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Sample records for psychoeducational support group

  1. Stress Prevention and Mindfulness: A Psychoeducational and Support Group for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Jenson E.; Murphy, Susan L.; McCarthy, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    A stress prevention and mindfulness (SPAM) group is described, which is a 6-week psychoeducational and support group for teachers. The group incorporated psychoeducation about stress and utilized elements of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). The group was implemented in a public charter school in the Southwest. Preliminary evaluation…

  2. Pragmatic randomised controlled trial of group psychoeducation versus group support in the maintenance of bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-didactically delivered curriculum based group psychoeducation has been shown to be more effective than both group support in a specialist mood disorder centre in Spain (with effects lasting up to five years, and treatment as usual in Australia. It is unclear whether the specific content and form of group psychoeducation is effective or the chance to meet and work collaboratively with other peers. The main objective of this trial is to determine whether curriculum based group psychoeducation is more clinically and cost effective than unstructured peer group support. Methods/design Single blind two centre cluster randomised controlled trial of 21 sessions group psychoeducation versus 21 sessions group peer support in adults with bipolar 1 or 2 disorder, not in current episode but relapsed in the previous two years. Individual randomisation is to either group at each site. The groups are carefully matched for the number and type of therapists, length and frequency of the interventions and overall aim of the groups but differ in content and style of delivery. The primary outcome is time to next bipolar episode with measures of the therapeutic process, barriers and drivers to the effective delivery of the interventions and economic analysis. Follow up is for 96 weeks after randomisation. Discussion The trial has features of both an efficacy and an effectiveness trial design. For generalisability in England it is set in routine public mental health practice with a high degree of expert patient involvement. Trial Registration ISRCTN62761948 Funding National Institute for Health Research, England.

  3. Supporting Unemployed, Middle-Aged Men: A Psychoeducational Group Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, Charlotte M.; Shillingford, M. Ann

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a comprehensive group counseling approach to support unemployed, middle-aged men. An inclusive group curriculum designed to provide support and address potential mental health issues related to unemployment is introduced. The focus of the group is divided into 6 major areas that research has shown to have a significant impact…

  4. Finding Your New Normal: Outcomes of a Wellness-Oriented Psychoeducational Support Group for Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannonhouse, Laura; Myers, Jane; Barden, Sejal; Clarke, Philip; Weimann, Rochelle; Forti, Allison; Moore-Painter, Terry; Knutson, Tami; Porter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Group interventions have been useful for survivors to overcome the challenges of cancer. This study employed a pre/post, mixed-methods design to explore the influence of an 8-week support group on the holistic wellness of 14 breast cancer survivors. Pairing experiential activities with wellness-centered psychoeducation was viewed positively by…

  5. Application of Focal Conflict Theory to Psychoeducational Groups: Implications for Process, Content, and Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champe, Julia; Rubel, Deborah J.

    2012-01-01

    Group psychoeducation is a common group type used for a range of purposes. The literature presents balancing content and process as a challenge for psychoeducational group leaders. While the significance of group psychoeducation is supported, practitioners are given little direction for addressing process in these groups. Focal Conflict Theory…

  6. A cluster randomized controlled platform trial comparing group MEmory specificity training (MEST) to group psychoeducation and supportive counselling (PSC) in the treatment of recurrent depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner-Seidler, Aliza; Hitchcock, Caitlin; Bevan, Anna; McKinnon, Anna; Gillard, Julia; Dahm, Theresa; Chadwick, Isobel; Panesar, Inderpal; Breakwell, Lauren; Mueller, Viola; Rodrigues, Evangeline; Rees, Catrin; Gormley, Siobhan; Schweizer, Susanne; Watson, Peter; Raes, Filip; Jobson, Laura; Dalgleish, Tim

    2018-06-01

    Impaired ability to recall specific autobiographical memories is characteristic of depression, which when reversed, may have therapeutic benefits. This cluster-randomized controlled pilot trial investigated efficacy and aspects of acceptability, and feasibility of MEmory Specificity Training (MEST) relative to Psychoeducation and Supportive Counselling (PSC) for Major Depressive Disorder (N = 62). A key aim of this study was to determine a range of effect size estimates to inform a later phase trial. Assessments were completed at baseline, post-treatment and 3-month follow-up. The cognitive process outcome was memory specificity. The primary clinical outcome was symptoms on the Beck Depression Inventory-II at 3-month follow-up. The MEST group demonstrated greater improvement in memory specificity relative to PSC at post-intervention (d = 0.88) and follow-up (d = 0.74), relative to PSC. Both groups experienced a reduction in depressive symptoms at 3-month follow-up (d = 0.67). However, there was no support for a greater improvement in depressive symptoms at 3 months following MEST relative to PSC (d = -0.04). Although MEST generated changes on memory specificity and improved depressive symptoms, results provide no indication that MEST is superior to PSC in the resolution of self-reported depressive symptoms. Implications for later-phase definitive trials of MEST are discussed. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Group Leader Development: Effects of Personal Growth and Psychoeducational Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohrt, Jonathan H.; Robinson, E. H., III; Hagedorn, W. Bryce

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to compare the effects of personal growth groups and psychoeducational groups on counselor education students' (n = 74) empathy and group leader self-efficacy. Additionally, we compared the degree to which participants in each group valued: (a) cohesion, (b) catharsis, and (c) insight. There were no…

  8. Training Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors in Group Dynamics: A Psychoeducational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Timothy R.

    1990-01-01

    Describes a six-session psychoeducational program for training vocational rehabilitation counselors in group dynamics. Presents evaluation of program by counselors (N=15) in which leadership styles, conflict management, and typology of group tasks concepts were rated as most beneficial. (Author/ABL)

  9. Cognitive behavioral group therapy versus psychoeducational intervention in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardelli, Isabella; Bloise, Maria Carmela; Bologna, Matteo; Conte, Antonella; Pompili, Maurizio; Lamis, Dorian A; Pasquini, Massimo; Fabbrini, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate whether cognitive behavioral group therapy has a positive impact on psychiatric, and motor and non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). We assigned 20 PD patients with a diagnosis of psychiatric disorder to either a 12-week cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group or a psychoeducational protocol. For the neurological examination, we administered the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and the non-motor symptoms scale. The severity of psychiatric symptoms was assessed by means of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, and the Clinical Global Impressions. Cognitive behavioral group therapy was effective in treating depression and anxiety symptoms as well as reducing the severity of non-motor symptoms in PD patients; whereas, no changes were observed in PD patients treated with the psychoeducational protocol. CBT offered in a group format should be considered in addition to standard drug therapy in PD patients.

  10. Reducing Depression, Anxiety, and Trauma of Male Inmates: An HIV/AIDS Psychoeducational Group Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Elizabeth C.; Kiam, Risa; Green, Diane L.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a quasi-experimental research study that found that a 10-session psychoeducational group intervention was effective in increasing knowledge of AIDS and decreasing depression, anxiety, and trauma symptoms among male inmates. The intervention consisted of both AIDS education topics and psychological support. Results indicate significant…

  11. Psychoeducation et attitude phenomenologique en psychotherapie de groupe

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Resume Nous pensons que la psychotherapie de groupe peut etre un moyen de faire concilier les recommandations en matiere de prophylaxie visees par les mesures psychoeducatrices, la dimension vivante de l?experience retrouvee dans l?attitude phenomenologique et les aspects tournes vers le monde communautaire de la mediation therapeutique. Pour articuler ces differents domaines, nous abordons les principes de la psychoeducation, les risques que celle-ci peut comporter et les apports ...

  12. A randomised controlled trial of carer-focussed multi-family group psychoeducation in bipolar disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Madigan, K

    2012-05-01

    In a RCT of family psychoeducation, 47 carers of 34 patients were allocated to one of three groups; Multifamily Group Psychoeducation, Solution Focussed Group Therapy or Treatment as Usual. Carers in both the MFGP intervention and the SFGP arm demonstrated greater knowledge and reduction in burden than those in the TAU arm.

  13. Evaluation of a psychoeducational group intervention for family and friends of youth with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Jessie; Jovev, Martina; Hulbert, Carol; McKechnie, Ben; McCutcheon, Louise; Betts, Jennifer; Chanen, Andrew M

    2017-01-01

    Despite high levels of burden and distress among families with a member who has borderline personality disorder (BPD), only two BPD specific family psychoeducation groups have been empirically evaluated. Neither of these is designed specifically for the family and friends of young people who are presenting early in the course of BPD. This study aimed to evaluate Making Sense of Borderline Personality Disorder (MS-BPD), a three-session, developmentally tailored, manualised psychoeducational group for the family and friends of youth with BPD features. The study employed a pre- and post-intervention, repeated measures design. Twenty-three participants completed self-report measures assessing for family burden, psychological distress, and knowledge about personality disorder. Demographic data were collected for the group participants and for their associated young person with BPD. Paired-samples t -tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of the MS-BPD intervention on participants' burden, distress and personality disorder knowledge. At the completion of session three (day 15), group participants reported significantly decreased subjective burden and increased personality disorder knowledge. Objective burden and distress remained unchanged. Family and friends of young people with BPD features experienced subjective, but not objective, benefit from attending a brief group-based psychoeducation intervention. Longer follow-up is likely to be required to detect behavioural change. The current findings support proceeding to a randomised controlled trial of MS-BPD.

  14. A Psychoeducational School-Based Group Intervention for Socially Anxious Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P.; Brouzos, Andreas; Damer, Diana E.; Mellou, Angeliki; Mitropoulou, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a psychoeducational group for social anxiety aimed at elementary children. An 8-week psychoeducational program based on empirically validated risk factors was designed. Interventions included cognitive restructuring, anxiety management techniques, and social skills training. Pre-and posttest data from 3 groups…

  15. The Effects of Music and Group Stage on Group Leader and Member Behavior in Psychoeducational Groups for Children of Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercone, Kristin; DeLucia-Waack, Janice

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of music and group stage on group process and group leader and member behavior within 8-week psychoeducational groups for children of divorce. Audiotapes of group sessions were rated using the Interactional Process Analysis and the Group Sessions Ratings Scale. Both treatment groups were very similar in terms of…

  16. Predicting the effect of psychoeducational group treatment for hypochondriasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, F.M.; Bouman, T.K.

    2008-01-01

    Both individual cognitive-behavioural therapy and short-term psychoeducational courses have shown to be effective in reducing hypochondriacal complaints. However, it is unknown which patients benefit from treatment. The aim of the present study is to explore which variables predict treatment outcome

  17. A Brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Psychoeducational Group for Chinese People with Chronic Illnesses: An Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel F. K.; Ip, Priscilla S. Y.; Lee, Kim Man

    2017-01-01

    This pilot study attempted to examine the effectiveness of a brief cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) psychoeducational group for Chinese people with chronic illness in Hong Kong. It adopted a single group design, and 52 participants joined the group. A questionnaire with three outcome measures, measuring general mental health, quality of life…

  18. Development and Implementation of a Psychoeducational Group for Ghanaian Adolescents Experiencing Parental Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkyi, Anthony K.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents development and informal assessment of a 10-week psychoeducational program designed for 8 adolescent group members experiencing parental divorce in a rural community in Ghana. Group design, cultural considerations, program implementation, and impacts are described. The literature review pertaining to group work as an…

  19. A Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Psychoeducational Group Manual for Problem Gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Abigail; McBride, Dawn Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    This project provides a comprehensive overview of the research literature on problem gambling in adults and includes a detailed mindfulness-based psychoeducational group manual for problem gambling, complete with an extensive group counselling consent form, assessment and screening protocols, 10 user-friendly lesson plans, templates for a…

  20. Psychosocial and psychoeducational group program for main caregiver of mentally sick in early phase of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estíbaliz Amaro Martín

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Deinstitutionalization processes in recent times have led to a new age in relations between family and mental health professionals. Care professionals were replaced, after the psychiatric reform, for care carried out by the family without the knowledge, information and skills to assume these functions. This is the situation of many families of patients with schizophrenia.Disabling features of schizophrenia usually cause depends on their families, who take care with the consequent impact on their lives. Psychosocial interventions assessing their work and want to build an alliance with them by giving them skills and coping mechanisms to reduce adverse family atmosphere, anticipate and solve problems and reduce the expressions of anger and guilt keeping appropiate expectations. However, these actions must be enforced by providing main caregivers with the skills that enable them to gain control, this is the main target of psychoeducational programs.Today there are many people in favour of such interventions in the early stages of schizophrenia. However, it is no clear how far development of these programs is supported by evidence of effectiveness. So it has proposed a psychosocial and psychoeducational program aimed at main caregivers of patients with schizophrenia in early stages. This program will be led by a psychiatric nurse in collaboration with other professionals in the interdisciplinary team; psychiatrist, clinical psychologist and social worker. It has developed clinical trial with a control group who will receive the gide for families, caregivers and people affected, "Cómo afrontar la esquizofrenia," and an experimental group will receive, in addition to the guide, the group intervention sessions.

  1. Changing the Sexual Aggression-Supportive Attitudes of Men: A Psychoeducational Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Barbara J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Assessed psychoeducational intervention designed to change attitudes of men found to be associated with sexual aggression toward women. College men receiving elaboration likelihood model-based intervention showed significantly more attitude change than did control group. One month later, in unrelated naturalistic context, intervention subjects…

  2. Changes in eating pathology and associated symptoms among chronically ill adults attending a brief psychoeducational group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ranson, Kristin M; Stevenson, Andrea S; Cannon, Colleen K; Shah, Wendy

    2010-08-01

    Two quasi-experimental pilot studies examined eating pathology, eating self-efficacy, shame, guilt, and pride in adults with chronic illness before and after participating in brief cognitive-behavioral psychoeducational groups addressing eating concerns. In Study 1, 60 adults completed assessments before and after a series of two groups; in Study 2, 21 adults also completed an assessment five weeks prior to the first group to identify time-related changes in symptoms. Study 1 participants improved across domains, whereas Study 2 analyses also examining time-related changes showed improvements in eating self-efficacy, shame, guilt, and pride, but not in eating pathology. Psychoeducational groups may help improve symptoms including eating pathology, eating self-efficacy, shame, guilt, and pride among chronically-ill adults with eating concerns. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development and Preliminary Examination of the Psychometric Properties of the Psychoeducational Group Alliance Scale for Children (PGA-c) in Two Samples of Children Participating in Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouzos, Andreas; Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P.; Baourda, Vasiliki C.

    2018-01-01

    Studies examining processes in youth group psychotherapy are scarce. This article reports on the development and psychometric properties of the Psychoeducational Group Alliance Scale for Children (PGAS-c). This scale was designed to assess the therapeutic alliance that develops between the members and the facilitator in a psychoeducational group…

  4. A Psychoeducational Group Approach for Individuals Recovering from Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Lisa

    Although in-depth, long-term group psychotherapy is a beneficial therapeutic experience for adolescent females suffering from anorexia nervosa, these clients are notoriously resistant to treatment and to long-term, open-ended group settings. This dissidence may stem from a motivational deficiency toward changing their eating patterns and…

  5. An effective group psychoeducational intervention for improving compliance with vaginal dilation: A randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffries, Sherryl A.; Robinson, John W.; Craighead, Peter S.; Keats, Melanie R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Although vaginal dilation is often recommended to minimize or prevent vaginal scarring after pelvic radiotherapy, compliance with this recommendation has historically been very low. Therefore, effective intervention strategies are needed to enhance compliance with vaginal dilation after radiotherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial of a psychoeducational intervention specifically designed to increase compliance with vaginal dilation. The information-motivation-behavioral skills model of enhancing compliance with behavioral change was the basis for the intervention design. Forty-two sexually active women, 21 to 65 years of age, diagnosed with Stages Ic-III cervical or endometrial cancer, who received pelvic radiotherapy, were randomized to either the experimental psychoeducational group or the information-only control group. Assessment via questionnaire occurred before treatment and at 6-week, 6-month, 12-month, 18-month, and 24-month follow-up. Assessment via interview also occurred at 6-month, 12-month, 18-month, and 24-month follow-up. Results: The psychoeducational intervention was successful in increasing compliance with vaginal dilation. Conclusions: This study is the first randomized controlled study to demonstrate the effectiveness of an intervention in increasing compliance with the use of vaginal dilators

  6. Towards a cultural adaptation of family psychoeducation: findings from three latino focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackethal, Veronica; Spiegel, Scott; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Kealey, Edith; Salerno, Anthony; Finnerty, Molly

    2013-10-01

    This study was undertaken among Latinos receiving treatment from a community mental health center in New York City. The primary mental health concern was schizophrenia. We conducted three focus groups and present the viewpoints of consumers, family members, and providers. Using qualitative content analysis we identified four predominant categories: (1) the importance of family ties; (2) stigma about mental illness; (3) respect and trust in interpersonal relationships; and (4) facilitators and barriers to implementing Family Psychoeducation. Analysis of transcripts revealed specific subthemes for each category. Implications for imparting culturally sensitive material into mental health services for Latinos are discussed.

  7. A Randomized Control Study on Psycho-Education Group on Improving Health-Related Quality of Life of Chinese Persons with Major Neurocognitive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kim-Wan

    2016-01-01

    People with a major neurocognitive disorder (PwND) are found to have a lower health related quality of life (HRQoL) than those without neurocognitive disorder. This research study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a psycho-education group in improving the HRQoL of Chinese PwND. By adopting randomized control trial (RCT), Chinese PwND were randomly assigned to either a 10-session psycho-education group or the control group. Family caregivers of treatment group were encouraged to take part in two sessions focusing on the caring and communication skills. Control group and their family caregivers received standardized educational materials on basic information on neurocognitive disorder for them to read at home. Standardized assessment was conducted both with PwND and their caregivers independently to give the self-rated and caregiver-rated HRQoL of PwND in the pre- and post- treatment periods by a research assistant who was blind to the group assignment of the participants. Moreover, qualitative interviews were also conducted for ten participants and five family caregivers of the treatment group to identify those group elements relating to its effectiveness. 2 × 2 repeated measures ANCOVA demonstrated that the treatment group (n = 32) was significantly more effective than the control group (n = 32) in improving the caregiver-rated HRQoL (F[1, 61] = 4.35, p = .04 psycho-education group significantly improves caregiver-rated HRQoL of PwND, supporting the feasibility and effectiveness of the psycho-education group.

  8. Effect of communication skill training using group psychoeducation method on the stress level of psychiatry ward nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazavi, Zahra; Lohrasbi, Fatemeh; Mehrabi, Tayebeh

    2010-12-01

    Nursing is a dynamic and supportive job, with the main role of taking care of patients. Maintaining appropriate communication of the nurse with the patients is particularly known as the main core of care in mental health. However, in spite of the importance of providing communication, one of the main sources of stress in nurses of psychiatry wards is communication with the patients. Some important reasons for inappropriate relationship between the nurse and patient can be lack of necessary skills to communicate with patients because of insufficient training. Although training communication skills is an important part of the education of medical and paramedical students, in recent studies it has been demonstrated that the communication skills learned in theoretical courses would not necessarily be transferred to clinical settings, and proving training in clinical settings is a must. The present study was carried out to determine the effect of training communication skills using psychoeducation method on the stress level of nurses of psychiatry wards in 2010. This is a quasi-experimental study. The participants were 45 nurses; 23 and 22 in the experiment and control groups, respectively, working in psychiatry wards of Noor and Farabi hospitals, Isfahan, Iran. The sampling was carried out by the census method, and then the participants were randomly assigned to the two groups of experiment and control, using random number table. The two groups filled out the demographic data form and also the questionnaire on nurses' occupational stress, designed by the researcher. The questionnaire was filled out three times; before, immediately after, and one month after the training. Training of communication skills was carried out using group psychoeducation method, in six sessions, each lasted for 1.5 hours. The training sessions of the experiment group were held in Farabi Hospital. The findings indicated that before the intervention, the members of the two groups had a high

  9. A randomized, controlled, pilot study of dialectical behavior therapy skills in a psychoeducational group for individuals with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, Sheri; Jeffrey, Janet; Katz, Mark R

    2013-03-05

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic and disabling psychiatric disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of mania/hypomania and depression. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) techniques have been shown to effectively treat borderline personality disorder, a condition also marked by prominent affective disturbances. The utility of DBT techniques in treating BD has been largely unexplored. The purpose of this research was to conduct a pilot study of a DBT-based psychoeducational group (BDG) in treating euthymic, depressed, or hypomanic Bipolar I or II patients. In this experiment, 26 adults with bipolar I or II were randomized to intervention or wait-list control groups and completed the Beck depression inventory II, mindfulness-based self-efficacy scale, and affective control scale at baseline and 12 weeks. The BDG intervention consisted of 12 weekly 90-min sessions which taught DBT skills, mindfulness techniques, and general BD psychoeducation. Using RM-ANOVA, subjects in BDG demonstrated a trend toward reduced depressive symptoms, and significant improvement in several MSES subscales indicating greater mindful awareness, and less fear toward and more control of emotional states (ACS). These findings were supported with a larger sample of patients who completed the BDG. Furthermore, group attendees had reduced emergency room visits and mental health related admissions in the six months following BDG. The small sample size in RCT affects power to detect between group differences. How well improvements after the12-week BDG were maintained is unknown. There is preliminary evidence that DBT skills reduce depressive symptoms, improve affective control, and improve mindfulness self-efficacy in BD. Its application warrants further evaluation in larger studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Multimedia psychoeducational interventions to support patient self-care in degenerative conditions: A realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Peter; Scott, David; Reid, Joanne; Porter, Sam

    2015-10-01

    Multimedia interventions are increasingly used to deliver information in order to promote self-care among patients with degenerative conditions. We carried out a realist review of the literature to investigate how the characteristics of multimedia psychoeducational interventions combine with the contexts in which they are introduced to help or hinder their effectiveness in supporting self-care for patients with degenerative conditions. Electronic databases (Medline, Science Direct, PSYCHinfo, EBSCO, and Embase) were searched in order to identify papers containing information on multimedia psychoeducational interventions. Using a realist review approach, we reviewed all relevant studies to identify theories that explained how the interventions work. Ten papers were included in the review. All interventions sought to promote self-care behaviors among participants. We examined the development and content of the multimedia interventions and the impact of patient motivation and of the organizational context of implementation. We judged seven studies to be methodologically weak. All completed studies showed small effects in favor of the intervention. Multimedia interventions may provide high-quality information in an accessible format, with the potential to promote self-care among patients with degenerative conditions, if the patient perceives the information as important and develops confidence about self-care. The evidence base is weak, so that research is needed to investigate effective modes of delivery at different resource levels. We recommend that developers consider how an intervention will reduce uncertainty and increase confidence in self-care, as well as the impact of the context in which it will be employed.

  11. Therapeutic Factors and Members' Perception of Co-Leaders' Attitudes in a Psychoeducational Group for Greek Children with Social Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouzos, Andreas; Vassilopoulos, Stephanos P.; Baourda, Vasiliki C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate therapeutic factors and perception of co-leaders' attitudes in elementary children. The Critical Incident Questionnaire was collected from participants during 8 sessions of 3 psychoeducational groups for social anxiety, whereas the Barrett-Lennard Relationship Inventory was administered twice. It was…

  12. Caregiver psychoeducation for first-episode psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    International best-practice guidelines for the management of first-episode psychosis have recommended the provision of psychoeducation for multifamily groups. While there is ample evidence of their efficacy in multiepisode psychosis, there is a paucity of evidence supporting this approach specifically for first-episode psychosis. We sought to determine whether a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme geared specifically at first-episode psychosis improves caregiver knowledge and attitudes.

  13. Testing Self-Efficacy as a Pathway that Supports Self-Care among Family Caregivers in a Psychoeducational Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savundranayagam, Marie Y.; Brintnall-Peterson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which a psychoeducational intervention supports family-centered care by influencing health risk and self-care behaviors of caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (N = 325). Moreover, this study investigated the extent to which changes in self-efficacy explained changes in health risk and self-care…

  14. Group psychoeducation with relaxation for severe fear of childbirth improves maternal adjustment and childbirth experience--a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhe, Hanna; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Toivanen, Riikka; Tokola, Maiju; Halmesmäki, Erja; Ryding, Elsa-Lena; Saisto, Terhi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on the treatment of women with fear of childbirth have focused on the delivery mode. Women with fear of childbirth often suffer from anxiety and/or depression, and treatment therefore also needs to target postnatal psychological well-being and the early mother-infant relationship. Three hundred and seventy-one nulliparous women out of 4575 scored ≥100 in prospective screening (Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire, W-DEQ-A), indicating severe fear of childbirth. These women were randomised to psychoeducative group intervention with relaxation (n = 131; six sessions during pregnancy, one postnatal) or to conventional care (n = 240) by community nurses (referral if necessary). Psycho-emotional and psychosocial evaluations [Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), social support, Maternal Adjustment and Attitudes (MAMA), Traumatic Events Scale (TES) and the Wijma Delivery Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ-B)] were completed twice during pregnancy and/or 3 months postpartum. Postnatal maternal adjustment (MAMA mean score 38.1 ± 4.3 versus 35.7 ± 5.0, p = 0.001) and childbirth experience (mean W-DEQ-B sum score 63.0 ± 29 versus 73.7 ± 32, p = 0.008) were better in the intervention group compared with controls. In hierarchical regression, social support, participating in intervention, and less fearful childbirth experience predicted better maternal adjustment. The level of postnatal depressive symptoms was significantly lower in the intervention group (mean sum score 6.4 ± 5.4 versus 8.0 ± 5.9 p = 0.04). There were no differences in the frequency of post-traumatic stress symptoms between the groups. In nulliparous women with severe fear of childbirth, participation in a targeted psychoeducative group resulted in better maternal adjustment, a less fearful childbirth experience and fewer postnatal depressive symptoms, compared with conventional care.

  15. The efficacy of psycho-educational group program on medication adherence and global functioning of patients with bipolar disorder type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahredar, Mohammad Jafar; Asgharnejad Farid, Ali Asghar; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Birashk, Behrooz

    2014-01-01

    Psycho-education is now considered as part of the integrated treatment for bipolar disorder. This study aimed to determine the efficacy of group psycho-education on medication adherence and global functioning of patients with bipolar disorder type I. 45 patients with bipolar disorder type I were allocated one of the three groups of psycho-education plus pharmacotherapy, pharmacotherapy and placebo plus pharmacotherapy. A psycho-educational program was conducted for the psycho-educational group during 9 weekly sessions. Medication adherence and global functioning of all the three groups were evaluated before the intervention, three months and six months after the intervention using Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). ANOVA was performed to examine the data. In the first and second assessments, the mean score of medication adherence and gobal functioning for patients in the psycho-educational group was significantly higher than that in the control and placebo groups (P=0.001). Medication adherence score of the psycho-educational group was increased from 6.27(0.88) to 7.92(1.38). while the mean score of the psycho-educational group increased from 56.6 (3.58) to 64.17 (2.12):, the global functioning reduced from 56.27(3.17) to 54.17(5.08) in the control group and from 56.67 (3.58) to 56 (4.36) in the placebo group. Psycho-educational program plus pharmacotherapy was effective in improvement medication adherence and global functioning of bipolar patients.

  16. The effect of group psycho-educational program on quality of life in families of patients with mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazavi, Zahra; Dehkhoda, Fateme; Yazdani, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Mood disorders related behaviors are imposed on family members and influence the family's mental atmosphere and level of quality of life. Therefore, the researchers decided to study the effect of group psycho-educational program on the quality of life in families of patients with mood disorders. This is a two-group interventional study conducted on 32 members of families of the patients with mood disorders selected through random sampling. A group psycho-educational program was conducted in ten 90-min sessions (twice a week) for the study group. (World Health Organization's Quality of Life-BREF WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire was adopted in the study and was filled before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention. Independent t-test showed a significant difference in the scores of quality of life in the domains of mental health, social communications, and environmental health, immediately after and 1 month after intervention in the study group compared to the control group. Repeated measure analysis of variance showed a significant increase in the mean scores of quality of life in the study group. The results showed that the impact of group psycho-educational program is observed in the prevention of reduction in quality of life and its promotion in the families of patients with mood disorders.

  17. The Effects of Group Psychoeducational Programme on Attitude toward Mental Illness in Families of Patients with Schizophrenia, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Rahmani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Family members often play a vital role as caregivers in the lives of individuals with schizophrenia. Results of the studies showed that family invironment is the most important determinint of patients outcomes like as quality of life, relapse, adherence. This study aimed to determine the effect of group psychoeducational programme on attitude towards mental illness in families of patients with schizophrenia. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 74 families who have schizophrenic patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards during sampling were selected by convenience sampling method. Then the sample was randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The families of experimental group received 8 continuous 90-minute 3 times a week psychoeducational sessions. Family attitude towards mental illness was measured using the questionnaire of Opinion about Mental Illnesses (OMI before and after intervention. Data analysis was conducted using 2 test, independent t-test, and paired t-test on SPSS software version 13. Results: The results showed that majority of the families had negative attitude towards mental illness (88.90%. In addition, the results showed that there was significant difference between different dimensions of attitude towards mental illness before and after psychoeducation in the experimental group. The mean score of families' post-test in the experimental group increased compared to control group 108.86 (14.9, vs. 88.86 (7.5. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that psychoeducation improves family attitude towards mental illness. Training methods like group psych education for the families of mental patients can be effective on their attitudes towards mental illness.

  18. The effectiveness of a group psycho-educational program on family caregiver burden of patients with mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navidian Ali

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brief family intervention may have a positive impact on family caregivers for patients with mental disorders. We assessed the effectiveness of a group psycho-educational program on family caregivers for patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders. Methods This randomized controlled trial was performed on 100 caregivers for patients with mental disorders attending the Isfahan Behavioral Sciences Research Center (IBSRC, in Isfahan, Iran. One hundred family caregivers of patients with schizophrenia (n = 50 and mood disorders (n = 50 were selected and assigned randomly to either a psycho-educational group intervention or routine care in each diagnosis category. The caregivers were followed for 3 months. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Zarit Burden Interview Results The mean scores of the Zarit caregiver burden decreased significantly for the group that participated in the psycho-educational program, while scores in the control group did not change significantly. Conclusions This group intervention program was effective to reduce the caregiver burden for both categories of mental disorders in the Iranian population. This group intervention program may improve the quality of life of patients and caregivers by improving the standards of care giving. Trial registration RCT registration number: IRCT138804272200N

  19. [Psychoeducation in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata Ospina, Juan Pablo; Rangel Martínez-Villalba, Andrés Mauricio; García Valencia, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of schizophrenia includes the use of psychotropic drugs, psychotherapy, and psychosocial interventions that include psychoeducation. This strategy has been defined as the delivery of information about the disorder and its treatment in a systematic and structured way. To review the literature on the efficacy of psychoeducation in schizophrenia. A search in PubMed, SciELO, EMBASE and PsycINFO was made with the terms "psychoeducation", "schizophrenia" and "psychosocial intervention". Articles in Spanish and English language were reviewed. Psychoeducation can be applied to patients, family or both, and individually or in groups. The number of sessions can vary. There have been many studies that seek to determine the efficacy of psychoeducation in the clinical course, family dynamics and stigma, with results that favor its implementation, but so far it has not been possible to determine exactly how best to apply psychoeducation, mainly because of the great variability of designs. The studies on psychoeducation have shown efficacy. However, this might be an overestimation, as there is a high risk of bias. Consequently, there is not enough evidence. At least for now, it is reasonable to complement pharmacotherapy with psycoeducation. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Group Decision Process Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, John; Hijikata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists.......Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists....

  1. Randomized control trial to assess the efficacy of metacognitive training compared with a psycho-educational group in people with a recent-onset psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, S; López-Carrilero, R; Barrigón, M L; Pousa, E; Barajas, A; Lorente-Rovira, E; González-Higueras, F; Grasa, E; Ruiz-Delgado, I; Cid, J; Birulés, I; Esteban-Pinos, I; Casañas, R; Luengo, A; Torres-Hernández, P; Corripio, I; Montes-Gámez, M; Beltran, M; De Apraiz, A; Domínguez-Sánchez, L; Sánchez, E; Llacer, B; Pélaez, T; Bogas, J L; Moritz, S

    2017-07-01

    Aims were to assess the efficacy of metacognitive training (MCT) in people with a recent onset of psychosis in terms of symptoms as a primary outcome and metacognitive variables as a secondary outcome. A multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial was performed. A total of 126 patients were randomized to an MCT or a psycho-educational intervention with cognitive-behavioral elements. The sample was composed of people with a recent onset of psychosis, recruited from nine public centers in Spain. The treatment consisted of eight weekly sessions for both groups. Patients were assessed at three time-points: baseline, post-treatment, and at 6 months follow-up. The evaluator was blinded to the condition of the patient. Symptoms were assessed with the PANSS and metacognition was assessed with a battery of questionnaires of cognitive biases and social cognition. Both MCT and psycho-educational groups had improved symptoms post-treatment and at follow-up, with greater improvements in the MCT group. The MCT group was superior to the psycho-educational group on the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale (BCIS) total (p = 0.026) and self-certainty (p = 0.035) and dependence self-subscale of irrational beliefs, comparing baseline and post-treatment. Moreover, comparing baseline and follow-up, the MCT group was better than the psycho-educational group in self-reflectiveness on the BCIS (p = 0.047), total BCIS (p = 0.045), and intolerance to frustration (p = 0.014). Jumping to Conclusions (JTC) improved more in the MCT group than the psycho-educational group (p = 0.021). Regarding the comparison within each group, Theory of Mind (ToM), Personalizing Bias, and other subscales of irrational beliefs improved in the MCT group but not the psycho-educational group (p tolerance to frustration. It seems that MCT could be useful to improve symptoms, ToM, and personalizing bias.

  2. MSUD Family Support Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Treatment Of MSUD The MSUD Family Support Group has provided funds to Buck Institute for its ... of the membership of the MSUD Family Support Group, research for improved treatments and potential cure was ...

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Trauma-Informed Support, Skills, and Psychoeducation Intervention for Survivors of Torture and Related Trauma in Kurdistan, Northern Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Judith; Murray, Sarah McIvor; Mohammed, Thikra Ahmed; Bunn, Mary; Gorman, William; Ahmed, Ahmed Mohammed Amin; Murray, Laura; Bolton, Paul

    2016-09-28

    Supportive counseling type interventions are frequently provided to meet the mental health needs of populations in emergency and post-conflicts contexts, but it has seldom been rigorously evaluated. Existing evaluations from low- and middle-income countries provide mixed evidence of effectiveness. While Iraqi Kurdistan experienced relative stability following the fall of Saddam Hussein's government, the population in the northern Dohuk region has continued to experience periodic violence due to conflicts with neighboring Turkey as well as more recent ISIS-associated violence. We evaluated the impact of a trauma-informed support, skills, and psychoeducation intervention provided by community mental health workers (CMHWs) on depressive symptoms and dysfunction (primary outcomes) as well as post-traumatic stress, traumatic grief, and anxiety symptoms (secondary outcomes). Between June 2009 and June 2010, 295 adults were screened; 209 (71%) met eligibility criteria (trauma exposure and a symptom severity score indicating significant distress and functional impairment, among others) and consented to participate. Of these, 159 were randomized to supportive counseling while 50 were randomized to a waitlist control condition. Comparing average symptom severity scores post-treatment among those in the intervention group with those in the waitlist control group, the supportive counseling program had statistically and clinically significant impacts on the primary outcomes of depression (Cohen's d, 0.57; P = .02) and dysfunction (Cohen's d, 0.53; P = .03) and significant but smaller impacts on anxiety. Although studies by the same research team of psychotherapeutic interventions in other parts of Kurdistan and in southern Iraq found larger effects, this study adds to the global research literature on mental health and psychosocial support and shows that a well-trained and supervised program of trauma-informed support, skills, and psychoeducation that emphasizes the therapeutic

  4. Definition of the Situation of Children Demobilized Illegal Armed Groups in the Legal Acts and Psychoeducational Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Alberto Carmona Parra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article begins with a reflection on performative utterances, which are speech acts, to show that the right contributes to the creation of reality and subjectivity. Based on this argument examines five definitions of the situation of children demobilized from illegal armed groups in Colombia, named according to their effects psychoeducational: victimizing, pathologizing, criminalizing, idealizing and responsabilizing. Each definition is examined in terms of their philosophical affiliation, deterministic, nondeterministic or interactionist, its effects on the construction of the identity of minors and in his appeal to responsibility and legal insanity. At the end of the article shows the intervention proposals arising from each of the definitions and shows the role that restorative justice can play in building a model of care which confers responsibility to the children demobilized from illegal armed groups, and other victims of armed conflict, which guarantees the restitution of rights and also empowers them as key actors in redefining their social role and identity reconstruction.

  5. Life satisfaction, general well-being and costs of treatment for severe fear of childbirth in nulliparous women by psychoeducative group or conventional care attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhe, Hanna; Salmela-Aro, Katariina; Toivanen, Riikka; Tokola, Maiju; Halmesmäki, Erja; Saisto, Terhi

    2015-05-01

    Fear of childbirth is a common reason for seeking cesarean section. It is important to consider outcomes and costs associated with alternative treatment and delivery mode. We compared well-being and costs of group psychoeducation and conventional care for fear of childbirth. Randomized controlled trial. A total of 371 nulliparous women scoring over the 95th centile in the Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire (W-DEQ) during the first trimester. Finland, data from obstetrical patient records and questionnaires. Randomization to group psychoeducation with relaxation (six sessions during pregnancy, one after childbirth, n = 131), or surveillance and referral on demand (n = 240). All costs in maternity care during pregnancy, delivery and postnatally according to Diagnoses Related Groups. Life satisfaction and general well-being 3 months after childbirth (by a Satisfaction with Life Scale and Well-being Visual Analogue Scale). The groups did not differ in total direct costs (€3786/woman in psychoeducative group and €3830/woman in control group), nor in life satisfaction or general well-being. Although only 76 (30%) of the women assigned to the surveillance were referred to special maternity care and 36 (15%) attended advanced prenatal classes, costs in the psychoeducation group did not exceed the costs of the controls, mostly because of the greater number of uncomplicated vaginal deliveries (63% vs. 47%, p = 0.005). Through an association with safer childbirth and equal well-being after delivery, psychoeducative group treatment for nulliparous women with fear of childbirth can be a recommended choice for the same overall costs as conventional treatment. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. The effect of group psycho-education program on the burden of family caregivers with multiple sclerosis patients in Isfahan in 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavanzadeh, Saeid; Dalvi-Isfahani, Fariba; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah; Chitsaz, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Lack of adequate training and support of primary caregivers of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is the major factor in causing stress, anxiety, and increase of burden. Therefore, the treatment team members such as psychiatric nurses can help these vulnerable people overcome psychiatric pressures effectively not only through their care and referral role but also through their supportive characteristic, which helps the patients improve their clinical status, together with their social, familial, and work adaptation. Therefore, the researcher tried to identify the effect of a group psycho-education program on the burden family caregivers with MS patients. This is a two-group three-stage clinical trial. The researcher referred to the heads of neurology clinics to present the purpose of the study and to start the sampling. The neurology clinics of AL Zahra University Hospital, and also a Private Neurology Clinic were selected to collect the data of the study. The subjects were randomly selected, and then, assigned to two groups of study and control. Independent t-test showed a significant reduction in family caregivers' burden immediately after and 1-month after intervention in the study group, compared to control. Repeated measure ANOVA showed a significant reduction in caregivers' burden mean score in the study group (P family caregivers' burden, it is recommended to develop and design other programs for the family caregivers of the patients with MS.

  7. Psychoeducation for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Merinder, Lars Bertil; Belgamwar, Madhvi R

    2014-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia can be a severe and chronic illness characterised by lack of insight and poor compliance with treatment. Psychoeducational approaches have been developed to increase patients’ knowledge of, and insight into, their illness and its treatment. It is supposed that this increased knowledge and insight will enable people with schizophrenia to cope in a more effective way with their illness, thereby improving prognosis. Objectives To assess the effects of psychoeducational interventions compared with standard levels of knowledge provision. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (February 2010). We updated this search November 2012 and added 27 new trials to the awaiting assessment section. Selection criteria All relevant randomised controlled trials focusing on psychoeducation for schizophrenia and/or related serious mental illnesses involving individuals or groups. We excluded quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis At least two review authors extracted data independently from included papers. We contacted authors of trials for additional and missing data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of homogeneous dichotomous data. We used a fixed-effects model for heterogeneous dichotomous data. Where possible we also calculated the numbers needed to treat (NNT), as well as weighted means for continuous data. Main results This review includes a total of 5142 participants (mostly inpatients) from 44 trials conducted between 1988 and 2009 (median study duration ~ 12 weeks, risk of bias - moderate). We found that incidences of non-compliance were lower in the psychoeducation group in the short term (n = 1400, RR 0.52 CI 0.40 to 0.67, NNT 11 CI 9 to 16). This finding holds for the medium and long term. Relapse appeared to be lower in psychoeducation group (n = 1214, RR 0.70 CI 0.61 to 0.81, NNT 9 CI 7 to 14) and this also applied to readmission (n = 206, RR 0.71 CI 0.56 to 0

  8. Bevalac computer support group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McParland, C.; Bronson, M.

    1985-01-01

    During the past year, a group was created and placed under the leadership of Charles McParland. This is an expansion of previous Bevalac software efforts and has responsibilities in three major hardware and software areas. The first area is the support of the existing data acquisition/analysis VAX 11/780s at the Bevalac. The second area is the continued support of present data acquisition programs. The third principal area of effort is the development of new data acquisition systems to meet the increasing needs of the Bevalac experimental program

  9. A 1-year videoconferencing-based psychoeducational group intervention following bariatric surgery: results of a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Beate; Hünnemeyer, Katharina; Sauer, Helene; Hain, Bernhard; Mack, Isabelle; Schellberg, Dieter; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Weiner, Rudolf; Meile, Tobias; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Königsrainer, Alfred; Zipfel, Stephan; Herzog, Wolfgang; Teufel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    For severely obese patients, bariatric surgery has been recommended as an effective therapy. The Bariataric Surgery and Education (BaSE) study aimed to assess the efficacy of a videoconferencing-based psychoeducational group intervention in patients after bariatric surgery. The BaSE study is a randomized, controlled multicenter clinical trial involving 117 patients undergoing bariatric surgery (mean preoperative body mass index [BMI] 49.9 kg/m(2), SD 6.4). Patients were enrolled between May 2009 and November 2012 and were randomly assigned to receive either conventional postsurgical visits or, in addition, a videoconferencing-based 1-year group program. Primary outcome measures were weight in kilograms, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and general self-efficacy (GSE). Secondary outcome measures were depression symptoms and eating behavior. 94% of the patients completed the study. Mean weight loss for all patients was 45.9 kg (SD 16.4) 1 year after surgery (mean excess weight loss [EWL] 63%). Intention-to-treat analyses revealed no differences in weight loss, EWL, HRQOL, or self-efficacy between study groups at 1 year after surgery. However, patients with clinically significant depression symptoms (CSD) at baseline assigned to the intervention group (n = 29) had a significantly better HRQOL (P = .03), lower depression scores (P = .02), and a trend for a better EWL (.06) 1 year after surgery compared with the control group (n = 20). We could not prove the efficacy of the group program for the whole study sample. However, results indicate that the intervention is effective for the important subgroup of patients with CSD. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Psychoeducational intervention for patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Ellen H; Ross, Lone; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2005-01-01

    to the control or intervention group. Patients in the intervention group were offered six weekly sessions of 2 hours of psychoeducation, consisting of health education, enhancement of problem-solving skills, stress management, and psychological support. The participants were assessed at baseline before random...

  11. Using the Solving Problems Together Psychoeducational Group Counseling Model as an Intervention for Negative Peer Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kimberly R.; Rushing, Jeri Lynn; Khurshid, Ayesha

    2011-01-01

    Problem-focused interventions are considered to be one of the most effective group counseling strategies with adolescents. This article describes a problem-focused group counseling model, Solving Problems Together (SPT), that focuses on working with students who struggle with negative peer pressure. Adapted from the teaching philosophy of…

  12. Implementation of a Psychoeducational Program for Cancer Survivors and Family Caregivers at a Cancer Support Community Affiliate: A Pilot Effectiveness Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockham, Bonnie; Schafenacker, Ann; Yoon, Hyojin; Ronis, David L; Kershaw, Trace; Titler, Marita; Northouse, Laurel

    2016-01-01

    Psychoeducational interventions, tested for efficacy in randomized clinical trials, are seldom implemented in clinical practice where cancer survivors and their family caregivers can benefit from them. This study examined the effectiveness of the FOCUS Program on cancer survivors' and their family caregivers' outcomes when implemented at a Cancer Support Community (CSC) affiliate by agency social workers. Study aims were to (1) test effects of the program on survivor and caregiver outcomes as a unit and (2) determine program feasibility in terms of enrollment, retention, intervention fidelity, and satisfaction. A preintervention and postintervention pilot effectiveness study was conducted with 34 cancer survivor-caregiver dyads (ie, pairs). The FOCUS Program, originally delivered by nurses in dyads' homes, was modified to a small-group format and delivered by CSC social workers. The primary outcome was quality of life (QOL). Intermediary outcomes were benefits of illness/caregiving, communication, support, and self-efficacy. Analyses included repeated-measures analysis of variance. Dyads had significant improvements in total QOL; physical, emotional, and functional QOL; benefits of illness; and self-efficacy. Effect sizes were similar to prior randomized clinical trial findings. Although dyads were difficult to recruit (enrollment, 60%), both retention (92%) and intervention fidelity (94%) were high. It was possible to implement the FOCUS Program at a CSC affiliate by agency staff, obtain positive intervention effects, and maintain intervention fidelity. Researchers and clinicians need to collaborate to implement more evidence-based interventions in practice settings for cancer survivors and their family caregivers.

  13. Hold Me Tight: An Emotionally-Focused Psychoeducational Group for Unmarried Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Hsien Sun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The research study adapted the “Hold Me Tight” Couple Intervention Program for Taiwanese dating couples to repair and strengthen their relationships by targeting emotions and facilitating secure attachment in group settings. This program is based on Emotionally Focused Therapy (ETF. The program was lead by two lead facilitators, who have received international certification of Emotionally Focused Therapy, and by four co-facilitators. The intervention program consisted of five 1.5 elaboration-hour units. Each unit included three parts: elaboration of key concepts of EFT, dyadic exercises to help create emotional connections between partners, and group discussion to consolidate the change. This study conducted quantitative evaluations at five time points, including pre-, post-, one-month, three-month, and six-month follow-up assessment after the completion of the intervention program. Evaluations included the adult attachment scale, relationship satisfaction, and social awareness between the couple. Focus group interviews were also held two weeks after the group program ended. In total, 20 couples (total of 40 individuals participated in the program; among them, 12 females and 11 males completed the quantitative evaluation and 29 participants participated in the focus group interviews. The result showed that participants improved their attachment security, increased the awareness of partners’ interpersonal behaviors, and facilitated sharing and the acceptance of each other’s vulnerabilities. In the focus group interviews, participants reported positive feedback in reducing vicious cycles and established a sense of security with their partners. Limitations of the study and clinical implications specific to this population were discussed for future cultural adaptation intervention practice and research.

  14. Sustained effects of a psychoeducational group intervention following bariatric surgery: follow-up of the randomized controlled BaSE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Beate; Hünnemeyer, Katharina; Sauer, Helene; Schellberg, Dieter; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Königsrainer, Alfred; Weiner, Rudolf; Zipfel, Stephan; Herzog, Wolfgang; Teufel, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Evidence regarding the efficacy of psychosocial interventions after bariatric surgery is rare and shows conflicting results. The Bariatric Surgery and Education (BaSE) study aimed to assess the efficacy of a psychoeducational group intervention in patients after bariatric surgery. The BaSE study was a randomized, controlled, multicenter clinical trial involving 117 patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Patients received either conventional postsurgical visits or, in addition, a 1-year psychoeducational group program. The present study evaluated the sustained effects of the intervention program. Mean follow-up duration was 37.9 months (standard deviation [SD] 8.2 months) after surgery. Outcome measures were as follows: body mass index (BMI), weight loss, self-efficacy, depression severity, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Groups were compared using an intention-to-treat approach with a mixed model for repeated measurements. A total of 74 patients (63.2%) completed the follow-up (T5) assessment. Mean weight loss for all patients was 43 kg (SD 15.5 kg) at T5 (mean BMI 35.1 kg/m 2 ). Mean excess weight loss was 60.4%. The effects of the surgery during the first postsurgical year were reflected, on average, by both decreasing weight and psychosocial burden. At the T5 time point, patients had slowly started to regain weight and to deteriorate regarding psychosocial aspects. However, at T5, patients who had participated in the intervention program (n = 39) showed significantly lower depression severity scores (p = .03) and significantly higher self-efficacy (p = .03) compared to the control group (n = 35). The 2 groups did not differ regarding weight loss and quality of life. Psychoeducational intervention shows sustained effects on both depression severity scores and self-efficacy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A psychoeducational intervention reduces the need for anesthesia during radiotherapy for young childhood cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, Sonja; Grotzer, Michael A; Niggli, Felix K; Landolt, Markus A; Linsenmeier, Claudia; Ammann, Roland A; Bodmer, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) has become an important treatment modality in pediatric oncology, but its delivery to young children with cancer is challenging and general anesthesia is often needed. To evaluate whether a psychoeducational intervention might reduce the need for anesthesia, 223 consecutive pediatric cancer patients receiving 4141 RT fractions during 244 RT courses between February 1989 and January 2006 were studied. Whereas in 154 RT courses corresponding with 2580 RT fractions patients received no psychoeducational intervention (group A), 90 RT courses respectively 1561 RT fractions were accomplished by using psychoeducational intervention (group B). This tailored psychoeducational intervention in group B included a play program and interactive support by a trained nurse according to age to get familiar with staff, equipment and procedure of radiotherapy. Group A did not differ significantly from group B in age at RT, gender, diagnosis, localization of RT and positioning during RT. Whereas 33 (21.4%) patients in group A got anesthesia, only 8 (8.9%) patients in group B needed anesthesia. The median age of cooperating patients without anesthesia decreased from 3.2 to 2.7 years. In both uni- and multivariate analyses the psychoeducational intervention significantly and independently reduced the need for anesthesia. We conclude that a specifically tailored psychoeducational intervention is able to reduce the need for anesthesia in children undergoing RT for cancer. This results in lower costs and increased cooperation during RT

  16. A psychoeducational intervention reduces the need for anesthesia during radiotherapy for young childhood cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsenmeier Claudia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiotherapy (RT has become an important treatment modality in pediatric oncology, but its delivery to young children with cancer is challenging and general anesthesia is often needed. Methods To evaluate whether a psychoeducational intervention might reduce the need for anesthesia, 223 consecutive pediatric cancer patients receiving 4141 RT fractions during 244 RT courses between February 1989 and January 2006 were studied. Whereas in 154 RT courses corresponding with 2580 RT fractions patients received no psychoeducational intervention (group A, 90 RT courses respectively 1561 RT fractions were accomplished by using psychoeducational intervention (group B. This tailored psychoeducational intervention in group B included a play program and interactive support by a trained nurse according to age to get familiar with staff, equipment and procedure of radiotherapy. Results Group A did not differ significantly from group B in age at RT, gender, diagnosis, localization of RT and positioning during RT. Whereas 33 (21.4% patients in group A got anesthesia, only 8 (8.9% patients in group B needed anesthesia. The median age of cooperating patients without anesthesia decreased from 3.2 to 2.7 years. In both uni- and multivariate analyses the psychoeducational intervention significantly and independently reduced the need for anesthesia. Conclusion We conclude that a specifically tailored psychoeducational intervention is able to reduce the need for anesthesia in children undergoing RT for cancer. This results in lower costs and increased cooperation during RT.

  17. Home-based COPD psychoeducation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bove, D G; Midtgaard, J; Kaldan, G

    2017-01-01

    in reducing symptoms of anxiety and increasing mastery of dyspnoea in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, we do not know if the intervention is perceived as meaningful and applicable in the everyday life of patients with advanced COPD. METHODS: We conducted a nested......OBJECTIVE: To explore the patients' experiences of a minimal home-based psychoeducative intervention aimed at reducing symptoms of anxiety. BACKGROUND: In a randomised controlled trial (RCT) we have shown that a minimal home-based and nurse-led psychoeducative intervention has a significant effect...... post-trial qualitative study. The study methodology was Interpretive Description as described by Thorne. The study was based on semi-structured interviews with twenty patients from the RCT intervention group i.g. home-living people with a diagnosis of advanced COPD and symptoms of anxiety. RESULTS...

  18. Online Support Groups for Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Breuer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This mixed-methods study aimed to explore the initial process of engagement with an online support group (OSG for depression. Fifteen British National Health Service patients experiencing depression who had not previously used an OSG for depression were offered facilitated access to an existing peer-to-peer OSG for 10 weeks. Pre- and post-measures of depression, social support, and self-stigma were taken in addition to a weekly measure of OSG usage. A follow-up qualitative interview was conducted with a subsample of nine participants. Depression and self-stigma reduced over the 10-week period, but perceived social support did not change. There was no evidence of adverse outcomes. Perceived benefits of OSG participation included connection to others, normalization of depression, and stigma reduction. However, engagement with the OSG was generally low. Barriers included concerns over causing harm to others or being harmed oneself, feeling different from others in the group, and fears of being judged by others. OSGs may potentially reduce depressive symptoms and perceived self-stigma. However, considerable barriers may hinder people with depression from engaging with OSGs. Further work is needed to determine who will benefit most from participating in OSGs for depression and how best to facilitate engagement.

  19. Psychoeducation for siblings of people with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Jacqueline; Jordan, Cheryl D; Barley, Elizabeth A; Henderson, Claire; Norman, Ian

    2015-05-08

    Many people with severe mental illness (SMI) have siblings. Siblings are often both natural agents to promote service users' recovery and vulnerable to mental ill health due to the negative impact of psychosis within the family. Despite a wealth of research evidence supporting the effectiveness of psychoeducation for service users with SMI and their family members, in reducing relapse and promoting compliance with treatment, siblings remain relatively invisible in clinical service settings as well as in research studies. If psychoeducational interventions target siblings and improve siblings' knowledge, coping with caring and overall wellbeing, they could potentially provide a cost-effective option for supporting siblings with resulting benefits for service users' outcomes. To assess the effectiveness of psychoeducation compared with usual care or any other intervention in promoting wellbeing and reducing distress of siblings of people affected by SMI.The secondary objective was, if possible, to determine which type of psychoeducation is most effective. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register and screened the reference lists of relevant reports and reviews (12th November 2013). We contacted trial authors for unpublished and specific data on siblings' outcomes. All relevant randomised controlled trials focusing on psychoeducational interventions targeting siblings of all ages (on their own or amongst other family members including service users) of individuals with SMI, using any means and formats of delivery, i.e. individual (family), groups, computer-based. Two review authors independently screened the abstracts and extracted data and two other authors independently checked the screening and extraction process. We contacted authors of trials to ascertain siblings' participation in the trials and seek sibling-specific data in those studies where siblings' data were grouped together with other participants' (most commonly other family members

  20. Psychoeducational group increases vaginal dilation for younger women and reduces sexual fears for women of all ages with gynecological carcinoma treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, John W.; Faris, Peter D.; Scott, Carol B.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The association between radiotherapy for gynecological carcinoma and sexual dysfunction is well established. Regular vaginal dilation is widely recommended to these women as a way for them to maintain vaginal health and good sexual functioning. However, the compliance rate with this recommendation is low. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a group psychoeducational program based on the 'information-motivation-behavioral skills' model of behavior change in increasing the rate of compliance. Methods and Materials: Thirty-two women with Stage I or II cervical or endometrial carcinoma who were being treated with radiotherapy were randomized and received either the experimental group program or the control intervention that consisted of written information and brief counseling. Outcome measures included global sexual health, knowledge about sexuality and cancer, fears about sexuality after cancer, and vaginal dilation compliance. Results: Younger women attending the experimental program (44.4%) were significantly more likely to follow recommendations for vaginal dilation than those who received the control intervention (5.6%). Women, regardless of age, who received the experimental intervention reported less fear about sex after cancer treatment. The older women who received the experimental intervention gained more sexual knowledge. There was no evidence that the experimental intervention improved global sexual health. Conclusions: This is the first controlled study to provide evidence of an intervention's effectiveness 1. in increasing women's vaginal dilation following radiotherapy for gynecological carcinoma and 2. in reducing their fears about sex after cancer. Most women, particularly younger women, are unlikely to follow the recommendation to dilate unless they are given assistance in overcoming their fears and taught behavioral skills

  1. Group psycho-education in patients with bipolar disorder associated with a dependency of toxic substances in patients who are in abstinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia González Alegre

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The high comorbility that exists among psychiatric disorders and addictive is important. In the latest years it is produced an increase of the sensibility related to this problem. A great deal it is due to the demand of Mental Health Services and also due to drug dependency, as a consequence of the lack of an integral approach. Because of this fact and because of the mentioned demand, we though it should be pertinent developing a research project in order to check if the carrying the psycho-educative preventive group project out in patients with a diagnose of bipolar disorder with an abuse of drugs history and/or dependency of toxic substance in abstinence at the moment influents in a positive way in the course of the number of relapses in the toxic consumption during at least six months subsequent to the intervention. And at this way, these patients will purchase a greater consciousness of the important of healthy habits in the bipolar disorder and the recovery in the toxic substance abuse. The program will be developed in an experimental research where the patients will be randomly assigned in group control/ experimentally, the intervention will last twenty sessions, each session will be an hour and a half long and will be held weekly. In these sessions we will deal with topics related to the psychiatric disorder and the toxic consume. At the same time we will bank on the development of practical relaxation workshops on in some of the sessions with the object of providing a resource in view of stress situations.

  2. The Impact of Psycho-Education on in Vitro Fertilisation Treatment Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belevska, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the efficiency of psycho-education of candidates for the IVF in stress, anxiety and depression decreasing, and the impact of the psycho educative techniques on the successfulness of the treatment. A random sample of 64 candidates for IVF treatment is divided in two groups: control group without psycho-education (32 candidates) and intervention group of 32 candidates included in psycho-education. Depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS) was used as a psychometric test. It's a multiple choice, self-reported inventory for measuring the levels of stress, anxiety and severity of depression. For statistic evaluation SPSS software was used. The study shows that the intervention group included in psycho-education has a signifycantly lower scores on stress (t = 3.201, p stress decreasing, as well as significant impact in the successfulness of the treatment. It was pointed out that psychological support of candidates for IVF is important for the lessening of the negative emotional reactions of candidates as well as for the successfulness of the treatment.

