WorldWideScience

Sample records for psychology occupational therapy

  1. Psychological Distress among Nursing, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Students: A Longitudinal and Predictive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerdrum, Per; Rustoen, Tone; Helge Ronnestad, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present longitudinal data on changes in psychological distress among 232 Norwegian undergraduate students of nursing, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy. Psychological distress was assessed by applying the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire. Nursing students became substantially more distressed during the…

  2. Psychological Distress among Nursing, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Students: A Longitudinal and Predictive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerdrum, Per; Rustoen, Tone; Helge Ronnestad, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present longitudinal data on changes in psychological distress among 232 Norwegian undergraduate students of nursing, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy. Psychological distress was assessed by applying the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire. Nursing students became substantially more distressed during the…

  3. About Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if}} {{{tweet}}} About Occupational Therapy What Is Occupational Therapy? Occupational therapy practitioners ask, "What matters to you?" not, " ... about our science-driven and evidence-based profession. Occupational Therapy: Improving Function While Controlling Costs 4 4 The ...

  4. Occupational Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Occupational Therapy KidsHealth > For Parents > Occupational Therapy Print A A ... for some kids. continue Kids Who Might Need Occupational Therapy According to the AOTA, kids with these medical ...

  5. American Occupational Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manage Your Practice Evidence-Based Practice & Research Ethics Occupational Therapy Assistants Advocacy & Policy New Evaluation Codes Learn how ... Reimbursement Education & Careers OT is a Top Job Occupational therapy consistently ranks high as one of the top ...

  6. Occupational therapy evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristina Tomra; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Occupational Therapy Intervention Process Model (OTIPM) serves to guide occupational therapists in their professional reasoning. The OTIPM prescribes evaluation of task performance based on both self-report and observation. Although this approach seems ideal, many clinicians raise...

  7. Interprofessional clinical education for occupational therapy and psychology students: a social skills training program for children with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Dana M; Wittman, Peggy; Bundy, Myra Beth

    2012-01-01

    An interprofessional clinical learning experience was developed for pre-licensure occupational therapy (OT) and psychology graduate students. Students worked in interprofessional teams to plan and implement a social skills training program for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The objectives were to provide a hands-on, student-led clinical experience; facilitate interprofessional collaborative learning through leadership partnerships and teach children with ASD to engage in appropriate social skill behaviors. Concurrently, faculty performed qualitative research to explore how the students worked together to provide intervention to the children. Data were collected via interview, direct observation of student planning sessions and student interprofessional interactions, and collection of posts from an online social network site used for session planning. There were six student participants and two faculty participants. Four themes emerged: learning who I am as a professional, learning to appreciate our professional differences, learning to communicate with each other and figuring it out, for the benefit of the kids. This interprofessional clinical learning experience and research helps ensure that students are adequately prepared to represent their profession as part of a diverse interprofessional health care team.

  8. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation Written ... accelerated aging in children. Children with Progeria need Physical Therapy (PT) and Occupational Therapy (OT) as often as ...

  9. Population Health and Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braveman, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners play an important role in improving the health of populations through the development of occupational therapy interventions at the population level and through advocacy to address occupational participation and the multiple determinants of health. This article defines and explores population health as a concept and describes the appropriateness of occupational therapy practice in population health. Support of population health practice as evidenced in the official documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association and the relevance of population health for occupational therapy as a profession are reviewed. Recommendations and directions for the future are included related to celebration of the achievements of occupational therapy practitioners in the area of population health, changes to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework and educational accreditation standards, and the importance of supporting, recognizing, rewarding, and valuing occupational therapy practitioners who assume roles in which direct care is not their primary function. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  10. Marketing occupational therapy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautzmann, L N

    1985-01-01

    The ability to understand and appropriately apply business skills is a key component in the development of a successful private practice. Marketing is one of the business skills occupational therapists need to have in order to take full advantage of the opportunities available to entrepeneurs in the health care industry. The purpose of this article is to present a structured approach to marketing occupational therapy services through the use of a marketing plan. The four components of a marketing plan, a situation analysis, the identification of problems, opportunities, and target markets, the development of a marketing strategy for each targeted market, and a method to monitor the plan, are discussed. Applications to occupational therapy practice are suggested. The use of a marketing plan as a method for organizing and focusing marketing efforts is an effective means of supporting and enhancing the development of a private practice.

  11. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Occupational Therapy Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in jobs in occupational therapy. Agency partners involved in this project include: the Illinois State board of Education, Illinois Community College…

  12. Uncovering the foundational heritage of Irish occupational therapy

    OpenAIRE

    O'Riordan, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed Background: This study arose from a wider University of Limerick, Clinical Therapies Departmental project, seeking to plot Irish occupational therapy history. Dr. Eamonn O???Sullivan???s, ??? A Textbook of Occupational Therapy with Chief Reference to Psychological Medicine??? emerged as a primary document outlining occupational therapy in Ireland at the beginning of the 20th Century. Objective: The study aims to identify the philosophical assumptions of occ...

  13. Embracing Creativity in Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen, MOT, OTR/L

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jen Gash, an occupational therapist and creativity coach living in the UK, provided the cover art for the winter 2015 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. The picture is titled “Over the Exe.” Jen uses her inspiration of the Kawa River model in this painting. The painting is of her husband and daughter standing where the river meets the sea. This is a metaphoric representation of rejoining the greater collective. In addition, Jen has a passion for occupational therapists to encompass creativity. A core aspect of occupational therapy is the multi-dimensional concept of occupations; it allows for occupational therapists to incorporate creativity into daily practice. Jen’s goal is for occupational therapy to embrace its creative theoretical roots.

  14. A Psychological Classification of Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, John L.; And Others

    This occupational classification for practical and theoretical use in vocational guidance, occupational research, vocational education, and social science rests upon a theory of personality types and includes 431 common occupations which comprise about 95 percent of the United States labor force. Each of the classification's six main classes…

  15. Wanted: entrepreneurs in occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kristin M; Nelson, David L

    2011-01-01

    The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) has challenged occupational therapy practitioners to advance the profession so that we may become more "powerful" and "widely recognized" by the year 2017 (AOTA, 2007a). To fully achieve this vision, this article argues that the profession should encourage occupational therapy entrepreneurship. As Herz, Bondoc, Richmond, Richman, and Kroll (2005, p.2) stated, "Entrepreneurship may provide us with the means to achieve the outcomes we need to succeed in the current health care environment." This article also argues the urgency of seizing the many opportunities that entrepreneurship offers and recommends specific actions to be taken by AOTA and by therapists.

  16. Occupational therapy, culture and diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Simó Algado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Occupational behaviour is always an environmental behaviour because the occupation is the dialogue between human beings and their environment. Culture is key dimension in our profession. This article is based on previous research and a new review of the scientific literature on the various meanings associated with culture. In the contemporary context the globalization involves the imposition of the American way of life on a planetary scale. In front of ethnocentrism and racism a diatopical hermeneutics is proposed. A cosmopolitan citizenship can be constructed supporting diversity. The article concludes by reflecting on strategies that can be implemented from occupational therapy to develop a culturally safe occupational therapy. An archaeology of meaning must be developed in front of the Americanization. Occupational therapy needs to develop a powerful political activism in order to build an inclusive society based on human rights and sustainability. Culture and diversity are key elements in this process.

  17. [The emergence of positive occupational health psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Arnold B; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Alfredo; Derks, Daantje

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the emerging concept of Positive Occupational Health Psychology (POHP). We discuss the usefulness of focusing on positive constructs in order to understand the path to health and well-being at work. We describe research findings on several POHP topics, including engagement, psychological capital, and job crafting. Additionally, we review the first positive interventions in this field and conclude by identifying some specific questions for future research.

  18. Spiritual Assessments in Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hemphill

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality is recognized as an important concept in the study and practice of medicine, including occupational therapy. This aligns with occupational therapy’s core value of treating people holistically—mind, body, and spirit. Currently, the Joint Commission for the Accreditation of Hospital Organizations ( JCAHO requires that a spiritual assessment be given to patients on admission. To conduct effective spiritual assessments, occupational therapists must distinguish between religion and spirituality. They also must be aware of their own spiritual beliefs and practices and how those might influence their clinical interactions. This article presents spiritual assessment tools that occupational therapists can use in clinical practice; they range from history taking, to questionnaires, to observation scales. Guidelines are presented for selecting among several spiritual assessments. A case study is presented in which a patient’s faith tradition is being challenged, which could affect the outcome of therapy. Finally, treatment and intervention planning and ethical considerations are discussed.

  19. Embracing Creativity in Occupational Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lydia Royeen, MOT, OTR/L

    2015-01-01

    Jen Gash, an occupational therapist and creativity coach living in the UK, provided the cover art for the winter 2015 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. The picture is titled “Over the Exe.” Jen uses her inspiration of the Kawa River model in this painting. The painting is of her husband and daughter standing where the river meets the sea. This is a metaphoric representation of rejoining the greater collective. In addition, Jen has a passion for occupational therapists to enco...

  20. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Kuyk, M.A.H. van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    Background: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is con

  1. Occupational therapy for multiple sclerosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Cardol, M.; Nes, J.C.M. van de; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are referred to occupational therapy with complaints about fatigue, limb weakness, alteration of upper extremity fine motor coordination, loss of sensation and spasticity that causes limitations in performance of activities of daily living and social part

  2. Occupational therapy intervention with children survivors of war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó-Algado, Salvador; Mehta, Nina; Kronenberg, Franciscus; Cockburn, Lynn; Kirsh, Bonnie

    2002-10-01

    A preventive occupational therapy program with children surviving the Kosovo conflict is examined. The objective of the program was to facilitate the emotional expression of traumatic experiences in order to prevent the development of future psychological problems. The intervention was based on a community-centred approach with spirituality as a central focus of the intervention. The Model of Human Occupational and the Occupational Performance Process Model were utilized to guide the identification and intervention of occupational performance issues. The children's return from a land of war to a land of children demonstrates the potential of occupational therapy intervention in this field. With increasing awareness of populations facing social and political challenges, there is a growing importance of the concept of occupational justice and the need to work against occupational apartheid.

  3. [Positive occupational health psychology: an introduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Arnold B; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    This article introduces the monographic section on Positive Occupational Health Psychology (POHP), presenting eight theoretical and empirical papers about diverse topics. Traditionally, research on occupational health has mainly been focused on causes of diseases and on identifying and preventing work factors related to worker's impaired health. However, this biased view may not provide a complete understanding of the mechanisms that lead to employee well-being and performance. We discuss the differences of POHP with similar constructs, and review reasons for its importance in the development of this field. Overall, the studies included in the monographic section show the usefulness of focusing on positive constructs, and present ideas and questions that we hope may help to further our progress in the field of POHP.

  4. Occupational Therapy and overweight and obese people: Knowledge and sharing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina Tereza Barbosa Lopes da Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a worldwide phenomenon that affects both the rich and poor populations. It results from the action of environmental factors, dietary habits, physical activity and psychological conditions on individuals genetically predisposed to present excess adipose tissue. The impact of obesity can be measured by its influence on the quality of life. Occupational therapy has developed a significant role within the interdisciplinary treatment of obesity. The objective of this paper is to describe the experience of the work of occupational therapists in an interdisciplinary group for adult and elderly people presenting overweight and obesity in an extension project of a private university in Natal, Rio Grande do Norte state. The Occupational Therapy team performed weekly interdisciplinary care, assessment, planning, organization of the therapeutic setting and occupational therapy intervention. The team was composed by an occupational therapy teacher, a scholar and five volunteer undergraduate students. The service group was open to new components, caregivers, and family and community members. Playful, cognitive, bodily, physical and productive occupational therapy activities were used in the sessions. These activities favored positive outcomes in mental, emotional and social dimensions. Thus, the project enabled the visibility of Occupational Therapy at the university, as well as the growth and expansion of academic and occupational knowledge on therapeutic intervention in obesity.

  5. Clarifying the Construct of Occupational Engagement for Occupational Therapy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jennifer; Davis, Jane A

    2017-01-01

    Occupational engagement (OE) has been presented as a core construct in occupational therapy; however, its broad conceptualization and confounding definitions are problematic. Clarifying the construct of OE would help occupational therapists to explicate the nature of their practice. The purpose of this study was to explore occupational therapists' perspectives of the construct of OE. Qualitative descriptive methodology was used to collect data using semistructured interviews with nine practicing occupational therapists in the Greater Toronto Area. Qualitative content analysis, using an inductive approach, was employed to uncover emerging categories. Participants spoke about transitioning from therapeutic engagement to OE with a client by following a client's path of choice. The essential elements and influencers of OE were highlighted, and the relationship between OE and occupational performance was discussed. The findings provide an initial understanding of essential elements necessary to enable clients to initiate engagement in therapy and then, subsequently, in occupations of their choice.

  6. [Operative applications of occupational therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saade, A

    2010-01-01

    Occupational therapy is the branch of rehabilitation whose main aim is to achieve maximum possible autonomy of the disabled person and the most complete integration into society, family and work. In subjects with motor disabilities following an occupational injury, the re-education programme includes a series of interventions aimed at progressive recovery of the ability to carry out work tasks compatible with the residual motor capacity of the worker. This article presents some examples related to the different stages making up the specific re-education programme: from the initial stages (with more purely kinesiotherapeutic techniques) directed at recovering movements and muscle strength, to the intermediate and final stages (more typically ergotherapeutic) directed first at the recovery of basic functions (clasping, pulling, pushing, lifting, lowering, carrying, etc.) and then, finally, retraining of work movements, with the introduction of compensatory methods and/or use of auxiliaries, when necessary.

  7. Re-examining concepts of occupation and occupation-based models: occupational therapy and community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair, Leanne L

    2010-02-01

    A growing body of literature supports the role of occupational therapists in community development. Using a community development approach, occupational therapists respond to community-identified occupational needs. They work to build local resources and capacities and self-sustaining programs that foster change within the community and potentially beyond. The purpose of this paper is to highlight some key issues related to occupational therapy practice in community development. The definitions and classifications of occupation focus primarily on the individual and fail to elaborate on the shared occupations of a community. As well, occupation-based models of practice are not easily applied to occupational therapy practice in community development. In order for occupational therapy to articulate its role in community development, greater heed needs to be given to the definition and categorization of occupation, occupation-based models of practice, and their application to communities.

  8. The Occupations of Literacy: Occupational Therapy's Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolek Clark, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Nationally, student proficiency in reading and writing is very low and requires ongoing focus from state and local agencies. With almost 25% of occupational therapists working in early intervention and school settings (AOTA, 2015), their role of facilitating literacy (e.g., reading, writing, speaking and listening) is critical. Occupational…

  9. [Side Effects of Occupational Group Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flöge, B; Fay, D; Jöbges, M; Linden, M; Muschalla, B

    2016-12-01

    Background: Occupational therapy is an important co-therapy in psychiatric therapy. It is a common belief that no risks are associated with occupational therapy. Negative effects caused by group therapy, especially occupational therapy, have not been in the focus of research yet. In this study we want to illustrate possible types and intensities of group side effects through occupational therapy. Patients and Methods: Patients of an inpatient rehabilitation facility filled out the Adverse Treatment Reaction Group Checklist. The checklist contains 47 items divided in six dimensions: group size, content, group participants, group outcome and global. The self-rating used a 5-point likert scale (0 = not at all; 4 = very much, extremely stressful) and gives information about types and intensities of the side effects. Results: 88.9 % of 45 patients reported negative effects of occupational group therapy. 28.9 % of the patients rated the side effect as at least severe. Discussion: Occupational therapy is associated with side effects as every other group therapy. Possible side effects caused by group therapy should be considered while planning and implementing occupational therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Sexuality and occupational therapy: Exploring the link

    OpenAIRE

    Simó i Algado, Salvador; Sakellariou, Dikaios

    2006-01-01

    Holism is perceived to be one of the major tenets of occupational therapy. This article discusses the relevance of sexuality to holistic health care and contributes to the continuing discussion regarding the legitimacy of sexuality as an area of concern for occupational therapists. Sexuality is an important part of the human experience and is linked closely with spirituality. However, it is often neglected by occupational therapists. The article explores the occupational nat...

  11. Unique Role of Occupational Therapy in Rehabilitation of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sheet The Unique Role of Occupational Therapy in Rehabilitation of the Hand Hand therapy, a specialty practice area of occupational ... are treated by occupational therapy practitioners specializing in hand rehabilitation. Practitioners who treat clients with conditions of the ...

  12. Occupational therapy practice in emergency care: Occupational therapists' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, Lisa; Holmqvist, Kajsa

    2015-01-01

    Emergency care takes place in a complex work environment that is characterized by critically ill patients, short hospital stays, and a wide variety of different healthcare professionals. Studies of occupational therapists' (OTs) experiences of working within emergency care have shown that they often experience difficulties in explaining the essence of occupational therapy and have to justify their approaches. Much effort has been made in Sweden to help OTs dispel the notion that occupational therapy is difficult to explain, and the aim of this study was to describe how Swedish OTs perceive their work in emergency care. A qualitative descriptive approach was taken, and 14 interviews were conducted with OTs working in emergency care. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. The overall theme that emerged was "Feeling established through deliberate occupation-based work". The underlying categories showed different strategies used by the OTs to provide occupational therapy in an emergency care context. Deliberate strategies were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of occupational therapy and its approaches to patients and other health care professionals, and this resulted in the OTs feeling both established and needed. Unlike the OTs in previous studies, the Swedish OTs experienced no difficulties in explaining occupational therapy and could make convincing arguments for their interventions. Parallel to their clinical work, the OTs worked with on-going development to find ways to improve their approaches. In summary, these Swedish OTs seem to have been provided with a professional language and the knowledge required to establish themselves in an emergency care setting.

  13. History of ergonomics and occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainer, Rochelle D

    2008-01-01

    Ergonomics is commonly known as "the scientific study of human work" [14, p. 3] and "the application of scientific information concerning human beings to the design of objects, systems, and environments" (p. 4). The American Occupational Therapy Association defines occupational therapy as "skilled treatment that helps individuals achieve independence in all facets of their lives. It gives people the 'skills for the job of living' necessary for independent and satisfying lives [1]." Both professions share common backgrounds. Occupational therapy has been involved in health care and ergonomics is looking for its place in the health care field.

  14. Occupational Therapy Home Safety Intervention via Telehealth

    OpenAIRE

    Lori E. Breeden

    2016-01-01

    Photography can be an effective addition for education-based telehealth services delivered by an occupational therapist.  In this study, photography was used as antecedent to telehealth sessions delivered by an occupational therapist focused on narrative learning about home safety.  After taking photographs of past home safety challenges, six participants experienced three web-based occupational therapy sessions each.  Sessions were recorded and transcribed.  Data were examined using content ...

  15. Occupational Therapy in School-Based Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinth, Yvonne; Chandler, Barbara; Hanft, Barbara; Jackson, Leslie; Shepherd, Jayne

    2004-01-01

    For the past ten years, concerns have been voiced about the preservice preparation of occupational therapy (OT) practitioners to work in schools and early childhood programs. States and local districts have long complained of shortages of occupational therapists (OTs) in these settings. In addition, the "Twenty-Second Annual Report to Congress on…

  16. Ethical principles in occupational therapy intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellido Mainar, J R

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available For 2,500 years, the medical profession has created a body of ethical principles. Adapting to differeft historical and sociological circumstances, it has driven the practice of health professionals and constitutes a compilation of the rights and duties of doctors and patients.These principles represent the embryo of an emergening human science known as Bioethics. From the impulse of the scientific paradigm, a set of tasks and cares that were included in what was called charity started to be classified in a group of new proffesions devoted to the "methodical" care of patients and the underprivileged. Several new professions sprung up, including Occupational Therapy. From then on, the practice of the occupational therapist has remained protected by ethical principles that have traditionally monitored and driven the medical practice.This article first summarizes the historical evolution of the different ethical codes used by health professionals, emphasizing those aspects with a greater influence in the configuration of the ethical codes connected with occupational therapy.Secondly, we analyse the way occupational therapy has integrated the ethical principles of the medical practice in its own intervention. The main ethical guidelines used in the field are the ones proposed by the American Association of Occupational Therapy (AOTA, the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT, and the Council of Occupational Therapists for the European Countries (COTEC.Finally, we point out some of the difficulties and bioethcal challenges faced by occupational therapists

  17. Can Occupational Therapy Slow Alzheimer's Decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_162135.html Can Occupational Therapy Slow Alzheimer's Decline? Patients, caregivers may reap some benefits, but ... slow down the physical decline that comes with Alzheimer's disease, a new clinical trial suggests. The study ...

  18. Occupational therapy, professional development and ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Morten

    2009-01-01

    The article's aim is to reflect on and contribute to developing occupational therapy as a profession. I propose an ethical interpretation of health and helping professions in general and occupational therapy in particular. According to this ethical interpretation, the essential function and mission...... of classical health and helping professions are defined by certain ethical values: the basic elements of a good human life. I argue that the central concepts of occupational therapy, activity and participation, can plausibly be understood in this light. However, this seems to imply a rather substantial...... conception of well-being which I try to spell out. In addition, I specify the basic principles of biomedical ethics in the context of occupational therapy according to an ethical interpretation. In conclusion, I point at four advantages of the ethical interpretation: It adds precision and content to ethical...

  19. The origins of occupational therapy in Spain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pérez de Heredia-Torres, M; Brea-Rivero, M; Martínez-Piédrola, R M

    2007-01-01

    Occupational therapy is a young discipline in many aspects, but since ancient times an important number of reports have appeared in the health sciences literature and in the early days of neurology...

  20. Evidence for Mental Health Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Hitch

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the evidence for mental health occupational therapy in peer-reviewed journals from 2000 to 2013. Descriptive and inductive methods were used to address this question, with evidence from CINAHL, OTDBase, PSYCInfo, SCOPUS, and Google Scholar® included. Many articles (n = 1,747 were found that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 47 different methods were used to develop evidence for mental health occupational therapy, and evidence appeared in 300 separate peer-reviewed journals. It takes on average 7 months for an article to progress from submission to acceptance, and a further 7 months to progress from acceptance to publication. More than 95% of articles published between 2000 and 2002 were cited at least once in the following decade, and around 70% of these citations were recorded in non-occupational therapy journals. The current evidence base for mental health occupational therapy is both substantial and diverse.

  1. Psychological therapies for the management of chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sturgeon JA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available John A Sturgeon Department of Anesthesiology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA Abstract: Pain is a complex stressor that presents a significant challenge to most aspects of functioning and contributes to substantial physical, psychological, occupational, and financial cost, particularly in its chronic form. As medical intervention frequently cannot resolve pain completely, there is a need for management approaches to chronic pain, including psychological intervention. Psychotherapy for chronic pain primarily targets improvements in physical, emotional, social, and occupational functioning rather than focusing on resolution of pain itself. However, psychological therapies for chronic pain differ in their scope, duration, and goals, and thus show distinct patterns of treatment efficacy. These therapies fall into four categories: operant-behavioral therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based therapy, and acceptance and commitment therapy. The current article explores the theoretical distinctiveness, therapeutic targets, and effectiveness of these approaches as well as mechanisms and individual differences that factor into treatment response and pain-related dysfunction and distress. Implications for future research, dissemination of treatment, and the integration of psychological principles with other treatment modalities are also discussed. Keywords: pain management, multidisciplinary pain treatment, psychological therapy

  2. A bibliometric analysis of occupational therapy publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Gutman, Sharon A; Ho, Yuh-Shan; Fong, Kenneth N K

    2018-01-01

    Bibliometrics involves the statistical analysis of the publications in a specific discipline or subject area. A bibliometric analysis of the occupational therapy refereed literature is needed. A bibliometric analysis was completed of the occupational therapy literature from 1991-2014, indexed in the Science Citation Index-Expanded or the Social Sciences Citation Index. Publications were searched by title, abstract, keywords, and KeyWords Plus. Total number of article citations, citations per journal, and contributions per country, individual authors, and institution were calculated. 5,315 occupational therapy articles were published in 821 journals. It appears that there is a citation window of an approximate 10-year period between the time of publication and the peak number of citations an article receives. The top three most highly cited articles were published in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, JAMA, and Lancet. AJOT, BJOT and AOTJ published the largest number of occupational therapy articles with the United States, Australia, and Canada producing the highest number of publications. McMaster University, the University of Queensland, and the University of Toronto were the institutions that published the largest number of occupational therapy journal articles. The occupational therapy literature is growing and the frequency of article citation is increasing.

  3. [The origins of occupational therapy in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de Heredia-Torres, M; Brea-Rivero, M; Martínez-Piédrola, R M

    Occupational therapy is a young discipline in many aspects, but since ancient times an important number of reports have appeared in the health sciences literature and in the early days of neurology and psychiatry that can shed light on the origins and the fundamental principles that underlie this profession today. We have gathered examples that show how the philosophy and the clinical practice of the procedures used in occupational therapy stem from the process of humanising medical care. After analysing the information currently available to us on the history of the influence of humanism on the development of medicine in Spain, the authors believe they have found enough evidence to identify the precursors of occupational therapy at that point in history. Our study examines facts that appear to situate the earliest evidence of occupational therapy at the origins of Spanish neurology and psychiatry in the 15th century, and which were later to have such a powerful influence on the birth of certain aspects of Pinel's moral treatment. If we accept 'moral treatment' as being one of the main forerunners of occupational therapy, and if we take into account that the humanitarian way patients were dealt with in Spanish neurological and psychiatric institutions and hospitals in the 15th century had a notable influence on the principles that regulated that 'moral treatment', then it is reasonable to state that the earliest evidence of occupational therapy is to be found in the development of humanisation within Spanish medical care.

  4. Exposure to occupational therapy as a factor influencing recruitment to the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Nicole

    2015-08-01

    This article provides insight into the impact that exposure to an occupational therapist, in personal capacity or via a professional interaction, has on the decision to enter an occupational therapy undergraduate programme. A quantitative survey was completed by 139 occupational therapy students. The survey tool focussed on the students' exposure to a range of allied health professions (e.g. occupational therapy, physiotherapy, psychology) and investigated how exposure to occupational therapy had influenced their decision to enter the programme. The results indicated that over 70% of respondents had personal professional exposure to occupational therapy prior to making a career decision. Exposure most frequently involved occupational therapy intervention of a friend or family member. The majority of students who had professional exposure to occupational therapy (e.g. family, self, friend received occupational therapy) identified that it was the most influential factor in their career choice. Forty per cent of the occupational therapy students did not enter the programme straight from school and the influence of 'working with an occupational therapist' was noteworthy for mature aged students. Occupational therapists need to consider that every interaction they have with the community provides valuable information regarding the profession and gives insight into occupational therapy as a potential career path for other people. Additionally, the current research identifies there were differences in the impact, type and number of exposures for different student groups, and this potentially offers some insight into ways in which occupational therapy could target specific groups within the community to increase future diversity in the profession. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  5. Enabling occupation: occupation-based and client centred practice in Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Barcelos Pontes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Occupational therapists have always been dedicated to the human occupation study, however the client hasn’t always been seen as an occupational being, with needs, interests and individual goals. The concern for our clients’ engagement in occupation, rather than the acquisition or restoration of performance components, together with the gradual modification of the concept of occupation from work-related activities to purposeful human activity, requires a broadening of our scope of practice. The most current theories related to occupational therapy practice have highlightes the use of client centered and occupational based practices. In occupation-based, client-centred practice the client participates actively in negotiating goals, and client occupational goals are given priority and are placed at the centre of assessment, intervention and outcomes. There are numerous evidences in the literature with significantly positive results supporting these approaches. These approaches are based on the premises that goals and objectives of interventions should be focused in occupation and significant activities to the client and reflect the occupational therapy core values: an occupational-centred perspective that respects client’s choices, goals and values, promoting and supporting the engagement on meaningful activities.

  6. Occupational Therapy's Role with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Occupational Therapy’s Role with Autism Autism is a developmental disorder—typically diagnosed around age 3 years— that affects brain functions, specifically those areas that control social behaviors ...

  7. An Exploration of the Role of Occupation in School-Based Occupational Therapy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jeryl DiSanti

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of occupation in school-based occupational therapy practice. The research questions were (1) How do school-based occupational therapists describe the role of occupation during intervention? (2) Which theories of occupation do school-based occupational therapists associate with their own practice?…

  8. An Exploration of the Role of Occupation in School-Based Occupational Therapy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jeryl DiSanti

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of occupation in school-based occupational therapy practice. The research questions were (1) How do school-based occupational therapists describe the role of occupation during intervention? (2) Which theories of occupation do school-based occupational therapists associate with their own practice?…

  9. The Environmental Impact on Occupational Therapy Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skubik-Peplaski, Camille Louise; Howell, Dana; Hunter, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the environment influenced the intervention choices occupational therapists made for patients recovering from a stroke in an inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Three occupational therapists were observed providing intervention for six patients over a 16-month period. Treatment spaces included a therapy gym, gym with kitchen combination, and a home-like space. Furniture was added to the therapy gym to be more home-like midway through the study. Observations included therapist selection of treatment location and interventions, and observational data of the environment and interactions among therapists and patients. This study found that inpatient rehabilitation environments did influence interventions. The occupational therapists provided therapy in the standard therapy gym environment most often, whether it was enhanced to be more home-like or not, and predominately used preparatory methods.

  10. Occupational Therapy Interventions for Adults With Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Dawn; Gillen, Glen; Arbesman, Marian; Lieberman, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Evidence Connection articles provide a clinical application of systematic reviews developed in conjunction with the American Occupational Therapy Association's (AOTA's) Evidence-Based Practice project. The clinical condition discussed in this inaugural Evidence Connection article is adults with stroke. Findings from the systematic reviews on this topic were published in the January/February 2015 issue of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy and in AOTA's Occupational Therapy Practice Guidelines for Adults With Stroke (Wolf & Nilsen, 2015). Each article in this series will summarize the evidence from the published reviews on a given topic and presents an application of the evidence to a related clinical case. Evidence Connection articles illustrate how the research evidence from the reviews can be used to inform and guide clinical decision making.

  11. Physical therapy and occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radder, Danique L M; Sturkenboom, Ingrid H; van Nimwegen, Marlies; Keus, Samyra H; Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Vries, Nienke M

    2017-01-04

    Current medical management is only partially effective in controlling the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. As part of comprehensive multidisciplinary care, physical therapy and occupational therapy aim to support people with Parkinson's disease in dealing with the consequences of their disease in daily activities. In this narrative review, we address the limitations that people with Parkinson's disease may encounter despite optimal medical management, and we clarify both the unique and shared approaches that physical therapists and occupational therapists can apply in treating these limitations.

  12. Target marketing strategies for occupational therapy entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautzmann, L N; Kautzmann, F N; Navarro, F H

    1989-01-01

    Understanding marketing techniques is one of the skills needed by successful entre renews. Target marketing is an effective method for occupational therapy entrepreneurs to use in determining when and where to enter the marketplace. The two components of target marketing, market segmentation and the development of marketing mix strategies for each identified market segment, are described. The Profife of Attitudes Toward Health Care (PATH) method of psychographic market segmentation of health care consumers is presented. Occupational therapy marketing mix strategies for each PATH consumer group are delineated and compatible groupings of market segments are suggested.

  13. Role of occupational therapy after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowland Tennille

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Internationally recognized best practice care in the early management and rehabilitation of individuals following stroke includes multidisciplinary assessment and treatment by a coordinated team of health care professionals that includes occupational therapists. Occupational therapists assess the impact of changes in motor function, sensation, coordination, visual perception, and cognition on a person′s capacity to manage daily life tasks. Intervention improves participation in meaningful roles, tasks, and activities; remediates deficits; minimizes secondary complications; and provides education and support to the patient and caregivers. Occupational therapists′ focus on independence and function, individual goal-setting, and their specialist skills in task adaptation and environmental modification underpin the profession′s contribution to the multidisciplinary stroke rehabilitation team. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of occupational therapy practice in stroke patients.

  14. Promoting Resilience in Schools: A View from Occupational Health Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers teacher resilience from the viewpoint of a discipline concerned with the interactions between work design, management style and employee health and well-being: occupational health psychology. It will be suggested that there are strong parallels between interventions designed to promote resilience and those designed to reduce…

  15. Promoting Resilience in Schools: A View from Occupational Health Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers teacher resilience from the viewpoint of a discipline concerned with the interactions between work design, management style and employee health and well-being: occupational health psychology. It will be suggested that there are strong parallels between interventions designed to promote resilience and those designed to reduce…

  16. A Mosaic of Creativity in Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Bathje MS, OTR/L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Martha Branson-Banks, OT, provided the cover art for the summer 2014 issue of the Open Journal of Occupational Therapy. The piece is titled “Garden with thanks to Klimt” and is one of several mosaic art pieces in her collection of works. She created the piece with art glass and resin on an abandoned door. Her use of a repurposed door represents her belief in the capacity for transformation and beauty within each individual she has treated and taught throughout her career. Martha’s work as an occupational therapist, educator, and artist reminds us of the foundational beliefs of the occupational therapy profession, including the benefits of engagement in meaningful and creative activities.

  17. Occupational health and psychological well-being of industrial employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bhardwaj

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : In the present era of globalization of business the nature of work organizations and its environment are changing radically extending noticeable impact on individual′s job, safety, health, and well-being. Material & Methods : The present study was designed to examine the effects of overall occupational health on psychological well-being in a sample of 150 line-staff operating in a production organization. Psychometrically standardized scales were employed to assess the extent of occupational health and psychological well-being. Results : The analyses of the obtained data revealed that occupational health positively correlates with employees′ mental health. Conclusion : The employees who perceived their work and its physical and psycho-social environment as to be adequate and healthy maintained relatively better overall mental health.

  18. Occupational therapy students' perspectives on the core ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... To explore the perspectives of final-year occupational therapy students with regard to the ... Methods. This explorative study used three focus groups to obtain the ... Information from the focus groups was transcribed and analysed thematically to determine the findings.

  19. Perceptions of fieldwork in occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingwersen, Kate; Lyons, Nikki; Hitch, Danielle

    2017-02-01

    There are few studies in occupational therapy that compare the perceptions of supervisors and students regarding quality clinical placement programmes, and those that exist indicate substantial differences in the perceptions held by each group. This pilot study was conducted using a cross-sectional descriptive design, with a single questionnaire distributed to occupational therapy students and clinical supervisors. A total of 40 questionnaires were returned: 17 from students and 23 from clinical supervisors. Differences were found between the perceptions of occupational therapy students and clinical supervisors in response to four topics: preparation from the university for their placements; consistency across placement sites; instances of supervisors seeking feedback from students; and the burden associated with the placement-related workload for clinicians. Differences were found between the perceptions of occupational therapy students and clinical supervisors in response to four topics DISCUSSION: Different perceptions around preparation from universities and consistency across placement sites relate to the existing roles of each group: students are more aware of university preparation and clinical supervisors are more aware of organisational inconsistencies in their respective usual work environments. The discrepancy in the perceived seeking of feedback from students has also been reported in student debriefing sessions. The burdens perceived by clinical supervisors appear to be influenced by a belief that clinical education is an additional duty rather than a core role. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. An Exploration of Teacher Perceptions toward Occupational Therapy and Occupational Therapy Practices: A Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Vi; Hodgetts, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Many occupational therapists work in school-based practice, where collaborative consultation between teachers and therapists is critical for intervention effectiveness. This scoping review explores teacher perceptions toward occupational therapy (OT). Three themes emerged: (1) teachers' confusion over the OT role and scope of practice; (2)…

  1. The Educational Interaction between Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Kimberly K.; Howell, Dana M.

    2003-01-01

    A survey of occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) program directors (n=123) to identify the prevalence of shared learning found that two-thirds shared some coursework; most OT and PT students do not have opportunities to practice interdisciplinary teamwork; and some perceived benefits of shared learning also posed barriers. (Contains…

  2. Cognitive behavioural therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Rachel; Moore, Theresa Hm; Caldwell, Deborah; Davies, Philippa; Jones, Hannah; Furukawa, Toshi A; Lewis, Glyn; Hunot, Vivien

    2010-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all CBT approaches compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depressionTo examine the effectiveness and acceptability of different CBT approaches (cognitive therapy, rational emotive behaviour therapy, problem-solving therapy, self-control therapy and Coping with Depression course) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all CBT approaches compared with different psychological therapy approaches (psychodynamic, behavioural, humanistic, integrative, third wave CBT) for acute depression.

  3. Review of occupational therapy for people with chronic pain.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robinson, Katie

    2011-04-01

    Chronic pain is a significant health-care problem. This review aims to critically analyse occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain and identify significant factors influencing the future development of occupational therapy services for people with chronic pain.

  4. Occupational Therapy intervention for patiens with COPD, Rehabilitation at home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stina Meyer; Petersen, Anne Karin

    2011-01-01

    Describe and demonstrate Occupational Therapy (OT) intervention for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).......Describe and demonstrate Occupational Therapy (OT) intervention for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)....

  5. Occupational therapy use by older adults with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Cutchin, Malcolm P; Weinberger, Morris; Meyer, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Occupational therapy may significantly improve cancer survivors' ability to participate in activities, thereby improving quality of life. Little is known, however, about the use of occupational therapy services by adults with cancer. The objective of this study was to understand what shapes patterns of occupational therapy use to help improve service delivery. We examined older (age >65 yr) adults diagnosed with breast, prostate, lung, or melanoma (skin) cancer between 2004 and 2007 (N = 27,131) using North Carolina Central Cancer Registry data linked to Medicare billing claims. Survivors who used occupational therapy within 1 yr before their cancer diagnosis were more likely to use occupational therapy after diagnosis but also experienced the highest levels of comorbidities. Survivors with Stage 4 cancers or lung cancer were less likely to use occupational therapy. These findings suggest possible disparities in utilization of occupational therapy by older adults with cancer. Copyright © 2014 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  6. The growth of the profession of occupational therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newton, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Occupational therapy is a frequently unknown and misunderstood profession. However, occupational therapy practitioners have a rich history in the US Army, from the inception of the profession to current challenges...

  7. Benefits of occupational therapy in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Paran; Kalra, Lalit

    2007-08-01

    Stroke is the largest single cause of severe physical disability and rehabilitation to reduce functional deficits is the most effective treatment. Occupational therapists play a central role in rehabilitation as members of a multidisciplinary team. Occupational therapy is a client-centered profession that uses meaningful activities across the spectrum of physical and mental domains to reduce limitations after stroke. Where remediation is not possible, occupational therapists implement compensatory strategies to promote independence. Rehabilitation is based on the concept of brain plasticity, which implies that it is possible to modulate or facilitate cerebral reorganization by external inputs. Occupational therapy activities are specifically geared to promote this re-education process and encourage the development of lost skills while accommodating for specific physical, cognitive or affective impairments. Principles of motor, sensory, cognitive and affective rehabilitation are incorporated into effective task-specific activities and environments are adapted to create the optimum conditions for successful rehabilitation. Several promising new rehabilitation approaches, based on neuropsychology and technological advances, have been developed to complement therapy inputs and exploit the brain's capacity to recover from stroke.

  8. The linkage between patterns of daily occupations and occupational balance: Applications within occupational science and occupational therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Mona; Orban, Kristina; Argentzell, Elisabeth; Bejerholm, Ulrika; Tjörnstrand, Carina; Erlandsson, Lena-Karin; Håkansson, Carita

    2017-01-01

    Patterns of daily occupations (PDO) and occupational balance (OB) are recurring phenomena in the literature. Both are related with health and well-being, which makes them central in occupational therapy practice and occupational science. The aim was to review how PDO and OB are described in the literature, to propose a view of how the two constructs may be linked, and elaborate on how such a view may benefit occupational science and occupational therapy. The literature was analysed by latent and manifest content analysis and comparative analysis. The findings were summarized in a model, framing PDO as the more objective and OB as the more subjective result from an interaction between personal preferences and environmental influences. The proposed model does not assume a cause-effect relationship between the targeted constructs, rather a mutual influence and a joint reaction to influencing factors. Indicators of PDO and OB were identified, as well as tools for assessing PDO and OB. The authors propose that discerning PDO and OB as separate but interacting phenomena may be useful in developing a theoretical discourse in occupational science and enhancing occupational therapy practice. Although the scope of this study was limited, the proposed view may hopefully inspire further scrutiny of constructs.

  9. Gestalt Therapy: Its Inheritance from Gestalt Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yontef, Gary M.

    When adequately elaborated, the basic method of Gestalt therapy can be traced to the phenomenological field theory of Gestalt psychology. Gestalt therapy differs from Gestalt psychology not because of a difference in philosophy or method, but because of different contexts; the clinical context has different demands than those of basic research.…

  10. 42 CFR 410.59 - Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient occupational therapy services... Other Health Services § 410.59 Outpatient occupational therapy services: Conditions. (a) Basic rule... occupational therapy services only if they are furnished by an individual meeting the qualifications in part...

  11. Animal-Assisted Therapy and Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Gena; Stella, Tiffany; Wilkison, Megan; Szczech Moser, Christy; Hoelzel, Allison; Hendricks, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The use of animals for therapeutic purposes has been documented in the literature for centuries. This review will highlight evidence of the benefits of animal-assisted therapy as well as provide a plethora of resources for therapists interested in learning more about how animals can provide restorative benefits for their clients.

  12. Occupational therapy in hospital based care in the Netherlands: a comparison of occupational therapy in general care (nursing homes, rehabilitation centres and general hospitals) and psychiatric care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.J.; Dekker, J.; Zee, J. van der; Lankhorst, G.

    1996-01-01

    The case of a 26-year old woman with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is presented. Multidimensional assessment showing severe debilitating fatigue and considerable psychological, social and occupational impairment confirmed the diagnosis. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) was based on a tested causal

  13. Occupational therapy in hospital based care in the Netherlands: a comparison of occupational therapy in general care (nursing homes, rehabilitation centres and general hospitals) and psychiatric care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.J.; Dekker, J.; Zee, J. van der; Lankhorst, G.

    1996-01-01

    The case of a 26-year old woman with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is presented. Multidimensional assessment showing severe debilitating fatigue and considerable psychological, social and occupational impairment confirmed the diagnosis. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) was based on a tested causal

  14. Psychodynamic therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Rachel; Moore, Theresa Hm; Davies, Philippa; Caldwell, Deborah; Jones, Hannah; Lewis, Glyn; Hunot, Vivien

    2010-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all psychodynamic therapy approaches compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of different psychodynamic therapy approaches (drive/structural, relational and integrative analytic models) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all psychodynamic therapy approaches compared with different psychological therapy approaches (behavioural, humanistic, integrative, cognitive-behavioural, 'third-wave' CBT) for acute depression.

  15. Occupational Therapy Home Safety Intervention via Telehealth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori E. Breeden

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Photography can be an effective addition for education-based telehealth services delivered by an occupational therapist.  In this study, photography was used as antecedent to telehealth sessions delivered by an occupational therapist focused on narrative learning about home safety.  After taking photographs of past home safety challenges, six participants experienced three web-based occupational therapy sessions each.  Sessions were recorded and transcribed.  Data were examined using content analysis.  A content analysis identified the following themes as well as an understanding of the learning process.  Analyses yielded themes of: the value of photos to support learning, the value of narrative learning related to home safety education, abstract versus concrete learners.  Procedural findings are included to support future endeavors.  Findings indicate that within a wellness context, home safety education for older adults can be delivered effectively via telehealth when using photography as a part of an occupational therapy intervention.

  16. Occupational Therapy in the Intensive Care Unit: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinreich, Mark; Herman, Jennifer; Dickason, Stephanie; Mayo, Helen

    2017-07-01

    This paper is a synthesis of the available literature on occupational therapy interventions performed in the adult intensive care unit (ICU). The databases of Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Library, ClinicalTrials.gov and CINAHL databases were systematically searched from inception through August 2016 for studies of adults who received occupational therapy interventions in the ICU. Of 1,938 citations reviewed, 10 studies met inclusion criteria. Only one study explicitly discussed occupational therapy interventions performed and only one study specifically tested the efficacy of occupational therapy. Future research is needed to clarify the specific interventions and role of occupational therapy in the ICU and the efficacy of these interventions.

  17. Who wants to go to occupational therapy school? Characteristics of Norwegian occupational therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsaksen, Tore; Kvarsnes, Hildegunn; Dahl, Mona

    2016-07-01

    Research on occupational therapy students has often been concerned with quite narrow topics. However, the basic characteristics of this group are yet to be examined in more depth. This study aimed to explore the sociodemographic, education-related, and work-related characteristics of occupational therapy students. A sample of 160 occupational therapy students in Norway participated. Differences between cohorts of students were examined with one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA) for continuous variables and with chi-square tests for categorical variables. The sample had a mean age of 24 years and was predominantly female (79%). More than one -third of the students had one or both parents in an occupation requiring health education, whereas two-thirds of the students had one or both parents in an occupation requiring higher education. At entry, 57% of the participants had occupational therapy as their preferred choice of education and 43% had previous higher education experience. The few significant differences between the study cohorts were negligible. In the education programmes, specific attention may be considered for students with characteristics associated with increased risk of poorer study performance or other problems. This may concern male students and students with no previous higher education experience.

  18. The Portrayal of Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science in Canadian Newspapers: A Content Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsing-Yee (Emily Chai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of occupational therapy is to enable people to participate in the activities of everyday life. The demand for occupational therapists in Canada is expected to grow sharply at an annual growth rate of 3.2%, compared to 0.7% for all occupations. At the same time, it is believed by occupational therapists in Canada that the Canadian public does not understand the role of occupational therapy. Occupational science is an emerging basic science field that supports the practice of occupational therapy. Given that newspapers are one source the public uses to obtain information and that newspapers are seen to shape public opinions, the purpose of this study is to investigate how “occupational therapy” is covered in Canadian newspapers from the term’s first appearance in 1917 until 2016 and how “occupational science” is covered from the term’s first appearance in 1989 to 2016. We interrogated the findings through the lens of three non-newspaper sources—two academic journals: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy (CJOT and Journal of Occupational Science (JOS; and one Canadian magazine: Occupational Therapy Now (OTN. We found that medical terms were prevalent in the newspaper articles covering occupational therapy similar to the presence of medical terms in the CJOT and OTN. However, the newspapers missed contemporary shifts in occupational therapy as evident in the CJOT, OTN and JOS—such as the increased engagement with enablement, occupational justice and other occupational concepts. The newspapers also failed to portray the societal issues that occupational therapy engages with on behalf of and with their clients, and the newspapers did not cover many of the client groups of occupational therapy. Occupational science was only mentioned in n = 26 articles of the nearly 300 Canadian newspapers covered with no concrete content linked to occupational science. The scope of occupational therapy presented in Canadian

  19. Occupational Therapy clinical documentation: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Simon Benevides Panzeri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Occupational therapy clinical documentation comprises all recorded information about a client/patient/user, from forwarding to discharge, and it may integrate the patient’s record or serve as support for the exclusive practice of occupational therapy. In Brazil, despite being a mandatory and routine practice, little scientific-technical material on the subject is available for the support of professionals. This study aimed to identify, through literature review, information for greater understanding and support to the practice of professional activity. The data were analyzed and presented according to the different themes identified, seeking common, complementary and divergent points on each theme. Twelve articles were included in the study. The information obtained addressed themes such as registration methods, perception and attitudes of professionals, communication and language, quality, and others. It was possible to achieve a preliminary approach to the subject and have an overview of aspects related to occupational therapy clinical documentation, but some segmented information and several weaknesses were found

  20. Reflections on a trajectory in Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Lancmam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This text is part of the memorial presented as a requirement of the contest for full professor positionin Occupational Therapy at the School of Medicine from the University of Sao Paulo. The reflections presentedaim to trace the trajectory contextualized in different periods and institutions where the writer has worked, andhow they have blended with the academic development of Occupational Therapy itself. The text also seeks todiscuss the solidification process of the writer’s training as a researcher and the results arisen thereof. Thesecourses were built on research and culminated in the Mental Health and Work search line and its interfaces withOccupational Therapy. Across the text, the academic and scientific development in the field of occupationaltherapy is reflected and, finally, discussions are pointed out on the necessary consolidation of the area in researchand graduate studies and, therefore, in the dissemination of knowledge by publications indexed and relevant tothe field. The text is both a personal account and a true representation of the profession development in Brazilin the past thirty years.

