui; Feng, Youzhi

    2016-01-01

    Paddy field methanogenic archaea are responsible for methane (CH4) production and contribute significantly to climate change. The information regarding the spatial variations in the abundance, the diversity and the composition of such ecologically important microbes, however, is quite limited at large scale. In this investigation, we studied the abundance, alpha diversity and geographical distribution of methanogenic archaeal communities in nine representative paddy sites, along a large latitudinal gradient in China, using pyrosequencing and real-time quantitative PCR. It is found that all paddy soils harbor constant methanogenic archaeal constituents, which is dominated by family Methanocellaceae (37.3%), Methanobacteriaceae (22.1%), Methanosaetaceae (17.2%), and Methanosarcinaceae (9.8%). Methanogenic archaeal abundance is primarily influenced by soil C (R = 0.612, P = 0.001) and N (R = 0.673, P = 0.001) contents, as well as alpha diversity by soil pH (PD: R = -0.552, P = 0.006; Chao1: R = -0.615, P = 0.002). Further exploration revealed that both spatial distance (R = 0.3469, P = 0.001, partial mental test) and soil chemical variables mainly about soil C and N (R = 0.2847, P = 0.001) are the two major factors affecting methanogenic archaeal community composition distribution in paddy soils. This finding will allow us to develop a better picture of the biogeographic ranges of these ecologically important microbes and get deeper insights into their ecology. PMID:27679621

  4. Effect of Nickel Levels on Hydrogen Partial Pressure and Methane Production in Methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) consumption and methane (CH4) production in pure cultures of three different methanogens were investigated during cultivation with 0, 0.2 and 4.21 μM added nickel (Ni). The results showed that the level of dissolved Ni in the anaerobic growth medium did not notably affect CH4 production in the cytochrome-free methanogenic species Methanobacterium bryantii and Methanoculleus bourgensis MAB1, but affected CH4 formation rate in the cytochrome-containing Methanosarcina barkeri grown on H2 and CO2. Methanosarcina barkeri also had the highest amounts of Ni in its cells, indicating that more Ni is needed by cytochrome-containing than by cytochrome-free methanogenic species. The concentration of Ni affected threshold values of H2 partial pressure (pH2) for all three methanogen species studied, with M. bourgensis MAB1 reaching pH2 values as low as 0.1 Pa when Ni was available in amounts used in normal anaerobic growth medium. To our knowledge, this is the lowest pH2 threshold recorded to date in pure methanogen culture, which suggests that M.bourgensis MAB1 have a competitive advantage over other species through its ability to grow at low H2 concentrations. Our study has implications for research on the H2-driven deep subsurface biosphere and biogas reactor performance. PMID:27992585

  5. Methanogenic activity and diversity in the centre of the Amsterdam Mud Volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; John Parkes, R; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stephane; Toffin, Laurent

    2012-07-01

    Marine mud volcanoes are geological structures emitting large amounts of methane from their active centres. The Amsterdam mud volcano (AMV), located in the Anaximander Mountains south of Turkey, is characterized by intense active methane seepage produced in part by methanogens. To date, information about the diversity or the metabolic pathways used by the methanogens in active centres of marine mud volcanoes is limited. (14)C-radiotracer measurements showed that methylamines/methanol, H(2)/CO(2) and acetate were used for methanogenesis in the AMV. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was measured all along the sediment core, Methanosarcinales affiliated sequences were detected using archaeal 16S PCR-DGGE and mcrA gene libraries, and enrichments of methanogens showed the presence of Methanococcoides in the shallow sediment layers. Overall acetoclastic methanogenesis was higher than hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, which is unusual for cold seep sediments. Interestingly, acetate porewater concentrations were extremely high in the AMV sediments. This might be the result of organic matter cracking in deeper hotter sediment layers. Methane was also produced from hexadecanes. For the most part, the methanogenic community diversity was in accordance with the depth distribution of the H(2)/CO(2) and acetate methanogenesis. These results demonstrate the importance of methanogenic communities in the centres of marine mud volcanoes. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Methanogenic community composition in an organic waste mixture in an anaerobic bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryta, Agata; Oszust, Karolina; Brzezińska, Małgorzata; Ziemiński, Krzysztof; Bilińska-Wielgus, Nina; Frąc, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the substantial relationship between the compositions of methanogen community that assembles in the anaerobic digester mass and link it to methane production activity. The results of the metagenomic studies were used to evaluate how the methanogen structure changes during an anaerobic digestion process under various waste retention times (21, 23, 25, 29, 33, 39, 47 and 61 days). Phylogenetically coherent populations of methanogens were assessed by 16S rRNA gene next-generation sequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting of a specific molecular marker, the mcrA gene. The results indicated multiple phylogenetically diverse methanogen populations associated with the various steps of anaerobic digestion. The stages of the anaerobic digestion process and waste retention times determine the microbial composition. The most dominant and acclimated microbial communities in all samples belonged to the genera Methanosaeta and Methanobacterium. The methane yield was consistent with the results of the microbial community structure, which indicated that acetotrophic Methanosaeta was the most active and most important during the methanogenic stage.

  7. Toxicity assessment of inorganic nanoparticles to acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity in anaerobic granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, James A

    2013-09-15

    Release of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) to municipal wastewater from industrial and residential sources could impact biological systems in wastewater treatment plants. Methanogenic inhibition can cause failure of anaerobic waste(water) treatment. This study investigated the inhibitory effect of a wide array of inorganic NPs (Ag(0), Al₂O₃, CeO₂, Cu(0), CuO, Fe(0), Fe₂O₃, Mn₂O₃, SiO₂, TiO₂, and ZnO supplied up to 1500 mgL(-1)) to acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge. Of all the NPs tested, only Cu(0) and ZnO caused severe methanogenic inhibition. The 50% inhibiting concentrations determined towards acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were 62 and 68 mgL(-1) for Cu(0) NP; and 87 and 250 mgL(-1) for ZnO NP, respectively. CuO NPs also caused inhibition of acetoclastic methanogens. Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) salts caused similar levels of inhibition as Cu(0) and ZnO NPs based on equilibrium soluble metal concentrations measured during the assays, suggesting that the toxicity was due to the release of metal ions by NP-corrosion. A commercial dispersant, Dispex, intended to increase NP stability did not affect the inhibitory impact of the NPs. The results taken as a whole suggest that Zn- and Cu-containing NPs can release metal ions that are inhibitory for methanogenesis.

  8. Molecular diversity and tools for deciphering the methanogen community structure and diversity in freshwater sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Prem Prashant; Brablcová, Lenka; Buriánková, Iva; Rulík, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Methanogenic archaeal communities existing in freshwater sediments are responsible for approximately 50 % of the total global emission of methane. This process contributes significantly to global warming and, hence, necessitates interventional control measures to limit its emission. Unfortunately, the diversity and functional interactions of methanogenic populations occurring in these habitats are yet to be fully characterized. Considering several disadvantages of conventional culture-based methodologies, in recent years, impetus is given to molecular biology approaches to determine the community structure of freshwater sedimentary methanogenic archaea. 16S rRNA and methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) gene-based cloning techniques are the first choice for this purpose. In addition, electrophoresis-based (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, temperature gradient gel electrophoresis, and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction techniques have also found extensive applications. These techniques are highly sensitive, rapid, and reliable as compared to traditional culture-dependent approaches. Molecular diversity studies revealed the dominance of the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales of methanogens in freshwater sediments. The present review discusses in detail the status of the diversity of methanogens and the molecular approaches applied in this area of research.

  9. A Three-Component Microbial Consortium from Deep-Sea Salt-Saturated Anoxic Lake Thetis Links Anaerobic Glycine Betaine Degradation with Methanogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta La Cono

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities inhabiting the deep-sea salt-saturated anoxic lakes of the Eastern Mediterranean operate under harsh physical-chemical conditions that are incompatible with the lifestyle of common marine microorganisms. Here, we investigated a stable three-component microbial consortium obtained from the brine of the recently discovered deep-sea salt-saturated Lake Thetis. The trophic network of this consortium, established at salinities up to 240, relies on fermentative decomposition of common osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB. Similarly to known extreme halophilic anaerobic GB-degrading enrichments, the initial step of GB degradation starts with its reductive cleavage to trimethylamine and acetate, carried out by the fermenting member of the Thetis enrichment, Halobacteroides lacunaris TB21. In contrast to acetate, which cannot be easily oxidized in salt-saturated anoxic environments, trimethylamine represents an advantageous C1-substrate for methylotrophic methanogenic member of the Thetis enrichment, Methanohalophilus sp. TA21. This second member of the consortium likely produces hydrogen via methylotrophic modification of reductive acetyl-CoA pathway because the initial anaerobic GB cleavage reaction requires the consumption of reducing equivalents. Ecophysiological role of the third member of the Thetis consortium, Halanaerobium sp. TB24, which lacks the capability of either GB or trimethylamine degradation, remains yet to be elucidated. As it is true for cultivated members of family Halanaerobiaceae, the isolate TB24 can obtain energy primarily by fermenting simple sugars and producing hydrogen as one of the end products. Hence, by consuming of TB21 and TA21 metabolites, Halanaerobium sp. TB24 can be an additional provider of reducing equivalents required for reductive degradation of GB. Description of the Thetis GB-degrading consortium indicated that anaerobic degradation of osmoregulatory molecules may play important role in the

  10. Fermentation enhancement of methanogenic archaea consortia from an Illinois basin coalbed via DOL emulsion nutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xiao

    Full Text Available Microbially enhanced coalbed methane technology must be used to increase the methane content in mining and generate secondary biogenic gas. In this technology, the metabolic processes of methanogenic consortia are the basis for the production of biomethane from some of the organic compounds in coal. Thus, culture nutrition plays an important role in remediating the nutritional deficiency of a coal seam. To enhance the methane production rates for microorganism consortia, different types of nutrition solutions were examined in this study. Emulsion nutrition solutions containing a novel nutritional supplement, called dystrophy optional modification latex, increased the methane yield for methanogenic consortia. This new nutritional supplement can help methanogenic consortia form an enhanced anaerobic environment, optimize the microbial balance in the consortia, and improve the methane biosynthesis rate.

  11. Fermentation enhancement of methanogenic archaea consortia from an Illinois basin coalbed via DOL emulsion nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dong; Peng, Su-Ping; Wang, En-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Microbially enhanced coalbed methane technology must be used to increase the methane content in mining and generate secondary biogenic gas. In this technology, the metabolic processes of methanogenic consortia are the basis for the production of biomethane from some of the organic compounds in coal. Thus, culture nutrition plays an important role in remediating the nutritional deficiency of a coal seam. To enhance the methane production rates for microorganism consortia, different types of nutrition solutions were examined in this study. Emulsion nutrition solutions containing a novel nutritional supplement, called dystrophy optional modification latex, increased the methane yield for methanogenic consortia. This new nutritional supplement can help methanogenic consortia form an enhanced anaerobic environment, optimize the microbial balance in the consortia, and improve the methane biosynthesis rate.

  12. Molecular diversity of methanogens in fecal samples from Bactrian camels (Camelus bactrianus) at two zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Kathryn L; Smith, Rachel P; St-Pierre, Benoit; Wright, André-Denis G

    2012-08-01

    Animals are dependent on mutualistic microbial communities that reside in their gastrointestinal track for essential physiological functions such as nutrition and pathogen resistance. The composition of microbial communities in an animal is influenced by various factors, including species, diet and geographical location. In this preliminary study, the population structure of fecal methanogens in Bactrian camels (Camelus bactrianus) from two zoos was studied using separate 16S rRNA gene libraries for each zoo. While methanogen sequences belonging to the genus Methanobrevibacter were dominant in both libraries, they showed significant differences in diversity (p=0.05) and structure (pZoo library and seven OTUs were unique to the Potter Park Zoo library. These preliminary results highlight how methanogen population structures can vary greatly between animals of the same species maintained in captivity at different locations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Towards the identification of methanogenic archaeal groups as targets of methane mitigation in livestock animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit eSt-Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In herbivores, enteric methane is a by-product from the digestion of plant biomass by mutualistic gastrointestinal tract (GIT microbial communities. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is not assimilated by the host and is released into the environment where it contributes to climate change. Since enteric methane is exclusively produced by methanogenic archaea, the investigation of mutualistic methanogen communities in the GIT of herbivores has been the subject of ongoing research by a number of research groups. In an effort to uncover trends that would facilitate the development of efficient methane mitigation strategies for livestock species, we have in this review summarized and compared currently available results from published studies on this subject. We also offer our perspectives on the importance of pursuing current research efforts on the sequencing of gut methanogen genomes, as well as investigating their cellular physiology and interactions with other GIT microorganisms.

  14. Potential for direct interspecies electron transfer in methanogenic wastewater digester aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morita, Masahiko; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Franks, Ashley E

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms for electron transfer within microbial aggregates derived from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor converting brewery waste to methane were investigated in order to better understand the function of methanogenic consortia. The aggregates were electrically conductive, with conduc......Mechanisms for electron transfer within microbial aggregates derived from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor converting brewery waste to methane were investigated in order to better understand the function of methanogenic consortia. The aggregates were electrically conductive...... be assigned to methane producers, consistent with the poor capacity for hydrogen and formate utilization. These results demonstrate for the first time that methanogenic wastewater aggregates can be electrically conductive and suggest that direct interspecies electron transfer could be an important mechanism...

  15. Factors influencing the degradation of garbage in methanogenic bioreactors and impacts on biogas formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Masahiko [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Chiba (Japan). Biotechnology Sector; Sasaki, Kengo [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Biotechnology

    2012-05-15

    Anaerobic digestion of garbage is attracting much attention because of its application in waste volume reduction and the recovery of biogas for use as an energy source. In this review, various factors influencing the degradation of garbage and the production of biogas are discussed. The surface hydrophobicity and porosity of supporting materials are important factors in retaining microorganisms such as aceticlastic methanogens and in attaining a higher degradation of garbage and a higher production of biogas. Ammonia concentration, changes in environmental parameters such as temperature and pH, and adaptation of microbial community to ammonia have been related to ammonia inhibition. The effects of drawing electrons from the methanogenic community and donating electrons into the methanogenic community on methane production have been shown in microbial fuel cells and bioelectrochemical reactors. The influences of trace elements, phase separation, and co-digestion are also summarized in this review. (orig.)

  16. Stimulation of methane generation from nonproductive coal by addition of nutrients or a microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth J P; Voytek, Mary A; Corum, Margo D; Orem, William H

    2010-11-01

    Biogenic formation of methane from coal is of great interest as an underexploited source of clean energy. The goal of some coal bed producers is to extend coal bed methane productivity and to utilize hydrocarbon wastes such as coal slurry to generate new methane. However, the process and factors controlling the process, and thus ways to stimulate it, are poorly understood. Subbituminous coal from a nonproductive well in south Texas was stimulated to produce methane in microcosms when the native population was supplemented with nutrients (biostimulation) or when nutrients and a consortium of bacteria and methanogens enriched from wetland sediment were added (bioaugmentation). The native population enriched by nutrient addition included Pseudomonas spp., Veillonellaceae, and Methanosarcina barkeri. The bioaugmented microcosm generated methane more rapidly and to a higher concentration than the biostimulated microcosm. Dissolved organics, including long-chain fatty acids, single-ring aromatics, and long-chain alkanes accumulated in the first 39 days of the bioaugmented microcosm and were then degraded, accompanied by generation of methane. The bioaugmented microcosm was dominated by Geobacter sp., and most of the methane generation was associated with growth of Methanosaeta concilii. The ability of the bioaugmentation culture to produce methane from coal intermediates was confirmed in incubations of culture with representative organic compounds. This study indicates that methane production could be stimulated at the nonproductive field site and that low microbial biomass may be limiting in situ methane generation. In addition, the microcosm study suggests that the pathway for generating methane from coal involves complex microbial partnerships.

  17. Stimulation of methane generation from nonproductive coal by addition of nutrients or a microbial consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth J.P.; Voytek, Mary A.; Corum, Margo D.; Orem, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Biogenic formation of methane from coal is of great interest as an underexploited source of clean energy. The goal of some coal bed producers is to extend coal bed methane productivity and to utilize hydrocarbon wastes such as coal slurry to generate new methane. However, the process and factors controlling the process, and thus ways to stimulate it, are poorly understood. Subbituminous coal from a nonproductive well in south Texas was stimulated to produce methane in microcosms when the native population was supplemented with nutrients (biostimulation) or when nutrients and a consortium of bacteria and methanogens enriched from wetland sediment were added (bioaugmentation). The native population enriched by nutrient addition included Pseudomonas spp., Veillonellaceae, and Methanosarcina barkeri. The bioaugmented microcosm generated methane more rapidly and to a higher concentration than the biostimulated microcosm. Dissolved organics, including long-chain fatty acids, single-ring aromatics, and long-chain alkanes accumulated in the first 39 days of the bioaugmented microcosm and were then degraded, accompanied by generation of methane. The bioaugmented microcosm was dominated by Geobacter sp., and most of the methane generation was associated with growth of Methanosaeta concilii. The ability of the bioaugmentation culture to produce methane from coal intermediates was confirmed in incubations of culture with representative organic compounds. This study indicates that methane production could be stimulated at the nonproductive field site and that low microbial biomass may be limiting in situ methane generation. In addition, the microcosm study suggests that the pathway for generating methane from coal involves complex microbial partnerships.

  18. Investigation into the effect of high concentrations of volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion on methanogenic communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke-Whittle, Ingrid H., E-mail: ingrid.whittle@uibk.ac.at [Institut für Mikrobiologie, Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstraße 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Walter, Andreas [Institut für Mikrobiologie, Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstraße 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Ebner, Christian [Abwasserverband Zirl und Umgebung, Meilbrunnen 5, 6170 Zirl (Austria); Insam, Heribert [Institut für Mikrobiologie, Universität Innsbruck, Technikerstraße 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Different methanogenic communities in mesophilic and thermophilic reactors. • High VFA levels do not cause major changes in archaeal communities. • Real-time PCR indicated greater diversity than ANAEROCHIP microarray. - Abstract: A study was conducted to determine whether differences in the levels of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in anaerobic digester plants could result in variations in the indigenous methanogenic communities. Two digesters (one operated under mesophilic conditions, the other under thermophilic conditions) were monitored, and sampled at points where VFA levels were high, as well as when VFA levels were low. Physical and chemical parameters were measured, and the methanogenic diversity was screened using the phylogenetic microarray ANAEROCHIP. In addition, real-time PCR was used to quantify the presence of the different methanogenic genera in the sludge samples. Array results indicated that the archaeal communities in the different reactors were stable, and that changes in the VFA levels of the anaerobic digesters did not greatly alter the dominating methanogenic organisms. In contrast, the two digesters were found to harbour different dominating methanogenic communities, which appeared to remain stable over time. Real-time PCR results were inline with those of microarray analysis indicating only minimal changes in methanogen numbers during periods of high VFAs, however, revealed a greater diversity in methanogens than found with the array.

  19. Quantitative analysis of ruminal methanogenic microbial populations in beef cattle divergent in phenotypic residual feed intake (RFI) offered contrasting diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carberry, Ciara A; Kenny, David A; Kelly, Alan K; Waters, Sinéad M

    2014-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emissions in cattle are an undesirable end product of rumen methanogenic fermentative activity as they are associated not only with negative environmental impacts but also with reduced host feed efficiency. The aim of this study was to quantify total and specific rumen microbial methanogenic populations in beef cattle divergently selected for residual feed intake (RFI) while offered (i) a low energy high forage (HF) diet followed by (ii) a high energy low forage (LF) diet. Ruminal fluid was collected from 14 high (H) and 14 low (L) RFI animals across both dietary periods. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis was conducted to quantify the abundance of total and specific rumen methanogenic microbes. Spearman correlation analysis was used to investigate the association between the relative abundance of methanogens and animal performance, rumen fermentation variables and diet digestibility. Abundance of methanogens, did not differ between RFI phenotypes. However, relative abundance of total and specific methanogen species was affected (P < 0.05) by diet type, with greater abundance observed while animals were offered the LF compared to the HF diet. These findings suggest that differences in abundance of specific rumen methanogen species may not contribute to variation in CH4 emissions between efficient and inefficient animals, however dietary manipulation can influence the abundance of total and specific methanogen species.

  20. Immobilization patterns and dynamics of acetate-utilizing methanogens in sterile granular sludge from upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jens Ejbye; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1999-01-01

    that immobilization does not affect the growth kinetics of these methanogens. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using polyclonal antibodies against either M. concilii GP-6 or M. mazeii S-6 showed significant variations in the two methanogenic populations in the different reactors. Polyclonal antibodies were...

  1. Immobilization patterns and dynamics of acetate-utilizing methanogens immobilized in sterile granular sludge in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jens Ejbye; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1999-01-01

    that immobilization does not affect the growth kinetics of these methanogens. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using polyclonal antibodies against either M. concilii GP-6 or M. mazeii S-6 showed significant variations in the two methanogenic populations in the different reactors. Polyclonal antibodies were...

  2. Detection and Isolation Techniques for Methanogens from Microbial Mats (in the El Tatio Geyser Field, Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, E. Z.; Franks, M. A.; Bennett, P.

    2010-12-01

    Isolating methanogenic archea from an extreme environment such as El Tatio (high altitude, arid climate) gives insight to the methanogenic taxas able to adapt and grow under extreme conditions. The hydrothermal waters at El Tatio geyser field demonstrate extreme geochemical conditions, with discharge water from springs and geysers at local boiling temperature (85° C) with high levels of arsenic and low DIC levels. Despite these challenges, many of El Tatio’s hundred plus hydrothermal features host extensive microbial mat communities, many showing evidence of methanogenesis. When trying to isolate methanogens unique to this area, various approaches and techniques were used. To detect the presence of methanogens in samples taken from the field, dissolved methane concentrations were determined via gas chromatography (GC) analysis. Samples were then selected for culturing and most probable number (MPN) enumeration, where growth was assessed using both methane production and observations of fluorescence under UV light. PCR was used to see if the archeal DNA was apparent directly from the field, and shotgun cloning was done to determine phylogenetic affiliation. Several culturing techniques were carried out in an attempt to isolate methanogens from samples that showed evidence of methanogenesis. The slant culturing method was used because of the increased surface area for colonization combined with the relative ease of keeping anaerobic. After a few weeks, when colonies were apparent, some were aseptically selected and inoculated to observe growth in a liquid media containing ampicillin to inhibit bacterial growth. Culturing techniques proved successful after inoculation, showing a slow growth of methanogens via GC and autofluorescence. Further PCR tests and subsequent sequencing were done to confirm and identify isolates.

  3. Methanogenic H2 syntrophy among thermophiles: a model of metabolism, adaptation and survival in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcuoglu, B. D.; Stewart, L. C.; Butterfield, D. A.; Huber, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 1 giga ton (Gt, 1015 g) of CH4 is formed globally per year from H2, CO2 and acetate through methanogenesis, largely by methanogens growing in syntrophic association with anaerobic microbes that hydrolyze and ferment biopolymers. However, our understanding of methanogenesis in hydrothermal regions of the subseafloor and potential syntrophic methanogenesis at thermophilic temperatures (i.e., >50°C) is nascent. In this study, the growth of natural assemblages of thermophilic methanogens from Axial Seamount was primarily limited by H2 availability. Heterotrophs supported thermophilic methanogenesis by H2 syntrophy in microcosm incubations of hydrothermal fluids at 55°C and 80°C supplemented with tryptone only. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, only heterotrophic archaea that produce H2, H2-consuming methanogens, and sulfate reducing archaea were found in 80°C tryptone microcosms from Marker 113 vent. No bacteria were found. In 55°C tryptone microcosms, sequences were found from H2-producing bacteria and H2-consuming methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. In order to model the impact of H2 syntrophy at hyperthemophilic temperatures, a co-culture was established consisting of the H2-producing hyperthermophilic heterotroph Thermococcus paralvinellae and a H2-consuming hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens. When grown alone in a chemostat, the growth rates and steady-state cell concentrations of T. paralvinellae decreased significantly when a high H2 (70 µM) background was present. H2 inhibition was ameliorated by the production of formate, but in silico modeling suggests less energetic yield for the cells. H2 syntrophy relieved H2 inhibition for both the heterotroph and the methanogenic partners. The results demonstrate that thermophilic H2 syntrophy can support methanogenesis within natural microbial assemblages and may be an important alternative energy source for thermophilic autotrophs in marine geothermal environments.

  4. Effect of dietary fiber on the methanogen community in the hindgut of Lantang gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Z; Liang, J B; Liao, X D; Wright, A D G; Wu, Y B; Yu, B

    2016-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of dietary fiber on methanogenic diversity and community composition in the hindgut of indigenous Chinese Lantang gilts to explain the unexpected findings reported earlier that Lantang gilts fed low-fiber diet (LFD) produced more methane than those fed high-fiber diet (HFD). In total, 12 Lantang gilts (58.7±0.37 kg) were randomly divided into two dietary groups (six replicates (pigs) per group) and fed either LFD (NDF=201.46 g/kg) or HFD (NDF=329.70 g/kg). Wheat bran was the main source of fiber for the LFD, whereas ground rice hull (mixture of rice hull and rice bran) was used for the HFD. Results showed that the methanogens in the hindgut of Lantang gilts belonged to four known species (Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, Methanobrevibacter wolinii, Methanosphaera stadtmanae and Methanobrevibacter smithii), with about 89% of the methanogens belonging to the genus Methanobrevibacter. The 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene copies of Methanobrevibacter were more than three times higher (P0.05) was observed in 16S rRNA gene copies of Fibrobacter succinogenes between the two dietary groups, and 18S rRNA gene copies of anaerobic fungi in gilts fed LFD were lower than (Pfiber source on the methanogen community, a follow-up in vitro fermentation using a factorial design comprised of two inocula (prepared from hindgut content of gilts fed two diets differing in their dietary fiber)×four substrates (LFD, HFD, wheat bran, ground rice hull) was conducted. Results of the in vitro fermentation confirmed that the predominant methanogens belonged to the genus of Methanobrevibacter, and about 23% methanogens was found to be distantly related (90%) to Thermogymnomonas acidicola. In vitro fermentation also seems to suggest that fiber source did change the methanogens community. Although the density of Methanobrevibacter species was positively correlated with CH4 production in both in vivo (P<0.01, r=0.737) and in vitro

  5. Hydrobiogeochemical controls on a low-carbon emitting energy extraction mechanism: exploring methanogenic crude oil biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jenna; McIntosh, Jennifer; Akob, Denise; Spear, John; Warwick, Peter; McCray, John

    2016-04-01

    Exploiting naturally-occurring microbial communities in the deep subsurface could help mitigate the effects of CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. These microbial communities, a combination of methanogens and syntrophic bacteria, can perform methanogenic crude oil biodegradation, namely the conversion of crude oil to natural gas, and have also been detected in biodegraded, methanogenic reservoirs. These microbes could target residual crude oil, a high-carbon, hard-to-obtain fossil fuel source, and convert it to natural gas, effectively "producing" a lower CO2 per BTU fuel source. Yet, little is known about what geochemical parameters are driving microbial population dynamics in biodegraded, methanogenic oil reservoirs, and how the presence of specific microbial communities may impact methanogenic crude oil biodegradation. To investigate methanogenic crude oil biodegradation, 22 wells along a subsurface hydrogeochemical gradient in the southeastern USA were sampled for DNA analysis of the microbial community, and geochemical analysis of produced water and crude oil. A statistical comparison of microbial community structure to formation fluid geochemical parameters, amount of crude oil biodegradation, and relative extent of methanogenesis revealed that relative degree of biodegradation (high, medium, or low), chloride concentration (550 mM to 2100 mM), well depth (393 m to 1588 m), and spatial location within the reservoir (i.e., oil field location) are the major drivers of microbial diversity. There was no statistical evidence for correlation between extent of methanogenesis and the subsurface community composition. Despite the dominance of methanogens in these sampled wells, methanogenic activity was not predicted solely based on the microbial community composition. Crude oil biodegradation, however, correlates with both community composition and produced water geochemistry, suggesting a co-linear system and implying that microbial communities associated with degree

  6. Activity and diversity of methanogens in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleikemper, Jutta; Pombo, Silvina A; Schroth, Martin H; Sigler, William V; Pesaro, Manuel; Zeyer, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Methanogenic activity was investigated in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer by using a series of four push-pull tests with acetate, formate, H(2) plus CO(2), or methanol to target different groups of methanogenic Archaea. Furthermore, the community composition of methanogens in water and aquifer material was explored by molecular analyses, i.e., fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes amplified with the Archaea-specific primer set ARCH915 and UNI-b-rev, and sequencing of DNA from dominant DGGE bands. Molecular analyses were subsequently compared with push-pull test data. Methane was produced in all tests except for a separate test where 2-bromoethanesulfonate, a specific inhibitor of methanogens, was added. Substrate consumption rates were 0.11 mM day(-1) for methanol, 0.38 mM day(-1) for acetate, 0.90 mM day(-1) for H(2), and 1.85 mM day(-1) for formate. Substrate consumption and CH(4) production during all tests suggested that at least three different physiologic types of methanogens were present: H(2) plus CO(2) or formate, acetate, and methanol utilizers. The presence of 15 to 20 bands in DGGE profiles indicated a diverse archaeal population. High H(2) and formate consumption rates agreed with a high diversity of methanogenic Archaea consuming these substrates (16S rRNA gene sequences related to several members of the Methanomicrobiaceae) and the detection of Methanomicrobiaceae by using FISH (1.4% of total DAPI [4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole]-stained microorganisms in one water sample; probe MG1200). Considerable acetate consumption agreed with the presence of sequences related to the obligate acetate degrader Methanosaeata concilii and the detection of this species by FISH (5 to 22% of total microorganisms; probe Rotcl1). The results suggest that both aceticlastic and CO(2)-type substrate-consuming methanogens are likely involved in the terminal step of hydrocarbon degradation

  7. Evaluation of the vinyl acetate elimination process in methanogenic sludge with oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, U.; Monroy, O.; Rendon, B.; Gomez, J.; Ramirez, F.

    2009-07-01

    The vinyl acetate (AV) is a volatile toxic used in the painting manufacture, causing serious problems of contamination in grounds, air and natural bodies of water. Under methanogenic conditions the complete mineralization of the AV has not been obtained, but evidences exist suggesting that with the addition of low oxygen concentrations to methanogenic sludge the elimination of this compound is possible. In this work was studied the respiratory process of elimination of the AV methano genesis and methano genesis with oxygen (1 mg/L-d). (Author)

  8. Development of methanogenic consortia in fluidized-bed batches using sepiolite of different particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, J M; Rodríguez, F; Valle, L; Muñoz, M A; Moriñigo, M A; Borrego, J J

    1996-09-01

    The addition of support materials, such as sepiolite, to fluidized-bed anaerobic digesters enhances the methane production by increasing the colonization by syntrophic microbiota. However, the efficiency in the methanogenesis depends on the particle size of the support material, the highest level of methane production being obtained by the smaller particle size sepiolite. Because of the porosity and physico-chemical characteristics of these support materials, the anaerobic microbial consortia formed quickly (after one week of incubation). The predominant methanogenic bacteria present in the active granules, detected both by immunofluorescence using specific antibodies and by scanning electron microscopy, were acetoclastic methanogens, mainly Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta.

  9. Quantitative immunologic analysis of the methanogenic flora of digestors reveals a considerable diversity. [Methanobacterium formicicum; Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macario, A.J.L.; de Macario, E.C.

    1988-01-01

    To determine which methanogens occur in digestors, we performed a quantitative immunologic analysis of a variety of samples. A comprehensive panel of calibrated polyclonal antibody probes of predefined specificity spectra was used. This allowed precise identification of bacteria by antigenic fingerprinting. A considerable diversity of methanogens was uncovered, much larger than previously reported, encompassing at least 14 strains of 11 species. Strategies were developed to measure the load of any given methanogen in a sample and to compare samples quantitatively. Two methanogens were found to predominate which were antigenically closely related with either Methanobacterium formicicum MF or Methanobrevibacter arboriphilus AZ. Fundamental data, probes, and methods are now available to monitor methanogenic subpopulations during digestor operation and thus learn about their respective roles and predictive and predictive significance.

  10. Consortium for Verification Technology Fellowship Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Lorraine E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-01

    As one recipient of the Consortium for Verification Technology (CVT) Fellowship, I spent eight days as a visiting scientist at the University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences (NERS). During this time, I participated in multiple department and research group meetings and presentations, met with individual faculty and students, toured multiple laboratories, and taught one-half of a one-unit class on Risk Analysis in Nuclear Arms control (six 1.5 hour lectures). The following report describes some of the interactions that I had during my time as well as a brief discussion of the impact of this fellowship on members of the consortium and on me/my laboratory’s technical knowledge and network.

  11. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M; Brooks, Philip J; Dugan, Vivien G; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T Kevin; Kelley, Christine A; Kuo, Lillian S; Labosky, Patricia A; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S; Srinivas, Pothur R; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A; Tucker, Jessica M; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies,

  12. Overview of the Inland California Translational Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkas, Linda H.

    2017-05-01

    The mission of the Inland California Translational Consortium (ICTC), an independent research consortium comprising a unique hub of regional institutions (City of Hope [COH], California Institute of Technology [Caltech], Jet Propulsion Laboratory [JPL], University of California Riverside [UCR], and Claremont Colleges Keck Graduate Institute [KGI], is to institute a new paradigm within the academic culture to accelerate translation of innovative biomedical discoveries into clinical applications that positively affect human health and life. The ICTC actively supports clinical translational research as well as the implementation and advancement of novel education and training models for the translation of basic discoveries into workable products and practices that preserve and improve human health while training and educating at all levels of the workforce using innovative forward-thinking approaches.

  13. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  14. The STRONG STAR Multidisciplinary PTSD Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    myocardial infarction and pre- dicting variables. J. Psychosom. Res. 69, 143e150. Harvey, B.H., Brand, L., Jeeva, Z., Stein, D.J., 2006. Cortical...For the STRONG STAR Consortium. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com j our na l h omepa g e: www.e l se v ie r.c om /l oca te/ psyne ue n 0306

  15. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Consortium Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-01

    This is the third progress report of the M.I.T. Home Automation and Healthcare Consortium-Phase Two. It covers majority of the new findings, concepts...research projects of home automation and healthcare, ranging from human modeling, patient monitoring, and diagnosis to new sensors and actuators, physical...aids, human-machine interface and home automation infrastructure. This report contains several patentable concepts, algorithms, and designs.

  16. Removal of triphenylmethane dyes by bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriaa, Jihane; Khaireddine, Monia; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2012-01-01

    A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila)-(CM-4) was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L) and malachite green (50 mg/L) dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  17. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C; Bleesing, Jack J H; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C; Dvorak, Christopher C; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fleisher, Thomas A; Bobby Gaspar, Hubert; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M; Logan, Brent R; Long-Boyle, Janel R; Malech, Harry L; McGhee, Sean A; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D; O'Reilly, Richard J; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J; Routes, John M; Shearer, William T; Small, Trudy N; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2014-02-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease through retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to encourage training of junior investigators, establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues, work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness, and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for primary immunodeficiency diseases. To date, the PIDTC has funded 2 pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans and B-cell reconstitution in patients with SCID after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first 2 PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives.

  18. Midwest superconductivity consortium. 1993 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, in the fourth year of operations further strengthened its mission to advance the science and understanding of high T{sub c} superconductivity. The goals of the organization and the individual projects continue to reflect the current needs for new knowledge in the field and the unique capabilities of the institutions involved. Group efforts and cooperative laboratory interactions to achieve the greatest possible synergy under the Consortium continue to be emphasized. Industrial affiliations coupled with technology transfer initiatives were expanded. Activities of the participants during the past year achieved an interactive and high level of performance. The number of notable achievements in the field contributed by Consortium investigators increased. The programmatic research continues to focus upon key materials-related problems in two areas. The first area has a focus upon {open_quotes}Synthesis and Processing{close_quotes} while the second is centered around {open_quotes}Limiting Features in Transport Properties of High T{sub c} Materials{close_quotes}.

  19. Removal of Triphenylmethane Dyes by Bacterial Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihane Cheriaa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila-(CM-4 was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L and malachite green (50 mg/L dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  20. Relation between methanogenic archaea and methane production potential in selected natural wetland ecosystems across China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Y. Liu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 emissions from natural wetland ecosystems exhibit large spatial variability at regional, national, and global levels related to temperature, water table, plant type and methanogenic archaea etc. To understand the underlying factors that induce spatial differences in CH4 emissions, and the relationship between the population of methanogenic archaea and CH4 production potential in natural wetlands around China, we measured the CH4 production potential and the abundance of methanogenic archaea in vertical soil profiles sampled from the Poyang wetland in the subtropical zone, the Hongze wetland in the warm temperate zone, the Sanjiang marsh in the cold temperate zone, and the Ruoergai peatland in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in the alpine climate zone. The top soil layer had the highest population of methanogens (1.07–8.29 × 109 cells g−1 soil in all wetlands except the Ruoergai peatland and exhibited the maximum CH4 production potential measured at the mean in situ summer temperature. There is a significant logarithmic correlation between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the soil organic carbon (R2 = 0.72, P < 0.001, n = 13 and between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the total nitrogen concentrations (R2 = 0.76, P < 0.001, n = 13 in wetland soils. This indicates that the amount of soil organic carbon may affect the population of methanogens in wetland ecosystems. While the CH4 production potential is not significantly related to methanogen population (R2 = 0.01, P > 0.05, n = 13, it is related to the dissolved organic carbon concentration (R2 = 0.31, P = 0.05, n = 13. This suggests that the methanogen population might be not an effective index for predicting the CH4 production in wetland

  1. High-Performance Biogas Upgrading Using a Biotrickling Filter and Hydrogenotrophic Methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupnock, Trisha L; Deshusses, Marc A

    2017-08-14

    This research reports the development of a biotrickling filter (BTF) to upgrade biogas, which is achieved by adding H2 to reduce CO2. H2 and CO2 (80:20% vol.) were fed to a bench-scale BTF packed with polyurethane foam (PUF) and inoculated with hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Maximum CH4 production rates recorded were as high as 38 m(3)CH4 m(-3)reactor day(-1), which is 5-30 times faster than earlier reports with other kinds of bioreactors. The high rates were attributed to the efficient mass transfer and high density of methanogens in the BTF. The removal efficiencies for H2 and CO2 were 83 and 96%, respectively. 5-Cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride/DAPI staining revealed that 67% of cells were alive near the gas entrance port, while only 8.3% were alive at the exit. Furthermore, DNA sequencing showed that only 27% of the biomass was composed of Euryarchaeota, the phylum which includes methanogens. These two observations suggest that optimizing the methanogen density and activity could possibly reach even higher biogas upgrading rates.

  2. Ruminal fermentation of anti-methanogenic nitrate- and nitro-containing forages in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrate, 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA), and 3-nitro-1-propanol (NPOH) can accumulate in forages and be poisonous to animals if fed at high enough amounts. These chemicals are also recognized as potent anti-methanogenic compounds, but plants naturally containing these chemicals have been studied li...

  3. Methanogenic community dynamics in anaerobic co-digestion of fruit and vegetable waste and food waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Lin; Jiane Zuo; Ruofan Ji; Xiaojie Chen; Fenglin Liu; Kaijun Wang; Yunfeng Yang

    2012-01-01

    A lab-scale continuously-stirred tank reactor (CSTR),used for anaerobic co-digestion of fruit and vegetable waste (FVW) and food waste (FW) at different mixture ratios,was operated for 178 days at the organic loading rate of 3 kg VS (volatile solids)/(m3.day).The dynamics of the Archaeal community and the correlations between environmental variables and methanogenic community structure were analyzed by polymerase chain reactions - denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and redundancy analysis (RDA),respectively.PCR-DGGE results demonstrated that the mixture ratio of FVW to FW altered the community composition of Aachaea.As the FVW/FW ratio increased,Methanoculleus,Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina became the predominant methanogens in the community.Redundancy analysis results indicated that the shift of the methanogenic community was significantly correlated with the composition of acidogenic products and methane production yield.Different mixture ratios of substrates led to different compositions of intermediate metabolites,which may affect the methanogenic community.These results suggested that the analysis of microbial communities could be used to diagnose anaerobic processes.

  4. Methanogenic degradation of (amino)aromatic compounds by anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linkova, Y.V.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of a range of aromatic substrates by anaerobic microbial communities was studied. Active methanogenic microbial communities decomposing aminoaromatic acids and azo dyes into CH4 and CO2 were isolated. Products of primary conversion were found to be 2-hydroxybenzyl and benzyl alcohols gra

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of an Obligately Methylotrophic Methanogen, Methanococcoides methylutens, Isolated from Marine Sediment

    KAUST Repository

    Guan, Yue

    2014-11-20

    Methanococcoides methylutens, the type species of the genus Methanococcoides, is a slightly halophilic methanogenic archaeon with a methylotrophic metabolism. Here, we present the annotated draft genome sequence of M. methylutens, which comprises 2,508,511 bp with 2,482 coding sequences, 51 tRNA genes, and a G+C content of 42.5%.

  6. Simulating the Contribution of Coaggregation to Interspecies Hydrogen Fluxes in Syntrophic Methanogenic Consortia†

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    A simple model (termed the syntrophy model) for simulating the contribution of coaggregation to interspecies hydrogen fluxes between syntrophic bacteria and methanogenic archaea is described. We applied it to analyzing partially aggregated syntrophic cocultures with various substrates, revealing that large fractions of hydrogen molecules were fluxed in aggregates.

  7. Selenate removal in methanogenic and sulfate-reducing upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, M.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Hommes, G.; Corvini, P.F.X.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) bioreactors (30 degrees C, pH = 7.0) to remove selenium oxyanions from contaminated waters (790 mu g Se L-1) under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions using lactate as electron donor. One UASB reactor received sulfate at

  8. Selenate removal in methanogenic and sulfate-reducing upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, M.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Hommes, G.; Corvini, P.F.X.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the use of upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) bioreactors (30 degrees C, pH = 7.0) to remove selenium oxyanions from contaminated waters (790 mu g Se L-1) under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions using lactate as electron donor. One UASB reactor received sulfate at dif

  9. Methanogenic inhibition by roxarsone (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylarsonic acid) and related aromatic arsenic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Cortinas, Irail; Field, Jim A

    2010-03-15

    Roxarsone (4-hydroxy-3-nitro-phenylarsonic acid) and p-arsanilic acid (4-aminophenylarsonic acid) are feed additives widely used in the broiler and swine industry. This study evaluated the inhibitory effect of roxarsone, p-arsanilic, and other phenylarsonic compounds on the activity of acetate- and H(2)-utilizing methanogenic microorganisms. Roxarsone, p-arsanilic, and 4-hydroxy-3-aminophenylarsonic acid (HAPA) inhibited acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens when supplemented at concentrations of 1mM, and their inhibitory effect increased sharply with incubation time. Phenylarsonic acid (1mM) inhibited acetoclastic but not H(2)-utilizing methanogens. HAPA, a metabolite from the anaerobic biodegradation of roxarsone, was found to be sensitive to autooxidation by oxygen. The compound (2.6mM) caused low methanogenic inhibition (only 14.2%) in short-term assays of 12h when autooxidation was prevented by supplementing HAPA solutions with ascorbate. However, ascorbate-free HAPA solutions underwent spontaneous autooxidation in the presence of oxygen, leading to the formation of highly inhibitory compounds. These results confirm the microbial toxicity of organoarsenic compounds, and they indicate that biotic as well as abiotic transformations can potentially impact the fate and microbial toxicity of these contaminants in the environment.