  3. Support Groups for Children of Divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Sherry; Galaris, Diana

    1993-01-01

    Describes model for support groups for children of divorce developed at Marriage Council of Philadelphia. Gives details about group organization, illustrative case material, and typical concerns that group members work with throughout group sessions. Summarizes reported effects of support group involvement and considers ways of intervening in…

  4. [Care and Self-Care Among Families with a Person Suffering from Bipolar Disorder and Belonging to the Psychoeducational Group of the Psychiatry Department of the University of Antioquia, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, María Victoria Builes; Hernández, Mauricio Bedoya

    2013-03-01

    To analyze the families from the Psychoeducational Group of the Psychiatry Department of the University of Antioquia that have one member with bipolar disorder (BD) in order to identify their care-related practices. A comprehensive research project using the phenomenological and hermeneutic method. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve families. The data obtained were analyzed using the Atlas ti qualitative software. Two main categories emerged: 1. Care and family life course and 2. Care and self-care in relation to bipolar disorder. The first category manifests itself through practices such as: Taking care of the diseased person by being physically present, providing physical or emotional support, or by transferring care-related actions to other family members. Two main perspectives could be identified in the second category, namely: the caretaker's perspective and that of the person being taken care of. Two tendencies were found regarding the first one: taking care of others brings about transformations in the caretakers and taking care of others is tough. The second perspective has the same number of tendencies: self-care as poetics and taking care of oneself in order to go from the Diving Bell to the Butterfly. Taking care of others is a way of building humanity. Conducting research on care and self-care practices (i.e. the practices of both the caretaker and the person being taken care of) results in a more aesthetic way of providing care and a more aesthetic patient-caretaker dyad. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of a support group for children of parents with mental illnesses: managing stressful situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, Brenda M; McKeever, Patricia; Seeman, Mary; Boydell, Katherine M

    2014-09-01

    We report an ethnographic analysis of a psycho-education and peer-support program for school-aged children of parents with mental illnesses. We conducted a critical discourse analysis of the program manual and observed group interactions to understand whether children shared program goals predetermined by adults, and how, or if, the intervention was responsive to their needs. Children were expected to learn mental illness information because "knowledge is power," and to express difficult feelings about being a child of a mentally ill parent that was risky. Participants used humor to manage group expectations, revealing how they made sense of their parents' problems, as well as their own. Suggestions are made for determining good mental health literacy based on children's preferences for explaining circumstances in ways they find relevant, and for supporting children's competencies to manage relationships that are important to them. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Study protocol for Enhancing Parenting In Cancer (EPIC): development and evaluation of a brief psycho-educational intervention to support parents with cancer who have young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Lesley; Sinclair, Michelle; Turner, Jane; Newman, Louise; Wakefield, Claire; Krishnasamy, Mei; Mann, G Bruce; Gilham, Leslie; Mason, Kylie; Rauch, Paula; Cannell, Julia; Schofield, Penelope

    2017-01-01

    Parents with cancer have high rates of psychological morbidity, and their children are at risk of poor psychosocial outcomes, particularly in the context of parental distress and poor family communication. Parents express concerns about the impact of cancer on their children and report a lack of professional guidance in meeting their children's needs. Few parenting interventions exist and current interventions have extensive infrastructure demands making them unsuitable for routine use in most health settings. The aims of this study are to develop and establish the feasibility and acceptability of a novel and accessible psycho-educational intervention to improve parenting efficacy and decrease parental stress among adults with cancer who have children aged 3-12 years. The intervention will be suitable for parents with cancer who are receiving treatment with a view to longer term survival, irrespective of cancer diagnosis, and their respective co-parents. This study comprises two phases using the UK Medical Research Council framework for developing complex interventions. In the development phase, intervention content will be iteratively developed and evaluated in consultation with consumers, and in the piloting phase, feasibility will be tested in a clinical sample of 20 parents with cancer and their co-parents using a single arm, pre-test post-test design. The intervention will comprise an audiovisual resource (DVD), a question prompt list, and a telephone call with a clinical psychologist. Questionnaires administered pre- and 1 month post-intervention will assess parental stress, psychological morbidity, quality of life, self-efficacy and perceptions of child adjustment, and family functioning. Intervention feasibility will be determined by mixed-method participant evaluation of perceived usefulness, benefits, and acceptability. This new initiative will translate existing descriptive evidence into an accessible intervention that supports parenting during cancer

  7. Online support groups for young women with breast cancer: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Joanne; Rojubally, Adina; Linden, Wolfgang; Zhong, Lihong; Mackenzie, Gina; Mahmoud, Sahar; Giese-Davis, Janine

    2017-07-01

    This initial study examined a therapist-led, synchronous, online support group (OSG) with psycho-education (OSG + E) compared to self-help psycho-education (E). The study aims were to examine proof of concept-feasibility, acceptability, and usefulness-and to hone methods for a formal RCT. One hundred five young breast cancer survivors (<50 years) post-treatment were randomized either to OSG + E or E. OSG + E received a therapist-led 10-week synchronous online intervention. E received a self-help workbook. Assessments were at baseline, 10 weeks, and 3 months, with willing OSG + E members completing post-study interviews. Researchers used inductive analysis, generating qualitative themes for feasibility, acceptability, and usefulness. We examined trajectories for one primary and two secondary quantitative outcomes and a combined moderator to discover who preferentially benefitted from the intervention. Qualitative analyses revealed that synchronous chat was at times challenging, but minimal technical coaching, structure, set topics, and professional facilitation enabled conversations that were focused and meaningful. A combined moderator indicated that generally more women benefitted from OSG + E relative to E and particularly those women in semi-rural and rural areas. This study suggests that therapist-led synchronous OSGs are feasible, acceptable, and useful for young breast cancer survivors and that a future RCT with a larger sample size, perhaps more focused on non-urban areas, is needed to establish its effectiveness.

  8. Leukemia Support Groups: How Are They Doing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss

    1997-10-01

    BACKGROUND: Support groups help their participants to cope with the emotional and practical impact of their illnesses. METHODS: The effectiveness of the Leukemia Society of America support groups in enhancing the quality of life for their participants is reviewed. The groundwork, purpose, and structure of such groups, as well as alternate sources of support, are presented. Evaluation and future directions for oncology groupwork are discussed. RESULTS: Support groups complement the therapies provided by clinical practitioners and scientists by addressing the additional needs of cancer patients over the course of illness and survival. CONCLUSIONS: New concepts and methods that address the needs of specific age-groups and incorporate the newly generated data on cancer treatments will further enhance the benefits provided by support groups.

  9. Support Group for Parents Coping with Children with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Tanja; Rutar, Miha; Battelino, Tadej; Drobnič Radobuljac, Maja; Bratina, Nataša

    2015-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood. Active parental involvement, parental support in the diabetes management and family functioning are associated with optimal diabetes management and glycemic control. The purpose of this study was to assess parental satisfaction with participation in the group and their perceptions of the impact of the intervention on living and coping with childrens T1D. A sample of 34 parents of children with T1D participated in this trend study. The participants' experience and satisfaction with support group was measured by a self- evaluation questionnaire, designed for the purpose of the present study. Quantitative data show that parents were overall satisfied with almost all measured items of the evaluation questionnaire (wellbeing in the group, feeling secure, experiencing new things, being able to talk and feeling being heard) during the 4-year period. However, parents from the second and third season, on average, found that the support group has better fulfilled their expectations than the parents from the first season (p = 0,010). The qualitative analysis of the participants' responses to the open-ended questions was underpinned by four themes: support when confronting the diagnosis, transformation of the family dynamics, me as a parent, exchange of experience and good practice and facing the world outside the family. The presented parent support group showed to be a promising supportive, therapeutic and psychoeducative space where parents could strengthen their role in the upbringing of their child with T1D.

  10. The effectiveness of support groups in Asian breast cancer patients: An integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Yu Chou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer support group has been studied as an intervention to improve patient psychosocial well-being. The effectiveness of support groups among Asian breast cancer (BC patients has been unclear and received limited attention to the evidence of its effectiveness. The social-cognitive processing theory underlies the principles of support groups and advocates that a positive, supportive social environment can improve cognitive processing. The purpose of this paper is to present an integrative review of research evidence on the effectiveness of cancer support groups with Asian BC patients. Empirical studies related to support group among Asian and Asian American BC patients published between 1982 and April 2014 are reviewed. There are 15 studies selected (12 from the Asian-Pacific region and 3 from Western countries. The review includes 1 qualitative study, 3 descriptive studies, 1 mixed method design, and 10 experimental or quasi-experimental studies. The support group intervention activities include psycho-educational program such as health education, problem-solving, and stress management. These studies support the effectiveness of support group in alleviating psychological distress and supporting quality of life of Asian BC women. Overall, there is limited research on the use and effectiveness of support groups with Asians cancer patients in Asia and in Western countries. Without accounting for Asian immigrants overseas, the Asian population is expected to grow from 4.3 to 5.3 billion by 2050. As cancer patients become more diverse due to global emigration, more rigorous studies examining the effectiveness of psychosocial intervention among transcultural cancer patients are needed.

  11. The Effectiveness of Support Groups in Asian Breast Cancer Patients: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Fang-Yu; Lee-Lin, Frances; Kuang, Lily Y

    2016-01-01

    Cancer support group has been studied as an intervention to improve patient psychosocial well-being. The effectiveness of support groups among Asian breast cancer (BC) patients has been unclear and received limited attention to the evidence of its effectiveness. The social-cognitive processing theory underlies the principles of support groups and advocates that a positive, supportive social environment can improve cognitive processing. The purpose of this paper is to present an integrative review of research evidence on the effectiveness of cancer support groups with Asian BC patients. Empirical studies related to support group among Asian and Asian American BC patients published between 1982 and April 2014 are reviewed. There are 15 studies selected (12 from the Asian-Pacific region and 3 from Western countries). The review includes 1 qualitative study, 3 descriptive studies, 1 mixed method design, and 10 experimental or quasi-experimental studies. The support group intervention activities include psycho-educational program such as health education, problem-solving, and stress management. These studies support the effectiveness of support group in alleviating psychological distress and supporting quality of life of Asian BC women. Overall, there is limited research on the use and effectiveness of support groups with Asians cancer patients in Asia and in Western countries. Without accounting for Asian immigrants overseas, the Asian population is expected to grow from 4.3 to 5.3 billion by 2050. As cancer patients become more diverse due to global emigration, more rigorous studies examining the effectiveness of psychosocial intervention among transcultural cancer patients are needed.

  12. Evaluation of a psychoeducation programme for parents of children and adolescents with ADHD: immediate and long-term effects using a blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrin, Maite; Moreno-Granados, J M; Salcedo-Marin, M D; Ruiz-Veguilla, M; Perez-Ayala, V; Taylor, E

    2014-08-01

    Recent guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have claimed the possible benefits of psychoeducational techniques in the comprehensive management of ADHD. To evaluate the efficacy of a psychoeducation programme for parents of children and adolescents with ADHD in a clinical setting using a blind randomized trial. 81 children/adolescents with ADHD were randomly assigned for their families to receive either a well-structured psychoeducation programme (intervention group, n = 44), or a parent counselling and support intervention (control group, n = 37). Measures of child ADHD symptoms, psychopathology, quality of life and family stress were taken before and after intervention and after a year follow-up. Parents and evaluators were unaware of the condition received. Compared to the support control group, the psychoeducation group showed ADHD Index and cognitive/inattention levels significantly reduced after the intervention ended (Mann-Whitney U = 3.34; p = 0.001; Mann-Whitney U = 3.47; p = 0.001). An improvement in the pro-social domain was also observed after 1 year follow-up (Mann-Whitney U = -2.37; p = 0.018), and clinical global impression found a statistically significant effect for severity over the time. Differences were initially found for the impact of the disorder in the family in different domains, including emotional and social functioning; these differences were no longer significant after alpha correction. No significant differences in quality of life or family stress were found in comparison with the control group. This psychoeducation programme is a valuable treatment for parents/carers of children/adolescents with ADHD, which needs to be considered when evaluating different non-pharmacological treatment options. Psychoeducation and other kind of non-pharmacological approaches need to be regarded not as a substitute, but as a complementary treatment to medications; these approaches might help other

  13. Family support group in psychosocial rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnuchamy, L.; Mathew, Baijumon K.; Mathew, Sheeba; Udayakumar, G.S.; Kalyanasundaram, S.; Ramprasad, Dharitri

    2005-01-01

    Background: Support groups for families of persons with mental illness are emerging as significant components in psychosocial rehabilitation programmes. Aim: To ascertain the expectations of family members who attend family support group meetings and to find out the efficacy of such programmes. Methods: The data were collected from support group members using a semi-structured interview schedule. The study sample (n=20) was drawn from family members who attended the support group meetings regularly for a minimum period of 6 months. Data analysis was done using percentile. Results: Analysis of the data revealed that members attending the support group meetings expected to get more information about the illness, develop skills to cope with problems at home and learn skills to deal with the ill person. An important finding of the study was that the members developed a ‘feeling of togetherness’ as a result of being a member of a group with common aims. Conclusion: Participation in a support group meeting positively affects key variables in the participant's adaptation to mental illness in a relative. PMID:20814460

  14. Help for breastfeeding mothers. Support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    Many people including some health workers and physicians believe bottle feeding is just as good as breast feeding, even though bottle feeding poses some dangers to infants. Further, health workers in hospital often are too busy to counsel new mothers in breast feeding or are simply not trained to do so. Moreover, young women often live in areas away from their family and friends thus not living close to women with whom they are familiar and who could guide them in mastering breast feeding skills. So new mothers who want to breast feed have no support, lack confidence, and/or feel they cannot do so because they work or have other responsibilities. Support groups for new breast feeding mothers can provide them with the needed confidence to breast feed by allowing them to discuss concerns with other new mothers and an experienced leader and to learn the advantages of breast feeding, e.g., a breast fed infant is never constipated. A confident experienced woman in breast feeding is best suited to start a support group in a community. She needs to promote the group by talking to health workers and physicians and advertising at maternity hospitals, women's organizations, and health centers. Once the support group has become successful, several mothers can undergo training to start and lead new support groups. If no national breast feeding promotion organization exists to offer advice on starting a support group, the article provides addresses of international organizations. At support group meetings, mothers learn how to breast feed, how to express and store breast milk, breast feed inconspicuously in public, how their bodies work, and about child growth and development. Support group members from the Philippines, Belize, Trinidad and Tobago, Australia, and singapore share their experiences.

  15. Creating a Supportive Environment : Peer Support Groups for Psychotic Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelein, Stynke; Bruggeman, Richard; Davidson, Larry; van der Gaag, Mark

    People with psychotic disorders frequently experience significant mental and social limitations that may result in persisting social isolation. Research has shown that a supportive social environment is crucial for the process of personal recovery. Peer support groups can provide an opportunity to

  16. Creating a Supportive Environment: Peer Support Groups for Psychotic Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelein, S.; Bruggeman, R.; Davidson, L.; van der Gaag, M.

    2015-01-01

    People with psychotic disorders frequently experience significant mental and social limitations that may result in persisting social isolation. Research has shown that a supportive social environment is crucial for the process of personal recovery. Peer support groups can provide an opportunity to

  17. Effects of a program of cognitive-behavioural group therapy, vestibular rehabilitation, and psychoeducational explanations on patients with dizziness and no quantified balance deficit, compared to patients with dizziness and a quantified balance deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, D A; Allum, J H J; Sleptsova, M; Gross, S; Gaab, J; Welge-Lüssen, A; Schaefert, R; Langewitz, W

    2018-02-01

    We examined whether a program combining cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), vestibular rehabilitation (VR) and psychoeducation is equally effective in improving psychometric measures in patients with dizziness independent of a balance deficit. Measures of patients with dizziness only (DO) were compared to those of patients also having a quantified balance deficit (QBD). 32 patients (23 female, 9 male) with persistent dizziness were analysed as 2 groups based on stance and gait balance control: those with QBD (pathological balance) or DO (normal balance). Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) questionnaires were used pre- and post-therapy to assess psychometric measures. Patients then received the same combination therapy in a group setting. The QBD group mean age was 60.6, SD 8.3, and DO group mean age 44.8, SD 12.1, years. Pre-therapy, questionnaire scores were pathological but not different between groups. Balance improved significantly for the QBD group (p=0.003) but not for the DO group. DHI and BSI scores improved significantly in the DO group (0.001balance control improving to near normal. Possibly, greater focus on phobic anxiety during the group therapy program would have improved psychological measures of QBD patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [A listening support group for nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    The feedback from a consultant nurse in a listening support group for health professionals shows that, for hospital nursing staff, the phenomenon of suffering in the workplace is a reality. In addition to providing help to professionals who request it, the missions of such a group are to promote discussion around psycho-social risks in the framework of a policy of compassionate care for staff. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Psycho-education for substance use and antisocial personality disorder: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Schrøder, Sidsel; Hesse, Morten

    2015-11-14

    Antisocial personality disorder often co-exists with drug and alcohol use disorders. This trial examined the effectiveness of offering psycho-education for antisocial personality disorder in community substance use disorder treatment centers in Denmark. A total of 176 patients were randomly allocated to treatment as usual (TAU, n = 80) or TAU plus a psycho-educative program, Impulsive Lifestyle Counselling (ILC, n = 96) delivered by site clinicians (n = 39). Using follow-up interviews 3 and 9 months after randomization, we examined changes in drug and alcohol use (Addiction Severity Index Composite Scores), percent days abstinent (PDA) within last month, and aggression as measured with the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire-Short Form and the Self-Report of Aggression and Social Behavior Measure. Overall engagement in psychological interventions was modest: 71 (76 %) of participants randomized to psycho-education attended at least one counselling session, and 21 (23 %) attended all six sessions. The Median number of sessions was 2. All patients reduced drug and alcohol problems at 9 months with small within-group effect sizes. Intention-to-treat analyses indicated significant differences between ILC and TAU in mean drugs composite score (p = .018) and in PDA (p = .041) at 3 months. Aggression declined in both groups, but no differences between ILC and TAU were observed in terms of alcohol problems or aggression at any follow-up. Moderate short-term improvements in substance use were associated with randomization to Impulsive Lifestyle Counselling. The findings support the usefulness of providing psycho-education to outpatients with antisocial personality disorder. ISRCTN registry, ISRCTN67266318 , 17/7/2012.

  20. Support Groups: Make Connections, Get Help

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use lead to isolation from your in-person social network. When you join a new support group, you may be nervous about sharing personal issues with people you don't know. So at first, you may benefit from simply listening. Over time, though, contributing your own ideas and ...

  1. Supporting CANDU operators-CANDU owners group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    The CANDU Owners Group (COG) was formed in 1984 by the Canadian CANDU owning utilities and Atomic Energy of Canada limited (AECL). Participation was subsequently extended to all CANDU owners world-wide. The mandate of the COG organization is to provide a framework for co-operation, mutual assistance and exchange of information for the successful support, development, operation, maintenance and economics of CANDU nuclear electric generating stations. To meet these objectives COG established co-operative programs in two areas: 1. Station Support. 2. Research and Development. In addition, joint projects are administered by COG on a case by case basis where CANDU owners can benefit from sharing of costs

  2. Family psychoeducation for affective disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmerby, Nina; Austin, Stephen; Bech, Per

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article was to examine the evidence of family psychoeducation (FPE) for affective disorders. Evidence indicates that FPE can be an effective supplement to the standard treatment of patients with affective disorders. FPE can effectively reduce the patients' risk of relapse and redu...

  3. Grupo psicoeducativo multifamiliar no tratamento dos transtornos alimentares na adolescência Grupo psicoeducativo multifamiliar y tratamiento de adolescentes con trastornos de la conducta alimentaria Multifamily psycho-educational group and treatment of adolescents with eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoela Nicoletti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A proposta deste artigo é apresentar o grupo psicoeducativo multifamiliar do ambulatório do Programa de Atendimento, Ensino e Pesquisa em Transtornos Alimentares da Infância e Adolescência - PROTAD - do Instituto de Psiquiatria, do Hospital das Clínicas, da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, PROTAD-AMBULIM-HC-IPq-FMUSP, como uma das modalidades do tratamento multidisciplinar oferecidas a pacientes adolescentes com transtornos alimentares e a suas famílias. O artigo baseia-se na experiência dos encontros mensais da equipe, nos quais participam os familiares e cuidadores dos pacientes adolescentes com transtornos alimentares do ambulatório, e expõe o modelo de grupo psicoeducativo empregado, relacionando-o aos achados da literatura e à prática clínica.La propuesta de este artículo es presentar el grupo psicoeducativo multifamiliar del ambulatorio del Programa de Atención, Enseñanza e Investigación en Trastornos Alimentarios en la Infancia y en la Adolescencia - PROTAD - del Instituto de Psiquiatría del Hospital de las Clínicas de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de São Paulo, PROTAD-AMBULIM-HC-IPq-FMUSP, como una de las modalidades de tratamiento multidisciplinario proporcionado por PROTAD a pacientes adolescentes con trastornos alimentarios y a sus familias. En especial, el artículo parte de la experiencia obtenida en los encuentros mensuales con la participación de familiares y cuidadores de los pacientes adolescentes con trastornos alimentarios del ambulatorio y expone el modelo de grupo psicoeducativo aplicado, relacionándolo a los modelos encontrados en la literatura médica y a la práctica clínica.The psycho-educational multifamily group is part of a multidisciplinary treatment offered to adolescents with eating disorders and their families, in the out-patient Program for Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders - PROTAD - of the Institute of Psychiatry, of Hospital das Cl

  4. Comparison of two psycho-educational family group interventions for improving psycho-social outcomes in persons with spinal cord injury and their caregivers: a randomized-controlled trial of multi-family group intervention versus an active education control condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Dennis G; Weeks, Douglas L; Gross, Sarah; Lederhos Smith, Crystal; Lott, Hilary A; Wallace, Aimee J; Wood, Sonya M

    2016-07-26

    Over 12,000 individuals suffer a spinal cord injury (SCI) annually in the United States, necessitating long-term, complex adjustments and responsibilities for patients and their caregivers. Despite growing evidence that family education and support improves the management of chronic conditions for care recipients as well as caregiver outcomes, few systematic efforts have been made to involve caregivers in psycho-educational interventions for SCI. As a result, a serious gap exists in accumulated knowledge regarding effective, family-based treatment strategies for improving outcomes for individuals with SCI and their caregivers. The proposed research aims to fill this gap by evaluating the efficacy of a structured adaptation of an evidence-based psychosocial group treatment called Multi-Family Group (MFG) intervention. The objective of this study is to test, in a randomized-controlled design, an MFG intervention for the treatment of individuals with SCI and their primary caregivers. Our central hypothesis is that by providing support in an MFG format, we will improve coping skills of persons with SCI and their caregivers as well as supportive strategies employed by caregivers. We will recruit 32 individuals with SCI who have been discharged from inpatient rehabilitation within the previous 3 years and their primary caregivers. Patient/caregiver pairs will be randomized to the MFG intervention or an active SCI education control (SCIEC) condition in a two-armed randomized trial design. Participants will be assessed pre- and post-program and 6 months post-program. Intent to treat analyses will test two a priori hypotheses: (1) MFG-SCI will be superior to SCIEC for SCI patient activation, health status, and emotion regulation, caregiver burden and health status, and relationship functioning, and (2) MFG will be more effective for individuals with SCI and their caregivers when the person with SCI is within 18 months of discharge from inpatient rehabilitation compared

  5. The effects of a childbirth psychoeducation program on learned resourcefulness, maternal role competence and perinatal depression: a quasi-experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, Fei-Wan; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi; Ip, Wan-Yim

    2009-10-01

    symptoms (p=0.01) from baseline to 6 months postpartum compared with those who only received the routine childbirth education after adjusting for baseline group differences on age and social support. No significant group difference was found on maternal role competence. The childbirth psychoeducation program appears to be a very promising intervention for promoting learned resourcefulness and minimizing the risk of perinatal depression in first-time Chinese childbearing women. Future empirical work is required to determine the effectiveness of extending the childbirth psychoeducation program into the early postpartum for the promotion of maternal role competence in Chinese childbearing women.

  6. The Effect of Conflict Theory Based Decision-Making Skill Training Psycho-Educational Group Experience on Decision Making Styles of Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colakkadioglu, Oguzhan; Gucray, S. Sonay

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effect of conflict theory based decision making skill training group applications on decision making styles of adolescents was investigated. A total of 36 students, including 18 students in experimental group and 18 students in control group, participated in the research. When assigning students to experimental group or control…

  7. Effects of Participation in Support Groups on Alzheimer’s Family Caregivers’ Strain and Spiritual Wellbeing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Mohammadi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Since support for family caregivers is crucial in providing care for elderly, this study was conducted to examine the effects of participation in support groups on Alzheimer’s family caregivers’ strain and spiritual wellbeing. Materials and Methods & Materials: In this semi-experimental study, 32 accessible family caregivers of elderly patients with Alzheimer who had at least one year of experience participated. The intervention consisted of a 4-month active participation in educational and emotional supportive sessions related to patient and caregivers care management. At the end of the intervention, the leadership of the groups was transferred to members of the groups. These sessions were conducted in 3 public centers in the community. Caregivers were assessed by caregiving strain and spiritual wellbeing questionnaires at the beginning, at the end of the intervention and 2 months later. Data was analyzed by ANOVA with repeated measurement. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: In general, 32 accessible family caregivers of elderly Alzheimer patients with at least one year of experience participated in this study. The mean of spiritual wellbeing through three mentioned measurements showed an improvement (26.029, 34.029, 34.471, whereas the care giving strain showed a decreasing trend (40.118, 32.706, 31.265. Findings based on ANOVA-repeated measurement revealed a significantly decrease in care giving strain (P=0.001 and an improvement in spiritual wellbeing (P=0.005. Conclusion: Participation in the support groups as a manifest of empowering helps family caregivers to deal effectively with care giving difficulties. Psychoeducational programs lead to a decreased care giving strain and improve the spiritual wellbeing of the caregivers. Hence, supportive interventions should be considered by policy makers and professional health care providers for elderly people.

  8. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy versus Psychoeducation in the Management of Depression among Patients Undergoing Haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Saraireh, Faris A; Aloush, Sami M; Al Azzam, Manar; Al Bashtawy, Mohammed

    2018-01-25

    The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to compare the effectiveness of psychoeducation versus cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the management of depression among renal dialysis patients. A sample of 130 dialysis patients participated in the study and they were assigned at random to one of two therapies: psychoeducation (N = 65) or CBT (N = 65). Hamilton depression rating scale was completed by the participants in both groups prior to the therapies and after completion. Both therapies were effective in the management of depression, although psychoeducation was superior. Psychoeducation is recommended over CBT in the management of depression among renal dialysis patients.

  9. Support groups for dementia caregivers - Predictors for utilisation and expected quality from a family caregiver's point of view: A questionnaire survey PART I*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luttenberger Katharina

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Support groups have proved to be effective in reducing the burden on family caregivers of dementia patients. Nevertheless, little is known about the factors that influence utilisation or quality expectations of family caregivers. These questions are addressed in the following paper. Methods The cross-sectional study was carried out as an anonymous written survey of family caregivers of dementia patients in Germany. Qualitative and quantitative data from 404 caregivers were analysed using content analysis and binary logistic regression analysis. Results The only significant predictor for utilisation is assessing how helpful support groups are for the individual care situation. Family caregivers all agree that psycho-educative orientation is a priority requirement. Conclusions In order to increase the rate of utilisation, family caregivers must be convinced of the relevant advantages of using support groups. Support groups which offer an exchange of experiences, open discussion, information and advice meet the requirements of family caregivers.

  10. Psychoeducational preparation of children for surgery: the importance of parental involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ho Cheung William; Lopez, Violeta; Lee, Tin Loi Isabel

    2007-01-01

    To examine the effects of therapeutic play intervention on outcomes of children undergoing day surgery, and to highlight the importance of parental involvement in the psychoeducational preparation of children for surgery. A randomized controlled trial, two group pre-test and repeated post-test, between subjects design was employed. Hong Kong Chinese children (7-12 years of age; n=203) admitted for elective surgery in a day surgery unit, along with their parents during a 13-month period, were invited to participate in the study. By using a simple complete randomization method, 97 of children with their parents were assigned to the experimental group receiving therapeutic play intervention, and 106 children with their parents were assigned to the control group receiving routine information preparation. The results showed that both children and their parents in the experimental group reported lower state anxiety scores in pre- and post-operative periods. Children in the experimental group exhibited fewer instances of negative emotional behaviors and parents in the experimental group reported greater satisfaction. The results, however, find no differences in children's post-operative pain between the two groups. The study provides empirical evidence to support the effectiveness of using therapeutic play intervention and the importance of parental involvement in the psychoeducational preparation of children for surgery. The findings heighten the awareness of the importance of integrating therapeutic play and parental involvement as essential components of holistic and quality nursing care to prepare children for surgery.

  11. Psychosexual distress in women with gynecologic cancer: a feasibility study of an online support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, Catherine C; Chivers, Meredith L; Urowitz, Sara; Barbera, Lisa; Wiljer, David; O'Rinn, Susan; Ferguson, Sarah E

    2013-04-01

    The psychosexual concerns of gynecologic cancer patients are often unaddressed and there are limited resources available for women to deal with this highly sensitive topic. This feasibility study examines the participation rates and preliminary outcomes for an online support group designed specifically for women who are sexually distressed subsequent to gynecologic cancer treatment A 12-week online intervention was developed to address the psychosexual impact of gynecologic cancer. This intervention included a professionally moderated, asynchronous discussion forum as well as the provision of psycho-educational materials addressing the psychosexual impact of gynecologic cancer. Each week, a new topic was introduced and relevant material was posted on the website. Women were encouraged to share their experiences related to the topic. Twenty-seven, sexually distressed, remitted gynecologic cancer patients were randomly assigned to immediate treatment or a waitlist control condition. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline, 4-month and 8-month follow-ups assessing sexual distress as the primary outcome as well as anxiety, depression, and illness intrusiveness. Participation rates differed between the two groups, with greater participation occurring in the second group. Exit interviews indicated that the majority of the participants were satisfied with the intervention. Intent-to-treat analyses suggest a small effect for reduction in sexual distress This feasibility study suggests that women find this intervention acceptable. Further research is required to determine efficacy. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Evaluation of a psychoeducational intervention for adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootenhuis, M.A.; Maurice-Stam, H.; Derkx, B.H.; Last, B.F.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), comprising Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and indeterminate colitis, often has its onset in adolescence. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a psychoeducational group intervention (aiming to enhance information seeking and giving about

  13. Mental health consumer parents' recommendations for designing psychoeducation interventions for their minor children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebschleger, Joanne; Onaga, Esther; Tableman, Betty; Bybee, Deborah

    2014-09-01

    This research explores consumer parents' recommendations for developing psychoeducation programs for their minor children. Data were drawn from a purposive sample of 3 focus groups of parent consumers of a community mental health agency. The research question was: "What do consumer parents recommend for developing psychoeducation programs for their minor children?" Parents recommended content foci of mental illness, recovery, heritability, stigma, and coping. The next step is youth psychoeducation intervention development and evaluation. Parents, youth, and professionals should be included in the program planning. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. How Professionals View Multifamily Psychoeducation: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingvarsdotter, K; Persson, K; Hjärthag, F; Östman, M

    2016-09-01

    Severe mental illness causes suffering for the patient as well as the patient's immediate family. The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare has recommended the implementation of multifamily psychoeducation in order to assist patient and family in the recovery process. The aim of this study was to determine how introducing multifamily psychoeducation in Sweden has been viewed by professionals. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 service providers, who were involved in evaluating multifamily psychoeducation. Our main findings fell under the headings of defensive culture and unsuitable model. Resistance to introducing the new intervention was found on multiple levels. The model proposed was considered too rigid for both the target group and the organizations because it could not be adjusted to the needs of patients, families, or facilitators. Despite good evidence for the effectiveness of the intervention, there were difficulties introducing the multifamily psychoeducation model in clinical practice. The feasibility of an intervention needs to be evaluated before adopting it as a national guideline.

  15. [Neuropsychology of psychoeducation in schizophrenia: results of the Munich COGPIP study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitschel-Walz, G; Gsottschneider, A; Froböse, T; Kraemer, S; Bäuml, J; Jahn, T

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine whether the efficacy of psychoeducation in patients with schizophrenia is dependent on their cognitive performance and if a preceding cognitive training can enhance the therapeutic effects of psychoeducation. A total of 116 inpatients were randomly assigned to either a standardized cognitive training (COGPACK) or to routine occupational therapy, followed by a psychoeducational group program of 8 sessions within 4 weeks for all study patients. The effects of cognitive training and psychoeducation were assessed directly afterwards and in a follow-up after 9 months. The patient knowledge and compliance improved. Neurocognition and especially memory acquisition significantly predicted illness knowledge after psychoeducation, whereas psychopathology did not. No differential effects of the COGPACK training were found. After 9 months 75% of the patients showed a very good compliance and the readmission rate was 18%. The results were comparable under both study conditions. Besides baseline illness knowledge neurocognition was the only significant predictor for illness knowledge after psychoeducation. Patients with cognitive deficits can profit from psychoeducation in the long run as well. In future it should be examined whether a modified cognitive training program could achieve a faster improvement of the illness knowledge.

  16. Stabilizing Group Treatment for Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Related to Childhood Abuse Based on Psycho-Education and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrepaal, Ethy; Thomaes, Kathleen; Smit, Johannes H.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.; van Dyck, Richard; Veltman, Dick J.; Draijer, Nel

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study tests a Stabilizing Group Treatment protocol, designed for the management of the long-term sequelae of child abuse, that is, Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Complex PTSD). Evidence-based treatment for this subgroup of PTSD patients is largely lacking. This stabilizing treatment aims at improving Complex PTSD using…

  17. Exploration of Support Behavior in Counseling Groups with Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Yoni; Shechtman, Zipora; Cutrona, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    The study explores the types of support expressed in counseling groups attended by trainee counselors. Support is a crucial factor in human life in general, and in groups in particular, yet little is known about the type of support presented in counseling groups. Type of support was categorized by means of the Social Support Behavior Code (SSBC;…

  18. Expeditionary Strike Group: Command Structure Design Support

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hutchins, Susan G; Kemple, William G; Kleinman, David L; Hocevar, Susan P

    2005-01-01

    An Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) is a new capability mix that combines the combat power of three surface combatants and one submarine with an Amphibious Readiness Group/ Marine Expeditionary Unit...

  19. Psycho-education for substance use and antisocial personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thylstrup, Birgitte; Schrøder, Sidsel; Hesse, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antisocial personality disorder often co-exists with drug and alcohol use disorders. Methods: This trial examined the effectiveness of offering psycho-education for antisocial personality disorder in community substance use disorder treatment centers in Denmark. A total of 176 patients......%) of participants randomized to psycho-education attended at least one counselling session, and 21 (23%) attended all six sessions. The Median number of sessions was 2. All patients reduced drug and alcohol problems at 9 months with small within-group effect sizes. Intention-to-treat analyses indicated significant...... differences between ILC and TAU in mean drugs composite score (p = .018) and in PDA (p = .041) at 3 months. Aggression declined in both groups, but no differences between ILC and TAU were observed in terms of alcohol problems or aggression at any follow-up. Conclusions: Moderate short-term improvements...

  20. Telephone-delivered psychoeducational intervention for Hong Kong Chinese dementia caregivers: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok T

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Timothy Kwok,1,2 Bel Wong,2 Isaac Ip,2 Kenny Chui,2 Daniel Young,2 Florence Ho2 1Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region; 2Jockey Club Centre for Positive Ageing, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region Purpose: Many family caregivers of persons with dementia (PWD are unable to participate in community center-based caregiver support services because of logistical constraints. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a telephone-delivered psychoeducational intervention for family caregivers of PWD in alleviating caregiver burden and enhancing caregiving self-efficacy. Subjects and methods: In a single-blinded randomized controlled trial, 38 family caregivers of PWD were randomly allocated into an intervention group or a control group. The intervention group received psychoeducation from a registered social worker over the phone for 12 sessions. Caregivers in the control group were given a DVD containing educational information about dementia caregiving. Outcomes of the intervention were measured by the Chinese versions of the Zarit Burden Interview and the Revised Scale for Caregiving Self-efficacy. Mann–Whitney U tests were used to compare the differences between the intervention and control groups. Results: The level of burden of caregivers in the intervention group reduced significantly compared with caregivers in the control group. Caregivers in the intervention group also reported significantly more gain in self-efficacy in obtaining respite than the control group. Conclusion: A structured telephone intervention can benefit dementia caregivers in terms of self-efficacy and caregiving burden. The limitations of the research and recommendations for intervention are discussed. Keywords: telephone intervention, psychoeducation, dementia caregivers

  1. Effectiveness of Psycho-Educational Intervention in HIV Patients? Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Clarisse; Sarmento e Castro, Rui; Dinis-Ribeiro, M?rio; Fernandes, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) is the main prognostic factor associated with HIV disease progression and death. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psycho-educational program to promote adherence to HAART in HIV patients. A longitudinal study (n=102) over 9 months in an Infectious Diseases Hospital was carried out. Adherence to HAART was measured with standardized scales and values of viral load. Two groups were defined: adherents and non-adherents. In th...

  2. Assessing the Psychoeducational Approach to Transcendence and Health Program: An Intervention to Foster Self-Transcendence and Well-Being in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Valerie Lander; Bowland, Sharon; Hall, Lynne A; Connelly, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    The late-life developmental process of self-transcendence shapes elders' perspectives on self, others, the nature of this world, and of a dimension beyond the here and now. This qualitative pilot study evaluated the Psychoeducational Approach to Transcendence and Health (PATH) Program, a psychoeducational intervention to promote self-transcendence and well-being in community-dwelling women at a senior center. The intervention involved eight weekly group sessions using group processes, mindfulness practices, creative experiences, and independent at-home practice. The findings supported the underlying theory-based structure and content of the intervention and indicated the intervention may empower elders to attend to self-care, develop acceptance, and learn new skills associated with health and well-being, thus merits further study. Based on insights gained from facilitators' and participants' experiences and perceptions, the intervention will be revised and strengthened. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Perceived Needs for Support Program for Family With Child Sexual Abuse Victim in South Korea: Focus Group Interview With Therapists and Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Suejung; Kim, Jinsook

    2016-10-01

    This study assessed perceived needs for psychological support program for family with victim of child sexual abuse in South Korea. We conducted two separate focus group interviews with five therapists who served child sexual abuse victims and families as well as four mothers of a child sexual abuse victim. Consensual qualitative research analysis revealed four domains: Emotional support for parents, psychoeducation, family therapy, and tailored and flexible service delivery. Core ideas of the four domains were identified. The results were consistent with the family support program contents developed in Western countries and suggested culture-specific contents and culturally sensitive service delivery. Clinical implications for developing family support program in South Korea were discussed.

  4. Psychoeducation for depression, anxiety and psychological distress: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuijpers Pim

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the high prevalence and burden associated with depression and anxiety disorders and the existence of treatment barriers, there is a clear need for brief, inexpensive and effective interventions such as passive psychoeducational interventions. There are no published meta-analyses of the effectiveness of passive psychoeducation in reducing symptoms of depression, anxiety or psychological distress. Methods Cochrane, PsycInfo and PubMed databases were searched in September 2008. Additional materials were obtained from reference lists. Papers describing passive psychoeducational interventions for depression, anxiety and psychological distress were included if the research design was a randomized controlled trial and incorporated an attention placebo, no intervention or waitlist comparison group. Results In total, 9010 abstracts were identified. Of these, five papers which described four research studies targeting passive psychoeducation for depression and psychological distress met the inclusion criteria. The pooled standardized-effect size (four studies, four comparisons for reduced symptoms of depression and psychological distress at post-intervention was d = 0.20 (95% confidence interval: 0.01-0.40; Z = 2.04; P = 0.04; the number needed to treat: 9. Heterogeneity was not significant among the studies (I2 = 32.77, Q:4.46; P = 0.22. Conclusions Although it is commonly believed that psychoeducation interventions are ineffective, this meta-analysis revealed that brief passive psychoeducational interventions for depression and psychological distress can reduce symptoms. Brief passive psychoeducation interventions are easy to implement, can be applied immediately and are not expensive. They may offer a first-step intervention for those experiencing psychological distress or depression and might serve as an initial intervention in primary care or community models. The findings suggest that the quality of psychoeducation may be

  5. STREAMS - Supporting Underrepresented Groups in Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho-Knighton, K.; Johnson, A.

    2009-12-01

    In Fall 2008, STREAMS (Supporting Talented and Remarkable Environmental And Marine Science students) Scholarship initiative began at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg, the only public university in Pinellas County. STREAMS is a partnership between the University of South Florida St. Petersburg’s (USFSP) Environmental Science and Policy Program and University of South Florida’s (USF) College of Marine Science. The STREAMS Student Scholarship Program has facilitated increased recruitment, retention, and graduation of USFSP environmental science and USF marine science majors. The STREAMS program has increased opportunities for minorities and women to obtain undergraduate and graduate degrees, gain valuable research experience and engage in professional development activities. STREAMS scholars have benefited from being mentored by USFSP and USF faculty and as well as MSPhDs students and NSF Florida-Georgia LSAMP Bridge to Doctorate graduate fellows. In addition, STREAMS has facilitated activities designed to prepare student participants for successful Earth system science-related careers. We will elucidate the need for this initiative and vision for the collaboration.

  6. The effects of psychoeducation on thought-action fusion, thought suppression, and responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino-Carper, Teresa; Negy, Charles; Burns, Gillian; Lunt, Rachael A

    2010-09-01

    The current study examined the effects of a psychoeducational intervention designed to target thought-action fusion (TAF) on TAF, thought suppression, and responsibility cognitions. 139 undergraduate students (25 male; 114 female) who were relatively high in TAF with respect to their peers served as participants. Immediately following intervention, individuals who had received psychoeducation regarding TAF reported significantly lower morality TAF scores than individuals who had received psychoeducation regarding thoughts in general and individuals in the control group. At the two-week follow-up assessment, the likelihood TAF scores of those who had received psychoeducation regarding TAF were significantly lower than those of the control group. In addition, the group that received psychoeducation regarding TAF was the only group that did not experience a significant increase in thought suppression from baseline to post-intervention, and was also the only group to experience an increase in both frequency of and belief in low-responsibility thoughts from baseline to follow-up. Implications are discussed. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of psychoeducation on the functioning level of patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdal, Ebru; Tanriverdi, Derya; Savas, Haluk Asuman

    2014-03-01

    Bipolar disorder has adverse effects on the lives of the individuals and the people around them and causes disability due to impaired social and occupational functioning, risk of suicide, and frequent relapses. This study was conducted as a two-group pretest-posttest design to determine the effect of psychoeducation on the functioning levels of patients with bipolar disorder. A total of 80 patients were assigned to either the experimental (n = 40) or the control group (n = 40). The data were collected using a questionnaire form, and the Bipolar Disorder Functioning Questionnaire. The experimental group scored significantly higher on the functioning levels (emotional functioning, intellectual functioning, feelings of stigmatization, social withdrawal, household relations, relations with friends, participating in social activities, daily activities and recreational activities, taking initiative and self-sufficiency, and occupation) (p < .05) compared with the control group after psychoeducation. Psychoeducation has become considerably effective in increasing the functioning levels of patients with bipolar disorder.

  8. Caregiver's Burden, Coping, and Psycho-Education in Indian Households with Single- and Multiple-Affected Members with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Satabdi; Bhatia, Triptish; Anderson, Carol; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L; Deshpande, Smita N

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that family psycho-education combined with pharmacological intervention for patients with schizophrenia increases family understanding of the illness, reduces the familial burden of care, and improves patient outcomes. However, no studies have determined whether the burden of care is greater for those families with more than one ill member (multiplex) than for families with a single-affected individual (simplex), and whether psycho-educational programs should be adapted to meet the specific needs of multiplex families. This study was conducted at a tertiary care postgraduate teaching hospital in New Delhi, India. Caregivers in simplex [n = 50] and multiplex families [n = 30] were compared with regard to levels of burden, coping, and the impact of psycho-education on family functioning. All the caregiver participants attended eight bimonthly, psycho-educational intervention sessions. They were assessed on the Burden Assessment Schedule (BAS) and the Coping Check List (CCL) before and after psycho-education. Caregivers from the multiplex families reported significantly more burden on two domains of the BAS, but there were no significant differences between the groups with regard to coping on the CCL. Following psycho-education, significant improvement occurred in the majority of domains of the BAS and the CCL; the effect sizes varied by domain and family type. Multiplex families face a greater burden of care compared with simplex families. Currently, available psycho-education programs are moderately effective for such families.

  9. Effectiveness of a Psycho-Education Program on Learned Helplessness and Irrational Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Yagmur; Duy, Baki

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a psycho-education program aimed at reducing learned helplessness and irrational beliefs of eight-grade elementary students. The study was an experimental study based on the pre-test-post-test model with control and placebo group. A total of 27 participants, 9 group members in each group,…

  10. Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy versus psychoeducation control for illness anxiety disorder and somatic symptom disorder: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Jill M; Smith, Jessica; Uppal, Shivani; Mason, Elizabeth; Mahoney, Alison E J; Andrews, Gavin

    2018-01-01

    To examine the efficacy of an Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy (iCBT) program for health anxiety compared to an active psychoeducation control group. Individuals (N = 86, mean age: 30 years, 87% female) with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.) diagnosis of illness anxiety disorder or somatic symptom disorder with health anxiety were randomized to either a 6-lesson clinician-guided iCBT program for health anxiety (n = 45) or an active control group who received anxiety psychoeducation, clinical support, and monitoring (control, n = 41) over a 12-week period. Both groups experienced significant improvements between baseline and posttreatment on self-report measures of health anxiety, depression, general anxiety, and functional impairment. Intention-to-treat analyses indicated that the iCBT group experienced greater improvements in health anxiety on the Short Health Anxiety Inventory (SHAI) compared to controls (between-groups effect size = 1.39, 95% confidence interval [0.87, 1.93]), and a greater proportion of the iCBT group showed clinically reliable change on the SHAI (84% vs. 34% in the control group). Similarly, the iCBT group outperformed the control group on secondary measures of depression, generalized anxiety, functional impairment, maladaptive cognitions, body hypervigilance, safety behaviors and avoidance, and intolerance of uncertainty. Gains were maintained at 3-month follow-up in the iCBT group. iCBT for health anxiety is more effective than psychoeducation, clinical support, and monitoring, and presents an efficacious and accessible treatment option for people with health anxiety. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Community Post-Tornado Support Groups: Intervention and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, Susan; And Others

    Post-tornado support groups were organized by the Greene County, North Carolina disaster coordinators and the Pitt County outreach workers from the Community Mental Health Center sponsored tornado follow-up project. The most significant intervention used was the emphasis on creating a climate of group support by establishing a forum for…

  12. The Family Support Group (FSG) Leaders’ Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-01

    family guide. Fort Hood, TX: Author. Granovsky , N. (1998). Family Support Group leader basic handbook (Operation READY). Alexandria, VA: U. S...Readiness and Financial Planning " (22.3 minutes). Granovsky , N. (1998). Family Support Group Leader Basic Handbook (Operation READY). Alexandria

  13. Economic aspects of peer support groups for psychosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stant, A.D.; Castelein, S.; Bruggeman, R.; Busschbach, J.T.; van der Gaag, M.; Knegtering, H.; Wiersma, D.

    2011-01-01

    Peer support groups are rarely available for patients with psychosis, despite potential clinical and economic advantages of such groups. In this study, 106 patients with psychosis were randomly allocated to minimally guided peer support in addition to care as usual (CAU), or CAU only. No relevant

  14. Stress and nurses' horizontal mobbing: moderating effects of group identity and group support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topa, Gabriela; Moriano, Juan A

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal mobbing is a process of systematic and repeated aggression towards a worker by coworkers. Among others, stress has been pointed out as one of the antecedents that favors the onset of horizontal mobbing, whereas group support to the target could act as a buffer. Moreover, the social identity approach emphasizes that group identity is an antecedent of group support. This study explores the interaction of group support and group identity in the explanation of horizontal mobbing in a sample (N = 388) of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses employed at two large hospitals in Madrid and Navarre (Spain). The results show that stress is positively associated to horizontal mobbing, whereas group support and group identity were negative predictors of horizontal mobbing. Furthermore, the combination of low group identity and low group support precipitated HM among nurses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Can older "at risk" adults benefit from psychoeducation targeting healthy brain aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrie, Louisa M; Diamond, Keri; Hickie, Ian B; Rogers, Naomi L; Fearns, Samantha; Naismith, Sharon L

    2011-04-01

    Multifactorial strategies that prevent or delay the onset or progress of cognitive decline and dementia are needed, and should include education regarding recognized risk factors. The current study sought to investigate whether older adults "at risk" of cognitive decline benefit from psychoeducation targeting healthy brain aging. 65 participants (mean age 64.8 years, SD 9.6) with a lifetime history of major depression; vascular risk as evidenced by at least one vascular risk factor; and/or subjective or objective memory impairment were allocated to weekly psychoeducation sessions or a waitlist control group. The small group sessions were conducted over ten weeks by a team of medical and allied health professionals with expertise in late-life depression and cognition. Sessions focused on modifiable risk factors for cognitive decline including vascular risk, diet, exercise, depression, anxiety and sleep disturbance, as well as providing practical strategies for memory and cognition. Both the psychoeducation and waitlist group completed a 20-item knowledge test at baseline and follow-up. Participants in the psychoeducation group were asked to complete follow-up self-report satisfaction questionnaires. Repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant interaction effect depicting improvements in knowledge associated with psychoeducation, corresponding to an improvement of 15% from baseline. Satisfaction data additionally showed that 92.3% of participants rated the program as "good" to "excellent", and over 90% suggested they would recommend it to others. A group-based psychoeducation program targeting healthy brain aging is effective in improving knowledge. Additionally, it is acceptable and rated highly by participants.

  16. Effectiveness of a comprehensive psychoeducational intervention with pregnant and parenting adolescents: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Deborah V; Looney, Stephen W

    2004-01-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of a comprehensive psychoeducational intervention on depression, self-esteem, and parenting attitudes/beliefs of at-risk pregnant and parenting adolescents. Adolescents (N = 41) attending either a residential treatment facility (RTF) or a rural alternative school (RAS) participated in a psychoeducational parenting group using Bavolek's Nurturing Program during Phase I. Phase II included health promotion issues, infant massage, and CPR. Using the Parenting Semantic Differential and the AAPI-2, there was significant improvement in parenting attitudes and beliefs. No significant change was found in self-esteem. A comprehensive psychoeducational parenting group can be effective in changing parenting attitudes and beliefs, which suggests an ultimate improvement in health promotion and disease prevention in adolescent women and their children.

  17. Effects of Psychoeducation for Offenders in a Community Correctional Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liau, Albert K.; Shively, Randy; Horn, Mary; Landau, Jennifer; Barriga, Alvaro; Gibbs, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The present study provided a randomized outcome evaluation of the psychoeducational component of the EQUIP program. The psychoeducational curriculum was implemented in a community correctional facility for adult felony offenders. The psychoeducational curriculum is designed to remedy offenders' delays in moral judgment maturity, social cognitive…

  18. Preliminary Investigation of a Stress Prevention and Mindfulness Group for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Jenson E.; McCarthy, Christopher J.

    2018-01-01

    This exploratory study evaluated a short-term (6-8 weeks) psychoeducation and support group for teachers focused on stress prevention and mindfulness (labeled SPAM group). A total of 4 groups were implemented in different schools, and evaluation was conducted with quantitative (pre- and post-measures of teacher vulnerability to stress, job…

  19. Support groups for older victims of domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, R S

    2001-01-01

    A 1997 nationwide (US and Canada) search to identify support groups for older victims of domestic violence located 16 sponsored by domestic violence programs and 14 sponsored by aging services. Interviews with group leaders indicated more similarities than differences between the two types of sponsorship in group purpose, leadership, numbers served, content of support group sessions, and success in accomplishing goals. Resistance of elders to participate in a group experience was cited by leaders as a major barrier. Recommendations for future groups include insuring accessibility of meeting site; using a leader and co-leader, at least one of whom is older or familiar with aging issues; allocating resources for recruitment; and seeking a steady source of funding. A policy of collaboration among the state's domestic violence coalition, state unit on aging, adult protective services, and victim assistance program may help in promoting support group development and utilization.

  20. Teacher regulation of multiple computer-supported collaborating groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leeuwen, Anouschka; Janssen, Jeroen; Erkens, Gijsbert; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    Teachers regulating groups of students during computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) face the challenge of orchestrating their guidance at student, group, and class level. During CSCL, teachers can monitor all student activity and interact with multiple groups at the same time. Not much is

  1. [Role of psychoeducation in therapy of women with paranoid schizophrenia on the background of abdominal obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinayko, V; Korovina, L

    2013-03-01

    Sufficient information of patients and their relatives about essence of disease, principles of medicamental therapy, is one of major factors influencing on adherence of patients to therapy. Application of psychoeducation programs allows to activate a patient in partnership with a doctor, that assists the increase of compliance. Research aim - to improve quality of remission and readaptation of patients with paranoid schizophrenia by realization of the psychoeducation programs. 45 women in age of 18-60 being on treatment in the Kharkiv regional clinical psychiatric hospital №3, with a diagnosis paranoid schizophrenia were examined. Psychoeducation lessons were conducted in closed groups for 7-8 persons, 2 times per a week, by duration every lesson for 45 minutes. The psychoeducation module consisted of informative block and forming of practical skills. Realization of psychoeducation lesson in this contingent showed the efficiency. Communicative activity became better for all patients as well as their adherence to therapy, that gave possibility promptly expose and warn development of side effects, improve quality and level of social adaptation of patients life.

  2. Online support groups for women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughan, Eilis; Parahoo, Kader; Hueter, Irene; Northouse, Laurel; Bradbury, Ian

    2017-03-10

    Survival rates for women with a diagnosis of breast cancer continue to improve. However, some women may experience physical, psychological and emotional effects post diagnosis, throughout treatment and beyond. Support groups can provide opportunities for people to share their experiences and learn from others. As the number of online support groups increases, more and more women with breast cancer will likely access them. To assess effects of online support groups on the emotional distress, uncertainty, anxiety, depression and quality of life (QoL) of women with breast cancer. We searched for trials in the Cochrane Breast Cancer Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE, Embase and PsycINFO on 2 May 2016, and we handsearched journals and reference lists. We also searched the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) search portal and clinicaltrials.gov on 2 May 2016. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing effects of online support groups on women with a diagnosis of breast cancer and women who have completed breast cancer treatment. We included studies comparing online support groups with a usual care group, and studies comparing two or more types of online support groups (without a usual care group). Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We presented outcome data using mean differences (MDs) and standardised mean differences (SMDs) along with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and we used the fixed-effect model when appropriate. We assessed the quality of the body of evidence using the GRADE approach. We included six studies (492 women) that assessed online support groups for women with breast cancer. Online support groups in these six trials lasted from six to 30 weeks. Women participated in these groups between 1.5 and 2.5 hours per week, and investigators conducted all studies in the USA

  3. Surfacing the life phases of a mental health support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Wanda K

    2004-01-01

    Support groups have increased rapidly in number and become a viable alternative to formal treatment in the United States. However, little is known regarding how mental health advocacy or support groups start and develop, or about challenges that can threaten their survival. In this 2 1/2-year ethnography, the author studied the culture of a developing family support program associated with a system of care. Several phases emerged, reflecting an organizational dynamic. The group dynamics and response to challenges have implications for organizers and parent organizations about the need for technical assistance necessary for survival of the group. Participant observation and immersion in the culture of such groups can provide a deeper understanding of the ideologies and values around which they organize and the kinds of tensions that members can experience during the group's cycle.

  4. Effect of mother support groups on nutritional status in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study aimed at determining how mother support groups affect the nutrition status of children under 2 years of age ... fants should be fed exclusively on breast milk from birth ... an intervention provides long-term health benefits for.

  5. Fostering supportive community connections through mothers' groups and playgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Cecily; Fisher, Colleen; Howat, Peter; Wood, Lisa

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the ways that mothers' groups and playgroups support families with children aged 0-5 years and foster community connectedness in newer residential communities in Perth, Western Australia. The transition to parenthood is a time of increased support need. Changing community demography has resulted in a loss of traditional support structures and an increased need for local community initiatives to support families with young children. A qualitative descriptive design was used for this initial phase of a mixed methods sequential exploratory study. Data were collected between December 2011-August 2012. Interviews and focus groups conducted with 39 mothers provided insights from 16 mothers' groups and 13 playgroups. In addition, interviews were undertaken with three child health nurses and four local government early childhood staff. For the participants in this study, mothers' groups and playgroups provided opportunities to learn about parenting, to build a supportive network, to forge friendships and a connectedness to the local community. The families who relocated often experienced isolation until new groups and social networks were found. In general, where participation in mothers' groups and playgroups facilitated relationships with others from the local community, connectedness to that community was reported by participants to be enhanced. Mothers' groups and playgroups provide important community development opportunities and appear to help reduce potential isolation for mothers with young children. The findings are of interest to nurses and other health professionals working with families with young children. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Caregiver psychoeducation for schizophrenia: is gender important?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McWilliams, Stephen

    2007-07-01

    Females care for individuals with chronic illness more commonly than males and have different attitudes to illness. Additionally, they experience greater burden and reduced quality of life, when compared to their male counterparts. Since knowledge has been shown to be related to burden, we sought to determine whether there were gender differences in knowledge acquisition during a six-week caregiver psychoeducation programme (CPP).

  7. Keep Your Brain Fit! A Psychoeducational Training Program for Healthy Cognitive Aging: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnders, Jennifer; van Heugten, Caroline; van Boxtel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A psychoeducational face-to-face training program (Keep Your Brain Fit!) was developed to support the working population in coping with age-related cognitive changes and taking proactive preventive measures to maintain cognitive health. A feasibility study was conducted to test the training program presented in a workshop format. Participants…

  8. Facilitating Support Groups for Professionals Working with People with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Arnold H.; Silverstein, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Describes support groups for health care professionals who work with people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and who are experiencing burnout from excessive demands on their energy, strength, and resources. Discusses group administration, effective intervention techniques, and issues of health…

  9. A Community Support Group for Single Custodial Fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedder, Sandra L.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Discusses a five-session group experience within the context of establishing a support group for single custodial fathers. Includes topics of dating, remarriage, homemaking and house maintenance, and the effects of divorce on children. A follow-up showed fathers appreciated the sense of community and specific information and coping strategies.…

  10. Computer-mediated support group intervention for parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragadóttir, Helga

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a computer-mediated support group (CMSG) intervention for parents whose children had been diagnosed with cancer. An evaluative one-group, before-and-after research design. A CMSG, an unstructured listserve group where participants used their E-mail for communication, was conducted over a 4-month period. Participation in the CMSG was offered to parents in Iceland whose children had completed cancer treatment in the past 5 years. Outcome measures were done: before the intervention (Time 1), after 2 months of intervention (Time 2) and after 4 months of intervention (Time 3) when the project ended. Measures included: demographic and background variables; health related vulnerability factors of parents: anxiety, depression, somatization, and stress; perceived mutual support; and use of the CMSG. Data were collected from November 2002 to June 2003. Twenty-one of 58 eligible parents participated in the study, with 71% retention rate for both post-tests. Mothers' depression decreased significantly from Time 2 to Time 3 (pcomputer technology for support is particularly useful for dispersed populations and groups that have restrictions on their time. Computer-mediated support groups have been shown to be a valuable addition to, or substitute for, a traditional face-to-face mutual support group and might suit both genders equally.

  11. Implementing a short-term family support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, E; Cox, D; Hastings, S

    1991-05-01

    1. Although family involvement has been increasingly recognized as a vital component in the treatment and care of the mentally ill, little has been written about efforts to provide education and support to the families of patients hospitalized for short-term evaluation and treatment. 2. The family education and support group provided emotional support and critical information to increase family members' coping and problem solving abilities, and enabled them to return to a pre-crisis or higher level of functioning. 3. The family education and support group not only enhances the assessment and planning phases of the nursing process, but it also can serve as a useful intervention for strengthening the patient's major support system.

  12. Lessons learned from a secret Facebook support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Debra Parker; Washington, Karla; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Gage, Ashley; Mooney, Megan; Demiris, George

    2015-05-01

    The National Association of Social Workers developed practice standards for social workers using technology in their practice. These standards were derived from the foundation of the social work code of ethics and are helpful as social workers explore the use of new tools for the benefit of their clients. Hospice caregivers, both active and bereaved, are in great need of support but are often unable to attend traditional support groups. Facebook secret groups offer social workers a potential tool, given the geographic barriers that exist for traditional face-to-face support groups. The authors' experience with a secret Facebook group indicates that the technology can be useful when managed by a social worker facilitator. As social workers continue to explore helpful ways to use technology with clients, it is critical that they evaluate that practice and assess the clinical outcomes to establish an evidence base behind this practice.

