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Sample records for psychiatric disabilities social

  1. Social mobility and psychiatric disabilities: an assessment of the social causation and social selection hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun-Uk; Han, Chang-Wan; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2010-09-01

    Social mobility is the movement of individuals, families and groups from one social position to another. Researchers indicate that people with psychiatric disabilities tend to come from lower socioeconomic status groups, and that the causal relationship between lower socioeconomic status and mental illness occurs through social mobility process. The purpose of this study was to examine the occupational social mobility process of a sample of self-identified psychiatrically disabled individuals who have been active members of the labor force for most of their adult lives. A total of 200 participants were recruited from the customers of a One-Stop Career Center in Gloucester County, New Jersey. The social mobility pattern of persons with psychiatric disabilities was compared to that of persons without psychiatric disabilities (n = 100 for each group). That is, the social selection and the social causation hypotheses were applied to the social mobility patterns of people with psychiatric disabilities. It was revealed that the social class distribution for fathers of people with psychiatric disabilities was not different from that of people without psychiatric disabilities and also there was no significant social mobility difference between the two groups. These findings do not support the social causation and the social selection hypotheses. Specifically, the findings demonstrate that occupational capabilities and skills of people with psychiatric disabilities have been stabilized and are similar to those of people without psychiatric disabilities. Furthermore, these results may dispute several biases and prejudices with regard to social mobility process of persons with psychiatric disabilities.

  2. Experiences of Social Work Educators Working with Students with Psychiatric Disabilities or Emotional Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Social work educators have an ethical responsibility to graduate students who are academically, behaviorally, and professionally prepared to enter the social work profession. Although a student's suitability to the profession is not necessarily hindered because of the effects of a psychiatric disability or an emotional problem, sometimes it is.…

  3. Social interaction among people with psychiatric disabilities--does attending a day centre matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentzell, Elisabeth; Leufstadius, Christel; Eklund, Mona

    2014-09-01

    Engaging in social interaction has, for people with psychiatric disabilities, been shown to enhance well-being and the experience of meaning and to generally prevent the worsening of mental illness. The aim of the study was to investigate how day centre attendees differed from non-attendees regarding different aspects of social interaction and to investigate how occupational factors, including day centre attendance, and previously known predictors were related to social interaction in the study sample as a whole. A total of 93 day centre attendees and 82 non-attendees with psychiatric disabilities were examined regarding social interaction, subjective perception of occupation, activity level, sense of self-mastery and socio-demographic and clinical variables. Data were analysed with non-parametric statistics, mainly logistic regression. Social support was mainly provided by informal caregivers such as family members. The day centre attendees had more social relations but did not experience better quality or closeness in their relationships than non-attendees. Important factors for social interaction were subjective perceptions of daily occupation, being married/cohabiting, self-mastery and severity of psychiatric symptoms. Alternative ways of enhancing social interactions in the community is needed, targeting the group's feeling of satisfaction and value in daily life together with self-mastery. © The Author(s) 2013.

  4. College Students with Psychiatric Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Delar K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on college students with psychiatric disabilities. It defines and discusses various psychiatric conditions such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, and personality disorders. It concludes with accommodations that a college professor can make to help these students succeed in higher education. (Contains 1…

  5. Cognitive Predictors of Work Among Social Security Disability Insurance Beneficiaries With Psychiatric Disorders Enrolled in IPS Supported Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, Susan R; Drake, Robert E; Xie, Haiyi; Riley, Jarnee; Milfort, Roline; Hale, Thomas W; Frey, William

    2017-08-31

    Impaired cognitive functioning is a significant predictor of work dysfunction in schizophrenia. Less is known, however about relationships of cognition and work in people with less severe disorders with relatively normal cognitive functioning. This secondary analysis evaluated cognitive predictors of work in Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries with a recent work history who were randomized to receive mental health services, supported employment, and freedom from work disincentives over a 2-year study period in the Mental Health Treatment Study. Of the 1045 participants randomized to the treatment package, 945 (90.4%) received a cognitive assessment at study entry. Competitive work activity was evaluated using a computer-assisted timeline follow-back calendar at baseline and quarterly for 24 months. Mood disorders were the most common psychiatric diagnoses (64.9%), followed by schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (35.1%). Tobit regression analyses predicting the average number of hours worked per week, controlling for demographic characteristics, diagnosis, and work history indicated that the cognitive composite score (P work over the study period. Cognitive functioning predicted work over 2 years in SSDI beneficiaries with mood or schizophrenia-spectrum disorders who were receiving supported employment and mental health interventions, despite a relative absence of cognitive impairment in the study participants. The findings suggest cognitive functioning contributes to competitive work outcomes in persons with psychiatric disorders who have relatively unimpaired cognitive abilities, even under optimal conditions of treatment and vocational support. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Evaluation of social disablement, psychiatric symptoms and autonomy in long-stay psychiatric patients Avaliação do comportamento social, sintomas psiquiátricos e autonomia em pacientes psiquiátricos de longa permanência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Abelha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Data on prevalence of social disablement, psychiatric symptoms and independent living skills in long-stay psychiatric patients are scarce in Brazil. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was carried out on a population of 881 long-stay psychiatric patients. METHOD: Data were collected from all the patients living in the Municipal Mental Health Institute from Rio de Janeiro city, using 3 instruments: Social Behaviour Schedule (SBS-BR, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, and Independent Living Skills Survey (ILSS-BR. RESULTS: 75% of total patients presented poor independent living skills, and high rates of social disablement, specially in the items: poor self care (50,9%, little spontaneous communication (46,2% and underactivity (37,5%. 15.1% of schizophrenic patients showed severe symptoms of hallucinations, delusions and conceptual disorganization.11.5% did not present psychiatric symptoms in the last month, and 16% showed no social disablement CONCLUSION: 50% of patients are older than 65 years and have been living in the institution for more than 38 years. They present high rates of problem behaviours and poor autonomy. Our data should suggest the adoption of treatment programs or interventions for those patients. Also, there is a group without psychiatric symptoms, good autonomy degree and no social disablement that could live in therapeutic residences in the community.INTRODUÇÃO: No Brasil ainda são escassos os dados sobre limitações no comportamento social, sintomas psiquiátricos e habilidades de vida independente. Nesse sentido foi realizado um estudo seccional em uma população de 881 pacientes psiquiátricos de longa permanência. METODOLOGIA: Foram coletados dados de todos os pacientes residentes no Instituto Municipal Juliano Moreira, utilizando três instrumentos: Avaliação das Limitações no Comportamento Social (SBS-BR, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS e o Inventário de Habilidades de Vida Independente para

  7. Examining differences in developmental work personality across disability category: Implications for individuals with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Deirdre; Strauser, David R; Wong, Alex W K

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the differences in levels of work personality for persons with psychiatric disabilities compared to persons with other types of disabilities. Seventy one adults eligible to receive Vocational Rehabilitation services participated; 30 reported a physical disability, 26 reported a psychiatric disability, and 15 reported a learning disability. Eligible participants were recruited through VR offices and volunteered to participate. Results indicate that persons with psychiatric disabilities scored significantly lower on the Work Task and Social Skills subscales of the Developmental Work Personality Scale (DWPS) when compared to individuals with physical disabilities, but scored higher than individuals with physical and learning disabilities on the Role Model subscale. The results of this study provide some initial clarity regarding developmental work personality differences among three broad categories of disability. Recommendations for future research are provided.