  10. Molecular Biology and Genetics of the Acetate-Utilizing Methanogenic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert P. Gunsalus

    2003-07-21

    Methane biosynthesis by the Methanosarcina species, in contrast to other methanogens, occurs from the full range of methanogenic substrates that include acetate, methanol, tri-methyl, di-methyl, and methyl-amine, methyl-sulfides, and in limited instances, H2/CO2. The Methanosarcina are also versatile in their ability to adapt and grow in habitats of varying osmolarity ranging from fresh water environments, marine environments, and to hyper saline environments (ca to 1.2 M NaCl). To facilitate studies that address the biochemistry, molecular biology and physiology of these organisms, we have constructed a whole-genome microarray to identify classes of differentially expressed genes in M. mazei strain Goe1. We propose to further identify and examine how genes and their proteins involved in the synthesis and transport of osmolytes in the cell are regulated. These compounds include N-epsilon-acetyl-beta-lysine, alpha-glutamate, betaine, and potassium whose levels within the cell are modulated in order to provide appropriate osmotic balance. We will identify differentially expressed genes involved in hydrogen and carbon dioxide sequestration since M. mazei strain Goe1 is currently the only practical model for such study. Finally, we will explore the essential roles of two metals, molybdate and tungstate, in methanogen regulation and metabolism of these environmentally essential organsims. The above studies will advance our general understanding of how methanogens respond to their environmental signals, and adapt by adjusting their physiology to thrive in changing anaerobic habitats whether natural or man-made.

  11. Rapid degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid facilitated by acetate under methanogenic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiman; Xu, Xiaohui; Dai, Meng; Wang, Lin; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Guo, Rongbo

    2017-05-01

    Acetate can be used as an electron donor to stimulate 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), which has not been determined under methanogenic condition. This study applied high-throughput sequencing and methanogenic inhibition approaches to investigate the 2,4-D degradation process using the enrichments obtained from paddy soil. Acetate addition significantly promoted 2,4-D degradation, which was 5-fold higher than in the acetate-unsupplemented enrichments in terms of the 2,4-D degradation rate constant. Dechloromonas and Pseudomonas were the dominant 2,4-D degraders. Methanogenic inhibition experiments indicated that the 2,4-D degradation was independent of methanogenesis. It was proposed that the accelerated 2,4-D degradation in the acetate-supplemented enrichment involved an unusual interaction, where members of the acetate oxidizers primarily oxidized acetate and produced H2. H2 was utilized by the 2,4-D degraders to degrade 2,4-D, but also partially consumed by the hydrogenotrophic methanogens to produce methane. The findings presented here provide a new strategy for the remediation of 2,4-D-polluted soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Toxic effects of pollutants on the Mineralization of 4-chlorophenol and Benzoate in methanogenic river sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beelen P; van Vlaardingen PLA

    1993-01-01

    The toxic effects of pollutants on the mineralization of 2 mug/l [U-14C] 4-chlorophenol and benzoate were studied in microcosms with methanogenic sediment from the Rhine river. In contrast with studies using a high substrate concentration no lag time was observed and the half-lives for 4-chlorophen

  13. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Soybean Biodiesel and Diesel Blends under Methanogenic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and the inhibitory effect of petrodiesel were studied under methanogenic conditions. Biodiesel removal efficiency of more than 95% was achieved in a chemostat with influent biodiesel concentrations up to 2.45 g/L. The kinetics of anaerobic...

  14. Methanogenic Food Web in Gut Contents of the Methane-Emitting Earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae from Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, Kristin; Hunger, S.; Brown, G.G.; Tsai, S.M.; Cerri, C.C.; Conrad, R.; Drake, H.

    2015-01-01

    The anoxic saccharide-rich conditions of the earthworm gut provide an ideal transient habitat for ingested microbes capable of anaerobiosis. It was recently discovered that the earthworm Eudrilus eugeniae from Brazil can emit methane (CH4) and that ingested methanogens might be associated with this

  15. Utilization of aminoaromatic acids by a methanogenic enrichment culture and by a novel Citrobacter freundii strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelieva, O.; Kotova, I.; Roelofsen, W.; Stams, A.J.M.; Netrusov, A.

    2004-01-01

    Following incubation of mesophilic methanogenic floccular sludge from a lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor used to treat cattle manure wastewater, a stable 5-aminosalicylate-degrading enrichment culture was obtained. Subsequently, a Citrobacter freundii strain, WA1, was isolated from the

  16. Reductive decolourisation of azo dyes by mesophilic and thermophilic methanogenic consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervantes, F.J.; Santos, dos A.B.; Madrid, de M.P.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2005-01-01

    The contribution of acidogenic bacteria and methanogenic archaea on the reductive decolourisation of azo dyes was assessed in anaerobic granular sludge. Acidogenic bacteria appeared to play an important role in the decolourising processes when glucose was provided as an electron donor; whereas metha

  17. Contribution by the methanogenic endosymbionts of anaerobic ciliates to methane production in Dutch freshwater sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Alen, T.A.; Vogels, G.D.; Hackstein, J.H.P.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic methane contributes substantially to the atmospheric methane concentration and thus to global warming. This trace gas is predominantly produced by strictly anaerobic methanogenic archaea, which thrive in the most divergent ecological niches, e. g. paddy fields, sediments, landfills, and the

  18. Kinetic and thermodynamic control of butyrate conversion in non-defined methanogenic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junicke, H; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Kleerebezem, R

    2016-01-01

    Many anaerobic conversions proceed close to thermodynamic equilibrium and the microbial groups involved need to share their low energy budget to survive at the thermodynamic boundary of life. This study aimed to investigate the kinetic and thermodynamic control mechanisms of the electron transfer during syntrophic butyrate conversion in non-defined methanogenic communities. Despite the rather low energy content of butyrate, results demonstrate unequal energy sharing between the butyrate-utilizing species (17 %), the hydrogenotrophic methanogens (9-10 %), and the acetoclastic methanogens (73-74 %). As a key finding, the energy disproportion resulted in different growth strategies of the syntrophic partners. Compared to the butyrate-utilizing partner, the hydrogenotrophic methanogens compensated their lower biomass yield per mole of electrons transferred with a 2-fold higher biomass-specific electron transfer rate. Apart from these thermodynamic control mechanisms, experiments revealed a ten times lower hydrogen inhibition constant on butyrate conversion than proposed by the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1, suggesting a much stronger inhibitory effect of hydrogen on anaerobic butyrate conversion. At hydrogen partial pressures exceeding 40 Pa and at bicarbonate limited conditions, a shift from methanogenesis to reduced product formation was observed which indicates an important role of the hydrogen partial pressure in redirecting electron fluxes towards reduced products such as butanol. The findings of this study demonstrate that a careful consideration of thermodynamics and kinetics is required to advance our current understanding of flux regulation in energy-limited syntrophic ecosystems.

  19. Microbial dark matter ecogenomics reveals complex synergistic networks in a methanogenic bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobu, Masaru K; Narihiro, Takashi; Rinke, Christian; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tringe, Susannah G; Woyke, Tanja; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2015-08-01

    Ecogenomic investigation of a methanogenic bioreactor degrading terephthalate (TA) allowed elucidation of complex synergistic networks of uncultivated microorganisms, including those from candidate phyla with no cultivated representatives. Our previous metagenomic investigation proposed that Pelotomaculum and methanogens may interact with uncultivated organisms to degrade TA; however, many members of the community remained unaddressed because of past technological limitations. In further pursuit, this study employed state-of-the-art omics tools to generate draft genomes and transcriptomes for uncultivated organisms spanning 15 phyla and reports the first genomic insight into candidate phyla Atribacteria, Hydrogenedentes and Marinimicrobia in methanogenic environments. Metabolic reconstruction revealed that these organisms perform fermentative, syntrophic and acetogenic catabolism facilitated by energy conservation revolving around H2 metabolism. Several of these organisms could degrade TA catabolism by-products (acetate, butyrate and H2) and syntrophically support Pelotomaculum. Other taxa could scavenge anabolic products (protein and lipids) presumably derived from detrital biomass produced by the TA-degrading community. The protein scavengers expressed complementary metabolic pathways indicating syntrophic and fermentative step-wise protein degradation through amino acids, branched-chain fatty acids and propionate. Thus, the uncultivated organisms may interact to form an intricate syntrophy-supported food web with Pelotomaculum and methanogens to metabolize catabolic by-products and detritus, whereby facilitating holistic TA mineralization to CO2 and CH4.

  20. Co-inhibition of methanogens for methane mitigation in biodegradable wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Tiantao; ZHANG Lijie; CHEN Haoquan; ZHAO Youcai

    2009-01-01

    The inhibition effects and mechanisms of chlorinated methane and acetylene on methanogenesis in the anaerobic digestion process of the biodegradable wastes were investigated.It was found that both chloroform and acetylene could effectively inhibit methanogens while the biodegradability of the wastes was not affected.Acetylene inhibited the activity of methanogens,while chloroform inhibited metabolic process of methanogenesis.A central composite design (CCD) and response surface regression analysis (RSREG) were employed to determine the optimum conditions and interaction effects of chloroform and acetylene in terms of inhibition efficiency,production of volatile fatty acids and molar ratio of propionic acid to acetic acid.Chloroform had significant effect on enhancing the production of VFA (F = 121.3;p0.05).In addition,a maximum molar ratio of propionic acid to acetic acid of 1.208 was estimated under the optimum conditions of chloroform concentration of 9.05 mg/kg and acetylene concentration of 3.6×10-3 (V/V).Hence,methanogens in the wastes can be inhibited while the stabilization process of the biodegradable wastes can still work well,as propionic acid generated during the inhibition process could hardly be utilized by methanogens.

  1. Visualization of candidate division OP3 cocci in limonene-degrading methanogenic cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Schauer, Regina; Probian, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Members of candidate division OP3 were detected in 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from methanogenic enrichment cultures that utilized limonene as a carbon and energy source. We developed probes for the visualization of OP3 cells. In situ hybridization experiments with newly designed OP3-specific...

  2. Potential methane production in thawing permafrost is constrained by methanogenic population size, carbon density, and substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebner, S.; Lehr, C.; Wagner, D.; Obu, J.; Lantuit, H.; Fritz, M.

    2016-12-01

    The release of carbon from newly thawed permafrost is estimated to add between 0.05 and 0.39 °C to the simulated global mean surface air temperature by the year 2300. The release of the potent greenhouse gas CH4 following permafrost thaw is thereby of particular concern. Models simulated a contribution of CH4 to the radiative forcing from thawing permafrost of up to 40% for the maximum extent of thermokarst (1). Batch experiments on thawed permafrost samples, however, have rendered the contribution of anaerobically produced carbon and in particular of CH4 to be surprisingly weak (2) and CH4 production which is realized through methanogenic archaea was reported to be low and associated with long lag phases . This leads to the hypotheses that initial methanogenic population sizes and/or substrates are limiting factors in permafrost. The objective of this study is to identify constraints for CH4 production in thawing permafrost. We analyzed several low Arctic permafrost cores of up to 3 m depth of different land cover types, sediment properties, age and stratigraphy for methanogenic abundance, potential methane production and predictors of both. We found that methanogenic population size and substrate pool are constraints on methane production but unlike expected, they do not fully explain low CH4 production rates in thawing permafrost. Even when both, population size and substrate concentrations, were large, the potential production of CH4 was still comparably low. Furthermore we show that the potential production of CH4 in thawing permafrost is a function of the methanogenic population size if substrate is not the limiting factor and that the methanogenic population size in turn is a function of the carbon density. Based on our study we propose that on the long term after permafrost has thawed, growth and community shifts within the methanogenic population will occur which potentially will increase methane production by orders of magnitude. 1. Schneider von

  3. Comparative analysis of metagenomes from three methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading enrichment cultures with 41 environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Boonfei; Jane Fowler, S; Laban, Nidal Abu; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenic hydrocarbon metabolism is a key process in subsurface oil reservoirs and hydrocarbon-contaminated environments and thus warrants greater understanding to improve current technologies for fossil fuel extraction and bioremediation. In this study, three hydrocarbon-degrading methanogenic cultures established from two geographically distinct environments and incubated with different hydrocarbon substrates (added as single hydrocarbons or as mixtures) were subjected to metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to test whether these differences affect the genetic potential and composition of the communities. Enrichment of different putative hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in each culture appeared to be substrate dependent, though all cultures contained both acetate- and H2-utilizing methanogens. Despite differing hydrocarbon substrates and inoculum sources, all three cultures harbored genes for hydrocarbon activation by fumarate addition (bssA, assA, nmsA) and carboxylation (abcA, ancA), along with those for associated downstream pathways (bbs, bcr, bam), though the cultures incubated with hydrocarbon mixtures contained a broader diversity of fumarate addition genes. A comparative metagenomic analysis of the three cultures showed that they were functionally redundant despite their enrichment backgrounds, sharing multiple features associated with syntrophic hydrocarbon conversion to methane. In addition, a comparative analysis of the culture metagenomes with those of 41 environmental samples (containing varying proportions of methanogens) showed that the three cultures were functionally most similar to each other but distinct from other environments, including hydrocarbon-impacted environments (for example, oil sands tailings ponds and oil-affected marine sediments). This study provides a basis for understanding key functions and environmental selection in methanogenic hydrocarbon-associated communities. PMID:25734684

  4. Laser spectroscopic real time measurements of methanogenic activity under simulated Martian subsurface analog conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmack, Janosch; Böhm, Michael; Brauer, Chris; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Möhlmann, Diedrich; Wagner, Dirk

    2014-08-01

    On Earth, chemolithoautothrophic and anaerobic microorganisms such as methanogenic archaea are regarded as model organisms for possible subsurface life on Mars. For this reason, the methanogenic strain Methanosarcina soligelidi (formerly called Methanosarcina spec. SMA-21), isolated from permafrost-affected soil in northeast Siberia, has been tested under Martian thermo-physical conditions. In previous studies under simulated Martian conditions, high survival rates of these microorganisms were observed. In our study we present a method to measure methane production as a first attempt to study metabolic activity of methanogenic archaea during simulated conditions approaching conditions of Mars-like environments. To determine methanogenic activity, a measurement technique which is capable to measure the produced methane concentration with high precision and with high temporal resolution is needed. Although there are several methods to detect methane, only a few fulfill all the needed requirements to work within simulated extraterrestrial environments. We have chosen laser spectroscopy, which is a non-destructive technique that measures the methane concentration without sample taking and also can be run continuously. In our simulation, we detected methane production at temperatures down to -5 °C, which would be found on Mars either temporarily in the shallow subsurface or continually in the deep subsurface. The pressure of 50 kPa which we used in our experiments, corresponds to the expected pressure in the Martian near subsurface. Our new device proved to be fully functional and the results indicate that the possible existence of methanogenic archaea in Martian subsurface habitats cannot be ruled out.

  5. Trace elements affect methanogenic activity and diversity in enrichments from subsurface coal bed produced water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Burcu; Perry, Verlin Ryan; Sheth, Mili; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Nüsslein, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Microbial methane from coal beds accounts for a significant and growing percentage of natural gas worldwide. Our knowledge of physical and geochemical factors regulating methanogenesis is still in its infancy. We hypothesized that in these closed systems, trace elements (as micronutrients) are a limiting factor for methanogenic growth and activity. Trace elements are essential components of enzymes or cofactors of metabolic pathways associated with methanogenesis. This study examined the effects of eight trace elements (iron, nickel, cobalt, molybdenum, zinc, manganese, boron, and copper) on methane production, on mcrA transcript levels, and on methanogenic community structure in enrichment cultures obtained from coal bed methane (CBM) well produced water samples from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Methane production was shown to be limited both by a lack of additional trace elements as well as by the addition of an overly concentrated trace element mixture. Addition of trace elements at concentrations optimized for standard media enhanced methane production by 37%. After 7 days of incubation, the levels of mcrA transcripts in enrichment cultures with trace element amendment were much higher than in cultures without amendment. Transcript levels of mcrA correlated positively with elevated rates of methane production in supplemented enrichments (R(2) = 0.95). Metabolically active methanogens, identified by clone sequences of mcrA mRNA retrieved from enrichment cultures, were closely related to Methanobacterium subterraneum and Methanobacterium formicicum. Enrichment cultures were dominated by M. subterraneum and had slightly higher predicted methanogenic richness, but less diversity than enrichment cultures without amendments. These results suggest that varying concentrations of trace elements in produced water from different subsurface coal wells may cause changing levels of CBM production and alter the composition of the active methanogenic community.

  6. Trace elements affect methanogenic activity and diversity in enrichments from subsurface coal bed produced water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu eÜnal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbial methane from coal beds accounts for a significant and growing percentage of natural gas worldwide. Our knowledge of physical and geochemical factors regulating methanogenesis is still in its infancy. We hypothesized that in these closed systems, trace elements (as micronutrients are a limiting factor for methanogenic growth and activity. Trace elements are essential components of enzymes or cofactors of metabolic pathways associated with methanogenesis. This study examined the effects of eight trace elements (iron, nickel, cobalt, molybdenum, zinc, manganese, boron, and copper on methane production, on mcrA transcript levels, and on methanogenic community structure in enrichment cultures obtained from coal bed methane well produced water samples from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Methane production was shown to be limited both by a lack of additional trace elements as well as by the addition of an overly concentrated trace element mixture. Addition of trace elements at concentrations optimized for standard media enhanced methane production by 37%. After seven days of incubation, the levels of mcrA transcripts in enrichment cultures with trace element amendment were much higher than in cultures without amendment. Transcript levels of mcrA correlated positively with elevated rates of methane production in supplemented enrichments (R2=0.95. Metabolically-active methanogens, identified by clone sequences of mcrA mRNA retrieved from enrichment cultures, were closely related to Methanobacterium subterraneum and Methanobacterium formicicum. Enrichment cultures were dominated by M. subterraneum and had slightly higher predicted methanogenic richness, but less diversity than enrichment cultures without amendments. These results suggest that varying concentrations of trace elements in produced water from different subsurface coal wells may cause changing levels of coal bed methane production and alter the composition of the active

  7. The role of methanogens in acetic acid production under different salinity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Keke; Guo, Chenghong; Maspolim, Yogananda; Zhou, Yan; Ng, Wun Jern

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a fed-batch acidogenic reactor was operated at a 3 d hydraulic retention time (HRT) and fed with alkaline pre-treated sludge to investigate salinity effects on methanogens' abundance, activities and their consumption of produced acetic acid (HAc) and total volatile fatty acids (VFAs). The salinity concentration was increased step-wise by adding sodium chloride. At 3‰ (parts per thousand) salinity, the average produced volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentration was 2410.16 ± 637.62 mg COD L(-1) and 2.70 ± 0.36 L methane was produced daily in the acidogenic reactor. Further batch tests indicated methanogens showed a HAc degradation rate of 3.81 mg COD g(-1) VSS h(-1) at initial HAc concentration of 1150 mg COD L(-1), and showed tolerance up to 16‰ salinity (3.76 g Na(+) L(-1)) as indicated by a constant HAc degradation rate. The microbiological study indicated this can be related to the predominance of acetate-utilizing Methanosarcinaceae and Methanomicrobiales in the reactor. However, with salinity increased to 20‰ and 40‰, increases in VFAs and HAc production and decreases in methane production, methanogens population, acidogenic bacteria population and acidification extent were observed. This study demonstrated presence of acetate-utilizing methanogens in an acidogenic reactor and their high tolerance to salinity, as well as their negative impacts on net VFAs production. The results would suggest the presence of methanogens in the acidogenic reactor should not be ignored and the recovery of methane from the acidogenic reactor needs to be considered to avoid carbon loss.

  8. Comparative analysis of metagenomes from three methanogenic hydrocarbon-degrading enrichment cultures with 41 environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Boonfei; Fowler, S Jane; Abu Laban, Nidal; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia; Gieg, Lisa M

    2015-09-01

    Methanogenic hydrocarbon metabolism is a key process in subsurface oil reservoirs and hydrocarbon-contaminated environments and thus warrants greater understanding to improve current technologies for fossil fuel extraction and bioremediation. In this study, three hydrocarbon-degrading methanogenic cultures established from two geographically distinct environments and incubated with different hydrocarbon substrates (added as single hydrocarbons or as mixtures) were subjected to metagenomic and 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to test whether these differences affect the genetic potential and composition of the communities. Enrichment of different putative hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in each culture appeared to be substrate dependent, though all cultures contained both acetate- and H2-utilizing methanogens. Despite differing hydrocarbon substrates and inoculum sources, all three cultures harbored genes for hydrocarbon activation by fumarate addition (bssA, assA, nmsA) and carboxylation (abcA, ancA), along with those for associated downstream pathways (bbs, bcr, bam), though the cultures incubated with hydrocarbon mixtures contained a broader diversity of fumarate addition genes. A comparative metagenomic analysis of the three cultures showed that they were functionally redundant despite their enrichment backgrounds, sharing multiple features associated with syntrophic hydrocarbon conversion to methane. In addition, a comparative analysis of the culture metagenomes with those of 41 environmental samples (containing varying proportions of methanogens) showed that the three cultures were functionally most similar to each other but distinct from other environments, including hydrocarbon-impacted environments (for example, oil sands tailings ponds and oil-affected marine sediments). This study provides a basis for understanding key functions and environmental selection in methanogenic hydrocarbon-associated communities.

  9. Seasonal changes in methanogenesis and methanogenic community in three peatlands, New York State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L. Sun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating environmental conditions can promote diversity and control dominance in community composition. In addition to seasonal temperature and moisture changes, seasonal supply of metabolic substrates selects populations temporally. Here we demonstrate cascading effects in the supply of metabolic substrates on methanogenesis and community composition of anaerobic methanogenic archaea in three contrasting peatlands in upstate New York. Fresh samples of peat soils, collected about every three months for 20 months and incubated at 22+2oC regardless of the in situ temperature, exhibited potential rates of methane (CH4 production of 0.02 to 0.2 mmol L-1 day-1 (380 to 3,800 nmol g-1 [dry] day-1. The addition of acetate stimulated rates of CH4 production in a fen peatland soil, whereas addition of hydrogen (H2, and simultaneous inhibition of H2-consuming acetogenic bacteria with rifampicin, stimulated CH4 production in two acidic bog soils, especially, in autumn and winter. The methanogenic community structure was characterized using TRFLP analyses of SSU rRNA genes. The E2 group of methanogens (Methanoregulaceae dominated in the two acidic bog peatlands with relatively greater abundance in winter. In the fen peatland, the E1 group (Methanoregulaceae and members of the Methanosaetaceae were co-dominant, with E1 having a high relative abundance in spring. Change in relative abundance profiles among methanogenic groups in response to added metabolic substrates was as predicted. The acetate-amendment increased abundance of Methanosarcinaceae, and H2-amendment enhanced abundance of E2 group in all peat soils studied, respectively. Additionally, addition of acetate increased abundance of Methanosaetaceae only in the bog soils. Variation in the supply of metabolic substrates helps explain the moderate diversity of methanogens in peatlands.

  10. Roles of thermophilic thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in the biocorrosion of oil pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Renxing; Grizzle, Robert S; Duncan, Kathleen E; McInerney, Michael J; Suflita, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Thermophilic sulfide-producing microorganisms from an oil pipeline network were enumerated with different sulfur oxyanions as electron acceptors at 55°C. Most-probable number (MPN) analysis showed that thiosulfate-reducing bacteria were the most numerous sulfidogenic microorganisms in pipeline inspection gauge (PIG) scrapings. Thiosulfate-reducing and methanogenic enrichments were obtained from the MPN cultures that were able to use yeast extract as the electron donor. Molecular analysis revealed that both enrichments harbored the same dominant bacterium, which belonged to the genus Anaerobaculum. The dominant archaeon in the methanogenic enrichment was affiliated with the genus Methanothermobacter. With yeast extract as the electron donor, the general corrosion rate by the thiosulfate-reducing enrichment (8.43 ± 1.40 milli-inch per year, abbreviated as mpy) was about 5.5 times greater than the abiotic control (1.49 ± 0.15 mpy), while the comparable measures for the methanogenic culture were 2.03 ± 0.49 mpy and 0.62 ± 0.07 mpy, respectively. Total iron analysis in the cultures largely accounted for the mass loss of iron measured in the weight loss determinations. Profilometry analysis of polished steel coupons incubated in the presence of the thiosulfate-reducing enrichment revealed 59 pits over an area of 71.16 mm(2), while only 6 pits were evident in the corresponding methanogenic incubations. The results show the importance of thiosulfate-utilizing, sulfide-producing fermentative bacteria such as Anaerobaculum sp. in the corrosion of carbon steel, but also suggest that Anaerobaculum sp. are of far less concern when growing syntrophically with methanogens.

  11. Roles of thermophilic thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in the biocorrosion of oil pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renxing eLiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermophilic sulfide-producing microorganisms from an oil pipeline network were enumerated with different sulfur oxyanions as electron acceptors at 55 oC. Most-probable number (MPN analysis showed that thiosulfate-reducing bacteria were the most numerous sulfidogenic microorganisms in pipeline inspection gauge (PIG scrapings. Thiosulfate-reducing and methanogenic enrichments were obtained from the MPN cultures that were able to use yeast extract as the electron donor. Molecular analysis revealed that both enrichments harbored the same dominant bacterium, which belonged to the genus Anaerobaculum. The dominant archaeon in the methanogenic enrichment was affiliated with the genus Methanothermobacter. With yeast extract as the electron donor, the general corrosion rate by the thiosulfate-reducing enrichment (8.43 ± 1.40 milli-inch per year, abbreviated as mpy was about 5.5 times greater than the abiotic control (1.49 ± 0.15 mpy, while the comparable measures for the methanogenic culture were 2.03 ± 0.49 mpy and 0.62 ± 0.07 mpy, respectively. Total iron analysis in the cultures largely accounted for the mass loss of iron measured in the weight loss determinations. Profilometry analysis of polished steel coupons incubated in the presence of the thiosulfate-reducing enrichment revealed 59 pits over an area of 71.16 mm2, while only 6 pits were evident in the corresponding methanogenic incubations. The results show the importance of thiosulfate-utilizing, sulfide-producing fermentative bacteria such as Anaerobaculum sp. in the corrosion of carbon steel, but also suggest that Anaerobaculum sp. are of far less concern when growing syntrophically with methanogens.

  12. International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium (ICPC), is a voluntary scientific organization that provides a forum for collaboration among some of the world's leading cancer and proteogenomic research centers.

  13. Latest Developments of the Isprs Student Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detchev, I.; Kanjir, U.; Reyes, S. R.; Miyazaki, H.; Aktas, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    The International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) Student Consortium (SC) is a network for young professionals studying or working within the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and other related geo-spatial sciences. The main goal of the network is to provide means for information exchange for its young members and thus help promote and integrate youth into the ISPRS. Over the past four years the Student Consortium has successfully continued to fulfil its mission in both formal and informal ways. The formal means of communication of the SC are its website, newsletter, e-mail announcements and summer schools, while its informal ones are multiple social media outlets and various social activities during student related events. The newsletter is published every three to four months and provides both technical and experiential content relevant for the young people in the ISPRS. The SC has been in charge or at least has helped with organizing one or more summer schools every year. The organization's e-mail list has over 1,100 subscribers, its website hosts over 1,300 members from 100 countries across the entire globe, and its public Facebook group currently has over 4,500 joined visitors, who connect among one another and share information relevant for their professional careers. These numbers show that the Student Consortium has grown into a significant online-united community. The paper will present the organization's on-going and past activities for the last four years, its current priorities and a strategic plan and aspirations for the future four-year period.

  14. An improved enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for whole-cell determination of methanogens in samples from anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A.H.; Ahring, B.K.

    1997-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed for the detection of whole cells of methanogens in samples from anaerobic continuously stirred tank digesters treating slurries of solid waste. The assay was found to allow for quantitative analysis of the most important groups of methanogens......-quality microtiter plates and the addition of dilute hydrochloric acid to the samples. In an experiment on different digester samples, the test demonstrated a unique pattern of different methanogenic strains present in each sample. The limited preparatory work required for the assay and the simple assay design make...

  15. The dominant acetate degradation pathway/methanogenic composition in full-scale anaerobic digesters operating under different ammonia levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia is a major environmental factor influencing biomethanation in full-scale anaerobic digesters. In this study, the effect of different ammonia levels on methanogenic pathways and methanogenic community composition of full-scale biogas plants was investigated. Eight full-scale digesters...... operating under different ammonia levels were sampled, and the residual biogas production was followed in fed-batch reactors. Acetate, labelled in the methyl group, was used to determine the methanogenic pathway by following the 14CH4 and 14CO2 production. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation was used...

  16. Car-2-Car Communication Consortium - Manifesto

    OpenAIRE

    Baldessari, Roberto; Bödekker, Bert; Deegener, Matthias; Festag, Andreas; Franz, Walter; Kellum, C. Christopher; Kosch, Timo; Kovacs, Andras; Lenardi, Massimiliano; Menig, Cornelius; Peichl, Timo; Röckl, Matthias; Seeberger, Dieter; Straßberger, Markus; Stratil, Hannes

    2007-01-01

    This document summarizes and describes the main building blocks of the Car2X Communication System as it is pursued by the Car2Car Communication Consortium (C2C-CC). “Car2X” means interactions among cars, between cars and infrastructures, and viceversa. It provides interested readers with an introduction to Car2X communications. It is intended to be a living document which will be complemented according to the progress of the work of the C2C-CC. One main objective of this document is to give i...

  17. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  18. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  19. Overview of the carbon products consortium (CPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, C.L. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is an industry, university, government cooperative research team which has evolved over the past seven years to produce and evaluate coal-derived feedstocks for carbon products. The members of the Carbon Products Consortium are UCAR Carbon Company, Koppers Industries, CONOCO, Aluminum Company of America, AMOCO Polymers, and West Virginia University. The Carbon and Insulation Materials Technology Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Fiber Materials Inc., and BASF Corporation are affiliates of the CPC. The initial work on coal-derived nuclear graphites was supported by a grant to WVU, UCAR Carbon, and ORNL from the U.S. DOE New Production Reactor program. More recently, the CPC program has been supported through the Fossil Energy Materials program and through PETC`s Liquefaction program. The coal processing technologies involve hydrogenation, extraction by solvents such as N-methyl pyrolidone and toluene, material blending, and calcination. The breadth of carbon science expertise and manufacturing capability available in the CPC enables it to address virtually all research and development issues of importance to the carbon products industry.

  20. BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE BY A MICROORGANISM CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alimohammadi, A. R. Mesdaghinia, M. Mahmoodi, S. Nasseri, A. H. Mahvi and J. Nouri

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE is one of the ether oxygenates which its use has been increased within the last twenty years. This compound is produced from isobutylene and methanol reaction that is used as octane index enhancer and also increases dissolved oxygen in gasoline and decreases carbon monoxide emission in four phased motors because of better combustion of gasoline. High solubility in water (52 g/L, high vapor pressure (0.54 kg/cm3, low absorption to organic carbon of soil and presence of MTBE in the list of potentially-carcinogens of U.S EPA has made its use of great concern. The culture media used in this study was Mineral Salt Medium (MSM. The study lasted for 236 days and in three different concentrations of MTBE of 200, 5 and 0.8 mg/L. A control sample was also used to compare the results. This research studied the isolation methods of microbial consortium in the MTBE polluted soils in Tehran and Abadan petroleum refinery besides MTBE degradation. The results showed the capability of bacteria in consuming MTBE as carbon source. Final microbial isolation was performed with several microbial passages as well as keeping consortium in a certain amount of MTBE as the carbon source.

  1. Fermentative hydrogen production by microbial consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maintinguer, Sandra I.; Fernandes, Bruna S.; Duarte, Iolanda C.S.; Saavedra, Nora Katia; Adorno, M. Angela T.; Varesche, M. Bernadete [Department of Hydraulics and Sanitation, School of Engineering of Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense, 400, 13566-590 Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil)

    2008-08-15

    Heat pre-treatment of the inoculum associated to the pH control was applied to select hydrogen-producing bacteria and endospores-forming bacteria. The source of inoculum to the heat pre-treatment was from a UASB reactor used in the slaughterhouse waste treatment. The molecular biology analyses indicated that the microbial consortium presented microorganisms affiliated with Enterobacter cloacae (97% and 98%), Clostridium sp. (98%) and Clostridium acetobutyricum (96%), recognized as H{sub 2} and volatile acids' producers. The following assays were carried out in batch reactors in order to verify the efficiencies of sucrose conversion to H{sub 2} by the microbial consortium: (1) 630.0 mg sucrose/L, (2) 1184.0 mg sucrose/L, (3) 1816.0 mg sucrose/L and (4) 4128.0 mg sucrose/L. The subsequent yields were obtained as follows: 15% (1.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), 20% (1.6 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), 15% (1.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose) and 4% (0.3 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), respectively. The intermediary products were acetic acid, butyric acid, methanol and ethanol in all of the anaerobic reactors. (author)

  2. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Ainsztein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators.

  3. Computational Modeling of Fluctuations in Energy and Metabolic Pathways of Methanogenic Archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luthey-Schulten, Zaida [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Carl R. Woese Inst. for Genomic Biology

    2017-01-04

    The methanogenic archaea, anaerobic microbes that convert CO2 and H2 and/or other small organic fermentation products into methane, play an unusually large role in the global carbon cycle. As they perform the final step in the anaerobic breakdown of biomass, methanogens are a biogenic source of an estimated one billion tons methane each year. Depending on the location, produced methane can be considered as either a greenhouse gas (agricultural byproduct), sequestered carbon storage (methane hydrate deposits), or a potential energy source (organic wastewater treatment). These microbes therefore represent an important target for biotechnology applications. Computational models of methanogens with predictive power are useful aids in the adaptation of methanogenic systems, but need to connect processes of wide-ranging time and length scales. In this project, we developed several computational methodologies for modeling the dynamic behavior of entire cells that connects stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of individual biochemical pathways with genome-scale modeling of metabolic networks. While each of these techniques were in the realm of well-defined computational methods, here we integrated them to develop several entirely new approaches to systems biology. The first scientific aim of the project was to model how noise in a biochemical pathway propagates into cellular phenotypes. Genetic circuits have been optimized by evolution to regulate molecular processes despite stochastic noise, but the effect of such noise on a cellular biochemical networks is currently unknown. An integrated stochastic/systems model of Escherichia coli species was created to analyze how noise in protein expression gives—and therefore noise in metabolic fluxes—gives rise to multiple cellular phenotype in isogenic population. After the initial work developing and validating methods that allow characterization of the heterogeneity in the model organism E. coli, the project shifted toward

  4. ICONE: An International Consortium of Neuro Endovascular Centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J; White, P; Kallmes, D F; Spears, J; Marotta, T; Roy, D; Guilbert, F; Weill, A; Nguyen, T; Molyneux, A J; Cloft, H; Cekirge, S; Saatci, I; Bracard, S; Meder, J F; Moret, J; Cognard, C; Qureshi, A I; Turk, A S; Berenstein, A

    2008-06-30

    The proliferation of new endovascular devices and therapeutic strategies calls for a prudentand rational evaluation of their clinical benefit. This evaluation must be done in an effective manner and in collaboration with industry. Such research initiative requires organisation a land methodological support to survive and thrive in a competitive environment. We propose the formation of an international consortium, an academic alliance committed to the pursuit of effective neurovascular therapies. Such a consortium would be dedicated to the designand execution of basic science, device developmentand clinical trials. The Consortium is owned and operated by its members. Members are international leaders in neurointerventional research and clinical practice. The Consortium brings competency, knowledge, and expertise to industry as well as to its membership across aspectrum of research initiatives such as: expedited review of clinical trials, protocol development, surveys and systematic reviews; laboratory expertise and support for research design and grant applications to public agencies. Once objectives and protocols are approved, the Consortium provides a stable network of centers capable of timely realization of clinical trials or pre clinical investigations in an optimal environment. The Consortium is a non-profit organization. The potential revenue generated from clientsponsored financial agreements will be redirected to the academic and research objectives of the organization. The Consortium wishes to work inconcert with industry, to support emerging trends in neurovascular therapeutic development. The Consortium is a realistic endeavour optimally structured to promote excellence through scientific appraisal of our treatments, and to accelerate technical progress while maximizing patients' safety and welfare.

  5. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-04-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  6. Growth behind the Mirror: The Family Therapy Consortium's Group Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendorf, Donald J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Charts the development of the Family Therapy Consortium, a group that provides supervision and continuing education in family therapy and explores the peer supervision process at work in the consortium. The focus is on individual and group development, which are seen as complementary aspects of the same growth process. (Author/NRB)

  7. International Arid Lands Consortium: A synopsis of accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter F. Ffolliott; Jeffrey O. Dawson; James T. Fisher; Itshack Moshe; Timothy E. Fulbright; W. Carter Johnson; Paul Verburg; Muhammad Shatanawi; Jim P. M. Chamie

    2003-01-01

    The International Arid Lands Consortium (IALC) was established in 1990 to promote research, education, and training activities related to the development, management, and reclamation of arid and semiarid lands in the Southwestern United States, the Middle East, and elsewhere in the world. The Consortium supports the ecological sustainability and environmentally sound...

  8. Low strength ultrasonication positively affects the methanogenic granules toward higher AD performance. Part I: Physico-chemical characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, S. K.; Hwang, Yuhoon; Kim, D. H.

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate the correlation between enhanced biogas production and changed physico-chemical properties of methanogenic granules after low strength ultrasonication, in this study, the effects of low strength ultrasonication on the settling velocity, permeability, porosity, and fluid collection...... efficiency of the methanogenic granules were investigated. In addition, their morphological changes were visualized using a scanning electron microscopic technique. The experimental results indicate that low strength ultrasonication increased both the permeability (37%) and specific surface area (230...

  9. The genome sequence of the rumen methanogen Methanobrevibacter ruminantium reveals new possibilities for controlling ruminant methane emissions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinead C Leahy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methane (CH(4 is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG, having a global warming potential 21 times that of carbon dioxide (CO(2. Methane emissions from agriculture represent around 40% of the emissions produced by human-related activities, the single largest source being enteric fermentation, mainly in ruminant livestock. Technologies to reduce these emissions are lacking. Ruminant methane is formed by the action of methanogenic archaea typified by Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, which is present in ruminants fed a wide variety of diets worldwide. To gain more insight into the lifestyle of a rumen methanogen, and to identify genes and proteins that can be targeted to reduce methane production, we have sequenced the 2.93 Mb genome of M. ruminantium M1, the first rumen methanogen genome to be completed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The M1 genome was sequenced, annotated and subjected to comparative genomic and metabolic pathway analyses. Conserved and methanogen-specific gene sets suitable as targets for vaccine development or chemogenomic-based inhibition of rumen methanogens were identified. The feasibility of using a synthetic peptide-directed vaccinology approach to target epitopes of methanogen surface proteins was demonstrated. A prophage genome was described and its lytic enzyme, endoisopeptidase PeiR, was shown to lyse M1 cells in pure culture. A predicted stimulation of M1 growth by alcohols was demonstrated and microarray analyses indicated up-regulation of methanogenesis genes during co-culture with a hydrogen (H(2 producing rumen bacterium. We also report the discovery of non-ribosomal peptide synthetases in M. ruminantium M1, the first reported in archaeal species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The M1 genome sequence provides new insights into the lifestyle and cellular processes of this important rumen methanogen. It also defines vaccine and chemogenomic targets for broad inhibition of rumen methanogens and represents a significant

  10. The virtual atomic and molecular data centre (VAMDC) consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubernet, M. L.; Antony, B. K.; Ba, Y. A.; Babikov, Yu L.; Bartschat, K.; Boudon, V.; Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.; Daniel, F.; Delahaye, F.; Del Zanna, G.; de Urquijo, J.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Domaracka, A.; Doronin, M.; Drouin, B. J.; Endres, C. P.; Fazliev, A. Z.; Gagarin, S. V.; Gordon, I. E.; Gratier, P.; Heiter, U.; Hill, C.; Jevremović, D.; Joblin, C.; Kasprzak, A.; Krishnakumar, E.; Leto, G.; Loboda, P. A.; Louge, T.; Maclot, S.; Marinković, B. P.; Markwick, A.; Marquart, T.; Mason, H. E.; Mason, N. J.; Mendoza, C.; Mihajlov, A. A.; Millar, T. J.; Moreau, N.; Mulas, G.; Pakhomov, Yu; Palmeri, P.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Perevalov, V. I.; Piskunov, N.; Postler, J.; Quinet, P.; Quintas-Sánchez, E.; Ralchenko, Yu; Rhee, Y.-J.; Rixon, G.; Rothman, L. S.; Roueff, E.; Ryabchikova, T.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Scheier, P.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmitt, B.; Stempels, E.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Tyuterev, Vl G.; Vujčić, V.; Wakelam, V.; Walton, N. A.; Zatsarinny, O.; Zeippen, C. J.; Zwölf, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) Consortium is a worldwide consortium which federates atomic and molecular databases through an e-science infrastructure and an organisation to support this activity. About 90% of the inter-connected databases handle data that are used for the interpretation of astronomical spectra and for modelling in many fields of astrophysics. Recently the VAMDC Consortium has connected databases from the radiation damage and the plasma communities, as well as promoting the publication of data from Indian institutes. This paper describes how the VAMDC Consortium is organised for the optimal distribution of atomic and molecular data for scientific research. It is noted that the VAMDC Consortium strongly advocates that authors of research papers using data cite the original experimental and theoretical papers as well as the relevant databases. .