  13. Combination treatment with risperidone long-acting injection and psychoeducational approaches for preventing relapse in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Yueren Zhao,1–3 Taro Kishi,1 Nakao Iwata,1 Manabu Ikeda3,4 1Department of Psychiatry, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan; 2Department of Psychiatry, Okehazama Hospital Fujita Kokoro Care Center, Toyoake, Aichi, Japan; 3Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto, Japan; 4Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Kumamoto, Japan Abstract: A recent meta-analysis showed that long-acting injectable (LAI antipsychotics were not superior to oral antipsychotics for preventing relapse in patients with schizophrenia. We therefore designed a treatment strategy combining risperidone LAI and COMPASS (COMprehensive Psycho-educational Approach and Scheme Set, an original psychoeducational program supporting treatment with risperidone LAI and evaluating subjective treatment satisfaction, transition of symptoms, and effectiveness in preventing symptomatic relapse. The aim of this study was to examine whether addition of COMPASS to risperidone LAI was more effective in preventing relapse in schizophrenia patients than risperidone LAI alone, with the latter group consisting of patients enrolled in a Phase III trial of risperidone LAI in Japan. Patients were followed up for 6 months, with COMPASS continuously implemented from the transition to the observation phase. The primary efficacy measurements were relapse rate (rates of rehospitalization and discontinuation due to inefficacy. Secondary efficacy measurements were the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF scores. Of the 96 patients originally enrolled, 19 (19.8% were discontinued from all causes. During the 6-month study period, ten of the 96 patients (10.4% relapsed, compared with a 12.2% relapse rate in patients enrolled in a Phase III trial of risperidone LAI in Japan. Patients showed significant improvements in BPRS total

  14. Parenting Young Children: Comparison of a Psychoeducational Program in Mexico and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis-Camara, Pedro R.; Fox, Robert A.; Nicholson, Bonnie C.

    2000-01-01

    Compared the cross-cultural effectiveness of a 10-hour psychoeducational program with 82 Mexican and 63 American mothers of very young children. Found that both groups significantly increased their expectations and use of nurturing strategies and reduced their use of verbal and corporal punishment following the program. Reported child behavior…

  15. Anger and Depression Management: Psychoeducational Skill Training Interventions for Women Caregivers of a Relative with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, David W.; Thompson, Larry; Steffen, Ann; Sorocco, Kristen; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the short-term impact of two theoretically based psychoeducational small group interventions with distressed caregivers, and it also examines the role of specific moderator and mediator variables on caregiver outcomes. Design and Methods: Female participants (N = 169) aged 50 and older who were caring for a…

  16. Evaluation of a psychoeducational intervention for adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Derkx, Bert H.; Last, Bob F.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), comprising Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, and indeterminate colitis, often has its onset in adolescence. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a psychoeducational group intervention (aiming to enhance information seeking and giving about the disease,

  17. Examination of bariatric surgery Facebook support groups: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koball, Afton M; Jester, Dylan J; Domoff, Sarah E; Kallies, Kara J; Grothe, Karen B; Kothari, Shanu N

    2017-08-01

    Support following bariatric surgery is vital to ensure long-term postoperative success. Many individuals undergoing bariatric surgery are turning to online modalities, especially the popular social media platform Facebook, to access support groups and pages. Despite evidence suggesting that the majority of patients considering bariatric surgery are utilizing online groups, little is known about the actual content of these groups. The purpose of the present study was to conduct a content analysis of bariatric surgery support groups and pages on Facebook. Online via Facebook, independent academic medical center, United States. Data from bariatric surgery-related Facebook support groups and pages were extracted over a 1-month period in 2016. Salient content themes (e.g., progress posts, depression content, eating behaviors) were coded reliably (all κ> .70). More than 6,800 posts and replies were coded. Results indicated that seeking recommendations (11%), providing information or recommendations (53%), commenting on changes since surgery (19%), and lending support to other members (32%) were the most common types of posts. Content surrounding anxiety, eating behaviors, depression, body image, weight bias, and alcohol was found less frequently. Online bariatric surgery groups can be used to receive support, celebrate physical and emotional accomplishments, provide anecdotal accounts of the "bariatric lifestyle" for preoperative patients, and comment on challenges with mental health and experiences of weight bias. Providers should become acquainted with the content commonly found in online groups and exercise caution in recommending these platforms to information-seeking patients. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Patient and family psychoeducation: Service development and implementation in a center in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsepassi, Zahra; Tabatabaee, Maryam; Sharifi, Vandad; Mottaghipour, Yasaman

    2018-02-01

    Family and patient psychoeducation have demonstrated significant improvement in clinical and social outcomes for patients suffering from severe mental disorders and their families. However, these evidence-based practices are not widely implemented at service delivery level and into routine clinical practice, especially in less developed countries. The aim of this article is to report the processes of development and implementation of a psychoeducational service for patients with severe mental illnesses and their families in Iran. The program was developed at Roozbeh Hospital in Tehran, Iran. A group of clinicians worked on the development phase of the program and drafting the manuals. Then, a series of workshops and supervision sessions were held to train group leaders for implementation of the group psychoeducation for patients and families. In the pilot phase, the services were delivered to two groups of patients and families, and then the manual was revised based on the feedback from group leaders and participants. The program consisted of eight 90-minute weekly patient group sessions and 6 weekly multiple family group sessions. Two manuals for patient education (schizophrenia and bipolar disorder) were developed. Several information sheets were developed and distributed during different sessions of family and patient psychoeducation related to the content of each session. Despite providing the hospital clinicians with the information regarding these new services, less than 10% of the admitted patients were referred by their clinicians. Feasibility and sustainability of the program are affected by a number of factors. Low referral rate of clinicians, limited resources of the hospital, issues related to stigma and logistic issues are barriers in implementation of these services. Administrators' and clinicians' understanding of the importance of patient and family psychoeducation seems to be crucial in sustainability of such programs in routine service delivery.

  19. EFFECT OF PSYCHOEDUCATION ON ANXIETY IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Sulistiyo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular heart disease still remains high in Indonesia. Various interventions have been implemented as an effort to deal with cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about intervention to reduce anxiety in patients with cardiovascular disease although anxiety is related to angina attack in this patient. Psychoeducation is considered effective in decreasing anxiety. Objective: To examine the effect of psychoeducation in decreasing anxiety in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD at the General Hospital of Semarang. Methods: This was a quasy experimental design with pretest posttest control group design. The study was conducted in the inpatient wards of the General Hospital of Semarang on January 17 until March 8, 2017. Fifty-six respondents were recruited using consecutive sampling, with 28 assigned in the experiment and control group. Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS was used to measure anxiety levels. Paired t-test and Independent t-test were used for data analysis. Results: Paired test showed that there was a statistically significant effect of psychoeducation on anxiety level in the experiment group with p-value 0.001 (<0.05, and significant effect of given a brochure of CHD on the anxiety level in the control group with p-value 0.001 (<0.05. Independent t-test showed a statistically significant difference of anxiety level after intervention in the experiment and control group with p-value 0.001 (<0.05. The mean anxiety level in the experiment group (22.46 was lower than the mean anxiety level in the control group (41.54. Conclusion: Psychoeducation is effective in reducing anxiety levels in patients with CHD. It is suggested that psychoeducation can be used as one of nursing intervention in an effort to reduce anxiety in patients with CHD.

  20. Effects of Psychoeducation on Mental Health in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashiri, Zahra; Aghajani, Mohammad; Masoudi Alavi, Negin

    2016-05-01

    Patients with coronary heart disease are at high risk for mental health disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Psychoeducation is a well-known intervention for psychiatric patients, but its use has been limited in other health conditions, such as coronary heart disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of psychoeducation on mental health in coronary heart disease patients. This randomized clinical trial included 70 patients with coronary heart disease at Shahid Beheshti hospital, in Kashan, Iran, in 2014. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups: the experimental group, which received eight sessions of psychoeducation, and the control group, which received routine care. Data were collected with the Goldberg mental health questionnaire (GHQ) and were analyzed using independent and paired t-tests performed with SPSS version 16. The means of overall GHQ scores were significantly decreased post-test in the intervention group, and the differences between the two groups were statistically significant in the overall GHQ scores (P = 0.0001). A significant difference was observed between the mean GHQ scores of the intervention group prior to and after the psychoeducational program (PEP) intervention (30 ± 4.66 vs. 20.50 ± 3.30) (P = 0.0001). No significant changes were observed in the control group pre- and post-test (P = 0.07). Psychoeducation resulted in improved mental health in patients with coronary heart disease. Therefore, it is recommended that this approach be performed as a complementary, effective, non-invasive, low-cost nursing intervention to reduce psychological problems in these patients.

  1. A multimodal support group with Hispanic traumatic brain injury survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengol, C G

    1999-06-01

    (a) To design and pilot a culturally sensitive and neuropsychologically informed support group addressing barriers to emotional, social, and vocational adjustment among high-level functioning Hispanic/Latino TBI survivors. (b) To determine efficacy through outcome measures. Ten-week multimodal, culturally sensitive support group focusing on TBI sequelae education, relaxation techniques, coping skills development, behavioral goal setting and monitoring, and family participation. Six Spanish-speaking high-level functioning TBI survivors aged 20-42. Outpatient neuropsychological assessment and treatment center. Beck Hopelessness Scale; Purpose in Life Test; Perceived Self-Regulatory Ability Inventory. Participants' sense of personal destiny and feelings of hopelessness improved, as evidenced by objective measures and self-report. A telephone interview a year later indicated that gains had been maintained, and most participants were vocationally active. Results underscore the importance of considering linguistic and ethnic factors in developing support groups.

  2. Affirmation, acknowledgment of in-group responsibility, group-based guilt, and support for reparative measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cehajić-Clancy, Sabina; Effron, Daniel A; Halperin, Eran; Liberman, Varda; Ross, Lee D

    2011-08-01

    Three studies, 2 conducted in Israel and 1 conducted in Bosnia and Herzegovina, demonstrated that affirming a positive aspect of the self can increase one's willingness to acknowledge in-group responsibility for wrongdoing against others, express feelings of group-based guilt, and consequently provide greater support for reparation policies. By contrast, affirming one's group, although similarly boosting feelings of pride, failed to increase willingness to acknowledge and redress in-group wrongdoing. Studies 2 and 3 demonstrated the mediating role of group-based guilt. That is, increased acknowledgment of in-group responsibility for out-group victimization produced increased feelings of guilt, which in turn increased support for reparation policies to the victimized group. Theoretical and applied implications are discussed.

  3. PEER GROUP SUPPORT CHANGE PERCEPTION OF HOMELESS AND BEGGAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwaningsih Purwaningsih

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Homeless and beggar are social problem in our society. The reason of people who becomes homeless and beggar can be influenced by internal factors such as lazy to work, mental and physical illness. Meanwhile, it also can be influenced by external factors, such as economy, geography, social, education, pshycology, culture and religion. The aimed of this study was to analyze the effect of peer group support to perception about the homeless and beggar. Method: A quasy experimental two group pre-post test purposive sampling design was used in this study. The subjects were homeless and beggar which stay at Lingkungan Pondok Sosial (Liponsos Keputih-Surabaya for at least three day. There were 16 respondent who met to the inclusion criteria which divided into two group (controlled and treatment. Data were analyzed by using Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and Mann Whitney U Test with significance level α≤0.05. Result: The result showed that controlled group has significance level p=0.109 and treatment group has significance level p=0.017, statistically by using Mann Whitney U Test showed p=0.021. Discussion: It can be concluded that peer group support can change the perception about the homeless and beggar who stayed at Liponsos Surabaya. Peer group support can used continuously as social activity at Liponsos.

  4. Understanding how education/support groups help lone mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lone-mother led families are at increased risk of psychosocial disadvantage, social isolation and mental health morbidity. Community-based programs are more accessible for families seeking assistance. We examine the experiences of eight lone mothers participating in a larger randomized controlled trial (RCT of a community-based education/support group program using mixed methods. Methods A purposeful sample of eight mothers participating in the intervention arm of an RCT of community-based support/education groups was selected for the qualitative study. Individual interviews asked mothers about themselves and their relationships with their children before and after the group. Interviews were taped, transcribed and content analysis was used to code and interpret the data. Quantitative data collected in the RCT were used to describe these mothers. Results Mothers participating in the RCT and qualitative study experienced multiple difficulties, including financial and mood problems. These mothers reported that before participating in the group, they had shared experiences of social isolation, stigma, a sense of failure, poor relationships with their children and difficulties with financial management. After the group, mothers identified improved self-esteem, support from other mothers, improved parenting skills and improved communication with their children as outcomes of group participation. Conclusions The qualitative data revealed mothers' perceptions of specific areas that improved by participating in the group. The utility of complementary information provided by qualitative and quantitative methods in understanding program impact, as well as the need for broader assistance is noted.

  5. Understanding how education/support groups help lone mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Ellen L; Kenny, Meghan; Jack, Susan; Cameron, Ruth; Secord, Margaret; Byrne, Carolyn

    2010-01-04

    Lone-mother led families are at increased risk of psychosocial disadvantage, social isolation and mental health morbidity. Community-based programs are more accessible for families seeking assistance. We examine the experiences of eight lone mothers participating in a larger randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a community-based education/support group program using mixed methods. A purposeful sample of eight mothers participating in the intervention arm of an RCT of community-based support/education groups was selected for the qualitative study. Individual interviews asked mothers about themselves and their relationships with their children before and after the group. Interviews were taped, transcribed and content analysis was used to code and interpret the data. Quantitative data collected in the RCT were used to describe these mothers. Mothers participating in the RCT and qualitative study experienced multiple difficulties, including financial and mood problems. These mothers reported that before participating in the group, they had shared experiences of social isolation, stigma, a sense of failure, poor relationships with their children and difficulties with financial management. After the group, mothers identified improved self-esteem, support from other mothers, improved parenting skills and improved communication with their children as outcomes of group participation. The qualitative data revealed mothers' perceptions of specific areas that improved by participating in the group. The utility of complementary information provided by qualitative and quantitative methods in understanding program impact, as well as the need for broader assistance is noted.

  6. Peer support groups boost use of female condom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Preliminary research findings from Brazil and Kenya indicate that, when women are provided with female condoms and peer group support, traditional obstacles to safe sex practices can be overcome. In these countries, as well as many others, women face cultural barriers to negotiating condom use with male partners. The study, conducted by the Women's Health Initiative of Family Health International's AIDS Control and Prevention Project, involved 106 Kenyan and 103 Brazilian women. A female focus group was held at the beginning of the study, followed by two peer support group meetings, with another focus group at the end of the study. Group support was an essential element in the acceptance process. Women who were afraid or unsuccessful with initial use were encouraged by other group members to try different, non-threatening approaches to the negotiation of female condom use and given suggestions for overcoming difficulties with insertion and lubrication. Some of these strategies included laying the female condom on the bed so the male partner raises the subject of its use and telling the partner the doctor had recommended the method to avoid the negative side effects associated with the pill. When female condom use is presented as a form of pregnancy prevention, the association of condoms with infidelity is overcome.

  7. Effects of a live educational music therapy intervention on acute psychiatric inpatients' perceived social support and trust in the therapist: a four-group randomized effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Social support is associated with enhanced illness management and recovery in persons with mental illness, making it an important topic addressed through acute inpatient psychoeducational programs. In addition, trust in the therapist may mediate clinical outcomes in this patient population. To date, few studies have examined the effect of music-based psychoeducational programs on these variables. The purpose of this study was to isolate and examine the component parts of a live educational music therapy intervention, and its effect on acute psychiatric inpatients' perceived social support from significant others, family, and friends and trust in the therapist. This study also explored whether trust in therapist varied across conditions, but did not examine it as a mediator for social support. Participants (N = 96) were cluster-randomized in a single-session posttest-only design to one of four conditions: live educational music therapy, recorded educational music therapy, education without music, or recreational music therapy without education. Conditions were designed to isolate the following intervention components: live vs. recorded music, educational vs. non-educational content, and music vs. nonmusic modality. Dependent measures were assessed post intervention via established self-report instruments evaluating perceived social support and trust in the therapist. There were no significant between-group differences for social support or trust in therapist total scores. However, subscale score analyses revealed two significant between-group differences: (a) participants in the Live Educational Music Therapy condition reported significantly higher perceived therapist competence compared with the Recorded Educational Music Therapy condition; (b) participants in the Live Educational Music Therapy condition reported significantly higher perceived support from friends compared with the Recreational Music Therapy condition. Live educational music therapy may be a way to

  8. Using social media to support small group learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Duncan; Rengasamy, Emma; Batchelor, Shafqat; Pope, Charles; Riley, Stephen; Cunningham, Anne Marie

    2017-11-10

    Medical curricula are increasingly using small group learning and less didactic lecture-based teaching. This creates new challenges and opportunities in how students are best supported with information technology. We explored how university-supported and external social media could support collaborative small group working on our new undergraduate medical curriculum. We made available a curation platform (Scoop.it) and a wiki within our virtual learning environment as part of year 1 Case-Based Learning, and did not discourage the use of other tools such as Facebook. We undertook student surveys to capture perceptions of the tools and information on how they were used, and employed software user metrics to explore the extent to which they were used during the year. Student groups developed a preferred way of working early in the course. Most groups used Facebook to facilitate communication within the group, and to host documents and notes. There were more barriers to using the wiki and curation platform, although some groups did make extensive use of them. Staff engagement was variable, with some tutors reviewing the content posted on the wiki and curation platform in face-to-face sessions, but not outside these times. A small number of staff posted resources and reviewed student posts on the curation platform. Optimum use of these tools depends on sufficient training of both staff and students, and an opportunity to practice using them, with ongoing support. The platforms can all support collaborative learning, and may help develop digital literacy, critical appraisal skills, and awareness of wider health issues in society.

  9. Effectiveness of Psycho-Educational Intervention in HIV Patients' Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Clarisse; Sarmento E Castro, Rui; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Fernandes, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) is the main prognostic factor associated with HIV disease progression and death. The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a psycho-educational program to promote adherence to HAART in HIV patients. A longitudinal study (n = 102) over 9 months in an Infectious Diseases Hospital was carried out. Adherence to HAART was measured with standardized scales and values of viral load. Two groups were defined: adherents and non-adherents. In the latter, a psycho-educational program was implemented and 6 months later measured adherence to HAART. Knowledge about the infection, CD4 T lymphocytes and HIV-ribonucleic acid values were measured before and after this program. The sample was predominantly male (70%), heterosexual (78%), with a mean age of 49 (SD = 12.7) years, and 48% of participants were not adhering to HAART. After the program, non-adherence decreased to 21.6%. Knowledge about the infection increased from 79 to 97%. A significant increase in CD4 T lymphocytes (mean 540-580) and a decrease in viral load (mean 5411-3052) were observed, the latter of statistical significance. This program seems to be feasible and efficient, improving adherence to HAART.

  10. Participation in online patient support groups endorses patients' empowerment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Uden-Kraan, C. F.; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, E; Seydel, E. R.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    Objective: Although much has been expected of the empowering effect of taking part in online patient support groups, there is no direct evidence thus far for the effects of participation on patient empowerment. Hence our exploring to what extent patients feel empowered by their participation in

  11. A social comparison theory analysis of group composition and efficacy of cancer support group programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack Taylor, Cindy L; Kulik, James; Badr, Hoda; Smith, Murray; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Penedo, Frank; Gritz, Ellen R

    2007-07-01

    Group-based psychosocial programs provide an effective forum for improving mood and social support for cancer patients. Because some studies show more benefit for patients with initially high psychosocial distress, and little or no benefit for patients with initially low distress, support programs may better address patient needs by only including distressed patients. However, distressed patients may benefit particularly from the presence of nondistressed patients who model effective coping, an idea many researchers and extensions of social comparison theory support. We present a theoretical analysis, based on a social comparison perspective, of how group composition (heterogeneous group of distressed and nondistressed patients versus homogeneous group of distressed patients) may affect the efficacy of cancer support programs. We propose that a heterogeneous group allows distressed patients maximal opportunity for the various social comparison activities they are likely to prefer; a homogeneous group does not. Though the presence of nondistressed patients in a heterogeneous group potentially benefits distressed patients, the benefits for nondistressed patients are unclear. For nondistressed patients, heterogeneous groups may provide limited opportunities for preferred social comparison activity and may create the possibility for no benefit or even negative effects on quality of life. We also discuss ethical issues with enrolling nondistressed patients whose presence may help others, but whose likelihood of personal benefit is questionable.

  12. Group Playing by Ear in Higher Education: The Processes That Support Imitation, Invention and Group Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvarigou, Maria

    2017-01-01

    This article explores how group playing by ear (GEP) through imitation of recorded material and opportunities for inventive work during peer interaction was used to support first year undergraduate western classical music students' aural, group creativity and improvisation skills. The framework that emerged from the analysis of the data describes…

  13. The management of social problems talk in a support group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza Gomes Peretti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The comprehension of the health-disease process from a multifactorial perspective has allowed important transformations in the healthcare practices. In this article, we discuss the use of the support group as a resource for mental health care, analyzing how conversations about social issues are managed in this context. Based on contributions from the social constructionist movement, we analyzed the transcripts of the conversations developed in meetings of a support group offered to patients of a mental health outpatient clinic. The analysis of the process of meaning making indicates that the discourse of the social influence on mental health is not legitimized, due to a predominant individualistic discourse, which psychologizes care and is centered on the emotional analysis of the problems of the quotidian. We argue that this mode of management brings limits to the construction of the group as a device for promoting autonomy and encouraging the social transformation processes.

  14. Leadership Qualities Emerging in an Online Social Support Group Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodatt, Stephanie A; Shenk, Jared E; Williams, Mark L; Horvath, Keith J

    2014-11-01

    Technology-delivered interventions addressing a broad range of problems for which clients present for therapy are proliferating. However, little is known of leadership dynamics that emerge in online group interventions. The purpose of this study was to assess the types of leadership qualities that would emerge in an online social support group intervention to improve medication adherence for men with HIV, and to characterize the demographic and psychosocial profiles of leaders. Written posts ( n =616) from 66 men were coded using an adapted version of the Full Range Model of Leadership. Results showed that 10% ( n =64) of posts reflected one of five leadership types, the most common of which was mentoring/providing feedback (40% of leadership posts). The next most common leadership style were instances in which encouragement was offered (30% of leadership posts). Leaders appeared to have lived with HIV longer and have higher Internet knowledge scores than non-leaders. Results indicate that online group interventions potentially may be useful to supplement traditional face-to-face treatment by providing an additional venue for group members to mentor and provide emotional support to each other. However, additional research is needed to more fully understand leadership qualities and group dynamics in other online group intervention settings.

  15. Integrating psychoeducation in a basic computer skills course for people suffering from social anxiety: participants' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löhr HD

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Hildegard D Löhr1,2, Jan H Rosenvinge1,3, Rolf Wynn2,41Division of General Psychiatry, University Hospital of North Norway, 2Telemedicine Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, 3Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, 4Division of Addiction and Specialized Psychiatry, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, NorwayAbstract: We describe a psychoeducational program integrated in a basic computer skills course for participants suffering from social anxiety. The two main aims of the course were: that the participants learn basic computer skills, and that the participants learn to cope better with social anxiety. Computer skills were taught by a qualified teacher. Psychoeducation and cognitive therapy skills, including topics such as anxiety coping, self-accept, and self-regulation, were taught by a clinical psychologist. Thirteen of 16 participants completed the course, which lasted 11 weeks. A qualitative analysis was performed, drawing on observations during the course and on interviews with the participants. The participants were positive about the integration of psychoeducation sessions in the computer course, and described positive outcomes for both elements, including improved computer skills, improved self-esteem, and reduced social anxiety. Most participants were motivated to undertake further occupational rehabilitation after the course.Keywords: cognitive therapy, information technology, occupational rehabilitation, psychoeducation, self-help, social anxiety

  16. Group decision support system for customer-driven product design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhihang; Chen, Hang; Chen, Kuen; Che, Ada

    2000-10-01

    This paper describes the work on the development of a group decision support system for customer driven product design. The customer driven is to develop products, which meet all customer requirements in whole life cycle of products. A process model of decision during product primary design is proposed to formulate the structured, semi-structured and unstructured decision problems. The framework for the decision support system is presented that integrated both advances in the group decision making and distributed artificial intelligent. The system consists of the product primary design tool kit and the collaborative platform with multi-agent structure. The collaborative platform of the system and the product primary design tool kit, including the VOC (Voice of Customer) tool, QFD (Quality Function Deployment) tool, the Conceptual design tool, Reliability analysis tool and the cost and profit forecasting tool, are indicated.

  17. Group dream work as a support for self – awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Brumen Žarn, Zarja

    2016-01-01

    Master's thesis discusses group dream work as a form of support for increasing the individual's self-awareness. Working with dreams encourages creativity, opens up the possibilities of self-knowing and helps individuals to guide their life paths. One of the fundamental concepts of social pedagogy is the empowerment of individuals for problem solving and self-development. For this purpose, social educational profession develops and uses a number of methods and approaches. Working with dreams i...

  18. A Group Creativity Support System for Dynamic Idea Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Idea evaluation is necessary in most modern organizations to identify the level of novelty and usefulness of new ideas. However, current idea evaluation research hinders creativity by primarily supporting convergent thinking (narrowing down ideas to a few tangible solutions), while divergent...... thinking (the development of wildly creative and novel thoughts patterns) is discounted. In this paper, this current view of idea evaluation is challenged through the development of a prototype that supports dynamic idea evaluation. The prototype uses knowledge created during evaluative processes...... to facilitate divergent thinking in a Group Creativity Support System (GCSS) designed from state-of-the-art research. The prototype is interpretively explored through a field experiment in a Danish IS research department. Consequently, the prototype demonstrates the ability to including divergent thinking...

  19. Caregiver’s Burden, Coping, and Psycho-Education in Indian Households with Single- and Multiple-Affected Members with Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Satabdi; Bhatia, Triptish; Anderson, Carol; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L.; Deshpande, Smita N.

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that family psycho-education combined with pharmacological intervention for patients with schizophrenia increases family understanding of the illness, reduces the familial burden of care, and improves patient outcomes. However, no studies have determined whether the burden of care is greater for those families with more than one ill member (multiplex) than for families with a single-affected individual (simplex), and whether psycho-educational programs should be adapted to meet the specific needs of multiplex families. This study was conducted at a tertiary care postgraduate teaching hospital in New Delhi, India. Caregivers in simplex [n = 50] and multiplex families [n = 30] were compared with regard to levels of burden, coping, and the impact of psycho-education on family functioning. All the caregiver participants attended eight bimonthly, psycho-educational intervention sessions. They were assessed on the Burden Assessment Schedule (BAS) and the Coping Check List (CCL) before and after psycho-education. Caregivers from the multiplex families reported significantly more burden on two domains of the BAS, but there were no significant differences between the groups with regard to coping on the CCL. Following psycho-education, significant improvement occurred in the majority of domains of the BAS and the CCL; the effect sizes varied by domain and family type. Multiplex families face a greater burden of care compared with simplex families. Currently, available psycho-education programs are moderately effective for such families. PMID:29449743

  20. FACEBOOK GROUPS AS A SUPPORTING TOOL FOR LANGUAGE CLASSROOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Ekoç

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to present a review of Facebook group pages as an educational tool for language learning. One of the primary needs of foreign language learners is to gain the opportunity to use the target language outside the classroom practice. Social media communication provides occasions for learners to receive input and produce output while engaging in negotiation of meaning. In line with this point, teachers can instigate class group pages in the social media in an attempt to provide a space for practice and communication free of the traditional pedagogic concerns of a typical classroom. The distinctive discursive behaviour of Facebook group pages helps one to achieve that attempt. In light of these views, the researcher, in this study, formed a group page to understand the dynamics of social media environment as a supporting tool for language classrooms. This paper addresses various features which make social media a unique place to contribute to the sense of class community and collaboration outside the classroom. The face-to face classroom is a controlled communication event, that is, teachers and students are required to be in the classroom at the same time but a teacher’s use of Facebook is an attempt to communicate with students outside of that controlled environment where teachers can meet students in their territory. When compared to its disadvantages, the advantages of setting a class group page on the social media outweigh. Students can feel motivated to contribute to an online community if they subsequently receive support or help. It also leads students to feel that they are being supported by a whole portion of their class community and promotes students’ desire to maintain a valued relationship with others. Students continue developing and strengthening relationships with others.

  1. Benefits of peer support groups in the treatment of addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy K

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Kathlene Tracy,1,2 Samantha P Wallace3 1Community Research and Recovery Program (CRRP, Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, 2New York Harbor Healthcare System (NYHHS, New York, 3Department of Community Health Sciences, State University of New York Downstate School of Public Health, Brooklyn, NY, USA Objective: Peer support can be defined as the process of giving and receiving nonprofessional, nonclinical assistance from individuals with similar conditions or circumstances to achieve long-term recovery from psychiatric, alcohol, and/or other drug-related problems. Recently, there has been a dramatic rise in the adoption of alternative forms of peer support services to assist recovery from substance use disorders; however, often peer support has not been separated out as a formalized intervention component and rigorously empirically tested, making it difficult to determine its effects. This article reports the results of a literature review that was undertaken to assess the effects of peer support groups, one aspect of peer support services, in the treatment of addiction.Methods: The authors of this article searched electronic databases of relevant peer-reviewed research literature including PubMed and MedLINE.Results: Ten studies met our minimum inclusion criteria, including randomized controlled trials or pre-/post-data studies, adult participants, inclusion of group format, substance use-related, and US-conducted studies published in 1999 or later. Studies demonstrated associated benefits in the following areas: 1 substance use, 2 treatment engagement, 3 human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis C virus risk behaviors, and 4 secondary substance-related behaviors such as craving and self-efficacy. Limitations were noted on the relative lack of rigorously tested empirical studies within the literature and inability to disentangle the effects of the group treatment that is often included as a component of other services

  2. Supporting awareness in creative group work by exposing design rationale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Farooq

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available When creativity is taken as a long-term, complex, and collaborative activity, support for awareness is required for group members to monitor the development of ideas, track how these ideas became narrowed, and understand how alternatives are being implemented and integrated by colleagues. In this paper, we investigate the effects of exposing design rationale to convey awareness, specifically activity awareness, in group creativity. Through evaluating a prototype, we investigate status updates that convey design rationale, and to what consequences, in small groups in fully distributed collaboration. We found that status updates are used for a variety of purposes and that participants’ comments on their collaborators’ status updates provided feedback. Overall, results suggest that participants’ awareness about their collaborators’ future plans increased over time. Majority of participants found the status updates useful, particularly those with higher metacognitive knowledge. Based on our results, two design strategies for activity awareness are proposed.

  3. Social support and support groups among people with HIV/AIDS in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrefa-Gyan, Tina; Wu, Liyun; Lewis, Marilyn W

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS, a chronic burden in Ghana, poses social and health outcome concerns to those infected. Examining the Medical Outcome Study Social Support Survey (MOS-SSS) instrument among 300 Ghanaians from a cross-sectional design, Principal Component Analysis yielded four factors (positive interaction, trust building, information giving, and essential support), which accounted for 85.73% of the total variance in the MOS-SSS. A logistic regression analysis showed that essential support was the strongest predictor of the length of time an individual stayed in the support group, whereas positive interaction indicated negative association. The study's implications for policy, research, and practice were discussed.

  4. Mental Health Support Groups, Stigma, and Self-Esteem : Positive and Negative Implications of Group Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crabtree, Jason W.; Haslam, S. Alexander; Postmes, Tom; Haslam, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Research into the relationship between stigmatization and well-being suggests that identification with a stigmatized group can buffer individuals from the adverse effects of stigma. In part, this is because social identification is hypothesized to provide a basis for social support which increases

  5. A Global Perspective on Psycho-Educational Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Linda; Islam, Shaheen; Su, Hui; Younesian, Sharifeh

    2015-01-01

    For psychologists in less developed countries, psycho-educational assessment is often challenging due to a lack of specialist training and a scarcity of appropriate, psychometrically robust instruments. This article focuses on school psychology and psycho-educational assessment in three countries: Bangladesh, China and Iran. Despite differences in…

  6. The Effectiveness of Psychoeducational Interventions Focused on Sexuality in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Hee; Yang, Younghee; Hwang, Eun-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Although sexual health is a common concern for oncology patients, no practical guidelines to sexual intervention exist, perhaps because of a lack of systematic reviews or meta-analyses. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect size for psychoeducational intervention focused on sexuality and to compare effect sizes according to intervention outcomes and characteristic. We explored quantitative evidence for the effects of sexual intervention for cancer patients or partners by using the electronic databases. Among them, we considered 15 eligible articles. The meta-analysis provided 133 effect sizes from 15 primary studies. The analysis revealed significant improvements after intervention, with a random-effects standardized mean difference of 0.75. Psychoeducational interventions focused on sexuality after cancer diagnosis were effective for compliance (2.40), cognitive aspect (1.29), and psychological aspect (0.83). Individual-based interventions (0.85) were more effective in improving outcomes than group approach and group combined with individual intervention. With regard to intervention providers, registered nurse only (2.22) and team approach including the registered nurse (2.38) had the highest effect size. Face-to-face intervention combined with telephone or the Internet (1.04) demonstrated a higher effect size than face-to-face (0.62) and telephone (0.58) independently. We conducted an analysis of data from various subgroups of preexisting studies, obtained an overall estimate of the effectiveness of the intervention, and compared its effectiveness across variables that affect intervention outcomes. These results provide empirical data for evidence-based practice and inform the development of useful intervention programs through a comprehensive review and meta-analysis of the results.

  7. Effectiveness of a focused, brief psychoeducation program for parents of ADHD children: improvement of medication adherence and symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yu-Feng; Yang, Li; Niu, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a psychoeducation program for parents of children with ADHD in enhancing adherence to pharmacological treatment and improving clinical symptoms. We developed a psychoeducation program based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB). Eighty-nine children with ADHD were cluster randomly assigned for their families to receive 3 months of well-structured psychoeducation (intervention group, n=44) or only general clinical counseling (control group, n=45). Parents in the intervention group were given an expert lecture (with slides and a parent manual), attended two expert-guided parent group sessions, and were invited to join a professional-guided online community. Measurement of parents' knowledge about ADHD, components of the TPB model, and child ADHD symptoms were taken before and after intervention. Medication adherence was assessed thoroughly at the end of the first and third months. Satisfaction with the psychoeducation program was assessed only in the intervention group. Two-independent-samples t-test, ANOVA, and chi-square test were employed to compare differences between groups. Compared to the control group, medication adherence in the intervention group was significantly higher after 1 and 3 months (97.7% intervention vs 75.6% control, P=0.002, and 86.4% intervention vs 53.3% control, P=0.001, respectively). Accordingly, the ADHD rating scale scores were lower in the intervention group than the control group after intervention (33.7±5.4 vs 45.1±7.9, P=0.008). Greater improvements in parents' knowledge about ADHD and many components of the TPB model were observed in the intervention group, especially increased intention to adhere to medication, compared to the control group (P<0.001). This psychoeducation program had a positive impact on both medication adherence and clinical symptoms of ADHD children. It could be considered as a potential beneficial supplement to clinical practice.

  8. Effects of psycho-educational training and stimulant medication on visual perceptual skills in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antigone S Papavasiliou

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Antigone S Papavasiliou, Irene Nikaina, Ioanna Rizou, Stratos AlexandrouDepartment of Neurology, Pendeli Children’s Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is treated with stimulants and psycho-educational remedial programs despite limited literature support for the latter. This study aimed to examine changes in a “Test of Visual Perceptual Skills” (TVPS that has not been previously reported in children with ADHD enrolled in such a program.Methods: Sixteen children, 7–11 years old, with ADHD were involved in occupational therapy and special education geared towards attention training. Six months later methylphenidate 1 mg/kg/day was prescribed. It was not taken by eight children because of family choice. The TVPS was given twice, upon diagnosis, and 8 months post-intervention. The groups were compared by a repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA with medication as a between groups factor and test-retest scores as within factor.Results: All children demonstrated increases in total scores in the second measurement. Medicated children scored higher but ANOVA showed a nonsignificant F for the two groups, medicated and unmedicated (F = 0.0031, p = 0.9563, indicating a non-differential effect of the two levels of treatment. It revealed a significant F for the pre- and post-treatment total TVPS scores (F = 30.91, p < 0.0001 indicating a significant difference between pre- and post-treatment tests. The interaction between pre-post treatment and level of treatment (medicated–unmedicated was nonsignificant (F = 2.20, p = 0.1604.Conclusion: TVPS scores improved in all children following intervention. Medicated children did better, but differences were nonsignificant.Keywords: ADHD, stimulants, psycho-educational therapy, TVPS

  9. Update on Activities of CEOS Disaster Management Support Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, H. M.; Lauritson, L.

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Disaster Management Support Group (DMSG) has supported natural and technological disaster management on a worldwide basis by fostering improved utilization of existing and planned Earth Observation (EO) satellite data. The DMSG has focused on developing and refining recommendations for the application of satellite data to selected hazard areas--drought, earthquake, fire, flood, ice, landslide, oil spill, and volcanic hazards. Particular emphasis was placed on working closely with space agencies, international and regional organizations, and commercial organizations on the implementation of these recommendations. The DMSG is in its last year with its primary focus on documenting its work and migrating on going activities to other fora. With over 300 participants from more than 140 organizations, the DMSG has found strong support among CEOS space agencies and the Integrated Global Observing Strategy (IGOS), as well as an enthusiastic reception from numerous international, regional, and national emergency managers, and distinct interest from the commercial sector. In addition, the group has worked to give full support to the work of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) in pursuit of decisions taken at UNISPACE III and the United Nations International Strategy on Disaster Reduction (ISDR). In conjunction with the IGOS, several of the DMSG hazards teams (earthquake, landslide, and solid Earth dimensions of volcanoes) are joining in the effort to develop an IGOS Geohazards theme team. Cooperation efforts with organizations such as IGOS, COPUOS, and ISDR will hopefully lead to the pick up of much of the on going DMSG activities. Since the inception of this ad hoc working group and its predecessor project, the DMSG has developed and refined recommendations for the application of satellite data by bringing together experts from eight hazard areas to identify user needs, as well as

  10. Impact of Psychoeducation on Knowledge of and Attitude Toward Medications in Clients With Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Kwisoon; Sung, Byung-Ju; Kang, Youngmi; Yoo, So Yeon

    2016-04-01

    To examine a psychoeducational intervention's effects on knowledge and attitudes toward antipsychotic medication in clients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders. A one-group pretest-posttest design was employed. A convenience sample (61 psychiatric clients aged 20 or above) was recruited from a Korean mental health center. At baseline, participants had limited knowledge (M = 50.89, range: 27-77, SD = 12.05) of and negative feelings toward antipsychotic medications (M = -.89, range: -8 to 8, SD = 4.27). Both measures significantly improved post-intervention. A psychoeducational intervention improved clients' knowledge of and attitudes toward antipsychotic medications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effect of Psycho-Educational Training Program for Parent's Having Child with Leukemia on Their Experience and Psychological Wellbeing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Sahar; Elaziz, Nahla Ahmed Abd

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia is a significant public health and life-threatening problem for pediatric cancer patients. Family caregivers of cancer patients receive little preparation, information, or support to perform their care giving role. This study aims to assess the effect of psycho-educational training program to enhancing practice and psychosocial adaptation…

  12. Software support: Pre-empting the quick question. [User's support group at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loebel, L.

    1987-09-01

    High energy physicists, researchers and graduate students, from universities all around the world come to Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to do their experiments. They use our computer facilities to perform all phases of their data-analysis and presentation. We have a large turnover of users and a rather small support group, in a multi-vendor environment. We strive to make our users self-sufficient through the use of well-publicized maintenance procedures, documentation systems, and product support standards. By these pre-emptive measures we attempt to have quick answers at hand for the truly quick questions, leaving us time for the interesting problems.

  13. Information and communication technology in patient education and support for people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Välimäki, Maritta; Hätönen, Heli; Lahti, Mari; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Adams, Clive E

    2012-10-17

    Poor compliance with treatment often means that many people with schizophrenia or other severe mental illness relapse and may need frequent and repeated hospitalisation. Information and communication technology (ICT) is increasingly being used to deliver information, treatment or both for people with severe mental disorders. To evaluate the effects of psychoeducational interventions using ICT as a means of educating and supporting people with schizophrenia or related psychosis. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (2008, 2009 and September 2010), inspected references of identified studies for further trials and contacted authors of trials for additional information. All clinical randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing ICT as a psychoeducational and supportive tool with any other type of psychoeducation and supportive intervention or standard care. We selected trials and extracted data independently. For homogenous dichotomous data we calculated fixed-effect risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD). We assessed risk of bias using the criteria described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. We included six trials with a total of 1063 participants. We found no significant differences in the primary outcomes (patient compliance and global state) between psychoeducational interventions using ICT and standard care.Technology-mediated psychoeducation improved mental state in the short term (n = 84, 1 RCT, RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.56 to 1.00; n = 30, 1 RCT, MD -0.51, 95% CI -0.90 to -0.12) but not global state (n = 84, 1 RCT, RR 1.07, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.42). Knowledge and insight were not effected (n = 84, 1 RCT, RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.15; n = 84, 1 RCT, RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.03). People allocated to technology-mediated psychoeducation perceived that they received more social support than people allocated to the standard care group (n = 30, 1 RCT, MD

  14. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Psychoeducational Intervention in Treatment-Naïve Patients with Antidepressant Medication in Primary Care: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Casañas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is evidence supporting the effectiveness of psychoeducation (PE in patients with symptoms of depression in primary care (PC, but very few studies have assessed this intervention in antidepressant-naïve patients. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a PE program in these patients, since the use of antidepressant (AD medication may interfere with the effects of the intervention. Methods. 106 participants were included, 50 from the PE program (12 weekly 1.5-hour sessions and 56 from the control group (CG that received the usual care. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 3, 6, and 9 months. The main outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and remission based on the BDI. The analysis was carried out on an intention-to-treat basis. Results. The PE program group showed remission of symptoms of 40% (P=0.001 posttreatment and 42% (P=0.012 at 6 months. The analysis only showed significant differences in the BDI score posttreatment (P=0.008; effect size Cohen’s d′=0.55. Conclusions. The PE intervention is an effective treatment in the depressive population not treated with AD medication. Before taking an AD, psychoeducational intervention should be considered.

  15. Influencia de los sucesos vitales y el apoyo social en una intervención psicoeducativa para mujeres con depresión The influence of life events and social support in a psycho-educational intervention for women with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Asunción Lara

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar la influencia del apoyo social y los sucesos vitales sobre los síntomas de depresión: pretratamiento, postratamiento (15-30 días y seguimiento (cuatro meses, en una intervención psicoeducativa para depresión. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se seleccionaron 254 mujeres con síntomas de depresión, de entre quienes solicitaron atención para dichos síntomas, en tres centros comunitarios de salud mental y un centro de salud de la Secretaría de Salud, en la Ciudad de México, entre enero de 1998 y diciembre de 2000. La intervención había mostrado previamente su eficacia en reducir los síntomas de depresión. Dichos síntomas se evaluaron con la Escala de Depresión del Centro de Estudios Epidemiológicos (CES-D, y los sucesos vitales y el apoyo social con escalas específicas para estos aspectos. Se realizaron análisis de regresión jerárquica para probar los diversos modelos. RESULTADOS: Modelo 1: efecto de sucesos vitales, apoyo social y variables sociodemográficas (edad, escolaridad, ingreso y ocupación sobre CES-D pretratamiento. El modelo fue significativo (pOBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of social support and adverse life events on depression symptoms, before and after therapy (15-30 days and during follow-up (4 months of a psycho-educational intervention for depression. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study population consisted of 254 women with depression symptoms selected among those seeking treatment for their symptoms in three community mental health centers and in one Ministry of Health center, all of them in Mexico City, between January 1998 and December 2000. The intervention has been proved effective previously in reducing depression symptoms. Symptoms were assessed using Radloff's CES-D scale, while specifically designed scales were used for events and social support. Hierarchical regression analyses were carried out to test various models. RESULTS: Model 1: effect of variables: life events, social support

  16. Effectiveness of a psychoeducational programme in enhancing motivation to change alcohol-addictive behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Mei-Yu; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Horng, Fen-Fang; Sung, Su-Ching

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a psychoeducational programme in enhancing motivation to change alcohol-addictive behaviour. The prevalence of alcohol abuse has increased over the past 10 years, and the age of initial alcohol use has decreased gradually in Taiwan. Alcohol dependence is one of the leading causes of disability and has led to increases in the incidence of crime and violence, with alcohol abuse identified as a problem in society. A quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent pre/post-testing was used. Alcohol-dependent inpatients undergoing alcohol treatment were selected from the psychiatric ward of a teaching hospital in northern Taiwan. The effectiveness of the psychoeducational programme in enhancing motivation to change alcohol-addictive behaviour was evaluated with the Severity of Alcohol Dependence Data Questionnaire and the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale. In total, 24 and 51 participants were recruited to the experimental and control groups, respectively, for the baseline survey, and 14 and 17 were in the final survey, respectively. After adjustment for baseline survey scores, the experimental group showed significantly greater increases in recognition and ambivalence relative to those observed in the control group. The results not only showed that the psychoeducational programme was effective in reinforcing addicted inpatients' motivation for changing their drinking behaviour but also provided clinical nurses with practical methods via which to enhance patient motivation. The psychoeducational programme could assist clinical nurses in helping alcohol-dependent patients to recognise the nature of their problematic drinking; increase participants' ambivalence towards their drinking behaviour, leading to the contemplation of change; and strengthen the possibility that they will change their addictive behaviour. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Supporting academic publication: evaluation of a writing course combined with writers' support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Claire M; McGrail, Matthew R; Jones, Rebecca; O'Meara, Peter; Robinson, Anske; Burley, Mollie; Ray-Barruel, Gillian

    2009-07-01

    Publication rates are a vital measure of individual and institutional performance, yet many nurse academics publish rarely or not at all. Despite widespread acceptance of the need to increase academic publication rates and the pressure university faculty may experience to fulfil this obligation, little is known about the effectiveness of practical strategies to support academic writing. In this small cohort study (n=8) comprising nurses and other professionals involved in university education, a questionnaire survey was used to evaluate the effectiveness of a one-week "Writing for Publication" course combined with a monthly writers support group to increase publication rates. Two year pre and post submissions increased from 9 to 33 articles in peer-reviewed journals. Publications (in print) per person increased from a baseline of 0.5-1.2 per year. Participants reported increased writing confidence and greater satisfaction with the publishing process. Peer support and receiving recognition and encouragement from line managers were also cited as incentives to publish. Writing for publication is a skill that can be learned. The evaluated model of a formal writing course, followed by informal monthly group support meetings, can effectively increase publication rates.

  18. A cost effectiveness analysis of midwife psycho-education for fearful pregnant women - a health system perspective for the antenatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohill, J; Callander, E; Gamble, J; Creedy, D K; Fenwick, J

    2017-07-11

    Psycho-education can reduce childbirth fear and caesarean section numbers. This study determines the cost-effectiveness of a midwife-led psycho-education intervention for women fearful of birth. One thousand four hundred ten pregnant women in south-east Queensland, Australia were screened for childbirth fear (W-DEQ A ≥ 66). Women with high scores (n = 339) were randomised to the BELIEF Study (Birth Emotions and Looking to Improve Expectant Fear) to receive psycho-education (n = 170) at 24 and 34 weeks of pregnancy or to the control group (n = 169). Women in both groups were surveyed 6 weeks postpartum with total cost for health service use during pregnancy calculated. Logistic regression models assessed the odds ratio of having vaginal birth or caesarean section in the study groups. Of 339 women randomised, 184 (54%) women returned data at 6 weeks postpartum (Intervention Group n = 91; Control Group n = 93). Women receiving psycho-education had a higher likelihood of vaginal birth compared to controls (n = 60, 66% vs. n = 54, 58%; OR 2.34). Mean 'treatment' cost for women receiving psycho-education was AUS$72. Mean cost for health services excluding the cost of psycho-education, was less in the intervention group (AUS$1193 vs. AUS$1236), but not significant (p = 0.78). For every five women who received midwife counselling, one caesarean section was averted. The incremental healthcare cost to prevent one caesarean section using this intervention was AUS$145. Costs of delivering midwife psycho-education to women with childbirth fear during pregnancy are offset by improved vaginal birth rates and reduction in caesarean section numbers. Australian New Zealand Controlled Trials Registry ACTRN12612000526875 , 17th May 2012 (retrospectively registered one week after enrolment of first participant).

  19. Differential Effects of Emotion-Focused Therapy and Psychoeducation in Facilitating Forgiveness and Letting Go of Emotional Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Leslie J.; Warwar, Serine H.; Malcolm, Wanda M.

    2008-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of emotion-focused therapy (EFT) involving gestalt empty-chair dialogue in the treatment of individuals who were emotionally injured by a significant other with therapy in a psychoeducation group designed to deal with these injuries. In addition, this study examined aspects of the emotional process of…

  20. Psychoeducational Services for Children and Youth in the Orient: Current Status, Problems, and some Remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakland, T; Hu, S

    1989-01-01

    Utilizing information obtained through an international survey and existing literature, patterns in the practices, research, and preparation of professionals who deliver psychoeducational services to children and youth in six Oriental countries (i.e., China, Hong Kong(1), Japan, the Philippines, Taiwan, and Thailand) are described. Services are provided by many professional groups. While few formal programs exist for the preparation of psychologists to work in schools, those providing such services have at least a bachelor's degree. Services commonly provided include assessment, vocational and educational guidance, counseling, parent education, and teaching. School psychological services generally are not governed by legislation or professional standards. Research tends to be applied and directed toward the construction and translations of tests and toward the needs of the mentally retarded, learning disabled, and behaviorally disordered. Ten major problems creating barriers for the delivery of psychoeducational services are identified. Three suggestions to help resolve these problems are offered.

  1. Core competencies necessary for a managerial psycho-educational training programme for business team coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette E. Maritz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to explore and describe core competencies necessary for a managerial psycho-educational training programme for business team coaches. The total number of participants in this qualitative research was 30. A purposive and snowball sampling strategy was used. Triangulation was achieved through focus groups, in-depth individual interviews and naïve sketches. Data were analysed through an open inductive approach and descriptive analysis. The results describe core competencies of a business team coach as situated within an Outcomes Based Education framework and relate to the knowledge to be discovered, skills to be mastered and the attitudes to be formed during a managerial psycho-educational training programme.

  2. Effectiveness of psycho-educational intervention in improving outcome of unipolar depression: results from a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K; Gupta, M

    2015-03-01

    Depressive disorders are one of the leading components of the global burden of disease with a prevalence of up to 14% in the general population. Numerous studies have demonstrated that pharmacotherapy combined with non-pharmacological measures offer the best treatment approach. Psycho-education as an intervention has been studied mostly in disorders such as schizophrenia and dementia, less so in depressive disorders. The present study aimed to assess the impact of psycho-education of patients and their caregivers on the outcome of depression. A total of 80 eligible depressed subjects were recruited and randomised into 2 groups. The study group involved an eligible family member and all were offered individual structured psycho-educational modules. Another group (controls) received routine counselling. The subjects in both groups also received routine pharmacotherapy and counselling from the treating clinician and were assessed at baseline, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), and Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBI). Results from both groups were compared using statistical methods including Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Student's t test, Pearson's correlation coefficient, as well as univariate and multiple regression analyses. Baseline socio-demographic and assessment measures were similar in both groups. The study group had consistent improvement in terms of outcome measures with HDRS, GAF, and PGWBI scores showing respective mean change of -15.08, 22, and 60 over 12 weeks. The comparable respective changes in the controls were -8.77, 18.1, and 43.25. Structured psycho-education combined with pharmacotherapy is an effective intervention for people with depressive disorders. Psycho-education optimises the pharmacological treatment of depression in terms of faster recovery, reduction in severity of depression, and improvement in subjective wellbeing and social functioning.

  3. Development of a 22q11DS psycho-educational programme: exploration of the views, concerns and educational needs of parents caring for children or adolescents with 22q11DS in relation to mental health issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alugo, T; Malone, H; Sheehan, A; Coyne, I; Lawlor, A; McNicholas, F

    2017-07-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is a multisystem genetic condition with a broad phenotype. It is associated with a high prevalence of depression and anxiety during childhood and increased risk of schizophrenia in adulthood. Despite this, studies report that families may receive inadequate information of mental health (MH) risks at diagnosis. Therefore, this study investigated parents' experiences of caring for a child with 22q11DS, investigated their knowledge regarding the risk of MH problems and assessed the need for a psycho-educational programme. A qualitative design and purposeful sampling was utilized. Parents registered with the '22q11 Ireland' support group, and parents listed on the cleft palate database in a children's hospital in Ireland were invited to participate. Focus groups were held with 22 parents. Data were thematically analysed using Burnard's method of analysis. Most parents had some knowledge of the relationship between 22q11DS and an increased risk of MH issues. Parents reported that MH information relating to 22q11DS was mainly obtained from 22q11DS conferences, the '22q11 Ireland' support group and the Internet. Parents expressed a need for information to prevent or cope with their child's MH issues. Parents suggested that the following topics would be quite useful in a psycho-educational programme. These included information on the early warning signs of MH issues and guidance on when and how to tell the child about the condition and how to manage the child or young person's anxiety, obsessive behaviour or hearing voices. The findings indicated parental support for a psycho-educational programme that would provide relevant, accurate and timely information on how to effectively care for a child with 22q11DS MH needs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Groups like the support sharing channel of information and knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Sergio de Aguiar Filho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of sharing information and knowledge which tends to lead to a new understanding of distribution channels, allowing the maturation of sharing concept and its relationship to the process of information management. This interaction arises range of alternatives par as organizations relate internally with employees and externally with your audience. Objects: The goal is to survey and presentation of studies related to information sharing and knowledge channels, trying to identify its correlates in the area of administration. Methodology: The work was developed from a literature search. For both sought to initially align the concepts and terminology of information science area and a second time to identify a differentiated approach to sharing that would contribute to validate the interdisciplinary character of the information area and the contribution that other areas can make to the studies of information management and knowledge. Results: The analysis of the survey indicated considerations relevant to the understanding of the various approaches used in relation to the sharing of channels, as well as the common and different characteristics of these media and the impact on their dynamics. Conclusions: The Support Group terminology is one of several approaches used in the sharing of information and knowledge, and, like the other approaches presented to assess and promote better information services to meet the specific demands.

  5. Promoting self-transcendence and well-being in community-dwelling older adults: A pilot study of a psychoeducational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Valerie Lander; Ling, Jiying; Bowland, Sharon; Hall, Lynne A; Connelly, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Self-transcendence changes how older adults perceive themselves, their relationships with others, the material world, and the metaphysical or spiritual dimension. It is associated with multiple indicators of well-being. The purpose of this pilot study (N = 20) was to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a psychoeducational intervention to increase self-transcendence and well-being in older adults. Data were analyzed using generalized estimating equations. All variables trended in the directions hypothesized. Self-transcendence increased in the intervention group and decreased in the control group but not significantly. The group × time interaction for life satisfaction was significant (z = 2.89, p = .004). This feasibility study supports further investigation to assess the effectiveness of the intervention in a larger sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of the family schizophrenia psychoeducation program for individuals with recent onset schizophrenia in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoc, T N; Weiss, B; Trung, L T

    2016-08-01

    Although psychoeducation has been found effective for improving the life functioning of patients with schizophrenia in high income countries, there have been relatively few studies of schizophrenia psychoeducation adapted for low and middle-income countries (LMIC), particularly in Southeast Asia. The present study assessed effects of the Family Schizophrenia Psychoeducation Program (FSPP) among Vietnamese patients and their families on the patients' (1) quality of life and (2) medication non-compliance, and the family and patients' (3) stigma towards schizophrenia, and (4) consumer satisfaction. This intervention study involved 59 patients, and their families, from the Da Nang Psychiatric Hospital, randomly assigned to treatment (n=30) or control (n=29) conditions. Control subjects received services as usual (antipsychotic medication); treatment group subjects received the FSPP as well. Blind-rater assessments were conducted at T1 immediately after project enrollment (prior to participating in the FSPP) and at T2 six months later. There were significant treatment effects on: (1) quality of life, (2) stigma, (3) medication compliance, and (4) consumer satisfaction, with all effects favoring the treatment group. Effect sizes were moderate to large. This psychoeducation program appears to reduce stigma, improve quality of life and medication compliance, and increase consumer satisfaction of Vietnamese patients with schizophrenia and their families, beyond the effects of antipsychotic medication. It involves relatively little cost, and it may be useful for it or equivalent programs to be implemented in other hospitals in Viet Nam, and potentially other low-income Asian countries to improve the lives of patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development and preliminary validation of the Scleroderma Support Group Leader Self-efficacy Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, N.E.; Gumuchian, S.T.; Delisle, V.C.; Pé pin, M.; Malcarne, V.L.; Carrier, M.E.; Kwakkenbos, C.M.C.; Pelá ez, S.; El-Baalbaki, G.; Thombs, B.D.

    2018-01-01

    Support groups are an important resource for people living with systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma). Peer support group leaders play an important role in the success and sustainability of SSc support groups, but face challenges that include a lack of formal training. An SSc support group leader

  8. Efficacy of Psychoeducational Intervention on Allograft Function in Kidney Transplant Patients: 10-Year Results of a Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breu-Dejean, Nathalie; Driot, Damien; Dupouy, Julie; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Rostaing, Lionel

    2016-02-01

    Improving treatment adherence to immunosuppressive agents could have positive effects on the morbidity and mortality of kidney transplant recipients. Our objective was to determine whether psychoeducational intervention aimed at improving treatment adherence also could improve 10-year kidney allograft survival rates. A randomized open-label study compared a group who received psychoeducational intervention (n = 55) with a control group (n = 55), with all patients being kidney transplant recipients in the Department of Nephrology and Organ Transplantation (University Hospital, Toulouse, France). Psychoeducational intervention comprised 8 weekly sessions provided by multidisciplinary teams. Patients were included between 2002 and 2003. The primary endpoint was allograft survival at 10 years (ie, by 2012). A failed allograft or death with a functioning allograft was considered an event. Mean overall allograft survival rate at 10 years was 78.2% (95% confidence interval, 70.5-25.3). In the control group, 48 patients (43.6%) still had a functioning graft at 10 years versus 38 patients (34.5%) in the psychoeducational intervention group (P = .02). However, a log-rank test did not find any significant difference in allograft survival between the groups (P = .06). In multivariate analyses (Cox model), no factor was significantly associated with allograft survival at 10 years. After an initial 6-month observational adherence survey, there was no benefit to kidney allograft survival at 10 years after the psychoeducational intervention, which had aimed to improve patient adherence to treatment with immunosuppressive agents. This might be related to the fact that booster interventions are needed (eg, on a yearly basis).

  9. Online psycho-education to the treatment of bipolar disorder: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ortega, Itxaso; Ugarte, Amaia; Ruiz de Azúa, Sonia; Núñez, Nuria; Zubia, Marta; Ponce, Sara; Casla, Patricia; Llano, Josu Xabier; Faria, Ángel; González-Pinto, Ana

    2016-12-22

    Bipolar disorder patients frequently present recurrent episodes and often experience subsyndromal symptoms, cognitive impairment and difficulties in functioning, with a low quality of life, illness relapses and recurrent hospitalization. Early diagnosis and appropriate intervention may play a role in preventing neuroprogression in this disorder. New technologies represent an opportunity to develop standardized psychological treatments using internet-based tools that overcome some of the limitations of face-to-face treatments, in that they are readily accessible and the timing of therapy can be tailored to user needs and availability. However, although many psychological programs are offered through the web and mobile devices for bipolar disorder, there is a lack of high quality evidence concerning their efficacy and effectiveness due to the great variability in measures and methodology used. This clinical trial is a simple-blind randomized trial within a European project to compare an internet-based intervention with treatment as usual. Bipolar disorder patients are to be included and randomly assigned to one of two groups: 1) the experimental group (tele-care support) and 2) the control group. Participants in both groups will be evaluated at baseline (pre-treatment) and post-treatment. This study describes the design of a clinical trial based on psychoeducation intervention that may have a significant impact on both prognosis and treatment in bipolar disorder. Specifically, bringing different services together (service aggregation), it is hoped that the approach proposed will significantly increase the impact of information and communication technologies on access and adherence to treatment, quality of the service, patient safety, patient and professional satisfaction, and quality of life of patients. NCT02924415 . Retrospectively registered 27 September 2016.

  10. Cooperative catalysis by silica-supported organic functional groups

    OpenAIRE

    Margelefsky, Eric L.; Zeidan, Ryan K.; Davis, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    Hybrid inorganic–organic materials comprising organic functional groups tethered from silica surfaces are versatile, heterogeneous catalysts. Recent advances have led to the preparation of silica materials containing multiple, different functional groups that can show cooperative catalysis; that is, these functional groups can act together to provide catalytic activity and selectivity superior to what can be obtained from either monofunctional materials or homogeneous catalysts. This tutorial...