  8. The dialectic of friendship for people with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydell, Katherine M; Gladstone, Brenda M; Crawford, Elaine Stasiulis

    2002-01-01

    In the psychiatric literature, the meaning and importance of friendship has remained largely unexplored, subsumed under the rubric of social support or viewed as a component of community integration. Twenty-one qualitative interviews were conducted with individuals suffering from psychiatric disabilities focusing on the meaning of friendship as they described it. Analysis revealed the contrasts, contradiction and paradox of friendship for this group of people. The ongoing struggles of people with psychiatric disabilities regarding the need to connect with others and have friends, and conversely, the need to be alone and to withdraw from others, was highlighted.

  9. Working with Students with Psychiatric Disabilities or Other Emotional Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Elena T.

    2015-01-01

    The professional literature on gatekeeping in social work education has grown; however, there remains a dearth in the literature regarding how educators truly work to engage students who are experiencing a psychiatric disability or other emotional problem. This qualitative study explored the experiences of 26 social work educators from 22 colleges…

  10. Validation of the Verbal and Social Interaction questionnaire: carers' focus in the carer-resident relationship in supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities (VSI-SH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, D; Rask, M

    2013-04-01

    A questionnaire to measure the verbal and social interactions between carers and residents in supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities has been developed. It is an adaptation of a questionnaire originally used in a forensic psychiatric setting. The aim of the present study was thus to investigate the construct validity and the reliability of this new version of the Verbal and Social Interactions questionnaire for use in supported housing facilities (VSI-SH). Two hundred and twenty-three carers from municipal and privately run housing facilities completed the questionnaire. A factor analysis was performed, which resulted in six factors. The number of items was reduced from the original 47 to 30 in order to minimize factorial complexity and multiple loadings. The reliability was tested with Cronbach's alpha and good internal consistency for the questionnaire and five of the six factors was found. The resulting six factors and the items were compared to the conceptual model and four of the six factors corresponded well with the categories in this original theoretical model. The questionnaire can be a useful contribution to the study of interactions between carers and residents in supported housing facilities for persons with psychiatric disabilities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  11. [Social psychiatric service as a cornerstone of psychiatric community care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, P; Tiggemann, H G

    1991-12-01

    Psychiatric care has gradually been shifting in Germany from its original inpatient basis to outpatient and complementary treatment. This shift of emphasis resulted in a transfer of psychiatry-political responsibility to communal bodies and hence also to communal public health services. Sociopsychiatric service ranks high in communal psychiatric care setups, since it promotes cooperation and helps to coordinate efforts in individual cases in respect of focal points on which such care is centered. For the future, an expert commission has suggested that the various institutions actively engaged in community psychiatric care should team up in each region. This applies in particular to mobile services visiting the patients in their homes, and to the offices providing contracts to sociopsychiatric services of public health offices. Despite positive outlooks there are also quite a few negative aspects of present-day practice. One of them is poor definition of tasks and functions of communal sociopsychiatric services, whereas another one are the unsatisfactory quantitative and qualitative means at their disposal. It is also too often overlooked that psychiatric patients and disabled persons are entitled to compensation insurance payments to promote their rehabilitation, as provided for by individual legislation in the various German laender. To tap these sources sufficiently well, sociopsychiatric services must be better equipped in every respect. The professional competence of social workers and physicians, as well as of the relevant staff, must be safeguarded by continuing education and specialist training measures.

  12. Psychiatric Disability in Law Enforcement Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Marilyn

    2017-03-01

    Law enforcement officers all across the world are exposed to violence, confrontation, and traumatic incidents. They regularly witness death and suffering and are at risk of personal injury. Psychiatric sequelae include an increased risk for trauma-related symptoms, depression, alcohol-use disorders, and stress-related medical conditions. Law enforcement officers have been applying for early disability retirement pensions at an increased rate for stress-related psychiatric and medical conditions. As a result, law enforcement agencies are prematurely losing valuable resources, officers with training and experience. Departments have become proactive in trying to address mental health issues to prevent psychiatric disability by implementing employee wellness plans and stress reduction interventions. Programs have been developed to mitigate the effects of stress on law enforcement personnel. Many law enforcement agencies have developed strategies to encourage early confidential referral for psychiatric treatment. They utilize peer support groups and employee assistance programs and develop alliances with mental health professionals. When these approaches fail, a fitness for duty process can be used to identify impairment in work functioning due to psychiatric factors with the prospect of later returning the officer to full duty. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Psychiatric diagnostic screening of social maladaptive behavior in children with mild intellectual disability: Differentiating disordered attachment and pervasive developmental disorder behavior.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giltaij, H.P.; Sterkenburg, P.S.; Schuengel, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children with intellectual disability (ID) are at risk for maladaptive development of social relatedness. Controversy exists whether Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) takes precedence over disordered attachment for describing maladaptive social behaviour. The aim of this study was

  14. Psychiatric evaluation of intellectually disabled offenders referred to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psychiatric evaluation of intellectually disabled offenders referred to the Free State Psychiatric Complex, 1993 - 2003. ... Increased crime is a problem in South Africa and complications arise when the accused is intellectually disabled. The accountability and fitness to stand trial of such individuals is an important facet that ...

  15. Psychiatric Disorders and Behavior Problems in People with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrbakk, Even; von Tetzchner, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between behavior problems and psychiatric disorders in individuals with intellectual disability is still unresolved. The present study compares the prevalence and pattern of psychiatric disorders in individuals with intellectual disability who were assessed on the ABC to have moderate and severe behavior problems and a matched…

  16. Women with and without intellectual disability and psychiatric disorders: an examination of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggart, L; McMillan, R; Lawson, A

    2008-09-01

    This article examines the literature on women with and without intellectual disability and psychiatric disorders, using a gender social model of health. Relevant empirical studies, international literature reviews and policies between 1980 and 2007 were identified from electronic databases, journals and secondary sources. Three areas were examined: psychiatric disorders, their contextual background, and their clinical presentation. There are minimal levels of research into women with intellectual disability and psychiatric disorders. However, this article hypothesizes that women with intellectual disability have higher rates of psychiatric disorders than women without. This may result from greater vulnerability related both to internal factors (;intra': cognitive deficits, poorer communication skills, limited social skills) and to the external world (;inter': lack of opportunities, stigma, poor social support networks). The article argues that such women require gender-sensitive mental health services. However, more empirical evidence is required to support this claim and to inform development and delivery of services.