  11. The Black Rock Forest Consortium: A narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzetto-More, Nicole Antoinette

    The Black Rock Forest is a 3,785-acre wilderness area whose richly forested landscape represents the splendor of the Hudson Valley Region of New York State. Although originally intended to become the home of wealthy banker James Stillman, it was his son Ernest whose love of conservation caused him to embrace the then new and revolutionary practice of sustainable forestry and establish Black Rock in 1928. Due to Ernest Stillman's foresight, the property was protected from development and bequeathed to Harvard University following his death for the establishment of an experimental forest. The modern environmental movement in America began when the Black Rock Forest was threatened with development by Consolidated Edison, and the people of the surrounding community banded together, battling tirelessly for over 17 years to stop the degradation of this historic forest. The outcome of this crusade marked a hallmark win for the environment leaving an illustrious and inveterate legacy. The campaign resulted in the watershed legislation the National Environmental Policy Act, the formation of several environmental advocacy groups, the creation of the Council on Environmental Quality of the Executive Office of the President, as well as set a precedent for communities to initiate and win cases against major corporations in order to safeguard natural resources. In the midst of the controversy it became apparent that alternative futures for the Forest needed to be explored. As a result of a committee report and one man's vision, the idea emerged to create a consortium that would purchase and steward the Forest. With a formation that took nearly fifteen years, the Black Rock Forest Consortium was formed, a unique amalgamation of K--12 public and private schools, colleges and universities, and science and cultural centers that successfully collaborate to enhance scientific research, environmental conservation, and education. The Consortium works to bridge the gaps between learners

  12. Microbial community changes in aquifer sediment microcosm for anaerobic anthracene biodegradation under methanogenic condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Wan; Shuying Zhang; Shuguang Xie

    2012-01-01

    The widespread distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons(PAHs)in groundwater has become an important environmental issue.Knowledge of microbial community changes could aid in identification of particular microorganisms that are capable of degrading PAHs in contaminated aquifers.Therefore,16S rRNA gene clone library analysis was used to identify the archaeal and bacterial communities in an aquifer sediment microcosm used for anaerobic anthracene degradation under methanogenic conditions.A remarkable shift of the archaeal community structure occurred after anaerobic anthracene degradation,but the types of the abundant bacterial phyla did not change.However,a decrease of both archaeal and bacterial diversity was observed.Bacterial genera Bacillus,Rhodococcus and Herbaspirillum might have links with anaerobic anthracene degradation,suggesting a role of microbial consortia.This work might add some new information for understanding the mechanism of PAH degradation under methanogenic conditions.

  13. Anaerobic biodegradation of fluoranthene under methanogenic conditions in presence of surface-active compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchedzhieva, Nadezhda; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    biodegradation was most likely as a result of the increased fluoranthene solubility. The results indicate that LAS can be considered as a promising agent for facilitation of the process of anaerobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) biodegradation under methanogenic conditions.......Bacillus cereus isolated from municipal wastewater treatment plant was used as a model strain to assess the efficiency of two anionic surfactants, a chemical surfactant and a biosurfactant during fluoranthene biodegradation under anaerobic methanogenic conditions. The surfactants selected...... for the study were linear alkyl benzene sulphonates (LAS) and rhamnolipid-biosurfactant complex from Pseudomonas sp. PS-17. Biodegradation of fluoranthene was monitored by GC/MS for a period up to 12th day. No change in the fluoranthene concentration was registered after 7th day. The presence of LAS enhanced...

  14. Monitoring methanogenic population dynamics in a full-scale anaerobic digester to facilitate operational management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie; Williams, Haydn; Dinsdale, Richard; Guwy, Alan; Esteves, Sandra

    2013-07-01

    Microbial populations in a full-scale anaerobic digester fed on food waste were monitored over an 18-month period using qPCR. The digester exhibited a highly dynamic environment in which methanogenic populations changed constantly in response to availability of substrates and inhibitors. The methanogenic population in the digester was dominated by Methanosaetaceae, suggesting that aceticlastic methanogenesis was the main route for the production of methane. Sudden losses (69%) in Methanosaetaceae were followed by a build-up of VFAs which were subsequently consumed when populations recovered. A build up of ammonium inhibited Methanosaetaceae and resulted in shifts from acetate to hydrogen utilization. Addition of trace elements and alkalinity when propionate levels were high stimulated microbial growth. Routine monitoring of microbial populations and VFAs provided valuable insights into the complex processes occurring within the digester and could be used to predict digester stability and facilitate digester optimization.

  15. Methanogenic diversity and activity in hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano, Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Cassandre Sara; Parkes, R John; Cragg, Barry A; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Toffin, Laurent

    2011-08-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are a significant source of methane to the atmosphere. The Napoli mud volcano, situated in the brine-impacted Olimpi Area of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, emits mainly biogenic methane particularly at the centre of the mud volcano. Temperature gradients support the suggestion that Napoli is a cold mud volcano with moderate fluid flow rates. Biogeochemical and molecular genetic analyses were carried out to assess the methanogenic activity rates, pathways and diversity in the hypersaline sediments of the centre of the Napoli mud volcano. Methylotrophic methanogenesis was the only significant methanogenic pathway in the shallow sediments (0-40 cm) but was also measured throughout the sediment core, confirming that methylotrophic methanogens could be well adapted to hypersaline environments. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was the dominant pathway below 50 cm; however, low rates of acetoclastic methanogenesis were also present, even in sediment layers with the highest salinity, showing that these methanogens can thrive in this extreme environment. PCR-DGGE and methyl coenzyme M reductase gene libraries detected sequences affiliated with anaerobic methanotrophs (mainly ANME-1) as well as Methanococcoides methanogens. Results show that the hypersaline conditions in the centre of the Napoli mud volcano influence active biogenic methane fluxes and methanogenic/methylotrophic diversity.

  16. Conductive iron oxide minerals accelerate syntrophic cooperation in methanogenic benzoate degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Li; Tang, Jia; Wang, Yueqiang; Hu, Min; Zhou, Shungui, E-mail: sgzhou@soil.gd.cn

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Paddy soil contaminated with benzoate incubated with hematite and magnetite. • Iron oxides addition enhanced methanogenic benzoate degradation by 25–53%. • The facilitated syntrophy might involve direct interspecies electron transfer. • Bacillaceae, Peptococcaceae, and Methanobacterium are potentially involved. - Abstract: Recent studies have suggested that conductive iron oxide minerals can facilitate syntrophic metabolism of the methanogenic degradation of organic matter, such as ethanol, propionate and butyrate, in natural and engineered microbial ecosystems. This enhanced syntrophy involves direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) powered by microorganisms exchanging metabolic electrons through electrically conductive minerals. Here, we evaluated the possibility that conductive iron oxides (hematite and magnetite) can stimulate the methanogenic degradation of benzoate, which is a common intermediate in the anaerobic metabolism of aromatic compounds. The results showed that 89–94% of the electrons released from benzoate oxidation were recovered in CH{sub 4} production, and acetate was identified as the only carbon-bearing intermediate during benzoate degradation. Compared with the iron-free controls, the rates of methanogenic benzoate degradation were enhanced by 25% and 53% in the presence of hematite and magnetite, respectively. This stimulatory effect probably resulted from DIET-mediated methanogenesis in which electrons transfer between syntrophic partners via conductive iron minerals. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that Bacillaceae, Peptococcaceae, and Methanobacterium are potentially involved in the functioning of syntrophic DIET. Considering the ubiquitous presence of iron minerals within soils and sediments, the findings of this study will increase the current understanding of the natural biological attenuation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic environments.

  17. Population dynamics of methanogens during acidification of biogas fermenters fed with maize silage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munk, Bernhard; Bauer, Christoph; Gronauer, Andreas; Lebuhn, Michael [Bavarian State Research Center of Agriculture, Institute for Agricultural Engineering and Animal Husbandry, Freising (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Limitations in the supply of essential trace elements for methanogenic Archaea can arise in biogas production from renewable resources in flow-through systems particularly when no manure is added. Without compensating supplementation, primarily Co and Na{sup +} can become limiting in long-term mono-digestion of maize silage at threshold values of ca. 0.03 and 10 mg/L, respectively. These deficiencies apparently triggered process acidification. Using molecular biological methods (PCR-SSCP and quantitative real-time PCR), microbial population dynamics were monitored qualitatively and quantitatively at distinct stages during the experiments, investigating mcrA/mrtA, coding for a subunit of the key enzyme of methanogenesis. An exponential correlation between mcrA/mrtA copies and methane productivity was obtained. Members of obligately acetoclastic Methanosaetaceae were found only at low acetate concentrations (below 1 g/L). At organic loading rates>1 g volatile solids/(L x d) and without acidification symptoms, obligately hydrogenotrophic (oh) Methanobacteriales and versatile Methanosarcinaceae were dominating, and an abundance of up to 10{sup 10} methanogens per mL fermenter content was determined. In the acidified process, however, ca. 4 orders of magnitude less methanogens were detected, and Methanomicrobiales (oh), more specifically Methanospirillum hungatei or Methanoculleus spp., were dominating. Species diversity at the DNA level was highest at efficient process performance without stress symptoms and at a relatively low organic loading rate (1-2 g volatile solids/(L x d)). According to the quantitative real-time PCR data, the process was not sustained below an availability of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -9}{mu}g Co per methanogenic cell. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Cattle Manure Enhances Methanogens Diversity and Methane Emissions Compared to Swine Manure under Rice Paddy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Yoon Kim

    Full Text Available Livestock manures are broadly used in agriculture to improve soil quality. However, manure application can increase the availability of organic carbon, thereby facilitating methane (CH4 production. Cattle and swine manures are expected to have different CH4 emission characteristics in rice paddy soil due to the inherent differences in composition as a result of contrasting diets and digestive physiology between the two livestock types. To compare the effect of ruminant and non-ruminant animal manure applications on CH4 emissions and methanogenic archaeal diversity during rice cultivation (June to September, 2009, fresh cattle and swine manures were applied into experimental pots at 0, 20 and 40 Mg fresh weight (FW ha-1 in a greenhouse. Applications of manures significantly enhanced total CH4 emissions as compared to chemical fertilization, with cattle manure leading to higher emissions than swine manure. Total organic C contents in cattle (466 g kg-1 and swine (460 g kg-1 manures were of comparable results. Soil organic C (SOC contents were also similar between the two manure treatments, but dissolved organic C (DOC was significantly higher in cattle than swine manure. The mcrA gene copy numbers were significantly higher in cattle than swine manure. Diverse groups of methanogens which belong to Methanomicrobiaceae were detected only in cattle-manured but not in swine-manured soil. Methanogens were transferred from cattle manure to rice paddy soils through fresh excrement. In conclusion, cattle manure application can significantly increase CH4 emissions in rice paddy soil during cultivation, and its pretreatment to suppress methanogenic activity without decreasing rice productivity should be considered.

  19. Microbial diversity and methanogenic activity of Antrim Shale formation waters from recently fractured wells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia eWuchter

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Antrim Shale in the Michigan Basin is one of the most productive shale gas formations in the U.S, but optimal resource recovery strategies must rely on a thorough understanding of the complex biogeochemical, microbial, and physical interdependencies in this and similar systems. We used Illumina Miseq 16S rDNA sequencing to analyze the diversity and relative abundance of prokaryotic communities present in Antrim shale formation water of three closely spaced recently fractured gas-producing wells. In addition, the well waters were incubated with a suite of fermentative and methanogenic substrates in an effort to stimulate microbial methane generation. The three wells exhibited substantial differences in their community structure that may arise from their different drilling and fracturing histories. Bacterial sequences greatly outnumbered those of archaea and shared highest similarity to previously described cultures of mesophiles and moderately halophiles within the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and δ- and ε-Proteobacteria. The majority of archaeal sequences shared highest sequence similarity to uncultured euryarchaeotal environmental clones. Some sequences closely related to cultured methylotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were also present in the initial well water. Incubation with methanol and trimethylamine stimulated methylotrophic methanogens and resulted in the largest increase in methane production in the formation waters, while fermentation triggered by the addition of yeast extract and formate indirectly stimulated hydrogenotrophic methanogens. The addition of sterile powdered shale as a complex natural substrate stimulated the rate of methane production without affecting total methane yields. Depletion of methane indicative of anaerobic methane oxidation was observed over the course of incubation with some substrates. This process could constitute a substantial loss of methane in the shale formation.

  20. Environmental Drivers of Differences in Microbial Community Structure in Crude Oil Reservoirs across a Methanogenic Gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Shelton, Jenna L.; Akob, Denise M.; Jennifer C McIntosh; Noah Fierer; Spear, John R.; Warwick, Peter D.; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulating in situ microbial communities in oil reservoirs to produce natural gas is a potentially viable strategy for recovering additional fossil fuel resources following traditional recovery operations. Little is known about what geochemical parameters drive microbial population dynamics in biodegraded, methanogenic oil reservoirs. We investigated if microbial community structure was significantly impacted by the extent of crude oil biodegradation, extent of biogenic methane production, a...

  1. Crop rotation of flooded rice with upland maize impacts the resident and active methanogenic microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenbach, Björn; Blaser, Martin B; Klose, Melanie; Conrad, Ralf

    2016-09-01

    Crop rotation of flooded rice with upland crops is a common management scheme allowing the reduction of water consumption along with the reduction of methane emission. The introduction of an upland crop into the paddy rice ecosystem leads to dramatic changes in field conditions (oxygen availability, redox conditions). However, the impact of this practice on the archaeal and bacterial communities has scarcely been studied. Here, we provide a comprehensive study focusing on the crop rotation between flooded rice in the wet season and upland maize (RM) in the dry season in comparison with flooded rice (RR) in both seasons. The composition of the resident and active microbial communities was assessed by 454 pyrosequencing targeting the archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA gene and 16S rRNA. The archaeal community composition changed dramatically in the rotational fields indicated by a decrease of anaerobic methanogenic lineages and an increase of aerobic Thaumarchaeota. Members of Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinaceae, Methanosaetaceae and Methanocellaceae were equally suppressed in the rotational fields indicating influence on both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens. On the contrary, members of soil crenarchaeotic group, mainly Candidatus Nitrososphaera, were higher in the rotational fields, possibly indicating increasing importance of ammonia oxidation during drainage. In contrast, minor effects on the bacterial community were observed. Acidobacteria and Anaeromyxobacter spp. were enriched in the rotational fields, whereas members of anaerobic Chloroflexi and sulfate-reducing members of Deltaproteobacteria were found in higher abundance in the rice fields. Combining quantitative polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing data revealed increased ribosomal numbers per cell for methanogenic species during crop rotation. This stress response, however, did not allow the methanogenic community to recover in the rotational fields during re-flooding and rice

  2. Vinyl acetate degradation by Brevibacillus agri isolated from a slightly aerated methanogenic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Mayorga, I; Durán-Hinojosa, U; Arana-Cuenca, A; Monroy-Hermosillo, O; Ramírez-Vives, F

    2010-01-01

    In a previous paper, the authors showed that a slight aeration of a methanogenic reactor treating wastewater from the manufacture of polymeric resins could improve its performance, by increasing or allowing the removal of some of its contaminants, including vinyl acetate (VA). This paper reports the isolation under aerobic conditions of a VA-biodegrading axenic culture (strain C1) retrieved from the sludge of a slightly aerated methanogenic reactor at 1 mg L(-1) d(-1) of dissolved oxygen (DO). The axenic culture obtained was phenotypically (morphology, biochemical properties, VA consumption kinetics) and phylogenetically characterized. It formed white colonies with a branched and flat morphology on solid medium. The cell morphology of the isolate was bacillus with round endings and flagellate. The cells could form chains and were stained Gram-negative. The isolate required simple nutritional elements and had a growth rate of 0.024 h(-1). The phylogenetical analysis showed that the aerobic bacterium was identified as Brevibacillus agri, with 99.3% similarity. The VA consumption kinetics in the methanogenic sludge were: volumetric consumption rate (rVA) of 1.74 +/- 0.2 mg L(-1) h(-1), maximum specific consumption rate (qVAmax) of 3.98 mg g(-1) volatile suspended solids (VSS) h(-1) and affinity constant (Ks) of 457.1 mg L(-1). The same parameters in the axenic culture were 1.69 +/- 0.04 mg L(-1) (h-1), 4.09 mg g(-1) dry weight h(-1) and 421.9 mg L(-1), respectively. These results show evidence that the aerobic isolated bacterium, identified as Brevibacillus agri, carried out the VA hydrolysis in the slightly aerated methanogenic sludge, which is the limiting step in the degradation of this compound.

  3. Integration of acidogenic and methanogenic processes for simultaneous production of biohydrogen and methane from wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkata Mohan, S.; Mohanakrishna, G.; Sarma, P.N. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500 007 (India)

    2008-05-15

    Feasibility of integrating acidogenic and methanogenic processes for simultaneous production of biohydrogen (H{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) was studied in two separate biofilm reactors from wastewater treatment. Acidogenic bioreactor (acidogenic sequencing batch biofilm reactor, AcSBBR) was operated with designed synthetic wastewater [organic loading rate (OLR) 4.75 kg COD/m{sup 3}-day] under acidophilic conditions (pH 6.0) using selectively enriched acidogenic mixed consortia. The resultant outlet from AcSBBR composed of fermentative soluble intermediates (with residual carbon source), was used as feed for subsequent methanogenic bioreactor (methanogenic/anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor, AnSBBR, pH 7.0) to generate additional biogas (CH{sub 4}) utilizing residual organic composition employing anaerobic mixed consortia. During the stabilized phase of operation (after 60 days) AcSBBR showed H{sub 2} production of 16.91 mmol/day in association with COD removal efficiency of 36.56% (SDR{sub A} - 1.736 kg COD/m{sup 3}-day). AnSBBR showed additional COD removal efficiency of 54.44% (SDR{sub M} - 1.071 kg COD/m{sup 3}-day) along with CH{sub 4} generation. Integration of the acidogenic and methanogenic processes enhanced substrate degradation efficiency (SDR{sub T} - 4.01 kg COD/m{sup 3}-day) along with generation of both H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} indicating sustainability of the process. (author)

  4. Selective inhibition of methanogens for the improvement of biohydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Kyu-Jung; Choi, Mi-Jin; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Ajayi, F.F.; Chang, In-Seop; Kim, In S. [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is a promising technology for producing biohydrogen at greater yield than with conventional technology. However, during a run of an acetate-fed MEC at an applied voltage of 0.5 V, substantial amounts of substrate are consumed in undesirable methanogenesis. Therefore, in order to suppress the methanogens specifically without adversely affecting exoelectrogens, this study examined the effects of sudden changes in pH, temperature and air-exposure, as well as chemical inhibitors, such as 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) and lumazine on methanogenesis. An abrupt decrease in temperature and pH from 30 to 20 C and 7 to 4.9, respectively, had no effect on methanogenesis. Exposing the anode biofilm to air was also ineffective in inhibiting specific methanogens because both methanogens and exoelectrogens were damaged by oxygen. However, an injection of BES (286 {mu}M) reduced the methanogenic electron losses substantially from 36.4 {+-} 4.4 (= 145.8 {+-} 17.4 {mu}mol-CH{sub 4}) to 2.5 {+-} 0.3% (= 10.2 {+-} 1.2 {mu}mol-CH{sub 4}), which in turn improved the overall hydrogen efficiency (acetate to H{sub 2}) from 56.1 {+-} 5.7 to 80.1 {+-} 6.5% (= 3.2 mol-H{sub 2}/mol-acetate). Once after inhibited, the inhibitory influence was retained even after 10 batch cycles in the absence of further BES addition. In contrast to BES, methanogenesis was unaffected by lumazine, even at much higher concentrations. The installation of a Nafion membrane resulted in the production of high purity hydrogen at the cathode but hindered proton migration, which caused a serious pH imbalance between the anode and cathode compartments. (author)

  5. Diversity and variability of methanogens during the shift from mesophilic to thermohilic conditions while biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziembińska-Buczyńska, A; Banach, A; Bacza, T; Pieczykolan, M

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is the most popular path of organic waste disposal. It is often used in wastewater treatment plants for excessive sludge removal. Methanogenic fermentation had usually been performed under mesophilic conditions, but in the past few years the thermophilic processes have become more popular due to economics and sludge sanitation. Methanogens, the group of microorganisms responsible for methane production, are thought to be sensitive to temperature change and it has already been proven that the communities performing methanogenesis under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions differ. But in most cases the research performed on methanogen diversity and changeability was undertaken in two separate anaerobic chambers for meso- and thermophilic conditions. It is also known that there is a group of microorganisms performing AD which are insensitive to temperature. Also the linkage between digester performance and its microbial content and community changeability is still not fully understood. That is why in this experiment we analyzed the bacterial community performing methanogenesis in a pilot scale anaerobic chamber during the shift from mesophilic to thermophilic conditions to point at the group of temperature tolerant microorganisms and their performance. The research was performed with PCR-DGGE (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). It occurred that the community biodiversity decreased together with a temperature increase. The changes were coherent for both the total bacteria community and methanogens. These bacterial shifts were also convergent with biogas production-it decreased in the beginning of the thermophilic phase with the bacterial biodiversity decrease and increased when the community seemed to be restored. DGGE results suggest that among a wide variety of microorganisms involved in AD there is a GC-rich group relatively insensitive towards temperature change, able to adapt quickly to shifts in

  6. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master`s Degrees and 9 Doctor`s of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors.

  7. A consortium approach to glass furnace modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.-L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    1999-04-20

    Using computational fluid dynamics to model a glass furnace is a difficult task for any one glass company, laboratory, or university to accomplish. The task of building a computational model of the furnace requires knowledge and experience in modeling two dissimilar regimes (the combustion space and the liquid glass bath), along with the skill necessary to couple these two regimes. Also, a detailed set of experimental data is needed in order to evaluate the output of the code to ensure that the code is providing proper results. Since all these diverse skills are not present in any one research institution, a consortium was formed between Argonne National Laboratory, Purdue University, Mississippi State University, and five glass companies in order to marshal these skills into one three-year program. The objective of this program is to develop a fully coupled, validated simulation of a glass melting furnace that may be used by industry to optimize the performance of existing furnaces.

  8. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium. Progress report, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bement, A.L. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. Programmatic research focuses upon key materials-related problems; principally, synthesis and processing and properties limiting transport phenomena. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 113 publications. publications. Two Master`s Degrees and one Ph.D. were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved two MISCON group meetings (held in July and January), twenty external speakers, 36 collaborations, 10 exchanges of samples and/or measurements, and one (1) gift of equipment from industry. Research achievements this past year expanded our understanding of processing phenomena on structure property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  9. Consortium sandbox: building and sharing resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mark D

    2014-06-25

    Some common challenges of biomedical product translation-scientific, regulatory, adoption, and reimbursement-can best be addressed by the broad sharing of resources or tools. But, such aids remain undeveloped because the undertaking requires expertise from multiple research sectors as well as validation across organizations. Biomedical resource development can benefit from directed consortia-a partnership framework that provides neutral and temporary collaborative environments for several, oftentimes competing, organizations and leverages the aggregated intellect and resources of stakeholders so as to create versatile solutions. By analyzing 369 biomedical research consortia, we tracked consortia growth around the world and gained insight into how this partnership model advances biomedical research. Our analyses suggest that research-by-consortium provides benefit to biomedical science, but the model needs further optimization before it can be fully integrated into the biomedical research pipeline.

  10. Methyl fluoride affects methanogenesis rather than community composition of methanogenic archaea in a rice field soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daebeler, Anne; Gansen, Martina; Frenzel, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic pathways of methane formation vary with environmental conditions, but whether this can also be linked to changes in the active archaeal community structure remains uncertain. Here, we show that the suppression of aceticlastic methanogenesis by methyl fluoride (CH(3)F) caused surprisingly little differences in community composition of active methanogenic archaea from a rice field soil. By measuring the natural abundances of carbon isotopes we found that the effective dose for a 90% inhibition of aceticlastic methanogenesis in anoxic paddy soil incubations was <0.75% CH(3)F (v/v). The construction of clone libraries as well as t-RFLP analysis revealed that the active community, as indicated by mcrA transcripts (encoding the α subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, a key enzyme for methanogenesis), remained stable over a wide range of CH(3)F concentrations and represented only a subset of the methanogenic community. More precisely, Methanocellaceae were of minor importance, but Methanosarcinaceae dominated the active population, even when CH(3)F inhibition only allowed for aceticlastic methanogenesis. In addition, we detected mcrA gene fragments of a so far unrecognised phylogenetic cluster. Transcription of this phylotype at methyl fluoride concentrations suppressing aceticlastic methanogenesis suggests that the respective organisms perform hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Hence, the application of CH(3)F combined with transcript analysis is not only a useful tool to measure and assign in situ acetate usage, but also to explore substrate usage by as yet uncultivated methanogens.

  11. Methyl fluoride affects methanogenesis rather than community composition of methanogenic archaea in a rice field soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Daebeler

    Full Text Available The metabolic pathways of methane formation vary with environmental conditions, but whether this can also be linked to changes in the active archaeal community structure remains uncertain. Here, we show that the suppression of aceticlastic methanogenesis by methyl fluoride (CH(3F caused surprisingly little differences in community composition of active methanogenic archaea from a rice field soil. By measuring the natural abundances of carbon isotopes we found that the effective dose for a 90% inhibition of aceticlastic methanogenesis in anoxic paddy soil incubations was <0.75% CH(3F (v/v. The construction of clone libraries as well as t-RFLP analysis revealed that the active community, as indicated by mcrA transcripts (encoding the α subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, a key enzyme for methanogenesis, remained stable over a wide range of CH(3F concentrations and represented only a subset of the methanogenic community. More precisely, Methanocellaceae were of minor importance, but Methanosarcinaceae dominated the active population, even when CH(3F inhibition only allowed for aceticlastic methanogenesis. In addition, we detected mcrA gene fragments of a so far unrecognised phylogenetic cluster. Transcription of this phylotype at methyl fluoride concentrations suppressing aceticlastic methanogenesis suggests that the respective organisms perform hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Hence, the application of CH(3F combined with transcript analysis is not only a useful tool to measure and assign in situ acetate usage, but also to explore substrate usage by as yet uncultivated methanogens.

  12. Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis as a tool for monitoring methanogenic Archaea changes in an anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Slawomir; Bułkowska, Katarzyna; Dabrowska, Dorota; Kaczmarczyk, Dariusz; Kowal, Przemyslaw; Możejko, Justyna

    2013-08-01

    The applicability of a newly-designed PCR primer pair in examination of methanogenic Archaea in a digester treating plant biomass was evaluated by Ribosmal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA). To find a suitable approach, three variants of RISA were tested: (1) standard, polyacrylamide gel-based, (2) automated, utilized capillary electrophoresis (GA-ARISA), and (3) automated microfluidics-based (MF-ARISA). All three techniques yielded a consistent picture of archaeal community structure changes during anaerobic digestion monitored for more than 6 weeks. While automated variants were more practical for handling and rapid analysis of methanogenic Archaea, the gel-based technique was advantageous when micro-organism identification was required. A DNA-sequence analysis of dominant bands extracted from the gel revealed that the main role in methane synthesis was played by micro-organisms affiliated with Methanosarcina barkeri. The obtained results revealed that RISA is a robust method allowing for detailed analysis of archaeal community structure during organic biomass conversion into biogas. In addition, our results showed that GA-ARISA has a higher resolution and reproducibility than other variants of RISA and could be used as a technique for tracking changes in methanogenic Archaea in an anaerobic digester.

  13. Microbial ecology of methanogenic crude oil biodegradation; from microbial consortia to heavy oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Head, Ian M.; Maguire, Michael J.; Sherry, Angela; Grant, Russell; Gray, Neil D.; Aitken, Carolyn M.; Martin Jones, D.; Oldenburg, Thomas B.P.; Larter, Stephen R. [Petroleum Research Group, Geosciences, University of Calgary (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the microbial ecology of methanogenic crude oil biodegradation. Biodegraded petroleum reservoirs are one of the most dramatic indications of the deep biosphere. It is estimated that heavy oil and oil sands will account for a considerable amount of energy production in the future. Carbon, a major resource for deep subsurface microorganisms, and energy are contained in large quantities in petroleum reservoirs. The aerobic to anaerobic paradigm shift is explained. A key process for in-situ oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs is methanogenesis. New paradigms for in-reservoir crude oil biodegradation are discussed. Variations in anaerobic degradation of crude oil hydrocarbons are also discussed. A graph shows the different patterns of crude oil biodegradation under sulfate-reducing and methanogenic conditions. Alternative anaerobic alkane activation mechanisms are also shown. From the study, it can be concluded that methanogenic crude oil degradation is of global importance and led to the establishment of the world's enormous heavy oil deposits.

  14. Dosing of anaerobic granular sludge bioreactors with cobalt: Impact of cobalt retention on methanogenic activity

    KAUST Repository

    Fermoso, Fernando G.

    2010-12-01

    The effect of dosing a metal limited anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor with a metal pulse on the methanogenic activity of granular sludge has thus far not been successfully modeled. The prediction of this effect is crucial in order to optimize the strategy for metal dosage and to prevent unnecessary losses of resources. This paper describes the relation between the initial immobilization of cobalt in anaerobic granular sludge cobalt dosage into the reactor and the evolution of methanogenic activity during the subsequent weeks. An operationally defined parameter (A0· B0) was found to combine the amount of cobalt immobilized instantaneously upon the pulse (B0) and the amount of cobalt immobilized within the subsequent 24. h (A0). In contrast with the individual parameters A0 and B0, the parameter A0· B0 correlated significantly with the methanogenic activity of the sludge during the subsequent 16 or 35. days. This correlation between metal retention and activity evolution is a useful tool to implement trace metal dosing strategies for biofilm-based biotechnological processes. © 2010.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Methanogenic Communities in Different Laboratory-Scale Anaerobic Digesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziganshin, Ayrat M.; Ziganshina, Elvira E.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative analysis of methanogenic archaea compositions and dynamics in 11 laboratory-scale continuous stirred tank reactors fed with different agricultural materials (chicken manure, cattle manure, maize straw, maize silage, distillers grains, and Jatropha press cake) was carried out by analysis of the methyl coenzyme-M reductase α-subunit (mcrA) gene. Various taxa within Methanomicrobiales, Methanobacteriaceae, Methanosarcinaceae, Methanosaetaceae, and Methanomassiliicoccales were detected in the biogas reactors but in different proportions depending on the substrate type utilized as well as various process parameters. Improved coverage and higher taxonomic resolution of methanogens were obtained compared to a previous 16S rRNA gene based study of the same reactors. Some members of the genus Methanoculleus positively correlated with the relative methane content, whereas opposite correlations were found for Methanobacterium. Specific biogas production was found to be significantly correlating with Methanosarcinaceae. Statistical analysis also disclosed that some members of the genus Methanoculleus positively correlated with the ammonia level, whereas the prevalence of Methanocorpusculum, Methanobacterium, and Methanosaeta was negatively correlated with this parameter. These results suggest that the application of methanogenic archaea adapted to specific feedstock might enhance the anaerobic digestion of such waste materials in full-scale biogas reactors. PMID:28074084

  16. Significance of ether lipids derived from methanogens in sediments from modern and ancient basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shouten, S.; Sinninghe Damste, J.S.; Hoefs, M.J.L.; De Leeuw, J.W. (Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Texel (Netherlands) Netherlands and Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands))

    1996-01-01

    High amounts of biphytanyl carbon skeletons with 0-3 cyclopentyl rings and low amounts of 2, 6, 10, 14, 18-pentamethyleicosane (PME) were detected after treatment with hydrogen iodide of fractions of several sediment extracts. These compounds are biosynthesized by archaebacteria only. Since the sediments were deposited in normal marine environments, these lipids are derived from methanogenic bacteria and more specifically Methanosarcina barkeri. In recent sediments from in and below the extensive oxygen-minimum zone in the Arabian Sea high amounts were detected in surface sediment samples where oxygen is still present. Our data suggest that these ether-bound compounds may be indicators for methane-production in the upper part of the water column and possibly an extensive oxygen-minimum zone. The concentrations varied strongly (2 orders of magnitude) in the Miocene Monterey Formation suggesting significant variations in water column methanogenic activity. The stable carbon isotopic compositions of the acyclic and cyclic biphytane carbon skeletons are several per mil heavier than those of compounds derived from photoautotrophic organisms whereas the stable carbon isotopic compositions of PME are several per mil lighter. This indicates the presence of different species of methanogens utilizing different carbon substrates.

  17. Significance of ether lipids derived from methanogens in sediments from modern and ancient basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shouten, S.; Sinninghe Damste, J.S.; Hoefs, M.J.L.; De Leeuw, J.W. [Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Texel (Netherlands)]|[Netherlands and Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)

    1996-12-31

    High amounts of biphytanyl carbon skeletons with 0-3 cyclopentyl rings and low amounts of 2, 6, 10, 14, 18-pentamethyleicosane (PME) were detected after treatment with hydrogen iodide of fractions of several sediment extracts. These compounds are biosynthesized by archaebacteria only. Since the sediments were deposited in normal marine environments, these lipids are derived from methanogenic bacteria and more specifically Methanosarcina barkeri. In recent sediments from in and below the extensive oxygen-minimum zone in the Arabian Sea high amounts were detected in surface sediment samples where oxygen is still present. Our data suggest that these ether-bound compounds may be indicators for methane-production in the upper part of the water column and possibly an extensive oxygen-minimum zone. The concentrations varied strongly (2 orders of magnitude) in the Miocene Monterey Formation suggesting significant variations in water column methanogenic activity. The stable carbon isotopic compositions of the acyclic and cyclic biphytane carbon skeletons are several per mil heavier than those of compounds derived from photoautotrophic organisms whereas the stable carbon isotopic compositions of PME are several per mil lighter. This indicates the presence of different species of methanogens utilizing different carbon substrates.

  18. Performance of thermophilic anaerobic digesters using inoculum mixes with enhanced methanogenic diversity

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanimeh, Sophia

    2017-05-30

    BACKGROUND Reportedly, various mixes of seeds were quasi-randomly selected to startup anaerobic digesters. In contrast, this study examines the impact of inoculating thermophilic anaerobic digesters with a designed mix of non-acclimated seeds based on their methanogen composition, using Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (QPCR) of 16S rRNA gene, to achieve high abundance and diversity of methanogens. RESULTS Based on QPCR results, two seed mixes were selected to inoculate two anaerobic digesters: digester (A) was inoculated with a control seed consisting of digestate, manure, and activated sludge; and digester (B) was inoculated with a further methanogen-enriched seed consisting of the control seed with added compost and leachate. Both seed combinations yielded a balanced microflora that is able to achieve a successful startup. However, upon reaching steady state, digester B exhibited lower propionate levels, resulting in lower VFA concentration and increased buffering capacity, indicating greater stability. Acetotrophs and hydrogenotrophs were dominated by Methanosarcinaceae and Methanobacteriales, respectively, in both digesters, exhibiting an average ratio of 66-to-34% in A and 76-to-24% in B during steady state. CONCLUSION The inoculation strategy in digester B resulted in improved stability, lower propionate concentration and 10% higher relative abundance of acetotrophs.

  19. Comparative Analysis of Methanogenic Communities in Different Laboratory-Scale Anaerobic Digesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayrat M. Ziganshin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative analysis of methanogenic archaea compositions and dynamics in 11 laboratory-scale continuous stirred tank reactors fed with different agricultural materials (chicken manure, cattle manure, maize straw, maize silage, distillers grains, and Jatropha press cake was carried out by analysis of the methyl coenzyme-M reductase α-subunit (mcrA gene. Various taxa within Methanomicrobiales, Methanobacteriaceae, Methanosarcinaceae, Methanosaetaceae, and Methanomassiliicoccales were detected in the biogas reactors but in different proportions depending on the substrate type utilized as well as various process parameters. Improved coverage and higher taxonomic resolution of methanogens were obtained compared to a previous 16S rRNA gene based study of the same reactors. Some members of the genus Methanoculleus positively correlated with the relative methane content, whereas opposite correlations were found for Methanobacterium. Specific biogas production was found to be significantly correlating with Methanosarcinaceae. Statistical analysis also disclosed that some members of the genus Methanoculleus positively correlated with the ammonia level, whereas the prevalence of Methanocorpusculum, Methanobacterium, and Methanosaeta was negatively correlated with this parameter. These results suggest that the application of methanogenic archaea adapted to specific feedstock might enhance the anaerobic digestion of such waste materials in full-scale biogas reactors.

  20. Anaerobic digestion from residue of industrial cassava industrialization with acidogenic and methanogenic physical separation phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, M A; Tavares, C R; Bergamasco, R; Bonifácio, A L; Costa, R T

    2000-01-01

    A trial was carried out in a continuous regimen, using a completely stirred tank reactor, at acidogenic phase, and a hybrid reactor (upflow anaerobic sludge blanket + fixed bed) at methanogenic phase at room temperature. The residue to be treated came from a flour and cassava meal industry, and the reactors operated for 300 d with affluent chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations of 7500, 9000, 11,000, and 14,000 mg/L. The final results showed a biogas production with a content of 80% methane and an average reduction of COD and free cyanide of nearly 96 and 98%, respectively. The separation of phases selected bacterial groups. At acidogenic phase, a predominance of propionic, n-butyric, and n-valeric acids, as well as a biomass composed of 95% fermentative bacilli, which were responsible for a 90% reduction in free cyanide concentration, was observed. At methanogenic phase, a predominance of methanogenic bacteria that came only from the Methanothrix genus was observed. The bacteria were responsible for high levels of organic matter removal and methane production.

  1. Methanogen Diversity in Indigenous and Introduced Ruminant Species on the Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao Dan; Martinez-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Long, Ruijun; Denman, Stuart E; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Host factors are regarded as important in shaping the archaeal community in the rumen but few controlled studies have been performed to demonstrate this across host species under the same environmental conditions. A study was designed to investigate the structure of the methanogen community in the rumen of two indigenous (yak and Tibetan sheep) and two introduced domestic ruminant (cattle and crossbred sheep) species raised and fed under similar conditions on the high altitude Tibetan Plateau. The methylotrophic Methanomassiliicoccaceae was the predominant archaeal group in all animals even though Methanobrevibacter are usually present in greater abundance in ruminants globally. Furthermore, within the Methanomassiliicoccaceae family members from Mmc. group 10 and Mmc. group 4 were dominant in Tibetan Plateau ruminants compared to Mmc. group 12 found to be highest in other ruminants studied. Small ruminants presented the highest number of sequences that belonged to Methanomassiliicoccaceae compared to the larger ruminants. Although the methanogen community structure was different among the ruminant species, there were striking similarities between the animals in this environment. This indicates that factors such as the extreme environmental conditions and diet on the Tibetan Plateau might have a greater impact on rumen methanogen community compared to host differences.

  2. Methanogen Diversity in Indigenous and Introduced Ruminant Species on the Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Dan Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Host factors are regarded as important in shaping the archaeal community in the rumen but few controlled studies have been performed to demonstrate this across host species under the same environmental conditions. A study was designed to investigate the structure of the methanogen community in the rumen of two indigenous (yak and Tibetan sheep and two introduced domestic ruminant (cattle and crossbred sheep species raised and fed under similar conditions on the high altitude Tibetan Plateau. The methylotrophic Methanomassiliicoccaceae was the predominant archaeal group in all animals even though Methanobrevibacter are usually present in greater abundance in ruminants globally. Furthermore, within the Methanomassiliicoccaceae family members from Mmc. group 10 and Mmc. group 4 were dominant in Tibetan Plateau ruminants compared to Mmc. group 12 found to be highest in other ruminants studied. Small ruminants presented the highest number of sequences that belonged to Methanomassiliicoccaceae compared to the larger ruminants. Although the methanogen community structure was different among the ruminant species, there were striking similarities between the animals in this environment. This indicates that factors such as the extreme environmental conditions and diet on the Tibetan Plateau might have a greater impact on rumen methanogen community compared to host differences.

  3. Cobalt- and Nickel-containing enzyme constructs from the sequences of methanogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balachandramohan J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The conserved domain of sequences revealed in methanogens is considered for designing enzymes among which the attention has been focused on the metalloenzymes showing evolutionary significances. Methods. Molecular evolution, molecular modelling and molecular docking methods. Results. Molecular evolutionary hypothesis has been applied for designing cobalt-containing sirohydrocholine cobalt chelatase and nickel-containing coenzyme F420 non-reducing hydrogenase from conserved domains encompassing metaland substrate-binding sites. It was hypothesized that if any enzyme has similar or identical conserved domain in its catalytic region, the construct can bring similar catalytic activity. Using this approach, the region which covers such functional module has to be modeled for yielding enzyme constructs. The present approach has provided a high likelihood to design stable metalloenzyme constructs from the sequences of methanogens due to their low functional divergence. The resulted enzyme constructs have shown diverse reaction specificity and binding affinity with respective substrates. Conclusions. It seems to provide a new knowledge on understanding the catalytic competence as well as substrate-specificity of enzyme constructs. The resulted enzyme constructs could be experimentally reliable as the sequences originally driven from methanogenic archaea.

  4. The effect of organic loading rate and retention time on hydrogen production from a methanogenic CSTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakarinen, O; Kaparaju, P; Rintala, J

    2011-10-01

    The possibility of shifting a methanogenic process for hydrogen production by changing the process parameters viz., organic loading rate (OLR) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) was evaluated. At first, two parallel semi-continuously fed continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were operated as methanogenic reactors (M1 and M2) for 78 days. Results showed that a methane yield of 198-218 L/kg volatile solids fed (VS(fed)) was obtained when fed with grass silage at an OLR of 2 kgVS/m³/d and HRT of 30 days. After 78 days of operation, hydrogen production was induced in M2 by increasing the OLR from 2 to 10 kgVS/m³/d and shortening the HRT from 30 to 6 days. The highest H₂ yield of 42 L/kgVS(fed) was obtained with a maximum H₂ content of 24%. The present results thus demonstrate that methanogenic process can be shifted towards hydrogen production by increasing the OLR and decreasing HRT.

  5. ZATPAC: a model consortium evaluates teen programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Kathryn; Murphy, Dana; Parsons, Chris

    2009-09-01

    How do we advance the environmental literacy of young people, support the next generation of environmental stewards and increase the diversity of the leadership of zoos and aquariums? We believe it is through ongoing evaluation of zoo and aquarium teen programming and have founded a consortium to pursue those goals. The Zoo and Aquarium Teen Program Assessment Consortium (ZATPAC) is an initiative by six of the nation's leading zoos and aquariums to strengthen institutional evaluation capacity, model a collaborative approach toward assessing the impact of youth programs, and bring additional rigor to evaluation efforts within the field of informal science education. Since its beginning in 2004, ZATPAC has researched, developed, pilot-tested and implemented a pre-post program survey instrument designed to assess teens' knowledge of environmental issues, skills and abilities to take conservation actions, self-efficacy in environmental actions, and engagement in environmentally responsible behaviors. Findings from this survey indicate that teens who join zoo/aquarium programs are already actively engaged in many conservation behaviors. After participating in the programs, teens showed a statistically significant increase in their reported knowledge of conservation and environmental issues and their abilities to research, explain, and find resources to take action on conservation issues of personal concern. Teens also showed statistically significant increases pre-program to post-program for various conservation behaviors, including "I talk with my family and/or friends about things they can do to help the animals or the environment," "I save water...," "I save energy...," "When I am shopping I look for recycled products," and "I help with projects that restore wildlife habitat."