  11. 75 FR 28298 - Avaya Inc., Worldwide Services Group, Global Support Services (GSS) Organization, Including On...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ...., Worldwide Services Group, Global Support Services (GSS) Organization, Including On-Site Leased Workers From..., Highlands Ranch, CO; Including Employees in Support of Avaya Inc., Worldwide Services Group, Global Support... workers of Avaya Inc., Worldwide Services Group, Global Support Services (GSS) Organization, including on...

  12. Supporting Alternative Strategies for Learning Chemical Applications of Group Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam, Daniel C.; Lewis, Jennifer E.

    2013-01-01

    A group theory course for chemists was taught entirely with process oriented guided inquiry learning (POGIL) to facilitate alternative strategies for learning. Students completed a test of one aspect of visuospatial aptitude to determine their individual approaches to solving spatial tasks, and were sorted into groups for analysis on the basis of…

  13. Randomized Controlled Trial of Web-Based Psychoeducation for Women With Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanarini, Mary C; Conkey, Lindsey C; Temes, Christina M; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M

    2017-07-11

    To determine if internet-based psychoeducation for borderline personality disorder is effective in reducing symptom severity and improving psychosocial functioning. Eighty women who met DSM-IV criteria for borderline personality disorder were randomly assigned either to the internet-based psychoeducation treatment group (n = 40) or to the internet-based control group with no psychoeducation (n = 40). Recruitment was conducted from July 2013 to March 2015. Subjects participated in 15 assessment periods that were divided into an acute phase (weeks 1-12) and a maintenance phase (months 6, 9, and 12). Main outcomes were assessed using the Zanarini Rating Scale for Borderline Personality Disorder. In the acute phase, women in the treatment group were found to have a significant decline in their scores on all 10 outcomes studied, while women in the control group had a significant decline on 7 of these outcomes. Two between-group differences were found to be significant-those in the treatment group reported a significantly greater decline in their impulsivity (z = -1.98, P = .048) and a significantly greater increase in their psychosocial functioning (z = -1.97, P = .049) than those in the control group. In the maintenance phase, those in the treatment group were found to have a significant decline in their scores on 9 of the 10 outcomes studied, while those in the control group had a significant decline in 3 of these outcomes. In terms of between-group differences, those in the treatment group reported a significantly greater decline in all 5 studied areas of borderline psychopathology: affective symptoms (z = -2.31, P = .021), cognitive symptoms (z = -3.20, P = .001), impulsivity (z = -2.44, P = .015), interpersonal difficulties (z = -2.15, P = .032), and overall borderline personality disorder symptoms (z = -2.11, P = .035). Taken together, these results suggest that internet-based psychoeducation is an effective form of early treatment for reducing the symptom

  14. BEfree: A new psychological program for binge eating that integrates psychoeducation, mindfulness, and compassion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Gouveia, José; Carvalho, Sérgio A; Palmeira, Lara; Castilho, Paula; Duarte, Cristiana; Ferreira, Cláudia; Duarte, Joana; Cunha, Marina; Matos, Marcela; Costa, Joana

    2017-09-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is associated with several psychological and medical problems, such as obesity. Approximately 30% of individuals seeking weight loss treatments present binge eating symptomatology. Moreover, current treatments for BED lack efficacy at follow-up assessments. Developing mindfulness and self-compassion seem to be beneficial in treating BED, although there is still room for improvement, which may include integrating these different but complimentary approaches. BEfree is the first program integrating psychoeducation-, mindfulness-, and compassion-based components for treating women with binge eating and obesity. To test the acceptability and efficacy up to 6-month postintervention of a psychological program based on psychoeducation, mindfulness, and self-compassion for obese or overweight women with BED. A controlled longitudinal design was followed in order to compare results between BEfree (n = 19) and waiting list group (WL; n = 17) from preintervention to postintervention. Results from BEfree were compared from preintervention to 3- and 6-month follow-up. BEfree was effective in eliminating BED; in diminishing eating psychopathology, depression, shame and self-criticism, body-image psychological inflexibility, and body-image cognitive fusion; and in improving obesity-related quality of life and self-compassion when compared to a WL control group. Results were maintained at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Finally, participants rated BEfree helpful for dealing with impulses and negative internal experiences. These results seem to suggest the efficacy of BEfree and the benefit of integrating different components such as psychoeducation, mindfulness, and self-compassion when treating BED in obese or overweight women. The current study provides evidence of the acceptability of a psychoeducation, mindfulness, and compassion program for binge eating in obesity (BEfree); Developing mindfulness and self-compassionate skills is an effective way of

  15. Using a group decision support system to make investment prioritisation decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Read, Martin; Gear, Tony; Minkes, Leonard; Irving, Ann

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with how decision making groups involved in making investment prioritisation decisions involving funding of technology and science projects may be supported by a group decision support system (GDSS). While interested in decision outcomes, the primary focus of this paper is the role of a group support system as an aid to developing shared understanding within a group. The paper develops the conceptual framework of decision-making, communication and group support, and de...

  16. Support group processes: Perspectives from HIV-infected women in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, J P; Visser, M J; Makin, J D; Forsyth, B W; Sikkema, K J

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the experiences and perceived benefits of support group participation among HIV-infected women in South Africa. From a qualitative analysis of responses, key psychological processes through which support groups are potentially beneficial were identified. These processes included: identification; modeling; acceptance; and empowerment. The participants' consequent life changes were explored in order to associate these processes with the positive outcomes of support group participation. Through understanding the relationship between the psychological processes within a support group setting and the potential benefits, and by targeting these processes in the development and implementation of future support group interventions, a framework is provided for achieving positive outcomes associated with support group participation.

  17. Web-Based Group Decision Support System: an Economic Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion ISTUDOR

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Decision Support Systems (DSS form a specific class of computerized information systems that support business and managerial decision-making activities. Making the right decision in business primarily depends on the quality of data. It also depends on the ability to analyze the data with a view to identifying trends that can suggest solutions and strategies. A “cooperative” decision support system means the data are collected, analyzed and then provided to a human agent who can help the system to revise or refine the data. It means that both a human component and computer component work together to come up with the best solution. This paper describes the usage of a software product (Vanguard System to a specific economic application (evaluating the financial risk assuming that the rate of the economic profitability can be under the value of the interest rate.

  18. [Healthy eating support groups on Facebook: content and features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leis, Ángela; Mayer, Miguel Ángel; Torres Niño, Javier; Rodríguez-González, Alejandro; Suelves, Josep Maria; Armayones, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    To determine the features and use of groups related to healthy eating on Facebook. We carried out a cross-sectional study through the Internet. Using the API on Facebook, we included open groups related to healthy eating in the Spanish language. The variables studied were name, description, category, the number and gender of users, date of creation, number of posts, content of the first 20 posts, and the most recent update. We selected 281 open groups for inclusion in the study. Of these, 125 were excluded because the content was unrelated to healthy eating. Finally 156 groups were studied with 14,619 users (10,373 women [71%] and 3,919 men [26.8%]). Dietary products were promoted by 40% of the groups. Facebook is used as a means of communication and for sharing health information. Because many of these groups promote dietary products, their usefulness for health education is doubtful. Health organizations should participate in social media. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Telematic Tools to Support Group Projects in Higher Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Johan (CTIT); Collis, Betty

    We describe ongoing evaluations and new research on the use of telematic tools to support project work in higher education. Practical experience at our University has shown that project work can be implemented using the World Wide Web for many aspects of the project activities. The possibilities

  20. Telematic tools to support group projects in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Johan (CTIT); Collis, Betty; Muldner, T.; Reeves, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    We describe ongoing evaluations and new research on the use of telematic tools to support project work in higher education. Practical experience at our University has shown that project work can be implemented using the World Wide Web for many aspects of the project activities. The possibilities

  1. Strategies for Organizational Change from Group Homes to Individualized Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Pam

    2012-01-01

    Organizations are increasingly looking to convert from facility-based services for adults with developmental disabilities to individualized supports. Such conversion involves not only a change in services but a transformation of organizational culture. This qualitative study involved four organizations that have made sustained efforts to…

  2. Virtual working systems to support R&D groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew, Peter M.; Leigh, Christine; Drew, Richard S.; Morris, David; Curson, Jayne

    1995-03-01

    The paper reports on the progress at Leeds University to build a Virtual Science Park (VSP) to enhance the University's ability to interact with industry, grow its applied research and workplace learning activities. The VSP exploits the advances in real time collaborative computing and networking to provide an environment that meets the objectives of physically based science parks without the need for the organizations to relocate. It provides an integrated set of services (e.g. virtual consultancy, workbased learning) built around a structured person- centered information model. This model supports the integration of tools for: (a) navigating around the information space; (b) browsing information stored within the VSP database; (c) communicating through a variety of Person-to-Person collaborative tools; and (d) the ability to the information stored in the VSP including the relationships to other information that support the underlying model. The paper gives an overview of a generic virtual working system based on X.500 directory services and the World-Wide Web that can be used to support the Virtual Science Park. Finally the paper discusses some of the research issues that need to be addressed to fully realize a Virtual Science Park.

  3. The role of psycho-education in improving outcome at a general ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rationale was to evaluate the effect of psychoeducation in a ... one of the outcome measures was compliance with .... closer routes to care such as traditional healers or local .... psychoeducation model, the content of which we believed.

  4. A bilingual dictionary for a specific user group: Supporting Setswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article is to discuss the design of a new English to Setswana dictionary for two narrowlydefined target user groups of Setswana learners, i.e. Upper Primary (10 to 12 years old); and JuniorSecondary (13 to 15 years old). The dictionary is intended to be a guide to text and speech productionin the foreign ...

  5. International multi-site survey on the use of online support groups in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peer support is an established component of recovery from bipolar disorder, and online support groups may offer opportunities to expand the use of peer support at the patient's convenience. Prior research in bipolar disorder has reported value from online support groups. AIMS: To unde......BACKGROUND: Peer support is an established component of recovery from bipolar disorder, and online support groups may offer opportunities to expand the use of peer support at the patient's convenience. Prior research in bipolar disorder has reported value from online support groups. AIMS.......8% of the total sample). Given the benefits reported in prior research, clarification of the role of online support groups in bipolar disorder is needed. With only a minority of patients using online support groups, there are analytical challenges for future studies....

  6. Short-Term Family-Focused Psycho-Educational Program for Bipolar Mood Disorder in Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Soltanifar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bipolar mood disorder type 1 is one of the mostserious psychiatric disorders. We aimed to assess the efficacyof a short-term family–focused treatment for patients with bipolarmood disorder type 1 in a one-year follow-up period.Methods: Sixty patients with bipolar mood disorder and acutemania episodes who referred to Ibn-e-Sina Psychiatric Hospitalin Mashhad were recruited. Half of them were randomly assignedto the psycho-education group. Their available adultfamily members received a psycho-educational training sessionbefore the patients' discharge from the hospital. All patients receivedconcurrent appropriate pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy.All the patients were evaluated by a blind home-visit teamevery 3 months for a period of one year. The evaluation includedthe number of psychiatric visits, patients' adherence, relapsestatus, number of re-hospitalizations, and time to relapse.Results: Fifty-seven patients completed the trial. In the experimentalgroup, there were four patients with relapse(13.79% and in the control group nine patients (31.58% hadrelapse of the disorder (P=0.006. The mean time of takingmedications in the education group was 11.41 months. Thistime was 9.14 months in the control group (P<0.001. Therewas also a significant difference between the two groups interms of frequency of psychiatric visits (P<0.001.Conclusion: Short–term family-focused psycho-education isan effective adjunct to pharmacotherapy for bipolar mood disorder.Further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy andcost-effectiveness of long-term family-focused psychoeducationaltreatment for patients with bipolar mood disorder.

  7. Group Work with Juvenile Delinquents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews group work literature on juvenile delinquents. Presents overview of interventions, including positive peer culture, cognitive-behavioral treatment, psychoeducational treatment, treatment of learned behavior, action-oriented treatment, milieu therapy, parental involvement, assertiveness training, and music therapy. Discusses outcome…

  8. A comparison of lurkers and posters within infertility online support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sumaira H; Coulson, Neil S

    2011-10-01

    Current research shows that online support groups can offer people affected by infertility a unique and valuable source of social support. However, to date most research has focused on the experiences of people who post messages to online infertility support groups; in comparison, little is known about how "lurkers" (i.e., those individuals who read messages but do not post messages) use and benefit from online infertility support groups. The purpose of the present study was to compare the use and experience of online infertility support groups between lurkers and posters. A total of 295 participants who were recruited from several online infertility support groups completed an online questionnaire containing questions about their use and experience of online support groups and measures of loneliness, social support, marital satisfaction, and perceived infertility-related stress. Differences between lurkers and posters were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U and χ or Fisher exact tests. Results revealed that compared with posters, lurkers visited the online support groups less often and scored significantly lower in overall satisfaction with the online support group. However, both lurkers and posters reported gaining a range of unique benefits from access to an online support group. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in loneliness, social support, infertility-related stress, and marital satisfaction between lurkers and posters. These findings suggest that reading messages posted to online support groups may be as beneficial as interacting with the group.

  9. Construction of Student Groups Using Belbin: Supporting Group Work in Environmental Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark; Polglase, Giles; Parry, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Belbin team role self and observer perceptions were applied to a large cohort (145) of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences undergraduates in a module assessed through two separate group projects. Students self-selected groups for the first project; for the second, groups were more "balanced." Results show slight improvement in…

  10. Self-reported differences in empowerment between lurkers and posters in online patient support groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F.; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; Seydel, Erwin R.; van de Laar, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients who visit online support groups benefit in various ways. Results of our earlier study indicated that participation in online support groups had a profound effect on the participants' feelings of "being empowered." However, most studies of online patient support groups have

  11. Self-reported differences in empowerment between lurkers and posters in online patient support groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, C.F.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; Seydel, E.R.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2008-01-01

    Background: Patients who visit online support groups benefit in various ways. Results of our earlier study indicated that participation in online support groups had a profound effect on the participants’ feelings of “being empowered.” However, most studies of online patient support groups have

  12. Effectiveness of implementing a dyadic psychoeducational intervention for cancer patients and family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titler, Marita G; Visovatti, Moira A; Shuman, Clayton; Ellis, Katrina R; Banerjee, Tanima; Dockham, Bonnie; Yakusheva, Olga; Northouse, Laurel

    2017-11-01

    This study examined the effectiveness, feasibility, and satisfaction with implementation of the FOCUS program in two US Cancer Support Community affiliates in Ohio and California as well as the cost to deliver the program. FOCUS is an evidence-based psychoeducational intervention for dyads (cancer patients and caregivers). A pre-post-intervention design was employed. Eleven, five-session Focus programs were delivered by licensed professionals in a small group format (three-four dyads/group) to 36 patient-caregiver dyads. An Implementation Training Manual, a FOCUS Intervention Protocol Manual, and weekly conference calls were used to foster implementation. Participants completed questionnaires prior to and following completion of each five-session FOCUS program to measure primary (emotional distress, quality of life) and secondary outcomes (benefits of illness, self-efficacy, and dyadic communication). Enrollment and retention rates and fidelity to FOCUS were used to measure feasibility. Cost estimates were based on time and median hourly wages. Repeated analysis of variance was used to analyze the effect of FOCUS on outcomes for dyads. Descriptive statistics were used to examine feasibility, satisfaction, and cost estimates. FOCUS had positive effects on QOL (p = .014), emotional (p = .012), and functional (p = .049) well-being, emotional distress (p = .002), benefits of illness (p = .013), and self-efficacy (p = .001). Intervention fidelity was 85% with enrollment and retention rates of 71.4 and 90%, respectively. Participants were highly satisfied. Cost for oversight and delivery of the five-session FOCUS program was $168.00 per dyad. FOCUS is an economic and effective intervention to decrease distress and improve the quality of life for dyads.

  13. Evaluation of primary health workers training program to provide psychoeducation to family caregivers of persons with psychotic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Raymondalexas Marchira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABTRACT Many persons suffering psychotic illnesses, such as schizophrenia, are largely untreated in low income countries. In these settings, most persons with severe mental illness live with their families. Thus, families play a particular critical role in determining whether a person with a psychotic illness will receive treatment and what the quality of treatment. Psychoeducation has proven to be extremely effective in helping families develop the knowledge and skills which is necessary to help their family members. Indonesia has a national policy to integrate the management of mental health problems into the primary health care system. However, in practice, such care does not implemented effectively. A preliminary study in primary health centers in two districts of Bantul and Gunung Kidul regency, Yogyakarta province, showed that there was very little or there is not any training for health care workers on diagnosis and treatment of psychotic disorder. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the training program for health workers in three primary health centers in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, to provide psychoeducation to family caregivers for persons with psychotic disorder. A quasi-experimental study with the approach of one group pre and posttest design was performed in this study. Fortythree health workers in 3 primary health centers in Bantul and Gunung Kidul, Yogyakarta were trained every week for a month to provide psychoeducation to family caregivers who live with psychotic disorder patient. Result showed that the baseline score of knowledge of schizophrenia among health workers in 3 primary health centers in Bantul and Gunung Kidul before training were not significantly different (p=0.162. After the psychoeducation training program there were significantly different (p=0.003 of the score of knowledge of schizophrenia among health workers in 3 primary health care centers compared with before training. For conclusion, the

  14. The dynamics of the level of social functioning and quality of life of patients with schizophrenia as a marker of the effectiveness of psychoeducational programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Kryshtal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of the level of social functioning and quality of life of patients with schizophrenia as a marker of the effectiveness of psychoeducational programs. A comprehensive survey was carried out of 142 female patients at the age 18 – 35, which have diagnosis the schizophrenia in period of stabilization state. The integrative model of psychoeducational work was proposed, which includes application of various information modules, techniques of cognitive-behavioral therapy, training effects, problem-oriented discussions, and family psychotherapy. The psychoeducation was determined to be superior over conventional complex treatment intended for reduction of negative symptoms, productive symptoms and general psychopathological symptoms of patients with schizophrenia. It is supported by dynamic analysis of the clinical disturbances and psychopathological ones on the PANSS. The improvement of psychosocial functioning and quality of life of the patients with schizophrenia who participated in the psychoeducational activities was determined. It is proved that psychoeducation not only increases the amount of knowledge intensifies confidence in the fight against the disease, but solves the problem of social reintegration of the patient.

  15. Family psychoeducation for major depressive disorder - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmerby, Nina; Austin, Stephen F; Ussing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder has been shown to affect many domains of family life including family functioning. Conversely, the influence of the family on the course of the depression, including the risk of relapse, is one reason for targeting the family in interventions. The few studies...... will investigate the effect of family psychoeducation compared to social support on the course of the illness in patients with major depressive disorder. METHOD/DESIGN: The study is designed as a dual center, two-armed, observer-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Relatives are randomized to participate in one...

  16. Effectiveness of psychoeducation in reducing sickness absence and improving mental health in individuals at risk of having a mental disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille; Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Labriola, Merete

    2015-01-01

    received a questionnaire on psychological symptoms, mental health-related quality of life, and locus of control. RESULTS: During the first 6 months after inclusion, the two groups had almost the same RR of a full return to work (RR:0.97, 95% CI: 0.78;1.21), but during the first 3 months, the individuals...... the control group. The intervention did not decrease the level of psychological symptoms or improve mental health-related quality of life; however, individuals in the intervention group improved their scores on internal locus of control at both 3 and 6 months. CONCLUSION: Offering psychoeducation......BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of psychoeducation on return to work as an adjunct to standard case management in individuals on sick leave at risk of having a mental disorder. The participants could have different diagnoses but were all at risk of having a mental...

  17. Early physical training and psycho-educational intervention for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. The SheppHeart randomized 2 × 2 factorial clinical pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højskov, Ida E; Moons, Philip; Hansen, Niels V; Greve, Helle; Olsen, Dorte Bæk; Cour, Søren La; Glud, Christian; Winkel, Per; Lindschou, Jane; Egerod, Ingrid; Christensen, Anne Vinggaard; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2016-10-01

    Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery often experience a range of problems and symptoms such as immobility, pain and insufficient sleep. Results from trials investigating testing in-hospital physical exercise or psychological intervention have been promising. However, no randomized clinical trials have tested a comprehensive rehabilitation programme consisting of both physical exercise and psycho-education in the early rehabilitation phase. The aims of the present SheppHeart pilot randomized clinical trial were to evaluate the feasibility of patient recruitment, patient acceptance of the intervention, safety and tolerability of the intervention. Sixty patients admitted for coronary artery bypass graft were randomized 1:1:1:1 to: 1) physical exercise plus usual care, or 2) psycho-educational intervention plus usual care, or 3) physical exercise and psycho-educational plus usual care, or 4) usual care alone during a four week period after surgery. The acceptability of trial participation was 67% during the three month recruitment period. In the physical exercise groups, patients complied with 59% of the total expected training sessions during hospitalization. Nine patients (30%) complied with >75% and nine patients (30%) complied with 50% of the planned exercise sessions. Eleven patients (42%) participated in ⩾75% of the four consultations and six patients (23%) participated in 50% of the psycho-educational programme. Comprehensive phase one rehabilitation combining physical exercise and psycho-education in coronary artery bypass graft patients shows reasonably high inclusion, feasibility and safety. © The European Society of Cardiology 2015.

  18. Families affected by childhood cancer: an analysis of the provision of social support within online support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, N S; Greenwood, N

    2012-11-01

    With increasing access to the Internet, there are new opportunities available to families to seek information, advice and support about childhood cancer online. A total of 487 messages were retrieved from three childhood cancer online support groups and were analysed using deductive thematic analysis for the presence of support-intended communication using Cutrona and Suhr's social support typology. In addition, the messages were examined for negative experiences or disadvantages. The results revealed the presence of five types of social support: emotional, informational, esteem support and tangible assistance. In addition, some potential limitations of online support were identified, including a lack of responses and difficulties in maintaining relationships outside the online group context. This study suggests that online support groups may offer the potential to support family members of children with cancer. In particular, it may be a useful resource for those seeking emotional and information support. However, there may be limitations associated with the use of online support groups. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Predictors of early change in bulimia nervosa after a brief psychoeducational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernàndez-Aranda, Fernando; Álvarez-Moya, Eva M; Martínez-Viana, Cristina; Sànchez, Isabel; Granero, Roser; Penelo, Eva; Forcano, Laura; Peñas-Lledó, Eva

    2009-06-01

    We aimed to examine baseline predictors of treatment response in bulimic patients. 241 seeking-treatment females with bulimia nervosa completed an exhaustive assessment and were referred to a six-session psychoeducational group. Regression analyses of treatment response were performed. Childhood obesity, lower frequency of eating symptomatology, lower body mass index, older age, and lower family's and patient's concern about the disorder were predictors of poor abstinence. Suicidal ideation, alcohol abuse, higher maximum BMI, higher novelty seeking and lower baseline purging frequency predicted dropouts. Predictors of early symptom changes and dropouts were similar to those identified in longer CBT interventions.

  20. Effectiveness of a focused, brief psychoeducation program for parents of ADHD children: improvement of medication adherence and symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai GN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Guan-nan Bai,1 Yu-feng Wang,2,3 Li Yang,2,3 Wen-yi Niu1 1Department of Social Medicine and Health Education, School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Peking University Sixth Hospital/Institute of Mental Health, Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders, Peking University Sixth Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of a psychoeducation program for parents of children with ADHD in enhancing adherence to pharmacological treatment and improving clinical symptoms. Methods: We developed a psychoeducation program based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB. Eighty-nine children with ADHD were cluster randomly assigned for their families to receive 3 months of well-structured psychoeducation (intervention group, n=44 or only general clinical counseling (control group, n=45. Parents in the intervention group were given an expert lecture (with slides and a parent manual, attended two expert-guided parent group sessions, and were invited to join a professional-guided online community. Measurement of parents’ knowledge about ADHD, components of the TPB model, and child ADHD symptoms were taken before and after intervention. Medication adherence was assessed thoroughly at the end of the first and third months. Satisfaction with the psychoeducation program was assessed only in the intervention group. Two-independent-samples t-test, ANOVA, and chi-square test were employed to compare differences between groups. Results: Compared to the control group, medication adherence in the intervention group was significantly higher after 1 and 3 months (97.7% intervention vs 75.6% control, P=0.002, and 86.4% intervention vs 53.3% control, P=0.001, respectively. Accordingly, the ADHD rating scale scores were lower in the intervention group than the control group after

  1. Cost-effectiveness of family psychoeducation to prevent relapse in major depression: Results from a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimodera Shinji

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family psychoeducation is a relatively simple and straightforward intervention whose prophylactic effectiveness and cost-effectiveness is well-established for schizophrenia. We have recently demonstrated its effectiveness for unipolar depression, but its cost-effectiveness has never been examined. We hereby report a cost-effectiveness analysis alongside a randomized controlled trial in order to assess its cost-effectiveness for preventing relapse/recurrence in depression. Methods Fifty-seven patients diagnosed with major depression and undergoing its maintenance treatment, and their primary family members were randomized to treatment as usual (TAU only or to TAU plus family psychoeducation, which consisted of four 2-hour multiple-family sessions consisting of didactic lectures about depression (30 minutes and group discussion and problem solving (60–90 minutes. The economic analyses were undertaken from the perspective of the National Health Insurance (NHI, assuming the most reasonable price of US$50 per psychoeducation session per patient. The main outcome measures included relapse-free days and direct costs to the NHI. Results The intervention group enjoyed 272 (SD: 7.1 relapse-free days, while the control group spent 214 (SD: 90.8 relapse-free days (Cox proportional hazard ratio = 0.17, 95%CI: 0.04 to 0.75, p = 0.002. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves suggested that the family psychoeducation has 90% or more chances of being cost-effective if the decision-maker is prepared to pay US$20 for one additional relapse-free day. This cost-effectiveness finding was robust when the price for family psychoeducation ranged between 50% to 150% of the baseline scenario in sensitivity analyses. If a relapse-free day is considered to be worth $30 or more, all the pricing scenarios have a close to 100% probability of being cost-effective. Conclusion Family psychoeducation is effective in the relapse prevention of

  2. Effects of a Brief Psychoeducational Intervention for Family Conflict: Constructive Conflict, Emotional Insecurity and Child Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Graff, Laura E; Cummings, E Mark; Bergman, Kathleen N

    2016-10-01

    The role of emotional security in promoting positive adjustment following exposure to marital conflict has been identified in a large number of empirical investigations, yet to date, no interventions have explicitly addressed the processes that predict child adjustment after marital conflict. The current study evaluated a randomized controlled trial of a family intervention program aimed at promoting constructive marital conflict behaviors thereby increasing adolescent emotional security and adjustment. Families (n = 225) were randomized into 1 of 4 conditions: Parent-Adolescent (n = 75), Parent-Only (n = 75), Self-Study (n = 38) and No Treatment (n = 37). Multi-informant and multi-method assessments were conducted at baseline, post-treatment and 6-month follow-up. Effects of treatment on destructive and constructive conflict behaviors were evaluated using multilevel models where observations were nested within individuals over time. Process models assessing the impact of constructive and destructive conflict behaviors on emotional insecurity and adolescent adjustment were evaluated using path modeling. Results indicated that the treatment was effective in increasing constructive conflict behaviors (d = 0.89) and decreasing destructive conflict behaviors (d = -0.30). For the Parent-Only Group, post-test constructive conflict behaviors directly predicted lower levels of adolescent externalizing behaviors at 6-month follow-up. Post-test constructive conflict skills also indirectly affected adolescent internalizing behaviors through adolescent emotional security. These findings support the use of a brief psychoeducational intervention in improving post-treatment conflict and emotional security about interparental relationships.

  3. Pilot study of a culturally adapted psychoeducation (CaPE) intervention for bipolar disorder in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Muhammad Ishrat; Chaudhry, Imran B; Rahman, Raza R; Hamirani, Munir M; Mehmood, Nasir; Haddad, Peter M; Hodsoll, John; Young, Allan H; Naeem, Farooq; Husain, Nusrat

    2017-12-01

    Despite the use of maintenance medication, recurrence rates in bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) are high. To date, there are no clinical trials that have investigated the use of psychological interventions in bipolar disorder in Pakistan. The purpose of the study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a culturally adapted bipolar psychoeducation programme (CaPE) in Pakistan. Thirty-four euthymic bipolar I and II outpatients were randomized to either 12 weekly sessions of individual psychoeducation plus Treatment As Usual (Intervention) or Treatment As Usual (TAU) (Control). Outcomes were assessed using the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), EuroQoL (EQ-5D), Bipolar Knowledge and Attitudes and Questionnaire (BKAQ), and a self-reported measure of medication adherence (Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4 items, MMAS-4). Effect sizes were derived from baseline adjusted standardized regression coefficients. Retention in the study was good, 80% of patients in the TAU follow-up assessment and 100% of patients in the CaPE group attended all 12 sessions. Patient satisfaction was higher in the CaPE group relative to control (ES = 1.41). Further, there were large effect sizes shown for CaPE versus TAU for medication adherence (MMAS-4: ES = 0.81), knowledge and attitudes towards bipolar (BKAQ: ES = 0.68), mania (YMRS: ES = 1.18), depression (BDI: ES = 1.17) and quality of life measures (EQ-5D: ES ⇒ 0.88). Culturally adapted psychoeducation intervention is acceptable and feasible, and can be effective in improving mood symptoms and knowledge and attitudes to BPAD when compared with TAU. Larger scale studies are needed to confirm our findings. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT02210390.

  4. Impact of a Psycho-Educational Team in early Breast Cancer Patients' Coping Strategies. The Venere Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreis, Federica; Meriggi, Fausto; Codignola, Claudio; Frigoli, Ilaria; Prochilo, Tiziana; Mutti, Stefano; Huscher, Alessandra; Libertini, Michela; Di Biasi, Brunella; Abeni, Chiara; Ogliosi, Chiara; Noventa, Silvia; Rota, Luigina; Pedrali, Chiara; Zaniboni, Alberto

    2018-04-09

    The main purpose of our psycho-educational groups was to help women with breast cancer learn how to cope with the physical, emotional, and lifestyle changes associated with cancer as well as with medical treatments that can be painful and traumatic. With this study, we wanted to detect the effects that group action had on the women who participated in it. We studied a total of 97 patients who participated in 13 psycho-education groups. The whole sample was female patients who had breast cancer with no recurrence or metastases. All patients were evaluated with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Body Image Scale (BIS). We found no significant effect on anxiety and body image for the brief psycho-educational group for women with breast cancer in this study. It is possible to highlight a statistical difference (Table 3) and hence an improvement between the results of the HADS depression test at T0 (first evaluation at the first meeting) and T1 (retest in the final meeting). The tests did not show a significant effect on anxiety and body image perception, but the patients reported that the psycho-educational group was an important intervention for their life. Outcome measurement is more complex in psychosocial research because many variables come into play and each phase of treatment is characterized by different types of problems for the patient: physical, relational and psychological aspects are involved. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. A Web-Based Psychoeducational Intervention for Adolescent Depression: Design and Development of MoodHwb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan Jones, Rhys; Thapar, Anita; Rice, Frances; Beeching, Harriet; Cichosz, Rachel; Mars, Becky; Smith, Daniel J; Merry, Sally; Stallard, Paul; Jones, Ian; Thapar, Ajay K; Simpson, Sharon A

    2018-02-15

    Depression is common in adolescence and leads to distress and impairment in individuals, families and carers. Treatment and prevention guidelines highlight the key role of information and evidence-based psychosocial interventions not only for individuals but also for their families and carers. Engaging young people in prevention and early intervention programs is a challenge, and early treatment and prevention of adolescent depression is a major public health concern. There has been growing interest in psychoeducational interventions to provide accurate information about health issues and to enhance and develop self-management skills. However, for adolescents with, or at high risk of depression, there is a lack of engaging Web-based psychoeducation programs that have been developed with user input and in line with research guidelines and targeted at both the individual and their family or carer. There are also few studies published on the process of development of Web-based psychoeducational interventions. The aim of this study was to describe the process underlying the design and development of MoodHwb (HwbHwyliau in Welsh): a Web-based psychoeducation multimedia program for young people with, or at high risk of, depression and their families, carers, friends, and professionals. The initial prototype was informed by (1) a systematic review of psychoeducational interventions for adolescent depression; (2) findings from semistructured interviews and focus groups conducted with adolescents (with depressive symptoms or at high risk), parents or carers, and professionals working with young people; and (3) workshops and discussions with a multimedia company and experts (in clinical, research, and multimedia work). Twelve interviews were completed (four each with young people, parents or carers, and professionals) and six focus groups (three with young people, one with parents and carers, one with professionals, and one with academics). Key themes from the interviews and

  6. A psycho-educational HIV/STI prevention intervention for internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti: results from a non-randomized cohort pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen H Logie

    Full Text Available Little evidence exists regarding efficacious HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI prevention interventions with internally displaced populations. Internally displaced women are at elevated risk for HIV/STI due to limited access to health services, heightened poverty and social network breakdown. The FASY (Famn an Aksyon Pou Sante' Yo (Women Taking Action For Their Health study examined the effectiveness of a peer health worker (PHW delivered psycho-educational HIV/STI pilot study with internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti.This was a non-randomized cohort pilot study. Participants completed a computer-assisted pre-test programmed on Android tablet PCs followed by an HIV/STI educational video-based session and a 6-week psycho-educational group program of weekly meetings. Participants completed a post-test upon completion of group sessions. The primary outcome was HIV knowledge; our pre-specified index of clinically significant change was an effect size of 0.30. Secondary outcomes included: STI knowledge, condom use, social support, resilient coping, depression and relationship control. We used mixed-effects regression to calculate mean outcome pre-post score change. This study was registered (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01492829.Between January 1-April 30, 2012 we assigned 200 participants to the study. The majority of participants (n = 176, 88% completed the study and were followed up at 8 weeks, finishing April 30, 2012. Adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, HIV knowledge (β = 4.81; 95% CI 4.36-5.26, STI knowledge (β = 0.84; 95% CI 0.70-0.99, condom use (AOR = 4.05, 95% CI 1.86-8.83, and depression (β = -0.63, 95% CI -0.88--0.39 scores showed statistically significant change post-intervention (p<0.05.This pilot study evaluated a PHW psycho-educational HIV/STI prevention intervention among internally displaced women in post-earthquake Haiti. Pilot studies are an important approach to understand feasibility and scientific

  7. Efficacy of a minimal home-based psychoeducative intervention versus usual care for managing anxiety and dyspnoea in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bove, Dorthe Gaby; Overgaard, Dorthe; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    investigates the efficacy of a minimal home-based psychoeducative intervention versus usual care for patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The trial is a randomised controlled trial with a 4-week and 3-month follow-up. 66 patients with severe chronic obstructive...... pulmonary disease and associated anxiety will be randomised 1:1 to either an intervention or control group. The intervention consists of a single psychoeducative session in the patient's home in combination with a telephone booster session. The intervention is based on a manual, with a theoretical...

  8. Who helps the leaders? Difficulties experienced by cancer support group leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsten, Laura; Butow, Phyllis; Price, Melanie; Hobbs, Kim; Sunquist, Kendra

    2006-07-01

    Cancer support groups are an important source of support for cancer patients, yet little is known about the challenges and training needs of both professionally trained and untrained leaders. The aim of this study was to discover the difficulties experienced and training desired by cancer support group leaders. Twenty-seven leaders of 34 cancer support groups participated in focus groups or individual interviews. Groups were purposively selected as representative of 173 support groups identified in New South Wales which were for adults with cancer and/or their adult carers and were not therapeutic or education-only groups. Difficulties identified included dealing with people's different communication styles and needs; dealing with recurrence, metastases and death; practical issues, including resources, setting the programme and funding security; maintaining personal balance and preventing burn out; establishing group credibility; dealing with group cycles; and leading groups in rural areas. Leaders also identified benefits and rewards from group leadership such as contributing to others' well-being, self-development and insight into others' lives. Non-professionally trained leaders experienced more difficulties, particularly in dealing with group process and practical issues. Difficulties identified were related both to working with a cancer population specifically and to working with groups in general. While some issues were common to both health professionals and non-health professionals, non-health professionals reported greater supportive needs. Clear guidelines, targeted training and development of better methods of support to reduce the stress and burn out experienced by group leaders are needed.

  9. A Psychoeducational Approach in the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotugno, Albert J.

    1980-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa exists as a clinical entity with significant ego disturbances which appear as primary features. Noneating and accompanying weight loss are often secondary features of the disturbance. The psychoeducational approach is most valuable because it integrates the psychological view with educational goals. (Author)

  10. The Psychoeducational Characteristics of Children with Turner Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovet, Joanne F.

    1993-01-01

    This study compared psychoeducational characteristics of 67 children (ages 6-16) with Turner syndrome and 27 nonaffected controls. Subjects exhibited selective impairments in visuospatial and memory areas; significant underachievement in arithmetic; poor social competence; and increased behavior problems, particularly in the area of hyperactivity.…

  11. Clinical Efficacy of Psychoeducational Interventions with Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limiñana-Gras, Rosa M.; Colodro-Conde, Lucía; Cuéllar-Flores, Isabel; Sánchez-López, M. Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the efficacy of psychoeducational interventions geared to reducing psychological distress for caregivers in a sample of 90 family caregivers of elderly dependent (78 women and 12 men). We conducted an analysis of the statistical and clinical significance of the changes observed in psychological health…

  12. Efficacy of Group CBT Vs Group Information and Support in Relapse and Recurrence of Depression in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Tony Cassidy

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse the rates and length of time to relapse and/or recurrence of depression in individuals who attended either Group CBT or Group Information and Support in an adult secondary mental health setting in Ireland. The present study centred on the analysis of previously collected data from groups running between 2005 and 2010 and on the retrospective file review. It formed part of a larger scale research study conducted by the Principal Clinical Psychologist evaluating the ...

  13. [Study of the occupational stress norm and it's application for the executive group and administrative support group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin-wei; Wang, Zhi-ming; Jin, Tai-yi; Lan, Ya-jia

    2006-07-01

    A study of the occupational stress norm and it's application for the executive group and administrative support group. In this study, cross-sectional study method is used, and a synthetic way of sorting and randomized sampling is adopted to deal with research targets (263 executive group, 569 administrative support group). Descriptive statistics for OSI-R scale scores for the executive group, administrative support group were modulated. Scale raw score to T-score conversion tables derived from the OSI-R normative sample for executive group, administrative support group were established. OSI-R profile from for executive group, administrative support group were established. For the ORQ and PSQ scales, scores at or above 70 indicate a strong levels of maladaptive stress and strain. Score inthe range of 60 to 69 suggest middle levels of maladaptive stress and strain. Score in the range of 40 to 59 indicate normal levels of stress and strain. Score below 40 indicate a relative absence of occupational stress and strain. For the PRQ scales, score below 30 indicate a significant lack of coping resources. Score in the range of 30 to 39 suggest middle deficits in coping resources. Score in the range of 40 to 59 indicate average coping resources. Scores at or above 60 indicate a strong levels of coping resources. Based on occupational Stress norm, raw score to T-score conversion tables, OSI-R profile form and classification criterion, we could estimate the level of occupation stress, stressor, strain and coping resources in different occupation. In addition, we combined subjective and objective environment match model of occupational stress. The various individual and organizational intervention measures should be taken to reduce the occupational stress and to increase coping so as to improve the work ability.

  14. Coping with somatic illnesses in online support groups: do the feared disadvantages actually occur?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, C.F.; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Taal, Erik; Lebrun, C.E.I.; Drossaers-Bakker, K.W.; Drossaers-Bakker, K.W.; Smit, W.M.; Seydel, E.R.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2008-01-01

    People in stressful circumstances, such as serious health conditions, often turn to support groups. With the increase in the availability and popularity of the Internet, the possibility has arisen to join support groups online. Various authors have raised potential disadvantages of these groups,

  15. Coping with somatic illnesses in online support groups : Do the feared disadvantages actually occur?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Uden-Kraan, C. F.; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, E; Lebrun, C.E.I.; Drossaers-Bakker, K. W.; Smit, W. M.; Seydel, E. R.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    People in stressful circumstances, such as serious health conditions, often turn to support groups. With the increase in the availability and popularity of the Internet, the possibility has arisen to join support groups online. Various authors have raised potential disadvantages of these groups,

  16. The E Sibling Project - exploratory randomised controlled trial of an online multi-component psychoeducational intervention for siblings of individuals with first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Jacqueline; Henderson, Claire; Pinfold, Vanessa; Norman, Ian

    2013-04-26

    Siblings of individuals with first episode psychosis are natural partners to promote service users' recovery and are themselves vulnerable to mental ill health due to the negative impact of psychosis within the family. This study aims to develop and undertake a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of an online multi-component psychoeducational intervention for siblings of individuals with first episode psychosis. The impetus for the intervention arose from siblings' expressed needs for peer support and information on psychosis, coping and management strategies for common symptoms and ways to promote recovery. The project design draws on the Medical Research Council framework for the design and evaluation of complex interventions. Mixed methods comprising collection of qualitative focus group data, systematic review and expert advisory group consultation are used to develop the theoretical basis for and design of the intervention. This protocol focuses on the modelling and piloting phase which uses a randomised controlled trial with factorial design to test the efficacy of the intervention. Outcome data on participants' mental wellbeing, knowledge, perceived self-efficacy and experiences of caregiving will be assessed at baseline, at end of the intervention (10 weeks later) and at 10 week follow-up. In addition, a post-intervention semi-structured interview with 20% of the participants will explore their experiences and acceptability of the intervention. This multi-component online psychoeducational intervention aims to enhance siblings' knowledge about psychosis and their coping capacity, thus potentially improving their own mental wellbeing and promoting their contribution to service users' recovery. The factorial design randomised controlled trial with a supplementary process evaluation using semi-structured interviews and usage-monitoring will collect preliminary evidence of efficacy, feasibility and acceptability, as well as feedback about the barriers and

  17. A student-facilitated community-based support group initiative for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A student-facilitated community-based support group initiative for Mental Health ... was a collaborative partnership between a local University Psychology Department ... users, Rehabilitation, Primary Health Care, Social support, Stigmatisation ...

  18. A student-facilitated community-based support group initiative for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leana Meiring

    supplement for offering support to service users in PHC settings. The group assisted ... training, as well as psychological and social support focussed on improving ... helping service users cope with their mental illness and improve their quality.

  19. Adoption of web-based group decision support systems: Experiences from the field and future developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hillegersberg, Jos; Koenen, Sebastiaan

    2016-01-01

    While organizations have massively adopted enterprise information systems to support business processes, business meetings in which key decisions are made about products, services and processes, are usually held without much support of information systems. This is remarkable as group decision

  20. Effects of needs-assessment-based psycho-education of schizophrenic patients' families on the severity of symptoms and relapse rate of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirabadi, Gholam Reza; Rafizadeh, Mahnaz; Omranifard, Victoria; Yari, Azam; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Mehrabi, Tayebe; Sadri, Sima

    2014-11-01

    Family psycho-education is one of the most effective interventions for preventing relapse in patients with schizophrenia. We evaluated the efficacy of a needs-assessment-based educational program in comparison with a current program (textbook based) in the treatment of schizophrenia. Patients with schizophrenia and their families (N = 60) were allocated to needs-assessment-based education (treatment) and textbook-based (control) programs; both included 10 sessions of education within about 6 months. Symptoms were assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) prior to intervention and every 3 months for a total of 18 months. A 25% decrease or increase in total PANSS score was considered as response or relapse, respectively. Forty-two cases completed the study. The total PANSS score was significantly decreased in both groups with more reduction in the treatment group. Positive and negative scale scores were reduced in the treatment group, but not significantly in the control group. Response rate was higher in the treatment group and relapse rate was lower (15% vs. 27.2%, P = 0.279). In logistic regression analysis, needs-assessment-based psycho-education was associated with more treatment response. Needs-assessment-based psycho-education is more effective than textbook-based education for treating schizophrenia. We recommend psychiatric care centers to conduct needs-assessment and develop their own program for family psycho-education.

  1. Experiences During a Psychoeducational Intervention Program Run in a Pediatric Ward: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Magalhães

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Hospitalization, despite its duration, is likely to result in emotional, social, and academic costs to school-age children and adolescents. Developing adequate psychoeducational activities and assuring inpatients' own class teachers' collaboration, allows for the enhancement of their personal and emotional competences and the maintenance of a connection with school and academic life. These educational programs have been mainly designed for patients with long stays and/or chronic conditions, in the format of Hospital Schools, and typically in pediatric Hospitals. However, the negative effects of hospitalization can be felt in internments of any duration, and children hospitalized in smaller regional hospitals should have access to actions to maintain the connection with their daily life. Thus, this investigation aims to present a psychoeducational intervention program theoretically grounded within the self-regulated learning (SRL framework, implemented along 1 year in a pediatric ward of a regional hospital to all its school-aged inpatients, regardless of the duration of their stay. The program counts with two facets: the psychoeducational accompaniment and the linkage to school. All the 798 school-aged inpatients (Mage = 11.7; SDage = 3.71; Mhospital stay = 4 days participated in pedagogical, leisure nature, and SRL activities designed to train transversal skills (e.g., goal-setting. Moreover, inpatients completed assigned study tasks resulting from the linkage between the students' own class teachers and the hospital teacher. The experiences reported by parents/caregivers and class teachers of the inpatients enrolling in the intervention allowed the researchers to reflect on the potential advantages of implementing a psychoeducational intervention to hospitalized children and adolescents that is: individually tailored, focused on leisure playful theoretically grounded activities that allow learning to naturally occur, and designed to facilitate

  2. Experiences During a Psychoeducational Intervention Program Run in a Pediatric Ward: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Paula; Mourão, Rosa; Pereira, Raquel; Azevedo, Raquel; Pereira, Almerinda; Lopes, Madalena; Rosário, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    Hospitalization, despite its duration, is likely to result in emotional, social, and academic costs to school-age children and adolescents. Developing adequate psychoeducational activities and assuring inpatients' own class teachers' collaboration, allows for the enhancement of their personal and emotional competences and the maintenance of a connection with school and academic life. These educational programs have been mainly designed for patients with long stays and/or chronic conditions, in the format of Hospital Schools, and typically in pediatric Hospitals. However, the negative effects of hospitalization can be felt in internments of any duration, and children hospitalized in smaller regional hospitals should have access to actions to maintain the connection with their daily life. Thus, this investigation aims to present a psychoeducational intervention program theoretically grounded within the self-regulated learning (SRL) framework, implemented along 1 year in a pediatric ward of a regional hospital to all its school-aged inpatients, regardless of the duration of their stay. The program counts with two facets: the psychoeducational accompaniment and the linkage to school. All the 798 school-aged inpatients ( M age = 11.7; SD age = 3.71; M hospital stay = 4 days) participated in pedagogical, leisure nature, and SRL activities designed to train transversal skills (e.g., goal-setting). Moreover, inpatients completed assigned study tasks resulting from the linkage between the students' own class teachers and the hospital teacher. The experiences reported by parents/caregivers and class teachers of the inpatients enrolling in the intervention allowed the researchers to reflect on the potential advantages of implementing a psychoeducational intervention to hospitalized children and adolescents that is: individually tailored, focused on leisure playful theoretically grounded activities that allow learning to naturally occur, and designed to facilitate school re

  3. Influence of Personality Type and Anonymity on Participation in a Group Support System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hartmann, Robert

    2000-01-01

    A group support system (GSS) uses a combination of networked personal computers, software that collects, manipulates, and aggregates member's individual input, and human facilitation to improve the group decision-making process...

  4. Psycho-educational interventions for children and young people with Type 1 Diabetes in the UK: How effective are they? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampopoulos, Dimitrios; Hesketh, Kathryn R; Amin, Rakesh; Paes, Veena Mazarello; Viner, Russell M; Stephenson, Terence

    2017-01-01

    To synthesise evidence from UK-based randomised trials of psycho-educational interventions in children and young people (CYP) with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) to inform the evidence-base for adoption of such interventions into the NHS. We searched Medline, Embase, Cochrane, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Web of Science up to March 2016. Two reviewers independently selected UK-based randomised trials comparing psycho-educational interventions for improving management of T1D for CYP with a control group of usual care or attention control. The main outcome was glycaemic control measured by percentage of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c); secondary outcomes included psychosocial functioning, diabetes knowledge, adverse and other clinical outcomes. A narrative synthesis and meta-analysis were conducted. Pooled effect sizes of standardised mean difference (SMD) were calculated. Ten eligible trials of three educational and seven psycho-educational interventions were identified. Most interventions were delivered by non-psychologists and targeted adolescents with more than one year duration of diabetes. Meta-analysis of nine of these trials (N = 1,838 participants) showed a non-significant reduction in HbA1c attributable to the intervention (pooled SMD = -0.06, 95% CI: -0.21 to 0.09). Psycho-educational interventions aiming to increase children's self-efficacy had a moderate, beneficial effect (SMD = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.13 to 0.87). No benefits on diabetes knowledge and other indicators of psychosocial functioning were identified. There is insufficient evidence to recommend the use of particular psycho-educational programme for CYP with T1D in the UK. Further trials with sufficient power and reporting standards are needed. Future trials could consider active involvement of psychological specialists in the delivery of psychologically informed interventions and implementation of psycho-educational interventions earlier in the course of the disease. PROSPERO CRD42015010701.

  5. Effect of a psycho-educational intervention for family members on caregiver burdens and psychiatric symptoms in patients with schizophrenia in Shiraz, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background This study explored the effectiveness of family psycho-education in reducing patients’ symptoms and on family caregiver burden. Methods Seventy Iranian outpatients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia disorder and their caregivers were randomly allocated to the experimental (n = 35) or control groups (n = 35). Patients in the experimental group received antipsychotic drug treatment and a psycho-educational program was arranged for their caregivers. The psycho-educational program consisted of ten 90-min sessions held during five weeks (two session in each week). Each caregiver attended 10 sessions (in five weeks) At baseline, immediately after intervention, and one month later. Validated tools were used to assess patients’ clinical status and caregiver burden. Results Compared with the control group, the case group showed significantly reduced symptom severity and caregiver burden both immediately after intervention and one month later. Conclusions These results suggest that even need based short-term psycho-educational intervention for family members of Iranian patients with schizophrenic disorder may improve the outcomes of patients and their families. Trial registration IRCT Number:138809122812 N1` PMID:22632135

  6. Family-focused cognitive behaviour therapy versus psycho-education for adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome: long-term follow-up of an RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Samantha; Chalder, Trudie; Rimes, Katharine A

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the long term efficacy of family-focused cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) compared with psycho-education in improving school attendance and other secondary outcomes in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). A 24 month follow-up of a randomised controlled trial was carried out. Participants received either 13 one-hour sessions of family-focused CBT or four one-hour sessions of psycho-education. Forty-four participants took part in the follow-up study. The proportion of participants reporting at least 70% school attendance (the primary outcome) at 24 months was 90% in CBT group and 84% in psycho-education group; the difference between the groups was not statistically significant (OR = 1.29, p = 0.80). The proportion of adolescents who had recovered in the family-focused CBT group was 79% compared with 64% in the psycho-education, according to a definition including fatigue and school attendance. This difference was not statistically significant (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.34). Family-focused CBT was associated with significantly better emotional and behavioural adjustment at 24 month follow-up compared to psycho-education, as reported by both adolescents (F = 6.49, p = 0.02) and parents (F = 4.52, P = 0.04). Impairment significantly decreased in both groups between six and 24 month follow-ups, with no significant group difference in improvement over this period. Gains previously observed for other secondary outcomes at six month follow-up were maintained at 24 month follow-up with no further significant improvement or group differences in improvement. In conclusion, gains achieved by adolescents with CFS who had undertaken family-focused CBT and psycho-education generally continued or were maintained at two-year follow-up. The exception was that family-focused CBT was associated with maintained improvements in emotional and behavioural difficulties whereas psycho-education was associated with

  7. Evaluation of support group interventions for children in troubled families: study protocol for a quasi-experimental control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerfving, Annemi; Johansson, Fredrik; Elgán, Tobias H

    2014-01-24

    Support groups for children in troubled families are available in a majority of Swedish municipalities. They are used as a preventive effort for children in families with different parental problems such as addiction to alcohol/other drugs, mental illness, domestic violence, divorce situations, or even imprisonment. Children from families with these problems are a well-known at-risk group for various mental health and social problems. Support groups aim at strengthening children's coping behaviour, to improve their mental health and to prevent a negative psycho-social development. To date, evaluations using a control-group study design are scarce. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the effects of support groups. This paper describes the design of an effectiveness study, initially intended as a randomized controlled trial, but instead is pursued as a quasi-experimental study using a non-randomized control group. The aim is to include 116 children, aged 7-13 years and one parent/another closely related adult, in the study. Participants are recruited via existing support groups in the Stockholm county district and are allocated either into an intervention group or a waiting list control group, representing care as usual. The assessment consists of questionnaires that are to be filled in at baseline and at four months following the baseline. Additionally, the intervention group completes a 12-month follow-up. The outcomes include the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ S11-16), the Kids Coping Scale, the "Ladder of life" which measures overall life satisfaction, and "Jag tycker jag är" (I think I am) which measures self-perception and self-esteem. The parents complete the SDQ P4-16 (parent-report version) and the Swedish scale "Familjeklimat" (Family Climate), which measures the emotional climate in the family. There is a need for evaluating the effects of support groups targeted to children from troubled families. This quasi-experimental study

  8. International multi-site survey on the use of online support groups in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha; Alda, Martin; Ardau, Raffaella; Baune, Bernhard T; Berk, Michael; Bersudsky, Yuly; Bilderbeck, Amy; Bocchetta, Alberto; Bossini, Letizia; Castro, Angela M Paredes; Cheung, Eric Y W; Chillotti, Caterina; Choppin, Sabine; Zompo, Maria Del; Dias, Rodrigo; Dodd, Seetal; Duffy, Anne; Etain, Bruno; Fagiolini, Andrea; Hernandez, Miryam Fernández; Garnham, Julie; Geddes, John; Gildebro, Jonas; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goodwin, Guy M; Grof, Paul; Harima, Hirohiko; Hassel, Stefanie; Henry, Chantal; Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Kapur, Vaisnvy; Kunigiri, Girish; Lafer, Beny; Larsen, Erik R; Lewitzka, Ute; Licht, Rasmus W; Hvenegaard Lund, Anne; Misiak, Blazej; Piotrowski, Patryk; Monteith, Scott; Munoz, Rodrigo; Nakanotani, Takako; Nielsen, René E; O'donovan, Claire; Okamura, Yasushi; Osher, Yamima; Reif, Andreas; Ritter, Philipp; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Sagduyu, Kemal; Sawchuk, Brett; Schwartz, Elon; Scippa, Ângela M; Slaney, Claire; Sulaiman, Ahmad H; Suominen, Kirsi; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Tam, Peter; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Tondo, Leonardo; Vieta, Eduard; Vinberg, Maj; Viswanath, Biju; Volkert, Julia; Zetin, Mark; Whybrow, Peter C; Bauer, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Peer support is an established component of recovery from bipolar disorder, and online support groups may offer opportunities to expand the use of peer support at the patient's convenience. Prior research in bipolar disorder has reported value from online support groups. To understand the use of online support groups by patients with bipolar disorder as part of a larger project about information seeking. The results are based on a one-time, paper-based anonymous survey about information seeking by patients with bipolar disorder, which was translated into 12 languages. The survey was completed between March 2014 and January 2016 and included questions on the use of online support groups. All patients were diagnosed by a psychiatrist. Analysis included descriptive statistics and general estimating equations to account for correlated data. The survey was completed by 1222 patients in 17 countries. The patients used the Internet at a percentage similar to the general public. Of the Internet users who looked online for information about bipolar disorder, only 21.0% read or participated in support groups, chats, or forums for bipolar disorder (12.8% of the total sample). Given the benefits reported in prior research, clarification of the role of online support groups in bipolar disorder is needed. With only a minority of patients using online support groups, there are analytical challenges for future studies.

  9. Disadvantages of online support groups for people with arthritis, fibromyalgia and breast cancer disproved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, C.F.; Taal, Erik; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Lebrun, C.E.I.; Smit, W.M.; Seydel, E.R.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: People in stressful circumstances, such as serious health conditions, often turn to support groups. With the increase in the availability and popularity of internet, the possibility has arisen to join support groups online. Various authors have raised attention for potential

  10. Impact of Group Support on Adjustment to Divorce by Single, Custodial Fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedder, Sandra L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the effects of a support group for single, custodial fathers (N=36) on measures of divorce adjustment, loneliness, and self-concept. Results indicated that men who attended the group meetings made more positive changes than those who did not attend and indicated a desire for support, sharing, and discussion. (JAC)

  11. Individual neuropsychological support and group sessions for relatives to TBI patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siert, Lars

    TITLE: Individual neuropsychological support and group sessions for relatives to TBI patients. OBJECTIVE: To describe how the neuropsychologist work with early and ongoing individual support and group sessions for relatives to adult TBI patients in the acute and sub acute phase and after discharge...

  12. Facilitation of self-transcendence in a breast cancer support group: II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Doris Dickerson

    2003-01-01

    To pilot a second support group intervention study promoting self-transcendence perspectives and activities and to document changes over time in well-being in support group participants compared with nonparticipants. Quasiexperimental, partial randomization, preference trial design. An urban breast cancer resource center established by survivors. 41 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer were recruited, and 39 completed the study. 22 women participated in three intervention support groups; 17 were in a comparison group. The intervention was an eight-week, closed support group based on self-transcendence theory. Data were collected three times during 14 months. Support group intervention, self-transcendence, and emotional and physical well-being. The intervention group had lower scores than the comparison group on self-transcendence and well-being variables at baseline (time [T] 1). Scores were higher for both groups postintervention (T2), with no differences between groups. One year postintervention (T3), intervention group scores again were lower than comparison group scores. Intervention group T3 scores were unchanged from T2. Most potential participants were unwilling to risk being randomized into a nonpreferred group. Activities based on self-transcendence theory were associated with expanded perspectives and activities and an improved sense of well-being in support group participants at the end of the intervention, but not one year later. Findings from the pilot studies informed a study currently in progress. Nurses should maintain awareness of local resources for support and make that information available to women when they are newly diagnosed with breast cancer, during their treatment, and later.

  13. Adoption of Web-based Group Decision Support Systems: Conditions for Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hillegersberg, Jos; Koenen, Sebastiaan

    2014-01-01

    While organizations have massively adopted enterprise information systems to support business processes, business meetings in which key decisions are made about products, services and processes are usually held without much support of information systems. This is remarkable as group decision support

  14. Systematic review of the information and communication technology features of web- and mobile-based psychoeducational interventions for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Danyang; Lustria, Mia Liza A; Hendrickse, Joshua

    2017-06-01

    To examine the information and communication technology (ICT) features of psychoeducational interventions for depression delivered via the Internet or via mobile technology. Web- and mobile-based psychoeducational intervention studies published from 2004 to 2014 were selected and reviewed by two independent coders. A total of 55 unique studies satisfied the selection criteria. The review revealed a diverse range of ICTs used to support the psychoeducational programs. Most interventions used websites as their main mode of delivery and reported greater use of communication tools compared to effective approaches like tailoring or interactive technologies games, videos, and self-monitoring tools. Many of the studies relied on medium levels of clinician involvement and only a few were entirely self-guided. Programs that reported higher levels of clinician involvement also reported using more communication tools, and reported greater compliance to treatment. Future experimental studies may help unpack the effects of technology features and reveal new ways to automate aspects of clinician input. There is a need to further examine ways ICTs can be optimized to reduce the burden on clinicians whilst enhancing the delivery of proven effective therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Diabetes Support Groups Improve Patient’s Compliance and Control Blood Glucose Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamrotul Izzah

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Providing information is not enough to improve diabetic patient’s compliance and achieve goals of therapy. Patient’s good awareness as well as emotional and social supports from family and community may play an important role to improve their compliance and clinical outcomes. Therefore, diabetes support groups were developed and each support group consisted of two pharmacists, two nurses, diabetic patients and their family members. A total of 70 type 2 diabetic patient’s were enrolled and randomized into support group 1 and support group 2. Patients in the group 1 received information leaflets only, while patient in the group 2 received pharmacist counselling and information leaflets at each meeting. Patient’s awareness of diabetes and compliance with medications were assessed by a short questionnaire at baseline and final follow-up. Blood glucose and cholesterol levels were also evaluated in both groups. At the end of study, the overall patient’s awareness and compliance improved by 61.5%. The random and fasting blood glucose levels decreased over than 30% in the group 2 and around 14% in the group 1. This study reveals that collaboration between health care professionals and community in the diabetes support group might help diabetic patients to increase their knowledge and compliance with the diabetes therapy as well as glycaemic control.