  17. Psychiatric Diagnostic Screening of Social Maladaptive Behaviour in Children with Mild Intellectual Disability: Differentiating Disordered Attachment and Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giltaij, H. P.; Sterkenburg, P. S.; Schuengel, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children with intellectual disability (ID) are at risk for maladaptive development of social relatedness. Controversy exists whether Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) takes precedence over disordered attachment for describing maladaptive social behaviour. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of disordered attachment…

  18. Psychiatric implications of language disorders and learning disabilities: risks and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundheim, Suzanne T P V; Voeller, Kytja K S

    2004-10-01

    This article reviews the relationship between different learning disabilities, language disorders, and the psychiatric disorders that are commonly associated with learning disabilities and language disorder: attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety disorders, depression, and conduct or antisocial personality disorder. The complex associations between language disorders and specific learning disabilities--dyslexia, nonverbal learning disorder, dyscalculia--and the various psychiatric disorders are discussed. Clinical vignettes are presented to highlight the impact of these disorders on a child's social and psychological development and the importance of early recognition and treatment.

  19. Occupational disability on psychiatric grounds in South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: School-teachers are exposed to high levels of stress and have high rates of premature retirement on psychiatric grounds. This study investigated factors ... displayed classroom phobia. Conclusion: Work-related stress is a major factor in South African teachers with occupational disability on psychiatric grounds.

  20. Barriers to Employment for Transition-age Youth with Developmental and Psychiatric Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Valerie A; Oulvey, Eugene; Drake, Robert E; Bond, Gary R

    2017-05-01

    Youth with developmental and psychiatric disabilities encounter significant vocational challenges, even when they receive supported employment services. We examined the barriers to employment for 280 transition-age youth with disabilities enrolled in supported employment in eight community rehabilitation centers. Employment team members identified each youth's top three barriers to employment using a 21-item checklist. Lack of work experience, transportation problems, and program engagement issues represented common barriers for both youth with developmental disabilities (53, 36, and 25%) and youth with psychiatric disabilities (20, 33, and 26%). Additional common barriers among youth with developmental disabilities included cognitive problems (32%) and lack of social skills (23%) and among youth with psychiatric disabilities included poor control of psychiatric symptoms (23%). Despite receiving evidence-based employment services, youth with disabilities encounter many barriers to employment. Awareness of typical barriers for transition-age youth, including those specific to different disability groups, may help employment programs anticipate challenges and develop strategies that avoid these barriers and their effects on employment opportunities.

  1. Psychiatric Service Use and Psychiatric Disorders in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaumik, S.; Tyrer, F. C.; McGrother, C.; Ganghadaran, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: UK policies aim to facilitate access to general psychiatric services for adults with intellectual disability (ID). If this is to be achieved, it is important to have a clear idea of the characteristics and proportion of people with ID who currently access specialist psychiatric services and the nature and extent of psychiatric…

  2. Psychiatric impairment and disability assessment — proposals to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impairment and disability assessment on psychiatric grounds has always been subjective, controversial and at best, a difficult task. The South African Society of Psychiatrists (SASOP) needs to be congratulated, firstly on being instrumental in the publication of the first 'Guidelines to the Management of Disability Claims on ...

  3. Disability and social stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, R

    1991-12-01

    This paper suggests that, for a variety of reasons, the sociology of social stratification--and, as a consequence, mainstream sociology more generally--has neglected the topic of disability. Using material drawn from a range of sources, it is argued that disability is related in definite ways to social class. Further, it is also argued that disability must be considered as a factor contributing to the production and reproduction of stratification in its own right, independently of class relations. These arguments are further advanced in the course of a more detailed consideration of research evidence concerned with mental handicap. The paper ends with a consideration of the role of non-class factors--specifically social status and citizenship--in the stratification systems of modern industrial societies.

  4. Causal attributions of job loss among people with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanctôt, Nathalie; Bergeron-Brossard, Prunelle; Sanquirgo, Nathalie; Corbière, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Guided by Weiner's attribution theory (1985), the aim of this study is to describe the reasons given by people with psychiatric disabilities to explain job loss. Using a sample of 126 people with psychiatric disabilities participating in a prospective study design, the authors evaluated the causal attributions pattern to explain job loss. During a 9-month follow-up phone interview, clients of supported employment programs were asked to explain the reasons why they had lost their jobs. The reasons provided were categorized according to type of job loss (voluntarily vs. involuntarily), locus of control (external vs. internal) and controllability (controllable vs. uncontrollable). The results show that 73% of participants had voluntarily ended their jobs. For the majority of participants, the reasons given to explain job loss were related to external and uncontrollable factors. Moreover, men used more external (34.1% vs. 23%) and uncontrollable (68.2% vs. 40%) reasons than women. Severity of symptoms and level of education also affected the attributional pattern. However, self-esteem, psychiatric diagnosis and work centrality did not correlate significantly to the attributional pattern. The results demonstrated that reasons given to explain job loss among people with psychiatric disabilities are mostly external. A more systematic evaluation of environmental factors should be put in place to favor longer job tenure for people with psychiatric disabilities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Higher education and psychiatric disabilities: national survey of campus disability services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Mary Elizabeth; Mowbray, Carol T

    2005-04-01

    Students with psychiatric disabilities are an increasing presence on college and university campuses. However, there is little factual information about the services available to these students in campus disability services offices or the extent to which they use these services. This article reports the results of a survey of disability services offices at colleges and universities in 10 states. Data from 275 schools revealed the number of students with psychiatric disabilities seeking assistance from disability services offices, characteristics of these offices, and the types of services they provide. Survey data also identified barriers to full participation of these students in academic settings. Implications of the study are discussed to inform policy and postsecondary institutional practices with the goal of better serving psychiatrically disabled students to maximize their talents and potential. Copyright (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Mind over matter? The role of individual perceptions in understanding the social ecology of housing environments for individuals with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Greg; Kloos, Bret

    2014-12-01

    There is a disagreement in place-based research regarding whether objective indicators or individual perceptions of environments are better predictors of well-being. This study assessed environmental influences on well-being for 373 individuals with psychiatric disabilities living independently in 66 neighborhoods in the southeastern United States. Three questions were examined utilizing random effects models: (1) How much variance in personal and neighborhood well-being can be explained by neighborhood membership? (2) What is the relationship between participant perceptions of neighborhood quality and researcher ratings of neighborhood quality? and (3) What is the relative influence of individual perceptions, perceptions aggregated by neighborhood, and researcher ratings of neighborhood quality in predicting personal and neighborhood well-being? Results indicate that individual perceptions of neighborhood quality were more closely related to well-being than either aggregated perceptions or researcher ratings. Thus, participants' perceptions of their neighborhoods were more important indicators of their well-being than objective ratings made by researchers. Findings have implications for measurement approaches and intervention design in placed-based research.