  6. Development of Multiwell-Plate Methods Using Pure Cultures of Methanogens To Identify New Inhibitors for Suppressing Ruminant Methane Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimar, M R; Cheung, J; Dey, D; McSweeney, C; Morrison, M; Kobayashi, Y; Whitman, W B; Carbone, V; Schofield, L R; Ronimus, R S; Cook, G M

    2017-08-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogens typically require strictly anaerobic culturing conditions in glass tubes with overpressures of H2 and CO2 that are both time-consuming and costly. To increase the throughput for screening chemical compound libraries, 96-well microtiter plate methods for the growth of a marine (environmental) methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis strain S2 and the rumen methanogen Methanobrevibacter species AbM4 were developed. A number of key parameters (inoculum size, reducing agents for medium preparation, assay duration, inhibitor solvents, and culture volume) were optimized to achieve robust and reproducible growth in a high-throughput microtiter plate format. The method was validated using published methanogen inhibitors and statistically assessed for sensitivity and reproducibility. The Sigma-Aldrich LOPAC library containing 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds and an in-house natural product library (120 compounds) were screened against M. maripaludis as a proof of utility. This screen identified a number of bioactive compounds, and MIC values were confirmed for some of them against M. maripaludis and M. AbM4. The developed method provides a significant increase in throughput for screening compound libraries and can now be used to screen larger compound libraries to discover novel methanogen-specific inhibitors for the mitigation of ruminant methane emissions.IMPORTANCE Methane emissions from ruminants are a significant contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions, and new technologies are required to control emissions in the agriculture technology (agritech) sector. The discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of methanogens using high-throughput phenotypic (growth) screening against compound libraries (synthetic and natural products) is an attractive avenue. However, phenotypic inhibitor screening is currently hindered by our inability to grow methanogens in a high-throughput format. We have developed, optimized, and validated a high

  7. [Activity of NTDs Drug-discovery Research Consortium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namatame, Ichiji

    2016-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are an extremely important issue facing global health care. To improve "access to health" where people are unable to access adequate medical care due to poverty and weak healthcare systems, we have established two consortiums: the NTD drug discovery research consortium, and the pediatric praziquantel consortium. The NTD drug discovery research consortium, which involves six institutions from industry, government, and academia, as well as an international non-profit organization, is committed to developing anti-protozoan active compounds for three NTDs (Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and African sleeping sickness). Each participating institute will contribute their efforts to accomplish the following: selection of drug targets based on information technology, and drug discovery by three different approaches (in silico drug discovery, "fragment evolution" which is a unique drug designing method of Astellas Pharma, and phenotypic screening with Astellas' compound library). The consortium has established a brand new database (Integrated Neglected Tropical Disease Database; iNTRODB), and has selected target proteins for the in silico and fragment evolution drug discovery approaches. Thus far, we have identified a number of promising compounds that inhibit the target protein, and we are currently trying to improve the anti-protozoan activity of these compounds. The pediatric praziquantel consortium was founded in July 2012 to develop and register a new praziquantel pediatric formulation for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Astellas Pharma has been a core member in this consortium since its establishment, and has provided expertise and technology in the area of pediatric formulation development and clinical development.

  8. The impact of dissolved organic carbon on the spatial variability of methanogenic archaea communities in natural wetland ecosystems across China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Deyan; Ding, Weixin; Jia, Zhongjun; Cai, Zucong

    2012-10-01

    Significant spatial variation in CH(4) emissions is a well-established feature of natural wetland ecosystems. To understand the key factors affecting CH(4) production, the variation in community structure of methanogenic archaea, in relation to substrate and external environmental influences, was investigated in selected wetlands across China, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Case study areas were the subtropical Poyang wetland, the warm-temperate Hongze wetland, the cold-temperate Sanjiang marshes, and the alpine Ruoergai peatland on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. The topsoil layer in the Hongze wetland exhibited the highest population of methanogens; the lowest was found in the Poyang wetland. Maximum CH(4) production occurred in the topsoil layer of the Sanjiang Carex lasiocarpa marsh, the minimum was observed in the Ruoergai peatland. CH(4) production potential was significantly correlated with the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration but not with the abundance or diversity indices of methanogenic archaea. Phylogenetic analysis and DOC concentration indicated a shift in the dominant methanogen from the hydrogenotrophic Methanobacteriales in DOC-rich wetlands to Methanosarcinaceae with a low affinity in wetlands with relatively high DOC and then to the acetotrophic methanogen Methanosaetaceae with a high affinity in wetlands with low DOC, or with high DOC but rich sulfate-reducing bacteria. Therefore, it is proposed that the dominant methanogen type in wetlands is primarily influenced by available DOC concentration. In turn, the variation in CH(4) production potential in the wetlands of eastern China is attributable to differences in the DOC content and the dominant type of methanogen present.

  9. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Timothy [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Ball, Kia [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Fournier, Ashley [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance

    2014-01-21

    In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortium’s programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub

  10. Establishing an International Soil Modelling Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    -change-feedback processes, bridge basic soil science research and management, and facilitate the communication between science and society . To meet these challenges an international community effort is required, similar to initiatives in systems biology, hydrology, and climate and crop research. We therefore propose to establish an international soil modelling consortium with the aims of 1) bringing together leading experts in modelling soil processes within all major soil disciplines, 2) addressing major scientific gaps in describing key processes and their long term impacts with respect to the different functions and ecosystem services provided by soil, 3) intercomparing soil model performance based on standardized and harmonized data sets, 4) identifying interactions with other relevant platforms related to common data formats, protocols and ontologies, 5) developing new approaches to inverse modelling, calibration, and validation of soil models, 6) integrating soil modelling expertise and state of the art knowledge on soil processes in climate, land surface, ecological, crop and contaminant models, and 7) linking process models with new observation, measurement and data evaluation technologies for mapping and characterizing soil properties across scales. Our consortium will bring together modelers and experimental soil scientists at the forefront of new technologies and approaches to characterize soils. By addressing these aims, the consortium will contribute to improve the role of soil modeling as a knowledge dissemination instrument in addressing key global issues and stimulate the development of translational research activities. This presentation will provide a compelling case for this much-needed effort, with a focus on tangible benefits to the scientific and food security communities.

  11. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayman Hawari; Nolan Hertel; Mohamed Al-Sheikhly; Laurence Miller; Abdel-Moeze Bayoumi; Ali Haghighat; Kenneth Lewis

    2010-12-29

    2 Project Summary: The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nation’s premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering

  12. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Joel [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industry-driven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  13. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Johnny

    concluded that the consortium of these bacteria can be used for the decontamination of ... affects the oil fluid properties such as gravity, viscosity and other physical parameters of crude ... by attack on the aliphatic or light aromatic fraction of oil.

  14. Regional Development and the European Consortium of Innovative Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Saskia Loer; Kokkeler, Ben; van der Sijde, P. C.

    2002-01-01

    The European Consortium of Innovative Universities is a network that shares information not just among universities but with affiliated incubators, research parks, and other regional entities. The learning network contributes to regional development.(JOW)

  15. Kinetics and characteristics of phenanthrene degradation by a microbial consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jin; Xu Hongke; An Mingquan; Yan Guiwen

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and characteristics of phenanthrene degradation by a microbial consortium W4 isolated from Henan Oilfield were investigated. The degradation percentage of solid phenanthrene at 200 mg/L in liquid medium after 6 days of incubation was higher than 95% under the condition of 37 ℃ and 120 r/min by this microbial consortium. The degradation of phenanthrene could be fitted to a first-order kinetic model with the half-life of 1.25 days. The optimum conditions for degradation of phenanthrene by consortium W4 were as follows: temperature about 37 ℃, pH from 6.0 to 7.0 and salinity about 8.0 g/L.It was concluded that microbial consortium W4 might degrade phenanthrene via both salicylic acid and o-phthalic acid pathways by analyzing products with GC-MS.

  16. AGRICOH: A Consortium of Agricultural Cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelia H. Zahm

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available AGRICOH is a recently formed consortium of agricultural cohort studies involving 22 cohorts from nine countries in five continents: South Africa (1, Canada (3, Costa Rica (2, USA (6, Republic of Korea (1, New Zealand (2, Denmark (1, France (3 and Norway (3. The aim of AGRICOH, initiated by the US National Cancer Institute (NCI and coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC, is to promote and sustain collaboration and pooling of data to investigate the association between a wide range of agricultural exposures and a wide range of health outcomes, with a particular focus on associations that cannot easily be addressed in individual studies because of rare exposures (e.g., use of infrequently applied chemicals or relatively rare outcomes (e.g., certain types of cancer, neurologic and auto-immune diseases. To facilitate future projects the need for data harmonization of selected variables is required and is underway. Altogether, AGRICOH provides excellent opportunities for studying cancer, respiratory, neurologic, and auto-immune diseases as well as reproductive and allergic disorders, injuries and overall mortality in association with a wide array of exposures, prominent among these the application of pesticides.

  17. [Japan Spastic Paraplegia Research Consortium (JASPAC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2014-10-01

    Japan Spastic Paraplegia Research Consortium (JASPAC), a nationwide clinical and genetic survey of patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), was started in 2006 as a project of the Research Committee for Ataxic Diseases of the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare, Japan. To date (April 4, 2014), 448 indexed patients with HSP have been registered from 46 prefectures in Japan. We are now performing molecular testing of the HSP patients using Sanger sequencing (SPG4, SPG11, SPG31, and ARSACS), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array (SPG1, 2, 3A, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, 20, 21, 31, 33, 39, 42, ABCD1, alsin, and ARSACS), and resequencing microarray (SPG1, 2, 3A, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 17, 20, 21, 31, 33, and ABCD1). In 206 Japanese families with autosomal dominant HSP, SPG4 was the most common form, accounting for 38%, followed by SPG3A (5%), SPG31 (5%), SPG10 (2%), and SPG8 (1%). In 88 patients with autosomal recessive HSP, although SPG11 was the most common form, accounting for 6%, most showed significant genetic heterogeneity. The results of molecular testing will be applicable to patients in terms of improved positive diagnosis, follow-up, and genetic counseling. JASPAC will contribute to elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying HSP, and will facilitate the development of better treatments for HSP.

  18. Astroparticle Physics European Consortium Town Meeting Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Astroparticle Physics European Consortium (APPEC) invites you to a town meeting at the Grand Amphithéatre de Sorbonne in Paris on the 6th and 7th April 2016 to discuss an update of the 2011 APPEC Astroparticle Physics roadmap, to be published in September 2016. In 2014 APPEC decided to launch an update of the 2011 Roadmap, transforming it to a “resource aware” roadmap. The intention was to gauge the financial impact of the beginnings of operation of the large global scale observatories put forward in the previous roadmap and to examine the possibilities of international coordination of future global initiatives. The APPEC Scientific Advisory Committee examined the field and prepared a set of recommendations. Based on these recommendations, the APPEC General Assembly drafted a set of “considerations” to be published by end of February 2016 and be debated in an open dialogue with the community, through the web page but primarily at the town meeting of 6-7 April. Based on this debate the final re...

  19. Zero-valent iron enhanced methanogenic activity in anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge after heat and alkali pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaobin; Feng, Yinghong; Quan, Xie

    2015-04-01

    Heat or alkali pretreatment is the effective method to improve hydrolysis of waste sludge and then enhance anaerobic sludge digestion. However the pretreatment may inactivate the methanogens in the sludge. In the present work, zero-valent iron (ZVI) was used to enhance the methanogenic activity in anaerobic sludge digester under two methanogens-suppressing conditions, i.e. heat-pretreatment and alkali condition respectively. With the addition of ZVI, the lag time of methane production was shortened, and the methane yield increased by 91.5% compared to the control group. The consumption of VFA was accelerated by ZVI, especially for acetate, indicating that the acetoclastic methanogenesis was enhanced. In the alkali-condition experiment, the hydrogen produced decreased from 27.6 to 18.8 mL when increasing the ZVI dosage from 0 to 10 g/L. Correspondingly, the methane yield increased from 1.9 to 32.2 mL, which meant that the H2-utilizing methanogenes was enriched. These results suggested that the addition of ZVI into anaerobic digestion of sludge after pretreated by the heat or alkali process could efficiently recover the methanogenic activity and increase the methane production and sludge reduction.

  20. Biodeterioration studies of thermoplastics in nature using indigenous bacterial consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Shahbaz Anwar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastics, poly vinyl chloride and low-density polyethylene were treated in the presence of indigenously developed bacterial consortium in laboratory and natural conditions. The consortium was developed using four bacteria, selected on the basis of utilization of PVC as primary carbon source, namely P. otitidis, B. aerius, B. cereus and A. pedis isolated from the plastic waste disposal sites in Northern India. The comparative in-vitro treatment studies as revealed by the spectral and thermal data, illustrated the relatively better biodegradation potential of developed consortium for PVC than the LDPE. Further, the progressive treatments of both the thermoplastics were conducted for three months under natural conditions. For this purpose, bioformulation of consortium was prepared and characterized for the viability up to 70 days of storage at 25±1ºC. The consortium treated polymer samples were monitored through SEM and FT-IR spectroscopy. Analytical data revealed the biodeterioration potential of the developed consortium for PVC and LDPE, which could help in disposing the plastic waste.

  1. Enrichment strategy to select functional consortium from mixed cultures: Consortium from rumen liquor for simultaneous cellulose degradation and hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Aijie; Ren, Nanqi [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Gao, Lingfang; Xu, Jifei; Liu, Chong; Lee, Duu-Jong [School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Strain isolation using conventional roll tube/plating technique is time consuming and is able to culture in vitro only a small fraction of existing microbes in a natural microflora. This paper proposed a simple and rapid method to select the as-simple-as-possible biological consortium by serially diluting the original mixed culture. The diluted which remains, while the one diluted in serial loses the target function, is defined as the functional consortium of the original mixed culture. Since the microbial structure and the reaction pathway incorporated with the functional consortium is much simpler than its original mother liquor, detailed analysis on the strain interaction is possible without the risk of losing key functional strains as often caused from conventional isolation method. The rumen liquor that can degrade cellulose and produce hydrogen is used as a demonstration example. A ''rumen cellulose-degrading bacterial consortium'' (RCBC) was identified using the proposed enrichment strategy. (author)

  2. Oceanic nickel depletion and a methanogen famine before the Great Oxidation Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konhauser, Kurt O; Pecoits, Ernesto; Lalonde, Stefan V; Papineau, Dominic; Nisbet, Euan G; Barley, Mark E; Arndt, Nicholas T; Zahnle, Kevin; Kamber, Balz S

    2009-04-09

    It has been suggested that a decrease in atmospheric methane levels triggered the progressive rise of atmospheric oxygen, the so-called Great Oxidation Event, about 2.4 Gyr ago. Oxidative weathering of terrestrial sulphides, increased oceanic sulphate, and the ecological success of sulphate-reducing microorganisms over methanogens has been proposed as a possible cause for the methane collapse, but this explanation is difficult to reconcile with the rock record. Banded iron formations preserve a history of Precambrian oceanic elemental abundance and can provide insights into our understanding of early microbial life and its influence on the evolution of the Earth system. Here we report a decline in the molar nickel to iron ratio recorded in banded iron formations about 2.7 Gyr ago, which we attribute to a reduced flux of nickel to the oceans, a consequence of cooling upper-mantle temperatures and decreased eruption of nickel-rich ultramafic rocks at the time. We measured nickel partition coefficients between simulated Precambrian sea water and diverse iron hydroxides, and subsequently determined that dissolved nickel concentrations may have reached approximately 400 nM throughout much of the Archaean eon, but dropped below approximately 200 nM by 2.5 Gyr ago and to modern day values ( approximately 9 nM) by approximately 550 Myr ago. Nickel is a key metal cofactor in several enzymes of methanogens and we propose that its decline would have stifled their activity in the ancient oceans and disrupted the supply of biogenic methane. A decline in biogenic methane production therefore could have occurred before increasing environmental oxygenation and not necessarily be related to it. The enzymatic reliance of methanogens on a diminishing supply of volcanic nickel links mantle evolution to the redox state of the atmosphere.

  3. Bacteria and methanogens differ along the gastrointestinal tract of Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Zhang, Zhigang; Xu, Chao; Zhao, Jingbo; Liu, Hanlu; Fan, Zhongyuan; Yang, Fuhe; Wright, André-Denis G; Li, Guangyu

    2014-01-01

    The current study provides the insight into the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and methanogens presented in the rumen and cecum of the Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus). The ruminal, ileal, cecal, and colonic contents, as well as feces, were obtained from each of the three, free-range, roe deer ingesting natural pasture after euthanasia. For the bacterial community, a total of 697,031 high-quality 16S rRNA gene sequences were generated using high-throughput sequencing, and assigned to 2,223 core operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (12 bacterial phyla and 87 genera). The phyla Firmicutes (51.2%) and Bacteroidetes (39.4%) were the dominant bacteria in the GIT of roe deer. However, the bacterial community in the rumen was significantly (Pbacteria within the families Veillonellaceae and Paraprevotellaceae were more abundant in the rumen than in the other regions. Unidentified bacteria within the family Enterobacteriaceae, Succinivibrio spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. were more predominant in the colon than in other regions. Unidentified bacteria within the family Ruminococcaceae, and Bacteroides spp. were more prevalent in the ileum, cecum and fecal pellets. For methanogens in the rumen and cecum, a total of 375,647 high quality 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained and assigned to 113 core OTUs. Methanobrevibacter millerae was the dominant species accounting for 77.3±7.4 (S.E) % and 68.9±4.4 (S.E) % of total sequences in the rumen and cecum of roe deer, respectively. However, the abundance of Methanobrevibacter smithii was higher in the rumen than in the cecum (P = 0.004). These results revealed that there was intra variation in the bacterial community composition across the GIT of roe deer, and also showed that the methanogen community in the rumen differed from that in the cecum.

  4. Thermoplasmatales and Methanogens: Potential Association with the Crenarchaeol Production in Chinese Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuyan Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Crenarchaeol is a unique isoprenoid glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (iGDGT lipid, which is only identified in cultures of ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota. However, the taxonomic origins of crenarchaeol have been debated recently. The archaeal populations, other than Thaumarchaeota, may have associations with the production of crenarchaeol in ecosystems characterized by non-thaumarchaeotal microorganisms. To this end, we investigated 47 surface soils from upland and wetland soils and rice fields and another three surface sediments from river banks. The goal was to examine the archaeal community compositions in comparison with patterns of iGDGTs in four fractional forms (intact polar-, core-, monoglycosidic- and diglycosidic-lipid fractions along gradients of environments. The DistLM analysis identified that Group I.1b Thaumarchaeota were mainly responsible for changes in crenarchaeol in the overall soil samples; however, Thermoplasmatales may also contribute to it. This is further supported by the comparison of crenarchaeol between samples characterized by methanogens, Thermoplasmatales or Group I.1b Thaumarchaeota, which suggests that the former two may contribute to the crenarchaeol pool. Last, when samples containing enhanced abundance of Thermoplasmatales and methanogens were considered, crenarchaeol was observed to correlate positively with Thermoplasmatales and archaeol, respectively. Collectively, our data suggest that the crenarchaeol production is mainly derived from Thaumarchaeota and partly associated with uncultured representatives of Thermoplasmatales and archaeol-producing methanogens in soil environments that may be in favor of their growth. Our finding supports the notion that Thaumarchaeota may not be the sole source of crenarchaeol in the natural environment, which may have implication for the evolution of lipid synthesis among different types of archaea.

  5. Biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Kurola, J M; Lähde, K; Kymäläinen, M; Sinkkonen, A; Romantschuk, M

    2014-10-01

    Over 258 Mt of solid waste are generated annually in Europe, a large fraction of which is biowaste. Sewage sludge is another major waste fraction. In this study, biowaste and sewage sludge were co-digested in an anaerobic digestion reactor (30% and 70% of total wet weight, respectively). The purpose was to investigate the biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community composition in the anaerobic digestion reactor under meso- (35-37 °C) and thermophilic (55-57 °C) processes and an increasing organic loading rate (OLR, 1-10 kg VS m(-3) d(-1)), and also to find a feasible compromise between waste treatment capacity and biogas production without causing process instability. In summary, more biogas was produced with all OLRs by the thermophilic process. Both processes showed a limited diversity of the methanogenic archaeal community which was dominated by Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (e.g. Methanosarcina) in both meso- and thermophilic processes. Methanothermobacter was detected as an additional dominant genus in the thermophilic process. In addition to operating temperatures, the OLRs, the acetate concentration, and the presence of key substrates like propionate also affected the methanogenic archaeal community composition. A bacterial cell count 6.25 times higher than archaeal cell count was observed throughout the thermophilic process, while the cell count ratio varied between 0.2 and 8.5 in the mesophilic process. This suggests that the thermophilic process is more stable, but also that the relative abundance between bacteria and archaea can vary without seriously affecting biogas production.

  6. Acetate oxidation is the dominant methanogenic pathway from actetate in the absence of Methanosaetaceae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Batstone, Damien J.; Trably, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The oxidation of acetate to hydrogen, and the subsequent conversion of hydrogen and carbon dioxide to methane, has been regarded largely as a niche mechanism occurring at high temperatures or under inhibitory conditions. In this study, 13 anaerobic reactors and sediment from a temperate anaerobic...... lake were surveyed for their dominant methanogenic population by using fluorescent in situ hybridization and for the degree of acetate oxidation relative to aceticlastic conversion by using radiolabeled [2-C-14]acetate in batch incubations. When Methanosaetaceae were not present, acetate oxidation...

  7. The effect of operational conditions on the sludge specific methanogenic activity and sludge biodegradability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, R. C.; Santaella, S. T.; Haandel, A. C. van; Zeeman, G.; Lettinga, G.

    2009-07-01

    The Specific Methanogenic Activity (SMA) and sludge biodegradability of an anaerobic sludge depends on various operational and environmental conditions imposed to the anaerobic reactor. However, the effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT), influent COD concentration (COD{sub i}nf) and sludge retention time (SRT) on those two parameters need to be elucidated. This knowledge about SMA can provide insights about the capacity of the UASB reactors to withstand organic and hydraulic shock loads, whereas the biodegradability gives information necessary for final disposal of the sludge. (Author)

  8. Identification of Endosymbiotic Methanogen and Ectosymbiotic Spirochetes of Gut Protists of the Termite Coptotermes formosanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Jun-Ichi; Noda, Satoko; Hongoh, Yuichi; Ui, Sadaharu; Ohkuma, Moriya

    2008-01-01

    Prokaryotic associations with gut protists of the termite Coptotermes formosanus were investigated based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. An endosymbiotic methanogen of Spirotrichonympha leidyi phylogenetically grouped with endosymbionts of other gut protists in the genus Methanobrevibacter, seemed to be unrelated to the host protist phylogeny. Three different lineages of ectosymbiotic spirochetes in the genus Treponema were identified in single cells of Holomastigotoides mirabile, indicating their simultaneous occurrence. Although these symbionts represented mere minor populations in the gut, their phylogenetic assignments suggest a common symbiotic relationship involving H(2) metabolism.

  9. Methanotrophs, methanogens, and microbial community structure in livestock slurry surface crusts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Yun-Feng (Kevin); Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Brejnrod, Asker Daniel

    2014-01-01

    , dominated the MOB community, whereas Methanocorpusculum was the predominant methanogen. Higher numbers of OTUs representing Type I than Type II MOB were found in all crusts. Potential CH4 oxidation rates were determined by incubations of crusts with CH4, and CH4 oxidization was observed in cattle......, but not in swine slurry crusts. Conclusions: Slurry surface crusts harbor a diverse microbial community. Type I MOB are more diverse and abundant than Type II MOB in this environment. The distinct CH4 oxidation rates could be related to microbial compositions. Significance and Impact of Study: This study...

  10. Lean breed Landrace pigs harbor fecal methanogens at higher diversity and density than obese breed Erhualian pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu-heng; Su, Yong; Wright, André-Denis G; Zhang, Ling-li; Smidt, Hauke; Zhu, Wei-yun

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of fecal methanogens of Erhualian (obese type) and Landrace (lean type) pigs was examined using separate 16S rRNA gene libraries for each breed. A total of 763 clones were analyzed; 381 from the Erhualian library and 382 from the Landrace library were identified belonging to the genus Methanobrevibacter. Others were identified belonging to the genus Methanosphaera. The two libraries showed significant differences in diversity (P Landrace library. Real-time PCR showed that the abundance of fecal methanogens in Landrace pigs was significantly higher than that in Erhualian pigs (P Landrace pig (lean) harbored a greater diversity and higher numbers of methanogen mcrA gene copies than the Erhualian pig (obese). These differences may be related to the fatness or leanness in these two pig breeds. The results provide new leads for further investigations on the fat storage of pigs or even humans.

  11. Investigation of methanogenic community structures in rural biogas digesters from different climatic regions in Yunnan, southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Minghua; Wu, Yan; Li, Qiumin; Tian, Guangliang; Yang, Bin; Li, Yingjuan; Zhang, Lijuan; Wang, Yongxia; Xiao, Wei; Yin, Fang; Zhao, Xingling; Zhang, Wudi; Cui, Xiaolong

    2015-05-01

    Understanding of the microbial community structures of the biogas digesters in different climatic regions can help improve the methane production in the fermentation process. The methanogenic archaeal diversity in four rural biogas digesters (BNA, JSA, LJA, and XGA) was investigated by a culture-independent rRNA approach in different climatic regions in Yunnan. Community structure composed of 711 clones in the all libraries. A total of 33 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were detected, and major groups of methanogens were the orders Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales. 63.2 % of all archaeal OTUs belong to the order Methanosarcinales which mostly contain acetotrophic methanogens. Methanomicrobiales (19.5 % in all OTUs) were detected in considerable number. Additionally, there were minor rates of uncultured archaea. The principal component analysis indicated that the genus Methanosaeta was mainly affected by the fermentation temperatures.

  12. Antioxidant activity of the probiotic consortium in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saule Saduakhasova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Available evidence suggests that probiotics have different biological functions that depend on several mechanisms, such as antioxidant and DNA-protective activities. The probiotic consortium includes bacterial cultures such as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, and other bacterial cultures isolated from traditional Kazakh dairy products (ayran, kumys, shubat, and healthy clinical material. The aim of this study was to investigate the total antioxidant activity of the consortium of probiotic bacteria and to determine the activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and DNA-protective action. Material and methods: In vitro comet assay was used to determine the antigenotoxicity of the probiotic consortium. Total antioxidant activity was determined using a method of analysis with Trolox as the equivalent. The analysis method of superoxide dismutase activity assesses the inhibition rate of the nitroblue tetrazolium reduction to formazan by superoxide dismutase. Determination of glutathione reductase activity is based on the measurement of the NADPH oxidation speed. Results: A significantly high level of the total antioxidant activity of the probiotic consortium intact cells (15.3 mM/ml was observed whereas the activity index of  lysate  was 11.1 mM/ml. The superoxide dismutase activity of probiotic consortium lysate was evaluated, with values that peaked at 0.24 U/mg protein. The superoxide dismutase activity of the consortium was lower in comparison to L.fernentum E-3 and L.fernentum E-18 cultures with values of 0.85 U/mg and 0.76 U/mg protein, respectively. SOD activity of probiotic consortium whole cells was not observed, which is typical for lactic acid bacteria. Glutathione reductase plays an important role in the optimal protection from oxidative stress. Glutathione reductase activity of the studied probiotic consortium was low; moreover, the activity of the lysate was two times

  13. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kartik; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Hooper, Eric; National Astronomy Consortium

    2015-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC; see https://sites.google.com/site/nraonac/) is a growing national partnership between majority and minority universities and institutions with the goal of increasing the numbers of under-represented minorities and students who might otherwise be overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM, or related, careers. The NAC model is based on the successful 'Posse Foundation' model for undergraduate success and incorporates all its major components: pre-training of cohorts to prepare them for the research experience, joint weekly cohort activities throughout the research summer, peer- and multiple mentoring, weekly discussion of various aspects of professional and career development, continued engagement of students in science after return to home institution and lifelong mentoring. The mentors also form a cohort, exchanging information and learning from each other. With its partner institutions, the NAC aims to build a complete pipeline from undergraduate through career for the next generation of scientists and engineers. Our annual goal is to create two to three cohorts of four to five students at each site (currently NRAO-Charlottesville, NRAO-Socorro and U. Wisconsin - Madison). Recruitment occurs in the fall semester with seminars and colloquia in partnership with faculty at the minority serving institutions and the GRAD-MAP program at the University of Maryland. In this talk we describe in detail all the components of the NAC and report on our progress. We are keen to interact and partner with new universities and institutions and encourage them to contact the NAC at nac4stem@googlegroups.com.

  14. Hydrogen Limitation and Syntrophic Growth among Natural Assemblages of Thermophilic Methanogens at Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçuoğlu, Begüm D; Stewart, Lucy C; Morrison, Hilary G; Butterfield, David A; Huber, Julie A; Holden, James F

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic methanogens are common autotrophs at hydrothermal vents, but their growth constraints and dependence on H2 syntrophy in situ are poorly understood. Between 2012 and 2015, methanogens and H2-producing heterotrophs were detected by growth at 80°C and 55°C at most diffuse (7-40°C) hydrothermal vent sites at Axial Seamount. Microcosm incubations of diffuse hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C demonstrated that growth of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogens is primarily limited by H2 availability. Amendment of microcosms with NH4 (+) generally had no effect on CH4 production. However, annual variations in abundance and CH4 production were observed in relation to the eruption cycle of the seamount. Microcosm incubations of hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C supplemented with tryptone and no added H2 showed CH4 production indicating the capacity in situ for methanogenic H2 syntrophy. 16S rRNA genes were found in 80°C microcosms from H2-producing archaea and H2-consuming methanogens, but not for any bacteria. In 55°C microcosms, sequences were found from H2-producing bacteria and H2-consuming methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A co-culture of representative organisms showed that Thermococcus paralvinellae supported the syntrophic growth of Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens at 82°C and Methanothermococcus sp. strain BW11 at 60°C. The results demonstrate that modeling of subseafloor methanogenesis should focus primarily on H2 availability and temperature, and that thermophilic H2 syntrophy can support methanogenesis within natural microbial assemblages and may be an important energy source for thermophilic autotrophs in marine geothermal environments.

  15. Reactive transport model of growth and methane production by high-temperature methanogens in hydrothermal regions of the subseafloor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, L. C.; Algar, C. K.; Topçuoğlu, B. D.; Fortunato, C. S.; Larson, B. I.; Proskurowski, G. K.; Butterfield, D. A.; Vallino, J. J.; Huber, J. A.; Holden, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogens are keystone high-temperature autotrophs in deep-sea hydrothermal vents and tracers of habitability and biogeochemical activity in the hydrothermally active subseafloor. At Axial Seamount, nearly all thermophilic methanogens are Methanothermococcus and Methanocaldococcus species, making this site amenable to modeling through pure culture laboratory experiments coupled with field studies. Based on field microcosm incubations with 1.2 mM, 20 μM, or no hydrogen, the growth of methanogens at 55°C and 80°C is limited primarily by temperature and hydrogen availability, with ammonium amendment showing no consistent effect on total methane output. The Arrhenius constants for methane production by Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (optimum 82°C) and Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus (optimum 65°C) were determined in pure culture bottle experiments. The Monod constants for hydrogen concentration were measured by growing both organisms in a 2-liter chemostat at two dilution rates; 55°C, 65°C and 82°C; and variable hydrogen concentrations. M. jannaschii showed higher ks and Vmax constants than M. thermolithotrophicus. In the field, hydrogen and methane concentrations in hydrothermal end-member and low-temperature diffuse fluids were measured, and the concentrations of methanogens that grow at 55°C and 80°C in diffuse fluids were determined using most-probable-number estimates. Methane concentration anomalies in diffuse fluids relative to end-member hydrothermal concentrations and methanogen cell concentrations are being used to constrain a 1-D reactive transport model using the laboratory-determined Arrhenius and Monod constants for methane production by these organisms. By varying flow path length and subseafloor cell concentrations in the model, our goal is to determine solutions for the potential depth of the subseafloor biosphere coupled with the amount of methanogenic biomass it contains.

  16. Hydrogen Limitation and Syntrophic Growth among Natural Assemblages of Thermophilic Methanogens at Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçuoğlu, Begüm D.; Stewart, Lucy C.; Morrison, Hilary G.; Butterfield, David A.; Huber, Julie A.; Holden, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Thermophilic methanogens are common autotrophs at hydrothermal vents, but their growth constraints and dependence on H2 syntrophy in situ are poorly understood. Between 2012 and 2015, methanogens and H2-producing heterotrophs were detected by growth at 80°C and 55°C at most diffuse (7–40°C) hydrothermal vent sites at Axial Seamount. Microcosm incubations of diffuse hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C demonstrated that growth of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic methanogens is primarily limited by H2 availability. Amendment of microcosms with NH4+ generally had no effect on CH4 production. However, annual variations in abundance and CH4 production were observed in relation to the eruption cycle of the seamount. Microcosm incubations of hydrothermal fluids at 80°C and 55°C supplemented with tryptone and no added H2 showed CH4 production indicating the capacity in situ for methanogenic H2 syntrophy. 16S rRNA genes were found in 80°C microcosms from H2-producing archaea and H2-consuming methanogens, but not for any bacteria. In 55°C microcosms, sequences were found from H2-producing bacteria and H2-consuming methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A co-culture of representative organisms showed that Thermococcus paralvinellae supported the syntrophic growth of Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens at 82°C and Methanothermococcus sp. strain BW11 at 60°C. The results demonstrate that modeling of subseafloor methanogenesis should focus primarily on H2 availability and temperature, and that thermophilic H2 syntrophy can support methanogenesis within natural microbial assemblages and may be an important energy source for thermophilic autotrophs in marine geothermal environments. PMID:27547206

  17. Identification of Methanogens and Controls on Methane Production in Incubations of Natural Methane Seep Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkian, R.; Lloyd, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Methane, the most abundant hydrocarbon in Earth's atmosphere, is produced in large quantities in sediments underlying the world's oceans. Very little of this methane makes it to surface sediments as it is consumed by Anaerobic Methanotrophs (ANME's) in consortia with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB). Less is known about which organisms are responsible for methane production in marine sediments, and whether that production is under thermodynamic control based on hydrogen concentrations. Although ANMEs have been found to be active in methanogenic sediments and incubations, it is currently unknown whether they are able to grow in methanogenic conditions. We demonstrated with bottle incubations of methane seep sediment taken from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, that hydrogen controls methane production. While sulfate was present the hydrogen concentration was maintained at below 2 nM. Only after the depletion of sulfate allowed hydrogen concentrations to rise above 5 nM did we see production of methane. The same sediments when spiked with methane gas demonstrated its complete removal while sulfate reduction occurred. Quantitative PCR shows that ANME-2 and ANME-1 increase in 16S copy number as methane increases. Total direct cell counts demonstrate a decline in cells with the decrease of sulfate until a recovery corresponding with production of methane. Our results strongly suggest that hydrogen concentrations influence what metabolic processes can occur in marine sediments, and that ANME-1 and ANME-2 are able to grow on the energy provided from methane production.

  18. Sequential biodegradation of complex naphtha hydrocarbons under methanogenic conditions in two different oil sands tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Shahimin, Mohd Faidz; Siddique, Tariq

    2017-02-01

    Methane emissions in oil sands tailings ponds are sustained by anaerobic biodegradation of unrecovered hydrocarbons. Naphtha (primarily C6-C10; n- iso- and cycloalkanes) is commonly used as a solvent during bitumen extraction process and its residue escapes to tailings ponds during tailings deposition. To investigate biodegradability of hydrocarbons in naphtha, mature fine tailings (MFT) collected from Albian and CNRL tailings ponds were amended with CNRL naphtha at ∼0.2 wt% (∼2000 mg L(-1)) and incubated under methanogenic conditions for ∼1600 d. Microbial communities in both MFTs started metabolizing naphtha after a lag phase of ∼100 d. Complete biodegradation/biotransformation of all n-alkanes (except partial biodegradation of n-octane in CNRL MFT) followed by major iso-alkanes (2-methylpentane, 3-methylhexane, 2- and 4-methylheptane, iso-nonanes and 2-methylnonane) and a few cycloalkanes (derivatives of cyclopentane and cyclohexane) was observed during the incubation. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing showed dominance of Peptococcaceae and Anaerolineaceae in Albian MFT and Anaerolineaceae and Syntrophaceae in CNRL MFT bacterial communities with co-domination of Methanosaetaceae and "Candidatus Methanoregula" in archaeal populations during active biodegradation of hydrocarbons. The findings extend the known range of hydrocarbons susceptible to methanogenic biodegradation in petroleum-impacted anaerobic environments and help refine existing kinetic model to predict greenhouse gas emissions from tailings ponds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of four TCE-dechlorinating microbial enrichments grown with different cobalamin stress and methanogenic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Yujie; Lee, Patrick K H; Harding, Katie C; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the important supportive microorganisms responsible for trichloroethene (TCE) bioremediation under specific environmental conditions and their relationship with Dehalococcoides (Dhc), four stable and robust enrichment cultures were generated using contaminated groundwater. Enrichments were maintained under four different conditions exploring two parameters: high and low TCE amendments (resulting in inhibited and uninhibited methanogenic activity, respectively) and with and without vitamin B₁₂ amendment. Lactate was supplied as the electron donor. All enrichments were capable of reductively dechlorinating TCE to vinyl chloride and ethene. The dechlorination rate and ethene generation were higher, and the proportion of electrons used for dechlorination increased when methanogenesis was inhibited. Biologically significant cobalamin biosynthesis was detected in the enrichments without B₁₂ amendment. Comparative genomics using a genus-wide microarray revealed a Dhc genome similar to that of strain 195 in all enrichments, a strain that lacks the major upstream corrin ring biosynthesis pathway. Seven other bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were detected using clone libraries. OTUs closest to Pelosinus, Dendrosporobacter, and Sporotalea (PDS) were most dominant. The Clostridium-like OTU was most affected by B₁₂ amendment and active methanogenesis. Principal component analysis revealed that active methanogenesis, rather than vitamin B₁₂ limitation, exerted a greater effect on the community structures even though methanogens did not seem to play an essential role in providing corrinoids to Dhc. In contrast, acetogenic bacteria that were abundant in the enrichments, such as PDS and Clostridium sp., may be potential corrinoid providers for Dhc.

  20. Unexpected competitiveness of Methanosaeta populations at elevated acetate concentrations in methanogenic treatment of animal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si; Cheng, Huicai; Liu, Jiang; Hazen, Terry C; Huang, Vicki; He, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    Acetoclastic methanogenesis is a key metabolic process in anaerobic digestion, a technology with broad applications in biogas production and waste treatment. Acetoclastic methanogenesis is known to be performed by two archaeal genera, Methanosaeta and Methanosarcina. The conventional model posits that Methanosaeta populations are more competitive at low acetate levels (competitiveness of Methanosaeta at elevated acetate was further supported by the enrichment of Methanosaeta with high concentrations of acetate (20 mM). The dominance of Methanosaeta in the methanogen community could be reproduced in anaerobic digesters with the direct addition of acetate to above 20 mM, again supporting the competitiveness of Methanosaeta over Methanosarcina at elevated acetate levels. This study for the first time systematically demonstrated that the dominance of Methanosaeta populations in anaerobic digestion could be linked to the competitiveness of Methanosaeta at elevated acetate concentrations. Given the importance of acetoclastic methanogenesis in biological methane production, findings from this study could have major implications for developing strategies for more effective control of methanogenic treatment processes.

  1. A RuBisCO-mediated carbon metabolic pathway in methanogenic archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Takunari; Mehrotra, Sandhya; Endo, Chikako; Kizu, Natsuko; Matusda, Mami; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Mizohata, Eiichi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Yokota, Akiho; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Ashida, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    Two enzymes are considered to be unique to the photosynthetic Calvin–Benson cycle: ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), responsible for CO2 fixation, and phosphoribulokinase (PRK). Some archaea possess bona fide RuBisCOs, despite not being photosynthetic organisms, but are thought to lack PRK. Here we demonstrate the existence in methanogenic archaea of a carbon metabolic pathway involving RuBisCO and PRK, which we term ‘reductive hexulose-phosphate' (RHP) pathway. These archaea possess both RuBisCO and a catalytically active PRK whose crystal structure resembles that of photosynthetic bacterial PRK. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometric analysis of metabolites reveals that the RHP pathway, which differs from the Calvin–Benson cycle only in a few steps, is active in vivo. Our work highlights evolutionary and functional links between RuBisCO-mediated carbon metabolic pathways in methanogenic archaea and photosynthetic organisms. Whether the RHP pathway allows for autotrophy (that is, growth exclusively with CO2 as carbon source) remains unknown. PMID:28082747

  2. Evaluation of methanogenic activity of biogas plant slurry on ossein factory wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellapandi, P; Uma, L

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the ossein factory wastes, which include primary clarified bone waste (PCBW) and sinews for methane production, by monitoring methanogenic activity of predigested biogas plant slurry. A specific methanogenic activity of biogas plant slurry (anaerobic seed) was measured at 38 degrees C using different proportions of ossein factory wastes in an assay medium. The pH of slurry was intensively maintained until course of digestion. A moderate proportion of both substrates showed a maximum methane production at 20 days of incubation in batch mode. However, a maximum cumulative methane yield achieved by biogas plant slurry on PCBW was low as compared to sinews. The best organic matter degradation was achieved even at a high proportion of ossein factory wastes used in digesters. These substitutes would be useful, without seriously reducing total gas production, for methane production if they partially mixed with cattle dung. As a result of this preliminary study, we suggest that ossein factory wastes are potential alternative sources for biogas production in ossein factory.

  3. Low Pressure Tolerance by Methanogens in an Aqueous Environment: Implications for Subsurface Life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickol, R. L.; Kral, T. A.

    2016-09-01

    The low pressure at the surface of Mars (average: 6 mbar) is one potentially biocidal factor that any extant life on the planet would need to endure. Near subsurface life, while shielded from ultraviolet radiation, would also be exposed to this low pressure environment, as the atmospheric gas-phase pressure increases very gradually with depth. Few studies have focused on low pressure as inhibitory to the growth or survival of organisms. However, recent work has uncovered a potential constraint to bacterial growth below 25 mbar. The study reported here tested the survivability of four methanogen species (Methanothermobacter wolfeii, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum, Methanococcus maripaludis) under low pressure conditions approaching average martian surface pressure (6 mbar - 143 mbar) in an aqueous environment. Each of the four species survived exposure of varying length (3 days - 21 days) at pressures down to 6 mbar. This research is an important stepping-stone to determining if methanogens can actively metabolize/grow under these low pressures. Additionally, the recently discovered recurring slope lineae suggest that liquid water columns may connect the surface to deeper levels in the subsurface. If that is the case, any organism being transported in the water column would encounter the changing pressures during the transport.