  16. MobiGroup: Enabling Lifecycle Support to Social Activity Organization and Suggestion with Mobile Crowd Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Bin; Yu, Zhiwen; Chen, Liming; Zhou, Xingshe; Ma, Xiaojuan

    2015-01-01

    The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link. This paper presents a group-aware mobile crowd sensing system called MobiGroup, which supports group activity organization in real-world settings. Acknowledging the complexity and diversity of group activities, this paper introduces a formal concept model to characterize group activities and classifies them into four organizational stages. We t...

  17. Moving the Self-Esteem of People with Epilepsy by Supportive Group: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritaya Sawangchareon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People with epilepsy (PWE face physical and mental illness, and social stigma, which affect their self-esteem and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a support group on the self-esteem of PWE. Methods: A Quasi-experimental study was performed on 120 PWE in the Epilepsy Clinic at Srinagarind Hospital. The experimental group (N=60 attended the support group before receiving regular health care services. The control group (N=60 received only regular healthcare services. Data was collected by using the Rosenberg self-esteem scale scoring before and after the experiment. The score was analyzed by using a paired t-test and an independent t-test. Results: The study showed that before the experiment, the self–esteem score of the control group was significantly higher than the experimental group. After the experiment, the scores of the control group and the experimental group showed a significant statistical difference. The score in the control group was significantly lower than the experimental group, while the score in the experimental group was significantly higher than before the experiment. Conclusion: The support group improves the self-esteem of PWE. Medical personnel should set up a support group for PWE to enhance their self-esteem.

  18. Psychoeducation Interventions in Families of Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Reis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The studies in expressed emotions allowed establishing a pattern in educational and psychoeducative interventions within the families of schizophrenic patients. In this paper, the author synthesises his research developed in expressed emotions of the chronic patient's relatives. The author refers the importance of the relative's cognitive variables about mental representation of the patient and his disease. These variables are studied through the attributions made about the patient's personality and causes of disease. Other cognitive variables are analysed, relying to the conceptualisation in family psycho educative intervention, such as, transactional games, family conflicts and parental relationship style. The evaluation of the relatives and families is considered as being part of the process of family psycho-educative intervention.

  19. The Bipolar Interactive Psychoeducation (BIPED study: trial design and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Ian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bipolar disorders affect between 3–5% of the population and are associated with considerable lifelong impairment. Since much of the morbidity associated with bipolar disorder is caused by recurrent depressive symptoms, which are often only poorly responsive to antidepressants, there is a need to develop alternative, non-pharmacological interventions. Psychoeducational interventions have emerged as promising long-term therapeutic options for bipolar disorder. Methods/design The study is an exploratory, individually randomised controlled trial. The intervention known as 'Beating Bipolar' is a psychoeducational programme which is delivered via a novel web-based system. We will recruit 100 patients with a diagnosis of DSM-IV bipolar disorder (including type I and type II currently in clinical remission. The primary outcome is quality of life. This will be compared for those patients who have participated in the psychoeducational programme with those who received treatment as usual. Quality of life will be assessed immediately following the intervention as well as 10 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes include current depressive and manic symptoms, number of episodes of depression and mania/hypomania experienced during the follow-up period, global functioning, functional impairment and insight. An assessment of costs and a process evaluation will also be conducted which will explore the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention as well as potential barriers to effectiveness. Discussion Bipolar disorder is common, under-recognised and often poorly managed. It is a chronic, life-long, relapsing condition which has an enormous impact on the individual and the economy. This trial will be the first to explore the effectiveness of a novel web-based psychoeducational intervention for patients with bipolar disorder which has potential to be easily rolled out to patients. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials

  20. Psycho-educational program for high school females

    OpenAIRE

    Perla Caridad López Hernández; Laura López Angulo; Eneida Bravo Polanco; Carmen Benítez Cabrera; Lisbet Cepero Águila; Rafael Luis Pino Pich

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: sex education provides knowledge, values and attitudes that both, men and women need to live with dignity and develop fully and happily. Objective: to determine the usefulness of applying a psycho-educational program on female sexuality in high school. Methods: a quasi-experimental study conducted between September 2007 and June 2008, based on a sample composed of 180 ninth grade females living in Cumanayagua's urban area. Variables analyzed: adolescents knowledge on sex-relate...

  1. Tagclouds and Group Cognition: Effect of Tagging Support on Students' Reflective Learning in Team Blogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ying; Lin, Shu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of supported tagging (a prompting mechanism for students to stop and think about their writing) for team blogging on undergraduate students' reflective learning and the relationship between tagclouds and group cognition. Thirty-nine students were randomly assigned to six groups and blogged for 5 weeks. Three groups were…

  2. The uses of an observation team with a parent support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, P J

    1994-04-01

    This brief report examines the uses of an Observation Team with a Parent Support Group. In particular, attention is placed on the idea of the Observation Team acting as a Reflecting Team in the final session of the group's life. Using the Observation Team in this manner has evolved from an amalgamation of ideas from family therapy and group therapy theory.

  3. The use of an online support group for neuromuscular disorders: a thematic analysis of message postings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Oonagh; Buchanan, Heather; Coulson, Neil

    2017-06-08

    People affected by neuromuscular disorders can experience adverse psychosocial consequences and difficulties accessing information and support. Online support groups provide new opportunities for peer support. The aim of this study was to understand how contributors used the message board function of a newly available neuromuscular disorders online support group. Message postings (n = 1951) from the first five months of the message board of a newly formed online support group for neuromuscular disorders hosted by a charitable organization were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Members created a sense of community through disclosing personal information, connecting with people with similar illness experiences or interests, welcoming others and sharing aspirations for the development of a resourceful community. Experiences, emotional reactions and support were shared in relation to: delayed diagnosis; symptom interpretation; illness management and progression; the isolating impact of rare disorders; and the influence of social and political factors on illness experiences. This study provided a novel insight into individuals' experiences of accessing a newly available online support group for rare conditions hosted by a charitable organization. The findings highlight how the online support group provided an important peer support environment for members to connect with others, exchange information and support and engender discussion on political and social issues unique to living with often-rare neuromuscular disorders. Online support groups may therefore provide an important and easily accessible support outlet for people with neuromuscular disorders as well as a platform for empowering members to raise awareness about the impact of living with these conditions. Further research is needed to examine member motivations for using such groups and any effects of participation in greater detail. Implications for rehabilitation Online support groups may

  4. A single blind randomized control trial on support groups for Chinese persons with mild dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young DKW

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Daniel KW Young,1 Timothy CY Kwok,2 Petrus YN Ng1 1Department of Social Work, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong; 2Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong Purpose: Persons with mild dementia experience multiple losses and manifest depressive symptoms. This research study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a support group led by a social worker for Chinese persons with mild dementia. Research methods: Participants were randomly assigned to either a ten-session support group or a control group. Standardized assessment tools were used for data collection at pretreatment and post-treatment periods by a research assistant who was kept blind to the group assignment of the participants. Upon completion of the study, 20 treatment group participants and 16 control group participants completed all assessments. Results: At baseline, the treatment and control groups did not show any significant difference on all demographic variables, as well as on all baseline measures; over one-half (59% of all the participants reported having depression, as assessed by a Chinese Geriatric Depression Scale score ≥8. After completing the support group, the depressive mood of the treatment group participants reduced from 8.83 (standard deviation =2.48 to 7.35 (standard deviation =2.18, which was significant (Wilcoxon signed-rank test; P=0.017, P<0.05, while the control group’s participants did not show any significant change. Conclusion: This present study supports the efficacy and effectiveness of the support group for persons with mild dementia in Chinese society. In particular, this present study shows that a support group can reduce depressive symptoms for participants. Keywords: support group, mild dementia, Chinese, depression

  5. Standard versus prosocial online support groups for distressed breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golant Mitch

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Internet can increase access to psychosocial care for breast cancer survivors through online support groups. This study will test a novel prosocial online group that emphasizes both opportunities for getting and giving help. Based on the helper therapy principle, it is hypothesized that the addition of structured helping opportunities and coaching on how to help others online will increase the psychological benefits of a standard online group. Methods/Design A two-armed randomized controlled trial with pretest and posttest. Non-metastatic breast cancer survivors with elevated psychological distress will be randomized to either a standard facilitated online group or to a prosocial facilitated online group, which combines online exchanges of support with structured helping opportunities (blogging, breast cancer outreach and coaching on how best to give support to others. Validated and reliable measures will be administered to women approximately one month before and after the interventions. Self-esteem, positive affect, and sense of belonging will be tested as potential mediators of the primary outcomes of depressive/anxious symptoms and sense of purpose in life. Discussion This study will test an innovative approach to maximizing the psychological benefits of cancer online support groups. The theory-based prosocial online support group intervention model is sustainable, because it can be implemented by private non-profit or other organizations, such as cancer centers, which mostly offer face-to-face support groups with limited patient reach. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01396174

  6. Standard versus prosocial online support groups for distressed breast cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepore, Stephen J; Buzaglo, Joanne S; Lieberman, Morton A; Golant, Mitch; Davey, Adam

    2011-08-25

    The Internet can increase access to psychosocial care for breast cancer survivors through online support groups. This study will test a novel prosocial online group that emphasizes both opportunities for getting and giving help. Based on the helper therapy principle, it is hypothesized that the addition of structured helping opportunities and coaching on how to help others online will increase the psychological benefits of a standard online group. A two-armed randomized controlled trial with pretest and posttest. Non-metastatic breast cancer survivors with elevated psychological distress will be randomized to either a standard facilitated online group or to a prosocial facilitated online group, which combines online exchanges of support with structured helping opportunities (blogging, breast cancer outreach) and coaching on how best to give support to others. Validated and reliable measures will be administered to women approximately one month before and after the interventions. Self-esteem, positive affect, and sense of belonging will be tested as potential mediators of the primary outcomes of depressive/anxious symptoms and sense of purpose in life. This study will test an innovative approach to maximizing the psychological benefits of cancer online support groups. The theory-based prosocial online support group intervention model is sustainable, because it can be implemented by private non-profit or other organizations, such as cancer centers, which mostly offer face-to-face support groups with limited patient reach. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01396174.

  7. Unmet Supportive Care Needs among Breast Cancer Survivors of Community-Based Support Group in Kuching, Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Joseph Fong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recognizing the needs of cancer survivors is one of the important aspects in healthcare delivery. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of unmet supportive care needs and its associated factors among the breast cancer survivors of community-based support group in Kuching, Sarawak. Materials and Methods. This was a cross-sectional study using Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-SF34. All the members of community-based breast cancer support groups in Kuching were invited. A total of 101 respondents were face-to-face interviewed after the consent was obtained. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results. The respondents endorsed health system and information domain with the highest mean score (2.48; 95% CI: 2.32–2.64. Top 10 items with “moderate to high” level unmet needs had a prevalence of 14.9% to 34.7% of respondents indicating need. Significantly higher level of unmet needs was associated with survivors who were younger (less than 60 years old, had higher education attainment, were unemployed, had survival duration of up to 5 years, and were undergoing active treatment. Conclusion. Systematic delivery of health information which is targeted, culturally sensitive, and linguistically appropriate for addressing younger age, education level, employment status, length of survivorship, and treatment stage should be considered not only at hospital-based setting but also at the community-based support groups.

  8. Overcoming Workplace Barriers: A Focus Group Study Exploring African American Mothers' Needs for Workplace Breastfeeding Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Angela Marie; Kirk, Rosalind; Muzik, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Persistent racial disparities in breastfeeding show that African American women breastfeed at the lowest rates. Return to work is a critical breastfeeding barrier for African American women who return to work sooner than other ethnic groups and more often encounter unsupportive work environments. They also face psychosocial burdens that make breastfeeding at work uniquely challenging. Participants share personal struggles with combining paid employment and breastfeeding and suggest workplace and personal support strategies that they believe will help continue breastfeeding after a return to work. To explore current perspectives on ways to support African American mothers' workplace breastfeeding behavior. Pregnant African American women (n = 8), African American mothers of infants (n = 21), and lactation support providers (n = 9) participated in 1 of 6 focus groups in the Greater Detroit area. Each focus group audiotape was transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used to inductively analyze focus group transcripts and field notes. Focus groups explored thoughts, perceptions, and behavior on interventions to support African American women's breastfeeding. Participants indicate that they generally believed breastfeeding was a healthy option for the baby; however, paid employment is a critical barrier to successful breastfeeding for which mothers receive little help. Participants felt breastfeeding interventions that support working African American mothers should include education and training for health care professionals, regulation and enforcement of workplace breastfeeding support policies, and support from peers who act as breastfeeding role models. Culturally appropriate interventions are needed to support breastfeeding among working African American women. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Effectiveness of a Unique Support Group for Physicians in a Physician Health Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Luis T; Candilis, Philip J; Arnstein, Fredrick; Eaton, Judith; Barnes Blood, Diana; Chinman, Gary A; Bresnahan, Linda R

    2016-01-01

    State Physician Health Programs (PHPs) assess, support, and monitor physicians with mental, behavioral, medical, and substance abuse problems. Since their formation in the 1970s, PHPs have offered support groups following the 12-step model for recovery from substance use disorders (SUDs). However, few programs have developed support groups for physicians without SUDs. This study at the Massachusetts PHP (Physician Health Services Inc.) represents the first effort to survey physician attitudes concerning a unique support group that goes beyond classic addiction models. The group was initiated because of the observation that physicians with problems other than SUDs did not fit easily into the 12-step framework. It was hypothesized that such a group would be effective in helping participants control workplace stress, improve professional and personal relationships, and manage medical and psychiatric difficulties. With a response rate of 43% (85 respondents), the survey identified a strong overall impact of the Physician Health Services Inc. support group, identifying positive effects in all areas of personal and professional life: family and friends, wellness, professional relationships, and career. Respondents identified the role of the facilitator as particularly important, underscoring the facilitator's capacity to welcome participants, manage interactions, set limits, and maintain a supportive emotional tone. The implications for physician health extend from supporting a broader application of this model to using a skilled facilitator to manage groups intended to reduce the stress and burnout of present-day medical practice. The results encourage PHPs, hospitals, medical practices, and physician groups to consider implementing facilitated support groups as an additional tool for maintaining physician health.

  10. Effectiveness of a psycho-educational program for improving quality of life of fibromyalgia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montesano Adrián

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most fibromyalgia patients are seen in primary care (PC. However, the effectiveness of the treatments prescribed by general practitioners is usually minimal. The main objective of the present research is to assess the efficacy of structured psycho-educational intervention, combined with relaxation, developed to improve the quality of life of patients suffering fibromyalgia (FM. The second objective is to assess the cost-effectiveness of this multimodal intervention. Method/Design Design. Randomized controlled trial with a 12-month follow-up involving two groups, one of which is the intervention group that includes patients receiving a psychoeducational program and the other the control group consisting of patients treated for FM in the usual way. Setting. Three urban PC centers in the province of Barcelona (Spain. Sample. The total sample comprises 218 patients (over 18 years of age suffering FM, selected from a database (Rheumatology service-Viladecans Hospital of patients with this illness. Only those patients introduced in the database between the years 2005 and 2007 were included in the selection. Selected patients will be asked for written informed consent to participate in the study. Intervention. Multi-component program including information about the illness, counselling about physical exercise and training in autogenic relaxation. The intervention consists of nine 2-hour sessions delivered during a two-month period. The pharmacological treatment prescribed by the physician was maintained in both groups. Main variables. Sociodemographic characteristics, quality of life, use and cost of healthcare and social services. Measures. Quality of life is to be measured with the FIQ and the EuroQol-5D, and the use of healthcare services with an adapted version of the Client Service Receipt Inventory (CSRI. These variables will be measured before the beginning of the program (baseline and 1, 2, 6 and 12 months later. Discussion

  11. Group affiliation in self-management: support or threat to identity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossy, Dagmara; Knutsen, Ingrid Ruud; Rogers, Anne; Foss, Christina

    2017-02-01

    Self-management is considered important in chronic illness, and contemporary health policy recommends participation in support groups for individuals with chronic conditions. Although withdrawal from or non-participation in support groups is an important problem, there is limited knowledge about individuals' own motivation for participation in or withdrawal from self-management support groups. To investigate how individuals with type 2 diabetes perceive participation in group-based self-management support. This is a qualitative focus group study using a semi-structured interview guide. Sixteen participants diagnosed with type 2 diabetes were included in the study. Individuals with and without group affiliations were mixed in three focus groups to trigger discussions. In the analysis, reoccurring themes of engagement and discussions between participants were focused within a theoretical frame of institutional logic. The focus groups are seen as social spaces where participants construct identity. Both participation and non-participation in group-based self-management support are associated with dealing with the stigma of having type 2 diabetes. Negotiations contribute to constructing an illness dignity as a response to the logic of moral responsibility for the disease. Contemporary policy contributes to societal understandings of individuals with type 2 diabetes as morally inadequate. Our study shows that group-based self-management support may counteract blame and contribute in negotiations of identity for individuals with type 2 diabetes. This mechanism makes participation in groups beneficial for some but stigma inducing for others. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Outcomes of an enhancement study with additional psychoeducational sessions for healthy siblings of a child with cancer during inpatient family-oriented rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemitz, Mandy; Goldbeck, Lutz

    2018-03-01

    Chronic illness of a child puts healthy children of the family at risk of distress. Previous studies have demonstrated that healthy children's psychological symptoms can be reduced when the child knows more about the disease. So far, there is limited evidence of the effectiveness of psychoeducational interventions for healthy children. To compare the effectiveness of an inpatient family-oriented rehabilitation program with vs without additional psychoeducational sessions for healthy children of families with children with cancer. We performed a controlled study in 4 German family-oriented rehabilitation clinics. The outcomes of n = 73 healthy children (mean age: M = 9.55; SD = 3.14; range: 4-18), who participated in 5 additional psychoeducational sessions, were compared with the outcomes of n = 111 healthy children (mean age: M = 8.85; SD = 3.28; range: 4-17), who underwent the usual inpatient rehabilitation program. Primary outcomes were the healthy children's cancer-specific knowledge and their emotional symptoms. Secondary outcomes were family satisfaction and quality of life. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that both groups improved significantly from preintervention to postintervention. Improvements comprised knowledge about cancer (F(1,174) = 11.03, p child with cancer. Additional psycho-educational sessions did not show any substantial additional improvement. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Evaluation of support groups for women with breast cancer: importance of the navigator role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till James E

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At least some forms of breast cancer are increasingly being viewed as a chronic illness, where an emphasis is placed on meeting the various ongoing needs of people living with cancer, their families and other members of their social support networks. This commentary outlines some approaches to the evaluation of cancer-related support groups, with a particular emphasis on those designed to provide long-distance support, via the internet, for women with breast cancer. Discussion The literature on evaluations of community-based cancer support groups indicates that they offer a number of benefits, and that it is more reasonable to expect an impact of such interventions on psychosocial functioning and/or health-related quality of life than on survival. The literature on both face-to-face and online social support groups suggests that they offer many advantages, although evaluation of the latter delivery mechanism presents some ethical issues that need to be addressed. Many popular online support groups are peer-moderated, rather than professionally-moderated. In an evaluation of online support groups, different models of the role of the "navigator" need to be taken into account. Some conceptual models are outlined for the evaluation of the "navigator role" in meeting the informational, decisional and educational needs of women with breast cancer. The Breast-Cancer Mailing List, an example of an unmoderated internet-based peer-support group, is considered within the context of a Shared or Tacit Model of the navigator role. Conclusion Application of the concept of a "navigator role" to support groups in general, and to unmoderated online ones in particular, has received little or no attention in the research literature. The navigator role should be taken into account in research on this increasingly important aspect of cancer communication.

  14. Self-reported differences in empowerment between lurkers and posters in online patient support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; Seydel, Erwin R; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2008-06-30

    Patients who visit online support groups benefit in various ways. Results of our earlier study indicated that participation in online support groups had a profound effect on the participants' feelings of "being empowered." However, most studies of online patient support groups have focused on the members of these groups who actively contribute by sending postings (posters). Thus far, little is known about the impact for "lurkers" (ie, those who do not actively participate by sending postings). In the present study, we explored if lurkers in online patient support groups profit to the same extent as posters do. We searched the Internet with the search engine Google to identify all Dutch online support groups for patients with breast cancer, fibromyalgia, and arthritis. Invitations to complete an online survey were sent out by the owners of 19 groups. In the online questionnaire, we asked questions about demographic and health characteristics, use of and satisfaction with the online support group, empowering processes, and empowering outcomes. The online questionnaire was completed by 528 individuals, of which 109 (21%) identified themselves as lurkers. Lurkers (mean age 47 years) were slightly older than active participants (mean age 43 years, P = .002), had a shorter disease history (time since diagnosis 3.7 years vs 5.4 years, P = .001), and reported lower mental well-being (SF 12 subscore 37.7 vs 40.5, P = .004). No significant differences were found in other demographic variables. Posters indicated visiting the online support groups significantly more often for social reasons, such as curiosity about how other members were doing, to enjoy themselves, as a part of their daily routine (all P posters did not differ in their information-related reasons for visiting the online support group. Lurkers were significantly less satisfied with the online support group compared to posters (P posters. However, lurkers did not differ significantly from posters with regard to

  15. The effectiveness of peer support groups in psychosis : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castelein, S.; Bruggeman, R.; van Busschbach, J. T.; van der Gaag, M.; Stant, A. D.; Knegtering, H.; Wiersma, D.

    Objective: To investigate the effect of a (minimally) guided peer support group (GPSG) for people with psychosis on social network, social support, self-efficacy, self-esteem, and quality of life, and to evaluate the intervention and its economic consequences. Method: In a multi-center randomized

  16. Group Awareness and Self-Presentation in Computer-Supported Information Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmerle, Joachim; Cress, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    A common challenge in many situations of computer-supported collaborative learning is increasing the willingness of those involved to share their knowledge with other group members. As a prototypical situation of computer-supported information exchange, a shared-database setting was chosen for the current study. This information-exchange situation…

  17. Supporting the Thesis Writing Process of International Research Students through an Ongoing Writing Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linda Y.; Vandermensbrugghe, Joelle

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from research suggests writing support is particularly needed for international research students who have to tackle the challenges of thesis writing in English as their second language in Western academic settings. This article reports the development of an ongoing writing group to support the thesis writing process of international…

  18. The ANU WellBeing study: a protocol for a quasi-factorial randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of an Internet support group and an automated Internet intervention for depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackinnon Andrew J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent projections suggest that by the year 2030 depression will be the primary cause of disease burden among developed countries. Delivery of accessible consumer-focused evidenced-based services may be an important element in reducing this burden. Many consumers report a preference for self-help modes of delivery. The Internet offers a promising modality for delivering such services and there is now evidence that automated professionally developed self-help psychological interventions can be effective. By contrast, despite their popularity, there is little evidence as to the effectiveness of Internet support groups which provide peer-to-peer mutual support. Methods/Design Members of the community with elevated psychological distress were randomised to receive one of the following: (1 Internet Support Group (ISG intervention, (2 a multi-module automated psychoeducational and skills Internet Training Program (ITP, (3 a combination of the ISG and ITP, or (4 an Internet Attention Control website (IAC comprising health and wellbeing information and question and answer modules. Each intervention was 12 weeks long. Assessments were conducted at baseline, post-intervention, 6 and 12 months to examine depressive symptoms, social support, self-esteem, quality of life, depression literacy, stigma and help-seeking for depression. Participants were recruited through a screening postal survey sent to 70,000 Australians aged 18 to 65 years randomly selected from four rural and four metropolitan regions in Australia. Discussion To our knowledge this study is the first randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of a depression ISG. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN65657330.

  19. Denunciation and the construction of norms in group conflict: examples from an Al-Qaeda-supporting group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, W M L

    2014-12-01

    In situations of violent group conflict, group members often argue about how to deal with the outgroup. While some argue for aggression, force, and separation, others argue for negotiation and cooperation. Each side attempts to persuade the group that their own position is normative and is most in line with the interests and essence of the group. These arguments often involve denunciations of opponents as disloyal or deviant. In such situations, definitions of group identities and norms, and what counts as loyalty and deviance, are therefore disputed. This article analyses how a UK-based Al-Qaeda-supporting organization denounces 'moderate' Muslims in the United Kingdom who engage with secular institutions and who ally themselves with non-Muslims in political disputes. Drawing on theological, historical, and political arguments, a prescriptive norm is constructed whereby the correct behaviour of Muslims in the West is to avoid participation in secular political systems and to avoid political cooperation with non-Muslims. Muslims who are seen as breaking these norms are denounced and denigrated in a variety of ways by assigning them a range of deviant identity positions. Denunciations involve explanatory accounts which construct opponents as unworthy representatives of the group based on their deviation from Islam, or from ignorance, cowardice, mental weakness, or self-interest. This article illustrates that the practice of denunciation is an important aspect of the organization of group conflict. Finally, it argues that it is dangerous for social psychologists to treat group norms and prototypes as consensual. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  20. Sustaining leaders of cancer support groups: the role, needs, and difficulties of leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butow, Phyllis; Ussher, Jane; Kirsten, Laura; Hobbs, Kim; Smith, Katharine; Wain, Gerald; Sandoval, Mirjana; Stenlake, Annie

    2005-01-01

    Cancer support groups are an important source of support for cancer patients, yet little is known about the characteristics of, and barriers to, effective leadership, and the training needs of both professionally trained and untrained leaders. This study explored the views of 179 leaders of 184 cancer support groups in NSW, Australia, regarding these issues. Four hundred and sixteen members of 50 groups selected from the larger cohort completed questionnaires eliciting the importance of group processes, including leader qualities, and satisfaction with group leadership. Finally, members of nine groups participated in focus groups regarding effective group processes. The importance of the leader(s) was emphasized in all stages of the research. Fifty-nine percent of group leaders were currently experiencing a difficulty, primarily related to infrastructure or group process. Three characteristics of effective leaders were identified: educational qualities, facilitation skills, and personal qualities. There is clearly a need to develop and evaluate effective interventions to maintain leaders in these roles, if the proven benefits for cancer patients are to be protected.

  1. Development and implementation of a peer-based mental health support programme for adolescents orphaned by HIV/AIDS in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thupayagale-Tshweneagae, Gloria

    2011-12-01

    The article describes a framework and the process for the development of the peer-based mental health support programme and its implementation. The development of a peer-based mental health support programme is based on Erikson's theory on the adolescent phase of development, the psycho-educational processes; the peer approach and the orphaned adolescents lived experiences as conceptual framework. A triangulation of five qualitative methods of photography, reflective diaries, focus groups, event history calendar and field notes were used to capture the lived experiences of adolescents orphaned to HIV and AIDS. Analysis of data followed Colaizzi's method of data analysis. The combination of psycho-education, Erikson's stages of development and peer support assisted the participants to gain knowledge and skills to overcome adversity and to assist them to become to more resilient. The peer based mental health support programme if used would enhance the mental health of adolescent orphans.

  2. Building consensus in strategic decision-making : system dynamics as a group support system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vennix, J.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    System dynamics was originally founded as a method for modeling and simulating the behavior of industrial systems. In recent years it is increasingly employed as a Group Support System for strategic decision-making groups. The model is constructed in direct interaction with a management team, and

  3. Supporting Family Carers Through Telephone-Mediated Group Programs: Opportunities For Gerontological Social Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Telephone-mediated group programs are an important but under-utilized medium for reaching frail or disabled older persons' family carers who are in need of support. The primary purpose and style of group programs can range across a broad spectrum–encompassing educational, supportive and therapeutic types. Gerontological social workers are the members of the multidisciplinary care team whose training, experience and supervision makes them most suitable for facilitating this broad range of group types. Drawing on the experience of training a number of group facilitators, this article provides suggestions for social workers contemplating the use of telephone-mediated groups and highlights groupwork skills peculiar to conducting group programs via the telephone.

  4. Review of the Empirical and Clinical Support for Group Therapy Specific to Sexual Abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Jerry L; Deming, Adam

    2017-12-01

    This review compiles 48 empirical studies and 55 clinical/practice articles specific to group therapy with sex offenders. Historically, group therapy has always been the predominant modality in sex offender-specific treatment. In the first decades of the field, treatment applied a psychoanalytic methodology that, although not empirically supported, fully appreciated the primary therapeutic importance of the group modality. Conversely, since the early 1980s, treatment has applied a cognitive behavioral method, but the field has largely neglected the therapeutic value of interpersonal group dynamics. The past decade has seen a growing re-appreciation of general therapeutic processes and more holistic approaches in sex offender treatment, and there is an emerging body of empirical research which, although often indirectly concerned with group, has yielded three definitive conclusions. First, the therapeutic qualities of the group therapist-specifically warmth, empathy, encouragement, and guidance-can strongly affect outcomes. Second, the quality of group cohesion can profoundly affect the effectiveness of treatment. Third, confrontational approaches in group therapy are ineffective, if not counter-therapeutic, and overwhelmingly rated as not helpful by sex offenders themselves. Additional conclusions are less strongly supported, but include compelling evidence that sex offenders generally prefer group therapy over individual therapy, that group therapy appears equally effective to individual therapy, and that mixing or separating groups by offense type is not important to therapeutic climate. Other group techniques and approaches specific to sexual abuse treatment are also summarized.

  5. Building consensus in strategic decision-making : system dynamics as a group support system

    OpenAIRE

    Vennix, J.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    System dynamics was originally founded as a method for modeling and simulating the behavior of industrial systems. In recent years it is increasingly employed as a Group Support System for strategic decision-making groups. The model is constructed in direct interaction with a management team, and the procedure is generally referred to as group model-building. The model can be conceptual (qualitative) or a full-blown (quantitative) computer simulation model. In this article, a case is describe...

  6. Patterns of Engagement With Inflammatory Bowel Disease Online Support Groups: Comparing Posters and Lurkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the varying patterns of member engagement within inflammatory bowel disease online support groups. The aim of the study was, therefore, to compare posters and lurkers (i.e., those who read messages but choose not to post) in terms of engagement and motives for accessing online groups as well as to explore reasons why lurkers do not make an active contribution through posting messages. The findings revealed that those who posted messages visited groups more often and spent longer periods of time accessing them. However, there was no difference between posters and lurkers in terms of length of time as a group member. Furthermore, posters were more inclined to access online support groups to both seek and provide emotional, informational, and experiential support. Finally, four main reasons were described by lurkers for not posting messages and these focused on personal factors, illness severity, being helpful, and new member. For those healthcare professionals or patient volunteers who are involved in supporting inflammatory bowel disease online support groups, there are a number of practical strategies arising from these results which can be implemented to help integrate and encourage active participation by all members.

  7. Group cohesion and social support in exercise classes: results from a danish intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ulla; Schmidt, Lone; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the formation of group cohesion and social support in exercise classes among former sedentary adults, participating in a Danish community-based intervention. Furthermore, the aim is to analyze the impact of this process on exercise activity among the participants. A multimethod...... approach was used, analyzing both survey data and 18 personal interviews collected among 87 participants who completed the intervention project. Analysis was performed according to the grounded theory method. The formation of group cohesion was conditioned by the social composition of the group......, the teaching ability by the instructors, and the activity by itself. The cohesive group was characterized by an attitude of mutual support toward exercise activities. This mutual support facilitated development of self-efficacy beliefs among the participants improving their mastery expectation regarding...

  8. Health of women: associations among life events, social support, and personality for selected patient groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlander, T; Dahlin, A; Archer, T

    2000-02-01

    This study examined the effects of life events, social support, personality traits, and siblings' birth-order on the health of women. 199 middle-class participants were included. 95 women, randomly assigned from four different patient groups, were compared with a control group of 96 randomly selected women without any special health problems. They completed a questionnaire which included questions regarding family background, health, different life events, social support, and signs of disease and a projective test, the Sivik Psychosomatism Test. Analysis indicated that report of negative life events was associated with more physical symptoms than positive life events and that the patient groups reported more negative life events and less social support than the control group.

  9. Social and psychological determinants of participation in internet-based cancer support groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Christensen, Jane

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: In this study, we identified the social and psychological characteristics of Danish cancer patients that determine use of the internet for support. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We invited 230 cancer patients taking part in a public rehabilitation program to participate in an internet module...... observed no difference between the two groups in quality of life or psychological well-being, while coping to some extent seemed related to participation in internet support groups. CONCLUSION: This study adds to the discussion on social inequality in internet use by cancer patients, showing that patients...... comprising training in the retrieval of cancer-related information from the internet and self-support groups. Persons who were motivated to join the internet groups (N = 100; 47%) were compared with persons who chose not to participate (N = 111) on the basis of self-reported baseline questionnaire data...

  10. Facilitation of self-transcendence in a breast cancer support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, D D

    1998-01-01

    To examine the feasibility and patterns of effectiveness of a breast cancer support group intervention specifically designed to facilitate self-transcendence views and perspectives that would enhance emotional and physical well-being. Pre-experimental design pilot intervention study with a quantitative approach to data analysis. Survivor-established breast cancer resource center in Austin, TX. Women with recently diagnosed breast cancer (N = 16) participating in 90-minute support group sessions that met weekly for eight weeks. Theory-driven support group intervention facilitated by an oncology clinical nurse specialist, a psychotherapist, and a breast cancer survivor. Activities planned for individual sessions were based on self-transcendence theory, cancer support group literature, and the facilitators' extensive previous support group experience. Self-transcendence, emotional well-being, physical well-being. Good networking, coordination, and follow-up were essential for participant recruitment and retention throughout the intervention period. Although specific theory-driven activities were planned for group sessions, facilitators maintained flexibility in meeting immediate concerns of the participants. Relationships among participants' scores on study variables indicated an association between self-transcendence and emotional well-being. Scores on self-transcendence and well-being variables at the end of the intervention increased from baseline, but only functional performance status, mood state, and satisfaction with life reached statistical significance. The pilot study was invaluable in providing direction for the conduct of future experimental studies. Provides preliminary support for the use of theory-driven activities for promotion of self-transcendence views and behaviors within a cancer support group setting.

  11. Banding together: an investigation of post-surgery support groups for laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Opolski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Though advocated as useful for patients, there is little in the literature regarding the use and effectiveness of bariatric support groups. This study investigated characteristics and experiences of bariatric patients who did and did not attend offered groups. Seventy-eight postoperative laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding patients from a private bariatric clinic completed mailed self-report questionnaires. Almost 60% reported having attended the clinic groups, with most wanting to meet other patients and obtain information rather than access psychological assistance. Participants reported generally positive experiences of attending. Nonattendance was often attributed to practical barriers. Satisfaction with support from others was not related to past or predicted future attendance, but higher psychological distress was related to and predictive of greater intention to attend future groups. Likely future attenders also held more positive beliefs about the groups than those who were unlikely to attend. Further research is required into potential positive and negative consequences of attendance, and characteristics of those who are likely to benefit or be harmed by attending. Interventions addressing stereotypes about support groups may help patients make informed decisions about whether to attend a bariatric support group.

  12. Comparing Facilitator Priorities of Suicide Survivor Support Groups: A Cross-Cultural Comparison Between Japanese and American Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelman, William; Feigelman, Beverly; Kawashima, Daisuke; Shiraga, Keisuke; Kawano, Kenji

    2017-08-01

    A total of 56 Japanese and 59 American survivor of suicide support group facilitators were asked to rank the mutual aid objectives of their groups following Shulman's scheme in terms of their frequency and importance. Both American and Japanese facilitators showed an emphasis on personal adaptation goals (such as helping bereaved feel less isolated in their grief or encouraging bereaved to share their coping with loss experiences) over collective goals (such as raising monies for more research on mental illness or trying to combat societal suicide stigma in their local communities). Differences were also noted with American facilitators evaluating helping with problem solving, sharing different ways of coping, viewing personal issues as societal problems, and advocating for promoting social change as significantly higher than the Japanese did. We believe some of these contrasts reflect differences in American and Japanese cultural values.

  13. Effectiveness of psychoeducation in reducing sickness absence and improving mental health in individuals at risk of having a mental disorder: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Pernille; Søgaard, Hans Jørgen; Labriola, Merete; Nohr, Ellen A; Jensen, Chris

    2015-08-08

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of psychoeducation on return to work as an adjunct to standard case management in individuals on sick leave at risk of having a mental disorder. The participants could have different diagnoses but were all at risk of having a mental disorder. Between 2012 and 2014, 430 participants on sick leave were randomly allocated to either an intervention or control group. The psychoeducation consisted of 2-h sessions once a week for 6 weeks. The sessions focused on stress and work life and was based on problem-solving techniques and coping strategies. The main outcome, the relative risk (RR) of a full return to work based on register data from the job centres, was determined during the first 3 and 6 months after participation in the psychoeducation programme. At baseline and at 3 and 6 months after the intervention, the participants received a questionnaire on psychological symptoms, mental health-related quality of life, and locus of control. During the first 6 months after inclusion, the two groups had almost the same RR of a full return to work (RR:0.97, 95% CI: 0.78;1.21), but during the first 3 months, the individuals in the intervention group had a significantly higher risk of not having fully returned to work (RR:0.68, 95% CI:0.47;0.98). The individuals in the intervention group who had participated in at least four of the six psychoeducational sessions returned to work considerably slower at both time points than did the control group. The intervention did not decrease the level of psychological symptoms or improve mental health-related quality of life; however, individuals in the intervention group improved their scores on internal locus of control at both 3 and 6 months. Offering psychoeducation to individuals on sick leave at risk of having a mental disorder had no influence on the chance of a full return to work during the first 6 months; however, it did result in a higher relative risk of not returning to work

  14. A Bystander Bullying Psychoeducation Program with Middle School Students: A Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgett, Aida; Doumas, Diana; Sears, Dara; Lundquist, Amanda; Hausheer, Robin

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a brief, stand-alone bystander bullying psychoeducation program for middle school students. The purpose of the program was to train students to take action as peer advocates. Pre- and post-tests indicated that after completing the 90-minute psychoeducation program, students reported an increase in their…

  15. Accessing Early Behavioral Intervention for Autism: The Development and Testing of a Psychoeducational Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steever, Michele Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the utility of psychoeducation within a stepped care model as applied to the problem of autism treatment. The current study developed and pilot tested a psychoeducational website for parents who recently had a child diagnosed with autism. A nonconcurrent multiple baseline across participants design was used to evaluate the…

  16. Computer-mediated and face-to-face communication in metastatic cancer support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhauer, Ruvanee P

    2014-08-01

    To compare the experiences of women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) in computer-mediated and face-to-face support groups. Interviews from 18 women with MBC, who were currently in computer-mediated support groups (CMSGs), were examined using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The CMSGs were in an asynchronous mailing list format; women communicated exclusively via email. All the women were also, or had previously been, in a face-to-face support group (FTFG). CMSGs had both advantages and drawbacks, relative to face-to-face groups (FTFGs), for this population. Themes examined included convenience, level of support, intimacy, ease of expression, range of information, and dealing with debilitation and dying. CMSGs may provide a sense of control and a greater level of support. Intimacy may take longer to develop in a CMSG, but women may have more opportunities to get to know each other. CMSGs may be helpful while adjusting to a diagnosis of MBC, because women can receive support without being overwhelmed by physical evidence of disability in others or exposure to discussions about dying before they are ready. However, the absence of nonverbal cues in CMSGs also led to avoidance of topics related to death and dying when women were ready to face them. Agendas for discussion, the presence of a facilitator or more time in CMSGs may attenuate this problem. The findings were discussed in light of prevailing research and theories about computer-mediated communication. They have implications for designing CMSGs for this population.

  17. Internet support groups for suicide survivors: a new mode for gaining bereavement assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigelman, William; Gorman, Bernard S; Beal, Karyl Chastain; Jordan, John R

    2008-01-01

    Taken among parents who sustained the loss of a child to suicide this study explores the participation of parents in Internet support groups, comparing their demographic and loss-related characteristics (N = 104) to other parent survivors participating in face-to-face support groups (N = 297). Contrary to expectations that Internet affiliates would be concentrated in under-served rural areas, we found similar levels of urban, suburban, small city and rural residents in both Internet and face-to-face subsamples. Bivariate and multivariate analyses suggested several important factors contributing to interest in Internet grief support including: 24/7 availability and opportunities to invest more time into this type of support group experience. Compared to their face-to-face group counterparts, Internet affiliates experienced greater suicide stigmatization from their families and other associates. Unable to find ready comfort and support from their personal communities, Internet users-and especially highly depressed survivors-sought and obtained valuable help from the Internet support resource.

  18. Internet Gaming Disorder in Adolescents: Personality, Psychopathology and Evaluation of a Psychological Intervention Combined With Parent Psychoeducation

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Bueso, Vega; Santamaría, Juan J.; Fernández, Daniel; Merino, Laura; Montero, Elena; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; del Pino-Gutiérrez, Amparo; Ribas, Joan

    2018-01-01

    Internet Gaming Disorder is an increasingly prevalent disorder, which can have severe consequences in affected young people and in their families. There is an urgent need to improve existing treatment programs; these are currently hampered by the lack of research in this area. It is necessary to more carefully define the symptomatic, psychosocial and personality characterization of these patients and the interaction between treatment and relevant variables. The objectives of this study were three: (1) to analyze the symptomatic and personality profiles of young patients with Internet Gaming Disorder in comparison with healthy controls; (2) to analyze the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral treatment on reducing symptomatology; and (3) to compare the results of that treatment with or without the addition of a psychoeducational group offered to the parents. The final sample consisted of 30 patients consecutively admitted to a specialized mental health unit in Spain, and 30 healthy controls. The experimental group received individual cognitive-behavioral therapy. The experimental group was divided into two subgroups (N = 15), depending on the addition or not of a psychoeducational group for their parents (consecutively admitted). Scores on the Millon Adolescent Personality Inventory (MACI), the Symptom Checklist-Revised (SCL-90-R), the State-Trait Anxiety Index (STAI), and other clinical and psychopathological measures were recorded. The patients were re-assessed post treatment (except for the MACI questionnaire). Compared with healthy controls, patients did not differ in symptomatology at baseline, but scored significantly higher in the personality scales: Introversive and Inhibited, and in the expressed concerns scales: Identity Confusion, Self-Devaluation, and Peer Insecurity and scored significantly lower in the Histrionic and Egotistic scale. In the experimental group, pre-post changes differed statistically on SCL-90-R scales Hostility, Psychoticism, and

  19. Internet Gaming Disorder in Adolescents: Personality, Psychopathology and Evaluation of a Psychological Intervention Combined With Parent Psychoeducation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vega González-Bueso

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Internet Gaming Disorder is an increasingly prevalent disorder, which can have severe consequences in affected young people and in their families. There is an urgent need to improve existing treatment programs; these are currently hampered by the lack of research in this area. It is necessary to more carefully define the symptomatic, psychosocial and personality characterization of these patients and the interaction between treatment and relevant variables. The objectives of this study were three: (1 to analyze the symptomatic and personality profiles of young patients with Internet Gaming Disorder in comparison with healthy controls; (2 to analyze the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral treatment on reducing symptomatology; and (3 to compare the results of that treatment with or without the addition of a psychoeducational group offered to the parents. The final sample consisted of 30 patients consecutively admitted to a specialized mental health unit in Spain, and 30 healthy controls. The experimental group received individual cognitive-behavioral therapy. The experimental group was divided into two subgroups (N = 15, depending on the addition or not of a psychoeducational group for their parents (consecutively admitted. Scores on the Millon Adolescent Personality Inventory (MACI, the Symptom Checklist-Revised (SCL-90-R, the State-Trait Anxiety Index (STAI, and other clinical and psychopathological measures were recorded. The patients were re-assessed post treatment (except for the MACI questionnaire. Compared with healthy controls, patients did not differ in symptomatology at baseline, but scored significantly higher in the personality scales: Introversive and Inhibited, and in the expressed concerns scales: Identity Confusion, Self-Devaluation, and Peer Insecurity and scored significantly lower in the Histrionic and Egotistic scale. In the experimental group, pre-post changes differed statistically on SCL-90-R scales Hostility

  20. Seeking support on facebook: a content analysis of breast cancer groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Jacqueline L; Jimenez-Marroquin, Maria-Carolina; Jadad, Alejandro R

    2011-02-04

    Social network sites have been growing in popularity across broad segments of Internet users, and are a convenient means to exchange information and support. Research on their use for health-related purposes is limited. This study aimed to characterize the purpose, use, and creators of Facebook groups related to breast cancer. We searched Facebook (www.Facebook.com) using the term breast cancer. We restricted our analysis to groups that were related to breast cancer, operated in English, and were publicly available. Two of us independently extracted information on the administrator and purpose of the group, as well as the number of user-generated contributions. We developed a coding scheme to guide content analysis. We found 620 breast cancer groups on Facebook containing a total of 1,090,397 members. The groups were created for fundraising (277/620, 44.7%), awareness (236, 38.1%), product or service promotion related to fundraising or awareness (61, 9%), or patient/caregiver support (46, 7%). The awareness groups as a whole contained by far the most members (n = 957,289). The majority of groups (532, 85.8%) had 25 wall posts or fewer. The support oriented groups, 47% (27/57) of which were established by high school or college students, were associated with the greatest number of user-generated contributions. Facebook groups have become a popular tool for awareness-raising, fundraising, and support-seeking related to breast cancer attracting over one million users. Given their popularity and reach, further research is warranted to explore the implications of social network sites as a health resource across various health conditions, cultures, ages, and socioeconomic groups.

  1. Promotion of Self-Transcendence in a Multiple Sclerosis Peer Support Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Ashktorab

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-transcendence can organize the challenges of multiple sclerosis patients to achieve and maintain a constant state of well-being and sense of integrity in the disease process. As a research based on self-transcendence didn't done in Iran, the present study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of peer groups on promoting selftranscendence level in multiple sclerosis (MS patients. Materials and Methods: This study is a before and after quasi-experimental study that was conducted on 33 patients with confirmed MS participated in three peer support groups: 10 men in male group, 11 women in female group and 12 men and women in mixed group. Eight weekly sessions and each session was 2 hours were held. Data collection tool was Self-Transcendence Scale (STS with 15 item and Cronbach's coefficient was 0.68 that after modifying, it increased to 0.81. Patients completed self administered questionnaires pre- and post of sessions. Results: Results showed that peer support groups promote the self-transcendence (p=0.001 with increases in mean self-transcendence scores in all 3 groups (men group: 0.008, women group 0.005 and mixed group: 0.003. Comparing scores before and after intervention demonstrated that self-transcendence increased equally in all groups. Conclusion: The results showed an improving in self-transcendence in peer support group participants at the end of the intervention. The results can be used in areas of nursing education and management. It is proposed that the self-transcendence assessment to be done in other chronic disease in order to evaluate its efficiency.

  2. Effect of Internet peer-support groups on psychosocial adjustment to cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Dalton, S O; Deltour, I

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We conducted a randomised study to investigate whether providing a self-guided Internet support group to cancer patients affected mood disturbance and adjustment to cancer. METHODS: Baseline and 1-, 6- and 12-month assessments were conducted from 2004 to 2006 at a national rehabilitat......BACKGROUND: We conducted a randomised study to investigate whether providing a self-guided Internet support group to cancer patients affected mood disturbance and adjustment to cancer. METHODS: Baseline and 1-, 6- and 12-month assessments were conducted from 2004 to 2006 at a national...... rehabilitation centre in Denmark. A total of 58 rehabilitation course weeks including 921 survivors of various cancers were randomly assigned to a control or an intervention group by cluster randomisation. The intervention was a lecture on the use of the Internet for support and information followed...... by participation in an Internet support group. Outcome measures included self-reported mood disturbance, adjustment to cancer and self-rated health. Differences in scores were compared between the control group and the intervention group. RESULTS: The effect of the intervention on mood disturbance and adjustment...

  3. Comparative efficacy of spirituality, cognitive, and emotional support groups for treating eating disorder inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, P Scott; Berrett, Michael E; Hardman, Randy K; Eggett, Dennis L

    2006-01-01

    Spiritual interventions are rarely used in contemporary treatment programs and little empirical evidence is available concerning their effectiveness. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a spiritual group intervention for eating disorder inpatients. We compared the effectiveness of a Spirituality group with Cognitive and Emotional Support groups using a randomized, control group design. Participants were 122 women receiving inpatient eating disorder treatment. Patients in the Spirituality group tended to score significantly lower on psychological disturbance and eating disorder symptoms at the conclusion of treatment compared to patients in the other groups, and higher on spiritual well-being. On weekly outcome measures, patients in the Spirituality group improved significantly more quickly during the first four weeks of treatment. This study provides preliminary evidence that attending to eating disorder patients' spiritual growth and well-being during inpatient treatment may help reduce depression and anxiety, relationship distress, social role conflict, and eating disorder symptoms.

  4. Relieving stress. A short-term support group for home attendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, M

    2000-01-01

    Home attendants (HAs) work in relative isolation, burdened by conflicting demands. This article details an eight-session support group for HAs, designed to explore its effects on their work life. Meeting for hour-and-a-half sessions with no fixed agenda, the group offered members an opportunity to communicate with others in similar situations. Participants reported that the group experience helped relieve stress and made them feel less alone. Other benefits included gaining strategies for coping with difficult situations and learning to set boundaries. Further investigation into the effectiveness of similar groups is suggested.

  5. Telehealth Interventions Delivering Home-based Support Group Videoconferencing: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banbury, Annie; Nancarrow, Susan; Dart, Jared; Gray, Leonard; Parkinson, Lynne

    2018-02-02

    Group therapy and education and support sessions are used within health care across a range of disciplines such as chronic disease self-management and psychotherapy interventions. However, there are barriers that constrain group attendance, such as mobility, time, and distance. Using videoconferencing may overcome known barriers and improve the accessibility of group-based interventions. The aim of this study was to review the literature to determine the feasibility, acceptability, effectiveness, and implementation of health professional-led group videoconferencing to provide education or social support or both, into the home setting. Electronic databases were searched using predefined search terms for primary interventions for patient education and/or social support. The quality of studies was assessed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. We developed an analysis framework using hierarchical terms feasibility, acceptability, effectiveness, and implementation, which were informed by subheadings. Of the 1634 records identified, 17 were included in this review. Home-based groups by videoconferencing are feasible even for those with limited digital literacy. Overall acceptability was high with access from the home highly valued and little concern of privacy issues. Some participants reported preferring face-to-face groups. Good information technology (IT) support and training is required for facilitators and participants. Communication can be adapted for the Web environment and would be enhanced by clear communication strategies and protocols. A range of improved outcomes were reported but because of the heterogeneity of studies, comparison of these across studies was not possible. There was a trend for improvement in mental health outcomes. Benefits highlighted in the qualitative data included engaging with others with similar problems; improved accessibility to groups; and development of health knowledge, insights, and skills. Videoconference groups were able to

  6. Energy-Efficient Region Shift Scheme to Support Mobile Sink Group in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Yongbin; Kim, Kyong Hoon; Aldwairi, Monther; Kim, Ki-Il

    2017-12-30

    Mobile sink groups play crucial roles to perform their own missions in many wireless sensor network (WSN) applications. In order to support mobility of such sink groups, it is important to design a mechanism for effective discovery of the group in motion. However, earlier studies obtain group region information by periodic query. For that reason, the mechanism leads to significant signaling overhead due to frequent flooding for the query regardless of the group movement. Furthermore, the mechanism worsens the problem by the flooding in the whole expected area. To deal with this problem, we propose a novel mobile sink group support scheme with low communication cost, called Region-Shift-based Mobile Geocasting Protocol (RSMGP). In this study, we utilize the group mobility feature for which members of a group have joint motion patterns. Thus, we could trace group movement by shifting the region as much as partial members move out of the previous region. Furthermore, the region acquisition is only performed at the moment by just deviated members without collaboration of all members. Experimental results validate the improved signaling overhead of our study compared to the previous studies.

  7. Therapeutic Affordances of Online Support Group Use in Women With Endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background The Internet has provided women living with endometriosis new opportunities to seek support online. Online support groups may provide a range of therapeutic affordances that may benefit these women. Objective To examine the presence of therapeutic affordances as perceived by women who use endometriosis online support groups. Methods Sixty-nine women (aged 19-50 years, mean 34.2 years; 65.2% (45/69) United Kingdom, 21.7% (15/69) United States) participated in a Web-based interview exploring online support group use. Participants had been using online support groups for an average of 2 years and 4 months (range = 1 month to 14 years, 9 months). Responses were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Results The analysis revealed 4 therapeutic affordances related to online support group use: (1) “connection,” that is, the ability to connect in order to support each other, exchange advice, and to try to overcome feelings of loneliness; (2) “exploration,” that is, the ability to look for information, learn, and bolster their knowledge; (3) “narration,” that is, the ability to share their experiences, as well as read about the experiences of others; and (4) “self-presentation,” that is, the ability to manage how they present themselves online. The associated outcomes of use were predominantly positive, such as reassurance and improved coping. However, a number of negative aspects were revealed including the following: concerns about the accuracy of information, arguments between members, overreliance on the group, becoming upset by negative experiences or good news items, and confidentiality of personal information. Conclusions Our findings support the previously proposed SCENA (Self-presentation, Connection, Exploration, Narration, and Adaptation) model and reveal a range of positive aspects that may benefit members, particularly in relation to reassurance and coping. However, negative aspects need to be addressed to maximize the potential

  8. The structure of social exchange in self-help support groups: development of a measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Louis D; Tang, Xiaohui; Hollman, Ruth L

    2014-03-01

    Self-help support groups are indigenous community resources designed to help people manage a variety of personal challenges, from alcohol abuse to xeroderma pigmentosum. The social exchanges that occur during group meetings are central to understanding how people benefit from participation. This paper examines the different types of social exchange behaviors that occur during meetings, using two studies to develop empirically distinct scales that reliably measure theoretically important types of exchange. Resource theory informed the initial measurement development efforts. Exploratory factor analyses from the first study led to revisions in the factor structure of the social exchange scales. The revised measure captured the exchange of emotional support, experiential information, humor, unwanted behaviors, and exchanges outside meetings. Confirmatory factor analyses from a follow-up study with a different sample of self-help support groups provided good model fit, suggesting the revised structure accurately represented the data. Further, the scales demonstrated good convergent and discriminant validity with related constructs. Future research can use the scales to identify aspects of social exchange that are most important in improving health outcomes among self-help support group participants. Groups can use the scales in practice to celebrate strengths and address weaknesses in their social exchange dynamics.

  9. Supportive relationships--psychological effects of group counselling in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roessler, Kirsten K; Glintborg, Dorte; Ravn, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    -intensity aerobic exercise followed by eight weeks of group counselling (n=8) or vice versa (n=9). Interpersonal communication, emotional and relational aspects were observed and analysed throughout the period focusing on changes in health behaviour. The most salient findings showed supportive relationships...... encouraging in the group that had initial counselling sessions before the physical intervention. It can be concluded that group counselling sessions focusing on supportive relationships followed by high-intensity aerobic training have beneficial effects on wellbeing, health and exercise behaviour.......The objective of the present study was to examine the psychological impact of a group-oriented approach to disease management and health behaviour in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Seventeen overweight PCOS women were randomised in a crossover design of eight weeks high...

  10. Meteorological Support Interface Control Working Group (MSICWG) Instrumentation, Data Format, and Networks Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenton, James; Roberts, Barry C.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an overview of instrumentation discussed at the Meteorological Interface Control Working Group (MSICWG), a reference for data formats currently used by members of the group, a summary of proposed formats for future use by the group, an overview of the data networks of the group's members. This document will be updated as new systems are introduced, old systems are retired, and when the MSICWG community necessitates a change to the formats. The MSICWG consists of personnel from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC), NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG), and the United States Air Force (USAF) 45th Space Wing and Weather Squadron. The purpose of the group is to coordinate the distribution of weather related data to support NASA space launch related activities.

  11. Enhancing effectiveness of agriculture group in supporting government program to increase food security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retnowati, Daru; Subarjo, A. H.

    2018-05-01

    Food Security is closely related to agriculture, including fisheries. Food is a basic necessity and indispensable to humans. Nowadays, there are many agricultural lands and fisheries are turning to settlements and offices. To overcome these obstacles, the government took the policy of forming farmer groups. Farmer groups are channeling the government assistance, whether capital, seeds, training, or technology and knowledge assistance. This research is qualitative. The population in this study were members of the fish farming group in Purwomartani, Kalasan, Sleman. The population in this study were 4 Farmers Group in Purwomartani, Kalasan, Sleman. The sample in this research is 1 farmer group with the largest number of members that is 31 people. For the other three groups of fish farmers the number of members is 20 people. The results show that farmer groups are effective in supporting government programs. The role of farmer groups is needed to support the successful management of agricultural land, improvement of knowledge and skills of fish farmers, renewal of agricultural technology and equipment, and marketing of agricultural products.

  12. How prostate cancer support groups do and do not survive: British Columbian perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliffe, John L; Halpin, Michael; Bottorff, Joan L; Hislop, T Gregory; McKenzie, Michael; Mroz, Lawrence

    2008-06-01

    Many prostate cancer support groups (PCSGs) have formed in North America during the past decade, yet their operation or factors influencing sustainability are poorly understood. This article reports micro (intragroup), meso (intergroup), and macro (group/structure) analyses drawn from the fieldwork and participant observations conducted for an ethnographic study of PCSGs based in British Columbia, Canada. The findings indicate that effective group leadership is integral to group sustainability and the recruitment and retention of attendees. At the meso level, intergroup connections and communication were often informal; however, the primary purpose of all the PCSGs was to provide information and support to men and their families. Many PCSGs were uncertain how formal associations with cancer fund-raising societies would influence group effectiveness. Macro issues such as prostate cancer activism resided with individual group "champions" through activities coordinated by provincial and national PCSG organizations. However, activism did not guarantee group sustainability. The study findings reveal why some groups flourish while others appear untenable, and form the basis for discussion about how PCSG sustainability might be best achieved.

  13. Integrated Multimedia Based Intelligent Group Decision Support System for Electrical Power Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Saxena

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrical Power Network in recent time requires an intelligent, virtual environment based decision process for the coordination of all its individual elements and the interrelated tasks. Its ultimate goal is to achieve maximum productivity and efficiency through the efficient and effective application of generation, transmission, distribution, pricing and regulatory systems. However, the complexity of electrical power network and the presence of conflicting multiple goals and objectives postulated by various groups emphasized the need of an intelligent group decision support system approach in this field. In this paper, an Integrated Multimedia based Intelligent Group Decision Support System (IM1GDSS is presented, and its main components are analyzed and discussed. In particular attention is focused on the Data Base, Model Base, Central Black Board (CBB and Multicriteria Futuristic Decision Process (MFDP module. The model base interacts with Electrical Power Network Load Forecasting and Planning (EPNLFP Module; Resource Optimization, Modeling and Simulation (ROMAS Module; Electrical Power Network Control and Evaluation Process (EPNCAEP Module, and MFDP Module through CBB for strategic planning, management control, operational planning and transaction processing. The richness of multimedia channels adds a totally new dimension in a group decision making for Electrical Power Network. The proposed IMIGDSS is a user friendly, highly interactive group decision making system, based on efficient intelligent and multimedia communication support for group discussions, retrieval of content and multi criteria decision analysis.

  14. The impact of structured support groups for pregnant South African women recently diagnosed HIV positive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Jonathan P; Visser, Maretha J; Makin, Jennifer D; Kershaw, Trace S; Forsyth, Brian W C; Jeffery, Bridget; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2011-08-31

    The authors of this study evaluated a structured 10-session psychosocial support group intervention for newly HIV-diagnosed pregnant South African women. Participants were expected to display increases in HIV disclosure, self-esteem, active coping and positive social support, and decreases in depression, avoidant coping, and negative social support. Three hundred sixty-one pregnant HIV-infected women were recruited from four antenatal clinics in Tshwane townships from April 2005 to September 2006. Using a quasi-experimental design, assessments were conducted at baseline and two and eight months post-intervention. A series of random effects regression analyses were conducted, with the three assessment points treated as a random effect of time. At both follow-ups, the rate of disclosure in the intervention group was significantly higher than that of the comparison group (p<0.001). Compared to the comparison group at the first follow-up, the intervention group displayed higher levels of active coping (t=2.68, p<0.05) and lower levels of avoidant coping (t=-2.02, p<0.05), and those who attended at least half of the intervention sessions exhibited improved self-esteem (t=2.11, p<0.05). Group interventions tailored for newly HIV positive pregnant women, implemented in resource-limited settings, may accelerate the process of adjusting to one's HIV status, but may not have sustainable benefits over time.