  7. [Comorbid psychiatric disorders and differential diagnosis of patients with autism spectrum disorder without intellectual disability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunz, Sandra; Dziobek, Isabel; Roepke, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) without intellectual disability are often diagnosed late in life. Little is known about co-occurring psychiatric disorders and differential diagnosis of ASC in adulthood, particularly with regard to personality disorders. What kind of comorbid psychiatric disorders occur in ASC? Which are the most prevalent differential diagnoses in a sample of patients who seek autism specific clinical diagnostics? 118 adults who were referred with a presumed diagnosis of autistic disorder, were diagnosed with autism specific instruments and the prevalence of further psychiatric disorders was investigated. 59 (50%) fulfilled the criteria of ASC. 36% of the individuals with ASC fulfilled also criteria for a DSM-IV axis-I psychiatric disorder. Affective disorders (24%) and social phobia (14%) were the most prevalent comorbid disorders. The most frequent differential diagnoses were depression, social phobia, paranoid, avoidant and narcissistic personality disorder. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Concerns and Needs of University Students with Psychiatric Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Enid; Weiner, Judith

    1996-01-01

    A study using individual interviews with 24 university students with psychiatric disabilities identified five areas of concern: problems with focusing attention and organization, low self-esteem, problems with trust, stigma, and high stress levels. Findings point to need for comprehensive services, including peer support group, one-to-one…

  9. Occurrence of Medical Concerns in Psychiatric Outpatients with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Kousha; Modi, Miti; Hurlbut, Janice; Lunsky, Yona

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that adults with both intellectual disabilities (ID) and psychiatric disorders are at increased risk for physical health problems, few studies have described their medical concerns specifically. This study reports on the rates of physical health issues and completion of recommended health screenings among 78 adult outpatients with…

  10. Social Context of Disabled Parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchomiuk, Monika

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses parenting of individuals with disability. It was based on the perspective of barriers, which (next to the perspective of risk and the functional perspective) marks the nature of discourse this theme takes in the literature on the subject and in practice. The perspective of barriers, related to the social model of disability, emphasizes the social factors important for the quality of parenting of individuals with disability. These factors were analyzed on the basis of available research results with mothers and fathers with disability, and able-bodied individuals who are part of their professional and non-professional environment. The article draws attention to the specificity of socialization of individuals with disability and its significance for preparations for family roles, social attitudes towards disabled individuals' parenting, and their determinants. It also presents disabled parents' experiences and the importance of realizing their role of a mother or father.

  11. The social model of disability: dichotomy between impairment and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Dimitris; Kauffman, James M

    2013-08-01

    The rhetoric of the social model of disability is presented, and its basic claims are critiqued. Proponents of the social model use the distinction between impairment and disability to reduce disabilities to a single social dimension-social oppression. They downplay the role of biological and mental conditions in the lives of disabled people. Consequences of denying biological and mental realities involving disabilities are discussed. People will benefit most by recognizing both the biological and the social dimensions of disabilities.

  12. The effect of psychiatric rehabilitation on the activity and participation level of clients with long-term psychiatric disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, T.F. van; Felling, A.J.A.; Persoon, J.M.G.

    2003-01-01

    During the last decades of the 20th century, many psychiatric hospitals changed the living environments of their clients with long-term psychiatric disabilities. We investigated the effect of this environmental psychiatric rehabilitation and normalization process on the activity and participation

  13. The Effect of Psychiatric Rehabilitation on the Activity and Participation Level of Clients with Long-Term Psychiatric Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, Tom van; Felling, Albert; Persoon, Jean

    2003-01-01

    During the last decades of the 20th century, many psychiatric hospitals changed the living environments of their clients with long-term psychiatric disabilities. We investigated the effect of this environmental psychiatric rehabilitation and normalization process on the activity and participation

  14. Social Psychoanalytic Disability Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodley, Dan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores connections and tensions between psychoanalysis and disability studies. The first part of the paper considers contemporaneous engagements with the psyche by a number of disability studies writers. These scholars have remained accountable to a politicised disability studies but have pushed for critical encounters with the…

  15. Rethinking disability: the social model of disability and chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goering, Sara

    2015-06-01

    Disability is commonly viewed as a problem that exists in a person's body and requires medical treatment. The social model of disability, by contrast, distinguishes between impairment and disability, identifying the latter as a disadvantage that stems from a lack of fit between a body and its social environment. This paper describes the social model of disability and then considers how it might deal with chronic disease or impairment and why medical professionals should learn about disability perspectives to improve their practice.

  16. Rethinking disability: the social model of disability and chronic disease

    OpenAIRE

    Goering, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Disability is commonly viewed as a problem that exists in a person’s body and requires medical treatment. The social model of disability, by contrast, distinguishes between impairment and disability, identifying the latter as a disadvantage that stems from a lack of fit between a body and its social environment. This paper describes the social model of disability and then considers how it might deal with chronic disease or impairment and why medical professionals should learn about disability...

  17. Community orientation of services for persons with a psychiatric disability. Comparison between Estonia, Hungary and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prof. dr. Jean Pierre Wilken; Zsolt Bugarszki; Karin Hanga; Dagmar Narusson; Koidu Saia; Marju Medar

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the way mental health services and social services are orientated on assisting people with a psychiatric disability to participate in different areas of community life. A large research project about community participation in three different countries (Estonia, Hungary and the

  18. The politics of cinematic representation of disability: "the psychiatric gaze".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawn, Ranjita

    2014-01-01

    Social representations as cultural products rooted in praxis are considered to play dominant role in the structuring of identities or self representations. It is a common belief that people with disabilities analyze their experiences in light of the existing meanings and practices prevalent in society. The paper addresses the matrices of recurring themes in representation of disability and discourses of "normalcy" in films in the nineteenth and twentieth century invoking reductionistic attitude, whereby "disability" becomes a condition subject to neurotypical display and narrative coding in the films in question in the context of India. It will especially seek to analyze the theoretical outlook based on the social model of disability, a perspective that includes specific analyses of the representation of people like themselves in popular culture. A systematic and thorough review of 26 Hindi films ranging from the 1960s to 2010 and six English movies. Apart from these, several books and articles have also been critically reviewed. The paper concludes with the argument that the idea of disability in mainstream contemporary cinema has been created and perceived as a speculative fantasy and for public consumption, thus reflecting the current status of people with disabilities as the present preferred "enigmatic" condition. Implications for Rehabilitation Films play significant role in communicating characters which have deep impact on peoples' perspective of persons with disabilities. Filmmakers need to adopt more intensely researched and more sensitized approach in creating movies centering on people with disabilities. Films need to focus more on the potentialities rather than the shortcomings of people with disabilities. Filmmakers need adequate training in order to recognize the needs of the concerned population and adopt appropriate resources and interventions to address various issues for their rehabilitation into the mainstream society.

  19. Rethinking disability: the social model of disability and chronic disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goering, Sara

    2015-01-01

    .... The social model of disability, by contrast, distinguishes between impairment and disability, identifying the latter as a disadvantage that stems from a lack of fit between a body and its social environment...

  20. Attitudes toward the sexuality of persons with physical versus psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson-Ohayon, Ilanit; Hertz, Ifat; Vilchinsky, Noa; Kravetz, Shlomo

    2014-05-01

    Research has shown that attitudes toward different disabilities form a hierarchy, with observers exhibiting more positive attitudes toward persons with physical disabilities than toward persons with psychiatric disabilities. In addition, investigations of attitudes toward persons with a disability indicate that they are often perceived as asexual. The current study examined whether involvement of persons with either a physical or psychiatric disability in a sexual relationship moderates the relation between their type of disability and attitudes toward them. After reading one of six randomly assigned vignettes, university students (N = 195) filled out a semantic differential-based attitude scale (Katz & Shurka, 1977; Kravetz, Katz, & Albez, 1994). The six vignettes consisted of a male with a physical disability/with a psychiatric disability/without a disability, who was either involved/not involved in a sexual relationship. An interaction between type of disability and involvement in a sexual relationship was found for two subscales of the attitudes scale, occupation and intelligence. Involvement in a sexual relationship was found to generate more positive attitudes when the target person had a physical disability but more negative attitudes when he had a psychiatric disability. Involvement in a sexual relationship seems to work in favor of persons with a physical disability because of the association of such a relationship with normality and adaptation. However, attributing such a relationship to persons with a psychiatric disability seems to be stigmatic. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Depression, anxiety, and social disability show synchrony of change in primary care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, J.; von Korff, M; van den Brink, W.; Katon, W.; Brilman, E; Oldehinkel, T.

