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Sample records for psychological assessment procedures

  1. The psychological mindedness assessment procedure - Validation study of a Dutch version

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.M. Smith (Annemarie J.); W.Chr. Kleijn (Wim); R.W. Trijsburg (Wim); R.W. Segaar (Robert); C. van der Staak; G.J.M. Hutschemaekers (Giel J.)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractObjective. The Psychological Mindedness Assessment Procedure [PMAP; McCallum, M. & Piper, W. E. (1990)] operationalizes psychological mindedness as a participant's understanding of the problem presented by two videotaped enacted patients. To possibly enhance predictive power for

  2. Cognitive procedures in sports psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Rojšek

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Sport with its emphasised efficiency component clearly reflects cognitive contents and the way they are linked to experience and behaviour. Beliefs, subjective judgements, attitudes, etc. define the attitude to sport, training, competition and results. Their contents can be defined by a psychological examination. We assess their meaning, appropriateness or inappropriateness. They can also be changed by using diverse cognitive-behavioural or reeducative procedures. Psychological work is carried out through systematic psychological preparation, crisis interventions and special psychological preparation within the framework of a training process. Cognitive forms of work represent a significant part of ideomotor, verbal, intellectual and situational training.

  3. Cognitive procedures in sports psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Janez Rojšek

    2002-01-01

    Sport with its emphasised efficiency component clearly reflects cognitive contents and the way they are linked to experience and behaviour. Beliefs, subjective judgements, attitudes, etc. define the attitude to sport, training, competition and results. Their contents can be defined by a psychological examination. We assess their meaning, appropriateness or inappropriateness. They can also be changed by using diverse cognitive-behavioural or reeducative procedures. Psychological work is carrie...

  4. Assessment of the standard forensic procedure for the evaluation of psychological injury in intimate-partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariña, Francisca; Arce, Ramón; Vilariño, Manuel; Novo, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    In judicial terms, a victim refers to any person who has suffered injury arising from an action or omission of an action that constitutes an offence, and the burden of proof lies with the prosecution. A review of Spanish judicial judgements underscored that the lack of evidence of psychological injury in cases of intimate-partner violence (IPV) accounted for approximately 40% of acquittals. Thus, the Spanish standard of proof for the forensic evaluation of psychological injury i.e., the MMPI-2 and the unstructured interview were assessed in order to determine if they met the statutory requirement for the assessment of psychological injury and the differential diagnosis of feigning. The results of the comparison of 51 women victims of IPV with firm convictions against their aggressors, and 54 women mock victims of IPV showed that the F, K, Fb, Fp and Ds scales, and the F-K index discriminated significantly and with medium and large effect sizes, between adjudicated and mock victims. However, the results did not provide a valid decision criterion for forensic settings i.e., false negatives (identifying feigner as honest protocols) were not classified correctly. In conclusion, the standard forensic procedure for the evaluation of psychological injury in cases of IPV did not constitute valid proof for judges who acquitted defendants on the grounds of not proven due to the lack of evidence of psychological injury.

  5. Perspectives on Computerized Psychological Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, James N.

    1985-01-01

    Psychological assessment, a subspecialty of psychology has served as one of the earliest proving grounds of automated technology. This Special Series highlights some of the advances in computerized psychological assessment methods and discusses some of the lingering issues and contemporary problems with automated psychological assessment…

  6. Psychological impact of prenatal diagnosis and post procedure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prenatal diagnosis is associated with psychological challenges, which may affect the response of women before, during or after the procedure, as well as their decision on the future of an affected pregnancy. This prospective study was to evaluate the psychological impact of prenatal diagnosis, factors that may be ...

  7. Psychological Assessment Training in Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihura, Joni L; Roy, Manali; Graceffo, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    We surveyed American Psychological Association-accredited clinical psychology doctoral programs' (n = 83) training in psychological assessment-specifically, their coverage of various assessment topics and tests in courses and practica, and whether the training was optional or required. We report results overall and separately per training model (clinical science, scientist-practitioner, and practitioner-focused). Overall, our results suggest that psychological assessment training is as active, or even more active, than in previous years. Areas of increased emphasis include clinical interviewing and psychometrics; multimethod, outcomes, health, and collaborative or therapeutic assessment; and different types of cognitive and self-report personality tests. All or almost all practice-focused programs offered training with the Thematic Apperception Test and Rorschach compared to about half of the scientist-practitioner programs and a third of the clinical science programs. Although almost all programs reported teaching multimethod assessment, what constitutes different methods of assessing psychopathology should be clarified in future studies because many programs appear to rely on one method-self-report (especially clinical science programs). Although doctoral programs covered many assessment topics and tests in didactic courses, there appears to be a shortage of program-run opportunities for students to obtain applied assessment training. Finally, we encourage doctoral programs to be familiar with (a) internships' assessment expectations and opportunities, (b) the professional guidelines for assessment training, and (c) the American Psychological Association's requirements for preinternship assessment competencies.

  8. Continuous Assessment in a Large Group of Psychology Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clariana, Merce; Gotzens, Concepcion; Badia, Mar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A continuous classroom assessment method was applied to a higher education course aimed at a large group of educational psychology students at the "Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona". Following the Bologna directions and the constructivist model, both declarative and procedural knowledge was taught in the module, and the…

  9. Counseling Health Psychology: Assessing Health Psychology Training within Counseling Psychology Doctoral Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque-Bogdan, Trisha L.; Torrey, Carrie L.; Lewis, Brian L.; Borges, Nicole J.

    2013-01-01

    Training directors of American Psychological Association-approved counseling psychology doctoral programs completed a questionnaire assessing (a) student and faculty involvement in health-related research, practice, and teaching; (b) health-related research conducted by students and faculty; and (c) programs' expectations and ability to…

  10. Assessment of psychological pain in suicidal veterans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Reist

    Full Text Available Psychological pain is a relatively understudied and potentially important construct in the evaluation of suicidal risk. Psychological pain also referred to as 'mental pain' or 'psychache' can be defined as an adverse emotional reaction to a severe trauma (e.g., the loss of a child or may be associated with an illness such as depression. When psychological pain levels reach intolerable levels, some individuals may view suicide as the only and final means of escape. To better understand psychological pain, we previously developed and validated a brief self-rating 10-item scale, Mee-Bunney Psychological Pain Assessment Scale [MBP] in depressed patients and non-psychiatric controls. Our results showed a significant increase in psychological pain in the depressed patients compared to controls. We also observed a significant linear correlation between psychological pain and suicidality in the depressed patient cohort. The current investigation extends our study of psychological pain to a diagnostically heterogeneous population of 57 US Veterans enrolled in a suicide prevention program. In addition to the MBP, we administered the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II, Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11. Suicidal patients scoring above a predetermined threshold for high psychological pain also had significantly elevated scores on all the other assessments. Among all of the evaluations, psychological pain accounted for the most shared variance for suicidality (C-SSRS. Stepwise regression analyses showed that impulsiveness (BIS and psychological pain (MBP contributed more to suicidality than any of the other combined assessments. We followed patients for 15 months and identified a subgroup (24/57 with serious suicide events. Within this subgroup, 29% (7/24 had a serious suicidal event (determined by the lethality subscale of the C-SSRS, including one completed suicide. Our

  11. Undergraduate study in psychology: Curriculum and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C; Hailstorks, Robin; Aiken, Leona S; Pfund, Rory A; Stamm, Karen E; Christidis, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    The undergraduate curriculum in psychology profoundly reflects and shapes the discipline. Yet, reliable information on the undergraduate psychology curriculum has been difficult to acquire due to insufficient research carried out on unrepresentative program samples with disparate methods. In 2014, APA launched the first systematic effort in a decade to gather national data on the psychology major and program outcomes. We surveyed a stratified random sample of department chairs/coordinators of accredited colleges and universities in the United States that offer undergraduate courses and programs in psychology. A total of 439 undergraduate psychology programs (45.2%) completed the survey. This article summarizes, for both associate and baccalaureate programs, the results of the Undergraduate Study in Psychology. Current practices concerning the introductory course, the courses offered, core requirements, the psychology minor, and tracks/concentrations are presented. The frequency of formal program reviews and program-level assessment methods are also addressed. By extending prior research on the undergraduate curriculum, we chronicle longitudinal changes in the psychology major over the past 20 years. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Pollutant Assessments Group procedures manual: Volume 2, Technical procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This is volume 2 of the manuals that describes the technical procedures currently in use by the Pollution Assessments Group. This manual incorporates new developments in hazardous waste assessment technology and administrative policy. Descriptions of the equipment, procedures and operations of such things as radiation detection, soil sampling, radionuclide monitoring, and equipment decontamination are included in this manual. (MB)

  13. Psychological adaptations for assessing gossip veracity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Nicole H; Hagen, Edward H

    2006-09-01

    Evolutionary models of human cooperation are increasingly emphasizing the role of reputation and the requisite truthful "gossiping" about reputation-relevant behavior. If resources were allocated among individuals according to their reputations, competition for resources via competition for "good" reputations would have created incentives for exaggerated or deceptive gossip about oneself and one's competitors in ancestral societies. Correspondingly, humans should have psychological adaptations to assess gossip veracity. Using social psychological methods, we explored cues of gossip veracity in four experiments. We found that simple reiteration increased gossip veracity, but only for those who found the gossip relatively uninteresting. Multiple sources of gossip increased its veracity, as did the independence of those sources. Information that suggested alternative, benign interpretations of gossip decreased its veracity. Competition between a gossiper and her target decreased gossip veracity. These results provide preliminary evidence for psychological adaptations for assessing gossip veracity, mechanisms that might be used to assess veracity in other domains involving social exchange of information.

  14. Guidelines, Criteria, and Rules of Thumb for Evaluating Normed and Standardized Assessment Instruments in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Domenic V.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of developing assessment instruments in psychology, issues of standardization, norming procedures, and test reliability and validity are discussed. Criteria, guidelines, and rules of thumb are provided to help the clinician with instrument selection for a given psychological assessment. (SLD)

  15. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF OPIOID DRUG ABUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Carballo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the prescription of opioid analgesics is related to increased rates of opioid abuse and the negative consequences of medication misuse. Several international health organisations recommend comprehensive and multidisciplinary patient assessment for the duration of the opioid treatment in order to identify and prevent medication abuse. Due to the lack of specific clinical guidelines in the Spanish National Health System, the aim of this paper is to present a proposal for psychological assessment based on the main psychological tools currently available for assessing opioid abuse. The assessment guidelines have been established based on the psychological variables that can predict and prolong the abuse, classifying all of the variables depending on the current stage of the therapeutic process for each patient. Although there are instruments with good psychometric properties, further research is necessary to adapt, translate and validate these instruments for use in the Spanish population. Future studies are also needed to investigate intervention and prevention strategies in depth in order to reduce the likelihood of abuse in patients treated with opioids.

  16. Psychological interventions helping pediatric oncology patients cope with medical procedures: a nurse-centered approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Aurélie G; Henrich, Christopher C

    2013-12-01

    This study explored whether psychological interventions are currently used by pediatric oncology nurses to help children cope with their treatment and, if so, which interventions were considered by oncology nurses to be the most effective. A web-based survey was developed to assess pediatric oncology nurses' impressions of psychological care for pediatric patients during their medical treatment. A sample of 88 pediatric oncologic nurses from twelve leading pediatric oncology departments in the US participated in the survey. The closed questions were analyzed through quantitative methods with statistics. The open questions were examined through qualitative methods with report narratives and discourse analysis. Pediatric oncology nurses identified three psychological interventions to reduce suffering: educating children by explaining the procedure; providing emotional support to children by listening, answering children's worries, or holding their hands; and distracting children through passive and active forms. The survey further showed that nurses spent on average 3 h per day providing emotional support, would be willing to be trained in additional interventions (93%), and could devote at least 10 min per treatment to provide support (77%). This work demonstrates the central role nurses play as emotional support caregivers. Since nurses would be willing to provide emotional support during treatments, training may be an approach to incorporate the use of psychological interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Distributive justice, procedural justice, and psychological distress: the moderating effect of coworker support and work autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Vincent; Salek, Salwa; Aubé, Caroline; Morin, Estelle M

    2009-07-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that the perception of injustice at work may increase psychological health-related problems. The purpose of this study is to examine the moderating effect of coworker support and work autonomy on the relationships between both distributive and procedural justice and psychological distress. Results, on the basis of responses to questionnaires given to 248 prison employees, show that coworker support moderates the relationships between both forms of justice and psychological distress. Specifically, these relationships are weakened when employees benefit from a high level of coworker support. Furthermore, work autonomy moderates the relationship between procedural justice and psychological distress but not the relationship between distributive justice and psychological distress. Thus, procedural injustice is less likely to increase psychological distress when the level of work autonomy is high. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. SPECAL ISSUE Assessing the Assessment Procedures and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    purpose only if they are of good quality. It follows that the ... comply with the CBE philosophy, the objectives of each CBE and the assessment criteria. It is with this ... The study generally attempted to examine the quality of assessment and grading guidelines of CBE courses at Jimma University. Specific Objectives. The study ...

  19. Procedures for health risk assessment in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seeley, M.R.; Tonner-Navarro, L.E.; Beck, B.D.; Deskin, R.; Feron, V.J.; Johanson, G.; Bolt, H.M.

    2001-01-01

    This report compares cancer classification systems, health risk assessment approaches, and procedures used for establishing occupational exposure limits (OELs), in various European countries and scientific organizations. The objectives were to highlight and compare key aspects of these processes and

  20. Multiculturalism and Psychopathology. Perspectives on Psychological Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelina Norma Contini de González

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This work is situated in the area of Psychological Assessment. This area is considered as a previous and necessary step to get to know the subject or the group whose health problems must be attended. The methods used in this area and the theories in which are based are alluded. The risk of commit diagnosis mistakes by using assessment instruments developed in a different context to that where they have been created are referred. It is analyzed if culture produces differences in psychopathology and if it is valid the use of general diagnosis categories such as DSM IV or CIE-10. Relations between culture and psychopathology are studied. Notions of diversity and uniformity and etic/emic are developed through two researches; one focus on intelligence. The other one on psychopathologies in adolescents, the way in which the social practices provoke the develop of specific cultural behavior is analyzed. It is concluded that because of the complex social dynamic, politic and economic, the multicultural view in psychological assessment is going to be a distinctive sign of this new century. It can contribute to not confuse cultural differences whit “deviation” or “psychopathology” and block the consequences that the globalization is producing on subjectivity. 

  1. Advancing the Assessment of Dynamic Psychological Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Aidan G C; Hopwood, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Most commonly used clinical assessment tools cannot fully capture the dynamic psychological processes often hypothesized as core mechanisms of psychopathology and psychotherapy. There is therefore a gap between our theories of problems and interventions for those problems and the tools we use to understand clients. The purpose of this special issue is to connect theory about clinical dynamics to practice by focusing on methods for collecting dynamic data, statistical models for analyzing dynamic data, and conceptual schemes for implementing dynamic data in applied settings. In this introductory article, we argue for the importance of assessing dynamic processes, highlight recent advances in assessment science that enable their measurement, review challenges in using these advances in applied practice, and adumbrate the articles in this issue.

  2. Assessing competence in sport psychology : An action research account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutter, R. I (Vana); Pijpers, J. R (Rob); Oudejans, Raôul R.D.

    2016-01-01

    Competent practice in sport psychology is of utmost importance for the professional status of the field, and hence proper assessment of competence for sport psychology practice is needed. We describe three cycles of action research to improve the assessment of competence in a sport psychology

  3. Methodology and Psychological Knowledge Issues in the Procedural Differentiation Sphere and the Evidence Doctrine: Problems of Theory and Legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey S. Tsyganenko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to actual problems of the theory and legislation of the modern criminal trial based on provisions of differentiation of a procedural form. Its basic provisions belong also to questions of evidentiary activity. Characteristics of knowledge on criminal case will claim the psychological knowledge and categories included in the mechanism of legal regulation of criminal procedure activity. Key role is allocated for the principle of freedom of an assessment of proofs. In this case the assessment of proofs is carried out on internal belief. Historically it is connected with institute of jury trial and competitiveness. Both the principle of freedom of assessment of proofs, and many other provisions of the procedural theory and the legislation need interpretation and an explanation with use of modern psychological knowledge. At the same time in modern Russian criminal procedure as well as in foreign types of criminal trial the reduced summary or special procedural jurisdictions are actively applied. It means formation of the differentiated model of criminal legal proceedings at which there is a summary process. Simplification of an order of proof on a criminal case through a wide range of exceptions is characteristic of them that constitutes a theoretical and practical problem. At their decision it is necessary to use a modern arsenal of methodology and the theory, including new achievements in the field of psychological knowledge.

  4. Ethical issues of using psychological knowledge in the proceedings of the non-procedural forms

    OpenAIRE

    Safuanov F.S.

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses the main ethical problems arising from the use of psychological knowledge in the criminal and civil proceedings in the form of non-procedural. Showing legal environment conducive to violations of ethics of psychological research reference and advisory nature: equality of the parties, the right of lawyers to draw on contractual basis to clarify issues related to the provision of legal aid. Reveals the main subjective factors of psychological research ethics violations: lo...

  5. Stylistic features of narrative procedure in a psychological short story in the context of teaching interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stakić Mirjana M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the stylistic features of narrative procedure in a psychological short story in the context of its interpretation in the teaching of the Serbian language and literature. The narrative procedure in a psychological short story is characterized by the use of the first person in narrating, that is I form, an interior monologue and direct interior monologue, dreams, oversights and introspective. It is also characterized by a particular sentence structure, of often incomplete and elliptical form, used to express the conflicts going on in characters' inner sphere and verbal interaction between the characters. The narrative procedure applied in a psychological short story indicates that its plot is subdued to the internal psychological experiences. During the interpretation of a psychological short story students, through the interpretation of stylistic and narrative procedures, are directed and encouraged to discover complex and often hidden psychological mechanisms which spur the characters to act, influence their behavior, verbal expression and mutual relations. The interpretation of language signs which may have psychological and semantic potential leads to the revealing of unconscious internal psychological processes and mechanisms which take place within a literary character.

  6. Ethical issues of using psychological knowledge in the proceedings of the non-procedural forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safuanov F.S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the main ethical problems arising from the use of psychological knowledge in the criminal and civil proceedings in the form of non-procedural. Showing legal environment conducive to violations of ethics of psychological research reference and advisory nature: equality of the parties, the right of lawyers to draw on contractual basis to clarify issues related to the provision of legal aid. Reveals the main subjective factors of psychological research ethics violations: low level of professional competence psychologist, ignoring the principles of independence, objectivity, confidentiality. Suggests ways of overcoming the ethical issues - in the process of formation of graduate and postgraduate education of ethical competence, implementation of certain algorithms psychologist interaction with the side of a criminal or civil process - customer psychological services. It is proposed to consolidate legislation or regulations regulating certain kinds of non-procedural forms of use of psychological knowledge in the proceedings.

  7. Developing and implementing assessment moderation procedures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is intended to help draw assessment moderation procedures to significantly minimize discrepancies between teachers in marking lab reports. It also helps students to develop their report writing skills. A population of 193 students taking two chemistry laboratory courses and a team of three instructors were used ...

  8. Physiological and psychological assessment of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihashi, R.; Ohira, Masayoshi; Kimura, Teiji; Fujiwara, Takayuki

    The psycho-physiological effects of several sound stimulations were investigated to evaluate the relationship between a psychological parameter, such as subjective perception, and a physiological parameter, such as the heart rate variability (HRV). Eight female students aged 21-22 years old were tested. Electrocardiogram (ECG) and the movement of the chest-wall for estimating respiratory rate were recorded during three different sound stimulations; (1) music provided by a synthesizer (condition A); (2) birds twitters (condition B); and (3) mechanical sounds (condition C). The percentage power of the low-frequency (LF; 0.05<=0.15 Hz) and high-frequency (HF; 0.15<=0.40 Hz) components in the HRV (LF%, HF%) were assessed by a frequency analysis of time-series data for 5 min obtained from R-R intervals in the ECG. Quantitative assessment of subjective perception was also described by a visual analog scale (VAS). The HF% and VAS value for comfort in C were significantly lower than in either A and/or B. The respiratory rate and VAS value for awakening in C were significantly higher than in A and/or B. There was a significant correlation between the HF% and the value of the VAS, and between the respiratory rate and the value of the VAS. These results indicate that mechanical sounds similar to C inhibit the para-sympathetic nervous system and promote a feeling that is unpleasant but alert, also suggesting that the HRV reflects subjective perception.

  9. Assessing Psychological Health: The Contribution of Psychological Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaskill, Ann; Denovan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Balanced assessment of mental health involves assessing well-being and strengths as well as psychopathology. The character strengths of curiosity, gratitude, hope, optimism and forgiveness are assessed in 214 new undergraduates and their relationships to mental health, subjective well-being and self-esteem explored. Scoring the mental health scale…

  10. Assessment of Body perception, Psychological Distress, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... Background: Obesity can lead to psychological, social, and medical problems that may negatively affect the quality of life Aim: In our study, we aimed to evaluate the body perception, psychological distress, and subjective quality of life of obese subjects in comparison with normal weighted ones. Methods: A ...

  11. Assessment of Body perception, Psychological Distress, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obesity can lead to psychological, social, and medical problems that may negatively affect the quality of life Aim: In our study, we aimed to evaluate the body perception, psychological distress, and subjective quality of life of obese subjects in comparison with normal weighted ones. Methods: A total of 494 ...

  12. Increasing Interest in Cognitive Psychology Using Scenario-Based Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormack, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Students often perceive cognitive psychology as an abstract and difficult subject with little intrinsic interest. When student feedback identified problems with the traditional essay assessment in a cognitive psychology module, action research led to the development of a forensic scenario-based assessment which successfully increased student…

  13. Assessment of military population-based psychological resilience programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Brenda J; Bibb, Sandra C Garmon

    2011-09-01

    Active duty service members' (ADSMs) seemingly poor adaptability to traumatic stressors is a risk to force health. Enhancing the psychological resilience of ADSMs has become a key focus of Department of Defense (DoD) leaders and the numbers of military programs for enhancing psychological resilience have increased. The purpose of this article is to describe the results of an assessment conducted to determine comprehensiveness of current psychological resilience building programs that target ADSMs. A modified six-step, population-based needs assessment was used to evaluate resilience programs designed to meet the psychological needs of the ADSM population. The assessment results revealed a gap in published literature regarding program outcomes. DoD leaders may benefit from targeted predictive research that assesses program effectiveness outcomes. The necessity of including preventive, evidence-based interventions in new programs, such as positive emotion interventions shown to enhance psychological resilience in civilian samples, is also recommended.

  14. Psychological assessment of a case of trigeminal neuralgia | Osawe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Recent report links trigeminal neuralgia as a trigger for psychiatric crisis. This article reports the findings from psychological assessment of a case of trigeminal neuralgia, to highlight the associated psychological problems of this condition. Method: A 58 years old male trader, who presented with one year history of ...

  15. Psychological Assessment of Aviators Captured in World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutker, Patricia B.; Allain, Albert N.

    1995-01-01

    Psychological assessments were administered to 33 World War II aviators who had been prisoners of war (POWs). Aviators showed fewer effects of captivity than age-similar, generally less well-educated, nonaviator POWs, but appeared less psychologically robust than Vietnam War POWs. Implications for the measurement of psychopathology are discussed.…

  16. Psychological assessment for adults and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psychological factors play a significant role in many nutritional abnormalities. These factors include mood (e.g., depression, anger, and anxiety), emotional eating, distorted body image, low self-esteem, poor self-efficacy and quality of life, dietary restraint, stress, susceptibility to external c...

  17. A PRACTICAL ASSESSMENT FOR PSYCHOLOGICAL CAPITAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Ponce Gutiérrez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychological Capital has to do with individual psychological resources available to people in an organization which are useful for dealing with adversity. In this work, a practice with an intervention program to develop psychological capital is evaluated. The effect of practice in a sample of students in a Venezuelan public university (N = 15 were studied. Research and theory support the relationship of Psychological Capital components of hope, self-efficacy, optimism and resilience, with positive results in organizations both individually and organizational scope. Hence exploring the feature of malleability in CapPsi and therefore its developed capability it is interesting. There have been proven intervention models to develop CapPsi showing positive results. Practice to develop CapPsi (PCP shown in this paper is based on these initial models. Through an experimental design with pre- and post-test the effects of PCP on CapPsi levels is evaluated. Preliminary results support the hypothesis that through a concentrated training with a short practice, you can develop and improve levels of CapPsi.

  18. Clinical Reasoning in School Psychology: From Assessment to Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jac J. W.; Syeda, Maisha M.

    2017-01-01

    School psychologists typically conduct psychological and psychoeducational assessments, provide prevention and intervention services, and consult and collaborate with allied professionals (e.g., teachers, physicians, psychiatrists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, social workers, and nurses) and parents toward better understanding and…

  19. Child Psychological Maltreatment in the Family: Definition and Severity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Ignacia Arruabarrena

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Psychological maltreatment is one of the main and potentially more destructive forms of child maltreatment. It is difficult to identify, assess and treat. Compared to other forms of child maltreatment such as sexual abuse, physical abuse and neglect, attention received from researchers, child protection service managers and practitioners has been scarce. A review of available knowledge about psychological maltreatment reveals challenges to define the concept in ways useful to policy makers and practitioners. This paper presents a review of definitions of child psychological maltreatment and several measures available for assessing its severity. The review has been used in the Comunidad Autónoma Vasca (Spain to develop more specific criteria for the identification and severity assessment of child psychological maltreatment in Spanish children services. This paper develops these criteria.

  20. Standardised Observation Analogue Procedure (SOAP) for Assessing Parent and Child Behaviours in Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cynthia R.; Butter, Eric M.; Handen, Benjamin L.; Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Mulick, James; Lecavalier, Luc; Aman, Michael G.; Arnold, Eugene L.; Scahill, Lawrence; Swiezy, Naomi; Sacco, Kelley; Stigler, Kimberly A.; McDougle, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Observational measures of parent and child behaviours have a long history in child psychiatric and psychological intervention research, including the field of autism and developmental disability. We describe the development of the Standardised Observational Analogue Procedure (SOAP) for the assessment of parent-child behaviour before…

  1. 42 CFR 90.3 - Procedures for requesting health assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for requesting health assessments. 90.3... ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES ADMINISTRATIVE FUNCTIONS, PRACTICES, AND PROCEDURES § 90.3 Procedures for requesting health assessments. (a) ATSDR will...

  2. Bullying and Cyberbullying: Their Legal Status and Use in Psychological Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Muthanna; Burbidge, Vicky; El Asam, Aiman; Foody, Mairéad; Smith, Peter K.; Morsi, Hisham

    2017-01-01

    Bullying and cyberbullying have severe psychological and legal consequences for those involved. However, it is unclear how or even if previous experience of bullying and cyberbullying is considered in mental health assessments. Furthermore, the relevance and effectiveness of current legal solutions has been debated extensively, resulting in a desire for a specific legislation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the psychological and legal components of bullying and cyberbullying. This is a qualitative research that includes interviews with five practitioner psychologists and four lawyers in the United Kingdom (UK). Thematic analysis revealed three main themes. One theme is related to the definition, characteristics, and impact of bullying and cyberbullying and the need for more discussion among the psychological and legal professions. Another theme is related to current professional procedures and the inclusion of questions about bullying and cyberbullying in psychological risk assessments. The third theme emphasised the importance of intervention through education. Two key messages were highlighted by the lawyers: ample yet problematic legislation exists, and knowledge will ensure legal success. The study recommends the necessity of performing revisions in the clinical psychological practices and assessments, and the legal policies regarding bullying and cyberbullying. In addition to improving legal success, this will reduce bullying prevalence rates, psychological distress, and psychopathology that can be comorbid or emerge as a result of this behaviour. PMID:29186780

  3. Bullying and Cyberbullying: Their Legal Status and Use in Psychological Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthanna Samara

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bullying and cyberbullying have severe psychological and legal consequences for those involved. However, it is unclear how or even if previous experience of bullying and cyberbullying is considered in mental health assessments. Furthermore, the relevance and effectiveness of current legal solutions has been debated extensively, resulting in a desire for a specific legislation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the psychological and legal components of bullying and cyberbullying. This is a qualitative research that includes interviews with five practitioner psychologists and four lawyers in the United Kingdom (UK. Thematic analysis revealed three main themes. One theme is related to the definition, characteristics, and impact of bullying and cyberbullying and the need for more discussion among the psychological and legal professions. Another theme is related to current professional procedures and the inclusion of questions about bullying and cyberbullying in psychological risk assessments. The third theme emphasised the importance of intervention through education. Two key messages were highlighted by the lawyers: ample yet problematic legislation exists, and knowledge will ensure legal success. The study recommends the necessity of performing revisions in the clinical psychological practices and assessments, and the legal policies regarding bullying and cyberbullying. In addition to improving legal success, this will reduce bullying prevalence rates, psychological distress, and psychopathology that can be comorbid or emerge as a result of this behaviour.

  4. Bullying and Cyberbullying: Their Legal Status and Use in Psychological Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Muthanna; Burbidge, Vicky; El Asam, Aiman; Foody, Mairéad; Smith, Peter K; Morsi, Hisham

    2017-11-24

    Bullying and cyberbullying have severe psychological and legal consequences for those involved. However, it is unclear how or even if previous experience of bullying and cyberbullying is considered in mental health assessments. Furthermore, the relevance and effectiveness of current legal solutions has been debated extensively, resulting in a desire for a specific legislation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the psychological and legal components of bullying and cyberbullying. This is a qualitative research that includes interviews with five practitioner psychologists and four lawyers in the United Kingdom (UK). Thematic analysis revealed three main themes. One theme is related to the definition, characteristics, and impact of bullying and cyberbullying and the need for more discussion among the psychological and legal professions. Another theme is related to current professional procedures and the inclusion of questions about bullying and cyberbullying in psychological risk assessments. The third theme emphasised the importance of intervention through education. Two key messages were highlighted by the lawyers: ample yet problematic legislation exists, and knowledge will ensure legal success. The study recommends the necessity of performing revisions in the clinical psychological practices and assessments, and the legal policies regarding bullying and cyberbullying. In addition to improving legal success, this will reduce bullying prevalence rates, psychological distress, and psychopathology that can be comorbid or emerge as a result of this behaviour.

  5. [The effects of psychological nursing on anxiety of patients in the procedure of impacted teeth extraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi-qun; Wan, Peng-bo; Qu, Dong-lin

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effects of psychological nursing on anxiety of patients during extraction of impacted teeth. Seventy patients who required impacted tooth extraction were randomly divided into intervention group (n=35) and control group (n=35). In the intervention group, psychological nursing was performed by special nurses before, during and after the surgical procedure; In the control group, patients were informed the general knowledge of the routine treatment and care. Anxiety was evaluate with anxiety scale at the end of surgical procedure. The data was analyzed with SPSS 13.0 software package for X2 test. The number of patients with anxiety in the intervention group was significantly reduced compared with the control. The difference was statistically significant (Pnursing assists to relieve anxiety of patients during impacted teeth removal.

  6. Pengaruh Psychological Capital Terhadap Innovative Work Behaviors: Efek Moderasi Percieved Procedural Fairness

    OpenAIRE

    Jovi Sulistiawan, Nurtjahja Moegni,

    2012-01-01

    The intensity of high competition among organization could be overcome if the organization has competitive advantage(s). One of the drivers of competitive advantage can be obtained from the employees who have innovative work behavior. This study examined the effect of employees' psychological capital towards innovative work behavior with procedural fairness as a moderator variable. The data were collected from 119 employees in Airlangga University. The result showed that the effect of p...

  7. Assessment of creativity in Psychology undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Luísa da Cruz Alves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is an important human faculty in several performance areas, including the work of a psychologist. This article aimed to describe creativity in a group of Psychology undergraduate students in order to verify whether their professional development fosters creative potential. The study comprised 75 students, equally distributed in three groups from the first, fifth and tenth terms, aged 18 to 59, who were submitted to the Verbal TTCT (Torrance Test of Creative Thinking: Thinking Creatively with Words, following technical specifications of this tool. Further to test evaluation, results of the three groups were statistically compared and the main results showed higher creativity index in senior students, mainly regarding Fluency – ability to produce a large number of ideas, and Originality – ability to produce new and infrequent ideas.

  8. [Contributions of child psychology to the assessment of pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabalia, M

    2009-12-01

    The efficacy of pain management is subordinated to the efficacy of pain assessment. Children are particularly difficult-to-assess patients. In this area, child psychology can contribute to the development of tools and to improving pain assessment. This paper highlights the relevance of studies on dialog in pain assessment situations and the importance of the specificity of both the patient and his pain. Assessing pain and listening to the patient's complaint means meeting the child in his own world. Nonetheless, it is necessary to use and develop assessment tools that are scientifically validated.

  9. Pollutant Assessments Group Procedures Manual: Volume 1, Administrative and support procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This manual describes procedures currently in use by the Pollutant Assessments Group. The manual is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 includes administrative and support procedures, and Volume 2 includes technical procedures. These procedures are revised in an ongoing process to incorporate new developments in hazardous waste assessment technology and changes in administrative policy. Format inconsistencies will be corrected in subsequent revisions of individual procedures. The purpose of the Pollutant Assessments Groups Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures documenting in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of the Environmental Measurements and Applications Section (EMAS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of PAG conform properly to protocol outlined by funding organizations. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by PAG and other contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards. The Procedures Manual is sufficiently comprehensive for use by PAG and contractor personnel in the planning, performance, and reporting of project activities and measurements. The Procedures Manual provides procedures for conducting field measurements and includes program planning, equipment operation, and quality assurance elements. Successive revisions of this manual will be archived in the PAG Document Control Department to facilitate tracking of the development of specific procedures.

  10. Psychological assessment of patients with Meniere's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cruijsen, N.; Jaspers, J. P. C.; van de Wiel, H. B. M.; Wit, H. P.; Albers, F. W. J.

    The objective of this study was to evaluate daily stressors, coping, personality, physical and mental health, and quality of life in Meniere patients. 110 consecutive patients with definite Meniere's disease were assessed using the Dutch Daily Hassles List, Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations

  11. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF OPIOID DRUG ABUSE

    OpenAIRE

    José Luis Carballo; Ainhoa Coloma-Carmona; Dana Mrozowicz-Gaudyn; Verónica Vidal-Arenas; Carlos van-der Hofstadt; Jesús Rodríguez-Marín

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prescription of opioid analgesics is related to increased rates of opioid abuse and the negative consequences of medication misuse. Several international health organisations recommend comprehensive and multidisciplinary patient assessment for the duration of the opioid treatment in order to identify and prevent medication abuse. Due to the lack of specific clinical guidelines in the Spanish National Health System, the aim of this paper is to present a proposal for psychol...

  12. Assessment of psychological barriers to cervical cancer screening ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Assessment of psychological barriers to cervical cancer screening among women in Kumasi, Ghana using a mixed methods approach. *Williams M1, Kuffour G2, Ekuadzi E3, Yeboah M4, ElDuah M1, Tuffour P2. 1. Department of Health Behavior, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA. 2. Department of Pharmaceutics ...

  13. Assessment of job satisfaction, job stress and psychological health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    2014-12-31

    Dec 31, 2014 ... Background: The relationship that exists between job stress and job satisfaction has been investigated across several professional groups. Aim: The study assessed the job satisfaction, perception of job stress and psychological morbidity among journalists in a state in the Southern part of Nigeria. Methods: ...

  14. Assessment of job satisfaction, job stress and psychological health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The relationship that exists between job stress and job satisfaction has been investigated across several professional groups. Aim: The study assessed the job satisfaction, perception of job stress and psychological morbidity among journalists in a state in the Southern part of Nigeria. Methods: The ...

  15. Impact of medication and psychological behaviour assessment by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug related problem (DRPs) is a key factor which will affect the outcome of therapy and safety. The aim of the present study is to assess the DRPs in T2DM patients and psychological aspects of patients by community pharmacists to observe the rate of DRP. Prospective randomized controlled intervention study involved ...

  16. Rubella Deaf-Blind Child: Implications of Psychological Assessment. Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouin, Carole

    Presented are proceedings of a conference involving authorities in testing and evaluating the blind, deaf, and deaf-blind. In a paper titled "Psychological Implications of Assessing the Deaf", C. Goetzinger discusses references used in audiology, anatomy and physiology of the ear, degrees of hearing impairment, and implications of the various…

  17. Long-term assessment of psychologic outcomes of orthognathic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazaridou-Terzoudi, T.; Kiyak, H.A.; Moore, R.

    2003-01-01

    . The level of body image and self-esteem approximated but did not reach that of a nonpatient population. In view of the current psychologic and social environment, patients should be offered the appropriate treatment to correct a disfigurement if it is subjectively perceived by them as a handicap, in part......This long-term study of post-orthognathic surgery patients aimed at assessing perceptions of problems with physical and psychologic functioning, self-concept, body image, and satisfaction with the surgical outcome based on subjective evaluations. In addition, the patient's perception of self...

  18. From Procedures To Objects: A Research Agenda For The Psychology Of Object-oriented Programming Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorma Sajaniemi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Programming education has experienced a shift from imperative and procedural programming to object-orientation. This shift has been motivated by educators' desire to please the information technology industry and potential students; it is not motivated by research either in psychology of programming or in computer science education. There are practically no results that would indicate that such a shift is desirable, needed in the first place, or even effective for learning programming. Moreover, there has been an implicit assumption that classic results on imperative and procedural programming education and learning apply to object-oriented programming (OOP as well. We argue that this is not the case and call for systematic research into the fundamental cognitive and educational issues in learning and teaching OOP. We also present a research agenda intended to improve the understanding of OOP and OOP education.

  19. The importance of psychological assessment in chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David A

    2013-11-01

    Much confusion has surrounded the purpose of the psychological assessment in the context of chronic pain. For many clinicians, the psychological assessment is used to rule out psychiatric illness and to identify the nonmedical causes for pain and disability. In essence, it is used to identify the causes of pain that fall outside of the biomedical model. Supported by over 30 years of evidence, the bio-psycho-social model acknowledges that psychosocial factors are inherent in chronic pain and require assessment if meaningful diagnostics and treatments are to occur. Five broad categories of psychosocial assessment are relevant to chronic pain. These categories have been shown to enhance the diagnosis of the underlying forms of pain, predict the transition from acute to chronic status, and help to phenotype individuals for the discovery of the underlying mechanisms responsible for pain. Informed assessment of chronic pain needs to include relevant biological, psychological, and social domains. This article describes those domains and offers suggestions of specific instruments to use in clinical or research settings.

  20. 34 CFR 303.166 - Evaluation, assessment, and nondiscriminatory procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evaluation, assessment, and nondiscriminatory procedures. 303.166 Section 303.166 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... Statewide System-Application Requirements § 303.166 Evaluation, assessment, and nondiscriminatory procedures...

  1. Assessing Student Interest and Familiarity with Professional Psychology Specialty Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark-Wroblewski, Kimberly; Wiggins, Tina L.; Ryan, Joseph J.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined undergraduate psychology students' (N = 83) self-reported interest in and familiarity with five specialty areas in professional psychology: counseling psychology, clinical psychology, school psychology, forensic psychology, and criminal profiling. Results suggest that although students are quite interested in careers…

  2. Computerized Tests. New practical and ethical challenges for Psychological Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Susana Lozzia

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to bring the readers in our field of knowledge closer to the new problems and solutions resulting from the application of computer systems to Psychological Assessment. Therefore, this work puts forward a suitable implementation of Computer-based and Internet-delivered Testing, includes a description of the new technologies that can be applied to Psychological Assessment: administration of traditional paper-and-pencil tests through computers, elaboration of automated reports, computerized adaptive tests, automated test construction and automatic generation of items, as well as the specific guidelines and regulations governing the development of each of these areas. This study provides an outline of the current issues connected with the appropriate use of Computerized Tests by way of conclusion and finally encourages psychologists to keep debating and reflecting on these topics.

  3. Assessing Psychological Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes-Truscott, Elizabeth; Pouwer, F; Speight, Jane

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This study aims to examine the operationalisation of 'psychological insulin resistance' (PIR) among people with type 2 diabetes and to identify and critique relevant measures. RECENT FINDINGS: PIR has been operationalised as (1) the assessment of attitudes or beliefs about....... This paper provides guidance on the selection of questionnaires for clinical or research purpose and the development of new, or improvement of existing, questionnaires....

  4. Brazilian scientific production analysis about psychological assessment in career guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Ambiel,Rodolfo Augusto Matteo; Polli, Mariana Fralleti de

    2011-01-01

    This study performed a survey of Brazilian scientific literature, published in national databases of scientific journals about the psychological assessment in the context of career guidance. To this end, a search was performed on the basis PePSIC and Scielo in August 2011, with selection and exclusion criteria and terms defined a priori, with the scope of analysis a total of 24 articles that were full texts analyzed. The results were organized into three blocks, about authors, journals and me...

  5. [Assessment of psychological conditions for the use of firearms in law enforcement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardell Molas, Jordi; Martí Agustí, Gabriel; Solé i Sanosa, M Angels

    2014-03-01

    To handle firearms safely, an individual needs to be in sound psychological conditions. This point is especially relevant in law enforcement, given that this group is likely to experience situations where there is a reasonably severe risk to life, physical integrity and that of third parties. These conditions cause high levels of stress and become a significant source of psychological strain. The assessment of these psychological conditions in law enforcement must stay ahead of this strain and should act preventively, establishing surveillance that is the product of a consensus between the needs of professionals and organizations. This evaluation should be conducted by technical specialists who understand and know the occupational reality of these professionals. A good assessment methodology starts with the need to discover the basic areas that need exploring, the ideal procedure for assessing these issues and the criteria that determine the aptitude (or lack thereof) for handling firearms. Once these goals have been established, we can be assured that the assessment will follow a set of principles that will give it homogeneity, effectiveness and efficiency. This type of assessment will help accomplish the mission that these security professionals are entrusted to by law, which is to protect the free exercise of rights and freedoms and ensure citizen safety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of Competence in EVAR Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, M; Lönn, L; Bech, B

    2017-01-01

    -3000) from vascular surgery (n = 21) and radiology (n = 11) was established. The first Delphi round was based on a review of endovascular skills assessment papers, stent graft instructions for use, and structured interviews. It led to a primary pool of 83 items that were formulated as global rating scale...... suggested by the panel and reduced to seven pivotal assessment items that reached consensus, Cronbach's alpha = 0.82. The seven item rating scale covers key elements of competence in EVAR stent placement and deployment. Each item has well defined grades with explicit anchors at unacceptable, acceptable...

  7. Teaching and assessing procedural skills: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchie, Claire; Humphrey-Murto, Susan; Varpio, Lara

    2013-05-14

    Graduating Internal Medicine residents must possess sufficient skills to perform a variety of medical procedures. Little is known about resident experiences of acquiring procedural skills proficiency, of practicing these techniques, or of being assessed on their proficiency. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively investigate resident 1) experiences of the acquisition of procedural skills and 2) perceptions of procedural skills assessment methods available to them. Focus groups were conducted in the weeks following an assessment of procedural skills incorporated into an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Using fundamental qualitative description, emergent themes were identified and analyzed. Residents perceived procedural skills assessment on the OSCE as a useful formative tool for direct observation and immediate feedback. This positive reaction was regularly expressed in conjunction with a frustration with available assessment systems. Participants reported that proficiency was acquired through resident directed learning with no formal mechanism to ensure acquisition or maintenance of skills. The acquisition and assessment of procedural skills in Internal Medicine programs should move toward a more structured system of teaching, deliberate practice and objective assessment. We propose that directed, self-guided learning might meet these needs.

  8. Self-assessment procedure using fuzzy sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimi, Fotini

    2000-10-01

    Self-Assessment processes, initiated by a company itself and carried out by its own people, are considered to be the starting point for a regular strategic or operative planning process to ensure a continuous quality improvement. Their importance has increased by the growing relevance and acceptance of international quality awards such as the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, the European Quality Award and the Deming Prize. Especially award winners use the instrument of a systematic and regular Self-Assessment and not only because they have to verify their quality and business results for at least three years. The Total Quality Model of the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM), used for the European Quality Award, is the basis for Self-Assessment in Europe. This paper presents a self-assessment supporting method based on a methodology of fuzzy control systems providing an effective means of converting the linguistic approximation into an automatic control strategy. In particular, the elements of the Quality Model mentioned above are interpreted as linguistic variables. The LR-type of a fuzzy interval is used for their representation. The input data has a qualitative character based on empirical investigation and expert knowledge and therefore the base- variables are ordinal scaled. The aggregation process takes place on the basis of a hierarchical structure. Finally, in order to render the use of the method more practical a software system on PC basis is developed and implemented.

  9. Essential Paul Meehl lessons for personality assessment psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, Allan R

    2005-10-01

    The author presents four essential Meehl lessons for personality assessment. First, Meehl's particular form of the integration of science and practice is described. Second, by outlining Meehl's Hedonic Capacity conjecture, Meehl's contribution to the inclusion of personality individual differences in generating the full clinical picture and in planning treatment is recognized. The third Meehl lesson is on the nature and importance of theory in test development and application programs. The fourth Meehl lesson is a more general epistemological lesson for psychology. Meehl's role in destroying the fantasy of an easy methodological formula for a scientific psychology is described. His program of taxometric research is shown to be an example of demanding greater material implications from theory. Meehl's corroboration index is described and contrasted with the p value of statistical significance testing. 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Psychological assessment of children in disasters and emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Victor

    2006-06-01

    Children and adolescents are among the most vulnerable members of communities affected by disasters and emergencies. There is a tremendous need for a systematic post-disaster psychological assessment of children and adolescents in order to understand better post-traumatic symptomatology in children and to identify populations that require an early intervention. This article reviews psychological instruments that are suitable for screening children and adolescents in emergency and disaster contexts for four different types of post-traumatic responses: post-traumatic stress disorder; depression; anxiety disorders; and behavioural disorders. A description of each instrument and psychometric data are provided, along with recommendations on the most appropriate instruments to be utilised in different emergency environments and a summary of previous post-disaster evaluations that have used each type. In addition to selecting apposite instruments, other important issues that should be taken into account when conducting post-emergency mental health needs appraisals of children and adolescents are discussed.

  11. [Psychotherapy and psychological procedures for fibromyalgia syndrome : Updated guidelines 2017 and overview of systematic review articles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köllner, V; Bernardy, K; Greiner, W; Krumbein, L; Lucius, H; Offenbächer, M; Sarholz, M; Settan, M; Häuser, W

    2017-06-01

    The regular update of the guidelines on fibromyalgia syndrome, AWMF number 145/004, was scheduled for April 2017. The guidelines were developed by 13 scientific societies and 2 patient self-help organizations coordinated by the German Pain Society. Working groups (n =8) with a total of 42 members were formed balanced with respect to gender, medical expertise, position in the medical or scientific hierarchy and potential conflicts of interest. A systematic search of the literature for systematic reviews of randomized, controlled studies on psychological and psychotherapeutic procedures from December 2010 to May 2016 was performed in the Cochrane library, MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Scopus databases. Levels of evidence were assigned according to the classification system of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine version 2009. The strength of recommendations was achieved by multiple step formalized procedures to reach a consensus. Efficacy, risks, patient preferences and applicability of available therapies were weighed up against each other. The guidelines were reviewed and approved by the board of directors of the societies engaged in the development of the guidelines. Cognitive behavioral therapies received a strong recommendation but biofeedback, guided imagery and hypnosis received a weak recommendation.

  12. Assessing procedural skills in context: Exploring the feasibility of an Integrated Procedural Performance Instrument (IPPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneebone, R; Nestel, D; Yadollahi, F; Brown, R; Nolan, C; Durack, J; Brenton, H; Moulton, C; Archer, J; Darzi, A

    2006-11-01

    The assessment of clinical procedural skills has traditionally focused on technical elements alone. However, in real practice, clinicians are expected to be able to integrate technical with communication and other professional skills. We describe an integrated procedural performance instrument (IPPI), where clinicians are assessed on 12 clinical procedures in a simulated clinical setting which combines simulated patients (SPs) with inanimate models or items of medical equipment. Candidates are observed remotely by assessors whose data are fed back to the clinician within 24 hours of the assessment. This paper describes the feasibility of IPPI. A full-scale IPPI and 2 pilot studies with trainee and qualified health care professionals has yielded an extensive data set including 585 scenario evaluations from candidates, 60 from clinical assessors and 31 from simulated patients (SPs). Interview and questionnaire data showed that for the majority of candidates IPPI provided a powerful and valuable learning experience. Realism was rated highly. Remote and real-time assessment worked effectively, although for some procedures limited camera resolution affected observation of fine details. IPPI offers an innovative approach to assessing clinical procedural skills. Although resource-intensive, it has the potential to provide insight into individual's performance over a spectrum of clinical scenarios and at no risk to the safety of patients. Additional benefits of IPPI include assessment in real time from experts (allowing remote rating by external examiners) as well as provision of feedback from simulated patients.

  13. Assessing procedural skills training in pediatric residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaies, Michael G; Landrigan, Christopher P; Hafler, Janet P; Sandora, Thomas J

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the opinions of pediatric program directors regarding procedural skills training of pediatric residents. We developed a survey based on the Residency Review Committee's guidelines for procedural training. It included items about the importance of 29 procedures encountered in pediatric training, estimates of residents' competence in performing them, and the teaching of procedural skills. The survey was sent to members of the Association of Pediatric Program Directors. The primary outcome was the perceived importance for residents to achieve competence in these procedures, rated on a 10-point Likert scale. Secondary outcomes included perception of resident competence to perform procedures and educational methods used by respondents for teaching procedural skills. Associations between demographic characteristics and perceived importance or competence were also assessed. Surveys were sent to 139 programs, and 112 responded. Thirteen procedures were rated 8 or higher by >75% of program directors. Seven skills that were prioritized by the Residency Review Committee did not achieve this level of consensus. Respondents reported that many residents failed to achieve competence by the end of training in 9 of 13 procedures that they rated as very important, including venipuncture, neonatal intubation, and administering injections. Residents who perform the majority of venipunctures and intravenous catheter placements at their institutions were more likely to be judged competent in performing these skills than residents who do not. The Residency Review Committee's list of procedures does not necessarily reflect the opinions of pediatric program directors on the most essential skills for trainees. Many residents may not develop competence in several important procedures by the end of residency, most notably vascular access and life-saving skills. A more robust and standardized method is needed for teaching procedural skills and for

  14. Teaching and assessing procedural skills using simulation: metrics and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Richard L; Davenport, Moira; Korley, Frederick; Griswold-Theodorson, Sharon; Fitch, Michael T; Narang, Aneesh T; Evans, Leigh V; Gross, Amy; Rodriguez, Elliot; Dodge, Kelly L; Hamann, Cara J; Robey, Walter C

    2008-11-01

    Simulation allows educators to develop learner-focused training and outcomes-based assessments. However, the effectiveness and validity of simulation-based training in emergency medicine (EM) requires further investigation. Teaching and testing technical skills require methods and assessment instruments that are somewhat different than those used for cognitive or team skills. Drawing from work published by other medical disciplines as well as educational, behavioral, and human factors research, the authors developed six research themes: measurement of procedural skills; development of performance standards; assessment and validation of training methods, simulator models, and assessment tools; optimization of training methods; transfer of skills learned on simulator models to patients; and prevention of skill decay over time. The article reviews relevant and established educational research methodologies and identifies gaps in our knowledge of how physicians learn procedures. The authors present questions requiring further research that, once answered, will advance understanding of simulation-based procedural training and assessment in EM.

  15. Behavioral and Psychological Assessment of Child Sexual Abuse in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Savita; Biswas, Parthasarathy

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the behavioral and psychological assessment of Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) in clinical practice. Following a brief introduction regarding definition and etiology of CSA and discussion on issues of behavioral/psychological consequences of CSA, the paper reviews the various approaches towards behavioral/psychological assessment in…

  16. Surgical procedures and pediatric medical traumatic stress (PMTS) syndrome: Assessment and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Amichai Ben; Peri, Tuvia; Margalit, Daniella; Galili-Weisstub, Esti; Udassin, Raphael; Benarroch, Fortu

    2017-10-16

    Surgical procedures involve traumatic stress. Children may develop chronic psychological distress and dysfunction after surgery, with consequent reluctance to comply with medical follow-up care. A literature review of this topic shows that it has been understudied. Our study aims to assess the frequency and characteristics of symptoms of persistent psychological distress in children following surgery, which have not been documented before, in order to promote its awareness and its early identification. Parents of 79 children (aged 1-6) that were hospitalized in a pediatric surgical ward, comprising a representative sample, completed three validated questionnaires assessing their children's psychological symptoms 3-5months after the hospitalization. A significant portion of children suffer from psychological distress 3-5months after hospitalization. Moreover, 10.39% of the children exhibited symptoms of PTSD, and 28.6% of parents reported that the child's distress causes dysfunction. Additionally, our findings emphasize the parents' concerns regarding the child's behavior, function, and health following hospitalization. Since a significant prevalence of hospitalization-related traumatic stress is documented, the awareness to it has to be improved, in order to reduce its frequency and increase adherence to medical follow-up care. Prognosis study. 1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychological Characteristics in Talented Soccer Players – Recommendations on How to Improve Coaches’ Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Musculus; Babett H. Lobinger

    2018-01-01

    Psychological characteristics, including personality traits and psychological skills, have been shown to be relevant predictors of soccer performance. In research, general and sport specific standardized self-report questionnaires have been applied in psychological diagnostics of sports talent. However, with regard to the assessment of psychological characteristics of talented soccer players, a gap between research and practice is apparent. While soccer clubs often ask their coaches to assess...

  18. Performance assessment in a flight simulator test—Validation of a space psychology methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, B.; Salnitski, Vyacheslav; Soll, Henning; Rauch, Melina; Goeters, Klaus-Martin; Maschke, Peter; Stelling, Dirk; Eißfeldt, Hinnerk

    2007-02-01

    The objective assessment of operator performance in hand controlled docking of a spacecraft on a space station has 30 years of tradition and is well established. In the last years the performance assessment was successfully combined with a psycho-physiological approach for the objective assessment of the levels of physiological arousal and psychological load. These methods are based on statistical reference data. For the enhancement of the statistical power of the evaluation methods, both were actually implemented into a comparable terrestrial task: the flight simulator test of DLR in the selection procedure for ab initio pilot applicants for civil airlines. In the first evaluation study 134 male subjects were analysed. Subjects underwent a flight simulator test including three tasks, which were evaluated by instructors applying well-established and standardised rating scales. The principles of the performance algorithms of the docking training were adapted for the automated flight performance assessment. They are presented here. The increased human errors under instrument flight conditions without visual feedback required a manoeuvre recognition algorithm before calculating the deviation of the flown track from the given task elements. Each manoeuvre had to be evaluated independently of former failures. The expert rated performance showed a highly significant correlation with the automatically calculated performance for each of the three tasks: r=.883, r=.874, r=.872, respectively. An automated algorithm successfully assessed the flight performance. This new method will possibly provide a wide range of other future applications in aviation and space psychology.

  19. A Bayesian Procedure for Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grezio, A.; Marzocchi, W.; Sandri, L.; Gasparini, P.

    2009-04-01

    We implement a Bayesian procedure for the Probability Tsunami Hazard Assessment (PTHA). The approach is general and modular incorporating all significant information relevant for the hazard assessment, such as theoretical and empirical background, analytical or numerical models, instrumental and historical data. The procedure provides the a posteriori probability distribution that integrates the a priori probability distribution based on the physical knowledge of the process, and the likelihood based on the historical data. Also, the method deals with aleatory and epistemic uncertainties incorporating in a formal way all sources of relevant uncertainty, from the tsunami generation process to the wave propagation and impact on the coasts. The modular structure of the procedure is flexible and easy to modify and/or update as long as new models and/or information are available. Finally, the procedure is applied to an hypothetical region, Neverland, to clarify the PTHA evaluation in a realistic case.