  4. Effect of humic acid in leachate on specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mengfei; Xian, Ping; Yang, Longhui; Liu, Xi; Zhan, Longhui; Bu, Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    In order to find out the effects of humic acid (HA) in anaerobic-treated landfill leachate on granular sludge, the anaerobic biodegradability of HA as well as the influences of HA on the total cumulative methane production, the anaerobic methanization process and the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) of granular sludge are studied in this paper. Experimental results show that as a non-biodegradable organic pollutant, HA is also difficult to be decomposed by microbes in the anaerobic reaction process. Presence of HA and changes in the concentration have no significant influences on the total cumulative methane production and the anaerobic methanization process of granular sludge. Besides, the total cumulative methane production cannot reflect the inhibition of toxics on the methanogenic activity of granular sludge on the premise of sufficient reaction time. Results also show that HA plays a promoting role on SMA of granular sludge. Without buffering agent the SMA value increased by 19.2% on average due to the buffering and regulating ability of HA, while with buffering agent the SMA value increased by 5.4% on average due to the retaining effect of HA on the morphology of the sludge particles. However, in the presence of leachate the SMA value decreased by 27.6% on average, because the toxic effect of the toxics in the leachate on granular sludge is much larger than the promoting effect of HA.

  5. Kinetics and inhibition during the decolorization of reactive anthraquinone dyes under methanogenic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, E J; Beydilli, M I; Lee, Y H; Pavlostathis, S G

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the biological decolorization of two reactive anthraquinone dyes (Reactive Blue 4, RB 4; Reactive Blue 19, RB 19) under methanogenic conditions. Using a mixed, methanogenic culture, batch assays were performed to evaluate both the rate and extent of color removal as well as any potential inhibition. The effect of initial dye, biomass, and organic feed concentration, as well as the effect of repetitive dye addition on color removal kinetics and culture inhibition were assessed. Overall, a lower rate and extent of color removal was observed in RB 4-amended cultures as opposed to the RB 19-amended cultures. For an incubation time of ca. 15 days and an initial dye concentration of 2000 mg/L, the extent of color removal was 50 and 95% for RB 4 and RB 19, respectively. Inhibition of acidogenesis and to a larger degree of methanogenesis, resulting in accumulation of volatile fatty acids, was observed in both RB 4- and RB 19-amended cultures. Although the degree of inhibition varied among the two dyes tested (RB 19 was more inhibitory than RB 4), an increase of inhibition was observed with increasing initial dye concentration. At an initial dye concentration of 500 mg/L or higher, methane production was lower than 6% of that of the control culture for both RB 4 and RB 19. However, color removal occurred despite culture inhibition.

  6. Quantitation and diversity analysis of ruminal methanogenic populations in response to the antimethanogenic compound bromochloromethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, Stuart E; Tomkins, Nigel W; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2007-12-01

    Methyl coenzyme-M reductase A (mcrA) clone libraries were generated from microbial DNA extracted from the rumen of cattle fed a roughage diet with and without supplementation of the antimethanogenic compound bromochloromethane. Bromochloromethane reduced total methane emissions by c. 30%, with a resultant increase in propionate and branched chain fatty acids. The mcrA clone libraries revealed that Methanobrevibacter spp. were the dominant species identified. A decrease in the incidence of Methanobrevibacter spp. from the clone library generated from bromochloromethane treatment was observed. In addition, a more diverse methanogenic population with representatives from Methanococcales, Methanomicrobiales and Methanosacinales orders was observed for the bromochloromethane library. Sequence data generated from these libraries aided in the design of an mcrA-targeted quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay. The reduction in methane production by bromochloromethane was associated with an average decrease of 34% in the number of methanogenic Archaea when monitored with this qPCR assay. Dissociation curve analysis of mcrA amplicons showed a clear difference in melting temperatures for Methanobrevibacter spp. (80-82 degrees C) and all other methanongens (84-86 degrees C). A decrease in the intensity of the Methanobrevibacter spp. specific peak and an increase for the other peak in the bromochloromethane-treated animals corresponded with the changes within the clone libraries.

  7. Methanogen community structure in the rumens of farmed sheep, cattle and red deer fed different diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyanathan, Jeyamalar; Kirs, Marek; Ronimus, Ron S; Hoskin, Simone O; Janssen, Peter H

    2011-05-01

    Development of inhibitors and vaccines that mitigate rumen-derived methane by targeting methanogens relies on knowledge of the methanogens present. We investigated the composition of archaeal communities in the rumens of farmed sheep (Ovis aries), cattle (Bos taurus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to generate fingerprints of archaeal 16S rRNA genes. The total archaeal communities were relatively constant across species and diets, and were less variable and less diverse than bacterial communities. There were diet- and ruminant-species-based differences in archaeal community structure, but the same dominant archaea were present in all rumens. These were members of three coherent clades: species related to Methanobrevibacter ruminantium and Methanobrevibacter olleyae; species related to Methanobrevibacter gottschalkii, Methanobrevibacter thaueri and Methanobrevibacter millerae; and species of the genus Methanosphaera. Members of an archaeal group of unknown physiology, designated rumen cluster C (RCC), were also present. RCC-specific DGGE, clone library analysis and quantitative real-time PCR showed that their 16S rRNA gene sequences were very diverse and made up an average of 26.5% of the total archaea. RCC sequences were not readily detected in the DGGE patterns of total archaeal 16S rRNA genes because no single sequence type was abundant enough to form dominant bands.

  8. Mature fine tailings from oil sands processing harbour diverse methanogenic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Tara J; Foght, Julia M

    2010-06-01

    Processing oil sands to extract bitumen produces large volumes of a tailings slurry comprising water, silt, clays, unrecovered bitumen, and residual solvent used in the extraction process. Tailings are deposited into large settling basins, where the solids settle by gravity to become denser mature fine tailings (MFT). A substantial flux of methane, currently estimated at ~40 million L/day, is being emitted from the Mildred Lake Settling Basin. To better understand the biogenesis of this greenhouse gas, the methanogenic consortia in MFT samples from depth profiles in 2 tailings deposits (Mildred Lake Settling Basin and West In-Pit) were analyzed by constructing clone libraries of amplified archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA genes. The archaeal sequences, whose closest matches were almost exclusively cultivated methanogens, were comparable within and between basins and were predominantly (87% of clones) affiliated with acetoclastic Methanosaeta spp. In contrast, bacterial clone libraries were unexpectedly diverse, with the majority (~55%) of sequences related to Proteobacteria, including some presumptive nitrate-, iron-, or sulfate-reducing, hydrocarbon-degrading genera (e.g., Thauera, Rhodoferax, and Desulfatibacillum). Thus, MFT harbour a diverse community of prokaryotes presumptively responsible for producing methane from substrates indigenous to the MFT. These findings contribute to our understanding of biogenic methane production and densification of MFT in oil sands tailings deposits.

  9. Archaea and Bacteria Acclimate to High Total Ammonia in a Methanogenic Reactor Treating Swine Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Esquivel-Elizondo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition by ammonium at concentrations above 1000 mgN/L is known to harm the methanogenesis phase of anaerobic digestion. We anaerobically digested swine waste and achieved steady state COD-removal efficiency of around 52% with no fatty-acid or H2 accumulation. As the anaerobic microbial community adapted to the gradual increase of total ammonia-N (NH3-N from 890±295 to 2040±30 mg/L, the Bacterial and Archaeal communities became less diverse. Phylotypes most closely related to hydrogenotrophic Methanoculleus (36.4% and Methanobrevibacter (11.6%, along with acetoclastic Methanosaeta (29.3%, became the most abundant Archaeal sequences during acclimation. This was accompanied by a sharp increase in the relative abundances of phylotypes most closely related to acetogens and fatty-acid producers (Clostridium, Coprococcus, and Sphaerochaeta and syntrophic fatty-acid Bacteria (Syntrophomonas, Clostridium, Clostridiaceae species, and Cloacamonaceae species that have metabolic capabilities for butyrate and propionate fermentation, as well as for reverse acetogenesis. Our results provide evidence countering a prevailing theory that acetoclastic methanogens are selectively inhibited when the total ammonia-N concentration is greater than ~1000 mgN/L. Instead, acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogens coexisted in the presence of total ammonia-N of ~2000 mgN/L by establishing syntrophic relationships with fatty-acid fermenters, as well as homoacetogens able to carry out forward and reverse acetogenesis.

  10. Evidence of active methanogen communities in shallow sediments of the sonora margin cold seeps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Adrien; L'Haridon, Stéphane; Godfroy, Anne; Roussel, Erwan G; Cragg, Barry A; Parkes, R John; Toffin, Laurent

    2015-05-15

    In the Sonora Margin cold seep ecosystems (Gulf of California), sediments underlying microbial mats harbor high biogenic methane concentrations, fueling various microbial communities, such as abundant lineages of anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME). However, the biodiversity, distribution, and metabolism of the microorganisms producing this methane remain poorly understood. In this study, measurements of methanogenesis using radiolabeled dimethylamine, bicarbonate, and acetate showed that biogenic methane production in these sediments was mainly dominated by methylotrophic methanogenesis, while the proportion of autotrophic methanogenesis increased with depth. Congruently, methane production and methanogenic Archaea were detected in culture enrichments amended with trimethylamine and bicarbonate. Analyses of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprinting and reverse-transcribed PCR-amplified 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from these enrichments revealed the presence of active methylotrophic Methanococcoides burtonii relatives and several new autotrophic Methanogenium lineages, confirming the cooccurrence of Methanosarcinales and Methanomicrobiales methanogens with abundant ANME populations in the sediments of the Sonora Margin cold seeps. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel and diesel blends under methanogenic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuyun; Yassine, Mohamad H; Suidan, Makram T; Venosa, Albert D

    2015-12-15

    Biotransformation of soybean biodiesel and the inhibitory effect of petrodiesel were studied under methanogenic conditions. Biodiesel removal efficiency of more than 95% was achieved in a chemostat with influent biodiesel concentrations up to 2.45 g/L. The kinetics of anaerobic biodegradation of soybean biodiesel B100 (biodiesel only) with different petrodiesel loads was studied using biomass pre-acclimated to B100 and B80 (80% biodiesel and 20% petrodiesel). The results indicated that the biodiesel fraction of the blend could be effectively biodegraded, whereas petrodiesel was not biodegraded at all under methanogenic conditions. The presence of petrodiesel in blends with biodiesel had a greater inhibitory effect on the rate of biodegradation than the biodegradation efficiency (defined as the efficiency of methane production). Both the biodegradation rate coefficient and the methane production efficiency increased almost linearly with the increasing fraction of biodiesel. With the increasing fraction of petrodiesel, the biodegradation rate and efficiency were correlated with the concentration of soluble FAMEs in the water.

  12. National University Consortium on Microwave Research (NUCOMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Robert J.; Agee, Forrest J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper introduces a new cooperative research program of national scale that is focused on crucial research issues in the development of high energy microwave sources. These have many applications in the DOD and industry. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), in coopertaion with the Phillips Laboratory, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the Army Research Laboratory, has established a tri-service research consortium to investigate novel high energy microwave sources. The program is part of the DODs 'Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative' and will be funded at a rate of $DLR3.0M per year for up to five years. All research performed under this program will be unclassified. Under its auspices, HPM scientists at nine US universities will be attacking twenty-two separate research projects under the leadership of Neville Luhmann at UC-Davis, Victor Granatstein at Maryland, Magne Kristiansen at Texas Tech, Edl Schamiloglu at New Mexico, John Nation at Cornell, Ned Birdsall at UC-Berkeley, George Caryotakis at Standord, Ronald Gilgenbach at Michigan, and Anthony Lin at UCLA. To facilitate the rapid transition of research results into the industrial community, formal collaborative subcontracts are already in place with James Benford at Physics International, Carter Armstrong at Northrop, and Glen Huffman at Varian Associates. Although this new program officially only came into existence in mid-March of this year, it builds on over a decade of microwave research efforts funded by the plasma physics office at AFOSR. It also is synergistic with the ongoing Tri-Service Vacuum Electronics Initiative led by Robert Parker of NRL as well as with the AFOSR's and Rome Laboratory's long standing Advanced Thermionic Research Initiative. An overview will be given of the broad spectrum of research objectives encompassed by NUCOMR. Areas of collaboration and technology transfer will be highlighted. The areas in which the three university consortia will conduct

  13. Advances in industrial microbiome based on microbial consortium for biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-Li; Zhou, Jin-Jie; Quan, Chun-Shan; Xiu, Zhi-Long

    2017-01-01

    One of the important targets of industrial biotechnology is using cheap biomass resources. The traditional strategy is microbial fermentations with single strain. However, cheap biomass normally contains so complex compositions and impurities that it is very difficult for single microorganism to utilize availably. In order to completely utilize the substrates and produce multiple products in one process, industrial microbiome based on microbial consortium draws more and more attention. In this review, we first briefly described some examples of existing industrial bioprocesses involving microbial consortia. Comparison of 1,3-propanediol production by mixed and pure cultures were then introduced, and interaction relationships between cells in microbial consortium were summarized. Finally, the outlook on how to design and apply microbial consortium in the future was also proposed.

  14. Evaluation of production of lettuce and radish in consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Santos Valete Damasceno

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the viability of radish-lettuce consortium, as well as the best arrangement for the development of the vegetables. The experiment was carried out in randomized block design, in the University of Mato Grosso – UNEMAT, Campus Alta Floresta. It were evaluated the cropping system of lettuce, radish, and the consortium between cultures in two arrangements (three rows of lettuce with two rows of radish and three rows of radish with two rows of lettuce, with 6 replications. Evaluated characteristics were total fresh weight, commercial fresh weight, leaf fresh weight and number of leaves by plants. Means were compared by Scott-Knott test, at 5% of probability. The arrangement with three lettuce crop rows and two radish proved feasible, with promising for use in the consortium system.

  15. The ISPRS Student Consortium: From launch to tenth anniversary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjir, U.; Detchev, I.; Reyes, S. R.; Akkartal Aktas, A.; Lo, C. Y.; Miyazaki, H.

    2014-04-01

    The ISPRS Student Consortium is an international organization for students and young professionals in the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, and the geospatial information sciences. Since its start ten years ago, the number of members of the Student Consortium has been steadily growing, now reaching close to 1000. Its increased popularity, especially in recent years, is mainly due to the organization's worldwide involvement in student matters. The Student Consortium has helped organize numerous summer schools, youth forums, and student technical sessions at ISPRS sponsored conferences. In addition, the organization publishes a newsletter, and hosts several social media outlets in order to keep its global membership up-to-date on a regular basis. This paper will describe the structure of the organization, and it will give some example of its past student related activities.

  16. In-situ biogas upgrading with pulse H2 additions: The relevance of methanogen adaption and inorganic carbon level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agneessens, Laura Mia; Ottosen, Lars Ditlev Mørck; Voigt, Niels Vinther; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; de Jonge, Nadieh; Fischer, Christian Holst; Kofoed, Michael Vedel Wegener

    2017-06-01

    Surplus electricity from fluctuating renewable power sources may be converted to CH4 via biomethanisation in anaerobic digesters. The reactor performance and response of methanogen population of mixed-culture reactors was assessed during pulsed H2 injections. Initial H2 uptake rates increased immediately and linearly during consecutive pulse H2 injections for all tested injection rates (0.3 to 1.7LH2/Lsludge/d), while novel high throughput mcrA sequencing revealed an increased abundance of specific hydrogenotrophic methanogens. These findings illustrate the adaptability of the methanogen population to H2 injections and positively affects the implementation of biomethanisation. Acetate accumulated by a 10-fold following injections exceeding a 4:1 H2:CO2 ratio and may act as temporary storage prior to biomethanisation. Daily methane production decreased for headspace CO2 concentrations below 12% and may indicate a high sensitivity of hydrogenotrophic methanogens to CO2 limitation. This may ultimately decide the biogas upgrading potential which can be achieved by biomethanisation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Uncultivated Firmicutes (Peptococcaceae SCADC) Single Cells Sorted from Methanogenic Alkane-Degrading Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, BoonFei; Charchuk, Rhianna; Li, Carmen; Nesbø, Camilla; Abu Laban, Nidal

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome of an uncultivated bacterium affiliated with the Peptococcaceae was reconstructed by co-assembling Illumina MiSeq sequences from three single cells sorted by microfluidics from two methanogenic alkane-degrading cultures. Peptococcaceae SCADC (short-chain alkane-degrading culture) may be genetically capable of anaerobic alkane activation by fumarate addition in the absence of sulfate. PMID:25212628

  18. Stable acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70ºC) mixed culture fermentation by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, F.; Zhang, Y.; Ding, J.; Dai, K.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Zeng, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    The control of metabolite production is difficult in mixed culture fermentation. This is particularly related to hydrogen inhibition. In this work, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were selectively enriched to reduce the hydrogen partial pressure and to realize efficient acetate production in extreme-th

  19. Lean Breed Landrace Pigs Harbor Fecal Methanogens at Higher Diversity and Density than Obese Breed Erhualian Pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, Y.H.; Su, Y.; Wright, A.D.G.; Zhang, L.L.; Smidt, H.; Zhu, W.Y.

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of fecal methanogens of Erhualian (obese type) and Landrace (lean type) pigs was examined using separate 16S rRNA gene libraries for each breed. A total of 763 clones were analyzed; 381 from the Erhualian library and 382 from the Landrace library were identified belonging to the genus

  20. Methanogenic community changes, and emissions of methane and other gases, during storage of acidified and untreated pig slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, S O; Højberg, O; Poulsen, M; Schwab, C; Eriksen, J

    2014-07-01

    Acidification with concentrated H(2)SO(4) is a novel strategy to reduce NH(3) emissions from livestock slurry. It was recently found that also CH(4) emissions from acidified slurry are reduced. This study investigated the microbiological basis and temporal stability of these effects. Pig slurry from two farms, acidified by different techniques or untreated, was stored for 83 days in a pilot-scale facility. Methanogens were characterized before and after storage by T-RFLP and qPCR targeting mcrA. Emissions of NH(3) and CH(4) during storage were quantified. Acidified slurry pH was nearly constant at values of 5·5 and 6·5. Ammonia losses were reduced by 84 and 49%, respectively, while CH(4) emission with both acidification techniques was reduced by >90%. T-RFLP fingerprints showed little effect of acidification or storage time. A major T-RF of 105 bp could represent methanogens related to Thermoplasmata (Tp). No treatment effects on gene copy numbers were seen with universal methanogen primers, whereas effects were found with Tp-specific primers. Methane emissions were reduced >90% during storage. Thermoplasmata-related methanogens could be involved in CH(4) emissions from pig slurry. The effect of acidification on CH(4) emissions during storage of pig slurry was quantified for the first time. Acidification with sulphuric acid holds promise as a novel greenhouse gas mitigation strategy for confined livestock production. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. 2,6,10,15,19-Pentamethylicosenes in Methanolobus bombayensis, a marine methanogenic archaeon, and in Methanosarcina mazei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderMaarel, MJEC; Huber, R; Damste, JSS; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    1997-01-01

    2,6,10,15,19-Pentamethylicosenes (PMEs) containing three to five double bonds have been found in the methanogenic archaea Methanosarcina mazei (DSM 3338), a strain isolated from sewage sludge, and in Methanolobus bombayensis (OCM 438), a non-extremophilic archaeon isolated from a marine sediment.

  2. Methanogenic community changes, and emissions of methane and other gases, during storage of acidified and untreated pig slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O; Højberg, Ole; Poulsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    and Results: Pig slurry from two farms, acidified by different techniques, and untreated slurry were stored for 83 d in a pilot-scale facility. Methanogens were characterized before and after storage by TRFLP and qPCR targeting mcrA. Emissions of NH3 and CH4 during storage were quantified. Acidified slurry p...

  3. Variation of carbon isotope fractionation in hydrogenotrophic methanogenic microbial cultures and environmental samples at different energy status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning, H.; Plugge, C.M.; Galand, P.E.; Conrad, R.

    2005-01-01

    Methane is a major product of anaerobic degradation of organic matter and an important greenhouse gas. Its stable carbon isotope composition can be used to reveal active methanogenic pathways, if associated isotope fractionation factors are known. To clarify the causes that lead to the wide variatio

  4. Acid resistance of methanogenic bacteria in a two-stage anaerobic process treating high concentration methanol Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xuefei; REN Nanqi

    2007-01-01

    In this study,the two-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket(UASB)system and batch experiments were employed to evaluate the performance of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of high concentration methanol wastewater.The acid resistance of granular sludge and methanogenic bacteria and their metabolizing activity were investigated.The results show that the pH of the first UASB changed from 4.9 to 5.8 and 5.5 to 6.2 for the second reactor.Apparently,these were not the advisable pH levels that common metha nogenic bacteria could accept.The methanogenic bacteria of the system,viz.Methanosarcina barkeri,had some acid resistance and could still degrade methanol at pH 5.0.If the methanogenic bacteria were trained further,their acid resistance would be improved somewhat.Granular sludge of the system could protect the methanogenic bacteria within its body against the impact of the acidic environment and make them degrade methanol at pH 4.5.The performance of granular sludge was attributed to its structure,bacteria species,and the distribution of bacterium inside the granule.

  5. Stable acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Jing; Dai, Kun; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Zeng, Raymond J.

    2014-06-01

    The control of metabolite production is difficult in mixed culture fermentation. This is particularly related to hydrogen inhibition. In this work, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were selectively enriched to reduce the hydrogen partial pressure and to realize efficient acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70°C) mixed culture fermentation. The continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) was stable operated during 100 days, in which acetate accounted for more than 90% of metabolites in liquid solutions. The yields of acetate, methane and biomass in CSTR were 1.5 +/- 0.06, 1.0 +/- 0.13 and 0.4 +/- 0.05 mol/mol glucose, respectively, close to the theoretical expected values. The CSTR effluent was stable and no further conversion occurred when incubated for 14 days in a batch reactor. In fed-batch experiments, acetate could be produced up to 34.4 g/L, significantly higher than observed in common hydrogen producing fermentations. Acetate also accounted for more than 90% of soluble products formed in these fed-batch fermentations. The microbial community analysis revealed hydrogenotrophic methanogens (mainly Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus and Methanobacterium thermoaggregans) as 98% of Archaea, confirming that high temperature will select hydrogenotrophic methanogens over aceticlastic methanogens effectively. This work demonstrated a potential application to effectively produce acetate as a value chemical and methane as an energy gas together via mixed culture fermentation.

  6. Stable acetate production in extreme-thermophilic (70ºC) mixed culture fermentation by selective enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, F.; Zhang, Y.; Ding, J.; Dai, K.; Van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.; Zeng, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    The control of metabolite production is difficult in mixed culture fermentation. This is particularly related to hydrogen inhibition. In this work, hydrogenotrophic methanogens were selectively enriched to reduce the hydrogen partial pressure and to realize efficient acetate production in extreme-th

  7. 嗜冷性产甲烷菌的研究进展%Research Progress of Psychrophilic methanogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张伟; 万永青; 段开红; 田瑞华

    2013-01-01

    Psychrophilic methanogens play a very important role in global carbon cycle,and attract more and more research interests.Though playing an important role in low-temperature anaerobic digestion,the so-far cultured cold-adaptive methanogenic strains are very few.The research progress of Psychrophilic methanogens was reviewed,with the focus on their classification,isolation and cold-adapted mechanisms,as well as the molecular biology techniques.The application of Psychrophilic methanogens in low-temperature anaerobic digestion was also analyzed.%嗜冷产甲烷菌在全球碳素循环中发挥了非常重要的作用,近年来引起了国内外学者的广泛关注.尽管已知冷适应的产甲烷古菌在低温厌氧消化中发挥着重要作用,但目前获得培养的嗜冷产甲烷古菌却很少.综述了嗜冷产甲烷菌的研究进展,阐述了嗜冷产甲烷古菌的分离、嗜冷机制及分子生物学技术的应用,并对嗜冷产甲烷菌在低温厌氧消化中的应用进行了分析.

  8. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium - Final Progress Report October 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bement, Arden L.

    2001-10-23

    The basic mission of the Consortium was to advance the science and understanding of high-T{sub c} superconductivity and to promote the development of new materials and improved processing technology. Focused group efforts were the key element of the research program. One program area is the understanding of the layered structures involved in candidate materials and the factors that control their formation, stability and relationship superconductor properties. The other program area had a focus upon factors that limit or control the transport properties such as weak links, flux lattice behavior, and interfaces. Interactions among Consortium d with industrial armiates were an integral part of the program.

  9. Augmentation of a Microbial Consortium for Enhanced Polylactide (PLA) Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nimisha R; Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-03-01

    Bioplastics are eco-friendly and derived from renewable biomass sources. Innovation in recycling methods will tackle some of the critical issues facing the acceptance of bioplastics. Polylactic acid (PLA) is the commonly used and well-studied bioplastic that is presumed to be biodegradable. Considering their demand and use in near future, exploration for microbes capable of bioplastic degradation has high potential. Four PLA degrading strains were isolated and identified as Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Serratia marcescens and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. A consortium of above strains degraded 44 % (w/w) PLA in 30 days time in laboratory conditions. Subsequently, the microbial consortium employed effectively for PLA composting.

  10. Environmental Drivers of Differences in Microbial Community Structure in Crude Oil Reservoirs across a Methanogenic Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jenna L.; Akob, Denise M.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Fierer, Noah; Spear, John R.; Warwick, Peter D.; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulating in situ microbial communities in oil reservoirs to produce natural gas is a potentially viable strategy for recovering additional fossil fuel resources following traditional recovery operations. Little is known about what geochemical parameters drive microbial population dynamics in biodegraded, methanogenic oil reservoirs. We investigated if microbial community structure was significantly impacted by the extent of crude oil biodegradation, extent of biogenic methane production, and formation water chemistry. Twenty-two oil production wells from north central Louisiana, USA, were sampled for analysis of microbial community structure and fluid geochemistry. Archaea were the dominant microbial community in the majority of the wells sampled. Methanogens, including hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic organisms, were numerically dominant in every well, accounting for, on average, over 98% of the total Archaea present. The dominant Bacteria groups were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Enterobacteriaceae, and Clostridiales, which have also been identified in other microbially-altered oil reservoirs. Comparing microbial community structure to fluid (gas, water, and oil) geochemistry revealed that the relative extent of biodegradation, salinity, and spatial location were the major drivers of microbial diversity. Archaeal relative abundance was independent of the extent of methanogenesis, but closely correlated to the extent of crude oil biodegradation; therefore, microbial community structure is likely not a good sole predictor of methanogenic activity, but may predict the extent of crude oil biodegradation. However, when the shallow, highly biodegraded, low salinity wells were excluded from the statistical analysis, no environmental parameters could explain the differences in microbial community structure. This suggests that the microbial community structure of the 5 shallow, up-dip wells was different than the 17 deeper, down-dip wells. Also, the 17 down-dip wells

  11. Environmental Drivers of Differences in Microbial Community Structure in Crude Oil Reservoirs across a Methanogenic Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jenna L; Akob, Denise M; McIntosh, Jennifer C; Fierer, Noah; Spear, John R; Warwick, Peter D; McCray, John E

    2016-01-01

    Stimulating in situ microbial communities in oil reservoirs to produce natural gas is a potentially viable strategy for recovering additional fossil fuel resources following traditional recovery operations. Little is known about what geochemical parameters drive microbial population dynamics in biodegraded, methanogenic oil reservoirs. We investigated if microbial community structure was significantly impacted by the extent of crude oil biodegradation, extent of biogenic methane production, and formation water chemistry. Twenty-two oil production wells from north central Louisiana, USA, were sampled for analysis of microbial community structure and fluid geochemistry. Archaea were the dominant microbial community in the majority of the wells sampled. Methanogens, including hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic organisms, were numerically dominant in every well, accounting for, on average, over 98% of the total Archaea present. The dominant Bacteria groups were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Enterobacteriaceae, and Clostridiales, which have also been identified in other microbially-altered oil reservoirs. Comparing microbial community structure to fluid (gas, water, and oil) geochemistry revealed that the relative extent of biodegradation, salinity, and spatial location were the major drivers of microbial diversity. Archaeal relative abundance was independent of the extent of methanogenesis, but closely correlated to the extent of crude oil biodegradation; therefore, microbial community structure is likely not a good sole predictor of methanogenic activity, but may predict the extent of crude oil biodegradation. However, when the shallow, highly biodegraded, low salinity wells were excluded from the statistical analysis, no environmental parameters could explain the differences in microbial community structure. This suggests that the microbial community structure of the 5 shallow, up-dip wells was different than the 17 deeper, down-dip wells. Also, the 17 down-dip wells

  12. Environmental drivers of differences in microbial community structure in crude oil reservoirs across a methanogenic gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jenna L.; Akob, Denise M.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Fierer, Noah; Spear, John R.; Warwick, Peter D.; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulating in situ microbial communities in oil reservoirs to produce natural gas is a potentially viable strategy for recovering additional fossil fuel resources following traditional recovery operations. Little is known about what geochemical parameters drive microbial population dynamics in biodegraded, methanogenic oil reservoirs. We investigated if microbial community structure was significantly impacted by the extent of crude oil biodegradation, extent of biogenic methane production, and formation water chemistry. Twenty-two oil production wells from north central Louisiana, USA, were sampled for analysis of microbial community structure and fluid geochemistry. Archaea were the dominant microbial community in the majority of the wells sampled. Methanogens, including hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic organisms, were numerically dominant in every well, accounting for, on average, over 98% of the total Archaea present. The dominant Bacteria groups were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Enterobacteriaceae, and Clostridiales, which have also been identified in other microbially-altered oil reservoirs. Comparing microbial community structure to fluid (gas, water, and oil) geochemistry revealed that the relative extent of biodegradation, salinity, and spatial location were the major drivers of microbial diversity. Archaeal relative abundance was independent of the extent of methanogenesis, but closely correlated to the extent of crude oil biodegradation; therefore, microbial community structure is likely not a good sole predictor of methanogenic activity, but may predict the extent of crude oil biodegradation. However, when the shallow, highly biodegraded, low salinity wells were excluded from the statistical analysis, no environmental parameters could explain the differences in microbial community structure. This suggests that the microbial community structure of the 5 shallow, up-dip wells was different than the 17 deeper, down-dip wells. Also, the 17 down-dip wells

  13. Environmental drivers of differences in microbial community structure in crude oil reservoirs across a methanogenic gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna L Shelton

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stimulating in situ microbial communities in oil reservoirs to produce natural gas is a potentially viable strategy for recovering additional fossil fuel resources following traditional recovery operations. Little is known about what geochemical parameters drive microbial population dynamics in biodegraded, methanogenic oil reservoirs. We investigated if microbial community structure was significantly impacted by the extent of crude oil biodegradation, extent of biogenic methane production, and formation water chemistry. Twenty-two oil production wells from north central Louisiana, USA, were sampled for analysis of microbial community structure and fluid geochemistry. Archaea were the dominant microbial community in the majority of the wells sampled. Methanogens, including hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic organisms, were numerically dominant in every well, accounting for, on average, over 98% of the total archaea present. The dominant Bacteria groups were Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Enterobacteriaceae, and Clostridiales, which have also been identified in other microbially-altered oil reservoirs. Comparing microbial community structure to fluid (gas, water, and oil geochemistry revealed that the relative extent of biodegradation, salinity, and spatial location were the major drivers of microbial diversity. Archaeal relative abundance was independent of the extent of methanogenesis, but closely correlated to the extent of crude oil biodegradation; therefore, microbial community structure is likely not a good sole predictor of methanogenic activity, but may predict the extent of crude oil biodegradation. However, when the shallow, highly biodegraded, low salinity wells were excluded from the statistical analysis, no environmental parameters could explain the differences in microbial community structure. This suggests that the microbial community structure of the 5 shallow up-dip wells was different than the 17 deeper, down-dip wells, and that

  14. Influence of niche differentiation on the abundance of methanogenic archaea and methane production potential in natural wetland ecosystems across China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Liu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 emissions from natural wetland ecosystems exhibit large spatial variability. To understand the underlying factors that induce differences in CH4 emissions from natural wetlands around China, we measured the CH4 production potential and the abundance of methanogenic archaea in vertical profile soils sampled from the Poyang wetland in the subtropical zone, the Hongze wetland in the warm temperate zone, the Sanjiang marsh in the cold temperate zone, and the Ruoergai peatland in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. The top soil layer had the highest population of methanogens (1.07−8.29×109 cells g−1 soil in all wetlands except the Ruoergai peatland and exhibited the maximum CH4 production potential measured at the mean in situ summer temperature. There is a significant logarithmic correlation between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the soil organic carbon (R2=0.718, P<0.001, n=13 and between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the total nitrogen concentrations (R2=0.758, P<0.001, n=13 in wetland soils. This indicates that the amount of soil organic carbon may affect the population of methanogens in wetland ecosystems. While the CH4 production potential is not significantly related to methanogen population (R2=0.011, P>0.05, n=13, it is related to the dissolved organic carbon concentration (R2=0.305, P=0.05, n=13. This suggests that the methanogen population is not an effective index for predicting the CH4 production in wetland ecosystems. The CH4 production rate of the top soil layer increases with increasing latitude, from 274 μg CH4 kg−1 soil d−1 in the Poyang wetland to 665 μg CH4 kg−1 soil d−1 in the Carex lasiocarpa

  15. Effects of Spartina alterniflora invasion on the communities of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria in estuarine marsh sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemaneh eZeleke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of plant invasion on the microorganisms of soil sediments is very important for estuary ecology. The community structures of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB as a function of Spartina alterniflora invasion in Phragmites australis-vegetated sediments of the Dongtan wetland in the Yangtze River estuary, China, were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR of the methyl coenzyme M reductase A (mcrA and dissimilatory sulfite-reductase (dsrB genes. Sediment samples were collected from two replicate locations, and each location included three sampling stands each covered by monocultures of P. australis, S. alterniflora and both plants (transition stands, respectively. qPCR analysis revealed higher copy numbers of mcrA genes in sediments from S. alterniflora stands than P. australis stands (5- and 7.5-fold more in the spring and summer, respectively, which is consistent with the higher methane flux rates measured in the S. alterniflora stands (up to 8.01 ± 5.61 mg m-2 h-1. Similar trends were observed for SRB, and they were up to two orders of magnitude higher than the methanogens. Diversity indices indicated a lower diversity of methanogens in the S. alterniflora stands than the P. australis stands. In contrast, insignificant variations were observed in the diversity of SRB with the invasion. Although Methanomicrobiales and Methanococcales, the hydrogenotrophic methanogens, dominated in the salt marsh, Methanomicrobiales displayed a slight increase with the invasion and growth of S. alterniflora, whereas the later responded differently. Methanosarcina, the metabolically diverse methanogens, did not vary with the invasion of, but Methanosaeta, the exclusive acetate utilizers, appeared to increase with S. alterniflora invasion. In SRB, sequences closely related to the families Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae dominated in the salt marsh, although they displayed minimal changes with the S

  16. Methanogenic pathway and archaeal communities in three different anoxic soils amended with rice straw and maize straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf eConrad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Addition of straw is common practice in rice agriculture, but its effect on the path of microbial CH4 production and the microbial community involved is not well known. Since straw from rice (C3 plant and maize plants (C4 plant exhibit different δ13C values, we compared the effect of these straw types using anoxic rice field soils from Italy and China, and also a soil from Thailand that had previously not been flooded. The temporal patterns of production of CH4 and its major substrates H2 and acetate, were slightly different between rice straw and maize straw. Addition of methyl fluoride, an inhibitor of aceticlastic methanogenesis, resulted in partial inhibition of acetate consumption and CH4 production. The δ13C of the accumulated CH4 and acetate reflected the different δ13C values of rice straw versus maize straw. However, the relative contribution of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis to total CH4 production exhibited a similar temporal change when scaled to CH4 production irrespectively of whether rice straw or maize straw was applied. The composition of the methanogenic archaeal communities was characterized by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP analysis and was quantified by quantitative PCR (qPCR targeting archaeal 16S rRNA genes or methanogenic mcrA genes.. The size of the methanogenic communities generally increased during incubation with straw, but the straw type had little effect. Instead, differences were found between the soils, with Methanosarcinaceae and Methanobacteriales dominating straw decomposition in Italian soil, Methanosarcinaceae, Methanocellales, and Methanobacteriale in China soil, and Methanosarcinaceae and Methanocellales in Thailand soil. The experiments showed that methanogenic degradation in different soils involved different methanogenic population dynamics. However, the path of CH4 production was hardly different between degradation of rice straw versus maize straw and was also similar for

  17. Factors regulating community composition of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria in brackish marsh sediments in the Min River estuary, southeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, C. X.; Zhang, Z. C.; Cadillo-Quiroz, H.; Tong, C.

    2016-11-01

    Assessing the diverse communities of methanogenic Archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is important to understand methane (CH4) production in wetland ecosystems. However, the vertical distribution of composition and diversity, and the effects of environmental factors on the methanogen and SRB communities in the sediments of subtropical estuarine brackish marshes have been poorly characterized. To assess the effects of variable environmental conditions on methanogenic and SRB communities in marshes, we studied three brackish marsh zones dominated by Phragmites australis, Cyperus malaccensis and Spartina alterniflora, respectively, in the Min River estuary, southeastern China. Methanogens of the Methanomicrobiales order was the dominant group at sediment depths of 0-30 cm, which indicated that the main pathway of methane production was H2/CO2 in this zone. In general, methanogens of the genus Methanoregula were dominant in the three marsh zones. For SRB, Desulfobacterales was the dominant group, and Desulfobacterium and Desulfosarcina were the predominant genera at the depth of 0-30 cm. The community composition of methanogens and SRB changed with vegetation type and soil depth. Compared with SRB, vegetation type demonstrated a stronger influence on the community composition of methanogens. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) analysis further revealed that the main factors affecting the methanogens community composition were EC (electric conductivity) and pH, and the main factors affecting SRB community composition were pH, SOC and TN, suggesting that pH is a common factor influencing the community compositions of both methanogen and SRB in the sediments of brackish marshes.

  18. Computational Astrophysics Consortium 3 - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, Stan [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2014-08-29

    Final project report for UCSC's participation in the Computational Astrophysics Consortium - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis. As an appendix, the report of the entire Consortium is also appended.

  19. Reductive transformation and inhibitory effect of ethylene under methanogenic conditions in peat-soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsgaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene (C2H4), which is a potent gaseous plant hormone, has often been found to accumulate in anoxic soils where pathways of anaerobic C2H4 oxidation are so far unknown and other C2H4 transformation processes are uncommon. The present study shows that ethylene was reduced almost...... stoichiometrically (89–92%) to ethane (C2H6) in peat-soil microcosms incubated under methanogenic conditions. Methanogenesis started after a prolonged anoxic lag-phase (>29 weeks) where added ethylene prevailed despite the availability of nitrate (NO3−) as an alternative electron acceptor. Methanogenesis, as well...... as ethylene reduction to ethane, was inhibited by 90% at 1% oxygen. Likewise, methanogenesis and ethane formation was gradually inhibited (to a similar extent) by increasing ethylene concentrations above 0.2%; this inhibition eventually reached 90–95% at 2.2–4.5% C2H4. The present results extend the known...

  20. Methylotrophic methanogenic Thermoplasmata implicated in reduced methane emissions from bovine rumen - in: GGAA2013 Conference Proceedings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten

    was sampled from the top and bottom part of the frontal, mid and distal section of the rumen (25 ml per section), pooled, physically disrupted to release microorganisms from organic matter and filtered (pore size: 0.5 mm). Total nucleic acids were extracted using a standard phenol-chloroform bead......-beating procedure. DNA was removed and double-stranded complementary DNA (ds-cDNA) was synthetized from purified RNA. The ds-cDNA was sequenced using the Illumina HiSeq2000 system (≈160bp; paired-end sequenced from 2×100bp read lengths). Concatenated small subunit (SSU) rRNA reads were analyzed according to Urich....... Analysis of SSU rRNA reads revealed that archaea were significantly decreased upon RSO supplementation, whereas bacterial and eukaryotic taxa were basically unaffected. The decrease of archaea could be assigned to a novel group of methanogens distantly related to Thermoplasmata (“Rumen Cluster C”, RCC...

  1. Methanogenic Archaea and oral infections – ways to unravel the black box

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter Horz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Archaea, organisms that make up the third domain of cellular life are members of the human oral microflora. They are strikingly less diverse than oral bacteria and appear to be relatively rare with respect to their numerical abundance. Since they have been exclusively found in association with oral infections such as periodontitis and apical periodontitis and given their unique physiology and energy metabolism, it is highly plausible that they are more than just secondary colonizers of infected areas, but instead are actively involved in the overall poly-microbial infection process. Conversely, it is a highly challenging task to clearly demonstrate their possible active participation – mostly due to the difficulty to grow them in routine microbiology laboratories. This current review points out the importance for understanding the medical impact of methanogens and aims at devising strategies for elucidating the true function of archaea in the oral ecosystem.

  2. Specific methanogenic activity (SMA of industrial sludge from the aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danieli Schneiders

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, specific methanogenic activity (SMA tests were performed on textile sludge and food industry sludge. The textile sludge from an activated sludge was collected at the entrance of the secondary biologic clarifier and the food sludge was collected in a UASB reactor. Once collected, the sludges were characterized and tested for SMA. It was found that the microrganisms present in the food sludge had SMA of 0.17 gCOD-CH4 gSSV.d-1 and 337.05 mL of methane production, while the microrganisms of the textile sludge presented 0.10 gCOD-CH4 gSSV.d-1 of SMA and 3.04 mL of methane production. Therefore, the food sludge was more suitable to be used as a starting inoculum in UASB.

  3. Competition between Methanogens and Acetogens in Biocathodes: A Comparison between Potentiostatic and Galvanostatic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molenaar, Sam D.; Saha, Pradip; Mol, Annemerel R.; Sleutels, Tom H. J. A.; ter Heijne, Annemiek; Buisman, Cees J. N.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis is a useful form of technology for the renewable production of organic commodities from biologically catalyzed reduction of CO2. However, for the technology to become applicable, process selectivity, stability and efficiency need strong improvement. Here we report on the effect of different electrochemical control modes (potentiostatic/galvanostatic) on both the start-up characteristics and steady-state performance of biocathodes using a non-enriched mixed-culture inoculum. Based on our results, it seems that kinetic differences exist between the two dominant functional microbial groups (i.e., homoacetogens and methanogens) and that by applying different current densities, these differences may be exploited to steer product selectivity and reactor performance. PMID:28106846

  4. Effects of oxytetracycline, tylosin, and amoxicillin antibiotics on specific methanogenic activity of anaerobic biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Amin

    2012-01-01

    Materials and Methods: To evaluate the inhibitory antibiotics amoxicillin, tetracycline, and tylosin on biomass activity, specific methanogenic activity (SMA using anerobic biomass batch; into 120 ml vials: 30 ml biomass and 70 ml substrate including volatile fatty acids, mainly acetic acid and various concentrations of antibiotics were added. Methane gas production replacement through solution of KOH (2 N as an absorber of CO 2 and bromine thymol blue as indicator was measured. Each batch was tested for 10 days. Results: Based on the findings, inhibitory concentration of oxytetracycline, amoxicillin, and tylosin were 8000, 9000, and 9000 mg/L, respectively. Conclusions: This study showed that with increasing concentrations of antibiotics, the produced biogas volume from biomass per unit weight is decreased. COD removal was 42-82 % due to long retention time and adsorption to flocks.