    Objectives. The purposes of this study were to (1) characterize the social disability associated with the common psychiatric illnesses of primary care patients in terms of role dysfunction (self-care, family role, social role, occupational role) and (2) establish whether severity of psychiatric

  2. Postsecondary Students With Psychiatric Disabilities Identify Core Services and Key Ingredients to Supporting Education Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biebel, Kathleen; Mizrahi, Raphael; Ringeisen, Heather

    2017-10-26

    Accessing and successfully completing postsecondary educational opportunities may be challenging for those living with psychiatric disabilities. This exploratory study highlights the experiences of individuals with psychiatric disabilities participating in postsecondary educational support initiatives. Investigators conducted case studies with 3 education support initiatives across the United States. Focus groups revealed what concrete supported education services were helpful and key ingredients in delivering education supports. Access to specialists, mindfulness techniques, help with time management and procrastination, and facilitating classroom accommodations were identified as critical. Developing authentic relationships with supported education staff, flexibility in service delivery and access to student peers living with psychiatric disabilities were noted as key ingredients in service delivery. Incorporating the voice of students with psychiatric disabilities into supported education services can increase access, involvement, and retention, therein providing more supports to students with psychiatric disabilities achieving their postsecondary education goals. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. SOCIAL JUSTICE FOR DISABLED PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazire Diker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to question the living conditions of disabled people in the 21st century from  the framework of social justice. The concept of “social justice” has a long history, influenced  by the works of numerous writers including Rawls (1971, Miller (1999, Reeves (2005, Fainstein (2009, Marcuse (2009 and Harvey (1992, 2009 and by the recent debates on  inequality, diversity, segregation, exclusion, and discrimination. The debates on segregation, exclusion and discrimination are generally focused on inequalities in terms of economic,  ethnic and gender dimensions; however, in these debates, there is very little reference to unequal opportunities of disabled people. On the other hand, the diversity issue is generally discussed with respect to ethnic and cultural elements, again with very little concern for the  rights of disabled people. In many developing countries, including Turkey, a legal framework  for addressing disability issues has started to be put in place. Awareness among governments and society of the needs and rights of people with disabilities is growing. In the  last decade in Turkey, the difficulties faced by disabled people have started to be taken into  consideration seriously. Before that, the only information about the disabled population could  be obtained from General Population Census in Turkey. In 2002 “Turkey Disability Survey” was carried out collectively by the State Institute of Statistics and the Presidency of  Administration on Disabled People. In this survey, it has been targeted to estimate the number of disabled people and comprehend their socio-economic characteristics, their  problems in social life, expectations, types and causes of disability, regional differences and also the proportion of population having chronic illnesses. After this survey, many projects  have started to be realized in order to propose strategies for eliminating discrimination in  Turkey. In this paper, we will

  4. Emerging adults with psychiatric disabilities involved with the criminal justice system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Stephanie W; Fisher, William H; Davis, Maryann

    2010-10-01

    Experiencing serious psychiatric problems during the transition from adolescence to adulthood intensifies the perils emerging adults confront. Emerging adults whose childhood and adolescent experiences include significant contact with the public mental health or criminal justice systems have numerous additional hurdles to overcome. Disruptions in education, few opportunities for involvement with nonpsychiatrically involved peers, and limited life experiences reflect difficulties developing normative social control, skills, and networks. This article examines the impact of age and multiple stigmatized statuses by comparing an emerging adult and older cohort of psychiatrically disabled offenders. It explores whether there are features (demographic, clinical, and criminal ) that distinguish emerging adults that should be considered in creating appropriate community services for treatment and prevention and subsequent desistance from continued criminal involvement.

  5. The Groningen Social Disabilities Schedule: Development, Relationship with I.C.I.D.H., and Psychometric Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The Groningen Social Disabilities Schedule for the assessment of social dysfunctioning of psychiatric patients is described. The measure is based on social role theory and the hierarchy in social disabilities as well as compatibility with the International Classification of Impairments. The semistructured measure allows for posing supplementary…

  6. Development of a Social Skills Assessment Screening Scale for Psychiatric Rehabilitation Settings: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, Poornima; Basavarajappa, Chethan; Guruprasad, Deepti; Hegde, Gayatri; Khanam, Fatema; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Chaturvedi, Santosh K

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in social skills may present in a range of psychiatric disorders, particularly in the more serious and persistent conditions, and have an influence on functioning across various domains. This pilot study aimed at developing a brief measure, for structured evaluation and screening for social skills deficits, which can be easily integrated into routine clinical practice. The sample consisted of 380 inpatients and their accompanying caregivers, referred to Psychiatric Rehabilitation Services at a tertiary care government psychiatric hospital. The evaluation included an Inpatient intake Proforma and the 20-item Social Skills Assessment Screening Scale (SSASS). Disability was assessed using the Indian Disability Evaluation and Assessment Scale (IDEAS) for a subset of 94 inpatients. The analysis included means and standard deviations, frequency and percentages, Cronbach's alpha to assess internal consistency, t -tests to assess differences in social skills deficits between select subgroups, and correlation between SSASS and IDEAS scores. The results indicated the profile of social skills deficits assessed among the inpatients with varied psychiatric diagnoses. The "psychosis" group exhibited significantly higher deficits than the "mood disorder" group. Results indicated high internal consistency of the SSASS and adequate criterion validity demonstrated by correlations with select IDEAS domains. Modifications were made to the SSASS following the pilot study. The SSASS has potential value as a measure for screening and individualised intervention plans for social skills training in mental health and rehabilitation settings. The implications for future work on the psychometric properties and clinical applications are discussed.

  7. Social disability of Brazilian mood disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tucci A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mood disorders cause many social problems, often involving family relationships. Few studies are available in the literature comparing patients with bipolar, unipolar, dysthymic, and double depressive disorders concerning these aspects. In the present study, demographic and disease data were collected using a specifically prepared questionnaire. Social adjustment was assessed using the Disability Adjustment Scale and family relationships were evaluated using the Global Assessment of Relational Functioning Scale. One hundred patients under treatment for at least 6 months were evaluated at the Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic of the Botucatu School of Medicine, UNESP. Most patients were women (82% more than 50 (49% years old with at least two years of follow-up, with little schooling (62% had less than 4 years, and of low socioeconomic level. Logistic regression analysis showed that a diagnosis of unipolar disorder (P = 0.003, OR = 0.075, CI = 0.014-0.403 and dysthymia (P = 0.001, OR = 0.040, CI = 0.006-0.275 as well as family relationships (P = 0.002, OR = 0.953, CI = 0914-0.992 played a significant role in social adjustment. Unipolar and dysthymic patients presented better social adjustment than bipolar and double depressive patients (P < 0.001, results that were not due to social class. These patients, treated at a teaching hospital, may represent the severest mood disorder cases. Evaluations were made knowing the diagnosis of the patients, which might also have influenced some of the results. Social disabilities among mood disorder patients are very frequent and intensive.