  15. The impact of social media-based support groups on smoking relapse prevention in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onezi, Hamidi Al; Khalifa, Mohamed; El-Metwally, Ashraf; Househ, Mowafa

    2018-06-01

    Tobacco smoking remains a major preventable cause of mortality and morbidity across the globe. People who attempt to quit smoking often experience episodes of relapse before finally quitting. Understanding the part that social networking sites and social media can play in smoking cessation and prevention of relapse is important to aid the development of novel techniques to curb the smoking epidemic. This study investigated the use of extra-treatment provided outside of the formal healthcare setting, bolstered by online social support in order to prevent smoking relapse in Saudi Arabia. This cross-sectional study included 473 smokers taking part in smoking cessation intervention programs run by the Riyadh branch of King Abdul-Aziz Medical City and PURITY, a Saudi anti-smoking association. Only subjects who expressed an interest in quitting smoking, and those attempting to quit, were considered for inclusion. The sample was divided into three groups: subjects who subscribed to support groups on Twitter (n = 150), and WhatsApp (n = 150), and a control group of subjects who had not subscribed to any social media support groups (n = 173). A significant difference was found between the mean average numbers of people who quit smoking among the three groups, with social media support proving to be more effective than other traditional methods. Our findings imply that Twitter and WhatsApp users found it easier to quit smoking than those who did not take part in these social media groups. Social media provides a good platform to discuss smoking cessation treatment, and thus reduce smoking relapses. Our findings support the suggestion that more social media support groups should be developed to help people to effectively cease smoking after abstinence. Individuals who struggle to quit smoking should be encouraged to join support groups on their social media platform of choice to increase their likelihood of quitting. Future studies should assess the effectiveness

  16. A Web-Based Psychoeducational Intervention Program for Depression and Anxiety in an Adult Community in Selangor, Malaysia: Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader Maideen, Siti Fatimah; Mohd-Sidik, Sherina; Rampal, Lekhraj; Mukhtar, Firdaus; Ibrahim, Normala; Phang, Cheng-Kar; Tan, Kit-Aun; Ahmad, Rozali

    2016-06-21

    Mental disorders are a major public health problem and are debilitating in many nations throughout the world. Many individuals either do not or are not able to access treatment. The Internet can be a medium to convey to the community accessible evidenced-based interventions to reduce these burdens. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of 4 weeks of a Web-based psychoeducational intervention program for depressive and anxiety symptoms in the community of Selangor, Malaysia. A two-arm randomized controlled trial of a single-blind study will be conducted to meet the objective of this study. We aim to recruit 84 participants each for the intervention and control groups. The recruitment will be from participants who participated in the first phase of this research. The primary outcomes of this study are depressive and anxiety scores, which will be assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7, respectively. The secondary outcome includes mental health literacy of the participants, which will be assessed using the self-developed and adapted Mental Health Literacy Questionnaire. The psychoeducational intervention program consists of four sessions, which will be accessed each week. The depressive and anxiety symptoms will be compared between participants who participated in the psychoeducational program compared with the control group. Depressive and anxiety scores and mental health literacy will be assessed at week 1 and at follow-ups at week 5 and week 12, respectively. The psychoeducational intervention program consists of four sessions, which will be accessed at each week. The depressive and anxiety symptoms will be compared between the intervention and control groups using a series of mixed ANOVAs. Depressive and anxiety scores and mental health literacy will be assessed at week 1 and at two follow-ups at week 5 and week 12, respectively. To our knowledge, this study will be the first randomized

  17. Efficiency of nuclear and mitochondrial markers recovering and supporting known amniote groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambret-Frotté, Julia; Perini, Fernando Araújo; de Moraes Russo, Claudia Augusta

    2012-01-01

    We have analysed the efficiency of all mitochondrial protein coding genes and six nuclear markers (Adora3, Adrb2, Bdnf, Irbp, Rag2 and Vwf) in reconstructing and statistically supporting known amniote groups (murines, rodents, primates, eutherians, metatherians, therians). The efficiencies of maximum likelihood, Bayesian inference, maximum parsimony, neighbor-joining and UPGMA were also evaluated, by assessing the number of correct and incorrect recovered groupings. In addition, we have compared support values using the conservative bootstrap test and the Bayesian posterior probabilities. First, no correlation was observed between gene size and marker efficiency in recovering or supporting correct nodes. As expected, tree-building methods performed similarly, even UPGMA that, in some cases, outperformed other most extensively used methods. Bayesian posterior probabilities tend to show much higher support values than the conservative bootstrap test, for correct and incorrect nodes. Our results also suggest that nuclear markers do not necessarily show a better performance than mitochondrial genes. The so-called dependency among mitochondrial markers was not observed comparing genome performances. Finally, the amniote groups with lowest recovery rates were therians and rodents, despite the morphological support for their monophyletic status. We suggest that, regardless of the tree-building method, a few carefully selected genes are able to unfold a detailed and robust scenario of phylogenetic hypotheses, particularly if taxon sampling is increased.

  18. Effectiveness of a nursing psychoeducative intervention as a helping tool in children´s mourning work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Carmen Pérez González

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The children grief has many special characteristics determinated by the childhood features. Several studies consider that children may have anxiety reactions, fears, depression and disadaptated behaviour when a relative is fort.The objective of this study is to know the effectiveness of a psychoeducative intervention of a Primary Care nurse in preventing misadaptative behaviours related to grief in children.To achieve this objective, a randomized controlled trial with an experimental group and a control group has been designed. 198 children and teenagers will be included in it (there will be randomized assigned 98 on each group from 5 to16 years old, having been affected of a relating grief, belonging to the Primary Care Centers of the 9, 10 and 11 areas in Madrid Community. Children and teenagers included in the experimental group will take a psychoeducative intervention based on 7 individualized weekly sessions. Measures of the punctuations obtained on the Children Behaviour Test will be made when children will be included in the study and after 3, 6 and 12 months.

  19. Music-supported motor training after stroke reveals no superiority of synchronization in group therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vugt, Floris T.; Ritter, Juliane; Rollnik, Jens D.; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Background: Music-supported therapy has been shown to be an effective tool for rehabilitation of motor deficits after stroke. A unique feature of music performance is that it is inherently social: music can be played together in synchrony. Aim: The present study explored the potential of synchronized music playing during therapy, asking whether synchronized playing could improve fine motor rehabilitation and mood. Method: Twenty-eight patients in neurological early rehabilitation after stroke with no substantial previous musical training were included. Patients learned to play simple finger exercises and familiar children's songs on the piano for 10 sessions of half an hour. Patients first received three individual therapy sessions and then continued in pairs. The patient pairs were divided into two groups. Patients in one group played synchronously (together group) whereas the patients in the other group played one after the other (in-turn group). To assess fine motor skill recovery the patients performed standard clinical tests such as the nine-hole-pegboard test (9HPT) and index finger-tapping speed and regularity, and metronome-paced finger tapping. Patients' mood was established using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Results: Both groups showed improvements in fine motor control. In metronome-paced finger tapping, patients in both groups improved significantly. Mood tests revealed reductions in depression and fatigue in both groups. During therapy, patients in the in-turn group rated their partner as more sympathetic than the together-group in a visual-analog scale. Conclusions: Our results suggest that music-supported stroke rehabilitation can improve fine motor control and mood not only individually but also in patient pairs. Patients who were playing in turn rather than simultaneously tended to reveal greater improvement in fine motor skill. We speculate that patients in the former group may benefit from the opportunity to learn from observation. PMID

  20. Music-supported motor training after stroke reveals no superiority of synchronisation in group therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floris Tijmen Van Vugt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Music-supported therapy has been shown to be an effective tool for rehabilitation of motor deficits after stroke. A unique feature of music performance is that it is inherently social: music can be played together in synchrony.Aim. The present study explored the potential of synchronised music playing during therapy, asking whether synchronised playing could improve fine motor rehabilitation and mood.Method. Twenty-eight patients in neurological early rehabilitation after stroke with no previous musical background were included. Patients learned to play simple finger exercises and familiar children’s songs on the piano for ten sessions of half an hour. Patients first received three individual therapy sessions and then continued in pairs. The patient pairs were divided into two groups. Patients in one group played synchronously (together group whereas the patients in the other group played one after the other (in-turn group. To assess fine motor skill recovery the patients performed standard clinical tests such as the nine-hole-pegboard test (9HPT and index finger-tapping speed and regularity, and metronome-paced finger tapping. Patients' mood was established using the Profile of Mood States (POMS.Results. Both groups showed improvements in fine motor control. In metronome-paced finger tapping, patients in both groups improved significantly. Mood tests revealed reductions in depression and fatigue in both groups. During therapy, patients in the in-turn group rated their partner as more sympathetic than the together-group in a visual-analogue scale.Conclusions. Our results suggest that music-supported stroke rehabilitation can improve fine motor control and mood not only individually but also in patient pairs. Patients who were playing in turn rather than simultaneously tended to reveal greater improvement in fine motor skill. We speculate that patients in the former group may benefit from the opportunity to learn from observation.

  1. Supportive Group Factors, Course Pedagogy, and Multicultural Competency within Multicultural Psychology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyer, Michael Ryan

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between course pedagogy and supportive group factors with variables of multicultural competency and multicultural counseling self-efficacy at the completion of a multicultural psychology course. The participants were students in graduate clinical psychology, counseling psychology, and school psychology programs…

  2. A Comparison of Support for Two Groups of Young Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soenen, Sarah; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina; Scholte, Evert

    2016-01-01

    Young adults with mild to borderline intellectual disability (MBID) have varying profiles of cognitive, adaptive and behavioural functioning. There is also variability in their educational and therapeutic needs. This study compares recommended and actual provision of support for two groups of young adults with MBID and looks at young adults'…

  3. Support groups for HIV-positive people in South Africa: Who joins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-members had tested due to illness, reported considerably more pain and were more likely to have no income. PLWHA experienced high mental, physical and social distress which must be addressed. Attention to gender differences is called for. While all members joined the support group to gain information and learn ...

  4. REECo activities and sample logistics in support of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wireman, D.L.; Rosenberry, C.E. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Activities and sample logistics of Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc. (REECo), in support of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG), are discussed in this summary report. Activities include the collection, preparation, and shipment of samples of soils, vegetation, and small animals collected at Pu-contaminated areas of the Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range. (CH)

  5. Representation of Coordination Mechanisms in IMS Learning Design to Support Group-based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, Yongwu; Burgos, Daniel; Griffiths, David; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Miao, Y., Burgos, D., Griffiths, D., & Koper, R. (2008). Representation of Coordination Mechanisms in IMS Learning Design to Support Group-based Learning. In L. Lockyer, S. Bennet, S. Agostinho & B. Harper (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Learning Design and Learning Objects: Issues, Applications and

  6. Influence of social support on health among gender and socio-economic groups of adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geckova, A; van Dijk, JP; Stewart, R; Groothoff, JW; Post, D

    Background: The influence of social support on health was explored among gender and socio-economic groups with the aim of contributing to the explanation of socio-economic health differences among Slovak adolescents. Methods: The sample consisted of 2616 Slovak adolescents (52.4% male, 47.6% female,

  7. Exploring students' learning effectiveness and attitude in Group Scribbles-supported collaborative reading activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, C. P.; Lin, Chih-Cheng; Chen, W.

    2014-01-01

    Improving students' reading comprehension is of significance. In this study, collaborative learning supported by Group Scribbles (GS), a networked technology, was integrated into a primary reading class. Forty-seven 10-year-old students from two 4th grade classes participated in the study...

  8. Breast cancer and support group in the life of mastectomized women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa da Luz Adorna

    Full Text Available AbstractObjectives To identify the importance of participation in support groups for mastectomized women’s recovery and their knowledge about this type of cancer.Material and methods Qualitative descriptive study with ten mastectomized women participants of the “Reborn” (“Renascer”, in portuguese support group. Data were collected by means of interviews, using a questionnaire prepared by the researcher as an instrument. The data collected were then qualitatively analyzed according to the systematization proposed by Minayo (4.Results Six categories were identified. This study addressed the knowledge of the participants on breast cancer and their participation in the support group.Conclusion A change of concepts and ideas about cancer in the interviewed women was identified, as well as the importance of information and explanation about this cancer, its treatment and consequences for the patient. The relevance of the support group in these women’s recovery is also noteworthy, due to the opportunity of socializing with other people with similar stories.

  9. Supporting intra-group social metacognitive activities with technology: A grammar learning game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, I.; Horvers, A.; Desain, P.W.M.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of a technology enhanced collaborative grammar learning activity on students sentence parsing and formulation. These types of collaborative learning activities for grammar education are expected to support more effective learning. Yet, effective intra-group social

  10. Social Influence in Online Health Discussions: An Evaluation of Online Graduate Student Support Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Erin Kay

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a field experimental design assessing online support groups testing hypotheses derived from the social identification model of deindividuation effects (SIDE; Lea & Spears, 1992) and social information processing theory (SIP; Walther, 1992). Specifically, it is predicted that individuals in an online support…

  11. Educational Support Group in Changing Caregivers' Psychological Elder Abuse Behavior toward Caring for Institutionalized Elders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Hsiu-Fang; Wang, Jing-Jy; Yen, Maiofen; Liu, Tzu-Ti

    2009-01-01

    Institutionalized elderly who are frail and dependent are vulnerable to be abused by overwhelmed caregivers especially caregiver psychological abusive behavior is a growing but hidden problem with few evidence-based interventions. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an educational support group in alleviating caregiver's…

  12. Children of Mentally Ill Parents Participating in Preventive Support Groups: Parental Diagnoses and Child Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santvoort, F. van; Hosman, C.M.H.; Doesum, K.T.M. van; Janssens, J.M.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    In the Netherlands, preventive support groups are offered to children of mentally ill parents. Given the variety of parental diagnoses it might be questionable if offering a standardized program for all these children is the most effective response. While no overall knowledge exists about the type

  13. Reducing Dropouts in Online Education-Group Tutoring in Virtual Seminars and Support Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Robert; Johansson, Sigurd

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a development project aimed at reducing the large number of dropouts in online degree project courses. The idea was that the introduction of group tutorials in virtual seminars, combined with extensive support materials, would reduce dropout rates. Among the students who participated, the dropout rate was reduced by 50%…

  14. The Relationships among Group Size, Participation, and Performance of Programming Language Learning Supported with Online Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ruey-Shiang

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among group size, participation, and learning performance factors when learning a programming language in a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) context. An online forum was used as the CSCL environment for learning the Microsoft ASP.NET programming language. The collaborative-learning experiment…

  15. Safety research needs for Russian-designed reactors / report by an OECD Support Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Seven Task Teams were formed within the OECD Support Group, addressing the following topics: Thermal-Hydraulics/Plant Transients for VVERs, Integrity of Equipment and Structures for VVERs, Severe Accidents for VVERs, Operational Safety Issues, Thermal-Hydraulics/Plant Transients for RBMKs, Integrity of Equipment and Structures for RBMKs, Severe Accidents for RBMKs. Each Task Team prepared and presented its report to the Support Group as a whole for review and approval. Consequently, the report represents a consensus of the Support Group that outlines the arguments for the safely research needs with the focus on the main technical issues that justify the need and urgency. The written text addresses three basic questions: What is the safety concern? What are the open issues? What are the safety research needs? The safety research needs as identified by the seven Task Teams, and approved by the Support Group, are reflected in the structure of the report. The chapter on the Uses of Safety Research provides examples on how Western research has been applied to improve the safety of nuclear power plants. In addition, the chapter emphasises the need for a national safety research policy

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of participants of support groups for hypersexual disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Els Tierens

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study is to examine the extent to which members of support groups for hypersexual disorder meet the proposed criteria for hypersexual disorder of Kafka, how the diagnosis of hypersexual disorders is made and what treatments are currently given. Methods: In this non-interventional research survey, members of support groups for hypersexual disorder received a questionnaire in which the criteria for hypersexual disorder according to Kafka were included as well as the way the disease was diagnosed and treated. Results: The questionnaire was presented to 32 people but only 10 completed questionnaires were returned. Five of the ten respondents met the criteria of Kafka. For the other five respondents a hypersexual disorder was not confirmed but neither excluded. Only for three respondents the diagnosis was made by a professional healthcare worker. The treatment included – besides the support group in nine cases – also individual psychotherapy. Two respondents took a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI, as recommended in the literature. Conclusions: The members of support groups for sex addiction were difficult to motivate for their participation. The way hypersexual disorders were diagnosed was far from optimal. Only two participants received the recommended medication.

  17. Development and pilot evaluation of an online psychoeducational program for suicide prevention among university students: A randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Han

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Suicide is the second leading cause of death for the university aged population globally. A significant proportion of students with suicidal ideation or behaviours do not seek professional help. Few primary suicide prevention programs have specifically targeted help seeking for suicidal ideation or behaviours among university students. Methods: This study reported the development and pilot test of a brief, two-module online psychoeducational program (ProHelp that aimed to encourage help seeking for suicidal ideation and behaviours among university students. The program consists of two five-minute modules that address the risk factors and warning signs of suicide, stigmatising attitudes, and perceived barriers to help seeking. 156 Chinese university students and 101 Australian university students were recruited to evaluate the effectiveness of this program at post-test and one-month follow-up. Participants were randomly assigned to the psychoeducational program or an attention control program. Results: Of the Chinese and Australian students who were randomised into the study, around 50% completed the two­day post­test survey, and 30% completed the one-month follow­up survey. Although no significant difference was found between the control and experimental group on professional help-seeking beliefs and intentions, both groups' help-seeking attitudes increased during the study (p=0.003 for the post­test survey, and p=0.008 for the follow­up survey. The experimental group in both countries demonstrated a significant improvement in suicide literacy at the post-test survey (p=0.015 compared to control. Qualitative feedback indicated that the ProHelp program was user-friendly, clear, and helpful. Conclusions: This study provides initial evidence that a brief online psychoeducational program could enhance university students' suicide literacy in both China and Australia. It also suggests that increasing suicide literacy might not be

  18. A Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Psycho-Education (B-CBE Program for Managing Stress and Anxiety of Main Family Caregivers of Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vico Chung Lim Chiang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Having a loved one in the intensive care unit (ICU is a stressful event, which may cause a high level of anxiety to the family members. This could threaten their wellbeing and ability to support the patients in, or after discharge from, the ICU. To investigate the outcomes of a brief cognitive-behavioral psycho-education program (B-CBE to manage stress and anxiety of the main family caregivers (MFCs, a pragmatic quasi-experimental study involving 45 participants (treatment group: 24; control group: 21 was conducted in an ICU. The Depression and Anxiety Stress Scale and the Critical Care Family Need Inventory were used to evaluate the primary outcomes on stress and anxiety, and satisfaction with family needs. The treatment group reported significantly better improvement in the information satisfaction score compared to the control group (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.09. Overall main effects were observed on the stress (p < 0.01; η2 = 0.20, anxiety (p < 0.01; η2 = 0.18, depression (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.13, support satisfaction (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.13, and comfort satisfaction (p < 0.05; η2 = 0.11 scores. The experience of this study suggest that MFCs are in great need of additional support like B-CBE to manage their stress and anxiety. Given the brevity of B-CBE, it is practical for critical care nurses to deliver and MFCs to take within the industrious context of an ICU. More studies are needed to investigate these types of brief psychological interventions.

  19. Using Web-Based, Group Communication Systems to Support Case Study Learning at a Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Rourke

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the capacity of Web-based, group communication systems to support case-based teaching and learning. Eleven graduate students studying at a distance were divided into three groups to collaborate on a case study using either a synchronous voice, an asynchronous voice, or a synchronous text communication system. Participants kept a detailed log of the time they spent on various activities, wrote a 1,500-word reflection on their experience, and participated in a group interview. Analysis of these data reveals that each group supplemented the system that had been assigned to them with additional communication systems in order to complete the project. Each of these systems were used strategically: email was used to share files and arrange meetings, and synchronous voice systems were used to brainstorm and make decisions. Learning achievement was high across groups and students enjoyed collaborating with others on a concrete task.

  20. Group of experience with the elderly: psychosocial support in health promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laudicéia Noronha Xavier

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the perception of the elderly on the importance of a group of experience. Methods: iIt is an exploratory, descriptive research with qualitative approach, developed at a Basic Health Unit in a county of the Brazilian northeast, with 13 elderly people attending the Group. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and analysis by the thematic analysis technique. Results: three empirical categories were identified: motivation to seek the group of experience, perspective concerning this group and changes perceived through participation. Conclusion: the group of experience can represent a therapeutic moment for the elderly, serving as support and strengthening the elderly in the social context, making the improvement and development of abilities as well as the obtaining more knowledge for health promotion possible.

  1. Group protocol to mitigate disaster stress and enhance social support in adolescents exposed to Hurricane Hugo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, J B; Hardin, S B; Weinrich, S; McGeorge, S; Lopez, J; Pesut, D

    1992-01-01

    Literature reports that cognitive understanding and social support can mitigate stress in both adults and adolescents. As a subcomponent of the Carolina Adolescent Health Project (CAHP), this research evaluated the efficacy of a Cognitive Social Support (CSS) group protocol designed to mitigate the disaster stress of adolescents who had been exposed seriously to Hurricane Hugo. A purposive sample of 259 students participated in and evaluated the CSS. This article reports the specific structure, content, process, rationale, and cost of the CSS. Evaluations indicated that 82% of the students evaluated the small-group component of the CSS as "very good" or "excellent," while 70% rated the large-group component as "very good" or "excellent."

  2. Children's Naive Concepts of OCD and How They Are Affected by Biomedical Versus Cognitive Behavioural Psychoeducation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butlin, B; Wilson, C

    2018-04-04

    How we conceptualize mental health conditions is important as it impacts on a wide range of mediators of treatment outcome. We do not know how children intuitively conceptualize obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), nor do we know the relative impact of biomedical or cognitive behavioural conceptual explanations, yet both are being widely used in psychoeducation for children with OCD. This study identified children's naive concepts of OCD, and the comparative impact of biomedical versus cognitive behavioural psychoeducation on perceived prognosis. A within- and between-subjects experimental design was used. After watching a video of a young person describing their OCD, 202 children completed a questionnaire examining their concepts of the condition. They repeated the questionnaire following a second equivalent video, this time preceded by either biomedical or cognitive behavioural psychoeducation. Participants' naive concepts of OCD reflected predominant models of OCD in healthcare. Even at the minimal dose of psychoeducation, participants' conceptualizations of OCD changed. Prior exposure to OCD resulted in a stronger alignment with the biomedical model. Exposure to biomedical psychoeducation resulted in participants predicting a slower recovery with less chance of complete remission. Psychoeducation for childhood OCD is impactful. Despite its wide use by clinicians and mental health services, biomedical psychoeducation appears to have deleterious effects. Children's concepts of OCD merit attention but caution should be applied in how they are targeted.

  3. The Alternative Peer Group: A Developmentally Appropriate Recovery Support Model for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Angela; Collier, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    Recovery as the goal for substance use disorder treatment has been a key component of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's mission for the past decade. Consistent with their mission, there is a call for research and development of recovery-oriented systems of care to support affected individuals through all stages of the recovery process. Evidence is emerging to support recovery practice and research for adults, but recovery-oriented models for adolescents are scant. The Alternative Peer Group (APG) is a comprehensive adolescent recovery support model that integrates recovering peers and prosocial activities into evidence-based clinical practice. Employing APG participants' own words, this article will describe the essential elements and three theoretical frameworks underlying the APG model to illustrate how the APG serves as a developmentally appropriate recovery support service for adolescents with substance use disorder.

  4. Brief psycho-education affects circadian variability in nicotine craving during cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosen, Elizabeth; Woody, Sheila R

    2013-09-01

    Nicotine cravings are a key target of smoking cessation interventions. Cravings demonstrate circadian variation during abstinence, often peaking during the morning and evening hours. Although some research has also shown diurnal variation in the efficacy of nicotine replacement medications, little research has examined how brief psychosocial interventions affect temporal patterns of craving during abstinence. The present study examined the impact of two brief psycho-education interventions on circadian variations in cravings during a 24-h period. 176 adult smokers interested in quitting participated in two lab sessions. During the first session, participants received (a) mindfulness psycho-education that encouraged acceptance of cravings as a normal, tolerable part of quitting that people should not expect to perfectly control, (b) standard cessation psycho-education, or (c) no psycho-education. Half the sample initiated a cessation attempt the following day. Dependent variables were assessed using ecological momentary assessment (24-h of monitoring, immediately after first lab session) and questionnaires four days later. Partially consistent with hypotheses, both forms of psycho-education were associated with differential diurnal variation in cravings during cessation. Relative to those receiving no psycho-education, standard smoking cessation psycho-education decreased morning cravings. Psycho-education encouraging acceptance of cravings was associated with lower craving in both the morning and evening, albeit only among successfully abstinent smokers. Results demonstrate that brief non-pharmacological interventions can affect circadian craving patterns during smoking cessation. Further investigation of mechanisms of change and of the impact of psycho-education on cessation outcomes is warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A psycho-educational HIV/STI prevention intervention for internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti: results from a non-randomized cohort pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Daniel, CarolAnn; Newman, Peter A; Weaver, James; Loutfy, Mona R

    2014-01-01

    Little evidence exists regarding efficacious HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STI) prevention interventions with internally displaced populations. Internally displaced women are at elevated risk for HIV/STI due to limited access to health services, heightened poverty and social network breakdown. The FASY (Famn an Aksyon Pou Sante' Yo) (Women Taking Action For Their Health) study examined the effectiveness of a peer health worker (PHW) delivered psycho-educational HIV/STI pilot study with internally displaced women in Leogane, Haiti. This was a non-randomized cohort pilot study. Participants completed a computer-assisted pre-test programmed on Android tablet PCs followed by an HIV/STI educational video-based session and a 6-week psycho-educational group program of weekly meetings. Participants completed a post-test upon completion of group sessions. The primary outcome was HIV knowledge; our pre-specified index of clinically significant change was an effect size of 0.30. Secondary outcomes included: STI knowledge, condom use, social support, resilient coping, depression and relationship control. We used mixed-effects regression to calculate mean outcome pre-post score change. This study was registered (clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01492829). Between January 1-April 30, 2012 we assigned 200 participants to the study. The majority of participants (n = 176, 88%) completed the study and were followed up at 8 weeks, finishing April 30, 2012. Adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, HIV knowledge (β = 4.81; 95% CI 4.36-5.26), STI knowledge (β = 0.84; 95% CI 0.70-0.99), condom use (AOR = 4.05, 95% CI 1.86-8.83), and depression (β = -0.63, 95% CI -0.88--0.39) scores showed statistically significant change post-intervention (pHaiti. Pilot studies are an important approach to understand feasibility and scientific impacts of HIV prevention strategies in disaster contexts. Study results may inform HIV prevention interventions among internally displaced women in

  6. Psycho-education with problem solving (PEPS therapy for adults with personality disorder: A pragmatic multi-site community-based randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duggan Conor

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impairment in social functioning is a key component of personality disorder. Therefore psycho-education and problem solving (PEPS therapy may benefit people with this disorder. Psycho-education aims to educate, build rapport, and motivate people for problem solving therapy. Problem solving therapy aims to help clients solve interpersonal problems positively and rationally, thereby improving social functioning and reducing distress. PEPS therapy has been evaluated with community adults with personality disorder in an exploratory trial. At the end of treatment, compared to a wait-list control group, those treated with PEPS therapy showed better social functioning, as measured by the Social Functioning Questionnaire (SFQ. A definitive evaluation is now being conducted to determine whether PEPS therapy is a clinically and cost-effective treatment for people with personality disorder Methods This is a pragmatic, two-arm, multi-centre, parallel, randomised controlled clinical trial. The target population is community-dwelling adults with one or more personality disorder, as identified by the International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE. Inclusion criteria are: Living in the community (including residential or supported care settings; presence of one or more personality disorder; aged 18 or over; proficiency in spoken English; capacity to provide informed consent. Exclusion criteria are: Primary diagnosis of a functional psychosis; insufficient degree of literacy, comprehension or attention to be able to engage in trial therapy and assessments; currently engaged in a specific programme of psychological treatment for personality disorder or likely to start such treatment during the trial period; currently enrolled in any other trial. Suitable participants are randomly allocated to PEPS therapy plus treatment as usual (TAU or TAU only. We aim to recruit 340 men and women. The primary outcome is social functioning as measured

  7. The E Sibling Project – exploratory randomised controlled trial of an online multi-component psychoeducational intervention for siblings of individuals with first episode psychosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Siblings of individuals with first episode psychosis are natural partners to promote service users’ recovery and are themselves vulnerable to mental ill health due to the negative impact of psychosis within the family. This study aims to develop and undertake a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of an online multi-component psychoeducational intervention for siblings of individuals with first episode psychosis. The impetus for the intervention arose from siblings' expressed needs for peer support and information on psychosis, coping and management strategies for common symptoms and ways to promote recovery. Methods/Design The project design draws on the Medical Research Council framework for the design and evaluation of complex interventions. Mixed methods comprising collection of qualitative focus group data, systematic review and expert advisory group consultation are used to develop the theoretical basis for and design of the intervention. This protocol focuses on the modelling and piloting phase which uses a randomised controlled trial with factorial design to test the efficacy of the intervention. Outcome data on participants’ mental wellbeing, knowledge, perceived self-efficacy and experiences of caregiving will be assessed at baseline, at end of the intervention (10 weeks later) and at 10 week follow-up. In addition, a post-intervention semi-structured interview with 20% of the participants will explore their experiences and acceptability of the intervention. Discussion This multi-component online psychoeducational intervention aims to enhance siblings' knowledge about psychosis and their coping capacity, thus potentially improving their own mental wellbeing and promoting their contribution to service users’ recovery. The factorial design randomised controlled trial with a supplementary process evaluation using semi-structured interviews and usage-monitoring will collect preliminary evidence of efficacy, feasibility and acceptability, as

  8. Easing reintegration: telephone support groups for spouses of returning Iraq and Afghanistan service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Linda Olivia; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer; Graney, Marshall J; Zuber, Jeffrey; Burns, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Spouses of returning Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom, OIF) and Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom, OEF) military service members report increased depression and anxiety post deployment as they work to reintegrate the family and service member. Reconnecting the family, renegotiating roles that have shifted, reestablishing communication patterns, and dealing with mental health concerns are all tasks that spouses must undertake as part of reintegration. We tested telephone support groups focusing on helping spouses with these basic reintegration tasks. Year-long telephone support groups focused on education, skills building (communication skills, problem solving training, cognitive behavioral techniques, stress management), and support. Spouse depression and anxiety were decreased and perceived social support was increased during the course of the study. In subgroup analyses, spouses with husbands whose injuries caused care difficulties had a positive response to the intervention. However, they were more likely to be depressed, be anxious, and have less social support compared to participants who had husbands who had no injury or whose injury did not cause care difficulty. Study findings suggest that this well-established, high-access intervention can help improve quality of life for military spouses who are struggling with reintegration of the service member and family.

  9. Atoning for Colonial Injustices: Group-Based Shame and Guilt Motivate Support for Reparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnifred R. Louis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the role of group-based shame and guilt in motivating citizens of ex-colonial countries to support restitution to former colonized groups which were the target of violence and oppression. Study 1 (N = 125 was conducted in Australia during the lead-up to the first official government apology to Aboriginal Australians. Among white Australians, guilt and shame were associated with attitudinal support for intergroup apology and victim compensation. However, only shame was associated with actual political behaviour (signing a petition in support of the apology. Study 2 (N = 181, conducted in Britain, focussed on Britain's violent mistreatment of the Kenyan population during decolonization. It tested a hypothesis that there are two forms of shame-essence shame and image shame-and demonstrated that image shame was associated with support for apology, whereas essence shame was associated with support for more substantial material and financial compensation. The findings are discussed in light of promoting restitution and reconciliation within nations with histories of colonial violence.

  10. Forming a support group for people affected by inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarup N

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nidhi Swarup,1 Saumya Nayak,2 Jessie Lee,2 Srinivas Pai Raikar,2 David Hou,2 Senthil Sockalingam,2 Ken J Lee2 1Crohn’s and Colitis Society of Singapore (CCSS, The Arcadia, 2QuintilesIMS, Science Park One, Singapore Abstract: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD – primarily Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis – is a debilitating lifelong condition with significant health and economic costs. From diagnosis to management, IBD can cause huge psychosocial concerns to patients and their caregivers. This study reports an experience of a Crohn’s patient, leading to the formation of the first IBD patient support group in Singapore and how this group has evolved in the last 4 years in supporting other IBD patients. IBD patient advocacy and/or support groups facilitate open conversations on patients’ fears, concerns, preferences and needs, and may potentially improve disease knowledge and quality of life for individuals with the condition or their families. Keywords: patient advocacy groups, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, patients, caregivers

  11. Experiences of a support group for interns in the setting of war and political turmoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Jamil, Fatima; Hamadeh, Ghassan N; Osman, Hibah

    2007-10-01

    Intern support groups have been instituted in many residency programs to improve resident well-being. In this article, we discuss the themes that emerged in intern support group meetings in a family medicine program operating in a setting of war and political instability. We held support groups, led by a family physician and a psychologist, that met monthly. Participants were residents in the family medicine program at the American University of Beirut. These residents began their training days after the commencement of the 34-day war between Israel and Hizbollah in 2006. Themes and issues discussed by the residents were noted and are reported in this article. We found that despite the stressors of the political situation, our interns focused on the usual stress of internship, such as the difficulties of functioning as interns in other departments and dealing with the time demands of internship as their main sources of stress at the beginning of internship. The stresses associated with the war did not emerge in the group until later in the year. These included tension with patients and political confrontations with staff, as well as personal struggles with the lack of political stability and depressed mood. This paper serves to share our experience and highlight some areas of concern that residents experience when training in a country or region that is at war.

  12. Psychoeducation against depression, anxiety, alexithymia and fibromyalgia: a pilot study in primary care for patients on sick leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Eva O; Svensson, Ralph; Thulesius, Hans O

    2018-06-01

    Feasibility testing of a psychoeducational method -The Affect School and Script Analyses (ASSA) - in a Swedish primary care setting. Exploring associations between psychological, and medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS). Pilot study. Three Swedish primary care centers serving 20,000 people. 8 weekly 2-hour sessions with a 5-7 participant group led by two instructors - followed by 10 individual hour-long sessions. Thirty-six patients, 29 women (81%), on sick-leave due to depression, anxiety, or fibromyalgia. Feasibility in terms of participation rates and expected improvements of psychological symptoms and MUPS, assessed by self-report instruments pre-, one-week post-, and 18 months post-intervention. Regression coefficients between psychological symptoms and MUPS. The entire 26-hour psychoeducational intervention was completed by 30 patients (83%), and 33 patients (92%) completed the 16-hour Affect School. One-week post-intervention median test score changes were significantly favorable for 27 respondents, with p 80% participation rates, and clear improvements of self-assessed psychological symptoms and MUPS. The ASSA intervention thus showed adequate feasibility in a Swedish primary care setting. Key Points  A pilot study of a psychoeducational intervention - The Affect School and Script Analyses (ASSA) - was performed in primary care   • The intervention showed feasibility for patients on sick-leave due to depression, anxiety, or fibromyalgia   • 92% completed the 8 weeks/16 hours Affect School and 83% completed the entire 26-hour ASSA intervention   • 9 of 11 self-reported measures improved significantly one-week post intervention   • 7 of 11 self-reported measures improved significantly 18 months post-intervention.

  13. Effectiveness of psycho-education on depression, hopelessness, suicidality, anxiety and substance use among basic diploma students at Kenya Medical Training College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Kagwiria Muriungi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the effectiveness of psycho-education on symptom severity in depression, hopelessness, suicidality, anxiety and risk of substance abuse among para-medical students at Kenya Medical Training College (KMTC. Methodology. A clinical trial drew experimental (N=1 181 and control (N=1 926 groups from different KMTC campuses. Self-administered questionnaires were used to collect data: the researcher-designed social demographic questionnaire was used at baseline only, while Beck’s Depression Inventory, Beck’s Hopelessness Scale, Beck’s Suicide Ideation Scale, Beck’s Anxiety Inventory and World Health Organization alcohol, smoking and substance involvement screening test (ASSIST (for drug abuse were used for baseline, mid-point and end-point assessments at 3-month intervals. The experimental group received a total of 16 hours of structured psycho-education. All study participants gave informed consent. Results. Overall, there was no significant reduction in symptom severity between the experimental and control groups at 3 months (p>0.05 but there was a significant difference at 6 months (p<0.05. Conclusion. Psycho-education was effective in reducing the severity of symptoms of depression, hopelessness, suicidality, anxiety and risk of substance abuse at 6 months.

  14. Mental health and psychosocial support in crisis and conflict: report of the Mental Health Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allden, K; Jones, L; Weissbecker, I; Wessells, M; Bolton, P; Betancourt, T S; Hijazi, Z; Galappatti, A; Yamout, R; Patel, P; Sumathipala, A

    2009-01-01

    The Working Group on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support was convened as part of the 2009 Harvard Humanitarian Action Summit. The Working Group chose to focus on ethical issues in mental health and psychosocial research and programming in humanitarian settings. The Working Group built on previous work and recommendations, such as the Inter-Agency Standing Committee's Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings. The objective of this working group was to address one of the factors contributing to the deficiency of research and the need to develop the evidence base on mental health and psychosocial support interventions during complex emergencies by proposing ethical research guidelines. Outcomes research is vital for effective program development in emergency settings, but to date, no comprehensive ethical guidelines exist for guiding such research efforts. Working Group members conducted literature reviews which included peer-reviewed publications, agency reports, and relevant guidelines on the following topics: general ethical principles in research, cross-cultural issues, research in resource-poor countries, and specific populations such as trauma and torture survivors, refugees, minorities, children and youth, and the mentally ill. Working Group members also shared key points regarding ethical issues encountered in their own research and fieldwork. The group adapted a broad definition of the term "research", which encompasses needs assessments and data gathering, as well as monitoring and evaluation. The guidelines are conceptualized as applying to formal and informal processes of assessment and evaluation in which researchers as well as most service providers engage. The group reached consensus that it would be unethical not to conduct research and evaluate outcomes of mental health and psychosocial interventions in emergency settings, given that there currently is very little good evidence base for such interventions

  15. Comulang: towards a collaborative e-learning system that supports student group modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troussas, Christos; Virvou, Maria; Alepis, Efthimios

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an e-learning system that is expected to further enhance the educational process in computer-based tutoring systems by incorporating collaboration between students and work in groups. The resulting system is called "Comulang" while as a test bed for its effectiveness a multiple language learning system is used. Collaboration is supported by a user modeling module that is responsible for the initial creation of student clusters, where, as a next step, working groups of students are created. A machine learning clustering algorithm works towards group formatting, so that co-operations between students from different clusters are attained. One of the resulting system's basic aims is to provide efficient student groups whose limitations and capabilities are well balanced.

  16. Applying voting theory in natural resource management: a case of multiple-criteria group decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukkanen, Sanna; Kangas, Annika; Kangas, Jyrki

    2002-02-01

    Voting theory has a lot in common with utility theory, and especially with group decision-making. An expected-utility-maximising strategy exists in voting situations, as well as in decision-making situations. Therefore, it is natural to utilise the achievements of voting theory also in group decision-making. Most voting systems are based on a single criterion or holistic preference information on decision alternatives. However, a voting scheme called multicriteria approval is specially developed for decision-making situations with multiple criteria. This study considers the voting theory from the group decision support point of view and compares it with some other methods applied to similar purposes in natural resource management. A case study is presented, where the approval voting approach is introduced to natural resources planning and tested in a forestry group decision-making process. Applying multicriteria approval method was found to be a potential approach for handling some challenges typical for forestry group decision support. These challenges include (i) utilising ordinal information in the evaluation of decision alternatives, (ii) being readily understandable for and treating equally all the stakeholders in possession of different levels of knowledge on the subject considered, (iii) fast and cheap acquisition of preference information from several stakeholders, and (iv) dealing with multiple criteria.

  17. Mobile group blogging in learning: a case study of supporting cultural transition

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Yinjuan

    2010-01-01

    A mobile group blog is an example of a Web 2.0 social space, as well as a tool for the instant collection of contextual information, the immediate sharing of information and later reflection. Records in the form of multimedia created through mobile blogging can assist people to keep a versatile representation of artefacts they encounter on the move in everyday life. Overseas students are an example of a large group of people whose cultural learning could be supported by this technology. They ...

  18. Neuroscience-informed psychoeducation for addiction medicine: A neurocognitive perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekhtiari, Hamed; Rezapour, Tara; Aupperle, Robin L; Paulus, Martin P

    2017-01-01

    Psychoeducation (PE) is defined as an intervention with systematic, structured, and didactic knowledge transfer for an illness and its treatment, integrating emotional and motivational aspects to enable patients to cope with the illness and to improve its treatment adherence and efficacy. PE is considered an important component of treatment in both medical and psychiatric disorders, especially for mental health disorders associated with lack of insight, such as alcohol and substance use disorders (ASUDs). New advancements in neuroscience have shed light on how various aspects of ASUDs may relate to neural processes. However, the actual impact of neuroscience in the real-life clinical practice of addiction medicine is minimal. In this chapter, we provide a perspective on how PE in addiction medicine can be informed by neuroscience in two dimensions: content (knowledge we transfer in PE) and structure (methods we use to deliver PE). The content of conventional PE targets knowledge about etiology of illness, treatment process, adverse effects of prescribed medications, coping strategies, family education, and life skill training. Adding neuroscience evidence to the content of PE could be helpful in communicating not only the impact of drug use but also the beneficial impact of various treatments (i.e., on brain function), thus enhancing motivation for compliance and further destigmatizing their symptoms. PE can also be optimized in its "structure" by implicitly and explicitly engaging different neurocognitive processes, including salience/attention, memory, and self-awareness. There are many interactions between these two dimensions, structure and content, in the delivery of neuroscience-informed psychoeducation (NIPE). We explore these interactions in the development of a cartoon-based NIPE to promote brain recovery during addiction treatment as a part of the brain awareness for addiction recovery initiative. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Computer Support of Groups: Theory-Based Models for GDSS Research

    OpenAIRE

    V. Srinivasan Rao; Sirkka L. Jarvenpaa

    1991-01-01

    Empirical research in the area of computer support of groups is characterized by inconsistent results across studies. This paper attempts to reconcile the inconsistencies by linking the ad hoc reasoning in the studies to existing theories of communication, minority influence and human information processing. Contingency models are then presented based on the theories discussed. The paper concludes by discussing the linkages between the current work and other recently published integrations of...

  20. The Effect of Functional Roles on Group Efficiency : Using Multilevel Modeling and Content Analysis to Investigate Computer-Supported Collaboration in Small Groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbos, J.W.; Martens, R.L.; Jochems, W.M.G.; Broers, N.J.

    2004-01-01

    The usefulness of roles to support small group performance can often be read; however, their effect is rarely empirically assessed. This article reports the effects of functional roles on group performance, efficiency, and collaboration during computer-supported collaborative learning. A comparison

  1. HIV/AIDS through the lens of Christianity: perspectives from a South African urban support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlongwana, K; Mkhize, S

    2007-05-01

    HIV is one of the most obscure viruses that humankind has had to face in recent times. Compounding this obscurity are often contesting perspectives on what it means to be HIV infected, and these perspectives are largely constituted by people's rationalisation of complex situations or experiences. Using qualitative research methods and ethnography in particular, this paper reflects on a broad understanding of what it means to live with HIV in the context of Christianity, using research participants' perspectives in an urban support group setting. Two fundamental patterns are evident in this paper: (1) as support group members rationalise their HIV infection, they continuously construct and reconstruct their identities; and (2) support group members rationalise their HIV infection to enhance their coping abilities, using Christianity and the Bible in particular, as a reference. Whilst rationalising HIV infection, three viewpoints emerge. The first viewpoint perceives HIV infection as an affliction by Satan; the second viewpoint sees it as originating from God; while the last viewpoint interprets HIV infection as a negotiated settlement between God and Satan. The paper is intended to trigger debate, and hopefully also to seek and provide answers from various sectors of society, and religious communities in particular, in order to help other HIV positive people in similar situations better manage their HIV condition.

  2. Electronic Support Groups: An Open Line of Communication in Contested Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael; Kontos, Nicholas; Freudenreich, Oliver

    Patients with functional somatic syndromes are often difficult to treat. The relationship between doctors and patients can be strained, which limits communication. Instead, patients often communicate with each other over the Internet in electronic support groups. This perspective summarizes studies of patient-to-patient communication over the Internet and uses the concept of contested illness to provide insights into the experiences of patients with functional somatic disorders. Conflict between a patient and their physician is a key feature of functional somatic syndromes. Physicians and patients do not have a shared understanding or appreciation of the patient's experiences. Patients with functional somatic syndromes often value their own embodied experience over medical knowledge. At the same time, they remain deeply invested in finding a "good doctor" who believes that the patient is suffering, agrees with their conception of the cause, and assents to the treatment as directed by the patient. Electronic support groups reinforce these beliefs. Patients may benefit from a compromising, collaborative approach that is realistic about the limitations of medical knowledge. However, physicians should not engage in unsafe treatment practices. Electronic support groups exist for a wide range of illnesses and the issues that rise to the surface in functional somatic syndromes likely occur to some extent with almost every patient. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Supporting self-management by Community Matrons through a group intervention; an action research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkham, Abigail M; Ersser, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility and impact of a group intervention by Community Matrons to support those living with multiple long-terms conditions. Little evidence exists as to how the role of the Community Matron (CM) should be delivered to effectively enhance disease self-management and levels of self-efficacy for the service users. This qualitative participatory action research study explored the use of group work as a method of intervention by CMs. A purposive sample of 29 participants was recruited. Each patient group had 8-10 participants, led by a CM working in both the researcher and practitioner role, operating over 12-month period. Data were collected by participant observation, researcher reflexive account and interviews. Grounded theory method was used to systematically analyse the data. Three main data categories emerged: (i) comparison by patients that leads to re-motivation of the self; (ii) learning, leading to enhanced self-management techniques, through storytelling and understanding of each other's experiences; and (iii) ownership that resulted in the self-awareness, cognisance and insight into the role of the support group they were based in and how it benefited them. The core category of 'Taking back the self - understanding the whole,' conveyed the impact that this care delivery method had upon readjusting the balance of power between health professional and service users and its consequence in refreshing and improving their self-management and the patients' self-efficacy. It was concluded that CM intervention using a model of group learning can lead to more effective and efficient support, through improving self-efficacy and patients' related self-management ability. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The impact of an online Facebook support group for people with multiple sclerosis on non-active users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqui Steadman

    2014-11-01

    Objectives: This study therefore aimed to explore the experiences of non-active users of an online Facebook support group for PwMS. Emphasis was placed on the facilitators and the barriers that were associated with membership to this group. Method: An exploratory qualitative research design was implemented, whereby thematic analysis was utilised to examine the ten semi-structured interviews that were conducted. Results: Several facilitators were acquired through the online support group; namely emotional support (constant source of support, exposure to negative aspects of the disease,informational support (group as a source of knowledge, quality of information and social companionship (place of belonging. Some barriers were also identified; namely emotional support (emotions lost online, response to messages, exposure to negative aspects of the disease, informational support (information posted on the group, misuse of group and social companionship (non-active status. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that the non-active members of the online support group for PwMS have valid reasons for their non-active membership status. More important,the findings suggest that the online Facebook support group provided the group members with an important support network in the form of emotional support, informational support and social companionship, despite their non-active membership status or the barriers that have been identified.

  5. Effects of psycho-education plus basic cognitive behavioural therapy strategies on medication-treated adolescents with depressive disorder in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isa, Ehimwenma W; Ani, Cornelius; Bella-Awusah, Tolulope; Omigbodun, Olayinka

    2018-04-11

    Limited data exists on psychological interventions for adolescent depression in African countries such as Nigeria. This study therefore investigates the effects of a psychological intervention that includes psycho-education and basic elements of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) on depressed medication-treated adolescents in Nigeria. This was a pre-post one-group intervention study of 18 adolescents aged 13-18 years with clinically diagnosed depressive disorder, attending a specialist psychiatric hospital. They had been on antidepressants for 3 months or longer. Depressive symptoms, knowledge of depression, hope, and attitudes towards treatment adherence were measured at baseline and repeated at 1 and 4 weeks post-intervention. The adolescents received four sessions of a group-based manualised intervention focused on psycho-education and basic CBT strategies. Statistically significant reductions in depressive symptoms were recorded, as were improvements in the adolescents' knowledge of depression, hope, and attitude towards treatment adherence one week after the intervention (all p = 0.001). All differences were sustained at 4 weeks post-intervention. Participants' satisfaction with the intervention was high. This study suggests that adding psycho-education with elements of CBT to antidepressant treatment is feasible, acceptable and can produce further benefits to depressed adolescents in this region.

  6. Self-monitoring and psychoeducation in bipolar patients with a smart-phone application (SIMPLe) project: design, development and studies protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Mateu, Ainoa; Reinares, María; Undurraga, Juan; Bonnín, Caterina del Mar; Sánchez-Moreno, José; Vieta, Eduard; Colom, Francesc

    2015-03-20

    New technologies have recently been used for monitoring signs and symptoms of mental health illnesses and particularly have been tested to improve the outcomes in bipolar disorders. Web-based psychoeducational programs for bipolar disorders have also been implemented, yet to our knowledge, none of them have integrated both approaches in one single intervention. The aim of this project is to develop and validate a smartphone application to monitor symptoms and signs and empower the self-management of bipolar disorder, offering customized embedded psychoeducation contents, in order to identify early symptoms and prevent relapses and hospitalizations. The project will be carried out in three complementary phases, which will include a feasibility study (first phase), a qualitative study (second phase) and a randomized controlled trial (third phase) comparing the smartphone application (SIMPLe) on top of treatment as usual with treatment as usual alone. During the first phase, feasibility and satisfaction will be assessed with the application usage log data and with an electronic survey. Focus groups will be conducted and technical improvements will be incorporated at the second phase. Finally, at the third phase, survival analysis with multivariate data analysis will be performed and relationships between socio-demographic, clinical variables and assessments scores with relapses in each group will be explored. This project could result in a highly available, user-friendly and not costly monitoring and psychoeducational intervention that could improve the outcome of people suffering from bipolar disorders in a practical and secure way. Clinical Trials.gov: NCT02258711 (October 2014).

  7. Power Distribution System Planning Evaluation by a Fuzzy Multi-Criteria Group Decision Support System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiefeng Zhang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of solutions is an important phase in power distribution system planning (PDSP which allows issues such as quality of supply, cost, social service and environmental implications to be considered and usually involves the judgments of a group of experts. The planning problem is thus suitable for the multi-criteria group decision-making (MCGDM method. The evaluation process and evaluation criteria often involve uncertainties incorporated in quantitative analysis with crisp values and qualitative judgments with linguistic terms; therefore, fuzzy sets techniques are applied in this study. This paper proposes a fuzzy multi-criteria group decision-making (FMCGDM method for PDSP evaluation and applies a fuzzy multi-criteria group decision support system (FMCGDSS to support the evaluation task. We introduce a PDSP evaluation model, which has evaluation criteria within three levels, based on the characteristics of a power distribution system. A case-based example is performed on a test distribution network and demonstrates how all the problems in a PDSP evaluation are addressed using FMCGDSS. The results are acceptable to expert evaluators.

  8. An isomorphism for algebra of distributions with compact support on Lie groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hussein, K.

    1991-08-01

    Let (H, H 0 ,...,H L L is an element of IN) be a finite sequence of abelian connected Lie Groups, G L = H, G 1 G i+1 χ ρi+1 H i+1 (0 ≤ i ≤ L - 1) and G = G 0 χ ρo H 0 the Lie groups which are the semi-direct product of G i by H-i (0 ≤ i ≤ L), where ρ i : H i → Aut(G i ) is a group homomorphism (0 ≤ i ≤ L). Let G-tilde = H x H L x...xH 0 be the Lie group of the direct product of H, H L ,..., and H 0 and let ε'(G-tilde) the Topological vector space of all distributions with compact support on G-tilde. In this paper, we prove that there is a structure of algebra on ε'(G-tilde) such that the algebra (convolution) of all distributions with compact support on G is isomorphic onto ε'(G-tilde). (author). 7 refs

  9. The impact of an online Facebook support group for people with multiple sclerosis on non-active users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Jacqui; Pretorius, Chrisma

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating disease and there is little research on support networks for people with MS (PwMS). More specifically, most studies on online support groups focus on those who actively participate in the group, whereas the majority of those who utilise online support groups do so in a passive way. This study therefore aimed to explore the experiences of non-active users of an online Facebook support group for PwMS. Emphasis was placed on the facilitators and the barriers that were associated with membership to this group. An exploratory qualitative research design was implemented, whereby thematic analysis was utilised to examine the ten semi-structured interviews that were conducted. Several facilitators were acquired through the online support group; namely emotional support (constant source of support, exposure to negative aspects of the disease), informational support (group as a source of knowledge, quality of information) and social companionship (place of belonging). Some barriers were also identified; namely emotional support (emotions lost online, response to messages, exposure to negative aspects of the disease), informational support (information posted on the group, misuse of group) and social companionship (non-active status). These findings demonstrate that the non-active members of the online support group for PwMS have valid reasons for their non-active membership status. More important, the findings suggest that the online Facebook support group provided the group members with an important support network in the form of emotional support, informational support and social companionship, despite their non-active membership status or the barriers that have been identified.

  10. The (Biological or Cultural) Essence of Essentialism: Implications for Policy Support among Dominant and Subordinated Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu Yalcinkaya, Nur; Estrada-Villalta, Sara; Adams, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    Most research links (racial) essentialism to negative intergroup outcomes. We propose that this conclusion reflects both a narrow conceptual focus on biological/genetic essence and a narrow research focus from the perspective of racially dominant groups. We distinguished between beliefs in biological and cultural essences, and we investigated the implications of this distinction for support of social justice policies (e.g., affirmative action) among people with dominant (White) and subordinated (e.g., Black, Latino) racial identities in the United States. Whereas, endorsement of biological essentialism may have similarly negative implications for social justice policies across racial categories, we investigated the hypothesis that endorsement of cultural essentialism would have different implications across racial categories. In Studies 1a and 1b, we assessed the properties of a cultural essentialism measure we developed using two samples with different racial/ethnic compositions. In Study 2, we collected data from 170 participants using an online questionnaire to test the implications of essentialist beliefs for policy support. Consistent with previous research, we found that belief in biological essentialism was negatively related to policy support for participants from both dominant and subordinated categories. In contrast, the relationship between cultural essentialism and policy support varied across identity categories in the hypothesized way: negative for participants from the dominant category but positive for participants from subordinated categories. Results suggest that cultural essentialism may provide a way of identification that subordinated communities use to mobilize support for social justice.

  11. The (Biological or Cultural Essence of Essentialism: Implications for Policy Support among Dominant and Subordinated Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Soylu Yalcinkaya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Most research links (racial essentialism to negative intergroup outcomes. We propose that this conclusion reflects both a narrow conceptual focus on biological/genetic essence and a narrow research focus from the perspective of racially dominant groups. We distinguished between beliefs in biological and cultural essences, and we investigated the implications of this distinction for support of social justice policies (e.g., affirmative action among people with dominant (White and subordinated (e.g., Black, Latino racial identities in the United States. Whereas, endorsement of biological essentialism may have similarly negative implications for social justice policies across racial categories, we investigated the hypothesis that endorsement of cultural essentialism would have different implications across racial categories. In Studies 1a and 1b, we assessed the properties of a cultural essentialism measure we developed using two samples with different racial/ethnic compositions. In Study 2, we collected data from 170 participants using an online questionnaire to test the implications of essentialist beliefs for policy support. Consistent with previous research, we found that belief in biological essentialism was negatively related to policy support for participants from both dominant and subordinated categories. In contrast, the relationship between cultural essentialism and policy support varied across identity categories in the hypothesized way: negative for participants from the dominant category but positive for participants from subordinated categories. Results suggest that cultural essentialism may provide a way of identification that subordinated communities use to mobilize support for social justice.

  12. Support groups for children in alternate care: a largely untapped therapeutic resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, D; Storer, S

    1995-01-01

    Children in alternate care often have adjustment problems that manifest in various aspects of their lives. Individual therapy is often assumed to be the desired intervention, but resources seldom permit one-to-one therapy for these disturbances. The authors argue that groupwork should be considered as a possible treatment of choice. Not only is it likely to be more economical than individual therapy, it has the inherent advantage of telling children in care that they are not alone, and that other children have similar experiences and feelings. It also allows them to develop their own support network. Such groups appear to have been underutilized in work with children in out-of-home care. This article describes such a group and its outcome. Various techniques were developed to achieve specified aims. The techniques appeared to be successful. Further work on such groups and more specific evaluation is called for.

  13. Self-esteem and anxiety: key issues in an abused women's support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimpey, M L

    1989-01-01

    A support group was organized for women who sought help to cope with physical and emotional abuse from their male partners. Women who have lived through the cycle of violence may experience a stress response that includes fear, depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem. High anxiety can interfere with problem solving and with developing new coping patterns. Low self-esteem can accompany depression and intensify the sense of helplessness and powerlessness abused women feel. A descriptive study was conducted to determine to what extent women in the group experienced high anxiety and low self-esteem. Results indicated that high levels of anxiety and low self-esteem were present in the group. Anxiety reduction strategies and techniques to enhance self-esteem were developed.