  1. Promoting Translational Research Among Movement Science, Occupational Science, and Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainburg, Robert L; Liew, Sook-Lei; Frey, Scott H; Clark, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Integration of research in the fields of neural control of movement and biomechanics (collectively referred to as movement science) with the field of human occupation directly benefits both areas of study. Specifically, incorporating many of the quantitative scientific methods and analyses employed in movement science can help accelerate the development of rehabilitation-relevant research in occupational therapy (OT) and occupational science (OS). Reciprocally, OT and OS, which focus on the performance of everyday activities (occupations) to promote health and well-being, provide theoretical frameworks to guide research on the performance of actions in the context of social, psychological, and environmental factors. Given both fields' mutual interest in the study of movement as it relates to health and disease, the authors posit that combining OS and OT theories and principles with the theories and methods in movement science may lead to new, impactful, and clinically relevant knowledge. The first step is to ensure that individuals with OS or OT backgrounds are academically prepared to pursue advanced study in movement science. In this article, the authors propose 2 strategies to address this need.

  2. Occupational Therapy and Special Education: Team Approach to Prevocational Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourk, Jane Davis; Mitchell, Marlys M.

    Since passage of P.L. 94-142, the number of occupational therapists being employed in public schools is increasing significantly; the implications of this trend for special education are considered. Legislation regarding occupational therapy is reviewed, particularly regarding the use of occupational therapy in the school system. Several models of…

  3. Participation and occupation in occupational therapy models of practice: A discussion of possibilities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson-Lund, Maria; Nyman, Anneli

    2017-11-01

    Occupation has been the focus in occupational therapy practice to greater or lesser degrees from a historical viewpoint. This evokes a need to discuss whether concepts that are added to our field will enhance or blur our focus on occupation. To explore how the concept of participation in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is related to the concept of occupation by reviewing and comparing its use in three models of practice within occupational therapy. The aim was also to generate discussion on possibilities and challenges concerning the relationship of participation and occupation. The models reviewed were The Model of Human Occupation (MOHO), the Canadian Model of Occupational Performance and Engagement (CMOP-E) and the Occupational Therapy Intervention Process Model (OTIPM). The concept of participation was related to occupation in different ways in these models. Based on the review some challenges and considerations for occupational therapy were generated. Relating the concept of participation from the ICF to the concept of occupation in models of practice can be challenging. At the same time, relating the concepts can be a resource to develop occupational therapy and the understanding of occupational issues in society.

  4. Occupational Therapy Students' Perceptions of Spirituality in Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthembu, Thuli Godfrey; Ahmed, Firdous; Nkuna, Thembi; Yaca, Khalipha

    2015-12-01

    Spirituality is recognized as an essential and integral component of a holistic approach in occupational therapy practice. However, little is known about occupational therapy students' perceptions regarding spirituality in learning context. This study used qualitative exploratory, descriptive design to explore the occupational therapy students' perceptions about spirituality in training. Using purposive sampling, four semi-structured interviews were conducted with two students, a lecturer and an occupational therapist. In addition, two focus groups were conducted with students in order to collect data. Data collected were audio-taped; transcribed and thematic analysis was used to identify themes. The analysis resulted in emergence of four themes: "Unique to every individual," "Spirituality in occupational therapy," "To be or not to be taught," and "The Real world." Participants perceived spirituality as an individually experienced. The study contributes to the body of knowledge base of occupational therapy education regarding spirituality. However, there is a need for guidelines to integrate spirituality in occupational therapy training.

  5. Towards inclusive occupational therapy: Introducing the CORE approach for inclusive and occupation-focused practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Robert B

    2017-06-29

    Occupation is a human right and a social determinant of health. It is also taken for granted. Having access to, and participating in, occupation, is intricately linked to positive health and wellbeing. Despite theory and evidence to support the link between occupation, health and wellbeing, occupational therapists can struggle with applying an occupation focus in practice and knowing how to use occupational frameworks to enable occupation. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Capabilities, Opportunities, Resources and Environments (CORE) approach for inclusive and occupation-focused practice. It provides occupational therapists with a means of operationalising occupational enablement and facilitating social inclusion. The CORE approach is introduced by linking its main ideas to Economist and Nobel Prize Laureate Amartya Sen's capabilities approach, as well as findings from the author's doctoral research into entrenched disadvantage and social inclusion. Practical questions guided by the CORE approach's acronym are given to explore how the approach can be utilised alongside other occupational models and frameworks to encourage strategies for effective enablement through occupation for social inclusion. As experts in enabling occupation, occupational therapists can use the CORE approach to design occupation-focused interventions and promote inclusive occupational therapy. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  6. Occupational stress, relaxation therapies, exercise and biofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Franklin

    2001-01-01

    Occupational stress is a widespread occurrence in the United States. It is a contributing factor to absenteeism, disease, injury and lowered productivity. In general stress management programs in the work place that include relaxation therapies, exercise, and biofeedback have been shown to reduce the physiological symptoms such as hypertension, and increase job satisfaction and job performance. Strategies to implement a successful stress management program include incorporating the coping activities into one's daily schedule, monitoring one's symptoms and stressors, and being realistic in setting up a schedule that is relevant and attainable. A short form of meditation, daily exercise program and the use of heart rate or thermal biofeedback can be helpful to a worker experiencing occupational stress.

  7. Occupation-centred, occupation-based, occupation-focused: same, same or different? Previously published in Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy 2013; 20: 162-173.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Anne G

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning of the occupational therapy profession, engagement in occupation has been valued as the primary therapeutic agent as well as the goal of intervention. While there are few today who would not support this idea, occupational therapists continue to struggle with implementing their beliefs through "what we do" and "how we do it". Contributing to this problem is their failure to use terminology in a manner that clearly defines what and how occupational therapists do what they do in occupational therapy research, education, and practice. The author will, therefore, first discuss some key occupational therapy terms and propose that they represent an occupation-related taxonomy that can be used to more clearly define and describe for occupational therapists and others what they do and how they do what they do as occupational therapists. Then, with a goal of fostering critical self-reflection among occupational scientists and occupational therapy researchers, educators, and practitioners, the author will go through the stages of the occupational therapy process outlined in the Occupational Therapy Intervention Process Model (OTIPM) and demonstrate how a more precise use of this occupation-related taxonomy can facilitate maximizing the power of occupation in practice.

  8. 42 CFR 409.23 - Physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech-language pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... therapy or speech-language pathology services must be furnished— (1) By qualified physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, occupational therapists, occupational therapy assistants or speech-language... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Physical therapy, occupational therapy and...

  9. Attitudes towards fibromyalgia: A survey of Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical therapy and occupational therapy students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badwall Parminder

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequent use of chiropractic, naturopathic, and physical and occupational therapy by patients with fibromyalgia has been emphasized repeatedly, but little is known about the attitudes of these therapists towards this challenging condition. Methods We administered a cross-sectional survey to 385 senior Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical and occupational therapy students in their final year of studies, that inquired about attitudes towards the diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia. Results 336 students completed the survey (response rate 87%. While they disagreed about the etiology (primarily psychological 28%, physiological 23%, psychological and physiological 15%, unsure 34%, the majority (58% reported that fibromyalgia was difficult to manage. Respondants were also conflicted in whether treatment should prioritize symptom relief (65% or functional gains (85%, with the majority (58% wanting to do both. The majority of respondents (57% agreed that there was effective treatment for fibromyalgia and that they possessed the required clinical skills to manage patients (55%. Chiropractic students were most skeptical in regards to fibromyalgia as a useful diagnostic entity, and most likely to endorse a psychological etiology. In our regression model, only training in naturopathic medicine (unstandardized regression coefficient = 0.33; 95% confidence interval = 0.11 to 0.56 and the belief that effective therapies existed (unstandardized regression coefficient = 0.42; 95% confidence interval = 0.30 to 0.54 were associated with greater confidence in managing patients with fibromyalgia. Conclusion The majority of senior Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical and occupational therapy students, and in particular those with naturopathic training, believe that effective treatment for fibromyalgia exists and that they possess the clinical skillset to effectively manage this disorder. The majority place high priority

  10. Evidence Considerations for Mobile Devices in the Occupational Therapy Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Erickson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile app-based device utilization, including smartphones and handheld tablets, suggests a need to evaluate evidence to guide selection and implementation of these devices in the occupational therapy process. The purpose of the research was to explore the current body of evidence in relation to mobile app-based devices and to identify factors in the use of these devices throughout the occupational therapy process. Following review of available occupational therapy profession guidelines, assistive technology literature, and available mobile device research, practitioners using mobile app-based devices in occupational therapy should consider three areas: client needs, practitioner competence, and device factors. The purpose of this guideline is to identify factors in the selection and use of mobile app-based devices throughout the occupational therapy process based on available evidence. Considerations for mobile device implementation during the occupational therapy process is addressed, including evaluating outcomes needs, matching device with the client, and identifying support needs of the client.

  11. The Bluebirds: World War I Soldiers' Experiences of Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Judith; Robinson, Katie; Moloney, Stephanie

    More is known about the experience of occupational therapists than the experience of patients during the profession's early years. We examined soldiers' experiences of occupational therapy in American Base Hospital 9 in France during World War I through analysis of a 53-line poem by Corporal Frank Wren contained in the unpublished memoir of occupational therapy reconstruction aide Lena Hitchcock. Historical documentary research methods and thematic analysis were used to analyze the poem, the memoir, and the hospital's published history. The poem describes the activities engaged in during occupational therapy, equipment used, and the context of therapy. It articulates positive dimensions of the experience of engaging in activities, including emotional benefits, diversion, and orthopedic benefits. Previous historical research has identified core philosophical premises about the use of occupational therapy; in this article, the enactment of these principles is established through the analysis of a soldier's account of receiving occupational therapy.

  12. The growth of the profession of occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Occupational therapy is a frequently unknown and misunderstood profession. However, occupational therapy practitioners have a rich history in the US Army, from the inception of the profession to current challenges. The article is a chronicle of historical highlights of occupational therapy which discusses how this history is harmonious with that of occupational therapy in the US Army. In researching this topic, several concepts emerged: (1) occupational therapy grew from a belief that people need occupation, or activity, to remain healthy; (2) people learn the best through purposeful activity; (3) the number of occupational therapists in the US Army decreases during peacetime, but in time of war the benefit of this profession is recognized and its numbers increase; (4) although models of health care change, the primary focus of occupational therapy remains constant; and (5) there is a direct correlation between the philosophy of occupational therapy and the philosophy of treating Soldiers with combat stress reactions, a "go-to-war" mission of Army occupational therapy practitioners. As such, the management of these Soldiers is enhanced by the unique skills offered by this profession.

  13. Occupational therapy internship in the community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreisi Carbone Anversa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The organization of Primary Health Care through the family health strategy calls for comprehensive and continuous attention of the residents on their area of expertise. Objective: To reflect on Occupational Therapy practice next to a Family Health Strategy (FHS, aiming to raise and expand the profession inclusion in this area and discuss the challenges and field potentials. Method: This is a report of professional and academic experiences that describes training and services activities. The practical activities were developed in partnership with FHS in Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The group, composed by 10 interns, conducted household interventions, all accompanied by supervisors. On 27 cases assisted, each individual received the Occupational Therapy service once a week, during one hour. Results: It was exciting to know, in fact, the subjects reality, their social context, daily life, organizational mode - allowing a series of interventions which would not be appropriate in a clinical environment. In addition, the home care provided a closer relationship among health professionals with patients and their families. Conclusion: Through mistakes, successes, obstacles and learning, a process of maturation and experiences with unique subjects, various diseases, illness and care, resulted in a unique moment that made possible to suggest how important it is, for both trainees and society, to make real this link between academia and health facilities, seeking services qualification.

  14. Human rights in occupational therapy education: A step towards a more occupationally just global society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Emma; Aplin, Tammy; Rodger, Sylvia

    2017-04-01

    Education on human rights will place occupational therapists in a strong position to address societal inequities that limit occupational engagement for many client groups. The imminent changes to the Minimum Standard for the Education of Occupational Therapists engender efforts towards social change and will require university-level human rights education. This education might enhance the profession's influence on disadvantaging social structures in order to effect social change. To contribute to the evidence base for social change education in occupational therapy, this research aims to understand the knowledge, skills, confidence and learning experiences of occupational therapy students who completed a human rights course. Final year occupational therapy students responded to questionnaires which included listing human rights, a human rights scale measuring knowledge and confidence for working towards human rights, and open questions. Numbers of rights listed, knowledge scores and confidence scores were calculated. Responses to the open questions were thematically analysed. After completing a human rights course, students had good knowledge and moderate confidence to work with human rights. Three themes were identified including 'learning about human rights', 'learning about structural, societal and global perspectives on occupational engagement' and 'learning how occupational therapists can work with groups, communities and populations: becoming articulate and empowered'. Human rights education fosters the development of occupational therapists who are skilled, knowledgeable, confident and empowered to address occupational injustices, according to these research findings. To develop a more occupationally just global society, education that considers iniquitous social structures and human rights is necessary. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  15. Occupational therapy for care home residents with stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Walker; J. Fletcher-Smith; C. Sackley; M. Feltham; E. Steultjens

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review we aim to measure the effects of occupational therapy interventions (provided directly by an occupational therapist or under the supervision of an occupational therapist) targeted at improving, restoring and maintaining independence in ADL (to include both self-care and

  16. Occupational therapy for care home residents with stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, Esther; Fletcher-Smith, J.; Walker, M.; Feltham, M.; Sackley, C.

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review we aim to measure the effects of occupational therapy interventions (provided directly by an occupational therapist or under the supervision of an occupational therapist) targeted at improving, restoring and maintaining independence in ADL (to include both self-care and lei

  17. Role of Sonographic Imaging in Occupational Therapy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy practice is grounded in the delivery of occupation-centered, patient-driven treatments that engage clients in the process of doing to improve health. As emerging technologies, such as medical imaging, find their way into rehabilitation practice, it is imperative that occupational therapy practitioners assess whether and how these tools can be incorporated into treatment regimens that are dually responsive to the medical model of health care and to the profession’s foundation in occupation. Most medical imaging modalities have a discrete place in occupation-based intervention as outcome measures or for patient education; however, sonographic imaging has the potential to blend multiple occupational therapy practice forms to document treatment outcomes, inform clinical reasoning, and facilitate improved functional performance when used as an accessory tool in direct intervention. Use of medical imaging is discussed as it relates to occupational foundations and the professional role within the context of providing efficient, effective patient-centered rehabilitative care. PMID:25871607

  18. [Co-therapy in intercultural clinical psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocreau, Jean-Bernard; Martins-Borges, Lucienne

    2013-01-01

    Numerous clinicians practicing systemic psychotherapy have recognized the relevance of co-therapy, an intervention model involving at least two clinicians. Intercultural psychology and ethnopsychiatry have been inspired by the principles of co-therapy and have adapted it to the intercultural context. Our objective is to illustrate how co-therapy works in intercultural psychology, as it has been developed by the Specialized Psychological Services for Immigrants and for Refugees (SAPSIR). This intervention model facilitates the working through processes of mourning and of identity, important issues with migrant individuals. Finally, this practice cannot be reduced to the mere application of techniques including some cultural elements; it implies a special way of being in relationship with others, with oneself and with one's knowledge.

  19. Spirituality in occupational therapy: do we practice what we teach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Douglas N; Stecher, Jo; Briggs-Peppler, Kayla M; Chittenden, Chelsea M; Rubira, Joseph; Wismer, Lindsay K

    2014-02-01

    This mixed-method study examined the responses of 97 occupational therapists on the subject of spirituality in occupational therapy practice. The inclusion of spirituality into the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework (2008) implies that clinicians address spirituality as a component of client-centered practice. This research revealed a gap between education, theory, and practice as evidenced in the quantitative and qualitative data. Although occupational therapy is intended to be holistic, therapists require a more complete understanding of what spirituality is and what the role of the occupational therapist is when addressing spirituality in evaluation or treatment. The discussion of this research provides information for future occupational therapy educators and educational programs as they seek to incorporate the construct of spirituality into curricula.

  20. Independence: proposing an initial framework for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Bethan

    2017-11-01

    The concept of independence is common in occupational therapy theory and practice but has rarely been clearly defined or conceptualized within in occupational therapy literature and there seems to be no standard definition. This can result in ambiguity, which potentially jeopardizes client-centred practice. This paper proposes an occupational therapy independence framework (OTIF) that synthesizes the range of characterizations of independence in a practically useful and occupation-centred manner. A review of literature, clinical experience, doctoral research and conversations with occupational therapists and disabled people, in particular those involved in a disability activism group and people with physical disabilities, has led to the development of the OTIF. Independence and interdependence, as characterized in the OTIF, occur when an individual exerts choice over occupational performance and can engage in occupations in a manner acceptable to the individual. Interdependence results when occupations are performed with another person whereas independence involves solitary occupational performance. Dependence typically results from inability to choose occupations or a mismatch between performance capacity and environmental factors. The OTIF has the potential to clarify the conceptualization of independence within occupational therapy theory and practice. This initial proposal is presented to stimulate debate and discussion.

  1. Parent Perceptions of School-Based Occupational Therapy Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jeryl D.; Elkin, Kathleen; Wechsler, Julie; Byrd, Lindsey

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore the perceptions of parents of children receiving occupational therapy in educational settings, understand the importance of the parent/occupational therapist relationship and its impact on the outcomes of therapy. In addition, this study aims to reveal best practices when providing services within the school system in…

  2. Parent Perceptions of School-Based Occupational Therapy Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jeryl D.; Elkin, Kathleen; Wechsler, Julie; Byrd, Lindsey

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore the perceptions of parents of children receiving occupational therapy in educational settings, understand the importance of the parent/occupational therapist relationship and its impact on the outcomes of therapy. In addition, this study aims to reveal best practices when providing services within the school system in…

  3. Occupational therapy for community dwelling elderly people: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Jellema, S.; Bakker, E.B.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Occupational therapy might play an important role in maintaining independent living for community dwelling elderly people. The aim of this systematic review is to determine whether occupational therapy improves outcome for people who are >/=60 years and are living independently. METHODS:

  4. Inpatients’ perspectives of occupational therapy in acute mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, KH; Morris, J; Craik, C

    2007-01-01

    Background Research into service users’ views of occupational therapy in acute mental health is extremely limited. This collaborative study between South West London and St George’s Mental Health NHS Trust and Brunel University (UK) obtained inpatients’ perspectives of occupational therapy. Methods Service users and occupational therapists were involved in designing a self-report questionnaire and, following training, in recruiting participants and collecting data. Results Si...

  5. Past Negative Time Perspective as a Predictor of Grade Point Average in Occupational Therapy Doctoral Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pat J. Precin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Time perspective is a fundamental dimension in psychological time, dividing human experiences into past, present, and future. Time perspective influences individuals’ functioning in all occupations, including education. Previous research has examined the relationship between time perspective and academic outcomes, but the same research has not been done, to date, with occupational therapy doctoral students. This quantitative, cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between time perspective and academic success in occupational therapy doctoral students across the United States. Data from the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI and grade point averages (GPAs were collected from 50 participants via surveymonkey.com. Past Negative time perspective statistically predicted GPA in the negative direction (p = .001 for students in pre-professional OTD programs, but did not predict GPA for post-professional students. Age, gender, and learning environment did not significantly influence the prediction of GPA in either group. The method and results of this study demonstrate that the ZTPI, an instrument used in the field of psychology, may have value in the profession of occupational therapy and occupational therapy doctoral programs.

  6. Contribution of Occupational Therapy to funcional approach in personality disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellido Mainar, J R

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Personality disorders ( personality disorder F03.675 are defined by a rigid pattern of unadapting behaviours that, on the short and medium term generate a significant socio environmental deterioration. The level of psychosocial function or dysfunction is a first class indicator when assessing the extent and assessment of the personality disorder.Psychotherapy ( psychotherapy F04.754 intervenes in the psychosocial compounds of this disorder by designing specific programs for the training in psychosocial skills (conductual-dialectic therapy. Occupational Therapy ( occupational therapy E02.831.489 is a health science with a long history in socioenvironmental therapy of mental diseases F04.754.864 . The focal point is the assessment of the disease, disorder or social unadaptation impact in the individual's occupation functionality. This science puts forward a wide, integrating concept of functionality, which is divided into three occupation areas: productive occupational area, self maintenance area and leisure time area.In the first part of this paper, the extent and features of the occupational disfunction in the personality disorder are analysed employing the occupational therapy method.Based on our six-year experience, a method for socioenvironmental treatment based on two models of occupational therapy (human occupation model and Canadian model is suggested in the second part of the paper

  7. Method for the evidence-based reviews on occupational therapy and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbesman, Marian; Lieberman, Deborah; Berlanstein, Debra R

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based reviews of the literature relevant to adults with stroke are important to the practice of occupational therapy. We describe the four questions that served as the focus for the evidence-based reviews of the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions for adults with stroke. The questions include occupation- and activity-based interventions to improve occupational performance and social participation after stroke, as well as interventions for motor, cognitive, and psychological and emotional impairments after stroke. We include the background for the reviews; the process followed for addressing each question, including search terms and search strategy; the databases searched; and the methods used to summarize and critically appraise the literature. The final number of articles included in each evidence-based review; a summary of the themes of the results; the strengths and limitations of the findings; and implications for practice, education, and research are presented.

  8. Occupational Therapy Interventions for Adolescents With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomchek, Scott; Koenig, Kristie Patten; Arbesman, Marian; Lieberman, Deborah

    Evidence Connection articles provide a clinical application of systematic reviews developed in conjunction with the American Occupational Therapy Association's (AOTA's) Evidence-Based Practice Project. In this Evidence Connection article, we describe a case report of an adolescent with autism spectrum disorder. The occupational therapy assessment and treatment processes for school, home, community, and transition settings are described. Findings from the systematic reviews on this topic were published in the September/October 2015 issue of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy and in AOTA's Occupational Therapy Practice Guidelines for Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder. Each article in this series summarizes the evidence from the published reviews on a given topic and presents an application of the evidence to a related clinical case. Evidence Connection articles illustrate how the research evidence from the reviews can be used to inform and guide clinical decision making. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  9. Future of mental health occupational therapy: student perspective and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Sarah; Bunger, Theresa; Courchesne, Kim; Smith, Katie A; Willoughby, M Marie

    2007-01-01

    Occupational therapy has been gradually slipping away from its foundation in mental health practice. In order to provide the best services to individuals with mental health disorders, the occupational therapy profession must maintain and expand its involvement in this area of practice. The purpose of this paper is to explore the threats and opportunities to promote education and practice in mental health from a student perspective. The authors reviewed the literature, distributed questionnaires, and conducted focus groups with occupational therapy students at a southeastern university. Based on findings in the literature and of the focus groups with students, the authors have drawn a list of suggestions to improve the visibility of occupational therapy in mental health care. These suggestions are for occupational therapy educational programs, mental health practitioners, AOTA, and state associations.

  10. Occupational therapy practice in hospital-based stroke rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Louise; Nugent, Nicole; Biros, Lenka

    2012-03-01

    Occupational therapy after stroke represents a complex intervention. The aim of this observational study was to document the content of occupational therapy stroke rehabilitation in an Australian general rehabilitation ward. A behavioural mapping tool recorded 22 occupational therapy sessions at five-minute intervals for nine participants with stroke (mean age 70.6 years, 88.9% female). The mean session length was 41 minutes. The focus of therapy was predominantly at body functions (mean 16.5 minutes) and motor and perceptual impairments were addressed most often. The overall amount of occupational therapy provided was consistent with session lengths reported from effective stroke units and recommended by stroke guidelines. However, the results highlight the difficulties for occupational therapists working within the hospital environment, including practice that was largely restricted to the level of impairment and basic activities of daily living.

  11. Evaluation of evidence in Occupational Therapy for stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Nygren, C.; Matzen, P.

    2011-01-01

    and the quality evaluated using an evidence taxonomy and an evidence hierarchy. Results: Evidence arose providing support for a client-centred approach, entailing outcome related to better ability to recall goals, the patients feeling more involved and able to manage more everyday life occupations after......Evidence-based practice creates practice that integrates research-driven evidence with clinical expertise and patients’ preferences in clinical decision-making. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate and evaluate the quality and applicability of scientific research in occupational therapy...... rehabilitation. There is also considerable evidence for the use of everyday life occupations in occupational therapy. Occupational therapy was evaluated as an important aspect of stroke rehabilitation improving outcomes in everyday life occupations including activities of daily living (ADL) and participation...

  12. Occupation and its relationship with health and wellbeing: the threshold concept for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortune, Tracy; Kennedy-Jones, Mary

    2014-10-01

    We introduce the educational framework of 'threshold concepts' and discuss its utility in understanding the fundamental difficulties learners have in understanding ways of thinking and practising as occupational therapists. We propose that the relationship between occupation and health is a threshold concept for occupational therapy because of students' trouble in achieving lasting conceptual change in relation to their understanding of it. The authors present and discuss key ideas drawn from educational writings on threshold concepts, review the emerging literature on threshold concepts in occupational therapy, and pose a series of questions in order to prompt consideration of the pedagogical issues requiring action by academic and fieldwork educators. Threshold concepts in occupational therapy have been considered in a primarily cross-disciplinary sense, that is, the understandings that occupational therapy learners grapple with are relevant to learners in other disciplines. In contrast, we present a more narrowly defined conception that emphasises the 'bounded-ness' of the concept to the discipline. A threshold concept that captures the essential nature of occupational therapy is likely to be (highly) troublesome in terms of a learner's acquisition of it. Rather than simplifying these learning 'jewels' educators are encouraged to sit with the discomfort that they and the learner may experience as the learner struggles to grasp them. Moreover, they should reshape their curricula to provoke such struggles if transformative learning is to be the outcome. © 2014 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  13. The career of an occupational psychology graduate: employment, employability and identity

    OpenAIRE

    Elsey, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    This thesis explored the factors contributing to the employability and identity development of occupational psychology graduates at various career stages. A mixed methods approach was taken to achieve three broad aims of the professional doctorate: 1) raising awareness of employability within the occupational psychology (OP) profession; 2) improving theoretical understanding of employability applied to a domain specific occupational sample; and finally 3) enhancing the professional practice o...

  14. Toward a Broader Role for Occupational Therapy in Supportive Oncology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleight, Alix G; Duker, Leah I Stein

    2016-01-01

    Supportive care in oncology helps people cope with cancer and its psychological, physical, and emotional side effects. However, cancer survivors report dissatisfaction with supportive care and a need for more psychosocial and self-management services. Occupational therapy practitioners represent an integral part of the supportive care team because their scope of practice emphasizes function. Through a focus on function, practitioners address the full spectrum of physical and psychosocial care. Currently, conceptualizations of occupational therapy for cancer survivors often focus solely on physical interventions and, therefore, do not represent the unique involvement of the profession in supportive oncology care. We advocate for a focused framework for occupational therapy practitioners in oncology as experts in function and providers of both physical and psychosocial treatments. Barriers to a focus on function are identified, and strategies are suggested for expanding involvement for the profession in supportive oncology care.

  15. Eudemonic Care: A Future Path for Occupational Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte l. Royeen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The core tenets of occupational therapy date to ancient Greece. Philosophers and physicians alike promulgated that quality of life, or “eudemonia,” is at the center of both ethical and medical concern and can be attained through healthful engagement in meaningful occupation. In more recent times, there has been a strong call to return to the powerful implementation of the eudemonic moral philosophy in health care practice, especially in occupational therapy. Searches of recent occupational therapy research show that integration of wellness initiatives into rehabilitative treatment sessions can have a profound impact on the physical and emotional healthfulness of people with a wide variety of ailments. Accordingly, we put forth three self-reflection questions and 10 client-centered questions to use in occupational therapy assessment to promote eudemonic care.

  16. Creating Environments Through the Art of Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Lori Reynolds has an interest in therapeutic gardens and the creation of living spaces that promote wellbeing for older adults. Dr. Reynolds educates various stakeholders on the benefits of occupational therapy, including landscape architects and senior living administrators. Her advocacy to expand occupational therapy beyond its mainstream roles is infectious. She speaks passionately about her work in helping to create therapeutic gardens and how her role as an occupational therapist offers great perspective in this process. She appreciates the environmental impact on an individual’s health and well-being and practices from a personenvironment-occupation theory

  17. Conceptualising professionalism in occupational therapy through a Western lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordichuk, Chelsea J; Robinson, Allison J; Sullivan, Theresa M

    2015-06-01

    The term professionalism is embedded within curriculum and occupational therapy documents, yet, explicit discussion of the concept is lacking in the literature. This paper strives for a greater understanding of how professionalism is currently conceptualised within Western occupational therapy literature. A broad literature search was conducted and included international peer-reviewed and grey literature from Western cultures including Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States. To enrich understanding, some documents from medicine were also included. Professionalism is widely upheld as a core construct of occupational therapy. However, an evidence-based consensus of the specific elements of professionalism guiding occupational therapy practice is lacking. Currently, understanding of professionalism is largely based on multiple, isolated concepts presented in Western professional association documents. Acknowledging the multifaceted and multicultural nature of professionalism is essential to begin systematically delineating and conceptualising elements of professionalism specific to occupational therapy. This review has been conducted from a solely Western cultural lens. Additional work to highlight differences specific to international contexts, cultures, and societal influences is needed to enrich the understanding of professionalism in occupational therapy practice. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  18. Investigating the experiences in a school-based occupational therapy program to inform community-based paediatric occupational therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rens, Lezahn; Joosten, Annette

    2014-06-01

    A collaborative approach with teachers is required when providing community-based occupational therapy to educationally at risk children. Collaborators share common goals and interact and support each other but challenges arise in providing collaborative occupational therapy in settings outside the school environment. The aim of this study was to capture experiences of teachers and occupational therapists working within a school-based occupational therapy program to determine if their experiences could inform collaborative practice. In this pilot study, participant responses to questionnaires (n = 32) about their experiences formed the basis for focus groups and individual interviews. Two focus group were conducted, one with teachers (n = 11) and one with occupational therapy participants (n = 6). Individual interviews were conducted with the supervising occupational therapist, school principal and two leading teachers. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data from closed questions, and thematic analysis using a constant comparison approach was used to analyse open ended questions, focus groups and interviews. Three main themes emerged: (i) the need for occupational therapists to spend time in the school, to explain their role, build relationships, understand classroom routines and the teacher role; (ii) occupational therapists need to not see themselves as the expert but develop equal partnerships to set collaborative goals and (iii) occupational therapists advocating for all parties to be informed throughout the occupational therapy process. The pilot study findings identified teacher and therapist experiences within the school setting that could inform improved collaborative practice with teachers and community-based occupational therapists and these findings warrant further investigation. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  19. Occupational Therapy for Adults With Cancer: Why It Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Williams, Grant R; Campbell, Claudine; Munoz, Lauro A; Muss, Hyman B

    2016-03-01

    Adults with cancer may be at risk for limitations in functional status and quality of life (QOL). Occupational therapy is a supportive service with the specific mission to help people functionally engage in life as safely and independently as possible with the primary goal of improving QOL. Unfortunately, for people with cancer, occupational therapy remains underused. The overall purpose of this review is to provide an understanding of what occupational therapy is and its relevance to patients with cancer, highlight the reasons to refer, and, last, provide general advice on how to access services. ©AlphaMed Press.

  20. Occupational therapy students' experiences in learning occupation-centred approaches to working with children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copley, Jodie A; Rodger, Sylvia A; Hannay, Victoria A; Graham, Fiona P

    2010-02-01

    The increasing emphasis on performance outcomes and the use of occupation-centred approaches has implications for practice education. This study aimed to describe students' experiences of learning to use occupation-centred approaches when working with children within a university clinic. Nine occupational therapy students and two clinical educators completed three indepth interviews at intervals across the students' fieldwork experiences. Therapy observations, review of therapy documentation, and tutorial group e-mails informed data triangulation. Thematic analysis was used to identify key themes. Students described needing to make a theoretical shift in thinking to focus on occupational performance and identified a number of challenges relating to learning complex techniques and strategies. Teaching methods that assist in making occupation-centred assessment and intervention techniques more explicit and learner-friendly for new users are required. These findings provide valuable new insights in guiding this process.

  1. Catalog of Performance Objectives and Performance Guides for Occupational Therapy Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This catalog provides a description of duties, tasks, performance objectives, performance guides, and related data in the area of occupational therapy occupations. Seven duties and their performance objectives are covered: (1) performing administrative tasks; (2) communicating information; (3) performing diagnostic measures; (4) planning…

  2. Occupational therapy in Australian acute hospitals: A modified practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Lauren; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2016-08-01

    Ongoing changes to health-care funding Australia wide continue to influence how occupational therapists practise in acute hospitals. This study describes the practice challenges experienced by Western Australian acute care occupational therapists. Then, it explores if and how acute care occupational therapists are modifying their practice in response to these practice changes. This study used a qualitative grounded theory approach. Semi-structured interviews were completed with 13 purposively selected acute care occupational therapists from four Western Australian metropolitan hospitals. Data were analysed using a constant comparative method to provide detailed descriptions of acute care occupational therapy practice and to generate theory. Five conceptual categories were developed. The first two addressed practice challenges: pragmatic organisational influences on client care and establishing a professional identity within the multidisciplinary team. Three categories related to therapist responses are as follows: becoming the client advocate, being the facilitator and applying clinical reasoning. Finally, modified practice was identified as the core category which explains the process whereby acute care occupational therapists are ensuring they remain relevant and authentic in the acute care context. Western Australian acute care occupational therapists are practising in a highly complex health context that presents many challenges. They are responding by using a modified form of practice that ensures occupational therapy skills remain relevant within the narrow confines of this health setting. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  3. Providing Educationally Relevant Occupational and Physical Therapy Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverdure, Patricia A.; Rose, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    As defined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, occupational and physical therapists provide services to support students to access, participate, and progress in their educational program within the least restrictive educational environment. Educationally relevant occupational and physical therapy services in school…

  4. Occupational Therapy for School-Aged Children in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Asha; Jatar, Anuradha; Bijlani, Jyothika

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapists exploring international opportunities should understand how the profession is practiced globally. This paper describes the framework under which occupational therapy services can be accessed by families of children with disabilities in urban India. Background information about the country, its health care, and occupational…

  5. Occupational Therapy for School-Aged Children in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Asha; Jatar, Anuradha; Bijlani, Jyothika

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapists exploring international opportunities should understand how the profession is practiced globally. This paper describes the framework under which occupational therapy services can be accessed by families of children with disabilities in urban India. Background information about the country, its health care, and occupational…

  6. A Commentary on the Social Responsibility of Occupational Therapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Dikaios; Pollard, Nick

    2013-01-01

    As one of the allied health professions, occupational therapy has adopted a primarily clinical focus on human occupation (or the process of daily life) and this is reflected in education, which has until recently tended to overlook contextual social factors such as poverty, marginalisation, exclusion, unemployment, incarceration and immigration.…

  7. A Commentary on the Social Responsibility of Occupational Therapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Dikaios; Pollard, Nick

    2013-01-01

    As one of the allied health professions, occupational therapy has adopted a primarily clinical focus on human occupation (or the process of daily life) and this is reflected in education, which has until recently tended to overlook contextual social factors such as poverty, marginalisation, exclusion, unemployment, incarceration and immigration.…

  8. The Dearth of Mental Health Research in Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Diane

    1984-01-01

    Reasons for the lack of research in occupational therapy include small numbers of doctoral level occupational therapists, the psychobehavioral/biochemical dichotomy, the lack of a theoretical framework, the level of research instruction, the impact of a predominantly female profession, and the attitudes of institutions. (SK)

  9. Evaluation of evidence within occupational therapy in stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Persson, Dennis; Nygren, Carita; Boll, Mette; Matzen, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Evidence-based practice creates practice that integrates research-driven evidence with clinical expertise and patients' preferences in clinical decision-making. The aim of this study was to investigate and evaluate the quality and applicability of scientific research in occupational therapy intervention related to the use of everyday life occupations and client-centred practice within stroke rehabilitation. Systematic searches of research studies published in English during 2000-2007 in peer-reviewed journals were undertaken. Thirty-nine articles and one Cochrane review were appraised and the quality evaluated using an evidence taxonomy and an evidence hierarchy. Evidence arose providing support for a client-centred approach, entailing outcome related to better ability to recall goals, the patients feeling more involved and able to manage more everyday life occupations after rehabilitation. There is also considerable evidence for the use of everyday life occupations in occupational therapy. Occupational therapy was evaluated as an important aspect of stroke rehabilitation improving outcomes in everyday life occupations including activities of daily living (ADL) and participation. As research of relevance for the profession to a large extent includes qualitative research it gives rise to reflection on including more tools than the evidence hierarchy while evaluating evidence within occupational therapy.

  10. Occupational Therapy and Community Reintegration of Persons with Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Occupational Therapy and Community Reintegration of Persons With Brain Injury Brain injuries can affect motor, sensory, cognitive, and behavioral functioning. A person who has sustained a brain ...

  11. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY IN ROMANIA - THE HISTORY OF A NEW BEGINNING

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanneke van Bruggen; Raveica Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    ...: occupational therapy. Even the need of this profession was identified in Romania since 2002, when the European Commission strongly recommended to the Ministry of Health and to Romanian authorities for disabled people...

  12. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Tracy M; Pitonyak, Jennifer S; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy's rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy's perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy's research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  13. Family psychology and family therapy in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameguchi, K; Murphy-Shigematsu, S

    2001-01-01

    The development of family psychology and family therapy in Japan has occurred mostly since the 1980s. This development was originally activated by the major social issue in contemporary Japan of school refusal, in which more than 127,000 children either overtly refuse to or claim that they cannot go to school. From a family perspective, this problem is analyzed as it relates to the confusion that children experience from unbalanced and unclear boundaries in family relations or "membranes." An approach to family therapy that adapts systems theory and integrates a clay sculpting medium has been developed to work with Japanese families confronting this problem. The design and implementation of preventative family psychology programs applied at the community level are also an important part of the future development in these fields.

  14. Occupational therapy in mental health: A review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    This review of the literature was conducted as part of the development of a position paper on the way ahead for research, education and practice in occupational therapy in mental health. It included publications over the past decade and concentrated on the British Journal of Occupational Therapy. Recognising experience from other countries would be beneficial, aspects of the literature from the National Journals in American, Canada and Australia which were most relevant to practice in the U...

  15. Epistemic reflections on Occupational Therapy in Mental Health

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy, along with other professions, is provoked to think its performance in the area of mental health in light of the new perspectives of assistance to people with mental distress. Considering the psychiatric reform as a backdrop, the aim of this paper is to discuss the theoretical conceptions that supported the interventions of occupational therapy in this field, and the new demands presented to professionals.To this end, a study of narrative review, whose search ...

  16. Differences and similarities in therapeutic mode use between occupational therapists and occupational therapy students in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Tove; Bonsaksen, Tore

    2017-11-01

    The Intentional Relationship Model (IRM) is a new model of the therapeutic relationship in occupational therapy practice. Two previous studies have focused on therapist communication style, or 'mode' use, but to date no group comparisons have been reported. To explore differences between occupational therapists and occupational therapy students with regard to their therapeutic mode use. The study had a cross-sectional design, and convenience samples consisting of occupational therapists (n = 109) and of second-year occupational therapy students (n = 96) were recruited. The Self-Assessment of Modes Questionnaire was the main data collection tool. Group differences were analysed with independent t-tests. The occupational therapists responded more within the collaborative and empathizing modes than the students did. The students responded more within the advocating and instructing modes than the occupational therapists did. There may be systematic differences between occupational therapists and students concerning their therapeutic mode use. Some modes, such as the collaborating and empathizing modes, may be viewed as requiring more experience, whereas other modes, such as the advocating mode may be related to more recent rehabilitation ideologies. These factors may contribute to explaining several of the group differences observed.

  17. Knowledge generation and utilisation in occupational therapy: towards epistemic reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Whiteford, Gail Elizabeth

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to consider the ways in which theory generation, and hence knowledge generation, in occupational therapy is a complex social process, and therefore carries (often hidden) responsibilities for those who are part of our epistemic community. An epistemic community is a knowledge-producing community, who apply their standards of credibility, and epistemic values, to theory choice. In occupational therapy this community is comprised of a worldwide group of scholars and practitioners. We propose that epistemic reflexivity can be used to critique and contribute to our disciplinary knowledge and to critically consider 'who' makes epistemological choices in our profession, and the consequent implications for the theories we adopt. The purpose of this article is to make these relations explicit so that scholars and therapists can become increasingly conscious and empowered with respect to their contributions to occupational therapy's epistemic community. To demonstrate an application of epistemic reflexivity, we critically consider a theoretical construction that has been widely adopted by the international occupational therapy community: evidence-based practice. As authors, we engage in epistemic reflexivity to critically consider the challenge posed by evidence-based practice. We propose a conception of practice knowledge that is informed by evidence yet based on a conception of wise practice. Our intention is to stimulate discussion and debate in occupational therapy's epistemic community, a number of approaches for fostering epistemic reflexivity in occupational therapy are suggested.

  18. The values of occupational therapy: Perceptions of occupational therapists in Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Marie-Josée; Désormeaux-Moreau, Marjorie

    2016-07-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the values of occupational therapy and the values held by occupational therapists. A wide range of values has been reported in the literature. Furthermore, despite the fact that values are an important part of professional identity, empirical studies have demonstrated that several occupational therapists possess an ambiguous professional identity. This study was undertaken to explore the values of Canadian occupational therapists, specifically French-speaking occupational therapists in Quebec. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 occupational therapists. Their narratives were subject to hermeneutic analysis, a method of textual analysis common in philosophical research. A total of 16 values were identified in the discourses of the occupational therapists interviewed: autonomy; human dignity; occupational participation; social justice and equity; professionalism; holism; partnership, environment, or ecological approach; quality of life; solicitude; honesty; integrity; health; creativity; professional autonomy; effectiveness; and spirituality. The results of this study are, in general, consistent with those reported in the few other empirical studies that have documented the values perceptions of occupational therapists. Finally, the explanation of the values of occupational therapists may reinforce their professional identity and favour best, or at least desirable, professional practices related to ethics and culture.

  19. Principal Approaches to Understanding Occupation and Occupational Science Found in the Chilean Journal of Occupational Therapy (2001–2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Silvia; Tapia, María Jesús; Rueda, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Background The progression of occupational science in Chile is documented in the main scientific publication of the field, the Chilean Journal of Occupational Therapy (RChTO). Objective Identify approaches to understanding and applying occupation and occupational science as elucidated in the RChTO. Methodology A systematic qualitative review of the journal (2001–2012) identified articles elucidating an approach to understanding and application operationally defined as references to specific authors, theories, models/paradigms, definitions, and other fields that support approaches to O/OS. Results The study identified two main approaches. The first considers occupation/occupational science from a practical perspective or as a means to explain human behavior; the second considers occupation/occupational science as an object of study. Each approach is further divided into categories. Conclusion This study provides a novel perspective on regional use of occupational science concepts. These findings contribute to our understanding of this science in context and to recognition of the cultural relevance of these scientific concepts.

  20. “Putting the Occupation Back in Occupational Therapy:” A Survey of Occupational Therapy Practitioners’ Use of Gardening as an Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Wagenfeld

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study examines how and why occupational therapy practitioners across practice areas use gardening as an intervention. Respondents’ interpretation of the best and least desirable aspects of their facility’s garden and whether they contributed to its design was also examined. Method. A description and link to a 15-question online survey about gardening as an occupational therapy intervention was emailed to Western Michigan University Occupational Therapy alumni and posted on four OT Connections groups and the AOTA LinkedIn site. Results. Gardening as an occupational therapy intervention is meaningful and purposeful (93.66%, n = 56, motivating (80%, n = 48, fun 61.67% (n = 37, and client-centered (31.67%, n =19. Frequency of gardening as a therapeutic intervention and practitioner involvement in designing the garden was significant (p = .007, suggesting that for respondents, environmental context supports engagement and heightens the meaningfulness and purposefulness of gardening. Conclusion. Based on results of this study, a suggested next step is evidence-based translational and intervention research to validate the efficacy of gardening as an occupational therapy intervention and occupational therapy practitioners’ professional value as implementers of such intervention. Assessing the effectiveness of the role of occupational therapy practitioners in facility garden design is also important to consider.

  1. Psychology Baccalaureates at Work: Major Area Subspecializations, Earnings, and Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajecki, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    A Census Bureau national survey identified baccalaureates aged up to 64 years having major area subspecializations labeled "psychology," "industrial/organizational (I/O) psychology," and "counseling psychology." Median 2009 earnings of all such types of baccalaureate psychology alumni were well below the distribution mean of the 153 fields in the…

  2. Psychology Baccalaureates at Work: Major Area Subspecializations, Earnings, and Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajecki, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    A Census Bureau national survey identified baccalaureates aged up to 64 years having major area subspecializations labeled "psychology," "industrial/organizational (I/O) psychology," and "counseling psychology." Median 2009 earnings of all such types of baccalaureate psychology alumni were well below the distribution mean of the 153 fields in the…

  3. 42 CFR 418.74 - Waiver of requirement-Physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and dietary counseling. 418.74 Section 418.74 Public Health... requirement—Physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and dietary counseling. (a) A... providing physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, and dietary counseling services...

  4. 42 CFR 418.72 - Condition of participation: Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology. 418.72 Section 418.72 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... therapy, occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology. Physical therapy services, occupational...

  5. Reflections on clinical reasoning in mental health occupational therapy: the case of the occupational therapy dynamic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taís Quevedo Marcolino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Clinical Reasoning Study supported by the American Occupational Therapy Association/AOTA and the American Occupational Therapy Foundation/AOTF in the United States in the late 1980s, had inaugurated the scientific production in the field and offered an initial framework on clinical reasoning for understanding and conducting clinical cases in Occupational Therapy. Most of the researches in this field have focused on reasoning processes, and point out the need to understand the contents of clinical thoughts, or how occupational therapists act and elaborate hypotheses, based on their background knowledge, in order to produce an explanatory theory. In this direction, this article presents the results of two studies from the author focused on understanding aspects of clinical reasoning of occupational therapists who work sustained by Occupational Therapy Dynamic Method/ MTOD, highlighting similarities and differences on diagnostic and procedural reasoning. The discussion points out need to expand the production of this type of research, in particular with Brazilian professionals, as well as the dissemination and study of this subject in the initial and continuing training of occupational therapists.