  20. Assessors' approaches to portfolio assessment in Assessment of Prior Learning procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Sluijsmans, Dominique; Jochems, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Joosten-ten Brinke, D., Sluijsmans, D. M. A., & Jochems, W. M. G. (2010). Assessors' approaches to portfolio assessment in Assessment of Prior Learning procedures. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 35(1), 59-74.

  1. Agricultural soils potentially contaminated: risk assessment procedure case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Beccaloni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available At the moment, the health-environmental risk analysis is used to decision-making targets in the contaminated sites management; this procedure allows to assess the quantitative health risk related to the pollutants presence in environmental compartments, as soil and waters. As regards potentially contaminated agricultural soils, the ingestion of food from vegetable and/or animal source, produced inside the contaminated area, is the most suitable way to assess the health risk. As an official procedure to this assessment is not available, the National Institute for Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità, ISS has worked out an operating procedure, organized into several phases, depending on the available specific-site know-how. In this document, agricultural soils potentially contaminated in two sites have been studied; the sites are the following: Brescia Caffaro and Torviscosa.

  2. Psychological assessment of airline pilot applicants with the MMPI-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, J N

    1994-02-01

    Psychological tests like the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) have been used widely to assess personality characteristics and appraise potential mental health problems of individuals applying for responsible positions. This study had three major goals: First, these data allowed for an evaluation of the effects of the new norms for the traditional validity and clinical scale scores of the MMPI-2 in an employment selection program. Second, the effects that test defensiveness had on the MMPI-2 scores of a group of individuals, airline pilot applicants who were taking the test in a preemployment context, were evaluated. Third, useful descriptive information was provided on the performance of airline pilot applicants on MMPI-2 scales to give interpretive guidelines for using the MMPI-2 in psychological screening. A sample of 437 airline pilot applicants seeking employment as airline flight crew members was administered the MMPI-2. Results of the study showed that the MMPI-2 norms were more appropriate for characterizing pilot applicants than were the original MMPI norms, which tended to overpathologize test takers. The effects of defensiveness on MMPI-2 profiles were found to be pronounced. Interpretive guidelines for using the MMPI-2 in personnel screening were proposed.

  3. Learner-centred feedback using remote assessment of clinical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger Kneebone; Fernando Bello; Debra Nestel; Neville Mooney; Andrew Codling; Faranak Yadollahi; Tanya Tierney; David Wilcockson; Ara Darzi

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the Imperial College Feedback and Assessment System (ICFAS) and explores its feasibility in supporting the learning of practical clinical procedures. ICFAS is an innovative combination of existing technologies which brings together video recording, networked mobile computers (laptop and handheld) and content management software. The aim is to observe, record, assess and provide feedback on multiple simulated encounters. We have developed ICFAS within the framework of our Integrated Procedural Performance Instrument (IPPI) (Kneebone et al. 2006a,b), providing a technology-based 'feedback space' for maximizing educational value.

  4. Ethical issues in personality assessment in forensic psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, S; VandeCreek, L

    2001-10-01

    In this article we address several ethical issues of concern for psychologists who are engaged in personality assessment in forensic settings such as for courts or attorneys. The ethical issues reviewed include the role of the psychologist as an expert witness, matters of competence, informed consent, confidentiality, multiple relationships, and special issues related to billing. Emphasis is placed on how psychologists can provide useful information to the courts in a manner consistent with the American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, the Committee on Ethical Guidelines for Forensic Psychologist's Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychologists, and the APA's Guidelines for Child Custody Evaluations in Divorce Proceedings. The practical recommendations made in this article are consistent with the APA's Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct.

  5. Assessment of a new procedure for modelling industrial energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinneck, J.W.

    1984-08-03

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of the assessment of a new procedure for modelling industrial energy systems. The new procedure combines second-law methods of analysis with simple component models that allow all of the plant energy forms to be included in a single model. As an example, the new procedure is used to analyze the steam system for a large Canadian petrochemicals plant. Changes in the system operation resulting in an estimated savings of $600,000 per year are identified. It is concluded that the new procedure can be used in Canadian industry to save energy and money. The recommended course of action is to incorporate the second-law measures into the ENERGY Mark II program that is currently under develpment and to consider funding the development of a version of the optimization model at a later date. 58 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Assessment of the MPACT Resonance Data Generation Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Williams, Mark L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-12-26

    Currently, heterogeneous models are being used to generate resonance self-shielded cross-section tables as a function of background cross sections for important nuclides such as 235U and 238U by performing the CENTRM (Continuous Energy Transport Model) slowing down calculation with the MOC (Method of Characteristics) spatial discretization and ESSM (Embedded Self-Shielding Method) calculations to obtain background cross sections. And then the resonance self-shielded cross section tables are converted into subgroup data which are to be used in estimating problem-dependent self-shielded cross sections in MPACT (Michigan Parallel Characteristics Transport Code). Although this procedure has been developed and thus resonance data have been generated and validated by benchmark calculations, assessment has never been performed to review if the resonance data are properly generated by the procedure and utilized in MPACT. This study focuses on assessing the procedure and a proper use in MPACT.

  7. Expanding the Aperture of Psychological Assessment: Introduction to the Special Section on Innovative Clinical Assessment Technologies and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    Contemporary psychological assessment is dominated by tried-and-true methods like clinical interviewing, self-report questionnaires, intellectual assessment, and behavioral observation. These approaches have served as the mainstays of psychological assessment for decades. To be sure, these methods have survived over the years because clinicians…

  8. 75 FR 52054 - Assessment of Mediation and Arbitration Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... Surface Transportation Board Assessment of Mediation and Arbitration Procedures AGENCY: Surface... matters relating to the use of mediation and arbitration as effective means of resolving disputes that are... mediation and arbitration in the resolution of disputes. If so, the proposed changes or new rules would be...

  9. 77 FR 23208 - Assessment of Mediation and Arbitration Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... Surface Transportation Board 49 CFR Parts 1108 and 1109 Assessment of Mediation and Arbitration Procedures... carriers to participate in the Board's arbitration program, unless they file a prior written notice with... to participate in the Board's arbitration program could file a request for arbitration with the Board...

  10. Improving L2 Reading Comprehension through Emotionalized Dynamic Assessment Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolrezapour, Parisa

    2017-01-01

    The paper reports a study on an emotionally-loaded dynamic assessment procedure used with Iranian EFL learners. It focuses on the effect of using emotional intelligence characteristics (based on Goleman's framework) as a tool for motivating learners while performing reading tasks. The study with 50 intermediate learners aged 12-15 used three…

  11. Nonspecialist Raters Can Provide Reliable Assessments of Procedural Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Oria; Dagnæs, Julia; Bube, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    skills which is difficult owing to the limited availability of faculty time. The aim of this study was to explore the validity of assessments of video recorded procedures performed by nonspecialist raters. METHODS: This study was a blinded observational trial. Twenty-three novices (senior medical...

  12. Barriers to Implementing Treatment Integrity Procedures in School Psychology Research: Survey of Treatment Outcome Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity data are essential to drawing valid conclusions in treatment outcome studies. Such data, however, are not always included in peer-reviewed research articles in school psychology or related fields. To gain a better understanding of why treatment integrity data are lacking in the school psychology research, we surveyed the…

  13. Psychological Characteristics in Talented Soccer Players – Recommendations on How to Improve Coaches’ Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Musculus

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Psychological characteristics, including personality traits and psychological skills, have been shown to be relevant predictors of soccer performance. In research, general and sport specific standardized self-report questionnaires have been applied in psychological diagnostics of sports talent. However, with regard to the assessment of psychological characteristics of talented soccer players, a gap between research and practice is apparent. While soccer clubs often ask their coaches to assess their players on self-designed, unevaluated scouting sheets, research widely neglects expert coaches’ and clubs’ perspectives on relevant performance characteristics. As we believe that expert coaches’ assessments could be a valid predictor of a player’s current performance and future success, we provide recommendations on how to improve coaches’ assessment of psychological characteristics. As the quality of the assessment of psychological characteristics is crucial, we provide recommendations on how to ensure the central diagnostic standards: objectivity, reliability, and validity in talent assessment. Further, we argue that assessing psychological characteristics should combine self ratings of players and external ratings of coaches in talent development. Sport psychologists should assist clubs and coaches in improving the diagnostics of psychological characteristics as well as in embedding psychological diagnostics and interventions in the talent development process.

  14. Psychological Characteristics in Talented Soccer Players – Recommendations on How to Improve Coaches’ Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musculus, Lisa; Lobinger, Babett H.

    2018-01-01

    Psychological characteristics, including personality traits and psychological skills, have been shown to be relevant predictors of soccer performance. In research, general and sport specific standardized self-report questionnaires have been applied in psychological diagnostics of sports talent. However, with regard to the assessment of psychological characteristics of talented soccer players, a gap between research and practice is apparent. While soccer clubs often ask their coaches to assess their players on self-designed, unevaluated scouting sheets, research widely neglects expert coaches’ and clubs’ perspectives on relevant performance characteristics. As we believe that expert coaches’ assessments could be a valid predictor of a player’s current performance and future success, we provide recommendations on how to improve coaches’ assessment of psychological characteristics. As the quality of the assessment of psychological characteristics is crucial, we provide recommendations on how to ensure the central diagnostic standards: objectivity, reliability, and validity in talent assessment. Further, we argue that assessing psychological characteristics should combine self ratings of players and external ratings of coaches in talent development. Sport psychologists should assist clubs and coaches in improving the diagnostics of psychological characteristics as well as in embedding psychological diagnostics and interventions in the talent development process. PMID:29459839

  15. Psychological Characteristics in Talented Soccer Players - Recommendations on How to Improve Coaches' Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musculus, Lisa; Lobinger, Babett H

    2018-01-01

    Psychological characteristics, including personality traits and psychological skills, have been shown to be relevant predictors of soccer performance. In research, general and sport specific standardized self-report questionnaires have been applied in psychological diagnostics of sports talent. However, with regard to the assessment of psychological characteristics of talented soccer players, a gap between research and practice is apparent. While soccer clubs often ask their coaches to assess their players on self-designed, unevaluated scouting sheets, research widely neglects expert coaches' and clubs' perspectives on relevant performance characteristics. As we believe that expert coaches' assessments could be a valid predictor of a player's current performance and future success, we provide recommendations on how to improve coaches' assessment of psychological characteristics. As the quality of the assessment of psychological characteristics is crucial, we provide recommendations on how to ensure the central diagnostic standards: objectivity, reliability, and validity in talent assessment. Further, we argue that assessing psychological characteristics should combine self ratings of players and external ratings of coaches in talent development. Sport psychologists should assist clubs and coaches in improving the diagnostics of psychological characteristics as well as in embedding psychological diagnostics and interventions in the talent development process.

  16. Simplified Expert Elicitation Procedure for Risk Assessment of Operating Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring; David Gertman; Jeffrey Joe; Julie Marble; William Galyean; Larry Blackwood; Harold Blackman

    2005-06-01

    This report describes a simplified, tractable, and usable procedure within the US Nuclear Regulator Commission (NRC) for seeking expert opinion and judgment. The NRC has increased efforts to document the reliability and risk of nuclear power plants (NPPs) through Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) and Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) models. The Significance Determination Process (SDP) and Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) programs at the NRC utilize expert judgment on the probability of failure, human error, and the operability of equipment in cases where otherwise insufficient operational data exist to make meaningful estimates. In the past, the SDP and ASP programs informally sought the opinion of experts inside and outside the NRC. This document represents a formal, documented procedure to take the place of informal expert elicitation. The procedures outlined in this report follow existing formal expert elicitation methodologies, but are streamlined as appropriate to the degree of accuracy required and the schedule for producing SDP and ASP analyses.

  17. Principles and practical procedures for acute psychological first aid training for personnel without mental health experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everly, George S; Flynn, Brian W

    2006-01-01

    Most authorities agree that mass disasters leave in their wake a need for some form of acute mental health services. However, a review of current literature on crisis intervention and disaster mental health reveals differing points of view on the methods that should be employed (Raphael, 1986; NIMH, 2002). Nevertheless, there appears to be virtual universal endorsement, by relevant authorities, of the value of acute "psychological first aid" (American Psychiatric Association, 1954; USDHHS, 2004; Raphael, 1986; NIMH, 2002; Institute of Medicine, 2003; WHO, 2003; DoD/VAPTSD, 2004; Ritchie, et al., 2004; Friedman, Hamblin, Foa, & Charney, 2004). Psychological first aid (PFA), as an acute mental health intervention, seems uniquely applicable to public health settings, the workplace, the military, mass disaster venues, and even the demands of more well circumscribed critical incidents, e.g., dealing with the psychological aftermath of accidents, robberies, suicide, homicide, or community violence. In this document, we shall introduce the notion of psychological first aid (PFA) as one aspect of a psychological continuum of care, offer a rudimentary definition of PFA, and provide the reader with a practicalframework for its implementation utilizing the individual psychological first aid (iPFA)format. The goal of this paper is to better prepare public health, public safety, and other disaster response personnel who do not possess formal clinical mental health degrees or specialized training to provide iPFA services to primary and secondary disaster victims.

  18. Psychological Assessment of Speech- and Language-Disordered Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Marcie; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Findings of a high prevalence of psychological problems among children with articulation and language disorders are reviewed and implications drawn for the role of the speech-language pathologist in behavior problem identification, referral, and therapy. A battery of psychological tests, including both parent-teacher questionnaires, and child…

  19. Predicting work Performance through selection interview ratings and Psychological assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liziwe Nzama

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to establish whether selection interviews used in conjunction with psychological assessments of personality traits and cognitive functioning contribute to predicting work performance. The sample consisted of 102 managers who were appointed recently in a retail organisation. The independent variables were selection interview ratings obtained on the basis of structured competency-based interview schedules by interviewing panels, fve broad dimensions of personality defned by the Five Factor Model as measured by the 15 Factor Questionnaire (15FQ+, and cognitive processing variables (current level of work, potential level of work, and 12 processing competencies measured by the Cognitive Process Profle (CPP. Work performance was measured through annual performance ratings that focused on measurable outputs of performance objectives. Only two predictor variables correlated statistically signifcantly with the criterion variable, namely interview ratings (r = 0.31 and CPP Verbal Abstraction (r = 0.34. Following multiple regression, only these variables contributed signifcantly to predicting work performance, but only 17.8% of the variance of the criterion was accounted for.

  20. An operational procedure for rapid flood risk assessment in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dottori, Francesco; Kalas, Milan; Salamon, Peter; Bianchi, Alessandra; Alfieri, Lorenzo; Feyen, Luc

    2017-07-01

    The development of methods for rapid flood mapping and risk assessment is a key step to increase the usefulness of flood early warning systems and is crucial for effective emergency response and flood impact mitigation. Currently, flood early warning systems rarely include real-time components to assess potential impacts generated by forecasted flood events. To overcome this limitation, this study describes the benchmarking of an operational procedure for rapid flood risk assessment based on predictions issued by the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS). Daily streamflow forecasts produced for major European river networks are translated into event-based flood hazard maps using a large map catalogue derived from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations. Flood hazard maps are then combined with exposure and vulnerability information, and the impacts of the forecasted flood events are evaluated in terms of flood-prone areas, economic damage and affected population, infrastructures and cities.An extensive testing of the operational procedure has been carried out by analysing the catastrophic floods of May 2014 in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia. The reliability of the flood mapping methodology is tested against satellite-based and report-based flood extent data, while modelled estimates of economic damage and affected population are compared against ground-based estimations. Finally, we evaluate the skill of risk estimates derived from EFAS flood forecasts with different lead times and combinations of probabilistic forecasts. Results highlight the potential of the real-time operational procedure in helping emergency response and management.

  1. Assessment procedure for the soft skills requested by Industry 4.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotet Gabriela Beatrice

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of an increasingly more performant global and informational environment, as the one found in the virtual organization, the process of selecting and evaluating the human resources holds a particular important role. The premise behind this article is that of the need to adapt the human resource performance to the requests of the industry 4.0 being supported by the organizational culture. Following the analysis of the state of the art literature we concluded that there is no clear procedure for the assessment of the constellation of skills and personal qualities – soft skills requested by industry 4.0. These capabilities should complete professional technical hard-skills; the procedure should provide a map for the constellation of capabilities necessary to adapt and perform, in specific industry 4.0 activities. Current psychological evaluation systems consider only some of such requested capabilities not always the most relevant. To solve this problem, we tried to identify and evaluate what we considered as the core of the complex various skills required. Our research was centred on the use of a psychological instrument for evaluating transversal capabilities. The capabilities map needed for the evaluation and selection of the human resource fit to work in the industry 4.0 environment was designed after the application of this complex system of evaluation on successive series of students from the University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest.

  2. Psychological and neuropsychological assessment of regular hoasca users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Paulo Cesar Ribeiro; Strassman, Rick J; da Silveira, Dartiu Xavier; Areco, Kelsy; Hoy, Robert; Pommy, Jessica; Thoma, Robert; Bogenschutz, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Hoasca (also called ayahuasca) is a N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) - containing psychedelic brew originally used for magico-religious purposes by Amerindian populations of the Amazon Basin. Recently, Brazilian syncretic churches have helped spread the ritual use of hoasca to Western societies. The aim of this study was to evaluate substance use, and neuropsychological and psychological functioning of regular hoasca users within a religious setting. Assessment of socio-economic status, mood, personality traits, impulsiveness, drug use, quality of life, extrinsic and intrinsic religiosity, and neuropsychological function was performed on 30 volunteers from a U.S. branch of União do Vegetal (UDV), a Brazilian religion which uses hoasca ritually. We also assessed 27 non-hoasca-using control subjects matched by socio-demographic profile and church attendance. Mann-Whitney U, chi-squared and Fisher tests were used to analyze differences between groups. Spearman's association and simple logistic regression tests were used to analyze the impact of frequency of hoasca use on dependent variables. Relative to the control group, the UDV group demonstrated lower scores for depression (p=0.043, r=.27) and confusion (p=0.032, r=.29) as assessed by the Profile of Mood States (POMS); higher scores on the instrument Big Five Inventory (BFI) for the personality traits agreeableness (p=0.028, r=.29) and openness (p=0.037, r=.28); higher scores on the quality life domain role limitations due to physical health as determined by the instrument Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 - SF-36 (p=0.035, r=.28); less recent use of alcohol (pbetter score on a measure of memory vulnerability to proactive interference as measured by the California Verbal Learning Test - CVLT (p=0.040, r=.27). Lifetime use of hoasca was positively correlated with role limitations due to physical health (p=0.032, rs=.39) and negatively associated with lifetime heavy alcohol use (p=0.034, OR=0.979). The findings

  3. [Procedures and methods of benefit assessments for medicines in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkering, G E; Kleijnen, J

    2008-12-01

    The Federal Joint Committee (FJC; Gemeinsamer Bundesausschuss, G-BA) defines the health-care elements that are to be reimbursed by sickness funds. To define a directive, the FJC can commission benefit assessments, which provide an overview of the scientific evidence regarding the efficacy and benefits of an intervention. This paper describes the operational implementation of the legal requirements with regard to the benefit assessments of medicines. Such benefit assessments are sometimes referred to as "isolated benefit assessments," to distinguish them from benefit assessments as part of a full economic evaluation. The FJC has the freedom to commission these assessments from any agency; however, to date the majority have commissioned the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG). Nevertheless, the content of this paper applies integrally to any institute commissioned for such assessments. In this report, "the institute"' is used when the text refers to any of these institutes. The legal framework for benefit assessments is laid out in the German Social Code Book version V (http://www. sozialgesetzbuch.de), Sects. 35b ( section sign 1), 139a ( section sign 4-6) and Sect. 139b ( section sign 3). It is specified that: The institute must guarantee high transparency. The institute must provide appropriate participation of relevant parties for the commission-related development of assessments, and opportunity for comment on all important segments of the assessment procedure. The institute has to report on the progress and results of the work at regular intervals. The institute is held to giving the commission to external experts. Based on the legal framework, the institute must guarantee a high procedural transparency. Transparency of the whole process should be achieved, which is evidenced by clear reporting of procedures and criteria in all phases undertaken in the benefit assessment. The most important means of enhancing transparency are: 1. To

  4. Procedures and methods of benefit assessments for medicines in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekkering, Geertruida E; Kleijnen, Jos

    2008-11-01

    The Federal Joint Committee (FJC; Gemeinsamer Bundesausschuss, G-BA) defines the health-care elements that are to be reimbursed by sickness funds. To define a directive, the FJC can commission benefit assessments, which provide an overview of the scientific evidence regarding the efficacy and benefits of an intervention. This paper describes the operational implementation of the legal requirements with regard to the benefit assessments of medicines. Such benefit assessments are sometimes referred to as "isolated benefit assessments," to distinguish them from benefit assessments as part of a full economic evaluation.The FJC has the freedom to commission these assessments from any agency; however, to date the majority have commissioned the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG). Nevertheless, the content of this paper applies integrally to any institute commissioned for such assessments. In this report, 'the institute' is used when the text refers to any of these institutes.The legal framework for benefit assessments is laid out in the German Social Code Book version V ( http://www.sozialgesetzbuch.de ), Sects. 35b ( section 1), 139a ( section 4-6) and Sect. 139b ( section 3). It is specified that: The institute must guarantee high transparency. The institute must provide appropriate participation of relevant parties for the commission-related development of assessments, and opportunity for comment on all important segments of the assessment procedure. The institute has to report on the progress and results of the work at regular intervals. The institute is held to giving the commission to external experts. Based on the legal framework, the institute must guarantee a high procedural transparency. Transparency of the whole process should be achieved, which is evidenced by clear reporting of procedures and criteria in all phases undertaken in the benefit assessment. The most important means of enhancing transparency are: 1. To implement a scoping

  5. Assessment of Conventional Teaching Procedures: Implications for Gifted Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogbel Aid K Alenizi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present research aims to assess the conventional teaching procedures in the development of mathematical skills of the students with learning difficulties. The study group was made up of all the children with academic learning disorders in KSA. The research questions have been scrutinized from the averages and the standard deviation of the marks scored by the participants in the test and control group. The outcomes of the study show that the conventional teaching procedures have effects on mathematical skill development of the female pupils with learning disorders. The results of the study show that the test group outperformed the control group. Based on the data and the evidences, various recommendations have been proposed for the stakeholders in the area of teaching the gifted children so as to ascertain better training for them. Keywords: Maths skills, Learning difficulties, Saudi Arabia

  6. The Social Psychology of Gender Differences and Procedural Justice in Close Relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tumewu, M.

    2007-01-01

    In this dissertation the influence of procedural justice on the reactions of men and women in contexts related to close relationships. Women are thought to be more sensitive to procedural justice than men because women are more caring towards others and value their close relationships more than men.

  7. An operational procedure for rapid flood risk assessment in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dottori

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of methods for rapid flood mapping and risk assessment is a key step to increase the usefulness of flood early warning systems and is crucial for effective emergency response and flood impact mitigation. Currently, flood early warning systems rarely include real-time components to assess potential impacts generated by forecasted flood events. To overcome this limitation, this study describes the benchmarking of an operational procedure for rapid flood risk assessment based on predictions issued by the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS. Daily streamflow forecasts produced for major European river networks are translated into event-based flood hazard maps using a large map catalogue derived from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations. Flood hazard maps are then combined with exposure and vulnerability information, and the impacts of the forecasted flood events are evaluated in terms of flood-prone areas, economic damage and affected population, infrastructures and cities.An extensive testing of the operational procedure has been carried out by analysing the catastrophic floods of May 2014 in Bosnia–Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia. The reliability of the flood mapping methodology is tested against satellite-based and report-based flood extent data, while modelled estimates of economic damage and affected population are compared against ground-based estimations. Finally, we evaluate the skill of risk estimates derived from EFAS flood forecasts with different lead times and combinations of probabilistic forecasts. Results highlight the potential of the real-time operational procedure in helping emergency response and management.

  8. A Short Test for the Assessment of Basic Knowledge in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Johannes; Leichner, Nikolas; Mayer, Anne-Kathrin; Krampen, Günter

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a fixed-choice test for the assessment of basic knowledge in psychology, for use with undergraduate as well as graduate students. Test content is selected based on a core concepts approach and includes a sample of concepts which are indexed most frequently in common introductory psychology textbooks. In a…

  9. Assessment of Positive Psychology Course According to Comments and Life Satisfaction Levels of Counselor Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Asli Uz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the "Positive Psychology" course according to comments and life satisfaction levels of counselor candidates. The course was offered in Guidance and Psychological Counseling undergraduate program as an elective course. The participants of the study were 56 senior undergraduate students attended…

  10. Computational Psycholinguistic Analysis and Its Application in Psychological Assessment of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Dalibor; Havigerová, Jana M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the issue of computational psycholinguistic analysis (CPA) and its experimental application in basic psychological and pedagogical assessment. CPA is a new method which may potentially provide interesting, psychologically relevant information about the author of a particular text, regardless of the text's factual (semantic)…

  11. The Effect and Implications of a "Self-Correcting" Assessment Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Alisha L.; Barnett, Jerrold

    2012-01-01

    We investigated Montepare's (2005, 2007) self-correcting procedure for multiple-choice exams. Findings related to memory suggest this procedure should lead to improved retention by encouraging students to distribute the time spent reviewing the material. Results from a general psychology class (n = 98) indicate that the benefits are not as…

  12. Essentials of MMPI-A[TM] Assessment. Essentials of Psychological Assessment Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Robert P.; Krishnamurthy, Radhika

    This book is designed to provide fundamental information concerning the procedures necessary to administer, score, interpret, and report findings from the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent[TM] (MMPI-A), the most widely used objective personality assessment instrument for adolescents. The chapters are: (1) "Overview";…

  13. Complex Situational Tasks in Assessment of Educational Outcomes in “Psychological Assessment of Students” Module of the Master’s Programme in School Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andruschenko T.Y.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the content of midterm performance evaluation of graduate students within the “Psychological Assessment” module of the master’s programme in School Psychology and focuses on the logic of the module’s design in relation to the professional standard in Educational Psychology. Complex situational tasks are considered in the modular program as the main means of assessing educational outcomes. The content of these tasks is determined by a range of diagnostic situations and closely corresponds with the real-life practice of educational psychologists. Setting complex situational tasks is related to a number of components of the educational psychologist’s professional activity in the field of psychological assessment, such as: planning the sequence of professional actions; ensuring the methodological background for assessment; taking into account deontological aspects of communication with assessed individuals; carrying out professional actions; reflecting on the process and outcomes of assessment. The paper analyses the place and role of graduate students’ self-assessment in finding solutions to complex situational tasks and offers a description of one such task that can be used in midterm performance evaluation of graduate students.

  14. Do Spousal Discrepancies in Marital Quality Assessments Affect Psychological Adjustment to Widowhood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Deborah; Boerner, Kathrin

    2009-01-01

    We use prospective couple-level data from the Changing Lives of Older Couples to assess the extent to which spouses concur in their assessments of marital quality (N = 844) and whether discrepancies in spouses' marital assessments affect the bereaved spouse's psychological adjustment 6 months after loss (n = 105). Spouses' assessments of marital…

  15. Assessment of "Teenage Diaries" for Teaching Concepts in Adolescent Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Meredith L.; MacDonald, Pamelyn M.

    2009-01-01

    Student self-report measures have been reported in numerous studies to assert that the use of case studies in college psychology courses can help students to better understand the relevance of course topics; however, few studies have directly measured the impact of case studies on students' learning. The present study differs from previous studies…

  16. Assessment of psychological problems in schoolgoing adolescents of Aligarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafis Faizi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescence is a period of physical, nutritional, and sexual transition, also remarkable for the accompanying psychological changes. Worldwide, 20% of children and adolescents suffer from a disabling mental illness. Therefore, knowledge of the prevalence of these disorders can be used to design intervention strategies. The present study was conducted in the 13–15 years' age group schoolgoing adolescents, with the objective to estimate the prevalence of psychological morbidity, employing Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in three different schools of Aligarh, in the 13–15 years' age group, with a prior permission from the school authorities. The study was approved by a multidisciplinary Institutional Ethics and Research Advisory Committee. Results: A total of 1456 students were sampled for the study. The prevalence of psychological morbidity on the basis of total difficulties score was found to be 9.75% (95% confidence interval - 8.33–11.39. The prevalence of emotional, conduct, hyperactivity, peer, and prosocial problems was 5.42%, 5.56%, 3.78%, 4.40%, and 4.26%, respectively. Conclusions: Psychological problems are fairly common in the adolescent age group. Despite the need, there is a dearth studies conducted in this crucial age group in India. Of the studies available, a wide variance is reported either due to the difference in diagnostic tools or due to the types of psychological disorders considered in different researches. For the purpose of uniformity and comparability, SDQ stands as a good option.

  17. The Impact of Psychological Science on Policing in the United States: Procedural Justice, Legitimacy, and Effective Law Enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Tom R; Goff, Phillip Atiba; MacCoun, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    The May 2015 release of the report of the President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing highlighted a fundamental change in the issues dominating discussions about policing in America. That change has moved discussions away from a focus on what is legal or effective in crime control and toward a concern for how the actions of the police influence public trust and confidence in the police. This shift in discourse has been motivated by two factors-first, the recognition by public officials that increases in the professionalism of the police and dramatic declines in the rate of crime have not led to increases in police legitimacy, and second, greater awareness of the limits of the dominant coercive model of policing and of the benefits of an alternative and more consensual model based on public trust and confidence in the police and legal system. Psychological research has played an important role in legitimating this change in the way policymakers think about policing by demonstrating that perceived legitimacy shapes a set of law-related behaviors as well as or better than concerns about the risk of punishment. Those behaviors include compliance with the law and cooperation with legal authorities. These findings demonstrate that legal authorities gain by a focus on legitimacy. Psychological research has further contributed by articulating and demonstrating empirical support for a central role of procedural justice in shaping legitimacy, providing legal authorities with a clear road map of strategies for creating and maintaining public trust. Given evidence of the benefits of legitimacy and a set of guidelines concerning its antecedents, policymakers have increasingly focused on the question of public trust when considering issues in policing. The acceptance of a legitimacy-based consensual model of police authority building on theories and research studies originating within psychology illustrates how psychology can contribute to the development of evidence

  18. The use of wound healing assessment methods in psychological studies: a review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschwanez, Heidi E; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2011-02-01

    To provide a critical review of methods used to assess human wound healing in psychological research and related disciplines, in order to guide future research into psychological influences on wound healing. Acute wound models (skin blister, tape stripping, skin biopsy, oral palate biopsy, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene tubing), surgical wound healing assessment methods (wound drains, wound scoring), and chronic wound assessment techniques (surface area, volumetric measurements, wound composition, and assessment tools/scoring systems) are summarized, including merits, limitations, and recommendations. Several dermal and mucosal tissue acute wound models have been established to assess the effects of psychological stress on the inflammatory, proliferative, and repair phases of wound healing in humans, including material-based models developed to evaluate factors influencing post-surgical recovery. There is a paucity of research published on psychological factors influencing chronic wound healing. There are many assessment techniques available to study the progression of chronic wound healing but many difficulties inherent to long-term clinical studies. Researchers need to consider several design-related issues when conducting studies into the effects of psychological stress on wound healing, including the study aims, type of wound, tissue type, setting, sample characteristics and accessibility, costs, timeframe, and facilities available. Researchers should consider combining multiple wound assessment methods to increase the reliability and validity of results and to further understand mechanisms that link stress and wound healing. ©2010 The British Psychological Society.

  19. Empirical assessment of published effect sizes and power in the recent cognitive neuroscience and psychology literature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Denes Szucs; John P A Ioannidis

    2017-01-01

    We have empirically assessed the distribution of published effect sizes and estimated power by analyzing 26,841 statistical records from 3,801 cognitive neuroscience and psychology papers published recently...

  20. Assessing Instructor Performance: A Classroom Project for an Industrial/Organizational Psychology Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottke, Janet L.

    1984-01-01

    For a class project students in an industrial/organizational psychology course had to construct a performance appraisal instrument for assessing the instructor's performance. Evaluations revealed that students found the exercise useful. (RM)

  1. Electronic momentary assessment in chronic pain 1: psychological pain responses as predictors of pain intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorbi, M.J.; Peters, M.L.; Kruise, D.A.; Maas, C.J.M.; Kerssens, J.J.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Bensing, J.

    Objectives and Methods: Electronic momentary assessment was employed to substantiate the relevance of psychological functioning in chronic pain. More than 7100 electronic diaries from 80 patients with varying IASP classified types of chronic pain served to investigate to what extent

  2. Rapid psychological assessment of depression and its relationship with physical health among urban elderly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pavithra Cheluvaraj; Mangesh Balu Nanaware; Surya Prakasa Rao

    2016-01-01

    .... Aims To assess psychological health status with respect to depression among geriatric urban community, and the relationship of depression with health perception and physical health status has been explored...

  3. A Holistic Approach to Assessing the Psychological Component in Low Back Pain with the MMPI,

    Science.gov (United States)

    today on a particular aspect of that practice of medical psychology, the psychological assessment of patients with low back pain , as a fairly...in the assessment of low back pain patients and the limitations of the trends in the literature to date. Second, the results of an unpublished quasi...prospective study of MMPI indices for treatment outcome in low back pain patients and discussion of interpretation of MPI elevations and configurations

  4. Rapid psychological assessment of depression and its relationship with physical health among urban elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Pavithra Cheluvaraj; Mangesh Balu Nanaware; Surya Prakasa Rao

    2016-01-01

    Background Old age is associated with increased occurrence of a wide array of Psychological impairments or losses, which might contribute to physical disabilities. As Depression has been identified as the most common aberration its rapid assessment would be able to identify the quality of individual and family life of the elderly. Aims To assess psychological health status with respect to depression among geriatric urban community, and the relationship of depression with health perce...

  5. 2010 Bruno Klopfer Distinguished Contribution Award. Some considerations for enhancing psychological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Roger L

    2011-05-01

    The field of psychological assessment appears to be bogged down in recent decades on refining existing measures and techniques to the detriment of real change. This article attempts to highlight some of the changes that need to take place in psychological assessment in the next few decades if real progress is to be achieved: (a) developing guidelines for psychological tests and measures; (b) establishing explicit criteria for training; (c) establishing guidelines for competencies; (d) recognizing the impact of marketing; (e) embracing electronic technology; and (f) implementing computer adaptive testing.

  6. Behavioral health assessments and interventions of residents and psychology trainees during dual interviewing: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcerelli, John H; Fowler, Shannon L; Klassen, Brian; Murdoch, William; Thakur, Elyse R; Wright, Brandy E; Morris, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Family medicine residents increasingly work collaboratively with psychology trainees. One type of collaborative experience involves dual interviewing of clinic patients. The goal of this observational study was to provide an initial description of what occurs during dual interviews as it relates to behavioral health assessments and interventions. Psychology trainees provided detailed descriptions of 550 collaborative patient encounters involving 348 patients from the Wayne State University/Crittenton Family Medicine Residency clinic. Psychology trainees coded the frequency of behavioral health assessments and interventions by the resident, psychology trainee, or both. Eighty percent of the encounters contained a behavioral health assessment, and 29% contained a behavioral health intervention. Most of these clinical activities were collaboratively done. Interestingly, residents and psychology trainees tended to provide different behavioral health interventions. Moreover, residents provided different behavioral health interventions in repeat dual interviews (n=202) as opposed to first-time visits (n=348), while psychology trainees did not. Little is known about the process of dual interviewing, and this study is an important first step in describing how residents and psychology trainees actually interact during these encounters. More research is needed about the impact of dual interviewing on residents' behavior.

  7. PP146. Psychological assessment of renal transplant recipients during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, V L L Belardi; de Oliveira, L G; Sass, N

    2012-07-01

    Although many centers have reported their experience on maternal and perinatal outcomes in renal transplant recipients. Very few information can be found about the psychological aspects that may rise for these patients during pregnancy. Considering the importance of the psychological concerns for this kind of patients, we have developed a protocol to better assist renal transplant recipients during pregnancy and here we show what we have learnt. To understand how the maternal concerns are seen from renal transplant recipients in terms of psychological aspects. Fifteen pregnant kidney transplanted women with an average age of 27.5years were included in the study. All patients have been investigated beyond the 20th week of pregnancy to delivery. The study is cross-sectional, qualitative, and participation is based on developed phenomenological method. Final data analysis will be done through thematic analysis and hermeneutics of meaning. The only exclusion criteria were the current presence of psychiatric disorders or use of drugs that could influence cognitive and emotional aspects during the psychological evaluation. During the last two years we have observed in these women that all of them are aware of the risks of pregnancy after transplantation. Qualitative aspects were: Pregnant with kidney transplantation show: in relation to pregnancy, the desire to be mothers, to give a son to her husband, to become a healthy person again; they believe that conception is God's will, they have fear of pregnancy, ambivalence of feelings (fear and happiness). In relation to the graft, they reported fear of baby malformations, fear and anguish of graft loss, still consider it worth the risk of having the baby, and some women name the graft, if it were another infant. In relation to delivery, state anxiety and anguish at the proximity of labor (fear of labor pain, anesthesia, cesarean section, vaginal delivery and the "psychic pain"). Pending the final results of this study, we

  8. An assessment of psychological noise reduction by landscape plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Bao, Zhi Yi; Zhu, Zhu Jun

    2011-04-01

    The emphasis in the term 'Green Transportation' is on the word 'green'. Green transportation focuses on the construction of a slow transport system with a visually pleasing, easy and secure trip environment composed of urban parks, green roadside spaces and some other space that is full of landscape plants. This trip environment encourages residents to make trip choices that reduce fuel consumption and pollution and is one of the most important ways of popularizing green transportation. To study the psychological benefits provided by urban parks and other landscape environments, we combined a subjective approach (a questionnaire) with an objective quantitative approach (emotional tests using an electroencephalogram; EEG). Using a questionnaire survey, we found that 90% of the subjects believed that landscape plants contribute to noise reduction and that 55% overrated the plants' actual ability to attenuate noise. Two videos (showing a traffic scene and a plant scene) were shown to 40 participants on video glasses. We detected and recorded EEG values with a portable electroencephalograph, and a comparison between the results of the two groups revealed that there was a highly significant asymmetry between the EEG activity of the vegetation scene and traffic scene groups. The results suggest that the emotions aroused by noise and visual stimuli are manifested in the synchronization of beta frequency band and the desynchronization of alpha frequency band, indicating that landscape plants can moderate or buffer the effects of noise. These findings indicate that landscape plants provide excess noise attenuating effects through subjects' emotional processing, which we term 'psychological noise reduction'.

  9. Student Evaluation of Friedman's Immediate Feedback, No Return Test Procedure for Introductory Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randolph A.; Wight, Randall

    1988-01-01

    Friedman's (1987) immediate feedback, no return test technique was evaluated via student ratings. Students were enthusiastic in their assessment of the technique and believed that it facilitated their learning. (Author)

  10. An empirical assessment of content in criminal psychological profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, Richard N

    2003-02-01

    Although criminal psychological profiling has been in use by law enforcement agencies for almost three decades, there is a paucity of empirical research examining the technique. A fundamental issue that has received little attention is the empirical evaluation of information contained in profiles composed by professional profilers. In this study, a group of profilers, police officers, psychologists, college students, and self-declared psychics were given information from a solved murder investigation, after which the participants composed a written profile predicting the probable offender. Professional profilers tended to write more lengthy profiles that contained more information about the nonphysical attributes of the offender and more information about the crime scene or the offender's behavior before, during, and after the crime. These results are discussed in terms of their implication for our broader understanding of the technique of profiling and future directions for research into profiling.

  11. An Assessment of Psychological Noise Reduction by Landscape Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The emphasis in the term ‘Green Transportation’ is on the word ‘green’. Green transportation focuses on the construction of a slow transport system with a visually pleasing, easy and secure trip environment composed of urban parks, green roadside spaces and some other space that is full of landscape plants. This trip environment encourages residents to make trip choices that reduce fuel consumption and pollution and is one of the most important ways of popularizing green transportation. To study the psychological benefits provided by urban parks and other landscape environments, we combined a subjective approach (a questionnaire with an objective quantitative approach (emotional tests using an electroencephalogram; EEG. Using a questionnaire survey, we found that 90% of the subjects believed that landscape plants contribute to noise reduction and that 55% overrated the plants’ actual ability to attenuate noise. Two videos (showing a traffic scene and a plant scene were shown to 40 participants on video glasses. We detected and recorded EEG values with a portable electroencephalograph, and a comparison between the results of the two groups revealed that there was a highly significant asymmetry between the EEG activity of the vegetation scene and traffic scene groups. The results suggest that the emotions aroused by noise and visual stimuli are manifested in the synchronization of beta frequency band and the desynchronization of alpha frequency band, indicating that landscape plants can moderate or buffer the effects of noise. These findings indicate that landscape plants provide excess noise attenuating effects through subjects’ emotional processing, which we term ‘psychological noise reduction’.

  12. An Assessment of Psychological Noise Reduction by Landscape Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Bao, Zhi Yi; Zhu, Zhu Jun

    2011-01-01

    The emphasis in the term ‘Green Transportation’ is on the word ‘green’. Green transportation focuses on the construction of a slow transport system with a visually pleasing, easy and secure trip environment composed of urban parks, green roadside spaces and some other space that is full of landscape plants. This trip environment encourages residents to make trip choices that reduce fuel consumption and pollution and is one of the most important ways of popularizing green transportation. To study the psychological benefits provided by urban parks and other landscape environments, we combined a subjective approach (a questionnaire) with an objective quantitative approach (emotional tests using an electroencephalogram; EEG). Using a questionnaire survey, we found that 90% of the subjects believed that landscape plants contribute to noise reduction and that 55% overrated the plants’ actual ability to attenuate noise. Two videos (showing a traffic scene and a plant scene) were shown to 40 participants on video glasses. We detected and recorded EEG values with a portable electroencephalograph, and a comparison between the results of the two groups revealed that there was a highly significant asymmetry between the EEG activity of the vegetation scene and traffic scene groups. The results suggest that the emotions aroused by noise and visual stimuli are manifested in the synchronization of beta frequency band and the desynchronization of alpha frequency band, indicating that landscape plants can moderate or buffer the effects of noise. These findings indicate that landscape plants provide excess noise attenuating effects through subjects’ emotional processing, which we term ‘psychological noise reduction’. PMID:21695027

  13. Test Reviews: Euler, B. L. (2007). "Emotional Disturbance Decision Tree". Lutz, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansy, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Emotional Disturbance Decision Tree (EDDT) is a teacher-completed norm-referenced rating scale published by Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc., in Lutz, Florida. The 156-item EDDT was developed for use as part of a broader assessment process to screen and assist in the identification of 5- to 18-year-old children for the special…

  14. Detecting acute distress and risk of future psychological morbidity in critically ill patients: validation of the intensive care psychological assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Dorothy M; Hankins, Matthew; Smyth, Deborah A; Rhone, Elijah E; Mythen, Michael G; Howell, David C J; Weinman, John A

    2014-09-24

    The psychological impact of critical illness on a patient can be severe, and frequently results in acute distress as well as psychological morbidity after leaving hospital. A UK guideline states that patients should be assessed in critical care units, both for acute distress and risk of future psychological morbidity; but no suitable method for carrying out this assessment exists. The Intensive care psychological assessment tool (IPAT) was developed as a simple, quick screening tool to be used routinely to detect acute distress, and the risk of future psychological morbidity, in critical care units. A validation study of IPAT was conducted in the critical care unit of a London hospital. Once un-sedated, orientated and alert, critical care patients were assessed with the IPAT and validated tools for distress, to determine the IPAT's concurrent validity. Fifty six patients took IPAT again to establish test-retest reliability. Finally, patients completed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and anxiety questionnaires at three months, to determine predictive validity of the IPAT. One hundred and sixty six patients completed the IPAT, and 106 completed follow-up questionnaires at 3 months. Scale analysis showed IPAT was a reliable 10-item measure of critical care-related psychological distress. Test-retest reliability was good (r =0.8). There was good concurrent validity with measures of anxiety and depression (r =0.7, P psychological morbidity was good (r =0.4, P psychological morbidity (AUC =0.7). The IPAT was found to have good reliability and validity. Sensitivity and specificity analysis suggest the IPAT could provide a way of allowing staff to assess psychological distress among critical care patients after further replication and validation. Further work is also needed to determine its utility in predicting future psychological morbidity.

  15. Assessment of the Operational Procedure of the Traditional Credit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the operational procedure of the traditional credit and savings associations in Imo State. It is aimed at identifying the associations whose operational procedure and organizational structure make linkage with the formal credit market possible without the associations losing their distinctive relevance to ...

  16. Pain Psychology: A Global Needs Assessment and National Call to Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheman, Judith; Davin, Sara; Burns, John W.; Murphy, Jennifer L.; Wilson, Anna C.; Kerns, Robert D.; Mackey, Sean C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The Institute of Medicine and the draft National Pain Strategy recently called for better training for health care clinicians. This was the first high-level needs assessment for pain psychology services and resources in the United States. Design. Prospective, observational, cross-sectional. Methods. Brief surveys were administered online to six stakeholder groups (psychologists/therapists, individuals with chronic pain, pain physicians, primary care physicians/physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and the directors of graduate and postgraduate psychology training programs). Results. 1,991 responses were received. Results revealed low confidence and low perceived competency to address physical pain among psychologists/therapists, and high levels of interest and need for pain education. We found broad support for pain psychology across stakeholder groups, and global support for a national initiative to increase pain training and competency in U.S. therapists. Among directors of graduate and postgraduate psychology training programs, we found unanimous interest for a no-cost pain psychology curriculum that could be integrated into existing programs. Primary barriers to pain psychology include lack of a system to identify qualified therapists, paucity of therapists with pain training, limited awareness of the psychological treatment modality, and poor insurance coverage. Conclusions. This report calls for transformation within psychology predoctoral and postdoctoral education and training and psychology continuing education to include and emphasize pain and pain management. A system for certification is needed to facilitate quality control and appropriate reimbursement. There is a need for systems to facilitate identification and access to practicing psychologists and therapists skilled in the treatment of pain. PMID:26803844

  17. Procedure for selecting GCM datasets for climate risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yu Lin Ching-Pin Tung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available General Circulation Models (GCMs are indispensable tools to project future climate. It is not realistic or necessary to use all GCM datasets when assessing climate risks and building adaptive capacity. Thus, a rational procedure for selecting GCM datasets is needed. It is also required to classify weather stations into climate zones and then suggest a suitable list of GCM datasets to avoid weather stations with similar climate patterns but using different GCM datasets. The purpose of this study is to establish a process for selecting GCM datasets for a region. The process consists of climate zonation, applicability ranking, and a model similarity check. Principal component analysis (PCA and cluster analysis are used to classify regional weather stations into climate zones. The weighted average ranking (WAR method and demerit point system (DPS are then used to rank the GCM performance using CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 datasets. The GCM family tree is then applied to screen out highly similar GCMs before generating a GCM suggestion list. Taiwan is chosen as the study area for this investigation. Taiwan receives monthly mean precipitation data from 25 weather stations. The weather stations were clustered into ten climate zones with different GCM datasets suggested for each zone. The top five GCM datasets suggested for Taiwan by the WAR method are HadGEM2-AO, CESM1-CAM5, CCSM4, MIROC5, and GISS-E2-R while those suggested by the DPS method are CSIRO-Mk3-6-0, HadGEM2-AO, CESM1-CAM5, MIROC5, and CCSM4. The GCM selection process presented in this study is applicable to other regions to assist users in finding GCM datasets suitable for their research.

  18. Metric qualities of the cognitive behavioral assessment for outcome evaluation to estimate psychological treatment effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolotti, Giorgio; Michielin, Paolo; Vidotto, Giulio; Sanavio, Ezio; Bottesi, Gioia; Bettinardi, Ornella; Zotti, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral assessment for outcome evaluation was developed to evaluate psychological treatment interventions, especially for counseling and psychotherapy. It is made up of 80 items and five scales: anxiety, well-being, perception of positive change, depression, and psychological distress. The aim of the study was to present the metric qualities and to show validity and reliability of the five constructs of the questionnaire both in nonclinical and clinical subjects. Four steps were completed to assess reliability and factor structure: criterion-related and concurrent validity, responsiveness, and convergent-divergent validity. A nonclinical group of 269 subjects was enrolled, as was a clinical group comprising 168 adults undergoing psychotherapy and psychological counseling provided by the Italian public health service. Cronbach's alphas were between 0.80 and 0.91 for the clinical sample and between 0.74 and 0.91 in the nonclinical one. We observed an excellent structural validity for the five interrelated dimensions. The clinical group showed higher scores in the anxiety, depression, and psychological distress scales, as well as lower scores in well-being and perception of positive change scales than those observed in the nonclinical group. Responsiveness was large for the anxiety, well-being, and depression scales; the psychological distress and perception of positive change scales showed a moderate effect. The questionnaire showed excellent psychometric properties, thus demonstrating that the questionnaire is a good evaluative instrument, with which to assess pre- and post-treatment outcomes.

  19. Psychological assessment and AIDS research with intravenous drug users: challenges in measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K H; Watters, J K; Case, P

    1988-01-01

    The instruments used for psychological assessment have been under close scrutiny for many years. In particular, ethnic and racial minorities have pointed out that misapplication of instruments standardized to White middle-class norms can result in incorrect assessments. An analogous situation exists with IVDUs. In the work of the present authors with IVDUs, they were found to be a very diverse group. Contrary to common wisdom, they differ by race, ethnicity, age, and drug use profiles. However, their economic circumstances and social stigma make them a special case in terms of psychological assessment. Given the unique characteristics of IVDUs, it behooves researchers to carefully examine the standardized instruments that are available for psychological evaluation. Too often, measures standardized on White middle-class samples lack the value neutrality that makes them applicable across disparate groups. In addition, many such measures are designed with certain presumptions that do not necessarily hold true with this population (e.g., willingness and/or ability to communicate intimate information about one's feelings and psychological states). This article briefly describes some of the challenges encountered in examining standardized instruments for use in the study of IVDUs, their health psychology and AIDS-related behavior. Concerns with self-report biases, literacy, attentional focus, measurement constructs, and drug states confounding psychological states all pose challenges to psychological research with this heterogeneous population. While the need for direct intervention on the sexual and needle-sharing behaviors of IVDUs remains paramount in the combat against the spread of AIDS, researchers must also continue with the further development of basic measurement tools.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Text mining and IRT for psychiatric and psychological assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    The information age has made it easy to store and process large amounts of data, including both structured data (e.g., responses to questionnaires) and unstructured data (e.g., natural language or prose). As an additional source of information in assessments, textual data has been increasingly used

  1. Identify the degree of socio-psychological self-assessment team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Avdeev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with theoretical aspects of the work and organizational psychology, organizational climate survey and analysis of the employees of the State Fire squad № 211 public institutions "Fire and rescue center". The purpose of this article – definition of psychological climate in the organization. To determine the psychological climate squad used a technique A. Nemov at identifying the degree of integration "SPSK" – social and psychological self-assessment team. This methodology is designed to study the level of social and psychological development of the team, which is a basic and necessary prerequisite for the formation of an optimal social and psychological climate. In April 2015 a survey was conducted, which was attended by 30 people (26% of the total population of employees in the unit at the position of "fire". Random sampling. The methodology included 75 statements describing the behavior of the individual and collective relations (70 claims of workers and 5 – control. Working statement distributed on seven blocks of 10 claims in each band respectively characteristics such as responsibility, teamwork, unity, contact (personal relationships, openness (in relation to newcomers and representatives of other groups, organization and knowledge. The article presents the results of the analysis, which have been formulated conclusions and guidelines.

  2. Psychological Assessment with the DSM-5 Alternative Model for Personality Disorders: Tradition and Innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Mark H; Hopwood, Christopher J; Krueger, Robert F; Morey, Leslie C; Pincus, Aaron L; Wright, Aidan G C

    2017-04-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (DSM-5) Section III Alternative Model for Personality Disorders (AMPD; APA, 2013) represents an innovative system for simultaneous psychiatric classification and psychological assessment of personality disorders (PD). The AMPD combines major paradigms of personality assessment and provides an original, heuristic, flexible, and practical framework that enriches clinical thinking and practice. Origins, emerging research, and clinical application of the AMPD for diagnosis and psychological assessment are reviewed. The AMPD integrates assessment and research traditions, facilitates case conceptualization, is easy to learn and use, and assists in providing patient feedback. New as well as existing tests and psychometric methods may be used to operationalize the AMPD for clinical assessments.

  3. Mandated Psychological Assessments for Suicide Risk in a College Population: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Grace L.; Marshall, Donn; Poyner, Sunney R.

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the impact of a protocol mandating psychological assessment of college students exhibiting specific signs of suicide risk and/or nonsuicidal self-harm. Thirty-seven current and former students who had been documented as at risk completed a structured interview in person or by phone. Outcomes suggest this…

  4. Assessing the Accuracy of Psychology Undergraduates' Perceptions of Graduate Admission Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, Margaret M.

    2000-01-01

    Assesses how accurately psychology undergraduates perceive: (1) the importance of various graduate admission criteria, including minimum grade point averages needed for consideration by graduate programs; (2) the length of time required to complete graduate degrees; and (3) starting salaries at various educational levels. Presents and discusses…

  5. Guidelines for Preparing Psychological Specialists: An Entry-Level Course on Intellectual Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakland, Thomas; Wechsler, Solange Muglia

    2016-01-01

    This article provides guidelines for an entry-level course that prepares psychology students and practitioners to acquire entry-level skills, abilities, knowledge, and attitudes important to the individual assessment of intellectual abilities of children and youth. The article reviews prominent international, regional, and national policies,…

  6. Best Practices in Educational Psychology: Using Evolving Concept Maps as Instructional and Assessment Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehl, Michelle M.; Fives, Helenrose

    2011-01-01

    We describe the implementation of evolving concept maps in two different graduate-level educational psychology courses: "The Adolescent Learner" and "Theories of Learning and Cognition." We provide an explicit description of how we used evolving concept maps as instructional and assessment tools in our respective classes, changes in the…

  7. Development and Evaluation of Turkish Language Versions of Three Positive Psychology Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haktanir, Abdulkadir; Lenz, A. Stephen; Can, Nesime; Watson, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the development and evaluation of a Turkish-language version of three positive psychology assessments for use in clinical, education and research settings with Turkish-speaking individuals. A multistage translation of the Brief Resilience Scale (BRS; Smith et al. in "International Journal of Behavioral Medicine," 15,…

  8. Assessing Children's Implicit Attitudes Using the Affect Misattribution Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amanda; Steele, Jennifer R.; Lipman, Corey

    2016-01-01

    In the current research, we examined whether the Affect Misattribution Procedure (AMP) could be successfully adapted as an implicit measure of children's attitudes. We tested this possibility in 3 studies with 5- to 10-year-old children. In Study 1, we found evidence that children misattribute affect elicited by attitudinally positive (e.g., cute…

  9. Cognitive Styles in Admission Procedures for Assessing Candidates of Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casakin, Hernan; Gigi, Ariela

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive style has a strong predictive power in academic and professional success. This study investigated the cognitive profile of candidates studying architecture. Specifically, it explored the relation between visual and verbal cognitive styles, and the performance of candidates in admission procedures. The cognitive styles of candidates who…

  10. A pebble count procedure for assessing watershed cumulative effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory S. Bevenger; Rudy M. King

    1995-01-01

    Land mangement activities can result in the delivery of fine sediment to streams. Over time, such delivery can lead to cumulative impacts to the aquactic ecosystem. Because numerous laws require Federal land managers to analyze watershed cumulative effects, field personnel need simple monitoring procedures that can be used directly and consistently. One approach to...

  11. 77 FR 19591 - Assessment of Mediation and Arbitration Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... and Arbitration Procedures AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... permit parties to engage voluntarily in mediation. The Board also proposes an arbitration program under... of arbitration in other disputes. The Board seeks comments regarding these proposed rules. DATES...