  8. How the social model of disability evolved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durell, Shirley

    The way nurses conceptualise disability influences their practice. Many use an individualised model, seeing disability as an individual problem arising from activity restriction and psychological loss. However, many disabled people are critical of this approach and instead promote a social way of thinking about disability. This article presents an overview of the individual and social models of disability so nurses can increase their understanding of these approaches.

  9. Psychosocial correlates of psychiatric diagnoses and maladaptive behaviour in youth with severe developmental disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J A; Ting, V; Perry, A

    2016-06-01

    We know little about the correlates of mental health problems in youth with severe and profound intellectual disability (ID), as most research includes these youth within larger samples that include greater proportions of mild and moderate disability. The purpose of the current study was to identify the child, family and psychosocial characteristics that were associated with the presence of psychiatric diagnoses and maladaptive behaviour in youth with severe ID. Participants were 141 parents of youth with severe or profound levels of ID, 4 to 18 years of age. The mean age of children was 11.04 years (SD = 3.38), with 68% male and 39% with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Parents completed a primarily online survey of child and family characteristics, negative life events, family quality of life and their own mental health. Logistic regression analyses revealed that youth with a psychiatric diagnosis had higher levels of adaptive behaviour and experienced more negative life events than youth without psychiatric diagnosis, while the presence of clinically significant maladaptive behaviour was related to higher levels of adaptive behaviour, parents' mental health problems and lower family quality of life. Child age, gender, ASD status and financial hardship were not related to either outcome variable. Youth with severe and profound ID who experience psychosocial stressors are more likely reported to have mental health problems than youth without such stressors. It is likely that a combination of child and family based interventions, along with with policies that address larger systemic issues of social adversity, are needed to promote mental health and treat psychopathology when it arises. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Comorbid Visual and Psychiatric Disabilities Among the Chinese Elderly: A National Population-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chao; Wang, Zhenjie; Li, Ning; Chen, Gong; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2017-12-01

    To estimate the prevalence of, and association between, co-morbid visual and psychiatric disabilities among elderly (>65 years-of-age) persons in China. Random representative samples were obtained using multistage, stratified, cluster sampling, with probabilities proportional to size. Standard weighting procedures were used to construct sample weights that reflected this multistage, stratified cluster sampling survey scheme. Logistic regression models were used to elucidate associations between visual and psychiatric disabilities. Among the Chinese elderly, >160,000 persons have co-morbid visual and psychiatric disabilities. The weighted prevalence among this cohort is 123.7 per 100,000 persons. A higher prevalence of co-morbid visual and psychiatric disabilities was found in the oldest-old (pvisual disability was significantly associated with a higher risk of having a psychiatric disability among persons aged ≥80 years-of-age [adjusted odds ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.54]. A significant number of Chinese elderly persons were living with co-morbid visual and psychiatric disabilities. To address the challenge of these co-morbid disorders among Chinese elders, it is incumbent upon the government to implement additional and more comprehensive prevention and rehabilitation strategies for health-care systems, reinforce health promotion among the elderly, and improve accessibility to health-care services.

  11. Comparison of psychiatric disability on the health of nation outcome scales (HoNOS) in resettled traumatized refugee outpatients and Danish inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palic, Sabina; Kappel, Michelle; Nielsen, Monica

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently, the mental health issues of traumatized refugees are mainly documented in terms of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and anxiety. Importantly, there are no reports of the level of psychiatric disability in treatment seeking traumatized refugees resettled in the West...... and social domains. The rate of pre- to post-treatment improvement on the HoNOS was smaller for the traumatized refugees than it was for the psychiatric inpatients. CONCLUSIONS: The level, and the versatile profile, of psychiatric disability on the HoNOS point to complex bio-psycho-social problems...... in resettled treatment seeking traumatized refugees. Thus, a broader assessment of symptoms and better cooperation between psychiatric, health care, and social systems is necessary in order to meet the treatment needs of this group....

  12. Characteristics of Third-Party Money Management for Persons With Psychiatric Disabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elbogen, Eric B; Swanson, Jeffrey W; Swartz, Marvin S; Wagner, H. Ryan

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The study examined different types of third-party money management arrangements for persons with psychiatric disabilities and consumers' perceptions of their finances in the context of these arrangements. METHODS...

  13. Predicting dropout in outpatient dialectical behavior therapy with patients with borderline personality disorder receiving psychiatric disability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Landes, Sara J; Chalker, Samantha A; Comtois, Katherine Anne

    2016-01-01

    .... Participants were 56 consumers with borderline personality disorder (BPD) who were psychiatrically disabled participating in a larger feasibility trial of Dialectical Behavior Therapy- Accepting the Challenges of Exiting the System...

  14. Virtual reality job interview training for individuals with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew J; Ginger, Emily J; Wright, Michael; Wright, Katherine; Boteler Humm, Laura; Olsen, Dale; Bell, Morris D; Fleming, Michael F

    2014-09-01

    Services are available to help support existing employment for individuals with psychiatric disabilities; however, there is a gap in services targeting job interview skills that can help obtain employment. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of Virtual Reality Job Interview Training (VR-JIT) in a randomized controlled trial. Participants were randomized to VR-JIT (n = 25) or treatment-as-usual (TAU) (n = 12) groups. VR-JIT consisted of 10 hours of simulated job interviews with a virtual character and didactic online training. The participants attended 95% of laboratory-based training sessions and found VR-JIT easy to use and felt prepared for future interviews. The VR-JIT group improved their job interview role-play performance (p ≤ 0.05) and self-confidence (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and follow-up as compared with the TAU group. VR-JIT performance scores increased over time (R = 0.65). VR-JIT demonstrated initial feasibility and efficacy at improving job interview skills and self-confidence. Future research may help clarify whether this intervention is efficacious in community-based settings.

  15. Empowerment and occupational engagement among people with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultqvist, Jenny; Eklund, Mona; Leufstadius, Christel

    2015-01-01

    Empowerment is essential in the rehabilitation process for people with psychiatric disabilities and knowledge about factors that may play a key role within this process would be valuable for further development of the day centre services. The present study investigates day centre attendees' perceptions of empowerment. The aim was to investigate which factors show the strongest relationships to empowerment when considering occupational engagement, client satisfaction with day centres, and health-related and socio-demographic factors as correlates. 123 Swedish day centre attendees participated in a cross-sectional study by completing questionnaires regarding empowerment and the targeted correlates. Data were analysed with non-parametric statistics. Empowerment was shown to be significantly correlated with occupational engagement and client satisfaction and also with self-rated health and symptoms rated by a research assistant. The strongest indicator for belonging to the group with the highest ratings on empowerment was self-rated health, followed by occupational engagement and symptom severity. Occupational engagement added to the beneficial influence of self-rated health on empowerment. Enabling occupational engagement in meaningful activities and providing occupations that can generate client satisfaction is an important focus for day centres in order to assist the attendees' rehabilitation process so that it promotes empowerment.