  14. The effectiveness of a trauma-focused psycho-educational secondary prevention program for children exposed to interparental violence: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Overbeek Mathilde M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children who witness interparental violence are at a heightened risk for developing psychosocial, behavioral and cognitive problems, as well as posttraumatic stress symptoms. For these children the psycho-educational secondary prevention program 'En nu ik...!' ('It's my turn now!' has been developed. This program includes specific therapeutic factors focused on emotion awareness and expression, increasing feelings of emotional security, teaching specific coping strategies, developing a trauma narrative, improving parent-child interaction and psycho-education. The main study aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of the specific therapeutic factors in the program. A secondary objective is to study mediating and moderating factors. Methods/design This study is a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial across cities in the Netherlands. Participants (N = 140 are referred to the secondary preventive intervention program by police, social work, women shelters and youth (mental health care. Children, aged 6-12 years, and their parents, who experienced interparental violence are randomly assigned to either the intervention program or the control program. The control program is comparable on nonspecific factors by offering positive attention, positive expectations, recreation, distraction, warmth and empathy of the therapist, and social support among group participants, in ways that are similar to the intervention program. Primary outcome measures are posttraumatic stress symptoms and emotional and behavioral problems of the child. Mediators tested are the ability to differentiate and express emotions, emotional security, coping strategies, feelings of guilt and parent-child interaction. Mental health of the parent, parenting stress, disturbances in parent-child attachment, duration and severity of the domestic violence and demographics are examined for their moderating effect. Data are collected one week before the program

  15. Group treatment for trichotillomania: cognitive-behavioral therapy versus supportive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Edson Luiz; De Togni Muniz, Enilde; Brito, Antônio Marcelo Cabrita; de Abreu, Cristiano Nabuco; Tavares, Hermano

    2015-04-01

    Trichotillomania is a psychiatric condition characterized by the chronic pulling and plucking of one's own hair. Cognitive-behavioral therapy shows promise as a treatment for trichotillomania and might be preferable to pharmacotherapy. However, there have been no randomized, controlled studies of the efficacy of group cognitive-behavioral therapy. We evaluated 44 subjects, recruited from April 2009 to May 2010, all of whom met DSM-IV criteria for a diagnosis of trichotillomania. Subjects were randomized to receive 22 sessions of either group cognitive-behavioral therapy or group supportive therapy (control). Treatment evaluation was non-blind and used self-report scales. The primary outcome measure was the improvement of hair-plucking behavior as assessed by the Massachusetts General Hospital Hairpulling Scale. Secondary measures included scores on the Beck Depression Inventory, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Social Adjustment Scale-Self-Report. Both groups showed significant posttreatment improvement in the scores from the Massachusetts General Hospital Hairpulling Scale (F = 23.762, P behavior over time was significantly greater in the study group than in the control group (F = 3.545, P cognitive-behavioral therapy is a valid treatment for trichotillomania. This treatment model should be further revised and expanded to address comorbidities such as anxiety and social maladjustment. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01968343. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  16. Narratives of empowerment and compliance: studies of communication in online patient support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzer, Helle S; Bygholm, Ann

    2013-12-01

    New technologies enable new forms of patient participation in health care. The article discusses whether communication in online patient support groups is a source of individual as well as collective empowerment or to be understood within the tradition of compliance. The discussion is based on a qualitative analysis of patient communication in two online groups on the Danish portal sundhed.dk, one for lung patients and one for women with fertility problems. The object of study is the total sum of postings during a specific period of time - a total of 4301 posts are included. The textmaterial was analyzed according to the textual paradigm of Paul Ricoeur, and the three steps of critical interpretation. Thus, the analysis moves from describing communicative characteristics of the site to a thorough semantic analysis of its narrative structure of construing meaning, interaction and collective identity, and finally as a source of collective action. The meta-narratives of the two groups confirm online patient support groups for individual empowerment, for collective group identity, but not for collective empowerment. The collective identities of patienthood on the two sites are created by the users (patients) through specific styles of communication and interaction, referred to as 'multi-logical narratives'. In spite of the potential of online communities of opening up health care to the critical voice of the public, the analysis points to a synthesis of the otherwise opposite positions of empowerment and compliance in patient care. On a collective level, the site is empowering the individual users to comply with 'doctor's recommendations' as a group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Speech-Language Pathologist's Guide to Creating a Support Group for Caregivers of Persons with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow-Odom, K. Leigh; Robbins, Sarah M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide basic guidelines to successfully establish a support group for caregivers of persons with dementia. Support groups should provide its members with a community of support, as well as coping and management strategies to improve daily function of loved ones. This should improve the care provided, and the…

  18. ["Accepting Demented Minds". Opinion Group, Information and Support on Stigma of Mental Illness on Facebook].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancera, Katherine Cárdenas; De Santacruz, Cecilia; Salamanca, Mayra Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    Mental illness is one of the diseases that generates more disability worldwide, and it is estimated that one in four people has or has had this kind of illness during their lives. Since the beginning, mental illness has been frequently linked to stigma and prejudice, which has important implications for the exercise of their human rights, including the right to health, as these preconceptions can delay their early detection and timely treatment. Eliminating stigma requires multiple interventions, in which the participation of people with these illnesses can be very helpful. Social networks portray an alternative for them and for people interested in this topic, helping them interact, clarify some concerns and doubts, and perhaps even modify their exclusion status. Describing the experience of the opinion and support group on Facebook called "Aceptando mentes dementes" ("Accepting Demented Minds"), created for people with mental illnesses, their families and any person interested in this matter, which seeks to make the impact and consequences that result from stigma more noticable. Analysis of qualitative and quantitative data collected over two and a half years of operation of the group, formed by 764 members from different countries. The aims of the group, as regards the spreading of information, interaction through shared experiences, and obtaining support were reached. Social networks allow the creation of communities that share specific needs, such as understanding and support, and all this at low cost. Knowing and being conscious about the stigma linked to mental illness helps raise awareness and generate options for change. To maintain and link it to other resources, the group will be included in the web site www.mentalpuntoapoyo.com. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Carbapenem Breakpoints for Acinetobacter baumannii Group: Supporting Clinical Outcome Data from Patients with Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Tzu; Chiang, Mei-Chun; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Wang, Yung-Chih; Lee, I-Hsin; Chen, Te-Li; Yang, Ya-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The carbapenem breakpoints set by different organizations for Acinetobacter are discordant, but supporting clinical data are lacking. This study aimed to provide the first clinical outcome data to support the carbapenem breakpoints for Acinetobacter baumannii (Ab) group in patients with bacteremia. This study included 117 adults who received carbapenems for treatment of Ab group bacteremia in Taipei Veterans General Hospital over an 8-year period. We analyzed 30-day mortality rates among patient groups acquiring isolates with different carbapenem minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). The carbapenem MIC breakpoint derived from classification and regression tree (CART) analysis to delineate the risk of 30-day mortality was between MICs of ≤ 4 mg/L and ≥ 8 mg/L. Mortality rate was higher in patients acquiring isolates with carbapenem MIC ≥ 8 mg/L than ≤ 4 mg/L, by bivariate (54.9% [28/51] vs 25.8% [17/66]; P = 0.003) and survival analysis (P = 0.001 by log-rank test). Multivariate analysis using logistic regression and Cox regression models including severity of illness indices demonstrated that treating patients with Ab group bacteremia caused by isolates with a carbapenem MIC ≥ 8 mg/L with carbapenem was an independent predictor of 30-day mortality (odds ratio, 5.125; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.946-13.498; P = 0.001, and hazard ratio, 2.630; 95% CI, 1.431-4.834; P = 0.002, respectively). The clinical outcome data confirmed that isolates with MIC ≤ 4 mg/L were susceptible to carbapenem, and those with MIC ≥ 8 mg/L were resistant in patients with Ab group bacteremia.

  20. Tuberculosis Relief Belt Supporting Project (Tuberculosis Patient Management Project for Poverty Group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Kyoung; Jeong, Ina; Lee, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jung Hyun; Han, Ah Yeon; Kim, So Yeon; Joh, Joon Sung

    2018-03-07

    The "Tuberculosis Relief Belt Supporting Project (Tuberculosis Patient Management Project for Poverty Groups)" is a national program for socioeconomically vulnerable tuberculosis (TB) patients. We sought to evaluate the clinical and socioeconomic characteristics of poverty-stricken TB patients, and determined the need for relief. We examined in-patients with TB, who were supported by this project at the National Medical Center from 2014 to 2015. We retrospectively investigated the patients' socioeconomic status, clinical characteristics, and project expenditures. Fifty-eight patients were enrolled. Among 55 patients with known income status, 24 (43.6%) had no income. Most patients (80%) lived alone. A total of 48 patients (82.8%) had more than one underlying disease. More than half of the enrolled patients (30 patients, 51.7%) had smear-positive TB. Cavitary disease was found in 38 patients (65.5%). Among the 38 patients with known resistance status, 19 (50%) had drug-resistant TB. In terms of disease severity, 96.6% of the cases had moderate-to-severe disease. A total of 14 patients (26.4%) died during treatment. Nursing expenses were supported for 12 patients (20.7%), with patient transportation costs reimbursed for 35 patients (60%). In terms of treatment expenses for 31 people (53.4%), 93.5% of them were supported by uninsured benefits. Underlying disease, infectivity, drug resistance, severity, and death occurred frequently in socioeconomically vulnerable patients with TB. Many uninsured treatment costs were not supported by the current government TB programs, and the "Tuberculosis Relief Belt Supporting Project" compensated for these limitations. Copyright©2018. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.

  1. The Community-based Organizations Working Group of the Space Science Education Support Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, J. H.; Lowes, L. L.; Asplund, S.

    2004-12-01

    The NASA Space Science Support Network Community-based Organizations Working Group (CBOWG) has been working for the past two years on issues surrounding afterschool programs and programs for youth (e.g., Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Boys and Girls Clubs, 4-H, summer camps, afterschool and weekend programs for various ages, programs with emphases on minority youth). In this session the co-leaders of the CBOWG will discuss the challenges of working with community-based organizations on a regional or national level. We will highlight some ties that we have forged with the National Institute for Out of School Time (NIOST) and the National Afterschool Association (NAA). We will also talk about efforts to coordinate how various entities within NASA cooperate with community-based organizations to serve the best interests of these groups. We will give a couple of examples of how NASA space science organizations have partnered with community-based organizations. The session will include some handouts of information and resources that the CBOWG has found useful in developing an understanding of this segment of informal education groups. We would like to thank NASA for providing resources to support the work of the CBOWG.

  2. Group Decision Support System Determination Of Best Employee Using Topsis And Borda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Made Arya Budhi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Determining the best employee at Lombok Garden inteded to stimulate the performance of the hotel employees Lombok Garden. Improved performance of employees it will have a direct effect on the quality of hotel services. Employee performance appraisement are conducted by six assessors, namely the head of each department and consists of several criteria. Assessments will be difficult if done manually considering each appraiser has its own preferences in assessment. To solve that problem, we need a computer system that helps decision-making is a group decision support system (GDSS determination of the best employees in the hotel Lombok Garden.Group decision support system developed in this study using TOPSIS (Technique For Order Preference By Similiarity To Ideal Solution and Borda to assist decision-making group. TOPSIS method is used for decision-making in each appraiser, while the Borda method used to combine the results of each assessor's decision so as to obtain the final result of the best employees in Lombok Garden.Based on the final result of the system of determination of the best employees in the form of a ranking of the final value of each employee. The highest value will be used as a recommendation as the best employee at Lombok Garden.

  3. Health Social Networks as Online Life Support Groups for Patients With Cardiovascular Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Edhelmira Lima; Loques, Orlando Filho; Mesquita, Cláudio Tinoco

    2013-01-01

    The number of patients who use the internet in search for information that might improve their health conditions has increased. Among them, those looking for virtual environments to share experiences, doubts, opinions, and emotions, and to foster relationships aimed at giving and getting support stand out. Therefore, there is an increasing need to assess how those environments can affect the patients' health. This study was aimed at identifying scientific studies on the proliferation and impact of virtual communities, known as health social networks or online support groups, directed to cardiovascular diseases, which might be useful to patients with certain conditions, providing them with information and emotional support. A systematic review of the literature was conducted with articles published from 2007 to 2012, related to cardiovascular diseases and collected from the following databases: PubMed; Association for Computing Machinery(ACM); and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Four articles meeting the inclusion criteria were selected. The results were interesting and relevant from the health viewpoint, identifying therapeutic benefits, such as provision of emotional support, greater compliance to treatment, and information sharing on diseases and on life experiences

  4. Social networking in online support groups for health: how online social networking benefits patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jae Eun

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of online support groups (OSGs) have embraced the features of social networking. So far, little is known about how patients use and benefit from these features. By implementing the uses-and-gratifications framework, the author conducted an online survey with current users of OSGs to examine associations among motivation, use of specific features of OSG, and support outcomes. Findings suggest that OSG users make selective use of varied features depending on their needs, and that perceptions of receiving emotional and informational support are associated more with the use of some features than others. For example, those with strong motivation for social interaction use diverse features of OSG and make one-to-one connections with other users by friending. In contrast, those with strong motivation for information seeking limit their use primarily to discussion boards. Results also show that online social networking features, such as friending and sharing of personal stories on blogs, are helpful in satisfying the need for emotional support. The present study sheds light on online social networking features in the context of health-related OSGs and provides practical lessons on how to improve the capacity of OSGs to serve the needs of their users.

  5. Health Social Networks as Online Life Support Groups for Patients With Cardiovascular Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Edhelmira Lima, E-mail: edhyly@ic.uff.br; Loques, Orlando Filho [Instituto de Computação - Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Mesquita, Cláudio Tinoco [Hospital Universitário Antônio Pedro - Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    The number of patients who use the internet in search for information that might improve their health conditions has increased. Among them, those looking for virtual environments to share experiences, doubts, opinions, and emotions, and to foster relationships aimed at giving and getting support stand out. Therefore, there is an increasing need to assess how those environments can affect the patients' health. This study was aimed at identifying scientific studies on the proliferation and impact of virtual communities, known as health social networks or online support groups, directed to cardiovascular diseases, which might be useful to patients with certain conditions, providing them with information and emotional support. A systematic review of the literature was conducted with articles published from 2007 to 2012, related to cardiovascular diseases and collected from the following databases: PubMed; Association for Computing Machinery(ACM); and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Four articles meeting the inclusion criteria were selected. The results were interesting and relevant from the health viewpoint, identifying therapeutic benefits, such as provision of emotional support, greater compliance to treatment, and information sharing on diseases and on life experiences.

  6. Adoption of web-based group decision support systems: experiences from the field and future developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos van Hillegersberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While organizations have massively adopted enterprise information systems to support business processes, business meetings in which key decisions are made about products, services and processes, are usually held without much support of information systems. This is remarkable as group decision support systems (GDSS seems to fit for this purpose. They have existed for decades and modern versions benefit of web-based technologies, enabling low cost any-place, any time and device independent meeting support. In this exploratory case research, we study nine organizations in four different adoption categories to learn more about the reasons for the relatively slow adoption of web-based GDSS. Using the Fit-Viability adoption framework we conduct interviews with organizations that have experience with using GDSS. We conclude that adopting GDSS requires considerable and carefully planned change of processes that are deeply grounded in the organization. Existing meeting routines need to be adapted. Introduction needs to be carefully planned and room for face-to-face meetings and creativity sessions away from the keyboard need to be built in depending on the type of meeting. Not all companies find the cost level affordable. Clear and convincing business cases are lacking. Still the added value is ranked highly and there are frequent and enthusiastic user organizations that may lead the way for others. Their success stories show others how to mitigate problems.

  7. The "Common Solutions" Strategy of the Experiment Support group at CERN for the LHC Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Girone, M; Barreiro Megino, F H; Campana, S; Cinquilli, M; Di Girolamo, A; Dimou, M; Giordano, D; Karavakis, E; Kenyon, M J; Kokozkiewicz, L; Lanciotti, E; Litmaath, M; Magini, N; Negri, G; Roiser, S; Saiz, P; Saiz Santos, M D; Schovancova, J; Sciabà, A; Spiga, D; Trentadue, R; Tuckett, D; Valassi, A; Van der Ster, D C; Shiers, J D

    2012-01-01

    After two years of LHC data taking, processing and analysis and with numerous changes in computing technology, a number of aspects of the experiments' computing, as well as WLCG deployment and operations, need to evolve. As part of the activities of the Experiment Support group in CERN's IT department, and reinforced by effort from the EGI-InSPIRE project, we present work aimed at common solutions across all LHC experiments. Such solutions allow us not only to optimize development manpower but also offer lower long-term maintenance and support costs. The main areas cover Distributed Data Management, Data Analysis, Monitoring and the LCG Persistency Framework. Specific tools have been developed including the HammerCloud framework, automated services for data placement, data cleaning and data integrity (such as the data popularity service for CMS, the common Victor cleaning agent for ATLAS and CMS and tools for catalogue/storage consistency), the Dashboard Monitoring framework (job monitoring, data management m...

  8. The impact of size of cooperative group on achievement, social support, and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, Andrea; Conte, Stella; Johnson, David W; Johnson, Roger T

    2010-01-01

    The effect of cooperative learning in pairs and groups of 4 and in individualistic learning were compared on achievement, social support, and self-esteem. Sixty-two Italian 7th-grade students with no previous experience with cooperative learning were assigned to conditions on a stratified random basis controlling for ability, gender, and self-esteem. Students participated in 1 instructional unit for 90 min for 6 instructional days during a period of about 6 weeks. The results indicate that cooperative learning in pairs and 4s promoted higher achievement and greater academic support from peers than did individualistic learning. Students working in pairs developed a higher level of social self-esteem than did students learning in the other conditions.

  9. Using web-based group support systems to enhance procedural fairness in administrative decision making in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Twinomurinzi, H

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors are investigating whether Web-based Group Support System (GSS) tools can support and enhance procedural fairness in administrative decision making in South Africa. They report here on work that emanates from a masters dissertation...

  10. Prototype for Internet support of pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes: focus group testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfsson A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Annsofie Adolfsson,1,2 Malin Jansson1,21School of Life Sciences, University of Skovde, Skovde, Sweden; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Skaraborg Hospital, Skovde, SwedenBackground: The aim of this study was to pilot test a prototype website called MODIAB-web designed to support pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes.Method: A focus group was undertaken and the results were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.Results: Eight subthemes were identified, comprising "blood glucose versus insulin," "application for smart phones," "the time aspect," "interface and technology," "forum," "direct link to the diabetes midwife," "ask the expert," and "lack of contact information." These subthemes were condensed into two main themes. The first theme was "easily understood interface, but in need of a more blood-glucose focused orientation" and the second theme was "forum for interaction with both equals and experts." Conclusion: The women in this study had positive impressions of several of the MODIAB-web functions, including a forum for pregnant mothers with type 1 diabetes and the possibility of being able to put their blood glucose levels into a diagram which could be sent directly to the diabetes midwife. Access to articles and information via the "fact" tab and the ability to ask questions of experts were also significantly helpful to women in the focus group. Pregnant women and mothers with type 1 diabetes can gain support from such a Web-based self-help system.Keywords: type 1 diabetes, web support, pregnancy, focus group interview

  11. Informal and Formal Support Groups Retain Women and Minorities in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Maria

    2005-10-01

    Ten U.S. minority female undergraduates who aspire to become physicists were followed over an 8-year period. Participant observation and in-depth interviews recorded the strategies they used to earn bachelor's degrees in physics or physics-related fields, and then go on to graduate school and/or careers in science. One significant strategy these women of color employed was participating in small subcommunities with other women or underrepresented ethnic minorities at the margins of their local physics community. The study found that informal peer groups offered safe spaces to counter negative experiences, to normalize their social realities, and to offer practical guidance for persevering in the field. Formal women- and minority-serving programs in physics provided foundations for community building, stronger curriculum and instruction, networking, and role models. The positive effects of informal and formal support groups on these students' experiences challenge a standard application of Pierre Bourdieu's framework of social and cultural capital. Women of color in the study initially lacked traditional capital of "acceptable" appearance, cultural background and habits, and networks that are more easily acquired by white males and are rewarded by the U.S. physics culture. However, instead of failing or leaving, as Bourdieu's theory would predict, the minority women persisted and achieved in science. The marginal communities contributed to their retention by offering safe spaces in which they could learn and share alternative ways of "accruing capital." Moreover, as these women made strides along their academic and career paths, they also engaged in social justice work in efforts to change the physics culture to be more welcoming of nontraditional members. The outcomes of the study offer empirical confirmation of the critical need for informal and institutionally supported women's and minorities' support groups to promote diversity in science.

  12. An economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial on psycho-education counselling intervention offered by midwives to address women's fear of childbirth in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkstra, Erika; Mihala, Gabor; Scuffham, Paul A; Creedy, Debra K; Gamble, Jenny; Toohill, Jocelyn; Fenwick, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    The rate of caesarean section continues to increase, and there is evidence that childbirth fear is a contributing factor. Insufficient evidence is available on the impact of reducing childbirth fear on health-related quality of life and health service use. We undertook an economic evaluation of a psycho-education counselling intervention offered by midwives to address women's fear of childbirth in Australia. Pregnant women (n = 339) with high childbirth fear were randomised to a midwife-led psycho-education intervention for childbirth fear or to usual care. This paper presents the economic evaluation of the intervention based on health-related quality of life and health service use from recruitment to six weeks postpartum (n = 184). The changes in health-related quality of life after birth (EQ-5D-3L: 0.016 vs. 0.010, p = 0.833, for usual care and intervention) and total health care use cost (AUS$10,110 vs. AUS$9980, p = 0.819) were similar between groups. The intervention did not increase costs; however, in a post hoc analysis, the interventions might be cost-effective for those women with very high childbirth fear. This brief psycho-education intervention by midwives did not improve the health-related quality of life of women, and had no impact on overall cost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of a student support group to reduce student stress in a nurse anesthesia program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kless, J R

    1989-02-01

    Stress in nurse anesthesia programs may be excessive at times, especially in new students. While some degree of stress is necessary to motivate learning, excessive or prolonged stress can interfere with the normal learning process, thereby prolonging a student's clinical and academic progress. In the extreme, excessive stress may even preclude a student's successful completion of the educational program. Active faculty intervention through a student support group is advocated as a method for controlling stress levels and facilitating student learning. The positive effects of such intervention also increase the overall productivity of a program and better prepare nurse anesthesia students for their future careers.

  14. Minimizing differential modal gain in cladding-pumped EDFAs supporting four and six mode groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Qiongyue; Lim, Ee-Leong; Jung, Francesco Poletti Yongmin; Baskiotis, Catherine; Alam, Shaif-Ul; Richardson, David J

    2014-09-08

    We employ a Genetic Algorithm for the purpose of minimization of the maximum differential modal gain (DMG) over all the supported signal modes (at the same wavelength) of cladding-pumped four-mode and six-mode-group EDFAs. The optimal EDFA designs found through the algorithm provide less than 1 dB DMG across the C-band (1530-1565 nm) whilst achieving more than 20 dB gain per mode. We then analyze the sensitivity of the DMG to small variations from the optimal value of the erbium doping concentration and the structural parameters, and estimate the fabrication tolerance for reliable amplifier performance.

  15. Emergence of Yalom's therapeutic factors in a peer-led, asynchronous, online support group for family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbeck, Cynthia A; Klemm, Paula R; Hayes, Evelyn R

    2014-01-01

    Support groups fill a critical void in the health care system, harnessing the power of shared experiences to provide support to group members. Likewise, family caregivers fill a void in the health care system, providing billions in unpaid care to the chronically ill. Caregiver support groups offer an opportunity for alleviating the psychological burden of caregiving. The power of any group, including a support group, to foster psychological well-being lies in its ability to cultivate Yalom's therapeutic factors. Gaps in the literature remain regarding the ability of non-prototypical groups to promote therapeutic mechanisms of change. The purpose of this study was to determine if and when Yalom's therapeutic group factors emerged in a peer-led support group delivered in an asynchronous, online format. Qualitative content analysis utilizing deductive category application was employed. Participants' responses were coded and frequency counts were conducted. Results revealed that 9 of 11 therapeutic factors emerged over the course of the group, with Group Cohesiveness, Catharsis, Imparting of Information, and Universality occurring most often. Several factors, including Interpersonal Learning, Corrective Recapitulation of the Primary Family Group, Imitative Behavior, and Development of Socializing Techniques were absent or virtually absent, likely due to the peer-led format of the group. Progression of therapeutic factors over the course of the group is presented. Findings demonstrate the presence of a variety of Yalom's therapeutic factors in an asynchronous, peer-led online support group.

  16. Effect of mother support groups on nutritional status in children under two years of age in Laisamis village, Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Undlien, Mattias; Viervoll, Håvard-Amund

    2016-01-01

    Background: To deal with the ongoing malnutrition problem in many parts of Kenya, the government has initialized preventive actions such as mother support groups to improve health and nutrition among children. Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of such interventions as mother support groups. Objective: This study aimed at determining how mother support groups affect the nutrition status of children under 2 years of age. Methods: A total of 41 children participated. Anthropometric me...

  17. Hydrodeoxygenation of vicinal OH groups over heterogeneous rhenium catalyst promoted by palladium and ceria support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Nobuhiko; Tamura, Masazumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Okumura, Kazu; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2015-02-02

    Heterogeneous ReOx-Pd/CeO2 catalyst showed excellent performance for simultaneous hydrodeoxygenation of vicinal OH groups. High yield (>99%), turnover frequency (300 h(-1)), and turnover number (10,000) are achieved in the reaction of 1,4-anhydroerythritol to tetrahydrofuran. This catalyst can be applied to sugar alcohols, and mono-alcohols and diols are obtained in high yields (≥85%) from substrates with even and odd numbers of OH groups, respectively. The high catalytic performance of ReOx-Pd/CeO2 can be assigned to rhenium species with +4 or +5 valence state, and the formation of this species is promoted by H2/Pd and the ceria support. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Establishing a group of endpoints to support collective operations without specifying unique identifiers for any endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksom, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.; Xue, Hanghon

    2016-02-02

    A parallel computer executes a number of tasks, each task includes a number of endpoints and the endpoints are configured to support collective operations. In such a parallel computer, establishing a group of endpoints receiving a user specification of a set of endpoints included in a global collection of endpoints, where the user specification defines the set in accordance with a predefined virtual representation of the endpoints, the predefined virtual representation is a data structure setting forth an organization of tasks and endpoints included in the global collection of endpoints and the user specification defines the set of endpoints without a user specification of a particular endpoint; and defining a group of endpoints in dependence upon the predefined virtual representation of the endpoints and the user specification.

  19. The efficacy of psychoeducation on recurrent depression: A randomised trial with a two-year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jørgen; Foldager, Leslie; Makki, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    and decline in Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI). Methods: Eighty patients were randomized, either to the psychoeducative programme (consisting of eight sessions, each of 2 hours duration) and 2-year outpatient follow-up (42 cases), or only to 2-year outpatient follow-up (38 controls). The patients were...... monitored during 2 years after randomization. Data were collected from interviews including BDI, drug treatment and social measurements, and register data concerning use of psychiatric services. Results: At 2-year follow-up, a significant reduction in the consumption of psychiatric inpatient services...... and in BDI was found; however, it was uniform for case and control patients. Drop-out/non-compliance was significantly more frequent among patients randomized to the control group. Furthermore, during follow-up the case group got a significant stronger attachment to the Labour market than the control group...

  20. Change in quality management in diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J; Baan, Caroline A; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Rutten, Guy E

    2015-02-01

    To assess the change in level of diabetes quality management in primary care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support. This before-and-after study with a 1-year follow-up surveyed quality managers on six domains of quality management. Questionnaires measured organization of care, multidisciplinary teamwork, patient centeredness, performance results, quality improvement policy, and management strategies (score range 0-100%). Based on the scores, responders received feedback and a benchmark and were granted access to a toolbox of quality improvement instruments. If requested, additional support in improving quality management was available, consisting of an elucidating phone call or a visit from an experienced consultant. After 1 year, the level of quality management was measured again. Of the initially 60 participating care groups, 51 completed the study. The total quality management score improved from 59.8% (95% CI 57.0-62.6%) to 65.1% (62.8-67.5%; P quality management score (P = 0.001). Of the 44 participating outpatient clinics, 28 completed the study. Their total score changed from 65.7% (CI 60.3-71.1%) to 67.3% (CI 62.9-71.7%; P = 0.30). Only the results in the domain multidisciplinary teamwork improved (P = 0.001). Measuring quality management and providing feedback and a benchmark improves the level of quality management in care groups but not in outpatient clinics. The questionnaires might also be a useful asset for other diabetes care groups, such as Accountable Care Organizations. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  1. Systematic review on Internet Support Groups (ISGs) and depression (2): What is known about depression ISGs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Kathleen M; Calear, Alison L; Banfield, Michelle; Tam, Ada

    2009-09-30

    Internet support groups (ISGs) are a popular means by which consumers with depression communicate online. A number of studies have evaluated the nature and impact of depression-specific ISGs. However, to date there have been no published systematic reviews of this evidence. The aim was to systematically identify and summarize the available evidence concerning the scope and findings of studies of depression ISGs. Three databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Cochrane) were searched using over 150 search terms extracted from relevant papers, abstracts, and a thesaurus. Papers were included if they employed an online peer-to-peer depression-specific support group and reported either quantitative or qualitative empirical data. The objective of each study was coded according to a 20-category classification system, which included the effect on depression and other outcomes, including help seeking; user characteristics, activity, satisfaction, perceived benefits, perceived disadvantages; the reason for using the ISG; the nature of ISG posts; characteristics of depression ISGs compared to other ISG types, face-to-face groups, and face-to-face counseling; ISG structure and longitudinal changes; and predictors of ISG adherence. Thirteen papers satisfied the inclusion criteria from an initial pool of 12,692 abstracts. Of these, three collected data using survey questionnaires, nine analyzed samples of posts, and one both collected survey data and analyzed a sample of posts. The quality of most studies was not high, and little data were collected on most key aspects of depression ISGs. The most common objective of the studies was to analyze the nature of the posts (eight studies) and to describe site usage (six studies) and user characteristics (five studies). The most prevalent types of social support were emotional, informational, and social companionship. Given the popularity of depression ISGs and the paucity of available evidence about them, there is a need for high

  2. Cognitive and Affective Uses of a Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Facebook Support Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kimberly K

    2014-09-01

    There are currently many disease-specific groups on Facebook in which patients may take an active part (Greene, Choudhry, Kilabuk, & Shrank, 2011). Although uses and gratifications of patient-disease groups have begun to be identified for chronic diseases, rare diseases have been omitted, even though they collectively affect roughly 30 million people in the United States and 350 million people worldwide. This study is a content analysis of one Facebook rare disease patient group, the Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) Awareness group. All wall posts were recorded and content analyzed for cognitive and affective categories and subcategories between October 9, 2011 (date of site origin), and May 1, 2012. Analysis of cognitive needs indicated TOS patients used the site more to share information about their own TOS symptoms and journey with diagnosis than to seek information. Analysis of affective needs found patients were more likely to use the site to give support and encouragement to others than to express concerns and complaints. The complaints they did express were primarily related to their frustration with the general medical community's perceived inability to diagnose and understand their disease or to question a specific doctor's diagnosis/recommendation. Results point to needs specific to TOS patients that uses and gratifications research can help clarify.

  3. The genesis of 'the Neophytes': a writing support group for clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Teresa; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Harris, Margaret; Sinclair, Peter M

    2010-10-01

    This paper profiles the establishment and evaluation of the Neophyte Writers' Group, run by nurse academics in collaboration with clinical nurses. The growing demand for nurses to write, publish and present their work had inspired the introduction of a series of workshops designed to develop and improve writing and presentation skills, which eventuated in formation of the Neophytes. The group was founded on the basis of Bandura's theory of self-efficacy (1997), a concept which has been discussed extensively in social psychology literature to explain motivation and learning theory. People with high assurance in their capabilities regard difficult tasks as challenges to be mastered rather than as threats to be avoided (Bandura, 1994). The Neophytes' group employs a collaborative approach intended to increase and reinforce members' self-confidence; the underlying philosophy is to promote and enhance writers' motivation, capacity and self-efficacy in order to achieve future publication goals confidently and independently. Support which engenders these strengths through a program relevant to participants' needs is likely, as this group found, to increase publication productivity. Additional unexpected outcomes resulted, such as engagement by clinical nurses' in academic work, and an increase in research higher degree enrolments. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A group-based spatial decision support system for wind farm site selection in Northwest Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorsevski, Pece V.; Cathcart, Steven C.; Mirzaei, Golrokh; Jamali, Mohsin M.; Ye, Xinyue; Gomezdelcampo, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the benefits of applying a spatial decision support system (SDSS) framework for evaluating the suitability for wind farm siting in Northwest Ohio. The multiple criteria evaluation (MCE) prototype system is intended for regional planning but also for promoting group decision making that could involve participants with different interests in the development of decision alternatives. The framework integrates environmental and economic criteria and builds a hierarchy for wind farm siting using weighted linear combination (WLC) techniques and GIS functionality. The SDSS allows the multiple participants to interact and develop an understanding of the spatial data for assigning importance values to each factor. The WLC technique is used to combine the assigned values with map layers, which are standardized using fuzzy set theory, to produce individual suitability maps. The maps created by personal preferences from the participants are aggregated for producing a group solution using the Borda method. Sensitivity analysis is performed on the group solution to examine how small changes in the factor weights affect the calculated suitability scores. The results from the sensitivity analysis are intended to aid understanding of compromised solutions through changes in the input data from the participant's perspective. - Highlights: ► We present a prototype tool that we developed for wind farm site selection. ► Multiple participants rank the factors for promoting group-based decision making. ► The factors are aggregated by WLC technique to generate maps from participants. ► Group-based solution uses Borda method to aggregate the maps from participants. ► Sensitivity analysis is performed on the group solution to examine solution affects

  5. Maintaining the potential of a psycho-educational program: efficacy of a booster session after an intervention offered family caregivers at disclosure of a relative's dementia diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Francine; Lachance, Lise; Lévesque, Louise; Zarit, Steven Howard; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Booster sessions as a means of maintaining the benefits of psycho-educational programs have received little attention in caregiving research. Caregivers were offered a booster session following participation in a program entitled Learning to Become a Family Caregiver (LBFC) intended to facilitate transition to the caregiver role after diagnostic disclosure of dementia in a relative. The 90-minute booster session served to review program content and afforded the opportunity to discuss and practice learned skills. This study sought to test the efficacy of the booster session in maintaining or recovering program effects at six months post-program. Participants in the program were randomly assigned to a group that received the booster session (n = 31) or a group that did not (n = 29). A third control group was also formed, which continued to receive only the usual care provided in memory clinics. Eligible participants - French-speaking primary caregivers of a relative diagnosed with Alzheimer's in the past nine months - were recruited in memory clinics in Quebec (Canada). Participants were blindly assessed before randomization and six months after the booster session on outcomes associated with a healthy role transition. Prediction analyses revealed one significant positive effect of the booster session: emergence of preparedness to provide care. Moreover, with or without the booster session, the program continued to have a positive effect on psychological distress and contributed to the emergence of self-efficacy in dealing with caregiving situations. The booster session had no significant effect on knowledge of services, planning for future care needs, use of reframing as a coping strategy, perceived informal support, and family conflicts. The limited effect observed is discussed in terms of the booster session's content and intensity. Recommendations are made for designing future research on the effect of booster sessions, including the importance of including a

  6. Support for Kurdish language rights in Turkey : The roles of ethnic group, group identifications, contact, and intergroup perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Çelebi, Elif; Verkuyten, Maykel; Smyrnioti, Natasa

    2016-01-01

    The question of Kurdish language rights has been a central issue in the Turkish–Kurdish conflict. The current study examined endorsement of Kurdish language rights in relation to intergroup factors (i.e. group identifications, cross-group friendships, perceived discrimination, and perceived

  7. THE ROLE OF SUPPORT GROUPS IN THE COOPERATION BETWEEN PARENTS OF PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES AND PROFESSIONAL STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metka NOVAK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the ways of building and developing a better cooperative relationship between parents of people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities and professional staff is the inclusion of parents in support groups for parents and staff in support groups for staff. Goal: To examine the correlation of the level of cooperative relationship between the parents of people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities and professional staff with the inclusion of parents in support groups for parents and staff in support groups for staff. Methodology: Respondents: parents (296 of people with severe and profound learning disabilities and staff (298 in five centres across Slovenia; Methods: descriptive statistics, test of homogeneity, the rankit method, one-way analysis of variance; Procedures: survey questionnaires for parents and staff. The data was processed using SPSS software for personal computers. Results: The difference between the variances of the groups (parent found is statistically significant (F = 6.16; p = 0.01. Staff included in support groups have a significantly lower level of cooperative relationship with parents (f=10; M = - 0.12 than staff not included in these groups (f = 191; M = 0.04. Conclusion:In contrast to theoretical findings the results indicated less successful cooperation for professional staff included in support groups. The results furthermore did not confirm any differences in the cooperative relationship of parents included in support groups and those who are not. We suggest an in-depth analysis of the workings of support groups.

  8. Effect of mother support groups on nutritional status in children under two years of age in Laisamis village, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undlien, Mattias; Viervoll, Håvard-Amund; Rostad, Berit

    2016-12-01

    In tackling the ongoing malnutrition problem in many parts of Kenya, the government has initialized preventive actions such as mother support groups in order to improve health and nutrition among children. Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of such intervention. This study aimed at determining how mother support groups affect the nutrition status of children under 2 years of age. 41 children participated. Anthropometric measurements were taken of the children once a month during 12 months. Medical history, nutrition status and socioeconomic factors were collected by interviews with the mothers. The children were divided into two groups depending on their mother's assigned group; mother support group or not. Nutritional status was significantly better among children in the mother support group (P=0.001). There were significantly more children with severe acute malnutrition among the children not in support group (P=0.040). The mean height (P=0.001) and mean weight (P=0.0281) were significantly higher among children in the non-support group. Mother support groups may have a beneficial effect on the nutritional status of children under 2 years of age. Cases of severe acute malnutrition seemed to be less prevalent in children whose mothers attend mother support groups.

  9. [Nutritional support and parenteral nutrition in the oncological patient: an expert group consensus report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camblor-Álvarez, Miguel; Ocón-Bretón, María Julia; Luengo-Pérez, Luis Miguel; Viruzuela, Juan Antonio; Sendrós-Maroño, María José; Cervera-Peris, Mercedes; Grande, Enrique; Álvarez-Hernández, Julia; Jiménez-Fonseca, Paula

    2018-01-10

    Malnutrition is a frequent medical problem of cancer patients that negatively impacts their quality of life. To analyze and respond to different issues related to the nutritional management of cancer patients in the clinical setting. A multidisciplinary group of experts in Medical Oncology, Pharmacy, and Nutrition developed a list of topics related to the nutritional status of cancer patients, which were grouped into three blocks: Nutritional support; Parenteral nutrition (PN); and Home PN (HPN) in cancer patients. A literature search, which included articles published in Spanish, English, and French until February 2017, was carried out. The document was organized as a questionnaire with those questions that, according to the panel's criteria, could generate greater controversy or doubt. Of the 18 questions addressed, 9 focused on nutritional support: 5 were related to PN and 4 about HPN. Among the different recommendations, the panel emphasized that in the cancer patient, PN is indicated mainly when it is not possible to use the digestive tract and/or oral feeding and/or enteral nutrition is not sufficient or possible. Additionally, the objective of the HPN is to improve or maintain the nutritional status of a patient at home. This document seeks to lay down a set of recommendations and to identify key issues that may be useful for the nutritional management of cancer Patients.

  10. Support System Model for Value based Group Decision on Roof System Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiono Utomo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A group decision support system is required on a value-based decision because there are different concern caused by differing preferences, experiences, and background. It is to enable each decision-maker to evaluate and rank the solution alternatives before engaging into negotiation with other decision-makers. Stakeholder of multi-criteria decision making problems usually evaluates the alternative solution from different perspective, making it possible to have a dominant solution among the alternatives. Each stakeholder needs to identify the goals that can be optimized and those that can be compromised in order to reach an agreement with other stakeholders. This paper presents group decision model involving three decision-makers on the selection of suitable system for a building’s roof. The objective of the research is to find an agreement options model and coalition algorithms for multi person decision with two main preferences of value which are function and cost. The methodology combines value analysis method using Function Analysis System Technique (FAST; Life Cycle Cost analysis, group decision analysis method based on Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP in a satisfying options, and Game theory-based agent system to develop agreement option and coalition formation for the support system. The support system bridges theoretical gap between automated design in construction domain and automated negotiation in information technology domain by providing a structured methodology which can lead to systematic support system and automated negotiation. It will contribute to value management body of knowledge as an advanced method for creativity and analysis phase, since the practice of this knowledge is teamwork based. In the case of roof system selection, it reveals the start of the first negotiation round. Some of the solutions are not an option because no individual stakeholder or coalition of stakeholders desires to select it. The result indicates

  11. The Melbourne Family Support Program: evidence-based strategies that prepare family caregivers for supporting palliative care patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter; Aranda, Sanchia

    2014-01-01

    Background A key component of palliative care is support for family caregivers. Although some family caregivers identify positive aspects, the impact is typically burdensome; they are prone to physical and psychological morbidity, financial disadvantage and social isolation. Outcomes of systematic reviews have highlighted the importance of investment in family caregiver intervention research. Purpose To provide an overview of the development, evaluation and outcomes arising from of a programme of research (The Melbourne Family Support Program (FSP)), which focused on reducing the psychosocial burden of family caregivers. Methods Developmental work involved a systematic literature review; focus groups with family caregivers and health professionals; and identification of a conceptual framework. Following a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT), a programme of psychoeducational intervention studies was developed and tested; one via RCT, the others via prepost test. Results Four psychoeducational interventions, incorporating one-to-one and group format delivery, conducted in both the home and inpatient hospital/hospice were evaluated. Statistically significant outcomes included improvements in family caregivers’ preparedness, competence, positive emotions, more favourable levels of psychological wellbeing and a reduction in unmet needs. Internationally endorsed guidelines for the psychosocial support of family caregivers were produced and several resources were constructed. Fifteen publications in international peer-reviewed journals have arisen from this programme. Conclusions The interventions and resources from the Melbourne FSP provide several evidenced-based and clinically relevant approaches that focus on reducing the psychosocial burden of the caregiving role. In several instances, however, more rigorous methodological testing is advocated. PMID:24644195

  12. Group cohesion and social support of the nurses in a special unit and a general unit in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yu Kyung

    2011-07-01

    To identify the degree of group cohesion and social support of nurses in special and general units in hospitals in Korea, and to compare group cohesion and social support between the two groups. The level of commitment nurses have to their organizations has been shown to correlate with work group cohesion and social support. The participants were 1751 nurses who were working in Korean hospitals. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire and were analysed using SAS. The statistical methods included: descriptive statistics, t-test, anova and Pearson's correlation coefficients. Group cohesion of nurses on special wards was significantly higher than for nurses on general wards. No significant difference was found between types of units in terms of social support. The degree of group cohesion was significantly different in terms of the respondents' clinical experience, position, religion, job satisfaction, number of supportive superiors and number of supportive peers. A statistically significant correlation was found between group cohesion scores and degree of social support. Hospital management can accomplish their goals more effectively through knowledge of the level of group cohesion, superior support and peer support for nursing staff in accordance with unit specialty. © 2011 The Author. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. [A group cognitive behavioral intervention for people registered in supported employment programs: CBT-SE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, T; Corbière, M; Lysaker, P H

    2014-06-01

    Supported employment programs are highly effective in helping people with severe mental illness obtain competitive jobs quickly. However, job tenure is often a problem for many. Of the various obstacles to job tenure documented, dysfunctional beliefs regarding the workplace and one's own abilities has been proposed as a therapeutic target. The purpose of this article is threefold: (1) to describe the development and the content of a novel group cognitive behavioral intervention designed to increase job tenure for people receiving supported employment services; (2) to present the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention; and (3) to investigate some preliminary data regarding employment outcomes. A group CBT intervention offered during 8 sessions over the course of one month, in order to respect the rapid job search principle of IPS (individual placement and support), was developed. The content was tailored to facilitate the learning of skills specific to the workplace, such as recognizing and managing one's stressors at work, determining and modifying dysfunctional thoughts (e.g. not jumping to conclusions, finding alternatives, seeking facts), overcoming obstacles (e.g. problem solving), improving one's self-esteem as a worker (recognizing strengths and qualities), dealing with criticism, using positive assertiveness, finding coping strategies (for symptoms and stress) to use at work, negotiating work accommodations and overcoming stigma. A trial is currently underway, with half the participants receiving supported employment as well as CBT-SE and the other half receiving only supported employment. A subsample of the first 24 participants having completed the 12-month follow-up were used for the analyses, including 12 having received at least 3 sessions out of the 8 group sessions and 12 receiving only supported employment. Feasibility and acceptability were determined by the group therapists' feedback, the participants' feedback as well as attendance to

  14. Phylogenomic analyses support the position of turtles as the sister group of birds and crocodiles (Archosauria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiari Ylenia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The morphological peculiarities of turtles have, for a long time, impeded their accurate placement in the phylogeny of amniotes. Molecular data used to address this major evolutionary question have so far been limited to a handful of markers and/or taxa. These studies have supported conflicting topologies, positioning turtles as either the sister group to all other reptiles, to lepidosaurs (tuatara, lizards and snakes, to archosaurs (birds and crocodiles, or to crocodilians. Genome-scale data have been shown to be useful in resolving other debated phylogenies, but no such adequate dataset is yet available for amniotes. Results In this study, we used next-generation sequencing to obtain seven new transcriptomes from the blood, liver, or jaws of four turtles, a caiman, a lizard, and a lungfish. We used a phylogenomic dataset based on 248 nuclear genes (187,026 nucleotide sites for 16 vertebrate taxa to resolve the origins of turtles. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian concatenation analyses and species tree approaches performed under the most realistic models of the nucleotide and amino acid substitution processes unambiguously support turtles as a sister group to birds and crocodiles. The use of more simplistic models of nucleotide substitution for both concatenation and species tree reconstruction methods leads to the artefactual grouping of turtles and crocodiles, most likely because of substitution saturation at third codon positions. Relaxed molecular clock methods estimate the divergence between turtles and archosaurs around 255 million years ago. The most recent common ancestor of living turtles, corresponding to the split between Pleurodira and Cryptodira, is estimated to have occurred around 157 million years ago, in the Upper Jurassic period. This is a more recent estimate than previously reported, and questions the interpretation of controversial Lower Jurassic fossils as being part of the extant turtles radiation

  15. Phylogenomic analyses support the position of turtles as the sister group of birds and crocodiles (Archosauria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The morphological peculiarities of turtles have, for a long time, impeded their accurate placement in the phylogeny of amniotes. Molecular data used to address this major evolutionary question have so far been limited to a handful of markers and/or taxa. These studies have supported conflicting topologies, positioning turtles as either the sister group to all other reptiles, to lepidosaurs (tuatara, lizards and snakes), to archosaurs (birds and crocodiles), or to crocodilians. Genome-scale data have been shown to be useful in resolving other debated phylogenies, but no such adequate dataset is yet available for amniotes. Results In this study, we used next-generation sequencing to obtain seven new transcriptomes from the blood, liver, or jaws of four turtles, a caiman, a lizard, and a lungfish. We used a phylogenomic dataset based on 248 nuclear genes (187,026 nucleotide sites) for 16 vertebrate taxa to resolve the origins of turtles. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian concatenation analyses and species tree approaches performed under the most realistic models of the nucleotide and amino acid substitution processes unambiguously support turtles as a sister group to birds and crocodiles. The use of more simplistic models of nucleotide substitution for both concatenation and species tree reconstruction methods leads to the artefactual grouping of turtles and crocodiles, most likely because of substitution saturation at third codon positions. Relaxed molecular clock methods estimate the divergence between turtles and archosaurs around 255 million years ago. The most recent common ancestor of living turtles, corresponding to the split between Pleurodira and Cryptodira, is estimated to have occurred around 157 million years ago, in the Upper Jurassic period. This is a more recent estimate than previously reported, and questions the interpretation of controversial Lower Jurassic fossils as being part of the extant turtles radiation. Conclusions These results

  16. HIV+ and HIV- youth living in group homes in South Africa need more psychosocial support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestadt, D F; Alicea, S; Petersen, I; John, S; Myeza, N P; Nicholas, S W; Cohen, L G; Holst, H; Bhana, A; McKay, M M; Abrams, E J; Mellins, C A

    2013-07-01

    Orphans and vulnerable youth who live in group homes are at risk of poor mental health and sexual and drug-using behaviors that increase the risk of HIV transmission. This study explores factors related to this risk among youth living in group homes ("children's homes") for orphans and vulnerable children in South Africa, a country afflicted by high levels of parental loss due to HIV. The study explores 1) knowledge and attitudes about HIV, 2) social support, 3) communication with group home caregivers, and 4) the relevance of an existing evidence-based HIV prevention and mental health promotion program to situations where sexual and drug risk behaviors can occur. In-depth qualitative individual interviews were conducted with 20 youth (age 10 to 16 years) residing in two children's homes in Durban, South Africa. Content analysis focused on critical themes related to coping and prevention of risk activities. Respondents exhibited inconsistent and incomplete knowledge of HIV transmission and prevention. They displayed positive attitudes toward people living with HIV, but reported experiencing or witnessing HIV-related stigma. Participants witnessed substance use and romantic/sexual relationships among their peers; few admitted to their own involvement. While relationships with childcare workers were central to their lives, youth reported communication barriers related to substance use, sex, HIV, and personal history (including parental loss, abuse, and other trauma). In conclusion, these qualitative data suggest that evidence-based HIV prevention programs that bring caregivers and youth together to improve communication, HIV knowledge, social support, youth self-esteem, and health care, reduce sexual and drug risk behaviors, and strengthen skills related to negotiating situations of sexual and substance use possibility could benefit youth and childcare workers in children's homes.

  17. From Social Exclusion to Supported Inclusion: Adults with Intellectual Disability Discuss Their Lived Experiences of a Structured Social Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J; Jaques, Hayden; Johnson, Amanda; Brotherton, Michelle L

    2017-09-01

    People with intellectual disability often have few friends and experience social exclusion. Recognising this gap, supported social groups with the aim of inclusion and interdependence were created by a supported employment provider. Interviews were undertaken with 10 adults with intellectual disability exploring their lived experiences of a supported social group. Data were analysed using descriptive phenomenology. Two themes emerged (i) supported engagement fosters wellbeing, and (ii) developing social belonging and connectedness. Participants not only acknowledged the support that they needed to participate, but also that the social group had changed their lives in many ways. Adults with intellectual disability want to socialise, have friends and be part of their community. For this to be achieved, they recognise the need to seek some form of support. With appropriate and targeted support, adults with intellectual disability can move from social exclusion towards supported inclusion and experience richer lives. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Evaluating feasibility and acceptability of a local psycho-educational intervention for pregnant women with common mental problems affected by armed conflict in Swat, Pakistan: A parallel randomized controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Naseem; Dherani, Mukesh; Chiumento, Anna; Atif, Najia; Bristow, Katie; Sikander, Siham; Rahman, Atif

    2017-12-01

    The current research was conducted in the Swat valley, where widespread conflict and militancy had been experienced prior to the field activities. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a locally developed psycho-educational intervention. This mixed-methods study incorporated a quantitative and qualitative component. For the quantitative component, trial participants were identified from a cross-sectional study conducted in the earlier phase of the research, with Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ) score of ≥9. Participants with suicidal ideation, severe mental or medical illness, recently given birth or living with another woman with an SRQ score of 9 or above were excluded. Participants fulfilling eligibility were randomized on a 1:1 allocation ratio using simple randomization to the psycho-educational intervention or routine care arm. The intervention arm received two psycho-educational sessions at their homes delivered by local community health worker from the study area. The primary outcome was help-seeking for psychological distress, measured by a semi-structured interview by a researcher blind to the allocation status at 2 months post-intervention. Secondary outcomes include psychological distress and social support measured by SRQ and Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), respectively, at 2 months post-intervention. Intervention acceptability was explored through in-depth interviews. Local community health workers with no mental health experience successfully delivered the psycho-educational sessions in the community. The uptake of intervention was good and the intervention was taken well by the families and the community health workers. The outcome evaluation was not powered; however, more women sought assistance for their distress from their community health workers in the intervention arm, compared to women in the control arm. This trial showed good acceptance and feasible delivery of a

  19. Social support contributes to resilience among physiotherapy students: a cross sectional survey and focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bíró, Éva; Veres-Balajti, Ilona; Kósa, Karolina

    2016-06-01

    The present study, taking a resource-oriented approach to mental health, aimed at investigating mental resilience and its determinants among undergraduate physiotherapy students using quantitative and qualitative tools. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey supplemented by 2 focus groups. One university in Hungary. 130 physiotherapy students at years 1, 2, and 3. Sense of coherence, a measure of dynamic self-esteem, as well as social support from family and peers were used to assess mental well-being. A screening instrument for psychological morbidity and perceived stress were used as deficiency-oriented approaches. Student opinions were gathered on positive and negative determinants of mental health. Resilience was lower [mean difference 4.8 (95% CI -3.4; 13.1)], and the occurrence of psychological morbidity (32.5% vs. 0%) was higher among female compared to male students. However, the proportion of students fully supported by their peers was higher among females (63% vs. 37.5%). Female students, unlike their male counterparts, experienced higher stress compared to their peers in the general population. Social support declined as students progressed in their studies though this proved to be the most important protective factor for their mental well-being. Results were fed back to the course organizers recommending the implementation of an evidence-based method to improve social support as delineated by the Guide to Community Preventive Services of the US the outcomes of which are to be seen in the future. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Development of Group Decision Support System for Strategic Item Classification using Analytic Hierarchy Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sung Ho; Tae, Jae Woong; Yang, Seung Hyo; Shin, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Korea has carried out export controls on nuclear items that reflect the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) guidelines (Notice on Trade of Strategic Item of Foreign Trade Act) since joining the NSG in 1995. Nuclear export control starts with classifications that determine whether export items are relevant to nuclear proliferation or not according to NSG guidelines. However, due to qualitative characteristics of nuclear item definition in the guidelines, classification spends a lot of time and effort to make a consensus. The aim of this study is to provide an analysis of an experts' group decision support system (GDSS) based on an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) for the classification of strategic items. The results of this study clearly demonstrated that a GDSS based on an AHP proved positive, systematically providing relative weight among the planning variables and objectives. By using an AHP we can quantify the subjective judgements of reviewers. An order of priority is derived from a numerical value. The verbal and fuzzy measurement of an AHP enables us reach a consensus among reviewers in a GDSS. An AHP sets common weight factors which are a priority of each attribute that represent the views of an entire group. It makes a consistency in decision-making that is important for classification

  1. A Development of Group Decision Support System for Strategic Item Classification using Analytic Hierarchy Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sung Ho; Tae, Jae Woong; Yang, Seung Hyo; Shin, Dong Hoon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Korea has carried out export controls on nuclear items that reflect the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) guidelines (Notice on Trade of Strategic Item of Foreign Trade Act) since joining the NSG in 1995. Nuclear export control starts with classifications that determine whether export items are relevant to nuclear proliferation or not according to NSG guidelines. However, due to qualitative characteristics of nuclear item definition in the guidelines, classification spends a lot of time and effort to make a consensus. The aim of this study is to provide an analysis of an experts' group decision support system (GDSS) based on an analytic hierarchy process (AHP) for the classification of strategic items. The results of this study clearly demonstrated that a GDSS based on an AHP proved positive, systematically providing relative weight among the planning variables and objectives. By using an AHP we can quantify the subjective judgements of reviewers. An order of priority is derived from a numerical value. The verbal and fuzzy measurement of an AHP enables us reach a consensus among reviewers in a GDSS. An AHP sets common weight factors which are a priority of each attribute that represent the views of an entire group. It makes a consistency in decision-making that is important for classification.

  2. Social Support in a Virtual Community: Analysis of a Clinic-Affiliated Online Support Group for Persons Living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flickinger, Tabor E; DeBolt, Claire; Waldman, Ava Lena; Reynolds, George; Cohn, Wendy F; Beach, Mary Catherine; Ingersoll, Karen; Dillingham, Rebecca

    2017-11-01

    Social support can improve outcomes for people living with HIV (PLWH) and could be provided through online support groups. The Positive Links smartphone app is a multicomponent intervention that allows users to interact in a clinic-affiliated anonymous online support group. We investigated how social support was exchanged in a group of 55 participants over 8 months, using an adaptation of the Social Support Behavior Code. Participant interviews assessed their experiences and perceptions of the app. Of 840 posts analyzed, 115 (14 %) were coded as eliciting social support and 433 (52 %) as providing social support. Messages providing support were predominantly emotional (41 %), followed by network (27 %), esteem (24 %), informational (18 %), and instrumental (2 %) support. Participants perceived connection and support as key benefits of the app. Technical issues and interpersonal barriers limited some participants in fully using the app. Mobile technology offers a useful tool to reach populations with barriers to in-person support and may improve care for PLWH.

  3. Effectiveness of preventive support groups for children of mentally ill or addicted parents: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santvoort, F. van; Hosman, C.M.H.; Doesum, K.T.M. van; Janssens, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In various countries preventive support groups are offered to children of mentally ill and/or addicted parents to reduce the risk that they will develop problems themselves. This study assessed the effectiveness of Dutch support groups for children aged 8-12 years old in terms of reducing negative

  4. Peer mentored teams to support undergraduate group work in higher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinderey, Lynn Elizabeth

    This research starts with a set of practical research questions to investigate a problem which occurs in some computing undergraduate modules that use group work as part of the learning and assessment strategy. In this study final year students with experience in information systems project work and trained in team processes met with small groups of first year computing students with the aim of turning the first year project group into a team. This study seeks to explore the experience of the final year students as they take on the role of peer tutor looking at the problems they perceive within the first year teams and the skills and knowledge they use to help them. The study includes the recruitment and training of final year students (n=9) and allocation to first year teams. The final year students acted as co-researchers and team leaders in L4 Information Systems project work and recorded their thoughts and observations in a diary during the first semester of 2008/9 academic year. Diary data was supplemented by interview data from a sample of final year students (n=4). The sample was selected based on the richness of the data provided in the diaries and the number of meetings held with their teams. Rich data and thick descriptions were essential for a phenomenological examination of the experience of the final year students. A number of findings emerged. A critical approach to analysis revealed ongoing conflicts occurred across cultural divides within the first year teams that final year leaders did not articulate or appear fully aware of. This had important implications for individual team members. Other findings which relate to issues of changing levels of motivation in the teams over the ten weeks, roles adopted by the leaders, ability to systematize the project or team processes and the ability to reflect on unsuccessful strategies also had implications for peer mentoring training and support. The picture that emerged from the data suggested that lack of

  5. The meaningfulness of participating in support groups for informal caregivers of older adults with dementia: a qualitative systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Jette; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard

    Introduction: Support groups are considered an effective and economical way to relieve informal caregivers stress and burden. Research shows, that participating in support groups seems to be beneficial for the informal caregivers, but there are no significant improvements in feelings of stress...... and burden. It is unclear how support groups can produce a meaningful and optimal outcome for the informal caregivers. Aim: To identify the meaningfulness of participating in support groups for informal caregivers of older adults with dementia living in their own home. Method: A systematic literature review...... that through comparison and sharing positive and negative emotions, the members of the support group are able to take on and maintain the role as caregiver....

  6. Group support system and explanatory feedback: An experimental study of mitigating halo effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intiyas Utami

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive assessment potentially leads to halo effect that will affect accuracy of auditors decision-making process. Biased initial audit decision will potentially influence final audit decision. It is there-fore necessary to mitigate halo effect that is the consequence of auditors good impression on clients initial condition. This re-search aims to empirically show that halo effect can be mitigated by explanatory feedback and Group Support System (GSS. The researchers experimentally mani-pulate explanatory feedback and GSS using online web-site. The subjects are stu-dents who have already taken auditing courses. The results show that: 1 explanato-ry feedback can mitigate halo effect so that audit decision will be more accurate 2 GSS can also mitigate halo effect 3 explanatory feedback and GSS are the best me-thods to mitigate halo effect.

  7. Supportive care for children with acute leukemia - Report of a survey on supportive care by the Dutch Childhood Leukemia Study Group. Part I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, A; Van Leeuwen, EF; Gerritsen, EJA; Roord, JJ; De vries-Hospers, HG

    1998-01-01

    The Dutch Childhood Leukemia Study Group celebrated its 20th anniversary by conducting a nationwide survey on supportive care for children with leukemia. Pediatricians were asked about daily practice and current perceptions with regard to supportive care. The results are discussed and compared to

  8. Self-transcendence in older men attending a prostate cancer support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-A-Loy, S S; Fernsler, J I

    1998-10-01

    Self-transcendence has been shown to be related to well-being in older adults, women with breast cancer, women with AIDS, gay men with AIDS, and a healthy population. The purpose of this descriptive pilot study was to examine self-transcendence in another high-priority population: older men with prostate cancer. A convenience sample of 23 men, age 60 and older (M = 69), from three prostate cancer support groups completed Reed's Self-Transcendence Scale (STS) and a demographic data form. The men were predominantly white (82.6%), of the Catholic faith (56.5%), married (78.3%), and not working (87.0%). Over half (65.2%) had a college degree or higher; most viewed their health as good (69.6%) or excellent (21.7%); and the majority (56.5%) viewed their prostate cancer as affecting some of their daily activities. These men scored high on the STS (M = 50.07), which was consistent with previous findings in other populations. Findings of this study contribute to Reed's middle-range theory of self-transcendence. The discovery that self-transcendence is relevant to this group of older men with prostate cancer provides a basis for nurses to investigate the phenomenon in this population and help their clients explore the benefits of the self-transcendence resource.