  12. Improving Major Depressive Episode Assessment: A New Tool Developed by Formal Psychological Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Francesca; Spoto, Andrea; Ghisi, Marta; Vidotto, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Major depressive episode (MDE) can manifest with different features. Discriminating between different types of MDEs is crucial for proper treatment. The aim of this study is to propose a new tool for MDE assessment in bipolar disorder (BD) or major depressive disorder (MDD) to overcome some limitations of current rating scales. The proposed tool investigates all of the clinical features of different MDEs and gives qualitative information, differentiating patients with the same score but different symptoms and psychopathology severity. To achieve this purpose authors used a new methodology called Formal Psychological Assessment (FPA). FPA allows creating relations between the items of an assessment tool, and the set of diagnostic criteria of a given clinical disorder. In the application at hand, given the capability to analyze all clinical features, FPA appears a useful way to highlight and differentiate between inhibited and agitated depressive symptoms. Method: The new tool contains 41 items constructed through 23 clinical criteria from the DSM-5 and literature symptoms. In line with FPA, starting from a set of items and a set of clinical criteria, a Boolean matrix was built assigning to each item its own set of clinical criteria. The participants include 265 in the control group and 38 patients with MDE (diagnosed with MDD or BD) who answered the QuEDS. After 1 month, 63 participants performed the test again and 113 took the Depression-Anxiety-Stress Scale to analyze convergent—divergent validity. Results: The scale showed adequate reliability and validity. A hierarchical confirmatory factor analysis highlighted the presence of three sub factors (affective, somatic, and cognitive) and one high-order factor (depression). Conclusions: The new tool is potentially able to inform clinicians about the patients' most likely diagnostic configuration. Indeed, the clinical state of a patient consists of the subset of items he/she answered affirmatively, along with

  13. Medical and psychology students' self-assessed communication skills: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiuraniemi, Juhani; Läärä, Riitta; Kyrö, Tuuli; Lindeman, Sari

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how psychology and medical students assess their own competency and skills before and after training, in which role-play was used to teach interpersonal and communication skills. Interpersonal and communication skills were assessed with a semi-structured questionnaire before and after the training. The students of both medicine and psychology estimated their skill levels to be higher after the course. The psychology students estimated their skills for communication, motivating interviewing, empathy and reflection, and change orientation to be better at the end of the course. Medical students estimated their communication skills, motivating interviewing skills, and change orientation skills to be better at the end of the course. Even a short period of training in interpersonal and communication skills can positively affect the self-assessed skills of the medical students. In the future, it would be worthwhile to pay attention to reflective teaching practices in the training of both medical and psychology students. The cognitive and emotional components of these practices help students to develop their own communication skills. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessing bias against overweight individuals among nursing and psychology students: an implicit association test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Tabitha; Lampman, Claudia; Lupfer-Johnson, Gwen

    2012-12-01

    To determine the implicit or unconscious attitudes of Nursing and Psychology majors towards overweight individuals in medical and non-medical contexts. Obesity is a leading health concern today, which impacts both physical and psychological health. Overweight individuals confront social biases in many aspects of their lives including health care. Examining the views of Nursing and Psychology students may reveal implicit attitudes towards overweight individuals that may lead to prejudiced behaviours. A mixed design experiment with one between-subjects variable (student major: Nursing or Psychology) and one within-subjects variable (condition: congruent or incongruent) was used to assess implicit attitudes in two convenience samples of Nursing and Psychology students. A computerised implicit association test was used to determine implicit attitudes towards overweight individuals in medical and non-medical contexts. A total of 90 students from Nursing (n= 45) and Psychology (n = 45) were recruited to complete an implicit association test. Reaction times in milliseconds between the congruent trials (stereotype consistent) and incongruent trials (stereotype inconsistent) were compared with determine adherence to social stereotypes or weight bias. A statistically significant implicit bias towards overweight individuals was detected in both subject groups and in both target settings (medical vs. non-medical). Stronger weight bias was found when the stimulus targets were female than male. Findings from this study expand understanding of the implicit attitudes and social biases of Nursing and Psychology students. The views held by these future healthcare professionals may negatively impact patient care. Providing education and support to overweight individuals is central to Nursing practice in a society struggling to manage obesity. Negative stereotypes or beliefs about these individuals may result in poor patient care. Therefore, nurses and other healthcare professionals

  15. A National Needs Assessment to Identify Technical Procedures in Vascular Surgery for Simulation Based Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Konge, Lars; Schroeder, T V

    2017-01-01

    a national needs assessment to identify the technical procedures that should be integrated in a simulation based curriculum. DESIGN AND METHODS: A national needs assessment using a Delphi process was initiated by engaging 33 predefined key persons in vascular surgery. Round 1 was a brainstorming phase...... to identify technical procedures that vascular surgeons should learn. Round 2 was a survey that used a needs assessment formula to explore the frequency of procedures, the number of surgeons performing each procedure, risk and/or discomfort, and feasibility for simulation based training. Round 3 involved...... eliminated, resulting in a final prioritised list of 19 technical procedures. CONCLUSION: A national needs assessment using a standardised Delphi method identified a list of procedures that are highly suitable and may provide the basis for future simulation based training programs for vascular surgeons...

  16. Computational psycholinguistic analysis and its application in psychological assessment of college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kučera Dalibor

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issue of computational psycholinguistic analysis (CPA and its experimental application in basic psychological and pedagogical assessment. CPA is a new method which may potentially provide interesting, psychologically relevant information about the author of a particular text, regardless of the text’s factual (semantic content and without the need to obtain additional materials. As part of our QPA-FPT research we studied the link between the linguistic form of a text by Czech college students and their personality characteristics obtained from a psychodiagnostic test battery. The article also discusses the basis of the method, opportunities for practical application and potential use within psychological and pedagogical disciplines

  17. A Procedure for High Resolution Satellite Imagery Quality Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Crespi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Data products generated from High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI are routinely evaluated during the so-called in-orbit test period, in order to verify if their quality fits the desired features and, if necessary, to obtain the image correction parameters to be used at the ground processing center. Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level. Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF. This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites.

  18. GPS based three-dimensional ionospheric monitoring: procedure and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, C.; Schlüter, S.; Heise, S.; Jacobi, Ch.; Jakowski, N.; Raabe, A.

    Integrated TEC measurements derived from ground- and space-based GPS observations are used to image the ionospheric electron density distribution through three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction. Here, the reconstruction procedure is presented, that has been applied for ionospheric mapping especially during perturbed geomagnetic conditions. The monitoring technique including tomographic algorithm and external constraints is described and discussed in detail. The procedure is based on an iterative MART algorithm and is initialised by a combined IRI/GCPM model. Input data are GPS TEC measured from ground-based networks as well as from the scientific Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellite CHAMP. The problem of spaceborne GPS instrumental biases is addressed, and the approach applied for bias estimation by using calibrated zenith antenna TEC data is presented. Statistical validations of tomographic results with independent data are shown.

  19. Psycho-ophthalmology: Contributions of Health psychology to the assessment and treatment of glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Ulrich, Jorge Luis; Sanz, Antoni

    2017-03-01

    Asymptomatic in its early stages, glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide. While psychosocial factors are taken into consideration for a host of diseases such as cancer, heart disease and autoimmune conditions, to date, psychological issues have been ignored in the clinical management of glaucoma. This work reviews the most relevant contributions from a health psychology perspective for the assessment and treatment of glaucoma, which is emerging in the field of psycho-ophthalmology. To provide scientific evidence regarding contributions of psychology to the comprehension of glaucoma, a bibliographic review of three databases (Psicodoc, PsycInfo and Medline) was conducted, spanning the period between 1940 and 2016. This review yielded a total of 66 studies published in the period analysed and identified three areas where health psychology has made substantive contributions to glaucoma screening, monitoring and treatment: the emotional impact on patients suffering from glaucoma, the adherence to treatment and the effects of stress on intraocular pressure. A health psychology approach for research and therapy of glaucoma must focus on the management of the negative affect associated with the diagnosis, the optimisation of treatment adherence and the stress management of the intraocular pressure measurements.

  20. Supported Decision-Making: Implications from Positive Psychology for Assessment and Intervention in Rehabilitation and Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyanik, Hatice; Shogren, Karrie A; Blanck, Peter

    2017-12-01

    Purpose This article reviews existing literature on positive psychology, supported decision-making (SDM), employment, and disability. It examines interventions and assessments that have been empirically evaluated for the enhancement of decision-making and overall well-being of people with disabilities. Additionally, conceptual themes present in the literature were explored. Methods A systematic review was conducted across two databases (ERIC and PsychINFO) using various combination of keywords of 'disabilit*', work rehabilitation and employment terms, positive psychology terms, and SDM components. Seven database searches were conducted with diverse combinations of keywords, which identified 1425 results in total to be screened for relevance using their titles and abstracts. Database search was supplemented with hand searches of oft-cited journals, ancestral search, and supplemental search from grey literature. Results Only four studies were identified in the literature targeting SDM and positive psychology related constructs in the employment and job development context. Results across the studies indicated small to moderate impacts of the assessment and interventions on decision-making and engagement outcomes. Conceptually there are thematic areas of potential overlap, although they are limited in the explicit integration of theory in supported decision-making, positive psychology, disability, and employment. Conclusion Results suggest a need for additional scholarship in this area that focuses on theory development and integration as well as empirical work. Such work should examine the potential utility of considering positive psychological interventions when planning for SDM in the context of career development activities to enhance positive outcomes related to decision-making, self-determination, and other positive psychological constructs.

  1. Operant Procedures for Assessing Behavioral Flexibility in Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brady, Anne Marie; Floresco, Stan B

    2015-01-01

    .... Understanding of the neurobiology of executive functions has been greatly advanced by the availability of animal tasks for assessing discrete components of behavioral flexibility, particularly...

  2. Space Shuttle Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Threat Assessment Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, J.; Christiansen, E.

    Prior to each shuttle mission, Meteoroid and orbital Debris (M/OD) threat assessments are performed to determine the critical penetration risk for the orbiter vehicle, the radiator tube leak risk &the window replacement risk. Mission parameters, such as vehicle attitude, exposure time and altitude are used as inputs for the assessment. The assessments are performed using the BUMPER computer code at the NASA/JSC Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HITF). An M/OD risk analysis is typically performed in support of orbiter Cargo Integration Reviews (CIR) and Flight Readiness Reviews (FRR). Three types of M/OD risk are assessed. The most important involves the calculation of "critical" penetration risk, defined as penetrations that may result in the catastrophic loss of vehicle and crew. Critical failure criteria have been established though detailed engineering evaluations by NASA and Boeing. The radiator assessment is concerned with premature end-of- mission due to loss of a coolant loop. The window assessment is a postflight maintenance and logistics issue. The result s are provided to the Space Shuttle Vehicle Engineering Office (MV) the Space and Life Science Directorate (SA) at JSC. This paper will document the inputs used in the critical penetration analysis for CIR, FRR, and post-flight assessments, it will also serve as a reference for the Space Shuttle Orbiter finite element model (FEM) surface property definitions that are used in M/OD threat assessments.

  3. Assessing mental imagery in clinical psychology: A review of imagery measures and a guiding framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, David G.; Deeprose, Catherine; Wallace-Hadrill, Sophie M.A.; Heyes, Stephanie Burnett; Holmes, Emily A.

    2013-01-01

    Mental imagery is an under-explored field in clinical psychology research but presents a topic of potential interest and relevance across many clinical disorders, including social phobia, schizophrenia, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is currently a lack of a guiding framework from which clinicians may select the domains or associated measures most likely to be of appropriate use in mental imagery research. We adopt an interdisciplinary approach and present a review of studies across experimental psychology and clinical psychology in order to highlight the key domains and measures most likely to be of relevance. This includes a consideration of methods for experimentally assessing the generation, maintenance, inspection and transformation of mental images; as well as subjective measures of characteristics such as image vividness and clarity. We present a guiding framework in which we propose that cognitive, subjective and clinical aspects of imagery should be explored in future research. The guiding framework aims to assist researchers in the selection of measures for assessing those aspects of mental imagery that are of most relevance to clinical psychology. We propose that a greater understanding of the role of mental imagery in clinical disorders will help drive forward advances in both theory and treatment. PMID:23123567

  4. Assessing mental imagery in clinical psychology: a review of imagery measures and a guiding framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, David G; Deeprose, Catherine; Wallace-Hadrill, Sophie M A; Burnett Heyes, Stephanie; Holmes, Emily A

    2013-02-01

    Mental imagery is an under-explored field in clinical psychology research but presents a topic of potential interest and relevance across many clinical disorders, including social phobia, schizophrenia, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. There is currently a lack of a guiding framework from which clinicians may select the domains or associated measures most likely to be of appropriate use in mental imagery research. We adopt an interdisciplinary approach and present a review of studies across experimental psychology and clinical psychology in order to highlight the key domains and measures most likely to be of relevance. This includes a consideration of methods for experimentally assessing the generation, maintenance, inspection and transformation of mental images; as well as subjective measures of characteristics such as image vividness and clarity. We present a guiding framework in which we propose that cognitive, subjective and clinical aspects of imagery should be explored in future research. The guiding framework aims to assist researchers in the selection of measures for assessing those aspects of mental imagery that are of most relevance to clinical psychology. We propose that a greater understanding of the role of mental imagery in clinical disorders will help drive forward advances in both theory and treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of positive functioning in clinical psychology: theoretical and practical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Stephen; Wood, Alex

    2010-11-01

    Positive psychology has led to an increasing emphasis on the promotion of positive functioning in clinical psychology research and practice, raising issues of how to assess the positive in clinical setting. Three key considerations are presented. First, existing clinical measures may already be assessing positive functioning, if positive and negative functioning exist on a single continuum (such as on bipolar dimensions from happiness to depression, and from anxiety to relaxation). Second, specific measures of positive functioning (e.g., eudemonic well-being) could be used in conjunction with existing clinical scales. Third, completely different measures would be needed depending on whether well-being is defined as emotional or medical functioning, or as humanistically orientated growth (e.g., authenticity). It is important that clinical psychologists introduce positive functioning into their research and practice in order to widen their armoury of therapeutic interventions, but in doing so researchers and practitioners need also to be aware that they are shifting the agenda of clinical psychology. As such, progress in clinical psychology moving toward the adoption of positive functioning requires reflection on epistemological foundations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Flood damage assessment – Literature review and recommended procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Lea; Löwe, Roland; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten

    is therefore important when assessing flood disaster mitigation options and economical optimizations of possible measures. A common definition is that the flood risk is found with the use of a flood hazard assessment and a flood vulnerability assessment (Apel, Merz and Thieken, 2008). The flood hazard...... is the quantification of amount, extent, and location of flooding expected to occur with a given return period. This means that the spatial distribution of the calculated inundation depth as a function of the return period can be used to describe the flood hazard. The vulnerability is the susceptibility of the area...... subjected to the flooding. A way to express the vulnerability is through a damage cost assessment....

  7. Validation of Short-Term Noise Assessment Procedures: FY16 Summary of Procedures, Progress, and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    measured values. Multiple topics were explored towards identifying possible sources of error. The peak-level calculation algorithm is found to...perform adequately, but an alternative method is recommended for future use. Significant meteorological variability is found across the landscape, leading...algorithm is continuing in FY17. Updates to the noise assessment tools are identified. Throughout this document, procedures used for calculations and analysis are included.

  8. Motor assessment instruments and psychometric procedures: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pâmella de Medeiros

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available It was our objective to identify the psychometric elements to an epistemological reflection through a systematic review of cross-cultural validation procedures of TGMD-2 batteries, MABC-2 and KTK. Searches were carried out by two evaluators independently without year and language restrictions in six databases: Web of Science, Science Direct, Lilacs, Scopus, Pubmed and The ScientificElectronic Library Online - SciELO. The key words used were: "MABC", "TGMD" and "KTK" all of them combined with the word "validity". There was a total of 734 articles, of which, after the exclusion criteria, remained only 11 studies. It was found that there are differences between the authors in relation to the psychometric factors taken into account in cross-cultural validation. So that there was a lack of unanimity of the validation criteria of all studies in this field.

  9. A procedure for assessing climate change impacts on hydropower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamududu, B.; Jjunju, E.; Killingtveit, Aa.; Alfredsen, K.

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Ever since climate change was highlighted as an important issue in water related projects, various procedures have been used by different researchers to gain indications of likely impact of climate change on hydropower. Though all methods give results, comparisons of these results is not ideal and may be difficult due to large differences in methods used. This paper is an attempt to propose an ideal procedure or process of estimating the impact of climate change on hydropower production in a basin. The paper describes where to begin, what future climate change projections are necessary, and where to get such data. It also shows highlights various techniques that are available and could be applied to climate projections in order to down scale the large scale projections from global climate models to site or basin climate. Another technique that has been applied is the delta approach or perturbation methods that transfer changes in meteorological variables between the control and the scenario simulations from the regional climate model to a database of observed meteorological data. Further it highlights various ways of transforming basin climate variables that can be used in hydrological modeling to produce runoff series. The paper also discusses applicability of hydrological modeling strategies for climate predictions in relation to stationarity in models and how this will influence climate predictions. The runoff is the input into hydropower systems and hydropower simulations to get the desired hydropower production in the future. In all these steps, different approaches for processing are highlighted. The paper ends with a section on different sources of uncertainties in climate projections. Finally some concluding remarks are given on the reliability of the results from various methodologies. A case study on Zambezi River basin is given towards the end illustrating the differences resulting from different methodologies. (Author)

  10. Use of Objective Neurocognitive Measures to Assess the Psychological States that Influence Return to Sport Following Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilaty, Nathan D; Nagelli, Christopher; Hewett, Timothy E

    2016-03-01

    There is growing interest in the effects of psychological states on human performance, especially with those who have suffered debilitating injury and are attempting to return to sport (RTS). Current research methods measure psychological states through validated questionnaires; however, these outcomes only allow for subjective assessment and may be unintentionally biased. Application of objective neurocognitive measures correlated with psychological states will advance understanding of injury outcomes by identifying human behavior and avoiding vague assumptions from subjective measures.

  11. Open thoracotomy procedural competency: validity study of teaching and assessment modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, D M; Rhee, K J; Marx, J A; Honigman, B; Panacek, E A; Martinez, D; Brofeldt, B T; Cavanaugh, S H

    1996-12-01

    To determine (1) reliability and validity estimates of three modalities used to assess open thoracotomy procedural competency and (2) the effect of computer practice on procedural performance as measured by the three assessment modalities. An experimental, sequential assessment design with volunteer examinees completing all three assessment modalities (paper, computer, pig model) was implemented at the animal support facilities of a university medical school with an affiliated emergency medicine residency program. Level of physician training (student, resident, faculty) and type of computer practice (thoracotomy, cricothyrotomy) were independent variables. Procedural competency scores were determined for each modality; scores were defined in terms of performance time and performance accuracy for three thoracotomy procedures (opening the chest, pericardiotomy, and aortic cross-clamping). Thoracotomy performance on the pig reliably discriminated among examinees known to differ in level of training. However, computer simulation performance did not significantly differ among examinees with different levels of training. Computer simulation practice significantly improved later performance on the computer assessment (P < .05) but not on the pig assessment. The greatest predictor of procedural competency (time and accuracy) on the pig assessment was the ability to sequentially order procedural steps. This study establishes the pig model as superior to the paper and computer models as the criterion standard for open thoracotomy assessment. Psychometric properties support the pig model as the most reliable and valid model yet described for assessing thoracotomy procedural competency. Computer simulation practice using visual images (complex anatomy) and the sequential ordering of procedural steps through paper modeling show promise for teaching and assessment of prerequisite skills required to develop psychomotor procedural competency.

  12. Zinc status, psychological and nutritional assessment in old people recruited in five European countries: Zincage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellini, Fiorella; Giuli, Cinzia; Papa, Roberta; Gagliardi, Cristina; Dedoussis, George; Herbein, George; Fulop, Tamas; Monti, Daniela; Rink, Lothar; Jajte, Jolanta; Mocchegiani, Eugenio

    2006-01-01

    The paper shows the results on the relationship between zinc status, psychological dimensions (cognitive functions, mood, perceived stress) and nutritional aspects in European healthy old subjects recruited for ZINCAGE Project (supported by the European Commission in the Sixth Framework Programme). The old healthy subjects were recruited in Italy, Greece, Germany, France, Poland taking into account the different dietary habits between Northern and Southern European Countries and the pivotal role played by zinc for psychological functions. Measures of the cognitive status, mood and perceived stress level were obtained at baseline, using the "Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE)"; the "Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS - 15 items)" and the "Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)", respectively. Nutritional status was assessed using "Frequency Food Questionnaire". The sample included 853 old subjects, classified in 4 groups of age: 60-69-years-old (n = 359); 70-74-years-old (n = 225); 75-79-years-old (n = 153); 80-84-years-old (n = 116). Subjects were studied on the basis of plasma zinc, in which zinc cognitive decline, whereas 76% presented a low GDS value indicating no depression. However, all psychological variables were related to plasma zinc values and nutritional assessment. In particular, a relationship between marginal zinc deficiency and impaired psychological dimensions occurred in Greece than in other European countries due to low intake and less variety of foods rich of zinc. This phenomenon was independent by the age, suggesting that a correct zinc intake from a wide range of foods may be useful to maintain a satisfactory plasma zinc levels as well as psychological status in elderly with subsequent achievement of healthy ageing.

  13. Puerto Rican Psychology: A Review of Issues Pertaining to Assessment and Counseling = La Psicologia Puertorriquena: Una Revision de la Problematica Relacionada con la Medicion y la Consejeria. Monograph #135.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prewitt-Diaz, Joseph O., Ed.

    This is a collection of papers related to psychological assessment and counseling in Puerto Rico. Included are: (1) an introduction (in Spanish), by Joseph O. Prewitt-Diaz; (2) "A Procedure for Constructing Valid Cross-Cultural Attitude Measures for Use in Puerto Rico," by Cecil R. Trueblood; (3) "Perfil de Personalidad en el…

  14. Assessment of washing procedure for determination some of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was proposed to assess the suitability of washing technique to distinguish between airborne and soil borne several metal contaminants. For this reason, six plant species which grew under Mobarakeh Steel Company emissions were selected. Aluminum, iron, nickel, manganese, zinc, copper and lead ...

  15. Methodological issues in assessing psychological adjustment in child witnesses of intimate partner violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Caroline M; Oxtoby, Claire; Ogle, Richard L

    2008-04-01

    This review summarizes a growing number of methodological concerns emerging from research on child witnesses of intimate partner violence (IPV). A brief summary of various psychological, biological, and cognitive impairments associated with witnessing IPV is presented. Directions for future research in this area are explored with particular attention paid to experimental design. Advantages and disadvantages of retrospective, cross-sectional, and longitudinal designs are evaluated. Suggested improvements include the use of multiple informants, behavioral observations, and prospective, longitudinal assessment.

  16. Introduction to the Special Section on Teaching, Training, and Supervision in Personality and Psychological Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin D

    2017-01-01

    This special section contains empirical and conceptual articles pertaining to the broad topic of teaching, training, and supervision of assessment. Despite some evidence of a decline in recent decades, assessment remains a defining practice of professional psychologists in many subfields, including clinical, counseling, school, and neuropsychology, that consumes a consequential proportion of their time. To restore assessment to its rightful place of prominence, a clear agenda needs to be developed for advancing teaching and training methods, increasing instruction to state-of-the-art methods, and defining aims that could be elucidated through empirical inquiry. The 7 articles in this special section provide a developmental perspective of these issues that collectively provide practical tools for instructors and begin to set the stage for a research agenda in this somewhat neglected area of study that is vital to the identity of professional psychology. Additionally, 2 comments are provided by distinguished figures in the field concerning the implications of the articles in the special section to health services psychology and the competencies-based movement in applied psychology.

  17. Psychological distress among women suffering from couple infertility in South Africa: a quantitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, S J; Abrahams, N; Mokoena, N E; Lombard, C J; van der Spuy, Z M

    2005-07-01

    Infertility in Africa is commonly associated with negative psycho-social consequences. To date, most studies from African countries addressing these consequences have been qualitative in nature. The aim of this study was to assess psychological distress quantitatively among women suffering from couple infertility in an urban community in South Africa. The Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R), a standardized instrument for the measurement of current psychological symptom status, was administered to 120 women at the time of their first presentation to an infertility clinic in a tertiary referral centre. The control group comprised 120 women presenting to local family planning clinics. In addition, socio-demographic information and data pertaining to the prevalence of abuse was captured through a structured questionnaire designed for the purpose of this study. Women suffering from involuntary childlessness scored significantly higher on all sub-scales and the global indices of distress of the SCL-90-R when compared to controls. In addition, women who reported abuse from their male partners had significantly higher scores on six of the 12 test scales when compared to infertile women in non-abusive relationships. Involuntary childlessness is associated with high levels of psychological distress. Women in abusive relationships are particularly at risk. This result is in keeping with several qualitative studies from African countries which describe infertility as an overwhelmingly negative and distressing experience. Cognizance needs to be taken of these experiences and effective interventions require medical, psychological and socio-cultural strategies.

  18. Psychological distress among men suffering from couple infertility in South Africa: a quantitative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Silke; Lombard, Carl; Van der Spuy, Zephne

    2009-11-01

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in the impact of infertility on reproductive health in developing countries. Most of the research which has addressed the psychosocial consequences of infertility in African countries has been qualitative in nature and focused on women. It was the aim of this study to assess psychological distress quantitatively in men suffering from couple infertility living in an urban community in South Africa. The Symptom Checklist-90-R, a standardized instrument for the measurement of current psychological symptom status, was administered to 120 men upon first presentation to a public health sector infertility clinic (study group) in a tertiary referral centre. The control group comprised 120 men who attended an antenatal clinic with their partner. All men may have previously fathered a child. Raw test scores were converted into standard area T scores and analyzed further. Participants in the study group differed in their psychological symptom status when compared with controls. Male partners of infertile couples had significantly elevated mean T scores for all nine primary symptom dimensions as well as the three global markers of distress (P infertile couples experienced elevated levels of psychological distress, but without, on average, suffering from psychopathology. A comparison with qualitative studies from African countries and with quantitative studies from the Western industrialized world revealed both similarities and differences. Understanding and addressing the male perspective of infertility is an important component of infertility management.

  19. Biomechanical Assessment of Patellar Advancement Procedures for Patella Alta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Adam; Baldini, Todd; Krughoff, Kevin; Shapiro, Joshua A; Lindeque, Bennie; Rhodes, Jason; Carollo, James

    2016-05-01

    Crouch gait deformity is common in children with cerebral palsy and often is associated with patella alta. Patellar tendon advancement typically is used to correct patella alta and restore normal knee mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanical strength of surgical constructs used for fixation during patellar advancement procedures. This study used a cadaveric model to determine which of 3 surgical techniques is biomechanically optimal for patellar tendon advancement in treating patella alta. Twenty-four human cadaveric knees (8 per group) were prepared using 1 of 3 different common surgical techniques: tibial tubercle osteotomy, patellar tendon partial resection and repair at the distal patella, and patellar tendon imbrication. The patella was loaded from 25 to 250 N at 1 Hz for 1000 cycles. A significant difference in patella displacement under cyclical loading was found between surgical techniques. Tibial tubercle osteotomy exhibited significantly less displacement under cyclical loading than distal patella excision and repair (Ppatella excision and repair (P=.0006). Tibial tubercle osteotomy survived longest. Based on failure criteria of 5 mm of displacement, tibial tubercle osteotomy lasted between 250 and 500 cycles. The other 2 techniques failed by 25 cycles. This study offers quantitative evidence regarding the relative mechanical strength of each construct and may influence choice of surgical technique. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e492-e497.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. [The influence of psychological variables on sports performance: assessment with the Questionnaire of Sports Performance-related Psychological Characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Fernando; Buceta, José Maria; Pérez-Llantada, María Carmen

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to observe the relationship among psychological variables and three important issues in sports competition: achieving success, long-term continuance and sustaining injuries. Three studies were carried out with three groups of athletes from the areas of judo, football and swimming, using the Questionnaire of Sports Performance-related Psychological Characteristics as the measuring instrument. The analyses carried out revealed significantly statistical associations between the perception of stress control and of self-confidence, and between achieving success, long-term continuance in competition sports and sustaining injuries. These results indicate the importance of psychological skills training to aid sports performance and prevent injuries, as well as the use of the above-mentioned questionnaire, which, with a limited number of items, measures a wide range of psychological variables in the specific context of sports.

  1. THE ASSESSMENT PROCEDURE OF THE OPERATIONAL RISK EVENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Iulia Iuga

    2009-01-01

    A credit institution must establish a management framework of the operational risk.This framework must cover the appetite and tolerance to the operational risk of a credit institution,in accordance with the management policies of this risk, including the measure and method inwhich the operational risk is transferred outside the credit institution.The management framework of the operational risk should include policies and processes for theidentification, assessment, monitoring and control/dim...

  2. Evaluation of Procedural Simulation as a Training and Assessment Tool in General Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Flemming; Strandbygaard, Jeanett; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic appendectomy is a commonly performed surgical procedure, but few training models have been described for it. We examined a virtual reality module for practising a laparoscopic appendectomy. METHODS: A prospective cohort study with the following 3 groups of surgeons (n = 4...... be useful as a training tool, but further development is required before it can be used for assessment purposes. Procedural simulation may demonstrate more variation for movement parameters, and future research should focus on developing better procedure-specific parameters....

  3. The Language Research Center's Computerized Test System for environmental enrichment and psychological assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, D. A.; Rumbaugh, D. M.; Richardson, W. K.

    1992-01-01

    In the spring of 1987, we undertook to provide environmental enrichment to nonhuman primate subjects in ways that would complement and even contribute to the bio-behaviorial science that justified the monkeys' captivity. Of course, the psychological well-being of captive primates--and indeed all research species-- has been an area of intense research activity since the 1985 amendment of the Animal Welfare Act. This mandate for researchers to ensure the psychological, as well as physical, fitness of experimental animals catalyzed the humane and scientific interests of the research community. The contemporary literature is replete with proposed means both of assaying and of providing enrichment and well-being. Notwithstanding, consensus on either assessment or intervention has yet to be reached. The paradigm we employed was modelled after successful efforts with chimpanzees. An automated test system was constructed in which subjects responded to computer tasks by manipulating a joystick. The tasks, interactive game-like versions of many of the classic testing paradigms of cognitive and comparative psychology, permitted the controlled presentation of stimuli and demands without the required presence of a human experimenter. Despite significant barriers to the success, rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) and a variety of other primate species (including, of course, humans) have mastered the skills necessary for testing in this paradigm. Previous experiments have illustrated the utility of the test system for addressing questions of learning, memory, attention, perception, and motivation. Additional data have been reported to support the contention that the Language Research Center's Computerized Test System (LRC-CTS) serves its other raison d'etre--providing environmental enrichment and assessing psychological well-being. This paper is designed to augment previous descriptions of the technology and the paradigm for scientists and caretakers interested in environmental

  4. Standardization of figures and assessment procedures for DTM verticalaccuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Casella

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Digital Terrain Models (DTMs are widely used in many sectors. They play a key role in hydrological risk prevention, risk mitigation and numeric simulations. This paper deals with two questions: (i when it is stated that a DTM has a given vertical accuracy, is this assertion univocal? (ii when DTM vertical accuracy is assessed by means of checkpoints, does their location influence results? First, the paper illustrates that two vertical accuracy definitions are conceivable: Vertical Accuracy at the Nodes (VAN, the average vertical distance between the model and the terrain, evaluated at the DTM's nodes and Vertical Accuracy at the interpolated Points (VAP, in which the vertical distance is evaluated at the generic points. These two quantities are not coincident and, when they are calculated for the same DTM, different numeric values are reached. Unfortunately, the two quantities are often interchanged, but this is misleading. Second, the paper shows a simulated example of a DTM vertical accuracy assessment, highlighting that the checkpoints’ location plays a key role: when checkpoints coincide with the DTM nodes, VAN is estimated; when checkpoints are randomly located, VAP is estimated, instead. Third, an in-depth, theoretical characterization of the two considered quantities is performed, based on symbolic computation, and suitable standardization coefficients are proposed. Finally, our discussion has a well-defined frame: it doesn't deal with all the items of the DTM vertical accuracy budget, which would require a much longer essay, but only with one, usually called fundamental vertical accuracy.

  5. Assessing the item response theory with covariate (IRT-C) procedure for ascertaining differential item functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tay, L.; Vermunt, J.K.; Wang, C.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluate the item response theory with covariates (IRT-C) procedure for assessing differential item functioning (DIF) without preknowledge of anchor items (Tay, Newman, & Vermunt, 2011). This procedure begins with a fully constrained baseline model, and candidate items are tested for uniform

  6. On the assessment of extremely low breakdown probabilities by an inverse sampling procedure [gaseous insulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Poul; Vibholm, Svend

    1991-01-01

    the flashover probability function and the corresponding distribution of first breakdown voltages under the inverse sampling procedure, and show how this relation may be utilized to assess the single-shot flashover probability corresponding to the observed average first breakdown voltage. Since the procedure...

  7. A Procedural Skills OSCE: Assessing Technical and Non-Technical Skills of Internal Medicine Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Debra; Hamstra, Stanley J.; Wood, Timothy J.; Humphrey-Murto, Susan; Touchie, Claire; Yudkowsky, Rachel; Bordage, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Internists are required to perform a number of procedures that require mastery of technical and non-technical skills, however, formal assessment of these skills is often lacking. The purpose of this study was to develop, implement, and gather validity evidence for a procedural skills objective structured clinical examination (PS-OSCE) for internal…

  8. Evaluation Methods for Assessing Users' Psychological Experiences of Web-Based Psychosocial Interventions: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feather, Jacqueline Susan; Howson, Moira; Ritchie, Linda; Carter, Philip D; Parry, David Tudor; Koziol-McLain, Jane

    2016-06-30

    The use of Web-based interventions to deliver mental health and behavior change programs is increasingly popular. They are cost-effective, accessible, and generally effective. Often these interventions concern psychologically sensitive and challenging issues, such as depression or anxiety. The process by which a person receives and experiences therapy is important to understanding therapeutic process and outcomes. While the experience of the patient or client in traditional face-to-face therapy has been evaluated in a number of ways, there appeared to be a gap in the evaluation of patient experiences of therapeutic interventions delivered online. Evaluation of Web-based artifacts has focused either on evaluation of experience from a computer Web-design perspective through usability testing or on evaluation of treatment effectiveness. Neither of these methods focuses on the psychological experience of the person while engaged in the therapeutic process. This study aimed to investigate what methods, if any, have been used to evaluate the in situ psychological experience of users of Web-based self-help psychosocial interventions. A systematic literature review was undertaken of interdisciplinary databases with a focus on health and computer sciences. Studies that met a predetermined search protocol were included. Among 21 studies identified that examined psychological experience of the user, only 1 study collected user experience in situ. The most common method of understanding users' experience was through semistructured interviews conducted posttreatment or questionnaires administrated at the end of an intervention session. The questionnaires were usually based on standardized tools used to assess user experience with traditional face-to-face treatment. There is a lack of methods specified in the literature to evaluate the interface between Web-based mental health or behavior change artifacts and users. Main limitations in the research were the nascency of the topic

  9. Acceptability of Functional Behavioral Assessment Procedures to Special Educators and School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Robert E.; Bundock, Kaitlin; Kladis, Kristin; Hawken, Leanne S.

    2015-01-01

    This survey study assessed the acceptability of a variety of functional behavioral assessment (FBA) procedures (i.e., functional assessment interviews, rating scales/questionnaires, systematic direct observations, functional analysis manipulations) to a national sample of 123 special educators and a state sample of 140 school psychologists.…

  10. The characteristics of a negotiated assessment procedure to promote teacher learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberg, Christina Petronella Maria

    2013-01-01

    The literature indicates that teacher professional development and learning may be improved by using formative assessment procedures. This thesis focuses on a specific form of formative assessment, negotiated assessment, which is characterised by the exchange of views between assessor and assessee

  11. 45 CFR 640.4 - Responsibilities and procedures for preparation of an environmental assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... an environmental assessment. 640.4 Section 640.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... § 640.4 Responsibilities and procedures for preparation of an environmental assessment. (a) Program... environmental impact that the applicant's proposed study may have. (c) Should an environmental assessment be...

  12. Assessing Dimensionality in Complex Data Structures: A Performance Comparison of DETECT and NOHARM Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetina, Dubravka

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of complex structure on dimensionality assessment in compensatory and noncompensatory multidimensional item response models (MIRT) of assessment data using dimensionality assessment procedures based on conditional covariances (i.e., DETECT) and a factor analytical approach (i.e., NOHARM). …

  13. Association between psychological and self-assessed health status and smartphone overuse among Korean college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Min, Jin-Young; Kim, Hye-Jin; Min, Kyoung-Bok

    2017-09-04

    Several studies suggest that subjective health status is closely related to various behavioral addictions, but there are few studies on smartphone overuse. This study investigated the associations between psychological and subjective health conditions and smartphone overuse in Korean college students. A total of 608 college students participated in this study. We investigated the perceived psychological factors, such as stress, depression symptoms and suicidal ideation. Overall health status was evaluated with self-assessed items, including usual health condition and EuroQol-visual analog scales (EQ-VAS) score. Smartphone overuse was evaluated as the Korean Smartphone Addiction Proneness Scale. Students with psychotic anxiety (i.e. stress, depression and suicidal ideation) showed significant associations with smartphone overuse, indicating an approximately twofold increased risk compared to those without psychological anxiety (all p Students who reported feeling that their usual health is not good were more likely to overuse smartphones than those who are in good health (OR = 1.98; 95% CI = 1.22-3.21). The EQ-VAS score, which indicates current self-assessed health status, also showed a similar result with general health status (OR = 2.14; 95% CI = 1.14-4.02). Negative conditions in self-perceived emotional or overall health condition are associated with the increased likelihood of smartphone overuse in Korean college students.

  14. RISK-ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES AND ESTABLISHING THE SIZE OF SAMPLES FOR AUDITING FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daniel Botez

    2014-01-01

    In auditing financial statements, the procedures for the assessment of the risks and the calculation of the materiality differ from an auditor to another, by audit cabinet policy or advice professional bodies...

  15. Determining the quality of competences assessment programs: A self-evaluation procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baartman, Liesbeth; Prins, Frans; Kirschner, Paul A.; Van der Vleuten, Cees

    2009-01-01

    Baartman, L. K. J., Prins, F. J., Kirschner, P. A., & Van der Vleuten, C. P. M. (2007). Determining the quality of Competence Assessment Programs: A self-evaluation procedure. Studies in Educational Evaluation, 33, 258-281.

  16. A National Needs Assessment to Identify Technical Procedures in Vascular Surgery for Simulation Based Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayahangan, L J; Konge, L; Schroeder, T V; Paltved, C; Lindorff-Larsen, K G; Nielsen, B U; Eiberg, J P

    2017-04-01

    Practical skills training in vascular surgery is facing challenges because of an increased number of endovascular procedures and fewer open procedures, as well as a move away from the traditional principle of "learning by doing." This change has established simulation as a cornerstone in providing trainees with the necessary skills and competences. However, the development of simulation based programs often evolves based on available resources and equipment, reflecting convenience rather than a systematic educational plan. The objective of the present study was to perform a national needs assessment to identify the technical procedures that should be integrated in a simulation based curriculum. A national needs assessment using a Delphi process was initiated by engaging 33 predefined key persons in vascular surgery. Round 1 was a brainstorming phase to identify technical procedures that vascular surgeons should learn. Round 2 was a survey that used a needs assessment formula to explore the frequency of procedures, the number of surgeons performing each procedure, risk and/or discomfort, and feasibility for simulation based training. Round 3 involved elimination and ranking of procedures. The response rate for round 1 was 70%, with 36 procedures identified. Round 2 had a 76% response rate and resulted in a preliminary prioritised list after exploring the need for simulation based training. Round 3 had an 85% response rate; 17 procedures were eliminated, resulting in a final prioritised list of 19 technical procedures. A national needs assessment using a standardised Delphi method identified a list of procedures that are highly suitable and may provide the basis for future simulation based training programs for vascular surgeons in training. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Determining procedures for simulation-based training in radiology: a nationwide needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Nielsen, Kristina Rue; Albrecht-Beste, Elisabeth; Bachmann Nielsen, Michael; Paltved, Charlotte; Lindorff-Larsen, Karen Gilboe; Nielsen, Bjørn Ulrik; Konge, Lars

    2018-01-09

    New training modalities such as simulation are widely accepted in radiology; however, development of effective simulation-based training programs is challenging. They are often unstructured and based on convenience or coincidence. The study objective was to perform a nationwide needs assessment to identify and prioritize technical procedures that should be included in a simulation-based curriculum. A needs assessment using the Delphi method was completed among 91 key leaders in radiology. Round 1 identified technical procedures that radiologists should learn. Round 2 explored frequency of procedure, number of radiologists performing the procedure, risk and/or discomfort for patients, and feasibility for simulation. Round 3 was elimination and prioritization of procedures. Response rates were 67 %, 70 % and 66 %, respectively. In Round 1, 22 technical procedures were included. Round 2 resulted in pre-prioritization of procedures. In round 3, 13 procedures were included in the final prioritized list. The three highly prioritized procedures were ultrasound-guided (US) histological biopsy and fine-needle aspiration, US-guided needle puncture and catheter drainage, and basic abdominal ultrasound. A needs assessment identified and prioritized 13 technical procedures to include in a simulation-based curriculum. The list may be used as guide for development of training programs. • Simulation-based training can supplement training on patients in radiology. • Development of simulation-based training should follow a structured approach. • The CAMES Needs Assessment Formula explores needs for simulation training. • A national Delphi study identified and prioritized procedures suitable for simulation training. • The prioritized list serves as guide for development of courses in radiology.

  18. The Stanmore Nursing Assessment of Psychological Status (SNAPS): not just for spinal cord injury rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikkos, George; Gall, Angela; Smyth, Carol

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is an uncommon condition, potentially causing a wide range of consequences and requiring specialist rehabilitation to optimize health, activity and participation. Early psychological response to injury and relations with staff, as well as family, may set the foundations for long-term emotional adjustment, healthcare utilization and quality of life. The Stanmore Nursing Assessment of Psychological Status has been developed at the London Spinal Cord Injury Centre to empower nurses to adopt a consistently empathic approach to patient care, as part of a comprehensive range of rehabilitation team skills. Its use in other spinal cord injury centers and a broader range of clinical environments (hospital and community) should therefore be considered.

  19. [Work-related stress and psychological distress assessment in urban and suburban public transportation companies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, L; Lazzarini, G; Farisè, E; Quintarelli, E; Riolfi, A; Perbellini, L

    2012-01-01

    The risk of work-related stress has been determined in bus drivers and workers employed in the service department of two urban and suburban public transportation companies. The INAIL evaluation method (Check list and HSE indicator tool) was used. The GHQ-12 questionnaire, which is widely used to assess the level of psychological distress, was also employed. 81.9% of workers involved in the survey answered both the HSE indicator tool and the GHQ-12 questionnaire. The Check list evaluation showed an increase in quantifiable company stress indicators while close examination using the HSE indicator tool demonstrated critical situations for all the subscales, with the control subscales more problematic in bus drivers. The demand, manager's support, relationships and change subscales were most associated with psychological distress in bus drivers, while relationships, role, change and demand subscales were negatively related in workers of the service department.

  20. A probabilistic seismic risk assessment procedure for nuclear power plants: (I) Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.-N.; Whittaker, A.S.; Luco, N.

    2011-01-01

    A new procedure for probabilistic seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is proposed. This procedure modifies the current procedures using tools developed recently for performance-based earthquake engineering of buildings. The proposed procedure uses (a) response-based fragility curves to represent the capacity of structural and nonstructural components of NPPs, (b) nonlinear response-history analysis to characterize the demands on those components, and (c) Monte Carlo simulations to determine the damage state of the components. The use of response-rather than ground-motion-based fragility curves enables the curves to be independent of seismic hazard and closely related to component capacity. The use of Monte Carlo procedure enables the correlation in the responses of components to be directly included in the risk assessment. An example of the methodology is presented in a companion paper to demonstrate its use and provide the technical basis for aspects of the methodology. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Procedure for assessing the performance of a rockfall fragmentation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matas, Gerard; Lantada, Nieves; Corominas, Jordi; Gili, Josep Antoni; Ruiz-Carulla, Roger; Prades, Albert

    2017-04-01

    A Rockfall is a mass instability process frequently observed in road cuts, open pit mines and quarries, steep slopes and cliffs. It is frequently observed that the detached rock mass becomes fragmented when it impacts with the slope surface. The consideration of the fragmentation of the rockfall mass is critical for the calculation of block's trajectories and their impact energies, to further assess their potential to cause damage and design adequate preventive structures. We present here the performance of the RockGIS model. It is a GIS-Based tool that simulates stochastically the fragmentation of the rockfalls, based on a lumped mass approach. In RockGIS, the fragmentation initiates by the disaggregation of the detached rock mass through the pre-existing discontinuities just before the impact with the ground. An energy threshold is defined in order to determine whether the impacting blocks break or not. The distribution of the initial mass between a set of newly generated rock fragments is carried out stochastically following a power law. The trajectories of the new rock fragments are distributed within a cone. The model requires the calibration of both the runout of the resultant blocks and the spatial distribution of the volumes of fragments generated by breakage during their propagation. As this is a coupled process which is controlled by several parameters, a set of performance criteria to be met by the simulation have been defined. The criteria includes: position of the centre of gravity of the whole block distribution, histogram of the runout of the blocks, extent and boundaries of the young debris cover over the slope surface, lateral dispersion of trajectories, total number of blocks generated after fragmentation, volume distribution of the generated fragments, the number of blocks and volume passages past a reference line and the maximum runout distance Since the number of parameters to fit increases significantly when considering fragmentation, the

  2. Rapid psychological assessment of depression and its relationship with physical health among urban elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithra Cheluvaraj

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Old age is associated with increased occurrence of a wide array of Psychological impairments or losses, which might contribute to physical disabilities. As Depression has been identified as the most common aberration its rapid assessment would be able to identify the quality of individual and family life of the elderly. Aims To assess psychological health status with respect to depression among geriatric urban community, and the relationship of depression with health perception and physical health status has been explored. Methods A cross-sectional total geriatric population survey consisting of 254 elderly has been carried out at urban field practice area. A standard geriatric depression scale (Short form has been utilized to assess psychological status. Detailed physical examination and investigations with special reference to Diabetes, Hypertension and Visual defects was carried out. Data was analyzed to find out the relationship of various socio-demographic factors, physical morbidities with depression. Results Out of 254 elderly examined, 32 per cent females and 23 per cent males were found to be suffering from depressive disorders. When assessed for individual health status perception, 25 per cent felt to have good health. Out of 190 geriatric subjects perceiving fair to bad health, 110 were found to be suffering from depression (p<0.001. Depression was also found to be associated with history of hospital admission in the previous year (p<0.05, low vision (p<0.05, diabetes (p<0.01 and hypertension (p<0.01. Conclusion Depression among geriatric age group is associated with physical illness and perception of health.

  3. The Needs Assessment in order to develop the Service of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center, Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance, the Faculty of Education, Mahasarakham University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaiporn Pongpisanrat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the needs assessment in order to develop the service of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center, Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance, the Faculty of Education, Mahasarakham University. This study aimed to compare the realistic service and the desirable service, as well as, to explore the directions to improve the service of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center among the service recipients based on their gender, age range, and field of studies. A total sample of 150 participants were service recipients; college students, lecturers, staff during the first semester academic year 2014 until the first semester academic year 2015. The instruments used included: the Questionnaire on needs assessment of the development of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center, and a focus group discussion. Frequency distribution, percentage, means, standard deviation, and variance were used to analyze the data. The needs assessment results showed as follows: 1 Overall the realistic basis of Psychological Lab and Counseling Center service was in an “above level of needs” while “the highest level of needs” was found in the desirable qualification. After having divided into categories, the result yielded an “above level” on the realistic basis of the counselor characteristics, task planning, and facility arrangement. For the desired qualification, the results showed that the needs on the counselors’ characteristics, task planning, and facility arrangement were identified as at a highest level of needs. 2 No differences were found on the realistic basis needs of the clients, the services provided, gender, and age range of the clients although they responded differently to the questionnaire. The clients who responded to the questionnaire from different field of studies showed the different needs of services provided in the realistic basis significantly at the level of .05 in which the General Sciences

  4. Empirical assessment of published effect sizes and power in the recent cognitive neuroscience and psychology literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, Denes; Ioannidis, John P A

    2017-03-01

    We have empirically assessed the distribution of published effect sizes and estimated power by analyzing 26,841 statistical records from 3,801 cognitive neuroscience and psychology papers published recently. The reported median effect size was D = 0.93 (interquartile range: 0.64-1.46) for nominally statistically significant results and D = 0.24 (0.11-0.42) for nonsignificant results. Median power to detect small, medium, and large effects was 0.12, 0.44, and 0.73, reflecting no improvement through the past half-century. This is so because sample sizes have remained small. Assuming similar true effect sizes in both disciplines, power was lower in cognitive neuroscience than in psychology. Journal impact factors negatively correlated with power. Assuming a realistic range of prior probabilities for null hypotheses, false report probability is likely to exceed 50% for the whole literature. In light of our findings, the recently reported low replication success in psychology is realistic, and worse performance may be expected for cognitive neuroscience.

  5. Binaural beat technology in humans: a pilot study to assess psychologic and physiologic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahbeh, Helané; Calabrese, Carlo; Zwickey, Heather

    2007-01-01

    Binaural beat technology (BBT) products are sold internationally as personal development and health improvement tools. Producers suggest benefit from regular listening to binaural beats including reduced stress and anxiety, and increased focus, concentration, motivation, confidence, and depth in meditation. Binaural beats are auditory brainstem responses that originate in the superior olivary nucleus as a result of different frequency auditory stimuli provided to each ear. Listeners to binaural beat "hear" a beat at a frequency equal to the difference between the frequencies of the applied tones. The objectives of this pilot study were to gather preliminary data on psychologic and physiologic effects of 60 days daily use of BBT for hypothesis generation and to assess compliance, feasibility, and safety for future studies. Uncontrolled pilot study. Eight healthy adults participated in the study. Participants listened to a CD with delta (0-4 Hz) binaural beat frequencies daily for 60 days. Psychologic and physiological data were collected before and after a 60-day intervention. PSYCHOLOGIC: Depression (Beck Depression Inventory-2), anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), mood (Profile of Mood States), absorption (Tellegen Absorption Scale) and quality of Life (World Health Organization-Quality of Life Inventory). PHYSIOLOGICAL: Cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone, melatonin, insulin-like growth factor-1, serotonin, dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, weight, blood pressure, high sensitivity C-reactive protein. There was a decrease in trait anxiety (p = 0.004), an increase in quality of life (p = 0.03), and a decrease in insulin-like growth factor-1 (p = 0.01) and dopamine (p = 0.02) observed between pre- and postintervention measurements. Binaural beat technology may exhibit positive effect on self-reported psychologic measures, especially anxiety. Further research is warranted to explore the effects on anxiety using a larger, randomized and controlled trial.

  6. Empirical assessment of published effect sizes and power in the recent cognitive neuroscience and psychology literature

    OpenAIRE

    Szucs, Denes; Ioannidis, JPA

    2017-01-01

    We have empirically assessed the distribution of published effect sizes and estimated power by analyzing 26,841 statistical records from 3,801 cognitive neuroscience and psychology papers published recently. The reported median effect size was D = 0.93 (interquartile range: 0.64-1.46) for nominally statistically significant results and D = 0.24 (0.11-0.42) for nonsignificant results. Median power to detect small, medium, and large effects was 0.12, 0.44, and 0.73, reflecting no improvement th...

  7. A combined deterministic and probabilistic procedure for safety assessment of components with cracks - Handbook.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillstroem, Peter; Bergman, Mats; Brickstad, Bjoern; Weilin Zang; Sattari-Far, Iradj; Andersson, Peder; Sund, Goeran; Dahlberg, Lars; Nilsson, Fred (Inspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-07-01

    SSM has supported research work for the further development of a previously developed procedure/handbook (SKI Report 99:49) for assessment of detected cracks and tolerance for defect analysis. During the operative use of the handbook it was identified needs to update the deterministic part of the procedure and to introduce a new probabilistic flaw evaluation procedure. Another identified need was a better description of the theoretical basis to the computer program. The principal aim of the project has been to update the deterministic part of the recently developed procedure and to introduce a new probabilistic flaw evaluation procedure. Other objectives of the project have been to validate the conservatism of the procedure, make the procedure well defined and easy to use and make the handbook that documents the procedure as complete as possible. The procedure/handbook and computer program ProSACC, Probabilistic Safety Assessment of Components with Cracks, has been extensively revised within this project. The major differences compared to the last revision are within the following areas: It is now possible to deal with a combination of deterministic and probabilistic data. It is possible to include J-controlled stable crack growth. The appendices on material data to be used for nuclear applications and on residual stresses are revised. A new deterministic safety evaluation system is included. The conservatism in the method for evaluation of the secondary stresses for ductile materials is reduced. A new geometry, a circular bar with a circumferential surface crack has been introduced. The results of this project will be of use to SSM in safety assessments of components with cracks and in assessments of the interval between the inspections of components in nuclear power plants

  8. Assessing Psychological Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes: a Critical Comparison of Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Truscott, E; Pouwer, F; Speight, J

    2017-07-01

    This study aims to examine the operationalisation of 'psychological insulin resistance' (PIR) among people with type 2 diabetes and to identify and critique relevant measures. PIR has been operationalised as (1) the assessment of attitudes or beliefs about insulin therapy and (2) hypothetical or actual resistance, or unwillingness, to use to insulin. Five validated PIR questionnaires were identified. None was fully comprehensive of all aspects of PIR, and the rigour and reporting of questionnaire development and psychometric validation varied considerably between measures. Assessment of PIR should focus on the identification of negative and positive attitudes towards insulin use. Actual or hypothetical insulin refusal may be better conceptualised as a potential consequence of PIR, as its assessment overlooks the attitudes that may prevent insulin use. This paper provides guidance on the selection of questionnaires for clinical or research purpose and the development of new, or improvement of existing, questionnaires.

  9. A Brief Description of Functional Assessment Procedures Reported in JASH (1983-1999).

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Robert E.; Johnson, Jesse W.

    2000-01-01

    This article describes the prevalence of different types of functional assessment and analysis procedures reported in articles in the "Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps" (JASH) involving individuals exhibiting problem behaviors. The most frequently reported functional assessment approach was the use of structured direct…

  10. Assessment of the atmospheric hazards and risks of new chemicals: procedures to estimate "hazard potentials"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw FAAM

    1993-01-01

    In this report a procedure for the assessment of atmospheric hazards and risks of newly introduced chemicals is discussed. However, an assessment of direct effects caused by exposure to expected ambient concentrations or by deposition is not discussed ; here emphasis is on the role which new

  11. The Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure as a Measure of Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timko, C. Alix; England, Erica L.; Herbert, James D.; Forman, Evan M.