  16. Emergent leadership among tenants with psychiatric disabilities living in supported housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piat, Myra; Sabetti, Judith; Padgett, Deborah

    2017-12-25

    The overall aim of this study was to explore the experiences of people with psychiatric disabilities living as tenants in independent, supported apartments for the first time. Supported housing provides an alternative to structured, custodial housing models, such as foster homes, or board-and-care homes, for clients in public mental health systems. This article reports findings on how leadership emerged among tenants after making the transition from custodial to supported housing. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with tenants (n = 24) and included questions on their housing history, current living situation, relationships with staff, participation, and understanding or experience of leadership. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, codes generated, and a thematic analysis conducted using a constructivist approach. The findings revealed an understanding and appreciation of leadership among tenants, who identified six pathways to leadership in their housing as a response to unmet tenant needs. Most tenant leaders emerged outside of formal authority or power structures. Supported housing provides a unique social setting and empowering community where the potential of persons with psychiatric disabilities to assume leadership may be realized and further developed. Mental health professionals working in community housing networks are well placed to harness these face-to-face tenant communities, and their natural leaders, as an additional tool in promoting tenant recovery, mutual help, neighbourhood integration, and the broader exercise of citizenship. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  17. Impact of social-psychiatric services and psychiatric clinics on involuntary admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emons, Barbara; Haussleiter, Ida Sybille; Kalthoff, Jörg; Schramm, Anja; Hoffmann, Knut; Jendreyschak, Jasmin; Schaub, Markus; Armgart, Carina; Juckel, Georg; Illes, Franciska

    2014-11-01

    Germany provides a wide range of highly developed mental health care to its citizens. The aim of this study was to identify factors influencing the voluntariness of admissions to psychiatric hospitals. Especially the impact of demographic factors of the region, characteristics of the psychiatric hospitals and characteristics of the psychosocial services was analyzed. A retrospective analysis of hospital admission registers from 13 German adult psychiatric hospitals in 2009 was conducted. Public data on the regional psychiatric accommodation and demographic situation were added. Hospitals were dichotomously divided according to their index of involuntary admissions. Group comparisons were performed between the clinics with low and high involuntary admission indices. Analysis was conducted with clinical, psychiatric provision and demographic data related to inpatients in the Landschaftsverbands Westfalen-Lippe (LWL)-PsychiatryNetwork. Especially the range of services provided by the social-psychiatric services in the region such as number of supervised patients and home visits had an influence on the proportion of involuntary admissions to a psychiatric hospital. Some demographic characteristics of the region such as discretionary income showed further influence. Contrary to our expectations, the characteristics of the individual hospital seem to have no influence on the admission rate. Social-psychiatric services show a preventive impact on involuntary acute psychiatry interventions. Sociodemographic factors and patient variables play a role with regard to the number of involuntary hospitalizations, whereas characteristics of hospitals seemed to play no role. © The Author(s) 2013.

  18. Strengthening Skills for Success: A Manual To Help Parents Support Their Psychiatrically Disabled Youth's Community Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Judith A.; And Others

    The manual provides information and suggestions to parents of youth with psychiatric disabilities, based on the program at Thresholds, a psychiatric rehabilitation center in Chicago, Illinois. The manual includes case examples, exercises, and space for parent responses. Chapters have the following titles and topics: "The Importance to You of Your…

  19. Psychotic experiences and disability: Findings from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hans; Koyanagi, Ai; Kelleher, Ian; DeVylder, Jordan

    2017-08-07

    Psychotic experiences are associated with a number of poor clinical outcomes, including multimorbid psychopathology, suicidal behavior, and poor treatment response. We wished to investigate the relationship between psychotic experiences and disability, including the following domains: cognition, mobility, self-care, social interaction, role functioning, and days out of role. We used three nationally representative and racially/ethnically diverse samples of the general US adult population: the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R), the National Latino and Asian American Survey (NLAAS), and the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Multi-variable logistic regression analyses were used to assess the associations between lifetime psychotic experiences (visual and auditory hallucinatory experiences and delusional ideation; WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview psychosis screen) and 30-day impairments in functioning across disability domains (using the WHO Disability Assessment Schedule II). In all three samples, models were adjusted for socio-demographics and co-occurring psychiatric disorders. In the NCS-R, models were also adjusted for chronic health conditions. Across all three studies, our adjusted models showed that people with disability had anywhere from about 1.5 to over 3 times the odds of reporting lifetime psychotic experiences, depending on the domain. This was true for each disability domain, except self-care in the NLAAS and in the NSAL. Psychotic experiences are markers of risk for disability across a wide range of domains. This may explain the elevated rates of service utilization among individuals who report psychotic experiences and supports the need to assess for and respond to psychotic experiences even in the absence of psychotic disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigating the Relationship between Challenging Behavior, Co-Morbid Psychopathology and Social Skills in Adults with Moderate to Severe Intellectual Disabilities in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Deirdre S.; Healy, Olive

    2011-01-01

    Researchers suggest that social skill deficits and psychiatric issues may be affected by the presence of maladaptive behaviors in people with intellectual disabilities. A sample of 39 participants with intellectual disability was surveyed for the presence of psychiatric symptoms and social skills deficits. Outcomes indicated that individuals with…

  1. Screening for Psychiatric Symptoms: PAS-ADD Checklist Norms for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. L.; Hatton, C.; Dixon, L.; Douglas, C.

    2004-01-01

    The Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults with Developmental Disabilities Checklist (PAS-ADD Checklist) is a screening instrument designed to help carers recognize likely mental health problems in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). To date there are no published PAS-ADD Checklist data on a large nonpsychiatric population of adults…

  2. Supporting Students with Psychiatric Disabilities in Postsecondary Education: Important Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferman, Scott I.; Schultz, Jared C.

    2015-01-01

    We began the exploratory process of identifying knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are important for disability service professionals to possess in order to provide beneficial services to students with psychiatric disabilities in postsecondary education. Using a three-round Delphi survey, two groups of experts identified 54 knowledge, skill,…

  3. Antipsychotic Medication Prescription Patterns in Adults with Developmental Disabilities Who Have Experienced Psychiatric Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsky, Yona; Elserafi, Jonny

    2012-01-01

    Antipsychotic medication rates are high in adults with developmental disability. This study considered rates of antipsychotic use in 743 adults with developmental disability who had experienced a psychiatric crisis. Nearly half (49%) of these adults were prescribed antipsychotics. Polypharmacy was common with 22% of those prescribed antipsychotics…

  4. Understanding the Experiences of Students with Psychiatric Disabilities: A Foundation for Creating Conditions of Support and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belch, Holley A.