  5. Integrated biogas upgrading and hydrogen utilization in an anaerobic reactor containing enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogenic culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    the existing natural gas grid. The current study presents a new biological method for biogas upgrading in a separate biogas reactor, containing enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogens and fed with biogas and hydrogen. Both mesophilic- and thermophilic anaerobic cultures were enriched to convert CO2 to CH4...... by PCR–DGGE. Nonetheless, they all belonged to the order Methanobacteriales, which can mediate hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Biogas upgrading was then tested in a thermophilic anaerobic reactor under various operation conditions. By continuous addition of hydrogen in the biogas reactor, high degree......Biogas produced by anaerobic digestion, is mainly used in a gas motor for heat and electricity production. However, after removal of CO2, biogas can be upgraded to natural gas quality, giving more utilization possibilities, such as utilization as autogas, or distant utilization by using...

  6. Localization of Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase as Metabolic Marker for Diverse Methanogenic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Wrede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl-Coenzyme M reductase (MCR as key enzyme for methanogenesis as well as for anaerobic oxidation of methane represents an important metabolic marker for both processes in microbial biofilms. Here, the potential of MCR-specific polyclonal antibodies as metabolic marker in various methanogenic Archaea is shown. For standard growth conditions in laboratory culture, the cytoplasmic localization of the enzyme in Methanothermobacter marburgensis, Methanothermobacter wolfei, Methanococcus maripaludis, Methanosarcina mazei, and in anaerobically methane-oxidizing biofilms is demonstrated. Under growth limiting conditions on nickel-depleted media, at low linear growth of cultures, a fraction of 50–70% of the enzyme was localized close to the cytoplasmic membrane, which implies “facultative” membrane association of the enzyme. This feature may be also useful for assessment of growth-limiting conditions in microbial biofilms.

  7. Ruminal fermentation of Anti-methanogenic Nitrate- and Nitro-Containing Forages In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin C. Anderson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate, 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA and 3-nitro-1-propanol (NPOH can accumulate in forages and be poisonous to animals if consumed in high enough amounts. These chemicals are also recognized as potent anti-methanogenic compounds, but plants naturally containing these chemicals have been studied little in this regard. Presently, we found that nitrate-, NPA- or NPOH-containing forages effectively decreased methane production, by 35 to 87%, during in vitro fermentation by mixed cultures of ruminal microbes compared to fermentation by cultures incubated similarly with alfalfa. Methane production was further decreased during incubation of mixed cultures also inoculated with Denitrobacterium detoxificans, a ruminal bacterium known to metabolize nitrate, NPA and NPOH. Inhibition of methanogens within the mixed cultures was greatest with the NPA- and NPOH-containing forages. Hydrogen accumulated in all the mixed cultures incubated with forages containing nitrate, NPA or NPOH but was dramatically higher, exceeding 40 µmol hydrogen/mL, in mixed cultures incubated with NPA-containing forage but not inoculated with D. detoxificans. This possibly reflects the inhibition of hydrogenase-catalyzed uptake of hydrogen produced via conversion of 50 µmol added formate per mL to hydrogen. Accumulations of volatile fatty acids revealed compensatory changes in fermentation in mixed cultures incubated with the nitrate-, NPA- and NPOH-containing forages as evidenced by lower accumulations of acetate, and in some cases higher accumulations of butyrate and lower accumulations of ammonia, iso-buytrate and iso-valerate compared to cultures incubated with alfalfa. Results reveal that nitrate, NPA and NPOH that accumulate naturally in forages can be made available within ruminal incubations to inhibit methanogenesis. Further research is warranted to determine if diets can be formulated with nitrate-, NPA- and NPOH-containing forages to achieve efficacious mitigation in

  8. [Cobalt(III)-EDTA]- Reduction by Thermophilic Methanogen Methanothermobacter Thermautotrophicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Rajesh [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States); Dong, Hailiang [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States); China Univ. of Geosciences, Beijing (China); Liu, Deng [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States); China Univ. of Geosciences, Wuhan (China); Marts, Amy R. [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States); Tierney, David L. [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States); Almquist, Catherine B. [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)

    2015-06-30

    Cobalt is a metal contaminant at high temperature radioactive waste disposal sites. In previous studies have largely focused on mesophilic microorganisms to remediate cobalt, despite the presence of thermophilic microorganisms at such sites. In this study,Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, a thermophilic methanogen, was used to reduce Co(III) in the form of [Co(III)–EDTA]-. Bioreduction experiments were conducted in a growth medium with H2/CO2 as a growth substrate at initial Co(III) concentrations of 1, 2, 4, 7, and 10 mM. At low Co(III) concentrations (< 4 mM), a complete reduction was observed within a week. Wet chemistry, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analyses were all consistent in revealing the reduction kinetics. But, at higher concentrations (7 and 10 mM) the reduction extents only reached 69.8% and 48.5%, respectively, likely due to the toxic effect of Co(III) to the methanogen cells as evidenced by a decrease in total cellular protein at these Co(III) concentrations. Methanogenesis was inhibited by Co(III) bioreduction, possibly due to impaired cell growth and electron diversion from CO2 to Co(III). Overall, our results demonstrated the ability of M. thermautotrophicus to reduce Co(III) to Co(II) and its potential application for remediating 60Co contaminant at high temperature subsurface radioactive waste disposal sites.

  9. Molecular Biomarker-Based Biokinetic Modeling of a PCE-Dechlorinating and Methanogenic Mixed Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heavner, Gretchen L. W.; Rowe, Annette R.; Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Pan, Ju Khuan; Gossett, James M.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2013-04-16

    Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes via anaerobic reductive dechlorination relies upon the activity of specific microbial population-most notably Dehalococcoides (DHC) strains. In the lab and field Dehalococcoides grow most robustly in mixed communities which usually contain both fermenters and methanogens. Recently, researchers have been developing quantitative molecular biomarkers to aid in field site diagnostics and it is hoped that these biomarkers could aid in the modeling of anaerobic reductive dechlorination. A comprehensive biokinetic model of a community containing Dehalococcoides mccartyi (formerly D. ethenogenes) was updated to describe continuously fed reactors with specific biomass levels based on quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based population data (DNA and RNA). The model was calibrated and validated with subsets of chemical and molecular biological data from various continuous feed experiments (n = 24) with different loading rates of the electron acceptor (1.5 to 482 μeeq/L-h), types of electron acceptor (PCE, TCE, cis-DCE) and electron donor to electron acceptor ratios. The resulting model predicted the sum of dechlorination products vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene (ETH) well. However, VC alone was under-predicted and ETH was over predicted. Consequently, competitive inhibition among chlorinated ethenes was examined and then added to the model. Additionally, as 16S rRNA gene copy numbers did not provide accurate model fits in all cases, we examined whether an improved fit could be obtained if mRNA levels for key functional enzymes could be used to infer respiration rates. The resulting empirically derived mRNA “adjustment factors” were added to the model for both DHC and the main methanogen in the culture (a Methanosaeta species) to provide a more nuanced prediction of activity. Results of this study suggest that at higher feeding rates competitive inhibition is important and mRNA provides a more accurate indicator of a population’s instantaneous

  10. Ruminal Fermentation of Anti-Methanogenic Nitrate- and Nitro-Containing Forages In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robin C.; Ripley, Laura H.; Bowman, Jan G. P.; Callaway, Todd R.; Genovese, Kenneth J.; Beier, Ross C.; Harvey, Roger B.; Nisbet, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate, 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (NPA) and 3-nitro-1-propanol (NPOH) can accumulate in forages and be poisonous to animals if consumed in high enough amounts. These chemicals are also recognized as potent anti-methanogenic compounds, but plants naturally containing these chemicals have been studied little in this regard. Presently, we found that nitrate-, NPA-, or NPOH-containing forages effectively decreased methane production, by 35–87%, during in vitro fermentation by mixed cultures of ruminal microbes compared to fermentation by cultures incubated similarly with alfalfa. Methane production was further decreased during the incubation of mixed cultures also inoculated with Denitrobacterium detoxificans, a ruminal bacterium known to metabolize nitrate, NPA, and NPOH. Inhibition of methanogens within the mixed cultures was greatest with the NPA- and NPOH-containing forages. Hydrogen accumulated in all the mixed cultures incubated with forages containing nitrate, NPA or NPOH and was dramatically higher, exceeding 40 μmol hydrogen/mL, in mixed cultures incubated with NPA-containing forage but not inoculated with D. detoxificans. This possibly reflects the inhibition of hydrogenase-catalyzed uptake of hydrogen produced via conversion of 50 μmol added formate per milliliter to hydrogen. Accumulations of volatile fatty acids revealed compensatory changes in fermentation in mixed cultures incubated with the nitrate-, NPA-, and NPOH-containing forages as evidenced by lower accumulations of acetate, and in some cases, higher accumulations of butyrate and lower accumulations of ammonia, iso-buytrate, and iso-valerate compared to cultures incubated with alfalfa. Results reveal that nitrate, NPA, and NPOH that accumulate naturally in forages can be made available within ruminal incubations to inhibit methanogenesis. Further research is warranted to determine if diets can be formulated with nitrate-, NPA-, and NPOH-containing forages to achieve efficacious mitigation

  11. Methanoculleus sediminis sp. nov., a methanogen from sediments near a submarine mud volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng-Chung; Chen, Mei-Fei; Lai, Mei-Chin; Weng, Chieh-Yin; Wu, Sue-Yao; Lin, Saulwood; Yang, Tsanyao F; Chen, Po-Chun

    2015-07-01

    A mesophilic, hydrogenotrophic methanogen, strain S3Fa(T), was isolated from sediments collected by Ocean Researcher I cruise ORI-934 in 2010 near the submarine mud volcano MV4 located at the upper slope of south-west Taiwan. The methanogenic substrates utilized by strain S3Fa(T) were formate and H2/CO2 but not acetate, secondary alcohols, methylamines, methanol or ethanol. Cells of strain S3Fa(T) were non-motile, irregular cocci, 0.5-1.0 μm in diameter. The surface-layer protein showed an Mr of 128,000.The optimum growth conditions were 37 °C, pH 7.1 and 0.17 M NaCl. The DNA G+C content of the genome of strain S3Fa(T) was 62.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain S3Fa(T) was most closely related to Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1(T) (99.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Genome relatedness between strain S3Fa(T) and Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1(T) was computed using both genome-to-genome distance analysis (GGDA) and average nucleotide identity (ANI) with values of 46.3-55.5% and 93.08%, respectively. Based on morphological, phenotypic, phylogenetic and genomic relatedness data, it is evident that strain S3Fa(T) represents a novel species of the genus Methanoculleus, for which the name Methanoculleus sediminis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is S3Fa(T) ( = BCRC AR10044(T) = DSM 29354(T)).

  12. The Bellarmine Outreach Consortium: An Innovative Approach to Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algren, Chris L.; Hockenberger, Susan

    The Bellarmine Outreach Consortium, which provides access to baccalaureate and masters education in nursing for registered nurses in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Tennessee, is described. The components of a marketing process for colleges are also considered, with attention to product, place, price, and promotion. The nursing department of…

  13. Teach Louisiana Consortium: A Fifth Year Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Broussard, Michelle; Stringer, Angelle

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a fifth year program evaluation of a private provider program for teacher certification in Louisiana. The study sought to evaluate the success of the Teach Louisiana Consortium program in terms of teacher placement, teacher retention, administrative satisfaction, teacher attitudes, and teacher pedagogical knowledge. Initial…

  14. It Takes a Consortium to Support Open Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Judy

    2009-01-01

    If the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER) has its way, expensive textbooks may go the way of typewriters and carbon paper. Ideally, Internet access for all students would allow educators to replace commercially printed textbooks with interactive digital textbooks and personal learning environments. However, until…

  15. Preface of the Proceedings of the Doctoral Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinciarelli, A.; Pelachaud, C.; Cowie, R.; Nijholt, A.

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects the contributions presented at the ACII 2009 Doctoral Consortium, the event aimed at gathering PhD students with the goal of sharing ideas about the theories behind affective computing; its development; and its application. Published papers have been selected out a large number

  16. The Worker Rights Consortium Makes Strides toward Legitimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Werf, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the rapid growth of the Workers Rights Consortium, a student-originated group with 44 member institutions which opposes sweatshop labor conditions especially in the apparel industry. Notes disagreements about the number of administrators on the board of directors and about the role of industry representives. Compares this group with the…

  17. The mammalian gene function resource: The International Knockout Mouse Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bradley (Allan); K. Anastassiadis (Konstantinos); A. Ayadi (Abdelkader); J.F. Battey (James); C. Bell (Cindy); M.-C. Birling (Marie-Christine); J. Bottomley (Joanna); S.D.M. Brown (Steve); F. Bürger (Friederike); C.J. Bult (Carol); W. Bushell (Wendy); F.S. Collins (Francis); C. Desaintes (Christian); B. Doe (Brendan); E. Aris (Economides); J.T. Eppig (Janan); R.H. Finnell (Richard); C. Fletcher (Colin); M. Fray (Martin); D. Frendewey (David); R.H. Friedel (Roland); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J. Hansen; Y. Hérault (Yann); G. Hicks (Geoffrey); A. Hörlein (Andreas); C. Houghton (Catherine); M. Hrabé De Angelis (Martin); D. Huylebroeck (Danny); V. Iyer (Vivek); P.J. de Jong (Pieter); J.A. Kadin (James); C. Kaloff (Cornelia); K. Kennedy (Karen); M. Koutsourakis (Manousos); K.C. Kent Lloyd (K.); S. Marschall (Susan); J. Mason (Jeremy); C. McKerlie (Colin); M.P. McLeod (Michael); H. von Melchner (Harald); M. Moore (Matt); A.O. Mujica (Alejandro); A. Nagy (Andras); M. Nefedov (Mikhail); L.M. Nutter (Lauryl); G. Pavlovic (Guillaume); J.L. Peterson (Jane); I. Pollock; R. Ramirez-Solis (Ramiro); D.E. Rancourt (Derrick); M. Raspa (Marcello); J.E. Remacle (Jacques); M. Ringwald (Martin); B. Rosen (Barry); N. Rosenthal (Nadia); J. Rossant (Janet); P. Ruiz Noppinger (Patricia); S. Ryder; J.Z. Schick (Joel Zupicich); F. Schnütgen (Frank); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); C. Seisenberger (Claudia); M. Selloum (Mohammed); E.M. Simpson (Elizabeth); W.C. Skarnes (William); D. Smedley (Damian); W.L. Stanford (William); A. Francis Stewart (A.); K. Stone (Kevin); K. Swan (Kate); H. Tadepally (Hamsa); J.L. Teboul (Jean Louis); G.P. Tocchini-Valentini (Glauco); D. Valenzuela (David); A.P. West (Anthony); K.-I. Yamamura (Ken-Ichi); Y. Yoshinaga (Yuko); M. Wurst (Martin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn 2007, the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) made the ambitious promise to generate mutations in virtually every protein-coding gene of the mouse genome in a concerted worldwide action. Now, 5 years later, the IKMC members have developed highthroughput gene trapping and, i

  18. Computerized comprehensive data analysis of Lung Imaging Database Consortium (LIDC)

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Jun; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xingwei; Leader, Joseph K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) is the largest public CT image database of lung nodules. In this study, the authors present a comprehensive and the most updated analysis of this dynamically growing database under the help of a computerized tool, aiming to assist researchers to optimally use this database for lung cancer related investigations.

  19. Consortium analysis of 7 candidate SNPs for ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, S.J.; Vierkant, R.A.; Johnatty, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium selected 7 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), for which there is evidence from previous studies of an association with variation in ovarian cancer or breast cancer risks. The SNPs selected for analysis were F31I (rs2273535) in AURKA, N372H...

  20. NASA Consortium awards funding to Virginia Tech's geospatial program

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2004-01-01

    NASA has selected a partnership between the Virginia Space Grant Consortium (VSGC) and Virginia Tech to receive a $100,000 grant for geospatial education and work force development. The grant, awarded through the NASA Space Grant College and Fellowship program, allows the partners to continue the already successful Virginia Geospatial Extension Program that was established in July 2003.

  1. On the Consortium for Business Object Promotion (CBOP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the goals and visions of a consortium inJapan, named Cons ortium for Business Object Promotion (CBOP), discussing its background, activiti es, and basic technical approaches to share and exchanging various types of Busi ness Objects. Especially, Object Pattern Technologies used in CBOP should be di scussed.

  2. The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy Technology (CARET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, E. M.; Henderson, D. O.; Buffinger, D. R.; Fuller, C. W.; Uribe, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy (CARET) is a research and education program which uses the theme of renewable energy to build a minority scientist pipeline. CARET is also a consortium of four universities and NASA Lewis Research Center working together to promote science education and research to minority students using the theme of renewable energy. The consortium membership includes the HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), Fisk, Wilberforce and Central State Universities as well as Kent State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. The various stages of this pipeline provide participating students experiences with a different emphasis. Some emphasize building enthusiasm for the classroom study of science and technology while others emphasize the nature of research in these disciplines. Still others focus on relating a practical application to science and technology. And, of great importance to the success of the program are the interfaces between the various stages. Successfully managing these transitions is a requirement for producing trained scientists, engineers and technologists. Presentations describing the CARET program have been given at this year's HBCU Research Conference at the Ohio Aerospace Institute and as a seminar in the Solar Circle Seminar series of the Photovoltaic and Space Environments Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. In this report, we will describe the many positive achievements toward the fulfillment of the goals and outcomes of our program. We will begin with a description of the interactions among the consortium members and end with a description of the activities of each of the member institutions .

  3. Genomic standards consortium workshop: metagenomics, metadata and metaanalysis (M3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterk, Peter; Hirschman, Lynette; Field, Dawn; Wooley, John

    2010-01-01

    The M3 workshop has, as its primary focus, the rapidly growing area of metagenomics, including the metadata standards and the meta-analysis approaches needed to organize, process and interpret metagenomics data. The PSB Workshop builds on the first M3 meeting, a Special Interest Group (SIG) meeting at ISMB 2009, organized by the Genomics Standards Consortium.

  4. Academic Library Consortium in Jordan: An Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mustafa H.; Suleiman, Raid Jameel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the current financial and managerial difficulties that are encountered by libraries in public universities in Jordan and the geographical diffusion of these academic institutions, the idea of establishing a consortium was proposed by the Council of Higher Education to combine these libraries. This article reviews the reality of…

  5. The mammalian gene function resource: The International Knockout Mouse Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bradley (Allan); K. Anastassiadis (Konstantinos); A. Ayadi (Abdelkader); J.F. Battey (James); C. Bell (Cindy); M.-C. Birling (Marie-Christine); J. Bottomley (Joanna); S.D.M. Brown (Steve); F. Bürger (Friederike); C.J. Bult (Carol); W. Bushell (Wendy); F.S. Collins (Francis); C. Desaintes (Christian); B. Doe (Brendan); E. Aris (Economides); J.T. Eppig (Janan); R.H. Finnell (Richard); C. Fletcher (Colin); M. Fray (Martin); D. Frendewey (David); R.H. Friedel (Roland); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J. Hansen; Y. Hérault (Yann); G. Hicks (Geoffrey); A. Hörlein (Andreas); C. Houghton (Catherine); M. Hrabé De Angelis (Martin); D. Huylebroeck (Danny); V. Iyer (Vivek); P.J. de Jong (Pieter); J.A. Kadin (James); C. Kaloff (Cornelia); K. Kennedy (Karen); M. Koutsourakis (Manousos); K.C. Kent Lloyd (K.); S. Marschall (Susan); J. Mason (Jeremy); C. McKerlie (Colin); M.P. McLeod (Michael); H. von Melchner (Harald); M. Moore (Matt); A.O. Mujica (Alejandro); A. Nagy (Andras); M. Nefedov (Mikhail); L.M. Nutter (Lauryl); G. Pavlovic (Guillaume); J.L. Peterson (Jane); I. Pollock; R. Ramirez-Solis (Ramiro); D.E. Rancourt (Derrick); M. Raspa (Marcello); J.E. Remacle (Jacques); M. Ringwald (Martin); B. Rosen (Barry); N. Rosenthal (Nadia); J. Rossant (Janet); P. Ruiz Noppinger (Patricia); S. Ryder; J.Z. Schick (Joel Zupicich); F. Schnütgen (Frank); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); C. Seisenberger (Claudia); M. Selloum (Mohammed); E.M. Simpson (Elizabeth); W.C. Skarnes (William); D. Smedley (Damian); W.L. Stanford (William); A. Francis Stewart (A.); K. Stone (Kevin); K. Swan (Kate); H. Tadepally (Hamsa); J.L. Teboul (Jean Louis); G.P. Tocchini-Valentini (Glauco); D. Valenzuela (David); A.P. West (Anthony); K.-I. Yamamura (Ken-Ichi); Y. Yoshinaga (Yuko); M. Wurst (Martin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn 2007, the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) made the ambitious promise to generate mutations in virtually every protein-coding gene of the mouse genome in a concerted worldwide action. Now, 5 years later, the IKMC members have developed highthroughput gene trapping and,

  6. 77 FR 43237 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Work Plan Review Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Genome in a Bottle Consortium--Work Plan Review Workshop.... SUMMARY: NIST announces the Genome in a Bottle Consortium meeting to be held on Thursday and Friday, August 16 and 17, 2012. The Genome in a Bottle Consortium is planning to develop the reference...

  7. 78 FR 47674 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Progress and Planning Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Genome in a Bottle Consortium--Progress and Planning... workshop. SUMMARY: NIST announces the Genome in a Bottle Consortium meeting to be held on Thursday and Friday, August 15 and 16, 2013. The Genome in a Bottle Consortium is developing the reference...

  8. 25 CFR 1000.23 - How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool... Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.23 How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool? To be considered for admission in the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must submit an application to the...

  9. The University of Utah Clinical Genetics Research Program as an NF1 Consortium Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    chair of the Biology Committee, and he organized a symposium of investigators and clinicians who were part of a MPNST (malignant peripheral nerve sheath...tumor) Consortium and the MPNST Committee of the NF1 Consortium that convened as a satellite meeting of the full NF1 Consortium meeting in Atlanta

  10. 76 FR 38666 - Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium/Dauphin Island...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... Nutrition (CFSAN) and the Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium/Dauphin Island Sea Lab (DISL). The goal... Marine Environmental Science Consortium-Dauphin Island Sea Lab (DISL) will greatly contribute to FDA's... Objectives FDA Gulf Coast Seafood Laboratory (GCSL) and the Marine Environmental Science Consortium of the...

  11. 77 FR 38770 - Notice of Consortium on “nSoft Consortium”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Notice of Consortium on ``nSoft Consortium'' AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: On June 3, 2011, the... feasibility of establishing a NIST/Industry Consortium on Neutron Metrology for Soft Materials...

  12. Iron sulfide attenuates the methanogenic toxicity of elemental copper and zinc oxide nanoparticles and their soluble metal ion analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    Elemental copper (Cu(0)) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25-75μm) and coarse (500 to 1200μm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu(0) and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu(0) NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excess of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens.

  13. Comparison of methanogen diversity of yak (Bos grunniens and cattle (Bos taurus from the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xiao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methane emissions by methanogen from livestock ruminants have significantly contributed to the agricultural greenhouse gas effect. It is worthwhile to compare methanogen from “energy-saving” animal (yak and normal animal (cattle in order to investigate the link between methanogen structure and low methane production. Results Diversity of methanogens from the yak and cattle rumen was investigated by analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences from rumen digesta samples from four yaks (209 clones and four cattle (205 clones from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau area (QTP. Overall, a total of 414 clones (i.e. sequences were examined and assigned to 95 operational taxonomic units (OTUs using MOTHUR, based upon a 98% species-level identity criterion. Forty-six OTUs were unique to the yak clone library and 34 OTUs were unique to the cattle clone library, while 15 OTUs were found in both libraries. Of the 95 OTUs, 93 putative new species were identified. Sequences belonging to the Thermoplasmatales-affiliated Linage C (TALC were found to dominate in both libraries, accounting for 80.9% and 62.9% of the sequences from the yak and cattle clone libraries, respectively. Sequences belonging to the Methanobacteriales represented the second largest clade in both libraries. However, Methanobrevibacter wolinii (QTPC 110 was only found in the cattle library. The number of clones from the order Methanomicrobiales was greater in cattle than in the yak clone library. Although the Shannon index value indicated similar diversity between the two libraries, the Libshuff analysis indicated that the methanogen community structure of the yak was significantly different than those from cattle. Conclusion This study revealed for the first time the molecular diversity of methanogen community in yaks and cattle in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau area in China. From the analysis, we conclude that yaks have a unique rumen microbial ecosystem that is significantly different

  14. Methane emission and community composition patterns of rumen bacteria and methanogens in Holstein dairy cows as affected by silage type and dietary fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten; Højberg, Ole; Canibe, Nuria

    ) to investigate effects of silages with different methanogenic potential (early grass, late grass, and maize) combined with a CH4-reducing feed additive (crushed rapeseed) on bacterial and methanogenic communities in the rumen. Bacterial and methanogenic community patterns were evaluated by T-RFLP analysis of 16S...... rRNA and methyl co-enzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes, respectively. Methanogen abundances were evaluated by qPCR using two mcrA-targeting primer sets. Silage type significantly affected CH4 emissions and rumen acetate:propionate ratios, being highest for late grass and lowest for maize. Dietary fat...... significantly reduced the gross energy lost as CH4 regardless of silage type. Silage type significantly affected the bacterial community composition pattern; the grass silages favored potential hemicellulose- and cellulose-degrading bacteria, while the maize silage mainly favored potentially starch...

  15. Complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens JH146(T) isolated from the basalt subseafloor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, You-Tae; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Stewart, Lucy C; Kwon, Soon-Wo; Holden, James F; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2015-12-01

    Methanocaldococcus bathoardescens JH146(T) is a hyperthermophilic and obligate hydrogenotrophic methanogen isolated from low-temperature (26 °C) hydrothermal vent fluid at Axial Seamount in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. It is most closely related to the N2-fixing methanogen Methanocaldococcus sp. FS406-22; however, they differ in that JH146 cannot fix N2 or reductively assimilate nitrate. In this study, we present the complete genome sequence of strain JH146(T) (1,607,556 bp) with its 1635 protein coding genes, and 41 RNA genes. Our analysis focuses on its methane production via the acetyl-CoA pathway and its deleted gene clusters related to nitrogen assimilation. This study extends our understanding of methanogenesis at high temperatures and the impact of these organisms on the biogeochemistry of subseafloor hydrothermal environments and the deep sea.

  16. Methanol induces low temperature resilient methanogens and improves methane generation from domestic wastewater at low to moderate temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Shaswati; Badhe, Neha; De Vrieze, Jo; Biswas, Rima; Nandy, Tapas

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature (methanol is a preferred substrate by methanogens in cold habitats. The study hypothesizes that methanol can induce the growth of low-temperature resilient, methanol utilizing, hydrogenotrophs in UASB reactor. The hypothesis was tested in field conditions to evaluate the impact of seasonal temperature variations on methane yield in the presence and absence of methanol. Results show that 0.04% (v/v) methanol increased methane up to 15 times and its effect was more pronounced at lower temperatures. The qPCR analysis showed the presence of Methanobacteriales along with Methanosetaceae in large numbers. This indicates methanol induced the growth of both the hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic groups through direct and indirect routes, respectively. This study thus demonstrated that methanol can impart resistance in methanogenic biomass to low temperature and can improve performance of UASB reactor.

  17. Molecular Genetic Diversity and Quantitation of Methanogen in Ruminal Fluid of Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis Fed Ration (Wheat Straw and Concentrate Mixture Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High roughage diet causes more methane emissions; however, the total methanogen abundance is not influenced by roughage proportion. Technologies to reduce methane emissions are lacking, and development of inhibitors and vaccines that mitigate rumen-derived methane by targeting methanogens relies on present knowledge of the methanogens. In this work, we have investigated molecular diversity of rumen methanogens of Surti buffalo. DNA from rumen fluid was extracted, and 16S rRNA encoding genes were amplified using methanogen specific primer to generate 16S rDNA clone libraries. Seventy-six clones were randomly selected and analysed by RFLP resulting in 21 operational taxonomic units (OTUs. BLAST analysis with available sequences in database revealed sequences of 13 OTUs (55 clones showing similarity with Methanomicrobium sp, 3 OTUs (15 clones with Methanobrevibacter sp. The remaining 5 OTUs (6 clones belonged to uncultured archaea. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that methanogenic communities found in the library were clustered in the order of Methanomicrobiales (18 OTUs and Methanobacteriales (3 OTUs. The population of Methanomicrobiales, Methanobacteriales, and Methanococcales were also observed, accounting for 1.94%, 0.72%, and 0.47% of total archaea, respectively.

  18. Genome sequencing of methanogenic Archaea Methanosarcina mazei TUC01 strain isolated from an Amazonian Flooded Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraúna, R. A.; Graças, D. A.; Ramos, R. T.; Carneiro, A. R.; Lopes, T. S.; Lima, A. R.; Zahlouth, R. L.; Pellizari, V. H.; Silva, A.

    2013-05-01

    Methanosarcina mazei is a strictly anaerobic methanogen from the Methanosarcinales order. This species is known for its broad catabolic range among methanogens and is widespread throughout diverse environments. The draft genome of a strain cultivated from the sediment of the Tucuruí hydroelectric power station, the fourth largest hydroelectric dam in the world, is described here. Approximately 80% of methane is produced by biogenic sources, such as methanogenic archaea from M. mazei species. Although the methanogenesis pathway is well known, some aspects of the core genome, genome evolution and shared genes are still unclear. A sediment sample from the Tucuruí hydropower station reservoir was inoculated in mineral media supplemented with acetate and methanol. This media was maintained in an H2:CO2 (80:20) atmosphere to enrich and cultivate M. mazei. The enrichment was conducted at 30°C under standard anaerobic conditions. After several molecular and cellular analyses, total DNA was extracted from a non-pure culture of M. mazei, amplified using phi29 DNA polymerase (BioLabs) and finally used as a source template for genome sequencing. The draft genome was obtained after two rounds of sequencing. First, the genome was sequenced using a SOLiD System V3 with a mate-paired library, which yielded 24,405,103 and 24,399,268 reads (50 bp) for the R3 and F3 tags, respectively. The second round of sequencing was performed using the SOLiD 5500 XL platform with a mate-paired library, resulting in a total of 113,588,848 reads (60 bp) for each tag (F3 and R3). All reads obtained by this procedure were filtered using Quality Assessment software, whereby reads with an average quality score below Phred 20 were removed. Velvet and Edena were used to assemble the reads, and Simplifier was used to remove the redundant sequences. After this, a total of 16,811 contigs were obtained. M. mazei GO1 (AE008384) genome was used to map the contigs and generate the scaffolds. We used the

  19. The membraneless bioelectrochemical reactor stimulates hydrogen fermentation by inhibiting methanogenic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kengo; Morita, Masahiko; Sasaki, Daisuke; Ohmura, Naoya; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2013-08-01

    The membraneless bioelectrochemical reactor (Ml-BER) is useful for dark hydrogen fermentation. The effect of the electrochemical reaction on microorganisms in the Ml-BER was investigated using glucose as the substrate and compared with organisms in a membraneless non-bioelectrochemical reactor (Ml-NBER) and bioelectrochemical reactor (BER) with a proton exchange membrane. The potentials on the working electrode of the Ml-BER and BER with membrane were regulated to -0.9 V (versus Ag/AgCl) to avoid water electrolysis with a carbon electrode. The Ml-BER showed suppressed methane production (19.8 ± 9.1 mg-C·L(-1)·day(-1)) and increased hydrogen production (12.6 ± 3.1 mg-H·L(-1)·day(-1)) at pHout 6.2 ± 0.1, and the major intermediate was butyrate (24.9 ± 2.4 mM), suggesting efficient hydrogen fermentation. In contrast, the Ml-NBER showed high methane production (239.3 ± 17.9 mg-C·L(-1)·day(-1)) and low hydrogen production (0.2 ± 0.0 mg-H·L(-1)·day(-1)) at pHout 6.3 ± 0.1. In the cathodic chamber of the BER with membrane, methane production was high (276.3 ± 20.4 mg-C·L(-1)·day(-1)) (pHout, 7.2 ± 0.1). In the anodic chamber of the BER with membrane (anode-BER), gas production was low because of high lactate production (43.6 ± 1.7 mM) at pHout 5.0 ± 0.1. Methanogenic archaea were not detected in the Ml-BER and anode-BER. However, Methanosarcina sp. and Methanobacterium sp. were found in Ml-NBER. Prokaryotic copy numbers in the Ml-BER and Ml-NBER were similar, as were the bacterial community structures. Thus, the electrochemical reaction in the Ml-BER affected hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens, but not the bacterial community.

  20. A University Consortium on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assanis, Dennis; Atreya, Arvind; Bowman, Craig; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Cheng, Wai; Davidson, David; Dibble, Robert; Edwards, Chris; Filipi, Zoran; Golden, David; Green, William; Hanson, Ronald; Hedrick, J Karl; Heywood, John; Im, Hong; Lavoie, George; Sick, Volker; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2007-03-31

    Over the course of this four year project, the consortium team members from UM, MIT, Stanford, and Berkeley along with contributors from Sandia National Labs and LLNL, have produced a wide range of results on gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The work spanned a wide range of activities including engine experiments, fundamental chemical kinetics experiments, and an array of analytical modeling techniques and simulations. Throughout the project a collaborative approach has produced a many significant new insights into HCCI engines and their behavior while at the same time we achieved our key consortium goal: to develop workable strategies for gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The major accomplishments in each task are summarized, followed by detailed discussion.

  1. Warmer temperature accelerates methane emissions from the Zoige wetland on the Tibetan Plateau without changing methanogenic community composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mengmeng; Ma, Anzhou; Qi, Hongyan; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Zhao, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Zoige wetland, locating on the Tibet Plateau, accounts for 6.2% of organic carbon storage in China. However, the fate of the organic carbon storage in the Zoige wetland remains poorly understood despite the Tibetan Plateau is very sensitive to global climate change. As methane is an important greenhouse gas and methanogenesis is the terminal step in the decomposition of organic matter, understanding how methane emissions from the Zoige wetland is fundamental to elucidate the carbon cycle in alpine wetlands responding to global warming. In this study, microcosms were performed to investigate the effects of temperature and vegetation on methane emissions and microbial processes in the Zoige wetland soil. A positive correlation was observed between temperature and methane emissions. However, temperature had no effect on the main methanogenic pathway—acetotrophic methanogenesis. Moreover, methanogenic community composition was not related to temperature, but was associated with vegetation, which was also involved in methane emissions. Taken together, these results indicate temperature increases methane emissions in alpine wetlands, while vegetation contributes significantly to methanogenic community composition and is associated with methane emissions. These findings suggest that in alpine wetlands temperature and vegetation act together to affect methane emissions, which furthers a global warming feedback loop. PMID:26109512

  2. A Reactive-Transport Model Describing Methanogen Growth and Methane Production in Diffuse Flow Vents at Axial Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algar, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis is an important mode of metabolism in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Diffuse vent fluids often show a depletion in hydrogen with a corresponding increase in methane relative to pure-mixing of end member fluid and seawater, and genomic surveys show an enrichment in genetic sequences associated with known methanogens. However, because we cannot directly sample the subseafloor habitat where these organisms are living, constraining the size and activity of these populations remains a challenge and limits our ability to quantify the role they play in vent biogeochemistry. Reactive-transport modeling may provide a useful tool for approaching this problem. Here we present a reactive-transport model describing methane production along the flow-path of hydrothermal fluid from its high temperature end-member to diffuse venting at the seafloor. The model is set up to reflect conditions at several diffuse vents in the Axial Seamount. The model describes the growth of the two dominant thermophilic methanogens, Methanothermococcus and Methanocaldococcus, observed at Axial seamount. Monod and Arrhenius constants for Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus and Methanocaldococcus jannaschii were obtained for the model using chemostat and bottle experiments at varying temperatures. The model is used to investigate the influence of different mixing regimes on the subseafloor populations of these methanogens. By varying the model flow path length and subseafloor cell concentrations, and fitting to observed hydrogen and methane concentrations in the venting fluid, the subseafloor biomass, fluid residence time, and methane production rate can be constrained.

  3. Forensic fingerprinting of oil-spill hydrocarbons in a methanogenic environment-Mandan, ND and Bemidji, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostettler, F.D.; Wang, Y.; Huang, Y.; Cao, W.; Bekins, B.A.; Rostad, C.E.; Kulpa, C.F.; Laursen, A.

    2007-01-01

    In recent decades forensic fingerprinting of oil-spill hydrocarbons has emerged as an important tool for correlating oils and for evaluating their source and character. Two long-term hydrocarbon spills, an off-road diesel spill (Mandan, ND) and a crude oil spill (Bemidji, MN) experiencing methanogenic biodegradation were previously shown to be undergoing an unexpected progression of homologous n-alkane and n-alkylated cyclohexane loss. Both exhibited degradative losses proceeding from the high-molecular-weight end of the distributions, along with transitory concentration increases of lower-molecular-weight homologs. Particularly in the case of the diesel fuel spill, these methanogenic degradative patterns can result in series distributions that mimic lower cut refinery fuels or admixture with lower cut fuels. Forensic fingerprinting in this long-term spill must therefore rely on more recalcitrant series, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon or drimane sesquiterpane profiles, to prove if the spilled oil is single-sourced or whether there is verifiable admixture with other extraneous refinery fuels. Degradation processes impacting n-alkanes and n-alkylated ring compounds, which make these compounds unsuitable for fingerprinting, nevertheless are of interest in understanding methanogenic biodegradation. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  4. Identification of metabolically active methanogens in anaerobic digester by DNA Stable-Isotope Probing using 13C-acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gowdaman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is gaining enormous attention due to the ability to covert organic wastes into biogas, an alternative sustainable energy. Methanogenic community plays a significant role in biogas production and also for proficient functioning of the anaerobic digester. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the methanogen diversity of a food waste anaerobic digester. After endogenous respiration, the digester samples were supplemented with isotopes of acetate to enrich methanogen population, and were analyzed using DNA-SIP (Stable-Isotope Probing. Following separation and fractionation of heavy (13C and light (12C DNA, PCR amplification was carried out using archaeal 16S rRNA gene followed by DGGE analysis. Sequencing of the prominent DGGE bands revealed the dominance of Methanocorpusculum labreanum species belonging to hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales, which can produce methane in the presence of H2/CO2 and requires acetate for its growth. This is the first instance where Methanocorpusculum labreanum is being reported as a dominant species in an anaerobic digester operative on food waste.

  5. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium, Post Traumatic Hypopituitarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    10 Aug 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Mission Connect MTBI Translational Research Consortium 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Post traumatic hypopituitarism 5b...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to identify the incidence of post traumatic hypopituitarism ...June 21, 2010; however, none have reached the six month milestone for blood testing 15. SUBJECT TERMS post traumatic hypopituitarism 16. SECURITY

  6. FLYSUB-Consortium Tracking and RICH Performance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Azumoun, Bob [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blatnik, Marie [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pak, Robert [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Purschke, Martin [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Di Ruzza, Benedetto [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Woody, Craig [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bhopatkar, Vallary [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Hohlmann, Marcus [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Twigger, Jessie [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Zhang, Aiwu [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Dehmelt, Klaus [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Deshpande, Abhay [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Feege, Nils [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Hemmick, Thomas [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Bai, Xinzhang [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Gnanvo, Kondo [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Gu, Chao [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Liyanage, Nilanga [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Majka, Richard [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Smirnov, Nikolai [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-09-23

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experiments of FLYSUB-Consortium who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2013-2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The ultimate goal of this test-beam effort is to test and verify the performance of the individual components according to their expectation.

  7. p-Cresol mineralization by a nitrifying consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Luna, C. D.; Gomez, J.; Houbron, E.; Cuervo Lopez, F. M.; Texier, A. C.

    2009-07-01

    Nitrification and denitrification processes are considered economically feasible technologies for nitrogen removal from wastewater. Knowledge of the toxic or inhibitory effects of cresols on the nitrifying respiratory process is still insufficient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinetic behavior and oxidizing ability of a nitrifying consortium exposed to p-cresol in batch cultures. Biotransformation of p-cresol was investigated by identifying the different intermediates formed. (Author)

  8. Meeting Report from the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Workshop 9

    OpenAIRE

    Davidsen, Tanja; Madupu, Ramana; Sterk, Peter; Field, Dawn; Garrity, George; Gilbert, Jack; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Kolker, Eugene; Kottmann, Renzo; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Morrison, Norman; Schriml, Lynn; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 9th workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), held at the J. Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, MD, USA. It was the first GSC workshop to have open registration and attracted over 90 participants. This workshop featured sessions that provided overviews of the full range of ongoing GSC projects. It included sessions on Standards in Genomic Sciences, the open access journal of the GSC, building standards for genome annotation, the M5 platf...

  9. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry—The 2012 Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current...

  10. Model organisms for genetics in the domain Archaea: methanogens, halophiles, Thermococcales and Sulfolobales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, John A; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Atomi, Haruyuki; Allers, Thorsten

    2011-07-01

    The tree of life is split into three main branches: eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea. Our knowledge of eukaryotic and bacteria cell biology has been built on a foundation of studies in model organisms, using the complementary approaches of genetics and biochemistry. Archaea have led to some exciting discoveries in the field of biochemistry, but archaeal genetics has been slow to get off the ground, not least because these organisms inhabit some of the more inhospitable places on earth and are therefore believed to be difficult to culture. In fact, many species can be cultivated with relative ease and there has been tremendous progress in the development of genetic tools for both major archaeal phyla, the Euryarchaeota and the Crenarchaeota. There are several model organisms available for methanogens, halophiles, and thermophiles; in the latter group, there are genetic systems for Sulfolobales and Thermococcales. In this review, we present the advantages and disadvantages of working with each archaeal group, give an overview of their different genetic systems, and direct the neophyte archaeologist to the most appropriate model organism.