  6. Occupational Therapy in Primary Health Care: reflections on the populations assisted

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Leme Gomes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is the result of reflections of a group discussion among professionals, students and teachersheld during the First Symposium on Occupational Therapy in Primary Health Care (PHC in 2011, which aimedto reflect on issues related to the populations assisted by the occupational therapist in PHC. The discussionssuggested two areas of consideration: (1 the challenges in the composition of care lines as well as living conditionsof the population assisted by occupational therapy; (2 the general practice of occupational therapists and theirinclusion in interdisciplinary teams. Participants reported that, in PHC, they provide assistance to populationstraditionally accompanied by Occupational Therapy such as people under psychological distress, people with disabilities, children with developmental delay, among others. The discussion pointed out that the difficultyof access to services, the weakness in the constitution of the lines of comprehensive health care and neglectof services to a number of groups that are excluded from care, define the profile of the population monitoredand the potential of assistance. These factors are related to the formation of PHC and “SUS” (Brazilian HealthSystem in the country. On the other hand, the living conditions of the population assisted, marked by povertyand social exclusion, the fragmentation of PHC practices, and the need for the professional to have a generalistprofile, being able to act interdisciplinarily and intersectorally, were considered crucial for the construction ofnew working tolls, theoretical improvement, and greater theoretical basis of professional performance in PHC.

  7. Occupational therapy and the pediatric division of bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Clemente Idemori

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bone Marrow Transplantation may cause a series of restrictions to patients. The child’s illness and hospitalization may further change daily life activities, playing and school routine; and social interaction, which will interfere in occupational roles. The occupational therapy procedures seek to provide a more accessible experience in hospital concerning the possibilities of involvement, favoring the child’s development through activities. Objective: This study aimed to describe the practice of an occupational therapist during therapeutic process with a school age child who has undergone bone marrow transplantation. Method: This is a qualitative research with a case study approach. Data was collected with a short form of personal and professional identification and characterization, and a semi-structured interview script. The interview was fully transcribed, and analyzed under the content analysis overview. Through the content obtained in the interviews, it was possible to raise four categories: occupational roles affected by illness, hospitalization; occupational therapy processes; benefits to children by the occupational therapy activities; and, successful practices: essential factors and theoretical principles. Results: The results showed that the occupational therapist took on roles as mediator between the hospital and the child’s original environment, and the relations to family, hospital team, towards the child’s needs and his/her life experience (school, family, hospital. Conclusion: It is expected that this study may contribute to the knowledge and propagation of the practice being developed by the therapists in children with bone marrow transplantation.

  8. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia and Occupational Therapy: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Angela C.

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes occupational therapy (OT) intervention in an outpatient setting and outcomes for a child diagnosed with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) from 4 to 28 months of age. There is little information on therapy intervention and outcomes of children who have survived. The patient is a white male, born at 35 weeks gestation…

  9. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia and Occupational Therapy: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Angela C.

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes occupational therapy (OT) intervention in an outpatient setting and outcomes for a child diagnosed with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) from 4 to 28 months of age. There is little information on therapy intervention and outcomes of children who have survived. The patient is a white male, born at 35 weeks gestation…

  10. Client-centred occupational therapy: the importance of critical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley Hammell, Karen R

    2015-07-01

    The occupational therapy profession has proclaimed itself to be client-centred for over 30 years, but until recently this assertion remained largely unchallenged. Critical thinkers, who have begun to explore client-centred practice in occupational therapy, highlight the necessity for further critical reflection. This paper aims to define what constitutes "critical" thinking; and to persuade occupational therapists of the importance of employing critical perspectives towards the profession's assumptions and assertions regarding occupational therapy's "client-centred" practices. Critical thinking is not solely a process of carefully and thoughtfully weighing various arguments or evidence, but of additionally appraising the ideological and structural contexts in which these positions or evidence have arisen. Critical perspectives towards occupational therapy's client-centred practices identify the ways in which power is exercised by the profession, and culturally specific and disabling ideologies are perpetuated. Critical thinking enables occupational therapists to reflect on their own inequitable access to privilege and power, and reduces the potential for the profession to re-inscribe dominant ideologies that devalue disabled people and justify their inequitable opportunities. Because critical thinking demands a readiness to restructure one's thinking, and decreases the risk of acting on faulty assumptions, it is an essential component of client-centred practice.

  11. Epistemic reflections on Occupational Therapy in Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Assis Costa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Occupational therapy, along with other professions, is provoked to think its performance in the area of mental health in light of the new perspectives of assistance to people with mental distress. Considering the psychiatric reform as a backdrop, the aim of this paper is to discuss the theoretical conceptions that supported the interventions of occupational therapy in this field, and the new demands presented to professionals.To this end, a study of narrative review, whose search was conducted in the Lilacs, Medline and SciELO databases , with the descriptors ‘Occupational Therapy’, ‘Mental Health’ and ‘Health Care’, between 1990 and 2012. One hundred sixteen indexed articles were found: 109 in LILACS and seven in SciELO, and 25 articles were analyzed. The results reveal the approaches that have underpinned occupational therapy, from the asylum model to the care model in mental health, indicating the challenges to be faced by the profession in the transition process to the current model of mental health. We conclude that the occupational therapist should be the one responsible to mediate the reinvention of the mental health users’ interaction with their multifaceted everyday activities/actions in order to contribute to the process of mental health care transformation, producing new ways of thinking and practicing occupational therapy

  12. Patients With Brain Tumors: Who Receives Postacute Occupational Therapy Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vincy; Xiong, Chen; Colantonio, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Data on the utilization of occupational therapy among patients with brain tumors have been limited to those with malignant tumors and small samples of patients outside North America in specialized palliative care settings. We built on this research by examining the characteristics of patients with brain tumors who received postacute occupational therapy services in Ontario, Canada, using health care administrative data. Between fiscal years 2004-2005 and 2008-2009, 3,199 patients with brain tumors received occupational therapy services in the home care setting after hospital discharge; 12.4% had benign brain tumors, 78.2% had malignant brain tumors, and 9.4% had unspecified brain tumors. However, patients with benign brain tumors were older (mean age=63.3 yr), and a higher percentage were female (65.2%). More than 90% of patients received in-home occupational therapy services. Additional research is needed to examine the significance of these differences and to identify factors that influence access to occupational therapy services in the home care setting.

  13. Choosing the Path of Leadership in Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Patrick Heard D.OT Reg. (Ont.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leadership is vital to the success and sustainability of any group, organization, or profession. Using a qualitative phenomenological methodology, consistent with interpretative phenomenological analysis, this study examines why occupational therapists choose the path of leadership. Data was collected through the completion of semistructured interviews with 10 occupational therapy leaders in Ontario, Canada. This collected data was transcribed verbatim and coded for themes by multiple coders. Several methods were employed to establish trustworthiness. Results identify that a desire to influence the profession or care delivery, a need for personal or career development, and a need for change motivate those occupational therapists who might choose the path of leadership. Recommendations for supporting new or developing leaders include a focus on linking occupational therapy practice and leadership theory at the curriculum and professional levels. Moreover, application of novel approaches to mentorship for new and developing leaders, such as supportive communities of practice, are also considered.

  14. Ponderings of an Occupational Therapy Administrator: Beyond Handwriting--Are We Ready?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polichino, Jean E.

    2016-01-01

    Handwriting has historically played a significant role in the services provided by occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants working in schools. Reflecting on nearly three decades of school practice, an occupational therapy administrator considers how this niche developed and how it positions occupational therapy practitioners to…

  15. The terms occupation and activity over the history of official occupational therapy publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerschmidt, Bree; Nelson, David L

    2011-01-01

    The history of articles in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy and its predecessors reflects trends and changes in professional terminology and the thoughts underlying that terminology. In this study, we investigate use of occupation, activity, and related terms across 9 decades of occupational therapy literature from the 1920s to the 2000s. The literature for 3 years of each of the 9 decades was scanned electronically. A random numbers table was used to equalize the number of words across decades, and a computer search function was used to determine each term's frequency of use for each decade. Results indicated that the term occupation was widely used in the 1920s but then declined until the 1980s. With a rapid increase in use in the 2000s, the term occupation actually appeared more often than it did in the 1920s. The term activity appeared infrequently in the 1920s but gained popularity from the 1930s to the 1960s. From the 1970s to the 1990s, the use of both terms was quite low. This study shows that basic occupational therapy terminology has fluctuated dramatically over time. Given the essential link between terminology and theory, these changes arguably reflect authors' and editors' changing viewpoints on the profession's fundamental nature.

  16. Levels of empathy in undergraduate occupational therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Williams, Brett; Boyle, Malcolm; Molloy, Andrew; McKenna, Lisa; Molloy, Liz; Lewis, Belinda

    2010-09-01

    Empathy is an important attribute for occupational therapists in establishing rapport and in better understanding their clients. However, empathy can be compromised by high workloads, personal stressors and pressures to demonstrate efficacy. Occupational therapists also work with patients from a variety of diagnostic groups. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of empathy and attitudes towards clients amongst undergraduate occupational therapy students at one Australian University. A cross-sectional study was undertaken using a written survey of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) and the Medical Condition Regard Scale. Overall, a strong level of empathy was reported amongst students. Four medical conditions that occupational therapists work with (stroke, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and depression) were held in high regard. Substance abuse, however, was held in comparatively low regard. Overall, the year of study appeared to have no significant impact on the students' empathy. Despite having a lower reported empathy level than found in health professions from other studies using the JSPE, occupational therapy students were found to have a good level of empathy. Of concern, however, was the bias reported against the medical condition of substance abuse, highlighting that the there may be a need to reinforce that patients from this diagnostic group are equally deserving of quality care irrespective of their clinical condition. Recommendations for future research include completing a longitudinal study of occupational therapy students' empathy levels and investigating the empathy levels of occupational therapists working with different client groups. Limitations of the study include the convenience sampling of occupational therapy students enrolled at one university which limits the generalizability of the results to groups of participants with similar characteristics.

  17. Occupational Therapy and Rehabilitation Engineering-a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Flynn, Susan; Ward, Tomas; Flynn, Gareth

    1999-01-01

    This is a case study of the occupational therapy rehabilitation process of a teenage girl who presented in 1997 with a rare neurological condition diagnosed as rapid onset Dystonia Parkinsonism. She was helped to obtain some of the occupational performances of her choice by assistive technology devices tailored to her needs by the rehabilitation engineering department, and in this paper we wish to point out how collaboration between our departments can be of benefit to patients, and how es...

  18. National survey of occupational therapy managers in mental health

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    This study, part of the College of Occupational Therapists' Mental Health Project, surveyed occupational therapy managers in mental health to gather data about them, the services they managed and their opinions on current and future issues of importance. A questionnaire was sent to the 184 managers who it was believed worked in mental health and it achieved a 65.2% response rate. The majority of the 120 respondents were female, with Head II therapists between the ages of 31 and 40 forming...

  19. Participatory citizenship: Critical perspectives on client-centred occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Hetty; Pollard, Nick; Kantartzis, Sarah; Viana-Moldes, Inés

    2015-07-01

    This article aims to discuss client-centred practice, the current dominant approach within occupational therapy, in relation to participatory citizenship. Occupational therapists work within structures and policies that set boundaries on their engagement with clients, while working with complex, multidimensional social realities. The authors present a critical discussion shaped by their research, including a survey, discussions at workshops at international conferences, and critical engagement with the literature on occupational therapy, occupation, and citizenship. A focus on citizenship suggests reframing professional development based on the participation in public life of people as citizens of their society. While occupational therapists often refer to clients in the context of communities, groups, families, and wider society, the term client-centred practice typically represents a particular view of the individual and may sometimes be too limited in application for a more systemic and societal approach. The authors question the individual focus which has, until recently, been typical of client-centred occupational therapy. Placing citizenship at the core of intervention is a transformative process that assumes all people are citizens and conceives of health as a collective issue, influencing the way we educate, do research, and practise.

  20. Culture or cult? The mythological nature of occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Greg; McFarlane, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The willingness of occupational therapists to act on their shared beliefs and values has created knowledge and techniques that have been handed down from generation to generation, and, thus, have entered into what might be called the 'mythology' of occupational therapy. These myths arose from a set of shared philosophical assumptions that provided a sense of cultural identity. In the present article the authors compare the occupational therapy process to a mythical hero's journey in which the occupational therapist uses narrative reasoning to guide the client (the hero) through a rite of passage to a kind of rehabilitative rebirth. By structuring therapy as an unfolding story, the occupational therapist creates personal myths for his or her clients. Unfortunately, there is a darker side to this process in which cultural identity distorts into membership of a 'cult', wherein expert practitioners become 'priests' or 'monks' possessing secret knowledge that cannot be readily explained to others, especially those from different cultures. It is argued that, by reflecting on and interacting with other cultures through shared mythologies, occupational therapists can learn to amend their values and beliefs accordingly. Myths could bring a sense of cohesiveness to a culture in which 'truth' is seen through these shared mythologies.

  1. Role of Occupational Therapy in Combating Human Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Kathleen W; Hatkevich, Beth Ann

    Human trafficking is a modern-day form of slavery that includes sex trafficking, labor trafficking, and trafficking of children. It is estimated that 35.8 million people are enslaved around the world. Because of the traumatic experiences that victims of human trafficking encounter, the needs of victims are extensive and require the services of several providers, including health care providers, for victims to transform into survivors and thrivers. Currently, the role of occupational therapy is minimal and unexplored. The profession of occupational therapy has the capacity of having a profound role in both providing client-centered care services to victims and survivors of human trafficking and partaking in preventive advocacy efforts to combat human trafficking. Further advocacy efforts are required to promote the profession of occupational therapy in combating human trafficking.

  2. [Occupational therapy: benefit of early intervention in the manic phase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riou, Gaëlle

    When people experiencing a manic episode arrive in hospital, restrictive measures are often put in place. The priority is to avoid all sources of stimulation, especially anything likely to activate the patient. The prescribing of occupational therapy sessions in a well-defined framework may however be appropriate at an early stage in the care. Aside from its effect on the therapeutic alliance, occupational therapy can help on the cognitive and temporal level, increasing awareness of the condition and engagement in the care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Student experiences of learning portfolios in occupational therapy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Karen P

    2007-01-01

    Learning portfolios are used extensively in general education; however, limited information is available regarding its usage and value in occupational therapy education. This article discusses the experiences of 30 senior-level occupational therapy students who used student-learning portfolios as a method of comprehensive learning within an upper extremity orthotics and prosthetics course. Results indicated that portfolios assisted students in structuring their learning environment, documented their learning journey, highlighted their achievements, and developed professional skills of organization, motivation, and higher-ordered thinking. Implications of this study lend support towards using student-learning portfolios as a teaching tool to facilitate more holistic and effective student-centered learning environments.

  4. Occupational Therapy Practitioners with Occupational Musculoskeletal Injuries: Prevalence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnaser, Musaed Z

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and risk factors of occupational musculoskeletal injuries (OMIs) among occupational therapy practitioners over a 12-month period. A self-administered questionnaire mailed to 500 randomly selected practicing occupational therapists (OTs) and occupational therapy assistants (OTAs) living in the state of Texas. A response rate of 38 % was attained with 192 questionnaires returned. In a 12-months working period, 23 % of occupational therapy practitioners experienced musculoskeletal injuries. Muscle strain (52 %) was most reported injury and lower back (32 %) was most injured body part. Years of practicing experience (t = 2.83, p = 0.01), and age x(2)(2, N = 192) = 8.28, p = 0.02 were found as significant factors associated with injuries among OTAs. No factors were significantly associated with injuries among OTs. Patient handling was the primary factor associated with injuries. Also, minimal experience and older age were concluded as risk factors that might contribute to OMIs.

  5. Occupational Therapy in Multidisciplinary Residency in Family and Community Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzianne Feijó Alexandre Paiva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report the experiences of occupational therapist during the Multidisciplinary Residency Program in Family and Community Health in Fortaleza, Ceará state, Brazil. With the creation of the Support Center for Family Health – NASF, occupational therapists began to participate more effectively in the Family Health Strategy of the Brazilian National Health System. Given this rocess, the category, which historically has trained its professionals following the biomedical model, is faced with the challenge to build a new field of knowledge. Objective: To analyze the inclusion of occupational therapy in the Family Health Strategy within the scope of Multidisciplinary Residency. Methodology: This is a descriptive study of qualitative approach, which was based on the experience of four occupational therapy resident students, performed through the documental analysis of field diaries, scientific papers, and case studies produced between 2009 and 2011. Results: The occupational therapists as well as the other NASF professionals operated the logic of Matrix Support to the Family Health teams, sharing their knowledge and assisting in resolving complex cases of the families, groups, and communities served. In this context, we found people with different relationships with their doings and a reduced repertoire of activities. The occupational therapists invested in the creation or consolidation of groups in the Family Health Centers and in the territory, which also stood as living and socializing spaces, focusing on prevention and health promotion.

  6. Profile of the Brazilian Researcher in Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Any Carolina Cardoso Guimarães Vasconcelos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to analyze the profile of Brazilian PhD researchers in occupational therapy based on data obtained from the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development - CNPq. Two hundred forty curricula of occupational therapists were individually analyzed, 102 of them from PhD researchers. The curricula were analyzed with respect to gender; completion time of undergraduate studies; institution; time spent for obtaining the doctorate; professional activities; geographical distribution, scientific, and editorial composition; and guidance of undergraduate research, specialization, and master, doctorate and post-doctorate courses. The data showed that 94% of the researchers were women. With regard to professional practice, 73% of the doctors were affiliated to public universities and 84% were located in the southeast region. A total of 1361 papers were produced, at an average of 13.3 articles per researcher, with 25% on the theme of functional health (cognitive, neuromotor, musculoskeletal occupational performance and assistive technology. The PhD researchers in occupational therapy also published 90 books and 488 book chapters. Additionally, 59% of the researchers collaborated as reviewers for scientific periodicals. The results of the analysis will allow the academic community to gain a perspective of the occupational therapy scenario in Brazil, assisting in the establishment of future priorities for improving knowledge and professional practice.

  7. OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY IN A CROSS-CULTURE PERSPECTIVE——An interview with Dr. Paul E. Spector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Occupational Health Psychology (OHP) is an interdisciplinary field concerned with psychological factors in employee's health, safety, and well-being, closely related to Industrial/Organizational (I/O) Psychology. Specific areas of concern are accidents, injuries, illness, stress, violence, counterproductive work behavior, and work-family conflict. Based on his research, Dr. Paul E. Spector answered our questions on aspects of Occupational Health Psychology, Cross-cultural Psychology and research/statistical methods in I/O Psychology. His opinions or suggestions about future research in I/O Psychology are informative and inspiring.

  8. What are the short-term and long-term effects of occupation-focused and occupation-based occupational therapy in the home on older adults' occupational performance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tove Lise; Petersen, Kirsten Schultz; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a lack of evidence-based knowledge about the effectiveness of home-based occupational therapy for older adults aimed at improving occupational performance by practicing activities and tasks. Aim This review synthesizes and discusses evidence for the effectiveness of occupation......-focused and occupation-based occupational therapy for older adults at home. Material and methods Peer-reviewed quantitative papers were included. Participants: > 60-year-old adults with functional limitations. Intervention: Occupational therapy aiming at improving occupational performance, primarily through the practice...... of activities and tasks. Outcome: Occupational performance. Context: Home. Three reviewers critically appraised 13 of 995 detected papers. Extracted data were presented and summarised descriptively. Results Eight high-quality papers showed that occupation-focused and occupation-based occupational therapy using...

  9. A course in autoethnography: fostering reflective practitioners in occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppes, Steve; Hamilton, Toby Ballou; Robinson, Cyndy

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes an academic course designed to lay the foundation for reflective practice in occupational therapy. In this course, students conduct highly personalized research based on experiences in Level II fieldwork that leads to writing an autoethnography. The paper describes autoethnography, details its use in occupational therapy literature, and discusses the design and outcomes of the course. Students' experiences with this autobiographical genre of qualitative research are illustrated. In the writing process, students find clinical stories that must be told and learn to "move around" in their stories. The outcomes of the course include integration of personal and professional experiences, closure to academic preparation, and deep reflection about what it means to be an occupational therapist.

  10. Mental health evidence in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Mariana; Jaffe, Lynn; Gibson, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    We reviewed the mental health articles published in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy (AJOT) from 2008 through 2009 in light of meeting the Centennial Vision charge of supporting practice through evidence. Seven articles that addressed mental health practice were published in AJOT over these years. Review of the articles found that only two addressed effectiveness of occupational therapy intervention; one was rated as Level II evidence, and the other was rated as Level V evidence. Two articles addressed instrument development and testing. Three articles were basic research studies that expanded consideration about the needs of people with mental health conditions. Scholars and clinicians have begun to embrace the charge of the Centennial Vision to support practice with evidence and continue to embrace mental health practice but have a distance to travel. We hope that in the coming years, the profession will see more evidence published in AJOT supporting mental health as practiced by occupational therapists.

  11. Anatomy in Occupational Therapy Program Curriculum: Practitioners' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Katherine Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy education is undergoing significant transformation. It is unknown whether changes are in accordance with occupational therapy (OT) practice needs. The purpose of this pilot study was to survey OT clinicians to determine their perspectives on the value of anatomy in OT curricula, and anatomical knowledge required for practice. In addition…

  12. Occupational Therapy Evaluation for Stroke Adults in the United States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shan-li

    2010-01-01

    @@ Of the 700,000 people in the United States who experience a new or recurrent stroke each year, more than 500,000 survive(American Stroke Association, 2007)[1]. Occupational therapy practitioners are critical rehabilitation professionals for stroke survivors.

  13. Anatomy in Occupational Therapy Program Curriculum: Practitioners' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Katherine Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy education is undergoing significant transformation. It is unknown whether changes are in accordance with occupational therapy (OT) practice needs. The purpose of this pilot study was to survey OT clinicians to determine their perspectives on the value of anatomy in OT curricula, and anatomical knowledge required for practice. In addition…

  14. The ICF and Postsurgery Occupational Therapy after Traumatic Hand Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitinghoff, Helene; Lindqvist, Birgitta; Nygard, Louise; Ekholm, Jan; Schult, Marie-Louise

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have examined the effectiveness of hand rehabilitation programmes and have linked the outcomes to the concept of ICF but not to specific ICF category codes. The objective of this study was to gain experience using ICF concepts to describe occupational therapy interventions during postsurgery hand rehabilitation, and to describe…

  15. Leadership Style Preference of Undergraduate Occupational Therapy Students in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Brown

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: The Considerate leadership style is characterised by creating comfortable working environments, following established procedures, and creating an easy work pace, while the Spirited leadership style is about inspiring people, generating excitement, turning work into play, and rallying people. It is recommended that leadership be integrated into occupational therapy curricula so as to adequately equip students for future professional practice.

  16. Anatomy in Occupational Therapy Program Curriculum: Practitioners' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Katherine Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy education is undergoing significant transformation. It is unknown whether changes are in accordance with occupational therapy (OT) practice needs. The purpose of this pilot study was to survey OT clinicians to determine their perspectives on the value of anatomy in OT curricula, and anatomical knowledge required for practice. In addition…

  17. The ICF and Postsurgery Occupational Therapy after Traumatic Hand Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitinghoff, Helene; Lindqvist, Birgitta; Nygard, Louise; Ekholm, Jan; Schult, Marie-Louise

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have examined the effectiveness of hand rehabilitation programmes and have linked the outcomes to the concept of ICF but not to specific ICF category codes. The objective of this study was to gain experience using ICF concepts to describe occupational therapy interventions during postsurgery hand rehabilitation, and to describe…

  18. A Comparison of Distance Education Instructional Methods in Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedlicka, Janet S.; Brown, Sarah W.; Bunch, Ashley E.; Jaffe, Lynn E.

    2002-01-01

    In a mental health course, 22 occupational therapy students were randomly assigned to two-way interactive video/audio, chatrooms, or independent study for case study work. No significant differences were found in scores on three multiple-choice tests; 77% preferred interactive video/audio. Comfort with distance learning significantly increased.…

  19. Predicting Academic Achievement of Undergraduate Occupational Therapy Students: Preliminary Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchulc, Cynthia M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Admissions criteria used for three classes of occupational therapy students were subjected to statistical analysis. Weighted factors included cumulative, science, and behavioral science grade point average, reading and mental ability test scores, and essay and interview scores. Revised factors eliminated the reading test and subject-specific grade…

  20. Participatory Action Research: Integrating Community Occupational Therapy Practice and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Lynn; Trentham, Barry

    2002-01-01

    Projects involving mental health clients receiving occupational therapy and senior citizens engaged in capacity building illustrate steps in the participatory action research (PAR) process: issue identification and planning; investigation and action; action, reflection, and modification cycles; and knowledge creation and change. Challenges and…

  1. Facilitating Occupational Therapy Student Learning to Enhance Cross-Cultural Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Barbara Carol Hooper

    2012-01-01

    Developing cultural awareness and effectiveness is critical to meaningful and successful occupational therapy practice and of concern to occupational therapists worldwide (World Federation of Occupational Therapists, 2010). Occupational therapy graduates, not fully representative of the demographics of the populations they will meet clinically,…

  2. Facilitating Occupational Therapy Student Learning to Enhance Cross-Cultural Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Barbara Carol Hooper

    2012-01-01

    Developing cultural awareness and effectiveness is critical to meaningful and successful occupational therapy practice and of concern to occupational therapists worldwide (World Federation of Occupational Therapists, 2010). Occupational therapy graduates, not fully representative of the demographics of the populations they will meet clinically,…

  3. COGNITIVE POTENTIALS AFTER STROKE- SOMATOTHERAPY AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Matovic

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Focal brain lesions or more small lesions due to stroke can cause measurable damage to cognitive potential. The aim of this paper is to examine the cognitive potential in people who are suffering from a stroke, according to the outcomes of tests of cognitive potential to create and implement somatotherapy and occupational therapy, and after completion of therapy final test of cognitive potential. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted with 64 patients who were suffering from a stroke. The subjects were recommended to somatotherapy and occupational therapy by a physiatrist. Before creating these therapies conducted initial measurement of cognitive potential MoCA test. Score 26-30 points is considered normal, while a score below 26 points indicates the presence of cognitive disorders. For those with a score less than 26 points on the initial examination of the individual created somatotherapy and occupational therapy, as well as for those with a score higher than 26 points to monitor cognitive potential. After the somatotherapy and occupational therapy for a period of 21 days, after 30 minutes during the day, measured the effects of these therapies final testing of cognitive potential MoCA test. Result: On initial examination score 26 points was present in 7.8% of respondents, while the final test score of 26 points was present in 21.9%. The statistical significance level of p <.005 between the initial and final tests of cognitive potential MoCA test confirmed the Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test, while the statistical significance level of p <.001, confirmed Spearman's correlation coefficient. Conclusion: This study confirmed the reliability of MoCA test at the initial and final testing the presence of cognitive impairment potential in people with stroke, and reliability is confirmed and when examining the effects of intensive use of individually created somatotherapy and occupational therapy to reduce the damage of cognitive

  4. Transformation from student to occupational therapist: Using the Delphi technique to identify the threshold concepts of occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola-Richmond, Kelli M; Pépin, Geneviève; Larkin, Helen

    2016-04-01

    Understanding and facilitating the transformation from occupational therapy student to practitioner is central to the development of competent and work-ready graduates. However, the pivotal concepts and capabilities that need to be taught and learnt in occupational therapy are not necessarily explicit. The threshold concepts theory of teaching and learning proposes that every discipline has a set of transformational concepts that students must acquire in order to progress. As students acquire the threshold concepts, they develop a transformed way of understanding content related to their course of study which contributes to their developing expertise. The aim of this study was to identify the threshold concepts of occupational therapy. The Delphi technique, a data collection method that aims to demonstrate consensus in relation to important questions, was used with three groups comprising final year occupational therapy students (n = 11), occupational therapy clinicians (n = 21) and academics teaching occupational therapy (n = 10) in Victoria, Australia. Participants reached consensus regarding 10 threshold concepts for the occupational therapy discipline. These are: understanding and applying the models and theories of occupational therapy; occupation; evidence-based practice; clinical reasoning; discipline specific skills and knowledge; practising in context; a client-centred approach; the occupational therapist role; reflective practice and; a holistic approach. The threshold concepts identified provide valuable information for the discipline. They can potentially inform the development of competencies for occupational therapy and provide guidance for teaching and learning activities to facilitate the transformation to competent practitioner. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  5. 42 CFR 409.17 - Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... therapist furnishing the physical therapy services. (4) A speech-language pathologist furnishing the speech... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech..., and speech-language pathology services. (a) General rules. (1) Except as specified in this...

  6. Associations of psychological capital, demographic and occupational factors with cigarette smoking among Chinese underground coal miners

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Li; Xu, Xin; Wu, Hui; Yang, Yilong; Wang, Lie

    2015-01-01

    Background As a specific male occupational group, underground coal miners have been commonly found to have a high prevalence of cigarette smoking. It is of urgent need to explore some factors that could be intervened to reduce smoking from personal or internal perspective. The purpose of the present study was to examine the associations of psychological capital (PsyCap), demographic and occupational factors with smoking among Chinese underground coal miners. Methods A cross-sectional survey w...

  7. Building International Sustainable Partnerships in Occupational Therapy: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupe, Debra Ann; Kern, Stephen B; Salvant, Sabrina; Talero, Pamela

    2015-09-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners frequently identify opportunities for international practice. The World Health Organization and the World Federation of Occupational Therapists have encouraged occupational therapists to address transnational issues, social inclusion, and equal access to opportunities grounded in meaningful occupation (WFOT, 2012). This case study describes a partnership between two U.S. schools of occupational therapy and a Cuban community based pediatric clinic. It examines the dynamics that have sustained the partnership despite political, economic, and logistical barriers. The literature is scrutinized to show how this case study fits into other accounts of collaborative international partnerships. Particularly, it investigates structural and institutional conditions that shape international sustainable partnerships. In doing so, we answer the following questions: (1) Under which circumstances do international partnerships emerge and flourish? (2) What structural and institutional conditions shape international sustainable partnerships? And (3) How do partners perceive and experience the bilateral international partnership? It also discusses and illustrates the foundations and development of international partnerships that succeed. Through the use of a case study we illustrate the development of this partnership. Finally, we consider the next steps of this particular sustainable and collaborative international partnership.

  8. The representation of occupational therapy in Irish national newspapers (1990-1999)

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, Eimear

    2014-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed Background: Documenting the history of occupational therapy allows practitioners to understand the factors which influenced the development of their profession and contemporary practice. The documentation of the history of occupational therapy in Ireland received little attention prior to the recent development of the History of Occupational Therapy Project at the University of Limerick. The representations of the occupational therapy profession in the Irish media are bei...

  9. Managing diverse occupational therapy resources in a creative, corporate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, S

    1993-10-01

    Two occupational therapy departments were amalgamated into a corporate whole and charged with the development of a workable, corporate structure. The departmental model which was developed served to enhance the concepts of quality of working life, employee autonomy, management team and quality circle theory. This paper provides a background from business and organizational literature, and outlines the development of the departmental model, in concert with the adoption of the client-centred model of occupational performance as a department basis for practice. This development was taking place concurrently with larger, institutional changes into a decentralized clinical programme management model. Discussion highlights the level of staff satisfaction with the changes, areas of concern during the development of the system and plans for the future growth. During this period of massive and critical change in the delivery of health care services, there has been a trend in restructuring health care institutions towards decentralized models. This paper will describe the experience of one occupational therapy department in developing an innovative departmental structure involving participatory management amalgamation. It is believed that the experience of the past occupational therapy work units with one viable option for a renewed management model. Staff skill sets can be maximized and optimal potential realized while faced with inevitable resource shrinkage and service reorganization.

  10. Occupational Therapy Interventions in Chronic Pain--A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselstrand, Malin; Samuelsson, Kersti; Liedberg, Gunilla

    2015-12-01

    The use of interventions based on the best available evidence in occupational therapy is essential, and evaluation of research is part of an evidence-based practice. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of studies describing and evaluating the effects of occupational therapy interventions on chronic pain. A systematic review of studies with diverse designs was carried out. A quality assessment was conducted, and the level of evidence was defined using the Research Pyramid Model. Of 19 included studies, three received the highest evidence level, and three were considered to be of high quality. The clinical recommendations that can be derived from this study are the following: occupational therapy interventions should start from the identified needs of the person with chronic pain; no support exists for the effectiveness of electromyographic biofeedback training as a supplement, more studies are needed to confirm this result; the efficacy of instructions on body mechanics was significant during work-hardening treatment; and occupational therapists need to perform and present more clinical studies of high quality and high-evidence level to build up a trustworthy arsenal of evidence-based interventions, for example, in persons with chronic pain. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. The Social Profiles of Occupational Therapy Students’ Educational Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore Bonsaksen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today’s occupational therapy models emphasize that a person’s choice of, satisfaction with, and performance in occupations are markedly influenced by the context. For students undergoing a group-based study module, the group is an important context factor. Until recently, there has been a lack of instruments available for the assessment of functioning and participation at the group level. This mixed methods pilot study aimed to examine occupational therapy students’ perceptions of their group’s level of functioning and course of development during one study module. Methods: The students’ perceptions of their group’s functioning were assessed in two ways: by examining their scores on the Social Profile (SP, a new instrument, and by examining their qualitative descriptions of the groups and how the groups developed over time. The sample consisted of four occupational therapy students. Results: Two students perceived their group functioning as stable over time. One student’s scores indicated an increase in group functioning over time, whereas one student’s showed a decrease. The interview statements showed varying degrees of connectedness with the SP items. Conclusions: Descriptions of stability and change corresponded very well with the students’ SP trajectories, indicating content validity of the assessment as a whole.

  12. Record of Occupational Therapy interventional practice in inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Barbieri Bombarda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of records in the professional practice of occupational therapy, it is necessary to instill a more insightful look at the effectiveness of practitioners’ notes, as well as encourage the development of research–oriented documentary practice. The preparation of records arises from the need to have information from the service as a means of guidance and oversight of the service provided and on the adopted technical responsibility, as well as from the fact that the notes are a valuable data providing resource for research. The present study sought to identify and characterize occupational therapists in the state of Sao Paulo who work in inclusive education and how the records of their interventional practices are performed. A structured questionnaire as a tool available on the website for specific predetermined time was used as the study instrument, and the obtained data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Participants were 55 occupational therapists working in the inclusive education process registered in the 3rd region of the Regional Council of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy. The results demonstrated that free narrative was the most commonly used registration model and that information related to the process of custody of notes was fragmented. These data showed weakness in the systematization of records, which is believed to result in improvement of the profession, a factor that demonstrates the necessity and temporality of the scientific production on this issue.

  13. Attitudes towards fibromyalgia: A survey of Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical therapy and occupational therapy students

    OpenAIRE

    Badwall Parminder; Kulkarni Abhaya V; Busse Jason W; Guyatt Gordon H

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The frequent use of chiropractic, naturopathic, and physical and occupational therapy by patients with fibromyalgia has been emphasized repeatedly, but little is known about the attitudes of these therapists towards this challenging condition. Methods We administered a cross-sectional survey to 385 senior Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical and occupational therapy students in their final year of studies, that inquired about attitudes towards the diagnosis and ma...

  14. Apps in therapy: occupational therapists' use and opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Anna M; Stotz, Nicole; Metz, Alexia E

    2017-11-01

    To gather information on occupational therapy practitioners' use and opinions of apps, an online survey was distributed to occupational therapy practitioners licensed in the state of Ohio. The survey sought information regarding clinical populations and skill areas for which apps are used, potential barriers to use of apps and preferred apps/app features. OTs working in medical and education-based settings and with clients of all ages responded to the survey. Over half (53%) reported not using apps in therapy, with "not having access to the technology at work" being the leading reason endorsed. Of practitioners who did report using apps, the majority used them with ≤25% of their case load and primarily used tablets to do so. Clinicians indicated that they use apps for a wide variety of reasons, including to promote skill building and to support the therapeutic process. Preferred features included the ability to grade difficulty up/down, multiple uses and accurate feedback. Recommendations from peers were the most commonly reported way respondents found new apps. The results suggest that occupational therapy practitioners employ clinical reasoning when implementing apps in therapy. Possible ways to improve access to apps for therapists who would like to implement them are discussed. Implications for Rehabilitation Many occupational therapy practitioners are using apps with at least a portion of their caseloads. Therapists select apps based on peer recommendations, most commonly selecting those which promote skill building and support the therapeutic process. More therapists might make use of apps if potential barriers were reduced or eliminated, including availability of technology in the clinical practice setting, therapist training and education, therapist input into app development and an enhanced evidence base.

  15. Coaching as a Family-Centred, Occupational Therapy Intervention for Autism: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Desley

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy interventions for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) require a sound evidence-base. In the context of emerging evidence on coaching interventions in paediatric occupational therapy practice, a review of the occupational therapy literature was conducted to investigate the use of coaching interventions for children and adolescents…

  16. Perceptions and Attitudes of Occupational Therapy Faculty towards the Scholarship of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordinetz, Sue Ann

    2009-01-01

    Occupational therapy educators have been encouraged to engage in the scholarship of teaching as a form of best practice in education. Despite professional documents and encouragement by leaders in the field of occupational therapy, there is very little known about occupational therapy educators' perceptions, attitudes, and engagement in the…

  17. Coaching as a Family-Centred, Occupational Therapy Intervention for Autism: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Desley

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy interventions for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) require a sound evidence-base. In the context of emerging evidence on coaching interventions in paediatric occupational therapy practice, a review of the occupational therapy literature was conducted to investigate the use of coaching interventions for children and adolescents…

  18. Perceptions and Attitudes of Occupational Therapy Faculty towards the Scholarship of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordinetz, Sue Ann

    2009-01-01

    Occupational therapy educators have been encouraged to engage in the scholarship of teaching as a form of best practice in education. Despite professional documents and encouragement by leaders in the field of occupational therapy, there is very little known about occupational therapy educators' perceptions, attitudes, and engagement in the…

  19. Physical and occupational therapy in inpatient stroke rehabilitation: the contribution of therapy extenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ching-Hui; Putman, Koen; Nichols, Diane; McGinty, Molly E; DeJong, Gerben; Smout, Randall J; Horn, Susan

    2010-11-01

    To understand the use of therapy extenders in stroke rehabilitation. Descriptive analysis of a prospective observational cohort study. Two hundred ninety-eight patients with moderate stroke and 284 with severe stroke from 5 inpatient rehabilitation facilities with complete physical and occupational therapy data are included in the study. Overall, occupational therapists and assistants contributed ∼70% and 21% of all occupational therapy hours, respectively. For physical therapy, these percentages in moderate group (60% vs. 31%) differ from those in severe group (65% vs. 23%). Some variations in the use of therapy extenders are noted in both disciplines across sites. Physical and occupational therapists spend more time in delivering advanced activities that include ongoing integrated evaluation and treatment planning or modification. Their assistants spend more time in delivering lower-level activities, such as bed mobility, transfers, dressing, or nonfunctional activities. Also, therapists are more likely to assign responsibility to assistants to treat moderate motor impairment among patients with stroke. Characterizing therapy practice in stroke rehabilitation is not straightforward. It is multifactorial and takes into account the (1) type of therapy, (2) therapy activity, (3) therapy provider including extender personnel, (4) specific training in stroke, and (5) years of experience. Future research to examine the association between use of therapy extenders and outcomes is recommended.

  20. Interpersonal, cognitive analytic and other integrative therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunot, Vivien; Moore, Theresa Hm; Caldwell, Deborah; Davies, Philippa; Jones, Hannah; Lewis, Glyn; Churchill, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all integrative therapies compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of different integrative therapy models (IPT, CAT, psychodynamic-interpersonal therapy, CBASP, counselling) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all integrative therapies compared with different psychological therapy approaches (psychodynamic, behavioural, humanistic, cognitive-behavioural, third wave CBT) for acute depression.

  1. Evaluation of evidence within occupational therapy in stroke rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Persson, Dennis; Nygren, Carita;

    2010-01-01

    appraised and the quality evaluated using an evidence taxonomy and an evidence hierarchy. Results: Evidence arose providing support for a client-centred approach, entailing outcome related to better ability to recall goals, the patients feeling more involved and able to manage more everyday life occupations......Abstract Evidence-based practice creates practice that integrates research-driven evidence with clinical expertise and patients' preferences in clinical decision-making. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate and evaluate the quality and applicability of scientific research in occupational...... therapy intervention related to the use of everyday life occupations and client-centred practice within stroke rehabilitation. Design: Systematic searches of research studies published in English during 2000-2007 in peer-reviewed journals were undertaken. Thirty-nine articles and one Cochrane review were...

  2. Cerebral vascular accident: some characteristics of occupational therapy evaluation forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenbacher, K

    1980-04-01

    To determine areas most commonly evaluated by occupational therapists and to ascertain methods in which evaluative information is gathered, 35 evaluation forms currently employed by occupational therapists to assess dysfunction in patients with cerebral vascular accident were collected. Five general areas including motor function, sensory deficit, hadn function, activities of daily living, and visual perception were found to be most frequently listed on the forms. These areas were divided into sub areas to operationally define the information collected. Analysis revealed that the level of measurement most frequently employed by therapists to record evaluate findings was the descriptive level. There was a tendency to collect data at "higher" or more sophisticated levels of measurement in those areas evaluated most frequently. The findings are discussed in relation to professional competency concerns and the need to develop unique occupational therapy evaluative instruments for areas of practice such as cerebral vascular accident.

  3. Occupation as therapy for trauma recovery: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    In this case study, a young women who has chronic verbal, emotional, and physical abuse and was exposed to repetitive adult acts of abuse as a child initially presented with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) marked by constriction and disconnection, which resulted in her feeling passive and tortured. As part of her occupational therapy intervention, based on the occupational adaptation, psychoanalytic, and recovery frames of reference, she was able to use her skills as a musician and lyricist to work through her trauma by performing heavy metal music. She used work to express emotions and tell and retell her story to audiences eager to hear her. Work helped her develop an identity that allowed her to be active in the world and reach out to others through her music. This case study focuses on the intervention - how music and occupation functioned as a foundation for relieving her PTSD.

  4. Holism in occupational therapy: elusive fiction and ambivalent struggle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, L

    2001-01-01

    The profession of occupational therapy is said to have underpinnings of holistic, humanistic, and client-centered values. How does this claim translate into practice? This article reports on a qualitative study in which the practice experiences of 12 occupational therapists in the United Kingdom were explored. Through phenomenological analysis of interviews and participant observation data, the findings revealed that although holism is indeed valued, considerable uncertainty exists about what it actually means. The therapists studied seemed to understand holism and enact it in different, sometimes contradictory, ways. Further, each therapist's practice could be simultaneously reductionistic and holistic, depending on the perceived needs of the situation. Therapists struggled to negotiate the tensions between beliefs and practices and to cope with their uncomfortable feelings when they did not achieve their ideals. Although the occupational therapists in this study strove to be person-centered, the demands of their work context pushed them to be pragmatic and strategic.

  5. Sandplay therapy with couples within the framework of analytical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Susan Carol

    2015-02-01

    Sandplay therapy with couples is discussed within an analytical framework. Guidelines are proposed as a means of developing this relatively new area within sandplay therapy, and as a platform to open a wider discussion to bring together sandplay therapy and couple therapy. Examples of sand trays created during couple therapy are also presented to illustrate the transformations during the therapeutic process. © 2015, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  6. Mexican American Fathers' Occupational Conditions: Links to Family Members' Psychological Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouter, Ann C.; Davis, Kelly D.; Updegraff, Kimberly; Delgado, Melissa; Fortner, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    To examine the implications of fathers' occupational conditions (i.e., income, work hours, shift work, pressure, workplace racism, and underemployment) for family members' psychological adjustment, home interviews were conducted with fathers, mothers, and two adolescent offspring in each of 218 Mexican American families. Results underscored the…

  7. Setting occupational exposure limits in humans: contributions from the field of experimental psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, M.A.M.; Kroeze, J.H.A.; Dalton, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Psychophysical methods from the field of experimental psychology are evaluated for their utility in the derivation of occupational exposure limits (OELs) for volatile chemicals based on acute sensory irritation in humans. The lateralization threshold method, which involves the localization of trigem

  8. Investigating the Psychological Well-Being and Job Satisfaction Levels in Different Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isgör, Isa Yücel; Haspolat, Namik Kemal

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between job satisfaction and psychological well-being levels of different occupational employees (education, security, health, justice, worker, engineer, and religious official) carrying on their duties in different institutions and organizations in a mid-scale provincial center of…

  9. Impact of Psychological Capital on Occupational Burnout and Performance of Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Saif ur; Qingren, Cao; Latif, Yasir; Iqbal, Pervaiz

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact and interrelation between positive psychological capital and occupational burnout among faculty associates of technical and professional training institutions. Design/methodology/approach: In total, 282 faculty members from 17 technical institutions were selected from the province of…

  10. Occupational therapy in the hospital context: an integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Aline Valente Santos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the scientific knowledge produced and published in journals indexed in major international databases, covering the area of Occupational Therapy (OT in hospitals. To this end, an integrative literature review was carried out with 17 selected articles published between 2004 and 2009, indexed in the following databases: LILACS, SciELO and MEDLINE. Studies show that the performance of an occupational therapist with hospitalized patients provides improvements in the hospitalization condition, higher levels of independence, function and quality of life, and facilitates the resumption of everyday life and social participation of individuals. The recent scientific production in Occupational Therapy regarding hospital contexts seems to be more directed to the report of experiences than to the evidence for effectiveness of actions developed through planned and controlled clinical and/or experimental studies. This type of production certainly contributes not only to a better dissemination and development of successful and effective therapeutic practices, but also to greater recognition of the need and importance of the occupational therapist in the composition of health teams in hospitals. However, productions with greater scientific consistency within internationally accepted standards are necessary.

  11. [Occupational therapy in rheumatoid arthritis: what rheumatologists need to know?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Pedro Henrique Tavares Queiroz; Pontes, Tatiana Barcelos; Matheus, João Paulo Chieregato; Muniz, Luciana Feitosa; da Mota, Licia Maria Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Interventions focusing on education and self-management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by the patient improves adherence and effectiveness of early treatment. The combination of pharmacologic and rehabilitation treatment aims to maximize the possibilities of intervention, delaying the appearance of new symptoms, reducing disability and minimizing sequelae, decreasing the impact of symptoms on patient's functionality. Occupational therapy is a health profession that aims to improve the performance of daily activities by the patient, providing means for the prevention of functional limitations, adaptation to lifestyle changes and maintenance or improvement of psychosocial health. Due to the systemic nature of RA, multidisciplinary follow-up is necessary for the proper management of the impact of the disease on various aspects of life. As a member of the health team, occupational therapists objective to improve and maintaining functional capacity of the patient, preventing the progression of deformities, assisting the process of understanding and coping with the disease and providing means for carrying out the activities required for the engagement of the individual in meaningful occupations, favoring autonomy and independence in self-care activities, employment, educational, social and leisure. The objective of this review is to familiarize the rheumatologist with the tools used for assessment and intervention in occupational therapy, focusing on the application of these principles to the treatment of patients with RA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Forensic Occupational Therapy in Canada: The Current State of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Adora L Y; Wong, Chantal Isabelle; Maraj, Sara A; Fry, Danielle; Jecker, Justine; Jung, Bonny

    2016-09-01

    Although occupational therapists have been practicing in forensic settings for many years, there is a paucity of literature regarding the nature of this practice in Canada. The purpose of this study was to describe the practices of Canadian occupational therapists in forensic mental health. An online survey was designed based on the Canadian Practice Process Framework. Following purposive and snowball sampling, responses were analysed with descriptive statistics and content analysis. Twenty-seven clinicians responded (56% response rate). Respondents indicated commonalities in workplaces, client caseloads and practice challenges. The outstanding need in Canada to demonstrate client outcomes through the use of evaluation instruments reflects those practice gaps identified internationally. Education, advocacy and research are critical areas for the development of Canadian forensic occupational therapy. Although findings heavily reflect one provincial context and may not be generalizable to nonhospital settings, a number of priority areas were identified. Future efforts should clarify the role of forensic occupational therapy to stakeholders, and validate their contributions through research that evaluates intervention efficacy and meaningful outcomes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. A tool to enhance occupational therapy reasoning from ICF perspective: The Hasselt Occupational Performance Profile (H-OPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghysels, R; Vanroye, E; Westhovens, M; Spooren, A

    2017-03-01

    In order to enhance occupational therapy reasoning in clinical practice, different elements such as client-centred approach, evidence-based care and interdisciplinary work should be taken into account, but is a challenge. To describe the development of the digital Hasselt Occupational Performance Profile (H-OPP(©)) that enhances occupational therapy reasoning from ICF perspective. A participative qualitative design was used to create the H-OPP(©) in an iterative way in which occupational therapy lectures, ICF experts, students and occupational therapists in the field were involved. After linking occupational therapy terminology to the ICF, different stages of the H-OPP were identified and elaborated with main features: generating an occupational performance profile based on inventarization of problems and possibilities, formulating an occupational performance diagnosis and enabling to create an intervention plan. In all stages, both the perspectives of the client and the occupational therapist were taken into account. To increase practical use, the tool was further elaborated and digitalized. The H-OPP(©) is a digital coach that guides and facilitates professional reasoning in (novice) occupational therapists. It augments involvement of the client system. Furthermore, it enhances interdisciplinary communication and evidence-based care.