    2010-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to pilot the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) in measuring attitudes toward the self: one related to body image specifically and another assessing the broader construct of self-esteem. Study 1 utilized the IRAP with female college students to examine self-referential beliefs regarding body image. Results…

  12. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik E. Langenau

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important. Methods: Using data from previously developed surveys and expert panels, a web-delivered survey was distributed to 3,443 residency program directors. For each of the 28 procedural and 18 advanced communication skills, program directors were asked which clinical skills should be assessed, by whom, when, and how. Descriptive statistics were collected, and Intraclass Correlations (ICC were conducted to determine consistency across different specialties. Results: Among 347 respondents, program directors reported that all advanced communication and some procedural tasks are important to assess. The following procedures were considered ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ to assess: sterile technique (93.8%, advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS (91.1%, basic life support (BLS (90.0%, interpretation of electrocardiogram (89.4% and blood gas (88.7%. Program directors reported that most clinical skills should be assessed at the end of the first year of residency (or later and not before graduation from medical school. A minority were considered important to assess prior to the start of residency training: demonstration of respectfulness (64%, sterile technique (67.2%, BLS (68.9%, ACLS (65.9% and phlebotomy (63.5%. Discussion: Results from this study support that assessing procedural skills such as cardiac resuscitation, sterile technique, and phlebotomy would be amenable to assessment at the end of medical school, but most procedural and advanced communications skills would be amenable to assessment at the end of the

  13. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, Erik E.; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Roberts, William L.; DeChamplain, Andre F.; Boulet, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important. Methods Using data from previously developed surveys and expert panels, a web-delivered survey was distributed to 3,443 residency program directors. For each of the 28 procedural and 18 advanced communication skills, program directors were asked which clinical skills should be assessed, by whom, when, and how. Descriptive statistics were collected, and Intraclass Correlations (ICC) were conducted to determine consistency across different specialties. Results Among 347 respondents, program directors reported that all advanced communication and some procedural tasks are important to assess. The following procedures were considered ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ to assess: sterile technique (93.8%), advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) (91.1%), basic life support (BLS) (90.0%), interpretation of electrocardiogram (89.4%) and blood gas (88.7%). Program directors reported that most clinical skills should be assessed at the end of the first year of residency (or later) and not before graduation from medical school. A minority were considered important to assess prior to the start of residency training: demonstration of respectfulness (64%), sterile technique (67.2%), BLS (68.9%), ACLS (65.9%) and phlebotomy (63.5%). Discussion Results from this study support that assessing procedural skills such as cardiac resuscitation, sterile technique, and phlebotomy would be amenable to assessment at the end of medical school, but most procedural and advanced communications skills would be amenable to assessment at the end of the first

  14. Impact of Psychological Factors on Subjective Disease Activity Assessments in Patients With Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordingley, Lis; Prajapati, Rita; Plant, Darren; Maskell, Deborah; Morgan, Catharine; Ali, Faisal R; Morgan, Ann W; Wilson, Anthony G; Isaacs, John D; Barton, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28), used to assess disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), is a composite score comprising clinical, biochemical, and patient self-report measures. We hypothesized that psychological factors (cognitions and mood) would be more strongly associated with patient-reported components of the DAS28 than clinical or biochemical components. Methods A cross-sectional, observational study of 322 RA patients with active disease (mean DAS28 6.0) awaiting therapy with a biologic agent was undertaken. Patients' illness beliefs, treatment beliefs, and mood were measured using the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ), the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), respectively. Relationships between psychological factors and 1) total DAS28 and 2) individual components of the DAS28 were analyzed using linear regression. Results Total DAS28 produced significant but weak associations with 2 of the Brief IPQ items, but no associations with BMQ or HADS scores. There were larger significant associations between the patient-reported visual analog scale (VAS) with 5 items of the Brief IPQ and with HADS depression. Low illness coherence was associated with higher tender joint count. Three Brief IPQ items and HADS anxiety scores were significantly associated with C-reactive protein level or erythrocyte sedimentation rate. No psychological factors were associated with the swollen joint count. Conclusion One of the subjective components of the DAS28, patient VAS, was highly correlated with cognitive factors and depression in those with severe RA. By reporting individual DAS28 components, clinicians may be better able to assess the impact of therapies on each component, adjusting approaches according to patients' needs. PMID:24339425

  15. Evaluation Methods for Assessing Users’ Psychological Experiences of Web-Based Psychosocial Interventions: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, Moira; Ritchie, Linda; Carter, Philip D; Parry, David Tudor; Koziol-McLain, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of Web-based interventions to deliver mental health and behavior change programs is increasingly popular. They are cost-effective, accessible, and generally effective. Often these interventions concern psychologically sensitive and challenging issues, such as depression or anxiety. The process by which a person receives and experiences therapy is important to understanding therapeutic process and outcomes. While the experience of the patient or client in traditional face-to-face therapy has been evaluated in a number of ways, there appeared to be a gap in the evaluation of patient experiences of therapeutic interventions delivered online. Evaluation of Web-based artifacts has focused either on evaluation of experience from a computer Web-design perspective through usability testing or on evaluation of treatment effectiveness. Neither of these methods focuses on the psychological experience of the person while engaged in the therapeutic process. Objective This study aimed to investigate what methods, if any, have been used to evaluate the in situ psychological experience of users of Web-based self-help psychosocial interventions. Methods A systematic literature review was undertaken of interdisciplinary databases with a focus on health and computer sciences. Studies that met a predetermined search protocol were included. Results Among 21 studies identified that examined psychological experience of the user, only 1 study collected user experience in situ. The most common method of understanding users’ experience was through semistructured interviews conducted posttreatment or questionnaires administrated at the end of an intervention session. The questionnaires were usually based on standardized tools used to assess user experience with traditional face-to-face treatment. Conclusions There is a lack of methods specified in the literature to evaluate the interface between Web-based mental health or behavior change artifacts and users. Main

  16. Association between pretransplant psychological assessments and posttransplant psychiatric disorders in living-related transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunishi, Isao; Sugawara, Yasutoshi; Takayama, Tadatoshi; Makuuchi, Masatoshi; Kawarasaki, Hideo; Surman, Owen S

    2002-01-01

    The authors examined pretransplant assessment in order to predict posttransplant occurrence of psychiatric disorders in living-related transplantation (LRT). Before LRT, the authors administered the Integrated House-Tree-Person Drawing Test (I-HTP) and 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) to 31 donor-recipient pairs undergoing living-related liver transplantation (LRLT) and 65 pairs undergoing living-related kidney transplantation (LRKT). After LRT, the authors examined the occurrence of psychiatric disorders for the recipients and donors. Pretransplant, two psychological indicators,-alexithymia, a lack of verbalized emotion and abnormal projective drawings such as truncated tree representation-were significantly related to the manifestation of paradoxical psychiatric syndrome (PPS) in LRLT and LRKT. The occurrence of PPS was significantly related to recipients' guilt feelings toward living donors, but these were strongly superseded by recipients' desires to escape from approaching death just before LRT. These results suggest that pretransplant psychological assessment is useful for predicting posttransplant occurrence of psychiatric disorders.

  17. Assessing institutional capacities to adapt to climate change: integrating psychological dimensions in the Adaptive Capacity Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothmann, T.; Grecksch, K.; Winges, M.; Siebenhüner, B.

    2013-12-01

    Several case studies show that social factors like institutions, perceptions and social capital strongly affect social capacities to adapt to climate change. Together with economic and technological development they are important for building social capacities. However, there are almost no methodologies for the systematic assessment of social factors. After reviewing existing methodologies we identify the Adaptive Capacity Wheel (ACW) by Gupta et al. (2010), developed for assessing the adaptive capacity of institutions, as the most comprehensive and operationalised framework to assess social factors. The ACW differentiates 22 criteria to assess 6 dimensions: variety, learning capacity, room for autonomous change, leadership, availability of resources, fair governance. To include important psychological factors we extended the ACW by two dimensions: "adaptation motivation" refers to actors' motivation to realise, support and/or promote adaptation to climate; "adaptation belief" refers to actors' perceptions of realisability and effectiveness of adaptation measures. We applied the extended ACW to assess adaptive capacities of four sectors - water management, flood/coastal protection, civil protection and regional planning - in northwestern Germany. The assessments of adaptation motivation and belief provided a clear added value. The results also revealed some methodological problems in applying the ACW (e.g. overlap of dimensions), for which we propose methodological solutions.

  18. Assessment of a consultation-liaison psychiatry and psychology health care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola BA Andreoli

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relevance of subjective criteria adopted by a psychiatry and psychology consultation-liaison service, and their suitability in the evaluation of case registries and objective results. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted and all supervisors of the university hospital service were interviewed. Routinely collected case registries were also reviewed. Standardized assessment with content analysis for each category was carried out. RESULTS: The results showed distortions in the adopted service focus (doctor-patient relationship and consultant requests. This focus is more on consulting physician-oriented interventions than on patients. DISCUSSION: Evaluation of the relevance of service criteria could help promoting quality assessment of the services provided, mainly when objective criteria have not yet been established to assure their suitability.

  19. Assessment of a consultation-liaison psychiatry and psychology health care program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreoli Paola BA

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relevance of subjective criteria adopted by a psychiatry and psychology consultation-liaison service, and their suitability in the evaluation of case registries and objective results. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted and all supervisors of the university hospital service were interviewed. Routinely collected case registries were also reviewed. Standardized assessment with content analysis for each category was carried out. RESULTS: The results showed distortions in the adopted service focus (doctor-patient relationship and consultant requests. This focus is more on consulting physician-oriented interventions than on patients. DISCUSSION: Evaluation of the relevance of service criteria could help promoting quality assessment of the services provided, mainly when objective criteria have not yet been established to assure their suitability.

  20. Objective techniques for psychological assessment, phase 2. [techniques for measuring human performance during space flight stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortz, E. C.; Saur, A. J.; Nowlis, D. P.; Kendall, M. P.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of an initial experiment in a research program designed to develop objective techniques for psychological assessment of individuals and groups participating in long-duration space flights. Specifically examined is the rationale for utilizing measures of attention as an objective assessment technique. Subjects participating in the experiment performed various tasks (eg, playing matrix games which appeared on a display screen along with auditory stimuli). The psychophysiological reactions of the subjects were measured and are given. Previous research of various performance and psychophysiological methods of measuring attention is also discussed. The experiment design (independent and dependent variables) and apparatus (computers and display devices) are described and shown. Conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  1. Self-regulatory mode (locomotion and assessment), well-being (subjective and psychological), and exercise behavior (frequency and intensity) in relation to high school pupils’ academic achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimmefors, Alexander; Mousavi, Fariba; Adrianson, Lillemor; Rosenberg, Patricia; Archer, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Background. Self-regulation is the procedure implemented by an individual striving to reach a goal and consists of two inter-related strategies: assessment and locomotion. Moreover, both subjective and psychological well-being along exercise behaviour might also play a role on adolescents academic achievement. Method. Participants were 160 Swedish high school pupils (111 boys and 49 girls) with an age mean of 17.74 (sd = 1.29). We used the Regulatory Mode Questionnaire to measure self-regulation strategies (i.e., locomotion and assessment). Well-being was measured using Ryff’s Psychological Well-Being Scales short version, the Temporal Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule. Exercise behaviour was self-reported using questions pertaining to frequency and intensity of exercise compliance. Academic achievement was operationalized through the pupils’ mean value of final grades in Swedish, Mathematics, English, and Physical Education. Both correlation and regressions analyses were conducted. Results. Academic achievement was positively related to assessment, well-being, and frequent/intensive exercise behaviour. Assessment was, however, negatively related to well-being. Locomotion on the other hand was positively associated to well-being and also to exercise behaviour. Conclusions. The results suggest a dual (in)direct model to increase pupils’ academic achievement and well-being—assessment being directly related to higher academic achievement, while locomotion is related to frequently exercising and well-being, which in turn, increase academic achievement. PMID:25861553

  2. Self-regulatory mode (locomotion and assessment), well-being (subjective and psychological), and exercise behavior (frequency and intensity) in relation to high school pupils' academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Danilo; Jimmefors, Alexander; Mousavi, Fariba; Adrianson, Lillemor; Rosenberg, Patricia; Archer, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Background. Self-regulation is the procedure implemented by an individual striving to reach a goal and consists of two inter-related strategies: assessment and locomotion. Moreover, both subjective and psychological well-being along exercise behaviour might also play a role on adolescents academic achievement. Method. Participants were 160 Swedish high school pupils (111 boys and 49 girls) with an age mean of 17.74 (sd = 1.29). We used the Regulatory Mode Questionnaire to measure self-regulation strategies (i.e., locomotion and assessment). Well-being was measured using Ryff's Psychological Well-Being Scales short version, the Temporal Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule. Exercise behaviour was self-reported using questions pertaining to frequency and intensity of exercise compliance. Academic achievement was operationalized through the pupils' mean value of final grades in Swedish, Mathematics, English, and Physical Education. Both correlation and regressions analyses were conducted. Results. Academic achievement was positively related to assessment, well-being, and frequent/intensive exercise behaviour. Assessment was, however, negatively related to well-being. Locomotion on the other hand was positively associated to well-being and also to exercise behaviour. Conclusions. The results suggest a dual (in)direct model to increase pupils' academic achievement and well-being-assessment being directly related to higher academic achievement, while locomotion is related to frequently exercising and well-being, which in turn, increase academic achievement.

  3. An exploratory assessment of theory of mind and psychological impairment in patients with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghi, Fiorenzo; Cotugno, Armando; Cecere, Francesco; Sirolli, Arianna; Palazzoni, David; Bosco, Francesca M

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate psychosocial functioning and different dimensions of theory of mind (ToM) in people with bulimia nervosa (BN) and Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified-BN type (EDNOS-BN). Psychosocial functioning and ToM were assessed in a sample of young adult females, 16 BN and 16 EDNOS-BN outpatients and 16 healthy controls (HCs). They were assessed using the Eating Disorder Inventory-Symptom Checklist-2 (EDI-2 SC) for evaluating psychological traits associated with eating disorders; the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) for evaluating psychopathological status; and the Theory of Mind Assessment Scale (Th.o.m.a.s.), a semi-structured interview aimed at assessing a person's different dimensions of ToM. The BN and EDNOS-BN groups exhibited worse performance than the control group on all dimensions of the SCL-90-R, and on all dimensions of the EDI-2 SC. The only difference for perfectionism was that BN obtained higher scores than EDNOS-BN group. Our results also revealed an impairment of third-person and second-order ToM in patients with bulimia (BN and EDNOS-BN) with respect to control subjects. These preliminary data have important implications for future empirical work, in that they provide valuable information regarding the importance of investigating the various facets of ToM ability separately, in order to provide a more detailed profile of ToM functioning in the clinical samples. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  4. An Assessment of Psychological Need in Emergency Medical Staff in the Northern Health and Social Care Trust Area

    OpenAIRE

    McAleese, Aisling; Diamond, Aisling; Curran, David

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Psychological stress is increasingly recognised within emergency medicine, given the environmental and clinical stressors associated with the specialism. The current study assessed whether psychological distress is experienced by emergency medical staff and if so, what is the expressed need within this population? Participants: Participants included ambulance personnel, nursing staff, doctors and ancillary support staff within two Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments and twel...

  5. Assessing distress in the community: psychometric properties and crosswalk comparison of eight measures of psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterham, P J; Sunderland, M; Slade, T; Calear, A L; Carragher, N

    2017-10-02

    Many measures are available for measuring psychological distress in the community. Limited research has compared these scales to identify the best performing tools. A common metric for distress measures would enable researchers and clinicians to equate scores across different measures. The current study evaluated eight psychological distress scales and developed crosswalks (tables/figures presenting multiple scales on a common metric) to enable scores on these scales to be equated. An Australian online adult sample (N = 3620, 80% female) was administered eight psychological distress measures: Patient Health Questionnaire-4, Kessler-10/Kessler-6, Distress Questionnaire-5 (DQ5), Mental Health Inventory-5, Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25), Self-Report Questionnaire-20 (SRQ-20) and Distress Thermometer. The performance of each measure in identifying DSM-5 criteria for a range of mental disorders was tested. Scale fit to a unidimensional latent construct was assessed using Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). Finally, crosswalks were developed using Item Response Theory. The DQ5 had optimal performance in identifying individuals meeting DSM-5 criteria, with adequate fit to a unidimensional construct. The HSCL-25 and SRQ-20 also had adequate fit but poorer specificity and/or sensitivity than the DQ5 in identifying caseness. The unidimensional CFA of the combined item bank for the eight scales showed acceptable fit, enabling the creation of crosswalk tables. The DQ5 had optimal performance in identifying risk of mental health problems. The crosswalk tables developed in this study will enable rapid conversion between distress measures, providing more efficient means of data aggregation and a resource to facilitate interpretation of scores from multiple distress scales.

  6. Assessing institutional capacities to adapt to climate change - integrating psychological dimensions in the Adaptive Capacity Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothmann, T.; Grecksch, K.; Winges, M.; Siebenhüner, B.

    2013-03-01

    Several case studies show that "soft social factors" (e.g. institutions, perceptions, social capital) strongly affect social capacities to adapt to climate change. Many soft social factors can probably be changed faster than "hard social factors" (e.g. economic and technological development) and are therefore particularly important for building social capacities. However, there are almost no methodologies for the systematic assessment of soft social factors. Gupta et al. (2010) have developed the Adaptive Capacity Wheel (ACW) for assessing the adaptive capacity of institutions. The ACW differentiates 22 criteria to assess six dimensions: variety, learning capacity, room for autonomous change, leadership, availability of resources, fair governance. To include important psychological factors we extended the ACW by two dimensions: "adaptation motivation" refers to actors' motivation to realise, support and/or promote adaptation to climate. "Adaptation belief" refers to actors' perceptions of realisability and effectiveness of adaptation measures. We applied the extended ACW to assess adaptive capacities of four sectors - water management, flood/coastal protection, civil protection and regional planning - in North Western Germany. The assessments of adaptation motivation and belief provided a clear added value. The results also revealed some methodological problems in applying the ACW (e.g. overlap of dimensions), for which we propose methodological solutions.

  7. Suicide Risk Assessment Training for Psychology Doctoral Programs: Core Competencies and a Framework for Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Robert J; Johnson, Shara M; McLaughlin, Jennifer; Rausch, Emilie M; Conroy, Mary Alice

    2013-02-01

    Clinical and counseling psychology programs currently lack adequate evidence-based competency goals and training in suicide risk assessment. To begin to address this problem, this article proposes core competencies and an integrated training framework that can form the basis for training and research in this area. First, we evaluate the extent to which current training is effective in preparing trainees for suicide risk assessment. Within this discussion, sample and methodological issues are reviewed. Second, as an extension of these methodological training issues, we integrate empirically- and expert-derived suicide risk assessment competencies from several sources with the goal of streamlining core competencies for training purposes. Finally, a framework for suicide risk assessment training is outlined. The approach employs Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) methodology, an approach commonly utilized in medical competency training. The training modality also proposes the Suicide Competency Assessment Form (SCAF), a training tool evaluating self- and observer-ratings of trainee core competencies. The training framework and SCAF are ripe for empirical evaluation and potential training implementation.

  8. The OPAL Project: Open source Procedure for Assessment of Loss using Global Earthquake Modelling software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniell, James

    2010-05-01

    This paper provides a comparison between Earthquake Loss Estimation (ELE) software packages and their application using an "Open Source Procedure for Assessment of Loss using Global Earthquake Modelling software" (OPAL). The OPAL procedure has been developed to provide a framework for optimisation of a Global Earthquake Modelling process through: 1) Overview of current and new components of earthquake loss assessment (vulnerability, hazard, exposure, specific cost and technology); 2) Preliminary research, acquisition and familiarisation with all available ELE software packages; 3) Assessment of these 30+ software packages in order to identify the advantages and disadvantages of the ELE methods used; and 4) Loss analysis for a deterministic earthquake (Mw7.2) for the Zeytinburnu district, Istanbul, Turkey, by applying 3 software packages (2 new and 1 existing): a modified displacement-based method based on DBELA (Displacement Based Earthquake Loss Assessment), a capacity spectrum based method HAZUS (HAZards United States) and the Norwegian HAZUS-based SELENA (SEismic Loss EstimatioN using a logic tree Approach) software which was adapted for use in order to compare the different processes needed for the production of damage, economic and social loss estimates. The modified DBELA procedure was found to be more computationally expensive, yet had less variability, indicating the need for multi-tier approaches to global earthquake loss estimation. Similar systems planning and ELE software produced through the OPAL procedure can be applied to worldwide applications, given exposure data. Keywords: OPAL, displacement-based, DBELA, earthquake loss estimation, earthquake loss assessment, open source, HAZUS

  9. Digital photography and the assessment of therapeutic results after bleaching procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengel, Wolfgang M

    2003-01-01

    The therapeutic outcome of tooth-bleaching procedures can be assessed by different methods, one of them being digital photography. However, none of the methods seems to be perfect. In this overview factors are discussed that have an influence on color rendition and image brightness in (digital) photography. A photographic procedure is proposed that results in comparable images. Beginning with a short description of some digital cameras currently used in dental photography, the article discusses the influence of light and camera technology on image brightness and color rendition in detail. Even if a highly standardized procedure is performed, there remain factors that affect color and brightness that cannot be excluded completely. Therefore, a photographic procedure is proposed that includes a piece of gray card in the picture as a neutral reference object. In this way, color casts can be eliminated and image brightness can be fine tuned using a standard image-editing program (Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Systems Incorporated, San Jose, CA, USA) before the relevant color values are metered by the same software. A photographic procedure using digital cameras is proposed that is relatively simple and sufficiently precise to allow the assessment of the therapeutic outcome of tooth-bleaching procedures.

  10. Essentials of TAT and Other Storytelling Techniques Assessment. Essentials of Psychological Assessment Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teglasi, Hedwig

    This book provides guidance into the use of storytelling techniques as an approach to personality assessment and explains how to administer, score, and interpret such tests. The tests discussed include the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT), the Roberts Apperception Test for Children, and the TEMAS (Tell-Me-a-Story). Each chapter contains callout…

  11. The appropriateness method has acceptable reliability and validity for assessing overuse and underuse of surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Elise H; Gibbons, Melinda Maggard; Ko, Clifford Y; Shekelle, Paul G

    2012-11-01

    To summarize the findings of methodological studies on the RAND/University of California Los Angeles (RAND/UCLA) appropriateness method, which was developed to assess if variation in the use of surgical procedures is because of overuse and/or underuse. A MEDLINE literature search was performed. Studies were included if they assessed the reliability or validity of the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method for a surgical procedure or the effect of altering panelist composition or eliminating in-person discussion between rating rounds. Information was abstracted on procedure, study design, and findings. One thousand six hundred one titles were identified, and 37 met the inclusion criteria. The test-retest reliability is good to very good (kappa, 0.64-0.81) for total knee and hip joint replacement, coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and carotid endarterectomy (CEA). The interpanel reliability is moderate to very good (kappa, 0.52-0.83) for CABG and hysterectomy. Construct validity has been demonstrated by comparing the appropriateness method with guidelines and/or evidence-based approaches for endoscopy, colonoscopy, CABG, hysterectomy, and CEA. Predictive validity has been studied for cardiac revascularization, in which concordance with appropriateness classification is associated with better clinical outcomes. Our findings support use of the appropriateness method to assess variation in the rates of the procedures studied by identifying overuse and underuse. Further methodological research should be conducted as appropriateness criteria are developed and implemented for a broader range of procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Procedure to select test organisms for environmental risk assessment of genetically modified crops in aquatic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbeck, Angelika; Bundschuh, Rebecca; Bundschuh, Mirco; Hofmann, Frieder; Oehen, Bernadette; Otto, Mathias; Schulz, Ralf; Trtikova, Miluse

    2017-11-01

    For a long time, the environmental risk assessment (ERA) of genetically modified (GM) crops focused mainly on terrestrial ecosystems. This changed when it was scientifically established that aquatic ecosystems are exposed to GM crop residues that may negatively affect aquatic species. To assist the risk assessment process, we present a tool to identify ecologically relevant species usable in tiered testing prior to authorization or for biological monitoring in the field. The tool is derived from a selection procedure for terrestrial ecosystems with substantial but necessary changes to adequately consider the differences in the type of ecosystems. By using available information from the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC), the procedure can draw upon existing biological data on aquatic systems. The proposed procedure for aquatic ecosystems was tested for the first time during an expert workshop in 2013, using the cultivation of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) maize as the GM crop and 1 stream type as the receiving environment in the model system. During this workshop, species executing important ecological functions in aquatic environments were identified in a stepwise procedure according to predefined ecological criteria. By doing so, we demonstrated that the procedure is practicable with regard to its goal: From the initial long list of 141 potentially exposed aquatic species, 7 species and 1 genus were identified as the most suitable candidates for nontarget testing programs. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:974-979. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  13. Assessment of significant psychological distress at the end of pregnancy and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorén-Guerrero, L; Gascón-Catalán, A; Pasierb, D; Romero-Cardiel, M A

    2017-10-25

    The aim of this study is to study the prevalence of mental distress at the end of pregnancy and after birth and the impact of selected socio-demographic and obstetric factors. This is a cross-sectional study. The sample is consisted of 351 puerperal women at the age of 18 and over. Sociodemographic, obstetric variables were collected to detect significant psychological distress; the instrument used was General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). Logistic multivariable regressions were used to investigate associations. The prevalence of significant mental distress amounted to 81.2%, mostly related to social relationship and anxiety. The women who affirmed having more stress during pregnancy had too significantly increased emotional distress before the birth as well as during early puerperium, increasing somatic symptoms (p socio-demographic data, being an immigrant is the only protective factor reducing the social dysfunction in the last weeks of pregnancy (p stress experienced during pregnancy and parity. It is advisable to perform proper assessment of stress and significant psychological distress at the early stage of pregnancy and repeatedly later on until delivery. Information and support from professionals can help to decrease and prevent their negative impact on maternal and fetal health, as observed in the current evidence.

  14. Assessing Risks and Benefits of Invasive Cardiac Procedures in Patients with Advanced Multimorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkaby, Ariela R; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    Age-related cardiovascular disease in older adults is more likely to occur in combination with other age-related diseases, with mounting interactive complexity as multiple morbidities accumulate. Although invasive cardiac procedures are frequently recommended for cardiovascular disease, their value is less certain in the context of age-related intricacies of care. Tools for risk assessment before invasive procedures are insensitive to risks corresponding to the unique challenges of older adults. Recognizing multimorbidity and other age-related risks provides opportunities to intervene and moderate dangers. By refocusing risk assessment in terms of patient-centered goals, the fundamental utility of invasive cardiac procedures may be reconsidered and alternative therapies prioritized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of Competence in EVAR Procedures: A Novel Rating Scale Developed by the Delphi Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm, M; Lönn, L; Bech, B; Schroeder, T V; Konge, L

    2017-07-01

    To develop a procedure specific global rating scale for assessment of operator competence in endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). A Delphi approach was used to achieve expert consensus. A panel of 32 international experts (median 300 EVAR procedures, range 200-3000) from vascular surgery (n = 21) and radiology (n = 11) was established. The first Delphi round was based on a review of endovascular skills assessment papers, stent graft instructions for use, and structured interviews. It led to a primary pool of 83 items that were formulated as global rating scale items with tentative anchors. Iterative Delphi rounds were executed. The panellists rated the importance of each item on a 5 point Likert scale. Consensus was defined as 80% of the panel rating an item 4 or 5 in the primary round and 90% in subsequent rounds. Consensus on the final assessment tool was defined as Cronbach's alpha > .8 after a minimum of three rounds. Thirty-two of 35 invited experts participated. Three rounds of surveys were completed with a completion rate of 100% in the first two rounds and 91% in round three. The 83 primary assessment items were supplemented with five items suggested by the panel and reduced to seven pivotal assessment items that reached consensus, Cronbach's alpha = 0.82. The seven item rating scale covers key elements of competence in EVAR stent placement and deployment. Each item has well defined grades with explicit anchors at unacceptable, acceptable, and superior performance on a 5 point Likert scale. The Delphi methodology allowed for international consensus on a new procedure specific global rating scale for assessment of competence in EVAR. The resulting scale, EndoVascular Aortic Repair Assessment of Technical Expertise (EVARATE), represents key elements in the procedure. EVARATE constitutes an assessment tool for providing structured feedback to endovascular operators in training. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier

  16. Developing best practices teaching procedures for skinfold assessment: observational examination using the Think Aloud method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrup, Michael E; Verba, Steven D; Lynn, Jeffrey S

    2015-12-01

    Skinfold assessment is valid and economical; however, it has a steep learning curve, and many programs only include one exposure to the technique. Increasing the number of exposures to skinfold assessment within an undergraduate curriculum would likely increase skill proficiency. The present study combined observational and Think Aloud methodologies to quantify procedural and cognitive characteristics of skinfold assessment. It was hypothesized that 1) increased curricular exposure to skinfold assessment would improve proficiency and 2) the combination of an observational and Think Aloud analysis would provide quantifiable areas of emphasis for instructing skinfold assessment. Seventy-five undergraduates with varied curricular exposure performed a seven-site skinfold assessment on a test subject while expressing their thoughts aloud. A trained practitioner recorded procedural observations, with transcripts generated from audio recordings to capture cognitive information. Skinfold measurements were compared with a criterion value, and bias scores were generated. Participants whose total bias fell within ±3.5% of the criterion value were proficient, with the remainder nonproficient. An independent-samples t-test was used to compare procedural and cognitive observations across experience and proficiency groups. Additional curricular exposure improved performance of skinfold assessment in areas such as the measurement of specific sites (e.g., chest, abdomen, and thigh) and procedural (e.g., landmark identification) and cognitive skills (e.g., complete site explanation). Furthermore, the Think Aloud method is a valuable tool for determining curricular strengths and weaknesses with skinfold assessment and as a pedagogical tool for individual instruction and feedback in the classroom. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  17. Assessment of Perceived Parental Psychological Control in Chinese Adolescents in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: There is no validated self-report measure of parental psychological control in the Chinese culture. The reliability and validity of the Chinese Paternal Psychological Control Scale (CPPCS) and Chinese Maternal Psychological Control Scale (CMPCS) were examined. Method: A total of 3,017 Chinese secondary school students responded to the…

  18. 40 CFR 63.1104 - Process vents from continuous unit operations: applicability assessment procedures and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....1104 Process vents from continuous unit operations: applicability assessment procedures and methods. (a... from continuous unit operations. The owner or operator of a process vent is not required to determine... process vent from a batch unit operation manifolded with at least one process vent from a continuous unit...

  19. Learning effects of repetitive administration of the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure in novice prosthetic users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golea-Vasluian, Ecaterina; Bongers, Raoul M; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; van der Sluis, Corry K

    Objective: The Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) evaluates the functionality of normal, injured or prosthetic hands. The aim was to evaluate the learning effects of SHAP tasks and the appropriateness of the time limits applied per task in novice prosthetic users. Methods: Right-handed

  20. Open Source Procedure for Assessment of Loss using Global Earthquake Modelling software (OPAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniell, J. E.

    2011-07-01

    This paper provides a comparison between Earthquake Loss Estimation (ELE) software packages and their application using an "Open Source Procedure for Assessment of Loss using Global Earthquake Modelling software" (OPAL). The OPAL procedure was created to provide a framework for optimisation of a Global Earthquake Modelling process through: 1. overview of current and new components of earthquake loss assessment (vulnerability, hazard, exposure, specific cost, and technology); 2. preliminary research, acquisition, and familiarisation for available ELE software packages; 3. assessment of these software packages in order to identify the advantages and disadvantages of the ELE methods used; and 4. loss analysis for a deterministic earthquake (Mw = 7.2) for the Zeytinburnu district, Istanbul, Turkey, by applying 3 software packages (2 new and 1 existing): a modified displacement-based method based on DBELA (Displacement Based Earthquake Loss Assessment, Crowley et al., 2006), a capacity spectrum based method HAZUS (HAZards United States, FEMA, USA, 2003) and the Norwegian HAZUS-based SELENA (SEismic Loss EstimatioN using a logic tree Approach, Lindholm et al., 2007) software which was adapted for use in order to compare the different processes needed for the production of damage, economic, and social loss estimates. The modified DBELA procedure was found to be more computationally expensive, yet had less variability, indicating the need for multi-tier approaches to global earthquake loss estimation. Similar systems planning and ELE software produced through the OPAL procedure can be applied to worldwide applications, given exposure data.

  1. Preliminary study of the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure for Children and its reliability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golea-Vasluian, Ecaterina; Bongers, Raoul M.; Reinders - Messelink, Heleen A.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) is currently used in the adult population for evaluating the functionality of impaired or prosthetic hands. The SHAP cannot be used for children because of the relatively larger size of the objects used to perform SHAP tasks and unknown

  2. A Classical Conditioning Procedure for the Hearing Assessment of Multiply Handicapped Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Hearing assessments of multiply handicapped children/adolescents were conducted using classical conditioning (with an air puff as unconditioned stimulus) and operant conditioning (with a modified visual reinforcement audiometry procedure or edible reinforcement). Findings indicate that classical conditioning was successful with 21 of the 23…

  3. A Choice Procedure to Assess the Aversive Effects of Drugs in Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnik, Christopher A.; Jimenez-Gomez, Corina; Woods, James H.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this series of experiments was to develop an operant choice procedure to examine rapidly the punishing effects of intravenous drugs in rats. First, the cardiovascular effects of experimenter-administered intravenous histamine, a known aversive drug, were assessed to determine a biologically active dose range. Next, rats responded on…

  4. Assessing Women's Responses to Sexual Threat: Validity of a Virtual Role-Play Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouriles, Ernest N.; Rowe, Lorelei Simpson; McDonald, Renee; Platt, Cora G.; Gomez, Gabriella S.

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the validity of a role-play procedure that uses virtual reality technology to assess women's responses to sexual threat. Forty-eight female undergraduate students were randomly assigned to either a standard, face-to-face role-play (RP) or a virtual role-play (VRP) of a sexually coercive situation. A multimethod assessment…

  5. 45 CFR 5.44 - Procedures for assessing and collecting fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... INFORMATION REGULATIONS Fees § 5.44 Procedures for assessing and collecting fees. (a) Agreement to pay. We... will require you to pay your past due fees and/or the estimated fees, or a deposit, before we start... normally require you to pay all fees before we furnish the records to you. We may, at our discretion, send...

  6. Developing a new assessment procedure of social information processing in adolescents within secure residential care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rest, M.M.; van Bokhoven, I.; van Nieuwenhuijzen, M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Vriens, A.; Matthys, W.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a new assessment procedure of social information processing (SIP) for adolescents, to explore its validity and to examine whether it differentiated between IQ groups. Ninety-four adolescents within secure residential care were administered the SIP

  7. Developing a new assessment procedure of social information processing in adolescents within secure residential care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rest, Maaike M.; van Bokhoven, Irene; van Nieuwenhuijzen, Maroesjka; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Vriens, Aart; Matthys, Walter

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a new assessment procedure of social information processing (SIP) for adolescents, to explore its validity and to examine whether it differentiated between IQ groups. Ninety-four adolescents within secure residential care were administered the SIP

  8. Meeting on Common Ground: Assessing Parent-Child Relationships through the Joint Painting Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavron, Tami

    2013-01-01

    A basic assumption in psychotherapy with children is that the parent-child relationship is central to the child's development. This article describes the Joint Painting Procedure, an art-based assessment for evaluating relationships with respect to the two main developmental tasks of middle childhood: (a) the parent's ability to monitor and…

  9. Evaluation of a procedure to assess the adverse effects of illicit drugs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amsterdam, J G C van; Best, W; Opperhuizen, A; Wolff, F A de

    2004-01-01

    The assessment procedure of new synthetic illicit drugs that are not documented in the UN treaty on psychotropic drugs was evaluated using a modified Electre model. Drugs were evaluated by an expert panel via the open Delphi approach, where the written score was discussed on 16 items, covering

  10. In systemic sclerosis, anxiety and depression assessed by hospital anxiety depression scale are independently associated with disability and psychological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, Angela; Mikhaylova, Svetlana; Baccini, Marco; Lupi, Ilaria; Matucci Cerinic, Marco; Maddali Bongi, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Anxious and depressive symptoms are frequent in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). Our objective is to assess their prevalence and association with district and global disability and psychological variables. 119 SSc patients were assessed by Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS). Clinical depression and anxiety were defined for HADS score cutoff ≥ 8. Patients were assessed for psychological symptoms (RSES, COPE-NIV), hand (HAMIS, CHFDS, fist closure, and hand opening) and face disability (MHISS, mouth opening), global disability, and fatigue (HAQ, FACIT). Both depression and anxiety in SSc are 36%. Depressive patients with comorbid anxiety have higher HADS-D score than patients with depression only (P = 0.001). HADS-A and -D are positively correlated with global disability, hands and mouth disability, fatigue, self-esteem and avoidance coping strategy, and, only HADS-A, also with social support (P anxiety correlate to local and global disabilities and psychological characteristics. Depressive patients with comorbid anxiety have higher level of depressive symptoms.

  11. Psychological Contract and Organizational Change: Assessing M-As’ Impact on Survivors of Pharmaceuticals in Puerto Rico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz E. Quiñones González

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mergers and acquisitions (M-A affect the psychological contract of employees. This study assessed the impact of the M-A on survivors’ psychological contract, job satisfaction, organizational commitment, turnover intention, and whether credible explanation moderated employees’ reactions. Statistical analyses were performed on data gathered from 196 respondents of two pharmaceuticals in Puerto Rico. Results revealed an inverse correlation between perceived psychological contract violation (PCV and the variables job satisfaction and organizational commitment. They also confirmed the direct correlation between PCV and the variable turnover intention. This study found an effect of the moderating variable credible explanation on the variables job satisfaction and organizational commitment. An understanding of psychological contract theory may reduce the perceived violation and its impact on employees’ attitudes.

  12. A study on psychological assessment of adolescent girls in rural schools of West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmalya Manna

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the adolescent population constitutes one-sixth of the total global population, their physical and mental health have become a serious concern. Depression is becoming the most common mental health problem. According to the WHO, depression is projected to become the second leading cause of disability after heart disease. Anxiety and its manifestations are influenced by cultural beliefs, practices and associated with substantial negative effects on children’s social, emotional and academic success. Specific effects include poor social and coping skills, loneliness, low self-esteem, and difficulty forming friendships. The objectives of the present study were to assess the psychological health profile of students using DASS21 Scale. This cross-sectional study was done among 435 rural school students selected by random sampling. Statistically significant association of depression with absence of sibling, self-reported scholastic performance, and relationship with parents and peers were found.

  13. A study on psychological assessment of adolescent girls in rural schools of West Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmalya Manna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the adolescent population constitutes oneHsixth of the total global population, their physical and mental health have become a serious concern. Depression is becoming the most common mental health problem. According to the WHO, depression is projected to become the second leading cause of disability after heart disease. Anxiety and its manifestations are influenced by cultural beliefs, practices and associated with substantial negative effects on children’s social, emotional and academic success. Specific effects include poor social and coping skills, loneliness, low selfHesteem, and difficulty forming friendships. The objectives of the present study were to assess the psychological health profile of students using DASS21 Scale. This cross sectional study was done among 435 rural school students selected by random sampling. Statistically significant association of depression with absence of sibling, self Hreported scholastic performance, relationship with parents and peers were found.

  14. Assessing social capacity and vulnerability of private households to natural hazards - integrating psychological and governance factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werg, J.; Grothmann, T.; Schmidt, P.

    2013-06-01

    People are unequally affected by extreme weather events in terms of mortality, morbidity and financial losses; this is the case not only for developing, but also for industrialized countries. Previous research has established indicators for identifying who is particularly vulnerable and why, focusing on socio-demographic factors such as income, age, gender, health and minority status. However, these factors can only partly explain the large disparities in the extent to which people are affected by natural hazards. Moreover, these factors are usually not alterable in the short to medium term, which limits their usefulness for strategies of reducing social vulnerability and building social capacity. Based on a literature review and an expert survey, we propose an approach for refining assessments of social vulnerability and building social capacity by integrating psychological and governance factors.

  15. Applying cognitive developmental psychology to middle school physics learning: The rule assessment method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinen, Nicole R.; Chi, Min; Chin, Doris B.; Prempeh, Joe; Blair, Kristen P.; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive developmental psychology often describes children's growing qualitative understanding of the physical world. Physics educators may be able to use the relevant methods to advantage for characterizing changes in students' qualitative reasoning. Siegler developed the "rule assessment" method for characterizing levels of qualitative understanding for two factor situations (e.g., volume and mass for density). The method assigns children to rule levels that correspond to the degree they notice and coordinate the two factors. Here, we provide a brief tutorial plus a demonstration of how we have used this method to evaluate instructional outcomes with middle-school students who learned about torque, projectile motion, and collisions using different instructional methods with simulations.

  16. Assessing motor imagery in brain-computer interface training: Psychological and neurophysiological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, Anatoly; Liburkina, Sofya; Yakovlev, Lev; Perepelkina, Olga; Kaplan, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Motor imagery (MI) is considered to be a promising cognitive tool for improving motor skills as well as for rehabilitation therapy of movement disorders. It is believed that MI training efficiency could be improved by using the brain-computer interface (BCI) technology providing real-time feedback on person's mental attempts. While BCI is indeed a convenient and motivating tool for practicing MI, it is not clear whether it could be used for predicting or measuring potential positive impact of the training. In this study, we are trying to establish whether the proficiency in BCI control is associated with any of the neurophysiological or psychological correlates of motor imagery, as well as to determine possible interrelations among them. For that purpose, we studied motor imagery in a group of 19 healthy BCI-trained volunteers and performed a correlation analysis across various quantitative assessment metrics. We examined subjects' sensorimotor event-related EEG events, corticospinal excitability changes estimated with single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), BCI accuracy and self-assessment reports obtained with specially designed questionnaires and interview routine. Our results showed, expectedly, that BCI performance is dependent on the subject's capability to suppress EEG sensorimotor rhythms, which in turn is correlated with the idle state amplitude of those oscillations. Neither BCI accuracy nor the EEG features associated with MI were found to correlate with the level of corticospinal excitability increase during motor imagery, and with assessed imagery vividness. Finally, a significant correlation was found between the level of corticospinal excitability increase and kinesthetic vividness of imagery (KVIQ-20 questionnaire). Our results suggest that two distinct neurophysiological mechanisms might mediate possible effects of motor imagery: the non-specific cortical sensorimotor disinhibition and the focal corticospinal excitability increase

  17. Assessing the monitor warm-up time required before a psychological experiment can begin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poth, Christian H.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Visual experiments in psychology, psychophysics, and cognitive neuroscience require precise control over stimulus characteristics, such as luminance and contrast. In such experiments, stimuli are most often presented using computer monitors. These monitors bear an often neglected and rarely reported source of experimental confounds and uncontrolled variation: they take a warm-up time in which their luminance systematically changes until a stable level is eventually reached. Here we demonstrate this problem by measuring luminance over time for five different monitors. Results indicate that not only the warm-up time but also the course that the warm-up takes can vary greatly between different monitors. To address this problem, we propose a simple method of approximating a monitor\\IeC {\\textquoteright }s warm-up time, which takes into account theoretical considerations of the specific experiment. On this basis, we suggest a standardized experimental procedure and a standardized way of reporting its results to enable experimenters to control for monitor warm-up time.

  18. Graphologists' assessment of extraversion compared with assessment by means of a psychological test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, J J; Hazelzet, A M

    1997-12-01

    The study investigated whether graphologists can infer extraversion from handwriting correctly. On the basis of three personality questionnaires, three persons (targets) were classified as extraverted and three as introverted. Ten graphologists independently analysed the handwriting of the targets and classified them as extraverted or introverted. Of the 60 (10 graphologists for 6 targets) classifications 58 were correct, which shows the graphologists assessed the classification of extraversion from handwriting. Graphologists agreed substantially on which characteristics of the handwriting were indicative for classification as extraversion or introversion. In each handwriting sample, however, both extraverted and introverted characteristics were present. Eventual classification may be based on the relative frequency of the two kinds of characteristics. Comparative studies like this one indicate that in research one should consider whether graphologists and psychologists share the same notion of extraversion.

  19. Assessment tools in obesity - psychological measures, diet, activity, and body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beechy, Laura; Galpern, Jennie; Petrone, Andrew; Das, Sai Krupa

    2012-08-20

    The global increase in the prevalence of obesity has led to an increased need for measurement tools for research, management and treatment of the obese person. The physical size limitations imposed by obesity, variations in body composition from that of normal weight, and a complex psychopathology all pose tremendous challenges to the assessment of an obese person. There is little published research regarding what tools can be used with confidence. This review is designed to provide researchers and clinicians with a guide to the current and emerging measurement tools specifically associated with obesity research and practice. Section 1 addresses psychological measures of well being. Sections 2, 3, and 4 focus on the assessment of food intake, activity, and body composition. All sections address basic challenges involved in the study and management of obesity, and highlight methodological issues associated with the use of common assessment tools. The best available methods for use in the obese both in research and clinical practice are recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Financial and testamentary capacity evaluations: procedures and assessment instruments underneath a functional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Liliana B; Simões, Mário R; Firmino, Horácio; Peisah, Carmelle

    2014-02-01

    Mental health professionals are frequently involved in mental capacity determinations. However, there is a lack of specific measures and well-defined procedures for these evaluations. The main purpose of this paper is to provide a review of financial and testamentary capacity evaluation procedures, including not only the traditional neuropsychological and functional assessment but also the more recently developed forensic assessment instruments (FAIs), which have been developed to provide a specialized answer to legal systems regarding civil competencies. Here the main guidelines, papers, and other references are reviewed in order to achieve a complete and comprehensive selection of instruments used in the assessment of financial and testamentary capacity. Although some specific measures for financial abilities have been developed recently, the same is not true for testamentary capacity. Here are presented several instruments or methodologies for assessing financial and testamentary capacity, including neuropsychological assessment, functional assessment scales, performance based functional assessment instruments, and specific FAIs. FAIs are the only specific instruments intended to provide a specific and direct answer to the assessment of financial capacity based on legal systems. Considering the need to move from a diagnostic to a functional approach in financial and testamentary capacity evaluations, it is essential to consider both general functional examination as well as cognitive functioning.

  1. Metric qualities of the cognitive behavioral assessment for outcome evaluation to estimate psychological treatment effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertolotti G

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Giorgio Bertolotti,1 Paolo Michielin,2 Giulio Vidotto,2 Ezio Sanavio,2 Gioia Bottesi,2 Ornella Bettinardi,3 Anna Maria Zotti4 1Psychology Unit, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Scientific Institute, Tradate, VA, 2Department of General Psychology, Padua University, Padova, 3Department of Mental Health and Addictive Behavior, AUSL Piacenza, Piacenza, 4Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, IRCCS, Scientific Institute, Veruno, NO, Italy Background: Cognitive behavioral assessment for outcome evaluation was developed to evaluate psychological treatment interventions, especially for counseling and psychotherapy. It is made up of 80 items and five scales: anxiety, well-being, perception of positive change, depression, and psychological distress. The aim of the study was to present the metric qualities and to show validity and reliability of the five constructs of the questionnaire both in nonclinical and clinical subjects. Methods: Four steps were completed to assess reliability and factor structure: criterion-related and concurrent validity, responsiveness, and convergent–divergent validity. A nonclinical group of 269 subjects was enrolled, as was a clinical group comprising 168 adults undergoing psychotherapy and psychological counseling provided by the Italian public health service. Results: Cronbach’s alphas were between 0.80 and 0.91 for the clinical sample and between 0.74 and 0.91 in the nonclinical one. We observed an excellent structural validity for the five interrelated dimensions. The clinical group showed higher scores in the anxiety, depression, and psychological distress scales, as well as lower scores in well-being and perception of positive change scales than those observed in the nonclinical group. Responsiveness was large for the anxiety, well-being, and depression scales; the psychological distress and perception of positive change scales showed a moderate effect. Conclusion: The questionnaire showed excellent psychometric

  2. The Assessment of 21st Century Skills in Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Complex and Collaborative Problem Solving

    OpenAIRE

    Neubert, Jonas; Mainert, Jakob; Kretzschmar, André; Greiff, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    In the current paper, we highlight why and how industrial and organizational psychology can take advantage of research on 21st century skills and their assessment. We present vital theoretical perspectives, a suitable framework for assessment, and exemplary instruments with a focus on advances in the assessment of Human Capital. Specifically, Complex Problem Solving (CPS) and Collaborative Problem Solving (ColPS) are two transversal skills (i.e., skills that span multiple domains) that are...

  3. Assessors' approaches to portfolio assessment in Assessment of Prior Learning procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Jochems, W.; Sluijsmans, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to gain better understanding of the assessment of prior informal and non-formal learning, this article explores assessors’ approaches to portfolio assessment. Through this portfolio assessment, candidates had requested exemptions from specific courses within an educational programme or admission to the programme based on their prior learning. The assessors judged the portfolios according to set rating criteria, and subsequently discussed their approaches. Their decision-making pr...

  4. A probabilistic seismic risk assessment procedure for nuclear power plants: (II) Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.-N.; Whittaker, A.S.; Luco, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the procedures and results of intensity- and time-based seismic risk assessments of a sample nuclear power plant (NPP) to demonstrate the risk-assessment methodology proposed in its companion paper. The intensity-based assessments include three sets of sensitivity studies to identify the impact of the following factors on the seismic vulnerability of the sample NPP, namely: (1) the description of fragility curves for primary and secondary components of NPPs, (2) the number of simulations of NPP response required for risk assessment, and (3) the correlation in responses between NPP components. The time-based assessment is performed as a series of intensity-based assessments. The studies illustrate the utility of the response-based fragility curves and the inclusion of the correlation in the responses of NPP components directly in the risk computation. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Assessment of Caregiving Constructs: Toward a Personal, Familial, Group, and Cultural Construction of Dementia Care through the Eyes of Personal Construct Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Eradah O; AlHadi, Ahmad N; Lee, Christopher J; Savundranayagam, Marie Y; Holmes, Jeffrey D; Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Johnson, Andrew M

    2017-12-01

    Conditions that cause cognitive impairment and behavioural and personality changes, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementia, have global impact across cultures. However, the experience of dementia care can vary between individuals, families, formal caregivers, and social groups from various cultures. Self-reported measures, caregiving stress models, and conceptual theories have been developed to address the physical, financial, psychological, and social factors associated with the experience of dementia care. Given the cross-cultural variability in the experience of dementia care, it is important for such methodologies to take individual and cultural construct systems into account. We contend that personal and group constructs associated with dementia care should be explored in both the formal and informal caregiving contexts. Therefore, in this paper we introduce the theory of Personal Construct Psychology (PCP) with its explicit philosophy, well-elaborated theory, and derived assessment methods as a potential constructivist research approach to examine the personal, familial, group, and cultural construct systems that determine the experience of dementia caregiving. These concepts and assessment procedures are illustrated in this paper through case study examples and scenarios from the context of dementia care with a focus on family home caregivers. This paper elaborates the assessment and therapeutic approaches of personal construct theory (PCT) to further expand alternatives for support services and program interventions and to amplify policies for dementia care within and across cultures.

  6. Preoperative psychological assessment of patients seeking weight-loss surgery: identifying challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards-Hampton SA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Shenelle A Edwards-Hampton,1 Sharlene Wedin2 1Department of General Surgery, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC, 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA Abstract: Preoperative psychosocial assessment is the standard of care for patients seeking weight-loss surgery (WLS. However, the assessment procedure varies widely by surgery site. Comprehensive assessments can provide a wealth of information that assists both the patient and the treatment team, anticipate and prepare for challenges associated with extensive behavioral and lifestyle changes that are required postsurgery. In this review, we provide an overview of the purpose of the preoperative psychosocial assessment and domains to be included. Challenges commonly identified in the assessment are discussed, including maladaptive eating behaviors, psychiatric comorbidities, and alcohol use. Potential solutions and approaches to these challenges are provided. Additionally, patient populations requiring special consideration are presented to include adolescents, those with cognitive vulnerabilities, and aging adults. Keywords: bariatric surgery, preoperative assessment, weight-loss surgery, challenges, adolescents, older adults, cognitive impairment, maladaptive eating, alcohol misuse

  7. Psychological and Work Stress Assessment of Patients following Angioplasty or Heart Surgery: Results of 1-year Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiabane, Elena; Giorgi, Ines; Candura, Stefano M; Argentero, Piergiorgio

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore changes in subjective psychological health and perceived work stress among patients who returned to work (RTW) after a multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation (CR) following cardiac interventions. A total of 108 patients were evaluated at the beginning of their CR, at 6 and 12 months after discharge. Self-report questionnaires were used to assess depression, anxiety, illness perception and work stress at each time stage. Results showed reports of depressive symptoms significantly decreased (p work stress after their RTW. Patients' psychological health and work stress need to be assessed during the CR and should be also carefully monitored after the RTW in order to identify patients' psychological and work-related barriers and facilitate a safe and successful work reintegration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. A Pilot Study of Psychological Traits in the Sasang Constitution According to the Braverman Nature Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soojin Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the psychological characteristics of the Sasang constitutions by using Braverman nature assessment (BNA. Methods: One hundred seventy-four students participated in this study, and among them, the 142 individuals who had clearly identified Sasang constitutional types were used for the analysis. Sasang constitutions and the Braverman temperaments of the subjects were determined by using a questionnaire for the Sasang constitution classification (QSCC II and BNA, respectively. Body mass index (BMI was used to compare the inclinations of the Sasang constitutions and Braverman temperament types. Results: Significant differences in Braverman temperament type existed among the Sasang constitutions (P = 0.042, and the relations between Soyangin and the dopamine type and between Taeeumin and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA type were meaningful. Significant differences were also shown in the comparison with the Yin and the Yang constitutions (P = 0.017, and the post-hoc analysis showed a strong and significant relation between the Yang constitution and the dopamine type and between the Yin constitution and the GABA type. The one–way analysis of variance (ANOVA and the independent t-test were conducted to examine the BMI and the degree of obesity among the Sasang constitutions and the Braverman temperament types. Concerning the BMI, Taeeumin showed a bigger BMI than the other constitutions (P < 0.001, but no significant differences in the BMI were observed between the Braverman temperament types. Conclusion: Soyangin has a close relationship to the dopamine type and Taeeumin has a close relationship to the GABA type. The correlation between two types were more clear when the Yin and the Yang types were compared to Braverman temperaments. These results may serve as a basis for identifying the psychological traits of Sasang constitutional types, especially in regard to the characteristics related

  9. Psychomotor skills assessment in practicing surgeons experienced in performing advanced laparoscopic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Anthony G; Smith, C Daniel; Bowers, Steven P; Seymour, Neal E; Pearson, Adam; McNatt, Steven; Hananel, David; Satava, Richard M

    2003-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has introduced a new and unique set of psychomotor skills for a surgeon to acquire and master. Although assessment technologies have been proposed, precise and objective psychomotor skills assessment of surgeons performing laparoscopic procedures has not been detailed. Two hundred ten surgeons attending the 2001 annual meeting of the American College of Surgeons in New Orleans who reported having completed more than 50 laparoscopic procedures participated. Subjects were required to complete one box-trainer laparoscopic cutting task and a similar virtual reality task. These tasks were specifically designed to test only psychomotor and not cognitive skills. Both tasks were completed twice. Performance of tasks was assessed and analyzed. Demographic and laparoscopic experience data were also collected. Complete data were available on 195 surgeons. In this group, surgeons performed the box-trainer task better with their dominant hand (p psychomotor skills is now possible. Surgeons who had performed more than 50 laparoscopic procedures showed considerable variability in their performance on a simple laparoscopic and virtual reality task. Approximately 10% of surgeons tested performed the task significantly worse than the group's average performance. Studies such as this may form the methodology for establishing criteria levels and performance objectives in objective assessment of the technical skills component of determining surgical competence.