  9. A proposal of group decision making procedure for supporting social consensus making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yoshiaki

    1996-01-01

    Being interested in supporting social consensus making, in this paper, we have proposed a group decision making procedure through conflict resolution in the following situation: each group has a different privilege with decision making; the final goal should be evaluated by a few qualitative sub-goals besides quantitative ones. For this purpose, we have developed a step-wise procedure that has been popularly adapted when encountered with complicated and large-scale problem-solving. As well as at the value system design phase, we applied the analytic hierarchy process, AHP to decide weights standing for the privilege at the decision making phase. Then, after rearranging the hierarchy of the sub-goals depending on the nature, we have provided an iterative procedure to derive a final solution from a discrete optimization problem. To reduce the difficulties of multi-objective decision making thereat, we took a scoring method for total evaluation and applied the genetic algorithm as a solution method. Through numerical experiments applied to a planning problem of the radioactive waste management system, we have shown numerically the proposed approach is very promising for social consensus making. (author)

  10. A qualitative study of an internet-based support group for women with sexual distress due to gynecologic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiljer, David; Urowitz, Sara; Barbera, Lisa; Chivers, Meredith L; Quartey, Naa Kwarley; Ferguson, Sarah E; To, Matthew; Classen, Catherine C

    2011-09-01

    Internet-based support groups for cancer patients have been studied extensively; very few have focused on gynecologic cancer. We pilot-tested a web-based support group for gynecologic cancer patients and assessed women's perceptions of the intervention. Twenty-seven gynecologic cancer patients were randomized to an immediate intervention or a waitlist control group. Women participated in a 12-week, web-based support group focusing on sexuality-related topics. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of the intervention. Women reported benefits to participating in the intervention, including receiving support from group members and moderators, increased emotional well-being, improved feelings of body image and sexuality, and comfort in discussing sexuality online. Web-based support groups are both feasible and accepted by gynecologic cancer patients with psychosexual distress. The online format provided women with easy access to the support group and anonymity in discussing psychosexual concerns. Women with gynecologic cancer may benefit from participating in online support groups which provide an environment of relative anonymity to discuss psychosexual concerns.

  11. Support vector machine learning-based fMRI data group analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze; Childress, Anna R; Wang, Jiongjiong; Detre, John A

    2007-07-15

    To explore the multivariate nature of fMRI data and to consider the inter-subject brain response discrepancies, a multivariate and brain response model-free method is fundamentally required. Two such methods are presented in this paper by integrating a machine learning algorithm, the support vector machine (SVM), and the random effect model. Without any brain response modeling, SVM was used to extract a whole brain spatial discriminance map (SDM), representing the brain response difference between the contrasted experimental conditions. Population inference was then obtained through the random effect analysis (RFX) or permutation testing (PMU) on the individual subjects' SDMs. Applied to arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion fMRI data, SDM RFX yielded lower false-positive rates in the null hypothesis test and higher detection sensitivity for synthetic activations with varying cluster size and activation strengths, compared to the univariate general linear model (GLM)-based RFX. For a sensory-motor ASL fMRI study, both SDM RFX and SDM PMU yielded similar activation patterns to GLM RFX and GLM PMU, respectively, but with higher t values and cluster extensions at the same significance level. Capitalizing on the absence of temporal noise correlation in ASL data, this study also incorporated PMU in the individual-level GLM and SVM analyses accompanied by group-level analysis through RFX or group-level PMU. Providing inferences on the probability of being activated or deactivated at each voxel, these individual-level PMU-based group analysis methods can be used to threshold the analysis results of GLM RFX, SDM RFX or SDM PMU.

  12. Increasing Responsive Parent–Child Interactions and Joint Engagement: Comparing the Influence of Parent-Mediated Intervention and Parent Psychoeducation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulsrud, Amanda; Kasari, Connie

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing immediate and contingent responding by caregivers to children’s signals is an important strategy to support social interactions between caregivers and their children with autism. Yet, there has been limited examination of parents’ responsive behaviour in association with children’s social behaviour post caregiver-mediated intervention. Eighty-five dyads were randomized to one of two 10-week caregiver-training interventions. Parent–child play interactions were coded for parental responsivity and children’s joint engagement. Significant gains in responsivity and time jointly engaged were found post JASPER parent-mediated intervention over a psychoeducation intervention. Further, combining higher levels of responsive behaviour with greater adoption of intervention strategies was associated with greater time jointly engaged. Findings encourage a focus on enhancing responsive behaviour in parent-mediated intervention models. PMID:26797940

  13. What’s all the talk about? Topic modelling in a mental health Internet support group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Carron-Arthur

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of content in an Internet Support Group (ISG is contributed by 1 % of the users (‘super users’. Computational methods, such as topic modelling, can provide a large-scale quantitative objective description of this content. Such methods may provide a new perspective on the nature of engagement on ISGs including the role of super users and their possible effect on other users. Methods A topic model was computed for all posts (N = 131,004 in the ISG BlueBoard using Latent Dirichlet Allocation. A model containing 25 topics was selected on the basis of intelligibility as determined by diagnostic metrics and qualitative investigation. This model yielded 21 substantive topics for further analysis. Two chi-square tests were conducted separately for each topic to ascertain: (i if the odds of super users’ and other users’ posting differed for each topic; and (ii if for super users the odds of posting differed depending on whether the response was to a super user or to another user. Results The 21 substantive topics covered a range of issues related to mental health and peer-support. There were significantly higher odds that super users wrote content on 13 topics, with the greatest effects being for Parenting Role (OR [95%CI] = 7.97 [7.85–8.10], Co-created Fiction (4.22 [4.17–4.27], Mental Illness (3.13 [3.11–3.16] and Positive Change (2.82 [2.79–2.84]. There were significantly lower odds for super users on 7 topics, with the greatest effects being for the topics Depression (OR = 0.27 [0.27–0.28], Medication (0.36 [0.36–0.37], Therapy (0.55 [0.54–0.55] and Anxiety (0.55 [0.55–0.55]. However, super users were significantly more likely to write content on 5 out of these 7 topics when responding to other users than when responding to fellow super users. Conclusions The findings suggest that super users serve the role of emotionally supportive companions with a focus on topics broadly

  14. Improving Emotional and Cognitive Outcomes for Domestic Violence Survivors: The Impact of Shelter Stay and Self-Compassion Support Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ashley Batts; Robertson, Emily; Patin, Gail A

    2017-10-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a domestic violence shelter and tested the impact of a self-compassion support group curriculum on outcomes valued by shelters such as autonomy, emotional restoration, and safety. Data were collected from 251 women staying in a domestic violence shelter who had the opportunity to attend a self-compassion support group during their stay. Women completed a pre- and posttest survey assessing self-compassion, empowerment, positive emotion, and perceptions of safety. First, women experienced a positive change ( N = 36) from pretest to posttest across all four outcome variables, suggesting the domestic violence shelter was effective at improving survivors' well-being. Second, participants who attended a self-compassion support group at least once reported more positive posttest scores compared with those who did not attend a group ( N = 79); however, this effect was limited to participants who stayed in shelter a short time. Women who stayed in shelter a longer amount of time experienced more positive posttest scores regardless of group attendance. Although the sample size was limited, analyses directly comparing the traditional shelter support group with the self-compassion support group show that both were equally effective. These findings provide support for shelter effectiveness in terms of improving well-being. They also suggest women who stay in shelter a short period of time may not experience as many shelter benefits unless they attend a support group. Therefore, shelters should consider offering support groups to women very soon after shelter entry. Furthermore, more research is needed to disentangle the benefits of self-compassion interventions over and above a general support group curriculum.

  15. Disability and Family in the People's Republic of China: Implementation, Benefits, and Comparison of Two Mutual Support Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Helen; McCabe, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background: The authors and 2 Chinese parents established 2 support groups in China. One group was for parents of children with autism, and the other was for young adults with either mental health issues or intellectual disability, and their parents. The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning and effectiveness of these groups from the…

  16. Evaluation of a video, telephone follow-ups, and an online forum as components of a psychoeducational intervention for caregivers of persons with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Mabel Q H; Chan, Sally W C

    2016-10-01

    Our aim was to evaluate caregivers' perceptions of a video, telephone follow-up, and online forum as components of a psychoeducational intervention. Qualitative semistructured face-to-face interviews were conducted with 12 participants two weeks post-intervention. The study was conducted from September of 2012 to May of 2015. Family caregivers were recruited from four home hospice organizations (HCA Hospice Care, Metta Hospice, Singapore Cancer Centre, and Agape Methodist Hospice) and the National Cancer Centre outpatient clinic in Singapore. A purposive sample was employed, and participants were recruited until data saturation. Qualitative interviews were transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded and analyzed using content analysis. Two of the research team members were involved in the data analysis. Two-thirds of participants were females (n = 8). Their ages ranged from 22 to 67 (mean = 50.50, SD = 11.53). About two-thirds were married (n = 7). Most participants were caring for a parent (n = 10), one for a spouse, and one for her mother-in-law. Caregivers favored the use of video for delivery of educational information. They liked the visual and audio aspects of the video. The ability to identify with the caregiver and scenarios in the video helped in the learning process. They appreciated telephone follow-ups from healthcare professionals for informational and emotional support. The online forum as a platform for sharing of information and provision of support was not received well by the caregivers in this study. The reasons for this included their being busy, not being computer savvy, rarely surfing the internet, and not feeling comfortable sharing with strangers on an online platform. This study provided insight into caregivers' perceptions of various components of a psychoeducational intervention. It also gave us a better understanding of how future psychoeducational interventions and support for caregivers of persons with advanced cancer could be

  17. The effect of psycho-educational intervention on the life quality of major depressive patients referred to hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in Shiraz-Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Farkhondeh; Nourian, Kheirollah; Ashkani, Hamid; Zoladl, Mohamad

    2012-09-01

    Depression is the world's fourth most prevalent health problem which is associated with substantial mortality, direct medical cost, diminished life quality, and significant physical and psychosocial impairment. This study aimed to investigate the effect of psycho-educational intervention on the life quality of major depressive patients. Sixty patients who were willing and had met the required criteria for participation were selected from hospitals in Shiraz city, Iran. So 30 of the patients were assigned to the experimental group and 30 others to the control group. For data collection, a two part questionnaire was developed, the first part consists of 13 items related to general characteristics and the second part with 36 items on life quality were used. The experimental group was divided into five subgroups of 6 patients. For each group, six intervention sessions were scheduled. The control group did not receive the intervention. The questionnaires were completed for all subjects in the experimental and control groups before and 1 month after the end of psycho-educational intervention. Tabulated data were analyzed using chi-square, independent and pair T-test. The results of the study indicated that psycho-educational intervention in comparison with other available treatments proved to be more effective on eight domains of life quality in the experimental group. A significant difference was observed for all the domains (P educational intervention can be used as an auxiliary treatment in improving life quality and decreasing depression in patients suffering from major depressive disorder.

  18. Patient-centered care in cancer treatment programs: the future of integrative oncology through psychoeducation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garchinski, Christina M; DiBiase, Ann-Marie; Wong, Raimond K; Sagar, Stephen M

    2014-12-01

    The reciprocal relationship between the mind and body has been a neglected process for improving the psychosocial care of cancer patients. Emotions form an important link between the mind and body. They play a fundamental role in the cognitive functions of decision-making and symptom control. Recognizing this relationship is important for integrative oncology. We define psychoeducation as the teaching of self-evaluation and self-regulation of the mind-body process. A gap exists between research evidence and implementation into clinical practice. The patients' search for self-empowerment through the pursuit of complementary therapies may be a surrogate for inadequate psychoeducation. Integrative oncology programs should implement psychoeducation that helps patients to improve both emotional and cognitive intelligence, enabling them to better negotiate cancer treatment systems.

  19. Expanding the Application of Group Interventions: Emergence of Groups in Health Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, David; Becker, Martin Swanbrow; Hess, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the health care arena and within the specialty of group work are contributing to the increased utilization of groups in health care settings. Psychoeducational, theme, and interpersonal therapy groups are highlighted for their contributions to treating challenging health conditions. An understanding of the evolution of these group…

  20. Use of indigenous cultural idioms by Chinese immigrant relatives for psychosis: impacts on stigma and psychoeducational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lawrence H; Singla, Daisy R

    2011-11-01

    Indigenous interpretations of mental illness might negatively impact treatment adherence. However, psychiatric "labeling" potentially leads to stigma among Chinese groups, thus encouraging the use of indigenous idioms. We examined how relatives' use of indigenous labeling varied with the consumers' experience of illness and whether indigenous labeling protected relatives from internalized and experienced forms of stigma. Forty-nine relatives of Chinese-immigrant consumers with psychosis were sampled. Although consumers had progressed to the middle stages of psychosis, 39% of relatives used indigenous idioms to label psychosis. Indigenous labeling decreased when illness duration increased and when visual hallucinations were present. Indigenous labeling further predicted lower internalized stigma among relatives. Relatives who used indigenous labeling also reported fewer indirect stigma experiences, although not after controlling for illness severity. The frequency of direct discrimination among relatives did not differ by labeling. These forms of felt stigma might be embedded into relatives' psychoeducation programs to mitigate adverse consequences of psychiatric labeling.

  1. Incorporating psychoeducation, mindfulness and self-compassion in a new programme for binge eating (BEfree): Exploring processes of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Gouveia, José; Carvalho, Sérgio A; Palmeira, Lara; Castilho, Paula; Duarte, Cristiana; Ferreira, Cláudia; Duarte, Joana; Cunha, Marina; Matos, Marcela; Costa, Joana

    2016-11-01

    This study explores the efficacy of BEfree, a 12-session group intervention that integrates psychoeducation, mindfulness, compassion and value-based action, in a sample of overweight and obese women with binge eating disorder ( N = 31). We used repeated measures analyses of variance and explored processes of change in binge eating and eating psychopathology. At post-intervention, participants decreased in binge eating severity, eating psychopathology, external shame, self-criticism, psychological inflexibility, body image cognitive fusion and increased self-compassion and engagement with valued actions. These results were maintained at 3- and 6-month follow-up. The changes in binge eating were mediated by the changes in the psychological processes promoted by BEfree.

  2. Psychoeducation in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Escobar-Córdoba

    2017-08-01

    In order to treat sleep apnea, that patients know the characteristics of the disease and the treatment is important since they become aware of it, thus achieving greater adherence to the treatments. There are several types of therapy: individual therapy, which is characterized as support provided by mental health professionals to the patient; couple and family therapy, which offer psychological help for the management of sleep apnea and its side effects, and group therapy, which educates about the entity and its treatment by sharing positive experiences with the group. Field intervention at work and progressive desensitization and relaxation techniques are also used to improve the adhesion to positive pressure in the airway (PAP therapy.

  3. Impact of cancer support groups on childhood cancer treatment and abandonment in a private pediatric oncology centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arathi Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To analyze the impact of two cancer support groups in the treatment and abandonment of childhood cancer. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective review of children with cancer funded and non-funded who were treated at Kanchi Kamakoti CHILDS Trust Hospital from 2010 to 2013. A total of 100 patients were funded, 57 by Ray of Light Foundation and 43 by Pediatric Lymphoma Project and 70 non-funded. Results: The total current survival of 80%, including those who have completed treatment and those currently undergoing treatment, is comparable in both the groups. Abandonment of treatment after initiating therapy was not seen in the financially supported group whereas abandonment of treatment after initiation was seen in one child in the non-funded group. Conclusions: Besides intensive treatment with good supportive care, financial support also has an important impact on compliance and abandonment in all socioeconomic strata of society. Financial support from private cancer support groups also has its impact beyond the patient and family, in reducing the burden on government institutions by non-governmental funding in private sector. Improvement in the delivery of pediatric oncology care in developing countries could be done by financial support from the private sector.

  4. From Social Exclusion to Supported Inclusion: Adults with Intellectual Disability Discuss Their Lived Experiences of a Structured Social Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J.; Jaques, Hayden; Johnson, Amanda; Brotherton, Michelle L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability often have few friends and experience social exclusion. Recognising this gap, supported social groups with the aim of inclusion and interdependence were created by a supported employment provider. Methods: Interviews were undertaken with 10 adults with intellectual disability exploring their lived…

  5. Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR) versus Supportive Expressive Group Therapy (SET) for distressed breast cancer survivors: evaluating mindfulness and social support as mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Melanie P J; Tamagawa, Rie; Labelle, Laura E; Speca, Michael; Stephen, Joanne; Drysdale, Elaine; Sample, Sarah; Pickering, Barbara; Dirkse, Dale; Savage, Linette Lawlor; Carlson, Linda E

    2017-06-01

    Despite growing evidence in support of mindfulness as an underlying mechanism of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs), it has been suggested that nonspecific therapeutic factors, such as the experience of social support, may contribute to the positive effects of MBIs. In the present study, we examined whether change in mindfulness and/or social support mediated the effect of Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR) compared to another active intervention (i.e. Supportive Expressive Group Therapy (SET)), on change in mood disturbance, stress symptoms and quality of life. A secondary analysis was conducted of a multi-site randomized clinical trial investigating the impacts of MBCR and SET on distressed breast cancer survivors (MINDSET). We applied the causal steps approach with bootstrapping to test mediation, using pre- and post-intervention questionnaire data of the participants who were randomised to MBCR (n = 69) or SET (n = 70). MBCR participants improved significantly more on mood disturbance, stress symptoms and social support, but not on quality of life or mindfulness, compared to SET participants. Increased social support partially mediated the impact of MBCR versus SET on mood disturbance and stress symptoms. Because no group differences on mindfulness and quality of life were observed, no mediation analyses were performed on these variables. Findings showed that increased social support was related to more improvement in mood and stress after MBCR compared to support groups, whereas changes in mindfulness were not. This suggests a more important role for social support in enhancing outcomes in MBCR than previously thought.

  6. Effectiveness of a psychoeducational skill training DVD program to reduce stress in Chinese American dementia caregivers: results of a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores; Wang, Peng-Chih; Liu, Weiling; Cheung, Vinnie; Peng, Rebecca; China, Danielle; Thompson, Larry W

    2010-04-01

    Prior research (Gallagher-Thompson, D., Gray, H., Tang, P., Pu, C.-Y., Tse, C., Hsu, S., et al. (2007). Impact of in-home intervention versus telephone support in reducing depression and stress of Chinese caregivers: Results of a pilot study. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 15, 425-434.) found that an in-home behavioral management program, derived conceptually from cognitive behavioral theories (CBT), was effective in reducing caregiver related stress and depressive symptoms in Chinese American dementia caregivers (CGs). Results were promising, but a more cost-effective intervention is needed to serve this growing population. Past work also found that a psychoeducational videotaped training program based on CBT was effective in reducing stress due to caregiving in Caucasian and African American dementia family CGs (Steffen, 2000, Anger management for dementia caregivers: A preliminary study using video and telephone interventions. Behavior Therapy, 31, 281-299.). To date no research has been conducted using a technological medium to deliver a similar kind of intervention to Chinese American caregivers. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a similar but culturally "tailored" program in which 70 CGs were randomly assigned to a 12-week CBT skill training program delivered on a DVD, or to a general educational DVD program on dementia. Both were available in Mandarin Chinese or English as preferred. Pre post change analyses indicated that CGs did not differ on change in level of negative depressive symptoms, but positive affect was higher, and patient behaviors were appraised as less stressful and bothersome, for CGs in the CBT skill training program. They were also more satisfied with the program overall and reported that they believed they were able to give care more effectively. Results encourage further development of theoretically based interventions, delivered using modern technology, for this ever increasing group of CGs.

  7. "Anonymous Meltdown": Content Themes Emerging in a Nonfacilitated, Peer-only, Unstructured, Asynchronous Online Support Group for Family Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbeck, Cynthia A; Klemm, Paula R; Hayes, Evelyn R

    2017-12-01

    By providing care for loved ones in the home, family caregivers save millions of dollars for our overtaxed healthcare system. Support groups can lighten the psychological burden of caregiving. Nonprofessionally facilitated (or peer) online caregiver support groups can help meet a critical need in healthcare as a low-cost resource for caregivers. Online caregiver peer support groups can promote the health and well-being of family caregivers and, by extension, the patients themselves, resulting in cost-savings for society. A better understanding of these types of groups is of critical importance, given the unrelenting pace of demographic shift in the United States. The purpose of this study was to examine content themes emerging from an unstructured, asynchronous online peer support group for family caregivers of people with chronic illness. Qualitative content analysis was used, yielding six themes: "experiencing the emotional toll," "need for catharsis/venting," "finding the silver linings," "seeking specific advice/problem solving," "realizing home is no longer a haven," and "adapting to the caregiver role." The themes reflect what emerged organically in an online support group that was not professionally facilitated or structured in any way. Heterogeneity in the relationship between caregivers and care recipients may negatively affect outcomes and requires further study.

  8. Recent developments in family psychoeducation as an evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucksted, Alicia; McFarlane, William; Downing, Donna; Dixon, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Among potential resources for people with serious mental illnesses (SMI) and their families, professionally delivered family psychoeducation (FPE) is designed to engage, inform, and educate family members, so that they can assist the person with SMI in managing their illness. In this article, we review research regarding FPE outcomes and implementation since 2001, updating the previous review in this journal (McFarlane, Dixon, Lukens, & Lucksted, Journal of Marital and Family Therapy 2003; 29, 223). Research on a range of FPE variations continues to return mostly positive effects for adults with schizophrenia and increasingly, bipolar disorder. More recent studies include functional outcomes as well as the more common relapse and hospitalization. FPE research involving adults with other diagnoses is increasing, as is FPE research outside the United States In both cases, uneven methodologies and multiple FPE variations make drawing conclusions difficult, although the core utility of access to information, skill building, problem solving, and social support often shines though. Since the previous review, several FPE programs for parents of children or youth with mood disorders have also been developed, with limited research showing more positive than null results. Similarly, we review the developing inquiry into early intervention and FPE, short-form FPE, and cost studies involving FPE. The second half of the article updates the paradox of FPE's evidence base versus its persistently low use, via recent implementation efforts. Multiple challenges and facilitating factors across healthcare systems and financing, individual programs and providers, family members, and consumers shape this issue, and we conclude with discussion of the need for empirical evaluation of implementation strategies and models. © 2011 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  9. Social support and education groups for single mothers: a randomized controlled trial of a community-based program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Ellen L; Boyle, Michael H

    2005-12-06

    Members of families headed by single mothers are at increased risk of psychosocial disadvantage and mental health problems. We assessed the effect of a community-based program of social support and education groups for single mothers of young children on maternal well-being and parenting. We recruited 116 single mothers of children 3 to 9 years old through community advertisements. Eligible mothers were randomly assigned either to participate in a 10-week program of group sessions (1.5 hours per week) offering social support and education, with a parallel children's activity group, or to receive a standard list of community resources and the option to participate in group sessions at the end of the follow-up period. Interviewers blinded to the randomization collected assessment data from all mothers at baseline and at 3 follow-up visits (immediately after the intervention and at 3 and 6 months after the intervention). Outcome measures were self-reported mood, self-esteem, social support and parenting. Between February 2000 and April 2003, the program was offered to 9 groups of single mothers. Most of the mothers in the trial reported high levels of financial and mental health problems. In the short term (after the intervention), mothers in the intervention group had improved scores for mood (p effect = 0.55) and self-esteem (p effect = 0.29) compared with mothers in the control group; scores for the other 2 measures did not differ between the groups. Growth curve analysis of program effects over the follow-up period showed improvement in all 4 outcomes, with no significant difference between the intervention and control groups. This community-based program of group sessions offering social support and education to low-income single mothers had positive short-term effects on mood and self-esteem but not on social support and parenting. Longer follow-up showed attenuation of these effects.

  10. The meaningfulness of participating in support groups for informal caregivers of older adults with dementia: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Jette; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard

    2015-01-01

    of participants: Informal caregivers of older adults aged 65 years and over with dementia. The informal caregiver was a family member, and care was performed at home. Phenomena of interest: How the informal caregivers perceived the meaningfulness of participating in support groups. The setting was all locations......BACKGROUND Informal caregivers who perform at-home care of older people with dementia might have feelings of a meaningless existence, burden, anxiety, stress and fatigue. Support groups are considered an especially effective and economical way to relieve informal caregivers’ stress and burden......, although it is unclear if participating in group meetings produces a meaningful outcome for the informal caregiver. OBJECTIVES To identify the meaningfulness of participating in support groups for informal caregivers of older adults with dementia living in their own home. INCLUSION CRITERIA Types...

  11. Stories of People Who Have Attended a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans Support Group in a Secure Intellectual Disability Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallentire, Liz; Smith, Matthew; David, Lee; Roberts, Adam; Bruce; Morrow, Sarah; Withers, Paul; Smith, Ian

    2016-08-31

    This research is about people who have intellectual disabilities and live in a secure hospital. It is about a group of people who meet at a support group. The support group is for people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender. These people with intellectual disabilities helped with planning, doing, and telling other people about the research. They told their stories about going to the support group. Their stories were joined together into a group story. The story said that the group helped people in lots of different ways. For some people going to the group was difficult at first because it was ?coming out'. This means telling other people you are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. Then it got easier and people started to feel better about themselves. Then they wanted to help others and this was important in their lives. This group seemed to help people get better. We have given some ideas for setting up other groups and doing more research. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Parent Evaluations of Traditional and Consumer-Focused School Psychoeducational Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hite, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Completion of pyschoeducational reports account for a significant amount of school psychologists' time. The report findings are often used to make high stakes educational decisions about the child. Parents are one of the main consumers of psychoeducational reports and expected to use the information contained in them to participate in making…

  13. Online Counseling: Prioritizing Psychoeducation, Self-Help, and Mutual Help for Counseling Psychology Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tai

    2005-01-01

    This reaction article extends the research and practice recommendations for online counseling from the Major Contribution to the November 2005 issue of "The Counseling Psychologist" by prioritizing research and practice in online psychoeducation, self-help, and mutual help. Research suggests that tens of millions of Americans use the Internet for…

  14. Reduced memory specificity predicts the acquisition of problem solving skills in psychoeducation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Daele, Tom; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Raes, Filip; Hermans, Dirk

    2013-03-01

    Research has shown that overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) is a valid predictor for the course of depression. It is not known, however, whether OGM also moderates information uptake and consolidation in a psychoeducation program to prevent stress, anxiety and depression. The present study was designed to investigate whether the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT; Williams, & Broadbent, 1986) is a valid predictor for the actual unfolding of skills learned through psychoeducation. The questionnaire included primarily the AMT and the Stress Anxiety Depression Means-Ends Problem Solving Questionnaire (SAD-MEPS). It was filled in prior to and after the psychoeducational course by 23 participants. Correlations were calculated for the AMT at baseline and the differences between the pre and post measurements on the SAD-MEPS. Significant correlations were observed between the number of specific responses and the changes in the number of relevant means (r = .49, p < .01). The sample size was rather small, but several checks were able to reduce the chance of spurious findings. These findings may have important implications for the guidance to and the setup of psychoeducational interventions. Suggestions include screening and memory specificity training prior to course commencement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Psycho-educational interventions for children and young people with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, H. R.; Rayman, G.; Skinner, T. C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: A systematic review of the literature in 2000 revealed numerous methodological shortcomings in education research, but in recent years progress has been made in the quantity and quality of psycho-educational intervention studies. Summary of contents: This review focuses on diabetes ed...

  16. Improving Empathy and Communication Skills of Visually Impaired Early Adolescents through a Psycho-Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Mehmet Ali; Duy, Baki

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an interpersonal communication skills psycho-education program to improve empathy and communication skills of visually impaired adolescents. Participants of the study were sixteen early adolescents schooling in an elementary school for visually impaired youth in Diyarbakir. The…

  17. Psycho-educational Therapy among Nigerian Adult Patients with Epilepsy: A Controlled Outcome Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olley, B. O.; Osinowo, H. O.; Brieger, W. R.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluates the efficacy of a two-day psychoeducational program among patients with epilepsy in Nigeria. Results reveal that participants showed a substantial significant decrease in level of depression; a significant increase in the knowledge about epilepsy; and significant decrease in all measures of neurotic disorders except for hysterical…

  18. Anxiety and Well-Being among Students in a Psychoeducation Program: The Mediating Role of Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Julie; Lévesque, Geneviève

    2018-01-01

    Mental health problems among university and college students are a major public health concern and a socioeconomic issue. Our psychoeducation department is not exempt from this reality and has seen an important increase in mental health problems, especially anxiety issues, over the past years. To better understand anxiety in our students, we…

  19. Efficacy of a minimal home-based psychoeducative intervention in patients with advanced COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bove, D. G.; Lomborg, K.; Jensen, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    -based psychoeducative intervention versus usual care for reducing symptoms of anxiety in patients with advanced COPD. METHODS: The trial included 66 participants with advanced COPD and symptoms of anxiety. The primary outcome was anxiety assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) subscale for anxiety...

  20. Making Sense of Inconsistencies in Psycho-Educational Assessment: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Linda; Miller, Robyn; Ward, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The case is presented of an 8-year-old boy who was referred for psycho-educational assessment because of difficulties with writing. The article provides an example of the way in which a case unfolds as further assessment data become available, and describes a number of challenging aspects of the assessment process. In this case, dilemmas arose…

  1. Responsiveness of the Psychoeducational Profile-Third Edition for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Lin; Chiang, Fu-Mei; Tseng, Mei-Hui; Fu, Chung-Pei; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the responsiveness of the Psychoeducational Profile-third edition (PEP-3) in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). We investigated the responsiveness in terms of three types of scores (i.e., raw scores, developmental ages, and percentile ranks) of the subtests and composites of the PEP-3 and three…

  2. Research and Development Strategies for Human Centered and Group Support Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    13 Detma W. Straub, Jr. and Renee Beauclair , "A New Dimension to Decision Support: Organizational Planning Made Easy with GDSS," Data Management...and Exposition, Washington, DC, June 1991. Straub, Detmar W., Jr., and Renee Beauclair , "A New Dimension to Decision Support: Organizational Planning

  3. The importance of 'Group Social Support' in treatment and re-union ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... unknown for sometimes. Some may be assisted by good Samaritans while others might fell under the circumstances of criminals. Social support and medical treatment may be required to reunite some of these subjects as illustrated by this case report. KeyWords : Paranoid Schizophrenia, Homelessness, Social support ...

  4. Black women, work, stress, and perceived discrimination: the focused support group model as an intervention for stress reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, V M

    1995-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the use of two components (small and large groups) of a community-based intervention, the Focused Support Group (FSG) model, to alleviate employment-related stressors in Black women. Participants were assigned to small groups based on occupational status. Groups met for five weekly 3-hr sessions in didactic or small- and large-group formats. Two evaluations following the didactic session and the small and large group sessions elicited information on satisfaction with each of the formats, self-reported change in stress, awareness of interpersonal and sociopolitical issues affecting Black women in the labor force, assessing support networks, and usefulness of specific discussion topics to stress reduction. Results indicated the usefulness of the small- and large-group formats in reduction of self-reported stress and increases in personal and professional sources of support. Discussions on race and sex discrimination in the workplace were effective in overall stress reduction. The study highlights labor force participation as a potential source of stress for Black women, and supports the development of culture- and gender-appropriate community interventions as viable and cost-effective methods for stress reduction.

  5. Effectiveness of preventive support groups for children of mentally ill or addicted parents: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Santvoort, Floor; Hosman, Clemens M H; van Doesum, Karin T M; Janssens, Jan M A M

    2014-06-01

    In various countries preventive support groups are offered to children of mentally ill and/or addicted parents to reduce the risk that they will develop problems themselves. This study assessed the effectiveness of Dutch support groups for children aged 8-12 years old in terms of reducing negative cognitions; improving social support, competence, and parent-child interaction (direct intervention goals); and reducing emotional and behavioural problems (ultimate intervention aim). Children from 254 families were randomly assigned to the intervention or a control condition. Parents and children completed questionnaires at baseline and 3 and 6 months later. Emotional and behavioural problems of intervention group children were also assessed 1 year after the start. Univariate analyses of variance showed that children in the intervention group experienced a greater decrease in negative cognitions and sought more social support, immediately after participation and 3 months later, as compared to control group children. They also remained stable in their feelings of social acceptance (competence aspect) immediately after the intervention, whereas these feelings declined in control group children. The intervention and control groups both improved over time in terms of cognitions, competence, parent-child interaction and emotional and behavioural problem scores. Additional improvement in terms of problem scores was found in the intervention group 1 year after baseline. Further enhancement of effectiveness requires re-consideration of the support group goals; it should be studied whether the goals reflect the most important and influential risk and protective factors for this specific population. Besides, effects should be studied over a longer period.

  6. Randomized controlled trial of a psychoeducation program for the self-management of chronic cardiac pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillion, Michael H; Watt-Watson, Judy; Stevens, Bonnie; Lefort, Sandra M; Coyte, Peter; Graham, Anthony

    2008-08-01

    Cardiac pain arising from chronic stable angina (CSA) is a cardinal symptom of coronary artery disease and has a major negative impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL), including pain, poor general health status, and inability to self-manage. Current secondary prevention approaches lack adequate scope to address CSA as a multidimensional ischemic and persistent pain problem. This trial evaluated the impact of a low-cost six-week angina psychoeducation program, entitled The Chronic Angina Self-Management Program (CASMP), on HRQL, self-efficacy, and resourcefulness to self-manage anginal pain. One hundred thirty participants were randomized to the CASMP or three-month wait-list usual care; 117 completed the study. Measures were taken at baseline and three months. General HRQL was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form and the disease-specific Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ). Self-efficacy and resourcefulness were measured using the Self-Efficacy Scale and the Self-Control Schedule, respectively. The mean age of participants was 68 years, 80% were male. Analysis of variance of change scores yielded significant improvements in treatment group physical functioning [F=11.75(1,114), Phealth [F=10.94(1,114), P=0.001] aspects of generic HRQL. Angina frequency [F=5.57(1,115), P=0.02], angina stability [F=7.37(1,115), P=0.001], and self-efficacy to manage disease [F=8.45(1,115), P=0.004] were also significantly improved at three months. The CASMP did not impact resourcefulness. These data indicate that the CASMP was effective for improving physical functioning, general health, anginal pain symptoms, and self-efficacy to manage pain at three months and provide a basis for long-term evaluation of the program.

  7. Feasibility trial of a psychoeducational intervention for parents with personality difficulties: The Helping Families Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crispin Day

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Helping Families Programme is a psychoeducational parenting intervention that aims to improve outcomes and engagement for parents affected by clinically significant personality difficulties. This is achieved by working collaboratively with parents to explore ways in which their emotional and relational difficulties impact on parenting and child functioning, and to identify meaningful and realistic goals for change. The intervention is delivered via one-to-one sessions at weekly intervals over a period of 16 weeks. This protocol describes a two-arm parallel RCT in which consenting parents are randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to either the Helping Families Programme plus the usual services that the parent may be receiving from their mental health and/or social care providers, or to standard care (usual services plus a brief parenting advice session. The primary clinical outcome will be child behaviour. Secondary clinical outcomes will be child and parental mental health, parenting satisfaction, parenting behaviour and therapeutic alliance. Health economic measures will be collected on quality of life and service use. Outcome measures will be collected at the initial assessment stage, after the intervention is completed and at 6-month follow-up by research staff blind to group allocation. Trial feasibility will be assessed using rates of trial participation at the three time points and intervention uptake, attendance and retention. A parallel process evaluation will use qualitative interviews to ascertain key-workers’ and parent participants' experiences of intervention delivery and trial participation. The results of this feasibility study will determine the appropriateness of proceeding to a full-scale trial.

  8. Innovative psycho-educational program to prevent common postpartum mental disorders in primiparous women: a before and after controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe Heather J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Universal interventions to prevent postnatal mental disorders in women have had limited success, perhaps because they were insufficiently theorised, not gender-informed and overlooked relevant risk factors. This study aimed to determine whether an innovative brief psycho-educational program for mothers, fathers and first newborns, which addressed salient learning needs about infant behaviour management and adjustment tasks in the intimate partner relationship, prevented postpartum mental health problems in primiparous women. Methods A before and after controlled study was conducted in primary care in seven local government areas in Victoria, Australia. English-speaking couples with one-week old infants were invited consecutively to participate by the maternal and child health nurse at the universal first home visit. Two groups were recruited and followed sequentially: both completed telephone interviews at four weeks and six months postpartum and received standard health care. Intervention group participants were also invited to attend a half-day program with up to five couples and one month old infants, facilitated by trained, supervised nurses. The main outcome was any Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI diagnosis of Depression or Anxiety or Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, Anxiety, or Mixed Anxiety and Depressed Mood in the first six months postpartum. Factors associated with the outcome were established by logistic regression controlling for potential confounders and analysis was by intention to treat. Results In total 399/646 (62% women were recruited; 210 received only standard care and 189 were also offered the intervention; 364 (91% were retained at follow up six months postpartum. In women without a psychiatric history (232/364; 64%, 36/125 (29% were diagnosed with Depression or Anxiety or Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, Anxiety, or Mixed Anxiety and Depressed Mood in the control group

  9. Psychoeducation and cognitive-behavioral therapy for patients with refractory bipolar disorder: a 5-year controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Isasi, A; Echeburúa, E; Limiñana, J M; González-Pinto, A

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this research, which represents an additional and longer follow-up to a previous trial, was to evaluate a 5-year follow-up study of a combined treatment (pharmacological+psychoeducational and cognitive-behavioral therapy) as compared with a standard pharmacological treatment in patients with refractory bipolar disorder. Forty patients were randomly assigned to either an Experimental group-under combined treatment - or a Control group - under pharmacological treatment. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA), with repeated measures at different evaluation time points. Between-group differences were significant at all evaluation time points after treatment. Experimental group had less hospitalization events than Control group in the 12-month evaluation (P=0.015). The Experimental group showed lower depression and anxiety in the 6-month (P=0.006; P=0.019), 12-month (P=0.001; Ptherapy is long-term effective for patients with refractory bipolar disorder. Suggestions for future research are commented. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Cognitive and affective determinants of decisions to attend a group psychosocial support program for women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Linda D; Booth, Roger J; Schlatter, Melanie; Ziginskas, Danute; Harman, John E; Benson, Stephen R C

    2005-01-01

    This prospective study assesses the roles of illness beliefs, emotion regulation factors, and sociodemographic characteristics in decisions to participate in a group support program for women recently diagnosed with breast cancer. Women recruited during clinic visits 2 to 4 weeks after diagnosis completed measures of affective and cognitive factors identified by Leventhal's Common-Sense Model of illness self-regulation: cancer-related distress, avoidance tendencies, beliefs that the breast cancer was caused by stress and altered immunity, and personal control beliefs. Measures of general anxiety and depression, social support, and demographic characteristics were also completed; prognostic status information was obtained from medical records. All women were encouraged to participate in a free, 12-week program offering coping skills training and group support. Participation was recorded by program staff. Of the 110 women, 54 (49%) participated in the group support program and 56 (51%) did not. Logistic regression analyses revealed that participation was predicted by stronger beliefs that the cancer was caused by altered immunity, higher cancer-related distress, lower avoidance tendencies, and younger age. Participation in the group psychosocial support program appeared to be guided by cognitive and affective factors identified by the Common-Sense Model. Psychosocial support programs and informational materials promoting their use may attract more participants if they are tailored to focus on resolving cancer-related distress rather than on general anxiety or depression, appeal to those with high avoidance tendencies, address the role of immune function in cancer progression, and meet the needs of older participants.

  11. Similarity-based grouping to support teachers on collaborative activities in exploratory learning environments

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez-Santos, Sergio; Mavrikis, M.; Geraniou, E.; Poulovassilis, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a computer-based tool that helps teachers group their students for collaborative activities in the classroom, the challenge being to organise groups of students based on their recent work so that their collaboration results in meaningful interactions. Students first work on an exploratory task individually, and then the computer suggests possible groupings of students to the teacher. The complexity of the tasks is such that teachers would require too long a time to create...

  12. An evaluation of Cognitive Stimulation Therapy sessions for people with dementia and a concomitant support group for their carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Jan; Kingston, Paul; Alford, Simon; Taylor, Louise; Tolhurst, Edward

    2017-11-01

    This research aimed to ascertain the impact of a pragmatic Cognitive Stimulation Therapy course of 10 sessions on the cognitive function of people living with dementia and whether attending a concomitant carers support group was beneficial to carers. A mixed method quasi-experimental approach was adopted; data were collected pre- and post-intervention. The quantitative arm utilised three validated questionnaires rated by the carers. Qualitative data were collected via semi-structured interviews with carers regarding their perceptions of the impact of Cognitive Stimulation Therapy and the carers support group. Quantitative data analysis found no statistically significant differences within or between groups. The qualitative data demonstrated that carers perceived Cognitive Stimulation Therapy had some benefits for the people living with dementia, especially social benefits. Carers also perceived that attending the carers support group was beneficial for them in terms of gaining a better understanding of dementia, developing coping skills and having peer support. The study was limited in scale and further research with a larger sample, using direct measures of the impact of Cognitive Stimulation Therapy with people living with dementia and supplementary research exploring which characteristic of carers support groups are effective would be worthwhile.

  13. The Effects of Psychoeducation on Long-term Inpatients with Schizophrenia and Schizoaffective Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Nobuhiko; Uchino, Toshiro; Uchimura, Naohisa

    2017-05-08

    This study aimed to examine the significance of intervention to improve medication adherence in long-term inpatients by providing psychoeducation and then elucidating the effects of this training in terms of patient knowledge and attitudes. Subjects were patients who had been hospitalized for more than 1 year after being admitted to a psychiatric hospital, had been diagnosed as F2 (schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder) according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Edition, and were capable of verbal communication. Patients suspected of having dementia were excluded. Items surveyed were patient background, prescriptions, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) score, Drug Attitude Inventory-10 (DAI-10) score, and Knowledge of Illness and Drugs Inventory (KIDI) score. The amount of medication taken and GAF, DAI-10, and KIDI scores were evaluated within 1 week of starting psychoeducation and within 1 week of completing psychoeducation. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and McNemar test was used to compare scores before and after intervention. The mean overall KIDI score increased significantly, and the mean overall DAI-10 score improved significantly after intervention. Furthermore, the mean overall KIDI score of very long-term inpatients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder increased significantly after intervention. Psychoeducation produced improvement in some areas of knowledge and attitudes towards medication among long-term inpatients. These results demonstrate that psychoeducation has an effect on long-term inpatients that is similar to the effect observed in earlier studies on patients leading community lives, including patients who have just been admitted or discharged and patients attending day care or outpatient visits.

  14. Effects of Minority Stress, Group-Level Coping, and Social Support on Mental Health of German Gay Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A Sattler

    Full Text Available According to epidemiological studies, gay men are at a higher risk of mental disorders than heterosexual men. In the current study, the minority stress theory was investigated in German gay men: 1 it was hypothesized that minority stressors would positively predict mental health problems and that 2 group-level coping and social support variables would moderate these predictions negatively.Data from 1,188 German self-identified gay men were collected online. The questionnaire included items about socio-demographics, minority stress (victimization, rejection sensitivity, and internalized homonegativity, group-level coping (disclosure of sexual orientation, homopositivity, gay affirmation, gay rights support, and gay rights activism, and social support (gay social support and non-gay social support. A moderated multiple regression was conducted.Minority stressors positively predicted mental health problems. Group-level coping did not interact with minority stressors, with the exception of disclosure and homopositivity interacting marginally with some minority stressors. Further, only two interactions were found for social support variables and minority stress, one of them marginal. Gay and non-gay social support inversely predicted mental health problems. In addition, disclosure and homopositivity marginally predicted mental health problems.The findings imply that the minority stress theory should be modified. Disclosure does not have a relevant effect on mental health, while social support variables directly influence mental health of gay men. Group-level coping does not interact with minority stressors relevantly, and only one relevant interaction between social support and minority stress was found. Further longitudinal or experimental replication is needed before transferring the results to mental health interventions and prevention strategies for gay men.

  15. Effects of Minority Stress, Group-Level Coping, and Social Support on Mental Health of German Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Frank A; Wagner, Ulrich; Christiansen, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    According to epidemiological studies, gay men are at a higher risk of mental disorders than heterosexual men. In the current study, the minority stress theory was investigated in German gay men: 1) it was hypothesized that minority stressors would positively predict mental health problems and that 2) group-level coping and social support variables would moderate these predictions negatively. Data from 1,188 German self-identified gay men were collected online. The questionnaire included items about socio-demographics, minority stress (victimization, rejection sensitivity, and internalized homonegativity), group-level coping (disclosure of sexual orientation, homopositivity, gay affirmation, gay rights support, and gay rights activism), and social support (gay social support and non-gay social support). A moderated multiple regression was conducted. Minority stressors positively predicted mental health problems. Group-level coping did not interact with minority stressors, with the exception of disclosure and homopositivity interacting marginally with some minority stressors. Further, only two interactions were found for social support variables and minority stress, one of them marginal. Gay and non-gay social support inversely predicted mental health problems. In addition, disclosure and homopositivity marginally predicted mental health problems. The findings imply that the minority stress theory should be modified. Disclosure does not have a relevant effect on mental health, while social support variables directly influence mental health of gay men. Group-level coping does not interact with minority stressors relevantly, and only one relevant interaction between social support and minority stress was found. Further longitudinal or experimental replication is needed before transferring the results to mental health interventions and prevention strategies for gay men.

  16. How to create more supportive supervision for primary healthcare: lessons from Ngamiland district of Botswana: co-operative inquiry group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkomazana, Oathokwa; Mash, Robert; Wojczewski, Silvia; Kutalek, Ruth; Phaladze, Nthabiseng

    2016-01-01

    Background Supportive supervision is a way to foster performance, productivity, motivation, and retention of health workforce. Nevertheless there is a dearth of evidence of the impact and acceptability of supportive supervision in low- and middle-income countries. This article describes a participatory process of transforming the supervisory practice of district health managers to create a supportive environment for primary healthcare workers. Objective The objective of the study was to explore how district health managers can change their practice to create a more supportive environment for primary healthcare providers. Design A facilitated co-operative inquiry group (CIG) was formed with Ngamiland health district managers. CIG belongs to the participatory action research paradigm and is characterised by a cyclic process of observation, reflection, planning, and action. The CIG went through three cycles between March 2013 and March 2014. Results Twelve district health managers participated in the inquiry group. The major insights and learning that emerged from the inquiry process included inadequate supervisory practice, perceptions of healthcare workers’ experiences, change in the managers’ supervision paradigm, recognition of the supervisors’ inadequate supervisory skills, and barriers to supportive supervision. Finally, the group developed a 10-point consensus on what they had learnt regarding supportive supervision. Conclusion Ngamiland health district managers have come to appreciate the value of supportive supervision and changed their management style to be more supportive of their subordinates. They also developed a consensus on supportive supervision that could be adapted for use nationally. Supportive supervision should be prioritised at all levels of the health system, and it should be adequately resourced. PMID:27345024

  17. Disability and family in the People's Republic of China: implementation, benefits, and comparison of two mutual support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Helen; McCabe, Karen

    2013-03-01

    The authors and 2 Chinese parents established 2 support groups in China. One group was for parents of children with autism, and the other was for young adults with either mental health issues or intellectual disability, and their parents. The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning and effectiveness of these groups from the parents' perspectives. Qualitative interviews and questionnaires were completed by members of the groups, across the first 16 months. Facilitator monthly reports were also analysed. Members of both groups found the groups provided a feeling of belonging and a place to interact with similar people. Differences existed relating to perspectives on the purpose of the groups and how families benefited, as well as in participation rates. Suggestions were provided by members. Implications of the differences in participation and desires of the parents are considered, including the understanding and perceptions of various disabilities in China.

  18. The Potential of a Mobile Group Blog to Support Cultural Learning among Overseas Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yinjuan; Crook, Charles

    2015-01-01

    We explored the use of mobile social software, in the form of a mobile group blog, to assist cultural learning. The potential of using this technology for cultural adaptation among overseas students was examined as those students adapted to the everyday life of studying abroad. Two pilot studies and a successful field study of a mobile group blog…

  19. Multipoint Multimedia Conferencing System with Group Awareness Support and Remote Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Noritaka; Asai, Kikuo

    2008-01-01

    A multipoint, multimedia conferencing system called FocusShare is described that uses IPv6/IPv4 multicasting for real-time collaboration, enabling video, audio, and group awareness information to be shared. Multiple telepointers provide group awareness information and make it easy to share attention and intention. In addition to pointing with the…

  20. The Melanoma care study: protocol of a randomised controlled trial of a psycho-educational intervention for melanoma survivors at high risk of developing new primary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieng, Mbathio; Kasparian, Nadine A; Morton, Rachael L; Mann, Graham J; Butow, Phyllis; Menzies, Scott; Costa, Daniel S J; Cust, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Despite a good prognosis for most melanoma survivors, many experience substantial fear of new or recurrent melanoma, worry and anxiety about the future, and unmet healthcare needs. In this protocol, we outline the design and methods of the Melanoma Care Study for melanoma survivors at high risk of developing new primary disease. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a psycho-educational intervention for improving psychological and behavioural adjustment to melanoma risk. The study design is a two-arm randomised controlled trial comparing a psycho-educational intervention to usual care. The intervention is comprised of a newly-developed psycho-educational booklet and three telephone sessions delivered by a trained psychologist. A total of 154 melanoma survivors at high risk of developing new primary disease who are attending one of three melanoma high risk clinics in New South Wales, Australia, will be recruited. Participants will be assessed at baseline (6 weeks before their high risk clinic dermatological appointment), and then 4 weeks and 6 months after their appointment. If effectiveness of the intervention is demonstrated at 6 months, an additional assessment at 12 months is planned. The primary outcome is fear of new or recurrent melanoma, as assessed by the Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory (FCRI). Secondary outcomes include anxiety, depression, unmet supportive care needs, satisfaction with clinical care, knowledge, behavioural adjustment to melanoma risk, quality of life, and cost-effectiveness of the intervention from a health system perspective. Following the intention-to-treat principle, linear mixed models will be used to analyse the data to account for repeated measures. A process evaluation will also be carried out to inform and facilitate potential translation and implementation into clinical practice. This study will provide high quality evidence on the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a psycho-educational

  1. The Melbourne Family Support Program: evidence-based strategies that prepare family caregivers for supporting palliative care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter; Aranda, Sanchia

    2014-09-01

    A key component of palliative care is support for family caregivers. Although some family caregivers identify positive aspects, the impact is typically burdensome; they are prone to physical and psychological morbidity, financial disadvantage and social isolation. Outcomes of systematic reviews have highlighted the importance of investment in family caregiver intervention research. To provide an overview of the development, evaluation and outcomes arising from of a programme of research (The Melbourne Family Support Program (FSP)), which focused on reducing the psychosocial burden of family caregivers. Developmental work involved a systematic literature review; focus groups with family caregivers and health professionals; and identification of a conceptual framework. Following a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT), a programme of psychoeducational intervention studies was developed and tested; one via RCT, the others via prepost test. Four psychoeducational interventions, incorporating one-to-one and group format delivery, conducted in both the home and inpatient hospital/hospice were evaluated. Statistically significant outcomes included improvements in family caregivers' preparedness, competence, positive emotions, more favourable levels of psychological wellbeing and a reduction in unmet needs. Internationally endorsed guidelines for the psychosocial support of family caregivers were produced and several resources were constructed. Fifteen publications in international peer-reviewed journals have arisen from this programme. The interventions and resources from the Melbourne FSP provide several evidenced-based and clinically relevant approaches that focus on reducing the psychosocial burden of the caregiving role. In several instances, however, more rigorous methodological testing is advocated. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. The impact of self-transcendence on physical health status promotion in multiple sclerosis patients attending peer support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JadidMilani, Maryam; Ashktorab, Tahereh; AbedSaeedi, Zhila; AlaviMajd, Hamid

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of self-transcendence on the physical health of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients attending peer support groups. This study was a quasi-experimental before-and-after design including 33 MS patients in three groups: 10 men in the men-only group, 11 women in the women-only group, and 12 men and women in the mixed group. Participants were required to attend eight weekly sessions of 2 h each. Instruments included the physical health section of the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life Inventory and Reed's Self-Transcendence Scale. Peer support group attendance was found to have a significant positive effect on the physical health and self-transcendence of MS patients when comparing average scores before and after attendance. Regression analysis showed that improvement in self-transcendence predicted improvement in physical health. Results show the positive effects of peer support groups on self-transcendence and physical health in MS patients, and suggest that improvement in well-being can be gained by promoting self-transcendence and physical health. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Psychoeducation with problem-solving (PEPS) therapy for adults with personality disorder: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a manualised intervention to improve social functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurran, Mary; Crawford, Mike J; Reilly, Joe; Delport, Juan; McCrone, Paul; Whitham, Diane; Tan, Wei; Duggan, Conor; Montgomery, Alan A; Williams, Hywel C; Adams, Clive E; Jin, Huajie; Lewis, Matthew; Day, Florence

    2016-07-01

    If effective, less intensive treatments for people with personality disorder have the potential to serve more people. To compare the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of psychoeducation with problem-solving (PEPS) therapy plus usual treatment against usual treatment alone in improving social problem-solving with adults with personality disorder. Multisite two-arm, parallel-group, pragmatic randomised controlled superiority trial. Community mental health services in three NHS trusts in England and Wales. Community-dwelling adults with any personality disorder recruited from community mental health services. Up to four individual sessions of psychoeducation, a collaborative dialogue about personality disorder, followed by 12 group sessions of problem-solving therapy to help participants learn a process for solving interpersonal problems. The primary outcome was measured by the Social Functioning Questionnaire (SFQ). Secondary outcomes were service use (general practitioner records), mood (measured via the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and client-specified three main problems rated by severity. We studied the mechanism of change using the Social Problem-Solving Inventory. Costs were identified using the Client Service Receipt Inventory and quality of life was identified by the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions questionnaire. Research assistants blinded to treatment allocation collected follow-up information. There were 739 people referred for the trial and 444 were eligible. More adverse events in the PEPS arm led to a halt to recruitment after 306 people were randomised (90% of planned sample size); 154 participants received PEPS and 152 received usual treatment. The mean age was 38 years and 67% were women. Follow-up at 72 weeks after randomisation was completed for 62% of participants in the usual-treatment arm and 73% in the PEPS arm. Intention-to-treat analyses compared individuals as randomised, regardless of treatment received or

  4. Aversive workplace conditions and absenteeism: taking referent group norms and supervisor support into account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biron, Michal; Bamberger, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Past research reveals inconsistent findings regarding the association between aversive workplace conditions and absenteeism, suggesting that other, contextual factors may play a role in this association. Extending contemporary models of absence, we draw from the social identity theory of attitude-behavior relations to examine how peer absence-related norms and leader support combine to explain the effect of aversive workplace conditions on absenteeism. Using a prospective design and a random sample of transit workers, we obtained results indicating that perceived job hazards and exposure to critical incidents are positively related to subsequent absenteeism, but only under conditions of more permissive peer absence norms. Moreover, this positive impact of peer norms on absenteeism is amplified among employees perceiving their supervisor to be less supportive and is attenuated to the point of nonsignificance among those viewing their supervisor as more supportive. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. LANL Institutional Decision Support By Process Modeling and Analysis Group (AET-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, Steven Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-04-04

    AET-2 has expertise in process modeling, economics, business case analysis, risk assessment, Lean/Six Sigma tools, and decision analysis to provide timely decision support to LANS leading to continuous improvement. This capability is critical during the current tight budgetary environment as LANS pushes to identify potential areas of cost savings and efficiencies. An important arena is business systems and operations, where processes can impact most or all laboratory employees. Lab-wide efforts are needed to identify and eliminate inefficiencies to accomplish Director McMillan’s charge of “doing more with less.” LANS faces many critical and potentially expensive choices that require sound decision support to ensure success. AET-2 is available to provide this analysis support to expedite the decisions at hand.

  6. Gender differences in computer-mediated communication: a systematic literature review of online health-related support groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Phoenix K H; Malik, Sumaira H; Coulson, Neil S

    2009-04-01

    Previous research has contended that the unique characteristics of the Internet might remove some of the gender differences that exist in face-to-face healthcare. The aims of the present study were to systematically review studies that have examined gender differences in communication within online health communities. A literature search was conducted to identify studies addressing gender differences in messages posted to online health-related support groups. Out of the 1186 articles identified, twelve were retrieved for review. Half of the studies examined gender differences by comparing male and female cancer discussion boards. The literature review revealed that some gender differences were observed in these studies. However, for studies that analysed mixed-gender communities, gender differences were less evident. Results seemed to reveal gender differences in communications in single-sex online health support groups, and similarities in communication patterns in mixed-sex online health support groups. However, findings should be treated with caution due to the diversity in studies and methodological issues highlighted in the present review. There is a need for health care professionals to take into account a range of situational and contextual factors that may affect how men and women use online health support groups. However, more robust research is needed before concrete guidelines can be developed to help health care professionals develop effective online support interventions.

  7. Should Health Care Organizations Use Information Gleaned from Organization-Sponsored Patient Support Groups in Strategic Planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambisan, Priya

    2017-11-01

    Online forums and partnerships with patients have several benefits, such as the creation of new products and services. However, as with any such initiatives, there are risks as well as benefits. Through analysis of a case of misinformation being spread through a health care provider-sponsored online support group for patients dealing with obesity, this article outlines best practices and strategies to deploy in such organization-sponsored patient support groups. These strategies would enable organizations and patients to use such forums to the fullest extent while preventing or managing their potential risks as best as possible. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Emotional Self-Disclosure in Online Breast Cancer Support Groups: Examining Theme, Reciprocity, and Linguistic Style Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloch, Yining Z; Taylor, Laramie D

    2018-02-05

    The present study investigated emotional self-disclosure (ESD) patterns and their effects in online support groups specific to different stages of breast cancer. Linguistic features of messages posted to an online breast cancer support group were analyzed. ESD was common, and was consistent across four stage forums. Emotional talk was linked to a variety of themes, but most prominently in the context of discussions about social connections rather than health or death. Linguistic style matching mediated the relationship between ESD in posts and reciprocal ESD in comments, suggesting a key role for mutual understanding and engagement between posters and commenters. Implications for health communication theory and practice were discussed.

  9. Importance of Group Therapeutic Support for Family Members of Children with Alopecia Areata: A Cross-Sectional Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbeck, Kelly A; McFarland, Sarah L; Hordinsky, Maria K; Lindgren, Bruce R; Farah, Ronda S

    2017-07-01

    The psychological effect of alopecia areata (AA) is well documented, but group interaction may help lessen this burden. We aimed to determine factors that draw patients with AA and their families to group events. Surveys were administered at the annual alopecia areata bowling social in 2015 and 2016. This event is a unique opportunity for children with AA and their families to meet others with the disease and connect with local support group resources from the Minnesota branch of the National Alopecia Areata Foundation. Data from 2015 and 2016 were combined. Comparisons of subgroups were performed using Fisher exact tests for response frequencies and percentages and two-sample t tests for mean values. An equal number of men and women participated in the study (n = 13 each). The average age was 41.1 years. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in survey responses based on respondent age or sex. Twenty-three (88.5%) attendees sought to connect with others with AA and met three or more people during the event. Seventeen (65.4%) also attended other support group events. Twelve respondents (46.2%) came to support a friend or family member. One hundred percent of attendees identified socializing with others with AA as important. Group interaction is an important source of therapeutic support for people with AA and their families. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effect of psycho-educational interventions on quality of life in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chi-Wen; Chen, Miao-Yi; Chen, Ting-Yu; Lin, Pai-Hui

    2016-09-30

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) were developed for primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death. However, ICD recipients' mortality is significantly predicted by their quality of life (QOL). The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of psycho-educational interventions on QOL in patients with ICDs. We systematically searched PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL through April 2015 and references of relevant articles. Studies were reviewed if they met following criteria: (1) randomized controlled trial, (2) participants were adults with an ICD, and (3) data were sufficient to evaluate the effect of psychological or educational interventions on QOL measured by the SF-36 or SF-12. Studies were independently selected and their data were extracted by two reviewers. Study quality was evaluated using a modified Jadad scale. The meta-analysis was conducted using the Cochrane Collaboration's Review Manager Software Package (RevMan 5). Study heterogeneity was assessed by Q statistics and I 2 statistic. Depending on heterogeneity, data were pooled across trials using fixed-effect or random-effect modeling. Seven randomized controlled trials fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and included 1017 participants. The psycho-educational interventions improved physical component summary (PCS) scores in the intervention groups more than in control groups (mean difference 2.08, 95 % CI 0.86 to 3.29, p educational interventions improved the physical component, but not the mental component of QOL in patients with ICDs.

  11. Effects of a psycho-educational programme on health-related quality of life in patients treated for colorectal and anal cancer: A feasibilit