  14. Occupational Therapy: Meeting the Needs of Families of People With Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhaneck, Heather Miller; Watling, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy has much to offer to families of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, people outside the profession may be unaware of occupational therapy's breadth and scope. It is our responsibility and our duty to express the full range of occupational therapy services through research, clinical practice, advocacy, and consumer education. This special issue of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy, with its focus on autism, embarks on this endeavor by highlighting research and theoretical articles that address the various aspects of occupational therapy practice that can help to fully meet the needs of people with ASD and their families.

  15. Developmental stages of occupational therapy and the feminist movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, M B

    1976-10-01

    Developmental stages characterize the growth of both the feminist movement and the field of occupational therapy. The human development stages described by Erik Erikson are used to compare the growth stages of these two groups to the human sequence. It is hypothesized that both female-dominated groups began with an "infancy" period in the early 1900s characterized by the beginnings of identity and confidence in their respective groups. Both continued to develop through stages corresponding to the childhood stages characterized by Erikson and into the adolescent acting out stages as characterized by the demonstrations of the 1960s. Present and future trends are explored in relation to developmental stages, as well as to implications for the field of occupational therapy in education, theory, and practice.

  16. Concept Mapping as a Learning Tool in Occupational Therapy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grice, Kimatha

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes concept mapping and its use as a teaching and learning tool in an entry level occupational therapy program. In order for students to demonstrate their mastery of the concepts associated with a particular topic or body of knowledge, assignments involving concept maps were developed and used in two courses in an entry level occupational therapy program. Students were then surveyed about their perceptions and attitudes regarding the assignments. Students found the process of creating concept maps valuable to their learning of the content and the majority also enjoyed the process as a learning activity. The use of concept mapping as a way to encourage independent, individualized, and student-centered learning is discussed.

  17. Information literacy and library attitudes of occupational therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipnis, Daniel G; Frisby, Anthony J

    2006-01-01

    Information literacy, often described as a person's ability to effectively find and evaluate answers to questions using a variety of information resources, is of particular importance to health care workers. This paper presents the results of an information literacy survey presented to occupational therapy (OT) students at Thomas Jefferson University during a series of required class activities. Also described are the authors' activities with the faculty and courses at Jefferson. The survey was made available to first-, second-, third-, and fourth-year occupational therapy students along with nursing students and pharmacy students. The survey is designed to identify research habits, skills, and preferences. Results confirm some commonly held perceptions about searching skills of young adults and an interesting dichotomy in students' learning habits. The paper concludes with a discussion of recommendations to OT faculty and librarians on how to improve information literacy education. The survey can be obtained by contacting the authors.

  18. Unilateral neglect syndrome after stroke: the role of Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Pereira de Oliveira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral Neglect Syndrome is one of the consequences of cerebral vascular accident (CVA generally following right parietal lobe lesion, leading to the impairment of perceptive visual, spatial and attention functions. The patient affected does not realize the environmental stimuli on the contralesional hemibody. Occupational therapy plays an important role in caring for this patient, seeking the recovery of perception, attention and social engagement. This study aimed to describe and evaluate the results of occupational therapy intervention and treatment in a single Unilateral Neglect Syndrome post CVA patient. Data were obtained from a survey of the patient’s medical records and interviews of his therapist and caretaker. The analysis of the patient’s medical records and his therapist’s report showed that the patient responded satisfactorily to treatment, presenting a decrease of the left unilateral neglect at the end of the study period. The favorable outcome of the patient outlined the relevance of evaluating the effects of Occupational Therapy interventions for clinical unilateral neglect syndrome.

  19. Amount and Focus of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy for Young Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisano, Robert J.; Begnoche, Denise M.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Bartlett, Doreen J.; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Chang, Hui-Ju

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) services for a cohort of 399 children with cerebral palsy (CP), 2-6 years old, residing in the United States and Canada. Parents completed a services questionnaire by telephone interview. Therapists classified children's Gross Motor Function Classification…

  20. Amount and Focus of Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy for Young Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisano, Robert J.; Begnoche, Denise M.; Chiarello, Lisa A.; Bartlett, Doreen J.; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Chang, Hui-Ju

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) services for a cohort of 399 children with cerebral palsy (CP), 2-6 years old, residing in the United States and Canada. Parents completed a services questionnaire by telephone interview. Therapists classified children's Gross Motor Function Classification…

  1. Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Orientation and Mobility Services in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, J; Bigby ,L; Nicholson, R

    2004-01-01

    The related service areas of occupational therapy, physical therapy, and orientation and mobility share some areas of professional practice but are quite distinct in the way services allow children with disabilities to fully participate in contemporary school environments. This article presents an overview of the roles and responsibilities of…

  2. Tracked ways and contributions for the development of Occupational Therapy in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luísa Guillaumon Emmel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay reflects the paths I have taken in occupational therapy during 40+ years in this profession, presenting briefly the main important activities and participation of my career. It is possible to visualize the route followed in the choices of research issues and the beginning of a series of projects and directions to growth and recognition of the Brazilian occupational therapy. The participation with the research funding grants and the strengthening of research activities are presented. Recounts the history of the foundation of the Occupational Therapy Program at Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar, the first research laboratory in Occupational Therapy in Brazil, the Journal of Occupational Therapy - UFSCar and also the Postgraduate Program in Occupational Therapy UFSCar (PPGTO. Some of the main challenges faced in teaching, community activities, the university management and the production of knowledge in occupational therapy are still registered, which contributed to the development of the profession.

  3. Literature and art therapy in post-stroke psychological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Yeongcheol; Yim, Jongeun

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and long-term disability worldwide, and post-stroke depression (PSD) is a common and serious psychiatric complication of stroke. PSD makes patients have more severe deficits in activities of daily living, a worse functional outcome, more severe cognitive deficits and increased mortality as compared to stroke patients without depression. Therefore, to reduce or prevent mental problems of stroke patients, psychological treatment should be recommended. Literature and art therapy are highly effective psychological treatment for stroke patients. Literature therapy divided into poetry and story therapy is an assistive tool that treats neurosis as well as emotional or behavioral disorders. Poetry can add impression to the lethargic life of a patient with PSD, thereby acting as a natural treatment. Story therapy can change the gloomy psychological state of patients into a bright and healthy story, and therefore can help stroke patients to overcome their emotional disabilities. Art therapy is one form of psychological therapy that can treat depression and anxiety in stroke patients. Stroke patients can express their internal conflicts, emotions, and psychological status through art works or processes and it would be a healing process of mental problems. Music therapy can relieve the suppressed emotions of patients and add vitality to the body, while giving them the energy to share their feelings with others. In conclusion, literature and art therapy can identify the emotional status of patients and serve as a useful auxiliary tool to help stroke patients in their rehabilitation process.

  4. Dynamics of Psychological Crisis Experience With Psychological Consulting by Gestalt Therapy Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Fahrutdinova, Liliya Raifovna; Nugmanova, Dzhamilia Renatovna

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics of experience as such and its corporeal, emotional and cognitive elements in the situation of psychological consulting provisioning is covered. The aim of research was to study psychological crisis experience dynamics in the situation when psychological consulting by gestalt therapy methods is provided. Theoretical analysis of the problem of crisis situations, phenomenon and structural, and dynamic organization of experience of the subject of consulting have been carried out. To fulf...

  5. Community engagement: outcomes for occupational therapy students, faculty and clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Victoria P

    2014-06-01

    Students in health care professions, including occupational therapy, are required to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in mental health and research. Persons diagnosed with a mental illness, a learning disability or an autism-spectrum disorder desire to achieve goals in higher education and employment. Faculty in health care programmes strives to meet professional goals and accreditation and institution requirements for teaching, service and scholarship. The Bridge Program, a programme based on principles of community engagement, was developed to meet the needs of these three stakeholders. The objective of this paper is to provide programme description and outcomes of the effectiveness of the Bridge Program for all three stakeholders. This uses mixed methods research design including descriptive and quantitative and qualitative one-group pre-test-post-test designs. Instruments consisted of the Occupational Therapy Student and Mental Health Population Scale and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Quantitative results support that graduate occupational therapy students gained research and clinical skills (n = 100; p = .000); clients increased performance and satisfaction toward goals (n = 113; p = .000) and faculty (n = 1) achieved goals related to teaching, service and scholarship. Programmes based on principles of community engagement can address the needs of the community, can provide outcomes that advance knowledge about community practice and can result in benefits for all stakeholders. This paper is limited to generalization and instrumentation and recommends an ongoing evaluation of other community engagement programmes involving all stakeholders in the future research. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy in Acute Stroke: Do Rural Patients Receive Less Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josie Merchant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess whether acute stroke patients in rural hospitals receive less occupational therapy and physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. Design. Retrospective case-control study of health data in patients ≤10 days after stroke. Setting. Occupational therapy and physiotherapy services in four rural hospitals and one metropolitan hospital. Participants. Acute stroke patients admitted in one health district. Main Outcome Measures. Frequency and duration of face-to-face and indirect therapy sessions. Results. Rural hospitals admitted 363 patients and metropolitan hospital admitted 378 patients. Mean age was 73 years. Those in rural hospitals received more face-to-face (p>0.0014 and indirect (p=0.001 occupational therapy when compared to those in the metropolitan hospital. Face-to-face sessions lasted longer (p=0.001. Patients admitted to the metropolitan hospital received more face-to-face (p>0.000 and indirect (p>0.000 physiotherapy when compared to those admitted to rural hospitals. Face-to-face sessions were shorter (p>0.000. Almost all were seen within 24 hours of referral. Conclusions. Acute stroke patients in Australian rural hospital may receive more occupational therapy and less physiotherapy than those in metropolitan hospitals. The dose of therapy was lower than recommended, and the referral process may unnecessarily delay the time from admission to a patient’s first therapy session.

  7. Occupation, work organisation conditions and the development of chronic psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Alain; Blanc, Marie-Ève

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of occupation and work organisation conditions to the development of chronic psychological distress in the Canadian workforce was examined. Longitudinal data came from the first five cycles (Cycle 1=1994-1995, Cycle 5=2002-2003) of Statistics Canada's National Population Health Survey. A sample of 5,500 workers nested in 1,300 neighbourhoods and aged 15 to 55 years. Data had a hierarchical structure and were analysed using multilevel logistic regression models. The results showed 46.4% of workers reported one episode of psychological distress, 23.5% more than one, and 10.6% three or more. Psychological distress decreased over time and varied significantly between individuals and neighbourhoods. Occupation was not significant, but psychological demands, job insecurity, and social support in the workplace were important determinants. The results showed strong contributions of individual and outside work factors (family, social support, neighbourhood). Research in occupational mental health must expand theoretical and empirical frameworks in order to capture actual workplace dynamics and the effects on workers' mental health. Interventions designed to reduce mental health problems should carefully evaluate not only the work environment itself, but also non-work factors and other individual characteristics.

  8. The axiological ontology of occupational therapy: a philosophical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Marie-Josée

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the results of a study analyzing several discourses on the values of occupational therapy and some philosophical assumptions upon which these values are based. A qualitative study of several values statements using the hermeneutical method--a conventional analytical approach in philosophy--was conducted. The literature review reveals that opinions on the values of occupational therapy differ greatly--no one value is shared among all the values statements examined. However, the majority of the texts mention occupational participation. A philosophical analysis of the literature shows that this value is based on a conception of human beings that can be traced back to the philosophical anthropologies of thinkers like Marx, Rousseau, Sartre, and Kant. The philosophical analysis also brought to light a certain conceptual confusion about what a value is. This article therefore offers some conceptual clarifications to help distinguish between values, beliefs, attitudes, principles, and non-evaluative concepts. It also presents the implications for practice of this philosophical analysis of values statements of the profession.

  9. Primary health care to elderly people: Occupational Therapy actions perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassio Batista Alves

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, Occupational Therapy (OT was legislated in 1969, and was introduced into the Primary Health Care (PHC in the 90s. At this level of care, the OT serves various stages of human development, including aging, in a perspective of care and active aging line, seeks to optimize opportunities for health, participation and safety, using clinical reasoning in order to plan, guide, conduct and reflect their actions in producing the line of care. This career considers human activities as part of the construction of the man himself as an expertise area and seeks to understand the relationships that the active human establishes in its life and health. This study aimed to verify the actions and identify the occupational therapy line of care with the elderly in APS. This is a qualitative study that used a semi-structured interview applied during April to May 2013 with six occupational therapists that cared for older people in the APS at Uberaba-MG. The data was analyzed using the Collective Subject Discourse (CSD technique. We observed that the OT actions to produce line of care for the elderly happen according to the general public care, whether individual or group, with the team during case discussions, referrals or work management and the territory during the territorial diagnosis and networks formation, all permeated by the principles of fairness, integrity, intersectoriality and clinical reasoning in OT.

  10. Dynamics of psychological crisis experience with psychological consulting by gestalt therapy methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrutdinova, Liliya Raifovna; Nugmanova, Dzhamilia Renatovna

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of experience as such and its corporeal, emotional and cognitive elements in the situation of psychological consulting provisioning is covered. The aim of research was to study psychological crisis experience dynamics in the situation when psychological consulting by gestalt therapy methods is provided. Theoretical analysis of the problem of crisis situations, phenomenon and structural, and dynamic organization of experience of the subject of consulting have been carried out. To fulfill research project test subjects experience crisis situation have been selected, studied in the situation when they provided psychological consulting by methods of gestalt therapy, and methodology of study of crisis situations experience has been prepared. Specifics of psychological crisis experience have been revealed and its elements in different stages of psychological consulting by gestalt therapy methods. Dynamics of experience of psychological crisis and its structural elements have been revealed and reliable changes in it have been revealed. Dynamics of psychological crisis experience and its structural elements have been revealed and reliable changes in it have been revealed. "Desiccation" of experience is being observed, releasing its substantiality of negative impression to the end of consulting and development of the new experience of control over crisis situation. Interrelations of structural elements of experience in the process of psychological consulting have been shown. Effecting one structure causes reliable changes in all others structural elements of experience. Giving actual psychological help to clients in crisis situation by methods of gestalt therapy is possible as it was shown in psychological consulting sessions. Structure of client's request has been revealed - problems of personal sense are fixed as the most frequent cause of clients' applications, as well as absence of choices, obtrusiveness of negative thoughts, tend to getting stuck on events

  11. Occupational therapy evaluation: use of self-report and/or observation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristina Tomra; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Occupational Therapy Intervention Process Model (OTIPM) serves to guide occupational therapists in their professional reasoning. The OTIPM prescribes evaluation of task performance based on both self-report and observation. Although this approach seems ideal, many clinicians raise...

  12. Teaching Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Undergraduate Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Tracey Ellen; Blau, Shawn; Grozeva, Dima

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an experimental undergraduate psychology course that ran for two semesters during the 2009 academic year at a private, urban university in the United States. Students learned the techniques and strategies of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) with a focus on the practical elements…

  13. Teaching Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Undergraduate Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Tracey Ellen; Blau, Shawn; Grozeva, Dima

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an experimental undergraduate psychology course that ran for two semesters during the 2009 academic year at a private, urban university in the United States. Students learned the techniques and strategies of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) with a focus on the practical elements…

  14. Positive Art Therapy: Linking Positive Psychology to Art Therapy Theory, Practice, and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Rebecca A.; Chilton, Gioia

    2013-01-01

    As a growing movement in the larger field of mental health, positive psychology has much to offer the art therapy profession, which in turn is uniquely poised to contribute to the study of optimal functioning. This article discusses the relationship of positive psychology to art therapy and its capacity to mobilize client strengths, to induce…

  15. Positive Art Therapy: Linking Positive Psychology to Art Therapy Theory, Practice, and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Rebecca A.; Chilton, Gioia

    2013-01-01

    As a growing movement in the larger field of mental health, positive psychology has much to offer the art therapy profession, which in turn is uniquely poised to contribute to the study of optimal functioning. This article discusses the relationship of positive psychology to art therapy and its capacity to mobilize client strengths, to induce…

  16. [Obesity psychological treatment: beyond cognitive and behavioral therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volery, M; Bonnemain, A; Latino, A; Ourrad, N; Perroud, A

    2015-03-25

    The psychological assessment of the patient with obesity aims to identify the factors of maintenance of excess weight, such as eating disorders or anxio-depressive disorders. Psychotherapy helps a better weight management. Cognitive-behavioral therapy has shown its effectiveness in the treatment of obesity. New psychotherapeutic approaches are explored. The hypnosis and mindfulness are proposed for the management of emotions and stress. A targeted approach on the body image disorder decreases body dissatisfaction. When post-traumatic stress syndrome is involved, EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization & Reprocessing) is better than other types of therapies. Family therapy is indicated when the entourage is impacted. Psychological difficulties should be the subject of specific care.

  17. Occupational therapy students' perspectives regarding international cross-cultural experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Tamera Keiter; Burket, Allison; Deveney, Rebecca; Kennedy, Katelyn

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perspectives of occupational therapy students who have engaged in international, cross-cultural learning and service experiences. This study utilized a qualitative, phenomenological design. Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted with students who engaged in international learning opportunities. The interviews were coded and analyzed using a constant comparative analysis approach. Three central themes emerged from the data analysis. Connectedness is the process of forming relationships with others while engaging in cross-cultural experiences. Students formed relationships with faculty, other students, and people within the community. Cultural awareness is the recognition and understanding of a different culture and responding to those differences. Students attempted to understand the new culture in comparison to their own lived experiences. Complexity portrays cross-cultural opportunities as dynamic, multi-faceted and intricate. This was demonstrated as the students raised additional questions about the conflict between their own culture and the new culture they entered. Students also identified limited orientation, support and structure with such experiences and the conflicting roles between volunteer, student, and team member. The ability to connect with others when building relationships in diverse cultural contexts held meaning for the students; however, the students also expressed conflict in trying to make sense of the new culture as it often challenged personal beliefs and constructs. The complexity and challenges of engaging in these opportunities needs to be recognized and further explored to assess how curricula and faculty best supports culturally responsive care. © 2011 The Authors Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  18. Money Matters: Recommendations for Financial Stress Research in Occupational Health Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Robert R; Cheung, Janelle H

    2016-08-01

    Money is arguably the most important resource derived from work and the most important source of stress for contemporary employees. A substantial body of research supports the relationship between access to financial resources and health and well-being, both at individual and aggregated (e.g. national) levels of analysis. Yet, surprisingly little occupational health psychology research has paid attention to financial issues experienced specifically by those in the labour force. With these issues in mind, the overarching goal of the present paper was to address conceptual and measurement issues in the study of objective and subjective aspects of financial stress and review several assessment options available to occupational health psychology researchers for both aspects of financial stress. Where appropriate, we offer guidance to researchers about choices among various financial stress measures and identify issues that require further research attention. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. An University-based masters program in occupational therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Karen; Nielsen, Kristina Tomra; Peoples, Hanne;

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop is to share and discuss educational methods to foster master level education. Rationale Among the challenges of the post graduate master program in Occupational Therapy at University of Southern Denmark is the educational change towards an academic culture required...... of students to ascertain master level learning competencies. Through individual study plans and by use of Rubrics as tools for evaluation and feedback processes self-responsible learning is facilitated. Journal Clubs are used to qualify critical research understanding as an integrated part of the curriculum...

  20. Mexican American Fathers’ Occupational Conditions: Links to Family Members’ Psychological Adjustment

    OpenAIRE

    Crouter, Ann C.; Davis, Kelly D.; Updegraff, Kimberly; Delgado, Melissa; Fortner, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    To examine the implications of fathers’ occupational conditions (i.e., income, work hours, shift work, pressure, workplace racism, and underemployment) for family members’ psychological adjustment, home interviews were conducted with fathers, mothers, and two adolescent offspring in each of 218 Mexican American families. Results underscored the importance of acculturation as a moderator. Fathers’ income was negatively associated with depressive symptoms in highly acculturated families but not...

  1. Evidence-based practice in Occupational Health Psychology. Current status and further developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricutoiu, Laurentiu P.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the status of evidence-based practice in Occupational Health Psychology (OHP. After several searches on large online databases, we have found that OHP papers that discuss interventions are less than 10% of the overall literature. Furthermore, quantitative reviews research that reports interventions on major OHP topics are generally absent. In the last part of the paper, we formulate some reccomendations for increasing the number of papers relevant for evidence-based practice in OHP.

  2. Doubly reflexive ethnography: contributions to the construction of occupational therapy from an intercultural perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Zango Martín

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of occupational therapy, as a result of the processes of globalization, there is a growing interest in aspects relating to culture and its relationship to health and well-being. The development of occupational therapy in multicultural contexts proposes to go beyond the terminological questions to deepen and refine new guidelines related to the construction and consolidation of knowledge. Thus, this paper raises a critical analysis of the main assumptions of occupational therapy, referring to the nature of the occupation and the link between occupation, health and well-being, as well as the praxis derived from them. The professional culture of occupational therapy is analyzed through doubly reflexive ethnography, a heuristic three-dimensional model consisting of syntactic, pragmatic and semantic dimensions. This study of the occupational therapy aims to raise the development of the discipline that may be conscious and responsible for the relations of power that are implicit and explicit in the theory and practice of occupational therapy. The co-reflexion with the different actors involved is determinant in the development of an intercultural perspective of occupational therapy that may be therapeutically effective. The concept of etnoccupation may be proposed as alternative to the ethnocentric concept of occupation, proposing a vision of the occupation on economic, social and political aspects which aims at social transformation

  3. Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy Interventions for Lower-Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Julie; Bradshaw, Michelle

    Lower-extremity (LE) musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) can have a major impact on the ability to carry out daily activities. The effectiveness of interventions must be examined to enable occupational therapy practitioners to deliver the most appropriate services. This systematic review examined the literature published between 1995 and July 2014 that investigated the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions for LE MSDs. Forty-three articles met the criteria and were reviewed. Occupational therapy interventions varied on the basis of population subgroup: hip fracture, LE joint replacement, LE amputation or limb loss, and nonsurgical osteoarthritis and pain. The results indicate an overall strong role for occupational therapy in treating clients with LE MSDs. Activity pacing is an effective intervention for nonsurgical LE MSDs, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation is effective for LE joint replacement and amputation. Further research on specific occupational therapy interventions in this important area is needed. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  4. Mindfulness-based 'third wave' cognitive and behavioural therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunot, Vivien; Moore, Theresa Hm; Caldwell, Deborah; Davies, Philippa; Jones, Hannah; Lewis, Glyn; Churchill, Rachel

    2010-09-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all third wave CBT approaches compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of different third wave CBT approaches (ACT,compassionate mind training, functional analytic psychotherapy, extended behavioural activation and meta-cognitive therapy) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all third wave CBT approaches compared with different psychological therapy approaches (psychodynamic, behavioural, humanistic, integrative, cognitive-behavioural) for acute depression.

  5. An international comparison of occupational health guidelines for the management of mental disorders and stress-related psychological symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, Margot C. W.; Brouwers, Evelien P. M.; van Beurden, Karlijn M.; Terluin, Berend; Ruotsalainen, Jani H.; Woo, Jong-Min; Choi, Kyeong-Sook; Eguchi, Hisashi; Moriguchi, Jiro; van der Klink, Jac J. L.; van Weeghel, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Background We compared available guidelines on the management of mental disorders and stress-related psychological symptoms in an occupational healthcare setting and determined their development and reporting quality. Methods To identify eligible guidelines, we systematically searched National Guide

  6. [Developmental status and goals in occupational therapy. The "Guidelines for Occupational Therapy in Psychiatric Hospitals"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, K; Kunze, H

    1987-01-01

    Work therapy, or ergotherapy, is a recognised and permanent part of psychiatric treatment and medical rehabilitation. It is also an essential part of psychiatric diagnosis and therapy; furthermore, it enables the patient to develop and stabilise a realistic image of himself and contributes to the prevention and reduction of damage caused by hospitalism. The present status of work therapy was checked in 74 psychiatric hospitals throughout the Federal Republic of Germany, resulting in the need for further development of present practical procedures. A working group was created by the Federal Ministry of Labour and National Welfare within the framework of the model programme for psychiatry, at the suggestion of a Federal Working Group of the organisations running public mental hospitals in the FRG. The aim of this working group was to develop a specialised concept of work therapy. The group consisted of experts from clinical practice as well as from the Federal German Labour Office Institution, psychiatric consultants of the Federal Government and the Land Governments, as well as from the Land Government sponsors of state social welfare services. The "Guidelines for Work Therapy in Psychiatric Hospitals and Departments of Psychiatry" are officially considered to be a suitable basis for further development work in the field of ergotherapy.

  7. Analysis of structural relationship among the occupational dysfunction on the psychological problem in healthcare workers: a study using structural equation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyougoku, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    activities, and work relationships (p occupational dysfunction had good fit on the stress response (RMSEA = 0.061, CFI = 0.947, and TLI = 0.943), burnout syndrome (RMSEA = 0.076, CFI = 0.919, and TLI = 0.913), and depression (RMSEA = 0.060, CFI = 0.922, TLI = 0.917). Moreover, the detected covariates include opportunities for refreshment, time spent on leisure activities, and work relationships on occupational dysfunction. Conclusion. Our findings indicate that psychological problems are associated with occupational dysfunction in healthcare workers. Reduction of occupational dysfunction might be a strategy of better preventive occupational therapies for healthcare workers with psychological problems. However, longitudinal studies will be needed to determine a causal relationship. PMID:26618078

  8. Analysis of structural relationship among the occupational dysfunction on the psychological problem in healthcare workers: a study using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraoka, Mutsumi; Kyougoku, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    activities, and work relationships (p model results suggest that the classification of occupational dysfunction had good fit on the stress response (RMSEA = 0.061, CFI = 0.947, and TLI = 0.943), burnout syndrome (RMSEA = 0.076, CFI = 0.919, and TLI = 0.913), and depression (RMSEA = 0.060, CFI = 0.922, TLI = 0.917). Moreover, the detected covariates include opportunities for refreshment, time spent on leisure activities, and work relationships on occupational dysfunction. Conclusion. Our findings indicate that psychological problems are associated with occupational dysfunction in healthcare workers. Reduction of occupational dysfunction might be a strategy of better preventive occupational therapies for healthcare workers with psychological problems. However, longitudinal studies will be needed to determine a causal relationship.

  9. Analysis of structural relationship among the occupational dysfunction on the psychological problem in healthcare workers: a study using structural equation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutsumi Teraoka

    2015-11-01

    activities, and work relationships (p < 0.01. The hypothesis model results suggest that the classification of occupational dysfunction had good fit on the stress response (RMSEA = 0.061, CFI = 0.947, and TLI = 0.943, burnout syndrome (RMSEA = 0.076, CFI = 0.919, and TLI = 0.913, and depression (RMSEA = 0.060, CFI = 0.922, TLI = 0.917. Moreover, the detected covariates include opportunities for refreshment, time spent on leisure activities, and work relationships on occupational dysfunction.Conclusion. Our findings indicate that psychological problems are associated with occupational dysfunction in healthcare workers. Reduction of occupational dysfunction might be a strategy of better preventive occupational therapies for healthcare workers with psychological problems. However, longitudinal studies will be needed to determine a causal relationship.

  10. Applied Behavior Analysis, Autism, and Occupational Therapy: A Search for Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Christie D; Polatajko, H J

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapists strive to be mindful, competent practitioners and continuously look for ways to improve practice. Applied behavior analysis (ABA) has strong evidence of effectiveness in helping people with autism achieve goals, yet it does not seem to be implemented in occupational therapy practice. To better understand whether ABA could be an evidence-based option to expand occupational therapy practice, the authors conducted an iterative, multiphase investigation of relevant literature. Findings suggest that occupational therapists apply developmental and sensory approaches to autism treatment. The occupational therapy literature does not reflect any use of ABA despite its strong evidence base. Occupational therapists may currently avoid using ABA principles because of a perception that ABA is not client centered. ABA principles and occupational therapy are compatible, and the two could work synergistically.

  11. Occupational Therapy and Older Drivers: Research, Education, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stav, Wendy B.

    2008-01-01

    Occupational therapists facilitate independence and support participation in occupations that are personally meaningful to clients to enhance well-being and quality of life. Among the occupations addressed by occupational therapists is the instrumental activity of daily living (IADL) of driving. Occupational therapists are particularly concerned…

  12. Occupational Therapy and Older Drivers: Research, Education, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stav, Wendy B.

    2008-01-01

    Occupational therapists facilitate independence and support participation in occupations that are personally meaningful to clients to enhance well-being and quality of life. Among the occupations addressed by occupational therapists is the instrumental activity of daily living (IADL) of driving. Occupational therapists are particularly concerned…

  13. Analysis of touch used by occupational therapy practitioners in skilled nursing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Douglas; Henegar, J; Khanin, S; Oberle, G; Thacker, S

    2014-09-01

    Instrumental touch is identified as having purposeful physical contact in order to complete a task. Expressive touch is identified as warm, friendly physical contact and is not solely for performing a task. Expressive touch has been associated with improved client status, increased rapport and greater gains made during therapy. The purpose of the study was to observe the frequency of expressive and instrumental touch utilized by an occupational therapist during an occupational therapy session. Thirty-three occupational therapy professionals, including occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants, employed at skilled nursing facilities in southwest Florida were observed. Data were collected on the Occupational Therapy Interaction Assessment. The results of the data analysis showed a positive relationship between the gender of the therapist and the frequency of expressive touch. The data also showed that a large majority of touches were instrumental touch and pertained to functional mobility. The results of the study can contribute to a better understanding of the holistic aspects of occupational therapy. By the use of more expressive touch, occupational therapy practitioners may have a positive, beneficial effect on both the client and the therapy process as a whole. Further research is needed to determine the effect an occupational therapy setting has on the frequency of instrumental and expressive touch. A larger sample size and a distinction between evaluation and treatment sessions would benefit future studies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. State of mental health research in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Sharon A

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I examine the state of mental health research in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy from 2008 to 2011. Although other practice areas have seen an increase in the number and rigor of intervention effectiveness studies, mental health occupational therapy research has been insufficient to support the profession's role in traditional mental health services. Strategies to enhance the profession's role in mental health practice are suggested and include using occupational therapy behavioral health management research in school-based and transition services to support occupational therapy's role in traditional mental health practice settings.

  15. 论护理的职业心态%On Occupational Psychology of Nursing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵宸宇

    2015-01-01

    随着社会的发展和文明的进步,我国的医疗模式发生了转变,因此更加注重“以人为本”的思想理念。如何成为一名护士,特别是一名优秀的护士,除了要掌握精湛的医术以外,更应该具备一流的心理素质,以提高护理质量。本文论述医疗过程中护士职业当前的现状及原因分析,所应该具备的职业心态和引导护士职业心态的对策建议。%With the development of society and the progress of civilization, China's mode of medical care has been changed, paying more attention to the"people-oriented"thought and con-cept. As a nurse, especially an excellent one, one should not only have exquisite medical skills, but also possess superb psycholog-ical quality, in order to improve the quality of nursing. This paper analyzes the current situation of nurses in medical process and its causes, as well as the occupational psychology they should pos-sess, and it also proposes countermeasures and suggestions to guide the occupational psychology of nurses.

  16. Cost-effectiveness of Occupational Therapy in Older People: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Hirofumi; Tomori, Kounosuke; Ohno, Kanta; Takahashi, Kayoko; Yamauchi, Keita

    2016-06-01

    A systematic review of the cost-effectiveness of occupational therapy for older people was conducted. MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, OT seeker and unpublished trials registers were searched. Reference lists of all potentially eligible studies were searched with no language restrictions. We included trial-based full economic evaluations that considered both costs and outcomes in occupational therapy for older people compared with standard care (i.e. other therapy) or no intervention. We reviewed each trial for methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and assessed the quality of economic evaluations using a Drummond checklist. In the results of this review, we included five eligible studies (1-5) that were randomized controlled trials with high-quality economic evaluation. Two studies were full economic evaluations of interventions for fall prevention (1 and 2); two studies were full economic evaluations of preventive occupational therapy interventions (3 and 4; one was a comparison of an occupational therapy group with a social work group); one study was a full economic evaluation of occupational therapy for individuals with dementia (5). Two of the studies (one was preventive occupational therapy [3] and the other was occupational therapy for dementia [5]) found a significant effect and confirmed the cost-effectiveness of occupational therapy for older people compared with the control group. These studies found that occupational therapy for older people was clinically effective and cost-effective in comparison with standard care or other therapies. With reference to their clinical implication, these intervention studies (using a client-centred approach) suggested potentially cost-effective means to motivate clients to maintain their own health. However, this review has limitations because of the high heterogeneity of the reviewed studies on full economic evaluations of occupational therapy for older people. Future

  17. Occupational Therapy Students’ Perspectives of Professionalism: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa M. Sullivan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professionalism is a dynamic, socially constructed idea, rendering it difficult to comprehend. Though characterized by the demonstration of values and behaviors, its meaning has not been fully explored and remains tacit. To explore how first- and second-year master’s of occupational therapy students conceptualize professionalism. Method: This qualitative pilot study evolved from an interpretivist theoretical perspective. Convenience sampling yielded four first-year and seven second-year students from one entry-level master’s program to participate in two separate focus groups. Line-by-line constant comparison methods were used to analyze the data and identify categories. An audit trail, peer debriefing, and member checking were employed. Results: Data analysis of the first-year focus group generated three categories: Searching for explicit examples, Responsibility to the profession, and Building and fulfilling societal responsibility. Analysis of the second-year focus group yielded two categories: Professional values and behaviors and Professionalism as socially constructed. Conclusion: Professionalism is a dynamic concept requiring nuanced understandings specific to context. Students should be encouraged to develop reflective abilities allowing them to analyze and act in a way that is most appropriate for the situation. Understanding students’ conceptualizations of professionalism may better allow occupational therapy regulators, managers, and academic and fieldwork educators to identify teaching and research priorities.

  18. Interprofessional Education in Occupational Therapy: The Idaho State University Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Gee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Interprofessional education (IPE is becoming a common practice among most allied health professions as a part of entry level training. IPE is intended to promote greater professional collaboration in routine clinical practice. The prerequisites for this type of educational process include gaining an understanding of one’s own and other professions while developing mutual respect, trust, and communication skills. The Idaho State University (ISU Interdisciplinary Evaluation Team (IET course delivery model is one such vehicle which fosters IPE across numerous disciplines while providing significant clinical support to the local community. This study presents the ISU IET course process, which combines clinical care of community pediatric clients via student/clinician partnership, which reflect on the process of interprofessional care. Occupational therapy student perceptions of the IET course consistently trended in favorable directions. All participants desired more opportunities for IPE combined with direct client interaction as a part of their other course work. Occupational therapy educational programs are well suited and positioned to host and/or to establish key roles in IPE to support student clinical training and meet the health and needs of their local communities.

  19. South Australian school teachers' perceptions of occupational therapy reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Robyn; Stewart, Hugh; Harrison, Jo

    2008-09-01

    The qualitative research reported here investigated the perceptions of primary school teachers regarding the usefulness of occupational therapy reports from the Flinders Medical Centre. The reports included either recommendations alone or in conjunction with written programs for the students. This qualitative descriptive study employed in-depth semistructured interviews to gather the perspectives of four school teachers from primary schools in the southern suburbs of Adelaide. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analysed using a thematic inductive approach. Four themes emerged from the data in relation to teachers' perceptions of the reports: (i) Understandable but not always useful; (ii) It's important ... we can't do it all; (iii) We never actually speak; and (iv) It's probably impossible but ... in an ideal world. The research findings provide an insight into the professional relationship between education and health professionals in the presence of minimal collaboration. The participants in this study described the occupational therapy reports as useful but they all wanted a higher level of interaction with therapists. The participants also gave suggestions for improving the current procedure to increase collaboration between health and education professionals. Such improvements could enhance educational outcomes for South Australian children with a disability.

  20. A Survey of Occupational Therapy Practice in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yun; Howe, Tsu-Hsin

    2016-06-01

    There is an increasing demand for rehabilitation services in China as a result of the growing number of people with physical and mental challenges, as well as the growing population of older adults. The purpose of this study was to explore the current occupational therapy (OT) resources available in Beijing, China, to serve as the first step in planning the response to increasing demand for OT services from the people of China. Specifically, using the snowball sampling survey method, we explored the work practice, including years of working experience, work setting, weekly work hours, annual income and factors related to job satisfaction among occupational therapists in Beijing, China. A total of 44 occupational therapists currently working in the Beijing area responded to our survey. The results demonstrated that most of the therapists working in Beijing area were young and inexperienced. Despite the fact that the participants had an average age of 31 years old and an average of 8 years' working experience, 61.4% of therapists were under 30 years old and more than half of therapists had less than 5 years of OT experiences. Among those included in the study sample, 50% had earned degrees in OT, and the rest of the OT personnel received OT-related on-the-job training in various forms and lengths of time. A majority of the participants worked in hospital settings with adults or children with physical disabilities and used therapeutic activities and therapeutic exercises. Being an occupational therapist is not a high-paying job. Education satisfaction, work experience and annual income are the factors related to job satisfaction for the participants. The majority of occupational therapists expressed the need to receive more support for clinical-related trainings. We plan to expand this pilot study nationwide to gain an in-depth and comprehensive understanding of the OT workforce in China. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley

  1. [An investigation of psychological state at different stages of occupational AIDS exposure and related influencing factors in Nanning, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Q; Ge, X M; Mo, J C; Li, S S; Chen, C C; Chen, S Y

    2016-10-20

    Objective: To investigate the changes in psychological state after occupational exposure in the AIDS occupational exposure population and related influencing factors, and to provide baseline data and a basis for related departments to conduct mental health prevention and intervention for personnel with occupational AIDS exposure. Methods: AIDS risk assessment was performed for all personnel with occupational AIDS exposure in 2014 in Nanning, China, and the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) psychological scale was used for psychological state evaluation at 24 hours, 1 week, and 3 months after occupational exposure in all persons who met the research criteria. Results: Most of the persons with occupational AIDS exposure came from secondary and tertiary hospitals (85%) , and nurses accounted for the highest percentage (78.3% ). The age ranged from 21 to 50 years, and the mean age was 31.02 ± 7.92 years. The persons with occupational AIDS exposure aged 20~29 years accounted for the highest percentage (51.6%) , and most persons (76.7%) graduated from junior colleges. Compared with the adult norm, there was significant increases in the total psychological score and the number of positive items after occupational exposure (P<0.05). The scores of all items at 24 hours were significantly higher than those at the other time points, and the scores of all items gradually decreased over time (F=227.24, 267.57, and 287.46, P<0.05). Compared with the adult norm, there were significant increases in the factor points at 24 hours and significant reductions in the factor points at 3 months (P<0.05). Compared with those at 24 hours, the factor scores at 3 months decreased significantly (P<0.05). Conclusion: Occupational AIDS exposure affects the mental status of related personnel, and the mental status at 24 hours after exposure is poor. Related departments should provide corresponding psychological counseling for the occupational exposure population at different exposure times.

  2. Occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings: Evidence from a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Lauren; Rosenwax, Lorna; McNamara, Beverley

    2015-12-01

    Increased accountability and growing fiscal limitations in global health care continue to challenge how occupational therapy practices are undertaken. Little is known about how these changes affect current practice in acute hospital settings. This article reviews the relevant literature to further understanding of occupational therapy practice in acute physical hospital settings. A scoping review of five electronic databases was completed using the keywords Occupational therapy, acute hospital settings/acute physical hospital settings, acute care setting/acute care hospital setting, general medicine/general medical wards, occupational therapy service provision/teaching hospitals/tertiary care hospitals. Criteria were applied to determine suitability for inclusion and the articles were analysed to uncover key themes. In total 34 publications were included in the review. Analysis of the publications revealed four themes: (1) Comparisons between the practice of novice and experienced occupational therapists in acute care (2) Occupational therapists and the discharge planning process (3) Role of occupation in the acute care setting and (4) Personal skills needed and organisation factors affecting acute care practice. The current literature has highlighted the challenges occupational therapists face in practicing within an acute setting. Findings from this review enhance understanding of how occupational therapy department managers and educators can best support staff that practise in acute hospital settings. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  3. [Deficits of routine occupational therapy services in rheumatic diseases: results of the RheumaDat study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, H; Löffler, K; Borgetto, B

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of the present study is to describe the frequency and potential determinants of occupational therapy routine services in patients with rheumatic diseases. The study is based on a secondary analysis of the RheumaDat database. The results of the survey on 907 patients were analyzed regarding frequency of occupational therapy routine services and related sociodemographic and disease-specific variables. Approximately 8% of the study population received occupational therapy, patients with rheumatoid arthritis representing the largest proportion of these at 13%. Only patients with osteoarthritis showed a clear treatment pattern. Patients from this group receiving occupational therapy were older, had a longer duration of disease and were more affected. No clear appraisal of the therapy status in the rheumatoid arthritis or fibromyalgia group could be made. The results indicate shortages and the lack of a clear system in occupational therapy routine services in patients with different rheumatic diseases.

  4. 75 FR 50880 - TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... therapist (PT), occupational therapist (OT), and speech therapist (ST) to be paid on a fee-for-service basis..., occupational therapists, and speech therapists. All providers are required to practice within the scope of... physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech therapists. Under current TRICARE......

  5. Occupational therapy treatment time during inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Teresa; Perritt, Ginger; Thimmaiah, Deepa; Heisler, Lauren; Offutt, Jennifer Lookingbill; Cantoni, Kara; Hseih, Ching-Hui; Gassaway, Julie; Ozelie, Rebecca; Backus, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Background Occupational therapy (OT) is a critical component of the rehabilitation process after spinal cord injury (SCI), the constitution of which has not been studied or documented in full detail previously. Objective To describe the type and distribution of SCI rehabilitation OT activities, including the amount of time spent on evaluation and treatment, and to discuss predictors (patient and injury characteristics) of the amount of time dedicated to OT treatment activities. Methods Six inpatient rehabilitation centers enrolled 600 patients with traumatic SCI in the first year of the SCIRehab. Occupational therapists documented 32 512 therapy sessions including time spent and specifics of each therapeutic activity. Analysis of variance and contingency tables/chi-square tests were used to test differences across neurologic injury groups for continuous and categorical variables. Results SCIRehab patients received a mean total of 52 hours of OT over the course of their rehabilitation stay. Statistically significant differences among four neurologic injury groups were seen in time spent on each OT activity. The activities that consumed the most OT time (individual and group sessions combined) were strengthening/endurance exercises, activities of daily living (ADLs), range of motion (ROM)/stretching, education, and a grouping of ‘therapeutic activities’ that included tenodesis training, fine motor activities, manual therapy, vestibular training, edema management, breathing exercise, cognitive retraining, visual/perceptual training desensitization, and don/doff adaptive equipment. Seventy-seven percent of OT work occurred in individual treatment sessions, with the most frequent OT activity involving ADLs. The variation in time (mean minutes per week) spent on OT ROM/stretching, ADLs, transfer training, assessment, and therapeutic activities can be explained in part by patient and injury characteristics, such as admission Functional Independence Measure (FIM

  6. Occupational Therapy in mental health: the occupation as an entity, agent and means of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moruno Miralles, P

    2004-12-01

    of the Emperor.Diego, who is not easily cheated by words—in this case, because he could not read the explanatory labels: T.O.R (on the puzzles and the dominoes, gerontogymnastics (near the rings and the balls, and especially a label over the entry door reading: Occupational Therapy. As I said, the child could not read nor perceive more than the bare reality: a kind of school.At that moment I better understood why the relative we were visiting repeatedly refused to go to Occupational Therapy; why he did not listen to my reccomendations, and why he liked better chatting with his friends at the garden, drinking a coffee or, when the pain and the sick feeling permitting, playing dominoes or going to the nearest park to play pétanque.I am afraid the story I am telling you is not an isolated fact in the practise of our profession. Furthermore, I would dare to say, without concrete data and relying on my experience (limited as everyone's, that it is more a standard than an exception.If what I suppose is true—and I hope it isn't so!—I think It is necessary to wonder: would you like to go to a similar place when being elder?; how would you feel colouring sheets with little ducks or throwing a red ball while repeating your name?; what can mean seeing yourself doing these things? and what about being watched by the rest of the people meanwhile?; Does a label give more sense to it?; what's its use?We can also wonder some other questions, these ones for experienced therapists. For instance: what kind of occupation is done there?; which is their personal, cultural or social meaning?; does stringing counting balls or mounting plastic cubes have any purpose?; Wouldn't be better playing dominoes or chess, even simplifying the game instead of playing with a children game to recover we don't know which capacities that the passage of time or the age tends to damage irremediably?. And what is more: Does the fact of improving coordination, attention or memory necessarily implies

  7. A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study of Occupational Therapy Students' Perceptions and Attitudes Towards Spirituality and Spiritual Care in Occupational Therapy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mthembu, Thuli Godfrey; Roman, Nicolette Vanessa; Wegner, Lisa

    2016-10-01

    Spirituality and spiritual care both have received increased attention over the course of this past decade from different disciplines. However, for many years, in the occupational therapy profession, the importance of spirituality and spiritual care seems to be controversial because it is unclear how these concepts are integrated in occupational therapy education. Although occupational therapy students are being educated to consider a holistic and client-centred approach, spirituality is not regarded within this framework which diminishes the integrity of holistic approach. In South African occupational therapy education, it is unclear whether any single course on teaching and learning of spirituality and spiritual care exists. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe occupational therapy students' perceptions and attitudes regarding spirituality and spiritual care in occupational therapy education. A cross-sectional descriptive study design of undergraduate occupational therapy students from one educational institution was used. Data included demographic characteristics, responses on Spiritual Care-Giving Scale (SCGS), Spiritual and Spiritual Care Rating Scale (SSCRS) and Spirituality in Occupational Therapy Scale (SOTS). A response rate of 50.5 % (n = 100 out of 198) was achieved. In the SCGS, among the factors only factor 1 had the highest mean value score showing consistent agreement about spirituality, whereas in the SSCRS only three factors were found to have highest mean score and one with lowest mean score. In SOTS, participants had a highest score mean in relation to formal education and training about spirituality. Thus, in the integration of spirituality and spiritual care a holistic approach needs to be considered in education to enhance students' knowledge of how to address mind, body and spirit needs.