  10. Assessment of Patients Referred to Specialty Dental Hospitals for Dental Implant Procedure: A Retrospective Cohort Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thukral, Rishi; Kumar, Anuj; Prasant, M C; Punjabi, Krunal M; Paliwal, Aparna; Patel, Kunal

    2016-06-01

    One of the most common and effective ways of replacing missing teeth is by dental implants. Both quality and quantity of bone along with the area of implant placement govern the prognosis of the implant procedure. Certain risk factors predispose the implant treatment to high failure rate. Hence, we assessed the implant patients who were referred from private practitioners to the specialty hospitals from 2010 to 2014. All the patients being referred from private clinics to the specialty dental hospital for the purpose of prosthetic rehabilitation by dental implants from June 2010 to July 2014 were included in the present study. Skilled oral and maxillofacial surgeons were appointed for performing the implant surgical procedures. Prosthetic rehabilitation was done after 6 to 8 weeks and after 10 to 14 weeks in implant cases without and with bone augmentation procedures respectively. Distribution of dental implants based on the indications, location, dimension of augmentation procedure, and complication of implants was analyzed and assessed for the level of significance. Of the patients, 712 were females, while the remaining were males. Most of the patients were in the age group of 50 to 59 years. As compared with completely edentulous patients, most of the patients required rehabilitation by a single implant. Maximum dental implants were placed in maxillary premolar region and mandibular first molar region. Over 1,000 cases in this study required rehabilitation by augmentation procedure. Partially edentulous patients are most commonly referred to specialized dental hospitals for prosthetic rehabilitation by dental implants, mostly with the purpose of implant placement. Failure rate can be minimized by following strict patient selection protocols along with following a standard surgical criterion. Following standard surgical protocols and strict treatment planning, prognosis of the dental implant procedures can be improved to a greater extent, thereby increasing its

  11. Assessing Psychological Well-Being: Self-Report Instruments for the NIH Toolbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsman, John M.; Lai, Jin-Shei; Hendrie, Hugh C.; Butt, Zeeshan; Zill, Nicholas; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Peterson, Christopher; Stoney, Catherine M.; Brouwers, Pim; Cella, David

    2013-01-01

    Objective Psychological well-being (PWB) has a significant relationship with physical and mental health. As part of the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function, we developed self-report item banks and short forms to assess PWB. Study Design and Setting Expert feedback and literature review informed the selection of PWB concepts and the development of item pools for Positive Affect, Life Satisfaction, and Meaning and Purpose. Items were tested with a community-dwelling U.S. internet panel sample of adults aged 18 and above (N=552). Classical and item response theory (IRT) approaches were used to evaluate unidimensionality, fit of items to the overall measure, and calibrations of those items, including differential item function (DIF). Results IRT-calibrated item banks were produced for Positive Affect (34 items), Life Satisfaction (16 items), and Meaning and Purpose (18 items). Their psychometric properties were supported based on results of factor analysis, fit statistics, and DIF evaluation. All banks measured the concepts precisely (reliability ≥0.90) for more than 98% of participants. Conclusion These adult scales and item banks for PWB provide the flexibility, efficiency, and precision necessary to promote future epidemiological, observational, and intervention research on the relationship of PWB with physical and mental health. PMID:23771709

  12. Nurse-led psychological interventions to improve diabetes control: assessing competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maissi, Esther; Ridge, Katie; Treasure, Janet; Chalder, Trudie; Roche, Suzanne; Bartlett, Jonathan; Schmidt, Ulrike; Thomas, Stephen; Ismail, Khalida

    2011-08-01

    To assess whether medical nurses can deliver motivational enhancement therapy (MET) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to a competent level and whether treatment fidelity is maintained. Training consisted of classroom teaching, written materials, a training caseload, and audio-visual feedback. We used the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI), the Revised 12-item Cognitive Therapy Scale (CTS-R), and components of the Motivational Interviewing Skill Code (MISC) to assess competency and treatment fidelity. Two independent clinical psychologists who were blind to the allocation rated a random selection of 40 sessions. Six nurses were trained in both interventions. For the MET the mean (SD) scores for empathy and spirit on the MITI scale were 5.1 (0.7) and 4.6 (1.0) respectively and for CBT the total mean (SD) CTS-R score was 52.1 (7.5), which was acceptable competency in both treatments. The two interventions were distinguishable. Results suggest that nurses can be trained to deliver diabetes-specific MET and CBT competently and maintain treatment fidelity. Findings of this study provide preliminary evidence to suggest that nurse-led psychological interventions could be incorporated into the traditional diabetes setting. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessing psychological well-being: self-report instruments for the NIH Toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsman, John M; Lai, Jin-Shei; Hendrie, Hugh C; Butt, Zeeshan; Zill, Nicholas; Pilkonis, Paul A; Peterson, Christopher; Stoney, Catherine M; Brouwers, Pim; Cella, David

    2014-02-01

    Psychological well-being (PWB) has a significant relationship with physical and mental health. As a part of the NIH Toolbox for the Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function, we developed self-report item banks and short forms to assess PWB. Expert feedback and literature review informed the selection of PWB concepts and the development of item pools for positive affect, life satisfaction, and meaning and purpose. Items were tested with a community-dwelling US Internet panel sample of adults aged 18 and above (N = 552). Classical and item response theory (IRT) approaches were used to evaluate unidimensionality, fit of items to the overall measure, and calibrations of those items, including differential item function (DIF). IRT-calibrated item banks were produced for positive affect (34 items), life satisfaction (16 items), and meaning and purpose (18 items). Their psychometric properties were supported based on the results of factor analysis, fit statistics, and DIF evaluation. All banks measured the concepts precisely (reliability ≥0.90) for more than 98% of participants. These adult scales and item banks for PWB provide the flexibility, efficiency, and precision necessary to promote future epidemiological, observational, and intervention research on the relationship of PWB with physical and mental health.

  14. A new simple score (ABS) for assessing behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K; Yamashita, T; Hishikawa, N; Ohta, Y; Deguchi, K; Sato, K; Matsuzono, K; Nakano, Y; Ikeda, Y; Wakutani, Y; Takao, Y

    2015-03-15

    In addition to cognitive impairment, behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are another important aspect of most dementia patients. This study was designed for a new simple assessment of BPSD. We first employed a clinical survey for the local community with sending an inquiry letter to all members (n=129) of dementia caregiver society, and then attempted to create a new BPSD score for dementia with 10 BPSD items. This new simple BPSD score was compared to a standard-detailed BPSD score neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI) for a possible correlation (n=792) and a time to complete (n=136). Inter-rater reliability was examined comparing scores between main and second caregivers (n=70) for AD. Based on the clinical survey for local caregivers, a new BPSD score for dementia (ABS, Abe's BPSD score) was newly created, in which each BPSD item was allotted by an already-weighted score (maximum 1-9) based on the frequency and severity, and was finalized with taking temporal occurrences into account. ABS was filled by the main caregiver with a full score of 44, was well correlated with NPI (r=0.716, **pABS in secondary than the main caregivers. ABS provides a new simple and quick test for BPSD assessment, with a good correlation to NPI but a shorter time, and with a high inter-rater reliability. Thus ABS is useful for evaluating BPSD for mild to moderate dementia patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Reliability of an Online Geriatric Assessment Procedure Using the interRAI Acute Care Assessment System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Khan, Melinda G; Edwards, Helen; Wootton, Richard; Counsell, Steven R; Varghese, Paul; Lim, Wen Kwang; Darzins, Peteris; Dakin, Lucy; Klein, Kerenaftali; Gray, Leonard C

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether geriatric triage decisions made using a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) performed online are less reliable than face-to-face (FTF) decisions. Multisite noninferiority prospective cohort study. Two specialist geriatricians assessed individuals sequentially referred for an acute care geriatric consultation. Participants were allocated to one FTF assessment and an additional assessment (FTF or online (OL)), creating two groups-two FTF (FTF-FTF, n = 81) or online and FTF (OL-FTF, n = 85). Three acute care public hospitals in two Australian states. Admitted individuals referred for CGA. Nurse-administered CGA, based on the interRAI Acute Care assessment system accessed online and other online clinical data such as pathology results and imaging enabling geriatricians to review participants' information and provide input into their care from a distance. The primary decision subjected to this analysis was referral for permanent residential care. Geriatricians also recorded recommendations for referrals and variations for medication management and judgment regarding prognosis at discharge and after 3 months. Overall percentage agreement was 88% (n = 71) for the FTF-FTF group and 91% (n = 77) for the OL-FTF group. The difference in agreement between the FTF-FTF and OL-FTF groups was -3%, indicating that there was no difference between the methods of assessment. Judgements made regarding diagnoses of geriatric syndromes, medication management, and prognosis (with regard to hospital outcome and location at 3 months) were found to be equally reliable in each mode of consultation. Geriatric assessment performed online using a nurse-administered structured CGA system was no less reliable than conventional assessment in making clinical triage decisions. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Prospective randomized assessment of single versus double-gloving for general surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na'aya, H U; Madziga, A G; Eni, U E

    2009-01-01

    There is increased tendency towards double-gloving by general surgeons in our practice, due probably to awareness of the risk of contamination with blood or other body fluids during surgery. The aim of the study was to compare the relative frequency of glove puncture in single-glove versus double glove sets in general surgical procedures, and to determine if duration of surgery affects perforation rate. Surgeons at random do single or double gloves at their discretion, for general surgical procedures. All the gloves used by the surgeons were assessed immediately after surgery for perforation. A total of 1120 gloves were tested, of which 880 were double-glove sets and 240 single-glove sets. There was no significant difference in the overall perforation rate between single and double glove sets (18.3% versus 20%). However, only 2.3% had perforations in both the outer and inner gloves in the double glove group. Therefore, there was significantly greater risk for blood-skin exposure in the single glove sets (p < 0.01). The perforation rate was also significantly greater during procedures lasting an hour or more compared to those lasting less than an hour (p < 0.01). Double-gloving reduces the risk of blood-skin contamination in all general surgical procedures, and especially so in procedures lasting an hour or more.

  17. Using Regression Equations Built from Summary Data in the Psychological Assessment of the Individual Case: Extension to Multiple Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, John R.; Garthwaite, Paul H.; Denham, Annie K.; Chelune, Gordon J.

    2012-01-01

    Regression equations have many useful roles in psychological assessment. Moreover, there is a large reservoir of published data that could be used to build regression equations; these equations could then be employed to test a wide variety of hypotheses concerning the functioning of individual cases. This resource is currently underused because…

  18. Electronic momentary assessment in chronic pain (I): pain and psychological pain responses as predictors of pain intensity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorbi, M.J.; Peters, M.L.; Kruise, D.A.; Maas, C.J.M.; Kerssens, J.J.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Bensing, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives and Methods: Electronic momentary assessment was employed to substantiate the relevance of psychological functioning in chronic pain. More than 7100 electronic diaries from 80 patients with varying IASP classified types of chronic pain served to investigate to what extent fear-avoidance,

  19. Practical Applications of Generalizability Theory for Designing, Evaluating, and Improving Psychological Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vispoel, Walter P; Morris, Carrie A; Kilinc, Murat

    2018-01-01

    In this article, we illustrate how generalizability theory (G-theory) can extend traditional assessment methods for designing, improving, and evaluating results from both objectively and subjectively scored measures of individual differences. Our illustrations include quantification of multiple sources of measurement error, derivation of unique indexes of consistency for norm- and criterion-referenced interpretations of scores, estimation of score consistency when changing a measurement procedure, and disattenuation of correlation coefficients for measurement error. We also expand G-theory analyses beyond the item level to include parcels and split measures and highlight linkages among G-theory, classical test theory, and structural equation modeling. Computer code and sample data are provided in online supplements to help readers apply the demonstrated techniques to their own assessments.

  20. A New Procedure for Damage Assessment of Prestressed Concrete Beams Using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sumangala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A damage assessment procedure has been developed using artificial neural network (ANN for prestressed concrete beams. The methodology had been formulated using the results obtained from an experimental study conducted in the laboratory. Prestressed concrete (PSC rectangular beams were cast, and pitting corrosion was introduced in the prestressing wires and was allowed to be snapped using accelerated corrosion process. Both static and dynamic tests were conducted to study the behaviour of perfect and damaged beams. The measured output from both static and dynamic tests was taken as input to train the neural network. Back propagation network was chosen for this purpose, which was written using the programming package MATLAB. The trained network was tested using separate test data obtained from the tests. A damage assessment procedure was developed using the trained network, it was validated using the data available in literature, and the outcome is presented in this paper.

  1. Health-related quality of life following ambulatory surgery procedures: assessment by RAND-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Kristiina; Lahtela, Merja; Hynynen, Markku

    2012-12-05

    Increasing numbers of elective surgical procedures are performed as day-cases. The impact of ambulatory surgery on health-related quality of life in the recovery period has seldom been described. We assessed health-related quality of life in 143 adult outpatients scheduled for arthroscopic procedures of the knee and shoulder joints, laparoscopic cholecystectomy and inguinal hernia repair using the RAND 36-Item Health Survey preoperatively and one week after patients had returned to work or comparable normal daily routines. Postoperatively all patient groups reported significant improvements in bodily pain and vitality. Physical functioning improved significantly in orthopedic and inguinal hernia patients. However, in the orthopedic groups, postoperative scores for physical health were still relatively lower compared to the general population reference values. Ambulatory surgery has a positive impact on health-related quality of life. Assessment of the recovery process is necessary for recognition of potential areas of improvement in care and postoperative rehabilitation.

  2. Developing the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure as a Measure of Self-Forgiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Bast, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The current thesis set out to develop an implicit relational assessment procedure as a measure of self-forgiveness across five studies. The first study targeted the development of a measure of implicit forgiveness of self related to “minor” transgressions (mistakes, flaws, shortcomings) versus the forgiveness of others. The results indicated that the measure of implicit forgiveness diverged from an explicit measure designed to measure the same construct. Moreover, implicitly, participants ten...

  3. A limited assessment of the ASEP human reliability analysis procedure using simulator examination results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gore, B.R.; Dukelow, J.S. Jr.; Mitts, T.M.; Nicholson, W.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This report presents a limited assessment of the conservatism of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) human reliability analysis (HRA) procedure described in NUREG/CR-4772. In particular, the, ASEP post-accident, post-diagnosis, nominal HRA procedure is assessed within the context of an individual`s performance of critical tasks on the simulator portion of requalification examinations administered to nuclear power plant operators. An assessment of the degree to which operator perforn:Lance during simulator examinations is an accurate reflection of operator performance during actual accident conditions was outside the scope of work for this project; therefore, no direct inference can be made from this report about such performance. The data for this study are derived from simulator examination reports from the NRC requalification examination cycle. A total of 4071 critical tasks were identified, of which 45 had been failed. The ASEP procedure was used to estimate human error probability (HEP) values for critical tasks, and the HEP results were compared with the failure rates observed in the examinations. The ASEP procedure was applied by PNL operator license examiners who supplemented the limited information in the examination reports with expert judgment based upon their extensive simulator examination experience. ASEP analyses were performed for a sample of 162 critical tasks selected randomly from the 4071, and the results were used to characterize the entire population. ASEP analyses were also performed for all of the 45 failed critical tasks. Two tests were performed to assess the bias of the ASEP HEPs compared with the data from the requalification examinations. The first compared the average of the ASEP HEP values with the fraction of the population actually failed and it found a statistically significant factor of two bias on the average.

  4. Psychological assessment of persons following suicide attempt by self-poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedić Gordana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Urgent psychiatric help and effective psychotherapeutic treatments are required soon after revival of a person after suicide attempt by self-poisoning. The aim of this article was to define an assessment of actual psychological characteristics of a person after suicide attempt by self-poisoning in order to apply psychotherapeutic crisis intervention after suicide attempt, as well as to show an approach to the treatment guided by the assessment that uses a psychodynamic model of suicidal crisis intervention based on our clinical experience. Methods. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD, Center for Epidemiological Studies- Depression Scale (CES-D, Defensive Questionnaire Scale (DSQ-40, Scaling of Life Events (Paykel, and Pierce Suicide Intent Scale (SIS were applied in 30 hospitalized persons following suicide attempt by self-poisoning and in 30 patients who had asked for psychiatric examination at the outpatient clinic due to various life crises not resulting in suicide attempt. The examinees of both groups were matched by sex, age, and education, professional and marital status. Comparison of the patient groups was done by the ttest. Logistic regression analysis was used for suicidal risk assessment. Results. The suicide attempters were depressed (HAMD = 22.60 ± 5.93, CES-D = 29.67 ± 7.99, with medium suicide risk factor (SIS = 4.5 ± 4.17, using immature (projection, dissociation, devaluation, acting-out and neurotic (altruism defense mechanisms. The most important motives for suicide attempt were separation problems, problems with parents and a problem of loneliness. The commonest feelings and thoughts of a subject preceding suicide attempt were a wish to escape an unbearable situation, loss of control, desire to show love for a partner and wish to be helped. After a suicide attempt, 90% of the persons felt relief because the attempt failed, although almost half of them intend to repeat it. The risk of repeated suicide

  5. Learning, experience, and self-assessment of competence of third-year medical students in performing bedside procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincher, R M; Lewis, L A

    1994-04-01

    Third-year medical students are expected to perform common bedside procedures as part of their daily ward activities, but there are few programs to teach these skills or document students' abilities to perform them. In addition to describing the clinical procedures course at the Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine, the purpose of this paper is to report how often students perform common bedside procedures during the third year of medical school, whether the number of times a procedure has been performed is indicative of self-perceived level of competence, and how useful the students find the procedures course for learning how to perform common procedures. In June 1991, the 163 entering third-year students participated in a two-day course in which they were taught universal precautions and provided specific step-by-step instructions for performing 16 clinical procedures. One year later, after the students had completed their third-year clerkships, they were asked to report the numbers of times they had performed the procedures during their clerkships, to provide self-assessments of their competency, and to indicate how helpful the course had been for learning clinical procedures. The association between the number of times the students reported performing a procedure and how competent they felt to perform the procedure was assessed using Kendall's tau coefficient. A total of 100 students returned completed questionnaires. Most of the students reported performing venipuncture, obtaining blood cultures, and scrubbing surgically more than five times, but they reported performing other procedures less frequently. For most procedures, self-assessment of competency correlated with frequency of performance. The procedures course was well received by students and instructors, based on both written evaluations and informal verbal feedback. Surprisingly, the students' self-reports indicated that many students performed procedures on patients infrequently. As

  6. Vibration Testing Procedures for Bone Stiffness Assessment in Fractures Treated with External Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Lorenza; Longo, Antonia; Di Puccio, Francesca; Ciulli, Enrico; Marchetti, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    A bone healing assessment is crucial for the successful treatment of fractures, particularly in terms of the timing of support devices. However, in clinical practice, this assessment is only made qualitatively through bone manipulation and X-rays, and hence cannot be repeated as often as might be required. The present study reconsiders the quantitative method of frequency response analysis for healing assessments, and specifically for fractures treated with an external fixator. The novelty consists in the fact that bone excitation and response are achieved through fixator pins, thus overcoming the problem of transmission through soft-tissues and their damping effect. The main objective was to develop and validate a test procedure in order to characterize the treated bone. More than 80 tests were performed on a tibia phantom alone, a phantom with pins, and a phantom with a complete fixator. Different excitation techniques and input-output combinations were compared. The results demonstrated the effectiveness of a procedure based on impact tests using a micro-hammer. Pins and fixator were demonstrated to influence the frequency response of the phantom by increasing the number of resonant frequencies. This procedure will be applied in future studies to monitor healing both in in vitro and in vivo conditions.

  7. Benchmarking an operational procedure for rapid flood mapping and risk assessment in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dottori, Francesco; Salamon, Peter; Kalas, Milan; Bianchi, Alessandra; Feyen, Luc

    2016-04-01

    The development of real-time methods for rapid flood mapping and risk assessment is crucial to improve emergency response and mitigate flood impacts. This work describes the benchmarking of an operational procedure for rapid flood risk assessment based on the flood predictions issued by the European Flood Awareness System (EFAS). The daily forecasts produced for the major European river networks are translated into event-based flood hazard maps using a large map catalogue derived from high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations, based on the hydro-meteorological dataset of EFAS. Flood hazard maps are then combined with exposure and vulnerability information, and the impacts of the forecasted flood events are evaluated in near real-time in terms of flood prone areas, potential economic damage, affected population, infrastructures and cities. An extensive testing of the operational procedure is carried out using the catastrophic floods of May 2014 in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia. The reliability of the flood mapping methodology is tested against satellite-derived flood footprints, while ground-based estimations of economic damage and affected population is compared against modelled estimates. We evaluated the skill of flood hazard and risk estimations derived from EFAS flood forecasts with different lead times and combinations. The assessment includes a comparison of several alternative approaches to produce and present the information content, in order to meet the requests of EFAS users. The tests provided good results and showed the potential of the developed real-time operational procedure in helping emergency response and management.

  8. Validity of visual analog scales for assessing psychological states in patients with chronic neck pain. Journal of Musculoskeletal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitriadis, Zacharias; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Kapreli, Eleni; Oldham, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Examination of visual analog scale’s [VAS] validity for assessing psychological states in patients with chronic neck pain.Methods: Forty-five patients with chronic neck pain completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, and Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Anxiety, depression, kinesiophobia, and catastrophizing were additionally assessed by using a VAS for each.Results: Only the anxiety VAS could correlate high enough with its corresponding questio...

  9. Social Identity Mapping: A procedure for visual representation and assessment of subjective multiple group memberships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruwys, Tegan; Steffens, Niklas K; Haslam, S Alexander; Haslam, Catherine; Jetten, Jolanda; Dingle, Genevieve A

    2016-12-01

    In this research, we introduce Social Identity Mapping (SIM) as a method for visually representing and assessing a person's subjective network of group memberships. To provide evidence of its utility, we report validating data from three studies (two longitudinal), involving student, community, and clinical samples, together comprising over 400 participants. Results indicate that SIM is easy to use, internally consistent, with good convergent and discriminant validity. Each study also illustrates the ways that SIM can be used to address a range of novel research questions. Study 1 shows that multiple positive group memberships are a particularly powerful predictor of well-being. Study 2 shows that social support is primarily given and received within social groups and that only in-group support is beneficial for well-being. Study 3 shows that improved mental health following a social group intervention is attributable to an increase in group compatibility. In this way, the studies demonstrate the capacity for SIM to make a contribution both to the development of social-psychological theory and to its practical application. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  10. Teaching and Assessing Critical Thinking Skills for Argument Analysis in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensley, D. Alan; Crowe, Deborah S.; Bernhardt, Paul; Buckner, Camille; Allman, Amanda L.

    2010-01-01

    Critical thinking is a valued educational outcome; however, little is known about whether psychology courses, especially ones such as research methods courses that might be expected to promote critical thinking skills, actually improve them. We compared the acquisition of critical thinking skills for analyzing psychological arguments in 3 groups…

  11. Experimental Research in School Psychology Internationally: An Assessment of Journal Publications and Implications for Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begeny, John C.; Levy, Rebecca A.; Hida, Rahma; Norwalk, Kate

    2018-01-01

    Past studies have examined the contents of journal articles in school psychology, and more recently there has been increased interest in examining the frequency and characteristics of experimental studies appearing in school psychology journals. However, no prior studies have examined the international representation of experimental and…

  12. Assessing Coverage of Maslow's Theory in Educational Psychology Textbooks: A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wininger, Steven R.; Norman, Antony D.

    2010-01-01

    Although Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory (HNT) is one of the most prevalent theories in psychology, the authors argued that it is also one of the most misinterpreted or misrepresented, particularly in educational psychology textbooks. Therefore, after carefully reading Maslow's writings on HNT they conducted a content analysis of 18 educational…

  13. Psychological Safety and Social Support in Groupware Adoption: A Multi-Level Assessment in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, J.; de Jong, A.; Wetzels, M.; de Ruyter, K.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the authors propose that psychological safety, a sense of interpersonal trust and being valued in a work team, is an important determinant of groupware technology adoption in an educational setting. They develop and test a model of antecedents and consequences of psychological safety. Data were collected from 361 university…

  14. Children's Views Matter Too! A Pilot Project Assessing Children's and Adolescents' Experiences of Clinical Psychology Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael; Russo, Kate

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study explored the experiences and understanding of clinical psychology practices and services of children and adolescents attending clinical psychology outpatient appointments. Fifteen young participants took part in the study. A content analysis indicated that young children and adolescents have an appropriate understanding of the…

  15. Portfolio assessment during medical internships: How to obtain a reliable and feasible assessment procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Nele R M; Driessen, Erik W; Muijtjens, Arno M M; Van Gaal, Luc F; Bossaert, Leo L; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2009-12-01

    A portfolio is used to mentor and assess students' clinical performance at the workplace. However, students and raters often perceive the portfolio as a time-consuming instrument. In this study, we investigated whether assessment during medical internship by a portfolio can combine reliability and feasibility. The domain-oriented reliability of 61 double-rated portfolios was measured, using a generalisability analysis with portfolio tasks and raters as sources of variation in measuring the performance of a student. We obtained reliability (Phi coefficient) of 0.87 with this internship portfolio containing 15 double-rated tasks. The generalisability analysis showed that an acceptable level of reliability (Phi = 0.80) was maintained when the amount of portfolio tasks was decreased to 13 or 9 using one and two raters, respectively. Our study shows that a portfolio can be a reliable method for the assessment of workplace learning. The possibility of reducing the amount of tasks or raters while maintaining a sufficient level of reliability suggests an increase in feasibility of portfolio use for both students and raters.

  16. Assessment of psychological predictors of weight loss: How and what for?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeretti, Lisa; Rotella, Francesco; Pala, Laura; Rotella, Carlo Maria

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease and the prominent factors playing a role in its pathogenesis are biological, environmental and psychological. There is a growing interest in understanding psychological functioning of obese subjects and the influence of psychological factors on treatment outcome. The aim of the present narrative review is to critically analyze the current literature, in order to point out the most common psychological constructs studied in obesity and to give an overview of the main existing tools investigating psychological features which have been considered significant for the prediction of success in weight loss and maintenance programs in obese patients. In this framework, the most common psychological constructs studied are: self-motivation, self-efficacy, locus of control, health related quality of life, self-esteem, self-control, concerns about body image, outcome expectations, and personality traits. These features have been explored through a wide variety of psychometric instruments. However, as an overall, studies evaluating the association between psychological features and treatment outcome failed to give consistent results. A possible explanation may consist on the fact that many tools widely used to explore psychological features were not specifically designed for obese patients and none of them was comprehensive of all possible psychological features involved. The identification of well-defined sub-groups of patients and the validation of more reliable and comprehensive tools, specifically designed for obese subjects, should be forecasted in order to reach a better knowledge of psychological functioning of obese individuals and to improve the outcome of weight loss programs. PMID:25815255

  17. Comparison of risk assessment procedures used in OCRA and ULRA methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Liu, Danuta; Groborz, Anna; Tokarski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the convergence of two methods by comparing exposure and the assessed risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders at 18 repetitive task workstations. The already established occupational repetitive actions (OCRA) and the recently developed upper limb risk assessment (ULRA) produce correlated results (R = 0.84, p = 0.0001). A discussion of the factors that influence the values of the OCRA index and ULRA's repetitive task indicator shows that both similarities and differences in the results produced by the two methods can arise from the concepts that underlie them. The assessment procedure and mathematical calculations that the basic parameters are subjected to are crucial to the results of risk assessment. The way the basic parameters are defined influences the assessment of exposure and risk assessment to a lesser degree. The analysis also proved that not always do great differences in load indicator values result in differences in risk zones. We focused on comparing methods that, even though based on different concepts, serve the same purpose. The results proved that different methods with different assumptions can produce similar assessment of upper limb load; sharp criteria in risk assessment are not the best solution.

  18. Assessment of the efficiency of language interpreter services in a busy surgical and procedural practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkle, Christopher M; Anderson, Kathleen A; Xiong, YaPa; Guerra, Andrea E; Tschida-Reuter, Daniel A

    2017-07-04

    Surgical and procedural patient care settings require efficient patient flow. The primary goal of this study was to assess use and efficiency of language services for our limited English proficiency (LEP) patients undergoing surgical and outpatient procedures. Patient language services needs were recorded from our operating room and procedural locations over a two and a half month period in 2016. Time from in-person interpreter request to arrival was recorded. Frequency of language service modality used and reason for telephone and professional video remote interpreting (VRI) rather than in person professional services was queried. Mean time from in-person interpreter request until arrival was 19 min. Variation was high. No cases were cancelled due to lack of available interpretive services and no LEP patient underwent a procedure without requested interpretative service assistance. Time for in person professional interpreter assistance was short but highly variable. Access to telephone interpretive services and VRI services ensured assistance when in person interpreters were immediately unavailable. With the numbers of LEP patients increasing over time along with any new mandates for providing language assistance, the stress on hospital patient service units and the financial implications for many health care facilities will likely continue as challenges.

  19. Selecting instruments for assessing psychological wellbeing in Afghan and Kurdish refugee groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman-Hill Cheryl MR

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Afghan and Iraqi refugees comprise nearly half of all those currently under United Nations protection. As many of them will eventually be resettled in countries outside the region of origin, their long term health and settlement concerns are of relevance to host societies, and will be a likely focus for future research. Since Australia and New Zealand have both accepted refugees for many years and have dedicated, but different settlement and immigration policies, a study comparing the resettlement of two different refugee groups in these countries was undertaken. The purpose of this article is to describe the instrument selection for this study assessing mental health and psychological well being with Afghan and Kurdish former refugees, in particular to address linguistic considerations and translated instrument availability. A summary of instruments previously used with refugee and migrant groups from the Middle East region is presented to assist other researchers, before describing the three instruments ultimately selected for the quantitative component of our study. Findings The Kessler-10 Psychological Distress Scale (K10, General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale (GPSE, and Personal Well-Being Index (PWI all showed good reliability (Cronbach's alphas of 0.86, 0.89 and 0.83 respectively for combined language versions and ease of use even for pre-literate participants, with the sample of 193 refugees, although some concepts in the GPSE proved problematic for a small number of respondents. Farsi was the language of choice for the majority of Afghan participants, while most of the Kurds chose to complete English versions in addition to Farsi. No one used Arabic or Turkish translations. Participants settled less than ten years were more likely to complete questionnaires in Farsi. Descriptive summary statistics are presented for each instrument with results split by gender, refugee group and language version completed. Conclusion

  20. Assessment of ecological risks at former landfill site using TRIAD procedure and multicriteria analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorvari, Jaana; Schultz, Eija; Haimi, Jari

    2013-02-01

    Old industrial landfills are important sources of environmental contamination in Europe, including Finland. In this study, we demonstrated the combination of TRIAD procedure, multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA), and statistical Monte Carlo analysis for assessing the risks to terrestrial biota in a former landfill site contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) and metals. First, we generated hazard quotients by dividing the concentrations of metals and PHCs in soil by the corresponding risk-based ecological benchmarks. Then we conducted ecotoxicity tests using five plant species, earthworms, and potworms, and determined the abundance and diversity of soil invertebrates from additional samples. We aggregated the results in accordance to the methods used in the TRIAD procedure, conducted rating of the assessment methods based on their performance in terms of specific criteria, and weighted the criteria using two alternative weighting techniques to produce performance scores for each method. We faced problems in using the TRIAD procedure, for example, the results from the animal counts had to be excluded from the calculation of integrated risk estimates (IREs) because our reference soil sample showed the lowest biodiversity and abundance of soil animals. In addition, hormesis hampered the use of the results from the ecotoxicity tests. The final probabilistic IREs imply significant risks at all sampling locations. Although linking MCDA with TRIAD provided a useful means to study and consider the performance of the alternative methods in predicting ecological risks, some uncertainties involved still remained outside the quantitative analysis. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  1. Poor psychological health status among patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases and osteoarthritis in multidisciplinary rehabilitation: need for a routine psychological assessment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriezekolk, J.; Eijsbouts, A.; Evers, A.W.M.; Stenger, A.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine psychological health status among patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases (i.e. rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis) and osteoarthritis in multidisciplinary rehabilitation, and to describe changes in psychological distress, illness

  2. Environmental risk assessment for plant pests: a procedure to evaluate their impacts on ecosystem services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilioli, G.; Schrader, G.; Baker, R.H.A.

    2014-01-01

    . By including both the structural and functional components of the environment threatened by invasive alien species (IAS), in particular plant pests, we propose an environmental risk assessment scheme that addresses this complexity. Structural components are investigated by evaluating the impacts of the plant...... Risk Analysis. The method enables the assessment of overall environmental risk which integrates the impacts on different components of the environment and their probabilities of occurrence. The application of the proposed scheme is illustrated by evaluating the environmental impacts of the invasive......The current methods to assess the environmental impacts of plant pests differ in their approaches and there is a lack of the standardized procedures necessary to provide accurate and consistent results, demonstrating the complexity of developing a commonly accepted scheme for this purpose...

  3. An Assessment of Psychological Need in Emergency Medical Staff in the Northern Health and Social Care Trust Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisling, McAleese; Aisling, Diamond; David, Curran

    2016-05-01

    Psychological stress is increasingly recognised within emergency medicine, given the environmental and clinical stressors associated with the specialism. The current study assessed whether psychological distress is experienced by emergency medical staff and if so, what is the expressed need within this population? Participants included ambulance personnel, nursing staff, doctors and ancillary support staff within two Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments and twelve ambulance bases within one Trust locality in NI (N = 107). The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Goldberg, 1972, 1978), Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale (STSS, Bride, 2004) and an assessment of need questionnaire were completed and explored using mixed method analysis. Results showed elevated levels of psychological distress within each profession except ambulance service clinical support officers (CSOs). Elevated levels of secondary trauma symptomatology were also found; the highest were within some nursing grades and junior doctors. Decreased enjoyment in job over time was significantly associated with higher scores. Analysis of qualitative data identified sources of stress to include low morale. A total of 65% of participants thought that work related stressors had negatively affected their mental health. Participants explored what they felt could decrease psychological distress including improved resources and psychoeducation. There were elevated levels of distress and secondary traumatic stress within this population as well as an expressed level of need, on both systemic and support levels.

  4. Preventing psychological disorders in service members and their families: an assessment of programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Denning, Laura Aiuppa; Meisnere, Marc; Warner, Kenneth E

    2014-01-01

    .... It is well documented in the literature that there are high rates of psychological disorders among military personnel serving in Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan and Operation Iraqi Freedom...

  5. [Patient first - The impact of characteristics of target populations on decisions about therapy effectiveness of complex interventions: Psychological variables to assess effectiveness in interdisciplinary multimodal pain therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Ulrike; Sabatowski, Rainer; Balck, Friedrich

    2017-08-01

    The assessment of treatment effectiveness in public health settings is ensured by indicators that reflect the changes caused by specific interventions. These indicators are also applied in benchmarking systems. The selection of constructs should be guided by their relevance for affected patients (patient reported outcomes). The interdisciplinary multimodal pain therapy (IMPT) is a complex intervention based on a biopsychosocial understanding of chronic pain. For quality assurance purposes, psychological parameters (depression, general anxiety, health-related quality of life) are included in standardized therapy assessment in pain medicine (KEDOQ), which can also be used for comparative analyses in a benchmarking system. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relevance of depressive symptoms, general anxiety and mental quality of life in patients undergoing IMPT under real life conditions. In this retrospective, one-armed and exploratory observational study we used secondary data of a routine documentation of IMST in routine care, applying several variables of the German Pain Questionnaire and the facility's comprehensive basic documentation. 352 participants with IMPT (from 2006 to 2010) were included, and the follow-up was performed over two years with six assessments. Because of statistically heterogeneous characteristics a complex analysis consisting of factor and cluster analyses was applied to build subgroups. These subgroups were explored to identify differences in depressive symptoms (HADS-D), general anxiety (HADS-A), and mental quality of life (SF 36 PSK) at the time of therapy admission and their development estimated by means of effect sizes. Analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0®. Six subgroups were derived and mainly proved to be clinically and psychologically normal, with the exception of one subgroup that consistently showed psychological impairment for all three parameters. The follow-up of the total study population revealed medium

  6. Assessment of successful smoking cessation by psychological factors using the Bayesian network approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaorong; Li, Suyun; Pan, Lulu; Wang, Qiang; Li, Huijie; Han, Mingkui; Zhang, Nan; Jiang, Fan; Jia, Chongqi

    2016-07-01

    The association between psychological factors and smoking cessation is complicated and inconsistent in published researches, and the joint effect of psychological factors on smoking cessation is unclear. This study explored how psychological factors jointly affect the success of smoking cessation using a Bayesian network approach. A community-based case control study was designed with 642 adult male successful smoking quitters as the cases, and 700 adult male failed smoking quitters as the controls. General self-efficacy (GSE), trait coping style (positive-trait coping style (PTCS) and negative-trait coping style (NTCS)) and self-rating anxiety (SA) were evaluated by GSE Scale, Trait Coping Style Questionnaire and SA Scale, respectively. Bayesian network was applied to evaluate the relationship between psychological factors and successful smoking cessation. The local conditional probability table of smoking cessation indicated that different joint conditions of psychological factors led to different outcomes for smoking cessation. Among smokers with high PTCS, high NTCS and low SA, only 36.40% successfully quitted smoking. However, among smokers with low pack-years of smoking, high GSE, high PTCS and high SA, 63.64% successfully quitted smoking. Our study indicates psychological factors jointly influence smoking cessation outcome. According to different joint situations, different solutions should be developed to control tobacco in practical intervention.

  7. Using a novel assessment of procedural proficiency provides medical educators insight into blood pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrup, Michael; Jensen, Brock; Burkart, Rebecca; Levis, Malorie

    2016-11-19

    This investigation was performed to determine how students in a health sciences program utilize and explain techniques within blood pressure measurement using a novel assessment, and changes associated with greater curricular exposure. An exploratory, qualitative and quantitative study was conducted using a 'Think Aloud' design with protocol analysis. Following familiarization, participants performed the task of measuring blood pressure on a reference subject while stating their thought processes. A trained practitioner recorded each participant's procedural proficiency using a standardized rubric. There were 112 participants in the study with varying levels of curricular exposure to blood pressure measurement. Four trends are noted. Specifically, a trend was observed wherein a marked increase in procedural proficiency with a plateau occurred (e.g. released cuff pressure 2-4 mmHg, 10%, 60%, 83%, 82%). Secondly, a trend was observed with improvement across groups (e.g. cuff placed snugly/smoothly on upper arm, 20%, 60%, 81%, and 91%). Other trends included a marked improvement with subsequent decrease, and an improvement without achieving proficiency (e.g. palpation of the brachial pulse, 5%, 90%, 81%, 68%, appropriate size cuff, 17%, 40%, 33%, 41%, respectively). Qualitatively, transcript interpretation resulted in a need for clarification in the way blood pressure procedure is instructed in the curriculum. The current investigation provides a snapshot of proficiency in blood pressure assessment across a curriculum and highlights considerations for best instructional practices, including the use of Think Aloud. Consequently, medical educators should use qualitative and quantitative assessments concurrently to determine achievement of blood pressure skill proficiency.

  8. The Advantages of Using an Analytic Scoring Procedure in Speaking Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Mukminatien

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This article describes the advantages of using analytic proce­dure in speaking assessment. An analytic scoring guide, as compared to the impressionistic one, has a double function: as an instrument to mea­sure the learner's speaking proficiency and as a diagnostic procedure for remedial teaching. Thus, it provides reliable sources of information in the form of scores of the speaking components and can be used as feed-back for the teacher and learner to identify which component needs im­provement.

  9. Psychological risk factors for poor outcome of spine surgery and spinal cord stimulator implant: a review of the literature and their assessment with the MMPI-2-RF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Andrew R; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Marek, Ryan J

    2013-01-01

    Back pain is experienced by up to of 85% of the United States population. Most often it resolves with minimal to no medical treatment. For those whose pain endures, worsens, or becomes protracted, conservative care is typically first attempted. Individuals who continue to experience significant back pain are often considered for surgical procedures, the results of which are not uniformly positive. The consequences of failed surgical intervention can be quite devastating, and psychosocial factors have been found to predict poor outcome. The literature on psychosocial risk factors for failed back surgery is reviewed first, identifying psychological dysfunction in the domains of emotions, cognitions, behavior, and interpersonal processes as increasing the risk for failed back surgery. Empirical findings with the MMPI-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) are presented next, including descriptive analyses with a sample of 1341 individuals assessed as part of a pre-surgical psychological screening. Correlations between MMPI-2-RF scale scores and measures of the primary risk factors identified in this review are reported for a smaller sample of 197 pre-surgical candidates. Interpretive implications of the MMPI-2-RF findings are discussed along with suggestions for further research in this area.

  10. Assessing the psychological predictors of benefit finding in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Carrie D; Horney, Debbie J; McGurk, Mark; Weinman, John; Herold, Jim; Altman, Keith; Smith, Helen E

    2013-01-01

    Some individuals are able to gain psychological benefits from illness and adversity, such as a greater sense of purpose and closer relationships, termed 'benefit finding' (BF). The main aim of this study was to explore the extent to which BF is reported in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Secondary aims were to establish the relationships between BF, other patient-reported outcomes and predictive factors such as coping strategy and level of optimism. This repeat measures study was conducted with 103 newly diagnosed patients with HNC. Self-completion questionnaires were used to assess BF pre-treatment and 6 months after treatment and pre-treatment coping, optimism, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Sixty-eight patients (66%) completed follow-ups. Moderate to high levels of BF were reported. Anxiety, depression and quality of life were not related to BF. Regression models of BF total score and three new factor analysed BF scales indicated that use of emotional support and active coping strategies were predictive of finding more positive consequences. Optimism, living with a partner and higher educational attainment were also found to have a protective effect. The amount of variance in BF explained by these five pre-treatment factors ranged from 32 to 46%. These findings demonstrate that both dispositional and potentially modifiable factors, in particular optimism and coping strategies, were associated with patients identifying positive consequences of a diagnosis of HNC. To maximise patient's longer-term resilience and adaptation, components of BF, either directly or via coping strategies, could be targeted for intervention. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A Qualitative Exploration of the Help-Seeking Behaviors of Students Who Experience Psychological Distress Around Assessment at Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Rachel I; Patel, Rakesh; Norman, Robert I

    2017-08-01

    Medical students are at high risk of experiencing psychological distress at medical school and developing mental ill-health during professional practice. Despite efforts by faculty to raise awareness about this risk, many students choose to suffer in silence in the face of psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore drivers that prompted help-seeking behavior and barriers that prevented individuals prioritizing their well-being around the time of high-stakes assessment at medical school. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with fifty-seven students who failed high-stakes assessment at two UK medical schools, exploring their experience of academic difficulty and perceptions about causes. A thematic analysis of twenty transcripts that met inclusion criteria was completed to identify key factors that influenced participants' decisions around seeking help for their psychological distress, and in some cases, mental health problems. Twenty participants who specifically described a deterioration in their mental health around the time of assessment were included in this study. Barriers to seeking help in these instances included: normalization of symptoms or situation; failure to recognize a problem existed; fear of stigmatisation; overt symptoms of mental distress; and misconceptions about the true nature of the medical school, for example beliefs about a punitive response from the school if they failed. Drivers for seeking help appropriately included: building trust with someone in order to confide in them later on, and self-awareness about the need to maintain good mental health. There are various drivers and barriers for students' help seeking behaviors when experiencing psychological distress around the time of assessment, particularly self-awareness about the problem and prioritisation of well-being. Students who fail to recognize their own deteriorating mental health are at risk of academic failure and medical schools need to develop

  12. [Are parents present during invasive procedures? Assessment in 32 Spanish hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamell Fullà, A; Corniero Alonso, P; Parra Cotanda, C; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, V; Luaces Cubells, C

    2010-04-01

    Parental participation in medical decisions involving their children is essential and family presence during invasive procedures (IP) is fundamental. 1) To determine the frequency of parental presence during different IP in Spanish Paediatrics Emergency Departments (PED). 2) To assess the reasons for restricting parental presence. 3) To evaluate the agreement of health care professionals with regards to parental presence. Descriptive multicentre study based on questionnaires sent to physicians in charge of different Spanish PED. Thirty-two out of 43 questionnaires were replied. Family presence during IP is never allowed in 11 hospitals. In the rest, this varies depending on the type of IP: blood sampling (15 hospitals), wound suture (14), urethral catheterization (9), lumbar puncture (7), intubation (1) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (1), with no significant differences between hospitals. The main arguments for restricting parental presence are parental anxiety (26/30) and a lower performance by health personnel (23/30). Occasional problems, such as nausea (22/28), have arisen due to family presence. The interviewed physicians in charge think that health care professionals' agreement rates for parental presence decrease significantly with the increasing invasiveness of the procedure. Two hospitals have a working group and one a specific protocol to address parental presence. Parental presence during IP is limited in Spanish PED, due to parental anxiety and is detrimental to the success of the procedure. Physicians and nurses disagree with family presence, especially during the most invasive procedures. 2009 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. The Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure As a Measure of Self-Esteem

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Timko, C Alix; England, Erica L; Herbert, James D; Forman, Evan M

    2010-01-01

    .... In Study 2, an IRAP measuring general self-esteem revealed positive correlations between IRAP performance and explicit measures of psychological functioning and negative correlations between the IRAP...

  14. RISK-ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES AND ESTABLISHING THE SIZE OF SAMPLES FOR AUDITING FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Botez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In auditing financial statements, the procedures for the assessment of the risks and the calculation of the materiality differ from an auditor to another, by audit cabinet policy or advice professional bodies. All, however, have the reference International Audit Standards ISA 315 “Identifying and assessing the risks of material misstatement through understanding the entity and its environment” and ISA 320 “Materiality in planning and performing an audit”. On the basis of specific practices auditors in Romania, the article shows some laborious and examples of these aspects. Such considerations are presented evaluation of the general inherent risk, a specific inherent risk, the risk of control and the calculation of the materiality.

  15. Psychological assessment tool for patients diagnosed with absolute uterine factor infertility and planning to undergo uterine transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saso, S; Bracewell-Milnes, T; Ismail, L; Hamed, A H; Thum, M-Y; Ghaem-Maghami, S; Del Priore, G; Smith, J R

    2014-08-01

    Uterine transplantation (UTn) has been proposed as a treatment option for women diagnosed with absolute uterine factor infertility (AUFI) and who are willing to bear their own child. AUFI renders a woman 'unconditionally infertile'. For AUFI women in general, UTn may offer a way to re-discover their own femininity through the restoration of fertility. Thus, when faced with a patient who may undergo UTn, the 'holistic approach' takes on an extra meaning. This is because the psychological element is two-sided for these patients. On one side lies the psychology of infertility, and on the other and equally important, is the substantially higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders in transplant candidates and recipients than in the general population. However, the psychology of a potential recipient of a uterine graft in order to bring about fertility has not been adequately explored or reviewed scientifically. We have presented here an outline of the areas which should be included in a psychological assessment for patients wishing to undergo UTn.

  16. A meta-analysis of criterion effects for the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) in the clinical domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahey, Nigel A; Nicholson, Emma; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

    2015-09-01

    The Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) is a technique that is attracting a substantial body of research literature, particularly within the clinical domain. In response, the present paper outlines a meta-analysis of clinically-focused IRAP effects (N = 494) to provide the first estimate of how well such effects validate against their respective criterion variables in general. The meta-analysis incorporated clinically-focused IRAP effects from 15 studies yielding a large effect size, r¯ = .45, with a desirably narrow 95% credibility interval (.23, .67). The funnel plot and subsequent sensitivity analyses indicated that this meta-effect was not subject to publication bias. The present meta-effect is an estimate based upon an IRAP literature that is still evolving rapidly in the clinical domain, and so as per its accompanying credibility interval, all conclusions that follow are necessarily provisional even if bounded. Apart from the fact that the current meta-effect might be subject to inadvertent under- and/or over-estimations of the current literature, the present meta-effect might strengthen with further refinements of the IRAP. The current meta-effect provides the means to calculate what sample size would be required to achieve a statistical power of .80 when testing the criterion validity of clinically-focused IRAP effects using a given parametric statistic. For example, first-order Pearson correlations would hypothetically require an N of 29-37 for such purposes depending upon how conservatively over-estimation of the present meta-effect is controlled for. Overall, the IRAP compares favourably with alternative implicit measures in clinical psychology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Improving the effectiveness of impact assessment pertaining to Indigenous peoples in the Brazilian environmental licensing procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, Philippe [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, PO Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Vanclay, Frank, E-mail: frank.vanclay@rug.nl [Department of Cultural Geography, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, PO Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Langdon, Esther Jean [Department of Anthropology, Center for Philosophy and Human Sciences, Federal University of Santa Catarina PO Box 5104, 88040-970, Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Arts, Jos [Department of Planning, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, PO Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-04-01

    The number of environmental licence applications for projects affecting Indigenous peoples in Brazil has increased since the implementation of a major infrastructure program (Programa de Aceleração do Crescimento) in 2007. This increase has caused problems for Brazilian agencies involved in environmental licensing procedures (IBAMA, FUNAI and others). We analyze the Brazilian environmental licensing procedure for situations involving Indigenous peoples, Maroons (Quilombolas) or other traditional communities in order to identify potential improvements for Brazil and potentially other countries. Although Brazilian procedures are consistent with international best practice in environmental licensing, in practice social impacts are inadequately addressed, mitigation measures are poorly implemented, and there is a lack of enforcement and compliance. The paper is based on document analysis and interviews with key actors in governmental and non-governmental organizations and Indigenous leaders. We suggest that Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) processes need to be conducted at the earliest stages of project planning, and that Indigenous peoples should actively participate in impact assessment, monitoring and evaluation processes. In order to achieve a social licence to operate, there needs to be full recognition of traditional knowledge and acceptance of Indigenous values and concepts. We also recommend increased involvement of social experts and mediators as well as improved accountability, enforcement and grievance mechanisms in the licensing process. - Highlights: • The Brazilian environmental licensing system needs to address social impacts better. • Communities need to be consulted at the earliest stage possible. • Indigenous peoples need to be invited to participate in impact assessment teams. • Independent Indigenous committees to monitor implementation of mitigation measures. • Accountability, enforcement and grievance mechanisms need to be

  18. Augmented Reality: A Brand New Challenge for the Assessment and Treatment of Psychological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicchi Giglioli, Irene Alice; Pallavicini, Federica; Pedroli, Elisa; Serino, Silvia; Riva, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality is a new technological system that allows introducing virtual contents in the real world in order to run in the same representation and, in real time, enhancing the user's sensory perception of reality. From another point of view, Augmented Reality can be defined as a set of techniques and tools that add information to the physical reality. To date, Augmented Reality has been used in many fields, such as medicine, entertainment, maintenance, architecture, education, and cognitive and motor rehabilitation but very few studies and applications of AR exist in clinical psychology. In the treatment of psychological disorders, Augmented Reality has given preliminary evidence to be a useful tool due to its adaptability to the patient needs and therapeutic purposes and interactivity. Another relevant factor is the quality of the user's experience in the Augmented Reality system determined from emotional engagement and sense of presence. This experience could increase the AR ecological validity in the treatment of psychological disorders. This paper reviews the recent studies on the use of Augmented Reality in the evaluation and treatment of psychological disorders, focusing on current uses of this technology and on the specific features that delineate Augmented Reality a new technique useful for psychology.

  19. Augmented Reality: A Brand New Challenge for the Assessment and Treatment of Psychological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Alice Chicchi Giglioli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality is a new technological system that allows introducing virtual contents in the real world in order to run in the same representation and, in real time, enhancing the user’s sensory perception of reality. From another point of view, Augmented Reality can be defined as a set of techniques and tools that add information to the physical reality. To date, Augmented Reality has been used in many fields, such as medicine, entertainment, maintenance, architecture, education, and cognitive and motor rehabilitation but very few studies and applications of AR exist in clinical psychology. In the treatment of psychological disorders, Augmented Reality has given preliminary evidence to be a useful tool due to its adaptability to the patient needs and therapeutic purposes and interactivity. Another relevant factor is the quality of the user’s experience in the Augmented Reality system determined from emotional engagement and sense of presence. This experience could increase the AR ecological validity in the treatment of psychological disorders. This paper reviews the recent studies on the use of Augmented Reality in the evaluation and treatment of psychological disorders, focusing on current uses of this technology and on the specific features that delineate Augmented Reality a new technique useful for psychology.

  20. Augmented Reality: A Brand New Challenge for the Assessment and Treatment of Psychological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicchi Giglioli, Irene Alice; Pedroli, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality is a new technological system that allows introducing virtual contents in the real world in order to run in the same representation and, in real time, enhancing the user's sensory perception of reality. From another point of view, Augmented Reality can be defined as a set of techniques and tools that add information to the physical reality. To date, Augmented Reality has been used in many fields, such as medicine, entertainment, maintenance, architecture, education, and cognitive and motor rehabilitation but very few studies and applications of AR exist in clinical psychology. In the treatment of psychological disorders, Augmented Reality has given preliminary evidence to be a useful tool due to its adaptability to the patient needs and therapeutic purposes and interactivity. Another relevant factor is the quality of the user's experience in the Augmented Reality system determined from emotional engagement and sense of presence. This experience could increase the AR ecological validity in the treatment of psychological disorders. This paper reviews the recent studies on the use of Augmented Reality in the evaluation and treatment of psychological disorders, focusing on current uses of this technology and on the specific features that delineate Augmented Reality a new technique useful for psychology. PMID:26339283

  1. Modulatory effects of aromatherapy massage intervention on electroencephalogram, psychological assessments, salivary cortisol and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Ji; Cui, Yanji; Yang, Yoon-Sil; Kang, Moon-Seok; Jung, Sung-Cherl; Park, Hyeung Keun; Yeun, Hye-Young; Jang, Won Jung; Lee, Sunjoo; Kwak, Young Sook; Eun, Su-Yong

    2014-06-01

    Aromatherapy massage is commonly used for the stress management of healthy individuals, and also has been often employed as a therapeutic use for pain control and alleviating psychological distress, such as anxiety and depression, in oncological palliative care patients. However, the exact biological basis of aromatherapy massage is poorly understood. Therefore, we evaluated here the effects of aromatherapy massage interventions on multiple neurobiological indices such as quantitative psychological assessments, electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectrum pattern, salivary cortisol and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. A control group without treatment (n = 12) and aromatherapy massage group (n = 13) were randomly recruited. They were all females whose children were diagnosed as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and followed up in the Department of Psychiatry, Jeju National University Hospital. Participants were treated with aromatherapy massage for 40 min twice per week for 4 weeks (8 interventions). A 4-week-aromatherapy massage program significantly improved all psychological assessment scores in the Stat-Trait Anxiety Index, Beck Depression Inventory and Short Form of Psychosocial Well-being Index. Interestingly, plasma BDNF levels were significantly increased after a 4 week-aromatherapy massage program. Alpha-brain wave activities were significantly enhanced and delta wave activities were markedly reduced following the one-time aromatherapy massage treatment, as shown in the meditation and neurofeedback training. In addition, salivary cortisol levels were significantly reduced following the one-time aromatherapy massage treatment. These results suggest that aromatherapy massage could exert significant influences on multiple neurobiological indices such as EEG pattern, salivary cortisol and plasma BDNF levels as well as psychological assessments. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Social psychology on the flight deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Social psychological and personality factors that can influence resource management on the flight deck are discussed. It is argued that personality and situational factors intersect to determine crew responses and that assessment of performance under full crew and mission conditions can provide the most valuable information about relevant factors. The possibility of training procedures to improve performance on these dimensions is discussed.

  3. Untested assumptions: psychological research and credibility assessment in legal decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Herlihy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trauma survivors often have to negotiate legal systems such as refugee status determination or the criminal justice system. Methods & results: We outline and discuss the contribution which research on trauma and related psychological processes can make to two particular areas of law where complex and difficult legal decisions must be made: in claims for refugee and humanitarian protection, and in reporting and prosecuting sexual assault in the criminal justice system. Conclusion: There is a breadth of psychological knowledge that, if correctly applied, would limit the inappropriate reliance on assumptions and myth in legal decision-making in these settings. Specific recommendations are made for further study.

  4. Development of a standardized testing procedure for assessing the irritation potential of occupational skin cleansers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Peter; Seyfarth, Florian; Antonov, Dimitar; John, Swen Malte; Diepgen, Thomas; Schliemann, Sibylle

    2014-03-01

    Frequent skin cleaning fulfils the definition of occupational 'wet work'. Standardized methods are required to assess the irritation potential of workplace cleansers. To develop a standardized procedure for testing the irritation potential of occupational skin cleansers. In this single-blind, single-centre trial in 25 healthy volunteers, the irritation potential of five generic reference cleansers was tested by three-times-daily washing with an automated skin cleaning device for 4 days, and quantification of cumulative skin barrier damage was performed by visual scoring, chromametry, transepidermal water loss TEWL, and corneometry. For two cleansers, reproducibility of the irritancy assessment was assessed. Furthermore, the irritation induced by four commercial workplace skin cleansers was studied. Whereas no significant changes were observed for any of the tested cleansers by either visual scoring or chromametry, significant increases in TEWL and significant decreases in stratum corneum hydration were found for all cleansers. Cleansers differed significantly in their irritation potential. On retesting of two cleansers, the first results were confirmed. Among the four commercial cleansers, one that was claimed to be mild was found to be disproportionally irritant. The presented model for testing cleansing preparations allows a highly controlled, practically relevant and reproducible irritancy assessment of occupational skin cleansers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Environmental risk assessment for plant pests: a procedure to evaluate their impacts on ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilioli, G; Schrader, G; Baker, R H A; Ceglarska, E; Kertész, V K; Lövei, G; Navajas, M; Rossi, V; Tramontini, S; van Lenteren, J C

    2014-01-15

    The current methods to assess the environmental impacts of plant pests differ in their approaches and there is a lack of the standardized procedures necessary to provide accurate and consistent results, demonstrating the complexity of developing a commonly accepted scheme for this purpose. By including both the structural and functional components of the environment threatened by invasive alien species (IAS), in particular plant pests, we propose an environmental risk assessment scheme that addresses this complexity. Structural components are investigated by evaluating the impacts of the plant pest on genetic, species and landscape diversity. Functional components are evaluated by estimating how plant pests modify ecosystem services in order to determine the extent to which an IAS changes the functional traits that influence ecosystem services. A scenario study at a defined spatial and temporal resolution is then used to explore how an IAS, as an exogenous driving force, may trigger modifications in the target environment. The method presented here provides a standardized approach to generate comparable and reproducible results for environmental risk assessment as a component of Pest Risk Analysis. The method enables the assessment of overall environmental risk which integrates the impacts on different components of the environment and their probabilities of occurrence. The application of the proposed scheme is illustrated by evaluating the environmental impacts of the invasive citrus long-horn beetle, Anoplophora chinensis. © 2013.