  11. Methanoculleus spp. as a biomarker of methanogenic activity in swine manure storage tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maialen; Gagnon, Nathalie; Morissette, Bruno; Topp, Edward; Kalmokoff, Martin; Brooks, Stephen P J; Matias, Fernando; Massé, Daniel I; Masse, Lucie; Talbot, Guylaine

    2012-05-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions represent a major problem associated with manure management in the livestock industry. A prerequisite to mitigate methane emissions occurring during manure storage is a clearer understanding of how the microbial consortia involved in methanogenesis function. Here, we have examined manure stored in outdoor tanks from two different farms, at different locations and depths. Physico-chemical and microbiological characterization of these samples indicated differences between each tank, as well as differences within each tank dependent on the depth of sampling. The dynamics of both the bacterial and archaeal communities within these samples were monitored over a 150-day period of anaerobic incubation to identify and track emerging microorganisms, which may be temporally important in the methanogenesis process. Analyses based on DNA fingerprinting of microbial communities identified trends common among all samples as well as trends specific to certain samples. All archaeal communities became enriched with Methanoculleus spp. over time, indicating that the hydrogenotrophic pathway of methanogenesis predominated. Although the emerging species differed in samples obtained from shallow depths compared to deep samples, the temporal enrichment of Methanoculleus suggests that this genus may represent a relevant indicator of methanogenic activity in swine manure storage tanks.

  12. APPLICATION OF RESPIROMETRIC TESTS FOR ASSESSMENT OF METHANOGENIC BACTERIA ACTIVITY IN WASTEWATER SLUDGE PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Cimochowicz-Rybicka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Production of a methane-rich gas (‘biogas’ is contemporary popular sludges processing technology which allows to generate thermal and/or electric energy. Formal requirements issued by the European Union to promote so called renewable energy resources made these process more attractive leading to its application in WWTPs which were designed based on different sludge handling processes. Authors (as active design engineers noted that dimensioning sludge digestion chamber is usually based on SRT assessment without any emphasis on sludge characteristics. Bio-mass characteristics and the estimation of its activity with respect to methane production are of great importance, from both scientific and practical points of view, as anaerobic digestion appears to be one of crucial processes in municipal wastewater handling and disposal. The authors propose respirometric tests to estimate a biomass potential to produce ‘a biogas’ and several years’ laboratory and full scale experience proved its usefulness and reliability both as a measurement and a design tool applicable in sludge handling. Dimensioning method proposed by authors, allows to construct and optimize operation of digestion chambers based on a methanogenic activity.

  13. The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Siegert, Michael

    2014-01-01

    High current densities in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) result from the predominance of various Geobacter species on the anode, but it is not known if archaeal communities similarly converge to one specific genus. MECs were examined here on the basis of maximum methane production and current density relative to the inoculum community structure. We used anaerobic digester (AD) sludge dominated by acetoclastic Methanosaeta, and an anaerobic bog sediment where hydrogenotrophic methanogens were detected. Inoculation using solids to medium ratio of 25% (w/v) resulted in the highest methane production rates (0.27 mL mL(-1) cm(-2), gas volume normalized by liquid volume and cathode projected area) and highest peak current densities (0.5 mA cm(-2)) for the bog sample. Methane production was independent of solid to medium ratio when AD sludge was used as the inoculum. 16S rRNA gene community analysis using pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR confirmed the convergence of Archaea to Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter, and of Bacteria to Geobacter, despite their absence in AD sludge. Combined with other studies, these findings suggest that Archaea of the hydrogenotrophic genera Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter are the most important microorganisms for methane production in MECs and that their presence in the inoculum improves the performance.

  14. Enhancement of anaerobic methanogenesis at a short hydraulic retention time via bioelectrochemical enrichment of hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Yaobin; Liu, Yiwen; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Zisheng; Liu, Sitong; Zhao, Huimin; Quan, Xie

    2016-10-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an important energy strategy for converting organic waste to CH4. A major factor limiting the practical applicability of AD is the relatively long hydraulic retention time (HRT) which declines the treatment efficiency of digesters. A coupling process of anaerobic digestion and 'electromethanogenesis' was proposed to enhance anaerobic digestion at a short HRT in this study. Microorganisms analysis indicated that the electric-biological reactor enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogens in both cathodic biofilm and suspended sludge, helping achieve the high organic removal (71.0% vs 42.3% [control reactor]) and CH4 production (248.5mL/h vs 51.3mL/h), while the additional electric input was only accounted for 25.6% of the energy income from the increased CH4 production. This study demonstrated that a bioelectrochemical enhanced anaerobic reactor could improve the CH4 production and organic removal at a short HRT, providing an economically feasible scheme to treat wastewater.

  15. Methanogenic biodegradation of creosote contaminants in natural and simulated ground-water ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsy, E. Michael; Goerlitz, Donald; Grbic-Galic, Dunja

    1992-01-01

    Wastes from a wood preserving plant in Pensacola, Florida have contaminated the near-surface sand-and-gravel aquifer with creosote-derived compounds and pentachlorophenol. Contamination resulted from the discharge of plant waste waters to and subsequent seepage from unlined surface impoundments that were in direct hydraulic contact with the ground water. Two distinct phases resulted when the creosote and water mixed: a denser than water hydrocarbon phase that moved vertically downward, and an organic-rich aqueous phase that moved laterally with the ground-water flow. The aqueous phase is enriched in organic acids, phenolic compounds, single- and double-ring nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen containing compounds, and single- and double-ring aromatic hydrocarbons. The ground water is devoid of dissolved O2, is 60-70% saturated with CH4 and contains H2S. Field analyses document a greater decrease in concentration of organic fatty acids, benzoic acid, phenol, 2-, 3-, 4-methylphenol, quinoline, isoquinoline, 1(2H)-quinolinone, and 2(1H)-isoquinolinone during downgradient movement in the aquifer than could be explained by dilution and/or dispersion. Laboratory microcosm studies have shown that within the study region, this effect can be attributed to microbial degradation to CH4 and CO2. A small but active methanogenic population was found on sediment materials taken from highly contaminated parts of the aquifer.

  16. THE EFFECT OF METHANOGENIC INHIBITOR FEED ON PROPIONIC ACID AND LAMB MEAT CHEMICAL QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Suryanto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effect of medium chain fatty acids (MCFA on propionic acids and lamb meat chemical quality. The treatment given was R1: feed without medium chain fatty acids (MCFA, while R2 dan R3 were the feed contained 1.0% and 1.5% of MCFA, respectively. The twelve heads of lambs yearling weight of 16-17 kg were used as materials. Biological trial was done for three months and then was slaughtered. Before being slaughtered, the animal was taken rumen fluid to be analyzed for propionic acid. The carcass was sampled to be analyzed for chemical composition, cholesterol and fatty acids content. This study showed that methanogenic inhibitor feed with 1.0-1.5% MCFA could be used as sheep feed, and the results: the propionic acid content in rumen increased 29.59 – 36.11%. The cholesterol content decreased 7.14-10.06%. For the meat fatty acids composition, unsaturated fatty acids increased 9.05 – 17.96%. while saturated fatty acid decreased 6.59 – 11.88%.

  17. Anaerobic degradation of benzaldehyde in methanogenic granular sludge: the influence of additional substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todini, O. (Environment Protection Dept., Eniricerche S.p.A., Rome (Italy)); Pol, L.H. (Wageningen Agricultural Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Environmental Technology)

    1992-12-01

    The degradation of benzaldehyde in methaogenic granular sludge was investigated in batch and in upflow anaerobic sludge blanked (UASB) reactors. The effect due to the presence of co-substrates, such as H[sub 2], sodium butyrate and sucrose, was studied using formaldehyde as a reference compound. The additional substrates enhanced the activity of benzaldehyde- and formaldehyde-degrading microorganisms (ACT[sub bdm] and ACT[sub fdm], respectively) and increased the transient production of benzyl alcohol and methanol. As a consequence, the concentrations of benzaldehyde and formaldehyde that caused 50% inhibition of the methanogenic activity (50% IC[sub m]) on sucrose were 3133 and 254 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/1 respectively, three times higher than the literature data values on acetate. Experiments performed in UASB reactors on benzaldehyde showed that the replacement of volatile fatty acids with sucrose as co-substrate improved the treatment capacity of the system from 0.73 to 4.36 kg COD benzaldehyde.m[sup -3].day[sup -1]. (orig.).

  18. Methanobacterium subterraneum sp. nov., a new alkaliphilic, eurythermic and halotolerant methanogen isolated from deep granitic groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelnikova, S; Macario, A J; Pedersen, K

    1998-04-01

    Deep subterranean granitic aquifers have not been explored regarding methanogens until now. Three autotrophic methane-producing Archaea were isolated from deep granitic groundwater at depths of 68, 409 and 420 m. These organisms were non-motile, small, thin rods, 0.1-0.15 micron in diameter, and they could use hydrogen and carbon dioxide or formate as substrates for growth and methanogenesis. One of the isolates, denoted A8p, was studied in detail. It grew with a doubling time of 2.5 h under optimal conditions (20-40 degrees C, pH 7.8-8.8 and 0.2-1.2 M NaCl). Strain A8p is eurythermic as it grew between 3.6 and 45 degrees C. It was resistant to up to 20 mg bacitracin l-1. The G + C content was 54.5 mol%, as determined by thermal denaturation. Phylogenetic studies based upon 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons placed the isolate A8p in the genus Methanobacterium. Phenotypic and phylogenetic characters indicate that the alkaliphilic, halotolerant strain A8p represents a new species. We propose the name Methanobacterium subterraneum for this species, and strain A8p (= DSM 11074T) is the type strain.

  19. Micro-scale H2-CO2 Dynamics in a Hydrogenotrophic Methanogenic Membrane Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Ottosen, Lars D M; Voigt, Niels V; Kofoed, M W; Revsbech, Niels P

    2016-01-01

    Biogas production is a key factor in a sustainable energy supply. It is possible to get biogas with very high methane content if the biogas reactors are supplied with exogenous hydrogen, and one of the technologies for supplying hydrogen is through gas permeable membranes. In this study the activity and stratification of hydrogen consumption above such a membrane was investigated by use of microsensors for hydrogen and pH. A hydrogenotrophic methanogenic community that was able to consume the hydrogen flux within 0.5 mm of the membrane with specific rates of up to 30 m(3) H2 m(-3) day(-1) developed within 3 days in fresh manure and was already established at time zero when analyzing slurry from a biogas plant. The hydrogen consumption was dependent on a simultaneous carbon dioxide supply and was inhibited when carbon dioxide depletion elevated the pH to 9.2. The activity was only partially restored when the carbon dioxide supply was resumed. Bioreactors supplied with hydrogen gas should thus be carefully monitored and either have the hydrogen supply disrupted or be supplemented with carbon dioxide when the pH rises to values about 9.

  20. Micro-scale H2–CO2 Dynamics in a Hydrogenotrophic Methanogenic Membrane Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Ottosen, Lars D. M.; Voigt, Niels V.; Kofoed, M. W.; Revsbech, Niels P.

    2016-01-01

    Biogas production is a key factor in a sustainable energy supply. It is possible to get biogas with very high methane content if the biogas reactors are supplied with exogenous hydrogen, and one of the technologies for supplying hydrogen is through gas permeable membranes. In this study the activity and stratification of hydrogen consumption above such a membrane was investigated by use of microsensors for hydrogen and pH. A hydrogenotrophic methanogenic community that was able to consume the hydrogen flux within 0.5 mm of the membrane with specific rates of up to 30 m3 H2 m-3 day-1 developed within 3 days in fresh manure and was already established at time zero when analyzing slurry from a biogas plant. The hydrogen consumption was dependent on a simultaneous carbon dioxide supply and was inhibited when carbon dioxide depletion elevated the pH to 9.2. The activity was only partially restored when the carbon dioxide supply was resumed. Bioreactors supplied with hydrogen gas should thus be carefully monitored and either have the hydrogen supply disrupted or be supplemented with carbon dioxide when the pH rises to values about 9. PMID:27582736

  1. Squalenes, phytanes and other isoprenoids as major neutral lipids of methanogenic and thermoacidophilic archaebacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornabene, T.G. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins); Langworthy, T.A.; Holzer, G.; Oro, J.

    1979-01-01

    The neutral lipids of nine species of methanogenic bacteria including five methanobacilli, two methanococci, a methanospirillum, one methanosarcina as well as two thermoacidophilic bacteria, Thermoplasma and Sulfolobus, were analyzed. The major components were C/sub 30/, C/sub 25/ and/or C/sub 20/ acyclic isoprenoid hydrocarbons with a continuous range of hydroisoprenoid homologues. The range of acyclic isoprenoids detected were from C/sub 14/ to C/sub 30/. Apart from Methanosarcina barkeri, squalene and/or hydrosqualene derivatives were the predominant components in all species studied. The components of Methanosarcina barkeri were a family of C/sub 25/ homologues. The distribution of the neutral lipid components and their specific variations in relative intensities emphasized the differences between the test organisms while the generic nature of the isoprenoid hydrocarbons demonstrated similarities between the diverse bacteria. The neutral lipid compositions from these bacteria, many of which exist in environmental conditions like those described for the various evolutionary stages of the archean ecology, resemble the isoprenoid distribution isolated from ancient sediments and petroleum. Therefore, these findings may have major implications to biological and biogeochemical evolution.

  2. Methanosarcina subterranea sp. nov., a methanogenic archaeon isolated from a deep subsurface diatomaceous shale formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Satoru; Ueno, Akio; Naganuma, Takeshi; Kaneko, Katsuhiko

    2015-04-01

    A methanogenic archaeon, strain HC-2(T), was isolated from a deep diatomaceous shale formation. The strain grew on methanol, monomethylamine, dimethylamine, trimethylamine and dimethylsulphide, but not on acetate, H2/CO2, formate, 2-propanol, 2-butanol or cyclopentanol. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, and coccus-like, 0.9-1.4 µm in diameter, and occurred singly, in pairs, or as aggregates. The strain grew at 10-40 °C (optimum 35 °C), pH 5.9-7.4 (optimum pH 6.6-6.8) and in 0-0.6 M NaCl (optimum 0.1-0.2 M). The genomic DNA G+C content was 41.5 mol% and the 16S rRNA gene sequence was closely related to those of Methanosarcina lacustris DSM 13486(T) (99.1%) and Methanosarcina siciliae DSM 3028(T) (98.3%). Values for DNA-DNA hybridization with these strains were less than 30%. The phenotypic and phylogenetic features of HC-2(T) indicate that it represents a novel species of the genus Methanosarcina , for which the name Methanosarcina subterranea sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HC-2(T) ( = DSM 22503(T) = JCM 15540(T) = NBRC 102578(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  3. Quantitative proteomics of nutrient limitation in the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrickson Erik L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methanogenic Archaea play key metabolic roles in anaerobic ecosystems, where they use H2 and other substrates to produce methane. Methanococcus maripaludis is a model for studies of the global response to nutrient limitations. Results We used high-coverage quantitative proteomics to determine the response of M. maripaludis to growth-limiting levels of H2, nitrogen, and phosphate. Six to ten percent of the proteome changed significantly with each nutrient limitation. H2 limitation increased the abundance of a wide variety of proteins involved in methanogenesis. However, one protein involved in methanogenesis decreased: a low-affinity [Fe] hydrogenase, which may dominate over a higher-affinity mechanism when H2 is abundant. Nitrogen limitation increased known nitrogen assimilation proteins. In addition, the increased abundance of molybdate transport proteins suggested they function for nitrogen fixation. An apparent regulon governed by the euryarchaeal nitrogen regulator NrpR is discussed. Phosphate limitation increased the abundance of three different sets of proteins, suggesting that all three function in phosphate transport. Conclusion The global proteomic response of M. maripaludis to each nutrient limitation suggests a wider response than previously appreciated. The results give new insight into the function of several proteins, as well as providing information that should contribute to the formulation of a regulatory network model.

  4. Isotope fractionation during the anaerobic consumption of acetate by methanogenic and sulfate-reducing microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gövert, D.; Conrad, R.

    2009-04-01

    During the anaerobic degradation of organic matter in anoxic sediments and soils acetate is the most important substrate for the final step in production of CO2 and/or CH4. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methane-producing archaea both compete for the available acetate. Knowledge about the fractionation of 13C/12C of acetate carbon by these microbial groups is still limited. Therefore, we determined carbon isotope fractionation in different cultures of acetate-utilizing SRB (Desulfobacter postgatei, D. hydrogenophilus, Desulfobacca acetoxidans) and methanogens (Methanosarcina barkeri, M. acetivorans). Including literature values (e.g., Methanosaeta concilii), isotopic enrichment factors (epsilon) ranged between -35 and +2 permil, possibly involving equilibrium isotope effects besides kinetic isotope effects. The values of epsilon were dependent on the acetate-catabolic pathway of the particular microorganism, the methyl or carboxyl position of acetate, and the relative availability or limitation of the substrate acetate. Patterns of isotope fractionation in anoxic lake sediments and rice field soil seem to reflect the characteristics of the microorganisms actively involved in acetate catabolism. Hence, it might be possible using environmental isotopic information to determine the type of microbial metabolism converting acetate to CO2 and/or CH4.

  5. Temperature impacts differentially on the methanogenic food web of cellulose-supplemented peatland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Oliver; Horn, Marcus A; Kolb, Steffen; Drake, Harold L

    2015-03-01

    The impact of temperature on the largely unresolved intermediary ecosystem metabolism and associated unknown microbiota that link cellulose degradation and methane production in soils of a moderately acidic (pH 4.5) fen was investigated. Supplemental [(13) C]cellulose stimulated the accumulation of propionate, acetate and carbon dioxide as well as initial methane production in anoxic peat soil slurries at 15°C and 5°C. Accumulation of organic acids at 15°C was twice as fast as that at 5°C. 16S rRNA [(13) C]cellulose stable isotope probing identified novel unclassified Bacteria (79% identity to the next cultured relative Fibrobacter succinogenes), unclassified Bacteroidetes (89% identity to Prolixibacter bellariivorans), Porphyromonadaceae, Acidobacteriaceae and Ruminococcaceae as main anaerobic degraders of cellulose-derived carbon at both 15°C and 5°C. Holophagaceae and Spirochaetaceae were more abundant at 15°C. Clostridiaceae dominated the degradation of cellulose-derived carbon only at 5°C. Methanosarcina was the dominant methanogenic taxa at both 15°C and 5°C. Relative abundance of Methanocella increased at 15°C whereas that of Methanoregula and Methanosaeta increased at 5°C. Thaumarchaeota closely related to Nitrosotalea (presently not known to grow anaerobically) were abundant at 5°C but absent at 15°C indicating that Nitrosotalea sp. might be capable of anaerobic growth at low temperatures in peat.

  6. Factor 390 chromophores: phosphodiester between AMP or GMP and methanogen factor 420.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausinger, R P; Orme-Johnson, W H; Walsh, C

    1985-03-26

    Two chromophores with absorbance maxima at 390 nm (factors 390) have been isolated from oxidized cells of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum delta H. The isolation procedure included anion-exchange chromatography of the soluble cofactor pool followed by reverse-phase chromatography. The factor 390 species are novel derivatives of methanogen coenzyme factor 420 in which the 5-deazaflavin 8-hydroxy group is in a phosphodiester linkage to adenosine 5'-phosphate or guanosine 5'-phosphate. The structural assignments were based, in part, on the UV-visible and 1H NMR spectra. In addition, the results from amino acid analysis, phosphate determination, 31P NMR spectroscopy, and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry were consistent with the proposed structures. Confirmation of the factor 390 structures was made following phosphodiesterase release of the nucleotide monophosphates from factor 420. The nucleotide monophosphates were identified as AMP and GMP by UV-visible spectra and based on elution position by using reverse-phase and anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. The presence of AMP was further demonstrated by using adenylate-5'-phosphate kinase which induced a spectral shift during conversion of the sample to IMP. In addition, the presence of GMP was established by a specific enzymatic assay.

  7. Methanogenic biodegradation of paraffinic solvent hydrocarbons in two different oil sands tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Shahimin, Mohd Faidz; Siddique, Tariq

    2017-04-01

    Microbial communities drive many biogeochemical processes in oil sands tailings and cause greenhouse gas emissions from tailings ponds. Paraffinic solvent (primarily C5-C6; n- and iso-alkanes) is used by some oil sands companies to aid bitumen extraction from oil sands ores. Residues of unrecovered solvent escape to tailings ponds during tailings deposition and sustain microbial metabolism. To investigate biodegradation of hydrocarbons in paraffinic solvent, mature fine tailings (MFT) collected from Albian and CNRL ponds were amended with paraffinic solvent at ~0.1wt% (final concentration: ~1000mgL(-1)) and incubated under methanogenic conditions for ~1600d. Albian and CNRL MFTs exhibited ~400 and ~800d lag phases, respectively after which n-alkanes (n-pentane and n-hexane) in the solvent were preferentially metabolized to methane over iso-alkanes in both MFTs. Among iso-alkanes, only 2-methylpentane was completely biodegraded whereas 2-methylbutane and 3-methylpentane were partially biodegraded probably through cometabolism. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing showed dominance of Anaerolineaceae and Methanosaetaceae in Albian MFT and Peptococcaceae and co-domination of "Candidatus Methanoregula" and Methanosaetaceae in CNRL MFT bacterial and archaeal communities, respectively, during active biodegradation of paraffinic solvent. The results are important for developing future strategies for tailings reclamation and management of greenhouse gas emissions.

  8. Impact of nano zero valent iron (NZVI) on methanogenic activity and population dynamics in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Guo, Jialiang; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-11-01

    Nano zero valent iron (NZVI), although being increasingly used for environmental remediation, has potential negative impact on methanogenesis in anaerobic digestion. In this study, NZVI (average size = 55 ± 11 nm) showed inhibition of methanogenesis due to its disruption of cell integrity. The inhibition was coincident with the fast hydrogen production and accumulation due to NZVI dissolution under anaerobic conditions. At the concentrations of 1 mM and above, NZVI reduced methane production by more than 20%. At the concentration of 30 mM, NZVI led to a significant increase in soluble COD (an indication of cell disruption) and volatile fatty acids in the mixed liquor along with an accumulation of H2, resulting in a reduction of methane production by 69% (±4% [standard deviation]). By adding a specific methanogenesis inhibitor-sodium 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) to the anaerobic sludge containing 30 mM NZVI, the amount of H2 produced was only 79% (±1%) of that with heat-killed sludge, indicating the occurrence of bacterially controlled hydrogen utilization processes. Quantitative PCR data was in accordance with the result of methanogenesis inhibition, as the level of methanogenic population (dominated by Methanosaeta) in the presence of 30 mM NZVI decreased significantly compared to that of the control. On the contrary, ZVI powder (average size inhibited methanogenesis described herein, the results suggest that the rapid hydrogen production due to NZVI dissolution also contribute to methanogenesis inhibition and lead to bacterially controlled hydrogenotrophic processes.

  9. Identification of methanogenic pathways in anaerobic digesters using stable carbon isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laukenmann, Stephan; Polag, Daniela; Greule, Markus; Lelieveld, Jos; Keppler, Frank [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany); Heuwinkel, Hauke; Gronauer, Andreas [Landesanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft, Freising (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    In a series of anaerobic batch experiments, the stable carbon isotopes, {delta}{sup 13}C{sub CH4} and {delta}{sup 13}C{sub CO2}, were measured in biogas produced from various sources (maize, cellulose, inoculum) to identify the degradation kinetics and specific methanogenic pathways. Isotopic analysis was performed using a new absorption laser spectrometer in addition to conventional MS. A comparison of the isotopic evolution shows large isotope dynamics for maize and cellulose, indicating a temporal change in degradation pathways and/or a change in the relative contribution from different carbon fractions within the substrate. Further batch experiments with isotopically labelled acetate (either {sup 13}CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}Na or CH{sup 13}{sub 3}CO{sub 2}Na) were carried out to study the degradation of acetate in inoculum systematically. The results suggest that the acetate is completely oxidized into CO{sub 2} which in turn is partly reduced to CH{sub 4}. Furthermore, the distinct isotopic signature CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} (for acetate-methyl labelling as well as for acetate-carboxy labelling) indicate that only a minor part of the produced methane derives from acetate. A substantial fraction of methane may have been produced at an earlier stage of the reaction chain or by other potential methane precursors such as formate or methanol. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Methanofollis aquaemaris sp. nov., a methanogen isolated from an aquaculture fish pond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, M C; Chen, S C

    2001-09-01

    A novel methanogen, designated strain N2F9704T, was isolated from an aquaculture fish pond near Wang-gong, Taiwan. The cells were irregular cocci, non-motile, 1.2-2.0 microm in diameter and stained gram-negative. Cells of strain N2F9704T lysed easily by SDS treatment (0.1 g l(-1)) and the S-layer protein had an Mr of 137000. The catabolic substrates used included formate and H2+CO2, but not acetate, methanol, trimethylamine or secondary alcohols. The optimal growth parameters for strain N2F9704T were pH 6.5, 37 degrees C with 0.5% NaCl. Trace amounts of tungstate not only promoted growth but also extended the range of growth conditions. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence revealed a phylogenetic relationship to Methanofollis species and the name Methanofollis aquaemaris sp. nov. is therefore proposed for strain N2F9704T (= OCM 746T = CCRC 16166T). Additionally, the strain was infected with a novel coccus-shaped, enveloped virus with a diameter of 200 nm.

  11. Methanogenic activity inhibition by increasing the linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Luiza F C; Florencio, Lourdinha; Gavazza, Savia; Kato, Mario T

    2016-07-02

    The effect of the initial concentration of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) on specific methanogenic activity (SMA) was investigated in this work. Six anaerobic flasks reactors with 1 L of total volume were inoculated with anaerobic sludge (2 g VSS L(-1)). The reactors were assayed for 42 days, and fed with volatile fatty acids, nutrients, and LAS. The initial LAS concentrations were 0, 10, 30, 50, 75, and 100 mg L(-1) for the treatment flasks T1 (control), T2, T3, T4, T5, and T6, respectively. When compared with T1, T2 exhibited a 30% reduction in maximum SMA and total methane production (TMP). In treatment T3 through T6, the reductions were 44-97% (T3-T6) for SMA, and 30-90% (T3-T6) for TMP. Total LAS removal increased following the increase in the initial LAS concentration (from 36% at T1 to 76% at T6), primarily due to the high degree of sludge adsorption. LAS biodegradation also occurred (32% in all treatments), although this was most likely associated with the formation of non-methane intermediates. Greater removal by adsorption was observed in long-chain homologues, when compared to short-chain homologues (C13 > C10), whereas the opposite occurred for biodegradation (C10 > C13). The C13 homologue was adsorbed to a great extent (in mass) in T4, T5 and T6, and may also have inhibited methane formation in these treatments.

  12. Micro-scale H2-CO2 dynamics in a hydrogenotrophic methanogenic membrane reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Garcia-Robledo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biogas production is a key factor in a sustainable energy supply. It is possible to get biogas with very high methane content if the biogas reactors are supplied with exogenous hydrogen, and one of the technologies for supplying hydrogen is through gas permeable membranes. In this study the activity and stratification of hydrogen consumption above such a membrane was investigated by use of microsensors for hydrogen and pH. A hydrogenotrophic methanogenic community that was able to consume the hydrogen flux within 0.5 mm of the membrane with specific rates of up to 30 m3 H2 m-3 day-1 developed within 3 days in fresh manure and was already established at time zero when analyzing slurry from a biogas plant. The hydrogen consumption was dependent on a simultaneous carbon dioxide supply and was inhibited when carbon dioxide depletion elevated the pH to 9.2. The activity was only partially restored when the carbon dioxide supply was resumed. Bioreactors supplied with hydrogen gas should thus be carefully monitored and either have the hydrogen supply disrupted or be supplemented with carbon dioxide when the pH rises to values about 9.

  13. Genome-scale analysis of gene function in the hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Felipe; Mrázek, Jan; Whitman, William B

    2013-03-19

    A comprehensive whole-genome analysis of gene function by transposon mutagenesis and deep sequencing methodology has been implemented successfully in a representative of the Archaea domain. Libraries of transposon mutants were generated for the hydrogenotrophic, methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis S2 using a derivative of the Tn5 transposon. About 89,000 unique insertions were mapped to the genome, which allowed for the classification of 526 genes or about 30% of the genome as possibly essential or strongly advantageous for growth in rich medium. Many of these genes were homologous to eukaryotic genes that encode fundamental processes in replication, transcription, and translation, providing direct evidence for their importance in Archaea. Some genes classified as possibly essential were unique to the archaeal or methanococcal lineages, such as that encoding DNA polymerase PolD. In contrast, the archaeal homolog to the gene encoding DNA polymerase B was not essential for growth, a conclusion confirmed by construction of an independent deletion mutation. Thus PolD, and not PolB, likely plays a fundamental role in DNA replication in methanococci. Similarly, 121 hypothetical ORFs were classified as possibly essential and likely play fundamental roles in methanococcal information processing or metabolism that are not established outside this group of prokaryotes.

  14. Multiple evidence for methylotrophic methanogenesis as the dominant methanogenic pathway in hypersaline sediments from the Orca Basin, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Guang-Chao; Elling, Felix J.; Nigro, Lisa M.; Samarkin, Vladimir; Joye, Samantha B.; Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-08-01

    Among the most extreme habitats on Earth, dark, deep, anoxic brines host unique microbial ecosystems that remain largely unexplored. As the terminal step of anaerobic degradation of organic matter, methanogenesis is a potentially significant but poorly constrained process in deep-sea hypersaline environments. We combined biogeochemical and phylogenetic analyses with incubation experiments to unravel the origin of methane in the hypersaline sediments of Orca Basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Substantial concentrations of methane, up to 3.4 mM, coexisted with high concentrations of sulfate from 16 to 43 mM in two sediment cores retrieved from the northern and southern parts of Orca Basin. The strong depletion of 13C in methane (-77‰ to -89‰) points towards a biological source. While low concentrations of competitive substrates limited the significance of hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis, the presence of non-competitive methylated substrates (methanol, trimethylamine, dimethyl sulfide, dimethylsulfoniopropionate) supported the potential for methane generation through methylotrophic methanogenesis. Thermodynamic calculations demonstrated that hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis were unlikely to occur under in situ conditions, while methylotrophic methanogenesis from a variety of substrates was highly favorable. Likewise, carbon isotope relationships between methylated substrates and methane suggested methylotrophic methanogenesis was the major source of methane. Stable and radio-isotope tracer experiments with 13C-labeled bicarbonate, acetate and methanol and 14C-labeled methylamine indicated that methylotrophic methanogenesis was the predominant methanogenic pathway. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, halophilic methylotrophic methanogens related to the genus Methanohalophilus dominated the benthic archaeal community in the northern basin and also occurred in the southern basin. High abundances of methanogen lipid biomarkers such as

  15. Transcriptional activities of methanogens and methanotrophs vary with methane emission flux in rice soils under chronic nutrient constraints of phosphorus and potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Rong; Chen, Anlei; Zhang, Miaomiao; Whiteley, Andrew S.; Kumaresan, Deepak; Wei, Wenxue

    2016-12-01

    Nutrient status in soil is crucial for the growth and development of plants which indirectly or directly affect the ecophysiological functions of resident soil microorganisms. Soil methanogens and methanotrophs can be affected by soil nutrient availabilities and plant growth, which in turn modulate methane (CH4) emissions. Here, we assessed whether deficits in soil-available phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) modulated the activities of methanogens and methanotrophs in a long-term (20 year) experimental system involving limitation in either one or both nutrients. Results showed that a large amount of CH4 was emitted from paddy soil at rice tillering stage (flooding) while CH4 flux was minimum at ripening stage (drying). Compared to soils amended with NPK fertiliser treatment, the soils without P input significantly reduced methane flux rates, whereas those without K input did not. Under P limitation, methanotroph transcript copy number significantly increased in tandem with a decrease in methanogen transcript abundance, suggesting that P-deficiency-induced changes in soil physio-chemical properties, in tandem with rice plant growth, might constrain the activity of methanogens, whereas the methanotrophs might be adaptive to this soil environment. In contrast, lower transcript abundance of both methanogen and methanotrophs were observed in K-deficient soils. Assessments of community structures based upon transcripts indicated that soils deficient in P induced greater shifts in the active methanotrophic community than K-deficient soils, while similar community structures of active methanogens were observed in both treatments. These results suggested that the population dynamics of methanogens and methanotrophs could vary along with the changes in plant growth states and soil properties induced by nutrient deficiency.

  16. Cultivation of algae consortium in a dairy farm wastewater for biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dairy farm wastewaters are potential resources for production of microalgae biofuels. A study was conducted to evaluate the capability of production of biodiesel from consortium of native microalgae culture in dairy farm treated wastewater. Native algal strains were isolated from dairy farm wastewaters collection tank (untreated wastewater as well as from holding tank (treated wastewater. The consortium members were selected on the basis of fluorescence response after treating with Nile red reagent. Preliminary studies of two commercial and consortium of ten native strains of algae showed good growth in wastewaters. A consortium of native strains was found capable to remove more than 98% nutrients from treated wastewater. The biomass production and lipid content of consortium cultivated in treated wastewater were 153.54 t ha−1 year−1 and 16.89%, respectively. 72.70% of algal lipid obtained from consortium could be converted into biodiesel.

  17. Microbial dehalogenation of trichlorophenol by a bacterial consortium: characterization and mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chlorinated phenolic compounds are a class of toxic and refractory organic pollutants. The pollution caused by chlorophenols poses serious ecological and environmental problems. A stable bacterial consortium capable of reductively dechlorinating trichlorophenol was isolated using chlorophenol as the sole source of carbon and energy. The physiological characteristics of the mixed cultures were studied and the results show that the consortium could use pyruvate as the carbon and energy source. The fermentation of pyruvate, sulfate reduction and dechlorination process proceeded strictly in succession within this consortium. The effect of specific inhibitors on the dechlorinating activity of the consortium was investigated, and the results indicate that sulfate and molybdate (1 mmol/L) have a strong inhibitive influence on the dechlorination activity. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique was applied to analyzing the composition of the consortium and the results reveal that one major subpopulation within the consortium was phylogenetically affiliated to gamma and delta subclass of Proteobacteria.

  18. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-03-31

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative

  19. Intergenomic evolution and metabolic cross-talk between rumen and thermophilic autotrophic methanogenic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, M; Chellapandi, P

    2017-02-01

    Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1 (MRU) is a rumen methanogenic archaean that can be able to utilize formate and CO2/H2 as growth substrates. Extensive analysis on the evolutionary genomic contexts considered herein to unravel its intergenomic relationship and metabolic adjustment acquired from the genomic content of Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus ΔH. We demonstrated its intergenomic distance, genome function, synteny homologs and gene families, origin of replication, and methanogenesis to reveal the evolutionary relationships between Methanobrevibacter and Methanothermobacter. Comparison of the phylogenetic and metabolic markers was suggested for its archaeal metabolic core lineage that might have evolved from Methanothermobacter. Orthologous genes involved in its hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis might be acquired from intergenomic ancestry of Methanothermobacter via Methanobacterium formicicum. Formate dehydrogenase (fdhAB) coding gene cluster and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (cooF) coding gene might have evolved from duplication events within Methanobrevibacter-Methanothermobacter lineage, and fdhCD gene cluster acquired from bacterial origins. Genome-wide metabolic survey found the existence of four novel pathways viz. l-tyrosine catabolism, mevalonate pathway II, acyl-carrier protein metabolism II and glutathione redox reactions II in MRU. Finding of these pathways suggested that MRU has shown a metabolic potential to tolerate molecular oxygen, antimicrobial metabolite biosynthesis and atypical lipid composition in cell wall, which was acquainted by metabolic cross-talk with mammalian bacterial origins. We conclude that coevolution of genomic contents between Methanobrevibacter and Methanothermobacter provides a clue to understand the metabolic adaptation of MRU in the rumen at different environmental niches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrated biogas upgrading and hydrogen utilization in an anaerobic reactor containing enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogenic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-11-01

    Biogas produced by anaerobic digestion, is mainly used in a gas motor for heat and electricity production. However, after removal of CO(2) , biogas can be upgraded to natural gas quality, giving more utilization possibilities, such as utilization as autogas, or distant utilization by using the existing natural gas grid. The current study presents a new biological method for biogas upgrading in a separate biogas reactor, containing enriched hydrogenotrophic methanogens and fed with biogas and hydrogen. Both mesophilic- and thermophilic anaerobic cultures were enriched to convert CO(2) to CH(4) by addition of H(2) . Enrichment at thermophilic temperature (55°C) resulted in CO(2) and H(2) bioconversion rate of 320 mL CH(4) /(gVSS h), which was more than 60% higher than that under mesophilic temperature (37°C). Different dominant species were found at mesophilic- and thermophilic-enriched cultures, as revealed by PCR-DGGE. Nonetheless, they all belonged to the order Methanobacteriales, which can mediate hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Biogas upgrading was then tested in a thermophilic anaerobic reactor under various operation conditions. By continuous addition of hydrogen in the biogas reactor, high degree of biogas upgrading was achieved. The produced biogas had a CH(4) content, around 95% at steady-state, at gas (mixture of biogas and hydrogen) injection rate of 6 L/(L day). The increase of gas injection rate to 12 L/(L day) resulted in the decrease of CH(4) content to around 90%. Further study showed that by decreasing the gas-liquid mass transfer by increasing the stirring speed of the mixture the CH(4) content was increased to around 95%. Finally, the CH(4) content around 90% was achieved in this study with the gas injection rate as high as 24 L/(L day).

  1. A Heme-based Redox Sensor in the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molitor, Bastian; Stassen, Marc; Modi, Anuja; El-Mashtoly, Samir F.; Laurich, Christoph; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Dawson, John H.; Rother, Michael; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Based on a bioinformatics study, the protein MA4561 from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans was originally predicted to be a multidomain phytochrome-like photosensory kinase possibly binding open-chain tetrapyrroles. Although we were able to show that recombinantly produced and purified protein does not bind any known phytochrome chromophores, UV-visible spectroscopy revealed the presence of a heme tetrapyrrole cofactor. In contrast to many other known cytoplasmic heme-containing proteins, the heme was covalently attached via one vinyl side chain to cysteine 656 in the second GAF domain. This GAF domain by itself is sufficient for covalent attachment. Resonance Raman and magnetic circular dichroism data support a model of a six-coordinate heme species with additional features of a five-coordination structure. The heme cofactor is redox-active and able to coordinate various ligands like imidazole, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon monoxide depending on the redox state. Interestingly, the redox state of the heme cofactor has a substantial influence on autophosphorylation activity. Although reduced protein does not autophosphorylate, oxidized protein gives a strong autophosphorylation signal independent from bound external ligands. Based on its genomic localization, MA4561 is most likely a sensor kinase of a two-component system effecting regulation of the Mts system, a set of three homologous corrinoid/methyltransferase fusion protein isoforms involved in methyl sulfide metabolism. Consistent with this prediction, an M. acetivorans mutant devoid of MA4561 constitutively synthesized MtsF. On the basis of our results, we postulate a heme-based redox/dimethyl sulfide sensory function of MA4561 and propose to designate it MsmS (methyl sulfide methyltransferase-associated sensor). PMID:23661702

  2. The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSiegert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High current densities in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs result from the predominance of various Geobacter species on the anode. MECs inoculated from different sources often converge in terms of current production and predominance of Geobacter species despite variability in the inoculum community. Relatively less is known about the effects of inoculum source on methane gas production in MECs, and specifically whether archaeal communities similarly converge to one specific genus. MECs were examined here on the basis of maximum methane production and current density relative to the inoculum community structure. We used anaerobic digester (AD sludge dominated by acetoclastic Methanosaeta species, and an anaerobic bog sediment where hydrogenotrophic methanogens were detected. Inoculation using solids to medium ratio of 25% w/v resulted in the highest methane production rates (0.27 mL mL–1 cm–2, gas volume normalized by liquid volume and cathode projected area and highest peak current densities (0.5 mA cm–2 for the bog sample. Methane production was independent of solid to medium ratio when AD sludge was used as the inoculum. 16S rRNA gene community analysis using pyrosequencing and qPCR confirmed the convergence of Archaea to Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter, and of Bacteria to Geobacter, despite their absence in AD sludge. Combined with other studies, these findings suggest that Archaea of the hydrogenotrophic genera Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter are the most important microorganisms for methane production in MECs and that their presence in the inoculum improves the performance.

  3. Methane Production in Dairy Cows Correlates with Rumen Methanogenic and Bacterial Community Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Rebecca; Dicksved, Johan; Sun, Li; Gonda, Horacio; Müller, Bettina; Schnürer, Anna; Bertilsson, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is produced as an end product from feed fermentation in the rumen. Yield of CH4 varies between individuals despite identical feeding conditions. To get a better understanding of factors behind the individual variation, 73 dairy cows given the same feed but differing in CH4 emissions were investigated with focus on fiber digestion, fermentation end products and bacterial and archaeal composition. In total 21 cows (12 Holstein, 9 Swedish Red) identified as persistent low, medium or high CH4 emitters over a 3 month period were furthermore chosen for analysis of microbial community structure in rumen fluid. This was assessed by sequencing the V4 region of 16S rRNA gene and by quantitative qPCR of targeted Methanobrevibacter groups. The results showed a positive correlation between low CH4 emitters and higher abundance of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium clade. Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) on operational taxonomic unit (OTU) level of bacteria showed two distinct clusters (P Fermentation pattern of volatile fatty acids showed that proportion of propionate was higher in cluster L, while proportion of butyrate was higher in cluster H. No difference was found in milk production or organic matter digestibility between cows. Cows in cluster L had lower CH4/kg energy corrected milk (ECM) compared to cows in cluster H, 8.3 compared to 9.7 g CH4/kg ECM, showing that low CH4 cows utilized the feed more efficient for milk production which might indicate a more efficient microbial population or host genetic differences that is reflected in bacterial and archaeal (or methanogens) populations. PMID:28261182

  4. Bacteroides paurosaccharolyticus sp. nov., isolated from a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Atsuko; Abe, Kunihiro; Ohtaki, Yoshimi; Kaku, Nobuo; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ueki, Katsuji

    2011-02-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterial strain (WK042(T)) was isolated from rice-straw residue in a methanogenic reactor treating waste from cattle farms in Japan. Cells were Gram-staining-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming rods. Growth was stimulated well by haemin, and was enhanced by cobalamin (vitamin B(12)). Strain WK042(T) utilized arabinose, xylose, glucose, mannose and aesculin as preferred substrates. Maltose, dextrin, glycogen, starch and pectin were also utilized, although growth on these substrates was much slower. The strain produced acetate, propionate and succinate from these saccharides. The strain was slightly alkaliphilic, with optimum growth at pH 7.7. The temperature range for growth was 10-40 °C, the optimum being 35 °C. The strain was sensitive to bile. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH and C(15 : 0). Menaquinone 11 (MK-11) was the major respiratory quinone and the genomic DNA G+C content was 41.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the strain in the phylum Bacteroidetes. Strain WK042(T) was related distantly to the type strains of species in the cluster including Bacteroides massiliensis, Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides dorei (91-92 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). Based on data from the present phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic analyses, strain WK042(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Bacteroides, for which the name Bacteroides paurosaccharolyticus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is WK042(T) (=JCM 15092(T) =DSM 21004(T)).