  8. Evolving identities: Thomas Bessell Kidner and occupational therapy in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Judith; Silva, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    A founder of the National Society for the Promotion of Occupational Therapy, Thomas Bessell Kidner (1866-1932) played a prominent role in the early development of occupational therapy in Canada and the United States. We describe Kidner's early life and how his work using occupations evolved. We then examine ideas and assumptions about occupations as treatment and trace Kidner's involvement through to his leadership role within the American Occupational Therapy Association. Through our analysis of primary and secondary source materials, we have extracted recurring themes and related them across and within the materials to discern Kidner's influence on the profession. From among his many contributions, three areas emerge as particularly relevant to current practice: occupational therapy's role in return to work, relationships with medicine, and the profession's image. Kidner's story gives us a window on our history and an opportunity to see how the profession has evolved.

  9. The Impact of Occupational Therapy on a Child's Playfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, J; Coker, P; Lynn, R; Suppinger, R; Pearigen, T; Rabon, S; St Aubin, M; Ward, A T

    2000-01-01

    The constant changing health care system has made it imperative for occupational therapists (OTs) to examine the effectiveness of treatment interventions with children. Few studies exist examining play as the desired outcome of the intervention. Previous studies in occupational therapy (OT) have focused on the motor aspects of play in children (Anderson, Hinojosa & Strauch, 1987; Florey, 1981; Morrison, Bundy, & Fisher, 1991). In these studies, the researchers hypothesize that improving motor skills will improve play skills in children. OTs frequently evaluate play using the Preschool Play Scale (PPS) (Bledsoe & Shephard, 1982; Knox, 1997) which provides a developmental age for play skills. Therapists also use developmental assessments designed to examine the skills used during play (Bundy, 1991). Skills used in play are important but fail to look at a child's approach or attitude during play. A child's approach to activities of play is termed "playfulness" (Bundy, 1997). The Test of Playfulness (TOP) (Bundy, 1997) was developed to measure this construct. The TOP provides information that can assist therapists working with children in designing measurable playfulness goals. This study examined the playfulness of four children who received OT intervention specifically designed to improve play behaviors in comparison to four children who did not receive this intervention. The results provide therapists with information and insight for treating children with play deficits. This information will help therapists design effective treatment to increase playfulness in children.

  10. Consensus statements on occupational therapy ethics related to driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Deborah Yarett

    2014-04-01

    As part of an expert panel convened to examine evidence and practice related to diverse aspects of driving evaluation and rehabilitation, consensus statements were developed on ethics. This paper provides context for the ethical obligation of practitioners to assess and make recommendations about the ability of clients to safely perform the activity of driving. It highlights key articles from the literature as well as principles from the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and Ethics Standards (2010). The statements support the importance of identifying impairments affecting driving, which could result in harm to the client as well as to the public. The ethical and professional obligation of practitioners to evaluate, make recommendations, and possibly report and/or refer to a driver rehabilitation specialist for further services is reinforced.

  11. Clinical heterogeneity was a common problem in Cochrane reviews of physiotherapy and occupational therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, C.H.M. van den; Steultjens, E.M.J.; Bouter, L.M.; Dekker, J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To identify the strategies used to deal with the clinical heterogeneity of interventions and multiple outcome measures used in Cochrane reviews on physiotherapy and occupational therapy. METHODS: A search for systematic reviews on physiotherapy and occupational therapy in

  12. Economic evaluation of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturkenboom, I.H.W.M.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Graff, M.J.L.; Adang, E.M.M.; Munneke, M.; Nijhuis, M.W.; Bloem, B.R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A large randomized clinical trial (the Occupational Therapy in Parkinson's Disease [OTiP] study) recently demonstrated that home-based occupational therapy improves perceived performance in daily activities of people with Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of the current study was to eval

  13. A Community Day Care Programme for Psychiatric Patients: The Role of Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradad, Akanksha; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the need for and role of occupational therapy in the organization and functioning of a community day care center for psychiatric patients in India. The occupational therapy program involves client evaluation, determination of therapeutic activities, physical exercise, recreational activities, group sessions, family involvement,…

  14. Occupational Therapy in the Context of Head Start: A Preliminary Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Patricia; Moore, Cary C.; Thom, Carly

    2016-01-01

    This preliminary, descriptive study yields information on the utilization of occupational therapy services within Head Start programs. Participants completed an Internet-based survey of 25 questions pertaining to the understanding, scope, and utilization of occupational therapy services. Surveys were completed by 35 respondents nationwide. A total…

  15. Referral for Occupational Therapy after Diagnosis of Developmental Disorder by German Child Psychiatrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Marcel; Drosselmeyer, Julia; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aims of this study were to assess how many patients received occupational therapy after diagnosis of developmental disorder (DD) in child psychiatrist practices in Germany and which factors influenced the prescription of occupational therapy. Methods: This study was a retrospective database analysis in Germany utilising the Disease…

  16. Occupational Therapy and Sensory Integration for Children with Autism: A Feasibility, Safety, Acceptability and Fidelity Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Roseann C.; Benevides, Teal W.; Kelly, Donna; Mailloux-Maggio, Zoe

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the feasibility, safety, and acceptability of a manualized protocol of occupational therapy using sensory integration principles for children with autism. Methods: Ten children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder ages 4-8 years received intensive occupational therapy intervention using sensory integration principles…

  17. Experiential Learning in Occupational Therapy: Can It Enhance Readiness for Clinical Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht-Sabres, Lisa Jean

    2013-01-01

    This mixed method study examined the effectiveness of experiential learning opportunities near the end of the occupational therapy students' didactic education. A pretest/posttest design with a gain score approach was used to determine whether there was a significant improvement in the occupational therapy students' self-perception of their…

  18. The Intermingled History of Occupational Therapy and Anatomical Education: A Retrospective Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Melissa A.; Lawson, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Few research articles have addressed the anatomical needs of entry-level occupational therapy students. Given this paucity of empirical evidence, there is a lack of knowledge regarding anatomical education in occupational therapy. This article will primarily serve as a retrospective look at the inclusion of anatomical education in the occupational…

  19. Occupational Therapy Contributions in Early Intervention: Implications for Personnel Preparation and Interprofessional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlenhaupt, Mary; Pizur-Barnekow, Kris; Schefkind, Sandra; Chandler, Barbara; Harvison, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy provides a unique contribution in early intervention programs for families and their children from birth to 3 years old who are at risk for, or who have, identified disabilities. This article describes occupational therapy's distinct value and presents the profession's perspective on services to enhance families' caregiving…

  20. The Intermingled History of Occupational Therapy and Anatomical Education: A Retrospective Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Melissa A.; Lawson, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    Few research articles have addressed the anatomical needs of entry-level occupational therapy students. Given this paucity of empirical evidence, there is a lack of knowledge regarding anatomical education in occupational therapy. This article will primarily serve as a retrospective look at the inclusion of anatomical education in the occupational…

  1. Occupational Therapy Contributions in Early Intervention: Implications for Personnel Preparation and Interprofessional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlenhaupt, Mary; Pizur-Barnekow, Kris; Schefkind, Sandra; Chandler, Barbara; Harvison, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapy provides a unique contribution in early intervention programs for families and their children from birth to 3 years old who are at risk for, or who have, identified disabilities. This article describes occupational therapy's distinct value and presents the profession's perspective on services to enhance families' caregiving…

  2. Occupational Therapy and Sensory Integration for Children with Autism: A Feasibility, Safety, Acceptability and Fidelity Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Roseann C.; Benevides, Teal W.; Kelly, Donna; Mailloux-Maggio, Zoe

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the feasibility, safety, and acceptability of a manualized protocol of occupational therapy using sensory integration principles for children with autism. Methods: Ten children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder ages 4-8 years received intensive occupational therapy intervention using sensory integration principles…

  3. Referral for Occupational Therapy after Diagnosis of Developmental Disorder by German Child Psychiatrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Marcel; Drosselmeyer, Julia; Kostev, Karel

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aims of this study were to assess how many patients received occupational therapy after diagnosis of developmental disorder (DD) in child psychiatrist practices in Germany and which factors influenced the prescription of occupational therapy. Methods: This study was a retrospective database analysis in Germany utilising the Disease…

  4. Experiences of international students from Asian backgrounds studying occupational therapy in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jung Wook; Honey, Anne; Du Toit, Sanet; Chen, Yu-Wei; Mackenzie, Lynette

    2016-10-01

    International students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds experience personal and academic challenges when studying health sciences in Australia. Given recent discussions about cultural specificity in occupational therapy and its status as an emerging profession in most Asian countries, this study aimed to explore and describe the experiences of international students from Asian backgrounds studying occupational therapy in Australia. A phenomenological approach was used to understand the experiences of participants. In-depth interviews were conducted with eight international occupational therapy students from Asian countries studying in Australia. Data were analysed using hermeneutic methods. Participants described three interlinked and ongoing experiences: (1) Discovering and engaging with occupational therapy; (2) Fitting into my new role; and (3) Anticipating my role at home. Whilst theoretical aspects of occupational therapy were seen as compatible with participants' home cultures, application was seen as problematic due to the differences in structure and institutional culture of the healthcare systems. Although students made adaptations to fit in as occupational therapy students in Australia, they continued to see themselves as different, and their adaptation also influenced how they saw themselves in relation to their home culture. Findings can contribute to creating culturally sensitive education for occupational therapy students from Asian countries. To best serve these students, educators should consider ways to facilitate transitions both out of and back into students' home cultures. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  5. Experiential Learning in Occupational Therapy: Can It Enhance Readiness for Clinical Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht-Sabres, Lisa Jean

    2013-01-01

    This mixed method study examined the effectiveness of experiential learning opportunities near the end of the occupational therapy students' didactic education. A pretest/posttest design with a gain score approach was used to determine whether there was a significant improvement in the occupational therapy students' self-perception of their…

  6. Managing Occupational Therapy in Rural Education: O.T. Student Perceptions of Adaptive Classroom Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Winnie; Hughes, Paula

    This report describes the Managing Occupational Therapy in Rural Education (MORE) a project that is designing a preservice training curriculum for occupational therapy students preparing to work in rural settings. Therapists need to have an understanding of rural school systems, educational aims, philosophy, and the structure of the system itself…

  7. Efficacy of occupational therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturkenboom, I.H.W.M.; Graff, M.J.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Veenhuizen, Y.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is insufficient evidence to support use of occupational therapy interventions for patients with Parkinson's disease. We aimed to assess the efficacy of occupational therapy in improving daily activities of patients with Parkinson's disease. METHODS: We did a multicentre, assessor-m

  8. Five years of mental health research in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Sharon A; Raphael-Greenfield, Emily I

    2014-01-01

    In the past 5 years, the number of research articles on occupational therapy in mental health published in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy has steadily declined. This article identifies the strengths and limitations of this body of research and provides directions for practitioners and researchers to enhance the profession's role as a valued mental health service provider.

  9. The integration of occupational therapy into primary care: a multiple case study design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background For over two decades occupational therapists have been encouraged to enhance their roles within primary care and focus on health promotion and prevention activities. While there is a clear fit between occupational therapy and primary care, there have been few practice examples, despite a growing body of evidence to support the role. In 2010, the province of Ontario, Canada provided funding to include occupational therapists as members of Family Health Teams, an interprofessional model of primary care. The integration of occupational therapists into this model of primary care is one of the first large scale initiatives of its kind in North America. The objective of the study was to examine how occupational therapy services are being integrated into primary care teams and understand the structures supporting the integration. Methods A multiple case study design was used to provide an in-depth description of the integration of occupational therapy. Four Family Health Teams with occupational therapists as part of the team were identified. Data collection included in-depth interviews, document analyses, and questionnaires. Results Each Family Health Team had a unique organizational structure that contributed to the integration of occupational therapy. Communication, trust and understanding of occupational therapy were key elements in the integration of occupational therapy into Family Health Teams, and were supported by a number of strategies including co-location, electronic medical records and team meetings. An understanding of occupational therapy was critical for integration into the team and physicians were less likely to understand the occupational therapy role than other health providers. Conclusion With an increased emphasis on interprofessional primary care, new professions will be integrated into primary healthcare teams. The study found that explicit strategies and structures are required to facilitate the integration of a new professional group

  10. Family Therapy of Terroristic Trauma: Psychological Syndromes and Treatment Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Reviews pertinent literature on terroristic trauma and combines this information with the author's experience in treating adults, children, and family victims and survivors of recent terrorist attacks. Describes the psychological syndromes resulting from terrorism and discusses the relevant individual and family therapy modalities for treating…

  11. A proposal of Occupational Therapy service to hospitalized elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Boaro Fernandez Canon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association between chronic diseases, functional dependency, and hospitalization represents a high risk for the elderly, because it contributes to decreased functional capacity. Objectives: This study aimed to describe an action protocol of Occupational Therapy with hospitalized elderly patients with diagnosis of chronic diseases, approaching sensory, cognitive, psychomotor and functional aspects, and to analyze whether this protocol maximizes the independence for the feeding activity. Methodology: Patients hospitalized in a Geriatric Ward, between December 2011 and February 2012, were selected according to inclusion criteria. After conduction of the intervention protocol, a functional evaluation, Functional Independence Measurement (FIM – motor part, was performed approaching sensory, cognitive, psychomotor and functional aspects. There were 10 sessions with average duration of 30 minutes, the first and the last ones for the assessment and orientation. Six (6 hospitalized elderly patients were selected: 5 females and 1 male, mean age of 88.8, 5.3 years of schooling. Results: The scoreboard mean for the feeding item of the FIM before hospitalization was 2.7 points, it dropped to 1.5 points in the first days of hospitalization, and then increased to 3.8 points after the intervention of Occupational Therapy. The scoreboard means for the motor part of the FIM before hospitalization, during the first days, and after the intervention were: 26.8, 16 and 23.2 points, respectively. Conclusions: All the elderly benefited from this protocol and started to perform more independently not only the activity of feeding, but also the other basic activities of daily living, when compared to the first days of hospitalization.

  12. Music therapy and Alzheimer's disease: Cognitive, psychological, and behavioural effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Gallego, M; Gómez García, J

    2017-06-01

    Music therapy is one of the types of active ageing programmes which are offered to elderly people. The usefulness of this programme in the field of dementia is beginning to be recognised by the scientific community, since studies have reported physical, cognitive, and psychological benefits. Further studies detailing the changes resulting from the use of music therapy with Alzheimer patients are needed. Determine the clinical improvement profile of Alzheimer patients who have undergone music therapy. Forty-two patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease underwent music therapy for 6 weeks. The changes in results on the Mini-mental State Examination, Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Barthel Index scores were studied. We also analysed whether or not these changes were influenced by the degree of dementia severity. Significant improvement was observed in memory, orientation, depression and anxiety (HAD scale) in both mild and moderate cases; in anxiety (NPI scale) in mild cases; and in delirium, hallucinations, agitation, irritability, and language disorders in the group with moderate Alzheimer disease. The effect on cognitive measures was appreciable after only 4 music therapy sessions. In the sample studied, music therapy improved some cognitive, psychological, and behavioural alterations in patients with Alzheimer disease. Combining music therapy with dance therapy to improve motor and functional impairment would be an interesting line of research. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. IMPROVING FUNCTIONAL INDEPENDENCE OF PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS BY PHYSICAL THERAPY AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Ticărat

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with multiple sclerosis can have a normal life despite of their real or possible disability and of the progressive nature of it. Scope. Patients who follow physical therapy and occupational therapy will have an increased quality of life and a greater functional independence.Methods. The randomized study was made on 7 patients with multiple sclerosis, from Oradea Day Centre, 3 times/week, ages between 35 – 55 years, functional level between mild and sever. Assessment and rehabilitation methods: inspection, BARTHEL Index. Frenkel method, brething exercises, weights exercises, gait exercises, writind exercises and games were used in the rehabilitation process. Group therapies: sociotherapy, arttherapy, music therapy. Results analysis consisted of the comparison of baseline and final means.Results. By analizing baseline and final means for Barthel Index for each functon separately, it was shown a mild improvement of functional independence for almost assessed functions, with at least 1-1,5 points.Conclusions. Persons with multiple sclerosis who follow physical therapy and occupational therapy presents a better functional independence after the treatment.

  14. A non-paternalistic value theory of occupational therapy: a comment to Dige.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Lars

    2012-01-01

    In an article by Morten Dige in the Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, a value theory for occupational therapy is developed where the goals of occupational therapy, i.e. activity and participation, are seen as valuable in themselves. Such a value theory opens up for a paternalistic approach towards the person in need of occupational therapy who risks being excluded from certain types of activities and the theory even risks excluding certain groups of persons. In this comment to Dige, it is argued that adopting a more subjective approach to value, in which activity and participation are instrumental to values such as subjective well-being or the fulfilment of desires, the risk of inherent paternalism and exclusion is minimized. Moreover, activity and participation can still maintain their central role as goals of occupational therapy.

  15. Curricular Inclusion of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Content in Occupational Therapy Education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Michelle L

    2016-10-01

    An exploratory, cross-sectional survey design was used to explore the extent to which CAM was included, what factors impacted its inclusion, topics and student learning outcomes covered, who taught the material, and what sources were used to prepare for delivering course content. While the vast majority of responding occupational therapy educators reported curricular inclusion of CAM, educational experiences for occupational therapy students varied widely. This overview of the curricular inclusion of CAM by faculty in occupational therapy programs in the United States indicated that many occupational therapy educators are responding to the demands of a more integrative healthcare system. Resolving ethical and pragmatic issues, providing faculty development opportunities, and standardizing student learning outcomes would align all stakeholders and mitigate ambiguities that currently exist surrounding the inclusion of CAM in occupational therapy education.

  16. Money or mental health: the cost of alleviating psychological distress with monetary compensation versus psychological therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Christopher J; Wood, Alex M

    2010-10-01

    AbstractMoney is the default way in which intangible losses, such as pain and suffering, are currently valued and compensated in law courts. Economists have suggested that subjective well-being regressions can be used to guide compensation payouts for psychological distress following traumatic life events. We bring together studies from law, economic, psychology and medical journals to show that alleviating psychological distress through psychological therapy could be at least 32 times more cost effective than financial compensation. This result is not only important for law courts but has important implications for public health. Mental health is deteriorating across the world - improvements to mental health care might be a more efficient way to increase the health and happiness of our nations than pure income growth.

  17. Occupational Health Psychology in Romania: Managers' and employees' needs and perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virga, Delia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Occupational Health Psychology (OHP in Romania is now emerging, in the practitioner’s and educational field. The risk management paradigm provides a framework for this paper. The analysis focus is on presenting the perception of current national approach related to stressors and processes that threat employee’s and organizational health. Further, we compare the employees’ and managers’ perspective on OHP issues looking, in Romania and other European countries. Finally we conclude and address OHP challenges and opportunities in Romania.

  18. The entry-level occupational therapy clinical doctorate: advantages, challenges, and international issues to consider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Crabtree, Jeffrey L; Mu, Keli; Wells, Joe

    2015-04-01

    Internationally, occupational therapy education has gone through several paradigm shifts during the last few decades, moving from certificate to diploma to bachelors to masters and now in some instances to clinical doctorate as the entry-level professional credential to practice. In the United States there is a recommendation under consideration by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) that by 2025, all occupational therapy university programs will move to the clinical doctorate level. It should be noted, however, that the AOTA Board can only make recommendations and it is the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) who has regulatory authority to approve such a change. What are the potential implications for the profession, our clients, and funders of occupational therapy services? What are the primary drivers for the move towards the clinical doctorate being the educational entry point? Is the next step in the evolution of occupational therapy education globally a shift to the entry-level clinical doctorate? This article reviews current literature and discusses issues about the occupational therapy entry-level clinical doctorate. The published evidence available about the occupational therapy entry-level clinical doctorate is summarized and the perceived or frequently cited pros and cons of moving to the clinical doctorate as the singular entry point to occupational therapy practice are considered. The potential impacts of the introduction of the clinical doctorate as the entry-to-practice qualification across the United States on the occupational therapy community internationally will be briefly discussed. If the United States moves toward the entry-level clinical doctorate as the only educational starting point for the profession, will other jurisdictions follow suit? Further discourse and investigation of this issue both inside and outside of the United States is needed so that informed decisions can be made.

  19. Investigation into health science students' awareness of occupational therapy: implications for interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Naser; Shayea, Abdulaziz; Nadar, Mohammed; Abu Tariah, Hashem

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the level of awareness of the occupational therapy profession among final-year health sciences students at Kuwait University. This study utilized a survey targeting final-year students in the Health Sciences Center at Kuwait University schools of medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, and allied health sciences. The survey addressed awareness of occupational therapy, its scope of practice, work environments, and preference for learning more about the profession. Of the 244 surveys distributed, 132 were returned, for a 54% response rate. The proportion of those who knew about occupational therapy ranged from 94% (radiologic science) to a low of 17% (medicine). Most respondents learned about occupational therapy from colleagues (77.1%), rather than from their academic programs (28.1%). RESULTS indicated that about one fifth of students (21.4%) were unsure about the role of occupational therapists as members of the health care team. Preferences for learning more about the profession were consistent with interprofessional opportunities, such as observing an occupational therapy session (64.5%) and attending a workshop (63.6%) or presentation (59.8%). Although most respondents had some awareness of occupational therapy, specifics about its scope of practice and relevance to the health care team were lacking. Preferences for learning more about occupational therapy were consistent with the current trend for interprofessional education in health care. Implications for interprofessional education are presented.

  20. Comparison of Cognitive Orientation to daily Occupational Performance and conventional occupational therapy on occupational performance in individuals with stroke: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Si-Nae; Yoo, Eun-Young; Jung, Min-Ye; Park, Hae-Yean; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Choi, Yoo-Im

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive Orientation to daily Occupational Performance (CO-OP) approach based on cognitive strategy in occupational therapy. To investigate the effects of CO-OP approach on occupational performance in individuals with hemiparetic stroke. This study was designed as a 5-week, randomized, single-blind. Forty-three participants who had a diagnosis of first stroke were enrolled in this study. The participants were randomly assigned to the experimental group (n = 20) or the control group (n = 23). The experimental group conducted CO-OP approach while the control group conducted conventional occupational therapy based on occupational performance components. This study measured Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and Performance Quality Rating Scale (PQRS). Outcome measurements were performed at baseline and post-intervention. After training, the scores of COPM and PQRS in trained task were significantly higher for the score in the experimental group than the control group. In addition, the non-trained task was significantly higher for the score in the experimental group than the control group in COPM and the PQRS. This study suggests that the CO-OP approach is beneficial effects on the occupational performance to improvement in individuals with hemiparetic stroke, and have positive effects on generalization and transfer of acquired skills.

  1. Occupational therapy influence on a carer peer support model in a clinical mental health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Cate; Sanders, Bronwyn; Allchin, Becca; Lentin, Primrose; Lang, Shannon

    2015-10-01

    Current policy frameworks call for the participation of consumers and carers in all levels of mental health service delivery in Australia. Such inclusion leads to better outcomes for all, however, it is recognised that carers have needs and occupations beyond their carer role. The aim of this article is to describe an innovative carer peer support program developed by a group of occupational therapists. The article describes the rationale, phases of development and the role that occupational therapists played in developing and sustaining the model. This is followed by an exploration of the occupational therapy attitudes, knowledge and skills that contributed to the conceptualisation and implementation of the model. Five occupational therapists engaged in a review process involving documentation, literature review, evaluation, reflection and discussion. Four of the occupational therapists had either coordinated or managed the service described. The fifth author facilitated the process. Review of the model indicates it equips carers to perform their caring occupation and helps carers recognise the need for occupations beyond caring, for their health and wellbeing. Employing carers as paid workers values their 'real life' experience in their caring occupation. Findings also illustrate that the attitudes, knowledge, skills and competency standards of occupational therapists are well suited in enabling this emerging area of service delivery. Although this model has been developed in a clinical mental health setting, the key principles could be applied with carers or consumers across a variety of settings in which occupational therapists are employed. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  2. Language Discordance and Patient-Centered Care in Occupational Therapy: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jenny; Leland, Natalie

    2017-01-01

    The accumulative burden of a growing non-English speaking minority population and health disparities in the United States demonstrate the urgency of examining occupational therapy practices and defining care that is timely, effective, safe, and patient-centered. In this context, we investigate an occupational therapy episode of care from the perspectives of patient, caregiver, and primary occupational therapy care provider. Treatment sessions were observed and one-on-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with the participants. Several themes describing areas of concern in communication and care delivery emerged, including expectations for care, the therapy relationship, professional identity, and pragmatic constraints. The use of untrained interpreters compromised treatment effectiveness and safety. This case highlights potential areas of concern in therapy when working with a diverse patient population. Abundant opportunities exist for occupational therapy to situate itself as an equitable, responsive, valuable, and essential service. PMID:26460475

  3. Language Discordance and Patient- Centered Care in Occupational Therapy: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jenny; Leland, Natalie

    2015-04-01

    The accumulative burden of a growing non-English speaking minority population and health disparities in the United States demonstrate the urgency of examining occupational therapy practices and defining care that is timely, effective, safe, and patient-centered. In this context, we investigate an occupational therapy episode of care from the perspectives of patient, caregiver, and primary occupational therapy care provider. Treatment sessions were observed and one-on-one semistructured interviews were conducted with the participants. Several themes describing areas of concern in communication and care delivery emerged, including expectations for care, the therapy relationship, professional identity, and pragmatic constraints. The use of untrained interpreters compromised treatment effectiveness and safety. This case highlights potential areas of concern in therapy when working with a diverse patient population. Abundant opportunities exist for occupational therapy to situate itself as an equitable, responsive, valuable, and essential service.

  4. Musculoskeletal complaints among physiotherapy and occupational therapy rehabilitation professionals in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shofiqul; Habib, Md Monjurul; Hafez, Md Abdul; Nahar, Nazmun; Lindstrom-Hazel, Debra; Rahman, Mohammad Khalilur

    2015-01-01

    Physiotherapy and occupational therapy professionals are at high risk of developing occupational musculoskeletal injuries globally. Musculoskeletal pain is the most common problem. To determine the extent of discomfort that physiotherapy and occupational therapy health professionals report while working at a physical rehabilitation centre. Physiotherapy and occupational therapy professionals which include both graduate and diploma physiotherapists and occupational therapists as well as physiotherapy and occupational therapy assistants. A self administered questionnaire (survey) was conducted on a convenient sample of 101 physiotherapy and occupational therapy personnel. The mean age of the 101 participants was 27.8 (± 4.5) years and most of the participants (62%) had less than 5 years of work experience. Ninety-five percent of the participants complained of work related pain. Most of the participants reported pain in the lower back (n=84) followed by upper back (n=71) and neck (n=66). Significant associations were found for pain in ankles/feet with age (p=0.05) and pain in neck with gender (p=0.01). Physiotherapy and occupational therapy professionals suffer from pain in relation to the work they do as therapists which may be due to non-practice of appropriate body mechanics. Mechanism to assess level of practice during dealing with patients may be introduced to enable corrective measures. Incentives should be considered for appropriate practice.

  5. Bibliometric Analysis: Mirror Therapy as an Occupational Therapy Intervention Strategy in the Clinical Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvis Siprián Castro Alzate

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the national and international scientific evidence regarding the use of mirror therapy, as an occupational therapy intervention tool in the clinical setting, in order to acquire knowledge and implement this strategy in professional practice. Materials and methods: A descriptive study was conducted in which the research strategy was held through medical subject headings (MeSH, such as “mirror neuron”, ”occupational therapy”, “physical rehabilitation” and “motor imagery”. Through the use of the bolean and combinations in five different databases were performed: Embase, Ebsco, OTseeker, Science Direct and Medline. The analysis was elaborated by establishing frequencies of different variables such as journal, country, study type and publish­ing year. Conclusions: In the evidence analysis it was found that mirror therapy is an interven­tion modality recently used by different rehabilitation professionals. Since 2004, an increase in the generation of high impact scientific evidence about this subject has been recognized, due in part to the reported effectiveness in clinical practices, mainly the treatment of health conditions secondary to stroke, limb amputations, chronic pain syndromes, and post-surgical rehabilitation. During the reviewed period, an increase in high level academic evidence was observed: 35.7 % of the analyzed publications correspond to randomized controlled trials and 42.9 % are system­atic reviews. The use of mirror therapy in occupational therapy is an intervention modality that facilitates functional rehabilitation processes, promotes independence in performing activities of daily living (adl and allows social participation and environment adaptation processes to happen.

  6. Facilitation of research-based evidence within occupational therapy in stroke rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Borg, T.; Hounsgaard, L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose:This study investigated the facilitation of evidence-based practice with the use of everyday life occupations and client-centred practice within occupational therapy in three settings of stroke rehabilitation. Method:The study was based on a phenomenological hermeneutical research approach...... of evidence-based occupational therapy....... to local contexts.The implementation resulted in various new working routines. Learning processes became part of developing the occupational therapists’ professional identities, expressed in more professional confidence. Collaboration in the organisation of the implementation process was significant...

  7. Facilitation of research-based evidence within occupational therapy in stroke rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, H.; Borg, T.; Hounsgaard, Lise

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the facilitation of evidence-based practice with the use of everyday life occupations and client-centred practice within occupational therapy in three settings of stroke rehabilitation. Method: The study was based on a phenomenological hermeneutical research...... of the implementation of evidence-based occupational therapy....... adapted to local contexts. The implementation resulted in various new working routines. Learning processes became part of developing the occupational therapists' professional identities, expressed in more professional confidence. Collaboration in the organisation of the implementation process...

  8. The effect of occupational stress, psychological stress and burnout on employee performance: Evidence from banking industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Hashemnia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation on the effects of occupational stress, psychological stress as well as job burnout on women’s employee performance in city of Karaj, Iran. The proposed study designs a questionnaire in Likert scale and distributes it among all female employees who worked for Bank Maskan in this city. In our survey, employee performance consists of three parts of interpersonal performance, job performance as well as organizational performance. Cronbach alpha has been used to verify the overall questionnaire, all components were within acceptable levels, and the implementation of Kolmogorov-Smirnov test has indicated that the data were not normally distributed. Using Spearman correlation ratio as well as regression techniques, the study has determined that while psychological stress influenced significantly on all three components of employee performance including interpersonal performance, job performance as well as organizational performance, the effect on job performance was greater than the other components. In addition, occupational stress only influences on organizational as well as interpersonal performance. Finally, employee burnout has no impact on any components of employee performance.

  9. The Role of Occupational Voice Demand and Patient-Rated Impairment in Predicting Voice Therapy Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersole, Barbara; Soni, Resha S; Moran, Kathleen; Lango, Miriam; Devarajan, Karthik; Jamal, Nausheen

    2017-07-11

    Examine the relationship among the severity of patient-perceived voice impairment, perceptual dysphonia severity, occupational voice demand, and voice therapy adherence. Identify clinical predictors of increased risk for therapy nonadherence. A retrospective cohort study of patients presenting with a chief complaint of persistent dysphonia at an interdisciplinary voice center was done. The Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10) and the Voice-Related Quality of Life (V-RQOL) survey scores, clinician rating of dysphonia severity using the Grade score from the Grade, Roughness Breathiness, Asthenia, and Strain scale, occupational voice demand, and patient demographics were tested for associations with therapy adherence, defined as completion of the treatment plan. Classification and Regression Tree (CART) analysis was performed to establish thresholds for nonadherence risk. Of 166 patients evaluated, 111 were recommended for voice therapy. The therapy nonadherence rate was 56%. Occupational voice demand category, VHI-10, and V-RQOL scores were the only factors significantly correlated with therapy adherence (P occupational voice demand are significantly more likely to be nonadherent with therapy than those with high occupational voice demand (P 40 is a significant cutoff point for predicting therapy nonadherence (P Occupational voice demand and patient perception of impairment are significantly and independently correlated with therapy adherence. A VHI-10 score of ≤9 or a V-RQOL score of >40 is a significant cutoff point for predicting nonadherence risk. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The relationship between approaches to study and academic performance among Australian undergraduate occupational therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Murdolo, Yuki

    2017-06-01

    The academic success and degree completion of tertiary students depends on their academic performance (AP), commonly measured by the percentage grades for the units they complete. No research has examined whether occupational therapy students' approaches to study are predictive of their AP. This study investigated whether approaches to study were predictive of the AP among a group of Australian undergraduate occupational therapy students. A total of 376 undergraduate occupational therapy students completed the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST). Regression analysis was conducted using a range of demographic characteristics and the ASSIST scores as independent variables with students' self-reported by their self-reported mean percentage grade range (as a proxy indicator of their AP) as the dependent variable. The deep and the strategic approaches to study were not significantly correlated with occupational therapy students' AP. The ASSIST fear of failure subscale of the surface approach to study had a unique contribution to AP, accounting for 1.3% of its total variance. Occupational therapy students' year level of enrolment made a unique contribution to their AP, accounting for 4.2% of the total variance. Age and gender made a unique contribution to AP as well although their impact was small. Undergraduate occupational therapy students' approaches to study were predictive of their AP to a very limited degree. However, their AP was predicted by a number of demographic variables, including age, gender and year level of enrolment. Further study in this area is recommended. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  11. Effect of play-based occupational therapy on symptoms of hospitalized children with cancer: A single-subject study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mohammadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cancer is one of the four leading causes of death in children. Its courses of diagnosis and treatment can cause physiologic symptoms and psychological distress that secondarily affect children's quality of life and participation in daily activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of play-based occupational therapy on pain, anxiety, and fatigue in hospitalized children with cancer who were receiving chemotherapy. Methods: Two hospitalized children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at least 4 months after diagnoses who received two courses of chemotherapy participated in this pilot study. Takata Play History and Iranian Children Participation Assessment Scale were used to develop intervention protocol. Nine, 30–45 min play-based occupational therapy sessions took place for each child. Children filled out the Faces Pain Scale, Visual Fatigue Scale, and Faces Anxiety Scale before and after each intervention session. Results: Pain, anxiety, and fatigue levels decreased in both participants. Furthermore, the results showed a relationship between pain, anxiety, and fatigue variables in these children. Conclusions: Play-based occupational therapy can be effective in improving pain, anxiety, and fatigue levels in hospitalized children with cancer receiving chemotherapy.

  12. Effect of Play-based Occupational Therapy on Symptoms of Hospitalized Children with Cancer: A Single-subject Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Ahmad; Mehraban, Afsoon Hassani; Damavandi, Shahla A

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is one of the four leading causes of death in children. Its courses of diagnosis and treatment can cause physiologic symptoms and psychological distress that secondarily affect children's quality of life and participation in daily activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of play-based occupational therapy on pain, anxiety, and fatigue in hospitalized children with cancer who were receiving chemotherapy. Two hospitalized children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia at least 4 months after diagnoses who received two courses of chemotherapy participated in this pilot study. Takata Play History and Iranian Children Participation Assessment Scale were used to develop intervention protocol. Nine, 30-45 min play-based occupational therapy sessions took place for each child. Children filled out the Faces Pain Scale, Visual Fatigue Scale, and Faces Anxiety Scale before and after each intervention session. Pain, anxiety, and fatigue levels decreased in both participants. Furthermore, the results showed a relationship between pain, anxiety, and fatigue variables in these children. Play-based occupational therapy can be effective in improving pain, anxiety, and fatigue levels in hospitalized children with cancer receiving chemotherapy.

  13. Occupational Stress, Work-Family Conflict and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Bank Employees: The Role of Psychological Capital

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Kan; Xiaosong Yu

    2016-01-01

    Although depression is a major problem affecting the physical and mental health of the occupational population worldwide, little research is available among bank employees. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of occupational stress and work-family conflict on depressive symptoms and the mediating role of psychological capital (PsyCap). A cross-sectional study was performed from May to June in 2013 in Liaoning province, China. The effort-reward imbalance (ERB) scale, the work-f...

  14. New psychological therapies for irritable bowel syndrome: mindfulness, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián Sánchez, Beatriz; Gil Roales-Nieto, Jesús; Ferreira, Nuno Bravo; Gil Luciano, Bárbara; Sebastián Domingo, Juan José

    2017-09-01

    The current goal of treatment in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) focuses primarily on symptom management and attempts to improve quality of life. Several treatments are at the disposal of physicians; lifestyle and dietary management, pharmacological treatments and psychological interventions are the most used and recommended. Psychological treatments have been proposed as viable alternatives or compliments to existing care models. Most forms of psychological therapies studied have been shown to be helpful in reducing symptoms and in improving the psychological component of anxiety/depression and health-related quality of life. According to current NICE/NHS guidelines, physicians should consider referral for psychological treatment in patients who do not respond to pharmacotherapy for a period of 12 months and develop a continuing symptom profile (described as refractory irritable bowel syndrome). Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is the best studied treatment and seems to be the most promising therapeutic approach. However, some studies have challenged the effectiveness of this therapy for irritable bowel syndrome. One study concluded that cognitive behavioral therapy is no more effective than placebo attention control condition and another study showed that the beneficial effects wane after six months of follow-up. A review of mind/body approaches to irritable bowel syndrome has therefore suggested that alternate strategies targeting mechanisms other than thought content change might be helpful, specifically mindfulness and acceptance-based approaches. In this article we review these new psychological treatment approaches in an attempt to raise awareness of alternative treatments to gastroenterologists that treat this clinical syndrome.

  15. Occupational, social, and relationship hazards and psychological distress among low-income workers: implications of the 'inverse hazard law'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Nancy; Kaddour, Afamia; Koenen, Karestan; Kosheleva, Anna; Chen, Jarvis T; Waterman, Pamela D; Barbeau, Elizabeth M

    2011-03-01

    Few studies have simultaneously included exposure information on occupational hazards, relationship hazards (eg, intimate partner violence) and social hazards (eg, poverty and racial discrimination), especially among low-income multiracial/ethnic populations. A cross-sectional study (2003-2004) of 1202 workers employed at 14 worksites in the greater Boston area of Massachusetts investigated the independent and joint association of occupational, social and relationship hazards with psychological distress (K6 scale). Among this low-income cohort (45% were below the US poverty line), exposure to occupational, social and relationship hazards, per the 'inverse hazard law,' was high: 82% exposed to at least one occupational hazard, 79% to at least one social hazard, and 32% of men and 34% of women, respectively, stated they had been the perpetrator or target of intimate partner violence (IPV). Fully 15.4% had clinically significant psychological distress scores (K6 score ≥ 13). All three types of hazards, and also poverty, were independently associated with increased risk of psychological distress. In models including all three hazards, however, significant associations with psychological distress occurred among men and women for workplace abuse and high exposure to racial discrimination only; among men, for IPV; and among women, for high exposure to occupational hazards, poverty and smoking. Reckoning with the joint and embodied reality of diverse types of hazards involving how people live and work is necessary for understanding determinants of health status.

  16. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Personal Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among Occupational Therapy Educators in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a baseline description of American occupational therapy educators' knowledge, attitudes, and personal use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a first step in exploring the larger issue of future occupational therapy practitioners' preparedness for meeting clients' occupational needs in today's evolving healthcare environment. Results of this cross-sectional survey highlighted limitations of occupational therapy educators' knowledge of common CAM concepts and therapies across all demographic variables, varying attitudes towards CAM in general and its inclusion in occupational therapy education, and personal use of common CAM therapies. Without increased occupational therapy educator knowledge about CAM and engagement in the current healthcare practices, occupational therapy practitioners are at risk for having a limited role in integrative healthcare.

  17. The Mediating Role of Psychological Capital on the Association between Occupational Stress and Job Burnout among Bank Employees in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xirui Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although job burnout is common among bank employees, few studies have explored positive resources for combating burnout in this population. This study aims to explore the relationship between occupational stress and job burnout among Chinese bank employees, and particularly the mediating role of psychological capital. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Liaoning, China, during June to August of 2013. A questionnaire that included the effort-reward imbalance scale, the Psychological Capital Questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, as well as demographic and working factors, was distributed to 1739 employees of state-owned banks. This yielded 1239 effective respondents (467 men, 772 women. Asymptotic and resampling strategies explored the mediating role of psychological capital in the relationship between occupational stress and job burnout. Both extrinsic effort and overcommitment were positively associated with emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation. Meanwhile, reward was negatively associated with emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation, but positively associated with personal accomplishment. There was a gender difference in the mediating role of Psychological capital on the occupational stress-job burnout. In male bank employees, Psychological capital mediated the relationships of extrinsic effort and reward with emotional exhaustion and depersonalization; in female bank employees, it partially mediated the relationships of extrinsic effort, reward and overcommitment with emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation, as well as the relationship between reward and personal accomplishment. Psychological capital was generally a mediator between occupational stress and job burnout among Chinese bank employees. Psychological capital may be a potential positive resource in reducing the negative effects of occupational stress on job burnout and relieving job burnout among bank employees, especially female bank

  18. The mediating role of psychological capital on the association between occupational stress and job burnout among bank employees in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xirui; Kan, Dan; Liu, Li; Shi, Meng; Wang, Yang; Yang, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jiana; Wang, Lie; Wu, Hui

    2015-03-10

    Although job burnout is common among bank employees, few studies have explored positive resources for combating burnout in this population. This study aims to explore the relationship between occupational stress and job burnout among Chinese bank employees, and particularly the mediating role of psychological capital. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Liaoning, China, during June to August of 2013. A questionnaire that included the effort-reward imbalance scale, the Psychological Capital Questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, as well as demographic and working factors, was distributed to 1739 employees of state-owned banks. This yielded 1239 effective respondents (467 men, 772 women). Asymptotic and resampling strategies explored the mediating role of psychological capital in the relationship between occupational stress and job burnout. Both extrinsic effort and overcommitment were positively associated with emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation. Meanwhile, reward was negatively associated with emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation, but positively associated with personal accomplishment. There was a gender difference in the mediating role of Psychological capital on the occupational stress-job burnout. In male bank employees, Psychological capital mediated the relationships of extrinsic effort and reward with emotional exhaustion and depersonalization; in female bank employees, it partially mediated the relationships of extrinsic effort, reward and overcommitment with emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation, as well as the relationship between reward and personal accomplishment. Psychological capital was generally a mediator between occupational stress and job burnout among Chinese bank employees. Psychological capital may be a potential positive resource in reducing the negative effects of occupational stress on job burnout and relieving job burnout among bank employees, especially female bank employees.

  19. Role of Occupational Therapy in Case Management and Care Coordination for Clients With Complex Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Monica; Fisher, Thomas F; Broussard, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Specific aspects of the profession of occupational therapy support a distinct value for its practitioners participating fully in the development of case management and care coordination systems. The expectation in the 21st century is that the U.S. health care system must be transformed from one that promotes volume of service to one that promotes value of care. Case management and care coordination will be critical components of that transformation. Occupational therapy's principles, education, practice, approach, and perspective offer much to benefit this increased attention to case management and care coordination. Occupational therapy practitioners should promote themselves and their profession as these system changes develop.

  20. Occupational therapy: cost-effective solutions for changing health system needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexe, Kate; Lammi, Brenda McGibbon; Zweck, Claudia von

    2013-01-01

    Evidence shows occupational therapy interventions are cost-effective in treating or preventing injury and improving health outcomes in areas such as falls prevention, musculoskeletal injury, stroke rehabilitation, early intervention in developmental disabilities, respiratory rehabilitation and home care. Additional research indicates opportunities for occupational therapy to play an increased role in the management of health outcomes in complex and chronic diseases, pain management, non-pharmaceutical mental health interventions, dementia, end-of-life or palliative care and home care. This article aligns the discussion of health system transformation with literature identifying the cost-effectiveness of occupational therapy in Canada.

  1. Construction of an Occupational Therapy Screenings Assessment for elderly medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holsbæk, Jonas

    there for demands a validated Occupational Therapy Screening Assessment, that fast and easy can tell if more Occupational Therapy is needed. Aim: The aim of the study is to develop a Screening Assessment which can be used in the Occupational Therapist practice screening Hospitalized Elderly medical inpatients......Background: Occupational Therapist working with Elderly Medical inpatients at hospitals in Denmark, are under pressure due to an increasing patients, demands for validated interventions and best practice and economically effectually solutions at the same time. Occupational Therapists in Denmark...... by means of the Content Validity Index (CVI) – Questionaire. Result: The result was a Screening Assessment and a Manual, which was built up using ICF and the ADL-Taxonomy as References. The Screening Instrument should be a support for the working Occupational Therapist in their Clinical Reasoning. CVI...

  2. Work-family conflict as a mediator between occupational stress and psychological health among mental health nurses in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Norio; Danjo, Kazuma; Furukori, Hanako; Sato, Yasushi; Tomita, Tetsu; Fujii, Akira; Nakagami, Taku; Kitaoka, Kazuyo; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2017-01-01

    Occupational stress among mental health nurses may affect their psychological health, resulting in reduced performance. To provide high-quality, sustainable nursing care, it is necessary to identify and control the factors associated with psychological health among mental health nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of work-family conflict (WFC) in the well-known relationship between occupational stress and psychological health among mental health nurses in Japan. In this cross-sectional study, data were gathered from 180 mental health nurses who had a coresident child or were married. Data from the Work-Family Conflict Scale, the Generic Job Stress Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression Scale were obtained via self-report questionnaires. The effects of occupational stress and WFC on psychological health were explored by hierarchical linear regression analysis. The relationship between emotional exhaustion and occupational factors, including quantitative workload and the variance in workload, disappeared with the addition of WFC (each work interference with family [WIF] or family interference with work [FIW]). The relationship between emotional exhaustion and mental demands disappeared only with the addition of WIF. The relationship between depressive symptoms and variance in workload disappeared with the addition of WFC (each WIF or FIW). Our findings may encourage hospital administrators to consider the risks of medical staff WFC. Furthermore, longitudinal investigations into the factors associated with WFC are required for administrative and psychological interventions.

  3. The experience of clinician-researchers in occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, A

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the experience of occupational therapy clinicians who do research to illuminate factors that influenced their research, the processes involved, and the outcomes. The qualitative approach of grounded theory was used. Purposive sampling of all research-productive clinicians in acute care hospitals in one Australian city occurred. Fifteen clinicians participated in in-depth interviews that explored their experiences of research. Results were analyzed with the constant comparative method, and six conceptual categories were developed. These categories were further analyzed in terms of their relationships, and a core category that explained and synthesized the data was identified--becoming a clinician-researcher. This category encompassed a process of role change during which the person changed from clinician to clinician-researcher. Conditions for this change were identified, and three key concepts were derived to elaborate the core category. In becoming a clinician-researcher, the person was active in (a) identifying research as significant, (b) constructing actions in relation to research, and (c) evaluating the experience. The findings further the understanding of clinician-researchers through the description of their experience and the empirically based theoretical formulation that explains it.