  6. Depression in Spinal Cord Injury : Assessing the Role of Psychological Resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, Claudio; Mueller, Rachel; Post, Marcel W. M.; van Leeuwen, Christel M. C.; Werner, Christina S.; Geyh, Szilvia

    Purpose: To test the spinal cord injury adjustment model (SCIAM) and to examine how psychological resources may influence depressive symptoms in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). We expect that (a) higher general self-efficacy (GSE) and higher purpose in life (PIL) are associated with lower

  7. Internationalising the Psychology Curriculum: Preliminary Notes on Conception and Assessment of Anticipated Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessop, Nadia; Adams, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Advocates for internationalisation of the undergraduate psychology curriculum anticipate a variety of beneficial outcomes strongly associated with forms of intellectual growth -- including critical thinking, appreciation for diversity, and global awareness -- that are the defining purpose of a university education. As a prelude to an intervention…

  8. Training in Strength-Based Intervention and Assessment Methodologies in APA-Accredited Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kayla; Graves, Scott L., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    The importance of identifying and building on individual strengths has been a key component of many psychoeducational theories and modalities focused on developing interventions. However, program training in this growing area is not well known. As such, this is the first study designed to ascertain the American Psychological Association-accredited…

  9. Diagnosing Cartman: Psychology Students' Use of Symptoms and Traits to Assess Child Antisocial Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalch, Matthew M.; Vitale, Erika M.; Ford, J. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Recent changes to the diagnosis of child antisocial behavior provide different methods of conceptualizing it (e.g., traditional symptom-based diagnoses and alternative trait-based methods). However, there is little research on how psychology students might use these different methods and what kind of instructional formats might be amenable to…

  10. Electronic diary assessment of pain, disability and psychological adaptation in patients differing in duration of pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, M.L.; Sorbi, M.J.; Kruise, D.A.; Kerssens, J.J.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Bensing, J.

    2000-01-01

    Computerized diary measurement of pain, disability and psychological adaptation was performed four times a day for 4 weeks in 80 patients with various duration of unexplained pain. Reported are (1) the temporal characteristics and stability of pain report during the 4-week measurement period, (2)

  11. Electronic diary assessment of pain, disability and psychological adaptation in patients differing in duration of pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, M.L.; Sorbi, M.J.; Kruise, D.A.; Kerssens, J.J.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Bensing, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Computerized diary measurement of pain, disability and psychological adaptation was performed four times a day for 4 weeks in 80 patients with various duration of unexplained pain. Reported are (1) the temporal characteristics and stability of pain report during the 4-week measurement period, (2)

  12. Psychological assessment of patients undergoing cardiac transplant in a teaching hospital (2004 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara dos Santos Cunha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the psychological evaluations of patients with heart failure waiting for heart transplantation. Methods: The data were obtained from patient records containing pre-surgery psychological evaluations performed by psychologists from the multidisciplinary cardiology team. The evaluation protocol included the Quality of Life Questionnaire (SF-36, Beck Depression Inventory, and an interview script. Results: The results of psychological evaluations performed between 2004 and 2012 for 60 candidates for heart transplantation were analyzed: 43 men and 17 women aged between 16 and 66 years (Mean=45.18; SD=11.91, predominantly from the São José do Rio Preto area (São Paulo state, Brazil (83%, with incomplete elementary education (68%, and who were in stable relationships (73%. Although women presented higher mean scores for depression (21.41 than men (14.61, there was no significant difference between genders. Women's quality of life was impaired in all domains compared to men (below 50% and was significantly poorer in the physical functioning (P=0.01, vitality (P=0.00, emotional role functioning (P=0.04, and mental health (P=0.02 domains. Conclusion: Patients with psychosocial vulnerability (e.g., depression identified before transplantation should receive psychological treatment.

  13. Consistency of Supervisor and Peer Ratings of Assessment Interviews Conducted by Psychology Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalvez, Craig J.; Deane, Frank P.; Caputi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Observation of counsellor skills through a one-way mirror, video or audio recording followed by supervisors and peers feedback is common in counsellor training. The nature and extent of agreement between supervisor-peer dyads are unclear. Using a standard scale, supervisors and peers rated 32 interviews by psychology trainees observed through a…

  14. Theater and Psychological Development: Assessing Socio-Cognitive Complexity in the Domain of Theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, José Eduardo; Ferreira, Pedro; Coimbra, Joaquim Luís; Menezes, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Theater is a millenary art form that has stably maintained its minimum indispensable elements over the years. Yet, not much is known about the psychological impact of this performing art. A literature review shows a broad and sometimes contradictory spectrum of theoretical and empirical evidence. In the last few decades, however, interdisciplinary…

  15. Psychological Distress in Out-Patients Assessed for Chronic Pain Compared to Those with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rice

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients diagnosed with chronic pain (CP and rheumatoid arthritis (RA represent two samples with overlapping symptoms, such as experiencing significant pain. Objectives. To compare the level of psychological distress among patients diagnosed CP attending a specialist pain clinic with those attending a specialist RA clinic. Measures. A cross-sectional study was conducted at an academic specialist chronic pain and rheumatology clinic. Participants. 330 participants included a CP group (n=167 and a RA group (n=163 completed a booklet of questionnaires regarding demographic characteristics, duration, and severity of their pain. Psychological and personality variables were compared between the CP and RA participants using a Multivariate Analysis of Covariance (MANCOVA. Results. Level of psychological distress based on the subscales of the DASS (depression, anxiety, and stress, PASS (escape avoidance, cognitive anxiety, fear of pain, and physiological anxiety, and PCS (rumination, magnification, and helplessness was significantly higher in the CP group compared to the RA group. Categorization of individuals based on DASS severity resulted in significant differences in rates of depression and anxiety symptoms between groups, with a greater number of CP participants displaying more severe depressive and anxiety symptoms. Discussion and Conclusions. This study found greater levels of psychological distress among CP individuals referred to an academic pain clinic when compared to RA patients referred to an academic rheumatology clinic.

  16. Training and Consultation in Psychological Assessment With Professional Psychologists: Suggestions for Enhancing the Profession and Individual Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, F Barton; Finn, Stephen E

    2017-01-01

    Once central to the identity and practice of clinical psychology, psychological assessment (PA) is currently more limited in professional practice and generally less emphasized in graduate training programs than in the past. Performance-based personality tests especially are taught and used less, even though scientific evidence of their utility and validity has never been stronger. We review research on training in PA and discuss challenges that contributed to its decreased popularity. We then review continuing education requirements for ethical practice in PA and recommend that PA should be reconceptualized as a specialty best practiced by psychologists who have the resources and time to maintain competency. We offer recommendations about how professional organizations concerned with PA can promote its practice and how individual expert clinicians can assist. We conclude by describing a collaborative model for providing group consultation in PA to practicing psychologists. If implemented widely, this model could help promote PA and raise its standard of practice.

  17. Evaluating the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP to assess the bond between dogs and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Rehn

    Full Text Available The Strange Situation Procedure (SSP is increasingly being used to study attachment between dogs and humans. It has been developed from the Ainsworth Strange Situation Procedure, which is used extensively to investigate attachment between children and their parents. In this experiment, 12 female beagle dogs were tested in two treatments to identify possible order effects in the test, a potential weakness in the SSP. In one treatment (FS, dogs participated together with a 'familiar person' and a 'stranger'. In a control treatment (SS, the same dogs participated together with two unfamiliar people, 'stranger A' and 'stranger B'. Comparisons were made between episodes within as well as between treatments. As predicted in FS, dogs explored more in the presence of the familiar person than the stranger. Importantly, they also explored more in the presence of stranger A (who appeared in the same order as the familiar person and followed the same procedure than stranger B in SS. Furthermore, comparisons between treatments, where a familiar person was present in FS and stranger A was present in SS, showed no differences in exploration. In combination, these results indicate that the effect of a familiar person on dogs' exploratory behaviour, a key feature when assessing secure attachment styles, could not be tested reliably due to the order in which the familiar person and the stranger appear. It is proposed that in the future only counterbalanced versions of the SSP are used. Alternatively, since dogs reliably initiated more contact with the familiar person compared to the strangers, it is suggested that future studies on attachment in dogs towards humans should focus either on the behaviour of the dog in those episodes of the SSP when the person returns, or on reunion behaviour in other studies, specially designed to address dog-human interactions at this time.

  18. Evaluating the Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) to Assess the Bond between Dogs and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehn, Therese; McGowan, Ragen T. S.; Keeling, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    The Strange Situation Procedure (SSP) is increasingly being used to study attachment between dogs and humans. It has been developed from the Ainsworth Strange Situation Procedure, which is used extensively to investigate attachment between children and their parents. In this experiment, 12 female beagle dogs were tested in two treatments to identify possible order effects in the test, a potential weakness in the SSP. In one treatment (FS), dogs participated together with a ‘familiar person’ and a ‘stranger’. In a control treatment (SS), the same dogs participated together with two unfamiliar people, ‘stranger A’ and ‘stranger B’. Comparisons were made between episodes within as well as between treatments. As predicted in FS, dogs explored more in the presence of the familiar person than the stranger. Importantly, they also explored more in the presence of stranger A (who appeared in the same order as the familiar person and followed the same procedure) than stranger B in SS. Furthermore, comparisons between treatments, where a familiar person was present in FS and stranger A was present in SS, showed no differences in exploration. In combination, these results indicate that the effect of a familiar person on dogs' exploratory behaviour, a key feature when assessing secure attachment styles, could not be tested reliably due to the order in which the familiar person and the stranger appear. It is proposed that in the future only counterbalanced versions of the SSP are used. Alternatively, since dogs reliably initiated more contact with the familiar person compared to the strangers, it is suggested that future studies on attachment in dogs towards humans should focus either on the behaviour of the dog in those episodes of the SSP when the person returns, or on reunion behaviour in other studies, specially designed to address dog-human interactions at this time. PMID:23437277

  19. Qualitative methodology in developmental psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demuth, Carolin; Mey, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative methodology presently is gaining increasing recognition in developmental psychology. Although the founders of developmental psychology to a large extent already used qualitative procedures, the field was long dominated by a (post) positivistic quantitative paradigm. The increasing...

  20. Assessment of Procedural Pain in Children Using Analgesia Nociception Index: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avez-Couturier, Justine; De Jonckheere, Julien; Jeanne, Mathieu; Vallée, Louis; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Logier, Régis

    2016-12-01

    The Analgesia Nociception Index (ANI), based on heart rate (HR) variability analysis, is known to decrease after a painful stimulus during surgery under general anesthesia in adults. It is measured continuously and noninvasively. We studied ANI response to procedural pain in a pediatric population and ANI measurement's feasibility in this context, across age. A prospective, noninterventional pilot study was performed. All children (between 6 mo and under 18 y) undergoing muscle biopsy conducted under analgesia and light sedation were included. Medical staff was blind to the ANI monitor. HR and ANI were recorded and analyzed during 2 periods: T1 before incision and T2 after incision. Pain was assessed by the FLACC scale at T2. We observed ANI and HR variations after incision. ANI, HR, and FLACC were compared between children younger or older than 6 years. Enrollment or technical issues were reported. A total of 26 children were included (median age, 6 y; ranging from 6 mo to 16 y; 16 male). ANI decreased from T1 to T2. HR, ANI, or FLACC values were not different in children younger or older than 6 years. No parents or children refused to take part in the study. No technical issues was reported. In this pilot study, ANI measurement seems relevant in pediatric procedural pain, across age. Further studies are needed to confirm these results.

  1. Procedure for conducting probabilistic safety assessment: level 1 full power internal event analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Won Dae; Lee, Y. H.; Hwang, M. J. [and others

    2003-07-01

    This report provides guidance on conducting a Level I PSA for internal events in NPPs, which is based on the method and procedure that was used in the PSA for the design of Korea Standard Nuclear Plants (KSNPs). Level I PSA is to delineate the accident sequences leading to core damage and to estimate their frequencies. It has been directly used for assessing and modifying the system safety and reliability as a key and base part of PSA. Also, Level I PSA provides insights into design weakness and into ways of preventing core damage, which in most cases is the precursor to accidents leading to major accidents. So Level I PSA has been used as the essential technical bases for risk-informed application in NPPs. The report consists six major procedural steps for Level I PSA; familiarization of plant, initiating event analysis, event tree analysis, system fault tree analysis, reliability data analysis, and accident sequence quantification. The report is intended to assist technical persons performing Level I PSA for NPPs. A particular aim is to promote a standardized framework, terminology and form of documentation for PSAs. On the other hand, this report would be useful for the managers or regulatory persons related to risk-informed regulation, and also for conducting PSA for other industries.

  2. Off-site toxic consequence assessment: a simplified modeling procedure and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnaccia, Joe; Hoppe, Tom

    2008-11-15

    An assessment of off-site exposure from spills/releases of toxic chemicals can be conducted by compiling site-specific operational, geographic, demographic, and meteorological data and by using screening-level public-domain modeling tools (e.g., RMP Comp, ALOHA and DEGADIS). In general, the analysis is confined to the following: event-based simulations (allow for the use of known, constant, atmospheric conditions), known receptor distances (on the order of miles or less), short time scale for the distances considered (order of 10's of minutes or less), gently sloping rough terrain, dense and neutrally buoyant gas dispersion, known chemical inventory and infrastructure (used to define source-term), and known toxic endpoint (defines significance). While screening-level models are relatively simple to use, care must be taken to ensure that the results are meaningful. This approach allows one to assess risk from catastrophic release (e.g., via terrorism), or plausible release scenarios (related to standard operating procedures and industry standards). In addition, given receptor distance and toxic endpoint, the model can be used to predict the critical spill volume to realize significant off-site risk. This information can then be used to assess site storage and operation parameters and to determine the most economical and effective risk reduction measures to be applied.

  3. Taking a systemic perspective on cognitive assessments and reports: reflections of a paediatric and adolescent psychology service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Angela; Christie, Deborah

    2008-04-01

    This article discusses current approaches in the neuropsychological assessment of children and young people. An audit of assessments found that nearly a quarter of referrals for neuropsychological assessments could have been resolved more effectively without completing a cognitive assessment. The audit also found that families and young people often found the report difficult to understand or unhelpful. We highlight the difficulties we have had with specific aspects of this process in a paediatric and adolescent medicine psychology service, and discuss the approaches we have taken in the light of feedback from children, young people and parents. The article describes how a systemic framework has been used in processing and responding to referrals. It also gives case examples illustrating how systemic theory and principles have been incorporated into the written reports. Families have responded very favourably to the use of creative and child friendly language in the feedback.

  4. A biometeorological procedure for weather forecast to assess the optimal outdoor clothing insulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, Marco; Crisci, Alfonso; Cecchi, Lorenzo; Modesti, Pietro Amedeo; Maracchi, Giampiero; Gensini, Gian Franco; Orlandini, Simone

    2008-09-01

    Clothing insulation represents an important parameter strongly dependent on climate/weather variability and directly involved in the assessment of the human energy balance. Few studies tried to explore the influence of climate changes on the optimal clothing insulation for outdoor spaces. For this reason, the aim of this work was to investigate mainly the optimal outdoor minimum clothing insulation value required to reach the thermal neutrality (min_clo) related to climate change on a seasonal basis. Subsequently, we developed an example of operational biometeorological procedure to provide 72-hour forecast maps concerning the min_clo. Hourly meteorological data were provided by three Italian weather stations located in Turin, Rome and Palermo, for the period 1951-1995. Environmental variables and subjective characteristics referred to an average adult young male at rest and at a very high metabolic rate were used as input variables to calculate the min_clo by using a thermal index based on the human energy balance. Trends of min_clo were assessed by a non-parametric statistical method. Results showed a lower magnitude of trends in a subject at a very high metabolic rate than at rest. Turin always showed a decrease of min_clo during the study period and prevalently negative trends were also observed in Palermo. On the other hand, an opposite situation was observed in Rome, especially during the morning in all seasons. The development of a daily operational procedure to forecast customized min_clo could provide useful information for the outdoor clothing fitting that might help to reduce the weather-related human health risk.

  5. Decision-making Procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldashev, Gani; Kirchsteiger, Georg; Sebald, Alexander Christopher

    2009-01-01

    It is a persistent finding in psychology and experimental economics that people's behavior is not only shaped by outcomes but also by decision-making procedures. In this paper we develop a general framework capable of modelling these procedural concerns. Within the context of psychological games we...

  6. Attitudes toward psychological assessment of candidates for obtaining and renewing driver’s license

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Augusto Matteo Ambiel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to verify the attitudes of the traffic-psychologic evaluation process. There were 50 participants getting their first permission or renewing the license to drive. They answered to a sociodemographic questionnaire and the Attitudes towards Psychologic Evaluation Service Scale. The Results indicated that the participants had a favorable attitude towards the evaluation. The candidates for the first driving license gave importance to the process while the candidates with undergraduate education reduced its value. There were no significances differences of sex or age. There were statistically significant and positive correlations between the factors: importance, efficiency and clarification of the process. Based on the results, it was possible to infer that despite complaints about the evaluation the candidates recognize its importance for the traffic.

  7. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT IN EXERCISE: AN INTERVIEW GUIDE FOR EXERCISERS AND INSTRUCTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: The practice of physical activity is associated to psychological, physical and social benefits. However, in the general population sport practice is still very low and the levels of dropout are very significant (Dishman, 1994; “Global strategy on diet, physical activity and health”, 2004). So it becomes important to understand the factors that can cause these problems. This paper proposes two interview guides for exercisers and instructors that facilitate a deeper analysis of the ps...

  8. Acupuncture Anxiolytic Effects on Physiological and Psychological Assessments for a Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Shayestehfar, Monir; Seif-Barghi, Tohid; Zarei, Sahar; Mehran, Amir

    2016-01-01

    In a randomized controlled trial we examined the effect of acupuncture on anxiety of the adolescent football players prior to the competition using psychological and physiological markers. A total of 45 athletes were equally allocated to either acupuncture group, sham group, or wait-list control group. Thereafter, all participants were asked to complete an anxiety questionnaire before and after the intervention. Their heart rate and skin conductance were also examined before and after the int...

  9. Assessment of Psychological and Psycho-physiological Problems Among Visually Impaired Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneswari, Mohanraj; Immanuel Selvaraj, Chinnadurai; Selvaraj, Balakrishnan; Srinivasan, Thiruvengadam

    2016-03-01

    Visual impairment tends to evoke more discomfiture than any other disability. Primarily, the biggest issue may be that blindness is visible. Furthermore, visual impairment develops serious medical, psychological, social and economic problems. The focus of the current study was to investigate the psychological and psycho physiological problems of visually impaired adolescent students. Purposive sampling was adopted to select 150 visually impaired students (71 males and 72 females) from five schools in Coimbatore city of the Tamil Nadu state, India. Anxiety, frustration, aggression and social and personal adjustment levels of the visually impaired students were measured in this study using Taylor's manifest anxiety scale, frustration test, aggression scale and the adolescent adjustment inventory, respectively. Anxiety (χ(2) = 185.66, P = 0 at P adjustment among visually impaired students. The adjustment score had a significant positive correlation with anxiety (r = 0.919, P = 0 at P adjustment among visually impaired students. Visually impaired students exhibited significant levels of psychological and psycho-physiological problems.

  10. Psychological impact of disasters on children: review of assessment and interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Nilamadhab

    2009-02-01

    There is a wide range of mental and behavioral sequel in children following disasters, which can last long. This review discusses the nature and extent of the psychiatric problems, their management options and process to organize the psychological interventions for affected children. Literatures were searched through PubMed with the words "children, disaster, psychiatry, and mental health" and relevant cross references were included in the review. Proportions of children having posttraumatic symptoms or syndromal diagnoses vary in different studies depending on various factors like nature and severity of disaster, diagnostic criteria used, cultural issues regarding meaning of trauma, support available, etc. Common psychiatric manifestations among children include acute stress reactions, adjustment disorder, depression, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety disorders specific to childhood and psychotic disorders. Comorbidities and sub-clinical syndromes are also common. Most of the post-disaster mental health interventions can be provided in the community by the local disaster workers. Supportive counselling, cognitive behavior therapy, brief trauma/grief-focused psychotherapy, and play therapy are the commonly utilized methods of psychological intervention, which can be given in groups. Information about the efficacy of medications is still emerging, while many are being used and found useful. Following disaster, systematic screening for psychological problems in children is suggested. An integrated approach using psycho-socio-educational and clinical interventions is expected to be effective.

  11. [Psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents in family law proceedings. Empirical analyses from psychological expert assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbach, Jelena; Kolbe, Florian; Lübbehüsen, Bärbel; Koglin, Ute

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the frequency and distribution of mental health problems in children and adolescents who had previously been psychologically evaluated in family law proceedings. The data stem from psychological evaluations (N=298) conducted between 2008 and 2012 at an evaluation institute in Bremen, Germany. The reports included were analyzed for indications of mental health problems by means of a content analysis. The total sample consisted of 496 children and adolescents. At least one mental health problem (according to ICD-F) was found in 39.5% of the children and adolescents. The comorbidity rate was 38.7%. Developmental deficits appeared in 12.3%, emotional or conduct problems in 22.8% of the sample. Furthermore, 11.5% were reported as having been victims of violence. Frequency distributions of mental health problems with respect to the juridical issues in question are given. These results provide a first empirical overview of mental health problems in psychologically evaluated children and adolescents. Our findings highlight the need for future studies to further examine mental health problems of children and adolescents in family court proceedings with respect to the juridical issues in question.

  12. Comparative Assessment of Dentists’ Psychological Health Status in Shiraz with their Physicians Counterparts Using General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Hasanzade

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: This study was conducted to assess the psychological health status of dentists in Shiraz city.Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, subjects consisted of 106 dentists and 94 general practitioners (comparison group from private and public clinics in Shiraz city. Subjects were requested to complete the standard general health questionnaire and a questionnaire on demographic variables. The data wereanalyzed by appropriate statistical tests. Chi-Square test and independent sample t-test were used to compare demographic and occupational variables of both groups. The questionnaires were scored and the overall score of each individual determined his/her psychological health status. Means of GHQ scores of both groups werecompared using statistical tests.Results: Both groups were similar in all demographic variables, except for age. The mean total score of GHQ-28 for both dentists (17.9 and physicians (16.34 groups were significantly lower than the cut-off point value of 23(P <0.01. The means of scores for somatic problems, depression, anxiety and insomnia as well as unusual social performance scales were significantly different between both groups (P<0.05. A significant positive association was found between GHQ total score and job tenure.Conclusion: Our findings revealed that psychological health status of dentists was poorer than that of physicians.Additionally, dentists’ scores were significantly different from those of their counterparts in all GHQ sub-scales.

  13. Assessment of work intensification by managers and psychological distressed and non-distressed employees: a multilevel comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamberger, Simon Grandjean; Larsen, Anelia; Vinding, Anker Lund; Nielsen, Peter; Fonager, Kirsten; Nielsen, René Nesgaard; Ryom, Pia; Omland, Øyvind

    2015-01-01

    Work intensification is a popular management strategy to increase productivity, but at the possible expense of employee mental stress. This study examines associations between ratings of work intensification and psychological distress, and the level of agreement between compared employee-rated and manager-rated work intensification. Multi-source survey data were collected from 3,064 employees and 573 company managers from the private sector in 2010. Multilevel regression models were used to compare different work intensification ratings across psychological distress strata. Distressed employees rated higher degree of total work intensification compared to non-distressed employees, and on three out of five sub ratings there were an increased prevalence of work intensification in the case group. In general, there was poor agreement between employee and company work intensification rating. Neither manager-rated work intensification nor employee/manager discrepancy in work intensification ratings was associated with psychological distress. Distressed employees had a higher total score of employee/manager agreed work intensification, and a higher prevalence of increased demands of labour productivity. This study demonstrates higher ratings of employee/manager agreed work intensification in distressed employees compared to non-distressed employees, challenging previous findings of reporting bias in distressed employees' assessment of work environment.

  14. Procedures to relate the NII safety assessment principles for nuclear reactors to risk

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, G N; Hemming, C R

    1985-01-01

    Within the framework of the Public Inquiry into the proposed pressurised water reactor (PWR) at Sizewell, estimates were made of the levels of individual and societal risk from a PWR designed in a manner which would conform to the safety assessment principles formulated by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). The procedures used to derive these levels of risk are described in this report. The opportunity has also been taken to revise the risk estimates made at the time of the Inquiry by taking account of additional data which were not then available, and to provide further quantification of the likely range of uncertainty in the predictions. This re-analysis has led to small changes in the levels of risk previously evaluated, but these are not sufficient to affect the broad conclusions reached before. For a reactor just conforming to the NII safety assessment principles a maximum individual risk of fatal cancer of about 10 sup - sup 6 per year of reactor operation has been estimated; the societal ris...

  15. Validation of a novel intraoperative assessment tool: The Surgical Procedure Feedback Rubric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprak, Ayca; Luhanga, Ulemu; Jones, Sarah; Winthrop, Andrea; McEwen, Laura

    2016-02-01

    The Surgical Procedure Feedback Rubric (SPR) is a tool to document resident intraoperative performance and provide targeted feedback to support learning in a competency-based model of surgical education. It differs from other assessment tools because it defines performance criteria by increasing complexity through the use of behavioral anchors, thus embedding standards of performance within the tool. This study explores aspects of validity of the SPR as an assessment tool. A 14-month observational study was conducted in 2 surgical training programs. Factor structure of the SPR was examined using exploratory factor analysis. Discriminative ability of the SPR was examined using analysis of variance. The SPR measures 3 factors: Operating Room Preparation, Technical skill, and intrinsic Competencies. Analysis of variance demonstrated the utility of the SPR to discriminate between intraoperative performances of residents by postgraduate training year. This study contributes to the validity argument for the SPR by providing evidence for construct and discriminative validity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Introducing Patchwork Assessment to a Social Psychology Module: The Utility of Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Caroline J.

    2013-01-01

    Patchwork text assessment offers an alternative to traditional forms of assessment that are often focused on single assessment outcomes. Embedded within patchwork text assessment is formative assessment whereby short pieces of work, or patches, are shared with staff or peers for feedback which students can reflect upon and use to amend their work…

  17. Pain assessment and management in patients undergoing endovascular procedures in the catheterization laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilário, Thamires de Souza; Santos, Simone Marques Dos; Kruger, Juliana; Goes, Martha Georgina; Casco, Márcia Flores; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2017-05-25

    To describe how pain is assessed (characteristic, location, and intensity) and managed in clinical practice in patients undergoing endovascular procedures in the catheterization laboratory setting. Cross-sectional study with retrospective data collection. Overall, 345 patients were included; 116 (34%) experienced post-procedural pain; in 107 (92%), pain characteristics were not recorded; the location of pain was reported in 100% of patients, and its intensity in 111 (96%); management was largely pharmacologic; of the patients who received some type of management (n=71), 42 (59%) underwent reassessment of pain. The location and intensity of pain are well reported in clinical practice. Pharmacologic pain management is still prevalent. Additional efforts are needed to ensure recording of the characteristics of pain and its reassessment after interventions. Describir cómo se evalúa el dolor (características, localización e intensidad) y su manejo en la práctica clínica en pacientes sometidos a procedimientos endovasculares en el laboratorio de cateterización. Estudio transversal con recolección retrospectiva de datos. En total, se incluyeron 345 pacientes; 116 (34%) experimentaron dolor post-procedimiento; en 107 (92%), no se registraron las características del dolor; la localización del dolor se informó en el 100% de los pacientes, y su intensidad en 111 (96%); el manejo fue en gran medida farmacológico; de los pacientes que recibieron algún tipo de tratamiento (n=71), 42 (59%) fueron sometidos a reevaluación del dolor. La ubicación y la intensidad del dolor se informan bien en la práctica clínica. El manejo farmacológico del dolor sigue siendo frecuente. Se necesitan esfuerzos adicionales para asegurar el registro de las características del dolor y su reevaluación después de las intervenciones.

  18. Parental psychological distress and anxiety after a successful IVF/ICSI procedure with and without preimplantation genetic screening : Follow-up of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukers, F.; Houtzager, B. A.; Paap, M C S; Middelburg, K J; Hadders-Algra, M; Bos, A.F.; Kok, J.H.

    Background: Infertility treatment has an acknowledged psychological impact on women and their partners; however, information about the development of parental well-being after child birth is inconclusive. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) has been suggested to increase the efficacy of

  19. Parental psychological distress and anxiety after a successful IVF/ICSI procedure with and without preimplantation genetic screening: Follow-up of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukers, F.; Houtzager, B. A.; Paap, M. C. S.; Middelburg, K. J.; Hadders-Algra, M.; Bos, A. F.; Kok, J. H.; Cobben, Jan Maarten; van der Heide, Maaike; Koomen, Alice; Repping, Sjoerd; Silberbusch, Lobke; Twisk, Moniek; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; van der Veen, Fulco; Bos, Arend F.; Haadsma, Maaike; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Heineman, Maas Jan; van Hoften, Jacorina; Jongbloed-Pereboom, Marjolein; Keating, Paul; Seggers, Jorien

    2012-01-01

    Background: Infertility treatment has an acknowledged psychological impact on women and their partners; however, information about the development of parental well-being after child birth is inconclusive. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) has been suggested to increase the efficacy of

  20. Parental psychological distress and anxiety after a successful IVF/ICSI procedure with and without Preimplantation Genetic Screening. Follow-up of a randomised controlled trail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukers, F.; Houtzager, B.A.; Paap, Muirne; Middelburg, K.; Hadders-Algra, M.; Bos, A.F.; Kok, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Infertility treatment has an acknowledged psychological impact on women and their partners; however, information about the development of parental well-being after child birth is inconclusive. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) has been suggested to increase the efficacy of

  1. AVIATION PSYCHOLOGY,

    Science.gov (United States)

    PSYCHOLOGY , AERONAUTICS, FLIGHT, PILOTS, PERCEPTION, ATTENTION, READING, MEMORY( PSYCHOLOGY ), PERSONALITY, EMOTIONS, FATIGUE(PHYSIOLOGY), AVIATION SAFETY, AVIATION ACCIDENTS, PSYCHOMOTOR TESTS, PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS, TRAINING.

  2. Psychological characteristics of Japanese patients with chronic pain assessed by the Rorschach test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kazumi; Kanbara, Kenji; Mutsuura, Hiromi; Ban, Ikumi; Mizuno, Yasuyuki; Abe, Tetsuya; Yoshino, Maki; Tajika, Aran; Nakai, Yoshihide; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2010-11-26

    The increasing number of patients with chronic pain in Japan has become a major issue in terms of the patient's quality of life, medical costs, and related social problems. Pain is a multi-dimensional experience with physiological, affective, cognitive, behavioral and social components, and recommended to be managed via a combination of bio-psycho-social aspects. However, a biomedical approach is still the dominant method of pain treatment in Japan. The current study aimed to evaluate comprehensive psychological functions and processes in Japanese chronic pain patients. The Rorschach Comprehensive System was administered to 49 in-patients with non-malignant chronic pain. Major variables and frequencies from the test were then compared to normative data from non-patient Japanese adults by way of the t-test and chi-square test. Patients exhibited high levels of emotional distress with a sense of helplessness with regard to situational stress, confusion, and ambivalent feelings. These emotions were managed by the patients in an inappropriate manner. Cognitive functions resulted in moderate dysfunction in all stages. Information processing tended to focus upon minute features in an inflexible manner. Mediational dysfunction was likely to occur with unstable affective conditions. Ideation was marked by pessimistic and less effective thinking. Since patients exhibited negative self-perception, their interpersonal relationship skills tended to be ineffective. Originally, our patients displayed average psychological resources for control, stress tolerance, and social skills for interpersonal relationships. However, patient coping styles were either situation- or emotion-dependent, and patients were more likely to exhibit emotional instability influenced by external stimuli, resulting in increased vulnerability to pain. Data gathered from the Rorschach test suggested psychological approaches to support chronic pain patients that are likely to be highly beneficial, and we

  3. Psychological characteristics of Japanese patients with chronic pain assessed by the Rorschach test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abe Tetsuya

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing number of patients with chronic pain in Japan has become a major issue in terms of the patient's quality of life, medical costs, and related social problems. Pain is a multi-dimensional experience with physiological, affective, cognitive, behavioral and social components, and recommended to be managed via a combination of bio-psycho-social aspects. However, a biomedical approach is still the dominant method of pain treatment in Japan. The current study aimed to evaluate comprehensive psychological functions and processes in Japanese chronic pain patients. Methods The Rorschach Comprehensive System was administered to 49 in-patients with non-malignant chronic pain. Major variables and frequencies from the test were then compared to normative data from non-patient Japanese adults by way of the t-test and chi-square test. Results Patients exhibited high levels of emotional distress with a sense of helplessness with regard to situational stress, confusion, and ambivalent feelings. These emotions were managed by the patients in an inappropriate manner. Cognitive functions resulted in moderate dysfunction in all stages. Information processing tended to focus upon minute features in an inflexible manner. Mediational dysfunction was likely to occur with unstable affective conditions. Ideation was marked by pessimistic and less effective thinking. Since patients exhibited negative self-perception, their interpersonal relationship skills tended to be ineffective. Originally, our patients displayed average psychological resources for control, stress tolerance, and social skills for interpersonal relationships. However, patient coping styles were either situation- or emotion-dependent, and patients were more likely to exhibit emotional instability influenced by external stimuli, resulting in increased vulnerability to pain. Conclusions Data gathered from the Rorschach test suggested psychological approaches to support

  4. Assessment of Psychological and Psycho-physiological Problems Among Visually Impaired Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneswari, Mohanraj; Immanuel Selvaraj, Chinnadurai; Selvaraj, Balakrishnan; Srinivasan, Thiruvengadam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Visual impairment tends to evoke more discomfiture than any other disability. Primarily, the biggest issue may be that blindness is visible. Furthermore, visual impairment develops serious medical, psychological, social and economic problems. Objectives: The focus of the current study was to investigate the psychological and psycho physiological problems of visually impaired adolescent students. Patients and Methods: Purposive sampling was adopted to select 150 visually impaired students (71 males and 72 females) from five schools in Coimbatore city of the Tamil Nadu state, India. Anxiety, frustration, aggression and social and personal adjustment levels of the visually impaired students were measured in this study using Taylor’s manifest anxiety scale, frustration test, aggression scale and the adolescent adjustment inventory, respectively. Results: Anxiety (χ2 = 185.66, P = 0 at P < 0.01), frustration (χ2 = 167.23, P = 0 at P < 0.01) and aggression (χ2 = 57.66, P = 0 at P < 0.01) were significantly related to adjustment among visually impaired students. The adjustment score had a significant positive correlation with anxiety (r = 0.919, P = 0 at P < 0.01), frustration (r = 0.887, P = 0 at P < 0.01) and aggression levels (r = 0.664, P = 0 at P < 0.01), anxiety was significantly correlated with frustration (r = 0. 961, P = 0 at P < 0.01) and aggression levels (r = 0.727, P < 0.01) and frustration was significantly correlated with aggression level (r = 0. 637, P = 0 at P < 0.01) of visually impaired adolescents. There was a positive relationship between psycho-physiological disorders and anxiety frustration, aggression and adjustment among visually impaired students. Conclusions: Visually impaired students exhibited significant levels of psychological and psycho-physiological problems. PMID:27284280

  5. [Novel Examination Procedures for the Assessment of Retinal Artery Occlusion by OCT Angiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loidl, Max; Enders, Christian; Werner, Jens Ulrich; Lang, Gerhard K; Lang, Gabriele E

    2017-09-01

    Background Retinal artery occlusion (RAO) is the most common primary angiopathy of the retina. With an incidence of 0.01 - 0.15%, this it is a rather rare disease, but is associated with irreversible damage to the retina and a poor prognosis for visual acuity. Since the 1960s - when fluorescence angiography (FA) was developed -, there has been little change in diagnostic investigations. FA is still the standard procedure for the assessment of retinal artery occlusions. With the development of OCT angiography (OCT-A), new multimodal imaging procedures have become possible. Patients/Methods We used Zeiss AngioPlex ® -OCT-A technology in combination with the CIRRUS ™ HD-OCT 5000 (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Inc., Dublin, USA) to create 6 × 6 mm and 3 × 3 mm volume scans of the area of non-perfusion in patients with RAO. Qualitative OCT-A analysis was performed on retinal images segmented into the superficial and deep retinal capillary plexus. In addition to this, volumetric scans can be segmented to any specific depth of the retina. On the basis of 4 cases, we demonstrate that OCT-A can be used to evaluate RAO. We present typical OCT-A findings. Results OCT-A images allow the detection of non-perfused areas in patients with acute and chronic RAO. The zones of reduced vascular perfusion are differently distributed in the superficial and deep retinal capillary plexus. In both acute and chronic cases of RAO, OCT-A offers important information on retinal vascular perfusion. Conclusion OCT-A can be used in the diagnosis and monitoring of acute and chronic cases of RAO. The advantages of OCT-A are that this technique is non-invasive and allows three dimensional microvascular visualisation within seconds. Although artefacts and the currently limited field of view can make it difficult to interpret OCT-A images reliably, these findings suggest that OCT-A may in future replace FA in the assessment of RAO in most patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New

  6. A Psychological Model of Translation Quality Assessment: Applying Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives to Grade English Texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Pourdana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study explored the possibility of grading English texts based on the psychological processes a non-native English translator might go through by applying Benjamin Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: Cognitive Domain. The researchers’ primary assumption was that the difficulty of English texts would increase as the translator’s performance proceeds from translating an English text that requires their only language Knowledge through the texts requiring increasing demands of their Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Aynthesis and Evaluation abilities. To the researchers, the quality of the translation performance could be assessed based on the type of psychological processing they conduct in translating a given text. To fulfil the ultimate purpose of the research, 30 undergraduate students majoring in English translation at Islamic Azad University, Karaj Branch, Iran took part in this investigation in 2012. In addition to Comprehensive English Language Test (CELT, the participants were given a translation essay-type test that included six short English passages of 150 to 200 words. The texts were carefully graded based on the type of behavioural objectives (i.e., psychological processes demanded of the translator and listed according to the hierarchy of Bloom’s cognitive domain. A non-parametric test of Kruskal Wallis proved that except for the fifth level, the Synthesis text, the trainee translators’ quality of performance was graded properly based on the difficulty levels expected and explored in Bloom’s levels of cognitive domain. The findings in this study are considerately practical in translation quality assessment, upgrading the reliability estimate of translation tests and teaching translation skills and strategies.

  7. The Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI) for assessing stress of seafarers on board merchant ships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenuto, Anna; Fasanaro, Angiola M; Molino, Ivana; Sibilio, Fabio; Saturnino, Andrea; Traini, Enea; Amenta, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    In their working activity, seafarers are exposed to high levels of stress that should be accuratelyinvestigated, measured, followed up and, if possible, countered. This is also required by regulations recently entered into force such as the Maritime Labour Convention 2006, recommending to consider special physiological or psychological problems created by the shipboard environment. The choice of the tools for this evaluation is challenging, and a common basic standard usable in a large scale should be identified. The aim of this study was to evaluate: 1) the suitability of the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI) questionnaire conducted on board for assessing stress in the sailing seafarers, 2) The presenceof stress in seafarers of different categories (deck officers, engine officers, deck crew, engine crew, chiefstewards/catering staff) monitored by the PGWBI. 162 male seafarers on board of 7 tankers belonging to the same shipping companywere evaluated through the PGWB questionnaire. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyse thedifferences in the scores of the questionnaire. Engine officers exhibited significantly higher anxiety levels than the deck or engine crew, andshowed lower satisfaction than the deck crew. Deck and engine officers revealed higher self-control levelsthan the engine crew. Chief stewards/catering staff showed lower vitality levels than the deck crew. Deck or engine officers should achieve a greater self-control than the crew and this is documentedby the present study. Our findings support the view that management responsibility is more often associated with higher levels of stress. In our opinion, the PGWB questionnaire is a reasonable compromise forobtaining a global evaluation of psychological conditions, including stress of seafarers. It should be therefore considered as a large scale tool for assessing the well-being and eventual stress levels of sailing seafarers.

  8. Structural equation modeling to assess gender differences in the relationship between psychological symptoms and dental visits after dental check-ups for university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Shinsuke; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Irie, Koichiro; Azuma, Tetsuji; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Morita, Manabu

    2015-07-01

    Some studies have shown a relationship between psychological symptoms and oral health behaviors. However, it is unknown whether gender differences affect the relationship between psychological symptoms and oral health behaviors. In addition, gender differences in the relationship between dental anxiety and dental visits for treatment or regular check-up are unclear. The objective of the present study was to explain the relationships among gender differences, psychological symptoms, oral health behaviors, dental anxiety and 'expectation of dental visit', evaluated as 'dental visits when treatments are recommended' in university students. A total of 607 students (311 males, 296 females) aged 18-38 years old were examined. The information was collected via questionnaire regarding gender, psychological symptoms and oral health behaviors. Psychological symptoms were assessed using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist. Structural equation modeling was used to test pathways from these factors to 'expectation of dental visit'. Multiple-group modeling was also conducted to test for gender differences. Psychological symptoms were related to low expectation of dental visit in females, but there was no such relationship in males. Oral health behaviors were related to expectation of dental visit in both genders. Psychological symptoms were directly related to expectation of dental visit in females and oral health behaviors were related to expectation of dental visit in both genders. To promote dental visits after dental check-ups at school, it might be necessary to improve oral health behaviors in both genders and to evaluate psychological symptoms, especially in females.

  9. Depression in spinal cord injury: assessing the role of psychological resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Claudio; Müller, Rachel; Post, Marcel W M; van Leeuwen, Christel M C; Werner, Christina S; Geyh, Szilvia

    2015-02-01

    To test the spinal cord injury adjustment model (SCIAM) and to examine how psychological resources may influence depressive symptoms in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). We expect that (a) higher general self-efficacy (GSE) and higher purpose in life (PIL) are associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms, and that (b) the effect of GSE and PIL on depressive symptoms is mediated by appraisals and coping strategies, as proposed by the SCIAM. A nationwide cross-sectional survey (the Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Cohort Study) was conducted with individuals with SCI living in the Swiss community (N = 516). Structural equation modeling was used to test relationships between variables as specified in the SCIAM. Higher GSE (r = -.54) and PIL (r = -.62) were significantly associated with lower depressive symptoms. The initial model yielded poor model fit. However, the final modified model fitted well, with χ2(21) = 54.00, p < .01, RMSEA = .055 (90% CI [.038, .073]), CFI = .98, explaining 62.9% of the variance of depressive symptoms. PIL had a direct large effect and an indirect effect on depressive symptoms via appraisals and coping strategies. The influence of GSE on depressive symptoms was fully mediated by appraisals and coping strategies. Psychological resources of individuals with SCI can have a direct effect on depressive symptoms. The mediated pathways are present, but not exclusive in our data, yielding only partial support for the mechanism proposed by the SCIAM. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. A procedure for assessing future trends of subdaily precipitation values on point scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianna, Guido; Villani, Veronica; Mercogliano, Paola; Vezzoli, Renata

    2015-04-01

    In many areas of Italy, urban flooding or floods in small mountain basins, induced by heavy precipitations on subdaily scale, represent remarkable hazards able to cause huge damages and casualties often increased by very high population density. A proper assessment about how frequency and magnitude of such events could change under the effect of Climate Changes (CC) is crucial for the development of future territorial planning (such as early warning systems). The current constraints of climate modeling, also using high resolution RCM, prevent an adequate representation of subdaily precipitation patterns (mainly concerning extreme values) while available observed datasets are often unsuitable for the application of the bias-correction (BC) techniques requiring long time series. In this work, a new procedure is proposed: at point scale, precipitation outputs on 24 and 48 hours are provided by high resolution (about 8km) climate simulation performed through the RCM COSMO_CLM driven by GCM CMCC_CM and bias-corrected by quantile mapping approach. These ones are adopted for a monthly stochastic disaggregation approach combining Random Parameter Bartlett-Lewis (RPBL) gamma model with appropriate rainfall disaggregation technique. The last one implements empirical correction procedures, called adjusting procedures, to modify the model rainfall output, so that it is consistent with the observed rainfall values on daily time scale. In order to take into account the great difficulties related to minimization of objective function required by retrieving the 7 RPBL parameters, for each dataset the computations are repeated twenty times. Moreover, adopting statistical properties on 24 and 48 hours to retrieve RPBL parameters allows, according Bo et al. (1994), to infer statistical properties until hourly scale maintaining the information content about the possible changes in precipitation patterns due to CC. The entire simulation chain is tested on Baiso weather station, in

  11. Reliability and validity of procedure-based assessments in otolaryngology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Zaid; Hayden, Lindsay; Robson, Andrew K; Muthuswamy, Keerthini; Tolley, Neil S

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the reliability and construct validity of procedure-based assessment (PBA) in assessing performance and progress in otolaryngology training. Retrospective database analysis using a national electronic database. We analyzed PBAs of otolaryngology trainees in North London from core trainees (CTs) to specialty trainees (STs). The tool contains six multi-item domains: consent, planning, preparation, exposure/closure, technique, and postoperative care, rated as "satisfactory" or "development required," in addition to an overall performance rating (pS) of 1 to 4. Individual domain score, overall calculated score (cS), and number of "development-required" items were calculated for each PBA. Receiver operating characteristic analysis helped determine sensitivity and specificity. There were 3,152 otolaryngology PBAs from 46 otolaryngology trainees analyzed. PBA reliability was high (Cronbach's α 0.899), and sensitivity approached 99%. cS correlated positively with pS and level in training (rs : +0.681 and +0.324, respectively). ST had higher cS and pS than CT (93% ± 0.6 and 3.2 ± 0.03 vs. 71% ± 3.1 and 2.3 ± 0.08, respectively; P otolaryngology trainees' performance and progress at all levels. It is highly sensitive in identifying competent trainees. The tool is used in a formative and feedback capacity. The technical domain is the best predictor and should be given close attention. NA. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Preliminary study of the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure for Children and its reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) is currently used in the adult population for evaluating the functionality of impaired or prosthetic hands. The SHAP cannot be used for children because of the relatively larger size of the objects used to perform SHAP tasks and unknown clinimetric properties. The aims of this study were to adapt the SHAP for use in children (SHAP-C), to determine norm values for the SHAP-C, and to analyze the reliability of the SHAP-C. Methods The SHAP-C was adapted based on the SHAP protocol. Some objects were downsized, and the timing of tasks was performed by the rater instead of the participant. Intra- and inter-rater reliability were assessed in 24 children (5 [0.54] y/o) with unimpaired hands. The repeatability coefficients (RCs) were calculated. An RC ≤ 75% of the mean SHAP-C task values was considered good reliability. Results Participants were able to perform all SHAP-C tasks. The means of the SHAP-C tasks ranged from 0.75 to 1.21 seconds for abstract objects and from 0.64-19.13 seconds for activities of daily living. The RCs of a single assessor did not exceed 75% in 17/26 SHAP-C tasks, displaying a relatively good intra-rater reliability, whereas the RCs for the inter-rater reliability exceeded 75% in 22/26 SHAP-C tasks, thus displaying poor reliability. Conclusion In this first study that adjusted the SHAP for pediatric use, we found that all SHAP-C objects and tasks could be performed by children. The intra-rater reliability was better than the inter-rater reliability. Although the SHAP-C appears to be a promising instrument, the protocol requires further modifications to provide reliable measurements in children. PMID:24916917

  13. Preliminary assessment of the dose to the interventional radiologist in fluoro-CT-guided procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M F; Alves, J G; Sarmento, S; Santos, J A M; Sousa, M J; Gouvêa, M; Oliveira, A D; Cardoso, J V; Santos, L M

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary assessment of the occupational dose to the intervention radiologist received in fluoroscopy computerised tomography (CT) used to guide the collection of lung and bone biopsies is presented. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the capability of the reading system as well as of the available whole-body (WB) and extremity dosemeters used in routine monthly monitoring periods to measure per procedure dose values. The intervention radiologist was allocated 10 WB detectors (LiF: Mg, Ti, TLD-100) placed at chest and abdomen levels above and below the lead apron, and at both right and left arms, knees and feet. A special glove was developed with casings for the insertion of 11 extremity detectors (LiF:Mg, Cu, P, TLD-100H) for the identification of the most highly exposed fingers. The H(p)(10) dose values received above the lead apron (ranged 0.20-0.02 mSv) depend mainly on the duration of the examination and on the placement of physician relative to the beam, while values below the apron are relatively low. The left arm seems to receive a higher dose value. H(p)(0.07) values to the hand (ranged 36.30-0.06 mSv) show that the index, middle and ring fingers are the most highly exposed. In this study, the wrist dose was negligible compared with the finger dose. These results are preliminary and further studies are needed to better characterise the dose assessment in CT fluoroscopy.

  14. A Specified Procedure for Distress Identification and Assessment for Urban Road Surfaces Based on PCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Loprencipe

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a simplified procedure for the assessment of pavement structural integrity and the level of service for urban road surfaces is presented. A sample of 109 Asphalt Concrete (AC urban pavements of an Italian road network was considered to validate the methodology. As part of this research, the most recurrent defects, those never encountered and those not defined with respect to the list collected in the ASTM D6433 have been determined by statistical analysis. The goal of this research is the improvement of the ASTM D6433 Distress Identification Catalogue to be adapted to urban road surfaces. The presented methodology includes the implementation of a Visual Basic for Application (VBA language-based program for the computerization of Pavement Condition Index (PCI calculation with interpolation by the parametric cubic spline of all of the density/deduct value curves of ASTM D6433 distress types. Also, two new distress definitions (for manholes and for tree roots and new density/deduct curve values were proposed to achieve a new distress identification manual for urban road pavements. To validate the presented methodology, for the 109 urban pavements considered, the PCI was calculated using the new distress catalogue and using the ASTM D6433 implemented on PAVERTM. The results of the linear regression between them and their statistical parameters are presented in this paper. The comparison of the results shows that the proposed method is suitable for the identification and assessment of observed distress in urban pavement surfaces at the PCI-based scale.

  15. Learning effects of repetitive administration of the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure in novice prosthetic users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasluian, Ecaterina; Bongers, Raoul M; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Dijkstra, Pieter U; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2014-09-01

    The Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP) evaluates the functionality of normal, injured or prosthetic hands. The aim was to evaluate the learning effects of SHAP tasks and the appropriateness of the time limits applied per task in novice prosthetic users. Right-handed unimpaired volunteers (n = 24, mean age 21.8 years) completed 8 SHAP sessions over 5 consecutive days using a prosthetic simulator. The execution times of SHAP tasks were transformed into 6 prehensile patterns, the functionality profile, and the index of function, a general functionality score. Learning effects in task times were analysed using multilevel analysis. Learning effects occurred in all SHAP tasks. Tasks, sex, sessions, tasks-sessions interaction, and the first session of the day contributed (p  25% of participants in at least the first 3 sessions, which affected the calculation of the functionality profile and index of function scores. The learning effects of SHAP in novice prosthetic users require consideration when conducting a reliability study. SHAP scores in novice prosthetic-hand users are confounded by learning effects and exceeded time limits.

  16. Development of new protocols and analysis procedures for the assessment of LBP by surface EMG techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddsson, L I; Giphart, J E; Buijs, R J; Roy, S H; Taylor, H P; De Luca, C J

    1997-10-01

    Spectral parameters of the surface electromyographic (EMG) signal from lumbar back muscles assessed during a fatiguing isometric contraction can be used to classify different categories of low back pain (LBP) subjects and control subjects without LBP. In the test protocol currently used at the NeuroMuscular Research Center at Boston University, subjects contract their back muscles at 80% of their maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force. This fatigue-based protocol has been successfully applied to persons with subacute or chronic LBP; those in acute pain, however, have not been included because of their inability to perform a maximal exertion. In this paper we will examine the force sensitivity of the currently used EMG parameters and also give an overview of some of our efforts to develop new test procedures. Our goal is to develop force-insensitive surface EMG parameters that can be used for classification purposes in populations of subjects who develop low trunk extension forces. In addition, the development of a model to predict MVC from anthropometrical measurements will be presented.

  17. FRP-RC Beam in Shear: Mechanical Model and Assessment Procedure for Pseudo-Ductile Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriana Petrone

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the development of a mechanics-based shear model for reinforced concrete (RC elements strengthened in shear with fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP and a design/assessment procedure capable of predicting the failure sequence of resisting elements: the yielding of existing transverse steel ties and the debonding of FRP sheets/strips, while checking the corresponding compressive stress in concrete. The research aims at the definition of an accurate capacity equation, consistent with the requirement of the pseudo-ductile shear behavior of structural elements, that is, transverse steel ties yield before FRP debonding and concrete crushing. For the purpose of validating the proposed model, an extended parametric study and a comparison against experimental results have been conducted: it is proven that the common accepted rule of assuming the shear capacity of RC members strengthened in shear with FRP as the sum of the maximum contribution of both FRP and stirrups can lead to an unsafe overestimation of the shear capacity. This issue has been pointed out by some authors, when comparing experimental shear capacity values with the theoretical ones, but without giving a convincing explanation of that. In this sense, the proposed model represents also a valid instrument to better understand the mechanical behavior of FRP-RC beams in shear and to calculate their actual shear capacity.

  18. PAINLESS RADIAL ACCESS PROCEDURES WITH NICORANDIL: A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT WITH CONVENTIONAL VERAPAMIL - NITROGLYCERINE COCKTAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain T Kallarakkal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radial artery spasm is a major limitation of the transradial approach. This study was designed to compare the spasmolytic effect between nicorandil and the conventional cocktail of nitroglycerine and verapamil during transradial coronary procedures. Materials and methods: 200 patients were randomized into two groups to compare 8 mg of nicorandil and cocktail (mixture of normal saline, 5 mg of verapamil and 200 μg of nitroglycerin. Radial artery spasm and patient comfort in both the groups were assessed. Results: Radial artery spasm and conversion rate to femoral access were statistically insignificant comparing both groups. None of the patients in the Nicorandil group had pain or burning sensation during its administration whereas all patients who received cocktail had pain and burning sensation in spite of aspirating blood and mixing cocktail thoroughly with blood. Conclusions: Nicorandil is a superior vasodilator and can be considered as a better alternative to the conventional cocktail of nitroglycerine and verapamil without any adverse effects as it gives more comfort to the patient by avoiding pain and burning sensation during its administration

  19. Investigating the current methods of assessing behavioral and psychological symptoms in residential aged care facilities in a metropolitan city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Samantha M; Lautenschlager, Nicola T

    2017-05-01

    Up to 90% of people with dementia living in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) display behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), and these are associated with poorer quality of life and increased morbidity and mortality. In order to implement appropriate interventions, it is important to understand the symptoms in more detail. Despite the availability of BPSD assessment tools, it is unknown what the current practice of monitoring of BPSD in RACFs. We sought to investigate the current BPSD assessment tools being used in RACFs and explore different stakeholders' views on current practices. A cross-sectional convenience sample of 21 clinicians were identified and administered a questionnaire. Old age psychiatrists, aged psychiatry clinicians, behavior management teams and RACF staff completed the questionnaires. Clinicians reported that objective consistent information about BPSD were important for recommending and implementing pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies for BPSD; however, the use of validated BPSD assessments in RACFs was not a usual part of clinical practice. RACF staff stated the major barrier to assessment of BPSD was lack of time. Alternate methods of assessing BPSD which consider preferences from clinicians and RACF staff should be further investigated. Modern technology which can allow "real time" assessment may be a solution.