  5. Decolorization and biodegradation of reactive dyes and dye wastewater by a developed bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratale, R G; Saratale, G D; Chang, J S; Govindwar, S P

    2010-11-01

    A bacterial consortium (consortium GR) consisting of Proteus vulgaris NCIM-2027 and Micrococcus glutamicus NCIM-2168 could rapidly decolorize and degrade commonly-used sulfonated reactive dye Green HE4BD and many other reactive dyes. Consortium GR shows markedly higher decolorization activity than that of the individual strains. The preferable physicochemical parameters were identified to achieve higher dye degradation and decolorization efficiency. The supplementation of cheap co-substrates (e.g., extracts of agricultural wastes) could enhance the decolorization performance of consortium GR. Extent of mineralization was determined with TOC and COD measurements, showing nearly complete mineralization of Green HE4BD by consortium GR (up to 90% TOC and COD reduction) within 24 h. Oxidoreductive enzymes seemed to be involved in fast decolorization/degradation process with the evidence of enzymes induction in the bacterial consortium. Phytotoxicity and microbial toxicity studies confirm that the biodegraded products of Green HE4BD by consortium GR are non-toxic. Consortium GR also shows significant biodegradation and decolorization activities for mixture of reactive dyes as well as the effluent from actual dye manufacturing industry. This confers the possibility of applying consortium GR for the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing dye pollutants.

  6. Overview of the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, S S; Akolkar, B; Concannon, P; Erlich, H; Hilner, J E; Julier, C; Morahan, G; Nerup, J; Nierras, C; Pociot, F; Todd, J A

    2009-12-01

    The Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) is an international, multicenter research program with two primary goals. The first goal is to identify genomic regions and candidate genes whose variants modify an individual's risk of type I diabetes (T1D) and help explain the clustering of the disease in families. The second goal is to make research data available to the research community and to establish resources that can be used by, and that are fully accessible to, the research community. To facilitate the access to these resources, the T1DGC has developed a Consortium Agreement (http://www.t1dgc.org) that specifies the rights and responsibilities of investigators who participate in Consortium activities. The T1DGC has assembled a resource of affected sib-pair families, parent-child trios, and case-control collections with banks of DNA, serum, plasma, and EBV-transformed cell lines. In addition, both candidate gene and genome-wide (linkage and association) studies have been performed and displayed in T1DBase (http://www.t1dbase.org) for all researchers to use in their own investigations. In this supplement, a subset of the T1DGC collection has been used to investigate earlier published candidate genes for T1D, to confirm the results from a genome-wide association scan for T1D, and to determine associations with candidate genes for other autoimmune diseases or with type II diabetes that may be involved with beta-cell function.

  7. Geodesy and the UNAVCO Consortium: Three Decades of Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, L. R.; Miller, M. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    UNAVCO, a non-profit, university consortium that supports geoscience research using geodesy, began with the ingenious recognition that the nascent Global Positioning System constellation (GPS) could be used to investigate earth processes. The consortium purchased one of the first commercially available GPS receivers, Texas Instrument's TI-4100 NAVSTAR Navigator, in 1984 to measure plate deformation. This early work was highlighted in a technology magazine, GPSWorld, in 1990. Over a 30-year period, UNAVCO and the community have helped advance instrument design for mobility, flexibility, efficiency and interoperability, so research could proceed with higher precision and under ever challenging conditions. Other innovations have been made in data collection, processing, analysis, management and archiving. These innovations in tools, methods and data have had broader impacts as they have found greater utility beyond research for timing, precise positioning, safety, communication, navigation, surveying, engineering and recreation. Innovations in research have expanded the utility of geodetic tools beyond the solid earth science through creative analysis of the data and the methods. For example, GPS sounding of the atmosphere is now used for atmospheric and space sciences. GPS reflectrometry, another critical advance, supports soil science, snow science and ecological research. Some research advances have had broader impacts for society by driving innovations in hazards risk reduction, hazards response, resource management, land use planning, surveying, engineering and other uses. Furthermore, the geodetic data is vital for the design of space missions, testing and advancing communications, and testing and dealing with interference and GPS jamming. We will discuss three decades (and counting) of advances by the National Science Foundation's premiere geodetic facility, consortium and some of the many geoscience principal investigators that have driven innovations in

  8. The role of different methanogen groups evaluated by Real-Time qPCR as high-efficiency bioindicators of wet anaerobic co-digestion of organic waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Methanogen populations and their domains are poorly understood; however, in recent years, research on this topic has emerged. The relevance of this field has also been enhanced by the growing economic interest in methanogen skills, particularly the production of methane from organic substrates. Management attention turned to anaerobic wastes digestion because the volume and environmental impact reductions. Methanogenesis is the biochemically limiting step of the process and the industrially interesting phase because it connects to the amount of biogas production. For this reason, several studies have evaluated the structure of methanogen communities during this process. Currently, it is clear that the methanogen load and diversity depend on the feeding characteristics and the process conditions, but not much data is available. In this study, we apply a Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) method based on mcrA target to evaluate, by specific probes, some subgroups of methanogens during the mesophilic anaerobic digestion process fed wastewater sludge and organic fraction of the municipal solid waste with two different pre-treatments. The obtained data showed the prevalence of Methanomicrobiales and significantly positive correlation between Methanosarcina and Methanosaetae and the biogas production rate (0.744 p < 0.01 and 0.641 p < 0.05). Methanosarcina detected levels are different during the process after the two pre-treatment of the input materials (T-test p < 0.05). Moreover, a role as diagnostic tool could be suggested in digestion optimisation. PMID:21982396

  9. Comparison of Fecal Methanogenic Archaeal Community Between Erhualian and Landrace Pigs Using Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Real-Time PCR Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Yong; Hauke Smidt; ZHU Wei-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Erhualian and Landrace breeds are typical genetically obese and lean pigs, respectively. To compare the fecal methanogenic Archaeal community between these two pig breeds, fecal samples from different growth phase pigs were collected and used for PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) with two primer pairs (344fGC/519r and 519f/915rGC) and real-time PCR analysis. Results showed that a better separation and higher quality of bands pattern were obtained in DGGE proifles using primers 344fGC/519r as compared with primers 519f/915rGC. Sequencing of DGGE bands showed that the predominant methanogens in the feces of Erhualian and Landrace pigs belonged to Methanobrevibacter spp. and Methanosphaera spp. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that there was no signiifcant difference in the numbers of fecal total methanogens between Erhualian and Landrace pigs;however, pig growth phase affected the numbers of 16S rRNA genes of total methanogens and Methanobrevibacter smithii. Dissociation curves of methyl coenzyme-M reductase subunit A (mcrA) gene fragments ampliifed with real-time PCR showed all samples possessed a single peak at 82°C, which might be associated with M. smithii. Samples from the same growth phase of each breed showed good replicative dissociation curves. The results suggest that the growth phase (including diet factor) other than genotype of pig may affect the fecal methanogenic Archaeal community of pigs.

  10. Gastrointestinal Bacterial and Methanogenic Archaea Diversity Dynamics Associated with Condensed Tannin-Containing Pine Bark Diet in Goats Using 16S rDNA Amplicon Pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeng R. Min

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen Kiko-cross meat goats (n=6 were used to collect gastrointestinal (GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea for diversity measures when fed condensed tannin-containing pine bark (PB. Three dietary treatments were tested: control diet (0% PB and 30% wheat straw (WS; 0.17% condensed tannins (CT dry matter (DM; 15% PB and 15% WS (1.6% CT DM, and 30% PB and 0% WS (3.2% CT DM. A 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing technique was used to characterize and elucidate changes in GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea diversity among the diets. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum in goats with mean relative abundance values ranging from 39.7 (30% PB to 46.5% (control and 47.1% (15% PB. Other phyla individually accounted for fewer than 25% of the relative abundance observed. Predominant methanogens were Methanobrevibacter (75, 72, and 49%, Methanosphaera (3.3, 2.3, and 3.4%, and Methanobacteriaceae (1.2, 0.6, and 0.7% population in control, 15, and 30% PB, respectively. Among methanogens, Methanobrevibacter was linearly decreased (P=0.05 with increasing PB supplementation. These results indicate that feeding PB selectively altered bacteria and methanogenic archaeal populations in the GI tract of goats.

  11. Gastrointestinal Bacterial and Methanogenic Archaea Diversity Dynamics Associated with Condensed Tannin-Containing Pine Bark Diet in Goats Using 16S rDNA Amplicon Pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byeng R; Solaiman, Sandra; Shange, Raymon; Eun, Jong-Su

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen Kiko-cross meat goats (n = 6) were used to collect gastrointestinal (GI) bacteria and methanogenic archaea for diversity measures when fed condensed tannin-containing pine bark (PB). Three dietary treatments were tested: control diet (0% PB and 30% wheat straw (WS); 0.17% condensed tannins (CT) dry matter (DM)); 15% PB and 15% WS (1.6% CT DM), and 30% PB and 0% WS (3.2% CT DM). A 16S rDNA bacterial tag-encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing technique was used to characterize and elucidate changes in GI bacteria and methanogenic archaea diversity among the diets. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum in goats with mean relative abundance values ranging from 39.7 (30% PB) to 46.5% (control) and 47.1% (15% PB). Other phyla individually accounted for fewer than 25% of the relative abundance observed. Predominant methanogens were Methanobrevibacter (75, 72, and 49%), Methanosphaera (3.3, 2.3, and 3.4%), and Methanobacteriaceae (1.2, 0.6, and 0.7%) population in control, 15, and 30% PB, respectively. Among methanogens, Methanobrevibacter was linearly decreased (P = 0.05) with increasing PB supplementation. These results indicate that feeding PB selectively altered bacteria and methanogenic archaeal populations in the GI tract of goats.

  12. EFFECTS OF AMARANTHS’ SEEDS ON DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY AND GASES EMISSION IN METHANOGENIC BIOREACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor COVALIOV

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of amaranths‘ seeds as the source of squalene on the dehydrogenase activity and efficiency of methane production were investigated in methanogenic bench-scale (5000 ml bioreactors used to treat the mixture of distillery wastes and farmyard manure. The adding of amaranth seeds to the methanogenic bioreactor has an inhibitory effect on the dehydrogenase activity and stimulates the process of methanogenesis. Dehydrogenase activity decreased with the increase of doses of squalene and its trend had a close connection with doses (R2=0.77-0.78. The methane content in the total amount of gases is 65.3-71.3% in a bioreactor with the additive of amaranth seeds in a dose of 50 mg l-1, which is 22.1% higher than in the the control bioreactor without additives. The increase in squalene concentration higher than 0.0005% is not rational because its stimulating effect on the methanogenic process decreases. Anaerobic digestion of alcohol distillery industry wastes with manure is a complex nonlinear time-varying microbiological process. Dehydrogenase activity trends in the experiment are described by the power function for 5 hours observations and by the logarithmic function for 120 hours of observations. Trends of CH4 are described by the polynomial function in all periods of testing. Correlation coefficients are 0.37 and 0.70 for CH4 after 5 and 120 hours of the anaerobic digestion. Dehydrogenase activity is in the close negative connection with the amount of gases, including methane. Correlation analysis between dehydrogenase activity and the release of gases has revealed the moderate and strongly negative link during 24 hours after the start of the experiment.EFECTUL SEMINŢELOR DE AMARANT ASUPRA ACTIVITĂŢII DEHIDROGENAZEI ŞI EMISIEI GAZELOR ÎN BIOREACTOARELE METANOGENEÎn bioreactoare metanogene unite consecutiv, cu volum de 5000 ml, utilizate pentru tratarea amestecului de borhot de la distilarea alcoolului cu gunoi de grajd, a fost

  13. Overview of the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, SS; Akolkar, B; Concannon, P; Erlich, H.; Hilner, JE; Julier, C.; Morahan, G; J. Nerup; Nierras, C.; Pociot, F; Todd, JA.

    2009-01-01

    The Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) is an international, multicenter research program with two primary goals. The first goal is to identify genomic regions and candidate genes whose variants modify an individual’s risk of type I diabetes (T1D) and help explain the clustering of the disease in families. The second goal is to make research data available to the research community and to establish resources that can be used by, and that are fully accessible to, the research community...

  14. WDM module research within the Canadian Solid State Optoelectronics Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Mahmoud; Koteles, Emil S.; Delage, Andre; Chatenoud, F.; Templeton, Ian M.; Champion, Garth; He, Jian Jun; Wang, Weijian; Dion, Michael M.; Barber, Richard A.

    1995-02-01

    We report on the design, growth, fabrication, and characterization of monolithic wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) modules produced within the Canadian Solid State Optoelectronics Consortium. The transmitter module includes multiple, discrete wavelength, distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diodes monolithically integrated with waveguide combiners fabricated using an InGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. The wavelength demultiplexer unit is based on a Rowland circle grating spectrometer monolithically integrated with a metal- semiconductor-metal (MSM) detector array fabricated on an InGaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. The epitaxial layer wafers for both transmitter and receiver modules were grown in single molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) runs.

  15. An integrated study reveals diverse methanogens, Thaumarchaeota, and yet-uncultivated archaeal lineages in Armenian hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, Brian P; Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Cole, Jessica K; Panosyan, Hovik H

    2013-07-01

    Culture-independent and enrichment techniques, with an emphasis on members of the Archaea, were used to determine the composition and structure of microbial communities inhabiting microbial mats in the source pools of two geothermal springs near the towns of Arzakan and Jermuk in Armenia. Amplification of small-subunit rRNA genes using "universal" primers followed by pyrosequencing (pyrotags) revealed highly diverse microbial communities in both springs, with >99 % of pyrosequences corresponding to members of the domain Bacteria. The spring in Arzakan was colonized by a photosynthetic mat dominated by Cyanobacteria, in addition to Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Spirochaeta and a diversity of other Bacteria. The spring in Jermuk was colonized by phylotypes related to sulfur, iron, and hydrogen chemolithotrophs in the Betaproteobacteria and Epsilonproteobacteria, along with a diversity of other Bacteria. Analysis of near full-length small subunit rRNA genes amplified using Archaea-specific primers showed that both springs are inhabited by a diversity of methanogens, including Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales and relatives of Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis, close relatives of the ammonia-oxidizing archaeon (AOA) "Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis", and the yet-uncultivated Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group and Deep Hydrothermal Vent Crenarchaeota group 1. Methanogenic enrichments confirmed the predicted physiological diversity, revealing methylotrophic, acetoclastic, and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at 45 and 55 °C, but not 65 °C. This is one of only a few studies combining cultivation-independent and -dependent approaches to study archaea in moderate-temperature (37-73 °C) terrestrial geothermal environments and suggests important roles for methanogenic archaea and AOA in the carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical cycles in these environments.

  16. Seasonal Variability of Tropical Wetland CH4 emissions: the role of the methanogen-available carbon pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Reay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a dynamic methanogen-available carbon model (DMCM to quantify the role of the methanogen-available carbon pool in determining the spatial and temporal variability of tropical wetland CH4 emissions over seasonal timescales. We fit DMCM parameters to satellite observations of CH4 columns from SCIAMACHY CH4 and equivalent water height (EWH from GRACE. Over the Amazon river basin we find substantial seasonal variability of this carbon pool (coefficient of variation = 28 ± 22% and a rapid decay constant (φ = 0.017 day−1, in agreement with available laboratory measurements, suggesting that plant litter is likely the prominent methanogen carbon source over this region. Using the DMCM we derive global CH4 emissions for 2003–2009, and determine the resulting seasonal variability of atmospheric CH4 on a global scale using the GEOS-Chem atmospheric chemistry and transport model. First, we estimate tropical emissions amount to 111.1 Tg CH4 yr−1 of which 24% is emitted from Amazon wetlands. We estimate that annual tropical wetland emissions have increased by 3.4 Tg CH4 yr−1 between 2003 and 2009. Second, we find that the model is able to reproduce the observed seasonal lag between CH4 concentrations peaking 1–3 months before peak EWH values. We also find that our estimates of CH4 emissions substantially improve the comparison between the model and observed CH4 surface concentrations (r = 0.9. We anticipate that these new insights from the DMCM represent a fundamental step in parameterising tropical wetland CH4 emissions and quantifying the seasonal variability and future trends of tropical CH4 emissions.

  17. Preferential methanogenic biodegradation of short-chain n-alkanes by microbial communities from two different oil sands tailings ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahimin, Mohd Faidz Mohamad; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2016-05-15

    Oil sands tailings ponds harbor diverse anaerobic microbial communities capable of methanogenic biodegradation of solvent hydrocarbons entrained in the tailings. Mature fine tailings (MFT) from two operators (Albian and CNRL) that use different extraction solvents were incubated with mixtures of either two (n-pentane and n-hexane) or four (n-pentane, n-hexane, n-octane and n-decane) n-alkanes under methanogenic conditions for ~600 d. Microbes in Albian MFT began methane production by ~80 d, achieving complete depletion of n-pentane and n-hexane in the two-alkane mixture and their preferential biodegradation in the four-alkane mixture. Microbes in CNRL MFT preferentially metabolized n-octane and n-decane in the four-alkane mixture after a ~80 d lag but exhibited a lag of ~360 d before commencing biodegradation of n-pentane and n-hexane in the two-alkane mixture. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing revealed Peptococcaceae members as key bacterial n-alkane degraders in all treatments except CNRL MFT amended with the four-alkane mixture, in which Anaerolineaceae, Desulfobacteraceae (Desulfobacterium) and Syntrophaceae (Smithella) dominated during n-octane and n-decane biodegradation. Anaerolineaceae sequences increased only in cultures amended with the four-alkane mixture and only during n-octane and n-decane biodegradation. The dominant methanogens were acetoclastic Methanosaetaceae. These results highlight preferential n-alkane biodegradation by microbes in oil sands tailings from different producers, with implications for tailings management and reclamation.

  18. Effect of sulfate on the methanogenic activity of a bacterial culture from a brewery Wastewater during glucose degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The maximum specific methanogenic activity (SMA) of a sludge originating from a brewery wastewater treatment plant on the degradation of glucose was investigated at various levels of sulfate on a specific loading basis. Batch experiments were conducted in serum bottles at pH 7 and 35℃.A comparison of the values indicates that the SMA of this mixed culture was increased and reached its highest level of 0.128g CH4 gas COD/(g VSS·d)when biomass was in contact with sulfate at a ratio of 1:0.114 by weight.

  19. Mitigation of methane emission from Holstein dairy cows: Effects of dietary manipulation on bacterial and methanogen communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    ). Future demands for meat and milk are expected to increase, with concomitant increase in CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Thus, reducing CH4 emission from ruminant production constitutes a massive challenge. Using in vitro rumen fluid fermentations and in vivo animal trials we investigated 1) effects...... on methanogenic archaea. In vitro fermentations revealed that pH and carbohydrate source had only minor effects on the rumen bacterial community composition, but significantly affected volatile fatty acid production patterns. pH significantly affected CH4 emission from rumen fluid, with optimum CH4 production...

  20. Abundance and diversity of methanogens: potential role in high arsenic groundwater in Hetao Plain of Inner Mongolia, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y H; Li, P; Dai, X Y; Zhang, R; Jiang, Z; Jiang, D W; Wang, Y X

    2015-05-15

    To investigate the community diversity and abundance of methanogens and their potential role in high arsenic groundwater, 17 groundwater samples from Hetao Plain of Inner Mongolia were investigated with an integrated method including 16S rRNA gene clone library, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and geochemistry analyses. Total arsenic (AsTot) concentrations were 82.7-1088.7 μg/L and arsenite (AsIII) mostly dominated in these samples with percentages of 0.04-0.79. CH₄ concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 292 μg/L and distinctly elevated only when AsTot were relatively high and SO₄(2-) were distinctly low. Principal component analysis indicated that these samples were divided into three groups according to the variations of AsTot, CH₄ and SO₄(2-). AsTot concentrations were distinctly high in the group with high CH₄ and low SO₄(2-) comparing to the other two groups (one with high CH₄ and high SO₄(2-), the other with low CH₄ and SO₄(2-)). The mcrA gene (methyl coenzyme-M reductase gene) based phylogenetic analysis of methanogens population showed that methanogenic archaea was diverse but mainly composed of Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteria and unidentified groups, with Methanomicrobiales being distinctly dominant (50.6%). The mcrA gene abundance in high arsenic groundwater ranged from 3.01 × 10(3) to 3.80 × 10(6)copies/L and accounted for 0-30.2% of total archaeal 16S rRNA genes. The abundance of mcrA genes was positively correlated with the concentrations of AsTot (R=0.59), AsIII (R=0.57) and FeII (R=0.79), while it was negatively correlated with oxidation-reduction potential (R=-0.66) and SO₄(2-) concentration (R=-0.64). These results implied that methanogenic archaea might accelerate As release in groundwater aquifers in Hetao Plain.

  1. The Latin American Consortium of Studies in Obesity (LASO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, L. E.; Casas, J. P.; Herrera, V. M.; Miranda, J. J.; Perel, P.; Pichardo, R.; González, A.; Sanchez, J. R.; Ferreccio, C.; Aguilera, X.; Silva, E.; Oróstegui, M.; Gómez, L. F.; Chirinos, J. A.; Medina-Lezama, J.; Pérez, C. M.; Suárez, E.; Ortiz, A. P.; Rosero, L.; Schapochnik, N.; Ortiz, Z.; Ferrante, D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Current, high-quality data are needed to evaluate the health impact of the epidemic of obesity in Latin America. The Latin American Consortium of Studies of Obesity (LASO) has been established, with the objectives of (i) Accurately estimating the prevalence of obesity and its distribution by sociodemographic characteristics; (ii) Identifying ethnic, socioeconomic and behavioural determinants of obesity; (iii) Estimating the association between various anthropometric indicators or obesity and major cardiovascular risk factors and (iv) Quantifying the validity of standard definitions of the various indexes of obesity in Latin American population. To achieve these objectives, LASO makes use of individual data from existing studies. To date, the LASO consortium includes data from 11 studies from eight countries (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Peru, Puerto Rico and Venezuela), including a total of 32 462 subjects. This article describes the overall organization of LASO, the individual studies involved and the overall strategy for data analysis. LASO will foster the development of collaborative obesity research among Latin American investigators. More important, results from LASO will be instrumental to inform health policies aiming to curtail the epidemic of obesity in the region. PMID:19438980

  2. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-11

    The numbers of individuals with adequate education and training to participate effectively in the highly technical aspects of environmental site cleanup are insufficient to meet the increasing demands of industry and government. Young people are particularly sensitive to these issues and want to become better equipped to solve the problems which will confront them during their lives. Educational institutions, on the other hand, have been slow in offering courses and curricula which will allow students to fulfill these interests. This has been in part due to the lack of federal funding to support new academic programs. This Consortium has been organized to initiate focused educational effort to reach inner-city youth with interesting and useful energy and environmental programs which can lead to well-paying and satisfying careers. Successful Consortium programs can be replicated in other parts of the nation. This report describes a pilot program in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Baltimore with the goal to attract and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas, environmental restoration, and waste management.

  3. A programmable Escherichia coli consortium via tunable symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa Kerner

    Full Text Available Synthetic microbial consortia that can mimic natural systems have the potential to become a powerful biotechnology for various applications. One highly desirable feature of these consortia is that they can be precisely regulated. In this work we designed a programmable, symbiotic circuit that enables continuous tuning of the growth rate and composition of a synthetic consortium. We implemented our general design through the cross-feeding of tryptophan and tyrosine by two E. coli auxotrophs. By regulating the expression of genes related to the export or production of these amino acids, we were able to tune the metabolite exchanges and achieve a wide range of growth rates and strain ratios. In addition, by inverting the relationship of growth/ratio vs. inducer concentrations, we were able to "program" the co-culture for pre-specified attributes with the proper addition of inducing chemicals. This programmable proof-of-concept circuit or its variants can be applied to more complex systems where precise tuning of the consortium would facilitate the optimization of specific objectives, such as increasing the overall efficiency of microbial production of biofuels or pharmaceuticals.

  4. The Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Jorge G; Teasdale, Thomas A; Hajjar, Ihab; Shaughnessy, Marianne; Mintzer, Michael J

    2007-03-01

    This paper describes the activities of the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI), a group dedicated to creating, using, and evaluating e-learning to enhance geriatrics education. E-learning provides a relatively new approach to addressing geriatrics educators' concerns, such as the shortage of professionals trained to care for older people, overcrowded medical curricula, the move to transfer teaching venues to community settings, and the switch to competency-based education models. However, this innovative education technology is facing a number of challenges as its use and influence grow, including proof of effectiveness and efficiency. CELGI was created in response to these challenges, with the goal of facilitating the development and portability of e-learning materials for geriatrics educators. Members represent medical and nursing schools, the Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare system, long-term care facilities, and other institutions that rely on continuing streams of quality health education. CELGI concentrates on providing a coordinated approach to formulating and adapting specifications, standards, and guidelines; developing education and training in e-learning competencies; developing e-learning products; evaluating the effect of e-learning materials; and disseminating these materials. The vision of consortium members is that e-learning for geriatric education will become the benchmark for valid and successful e-learning throughout medical education.

  5. How Specific Microbial Communities Benefit the Oil Industry: Significant Contribution of Methyl/Methanol-Utilising Methanogenic Pathway in a Subsurface Biogas Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strąpoć, Dariusz; Ashby, Matt; Wood, Ladonna; Levinson, Rick; Huizinga, Bradley

    Methanogenesis is considered the main terminal process of subsurface anaerobic organic-matter degradation. Previous geochemical studies have reported CO2-reducing and acetoclastic methanogenesis as the predominant subsurface methanogenic pathways for primary and secondary biogenic gas generation (i.e. in oil biodegradation or coalbed methane settings). In lab-scale experiments and microbiology literature, however, methanogens have been shown to be able to utilise a wider variety of substrates, typically containing methyl groups, i.e. dimethyl sulphide (DMS), methyl amines (e.g. TMA), formate, and methanol. Additional methanogenic substrates include CO and other primary alcohols and secondary alcohols (Whitman et al., 2006; Fig. 25.1). Here, we describe a volumetrically important natural biogenic gas field in which these methylotrophic pathways have contributed significantly to biomethane formation.

  6. Influence of Martian regolith analogs on the activity and growth of methanogenic archaea, with special regard to long-term desiccation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janosch eSchirmack

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic archaea have been studied as model organisms for possible life on Mars for several reasons: they can grow lithoautotrophically by using hydrogen and carbon dioxide as energy and carbon sources, respectively; they are anaerobes; and they evolved at a time when conditions on early Earth are believed to have looked similar to those of early Mars. As Mars is currently dry and cold and as water might be available only at certain time intervals, any organism living on this planet would need to cope with desiccation. On Earth there are several regions with low water availability as well, e.g. permafrost environments, desert soils and salt pans. Here, we present the results of a set of experiments investigating the influence of different Martian regolith analogs on the metabolic activity and growth of three methanogenic strains exposed to culture conditions as well as long-term desiccation. In most cases, concentrations below 1 %wt of regolith in the media resulted in an increase of methane production rates, whereas higher concentrations decreased the rates, thus prolonging the lag phase. Further experiments showed that methanogenic archaea are capable of producing methane when incubated on a water-saturated sedimentary matrix of regolith lacking nutrients. Survival of methanogens under these conditions was analyzed with a 400 day desiccation experiment in the presence of regolith analogs. All tested strains of methanogens survived the desiccation period as it was determined through reincubation on fresh medium and via qPCR following propidium monoazide treatment to identify viable cells. The survival of long-term desiccation and the ability of active metabolism on water-saturated MRAs strengthens the possibility of methanogenic archaea or physiologically similar organisms to exist in environmental niches on Mars. The best results were achieved in presence of a phyllosilicate, which provides insights of possible positive effects in habitats

  7. Succession of methanogenic archaea in rice straw incorporated into a Japanese rice field: estimation by PCR-DGGE and sequence analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Sugano

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The succession and phylogenetic profiles of methanogenic archaeal communities associated with rice straw decomposition in rice-field soil were studied by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE analysis followed by 16S rDNA sequencing. Nylon bags containing either leaf sheaths or blades were buried in the plowed layer of a Japanese rice field under drained conditions during the off-crop season and under flooded conditions after transplanting. In addition, rice straw samples that had been buried in the rice field under drained conditions during the off-crop season were temporarily removed during spring plowing and then re-buried in the same rice field under flooded conditions at transplanting. Populations of methanogenic archaea were examined by amplification of the 16S rRNA genes in the DNA extracted from the rice straw samples. No PCR product was produced for samples of leaf sheath or blade prior to burial or after burial under drained conditions, indicating that the methanogen population was very small during decomposition of rice straw under oxic conditions. Many common bands were observed in rice straw samples of leaf sheath and blade during decomposition of rice straw under flooded conditions. Cluster analysis based on DGGE patterns divided methanogenic archaeal communities into two groups before and after the mid-season drainage. Sequence analysis of DGGE bands that were commonly present were closely related to Methanomicrobiales and Rice cluster I. Methanomicrobiales, Rice cluster I and Methanosarcinales were major members before the mid-season drainage, whereas the DGGE bands that characterized methanogenic archaeal communities after the mid-season drainage were closely related to Methanomicrobiales. These results indicate that mid-season drainage affected the methanogenic archaeal communities irrespective of their location on rice straw (sheath and blade and the previous history of decomposition

  8. Dietary pea fiber increases diversity of colonic methanogens of pigs with a shift from Methanobrevibacter to Methanomassiliicoccus-like genus and change in numbers of three hydrogenotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuheng; Chen, Hong; Yu, Bing; He, Jun; Zheng, Ping; Mao, Xiangbing; Tian, Gang; Yu, Jie; Huang, Zhiqing; Luo, Junqiu; Chen, Daiwen

    2017-01-17

    Pea fiber (PF) is a potential fibrous supplement in swine production. The influence of dietary PF on microbial community in the colon of pigs remains largely unexplored. Methanogens in the hindgut of monogastric animals play important roles in degradation of dietary fibers and efficient removal of microbial metabolic end product H2. Understanding the impact of dietary PF on the structure of colonic methanogens may help understand the mechanisms of microbe-mediated physiological functions of PF. This study investigated the influence of PF on the diversity and quantity and/or activity of colonic methanongens of piglets and finishing pigs. Four archaeal 16S rRNA clone libraries were constructed for piglets and finishers fed with control (Piglet-C and Finisher-C) or PF diet (Piglet-P and Finisher-P). There were 195, 190, 194 and 196 clones obtained from the library Piglet-C, Piglet-P, Finisher-C and Finisher-P, respectively, with corresponding 12, 11, 11 and 16 OTUs (operational taxonomic units). Significant differences of Shannon Index among the four libraries were found (P genus as a result of dietary PF. Supplementation of PF significantly increased the copy numbers of mcrA and dsrA genes (P < 0.05). Alteration of methanogenic community structure may lead to functional transition from utilization of H2/CO2 to employment of both H2/CO2 and methanol/CO2. Quantification of three functional genes (mcrA, dsrA and fhs) of methanogens, sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and acetogens revealed that dietary PF also increased the activity of methanogens and SRB,probably associated with increased proportion of Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis-species. Further study is required to examine the interaction between specific methanogens and SRB during fermentation of dietary PF.

  9. 25 CFR 1000.16 - What criteria must a Tribe/Consortium satisfy to be eligible for admission to the “applicant pool”?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .../Consortium satisfy to be eligible for admission to the “applicant pool”? To be admitted into the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must either be an Indian Tribe or a Consortium of Indian Tribes and...

  10. Ophthalmic epidemiology in Europe : the "European Eye Epidemiology" (E3) consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delcourt, Cecile; Korobelnik, Jean-Francois; Buitendijk, Gabrielle H. S.; Foster, Paul J.; Hammond, Christopher J.; Piermarocchi, Stefano; Peto, Tunde; Jansonius, Nomdo; Mirshahi, Alireza; Hogg, Ruth E.; Bretillon, Lionel; Topouzis, Fotis; Deak, Gabor; Grauslund, Jakob; Broe, Rebecca; Souied, Eric H.; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Sahel, Jose; Daien, Vincent; Lehtimaki, Terho; Hense, Hans-Werner; Prokofyeva, Elena; Oexle, Konrad; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Cumberland, Phillippa M.; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Fauser, Sascha; Bertelsen, Geir; Hoyng, Carel; Bergen, Arthur; Silva, Rufino; Wolf, Sebastian; Lotery, Andrew; Chakravarthy, Usha; Fletcher, Astrid; Klaver, Caroline C. W.

    The European Eye Epidemiology (E3) consortium is a recently formed consortium of 29 groups from 12 European countries. It already comprises 21 population-based studies and 20 other studies (case-control, cases only, randomized trials), providing ophthalmological data on approximately 170,000

  11. Final Report: Appalachian Consortium. Evaluation of a Dissemination and Diffusion Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsbery Systems Analysis, Ltd., Flushing, NY.

    The Appalachian Consortium was evaluated as an organization for the dissemination of educational information regarding programs for the early identification of preschool handicapped children. Chapter I provides a historical overview and discusses the Consortium's independence from the Appalachian Educational Laboratory. The chapter also indicates…

  12. The Launch of the Philadelphia Education Research Consortium: Lessons Learned from the First Year of Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The Philadelphia Education Research Consortium (PERC) was launched in July 2014 as an innovative place-based consortium of educational research partners from multiple sectors. Its primary objective is to provide research and analyses on some of the city's most pressing education issues. As such, PERC's research agenda is driven by both traditional…

  13. Isolation and Characteristics of a Microbial Consortium for Effectively Degrading Phenanthrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Xu Hongke; Guo Shaohui

    2007-01-01

    A microbial consortium (named W4) capable of aerobic biodegradation of solid phenanthrene as the sole source of carbon and energy was isolated by selective enrichment from petroleum-contaminated soil in the Henan oilfield,China. The strains of the consortium were identified as Sphingomonas cloacae, Rhizobium sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Achromobacter xylosoxidans respectively by means of genetic methods. The major metabolites of phenanthrene were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The biodegradation percentage of solid phenanthrene at 200 mg/L in liquid medium after 7 days of growth was greater than 99%. The degradation of phenanthrene was compared between individual predominant strains and the microbial consortium in different treatment processes. The microbial consortium showed a significant improvement of phenanthrene degradation rates in either static or shaking culture. The degradation percentage of phenanthrene by the consortium W4 decreased to some degree when C 16 coexisted, however it was hardly affected by C30. Furthermore, the ability of consortium W4 to remediate oil sludge from the Dagang oil refinery was studied by composting; and it was found that the consortium W4 could obviously remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and paraffinic hydrocarbons. All the results indicated that the microbial consortium W4 had a promising application in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments and could be potentially used in microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR).

  14. 77 FR 12041 - Applications for New Awards; Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... Applications for New Awards; Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program AGENCY: Office...: Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program; Notice inviting applications for new... appropriate entities to improve the delivery of services to migrant children whose education is...

  15. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), RO-077125 Magurele (Romania); Cabellos, O. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Kodeli, I. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Koning, A. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Konobeyev, A.Yu. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Leeb, H. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8–10, 1040 Wien (Austria); Rochman, D. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sauvan, P. [Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, C. Juan del Rosal, 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sublet, J.-C. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Trkov, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dupont, E. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris (France); Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J. [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  16. 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NIH Pain Consortium will convene the 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, featuring keynote speakers and expert panel sessions on Innovative Models and Methods. The first keynote address will be delivered by David J. Clark, MD, PhD, Stanford University entitled “Challenges of Translational Pain Research: What Makes a Good Model?” |

  17. Ophthalmic epidemiology in Europe : the "European Eye Epidemiology" (E3) consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delcourt, Cecile; Korobelnik, Jean-Francois; Buitendijk, Gabrielle H. S.; Foster, Paul J.; Hammond, Christopher J.; Piermarocchi, Stefano; Peto, Tunde; Jansonius, Nomdo; Mirshahi, Alireza; Hogg, Ruth E.; Bretillon, Lionel; Topouzis, Fotis; Deak, Gabor; Grauslund, Jakob; Broe, Rebecca; Souied, Eric H.; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Sahel, Jose; Daien, Vincent; Lehtimaki, Terho; Hense, Hans-Werner; Prokofyeva, Elena; Oexle, Konrad; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Cumberland, Phillippa M.; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Fauser, Sascha; Bertelsen, Geir; Hoyng, Carel; Bergen, Arthur; Silva, Rufino; Wolf, Sebastian; Lotery, Andrew; Chakravarthy, Usha; Fletcher, Astrid; Klaver, Caroline C. W.

    2016-01-01

    The European Eye Epidemiology (E3) consortium is a recently formed consortium of 29 groups from 12 European countries. It already comprises 21 population-based studies and 20 other studies (case-control, cases only, randomized trials), providing ophthalmological data on approximately 170,000 Europea

  18. Clostridium huakuii sp. nov., an anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium isolated from methanogenic consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Zhiyong; Wang, Yanwei; Zhang, Chi; Song, Jinlong; Zhai, Yi; Zhuang, Yan; Wang, Huimin; Chen, Xiaorong; Li, Yanting; Zhao, Bingqiang; Zhao, Bin

    2014-12-01

    A Gram-staining-positive, spore-forming, obligately anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium, designated LAM1030(T), was isolated from methanogenic consortia enriched from biogas slurry collected from the large-scale anaerobic digester of Modern Farming Corporation in Hebei Province, China. Cells of strain LAM1030(T) were motile, straight or spiral-rod-shaped. Strain LAM1030(T) could utilize glucose, fructose, maltose, galactose, lactose, sucrose, cellobiose, mannitol, pyruvate, succinic acid and tryptophan as the sole carbon source. Acetic acid, isovaleric acid and butanoic acid were the main products of glucose fermentation. Sodium sulfite was used as an electron acceptor. Growth of strain LAM1030(T) was completely inhibited by the addition of ampicillin, tetracycline, gentamicin or erythromycin at a concentration of 20 µg ml(-1). The main polar lipids of strain LAM1030(T) were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, 11 unknown glycolipids and two unknown phospholipids. No respiratory quinone was detected. The major fatty acids of strain LAM1030(T) were C16 : 0 (21.1 %), C14 : 0 (10.3 %), summed feature 9 (including C16:0 10-methyl and/or iso-C17:1 ω9c) (11.3% ), summed feature 3 (including C16:1 ω7c and/or C16:1 ω6c) (10.6% ) and iso-C15 : 0 (6.6 %). Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain LAM1030(T) belonged to the genus Clostridium and was most closely related to Clostridium subterminale DSM 6970(T), Clostridium thiosulfatireducens DSM 13105(T) and Clostridium sulfidigenes DSM 18982(T), with 97.0, 96.9 and 96.8 % similarity, respectively. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain LAM1030(T) was 31.2±0.3 mol%. On the basis of its phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic characterization, strain LAM1030(T) is suggested to represent a novel species of the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium huakuii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LAM1030(T) ( = ACCC 00698(T

  19. Methanocella conradii sp. nov., a thermophilic, obligate hydrogenotrophic methanogen, isolated from Chinese rice field soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Lü

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methanocellales contributes significantly to anthropogenic methane emissions that cause global warming, but few pure cultures for Methanocellales are available to permit subsequent laboratory studies (physiology, biochemistry, etc.. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By combining anaerobic culture and molecular techniques, a novel thermophilic methanogen, strain HZ254(T was isolated from a Chinese rice field soil located in Hangzhou, China. The phylogenetic analyses of both the 16S rRNA gene and mcrA gene (encoding the α subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase confirmed its affiliation with Methanocellales, and Methanocella paludicola SANAE(T was the most closely related species. Cells were non-motile rods, albeit with a flagellum, 1.4-2.8 µm long and by 0.2-0.3 µm in width. They grew at 37-60 °C (optimally at 55 °C and salinity of 0-5 g NaCl l(-1 (optimally at 0-1 g NaCl l(-1. The pH range for growth was 6.4-7.2 (optimum 6.8. Under the optimum growth condition, the doubling time was 6.5-7.8 h, which is the shortest ever observed in Methanocellales. Strain HZ254(T utilized H(2/CO(2 but not formate for growth and methane production. The DNA G+C content of this organism was 52.7 mol%. The sequence identities of 16S rRNA gene and mcrA gene between strain HZ254(T and SANAE(T were 95.0 and 87.5% respectively, and the genome based Average Nucleotide Identity value between them was 74.8%. These two strains differed in phenotypic features with regard to substrate utilization, possession of a flagellum, doubling time (under optimal conditions, NaCl and temperature ranges. Taking account of the phenotypic and phylogenetic characteristics, we propose strain HZ254(T as a representative of a novel species, Methanocella conradii sp. nov. The type strain is HZ254(T ( = CGMCC 1.5162(T = JCM 17849(T = DSM 24694(T. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Strain HZ254(T could potentially serve as an excellent laboratory model for studying Methanocellales due to its

  20. STRUCTURE OF CONSORTIUM DESTRUCTIVE COMPONENTS IN THE INDUSTRIAL AREA OF KRIVYI RIG BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kachinskaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Тhe structural organization and a biological variety of ground mesofauna on consortium level of the organization of ecosystems are considered. The analysis of indicators of the structural organization and a biodiversity of ground mesofauna in consortium Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of territories of industrial mining – metallurgical complex of Krivyi Rig Basin is carried out. It is established that taxonomical structure of ground mesofauna is characterized by insignificant number and quantity of taxonomical groups. Prevalence in morfo-ecological structure of hortobiontes and herpetobiontes testifies about faunae considerable attachment to consortium determinants and influences of a steppe climate on its structure. Prevalence of phytophages and polyphages in trophic structure is caused by combination of determinants specificity of consortium and zone source of fauna formations. The structural organization of ground mesofauna in consortium Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of industrial sites is characterized simplified taxonomical structure with a low biodiversity at all levels. It was suggested that structural and functional organization of destructive components of the block consortium of Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of industrial sites are simplified and determined by biogeochemical patterns of pedogenic and leaf litter layer of consortium and type of anthropogenic impact. Management and sustainable use of consortium under technogenic pressure should be based on the effects of extreme and critical components in the evolution of consortium. These critical points are the type of leading man-made factors and pedogenic and leaf litter biogeochemical conditions of consortium determinants, which results in inhibition of development and simplification of the structural and functional organization of destructive components of the block. The elaboration of measures to restore and maintain that structural and functional organization