  4. Online Learning of Safe Patient Transfers in Occupational Therapy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia L. Hayden D. H. Ed., OTR/L, CHT

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Online higher education is steadily increasing. For programs in allied health to be offered effectively in an elearning format, clinical psychomotor skills need to be addressed. The aim of this research was to design, implement, and evaluate an online safe patient transfers module for occupational therapy assistant (OTAstudents. The efficacy of teaching safe patient transfers in an e-learning environment was appraised using both quantitative and qualitative analysis. The applied research project was completed at a Tennessee community college. A convenience sample of eighteen students participated in the pilot study. Twenty-five studentsparticipated in the subsequent study. The instructional design of the course was based on Mager’s CriterionReferenced Instruction model. Streaming video was used as the delivery method for course material. A pretest/posttest evaluated the students’ cognitive knowledge of safe patient transfers. A behavioral transferscompetency checklist was used to rate videotapes of students’ performance of assisted stand pivot and dependent sliding board transfers. Research findings indicated students were able to learn this psychomotor clinical skill online with beginning proficiency. A paired t-test showed marked improvement of cognitive knowledge. A student learning survey revealed the majority of students preferred at least one hands-on classroom session where instructor feedback and interaction with classmates confirmed safe and effectiveclinical technique.

  5. Working memory and older adults: implications for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andiel, C; Liu, L

    1995-01-01

    Atkinson and Shiffrin's (1968) modal model of memory is still commonly used by rehabilitation professionals to evaluate memory impairment in older adults. However, research to date has been unable to indicate that short-term memory declines with age. These findings have led some rehabilitation professionals to mistakenly conclude that short-term memory is not affected by the aging process. This article reviews both the traditional concept of short-term memory, as outlined by Atkinson and Shiffrin, and the more recent conceptualization of short-term memory in terms of Baddeley and Hitch's (1974) model of working memory. The implications of the concept of working memory has implications for occupational therapy interventions for older adults. For example, clients with dementia may experience difficulties in performing tasks that require drawing inferences. Similarly, language that contains vague references may present problems for these clients. In addition, changes in working memory in older adults suggest that they may experience difficulties with medication management and what Rule, Milke, and Dobbs (1992) called wayfinding. Therefore, evaluations of working memory would provide a better indication of older adults' memory performance than the modal model.

  6. Changing Face of Stroke: Implications for Occupational Therapy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Timothy J.; Baum, Carolyn; Connor, Lisa Tabor

    2010-01-01

    Stroke is one of the most life-altering syndromes affecting the world population. Rehabilitation for people experiencing stroke is focused almost exclusively on self-care activities and being able to return home and has little to no focus on work rehabilitation or community reintegration. The Cognitive Rehabilitation Research Group (CRRG) at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis was formed with the vision of improving everyday life for people after stroke by translating knowledge from neuroscience into treatment programs for productive living. Descriptive analysis of the intake assessment from the CRRG Clinical Core (N = 7,740) revealed three important findings: The age at stroke is decreasing, most strokes are neurologically mild to moderate in nature, and discharge placement decisions are being made largely on the basis of measures of impairment. The changes in the stroke population require occupational therapy to expand rehabilitation beyond the acute management of stroke to address full participation in work, family, and community life. PMID:19785261

  7. Home programs for upper extremity recovery post-stroke: a survey of occupational therapy practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso Brown, Elena V; Fichter, Renae

    2017-09-08

    Upper extremity hemiparesis is an impairment post-stroke that impacts quality of life. Home programs are an intervention strategy used by many occupational therapists to support continued motor recovery post-stroke, yet little is known about how these programs are designed and implemented. The purpose of this study was to describe how occupational therapy practitioners approach this task and specifically what strategies they use to support adherence and what types of technology are most commonly used. An on-line survey methodology was used. Participants were recruited through multiple sources including state associations and occupational therapy educational program directors. A total of 73 occupational therapy practitioners submitted complete surveys. It was found that majority of occupational therapy practitioners in the sample (n = 53) reported creating home programs focused on upper extremity motor recovery more than 80% of the time. Range of motion and strengthening were reported as being in the top three most commonly used interventions by more than half the sample, however incorporating clients' goals and interests were reported most often as strategies to create meaning in the home program. Respondents also reported limited incorporation of technology and strategies to support adherence. Personal motivation was reported by occupational therapy practitioners to be a key moderator of adherence to a home program. Occupational therapy practitioners often provide home programs for individuals post-stroke focusing on upper extremity function. Future research that aims to understand stakeholders' perspectives on home programs and determine effective strategies for ensuring adherence is needed.

  8. Facilitation of research-based evidence within occupational therapy in stroke rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, H.; Borg, T.; Hounsgaard, Lise

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the facilitation of evidence-based practice with the use of everyday life occupations and client-centred practice within occupational therapy in three settings of stroke rehabilitation. Method: The study was based on a phenomenological hermeneutical research...... adapted to local contexts. The implementation resulted in various new working routines. Learning processes became part of developing the occupational therapists' professional identities, expressed in more professional confidence. Collaboration in the organisation of the implementation process...

  9. A survey of occupational therapy practitioners in mental health

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    As part of the College of Occupational Therapists’ Mental Health Project, a survey of occupational therapists practising in mental health in the UK was conducted. A questionnaire was sent to 200 members of the Association of Occupational Therapists in Mental Health and achieved a 68.5% response rate. The majority of the 137 respondents were female, with Senior I staff between 20 and 30 years of age who were unlikely to have worked in another area forming the largest group. Although most...

  10. What, Why, How - Creative Activities in Occupational Therapy Practice in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllersdorf, Maria; Ivarsson, Ann-Britt

    2016-12-01

    Creative activities have historically been used in occupational therapy, and although their usage has declined in recent decades, they are still used in Swedish practice. The aim of this study was to better understand how occupational therapists use creative activities in practice. A web-based survey was sent to 520 occupational therapists, of which 304 (58.5%) responded. The main reason identified for using creative activities was to strengthen the client's occupational performance, well-being and self-esteem. The expected outcomes of applying creative activities were to support the client in self-expression and experiencing joy and desire. More than half of the occupational therapist respondents did not use creative activities to the extent they desired. Creative activities in occupational therapy are still used as a vital treatment to strengthen the clients' occupational performance abilities. The survey has looked at only a professional perspective on effectiveness of applying creative activities in occupational therapy. More research is needed to evaluate how occupational therapists internationally apply creative activities. There is also a need to gain information from the client's perspective on the therapeutic value of creative activities. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. 'Third wave' cognitive and behavioural therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunot, Vivien; Moore, Theresa H M; Caldwell, Deborah M; Furukawa, Toshi A; Davies, Philippa; Jones, Hannah; Honyashiki, Mina; Chen, Peiyao; Lewis, Glyn; Churchill, Rachel

    2013-10-18

    So-called 'third wave' cognitive and behavioural therapies represents a new generation of psychological therapies that are increasingly being used in the treatment of psychological problems. However, the effectiveness and acceptability of third wave cognitive and behavioural therapy (CBT) approaches as a treatment for depression compared with other psychological therapies remain unclear. 1. To examine the effects of all third wave CBT approaches compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.2. To examine the effects of different third wave CBT approaches (ACT, compassionate mind training, functional analytic psychotherapy, extended behavioural activation and metacognitive therapy) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.3. To examine the effects of all third wave CBT approaches compared with different psychological therapy approaches (psychodynamic, behavioural, humanistic, integrative, cognitive-behavioural) for acute depression. We searched the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group Specialised Register (CCDANCTR to 01/01/12), which includes relevant randomised controlled trials from The Cochrane Library (all years), EMBASE (1974-), MEDLINE (1950-) and PsycINFO (1967-). We also searched CINAHL (May 2010) and PSYNDEX (June 2010) and reference lists of the included studies and relevant reviews for additional published and unpublished studies. An updated search of CCDANCTR restricted to search terms relevant to third wave CBT was conducted in March 2013 (CCDANCTR to 01/02/13). Randomised controlled trials that compared various third wave CBT with other psychological therapies for acute depression in adults. Two review authors independently identified studies, assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information where required. We rated the quality of evidence using GRADE methods. A total of three studies involving 144 eligible participants

  12. Factors affecting the choice of treatment in occupational therapy practices in hospital-based care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.J.; Dekker, J.; Lankhorst, G.; Zee, J. van der

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this article was twofold: to describe the occurrence of treatment goals, health-care programmes and type of interventions chosen by occupational therapists; and to investigate relationships between treatment goals, health-care programmes and interventions. A survey on occupational therapy

  13. Occupational Therapy Home Program for Children with Intellectual Disabilities: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuang, Yee-Pay; Ho, Guang-Sheng; Su, Chwen-Yng

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a proposed occupational therapy home program (OTHP) for children with intellectual disabilities (ID). Children with ID were randomly and equally assigned to OTHP or to no OTHP groups. The primary outcome measures were Canadian Occupational Performance, Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor…

  14. Evaluation of an Occupational Therapy Mentorship Program: Effects on Therapists' Skills and Family-Centered Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gillian; Tam, Cynthia; Fay, Linda; Pilkington, Martha; Servais, Michelle; Petrosian, Hasmik

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in understanding the usefulness of mentorship programs for children's rehabilitation service providers. This evaluation study examined the effects of an occupational therapy mentorship program on the skills and behaviors of 8 new and 17 experienced occupational therapists practicing at a regional children's rehabilitation…

  15. Evaluation of an Occupational Therapy Mentorship Program: Effects on Therapists' Skills and Family-Centered Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gillian; Tam, Cynthia; Fay, Linda; Pilkington, Martha; Servais, Michelle; Petrosian, Hasmik

    2011-01-01

    There is growing interest in understanding the usefulness of mentorship programs for children's rehabilitation service providers. This evaluation study examined the effects of an occupational therapy mentorship program on the skills and behaviors of 8 new and 17 experienced occupational therapists practicing at a regional children's rehabilitation…

  16. WORK ADJUSTMENT AS A FUNCTION OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, STUDY COURSE V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JONES, MONA; KANDEL, DITHA

    RESULTING FROM ONE OF SIX 1-WEEK STUDY COURSES FOLLOWING THE THIRD INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF THE WORLD FEDERATION OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS IN 1962, THIS MANUAL PRESENTS A BROAD REVIEW OF THE PHILOSOPHY, ROLE, AND TECHNIQUES OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY IN THE FIELD OF PREVOCATIONAL EVALUATION, VOCATIONAL TRAINING, AND SHELTERED WORKSHOPS. NINETEEN…

  17. Factors affecting the choice of treatment in occupational therapy practices in hospital-based care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.J.; Dekker, J.; Lankhorst, G.; Zee, J. van der

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this article was twofold: to describe the occurrence of treatment goals, health-care programmes and type of interventions chosen by occupational therapists; and to investigate relationships between treatment goals, health-care programmes and interventions. A survey on occupational therapy

  18. Occupational Therapy Home Program for Children with Intellectual Disabilities: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuang, Yee-Pay; Ho, Guang-Sheng; Su, Chwen-Yng

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a proposed occupational therapy home program (OTHP) for children with intellectual disabilities (ID). Children with ID were randomly and equally assigned to OTHP or to no OTHP groups. The primary outcome measures were Canadian Occupational Performance, Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor…

  19. Expanding the Boundaries of Occupational Therapy Practice through Student Fieldwork Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Judith; Polatajko, Helene; Gage, Marie

    2001-01-01

    With government funding, Ontario occupational therapy students were placed in community agencies not typically using therapists, at no cost. Offsite occupational therapists provided supervision. Students learned to work independently and understand the therapist's role in health promotion and prevention. Ongoing funding was provided by 25% of…

  20. Determinants for the effectiveness of implementing an occupational therapy intervention in routine dementia care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dopp, C.M.E.; Graff, M.J.L.; Rikkert, M.G.; Sanden, M.W.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A multifaceted implementation (MFI) strategy was used to implement an evidence-based occupational therapy program for people with dementia (COTiD program). This strategy was successful in increasing the number of referrals, but not in improving occupational therapists' (OTs) adherence. T

  1. An Exploration of the Use of Occupational Language in School-Based Occupational Therapy Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jeryl D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of occupation-based terminology in the documentation of school-based occupational therapists. A retrospective qualitative analysis of school-based documents using a priori codes was completed. Analysis included 33 Individual Educational Program (IEP) documents and 118 OT goals. Analyses showed that…

  2. Sustaining International Partnerships: The European Master of Science Program In Occupational Therapy: A Case Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilott, Irene; Kottorp, Anders; la Cour, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract International partnerships are a mechanism for supporting the academic development of occupational therapy and promoting cultural competence. This case study describes the factors that have helped to sustain a post-qualifying programme implemented by five higher education institutions...

  3. Integration of International Service Learning in Developing Countries within Occupational Therapy Education: Process and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    International service learning (ISL) is included in an increasing number of courses at post-secondary levels of education, including programs which educate future occupational therapy practitioners. There is a limited amount of literature and research concerning best practices for course-based occupational therapy education featuring ISL experiences, in particular within developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to (a) to review key literature on ISL, (b) explicate key elements which can help design course-based ISL experiences; and (c) suggest areas for further research and development of course-based ISL. The seven elements of focus that provide a base to guide occupational therapy educators who create ISL courses with an immersion component in a country with a developing economy are discussed, as well as future challenges and possibilities when providing occupational therapy services to a global society.

  4. Emotional intelligence, self-efficacy, and occupational therapy students' fieldwork performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andonian, Lynne

    2013-07-01

    This study explored the relationship of emotional intelligence level and self-efficacy to fieldwork performance for occupational therapy students. Occupational therapy students (n = 199) from 36 occupational therapy programs in the United States completed the two surveys, the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test and the Student Confidence Questionnaire, during their professional Level 2 fieldwork placements. The surveys were compared to the Fieldwork Performance Evaluation for the Occupational Therapy Student completed by the fieldwork educators. Results showed that degree of emotional intelligence, having a choice in the fieldwork setting, and having professional experience in a related setting were positively correlated to Fieldwork Performance scores. Students' self-efficacy was not related to Fieldwork Performance scores. This suggests fostering students' emotional intelligence and capacity for accurate skill appraisal supports fieldwork success.

  5. Involving Clients in Programme Evaluation and Research: A New Methodology for Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Carrie; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reviews the relationship between occupational therapy and client involvement, examines the rationale for involving clients in program evaluation and research, and discusses how clients are involved in evaluation and research in today's mental health care setting. (Author)

  6. Living with Parkinson’s and the Emerging Role of Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelka Jansa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease is a chronic and increasingly complex condition, demanding multidisciplinary management. Over the last twenty years or so, alongside the growth of specialist services and healthcare teams specifically developed for people with Parkinson’s, occupational therapy has grown in recognition as a treatment option, especially since evidence of its efficacy is now slowly emerging. The purpose of this work is to outline the role of occupational therapy clinical practice in the management of people living with Parkinson’s disease and its emergent evidence base, combined with details of current occupational therapy philosophy and process, as applicable to occupational therapy practice for people with Parkinson’s. The Canadian Practice Process Framework is used to structure this overview and was selected because it is a well-recognized, evidence-based tool used by occupational therapists and encompasses the core concepts of human occupation and person-centred practice. The framework employed allows the flexibility to reflect the pragmatic occupational therapy intervention process and so enables the illustration of the individually tailored approach required to accommodate to the complex pathology and personal, domestic, and social impacts, affecting the functioning of Parkinson’s disease patients on a daily basis.

  7. Mexican American Fathers’ Occupational Conditions: Links to Family Members’ Psychological Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouter, Ann C.; Davis, Kelly D.; Updegraff, Kimberly; Delgado, Melissa; Fortner, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    To examine the implications of fathers’ occupational conditions (i.e., income, work hours, shift work, pressure, workplace racism, and underemployment) for family members’ psychological adjustment, home interviews were conducted with fathers, mothers, and two adolescent offspring in each of 218 Mexican American families. Results underscored the importance of acculturation as a moderator. Fathers’ income was negatively associated with depressive symptoms in highly acculturated families but not in less acculturated families. In contrast, fathers’ reports of workplace racism were positively associated with depressive symptoms in less acculturated families but not in more acculturated family contexts. These findings were consistent across all 4 family members, suggesting that the “long arm” of the jobs held by Mexican American fathers extends to mothers and adolescent offspring. PMID:18414596

  8. Effects of occupational stress on the physical and psychological health of women in a microelectronics plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromet, E J; Dew, M A; Parkinson, D K; Cohen, S; Schwartz, J E

    1992-06-01

    Physical and psychological effects of occupational stress were examined in a sample of 552 female blue collar employees of a microelectronics facility. After controlling for demographic and biological risk factors, non-work life events, and solvent exposure, job-related conflict was associated with depressive symptomatology, severe headaches, lightheadedness weakness/fatigue, rashes, and presence of multiple symptoms. Job demands were only associated with multiple symptoms. Solvent exposure did not interact with either of the job stress measures synergistically to increase symptom reports. Although the main effects of social support, when present, were in the direction of reducing symptomatology, the interactive effects of social support and stress on health were inconsistent and dependent on the source of support.

  9. Tracked ways and contributions for the development of Occupational Therapy in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Luísa Guillaumon Emmel

    2017-01-01

    This essay reflects the paths I have taken in occupational therapy during 40+ years in this profession, presenting briefly the main important activities and participation of my career. It is possible to visualize the route followed in the choices of research issues and the beginning of a series of projects and directions to growth and recognition of the Brazilian occupational therapy. The participation with the research funding grants and the strengthening of research activities a...

  10. Sir David K Henderson and the origins of British occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentland, Duncan; Pentland, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Sir David K Henderson made several major contributions in the field of psychiatry, gaining an international reputation but, perhaps lesser known is his role in the introduction of occupational therapy in the United Kingdom. The part Henderson played in establishing occupational therapy as an aspect of his evolving approach to treating mental illness in Scotland is discussed, as is the influence he had in stimulating and supporting the early pioneers of the profession elsewhere in the UK.

  11. Research priorities in mental health occupational therapy: A study of clinician perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitch, Danielle; Lhuede, Kate

    2015-10-01

    The evidence to support mental health occupational therapy has proliferated in the early years of this century, but this growth has tended to be organic rather than targeted. Previous efforts to identify research priorities in this area of practice are either out dated, or encompass discrete areas of practice. The aim of this study was to identify priority areas for research in mental health occupational therapy from clinician's perspectives. A Policy Delphi method was used to enable occupational therapists to define and differentiate their perspectives on research priorities. Forty-two occupational therapists took part in the first two rounds of this method, with 69% (n = 29) going on to complete the third and final round of data collection. A Likert scale was used to rate the importance of each priority, and descriptive quantitative analysis undertaken to identify those most consistently identified as being highly important. Four research priorities were identified as being highly important in this study: (i) working in an occupationally focussed way; (ii) consumer experience of therapy groups; (iii) identifying factors which increase consumer engagement in occupation; and (iv) engaging patients on the inpatient unit in meaningful and positive occupation. Two of the priority areas are already the subject of substantial evidence bases, but there has been far less research into consumer experiences of groups and occupational engagement in acute settings. Collaboration between research teams and greater consumer inclusion are recommended for the future. This study provides an updated indication of research priorities for mental health occupational therapy in Australia. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  12. Benchmarking the research track record and level of appointment of Australian occupational therapy academics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, Kieran; Gray, Marion

    2017-05-14

    Academic faculty are active contributors to the evidence base of the profession. Little is known about the research productivity of Australian occupational therapy academics. A bibliographic analysis of Australian occupational therapy faculty websites and corresponding Scopus citation database profiles was conducted. A description of current research productivity benchmarks and relationships with holding a doctorate, academic appointment level and institutional characteristics were explored. The median H-index of Clinical and Associate Lecturers was 0, 1 for Lecturers, 4 for Senior Lecturers, 7.5 for Associate Professors and 13 for Professors. The number of publications and number of citing documents follows a Pareto tendency, where 20% of researchers are responsible for around 80% of the research track record of Australian occupational therapy academics. The findings provide a benchmark for Australian occupational therapy faculty research track records and associations with appointment levels. This benchmark differs across countries and disciplines. The results raise considerations for enhancing the overall research track record of occupational therapy academics. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  13. The effect of occupational therapy in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsen, Unni; Bentzen, Hege; Holter, Morag Kelly; Nilsen, Tove; Skullerud, Hallvard; Mowinckel, Petter; Kjeken, Ingvild

    2017-03-01

    Aim The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of individualized occupational therapy in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Additionally, the authors wanted to explore the occupational problems experienced in daily life by individuals with COPD. Methods A total of 52 patients were randomly assigned to the intervention group (occupational therapy) or control group (treatment as usual). The primary outcome was assessed using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), and participants were assessed at baseline and after four and 12 months. Results There were no treatment effects on occupational performance or satisfaction with performance, as measured by the COPM. However, we found a significant effect in favour of the intervention group at exertion when performing an individually chosen activity, and in the activity dimension of St George's Respiratory Questionnaire. A total of 595 occupational problems were reported, most frequently within mobility, active recreation, and household management. Conclusions The results show that, compared with the usual care, individualized occupational therapy did not improve occupational performance or satisfaction with performance. Small but significant changes in activity performance in favour of the intervention group were found in some of the secondary outcomes.

  14. Performance-based testing in mild stroke: identification of unmet opportunity for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, M Tracy; Edwards, Dorothy F; Giles, Gordon Muir

    2015-01-01

    Age at first stroke is decreasing, and most strokes are mild to moderate in severity. Executive function (EF) deficits are increasingly recognized in the stroke population, but occupational therapists have not altered their evaluation methods to fully accommodate changing patient needs. We present a hierarchical performance-based testing (PBT) pathway using data to illustrate how PBT could identify patients with mild stroke-related EF deficits in need of occupational therapy intervention. Data suggest that a substantial number of patients with EF deficits after mild stroke could benefit from occupational therapy services.

  15. Philip King Brown and Arequipa Sanatorium: early occupational therapy as medical and social experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Lilas; Schwartz, Kathleen Barker

    2013-01-01

    Historical inquiry enriches occupational therapy practice by identifying enduring values and inspiring future excellence. This study presents for the first time the pioneering life and work of Philip King Brown, a San Francisco physician who used occupation to treat the physical, mental, and social effects of tuberculosis (TB) at Arequipa Sanatorium, the institution he founded in 1911. Through textual analysis of the Arequipa Sanatorium Records, this article evaluates and defends Brown's assertion that his institution was medically and socially experimental. The Arequipa Sanatorium promoted occupational therapy by demonstrating its viability in the treatment of TB, the era's most critical health threat. It also put into practice the ideals of holism, humanism, and occupational justice that resonate within the profession today. Finally, Arequipa provided an example of how an occupation program can change the public perception of disability.

  16. Role for Occupational Therapy in Community Mental Health: Using Policy to Advance Scholarship of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, Lisa; Burson, Kathrine A; Januszewski, Celeste; Pitts, Deborah B; Preissner, Katharine

    2015-01-01

    Occupational therapists must be aware of professional and policy trends. More importantly, occupational therapists must be involved in efforts to influence policy both for the profession and for the people they serve (Bonder, 1987). Using the state of Illinois as an example, this article reviews the policies and initiatives that impact service decisions for persons with psychiatric disabilities as well as the rationale for including occupational therapy in community mental health service provision. Despite challenges in building a workforce of occupational therapists in the mental health system, this article makes the argument that the current climate of emerging policy and litigation combined with the supporting evidence provides the impetus to strengthen mental health as a primary area of practice. Implications for scholarship of practice related to occupational therapy services in community mental health programs for individuals with psychiatric disability are discussed.

  17. Examining the Use of Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy in Canadian Neurological Occupational and Physical Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, Alana; Che, Marion; MacKay-Lyons, Marilyn; MacKenzie, Diane; Page, Stephen; Eskes, Gail; McDonald, Alison; Boyce, Joy

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To investigate the use of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in Canadian neurological occupational and physical therapy. Method: An online survey was completed by occupational and physical therapists practising in Canadian adult neurological rehabilitation. We measured participants' practices, perceptions, and opinions in relation to their use of CIMT in clinical practice. Results: A total of 338 surveys were returned for a 13% response rate; 92% of respondents knew of CIMT, and 43% reported using it. The majority (88%) of respondents using CIMT employed a non-traditional protocol. Self-rating of level of CIMT knowledge was found to be a significant predictor of CIMT use (p≤0.001). Commonly identified barriers to use included “patients having cognitive challenges that prohibit use of this treatment” and “lack of knowledge regarding treatment.” Conclusions: Although the majority of respondents knew about CIMT, less than half reported using it. Barriers to CIMT use include lack of knowledge about the treatment and institutional resources to support its use. Identifying and addressing barriers to CIMT use—for example, by using continuing professional education to remediate knowledge gaps or developing new protocols that require fewer institutional resources—can help improve the feasibility of CIMT, and thus promote its clinical application. PMID:24719511

  18. The Training and Use of Service Dogs in Occupational Therapy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Isaacson ATP, Ed.D., OTR/L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to describe the role of occupational therapy fieldwork students in the training of service dogs. Ethnography is an approach that strives to explore and describe the point of view of people. Ethnographers view the researcher as an instrument to gain insight into the subject. This researcher utilizedher own experiences as an occupational therapist, an occupational therapy educator, and as a volunteer dog trainer of service dogs. She then validated the process through interviews with key informants. The results indicate that occupational therapists and occupational therapy students are capable of playing a significantrole in the training and placement of service dogs. During a level I experience, occupational therapy students experienced the importance that a dog can play in a person’s life as a tool of adaptation. They also learned advocacy and professionalism and applied the Person-Environment-Occupation model of practice. In addition, students recognized that barriers exist in the use of service dogs.

  19. Effects of occupational therapy on quality of life of patients with metastatic prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huri, Meral; Huri, Emre; Kayihan, Hulya; Altuntas, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the efficiency of occupational therapy relative to a home program in improving quality of life (QoL) among men who were treated for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC). Methods: Fifty-five men were assigned randomly to either the 12-week cognitive behavioral therapy based occupational therapy (OT-CBSM) intervention (treatment group) or a home program (control group) between March 2012 and August 2014 in the Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used to measure the occupational performance and identify difficulties in daily living activities. The QoL and symptom status were measured by The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and its Prostate Cancer Module. A 12-week OT-CBSM intervention including client-centered training of daily living activities, recreational group activities, and cognitive behavioral stress management intervention were applied. Results: The COPM performance and satisfaction scores, which indicate occupational participation and QoL increased statistically in the treatment group in relation to men who were included in the home-program (p≤0.05). Conclusion: A 12-week OT-CBSM intervention was effective in improving QoL in men treated for MPC, and these changes were associated significantly with occupational performance. PMID:26219446

  20. A Bibliometric Analysis of Highly Cited and High Impact Occupational Therapy Publications by American Authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Sharon A; Brown, Ted; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2017-07-01

    A bibliometric analysis was completed of peer-reviewed literature from 1991-2015, written by American occupational therapists, to examine US high impact scholarship with "occupational therapy" and "occupational therapist(s)" used as keywords to search journal articles' publication title, abstract, author details, and keywords. Results included 1,889 journal articles from 1991-2015 published by American occupational therapists as first or corresponding author. Sixty-nine articles attained a TotalCitation2015 ≥ 50 and 151 attained a Citation2015 ≥ 5 indicating that they were the most highly cited literature produced in this period. Although the majority (58%) of this literature was published in occupational therapy-specific journals, 41% was published in interdisciplinary journals. Results illustrate that the volume of highly cited American occupational therapy peer-reviewed literature has grown over the last two decades. There is need for the profession to strategize methods to enhance the publication metrics of occupational therapy-specific journals to reduce the loss of high quality publications to external periodicals.

  1. The Care for the Dying: A critical historical analysis of occupational therapy in hospice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Russell

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an historical analysis of occupational therapy’s role in hospice care with relation to past and current hospice practices, as well as cultural forces that impact that role. Since the beginning of the movement, hospice has developed into a strong component of end-of-life care, and occupational therapy practice models and interventions are unique in addressing the occupational needs of clients during this stage of life. Despite compelling evidence of the positive impact of employing occupational therapists, there continue to be significant barriers to implementation of services. The author proposes that the concept of occupation, as experienced at the end-of-life stage, needs to be more clearly defined and occupational therapy’s role broadened in order to strengthen the profession’s presence in the hospice setting.

  2. Review of Occupational Therapy Intervention Research in the Practice Area of Children and Youth 2009–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendixen, Roxanna M.; Huang, Yu Yun; Lim, Yoonjeong

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE. We conducted a systematic review examining the extent to which pediatric intervention research recently published in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy reflects occupational therapy’s holistic occupation-based tenets. METHOD. We surveyed 10 systematic reviews and analyzed 38 single effectiveness studies for intervention approach, type, level of environmental targeting, level of occupational task and participation practice, and measures used. RESULTS. Of the 38 single effectiveness studies, 12 (32%) explicitly incorporated both environmental targets of intervention and practice of complex or in vivo occupational tasks, with steady increases during the 2009–2013 time frame. CONCLUSION. In the area of children and youth, occupational therapy is making steady gains in reflecting and demonstrating the effectiveness of the profession’s holistic, occupation-based tenets. Occupational therapy researchers must be mindful to ensure that despite the reductionist nature of intervention research, interventions reflect the profession’s holistic understanding of the interplay between the child, environment, and occupations. PMID:24581415

  3. Critical perspective from Latin America: an epistemic disobedience in the contemporary Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pino Morán

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to present the critical foundations underlying the Occupational Therapy practice construction in Chile and Latin America. Although the manuscript has a theoretical/conceptual development, it is the result of the tension emerging from daily practice. The results presented have the political intention of inviting occupational therapists to identify a chain of common knowledge, applicable in various fields of the discipline role. The work’s scope should be sized as a small bibliographical discussion of a much broader and deeper stream, however, it offers us various inputs for practice and theory and research in Occupational Therapy. In conclusion we can identify a number of theories, methodologies and techniques used in the practice of occupational therapy that are not clearly identified as a particular perspective from Latin America, which is the manuscript proposal, inviting to a deeper discussion .

  4. INTERDISCIPLINARY MODULE IN PREVENTION AND HEALTH PROMOTION IN POPULATION HEALTH FOR OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY AND PHYSIOTHERAPY STUDENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose is to provide physiotherapy and occupational therapy students at the University College Cvu vita in Holstebro, Denmark, the opportunity to develop competences for interdisciplinary working situations concerning promotion of population health. RELEVANCE: The Danish Ministry...... and occupational health. The occupational therapy and physiotherapy students are mixed in interdisciplinary groups of 4-5 students connected to a private company or a public institution. Together the group and the company/institution formulate work related, or population health related issues and co......-operate towards appropriate solutions. The groups suggest and present preventive and health promotion solutions and strategies especially designed for this particular situation. The groups are supervised by an interdisciplinary team of occupational therapy and physiotherapy lecturers. In addition...

  5. Parents' explanatory models and hopes for outcomes of occupational therapy using a sensory integration approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Ellen S; Kramer, Jessica; Schub, Jamie A; May-Benson, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE. To describe parents' concerns and hopes for their children who would be receiving occupational therapy using a sensory integration approach. METHOD. Content analysis of 275 parental responses to three open-ended questions on developmental-sensory history intake forms. FINDINGS. Parents' descriptions of why they sought for their children were categorized into four overarching concerns about their children's challenges: self-regulation, interacting with peers, participating in skilled motor activities, and self-confidence. Parents often linked these concerns together, revealing explanatory models of how they make sense of potential relationships among their children's challenges and how these challenges affect occupational performance. Parents hoped occupational therapy would help their children develop self-understanding and frustration tolerance to self-regulate their behavior in socially acceptable ways. IMPLICATIONS. Assessment and intervention should explicitly focus on links among self-regulation, social participation, skills, and perceived competence to address parents' expectations. Copyright © 2014 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  6. Justice and U.S. Occupational Therapy Practice: A Relationship 100 Years in the Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Rebecca M; Boston, Tessa L; Daaleman, Claire E

    At 99 years old, occupational therapy is a global health care profession with a growing orientation toward justice. Because much of the occupational justice discourse has developed outside the United States, parallels between the profession's ethos and its current focus on justice must be examined more closely in this country. Although occupational therapy practitioners in the United States are better equipped than their predecessors with language and theories that explicitly emphasize justice, the potential for bringing that focus to bear depends on practitioners' willingness to think differently about their practices. We argue that a focus on justice can be naturally integrated with curriculum standards by emphasizing the link between cultural humility, client-centeredness, and embodied habits of "seeking out unknown others." Outside formal education, practitioners can be encouraged to think of justice as something that already intersects with practice, not something that practitioners must choose whether to take up. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  7. The Occupational Therapy in adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU and team perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Barbieri Bombarda

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA, on 24 February 2010, adopted resolution number 7, which makes mandatory the presence of an occupational therapist as an active member of the Intensive Care Unit professional team. It is believed that the ICU scope is a small professional practice in Occupational Therapy due to the small number of publications in the literature. Objective: To describe the experience and actions developed by occupational therapy in an adult ICU and report the staff awareness reagrding this practice at a state hospital, located in the state of São Paulo. Method: This is an experience report in which we conducted document analysis to obtain data regarding actions taken by occupational therapy, as well as the application of a questionnaire with the team to understand the professionals perceptions regarding the care provided. The data obtained was processed through thematic content analysis. Results: We identified that the occupational therapy intervention transited by functional aspects and support for coping, with the recognition of these actions by the team. Conclusion: The described action consists of practices derived from the occupational therapy insertion process in an adult ICU and meets the desire to encourage the research development in this area for the promotion of debates to promote technical improvement of the profession in the care of critically ill patients.

  8. Health psychology as a context for massage therapy: a conceptual model with CAM as mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymel, Glenn M; Rich, Grant J

    2014-04-01

    Health psychology represents a context within which massage therapy research, education, and practice can be positioned for the mutual benefit of both. Furthermore, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) more often than not plays a mediating role in relating massage therapy to health psychology. On occasion, though, the linkage between health psychology and massage therapy can be quite direct without the mediating influence of CAM. This paper, accordingly, advances a conceptual model via both flowchart and Venn diagram displays for viewing the health psychology context for massage therapy with the possibility of CAM as a mediating factor. Attention is also given to the broad range of issues constituting contemporary health psychology as well as its correspondence to an equally diverse array of client populations and health conditions addressed in massage therapy research. Future directions in the areas of health psychology, CAM, and massage therapy are proposed with a view toward a mutual and reciprocal benefit accruing to these behavioral and health science arenas.

  9. Occupational Therapy After Myocardial or Cerebrovascular Infarction: Which Factors Influence Referrals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Drosselmeyer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular diseases remain the number one cause of death worldwide, and many survivors suffer lasting disabilities. Occupational therapy can help such patients regain as much function as possible. However, little is known about the factors influencing referrals to occupational therapy after stroke or myocardial infarction (MI. Method: Data from the IMS Disease Analyzer® database were observed for a three-year period. The study population included 7,440 patients who were examined by a cardiologist due to stroke or MI. In addition to baseline characteristics, the presence of certain cardiovascular risk factors or comorbidities was recorded. Cox regression analyses were performed and the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI was utilized. Results: Occupational therapy was received by 1,779 patients; 88.5% had suffered an MI and 11.5% a stroke. In the group without referral (n = 5,661, 60.7% had experienced an MI and 39.3% a stroke. No significant gender-related differences were observed. Younger age, an MI diagnosis, and the presence of hypertension positively influenced referral rate and time, while risk factors, such as adiposity, delayed therapy. The CCI was higher in the group with occupational therapy. Conclusion: The chance of being offered occupational therapy increased with younger age, history of MI, and the presence of hypertension. Future studies should also consider severity of ischemic lesion to account for the degree of remaining impairment.

  10. Perceptions among Occupational and Physical Therapy Students of a Nontraditional Methodology for Teaching Laboratory Gross Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K. Jackson; Denham, Bryan E.; Dinolfo, John D.

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to assess the perceptions of physical therapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) students regarding the use of computer-assisted pedagogy and prosection-oriented communications in the laboratory component of a human anatomy course at a comprehensive health sciences university in the southeastern United States. The…

  11. Comparison of occupation-based and impairment-based occupational therapy for subacute stroke: a randomized controlled feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomori, Kounosuke; Nagayama, Hirofumi; Ohno, Kanta; Nagatani, Ryutaro; Saito, Yuki; Takahashi, Kayoko; Sawada, Tatsunori; Higashi, Toshio

    2015-08-01

    To compare occupation-based and impairment-based approaches in occupational therapy and determine the feasibility of patient recruitment and retention. A multicenter, randomized, controlled pilot trial with a single blind assessor. Ten subacute rehabilitation units in Japan. Fifty-four patients with subacute stroke. The experimental group used the iPad application, Aid for Decision-making in Occupation Choice, to establish occupation-based goals, and evaluation and intervention were conducted mainly through real occupations. The control group was evaluated according to patients' generic abilities and activities of daily living (ADL), and the intervention mainly involved the impairment-based approach. Short Form-36, Functional Independence Measure, Brunnstrom recovery stages, The Client Satisfaction Questionnaire, and length of hospital stay. Of the 1465 potential participants, 54 (3%) subacute stroke patients were enrolled over 16 months and 68% (n = 36) were retained to the 2-month assessment: experimental group (n = 16); control group (n = 21). Although there was no significant intergroup difference for any outcomes, the experimental group had a small effect size advantage on the Short Form-36 "General health" (d = 0.42) and "Role emotional" (d = 0.43) subscales relative to the control group. A sample of 118 subacute stroke patients per group would be required for a lager study. Results suggest that the occupation-based approach has more potential to improve "General health" and "Role emotional" scores on the Short Form-36 than the impairment-based approach. Further investigation of study protocol with interventions and recruiting is needed prior to a larger trial. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Contributions to clinical Occupational Therapy in the area of early intervention in interdisciplinary team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dani Laura Peruzzolo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Specialized care for infants considers that the sooner the intervention in risk and symptoms occurs, the greater the possibility of obtaining better results. Aims: To describe the process of early intervention provided by an extension program of graduate studies in Occupational Therapy and Hearing, Speech and Languages Science courses and also discuss the theoretical and practical paths in the care for infants and in the Occupational Therapy area. Method: Case report with convenience sample. The study was carried out through an assessment interpreted in light of psychomotor, occupational therapeutic, and speech, hearing and language contributions. The intervention was under the responsibility of an occupational therapist supported by an interdisciplinary team. It occurred once a week from August 2011 to January 2012 and from March 2012 to July 2012. Data analysis was carried out by comparing the entry assessment test and the final assessment test. Results: The boy had not developed concepts of body schema and body image that could sustain his relationship with objects, space and other persons. He presented little linguistic evolution. Considering the contributions of occupational therapy in psychomotor clinic, the boy reconstructed his family place in early intervention. The possibility of language functioning connected to the boy’s demands allowed access to symbolism. Conclusion: The proposal of early occupational therapy intervention with a single therapist supported by an interdisciplinary team was able to overcome the structural and instrumental obstacles to the boy’s development.

  13. Content analysis of five occupational therapy journals, 2006-2010: further review of characteristics of the quantitative literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Andrew W; Brennan, Alexandra R; Journey, Tiffany I; Antill, Kayla D; McPherson, James J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To analyze the content of publications in 5 occupational therapy journals to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the literature base from 2006 to 2010. METHOD. A content analysis for 2006 through 2010 of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy (AJOT), Australian Occupational Therapy Journal (AOTJ), British Journal of Occupational Therapy (BJOT), Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy (CJOT), and Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy (SJOT) was completed. RESULTS. AJOT and SJOT had the highest percentage of articles focusing on physical disabilities, whereas a majority of articles in AOTJ, BJOT, and CJOT focused on education. SJOT published articles with the highest median number of participants in all research designs excluding descriptive studies. The majority of the research articles were descriptive for all journals. CONCLUSION. From 2006 to 2010, AJOT provided stronger evidence conducted at higher levels than the other journals by publishing more articles investigating interventions used to support clinical practice.

  14. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitonyak, Jennifer S.; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E.

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy’s rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy’s perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy’s research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. PMID:26356651

  15. [Effectiveness of occupational therapy and other non-pharmacological therapies in cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilla-Mora, Rosa; Martínez-Piédrola, Rosa María; Fernández Huete, Javier

    A review is presented on the existing knowledge about the usefulness of the occupational therapy in the non-pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer's disease. After conducting a literature search of the period 2010-2015, 25 articles that met the inclusion criteria were selected. The evidence obtained showed the efficiency and effectiveness of OT in delaying the progression of various disorders, especially when structured home OT programs are used. These programs should include aerobic and strengthening, sensory stimulation, and cognitive and memory training exercises based on learning without mistakes. These have shown benefits in the performance of activities of daily living, cognitive and emotional functioning. The importance is stressed of the combined and individual household level intervention and caregiver education. Finally, the need for more studies on the effectiveness of long-term sensory stimulation is highlighted. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Identifying educational priorities for occupational therapy students to prepare for mental health practice in Australia and New Zealand: Opinions of practising occupational therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Justin Newton; Pépin, Geneviève; Haracz, Kirsti; Ennals, Priscilla; Webster, Jayne S; Meredith, Pamela J; Batten, Rachel; Bowman, Siann; Bonassi, Marianne; Bruce, Rosie

    2015-10-01

    The effective preparation of occupational therapy students for mental health practice is critical to facilitate positive consumer outcomes, underpin optimal practice and support new graduates' professional identity. This project was established to determine a set of 'educational priorities' for occupational therapy students to prepare them for current (and future) entry-level practice in mental health, from the perspective of mental health occupational therapists in Australia and New Zealand. The study included two phases. In Phase One, participants identified what they considered to be important educational priorities for occupational therapy students to prepare them for practice in mental health. For Phase Two, an 'expert panel' was assembled to review and rank these using a Policy Delphi approach. Eighty-five participants provided educational priorities in Phase One. These were grouped into a total of 149 educational themes. In Phase Two, the expert panel (consisting of 37 occupational therapists from diverse locations and practice settings) prioritised these themes across three Delphi rounds. A final priority list was generated dividing educational themes into three prioritised categories: 29 'Essential', 25 'Important' and 44 'Optional' priorities. Highest-ranked priorities were: clinical reasoning, client-centred practice, therapeutic use of self, functional implications of mental illness, therapeutic use of occupation and mental health fieldwork experience. The priority list developed as part of this project provides additional information to support the review of occupational therapy curricula across Australia and New Zealand to ensure that new graduates are optimally prepared for mental health practice. © 2015 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  17. Intervention group as a resource of Occupational Therapy: an experience with menopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Diniz Rosa

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intervention group as a resource of Occupational Therapy is the main theme of this study. Herein we present an experience carried out in two universities in the areas of occupational therapy, pharmacy and medicine, more specifically in the field of gynecology regarding the care of climacteric woman. The first intervention occurred in 2004 with trainees of the occupational therapy course and medical school residents. However, the study was restarted in 2010 with expansion to the human resources and knowledge areas. The methodology was based on the transcripts of the remarks made after each group meeting, which was coordinated by the Occupational Therapy. Results showed that the intervention group process has helped participants in the understanding of this stage of life and has interfered in the changing of habits and attitudes, with great improvement in daily life organization. We concluded that the use of intervention group as a resource of Occupational Therapy and the liaison with other areas are of great importance because they enable the construction of a unique treatment plan for the group, given the contribution from each clinical area.

  18. Performances of Occupational Therapy in the museum context: awareness of the diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desirée Nobre Salasar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the Occupational Therapist actions in a museum. Therefore, we approach issues that characterize the areas of museum environment presenting it as a possible workplace for the professionals, and will discuss which activities can be performed by professional occupational therapy in a museum, its relevance, and the achievement gap when performed by the occupational therapist and other professionals. Thus, the study’s main objective is to present a new occupational therapy work field for the highlighting the importance of public awareness activities and how these can influence the museum visitor experiences. We report two distinct activities with visually impaired awareness theme, conducted between February and March 2015, at the Batalha Community Museum in Portugal. We report the activities and analyze the results, seeking to qualitatively assess the public participation, and its response to the impact that such activities may bear in the cultural inclusion of visually impaired people.

  19. The Role of Occupational Therapy in Community-Based Programming: Addressing Childhood Health Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Kugel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity and poor health habits impact youth’s health and occupational participation. Occupational therapy’s role in preventing and treating obesity continues to emerge in the research literature. This article explores the impact of a community-based program emphasizing health and wellness for female youth. Methods: Five girls 11 to 13 years of age participated in the healthy occupations program. Before and after the program, the participants engaged in an individual semi-structured interview and completed the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure and the CATCH Kids Club Questionnaire. The youth participated in a focus group midprogram. Results: The participants were receptive to information regarding healthy behaviors and initiated positive health behavior changes after implementation of a 7-week healthy lifestyle community- based program. Conclusion: Occupational therapy can collaborate with community partners to provide programming focused on health promotion and prevention as part of the interprofessional approach to preventing and treating childhood obesity and building healthier communities.

  20. Career Choices: A Comparison of Two Occupational Therapy Practice Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Seanne; Rosenthal, Carolyn

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of 20 occupational therapists in gerontology with 20 in pediatrics found that societal and personal values, opportunity structures, attitudes and beliefs, experiences, and the context of work influenced choice of practice setting. Academic and clinical experiences were very influential for those in pediatrics. Those in gerontology felt…

  1. Social participation: redesign of education, research, and practice in occupational therapy. Previously published in Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy 2013; 20: 2-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piškur, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    There is growing attention to participation and social participation in literature and policy reports. Occupational therapists strongly believe that creating coherence between the person's occupations and environment will facilitate participation of each individual. Nowadays, societal developments such as "health literacy and self-management", "Web 2.0 social media", "empowering communities", and "Nothing About Us Without Us" increase opportunities for people to interact on different levels of social participation. Social participation can be used as an outcome, though it can also be seen as a means to change society and to develop solutions for barriers experienced by people with chronic diseases or disabilities. Societal developments will have an impact on social participation in terms of supporting each other and contributing to society. Additionally, these changes will have a major influence on the way we educate, conduct research, and deliver occupational therapy practice.

  2. [Evaluating influence of Captopril therapy on occupational activity of engine operators with hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serikov, V V; Kolyagin, V Ya; Bogdanova, V E

    2016-01-01

    The article covers results of study concerning influence of Captopril (25 mg) therapy on occupational activity of locomotive crew workers in real night travels model on training complex "EP1M locomotive operator cabin". Findings are that single use of Captopril (25 mg) in modelled railway activity enabled to increase reliability of occupational activity, that manifested in lower number of errors in locomotive operators' actions at night, and in psychophysiologic regulation of various psychic acts.

  3. Taking on the challenge of the centennial vision: transforming the passion for occupational therapy into a passion for leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copolillo, Al; Shepherd, Jayne; Anzalone, Marie; Lane, Shelly J

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Centennial Vision makes it clear that the profession of occupational therapy is facing challenges that require members to move beyond clinical excellence toward larger health care initiatives (American Occupational Therapy Association, 2007). Accomplishing this goal requires the development of professionals with leadership skills. The focus of the doctorate in occupational therapy at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) hits this mark. In this paper, we describe the development process of a postprofessional occupational therapy doctorate focused on building leaders. To exemplify putting the Centennial Vision in action through education, we describe courses and content, and offer examples of the capstone leadership project and data describing students' experiences with becoming leaders.

  4. Can critical inquiry differ from criticism? A dialogue with current occupational science and occupational therapy schools of inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Wilson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Critical inquiry has been adopted by various academic disciplines. However, there is a lack of consistency and transparency in the way this complex theoretical and methodological position is applied in research. For novice researchers that ambiguity can lead to blurring the conceptual distinction between critical research and the act of criticizing. Objective: The purpose of this essay is to reflect on what it means to keep a critical perspective for novice researchers. Method: The concepts are explored through a personal narrative that allows authors to examine the details of their trajectory to embrace a critical perspective, which has the power to lead to change, both personal and social. Results: We explore the methodological foundations of the critical research and observe how the emotion is taken over or suppressed in the investigation process. Conclusion: We contextualize key concepts of critical investigation, examining its recent application both in occupational science and in occupational therapy.