  20. Step by Step: Biology Undergraduates’ Problem-Solving Procedures during Multiple-Choice Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Luanna B.; Lemons, Paula P.

    2016-01-01

    This study uses the theoretical framework of domain-specific problem solving to explore the procedures students use to solve multiple-choice problems about biology concepts. We designed several multiple-choice problems and administered them on four exams. We trained students to produce written descriptions of how they solved the problem, and this allowed us to systematically investigate their problem-solving procedures. We identified a range of procedures and organized them as domain general, domain specific, or hybrid. We also identified domain-general and domain-specific errors made by students during problem solving. We found that students use domain-general and hybrid procedures more frequently when solving lower-order problems than higher-order problems, while they use domain-specific procedures more frequently when solving higher-order problems. Additionally, the more domain-specific procedures students used, the higher the likelihood that they would answer the problem correctly, up to five procedures. However, if students used just one domain-general procedure, they were as likely to answer the problem correctly as if they had used two to five domain-general procedures. Our findings provide a categorization scheme and framework for additional research on biology problem solving and suggest several important implications for researchers and instructors. PMID:27909021

  1. Assessing the Quality and Value of Psychological Health Care in Civilian Health Plans: Lessons and Implications for the Military Health System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    growing number of individuals with psychological health conditions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder ...ment, follow-up care for children prescribed attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication, and mental health utilization (among other...SUMMARY ■ C O R P O R A T I O N Assessing the Quality and Value of Psychological Health Care in Civilian Health Plans Lessons and Implications

  2. Assessment of the changes in the stress-related salivary cortisol levels to the various dental procedures in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila J Patil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fear and pain are the factors producing stress and there is evidence that dental fear acquired in childhood may persist to influence adult behavior. Dental treatment is often considered as anxiety producing and stressful. Aim: To assess the levels of stress displayed by the healthy children undergoing routine dental procedures like oral examination, restoration, and extraction by analyzing salivary levels of cortisol before, during, and after the procedures. Materials and Methods: Twenty healthy children aged between 4 and 8 years having their first dental visit and requiring at least one restoration and one extraction were selected. In each patient, three procedures were carried out: (i Routine dental examination, (ii restoration, and (iii extraction. Unstimulated salivary samples were collected 10 min before, during the procedure, and 30 min after each procedure at three different visits for comparison of cortisol production in response to anxiety and stress over time. Total 180 samples were collected to determine salivary cortisol levels using UBI-MAGIWEL TM kit and the readings were noted. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software with paired t-test, two independent sample t-tests, and analysis of variance (ANOVA were used to analyze the findings. Results: A correlation between salivary cortisol and stress in dental procedure was noticed. Cavity preparation is more stressful procedure in children, so alternative methods can be used in anxious children. Stress associated with extraction persists to a postoperative period. No correlation exists in between Corah′s anxiety scale and salivary cortisol.

  3. SINTAP: draft of a unified European failure assessment procedure. An introduction; SINTAP: Entwurf einer vereinheitlichten europaeischen Fehlerbewertungsprozedur. Eine Einfuehrung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerbst, U.; Kocak, M. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung; Wiesner, C. [The Welding Institute (TWI), Cambridge (United Kingdom). Structural Integrity Dept.; Hodulak, L. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik (IWM), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Fracture mechanics based flaw assessment concepts are increasingly used in industrial regulations and standards. A considerable number of different guidelines and procedures are available which are partly based on each other but also exhibit significant differences. At this background, the EU sponsored SINTAP, an interdisciplinary Brite Euram project. SINTAP stands for 'Structural Integrity Assessment Procedures for European Industry'. From 1996 to 1999 seventeen organisations from nine European countries participated in the project the aim of which was to unify the available procedures. The present report is an introduction into the content, the structure and the scientific background of the procedure which was generated within SINTAP. (orig.) [German] Bruchmechanische Bewertungskonzepte werden international in zunehmendem Masse Bestandteil industrieller Regelwerke und Fachbereichsstandards. Bereits heute existiert eine Vielzahl derartiger Vorschriften und Rechnerprogramme, die teilweise aufeinander aufbauen, teilweise aber auch signifikante Unterschiede aufweisen. Vor diesem Hintergrund wurde durch die EU von 1996 bis 1999 SINTAP, ein interdisziplinaeres Brite-Euram-Projekt gefoerdert, dessen Ziel in einer Vereinheitlichung der vorhandenen Ansaetze bestand, und an dem siebzehn Institutionen aus neun europaeischen Laendern beteiligt waren. SINTAP steht fuer 'Structural Integrity Assessment Procedures for European Industry'. Der vorliegende Bericht ist eine Einfuehrung in Inhalt, Struktur und wissenschaftlichen Hintergrund der im Ergebnis des Projektes entstandenen SINTAP-Prozedur. (orig.)

  4. A pilot study to assess the effects of a guided imagery audiotape intervention on psychological outcomes in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Traci R; Olivo, Erin L; Grand, Sandy Hermele; Namerow, Pearila B; Costa, Joseph; Oz, Mehmet C

    2010-01-01

    Depression and anxiety are associated with increased risk of postoperative cardiac events and death in patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery. These risks persist even several months after the procedure. Guided imagery has been used with cardiac surgery patients for some time and with numerous anecdotal reports of considerable benefit. In addition, this therapy is low-cost and easy to implement, and the literature holds ample evidence for its efficacy in symptom reduction in various patient populations. It was thus hypothesized that preoperative use of guided imagery would reduce postoperative distress in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft. Fifty-six patients scheduled to undergo coronary artery bypass graft at Columbia University Medical Center were randomized into 3 groups: guided imagery, music therapy, and standard care control. Patients in the imagery and music groups listened to audiotapes preoperatively and intraoperatively. All patients completed psychological, complementary medicine therapies use, and other assessments preoperatively and at 1 week and 6 months postoperatively. Only preoperative distress was predictive of postoperative distress at follow-up. Use of complementary medicine therapies was high in all groups and this fact, in addition to the small sample size, may have accounted for the lack of significant relationship between imagery and postoperative distress. Regardless, this complementary and alternative medicine therapy remains palatable to patients. Given its efficacy in other patient populations, it is worth exploring its potential utility for this population with a larger sample.

  5. An assessment of the BEST procedure to estimate the soil water retention curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, Mirko; Di Prima, Simone; Iovino, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    and γ was considered and a different couple of parameters was chosen (in general, extreme values of the parameters), lower RMSD values were detected in three out of four cases for BEST-slope; iv) the negligible observed differences of RMSD however suggest that using the reference values of infiltration constants, does not worsen significantly the soil water retention curve estimation; v) in 25% of considered soils (PAL site), the BEST procedure was not able to reproduce the retention curve of the soil in a sufficiently accurate way. In conclusion, our results showed that the BEST-slope algorithm appeared to yield more accurate estimates of water retention data with reference to three of the four sampled soils. Conversely, determining water retention curves by the -intercept and -steady algorithms may be questionable, since these algorithms overestimated hg yielding independent values of this parameter from the proportionality coefficient γ. (*) The work was supported by the project "STRATEGA, Sperimentazione e TRAsferimento di TEcniche innovative di aGricoltura conservativA", financed by Regione Puglia - Servizio Agricoltura. References Castellini, M., Iovino, M., Pirastru, M., Niedda, M., Bagarello, V., 2016. Use of BEST Procedure to Assess Soil Physical Quality in the Baratz Lake Catchment (Sardinia, Italy). Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 80:742-755. doi:10.2136/sssaj2015.11.0389 Di Prima, S., Lassabatere, L., Bagarello, V., Iovino, M., Angulo-Jaramillo, R., 2016. Testing a new automated single ring infiltrometer for Beerkan infiltration experiments. Geoderma 262, 20-34. doi:10.1016/j.geoderma.2015.08.006 Lassabatère, L., Angulo-Jaramillo, R., Soria Ugalde, J.M., Cuenca, R., Braud, I., Haverkamp, R., 2006. Beerkan Estimation of Soil Transfer Parameters through Infiltration Experiments-BEST. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 70:521-532. doi:10.2136/sssaj2005.0026 Smettem, K.R.J., Parlange, J.Y., Ross, P.J., Haverkamp, R., 1994. Three-dimensional analysis of infiltration from the disc

  6. Appropriateness criteria to assess variations in surgical procedure use in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Elise H; Gibbons, Melinda Maggard; Ingraham, Angela M; Shekelle, Paul G; Ko, Clifford Y

    2011-12-01

    To systematically describe appropriateness criteria (AC) developed in the United States for surgical procedures and to summarize how these criteria have been applied to identify overuse and underuse of procedures in US populations. MEDLINE literature search performed in February 2010 and May 2011. Studies were included if they addressed the appropriateness of a surgical procedure using the RAND-UCLA Appropriateness Method. Non-US studies were excluded. Information was abstracted on study design, surgical procedure, and reported rates of appropriate use, overuse, and underuse. Identified AC were cross-referenced with lists of common procedures from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and the State Ambulatory Surgery databases. A total of 1601 titles were identified; 39 met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 17 developed AC and 27 applied AC to US populations. Appropriateness criteria have been developed for 16 surgical procedures. Underuse has only been studied for coronary artery bypass graft surgery, and rates range from 24% to 57%. Overuse has been more broadly studied, with rates ranging from 9% to 53% for carotid endarterectomy, 0% to 14% for coronary artery bypass graft, 11% to 24% for upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy, and 16% to 70% for hysterectomy. Appropriateness criteria exist for 10 of the 25 most common inpatient procedures and 6 of the 15 top ambulatory procedures in the United States. Most studies are more than 5 years old. Most existing AC are outdated, and AC have never been developed for most common surgical procedures. A broad and coordinated effort to develop and maintain AC would be required to implement this tool to address variation in the use of surgical procedures.

  7. Assessment of grammar optimizes language tasks for the intracarotid amobarbital procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Połczyńska, Monika; Kuhn, Taylor; You, S Christine; Walshaw, Patricia; Curtiss, Susan; Bookheimer, Susan

    2017-11-01

    A previous study showed that assessment of language laterality could be improved by adding grammar tests to the recovery phase of the intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP) (Połczyńska et al. 2014). The aim of this study was to further investigate the extent to which grammar tests lateralize language function during the recovery phase of the IAP in a larger patient sample. Forty patients with drug-resistant epilepsy (14 females, thirty-two right-handed, mean age 38.5years, SD=10.6) participated in this study. On EEG, 24 patients had seizures originating in the left hemisphere (LH), 13 in the right hemisphere (RH), and 4 demonstrated mixed seizure origin. Thirty participants (75%) had bilateral injections, and ten (25%) had unilateral injections (five RH and five LH). Based on results from the encoding phase, we segregated our study participants to a LH language dominant and a mixed dominance group. In the recovery phase of the IAP, the participants were administered a new grammar test (the CYCLE-N) and a standard language test. We analyzed the laterality index measure and effect sizes in the two tests. In the LH-dominant group, the CYCLE-N generated more profound language deficits in the recovery phase than the standard after injection to either hemisphere (pgrammar tasks was still higher than for the standard tests. Critically, the CYCLE-N administered in the recovery phase was nearly as effective as the standard tests given during the encoding phase. The results may be significant for individuals with epilepsy undergoing IAP. The grammar tests may be a highly efficient measure for lateralizing language function in the recovery phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Integrated assessment procedure for determining the fracture strength of glass components in CSP systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guerra Rosa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The structural integrity and reliability of glass components are key issues for concentrated solar power (CSP systems. For example, the glass windows in a solar furnace may suffer catastrophic fracture due to thermal and structural loadings, including reaction chamber pressure cycling. Predicting design strength provides the basis for which the optical components and mounting assembly can be designed so that failure does not occur over the operational lifetime of a given CSP system. The fracture strength of brittle materials is dependent on the size and distribution of cracks or surface flaws. Due to the inherent brittleness of glass resulting in catastrophic failure, conservative design approaches are currently used for the development of optical components made of glass, which generally neglect the specific glass composition as well as subcritical crack growth, surface area under stress, and nature of the load – either static or cyclic – phenomena. In this paper, several methods to characterize the strength of glass are discussed to aid engineers in predicting a design strength for a given surface finish, glass type, and environment. Based on the Weibull statistical approach and experimental data available on testing silica glass rod specimens, a theoretical model is developed for estimating their fracture strength under typical loading conditions. Then, an integrated assessment procedure for structural glass elements is further developed based on fracture mechanics and the theory of probability, which is based on the probabilistic modelling of the complex behaviour of glass fracture but avoids the complexity for calculation in applications. As an example, the design strength of a glass window suitable for a solar furnace reaction chamber is highlighted.

  9. Development of Biocompatibility Procedures for Assessment of Plant Growth in Ground Test Hardware for the EMCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, R. N.; Steele, M. K.; Sun, S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS) is an European Space Agency-developed facility designed to support plant research in microgravity on the IS NASA is responsible for providing US specific hardware to use within the EMCS. In preparation for flight, research will be developed and tested at Ames Research Center in the EMCS ground test hardware, the Experiment Reference Module (ERM) In order to determine the acceptability of the ERM for such purposes, biocompatibility tests will be performed to determine that the hardware functions as intended and successfully supports the' growth of plants. In this report, we describe the development of procedures and the collection of baseline data against which to compare ERM function, e.g. biocompatibility testing. A simple and robust system was developed to grow whole Arabidopsis thaliana plants within the confined volumes characteristic of spaceflight hardware. Our system for growing plants eliminated the necessity of a water/nutrient delivery system and allowed for quantifiable assessment of individual plants, as well as entire population dynamics. To insure uniform germination, seeds were started in small straw segments and transplanted into modified scintillation vials. Seedlings were selected prior to transplantation to decrease genetic variability. Plants were grown for a total of 24 days in standard laboratory plant growth chambers under controlled conditions. Sequential digital still images were taken on a daily basis. Analysis of these images allowed for the quantification of even minute environmental effect, on growth dynamics whole plants. The data collected provide reliable growth curves against which to compare plants grown in the ERM.

  10. Comparison of four extraction procedures to assess arsenate and arsenite species in contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giral, Melanie [Department of Civil, Geological and Mining Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, P.O. Box 6079, Station Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3A7 (Canada); Zagury, Gerald J., E-mail: gerald.zagury@polymtl.c [Department of Civil, Geological and Mining Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, P.O. Box 6079, Station Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3A7 (Canada); Deschenes, Louise [The Interuniversity Research Centre for the Life Cycle of Products, Processes and Services (CIRAIG), Department of Chemical Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, P.O. Box 6079, Station Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3A7 (Canada); Blouin, Jean-Pierre [Centre d' expertise en analyse environnementale du Quebec, Ministere de l' Environnement, du Developpement Durable et des Parcs, 850, boulevard Vanier, Laval, Quebec H7C 2M7 (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    Inorganic arsenic in soils poses an important environmental concern. Several studies reported an oxidation of arsenite to arsenate during its extraction from soils. The objectives of this study were to (1) identify, among published procedures, an extraction method which preserves the oxidation state of arsenic and (2) to assess the influence of soil physicochemical properties on the performance of these methods. Four extraction strategies were compared: 1) 10 M HCl, 2) 15% (v/v) H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, 3) 10 mM phosphate + 0.5% (w/v) NaDDC, and, 4) 1 M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} + 0.5 M ascorbic acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 6}). Separation and analysis of As species was performed by HPLC-ICP/MS. Oxidation of As(III) into As(V) during extraction was more important in soils with high content of Mn oxides. Extraction of arsenic from soils with 1 M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} + 0.5 M C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 6} under microwaves was the best strategy to extract the majority of As while minimizing conversion of As(III) into As(V). - Extraction of arsenic from soils with 1 M H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} + 0.5 M C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 6} under microwaves is a suitable method to extract the majority of As while minimizing conversion of As(III) into As(V).

  11. Psychiatric/ psychological forensic report writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gerald

    Approaches to forensic report writing in psychiatry, psychology, and related mental health disciplines have moved from an organization, content, and stylistic framework to considering ethical and other codes, evidentiary standards, and practice considerations. The first part of the article surveys different approaches to forensic report writing, including that of forensic mental health assessment and psychiatric ethics. The second part deals especially with psychological ethical approaches. The American Psychological Association's Ethical Principles and Code of Conduct (2002) provide one set of principles on which to base forensic report writing. The U.S. Federal Rules of Evidence (2014) and related state rules provide another basis. The American Psychological Association's Specialty Guidelines for Forensic Psychology (2013) provide a third source. Some work has expanded the principles in ethics codes; and, in the third part of this article, these additions are applied to forensic report writing. Other work that could help with the question of forensic report writing concerns the 4 Ds in psychological injury assessments (e.g., conduct oneself with Dignity, avoid the adversary Divide, get the needed reliable Data, Determine interpretations and conclusions judiciously). One overarching ethical principle that is especially applicable in forensic report writing is to be comprehensive, scientific, and impartial. As applied to forensic report writing, the overall principle that applies is that the work process and product should reflect integrity in its ethics, law, and science. Four principles that derive from this meta-principle concern: Competency and Communication; Procedure and Protection; Dignity and Distance; and Data Collection and Determination. The standards or rules associated with each of these principles are reviewed. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment Procedures of Norwegian PhD Theses as Viewed by Examiners from the USA, the UK and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyvik, Svein

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the assessment procedures of Norwegian PhD theses as viewed by external members of evaluation committees from three countries with different examination systems; the USA, the UK and Sweden. Their viewpoints give useful information not only on the pros and cons with the Norwegian system, but also on the strengths and…

  13. Exploring the Potential for and Promise of Incorporating Distributive and Procedural Justices into Post-Secondary Assessment of Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Christine Cooper

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of incorporating constructs of distributive justice and procedural justice into summative assessment of student learning in higher education. I systematically compare the process used by managers to evaluate employee performance in organizations--performance appraisal (PA)--with processes used by professors to…

  14. Procedural Influence on Internal and External Assessment Scores of Undergraduate Vocational and Technical Education Research Projects in Nigerian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. C., John; Manabete, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine the procedural influence on internal and external assessment scores of undergraduate research projects in vocational and technical education programmes in the university under study. A survey research design was used for the conduct of this study. The population consisted of 130 lecturers and 1,847 students in the…

  15. Psychological impact of preconception counseling: Assessment of anxiety before and during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. de Weerd; A.K. van der Bij (Akke); J.C.C. Braspenning (Jozé); R.J.L.M. Cikot (Rolf J.L.M); D.D.M. Braat (Didi); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Assessment of anxiety levels in women and men before and after preconception counseling and during the first trimester of pregnancy. Methods: Couples were recruited from the fertility clinic of the University Medical Center Nijmegen, the Netherlands. Anxiety was assessed using

  16. Step by Step: Biology Undergraduates' Problem-Solving Procedures during Multiple-Choice Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Luanna B; Lemons, Paula P

    2016-01-01

    This study uses the theoretical framework of domain-specific problem solving to explore the procedures students use to solve multiple-choice problems about biology concepts. We designed several multiple-choice problems and administered them on four exams. We trained students to produce written descriptions of how they solved the problem, and this allowed us to systematically investigate their problem-solving procedures. We identified a range of procedures and organized them as domain general, domain specific, or hybrid. We also identified domain-general and domain-specific errors made by students during problem solving. We found that students use domain-general and hybrid procedures more frequently when solving lower-order problems than higher-order problems, while they use domain-specific procedures more frequently when solving higher-order problems. Additionally, the more domain-specific procedures students used, the higher the likelihood that they would answer the problem correctly, up to five procedures. However, if students used just one domain-general procedure, they were as likely to answer the problem correctly as if they had used two to five domain-general procedures. Our findings provide a categorization scheme and framework for additional research on biology problem solving and suggest several important implications for researchers and instructors. © 2016 L. B. Prevost and P. P. Lemons. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. Interdisciplinary technology assessment of service robots: the psychological/work science perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The article sheds light on psychological and work science aspects of the design and utilization of service robots. An initial presentation of the characteristics of man-robot interaction is followed by a discussion of the principles of the division of functions between human beings and robots in service area work systems. The following aspects are to be considered: (1) the organisation of societal work (such as the different employment and professional profiles of service employees), (2) the work tasks to be performed by humans and robots (such as handling, monitoring or decision-making tasks), (3) the possibilities and the limitations of realizing such tasks by means of information technology (depending, for example, on the motoric capabilities, perception and cognition of the robot). Consideration of these three design perspectives gives rise to criteria of usability. Current debate focuses on the (work science) principles of man-machine communication, though in future these should be supplemented with robot-specific criteria such as "motoric capabilities" or "relationship quality." The article concludes by advocating the convergence and combination of work science criteria with ideas drawn from participative design approaches in the development and utilization of service robots.

  18. Probabilistic reasoning under time pressure: an assessment in Italian, Spanish and English psychology undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agus, M.; Hitchcott, P. K.; Penna, M. P.; Peró-Cebollero, M.; Guàrdia-Olmos, J.

    2016-11-01

    Many studies have investigated the features of probabilistic reasoning developed in relation to different formats of problem presentation, showing that it is affected by various individual and contextual factors. Incomplete understanding of the identity and role of these factors may explain the inconsistent evidence concerning the effect of problem presentation format. Thus, superior performance has sometimes been observed for graphically, rather than verbally, presented problems. The present study was undertaken to address this issue. Psychology undergraduates without any statistical expertise (N = 173 in Italy; N = 118 in Spain; N = 55 in England) were administered statistical problems in two formats (verbal-numerical and graphical-pictorial) under a condition of time pressure. Students also completed additional measures indexing several potentially relevant individual dimensions (statistical ability, statistical anxiety, attitudes towards statistics and confidence). Interestingly, a facilitatory effect of graphical presentation was observed in the Italian and Spanish samples but not in the English one. Significantly, the individual dimensions predicting statistical performance also differed between the samples, highlighting a different role of confidence. Hence, these findings confirm previous observations concerning problem presentation format while simultaneously highlighting the importance of individual dimensions.

  19. Assessment of selected psychological factors in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morys, Joanna M; Kaczówka, Anna; Jeżewska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the majority of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) mental health problems are demonstrated in the form of excessive anxiety and unstable emotional reactions. Emotional instability affects the wellbeing of these patients, and also their attitude towards the disease and the course of treatment. The objective of the study is to evaluate psychological factors in patients with IBD, and to compare patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and patients suffering from Crohn's disease (CD) with respect to intensity of these factors. The study included 108 patients with IBD. NEO-FFI and type-D Scale were used to evaluate personality traits. Anxiety level was measured with STAI. CECS was used to measure the patients' tendency to suppress negative emotions. In the patients with CD 45% of subjects presented type D personality. In the group of patients with UC, type D personality was found in 38%. The higher levels of neuroticism and extraversion were observed in patients with UC, whereas the patients with CD exhibited a higher level of openness to experience and agreeableness. In patients with CD the levels of state anxiety were elevated, whereas in patients with UC higher scores were both for state and trait anxiety. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of personality factors in a group of patients with CD and UC. It was found that the majority of patients with IBD suffer elevated or high sense of anxiety.

  20. Acupuncture Anxiolytic Effects on Physiological and Psychological Assessments for a Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Shayestehfar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a randomized controlled trial we examined the effect of acupuncture on anxiety of the adolescent football players prior to the competition using psychological and physiological markers. A total of 45 athletes were equally allocated to either acupuncture group, sham group, or wait-list control group. Thereafter, all participants were asked to complete an anxiety questionnaire before and after the intervention. Their heart rate and skin conductance were also examined before and after the intervention. The results of ANOVA on posttest scores showed that acupuncture had a significant effect on cognitive anxiety (p=0.001 and somatic anxiety (p0.05. Furthermore, the results showed that acupuncture significantly decreased the skin conductance in acupuncture group compared to sham group (p=0.006 and wait-list control group (p<0.001. In conclusion, the results suggested that acupuncture has the capacity to decrease cognitive anxiety and somatic anxiety prior to competition in adolescent athletes, while this was accompanied by significant physiological changes. This trial is registered with IRCT138904074264N1 (IRCT is a Primary Registry in the WHO Registry Network.

  1. Personality psychology: lexical approaches, assessment methods, and trait concepts reveal only half of the story--why it is time for a paradigm shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Jana

    2013-03-01

    This article develops a comprehensive philosophy-of-science for personality psychology that goes far beyond the scope of the lexical approaches, assessment methods, and trait concepts that currently prevail. One of the field's most important guiding scientific assumptions, the lexical hypothesis, is analysed from meta-theoretical viewpoints to reveal that it explicitly describes two sets of phenomena that must be clearly differentiated: 1) lexical repertoires and the representations that they encode and 2) the kinds of phenomena that are represented. Thus far, personality psychologists largely explored only the former, but have seriously neglected studying the latter. Meta-theoretical analyses of these different kinds of phenomena and their distinct natures, commonalities, differences, and interrelations reveal that personality psychology's focus on lexical approaches, assessment methods, and trait concepts entails a) erroneous meta-theoretical assumptions about what the phenomena being studied actually are, and thus how they can be analysed and interpreted, b) that contemporary personality psychology is largely based on everyday psychological knowledge, and c) a fundamental circularity in the scientific explanations used in trait psychology. These findings seriously challenge the widespread assumptions about the causal and universal status of the phenomena described by prominent personality models. The current state of knowledge about the lexical hypothesis is reviewed, and implications for personality psychology are discussed. Ten desiderata for future research are outlined to overcome the current paradigmatic fixations that are substantially hampering intellectual innovation and progress in the field.

  2. One-Year Follow-Up of Girls with Precocious Puberty and Their Mothers: Do Psychological Assessments Change over Time or with Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoelwer, Melissa J; Donahue, Kelly L; Didrick, Paula; Eugster, Erica A

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether psychological characteristics of girls with variations of early puberty and their mothers change over time and with treatment in girls with central precocious puberty (CPP). Girls with CPP, premature adrenarche (PA), and early normal puberty (ENP) completed psychological assessments at baseline and after 1 year along with their mothers. All girls with CPP were treated with GnRH analogs. Psychological effects of group and time were examined using 2 × 3 mixed ANOVAs. Sixty-two subjects aged 7.5 ± 1.4 years (range 4.8-10.5) were enrolled, of whom 36 (15 with CPP, 8 with PA, and 13 with ENP) completed 1-year follow-up assessments. Psychological measures were normal in all girls. No significant group differences were found for any measure of girls' psychological functioning at either time point. However, across all groups there was change over time with a decrease in perceived physical competence (p puberty, and all groups were in the normal range. Our results are largely reassuring regarding concerns of adverse psychological consequences of early puberty in girls. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Assessing social capacity and vulnerability of private households to natural hazards – integrating psychological and governance factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Werg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available People are unequally affected by extreme weather events in terms of mortality, morbidity and financial losses; this is the case not only for developing, but also for industrialized countries. Previous research has established indicators for identifying who is particularly vulnerable and why, focusing on socio-demographic factors such as income, age, gender, health and minority status. However, these factors can only partly explain the large disparities in the extent to which people are affected by natural hazards. Moreover, these factors are usually not alterable in the short to medium term, which limits their usefulness for strategies of reducing social vulnerability and building social capacity. Based on a literature review and an expert survey, we propose an approach for refining assessments of social vulnerability and building social capacity by integrating psychological and governance factors.

  4. Reliability assessment of a manual-based procedure towards learning curve modeling and fmea analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Rech

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Separation procedures in drug Distribution Centers (DC are manual-based activities prone to failures such as shipping exchanged, expired or broken drugs to the customer. Two interventions seem as promising in improving the reliability in the separation procedure: (i selection and allocation of appropriate operators to the procedure, and (ii analysis of potential failure modes incurred by selected operators. This article integrates Learning Curves (LC and FMEA (Failure Mode and Effect Analysis aimed at reducing the occurrence of failures in the manual separation of a drug DC. LCs parameters enable generating an index to identify the recommended operators to perform the procedures. The FMEA is then applied to the separation procedure carried out by the selected operators in order to identify failure modes. It also deployed the traditional FMEA severity index into two sub-indexes related to financial issues and damage to company´s image in order to characterize failures severity. When applied to a drug DC, the proposed method significantly reduced the frequency and severity of failures in the separation procedure.

  5. Psychological distress associated with cancer screening: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chad-Friedman, Emma; Coleman, Sarah; Traeger, Lara N; Pirl, William F; Goldman, Roberta; Atlas, Steven J; Park, Elyse R

    2017-10-15

    Current national cancer screening recommendations include the potential risk of psychological harm related to screening. However, data on the relation of psychological distress to cancer screening is limited. The authors conducted a systematic review to assess psychological distress associated with cancer screening procedures. Studies that administered measures of psychological distress between 2 weeks before and 1 month after the screening procedure were included. In total, 22 eligible studies met criteria for review, including 13 observational trials and 9 randomized controlled trials. Eligible studies used a broad range of validated and unvalidated measures. Anxiety was the most commonly assessed construct and was measured using the State Trait Anxiety Inventory. Studies included breast, colorectal, prostate, lung, and cervical screening procedures. Distress was low across procedures, with the exception of colorectal screening. Distress did not vary according to the time at which distress was measured. None of the studies were conducted exclusively with the intention of assessing distress at the time of screening. Evidence of low distress during the time of cancer screening suggests that distress might not be a widespread barrier to screening among adults who undergo screening. However, more studies are needed using validated measures of distress to further understand the extent to which screening may elicit psychological distress and impede adherence to national screening recommendations. Cancer 2017;123:3882-94. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. Procedures of assessment on the quantification of thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis by radiography and photogrammetry: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Alessandra Beggiato; Okazaki, Victor Hugo Alves

    2017-10-01

    The quantification of thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis can be assessed in different ways; among them radiography and photogrammetry. However, the assessment procedures are not consistent in the literature for either method. The objective of this study was to conduct a literature review about postural assessment through radiography and photogrammetry, for delineating the procedures for both methods. In total 38 studies were selected by an online search in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases with the keywords: radiograph and posture, postural alignment, photogrammetry or photometry or biophotogrammetry. For the radiographic method, the results showed divergences in arm positioning and in the calculation of thoracic and lumbar angles. The photogrammetry demonstrated differences in relation to the camera, tripod, plumb line and feet positioning, angle calculation, software utilization, and the use of footwear. Standardization is proposed for both methods to help establish normative values and comparisons between diagnoses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A teaching method for multicultural assessment: psychological report contents and cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Richard H; Aguilar-Kitibutr, Ailsa; Diaz-Vivar, Nilda; Vetter, Heidi

    2002-10-01

    An earlier training model emphasized systematic feedback on accuracy of concepts contained in student assessment reports prepared with common data sets from standard tests. This feedback resulted in consistent increments in concept agreements between reports prepared by students and more experienced assessors. This model was applied in courses with multicultural students by contrasting standard and multicultural assessment and using data sets from multicultural assessees. These students experienced greater difficulty in demonstrating consistent increments of agreement in report concepts due to uneven knowledge of specific cultures, inapplicability of available norms, and interpretation issues. The effectiveness of combining standard and multicultural training should be compared with conventional standard training followed by culturally focused specialized assessment courses.

  8. Tools to assess psychological trauma & its correlates in child sexual abuse: A review & current needs in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satapathy, Sujata; Choudhary, Vandana; Sagar, Rajesh

    2017-02-01

    Absence of visible physical symptoms and limited capacity to express trauma directly, pose significant challenges in assessment of its exact nature of trauma and its correlates in child sexual abuse. There are numerous assessment tools however, deciding upon the appropriateness is often challenging in Asian socio-cultural and health care set up. A review would provide a ready reference to the practioner regarding the exact clinically utility of the tools and also would guide them in the direction of culture specific modifications. Computerized databases namely Medline, PsycINFO, Health and Psychosocial Instruments, and Social Sciences Citation Index were used. 52 scales were obtained and analysed in terms of scale characteristics, reference to theory and DSM, and cultural competency. Despite of a wide variety of methods, and newer instruments, many of the traditionally used techniques of child's internal thinking and emotional assessment appear outdated while reviewing the recent theories of CSA related psychological trauma. An integrated format, incroporating child-parent-clinicain rating, with multiple domain speciafic items and verbal and non-verbal tasks, is the current need in the Asian region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of the tomographic values in keratoconic eyes after collagen crosslinking procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefic Kasumovic, Sanja; Racic-Sakovic, Adisa; Kasumovic, Aida; Pavljasevic, Suzana; Duric-Colic, Belkisa; Cabric, Emir; Mavija, Milka; Lepara, Orhan; Jankov, Mirko

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the differences in values of K1 and K2 readings, the central corneal thickness (PAH) before the collagen crosslinking procedure (CXL) and 3, 6, 12 months later. 64 eyes were evaluated in retrospective cross sectional study. The corneal biomechanical parameters were taken with WaveLight Allegro Oculyzer produced by Alcon before the CXL, 3,6, 12 months after the procedure. The curvature of K1 reading and K2 reading were taken and the central corneal thickness were considered due to the time after CXL. The value of K1 reading before the treatment was 48.8 diopters (D) (46.65-50.50) and was statistically significant lower comparing to the value of K1 3 months after the collagen CXL procedure 46.30 D (43.57-49.45) (p=0.0006), K1 reading one year post collagen CXL procedure was 47.20 D (44.35-50.07) (p=0.002). The value of K2 reading before the collagen CXL procedure was 52.65 D (47.55-54.72), 3 months after the procedure was 51.4 (45.05-54.0), 6 months later 48.55 D (47.20-50.62), 12 months later 51.30 D (47.22-54.77). There is statistically significant lower value of K2 reading 6 months after the treatment comparing to the values 3 months postoperatively (p=0.014). However there is significantly lower values of K2 reading 12 months postoperatively comparing to preoperative period (p=0.006). The value of central corneal thickness preoperative was 431.0 microns (398.0-446.25), 3 months after collagen CXL procedure was 373.50 microns (363.25-430.75), 6 months later 435.0 microns (360.0-464.75), 12 months after the CXL procedure was 429.50 microns (357.75-496.25). There is statistically significant lower values of central corneal thickness 3 months after collagen CXL treatment comparing to the central corneal thickness preoperative (pkeratokonus there was significant decrease in central corneal thickness 3 and 6 months after the procedure and the thickness is almost the same 12 months. However, K2 (Kmax) reading is significantly changed 3

  10. Assessing psychological distress in patients with facial paralysis using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, S.; Beurskens, C.H.G.; Kleiss, I.J.; Ingels, K.J.A.O.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Anxiety and depression are seen among patients with facial paralysis (FP), but less is known about the exact prevalence. The aim of the current study is to assess the prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders in the FP population and to investigate possible differences between

  11. Assessing Adolescents' Positive Psychological Functioning at School: Development and Validation of the Student Subjective Wellbeing Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Tyler L.; Long, Anna C. J.; Cook, Clayton R.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on the initial development and validation of the Student Subjective Wellbeing Questionnaire (SSWQ) with a sample of 1,002 students in Grades 6-8. The SSWQ is a 16-item self-report instrument for assessing youths' subjective wellbeing at school, which is operationalized via 4 subscales measuring school connectedness, academic…

  12. An Introduction to the Psychological and Educational Assessment of Blind and Partially Sighted Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Designed for educational psychologists, the paper discusses the range of tests used for assessing visually handicapped children. Specific tests used in Britain for preschool children (including the Williams Intelligence Test for Children with Defective Vision and the Social Maturity Scale for Blind Pre-school Children) and for school aged children…

  13. Improving the scalability of psychological treatments in developing countries: an evaluation of peer-led therapy quality assessment in Goa, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Daisy R; Weobong, Benedict; Nadkarni, Abhijit; Chowdhary, Neerja; Shinde, Sachin; Anand, Arpita; Fairburn, Christopher G; Dimijdan, Sona; Velleman, Richard; Weiss, Helen; Patel, Vikram

    2014-09-01

    Psychological treatments delivered by lay therapists, with little or no previous mental health training, have been shown to be effective in treating a range of mental health problems. In low resource settings, the dearth of available experts to assess therapy quality potentially leads to a bottleneck in scaling up lay therapist delivered psychological treatments. Peer-led supervision and the assessment of therapy quality may be one solution to address this barrier. The purpose of this study was two-fold: 1) to assess lay therapist quality ratings compared to expert supervisors in a multisite study where lay therapists delivered two locally developed, psychological treatments for harmful and dependent drinking and severe depression; 2) assess the acceptability and feasibility of peer-led supervision compared to expert-led supervision. We developed two scales, one for each treatment, to compare lay therapist and expert ratings on audio-taped treatment sessions (n = 189). Our findings confirmed our primary hypothesis of increased levels of agreement between peer and expert ratings over three consecutive time periods as demonstrated by a decrease in the differences in mean therapy quality rating scores. This study highlights that lay therapists can be trained to effectively assess each other's therapy sessions as well as experts, and that peer-led supervision is acceptable for lay therapists, thus, enhancing the scalability of psychological treatments in low-resource settings. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychological factors are related to return to work among long-term sickness absentees who have undergone a multidisciplinary medical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Klas; Lundh, Göran; Svedberg, Pia; Linder, Jürgen; Alexanderson, Kristina; Marklund, Staffan

    2013-02-01

    To assess the associations between psychological factors and return to work among long-term sickness absentees. Longitudinal study with a 3-year follow-up. Long-term sickness absentees (n = 905) who had undergone a multidisciplinary medical assessment. Three years after multidisciplinary medical assessment, return to work status (full, partial, or none) was determined according to whether the individuals received full, partial, or no sickness benefits. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals for return to work related to indecision, lassitude, fatigability, reduced sleep, social functioning, emotional role limitations, and vitality. After adjusting for socio-demographic factors and medical diagnoses most of the studied psychological factors were significantly associated with full (odds ratios 2.13-1.50) and partial (odds ratios 2.25-1.63) return to work in the follow-up period. Low level of lassitude was associated with full return to work (odds ratio 1.72) even when the other psychological factors were controlled for. Similarly, low fatigability was associated with partial return to work (odds ratio 1.81). This study indicates that psychological factors are important for both full and partial return to work among long-term sickness absentees who have undergone a multidisciplinary medical assessment.

  15. Using the Kannada version of the Connor Davidson Resilience Scale to assess resilience and its relationship with psychological distress among adolescent girls in Bangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidheek, K P Fasli; Satyanarayana, Veena A; Sowmya, H R; Chandra, Prabha S

    2017-12-01

    A widely used and accepted scale for assessing resilience is the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). The aim of the present study was to establish the psychometric properties of the Kannada version of the scale and assess the relationship between resilience and psychological distress in a sample of adolescent girls living in low-income settings. Data was obtained from a sample of 606 adolescent girls studying in a college meant for women from a socio-economically disadvantaged setting. The CD- RISC (25 item) was used to assess resilience and Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10) was used to assess psychological distress. Exploratory factor analysis yielded four stable factors instead of the original five factors. Similar results have been obtained in other factor-analytic studies. A significant negative correlation was found between psychological distress and resilience. Our study shows that the CD-RISC is a valuable measure to assess resilience among adolescents in low-income settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. ENGINEERING PSYCHOLOGY,

    Science.gov (United States)

    MAN MACHINE SYSTEMS, APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY ), INFORMATION THEORY, ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING, PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ...PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, AUTOMATION, BRAIN, AUDITORY PERCEPTION, VISUAL PERCEPTION, MEMORY( PSYCHOLOGY ), MOTOR REACTIONS, NOISE, PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), USSR

  17. Assessment of anhedonia in psychological trauma: development of the Hedonic Deficit and Interference Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Frewen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms of anhedonia, or deficits in the ability to experience positive affect, are increasingly recognized as an outcome of traumatic stress. Herein we demonstrate a phenomenon of “negative affective interference”, specifically, negative affective responses to positive events, in association with childhood trauma history. Young adults (n=99 completed a Hedonic Deficit & Interference Scale (HDIS, a self-report measure developed for this study, as well as a modified version of the Fawcette-Clarke Pleasure Capacity Scale that assessed not only positive but also negative affective responses to positive events. The two assessment approaches demonstrated convergent validity and predicted concurrent individual differences in trait positive and negative affect, and extraversion and neuroticism. Histories of childhood emotional and sexual abuse were differentially associated with negative affective responses to positive events. Future research and clinical directions are discussed.For the abstract or full text in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Reading Tools online.

  18. Study addiction - a new area of psychological study: conceptualization, assessment, and preliminary empirical findings

    OpenAIRE

    Atroszko, PA; Andreassen, CS; Griffiths, M.; Pallesen, S

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Recent research has suggested that for some individuals, educational studying may become compulsive and excessive and lead to ‘study addiction’. The present study conceptualized and assessed study addiction within the framework of workaholism, defining it as compulsive over-involvement in studying that interferes with functioning in other domains and that is detrimental for individuals and/or their environment. Methods: The Bergen Study Addiction Scale (BStAS) was tested - reflecting se...

  19. Standardized Methods of Assessment of Individual’s Social Network in Social Work and Psychological Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Lifintsev D.V.; Lifintseva A.A.; Serykh A.B.

    2015-01-01

    This article is a theoretical overview of the main standardized techniques for assessment of the social relations of the individual. The study of these techniques allows professionals to get the basic information about the microsocial environment of people. Theoretical analysis shows that the study of the social network of an individual involves the analysis of its structure, composition and function of its components. Described and analyzed the most common techniques for asses...

  20. Assessment of a model for achieving competency in administration and scoring of the WAIS-IV in postgraduate psychology students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Margaret Roberts

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for an evidence-based approach to training professional psychologists in the administration and scoring of standardized tests such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS due to substantial evidence that these tasks are associated with numerous errors that have the potential to significantly impact clients’ lives. Twenty three postgraduate psychology students underwent training in using the WAIS-IV according to a best-practice teaching model that involved didactic teaching, independent study of the test manual, and in-class practice with teacher supervision and feedback. Video recordings and test protocols from a role-played test administration were analyzed for errors according to a comprehensive checklist with self, peer, and faculty member reviews. 91.3% of students were rated as having demonstrated competency in administration and scoring. All students were found to make errors, with substantially more errors being detected by the faculty member than by self or peers. Across all subtests, the most frequent errors related to failure to deliver standardized instructions verbatim from the manual. The failure of peer and self-reviews to detect the majority of the errors suggests that novice feedback (self or peers may be ineffective to eliminate errors and the use of more senior peers may be preferable. It is suggested that involving senior trainees, recent graduates and/or experienced practitioners in the training of postgraduate students may have benefits for both parties, promoting a peer-learning and continuous professional development approach to the development and maintenance of skills in psychological assessment.

  1. Reliability and validity of a test designed to assess combat medics' readiness to perform life-saving procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Connie C; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Yoshida, Ken; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Sainfort, Francois; Beilman, Gregory; Clinton, Joseph; Cooper, Jimmy; Reihsen, Troy; Sweet, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Reducing preventable deaths because of uncontrolled hemorrhage, tension pneumothorax, and airway loss is a priority. As part of a research initiative comparing different training models, this study evaluated the reliability and validity of a test that assesses combat medic performance during a polytrauma scenario using live animal models. Nine procedural checklists and seven global rating scales were piloted with four cohorts of soldiers (n = 94) at two U.S. training sites. Cohorts represented "novice" to "proficient" trainees. Procedure scores and a mean global score were calculated per subject. The intraclass correlation was calculated per procedure, with 0.70 as the threshold for acceptability. An overall difference among cohorts was hypothesized: Cohort 4 (proficient) > Cohort 3 (competent) > Cohort 2 (beginners) > Cohort 1 (novice) trainees. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and analysis of variance. At Site A, intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 74% to 93% for 6 of 9 procedures. Cohorts differed significantly on hemorrhage control, needle decompression, cricothyrotomy, amputation management, chest tube insertion, and mean global scores. Cohort 4 outperformed the others, and Cohorts 2 and 3 outperformed Cohort 1. The test differentiates novices from beginners, competent, and proficient trainees on difficult procedures and overall performance. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  2. Military Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MILITARY FORCES(FOREIGN), *MILITARY PSYCHOLOGY , *TEXTBOOKS, USSR, ORGANIZATIONS, COMBAT READINESS, PSYCHOMOTOR FUNCTION, REASONING, SURVEYS...TRANSLATIONS, MILITARY TRAINING, OFFICER PERSONNEL, PERCEPTION( PSYCHOLOGY ), PERSONALITY, COMMUNISM, INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS, EMOTIONS.

  3. Assessment of a calibration procedure to estimate soil water content with Sentek Diviner 2000 capacitance probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallo, G.; Giordano, G.; Provenzano, G.

    2012-04-01

    In irrigated systems, soil water content is a major factor determining plant growth. Irrigation scheduling criteria are often related to measurements of soil water content or matric potential. Strategies to manage irrigation can be used to optimize irrigation water use or to maximize crop yield and/or quality, in order to increase the net return for the farmer. Of course, whatever criterion is adopted to schedule irrigation and in particular when crop water stress conditions are considered, the accurate monitoring of the water content in the soil profile, could allow to verify the exact irrigation timing, defined according to the crop response to water stress. Currently many methods are available for determining soil water content on a volume basis (m3m-3) or a tension basis (MPa), as described by Robinson (2008). Recently, distributed fiber optic temperature measurement, has been assessed as a new technique for indirect and precise estimation of soil water contents. Over the past decade Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) probes, allowing to measure the apparent dielectric constant of the soil (K), indirectly related to the volumetric water content (θv), have been improved, due to the good potentiality of capacitance based sensors to in situ measurements of soil water content. However, due to the high variability of K with soil minerals and dry plants tissues, it necessary to proceed to a specific calibration of the sensor for each soil (Baumhardt et al., 2000), even to take into account the effect of soil temperature, bulk density and water salinity (Al Ain et al., 2009). . According to Paltineanu and Starr (1997), the precision of the calibration equation, obtained with in situ measurements, mainly depends on the errors related to the sampling of the soil volume investigated by the sensor, that must be done accurately. For swelling/shrinking soils, the changes of soil bulk volume with water content cause modifications in the geometry of some if not all the

  4. Evolution of cancer risk assessment and counseling related to psychological, financial and legal implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Carrie

    2016-07-01

    Cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling and genetic testing have experienced advances and changes over the past two decades due to improved technology, legal movements to protect those at an increased risk for cancer due to genetics, as well as advances in detection, prevention and treatment. This brief article will provide a summary of these advances over three eras of cancer genetics: pre-discovery of the more common high impact genes, namely BRCA1/BRCA2 and the mismatch repair genes associated with Lynch syndrome; the time during which the genes were being discovered; and current day.

  5. Using the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure to examine implicit beauty-bias in the context of employability evaluations

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The current research aimed to examine the presence of attractiveness bias in ratings of employability by undergraduate university students using an implicit measure (the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure; IRAP) and a number of explicit measures (Interpersonal Judgement Scale, Byrne, 1971; Measures of Interpersonal Attraction, McCroskey & McCain, 1974; and Likert scales). A number of explicit (self-report questionnaires etc.) have shown that attractiveness can be an influencing factor i...

  6. Assessing culture via the Internet: methods and techniques for psychological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, D T

    2001-02-01

    This study examines the acculturation experiences of Arabic immigrants and assesses the utility of the Internet as a data collection tool. Based on in-depth pilot interview data from 10 male Arabic immigrants and items selected from pre-existing measures, the Male Arabic Ethnic Identity Measure (MAEIM) was developed. Male Arab immigrants (115 males) were solicited through traditional methods in addition to the Internet. Satisfactory reliability and validity were reported for the MAEIM. No significant differences emerged between the Internet and Midwestern samples. The Internet proved to be an effective method for soliciting a relatively large, geographically dispersed sample of Arabic immigrants. The use of the Internet as a research tool is examined in the context of anonymity, networking, low-cost, perceived interactive control, methodological rigor, and external validity. The Internet was an effective vehicle for addressing concerns raised by prospective participants. It is suggested that the Internet may be an important method to assess culture-relevant variables in further research on Arab and other immigrant populations.

  7. Study addiction--a new area of psychological study: conceptualization, assessment, and preliminary empirical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atroszko, Paweł A; Andreassen, Cecilie Schou; Griffiths, Mark D; Pallesen, Ståle

    2015-06-01

    Recent research has suggested that for some individuals, educational studying may become compulsive and excessive and lead to 'study addiction'. The present study conceptualized and assessed study addiction within the framework of workaholism, defining it as compulsive over-involvement in studying that interferes with functioning in other domains and that is detrimental for individuals and/or their environment. The Bergen Study Addiction Scale (BStAS) was tested - reflecting seven core addiction symptoms (salience, mood modification, tolerance, withdrawal, conflict, relapse, and problems) - related to studying. The scale was administered via a cross-sectional survey distributed to Norwegian (n = 218) and Polish (n = 993) students with additional questions concerning demographic variables, study-related variables, health, and personality. A one-factor solution had acceptable fit with the data in both samples and the scale demonstrated good reliability. Scores on BStAS converged with scores on learning engagement. Study addiction (BStAS) was significantly related to specific aspects of studying (longer learning time, lower academic performance), personality traits (higher neuroticism and conscientiousness, lower extroversion), and negative health-related factors (impaired general health, decreased quality of life and sleep quality, higher perceived stress). It is concluded that BStAS has good psychometric properties, making it a promising tool in the assessment of study addiction. Study addiction is related in predictable ways to personality and health variables, as predicted from contemporary workaholism theory and research.

  8. The Role of Some Selected Psychological and Personality Traits of the Rater in the Accuracy of Self- and Peer-Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlFallay, Ibrahim

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of some selected psychological and personality traits of learners of English as a foreign language in the accuracy of self- and peer-assessments. The selected traits were motivation types, self-esteem, anxiety, motivational intensity, and achievement. 78 students of English as a foreign language participated in…

  9. Psychobiological Assessment and Enhancement of Team Cohesion and Psychological Resilience in ROTC Cadets Using a Virtual-Reality Team Cohesion Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Using a Virtual- Reality Team Cohesion Test PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Josh Woolley MD/PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Northern California Institute for...NUMBER Psychobiological Assessment & Enhancement of Team Cohesion and Psychological Resilience in ROTC Cadets Using a Virtual- Reality Team Cohesion...While much work has been done in defining, quantifying, and increasing unit cohesion, the precise psychobiological mechanisms that subserve unit

  10. ATS-PD: An Adaptive Testing System for Psychological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donadello, Ivan; Spoto, Andrea; Sambo, Francesco; Badaloni, Silvana; Granziol, Umberto; Vidotto, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    The clinical assessment of mental disorders can be a time-consuming and error-prone procedure, consisting of a sequence of diagnostic hypothesis formulation and testing aimed at restricting the set of plausible diagnoses for the patient. In this article, we propose a novel computerized system for the adaptive testing of psychological disorders.…

  11. Emotional Intelligence: A Predictor Of Psychological Adjustment To ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed emotional intelligence as a predictor of psychological adjustment to anxiety and depression among Nigerian adolescents. Five hundred (500) adolescents drawn from 10 Senior Secondary Schools participated in the study. The participants were drawn through a multi-stage sampling procedure from the ...

  12. Occupational exposure assessment in procedures of portable digital veterinary radiology for small size animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canato, G. R.; Drumond, L. F.; Paschuk, S. A.; Asfora, V. K.; Andrade, M. E. A.; Denyak, V.; Schelin, H. R.

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluates the dose received by veterinarians and assistants involved in portable digital veterinary radiology procedures and checks the dose reduction obtained with the use of individual protection equipment. For this evaluation measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD-100, positioned at different parts of the body: hands, thorax, thyroids, gonads, left and right eye corners and at the center of the eyes. The dose was evaluated through 65 procedures performed with 55 animals. The results showed that in the case of assistants the received dose is significantly larger than that of the veterinarian. The most likely reason of this effect is that they are closer to the primary beam and thus are exposed to higher level of primary radiation first of all in regions of eyes and thyroids. The doses received by various body parts of the assistant are close to the annual limit recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection.

  13. Assessment of psychological functioning in adolescent earthquake victims in Colombia using the MMPI-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Ronald L; Knoth, Russell L; Beltran-Quiones, Monica; Gomez, Nelson

    2003-02-01

    The earthquake that hit Armenia, Colombia, on January 25, 1999, dramatically impacted the lives of thousands of people, including children and adolescents. This study used the Hispanic MMPI-A to clinically assess for ongoing psychopathology in a group of 59 adolescent earthquake victims. Their scores on the basic, content, and supplementary scales of the instrument were compared to those of a control group of 62 Colombian adolescents with similar socioeconomic, educational, and ethnic backgrounds. The results showed no clinically significant elevations for the earthquake victims indicating that the disaster had not resulted in diagnosable psychopathology. When compared to controls, earthquake victims showed significant elevations on D, Pt, and Sc indicating that they were mildly affected (but within the normal range) by the earthquake. The results are discussed in the context of cultural factors and the contemporary disaster and resiliency literature.

  14. Play Room as an psychological assessment method in cases of alleged child sexual abuse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagelskjær, Marie

    2017-01-01

    of Play Room from prevention into clinical assessment, in cases of alleged child sexual abuse. Taking its starting point in the theory of Jean Laplanche, this article will discuss how psychoanalytic concepts such as seduction, translation, asymmetry, absence, and listening to listening can be used......This article presents an example of how psychoanalytic theory can be implemented in practice. The aim is to introduce and discuss the semi-projective material ‘Play Room’ which was originally developed to support prevention of sexual abuse among vulnerable children in Denmark. However, a recent...... study has shown that, when measured with a scale called Ability to Answer, children exposed to sexual abuse talked about the illustrations in Play Room in a significantly different way than did a clinical sample and a normal control group. The finding indicates the potential for expanding the scope...

  15. A complementary emissions test for light-duty vehicles: Assessing the technical feasibility of candidate procedures

    OpenAIRE

    WEISS MARTIN; Bonnel, Pierre; HUMMEL RUDOLF; STEININGER Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Light-duty diesel vehicles emit on the road substantially more nitrogen oxides than permitted by regulatory emissions standards. The European Commission addresses this problem by developing a complementary emissions test procedure for the type approval and in-service conformity testing of these vehicles. To facilitate the technical development, the European Commission established in January 2011 the Real-Driving Emissions - Light-Duty Vehicles (RDE-LDV) working group that is open to all stake...

  16. Assessment of cardiovascular parameters during dental procedures under the effect of benzodiazepines: a double blind study

    OpenAIRE

    Faraco Fatima Neves; Armonia Paschoal Laércio; Simone José Leonardo; Tortamano Nicolau

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cardiovascular parameters during dental procedures: systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressures, and heart rate. Nineteen healthy normotensive patients (18-56 years of age) received restorative treatment on three maxillary molars. The patients were continuously monitored by a non-invasive automatic monitor for blood pressure and heart rate during the pre-, trans-, and post-operative periods at the following stages: 15 min prior to anesthesia; during...

  17. PAINLESS RADIAL ACCESS PROCEDURES WITH NICORANDIL: A COMPARATIVE ASSESSMENT WITH CONVENTIONAL VERAPAMIL - NITROGLYCERINE COCKTAIL

    OpenAIRE

    Jain T Kallarakkal; Rajesh T

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radial artery spasm is a major limitation of the transradial approach. This study was designed to compare the spasmolytic effect between nicorandil and the conventional cocktail of nitroglycerine and verapamil during transradial coronary procedures. Materials and methods: 200 patients were randomized into two groups to compare 8 mg of nicorandil and cocktail (mixture of normal saline, 5 mg of verapamil and 200 μg of nitroglycerin). Radial artery spasm and patient comfort in both t...

  18. Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics Version 4 (ANAM4): Select Psychometric Properties and Administration Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    disorders (including attention deficit hyperac- tivity disorder [ ADHD ]), and no gross visual (no worse than 20/30 corrected or uncorrected) or hearing...screening interview con- sisted of the Conners Adult ADHD Rating Scale–Self-Report: Short Version (CAARS–S:S; Pearson, San Antonio, TX), the Post Traumatic...required intervention by the experimenter to enter relevant information, adjust the camera, and initiate the calibration procedure. Calibration of the eye

  19. Assessment of cardiovascular parameters during dental procedures under the effect of benzodiazepines: a double blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faraco Fatima Neves

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate cardiovascular parameters during dental procedures: systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressures, and heart rate. Nineteen healthy normotensive patients (18-56 years of age received restorative treatment on three maxillary molars. The patients were continuously monitored by a non-invasive automatic monitor for blood pressure and heart rate during the pre-, trans-, and post-operative periods at the following stages: 15 min prior to anesthesia; during topical anesthesia; during infiltrative anesthesia; for 5 minutes immediately after; during cavity preparation; during restorative procedure; for 10 min after completion. Patients were divided into three groups: A (without pre-medication, B (preceded by 10 mg diazepam, and C (preceded by placebo. All patients received infiltrative anesthesia containing 1.8 mL of 2% lidocaine (36 mg with epinephrine 1:100,000 (18 µg. There were no changes in the parameters during the clinical procedures. When groups were compared, there were significant differences in diastolic arterial pressures during anesthesia.

  20. Secure Base Script and Psychological Dysfunction in Japanese Young Adults in the 21st Century: Using the Attachment Script Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Tomotaka; Watanabe, Manami; Tazuke, Kohei; Asada-Hirano, Shintaro; Kudo, Shimpei

    2018-01-25

    The universality of secure base construct, which suggests that one's use of an attachment figure as a secure base from which to explore the environment is an evolutionary outcome, is one of the core ideas of attachment theory. However, this universality idea has been critiqued because exploration is not as valued in Japanese culture as it is in Western cultures. Waters and Waters (2006) hypothesized that one's experiences of secure base behaviors are stored as a script in memory, and developed a narrative assessment called the Attachment Script Assessment (ASA) to evaluate one's secure base script. This study examined the validity of the ASA and the utility of secure base concept in Japanese culture. A sample of Japanese young adults (N = 89; M = 23.46; SD = 3.20; 57% = females) completed both the ASA and self-report questionnaires. The results revealed that the ASA score was associated with two dimensions of self-report questionnaires assessing parent-youth attachment relationships (trust and communication). The ASA score was not related to Japanese cultural values (amae acceptance, interdependent self-construal, and low independent self-construal). However, a low ASA score was related to a psychological dysfunction in the Japanese cultural context; hikikomori symptoms, which are defined as a desire to remain in his or her own room and his or her understanding of this behavior in other people. We concluded that since hikikomori can be interpreted as an extreme inhibition of exploration, the association between low secure base script and hikikomori symptoms suggests the utility of secure base construct in Japan. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Translation and Cross-Cultural Adaptation of Assessment Instruments Used in Psychological Research with Children and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Widenfelt, Brigit M.; Treffers, Philip D. A.; de Beurs, Edwin; Siebelink, Bart M.; Koudijs, Els

    2005-01-01

    With the increased globalization of psychology and related fields, having reliable and valid measures that can be used in a number of languages and cultures is critical. Few guidelines or standards have been established in psychology for the translation and cultural adaptation of instruments. Usually little is reported in research publications…

  2. Assessing Psychological Inflexibility: The Psychometric Properties of the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth in Two Adult Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergus, Thomas A.; Valentiner, David P.; Gillen, Michael J.; Hiraoka, Regina; Twohig, Michael P.; Abramowitz, Jonathan S.; McGrath, Patrick B.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined whether the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y; L. A. Greco, W. Lambert, & R. A. Baer, 2008), a self-report measure of psychological inflexibility for children and adolescents, might be useful for measuring psychological inflexibility for adults. The psychometric properties of the AFQ-Y were examined…

  3. Subjective versus objective assessment in early clinical outcome of modified Lapidus procedure for hallux valgus deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, S; Moerenhout, K; Crevoisier, X

    2016-02-01

    Studies have assessed the outcome of hallux valgus surgeries based on subjective questionnaires, usually the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Score, and radiographic results reporting good to excellent outcome at 6-12 months postoperatively. However, contrasting results were reported by gait studies at 12-24 months postoperatively. In a previous study, we found nine gait parameters which can describe the altered gait in hallux valgus deformity. This study aimed, to assess the outcome of modified Lapidus at 6 months postoperatively, using gait assessment method, to determine if the nine specified gait parameters effectively relates with the clinical scores and the radiological results or add information missed by these commonly used clinical assessments. We assessed 21 participants including 11 controls and 10 patients with moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity. The patient group was followed 6 months postoperatively. The ambulatory gait assessment was performed utilizing pressure insoles and inertial sensors. Clinical assessment includes foot and ankle questionnaires along with radiographic results. Comparison was made using non parametric tests, Phallux valgus surgeries. The existing clinical assessment overestimates the functional outcome at the early postoperative phase. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The assessment of eating behaviour in children who are obese: a psychological approach. A position paper from the European childhood obesity group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braet, Caroline; O'Malley, Grace; Weghuber, Daniel; Vania, Andrea; Erhardt, Eva; Nowicka, Paulina; Mazur, Artur; Frelut, Marie Laure; Ardelt-Gattinger, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces health professionals to the different psychological models thought to influence eating behaviour in the absence of hunger in children who are obese and to propose a method of assessing these behaviours in practice. Clinical researchers from the European Childhood Obesity Group (ECOG) adopted an evidence-based approach to examine the literature concerning the assessment of eating behaviour in children who are obese. Studies published in English were filtered out of the medical and psychological literature from 1960 to the present, and the resulting bibliography was searched for relevant articles. Key themes from the current evidence were compiled and classified according to the underpinning psychological models. Based on the current evidence and the authors' combined clinical experience, a three-staged approach to assessment was agreed by consensus. Valid and reliable tools for assessing and monitoring each of the three identified models (Dietary Restraint Theory, Emotional Eating and the Diathesis-Stress Model) are suggested for use in clinical practice, and the ECOG three-staged approach to assessing eating behaviours in the absence of hunger is described. This paper presents practical guidance on how to assess eating behaviour in the absence of hunger in children who are clinically obese and suggests a focus for future research.

  5. The Assessment of Eating Behaviour in Children Who Are Obese: A Psychological Approach. A Position Paper from the European Childhood Obesity Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Braet

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper introduces health professionals to the different psychological models thought to influence eating behaviour in the absence of hunger in children who are obese and to propose a method of assessing these behaviours in practice. Methods: Clinical researchers from the European Childhood Obesity Group (ECOG adopted an evidence-based approach to examine the literature concerning the assessment of eating behaviour in children who are obese. Studies published in English were filtered out of the medical and psychological literature from 1960 to the present, and the resulting bibliography was searched for relevant articles. Key themes from the current evidence were compiled and classified according to the underpinning psychological models. Based on the current evidence and the authors' combined clinical experience, a three-staged approach to assessment was agreed by consensus. Results: Valid and reliable tools for assessing and monitoring each of the three identified models (Dietary Restraint Theory, Emotional Eating and the Diathesis-Stress Model are suggested for use in clinical practice, and the ECOG three-staged approach to assessing eating behaviours in the absence of hunger is described. Conclusions: This paper presents practical guidance on how to assess eating behaviour in the absence of hunger in children who are clinically obese and suggests a focus for future research.

  6. The Assessment of Eating Behaviour in Children Who Are Obese: A Psychological Approach. A Position Paper from the European Childhood Obesity Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braet, Caroline; O'Malley, Grace; Weghuber, Daniel; Vania, Andrea; Erhardt, Éva; Nowicka, Paulina; Mazur, Artur; Frelut, Marie Laure; Ardelt-Gattinger, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Objective This paper introduces health professionals to the different psychological models thought to influence eating behaviour in the absence of hunger in children who are obese and to propose a method of assessing these behaviours in practice. Methods Clinical researchers from the European Childhood Obesity Group (ECOG) adopted an evidence-based approach to examine the literature concerning the assessment of eating behaviour in children who are obese. Studies published in English were filtered out of the medical and psychological literature from 1960 to the present, and the resulting bibliography was searched for relevant articles. Key themes from the current evidence were compiled and classified according to the underpinning psychological models. Based on the current evidence and the authors' combined clinical experience, a three-staged approach to assessment was agreed by consensus. Results Valid and reliable tools for assessing and monitoring each of the three identified models (Dietary Restraint Theory, Emotional Eating and the Diathesis-Stress Model) are suggested for use in clinical practice, and the ECOG three-staged approach to assessing eating behaviours in the absence of hunger is described. Conclusions This paper presents practical guidance on how to assess eating behaviour in the absence of hunger in children who are clinically obese and suggests a focus for future research. PMID:24820848

  7. Assessing the safety and efficacy of drugs used in preparing the nose for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saif, A M; Farboud, A; Delfosse, E; Pope, L; Adke, M

    2016-10-01

    preparation for flexible nasendoscopy. Those undergoing rigid endoscopy conversely always require the use of a vasoconstrictor and local anaesthetic. Pre-procedure assessment of patients is recommended, with agents being reserved for those with low pain thresholds, high anxiety and small nasal apertures presenting resistance to the insertion of the endoscope. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Self-Monitoring Microbiological Criteria for the Assessment of Hygienic Procedures During Chicken Slaughtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Dias

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Self-monitoring procedures are adopted by food industries to ensure the quality and safety of final products, considering hygiene and processing criteria. This study aimed to evaluate contamination in chicken processing, considering the microbiological criteria proposed by self-monitoring systems. Environmental samples from reception, slaughtering and processing were collected from three chicken slaughterhouses (Sl1, Sl2, Sl3, and subjected to microbiological analysis to enumerate hygiene indicators microorganisms: mesophilic aerobes, enterobacteriaceae, coliforms and Escherichia coli. The obtained counts were converted to log10, compared by ANOVA (p<0.05 and self-monitoring microbiological criteria for each slaughterhouse were considered. In reception, the mean counts of hygiene indicator microorganisms in Sl3 were significantly higher than mean counts observed in Sl1 and Sl2 (p<0.05. During slaughtering, the chilling was enough to decrease the mean counts of all hygiene indicator microorganisms in Sl1, Sl2 and Sl3 (p<0.05. Based on self-monitoring criteria, in the first stages of slaughtering the facilities presented higher frequencies of chicken carcasses with counts above their respective reference values. Sl02 presented carcasses with higher counts after final washing, resulting in environmental samples with higher counts when compared to Sl1 and Sl3 (p<0.05. Even considering the high counts observed in the initial steps of chicken processing and slaughtering, the results indicated the efficacy of hygienic procedures in providing chicken carcasses and cuts with low microbiological contamination. Self-monitoring criteria supported these results, and the high levels of microbial contamination during the initial steps of slaughtering require subsequent antimicrobial hygienic procedures.

  9. Self-assessment of performance among surgical trainees during simulated procedures in a simulated operating theater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Krishna; Munz, Yaron; Adams, Sally; Pandey, Vikas; Darzi, Ara

    2006-07-01

    The ability of surgeons to assess their own performance is essential for training and self-regulation. The latter is based on the premise that they recognize their weaknesses and seek remedial action accordingly. Twenty-seven surgical trainees performed a simulated saphenofemoral high-tie on a synthetic model in a simulated operating theater. The performance assessment consisted of blinded rating of technical skills and a global rating of team skills by a human factors expert and a trained surgical research fellow. Subjects also were asked to assess their own performance using the same methods. Spearman's rho was used for data analysis. There was a strong correlation between the experts rating of technical skills and self-assessment (rho = .64). However, the correlation improved with increasing experience. It was .24 for junior trainees, .43 for those with intermediate experience, and .52 for senior trainees. There was a low correlation between the self-assessment and the expert scores for human factors skills (rho = .31). The correlation was higher for the 2 junior groups compared with the senior trainees. Unlike other studies on self-assessment, this study found that senior surgical trainees are accurate in their self-assessment of technical skills. However, this was not true in the case of human factors skills.

  10. Assessing psychological flexibility in patients with chronic pain: the Korean adaptation of the Brief Pain Response Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, KyungHun; Kim, DoWan; Cho, Sungkun

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Korean version of the Brief Pain Response Inventory (K-BPRI) regarding patients with chronic pain. This study employed a retrospective survey design. One hundred sixty-four Korean patients with chronic pain participated in the study. Construct validity was assessed using confirmatory factor analysis and Pearson correlation. Internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, and measurement error were examined using Cronbach's α, the inter-item correlation coefficients, and the item-total correlation coefficients; the intra-class correlation coefficient; and the standard error of measurements, respectively. Confirmatory factory analysis showed the best fit to the data for the adjusted two-factor structure of the K-BPRI. The K-BPRI demonstrated good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Measurement errors for the K-BPRI and subscale scores were standard error of measurements = 5.74, 5.63, and 10.26, respectively, and minimum detectable change = 15.86, 15.56, and 28.35, respectively. Weak-to-moderate negative correlations were observed between the K-BPRI and the numerical rating scale for pain intensity and the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, and moderately positive correlations were observed between the K-BPRI and Short Form-12. This study provided evidence for the psychometric properties of the K-BPRI, suggesting that it can be a brief and efficient instrument for measuring psychological flexibility in coping with chronic pain.

  11. Using regression equations built from summary data in the psychological assessment of the individual case: extension to multiple regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, John R; Garthwaite, Paul H; Denham, Annie K; Chelune, Gordon J

    2012-12-01

    Regression equations have many useful roles in psychological assessment. Moreover, there is a large reservoir of published data that could be used to build regression equations; these equations could then be employed to test a wide variety of hypotheses concerning the functioning of individual cases. This resource is currently underused because (a) not all psychologists are aware that regression equations can be built not only from raw data but also using only basic summary data for a sample, and (b) the computations involved are tedious and prone to error. In an attempt to overcome these barriers, Crawford and Garthwaite (2007) provided methods to build and apply simple linear regression models using summary statistics as data. In the present study, we extend this work to set out the steps required to build multiple regression models from sample summary statistics and the further steps required to compute the associated statistics for drawing inferences concerning an individual case. We also develop, describe, and make available a computer program that implements these methods. Although there are caveats associated with the use of the methods, these need to be balanced against pragmatic considerations and against the alternative of either entirely ignoring a pertinent data set or using it informally to provide a clinical "guesstimate." Upgraded versions of earlier programs for regression in the single case are also provided; these add the point and interval estimates of effect size developed in the present article.

  12. The American Psychological Association Task Force assessment of violent video games: Science in the service of public interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Sandra L; Appelbaum, Mark; Dodge, Kenneth A; Graham, Sandra; Nagayama Hall, Gordon C; Hamby, Sherry; Fasig-Caldwell, Lauren G; Citkowicz, Martyna; Galloway, Daniel P; Hedges, Larry V

    2017-01-01

    A task force of experts was convened by the American Psychological Association (APA) to update the knowledge and policy about the impact of violent video game use on potential adverse outcomes. This APA Task Force on Media Violence examined the existing literature, including the meta-analyses in the field, since the last APA report on media violence in 2005. Because the most recent meta-analyses were published in 2010 and reflected work through 2009, the task force conducted a search of the published studies from 2009-2013. These recently published articles were scored and assessed by a systematic evidentiary review, followed by a meta-analysis of the high utility studies, as documented in the evidentiary review. Consistent with the literature that we reviewed, we found that violent video game exposure was associated with: an increased composite aggression score; increased aggressive behavior; increased aggressive cognitions; increased aggressive affect, increased desensitization, and decreased empathy; and increased physiological arousal. The size of the effects was similar to that in prior meta-analyses, suggesting a stable result. Our task force concluded that violent video game use is a risk factor for adverse outcomes, but found insufficient studies to examine any potential link between violent video game use and delinquency or criminal behavior. Our technical report is the basis of this article. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Burdensomeness, Belongingness, and Capability: Assessing the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide With MMPI-2-RF Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anestis, Joye C; Finn, Jacob A; Gottfried, Emily D; Hames, Jennifer L; Bodell, Lindsay P; Hagan, Christopher R; Arnau, Randolph C; Anestis, Michael D; Arbisi, Paul A; Joiner, Thomas E

    2016-06-01

    Given the emerging body of literature demonstrating the validity of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPTS), and the importance of increasing our understanding of the development of risk factors associated with suicidal behavior, it seems worthwhile both to expand IPTS research via Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) correlates and to expand the availability of methods by which to assess the constructs of the IPTS. The present study attempted to do so in a large adult outpatient mental health sample by (a) inspecting associations between the IPTS constructs and the substantive scales of the MMPI-2-RF and (b) exploring the utility of MMPI-2-RF scale-based algorithms of the IPTS constructs. Correlates between the IPTS constructs and the MMPI-2-RF scales scores largely followed a pattern consistent with theory-based predictions, and we provide preliminary evidence that the IPTS constructs can be reasonably approximated using theoretically based MMPI-2-RF substantive scales. Implications of these findings are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Evaluation of a screening programme for psychological distress in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morasso, Gabriella; Di Leo, Silvia; Caruso, Anita; Decensi, Andrea; Beccaro, Monica; Berretta, Laura; Bongiorno, Laura; Cosimelli, Maurizio; Finelli, Stefania; Rondanina, Gabriella; Santoni, Wissya; Stigliano, Vittoria; Costantini, Massimo

    2010-12-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the feasibility of a screening procedure for psychological distress in cancer survivors. Consecutive series of 339 cancer patients from three centres were requested to fill in two questionnaires measuring psychological distress (PDI) and social support (MOSS). Psychological intervention was offered to patients with significant degree of distress. Most patients accepted to be screened (72.0%; n = 244), and a subgroup (16.0%) showed high psychological distress. A higher ratio of distressed patients was observed among those with lower social support (P = 0.017). A significant (P psychological distress and social support was observed. A psychological intervention was offered to patients with high psychological distress, but only 15.6% completed it. Results from this study provide both some insights into the characteristics of psychological distress and some input on issues that may arise when implementing a screening procedure for psychological distress in cancer survivors. Further research is needed to assess both the clinical significance of distress and the most appropriate tools to carry out screening procedures within the target population.

  15. PATIENT DOSE ASSESSMENT AFTER INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY PROCEDURES: A MULTI-CENTRIC APPROACH TO TRIGGER OPTIMISATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryckx, Nick; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Stauffer, Jean-Christophe; Verdun, Francis R

    2016-06-01

    As the number and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions increase, a serious effort has to be put on the optimisation of the X-ray dose delivered to the patient. In order to set up this optimisation process, the clinical practice for a given cardiology centre has to be analysed with relevant statistical power and compared with the data at local or national level. Data from 8 Swiss cardiology centres for 10 different vascular and heart rhythm procedures have been collected. The collected dose indicators were, when available, cumulated air kerma, cumulated dose-area product, fluoroscopy time and the number of images per procedure. Data analysis was performed using an in-house software solution in terms of the first, second and third quartiles. This kind of large-scale analysis could yield some onsets towards local practice optimisation based on anonymous dose indicator cross-comparison. Further effort should nevertheless be made in order to proceed towards an operator-based data analysis, thus allowing for an individual practice optimisation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Defining System Requirements: a critical assessment of the Niam conceptual design procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peta Darke

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available Requirements definition is a fundamental activity within information systems development. Social and organisational issues are at the centre of many of the problems experienced during the development and implementation of information systems, and these need to be explored during requirements definition. The NIAM Conceptual Schema Design Procedure (CSDP is a method for identifying and describing information requirements using fact types. This paper discusses some limitations of the information requirements definition step of the CSDP which result from its lack of focus on the socio-organisational dimension of information systems development. Four different approaches to exploring the socio-organisational contexts of systems are discussed. It is proposed that one of these, viewpoint development, be incorporated into the NIAM CSDP to provide a means of exploring and understanding a system's socio organisational context and to ensure that contextual information is a major input to the requirements definition process. This results in an enhanced design procedure. Future and current research areas are identified.

  17. Preliminary Guideline for the High Temperature Structure Integrity Assessment Procedure Part I. High Temperature Structure Design Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Han; Kim, J. B.; Lee, H. Y.; Park, C. G.; Joo, Y. S.; Koo, G. H.; Kim, S. H

    2007-02-15

    A preliminary guideline for the design and evaluation of LMR high temperature structure is presented based upon ASME B and PV Code, Section III, Subsection NH. The main contents of this guideline are the materials, general design, vessel, piping, core support structure, pumps, valves, fabrication, examination, and testing for the class 1 components. The ratcheting evaluation, enhanced creep assessment, welds design and evaluation, inelastic analysis approach, piping design alternatives, and bellows design method are described in appendices. A user of this guideline should follow the essential procedures and may refer to other pertinent codes, standards, laws, regulations, or other pertinent documents when this guideline does not lead to proper design of the structure. While this guideline adopts major procedures of Subsection NH, it refers to the RCC-MR and/or DDS in some amount for the items where these codes have excellency to improve this guideline.

  18. Mainstreaming culture in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Fanny M

    2012-11-01

    Despite the "awakening" to the importance of culture in psychology in America, international psychology has remained on the sidelines of psychological science. The author recounts her personal and professional experience in tandem with the stages of development in international/cross-cultural psychology. Based on her research in cross-cultural personality assessment, the author discusses the inadequacies of sole reliance on either the etic or the emic approach and points out the advantages of a combined emic-etic approach in bridging global and local human experiences in psychological science and practice. With the blurring of the boundaries between North American-European psychologies and psychology in the rest of the world, there is a need to mainstream culture in psychology's epistemological paradigm. Borrowing from the concept of gender mainstreaming that embraces both similarities and differences in promoting equal opportunities, the author discusses the parallel needs of acknowledging universals and specifics when mainstreaming culture in psychology. She calls for building a culturally informed universal knowledge base that should be incorporated in the psychology curriculum and textbooks. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. The Impact of Complications on Patients’ Assessment of the Outcome of Tension-Free Vaginal Tape Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Shaker

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our study aimed to assess the impact of managed complications of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT on the patients’ assessment of the results as measured by Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective study, supplemented with a telephone interview, comparing patients who had complications of TVT procedures with those where no complications recorded. The primary outcome was the PGI-I score in the 2 groups. Results: A total of 118 invitations were sent. In all, 60 patients returned the signed consent and completed the telephone interview with one of the authors (response rate = 50.8%. Complications were recorded in 21 patients (group 1 and no complications in 39 patients (group 2. There was no statistically significant difference between PGI-I in both groups. Conclusions: Managed complications of TVT do not seem to affect patients’ assessment of outcome as measured by PGI-I score.

  20. The Impact of Complications on Patients’ Assessment of the Outcome of Tension-Free Vaginal Tape Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, David; Lindgren, Alexander J; Chapman, Gwenda

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Our study aimed to assess the impact of managed complications of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) on the patients’ assessment of the results as measured by Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I). Materials and methods: This was a retrospective study, supplemented with a telephone interview, comparing patients who had complications of TVT procedures with those where no complications recorded. The primary outcome was the PGI-I score in the 2 groups. Results: A total of 118 invitations were sent. In all, 60 patients returned the signed consent and completed the telephone interview with one of the authors (response rate = 50.8%). Complications were recorded in 21 patients (group 1) and no complications in 39 patients (group 2). There was no statistically significant difference between PGI-I in both groups. Conclusions: Managed complications of TVT do not seem to affect patients’ assessment of outcome as measured by PGI-I score. PMID:29162981

  1. The Impact of Complications on Patients' Assessment of the Outcome of Tension-Free Vaginal Tape Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, David; Lindgren, Alexander J; Chapman, Gwenda

    2017-01-01

    Our study aimed to assess the impact of managed complications of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) on the patients' assessment of the results as measured by Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I). This was a retrospective study, supplemented with a telephone interview, comparing patients who had complications of TVT procedures with those where no complications recorded. The primary outcome was the PGI-I score in the 2 groups. A total of 118 invitations were sent. In all, 60 patients returned the signed consent and completed the telephone interview with one of the authors (response rate = 50.8%). Complications were recorded in 21 patients (group 1) and no complications in 39 patients (group 2). There was no statistically significant difference between PGI-I in both groups. Managed complications of TVT do not seem to affect patients' assessment of outcome as measured by PGI-I score.

  2. A cross sectional, observational survey to assess levels and predictors of psychological wellbeing in adults with epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Dures

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa (EB describes a cluster of genetically determined skin disorders. Symptoms can be painful, disabling and disfiguring, yet there is little research on the psychological impact of the disease. The study aim was to measure psychological wellbeing in adults with EB; and to examine the association between psychological wellbeing and self efficacy, health locus of control and adjustment to appearance in an observational, cross sectional survey. Questionnaire packs comprising the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, the General Self Efficacy Scale (GSE, the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (MHLOC, and the Derriford Appearance Scale (DAS-24, were sent to approximately 385 adults with EB. The data were analysed using SPSS. Eighty-seven participants responded. Scores on the GHQ-12 showed non-problematic psychological health in 36% of the sample; levels bordering on clinical disorder in 32.1% and severe psychological distress in 31.9%. No correlations were found between demographic factors (age and sex or clinical factors (EB type and perceived severity and psychological well-being. Scores on the GSE, the internal locus of control sub-scale of the MHLOC and the DAS-24 showed them to be statistically significant correlates of psychological wellbeing (P<0.001; P<0.018; and P<0.001 respectively. In a regression analysis, adjustment to appearance and self efficacy accounted for 24% of the variation in psychological wellbeing. Adults with EB might be at risk of experiencing poor psychological health. Interventions designed to enhance disease self management, self efficacy and improve body image are likely to be beneficial in this clinical group.

  3. Probabilistic Risk Assessment Procedures Guide for NASA Managers and Practitioners (Second Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatelatos,Michael; Dezfuli, Homayoon; Apostolakis, George; Everline, Chester; Guarro, Sergio; Mathias, Donovan; Mosleh, Ali; Paulos, Todd; Riha, David; Smith, Curtis; hide

    2011-01-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is a comprehensive, structured, and logical analysis method aimed at identifying and assessing risks in complex technological systems for the purpose of cost-effectively improving their safety and performance. NASA's objective is to better understand and effectively manage risk, and thus more effectively ensure mission and programmatic success, and to achieve and maintain high safety standards at NASA. NASA intends to use risk assessment in its programs and projects to support optimal management decision making for the improvement of safety and program performance. In addition to using quantitative/probabilistic risk assessment to improve safety and enhance the safety decision process, NASA has incorporated quantitative risk assessment into its system safety assessment process, which until now has relied primarily on a qualitative representation of risk. Also, NASA has recently adopted the Risk-Informed Decision Making (RIDM) process [1-1] as a valuable addition to supplement existing deterministic and experience-based engineering methods and tools. Over the years, NASA has been a leader in most of the technologies it has employed in its programs. One would think that PRA should be no exception. In fact, it would be natural for NASA to be a leader in PRA because, as a technology pioneer, NASA uses risk assessment and management implicitly or explicitly on a daily basis. NASA has probabilistic safety requirements (thresholds and goals) for crew transportation system missions to the International Space Station (ISS) [1-2]. NASA intends to have probabilistic requirements for any new human spaceflight transportation system acquisition. Methods to perform risk and reliability assessment in the early 1960s originated in U.S. aerospace and missile programs. Fault tree analysis (FTA) is an example. It would have been a reasonable extrapolation to expect that NASA would also become the world leader in the application of PRA. That was

  4. A procedure for grouping food consumption data for use in food allergen risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birot, Sophie; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; Kruizinga, Astrid G.

    2017-01-01

    , the risk was calculated for each initial food group and its subgroups to verify if it also represents a relevant difference in risk. Forty-eight food groups were designated in Denmark (53 in the Netherlands, 54 in France). Finally, summary statistics and names for each food group for the Danish data...... consumers. One of the input parameters in risk assessment is the amount of a given food consumed in a meal. There has been little emphasis on how food consumption data can be used in food allergen risk assessment. The aim of the study was to organize the complex datasets from National Food Consumption...... Surveys from different countries (France, Netherlands and Denmark) to be manageable in food allergen risk assessment. To do this, a two-step method was developed. First, based on initial groups of similar food items, the homogeneity of consumption was evaluated using a customized clustering method. Then...

  5. Lest we forget that industrial and organisational psychology is psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DJW Strümpfer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The tie between industrial/organisational psychology (IOP and general psychology should be taken seriously. The origin of the split into separate academic departments is discussed. Four IOP topics are presented which are rooted in psychology or where the psychological quality is strong, making the tie-in clear: motivation, leadership, assessment, and appreciative inquiry; by way of illustration, proponents are referred to. Specialisation and professionalisation often bring undue emphasis on technology. IOP cannot be human resource management. Suggestions are made about bringing IOP and psychology closer within teaching programmes and internships. Appreciative images of what IOP, hand-in-hand with psychology, could be like, are put forward.

  6. Differentiation of ileostomy from colostomy procedures: assessing the accuracy of current procedural terminology codes and the utility of natural language processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Elaine; Davila, Jessica A; Hou, Jason; Hodge, Krystle; Li, Linda T; Suliburk, James W; Kao, Lillian S; Berger, David H; Liang, Mike K

    2013-08-01

    Large databases provide a wealth of information for researchers, but identifying patient cohorts often relies on the use of current procedural terminology (CPT) codes. In particular, studies of stoma surgery have been limited by the accuracy of CPT codes in identifying and differentiating ileostomy procedures from colostomy procedures. It is important to make this distinction because the prevalence of complications associated with stoma formation and reversal differ dramatically between types of stoma. Natural language processing (NLP) is a process that allows text-based searching. The Automated Retrieval Console is an NLP-based software that allows investigators to design and perform NLP-assisted document classification. In this study, we evaluated the role of CPT codes and NLP in differentiating ileostomy from colostomy procedures. Using CPT codes, we conducted a retrospective study that identified all patients undergoing a stoma-related procedure at a single institution between January 2005 and December 2011. All operative reports during this time were reviewed manually to abstract the following variables: formation or reversal and ileostomy or colostomy. Sensitivity and specificity for validation of the CPT codes against the mastery surgery schedule were calculated. Operative reports were evaluated by use of NLP to differentiate ileostomy- from colostomy-related procedures. Sensitivity and specificity for identifying patients with ileostomy or colostomy procedures were calculated for CPT codes and NLP for the entire cohort. CPT codes performed well in identifying stoma procedures (sensitivity 87.4%, specificity 97.5%). A total of 664 stoma procedures were identified by CPT codes between 2005 and 2011. The CPT codes were adequate in identifying stoma formation (sensitivity 97.7%, specificity 72.4%) and stoma reversal (sensitivity 74.1%, specificity 98.7%), but they were inadequate in identifying ileostomy (sensitivity 35.0%, specificity 88.1%) and colostomy (75

  7. Correlates of Harmful Alcohol Consumption in Six Countries: Development of an International Screening and Assessment Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasland, Olaf Gjerlow; and Others

    The aim of this study was to develop tools for screening and assessment of socio-medical effects of alcohol use which are simple and inexpensive enough to be used in any primary health care setting. A test protocol was prepared by a group of investigators from Australia, Bulgaria, Kenya, Mexico, Norway, and the United States. Based on a number of…

  8. D16.3 Proposal of procedures for assessment of preventive and active safety functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholliers, J.; Heinig, K.; Blosseville, J.M.; Netto, M.; Anttila, V.; Leanderson, S.; Engström, J.; Aust, M.L.; Hendriks, F.M.; Ploeg, J.; Chen, J.

    2007-01-01

    PReVAL addresses the possible safety impacts of functions developed and demonstrated in the PReVENT integrated project. One of the major aims of the PReVAL project is the development of a harmonized framework for the assessment of preventive safety applications and advanced driver assistance

  9. Incorporation of biomagnification in procedures for environmental risk assessment and standard setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttik R; Traas TP; de Greef J

    1992-01-01

    Recently methods have been developed in the Netherlands to assess quality standards for the environment. Maximum permissible concentrations have been derived for direct exposure to environmental media. In 1991 two simple foodchains were analyzed at the RIVM. - Water --> Fish --> Fish-eating

  10. Assessing Reading Skill with a Think-Aloud Procedure and Latent Semantic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magliano, Joseph P.; Millis, Keith K.

    2003-01-01

    Two studies examined the viability of assessing reading strategies using a think-aloud protocol combined with latent semantic analysis (LSA). Findings demonstrated that the responses of less-skilled readers semantically overlapped more with focal sentences than with causal antecedent sentences, whereas skilled readers' responses overlapped with…

  11. The Validity and Reliability of a Performance Assessment Procedure in Ice Hockey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Luc; Richard, Jean-Francois; Godbout, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background: Coaches and physical educators must obtain valid data relating to the contribution of each of their players in order to assess their level of performance in team sport competition. This information must also be collected and used in real game situations to be more valid. Developed initially for a physical education class context, the…

  12. Assessment of functional performance after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review of measurement procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen-van Melick, N.; Cingel, R.E. van; Tijssen, M.P.W.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this systematic review was to identify the measurements that are used in clinical practice to assess the quantity and quality of functional performance in men and women more than 2 years after ACL reconstruction with bone patellar-tendon bone (BPTB) or semitendinosus/gracilis

  13. Interviewing to assess credibility in the Swedish asylum procedure: analyzing question style, type and theme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhuizen, T.S.; Horselenberg, R.; Landström, S.; Granhag, P.A.; van Koppen, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current vignette study is to map the style, type, and themes of questions that are asked when assessing the credibility of asylum seekers' claims. Sixty-five officials from the Swedish Migration Agency (Migrationsverket), were asked to respond to one out of four different vignettes

  14. A procedure for grouping food consumption data for use in food allergen risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birot, S.; Madsen, C.B.; Kruizinga, A.G.; Christensen, T.; Crépet, A.; Brockhoff, P.B.

    2017-01-01

    Food allergic subjects need to avoid the allergenic food that triggers their allergy. However, foods can also contain unintended allergens. Food manufacturers or authorities need to perform a risk assessment to be able to decide if unintended allergen presence constitutes a risk to food allergic

  15. Study on Design and Implementation of JAVA Programming Procedural Assessment Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingting, Xu; Hua, Ma; Xiujuan, Wang; Jing, Wang

    2015-01-01

    The traditional JAVA course examination is just a list of questions from which we cannot know students' skills of programming. According to the eight abilities in curriculum objectives, we designed an assessment standard of JAVA programming course that is based on employment orientation and apply it to practical teaching to check the teaching…

  16. Expertise, following the 5.7.1977 decree: assessment of the procedure; Expertise, arrete du 5.7.77 - bilan de la procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maillard, M. [Ministere de l`Industrie, des Postes et Telecommunications, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    The French Government decree concerning the periodical inspection and extensive examination procedure for plants and buildings where thermal energy is consumed, is presented. The inspection procedure is intended to control the thermal and electrical equipment, the regulation systems, the pollutant emission control systems and the waste heat recovery systems. Design recommendations, fuel substitution, pollution abatement, waste heat up-grading, etc. may be proposed by the expert

  17. Legal Assessment of the Legal Force Exclusion of the 1st Prudential Procedure in the Act on Public Finance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Tyniewicki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available By the amendment of the Act on Public Finance of 26 July 2013, Polish legislature made a temporary suspension – till the end of 2013 – of the application of the provisions governing the Ist prudential procedure. This procedure has a crucial meaning for reducing the growth of budget deficit and in consequence – reducing public debt growth. In case of such crucial provisions for public finance, any amendments should be carried out in situations really justified and exceptional as well as with careful respecting of principles of proper legislation. In these aspects mentioned amendment rises a number of objections. For example, rapid pace of parliamentary works causes doubts about correctness of the legislative process. Therefore, in this article the author tries to make a legal assessment of the amendment of the Act on Public Finance of 26 July 2013, both from the formal and legal point of view and taking into the consideration the importance of provisions governing the prudential procedure for whole sphere of Polish public finance.

  18. An evaluation of the fixed concentration procedure for assessment of acute inhalation toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Fiona; Ragan, Ian; Indans, Ian; Marczylo, Tim; Stallard, Nigel; Griffiths, David; Holmes, Thomas; Smith, Paul; Horgan, Graham

    2018-01-06

    Acute inhalation studies are conducted in animals as part of chemical hazard identification and for classification and labelling. Current methods employ death as an endpoint (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline (TG) 403 and TG436) while the recently approved fixed concentration procedure (FCP) (OECD TG433) uses fewer animals and replaces lethality as an endpoint with evident toxicity. Evident toxicity is the presence of clinical signs that predict that exposure to the next highest concentration will cause severe toxicity or death in most animals. Approval of TG433 was the result of an international initiative, led by the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement & Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs), which collected data from six laboratories on clinical signs recorded for inhalation studies on 172 substances. This paper summarises previously published data and describes the additional analyses of the dataset that were essential for approval of the TG. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid assessment procedures in environmental sanitation research: a case study from the northern border of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Enrique; Alamo, Urinda; Kendall, Tamil; Brunkard, Joan; Scrimshaw, Susan

    2006-01-01

    There is a need to enhance the quality and sustainability of environmental health programs in Mexico. What socio-cultural factors influenced the adoption or rejection of Clean Water in Homes programs in this population? We applied rapid appraisal procedures (RAP) to evaluate these community-based programs. Qualitative study conducted in communities along Mexico's northern border. We conducted informal dialogues, semi-structured interviews, field notes and observations. Home visits used a checklist to observe: sources of water, handwashing, as well as human waste and garbage disposal patterns. Data analysis was conducted using ATLAS.ti, which facilitated comparison and illustration of discrepancies, the elaboration of emerging issues and relationships between them. Community members perceived that the Clean Water program was a top-down intervention. Water is perceived as a political issue and a matter of corruption. Inequity also limits solidarity activities involved in environmental sanitation. Migration to the United States of America (US) contributes to community fragmentation, which in turn dilutes communal efforts to improve water and sanitation infrastructure. While targeting women as program "recipients", the Clean Water program did not take gendered spheres of decision-making into account. Community members and authorities discussed the main results in "assemblies", particularly addressing the needs of excluded groups. The oversight of not exploring community members' needs and priorities prior to program implementation resulted in interventions that did not address the structural (economic, infrastructure) and socio-cultural barriers faced by community members to undertake the health-promoting behaviour change, and provoked resentment.

  20. Minimally invasive procedures in severe acute pancreatitis treatment - assessment of benefits and possibilities of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeliga, Jacek; Jackowski, Marek

    2014-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) consists of an extremely varied complex of pathological symptoms and clinical conditions, ranging from mild gastric complaints to multi-organ failure resulting in death. To present the authors' own experience regarding surgical treatment for pancreatic necrosis complicated by infection using different methods, including classic and laparoscopic methods as well as those combined with percutaneous techniques. In the period 2007-2010, 34 patients with the diagnosis of severe AP were treated at the Department of General, Gastroenterological and Oncological Surgery, Collegium Medicum, Nicolaus Copernicus University. In 7 patients classic necrosectomy with repeated peritoneal flushing was performed (type 1), in 5 patients laparotomy with active drainage (type 2), in 12 video-assisted retroperitoneal debridement (type 3), and in 10 only percutaneous drainage methods (type 4). Total duration of hospitalisation was from 10 to 192 days. The highest death rate was observed for type 1 procedures. Significant differences with regard to the absolute number of postoperative complications between different groups were not observed; however, their quality varied. Classic methods were used in patients whose general and local condition was more severe. When AP and its complications are diagnosed, a suitable method of surgical treatment has to be selected extremely precisely and in an individualised way. Minimally invasive methods used in selected patients provide better outcomes and higher safety superseding classic, open techniques of surgical treatment.

  1. Inspection procedure of buildings for the purpose of subsequent assessment of their residual life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolina Tat’yana Vladimirovna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers and asserts the need to obtain the results of inspection of a building at the stage of its commissioning in order to apply comprehensive methodology for assessing its residual life. The author proposes to build regression relationship by correlating the levels of the time series dynamics of stress at certain points of the object calculation scheme considering the results of subsequent surveys. It allows estimating the wear rate of structural elements. The assessment of the reliability and durability of the building frame in a deterministic form is based on the limit states method. The application of this method allows taking into account the random nature of not only the combination of existing loads, but also the strength properties of construction materials by creating a system of safety factors.

  2. Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics, Version 4 (ANAM4): Examination of Select Psychometric Properties and Administration Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    performance; 2) assess the test- retest reliability and practice effects of individual ANAM4 test modules; 3) examine the validity of the ANAM4 Mood Scale ...individual ANAM4 test modules. Study 3 examines the validity of the ANAM4 Mood Scale . Study 4 aims to establish a nationally- representative normative... parametric approach using major advances on spectroscopic methods and neuroimaging to identify biomarkers that can be used to distinguish between post

  3. Air Force Instructor Evaluation Enhancement: Effective Teaching Behaviors and Assessment Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-01

    results. Target population. At least a dozen states test students prior to amission to teacher education programs . The most comon (and nearly universal... education programs in at least eight states. Trends. The use of competency testing as a requirement for teacher certification continues to increase. Haney...line of optional evidence teachers may use in seeking promotion. Competency data have also been used as a means of assessing the quality of teacher

  4. Assessment procedures regarding end-of-life decisions in neonatology in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorscheidt, Jozef H H M

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes the position of Dutch law concerning end-of-life decisions in neonatology consequent on rulings of the Dutch appeals court in two cases. The concept of a multidisciplinary assessment committee is explored. The European Convention on Human Rights in its articles 2 and 13 is relevant to this concept. The author provides a detailed discussion of the current situation and draws conclusions based on his perception of future developments in regulating thanatic practices in neonatology.

  5. Tri-Service Procedural Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessments. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Acheta domesticus to acridine. Environ. Entomol. 9:18-20. B-93 Technique Name: Terrestrial Arthropods (non-insect) and isopods...US EPA 1982). Crickets and harvester ants have been used on a limited basis within an ecological effects assessment. Adult house crickets ( Acheta ... domesticus ) were exposed to acridine via the diet, and following 18-day exposures lethality and sublethal effects were determined. House crickets and

  6. Assessment and Measures of Effectiveness in Stability Ops: Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures (Handbook)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    public business as required by law of the Department. Unless otherwise stated, whenever the masculine or feminine gender is used, both are intended...problems can quickly develop. Upon meeting an interpreter, it is important to assess their proficiency in English . An interpreter with a firm grasp of... English and the terminology that may be encountered is necessary. The following are several useful tips for working with an interpreter: • Placement

  7. Assessing technical skill in surgery and endoscopy: a set of metrics and an algorithm (C-PASS) to assess skills in surgical and endoscopic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylopoulos, Nicholas; Vosburgh, Kirby G

    2007-06-01

    Historically, the performance of surgeons has been assessed subjectively by senior surgical staff in both training and operating environments. In this work, the position and motion of surgical instruments are analyzed through an objective process, denoted C-PASS, to measure surgeon performance of laparoscopic, endoscopic, and image-guided procedures. To develop C-PASS, clinically relevant performance characteristics were identified. Then measurement techniques for parameters that represented each characteristic were derived, and analytic techniques were implemented to transform these parameters into explicit, robust metrics. The metrics comprise the C-PASS performance assessment method, which has been validated over the last 3 years in studies of laparoscopy and endoscopy. These studies show that C-PASS is straightforward, reproducible, and accurate. It is sufficiently powerful to assess the efficiency of these complex processes. It is likely that C-PASS and similar approaches will improve skills acquisition and learning and also enable the objective comparison of systems and techniques.

  8. Prospective assessment of quality of life and psychological distress in patients with gynecologic malignancy: a 1-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavas, Guler; Dogan, Nasuh Utku; Yavas, Cagdas; Benzer, Nilgun; Yuce, Deniz; Celik, Cetin

    2012-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and psychological distress in patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) for gynecologic malignancy. Fifty-seven women with either cervical or endometrial cancer were prospectively enrolled. We assessed HRQoL at baseline (after surgery before RT), at the end of RT, and during follow-up (every 3 months thereafter) using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cervical Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 24 (EORTC QLQ-CX24), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. We demonstrated changes in appetite loss (P = 0.03), nausea and vomiting (P = 0.02), and role function score (P = 0.003) domains of EORTC QLQ-C30. Only the mean body image score of EORTC QLQ-CX24 was significantly different during follow-up (P = 0.02). Type of surgery, histopathological diagnosis, and the menopausal and marital status of the patients affected baseline body image scores (P = 0.032, 0.004, and 0.019 and 0.005, respectively). Patients who underwent chemotherapy had higher baseline body image scores when compared with patients without any chemotherapy before RT (P = 0.028). All the complaints of patients except body image scores improved during the follow-up period. The baseline and follow-up anxiety and depression scores did not differ significantly. Although pelvic RT deteriorated HRQoL in gynecologic cancer, patients' improvement in HRQoL during follow-up was observed. Patients receiving RT could be reassured about the improvement of acute adverse effects in the course of treatment.

  9. A procedure to identify and to assess risk parameters in a SCR (Steel Catenary Riser) due to the fatigue failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefane, Wania [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Morooka, Celso K. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo. Centro de Estudos de Petroleo; Pezzi Filho, Mario [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). E and P. ENGP/IPMI/ES; Matt, Cyntia G.C.; Franciss, Ricardo [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2009-12-19

    The discovery of offshore fields in ultra deep water and the presence of reservoirs located in great depths below the seabed requires innovative solutions for offshore oil production systems. Many riser configurations have emerged as economically viable technological solutions for these scenarios. Therefore the study and the development of methodologies applied to riser design and procedures to calculate and to dimension production risers, taken into account the effects of mete ocean conditions, such as waves, current and platform motion in the fatigue failure is fundamental. The random nature of these conditions as well as the mechanical characteristics of the riser components are critical to a probabilistic treatment to ensure the greatest reliability for risers and minimum risks associated to different aspects of the operation like the safety of the installation, economical concerns and the environment. The current work presents a procedure of the identification and the assessment of main parameters of risk when considering fatigue failure. Static and dynamic behavior of Steel Catenary Riser (SCR) under the effects of mete ocean conditions and uncertainties related to total cumulative damage (Miner-Palmgren's rule) are taken into account. The methodology adopted is probabilistic and the approach is analytical. The procedure is based on the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) which usually presents low computational effort and acceptable accuracy. The procedure suggested is applied for two practical cases, one using data available from the literature and the second with data collected from an actual Brazilian offshore field operation. For both cases, results of the probability of failure due to fatigue were obtained for different locations along the SCR length connected to a semi-submersible platform. From these results, the sensitivity of the probability of failure due to fatigue for a SCR could be verified, and the most effective parameter could also be

  10. Psychological Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Low FODMAP Diet Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living ... Low FODMAP Diet Complementary or Alternative Treatments Medications Psychological Treatments Online Studies News You Can Use Living ...

  11. Assessing psychological well-being in mothers of children with disability: evaluation of the Parenting Morale Index and Family Impact of Childhood Disability scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzies, Karen M; Trute, Barry; Worthington, Catherine; Reddon, John; Keown, Leslie-Anne; Moore, Melanie

    2011-06-01

    Process model of stress and coping guided psychometric assessment of two brief measures of psychological well-being: Parenting Morale Index (PMI); Family Impact of Childhood Disability (FICD) scale. Canadian mothers (N=195) of children with disability (CWD) completed PMI, FICD, and validation measures (Brief Family Assessment Measure [FAM], Personal Well-Being Index, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, General Self-Efficacy Scale, Social Desirability Scale) via computer-assisted telephone interview. Of these, 154 completed additional validation measures (Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, Parenting Stress Index, Family Hardiness Index, Brief FAM) 1 year later. Factor structures of PMI and FICD were supported; both demonstrated internal consistency, temporal stability, and convergent and discriminant validity. After 1 year, PMI and FICD jointly predicted depressive symptoms, parenting stress, family hardiness, and family adjustment. PMI and FICD can identify mothers of CWD at risk for poor psychological well-being to increase the specificity of supports.

  12. Tools used to assess medical students competence in procedural skills at the end of a primary medical degree: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie C. Morris

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to systematically review the literature to identify and grade tools used for the end point assessment of procedural skills (e.g., phlebotomy, IV cannulation, suturing competence in medical students prior to certification. The authors searched eight bibliographic databases electronically – ERIC, Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Psychinfo, PsychLIT, EBM Reviews and the Cochrane databases. Two reviewers independently reviewed the literature to identify procedural assessment tools used specifically for assessing medical students within the PRISMA framework, the inclusion/exclusion criteria and search period. Papers on OSATS and DOPS were excluded as they focused on post-registration assessment and clinical rather than simulated competence. Of 659 abstracted articles 56 identified procedural assessment tools. Only 11 specifically assessed medical students. The final 11 studies consisted of 1 randomised controlled trial, 4 comparative and 6 descriptive studies yielding 12 heterogeneous procedural assessment tools for analysis. Seven tools addressed four discrete pre-certification skills, basic suture (3, airway management (2, nasogastric tube insertion (1 and intravenous cannulation (1. One tool used a generic assessment of procedural skills. Two tools focused on postgraduate laparoscopic skills and one on osteopathic students and thus were not included in this review. The levels of evidence are low with regard to reliability – κ = 0.65–0.71 and minimum validity is achieved – face and content. In conclusion, there are no tools designed specifically to assess competence of procedural skills in a final certification examination. There is a need to develop standardised tools with proven reliability and validity for assessment of procedural skills competence at the end of medical training. Medicine graduates must have comparable levels of procedural skills acquisition entering the clinical workforce irrespective of the country of

  13. Investigative psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Canter, David V.

    2010-01-01

    The domain of Investigative Psychology covers all aspects of psychology that are relevant to the conduct of criminal or civil investigations. Its focus is on the ways in which criminal activities may be examined and understood in order for the detection of crime to be effective and legal proceedings to be appropriate. As such Investigative Psychology is concerned with psychological input to the full range of issues that relate to the management, investigation and prosecution of crime

  14. Using Procedure Based on Item Response Theory to Evaluate Classification Consistency Indices in the Practice of Large-Scale Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the growing interest in the methods of evaluating the classification consistency (CC indices, only few researches are available in the field of applying these methods in the practice of large-scale educational assessment. In addition, only few studies considered the influence of practical factors, for example, the examinee ability distribution, the cut score location and the score scale, on the performance of CC indices. Using the newly developed Lee's procedure based on the item response theory (IRT, the main purpose of this study is to investigate the performance of CC indices when practical factors are taken into consideration. A simulation study and an empirical study were conducted under comprehensive conditions. Results suggested that with negatively skewed distribution, the CC indices were larger than with other distributions. Interactions occurred among ability distribution, cut score location, and score scale. Consequently, Lee's IRT procedure is reliable to be used in the field of large-scale educational assessment, and when reporting the indices, it should be treated with caution as testing conditions may vary a lot.

  15. Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  16. Metodología de desarrollo de un procedimiento para la resolución de conflictos y acoso psicológico laboral Development of a procedure for the resolution of conflict situations and psychological harassment at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Bernat Jiménez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available El artículo se centra en la descripción de la metodología utilizada en la elaboración de un procedimiento de resolución de conflictos y acoso psicológico en el entorno laboral. El procedimiento se encuadra dentro de una línea de trabajo de diseño preventivo, que pretende constituir un programa de actuación para prevenir la violencia interna en una organización sanitaria. La característica fundamental de este desarrollo, es apostar por la corresponsabilidad de todos los miembros de la organización a la hora de elaborar e implementar las herramientas que constituyen el programa preventivo.This article is focused on describing the methodology used in the creation of a conflict situation and psychological harassment at work resolution procedure. The described procedure is part of a preventive design line of work intended to constitute an action plan to prevent violence within a healthcare organization. Its main feature is the importance given to the co-responsability of every member of the organization in terms of creating and implementing the preventive measures that constitute the preventive program itself.

  17. [Forensic assessments from the Netherlands Institute of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology in retrospect; applications of genetics and neuroscience, in 2000 and 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Harmsel, J F; Molendijk, T; van El, C G; M'charek, A; Kempes, M; Rinne, T; Pieters, T

    2016-01-01

    Developments in neurosciences and genetics are relevant for forensic psychiatry. To find out whether and how genetic and neuroscientific applications are being used in forensic psychiatric assessments, and, if they are, to estimate to what extent new applications will fit in with these uses. We analysed 60 forensic psychiatric assessments from the Netherlands Institute of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology, Pieter Baan Center, and 30 non-clinical assessments from 2000 and 2009. We found that (behavioral) genetic, neurological and neuropsychological applications played only a modest role in forensic psychiatric assessment and they represent different phases of the implementation process. Neuropsychological assessment already occupied a position of some importance, but needed to be better integrated. Applications from neurology were still being developed. Clinical genetic assessment was being used occasionally in order to diagnose a genetic syndrome with behavioral consequences. If further validated information becomes available in the future, it should be possible to integrate new research methods more fully into current clinical practice.

  18. A comparison between robust z and 0.3-Logit Difference procedures in assessing stability of linking items for the Rasch model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Huynh; Rawls, Anita

    2011-01-01

    There are at least two procedures to assess item difficulty stability in the Rasch model: robust z procedure and ".3 Logit Difference" procedure. The robust z procedure is a variation of the z statistic that reduces dependency on outliers. The ".3 Logit Difference" procedure is based on experiences in Rasch linking for tests developed by Harcourt. Both methods were applied to archival data from two large-scale South Carolina assessment programs: HSEE 1986/1987 and PACT 2004/2005.The results of the analysis showed the ".3 Logit Difference" procedure identifies slightly more stable items (2.6%) for all items under study. In addition, approximately 93% of all items under consideration were identically classified as stable or unstable for both procedures. This very high level of agreement between the two methods indicates that either procedure can be safely used to identify stable items for use in a common-item linking design. The advantage of the robust z procedure lies in its foundation of robust statistical inference. The procedure takes into account well-accepted models for identifying outliers and permits critical values set at a specified Type I error.

  19. Psychological work characteristics, psychological workload and associated psychological and cognitive requirements of train drivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoer, Ilona; Sluiter, Judith K.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the psychological work characteristics and psychological workload of train drivers and to define the psychological and cognitive requirements of their work. A systematic literature search was performed, and expert interviews were conducted. The following work demands were

  20. In vitro assessment of a direct transfer vitrification procedure for bovine embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Chillòn, L F; Walker, D J; de la Torre-Sanchez, J F; Seidel, G E

    2006-04-01

    We developed a simple vitrification technique for bovine embryos that could permit direct transfer. Embryos were produced in-vitro by standard procedures. The base medium for cryopreservation was a chemically defined medium similar to SOF + 25 mM Hepes and 0.25% fatty acid free bovine serum albumin (FAF-BSA) (HCDM2). In experiment 1, embryos were first exposed to 3.5M ethylene glycol (V1) for 1, 2 or 3 min at room temperature (20-24 degrees C), and then moved to 7 M ethylene glycol (V2) at 4 or 20-24 degrees C and loaded in 0.25-mL straws. After 45 s in 7 M ethylene glycol, straws were placed in liquid nitrogen. Embryos that were loaded at 20-24 degrees C had higher survival rates than those loaded at 4 degrees C (Pembryos survived well after 15 min in straws if warmed at 37 degrees C. In experiment 3, ethylene glycol concentration (3, 4 or 5 M) and exposure time (0.5 or 1 min) during two-step addition of cryoprotectant were studied for bovine morulae. In experiment 4, morulae were exposed to V2 for 30 or 45 s in HCDM2 or Vigro holding medium and then held in 22-24 degrees C air or 37 degrees C water post-warming. Experiment 5 was like experiment 4 except blastocysts were used. Overall survival rates of blastocysts in experiment 5 averaged 80% of non-vitrified controls after 48 h culture. The survival rates with in vitro-produced morulae in experiments 1, 3 and 4 were unacceptable. Vitrification solutions based on Vigro tended to result in higher survival than HCDM2 for blastocysts, but not morulae. In experiment 6, the survival rate in vitro of in vivo-produced morulae and blastocysts after two-step vitrification was nearly 100%. Our vitrification technique was very effective for in vitro produced blastocysts, but not for in vitro-produced morulae.