  5. Contribution of Occupational Therapy in cardiac rehabilitation: intervention, challenges and reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Vila Paz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular disease increases the prevalence of disability and mortality in Western countries. In Spain, it is the main health problem of the adult population. Objective: To understand the professional role of Occupational Therapy in cardiac rehabilitation, in the different stages of intervention, as well as the standardized instruments currently available for evaluation. Method: Review and narrative analysis of the literature on Occupational Therapy and cardiac rehabilitation. The search in the Medline database did not locate any article; in the IME database, a study was identified. In addition, a manual search of articles, books and other academic works of relevance in this intervention area was conducted. Results: Regaining independence and autonomy in occupations and significant roles is the main goal of Occupational Therapy. The intervention follows a holistic paradigm, focused on achieving an active, healthy, social and productive life, according to the needs of each person. Individualized counselling and training actions include incorporating the principles of energy conservation, ergonomic analysis, simplification of tasks and the use of technology and environmental adaptations. In the evaluation of occupational performance, the therapist can use the generic scales FIM, Barthel and COPM in the absence of specific tools for this population; SF-36 is an important instrument to analyze quality of life. Conclusion: The relevance of OT in the promotion of autonomy argues the need to involve this professional in cardiac rehabilitation strategies, in order to promote educational and practical approaches focused on human occupation.

  6. A national evaluation of the Australian Occupational Therapy Competency Standards (1994): a multistakeholder perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodger, Sylvia; Clark, Michele; Banks, Rebecca; O'Brien, Mia; Martinez, Kay

    2009-12-01

    This paper summarises results from an evaluation of the adequacy and utility of the Australian Competency Standards for Entry-Level Occupational Therapists (OT AUSTRALIA, 1994a). It comprised a two-part study, incorporating an online survey of key national stakeholders (n = 26), and 13 focus groups (n = 152) conducted throughout Australia with occupational therapy clinicians, academics, OT AUSTRALIA association and Occupational Therapy Registration Board representatives, as well as university program accreditors. The key recommendations were that: (i) urgent revision to reflect contemporary practice, paradigms, approaches and frameworks is required; (ii) the standards should exemplify basic competence at graduation (not within two years following); (iii) a revision cycle of five years is required; (iv) the Australian Qualifications Framework should be retained, preceded by an introduction describing the scope and nature of occupational therapy practice in the national context; (v) access to the standards should be free and unrestricted to occupational therapists, students and the public via the OT AUSTRALIA (national) website; (vi) the standards should incorporate a succinct executive summary and additional tools or templates formatted to enable occupational therapists to develop professional portfolios and create working documents specific to their workplace; and (vii) language must accommodate contextual variation while striking an appropriate balance between providing instruction and encouraging innovation in practice.

  7. Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy Interventions for Adults With Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Patricia; Tencza, Melissa; Apodaca, Beverly; Poole, Janet L

    We reviewed the efficacy of occupational therapy-related interventions for adults with rheumatoid arthritis. We examined 51 Level I studies (19 physical activity, 32 psychoeducational) published 2000-2014 and identified from five databases. Interventions that focused solely on the upper or lower extremities were not included. Findings related to key outcomes (activities of daily living, ability, pain, fatigue, depression, self-efficacy, disease symptoms) are presented. Strong evidence supports the use of aerobic exercise, resistive exercise, and aquatic therapy. Mixed to limited evidence supports dynamic exercise, Tai Chi, and yoga. Among the psychoeducation interventions, strong evidence supports the use of patient education, self-management, cognitive-behavioral approaches, multidisciplinary approaches, and joint protection, and limited or mixed evidence supports the use of assistive technology and emotional disclosure. The evidence supports interventions within the scope of occupational therapy practice for rheumatoid arthritis, but few interventions were occupation based.

  8. Manualization of occupational therapy interventions: illustrations from the pressure ulcer prevention research program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Fogelberg, Donald; Diaz, Jesus; Carlson, Mike; Clark, Florence

    2011-01-01

    The manualization of a complex occupational therapy intervention is a crucial step in ensuring treatment fidelity for both clinical application and research purposes. Toward the latter end, intervention manuals are essential for ensuring trustworthiness and replicability of randomized controlled trials that aim to provide evidence of the effectiveness of occupational therapy. In this article, we review the literature on the process of intervention manualization. We then illustrate the prescribed steps through our experience in implementing the University of Southern California/Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center's collaborative Pressure Ulcer Prevention Project. In this research program, qualitative research provided the initial foundation for manualization of a multifaceted occupational therapy intervention designed to reduce the incidence of medically serious pressure ulcers in adults with spinal cord injury.

  9. E-learning based Occupational Therapy education leads to engaged students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bensen, Maria; Kolbæk, Ditte

    2017-01-01

    students engagement in e-learning based professional bachelor educations such as Occupational Therapy (OT). Research questions The research questions in this paper is: On the basis of the OT-students experiences, how can learning activities be supported in a synchronous, virtual learning environment...... as Adobe Connect? How do the Occupational Therapy e-learning students experience their engagement in learning activities in Adobe Connect? Findings Students find that the sense of belonging to both their fellow students and the education is crucial to their engagement in activities in Adobe Connect...... in its use of Adobe Connect in a practical education as Occupational Therapy and in the use of memory-work as a phenomenological approach. Furthermore the findings are interesting, as the students experience how a meaningful and helpful online learning-environment is based on self-regulated engagement....

  10. The Accountability-Well-Being-Ethics framework: a new philosophical foundation for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taff, Steven D; Bakhshi, Parul; Babulal, Ganesh M

    2014-12-01

    The context that supported occupational therapy's inception has been replaced with new challenges brought on by globalization and dramatic changes in health care. Thus, the profession's philosophical grounding needs to be reframed to (a) achieve balance between science-driven and holistic elements, (b) operate within larger contexts on problems brought on by sociopolitical and natural determinants of health, and (c) maintain an ethical identity across all arenas of practice. This paper presents a brief discussion of the philosophical underpinnings in occupational therapy's history, outlines new global challenges for the profession, and proposes a new framework to address these challenges through education, practice, and research. Occupational therapy finds itself practising in a growing number of middle- and low-income countries where its roles and values need to be context and culture specific. The Accountability-Well-Being-Ethics framework guides the three domains of education, research, and practice to be relevant in an increasingly complex world.

  11. Single-Case Experimental Design: Current Standards and Applications in Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Justin D; Ledford, Jennifer R; Gast, David L

    Occupational therapy is a field with a long-standing history of recommending and implementing interventions designed to improve the quality of life of clients with disabilities. Often, the interventions are individualized to meet the needs of this diverse group of clients in dynamic settings. Identifying effective and efficient interventions for such a diverse group of clients and settings requires a flexible research approach. Single-case experimental designs (SCEDs) allow practitioners and researchers to answer experimental questions within the context of rigorous research designs. The purpose of this article is to highlight the similarities between the mission of occupational therapy and SCEDs. Recommendations for designing single-case studies with the framework provided by the Single-Case Reporting Guideline in Behavioral Interventions are provided. In addition, common problems and proposed solutions, along with implications for practitioners and researchers, are provided. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  12. Evidence-based practice behaviours: a comparison amongst occupational therapy students and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Aliki; Saroyan, Alenoush; Snider, Laurie M

    2012-04-01

    Occupational therapy graduates are expected to demonstrate entry-level competencies in evidence-based practice. To support students during the course of professional education in developing the knowledge, skills, and attitudes for integrating scientific findings into clinical practice, educators must identify the process by which these competencies are developed. To identify the differences in evidence-based practice decisions amongst occupational therapy students and experienced clinicians. Using a vignette depicting an older client with a history of falls, participants' evidence-based practice decisions were compared to a reference model. In the initial steps of the process, knowledge of evidence-based practice concepts appeared to be dependent upon formal instruction, whereas expert-like behaviours in the integration of evidence for decision-making seemed to be a function of clinical experience. Academic and clinical educators can use identified gaps in knowledge and synthesis of concepts to update the evidence-based practice content in occupational therapy curricula and fieldwork.

  13. Effectiveness of Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy after Traumatic Brain Injury in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Hellweg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiotherapy and occupational therapy are frequently administered in intensive care units (ICUs after traumatic brain injury (TBI to promote recovery. The increasing economic pressure and the growing need for evidence of therapeutic effectiveness are reasons for reviewing the currently available scientific data. The databases of OTseeker, PEDro, Medline, and Cochrane were searched for studies on frequently applied therapeutic procedures in the ICU following a TBI. It becomes evident that the currently available data on physiotherapy and occupational therapy are very limited. Consequently, it is not possible to give conclusive recommendations within an evidence-based context. Studies of other neurological disorders indicate that early mobilisation positively influences outcome parameters such as the ability to walk. It can be concluded from three studies that physiotherapy for the prevention or treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia is not effective. The proof of effectiveness for other physiotherapeutic and occupational therapy interventions must still be demonstrated.

  14. Accommodating student learning styles and preferences in an online occupational therapy course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Nancy Wolcott; Jacobs, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Occupational therapy's online education must be research-based and inclusive. One way to provide a more inclusive online learning experience is to attend to individual learning styles and preferences. This study uses the best available evidence on learning styles and online education to develop, implement, and study occupational therapy students' experiences with an online learning module and related assignment. Eight students consented to take an online survey after completing a learning module and related assignment in an online post-professional graduate course in occupational therapy. The survey explored their learning experience and its applicability to clinical work. Data gathered from multiple-choice, Likert-scale, and open-ended questions were descriptively analyzed. Results from this study suggest that students find the study of learning styles and preferences enjoyable and applicable to their clinical work, but are often motivated by factors such as time and technology when selecting the format of a course assignment.

  15. Do occupational therapy and physical therapy curricula teach critical thinking skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Kimberly A; Geelhoed, Michael; Grice, Kimatha O; Murphy, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated whether critical thinking ability can be improved through participation in occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) curricula. The researchers compared levels of the critical thinking skills of OT and PT students at the beginning and end of their programs to determine whether changes occurred and to examine facets of the curricula that may have caused the differences. The curricula include teaching strategies of problem-based learning modules, small group discussion and problem-solving, case studies, clinical observation, and evidence-based practice assignments, as well as teaching about critical thinking as a process in itself. Fifty OT and PT students completed the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal at the beginning and end of 20 mos of the academic phase of their master's degree programs. Researchers analyzed the data using a one-way repeated-measures ANOVA. Results showed no differences between OT and PT students on the pretest or post-test and no differences for PT students between the pretest and post-test. OT students' scores increased significantly from pretest to post-test. The influence of the timing of teaching critical thinking skills in the resulting differences between the two curricula, as well as the validity of the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal is a valid measure of critical thinking changes in allied health students are discussed.

  16. Effects of rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention on the perceptions of organizational climate and occupational risk management practices among electronics technology employees in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuanya, Theresa Chinyere; Eseadi, Chiedu; Orji, Chibueze Tobias; Ede, Moses Onyemaechi; Ohanu, Ifeanyi Benedict; Bakare, Jimoh

    2017-05-01

    Improving employees' perception of organizational climate, and coaching them to remain steadfast when managing occupational risks associated with their job, might have an important effect on their psychosocial wellbeing and occupational health. This study examined the effects of a rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention program on the perceptions of organizational climate and occupational risk management practices. The participants were 77 electronics technology employees in the south-east of Nigeria. The study used a pretest-posttest control group design. The rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention program significantly improved perceptions of the organizational climate for the people in the treatment group compared to those in the waitlist control group at post-intervention and follow-up assessments. Occupational risk management practices of the employees in the treatment group were also significantly better than those in the waitlist control group at the same 2 assessments. Corporate application of a rational emotive behavior therapy as an occupational health therapy intervention program is essential for improving the perceptions of organizational climate and promoting the adoption of feasible occupational risk management strategies in the workplace.

  17. Occupational therapy with people with depression: using nominal group technique to collate clinician opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitch, Danielle; Taylor, Michelle; Pepin, Genevieve

    2015-05-01

    This aim of this study was to obtain a consensus from clinicians regarding occupational therapy for people with depression, for the assessments and practices they use that are not currently supported by research evidence directly related to functional performance. The study also aimed to discover how many of these assessments and practices were currently supported by research evidence. Following a previously reported systematic review of assessments and practices used in occupational therapy for people with depression, a modified nominal group technique was used to discover which assessments and practices occupational therapists currently utilize. Three online surveys gathered initial data on therapeutic options (survey 1), which were then ranked (survey 2) and re-ranked (survey 3) to gain the final consensus. Twelve therapists completed the first survey, whilst 10 clinicians completed both the second and third surveys. Only 30% of the assessments and practices identified by the clinicians were supported by research evidence. A consensus was obtained on a total of 35 other assessments and interventions. These included both occupational-therapy-specific and generic assessments and interventions. Principle conclusion. Very few of the assessments and interventions identified were supported by research evidence directly related to functional performance. While a large number of options were generated, the majority of these were not occupational therapy specific.

  18. Achieving intersubjective understanding: examples from an occupational therapy treatment session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepeau, E B

    1991-11-01

    Occupational therapists, like other health care professionals, must balance their application of treatment techniques with an understanding of their patients' life experiences. This paper reviews the literature from interpretive and medical sociology regarding the interplay between professional power and the achievement of an understanding of another person. It analyzes how an occupational therapist, during a single treatment session, enters into her patient's life-world and simultaneously controls and manages the treatment process. The concepts of knowledge schemata (the expectations and beliefs people bring to a situation) and footings (the shifts in alignment, or focus, that occur during interaction) are central to this analysis. The process of achieving a balance between professional power and an understanding of the patient's experience may be fostered in education and in clinical supervision through increased emphasis on the importance of understanding the values and beliefs of patients and on the development and refinement of interactive skills.

  19. Facilitating Participation of Students with Severe Disabilities: Aligning School-Based Occupational Therapy Practice with Best Practices in Severe Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Keli; Royeen, Charlotte

    2004-01-01

    School-based occupational therapy is the largest employer of occupational therapists. School-based occupational therapists work extensively with students with severe disabilities. Over the past decade, one significant change in the field of severe disabilities has been the advocacy of best practices. This paper discusses the implications of best…

  20. War, what is it good for? Historical contribution of the military and war to occupational therapy and hand therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakobina, Sheila Catherine; Yakobina, Stephanie Robin; Harrison-Weaver, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    War has negative connotations; nevertheless, this article aims to highlight some of the positive outcomes that have occurred in the fields of occupational therapy (OT) and hand therapy due to war and war-related injuries. From the military background of one of OT's founders, Thomas Kidner, to the valiant efforts of the reconstruction aides, to the origin of hand therapy during the Vietnam War, the military influence has been a powerful force in furthering our profession. This article reviews the unique history of war, the establishment and development of OT and hand therapy, and the contributions from military service members.

  1. Stavroula Leka & Robert R. Sinclair, Eds. 2014. Contemporary Occupational Health Psychology. Global perspectives on research and practice (Volumul 3. West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 264 p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICIA ALBULESCU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Stavroula Leka & Robert R. Sinclair, Eds. 2014. Contemporary Occupational Health Psychology. Global perspectives on research and practice (Volumul 3. West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell, 264 p.

  2. Managing work-related psychological complaints by general practitioners, in coordination with occupational physicians: A pilot Study - Developing and testing a guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, P.C.; Dijk, F.J.H. van; Evers, M.; Klink, J.J.L. van de; Anema, H.

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, workers have psychological work-related complaints, endangering their work ability and causing considerable economic losses. Many employees consult their general practitioner (GP). He, however, often pays insufficient attention to work-relatedness or to coordination with occupational p

  3. Instructing occupational therapy students in use of theory to guide practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikiugu, Moses N; Smallfield, Stacy

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of instructing students in occupational therapy practice models to facilitate their competence in applying theory in clinical practice. Course evaluation data were gathered and analyzed retrospectively. We found that perceived understanding of theory and its application improved significantly after instruction. The students' perceived competence in theory use predicted their level of confidence in their assessment and intervention skills. We concluded that emphasis on instruction of students in the use of occupational therapy practice models could be a viable method of improving practice through consistent use of theoretical guidelines in clinical reasoning.

  4. Special Issue on Occupational Therapy for Adults With Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Janet M

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the incidence and consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has increased in recent years, along with interest in knowing how best to treat this complex condition. This editorial provides an overview of the various factors that contribute to the complexity of TBI and introduces the six systematic reviews and one qualitative study included in this special issue of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy focusing on interventions for TBI from an occupational therapy perspective. Issues with the generation and interpretation of research evidence are discussed, along with the importance of valuing clinician expertise and client perspectives along with research findings in implementing evidence-based and evidence-informed practice.

  5. Knowledge dissemination in occupational therapy in Brazil: a portrait in its journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseli Esquerdo Lopes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We present and discuss the results of a survey that took as an object the papers published between 1990 and 2014, in the Cadernos de Terapia Ocupacional da UFSCar (Occupational Therapy UFSCar Journal and in the Revista de Terapia Ocupacional da USP (Occupational Therapy Journal of USP. Objectives: To characterize the production according to the publication year, authors, authors’ institutions, area and subarea, text category and the presence of the term “occupational therapy” or correlate in the title, abstract or keywords. A virtual database was created to systematize this production, which constitutes a considerable part of the Brazilian occupational therapists publications. Method: With the data gathering and organization regarding all the journals volumes in the period, were included in the study 881 texts, and this number has increased importantly, especially since 2006. Results: Over 60% of the texts are from the occupational therapy area, and two of its subareas were present with greater prominence: “mental health” and “fundamentals”. There were 254 authors’ institutions of origin enrolled, in which the Higher Education is more prevalent, notably public universities. We identified 1404 different authors, 85.8% were women, being the vast majority occupational therapists. In both journals, more than 80% of the authors published only one text, and few (between 5.3% and 3.2% published five or more. Conclusion: Such data regarding the academic institutionalization of Brazilian occupational therapy is worrisome, since the publications is a necessary condition, but not enough, for dialogue and academic construction.

  6. The value of pre-discharge occupational therapy home visits for patients who have had a stroke: p erceptions of patients, occupational therapists and experts

    OpenAIRE

    Fellows, Karen Rachael

    2014-01-01

    Pre-discharge occupational therapy home visits after stroke are routinely conducted during the discharge planning process. However, there is limited research evidence about the value of these visits for patients. The aims of this study were two fold. Firstly, to identify and report on the value of pre- discharge occupational therapy home visits for patients returning home after stroke. Secondly, to gain knowledge to inform the design of future research into home visits after stroke. M...

  7. Importance of Occupational Therapy for Stroke Patients (review)%作业疗法在脑卒中患者康复中的重要性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐胜林; 赵菁; 何龙文; 沈敏; 蔡娴颖

    2012-01-01

    作业疗法是康复医学的重要组成部分.脑卒中患者存在运动、感觉、吞咽、言语、视力、认知、心理和社会交往等方面的功能障碍.作业疗法在脑卒中患者的全程干预中有着积极重要的作用,可以帮助患者最大程度地提高生活质量.%Occupational therapy is an important part of rehabilitation medicine. There I? Movement, feel, swallowing, speech, vision, cognitive, psychological and social relations dysfunction in stroke patients. Occupational therapy play an important part in the whole process of intervention for stroke patients, and help them improve their quality of life.

  8. Effectiveness of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturkenboom, Ingrid H W M; Graff, Maud J; Borm, George F; Adang, Eddy M M; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Munneke, Marten

    2013-02-02

    Occupational therapists may have an added value in the care of patients with Parkinson's disease whose daily functioning is compromised, as well as for their immediate caregivers. Evidence for this added value is inconclusive due to a lack of rigorous studies. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the (cost) effectiveness of occupational therapy in improving daily functioning of patients with Parkinson's disease. A multicenter, assessor-blinded, two-armed randomized controlled clinical trial will be conducted, with evaluations at three and six months. One hundred ninety-two home-dwelling patients with Parkinson's disease and with an occupational therapy indication will be assigned to the experimental group or to the control group (2:1). Patients and their caregivers in the experimental group will receive ten weeks of home-based occupational therapy according to recent Dutch guidelines. The intervention will be delivered by occupational therapists who have been specifically trained to treat patients according to these guidelines. Participants in the control group will not receive occupational therapy during the study period. The primary outcome for the patient is self-perceived daily functioning at three months, assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Secondary patient-related outcomes include: objective performance of daily activities, self-perceived satisfaction with performance in daily activities, participation, impact of fatigue, proactive coping skills, health-related quality of life, overall quality of life, health-related costs, and effectiveness at six months. All outcomes at the caregiver level will be secondary and will include self-perceived burden of care, objective burden of care, proactive coping skills, overall quality of life, and care-related costs. Effectiveness will be evaluated using a covariance analysis of the difference in outcome at three months. An economic evaluation from a societal perspective will be conducted, as

  9. Introduction of Vertical Integration and Case-Based Learning in Anatomy for Undergraduate Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Suresh K.; Rathinam, Bertha A. D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present pilot study was to evaluate the benefits of innovative teaching methodologies introduced to final year occupational and physical therapy students in Christian Medical College in India. Students' satisfactions along the long-term retention of knowledge and clinical application of the respiratory anatomy have been…

  10. Introduction of Vertical Integration and Case-Based Learning in Anatomy for Undergraduate Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Suresh K.; Rathinam, Bertha A. D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present pilot study was to evaluate the benefits of innovative teaching methodologies introduced to final year occupational and physical therapy students in Christian Medical College in India. Students' satisfactions along the long-term retention of knowledge and clinical application of the respiratory anatomy have been…

  11. 42 CFR 440.110 - Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and services for individuals with speech, hearing, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... services for individuals with speech, hearing, and language disorders. 440.110 Section 440.110 Public..., occupational therapy, and services for individuals with speech, hearing, and language disorders. (a) Physical... by or under the direction of a qualified physical therapist. It includes any necessary supplies...

  12. STUDY REGARDING THE OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY INTERVENTION IN FREEDOM-DEPRIVED PERSONS' LEISURE TIME ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciocan Dana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The choice of the theme for this research was determined by the combination of two of my professional interests: occupational therapy, and physical education and sports. The aim and tasks of this paper are to identify and contribute to the introduction of occupational therapy in the freedom-deprived persons in penitentiaries, following their involvement in leisure time athletic activities. The study was conducted at the Bacau Penitentiary for minors and youths, over the course of three months, March-May, 2013, the group of subjects being composed of 18 minors. The initial hypothesis presumes that the use of the occupational therapy intervention in the minor freedom-deprived persons contributes to a more effective use of their leisure time performing activities that would give them satisfactions, improving their health and quality of life. The research consisted in applying an intervention with the help of several students, who over the course of three months assessed the freedom-deprived penitentiary minors, conceived an intervention plan for the leisure time athletic activities, and applied it. The results obtained after the initial assessment indicated the existence of certain occupational problems in the area of leisure time athletic activities, in the studied subjects. After the occupational therapy intervention, a questionnaire was applied to assess the effectiveness of the intervention. The development of the study and the interpretation of the results have lead to the following conclusions: One can say that the use of occupational therapy for the freedom-deprived minors lead to the improvement of their quality of life, thus confirming the initial hypothesis. The regular practice of athletic activities leads to a healthy life pattern and to structuring your leisure time through activities that have a positive effect, forming self-efficacy beliefs and competences, and have a direct relation with self-esteem, overshadowing the passive

  13. Work–family conflict as a mediator between occupational stress and psychological health among mental health nurses in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugawara N

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Norio Sugawara,1,2 Kazuma Danjo,3 Hanako Furukori,4 Yasushi Sato,2,5 Tetsu Tomita,2,6 Akira Fujii,7 Taku Nakagami,2,8 Kazuyo Kitaoka,9 Norio Yasui-Furukori2 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Translational Medical Center, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kodaira, Tokyo, 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, Hirosaki University School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Aomori, 3Mizoguchi Mental Hospital, Shizuoka, 4Department of Psychiatry, Kuroishi-Akebono Hospital, Kuroishi, 5Department of Psychiatry, Mutsu General Hospital, Mutsu, 6Department of Psychiatry, Hirosaki-Aiseikai Hospital, Kitazono, Hirosaki, 7Department of Psychiatry, Seihoku-Chuoh Hospital, Goshogawara, Aomori, 8Department of Psychiatry, Odate Municipal General Hospital, Odate, Akita, 9Mental Health Nursing, Institute of Medical, Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan Background: Occupational stress among mental health nurses may affect their psychological health, resulting in reduced performance. To provide high-quality, sustainable nursing care, it is necessary to identify and control the factors associated with psychological health among mental health nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of work–family conflict (WFC in the well-known relationship between occupational stress and psychological health among mental health nurses in Japan. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data were gathered from 180 mental health nurses who had a coresident child or were married. Data from the Work–Family Conflict Scale, the Generic Job Stress Questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression Scale were obtained via self-report questionnaires. The effects of occupational stress and WFC on psychological health were explored by hierarchical linear regression analysis. Results: The relationship between emotional exhaustion and occupational factors, including

  14. A CASE STUDY OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY APPLICATION IN A PATIENT WITH DEPRESSION AND HYPOACUSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Mihaela Ciucurel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We chose to present an exemplifying case-study of occupational therapy (OT application in an adult patient with depression and hypoacusis by using the narrative interview method. We started from the principle that in each OT case-study it is important to identify the patient’s previously life roles held and the activities that were fulfilled within these roles. As methodological tool, we applied the Person-Environment-Occupation Model (PEO in a 48 years old woman, with reactive depression (after her husband’s death and congenital hypoacusis. After identifying the occupational routine and life style of the client, we established as a valid aim of OT intervention the client’s return to an old hobby, the flowers photography, and we described the PEO factors that influence flower shooting performance. From a global perspective, client’s occupational performance was considered as satisfactory. Her abilities and independent functional status allow her to be engaged in different daily occupations that match with her environment. After completing the PEO transaction for flower shooting, we extracted the occupational needs of the client. This client centered case study is an example of good practice, which reveals the possibility of achieving a higher level of occupational performance and to increase self-esteem for individuals with depression.

  15. Stories of rediscovering agency: home-based occupational therapy for people with severe psychiatric disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindström, Maria; Sjöström, Stefan; Lindberg, Margareta

    2013-06-01

    As part of a larger study, we offered Everyday Life Rehabilitation (ELR) as a model for integrated occupational therapy in sheltered or supported housing facilities, to enable meaningful daily occupations for people with psychiatric disabilities. Our aim with this study was to understand how participants made sense of their occupational transformations in the context of their everyday life and life history. We carried out qualitative interviews and field observations with 16 participants with psychosis-related disorders. We used narrative analysis and disclosed stories of "rediscovering agency," referring to occupational and identity transformations. A parallel outcome study has shown positive results for participants, and by using narrative inquiry we contribute with a deeper understanding of the meaning making of their transformations and mechanisms of the intervention; i.e., hope, extended value of reaching goals, reentering the majority world, transparency of process, and attunement to the individual. The findings support the use of the ELR intervention.

  16. The effects of single and repeated psychiatric occupational therapy on psychiatric symptoms: assessment using a visual analogue scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hitomi; Terao, Takeshi; Mizokami, Yoshinori

    2012-04-01

    The main aims of psychiatric occupational therapy are to improve daily activity, to enhance communication with others and to reinforce social adaptation. Also, substantial improvements in psychiatric symptoms have been reported, but the effects on psychiatric symptoms are yet to be established. In the present study, we investigated the effects of single and repeated administrations of psychiatric occupational therapy on psychiatric symptoms and determined whether the effects can be predicted. Our subjects were 215 inpatients or outpatients at our university hospital who participated in psychiatric occupational therapy. Five psychiatric symptoms (i.e. depressive mood, tension, irritability, anxiety and fatigue) were subjectively measured just before and just after each psychiatric occupational therapy by using a visual analogue scale (VAS). As a result, there was a significant short-term effect from single psychiatric occupational therapy, but there was no significant further improvement of any psychiatric symptom from repeated psychiatric occupational therapy. The VAS value at the beginning stage significantly predicted improvement of each psychiatric symptom. These findings suggest that single psychiatric occupational therapy can bring about a short-term effect, whereas repeated psychiatric occupational therapy cannot induce long-term effect (accumulated effect) on psychiatric symptoms, and that the improvement can be predicted by baseline psychiatric symptoms.

  17. The effectiveness of occupational therapy in restoring the functional state of hands in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoliene, Jolita; Krisciūnas, Aleksandras

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of occupational therapy in rheumatoid arthritis patients with impaired hand function. Standardized Functional Independence Measure was employed in order to evaluate the functional status of the patients and impaired activities. A dynamometer was used for the measurements of muscular strength of hands and a goniometer, for the range of motion of the wrist. Totally, we have examined 120 rheumatoid arthritis patients. They were divided into two groups: 60 patients in each. Occupational therapy was applied only to the patients of the first group. The mean age of Group 1 patients was 53.4+/-1.8 years, the mean age of Group 2 patients was 52.0+/-1.9 years. The mean duration of the disease was 11.5+/-2.6 years and 12.1+/-2.4 years, respectively. The effectiveness of therapy was considered ineffective if, after the completion of the course of occupational therapy, no increase in Functional Independence Measure score for patients with rheumatoid arthritis was observed. When the score increased from 1 to 3, we considered this as moderate effectiveness; when the score increased to 4-6, we evaluated the effectiveness of occupational therapy as good, and when the score of 7 was attained, effectiveness of occupational therapy was considered as very good. In Group 1, the moderate effectiveness of occupational therapy was determined in 31.7% of patients; good effectiveness, in 61.7%; and very good effectiveness, in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In Group 2, the moderate effectiveness of treatment was determined in 48.3% of patients and good effectiveness, in 5% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. CONCLUSIONS. Hand function (the strength of fingers and hands, the range of motion of the wrist) significantly improved in patients with rheumatoid arthritis after completion of a course of occupational therapy (p<0.05). The improvement of hand functions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis led to increased ability to take food

  18. Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy Interventions for Musculoskeletal Shoulder Conditions: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Shawn C.

    2017-01-01

    People with musculoskeletal disorders of the shoulder commonly experience pain, decreased strength, and restricted range of motion (ROM) that limit participation in meaningful occupational activities. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the current evidence for interventions within the occupational therapy scope of practice that address pain reduction and increase participation in functional activities. Seventy-six studies were reviewed for this study—67 of Level I evidence, 7 of Level II evidence, and 2 of Level III evidence. Strong evidence was found that ROM, strengthening exercises, and joint mobilizations can improve function and decrease pain. The evidence to support physical modalities is moderate to mixed, depending on the shoulder disorder. Occupational therapy practitioners can use this evidence to guide daily clinical decision making. PMID:28027039

  19. Occupational Therapy and the use of assistive technology as therapeutic resource in arthrogryposis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Cristina Rocha da Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present the intervention of occupational therapy through the use of Assistive Technology resources in a case of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC. It is a descriptive case study with qualitative research. We made use of two instruments: the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI was used for standardized assessment, while the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF was used for classification. We observed improvement of functional abilities comparing the first and second assessments after occupational therapy intervention through the use of Assistive Technology. Improvement was noted mainly in the continuous PEDI score, which compares the patient with himself/herself. Regarding the ICF, case evolution was observed in the component ‘Activities and Participation and Environmental Factors’ evaluated from the clinical history. The occupational therapist uses Assistive Technology as a therapeutic resource in rehabilitative care not only as a single resource, but also as a constituent element of clinical reasoning

  20. Occupational therapy and the journal citation reports: 10-year performance trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguin, Jess Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document performance of occupational therapy journals on the metrics of the Journal Citation Reports (JCR), the annually appearing index used as a yardstick to assess the quality of scholarly publications. Outcomes for the field's two indexed journals, the American Journal of Occupational Therapy and OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, were assessed over a 10-year period (1996-2005) to determine their overall standing and patterns of change on each of the JCR's five metrics. The mean category ranking for the two journals was generally above the 50th percentile. However, they performed least adequately and evidenced a downward trend over time on the most widely used metric (the journal impact factor). Possible reasons underlying this latter result are explored, pressing implications of the overall findings for practice and research are discussed, and strategic steps toward ethically safeguarding the profession's viability are offered.

  1. Occupational therapy students' attitudes towards inclusion education in Australia, United Kingdom, United States and Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Keli; Brown, Ted; Peyton, Claudia G; Rodger, Sylvia; Huang, Yan-Hua; Wu, Chin-Yu; Watson, Callie; Stagnitti, Karen; Hutton, Eve; Casey, Jackie; Hong, Chia Swee

    2010-03-01

    This international, cross-cultural study investigated the attitudes of occupational therapy students from Australia, United Kingdom, United States and Taiwan towards inclusive education for students with disabilities. The possible impact of professional education on students' attitudes was also explored. A total of 485 students from 11 entry-level occupational therapy education programmes from Australia, the United Kingdom, the United States and Taiwan participated in the study. Among them, 264 were freshmen (first-year students) and 221 were seniors (final-year students). Data collected from a custom-designed questionnaire were analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. In general, the occupational therapy students reported having positive attitudes towards inclusion. Considerable differences, however, existed among the student groups from the four countries. Professional education appeared to have a significant impact on students' attitudes towards inclusion from first year to senior year. Although students were in favour of inclusion, they also cautioned that their support for inclusive practices depended on various factors such as adequate preparation, support and assistance to students with disabilities. Limitations of the study included the small, convenience sample and different degree structures of the participating programmes. Future research studies need to compare occupational therapy students' attitudes with students from other health care professions. A longitudinal study on the impact of the professional education programme on students' attitudes towards inclusive education is warranted.

  2. Faculty perceptions of occupational therapy program directors' leadership styles and outcomes of leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Jeff; Shachar, Mickey

    2008-01-01

    This research study investigated the relationship between faculty perceptions of occupational therapy program directors' leadership styles and outcomes of leadership and the effects of moderating demographic and institutional characteristics. Data for this study were collected utilizing the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire Form 5X and the self-designed Demographic and Institution Questionnaire. The study working sample included 184 graduate occupational therapy faculty members from 98 (65%) of all accredited academic occupational therapy programs in the United States for the 2005-06 academic year. Major findings from the study indicate that, in general, transformational leadership had a significant (p leadership outcomes whereas transactional leadership had a significant (p leadership attribute (although belonging to the transactional leadership construct) was found to be a positive predictor of leadership outcomes. Demographic and institutional characteristics did not have a significant (p > 0.01) influence on perceived leadership styles and leadership outcomes. The results of this research show that the most effective occupational therapy leaders in academia have been found to be those who adopt and utilize a full range of leadership styles that combine both transformational and transactional contingent reward leadership styles and suggest common effectiveness for other allied health fields.

  3. Impact of cultural contact on intercultural competency of occupational therapy students and international graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Sandra J; Miller, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    This study examined changes in cultural perceptions and communication of 47 occupational therapy students and 39 international graduate students following 5 peer teaching activities. The peer-teaching activities were designed on the premise that positive contact between people of equal status improves intercultural competency, and included social exchanges, interviews, feedback on practice teaching, and role-playing. Changes in intercultural competency were measured with pre- and post administration of the Cross Cultural Adaptability Inventory (CCAI), as well as questionnaires and journals. Significant positive change between pre- and post-test scores on the CCAI (p<.0002) was found for the 86 participants. When stratified into 3 subgroups (international students and occupational therapy students with and without international travel experience), changes were more pronounced. Occupational therapy students with international travel experience benefited the most from the peer-teaching activities (p<.002) and international graduate students benefited as well (p<.009). Occupational therapy students without international travel experienced no significant change. The findings indicate that peer teaching activities significantly impacted cross-cultural communication for students with prior international travel experience and confirm the importance of contextual learning.

  4. Approaches to learning among occupational therapy undergraduate students: A cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Fong, Kenneth N K; Bonsaksen, Tore; Lan, Tan Hwei; Murdolo, Yuki; Gonzalez, Pablo Cruz; Beng, Lim Hua

    2017-07-01

    Students may adopt various approaches to academic learning. Occupational therapy students' approaches to study and the impact of cultural context have not been formally investigated to date. To examine the approaches to study adopted by undergraduate occupational therapy students from four different cultural settings. 712 undergraduate occupational therapy students (n = 376 from Australia, n = 109 from Hong Kong, n = 160 from Norway and n = 67 from Singapore) completed the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST). A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to compare the ASSIST subscales for the students from the four countries. Post-hoc comparisons using the Tukey HSD test indicated that the mean scores for the strategic approach were significantly different between Australia and the other three countries. The mean scores for the surface approach were significantly different between Australia and Hong Kong, and Hong Kong and Norway. There were no significant differences between the deep approach to studying between Australia, Norway, Singapore and Hong Kong. Culture and educational context do appear to impact the approaches to study adopted by undergraduate occupational therapy students. Academic and practice educators need to be cognizant of what approaches to studying the students they work with adopt.

  5. Quality of local authority occupational therapy services: developing an instrument to measure the user's perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calnan, S.; Sixma, H.J.; Calnan, M.W.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2000-01-01

    The aims of this paper are threefold: (1) to describe the development of an instrument measuring quality of care from the specific perspective of the users of local authority occupational therapy services; (2) to present the results from a survey of users' views about the quality of services offered

  6. Promoting the Role of Occupational Therapy in School-Based Collaboration: Outcome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This evidence-based project provided a professional development opportunity for educators to enhance the awareness of school-based occupational therapy and promote a collaborative approach when supporting student participation in daily learning tasks. Through asynchronous web-based delivery, participants viewed five narrated PowerPoint…

  7. Experiences of occupational therapy students in the first fieldwork education: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Mehdi; Rassafiani, Mehdi; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fieldwork education is a core part of all occupational therapy curriculums around the world to enable the students meet minimum competencies required for their professional life. Student experience is a valuable source to explore the nature of fieldwork training and plan more efficient curriculums in the future. This study aimed to explore the students' experiences in the first fieldwork education. Methods: Data were collected through a focus group and series of semi-structured interviews with 16 occupational therapy students who had passed the first semester of fieldwork education at three occupational therapy departments in Iran. The interviews were transcribed line by line and analyzed according to inductive content analysis. Results: Following the analysis of the data, three main themes were identified including the importance of supervisors’ management, deficits in the current curriculum and challenges in the educational environment. Each theme included different categories to show students’ concerns and challenges in the first fieldwork education experience and their suggestions for more efficient trainings. Conclusion: The research argues that several combined key factors determine the nature and utility of occupational therapy (OT) fieldwork experiences of the students. However, further studies are needed to clarify the experiences of the supervisors, department managers and others involved in the fieldwork education. PMID:25664311

  8. The Flexible Learning Needs and Preferences of Regional Occupational Therapy Students In Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldenryk, Lynne; Bradey, Scott

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the flexible learning needs and preferences of occupational therapy students from a regional Australian university. Participants ("n"?=?170) were surveyed using a quantitative survey tool. Findings were analysed using SPSS to determine significant differences between variable attributes of the student cohort.…

  9. Ingredients and change processes in occupational therapy for children: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Samantha; Swallow, Veronica; Kolehmainen, Niina

    2017-05-01

    There is limited evidence about the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions for participation outcomes in children with coordination difficulties. Developing theory about the interventions, i.e. their ingredients and change processes, is the first step to advance the evidence base. To develop theory about the key ingredients of occupational therapy interventions for children with coordination difficulties and the processes through which change in participation might happen. Grounded theory methodology, as described by Kathy Charmaz, was used to develop the theory. Children and parents participated in semi-structured interviews to share their experiences of occupational therapy and processes of change. Data collection and analysis were completed concurrently using constant comparison methods. Five key ingredients of interventions were described: performing activities and tasks; achieving; carer support; helping and supporting the child; and labelling. Ingredients related to participation by changing children's mastery experience, increasing capability beliefs and sense of control. Parents' knowledge, skills, positive emotions, sense of empowerment and capability beliefs also related to children's participation. The results identify intervention ingredients and change pathways within occupational therapy to increase participation. It is unclear how explicitly and often therapists consider and make use of these ingredients and pathway.

  10. Instructional Strategies Used to Improve Students' Comfort and Skill in Addressing the Occupational Therapy Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht-Sabres, Lisa Jean; Egan, Brad E.; Wallingford, Minetta S.; Kovic, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an intentional blending of instructional strategies in an occupational therapy (OT) entry-level master's course. The OT Adult Practice course uses case-based instructional strategies, clinical skills labs, and standardized patient experiences in a dovetailed approach across three…

  11. Enabling Meaningful Learning through Web-Based Instruction with Occupational Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Cynthia; Weston, Cynthia; Gisel, Erika

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the design of a Web-based tutorial for Activity Analysis offered within an undergraduate course of occupational therapy and how its design features influenced meaningful learning from the students' perspective. This tutorial, using a case-based format, offers a learner-directed approach to students and the application of…

  12. A Systems Approach to Understanding Occupational Therapy Service Negotiations in a Preschool Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Fern; Kramer, Paula; Ravitch, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a systems approach to examine informal communications, meaning those occurring outside of scheduled meetings, among stakeholders in a preschool early intervention program. This investigation expands the discussion of how occupational therapy treatment decisions are made in educational settings by using a…

  13. The Use of Blended Learning to Facilitate Critical Thinking in Entry Level Occupational Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Eva L.

    2009-01-01

    The popularity of using online instruction (both in blended and complete distance learning) in higher education settings is increasing (Appana, 2008; Newton, 2006; Oh, 2006). Occupational therapy educators are using blended learning methods under the assumption that this learning platform will facilitate in their students the required level of…

  14. The impact of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease: a randomized controlled feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturkenboom, I.H.W.M.; Graff, M.J.L.; Borm, G.F.; Veenhuizen, Y.; Bloem, B.R.; Munneke, M.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial including process and potential impact of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease. DESIGN: Process and outcome were quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated in an exploratory multicentre, two-armed randomized controlled trial at

  15. Analyzing Reasons for Non-Adoption of Distance Delivery Formats in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergen, Theresa; Roblyer, M. D.

    2013-01-01

    Though distance education formats could help address an urgent need for growth in the occupational therapy assistant (OTA) workforce, distance methods are not as accepted in these programs as they are in other professional and clinical programs. This study investigated whether beliefs and levels of experience of OTA program directors shaped their…

  16. Designing and implementing a physiology course for a new doctoral occupational therapy program with student feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Barbara E; Ikiugu, Moses N

    2017-09-01

    Recently, the Occupational Therapy Department requested a custom-designed medical physiology course for the students in the new occupational therapy doctoral program. The first author, a physiologist with extensive experience in teaching both undergraduate preprofessional and medical students in human physiology, was recruited to design and implement the course. The course was designed to be consistent with the constructivist philosophy that guides the occupational therapy curriculum. The course was offered for the first time during fall/spring 2015/2016 and included both first- and second-year occupational therapy doctoral students. A number of anonymous assessment tools were used to evaluate students' perceptions regarding the effectiveness of various pedagogies used in the course in enhancing their learning. A summative course assessment survey with comments was used at the end of the course. This paper describes the model of course design and the student feedback, which generated some suggestions for improvement of the course. This approach in designing a new course for a new disciplinary group of students should be helpful to other faculty involved in developing courses for health career programs populated by students with variable physiology backgrounds and different educational needs. The final relevant feedback from the course would be to have the students evaluate the usefulness of the course to their future careers immediately following their certification examinations in a year or two and during their subsequent clinical experiences; however, that information will likely be more difficult to obtain. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. The History of Occupational Therapy Assistants in Canada: A Comparison with the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Penny

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of the occupational therapy assistant field in Canada and the United States shows rapid growth and development in the latter of formal training, standards, accreditation, regulation, and certification. Canada, in contrast, has no national standards, accreditation, or certification and appears to have resisted professionalization.…

  18. Evidence of the efficacy of occupational therapy in different conditions: an overview of systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Leemrijse, C.J.; Ende, van den C.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the research evidence available from systematic reviews of the efficacy of occupational therapy (OT) for practitioners, researchers, purchasing organizations and policy-makers. DATA SOURCE: The search for systematic reviews was conducted in PubMed and the Cochrane Library (Oc

  19. Evidence of the efficacy for occupational therapy in different conditions: an overview of systematic reviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Leemrijse, C.J.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the research evidence available from systematic reviews of the efficacy of occupational therapy (OT) for practitioners, researchers, purchasing organizations and policy-makers. DATA SOURCE: The search for systematic reviews was conducted in PubMed and the Cochrane Library (Oc

  20. Promoting the Role of Occupational Therapy in School-Based Collaboration: Outcome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This evidence-based project provided a professional development opportunity for educators to enhance the awareness of school-based occupational therapy and promote a collaborative approach when supporting student participation in daily learning tasks. Through asynchronous web-based delivery, participants viewed five narrated PowerPoint…

  1. Bridging Identity "Chasms": Occupational Therapy Academics' Reflections on the Journey towards Scholarship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortune, Tracy; Ennals, Priscilla; Bhopti, Anoo; Neilson, Cheryl; Darzins, Susan; Bruce, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The performative context of higher education demands that practice-oriented academics shift their priorities from preparing practitioners for the profession, towards "productive" scholarship. We present narratives from occupational therapy academics at the end of a year-long journey through an action research project focussed on academic…

  2. The Use of Blended Learning to Facilitate Critical Thinking in Entry Level Occupational Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Eva L.

    2009-01-01

    The popularity of using online instruction (both in blended and complete distance learning) in higher education settings is increasing (Appana, 2008; Newton, 2006; Oh, 2006). Occupational therapy educators are using blended learning methods under the assumption that this learning platform will facilitate in their students the required level of…

  3. Waiting list management practices for home-care occupational therapy in the province of Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Marie-Hélène; Demers, Louise; Feldman, Debbie E

    2016-03-01

    Referral prioritisation is commonly used in home-based occupational therapy to minimise the negative impacts of waiting, but this practice is not standardised. This may lead to inequities in access to care, especially for clients considered as low priority, who tend to bear the brunt of lengthy waiting lists. This cross-sectional study aimed to describe waiting list management practices targeting low-priority clients in home-based occupational therapy in the province of Quebec, Canada, and to investigate the association between these practices and the length of the waiting list. A structured telephone interview was conducted in 2012-2013 with the person who manages the occupational therapy waiting list in 55 home care programmes across Quebec. Questions pertained to strategies aimed at servicing low-priority clients, the date of the oldest referral and the number of clients waiting. Results were analysed using descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests. The median wait time for the oldest referral was 18 months (range: 2-108 months). A variety of strategies were used to service low-priority clients. Programmes that used no strategies to service low-priority clients (n = 16) had longer wait times (P occupational therapy programmes. However, in programmes where none of these strategies are used, low-priority clients may be denied access to services indefinitely.

  4. Enabling Meaningful Learning through Web-Based Instruction with Occupational Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Cynthia; Weston, Cynthia; Gisel, Erika

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the design of a Web-based tutorial for Activity Analysis offered within an undergraduate course of occupational therapy and how its design features influenced meaningful learning from the students' perspective. This tutorial, using a case-based format, offers a learner-directed approach to students and the application of…

  5. Quality of local authority occupational therapy services: developing an instrument to measure the user's perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calnan, S.; Sixma, H.J.; Calnan, M.W.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2000-01-01

    The aims of this paper are threefold: (1) to describe the development of an instrument measuring quality of care from the specific perspective of the users of local authority occupational therapy services; (2) to present the results from a survey of users' views about the quality of services offered

  6. The Flexible Learning Needs and Preferences of Regional Occupational Therapy Students In Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldenryk, Lynne; Bradey, Scott

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the flexible learning needs and preferences of occupational therapy students from a regional Australian university. Participants ("n"?=?170) were surveyed using a quantitative survey tool. Findings were analysed using SPSS to determine significant differences between variable attributes of the student cohort. The survey…

  7. Analyzing Reasons for Non-Adoption of Distance Delivery Formats in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergen, Theresa; Roblyer, M. D.

    2013-01-01

    Though distance education formats could help address an urgent need for growth in the occupational therapy assistant (OTA) workforce, distance methods are not as accepted in these programs as they are in other professional and clinical programs. This study investigated whether beliefs and levels of experience of OTA program directors shaped their…

  8. Working in the Methodological "Outfield": The Case of Bourdieu and Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jo; Grenfell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The article reports on a study of methodological innovation involving occupational therapy (OT) students in higher education (HE). It is based on an original project which examined the experiences and outcomes of non-traditional entrants to pre-registration OT education. A feature of the original project was the application of the epistemological…

  9. A Systems Approach to Understanding Occupational Therapy Service Negotiations in a Preschool Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Fern; Kramer, Paula; Ravitch, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a systems approach to examine informal communications, meaning those occurring outside of scheduled meetings, among stakeholders in a preschool early intervention program. This investigation expands the discussion of how occupational therapy treatment decisions are made in educational settings by using a…

  10. Respiratory Care/Inhalation Therapy Occupations: Task Analysis Data. UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Thomas E.; Goldsmith, Katherine L.

    This study's objectives were to explore and analyze task interrelationships among department personnel; determine what specific tasks are currently performed in inhalation therapy/respiratory care departments; propose a series of appropriate tasks for occupational titles; and report future plans of the AHPP in the area of study. Contents include…

  11. User involvement in measuring service quality of local authority occupational therapy services: a new approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sixma, H.J.; Calnan, S.; Calnan, M.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this paper is two-fold: (i) to describe the development of a new measuring instrument for quality of care from the perspective of the users of local authority Occupational Therapy (OT) services, and (ii) to evaluate the potential of the new instrument as a standardized approach for the

  12. Exploring the Effectiveness of a Virtual Learning Methodology in Occupational Therapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebeau, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative, randomly controlled study sought to find relationships between occupational therapy students' participation in a virtual situated-case scenario (VSCS) and enhanced perceived self-efficacy as well as academic performance when compared to participation in a text-based case study. To determine effects of participation in a virtual…

  13. An Exploratory Study of the Professional Beliefs and Practice Choices of Novice Occupational Therapy Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Deborah Ann

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this basic interpretive qualitative study was to explore how novice occupational therapy assistants begin to understand their profession, form practice beliefs, and subsequently select and initiate certain treatment methods and approaches with clients. The primary source of data for this study was obtained via semi-structured…

  14. Development of a Questionnaire To Examine Confidence of Occupational Therapy Students during Fieldwork Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derdall, Michele; Olson, Peggy; Janzen, Wonita; Warren, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    An instrument to measure occupational therapy students' self-confidence during field work was tested with 70 Canadian students. Results demonstrates that confidence increases during placement and grows higher in later placements. Student characteristics and placement settings had no significant effect on confidence. (SK)

  15. An Occupational Therapy Work Skills Assessment for Individuals with Head Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Irene; Higham, Julie; McLean, Alison M.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an occupational therapy skills assessment protocol developed and used to evaluate physical, cognitive, and behavioral abilities for persons seeking to return to work following head injuries. It measures them within the framework of productivity, interpersonal skills, and safety. (Contains 48 references.) (Author/JOW)

  16. Working in the Methodological "Outfield": The Case of Bourdieu and Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jo; Grenfell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The article reports on a study of methodological innovation involving occupational therapy (OT) students in higher education (HE). It is based on an original project which examined the experiences and outcomes of non-traditional entrants to pre-registration OT education. A feature of the original project was the application of the epistemological…

  17. Multicultural training in the United States: a survey of occupational therapy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Elena Verdine Donoso; Muñoz, Jaime Phillip; Powell, Janet M

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was designed to describe multicultural training practices in occupational therapy programs. A survey was sent to occupational therapy programs in the United States to gather information on multicultural content, skills, and teaching methods as well as diversity context and challenges. The response rate was 54%. The most frequently covered multicultural content was related to cultural background and sociopolitical factors. Multicultural skills covered most often were practice oriented and interpersonal skills. Teaching methods reported as used most often differed from the methods thought by the respondents to be most effective. Programs reported multiple challenges to multicultural training including lack of time and lack of diversity in the student body, faculty, and environment. Results suggest that educators may need to expand multicultural content and skills to prepare occupational therapy students for providing care in increasingly diverse practice settings. In addition, increased use of teaching methods that focus on exposure to diverse populations and reflection may be needed to improve the effectiveness of multicultural training in occupational therapy programs.

  18. Program Evaluations of Occupational Therapy Level II Fieldwork Environments: A Naturalistic Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Susan K.

    1989-01-01

    Three occupational therapy fieldwork environments--mental health, adult physical disabilities, and pediatrics--were evaluated with the naturalistic inquiry methodology. Students and supervisors described and compared ideal clinical education environments with actual fieldwork environments. Different priorities emerged in the three environments,…

  19. Evidence of the efficacy of occupational therapy in different conditions: an overview of systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Leemrijse, C.J.; Ende, van den C.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the research evidence available from systematic reviews of the efficacy of occupational therapy (OT) for practitioners, researchers, purchasing organizations and policy-makers. DATA SOURCE: The search for systematic reviews was conducted in PubMed and the Cochrane Library

  20. The Role of Reusable Learning Objects in Occupational Therapy Entry-Level Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan M. Gee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Out of early research, Cisco Systems (1999 have built an impressive foundation that advocates for reusable learning objects (RLOs. As the need for online methods for delivering both formal and informal educational content has increased, the prospect of greater influence through carefully constructed RLOs has grown. RLOs are any digital resource that can be used and reused to enhance online learning. RLOs typically are small, discrete, self-contained digital objects that may be sequenced, combined, and used within a variety of instructional activities. RLOs have been implemented in nursing, pharmacy, and physician assistant programs. However, there is a lack of literature regarding RLOs in occupational therapy education. An attitudinal survey was administered to occupational therapy students after they had used an RLO focused on goal writing. Student preferences toward RLO content, instructional design, and eLearning were generally positive. Nearly three-quarters of the students who responded to the survey indicated that the RLO presented was beneficial. All respondents noted that they would use the RLO for future occupational therapy courses. It is argued that incorporating RLOs offers a cost-effective, efficient learning tool, and also adds credibility to the given curriculum program as being innovative with instructing occupational-therapy related concepts.

  1. Creating healthier workplaces: The American Psychological Association/National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health cooperative agreement. Introduction and historical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, J C; Camara, W J; Johnson, J V; Sauter, S L; Hurrell, J J; Piotrkowski, C S; Spielberger, C D

    1997-01-01

    This article introduces the special section on the American Psychological Association/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (APA/NIOSH) collaboration. The section includes an overview statement of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health research by Linda Rosenstock and 5 competitively peer-reviewed articles submitted to the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology following their presentation in an earlier form at the 3rd APA/NIOSH conference in September 1995. This article provides a brief history of the APA/NIOSH collaboration forged at the turn of this decade.

  2. Functional assessment in mental health: lessons from occupational therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Joan C.; Holm, Margo B.

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapists have been conducting functional assessments since World War I, and this accumulated experience has taught us several critical lessons. First, a comprehensive profile of a patient's functioning requires multiple assessment methods. Second, assessment content and measurement constructs must change with the times. Third, technology can enhance and extend functional assessment. Fourth, performance-based assessments of everyday activities can also be used to measure body functions/impairments. However, while deconstructing activities into body functions/impairments is possible, the results do not reflect patients' abilities to integrate the cognitive, motor, sensory and affective functions necessary to complete a complex activity. Finally, the differential complexity of everyday activities that a patient can master or successfully complete can also provide a ruler with which to measure progress. PMID:27489454

  3. Conceptualizing Autoethnography as Assemblage: Accounts of Occupational Therapy Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Denshire PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on theoretical work within ethnography and poststructuralism, this article discusses a conceptualization of autoethnography as assemblage. The concept of assemblage includes but goes beyond the literal bringing together of a range of heterogeneous elements in different modalities to offer different perspectives on a phenomenon. It challenges and displaces boundaries between the individual and the social through a focus on practice, which offers a new ontology of the social. These ideas are illustrated through excerpts from an autoethnographic study of an occupational therapist working with young people in a Sydney children's hospital in the mid-1980s. The article makes visible a material, relational, and affective landscape of remembered practice. Through successive displacements of the self as the primary site of experience and meaning, we seek to contribute new understandings about the potential for autoethnography to engage with professional practice as a space of multiplicity.

  4. Functional assessment in mental health: lessons from occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Joan C; Holm, Margo B

    2016-06-01

    Occupational therapists have been conducting functional assessments since World War I, and this accumulated experience has taught us several critical lessons. First, a comprehensive profile of a patient's functioning requires multiple assessment methods. Second, assessment content and measurement constructs must change with the times. Third, technology can enhance and extend functional assessment. Fourth, performance-based assessments of everyday activities can also be used to measure body functions/impairments. However, while deconstructing activities into body functions/impairments is possible, the results do not reflect patients' abilities to integrate the cognitive, motor, sensory and affective functions necessary to complete a complex activity. Finally, the differential complexity of everyday activities that a patient can master or successfully complete can also provide a ruler with which to measure progress.

  5. Personnel and human resource management in the occupational therapy curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, L S

    1988-01-01

    Personnel and human resource management has emerged as a dynamic, vital, and important component of the management of any organization. Persons involved in management at all levels are responsible for organizing, directing, motivating, coordinating, and controlling the people under them in the organizational hierarchy. Health care professionals are almost always in a position requiring them to supervise some aspect of human resources. Graduates of the health professions often find themselves unprepared to meet the rigors of human resource management and are not cognizant of the body of information available to assist them in becoming proficient managers. This article outlines the development of a graduate course in human resource management for occupational therapists. The course was designed to recognize the unique background, experience and needs the health care professional brings to management while offering the student a strong base of information appropriate to the discipline of human resource management.

  6. Systematic review study on the use of the concept of daily life in the field of occupational therapy in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Simões Matsukura

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the concept of daily life has increased in the field of occupational therapy, with studies referring to daily life as a tool that is both theoretic-conceptual and practical, providing support for both research and care. In this study, we aimed to identify and systematize the knowledge production about the daily life concept in occupational therapy in Brazil. A systematic review of the Brazilian literature of the past ten years on the concept of daily life in occupational therapy was used as our methodological approach. Twelve articles were selected to compose this research. The concept of daily life as considered in studies of occupational therapists, is established in the relationship between what is singular to the individual and what is collective and social. This concept defines a theoretical position in occupational therapy, departing from a medical and positivist interpretation of health care, giving attention to the subjectivity of individuals, their day-to-day activities and their social inclusion. The concept of daily life was also used in the reflection about how illnesses change people’s daily lives, to support the description and analysis of the daily lives of the studied subjects and to discuss the concept of daily life in occupational therapy practice. There is a wide range of possibilities for the use of the concept of daily life in the research and practice of occupational therapy. The present study shows that this concept adds to the basis of contemporary occupational therapy knowledge produced in Brazil.

  7. Economic evaluation of occupational therapy in Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturkenboom, Ingrid H W M; Hendriks, Jan C M; Graff, Maud J L; Adang, Eddy M M; Munneke, Marten; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2015-07-01

    A large randomized clinical trial (the Occupational Therapy in Parkinson's Disease [OTiP] study) recently demonstrated that home-based occupational therapy improves perceived performance in daily activities of people with Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of the current study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of this intervention. We performed an economic evaluation over a 6-month period for both arms of the OTiP study. Participants were 191 community-dwelling PD patients and 180 primary caregivers. The intervention group (n = 124 patients) received 10 weeks of home-based occupational therapy; the control group (n = 67 patients) received usual care (no occupational therapy). Costs were assessed from a societal perspective including healthcare use, absence from work, informal care, and intervention costs. Health utilities were evaluated using EuroQol-5d. We estimated cost differences and cost utility using linear mixed models and presented the net monetary benefit at different values for willingness to pay per quality-adjusted life-year gained. In our primary analysis, we excluded informal care hours because of substantial missing data for this item. The estimated mean total costs for the intervention group compared with controls were €125 lower for patients, €29 lower for caregivers, and €122 higher for patient-caregiver pairs (differences not significant). At a value of €40,000 per quality-adjusted life-year gained (reported threshold for PD), the net monetary benefit of the intervention per patient was €305 (P = 0.74), per caregiver €866 (P = 0.01) and per patient-caregiver pair €845 (P = 0.24). In conclusion, occupational therapy did not significantly impact on total costs compared with usual care. Positive cost-effectiveness of the intervention was only significant for caregivers. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. Information literacy skills of occupational therapy graduates: a survey of learning outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Carol A.; Case-Smith, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to assess whether recent graduates of the Ohio State University's Occupational Therapy division are applying information-seeking skills they learned as undergraduates, and to seek their advice on ways to improve information-literacy instruction for current and future occupational therapy students. Method: A survey was sent to a sample of graduates from 1995–2000. The results were entered into an SPSS database, and descriptive and inferential results were calculated to determine the information-seeking patterns of these recent graduates. Results: A majority of the occupational therapy graduates who responded to the survey prefer to use information resources that are readily available to them, such as advice from their colleagues or supervisors (79%) and the Internet (69%), rather than the evidence available in the journal literature. Twenty-six percent (26%) of the graduates have searched MEDLINE or CINAHL at least once since they graduated. Formal library instruction sessions were considered useful by 42% of the graduates, and 22% of the graduates found informal contacts with librarians to be useful. Conclusions: Librarians and occupational therapy faculty must intensify their efforts to convey the importance of applying research information to patient care and inform students of ways to access this information after they graduate. In addition to teaching searching skills for MEDLINE and CINAHL, they must provide instruction on how to assess the quality of information they find on the Internet. Other findings suggest that occupational therapy practitioners need access to information systems in the clinical setting that synthesize the research in a way that is readily applicable to patient-care issues. PMID:14566378

  9. Why Has So Little Progress Been Made in the Practice of Occupational Therapy in Relation to Sexuality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Grath, Margaret; Sakellariou, Dikaios

    2016-01-01

    Despite recognition of the rights of disabled people to sexuality, occupational therapists continue to not address sexuality in practice. This failure can be understood as a consequence of social discourses relating to sexuality and disability and a professional discourse that values certain occupations over others. Given the importance of sexuality to the human experience and the evidence of the link between the opportunity for sexual expression and well-being, occupational therapists need to change their practice in relation to sexuality and disability. One method of achieving this change may be to adopt a rights-based approach to sexuality and disability. This article presents the possibilities offered by such an approach, discusses implications for occupational therapy practitioners, and proposes suggestions for future actions to ensure that the rights of disabled people to sexuality are embedded in occupational therapy practice. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  10. Pragmatist Epistemology and Jane Addams: Fundamental Concepts for the Social Paradigm of Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Rodolfo

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to contribute to the education of future occupational therapists within the current paradigm of the profession. To this purpose, some of the conceptual foundations of pragmatist epistemology and philosophical contributions of the philosopher Jane Addams are presented. Some pragmatist fundamentals such as the holistic vision of the human being, the paradox of separating "knowing from doing", and giving the usefulness of the activity and knowledge primacy in the process of human development, inspired the profession of Occupational Therapy in the United States at the beginning of the twentieth century. Today, almost 100 years after the founding of the National Society for the Promotion of Occupational Therapy, pragmatism is still relevant to the profession. Specifically, its pertinence is related to the current scenario of the profession, and its powerful development in working scopes related to socio-community fields. This helps identify how we are on the verge of another paradigm, known as Social Paradigm of the Occupation. This new social understanding of the discipline allows us to understand the relevance of professional work in community or social contexts. Future research could address how the pragmatism contributes to the understanding of occupation as a social phenomenon within this new paradigm. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Occupational therapy research on assistive technology and physical environmental issues: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Synneve Dahlin; Iwarsson, Susanne; Sonn, Ulla

    2006-04-01

    To determine future directions for research in the area of assistive technology and physical environmental issues, it is important to have an understanding of prior research. This literature review examined how assistive technology and physical environmental issues have been studied in the research published in international peer-reviewed occupational therapy journals. Five recent volumes of nine journals were manually searched utilizing specific criteria. The publications were classified according to their perspective, application of the Person-Environment-Occupation (PEO) model, and the research design. Both research fields demonstrated use of different research methods and they displayed equal needs with regard to improved research methodologies. There are a lack of studies involving all three PEO components indicating a lack of research in occupational performance issues. Further research on occupational performance is important for developing occupational therapy practice in the area of assistive technology and physical environmental issues. Furthermore, study designs reflecting the societal level in all three PEO components are required. Finally, there is a strong need for conceptual and theoretical development in both fields.

  12. Role Performance and Role Valuation Among Occupational Therapy Students in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore Bonsaksen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Model of Human Occupation describes roles as providing the person with a framework around which to organize daily occupations. Role performance and role valuation in young adults may be related to gender, but there are few research studies to date to support this view. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional design using a sample of 87 occupational therapy students in Norway. We used the Role Checklist to assess the students’ performance and valuation of roles, and a variety of statistical procedures were employed in the analysis. Results: Compared to the female participants, males performed roles in the community, social, and civic life area of participation more frequently. Otherwise, male and female participants were largely equal in current role performance. For most roles, we found associations between role performance and high valuation of the respective roles. Discussion: Gender appears to be a factor of relevance for our understanding of role performance. This study suggests that occupational therapists should consider the societal as well as the personal aspects of roles. In addition, occupational therapy interventions could aim toward improving congruence between the roles clients perform and the value these roles have for them

  13. Occupational Therapy and the amazon riverside child victim of scalping by motor boat shaft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Dayse Braga Santos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Although scalping is a recurrentaccident innorthern Brazil, there are still few studies on the subject. The aim of the present work was to report the occupational therapy procedure on the minimization of the occupational performance impairment of two riverside children that were victims of scalping by unprotected motor boat shaft, through the evaluation of occupational performance and exposure of the intervention performed. This is a case study with two scalped riverside girls hospitalized between April and June, 2013. The application of evaluation protocols verified changes in the areas of occupational performance, where activities of daily living (ADL such as dependence for bathing and ambulationare inserted; changesin the performance context, verified in the anxiety to be discharged from hospital; and changesin the performance component, with decreased self-esteem because of the change on their self-image. Reassessment after intervention showed improvement in the performance of ADL and self-image perceptionof both patients. Thereby it is believed that the development of the research allowed the contact with a theme that is so typical in the Braziliannorth region, stressing the importance of Occupational Therapy assistance, providing greater independence in the performance of ADL that are meaningful to each child.

  14. Efficacy of occupational therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturkenboom, Ingrid H W M; Graff, Maud J L; Hendriks, Jan C M; Veenhuizen, Yvonne; Munneke, Marten; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W

    2014-06-01

    There is insufficient evidence to support use of occupational therapy interventions for patients with Parkinson's disease. We aimed to assess the efficacy of occupational therapy in improving daily activities of patients with Parkinson's disease. We did a multicentre, assessor-masked, randomised controlled clinical trial in ten hospitals in nine Dutch regional networks of specialised health-care professionals (ParkinsonNet), with assessment at 3 months and 6 months. Patients with Parkinson's disease with self-reported difficulties in daily activities were included, along with their primary caregivers. Patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to the intervention or control group by a computer-generated minimisation algorithm. The intervention consisted of 10 weeks of home-based occupational therapy according to national practice guidelines; control individuals received usual care with no occupational therapy. The primary outcome was self-perceived performance in daily activities at 3 months, assessed with the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (score 1-10). Data were analysed using linear mixed models for repeated measures (intention-to-treat principle). Assessors monitored safety by asking patients about any unusual health events during the preceding 3 months. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01336127. Between April 14, 2011, and Nov 2, 2012, 191 patients were randomly assigned to the intervention group (n=124) or the control group (n=67). 117 (94%) of 124 patients in the intervention group and 63 (94%) of 67 in the control group had a participating caregiver. At baseline, the median score on the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure was 4·3 (IQR 3·5-5·0) in the intervention group and 4·4 (3·8-5·0) in the control group. At 3 months, these scores were 5·8 (5·0-6·4) and 4·6 (4·6-6·6), respectively. The adjusted mean difference in score between groups at 3 months was in favour of the intervention group (1·2; 95% CI 0·8-1·6

  15. Ethical and moral dilemmas in the treatment of an abusive parent--the occupational therapy perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luboshitsky, D; Weil, F

    1993-01-01

    Treating patients who physically abuse their children creates in the therapist moral and ethical dilemmas which challenge his or her ability to maintain a professional conduct and attitude. In such cases the therapist usually finds himself or herself confronted with the following dilemmas: (a) treatment of a patient who experiences therapy as a no-choice situation; (b) treatment of a patient whose conduct is in conflict with the moral values of the therapist; (c) the obligation of the therapist to report the abusive acts to the authorities versus his or her duty to protect the patient's right to confidentiality; and (d) the therapist's loyalty to the patient's welfare, when it is in conflict with the abused person's welfare. These issues are illustrated through the following case study examined in the context of occupational therapy (OT): A 26-year-old married woman, mother to a four-month-old infant was referred to therapy after causing severe burns to her daughter's hands. As a child the patient experienced physical abuse by her parents. The patient viewed treatment as her only possible means of keeping her child. On the other hand, she was suspicious of verbal therapy, as she assumed that the contents might incriminate her. Occupational therapy was therefore a major therapeutic modality used to assess and improve her disturbed psychosocial occupational performances. The article describes the way in which the OT approach helped overcome and resolve the moral and ethical dilemmas raised in the case.

  16. Randomized controlled trial of occupational therapy in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchain Patrícia Cardoso

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: It is well established that the combination of psychopharmacological treatment and psychosocial interventions, such as psychotherapy, family orientation and occupational therapy (OT, represent the best strategy for treating patients with schizophrenia. However, in terms of treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS almost only psychopharmacological treatments are available and psychosocial interventions such as OT had not proved to be effective. The aim of this study is to investigate if OT is effective when added to a psychopharmacological treatment in TRS. METHODS: Two groups of patients with TRS were compared: The experimental group (EG received psychopharmacological treatment with clozapine plus sessions of occupational therapy (OT and the control group (CG received only clozapine. The Scale for Interactive Observation in Occupational Therapy (EOITO was employed to evaluate the outcome. The duration of the study was 6 months and patients were rated at baseline and monthly totaling 7 assessments. EOITO was independently applied by two occupational therapists with high reliability rates (Kappa=0.90, p=0.001. Repeated measures of analyses of variance and the evaluation of the standardized effect sizes were used for statistical analyses. RESULTS: The EG showed that the OT intervention was effective along the whole period of observation, mainly from the 4th month to the end of the study. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with TRS the combination of OT and clozapine showed to be more effective than the use of clozapine alone. OT may represent an additional therapeutic option for patients with TRS.

  17. Occupational Therapy and Sexual and Reproductive Health Promotion in Adolescence: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontijo, Daniela Tavares; de Sena e Vasconcelos, Anna Carolina; Monteiro, Rosana Juliet Silva; Facundes, Vera Lúcia Dutra; Trajano, Maria de Fátima Cordeiro; de Lima, Luciane Soares

    2016-03-01

    Occupational therapy can contribute to sexual and reproductive health through health education. The purpose of this study was to describe an occupational therapy intervention aimed at sexual and reproductive health promotion in adolescents. Fifty-eight adolescents were involved in the study, before, during and after the interventions. Educative activities such as puzzles, storytelling, mime and board games were used, which occupational therapy faculty and students had constructed. The games were employed as mediators for gaining knowledge in sexual and reproductive health. Outcome was measured using a questionnaire, audio recordings and field diaries. The data were analysed by descriptive statistics and thematic content analysis. The results showed the adolescents' increased knowledge of sexual and reproductive health information immediately after the intervention. The thematic analysis was grouped into three categories: the adolescents' initial expectations regarding the project, reflections on the process experienced during the interventions and use of educational games by occupational therapists. The importance of rapport and dialogue was highlighted in the construction of interventions based on participatory methods. The absence of a longitudinal follow-up is a limitation in this study. Further research is important to systematically assess sexual health promotion strategies in adolescence. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Occupational Therapy Predischarge Home Visits in Acute Hospital Care: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson, Lindy; Lannin, Natasha A; Wales, Kylie; Salkeld, Glenn; Rubenstein, Laurence; Gitlin, Laura; Barris, Sarah; Mackenzie, Lynette; Cameron, Ian D

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether an enhanced occupational therapy discharge planning intervention that involved pre- and postdischarge home visits, goal setting, and follow-up (the HOME program) would be superior to a usual care intervention in which an occupational therapy in-hospital consultation for planning and supporting discharge to home is provided to individuals receiving acute care. Randomized controlled trial. Acute and medical wards. Individuals aged 70 and older (N = 400). Primary outcomes: activities daily living (ADLs; Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living) and participation in life roles and activities (Late Life Disability Index (LLDI)). Occupational therapist recommendations differed significantly between groups (P occupational therapy recommendations as the in-hospital only consultation, which had a greater emphasis on equipment provision, but HOME did not demonstrate greater benefit in global measures of ADLs or participation in life tasks than in-hospital consultation alone. It is not recommended that home visits be conducted routinely as part of discharge planning for acutely hospitalized medical patients. Further work should develop guidelines for quality in-hospital consultation. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Occupational therapy students' technological skills: Are 'generation Y' ready for 21st century practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Caroline; Ryan, Susan; Smith, Derek R; Warren-Forward, Helen; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Lapkin, Samuel

    2016-12-01

    Technology is becoming increasingly integral to the practice of occupational therapists and part of the everyday lives of clients. 'Generation Y' are purported to be naturally technologically skilled as they have grown up in the digital age. The aim of this study was to explore one cohort of 'Generation Y' occupational therapy students' skills and confidence in the use of technologies relevant to contemporary practice. A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from a cohort of 274 students enrolled in an Australian undergraduate occupational therapy programme. A total of 173 (63%) students returned the survey. Those born prior to 1982 were removed from the data. This left 155 (56%) 'Generation Y' participants. Not all participants reported to be skilled in everyday technologies although most reported to be skilled in word, Internet and mobile technologies. Many reported a lack of skills in Web 2.0 (collaboration and sharing) technologies, creating and using media and gaming, as well as a lack of confidence in technologies relevant to practice, including assistive technology, specialist devices, specialist software and gaming. Overall, the results suggested that this group of 'Generation Y' students were not universally skilled in all areas of technology relevant to practice but appear to be skilled in technologies they use regularly. Recommendations are therefore made with view to integrating social networking, gaming, media sharing and assistive technology into undergraduate programmes to ensure that graduates have the requisite skills and confidence required for current and future practice. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  20. [The concept of Mental Health from the perspective of Occupational Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneri, Sara María; Pérez, Laura Raquel

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this text is to share the way we think and organize information in order to build our perspective of Mental Health from Occupational Therapy on the basis of our academic instruction. We use the word "building" because we understand this as a dynamic, flexible, and ever changing process in which the Occupational Therapist implement diverse verbal and material resources according to the moment in the Health-Disease process. We hope that this revision will offer a specific view of the meaning of "doing" from the Occupational Therapy perspective; process that implies different stages in a permanent reflection between theory and praxis. The main purpose is that persons, groups or communities reach the best opportunities of autonomy and quality of life. We will cover notions about risk and psychosocial dysfunction in articulation with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) followed by the paradigm that have transformed our clinical practice in every level in which Occupational Therapy intervenes. We do not pretend to arrive to conclusions but to question certain ideas that we have inherited from other health-disciplines like: chronic/acute; adapted/mis-adapted; disqualified/ rehabilitated, and that have influenced our profession.

  1. Territory and diversity: paths of Occupational Therapy in art and culture experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Dias de Castro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a view of territorial actions marked by social movements related to the de-institutionalization of insanity and the development of rights of physically-and mentally handicapped people, which configures a new field of occupational therapy practices oriented towards the complex demands of assisted population and targeted on increasing sociocultural participation. Those are actions and strategies, implemented by the participants of the Laboratory of Studies and Research Art, Body and Occupational Therapy of the University of São Paulo, which are articulated with the public policies of mental health, humanization and culture set up in in Brazil as of 2000. They involve teaching, research and extension; contribute to the quality of services offered to the community and strengthen the assistance and social participation networks. The main follow up and interventions assessment methods are related to qualitative research, development of an intensive reflection in that seek to build up local knowledge of occupational therapy guided by creative actions and by crossed clinical, artistic and cultural references. The projects implemented have broaden the access of the population assisted to artistic and cultural experiments in the territory, they have contributed to the construction of life policies enabling ways of participation, of living together and subjectivity producing. Thus, sociocultural technologies are configured in agreement with the importance of strengthening and supporting new proposals for populations expropriated from their life networks, supported by significant intervention of occupational therapists.

  2. Seeing white: a critical exploration of occupational therapy with Indigenous Australian people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Alison

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to critique current occupational therapy practice and theory using Indigenous Australian people as a case example. Critical race theory will be used to help question the privileged position of an occupational therapist from a dominant Westernized culture. In-depth interviews were conducted with 15 (eight female and seven male) Indigenous Australian young people about their perspectives of health and physical activity. In addition, the Kawa model was used as an alternative data-collection tool and detailed field notes and researcher reflections were used as data sources. Preliminary analysis of data is used to illustrate the ways in which critical race theory can inform occupational therapy practitioners and researchers about the ways Indigenous Australian young people view their health. Methodological dilemmas are also discussed. The paper is based on preliminary findings and further analysis needs to continue. Cross-cultural research is inherently complex but can offer those from the dominant culture valuable insights into their taken-for-granted assumptions. Further use of critical race theory may prove useful as the occupational therapy profession continues to evolve its understanding of cultural safety.

  3. The Kawa model: the power of culturally responsive occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwama, Michael K; Thomson, Nicole A; Macdonald, Rona M

    2009-01-01

    The Kawa (Japanese for river) model, developed by Japanese and Canadian rehabilitation professionals, presents an important and novel alternative to contemporary 'Western' models of rehabilitation. Rather than focussing primarily on the individual client, the Kawa model focusses on 'contexts' that shape and influence the realities and challenges of peoples' dayto-day lives. The first substantial model of rehabilitation practice developed outside of the West illuminates the transactional quality of human-environment dynamics and the importance of inter-relations of self and others through the metaphor of a river's flow. The model's reflection of Eastern thought and views of nature presents a useful point of comparison to familiar rational and mechanical explanations of occupation and well-being. In this article, the rationale for an alternative model in rehabilitation is presented, followed by an explanation of the structure and concepts of the Kawa model. Implications for culturally responsive practice as well as the model's significance to the advancement of culturally safe rehabilitation worldwide are discussed.

  4. Studies on effect of psychological intervention combination with music therapy on nursing for abdominal MRI scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-xia SUN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effectiveness and significance of the Psychological intervention combined with music therapy in abdominal MRI examination. Methods: 230 cases who underwent abdominal MRI examination between 2010 January and 2012 December were collected. They were divided into three groups randomly: routine nursing group, Psychological intervention group and music therapy group. Differences in age, gender, educational level, blood pressure and heart rate were compared between the three groups; To analyze the changes of vital signs after MRI examination, MRI examination results , psychological reaction before and after MRI examination of the three groups. Results: (1There was no significant difference in the general information (P>0.05; (2The heart rate, respiration and blood pressure after MRI examination of patients with routine nursing increased significantly than the other two groups. And psychological nursing group was higher than the music therapy group to some extent;The MRI detection time of routine nursing group was significantly longer than the other two groups (P <0.05; (3The one-time completion rate of the last two groups was significantly higher than the routine nursing  group (P <0.05, and music therapy group was significantly higher than that of the psychological intervention group.The adverse psychological reaction in Psychological intervention group was significantly decreased compared with routine nursing group; and music therapy group decreased significantly compared with the psychological  intervention  group (P <0.05; (4Although the anxiety / depression score of psychological  intervention  group increased slightly ,but it significantly lower than the usual care group (P <0.05; The anxiety / depression scores of music therapy group were significantly decreased, significantly lower than the other two groups (P <0.05. Conclusion: Psychological nursing combined with music therapy is a good way to eliminate the

  5. Teaching ill-structured problem solving using occupational therapy practice epistemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Anita Witt

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epistemic and ontological cognition (EOC) have to do with an individual's beliefs about knowledge and knowing. Research has shown that EOC have an influence on learning and achievement. EOC may be discipline-specific with a profession being defined by its practice epistemology. If an individual's EOC is inconsistent with the profession's practice epistemology, the student or practitioner may struggle with effectively solving ill-structured occupational performance problems. The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of the constructs of EOC, to describe its importance to occupational therapy education and practice, and to provide recommendations for educators and researchers. Specific examples are detailed and recommendations for future research are proposed.

  6. Transformation of paper-based occupational therapy assessment forms to a digital format

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Marie Bangsgaard; Lunn, Tine Bieber Kirkegaard; Helle, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Background The growing digitalization process serves to modernize the health care systems, to improve documentation and the efficiency of the public sector. Consequently, the adoption of digitalization at large is critical for the development of occupational therapy (OT). Yet, most OT assessment......, was employed to identify the users’ requests concerning the function of the app, afterwards, an iterative process between usability tests and improving the app followed. 2.Testing: Seven occupational therapists utilized the app in five clinical housing cases each (N=35 cases). Usability data was collected...

  7. Occupational therapists as dog handlers: the collective experience with animal-assisted therapy in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fike, Lorie; Najera, Cecilia; Dougherty, David

    2012-01-01

    The first pair of US Army animal-assisted therapy (AAT) dogs deployed to Iraq in December 2007 with the 85th Medical Detachment Combat and Operational Stress Control unit. As of this writing, 6 dogs have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, offering Soldiers a small reminder of home. Army occupational therapists led the way in this endeavor as primary handlers; the path has been rocky but ultimately rewarding. This article depicts how occupational therapists used AAT and animal-assisted activities to help Soldiers cope with the stressors of living in a deployed environment. Challenges and lessons-learned, including anecdotal examples, are discussed.

  8. The development of occupational therapy in St. Finan???s Psychiatric Hospital, Killarney, Co. Kerry (1932-1939)

    OpenAIRE

    Lane, Niamh

    2014-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed This study developed from a larger research project in the Clinical Therapies Department in the University of Limerick. The research project aims to document the Irish history of occupational therapy. In this study the researcher focused on the development of occupational therapy in St.Finan???s Psychiatric Hospital. The closure of St.Finan???s Psychiatric Hospital in 2012 and the release of its documentation to Kerry library archives provided this study with primary sour...

  9. Social participation: redesign of education, research, and practice in occupational therapy*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piškur, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    There is growing attention to participation and social participation in literature and policy reports. Occupational therapists strongly believe that creating coherence between the person's occupations and environment will facilitate participation of each individual. Nowadays, societal developments such as "health literacy and self-management", "Web 2.0 social media", "empowering communities", and "Nothing About Us Without Us" increase opportunities for people to interact on different levels of social participation. Social participation can be used as an outcome, though it can also be seen as a means to change society and to develop solutions for barriers experienced by people with chronic diseases or disabilities. Societal developments will have an impact on social participation in terms of supporting each other and contributing to society. Additionally, these changes will have a major influence on the way we educate, conduct research, and deliver occupational therapy practice.

  10. The Process for the Formulation of the International Telehealth Position Statement for Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    JACOBS, KAREN; CASON, JANA; MCCULLOUGH, ANN

    2015-01-01

    The World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) consists of 84 member organizations representing over 420,000 occupational therapists internationally (WFOT, 2014). In 2014, WFOT published the WFOT Telehealth Position Statement on the use of telehealth in occupational therapy. The process for the formulation of the official document involved reviewing WFOT member organizations’ telehealth position statements and data collected from a survey sent to member organizations’ delegates in April 2014. Qualitative data from 39 countries yielded factors to consider in five key areas: licensure/registration requirements, the cost of technology, privacy and security, reimbursement/payment models, and other issues (e.g., need for collaboration/transfer of knowledge, client selection, provider competencies, standard of care). The WFOT Telehealth Position Statement addressed each of these areas. The collaborative effort resulting in the development of the WFOT Telehealth Position Statement serves as a model for other international organizations. PMID:27563380

  11. Measuring psychological change during cognitive behaviour therapy in primary care: a Polish study using 'PSYCHLOPS' (Psychological Outcome Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Czachowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psychological outcome measures are evolving into measures that depict progress over time. Interval measurement during therapy has not previously been reported for a patient-generated measure in primary care. We aimed to determine the sensitivity to change throughout therapy, using 'PSYCHLOPS' (Psychological Outcome Profiles, and to determine if new problems appearing during therapy diminish overall improvement. METHODS: Responses to PSYCHLOPS, pre-, during- and post-therapy were compared. SETTING: patients offered brief cognitive behaviour therapy in primary care in Poland. RESULTS: 238 patients completed the pre-therapy questionnaire, 194 (81.5% the during-therapy questionnaire and 142 the post-therapy questionnaire (59.7%. For those completing all three questionnaires (n = 135, improvement in total scores produced an overall Effect Size of 3.1 (2.7 to 3.4. We estimated change using three methods for dealing with missing values. Single and multiple imputation did not significantly change the Effect Size; 'Last Value Carried Forward', the most conservative method, produced an overall Effect Size of 2.3 (1.9 to 2.6. New problems during therapy were reported by 81 patients (60.0%: new problem and original problem scores were of similar magnitude and change scores were not significantly different when compared to patients who did not report new problems. CONCLUSION: A large proportion of outcome data is lost when outcome measures depend upon completed end of therapy questionnaires. The use of a during-therapy measure increases data capture. Missing data still produce difficulties in interpreting overall effect sizes for change. We found no evidence that new problems appearing during therapy hampered overall recovery.

  12. Effectiveness of a positive psychology intervention combined with cognitive behavioral therapy in university students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosario Josefa Marrero; Mónica Carballeira; Sabrina Martín; Miriam Mejías

    2016-01-01

      The aim of this study was to design and implement a positive intervention combined with cognitive-behavioral therapy to enhance subjective and psychological well-being and other positive functioning...

  13. Play Therapy Training among School Psychology, Social Work, and School Counseling Graduate Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascarella, Christina Bechle

    2012-01-01

    This study examined play therapy training across the nation among school psychology, social work, and school counseling graduate training programs. It also compared current training to previous training among school psychology and school counseling programs. A random sample of trainers was selected from lists of graduate programs provided by…

  14. Exploring the role of occupational therapy in caring for cancer survivors in Australia: A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Nicole; Mackenzie, Lynette

    2017-05-16

    With increasing rates of cancer survival in Australia, more people are living with long-term side effects of cancer and its treatment, and cancer survivorship is now considered a distinct phase of cancer care. While occupational therapists play an integral role in multidisciplinary care for people with chronic conditions, there is little evidence documenting the occupational therapy role for people living with chronic cancer-related conditions. This study aimed to explore the views of Australian occupational therapists about current practice and what constitutes best practice for cancer survivors. A cross-sectional online survey was developed and distributed via emailed invitations to the Occupational Therapy Australia membership to collect responses from occupational therapists in a range of locations and practice settings around Australia. A total of 204 completed surveys were returned (response rate of 4%). More than 70% (n = 143) of respondents worked with people with cancer at least sometimes and most worked in acute (13.8%, n = 28) or community (11.2%, n = 23) settings. Participants rated equipment provision as the most common intervention (94%, n = 192), followed by energy conservation (91%, n = 185) and pressure care (78%, n = 160). Lack of funding for occupational therapy positions and a lack of recognition of the role of occupational therapy by health professionals and consumers were identified as key barriers to survivorship care. Research is needed to provide evidence supporting the role and practice of occupational therapy with cancer survivors. Collaborative work with multidisciplinary teams is needed to develop long-term routine treatment pathways that include occupational therapy interventions. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  15. Evaluation of a Prison Occupational Therapy Informal Education Program: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Jeffrey L; Ohm, David; Wall, Jarrod M; Ray, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    This pilot study explored the strengths and weaknesses of an informal education program and identified elements of the program valued by participants. Participants were men living in a minimum security prison who had been incarcerated for ten or more years. The outside researcher was joined by three former program participants as co-researchers. Together, they interviewed 27 residents who completed the informal education program. Interviews were transcribed and de-identified. Researchers used the summative content analysis approach to analyze the data. Initial content analysis yielded five concepts: doing (engaging in purposeful activities); information (program handouts and discussions that included data and descriptions of all of the topics discussed); re-entry fears (socialization; making amends with victims and/or reuniting with family and friends); technology (includes, but not limited to, using smartphones, internet and other technology in all areas of occupation); and self-worth as a person. Further interpretation per the summative content analysis method yielded three themes: doing (engaged in purposeful activities), validation of self-worth (confirmation of being a valued human being in spite of having committed a serious crime) and concerns about the future (being able to successfully engage in virtually all occupations). Whilst informal education programs may help people who are incarcerated gain information, gain a sense of self-worth and allay some reentry fears, understanding the long-term affect such programs may have such as preparing them for successful re-entry to society or reducing recidivism rates, will require long-term follow-up. Regardless of the occupational therapy intervention, the practice of occupational therapy in the criminal justice system needs to be client-centred. Because of the small number of participants and limited access to participants, one should not generalize the findings of this study to other situations or populations

  16. Occupational Therapy and workers’ health: an overview of the bibliographic production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Magalhães Nunes Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Occupational therapy has presented an increasing growth in the health and occupational field, with interventions in rehabilitation, prevention, promotion and surveillance in occupational health. Objective: The study aimed to analyze occupational therapy scientific publications in the period from 2000 to 2013, based on the level of evidence. Method: A bibliographical research on the production of papers from the two main journals in the field of occupational therapy in Brazil was developed: Revista de Terapia Ocupacional from USP and Cadernos de Terapia Ocupacional from UFSCar, using as key words, in Portuguese, corresponding to “workers’ health”, “ergonomics”, “work accidents”, “worker”, “RSI (Repetitive Strain Injuries”, “professional rehabilitation”, and “people with disabilities”. Results: The data were grouped and organized as: (a production by types of work analyzed according to the level of evidence; (b production by years of publications; and (c publication in accordance with the object of study. The sample consisted of 30 papers, with 90% (n=27 with level of evidence six, 34% (n=10 of publications between the years 2011 to 2012 and regarding the first author affiliation, 90% (n=27 was affiliated to the educational institution. On the object of study 27% was RSI, 23% (n=7 was ergonomics, 17% (n=50 was mental health and work and 13% (n=40 people with disabilities. Conclusion: It was concluded that publications included in this research point to a predominance of publishing approach. The failure to find other studies showed the need for further research based on different methodological approaches

  17. The Scope of Practice of Occupational Therapy in U.S. Criminal Justice Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Jaime P; Moreton, Emily M; Sitterly, Audra M

    2016-09-01

    In the past 40 years, prison populations in the U.S. have nearly quadrupled while funding for rehabilitation, education and other programmes has been cut. Despite accounting for a small fraction of the world's population more than 20% of the worlds incarcerated population is in the U.S. and the rate of recidivism remains alarmingly high. Occupational therapists have the capability to play a significant role in addressing the needs of persons within the criminal justice system. However, the profession has been slow to delineate of the role occupational therapy within criminal justice settings. This study sought to provide a descriptive analysis of current occupational therapy roles and practices within the U.S. criminal justice system. Using survey research methods, the researchers collected data from respondents (N = 45; Response Rate + 51.7%) to establish a baseline of the scope of practices employed by occupational therapists working in the U.S. criminal justice system. U.S. practitioners work within institutional and community based criminal justice settings. Primary practice models, assessments and group interventions were catalogued. Respondents strongly valued the creation of networking to build the professions' presence within criminal justice settings. Occupational therapy in the criminal justice system remains an emerging practice arena. Understanding the current scope of practice in the U.S. and creating a mechanism for collaboration may help increase the depth, breadth and overall growth of the profession's role in these settings. The sampling method does not guarantee a representative sample of the population and is limited to practice within the United States. Survey design may not have allowed for respondents to fully describe their practice experiences. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Resources and technologies in Social Occupational Therapy: actions with the poor youth in town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseli Esquerdo Lopesa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The METUIA team from the Occupational Therapy Department of the Federal University of Sao Carlos – UFSCar has been elaborating procedures and resources, which have produced contributions to the action of occupational therapy based on a local and communal dimension, aiming at a locally rooted technical contribution and directed to face the challenges of the social field. The territory notion adopted presupposes historical, economic, social and cultural dimensions that contextualize a given geographical area where the therapeutic and occupational action is developed. We have been dealing with questions related to the poor urban youth and working in the production of social technologies (understood as products, techniques or replicable methodologies developed in interaction with the community, and that represent alternatives for social transformation, which have been able to foster new possibilities of action, integrating and articulating actions of macro and micro social scope. This article presents discussions on Workshops of Dynamics, Activities and Projects; Individual and Territorial Follow-up; Articulation of Resources in the Social Field; and Dynamization of the Social Care Network. We support a continuous and critical reflection on the labor process, assuming the technical, ethical and political dimensions that comprise the professional qualification of occupational therapists. We also advocate that the practical and conceptual existence of these technologies promotes actions associated with the social question of the lives of these young individuals, seeking the expansion of equality, recognition of differences, and their space in the public sphere, so that more participation can be produced with more freedom, autonomy and solidarity.

  19. The conception of disability under discussion: the point of view of Occupational Therapy professors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Ramos Baleotti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The way one conceives disabled people seems to influence the actions directed toward them. Occupational therapists constitute a part of health professionals that direct their actions based on a comprehensive view of disability. The aim of this study was to identify and analyze the conception of disability from the standpoint of occupational therapists. Fifteen university teachers of Occupational Therapy undergraduate courses participated in this study: seven from public universities and eight from private institutions, located in mid-sized municipalities in the state of São Paulo. The data were collected by means of a scale denominated “Escala de Avaliação da Concepção de Deficiência” (Rating Scale for Conception of Disability. The results show that the subjects tend to follow interactional, social conceptions of disability. This study yields contributions to understand the conception of disability held by teachers of Occupational Therapy. This conception certainly guides their teaching performance and affects the training of future professionals.

  20. Occupational therapy practice community: process evaluation by the participants and researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Maria Galheigo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a participatory action research with occupational therapists in a community of practice which purpose was to discuss the care production provided by occupational therapy to hospitalized children and adolescents. The participants were nine occupational therapists from hospitals of the city of São Paulo. Ten face-to-face meetings were conducted and a Web-mediated environment was created for conducting virtual activities. The face meetings were recorded and tapped. This article aims to present the evaluation made by the participants and researchers about the process experienced in the community. Through content analysis, seventeen reporting units were identified and grouped into four main themes: the dialogic process; theoretical and practical implications; reflective process; participatory process and its barriers. The process evaluation showed that dialogue during the meetings contributed to a sense of belonging, integration, and awareness/group cohesion and made possible discussing and reflecting on topics relevant to the practice of occupational therapist. Direct communication proved to be the main form of exchange among the professionals in the group. The participants working conditions, the computers and virtual environments access issues, the surplus work generated by meetings and the displacement in urban centers were complicating factors for the participant’s greater adhesion. Evaluation showed that this strategy favored the construction of shared knowledge, and its implementation can foster reflection, research development and knowledge production, as well as contribute to the occupational therapist professional practice improvement.