    2011-01-01

    One of the fastest-growing categories of disability in the college student population is psychiatric disabilities: bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, and borderline personality disorders, among other. Appropriate treatment and support can provide students with psychiatric disabilities the opportunity to develop their talents and realize their…

  5. Gender differences in psychiatric diagnoses among inpatients with and without intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsky, Yona; Bradley, Elspeth A; Gracey, Carolyn D; Durbin, Janet; Koegl, Chris

    2009-01-01

    There are few published studies on the relationship between gender and psychiatric disorders in individuals with intellectual disabilities. Adults (N = 1,971) with and without intellectual disabilities who received inpatient services for psychiatric diagnosis and clinical issues were examined. Among individuals with intellectual disabilities, women were more likely to have a diagnosis of mood disorder and sexual abuse history; men were more likely to have a substance abuse diagnosis, legal issues, and past destructive behavior. Gender difference patterns found for individuals with intellectual disabilities were similar to those of persons without intellectual disabilities, with the exception of eating disorder and psychotic disorder diagnoses. Gender issues should receive greater attention in intellectual disabilities inpatient care.

  6. Psychiatric Illness and Behavioural Problems in Adults with Learning Disability and Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoumitro Deb

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively collected data on the rate and type of psychiatric illness and behavioural problems on 143 adults with learning disability and epilepsy. 55% behavioural problems. 19% verbal aggression and temper tantrums, and 13% injurious behaviour. The overall rates of behavioural problems and different types of behaviours found in the current study cohort are similar to what was found before in learning disabled adults in general, as well as in epileptic and non-epileptic learning disabled adults. Psychiatric diagnosis was made in 12.6% combined diagnosis of schizophrenia, delusional disorder and schizo-affective disorder was most common (5% diagnosis of depressive episode (3% bipolar affective disorder.

  7. Ambiguity in determining financial capability of SSI and SSDI beneficiaries with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Christina M; Black, Anne C; McMahon, Thomas J; O'Shea, Kevin; Rosen, Marc I

    2015-03-01

    The liberty of individuals who receive Social Security disability payments is constrained if they are judged incapable of managing their payments and are assigned a payee or conservator to manage benefit payments on their behalf. Conversely, beneficiaries' well-being may be compromised if they misspend money that they need to survive. Several studies have shown that determinations of financial capability are made inconsistently and that capability guidelines appear to be applied inconsistently. This article describes ambiguities that remained for individuals even after a comprehensive assessment of financial capability was conducted by independent assessors. Trained, experienced assessors rated the financial capability of 118 individuals in intensive outpatient or inpatient psychiatric facilities who received Social Security Disability Insurance or Supplemental Security Income. Ten individuals' cases were determined to be difficult to judge. Six sources of ambiguity were identified by case review: distinguishing incapability from the challenges of navigating poverty, the amount of nonessential spending that indicates incapability, the amount of spending on harmful things that indicates incapability, how to consider intermittent periods of capability and incapability, the relative weighting of past behavior and future plans to change, and discrepancies between different sources of information. The cases raise fundamental questions about how to define and identify financial incapability, but they also illustrate how detailed consideration of beneficiaries' living situations and decision making can inform the difficult dichotomous decision about capability.

  8. A Social Constructionist Approach to Disability: Implications for Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Dimitris; Kauffman, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Proponents of a social model of disability derive their arguments from social constructionism. They combine different disabling conditions under one term: disability. Subsequently, they apply the specific viewpoint of the disability rights social movement of people with physical disabilities to other conditions such as intellectual disabilities,…

  9. Enriching Social Work through Interdisciplinary Disability Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Irene; Quaglia, Christine; Leslie, Donald

    2010-01-01

    This paper recommends that faculties of Social Work incorporate Disability Studies in their curriculum by embracing its interdisciplinary deconstructionist perspective. Disability Studies encourages Social Work to move beyond person-in--the-environment and anti-oppressive approaches to find more effective ways of removing barriers for persons with…

  10. Determinants of functional disability and social adjustment in major depressive disorder: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rytsälä, Heikki J; Melartin, Tarja K; Leskelä, Ulla S; Lestelä-Mielonen, Paula S; Sokero, T Petteri; Isometsä, Erkki T

    2006-08-01

    We examined prospectively factors influencing social and occupational disability and social adjustment among patients with major depressive disorder. The Vantaa Depression Study comprises a cohort of psychiatric inpatients and outpatients with major depressive disorder in the city of Vantaa, Finland. We prospectively interviewed 193 of 269 (72%) patients both 6 and 18 months after baseline. Axis I and II diagnoses were assessed via semistructured WHO Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry 2.0 and SCID-II interviews. Global disability and social and work adjustment were assessed. Patients' functional disability and social adjustment were alleviated concurrently with recovery from depression during the follow-up. The current level of functioning and social adjustment of a patient with depression was predicted by severity of depression, recurrence before baseline and during follow-up, lack of full remission, and time spent depressed. Comorbid psychiatric disorders, personality traits (neuroticism), and perceived social support had significant influence.

  11. [Sickness absence and disability due to psychiatric disorders from a gender perspective - a systematic literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, S; Stengler, K

    2013-06-01

    This work is aimed at providing a review of the literature on gender differences in the prevalence of mental disorders at the workplace. A systematic literature search of all original works on sickness absence and disability due to psychiatric disorders published in PubMed from 2000 through to 2011 was undertaken. Female employees have more frequent and longer sickness absences due to psychiatric disorders. Male employees are at a high risk of disability due to psychiatric disorders. Gender-specific prevention strategies at the workplace should target the prevention of short and long-term consequences for female employees and the long-term impact of psychiatric disorders in male employees. However, there is still a lack of knowledge about implications for gender specific prevention strategies at the workplace. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Psychiatric disorders in adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome and other intellectual disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.; Shah, Bhavik; Davis, Bruce; Baker, Courtney; Fife, Taylor; Fitzpatrick, Jeri

    2015-01-01

    Background Relative to other aspects of Down syndrome, remarkably little is known about the psychiatric problems experienced by youth and young adults with this syndrome and if these problems differ from others with intellectual disabilities. Yet adolescence and young adulthood are particularly vulnerable time periods, as they involve multiple life transitions in educational, medical, and other service systems. Methods This study compared the psychiatric diagnoses of 49 adolescent and young a...

  13. [Quality of the psychiatric care in social welfare houses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopińiska, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the research is a diagnosis of the level of the psychiatric help in social welfare houses. The research was conducted in the form of a questionnaire. The questionnaire was sent at random to 60 houses of social welfare for people with psychic disorders on the whole territory of Poland. 37 responses were received. All the houses in question provide their inhabitants with regular contact with a psychiatrist, 86% inside the social welfare house. 92% of inhabitants have no problems with obtaining referral to psychiatric hospital, however, 70% inhabitants of the social welfare houses have problems with being admitted to hospital. Half of the houses in question use direct compulsion. All the places studied possess therapeutic-caring teams, in 97% of the houses treatment is based on the individual plan. 14% of the houses do not allow the patients to have access to the medical documentation concerning them. In every house integrated pharmacotherapy is used together with various forms of therapy, 76% of the houses involve the family of the patient into the therapeutic process. 78% of those studied note the existence of different factors reducing the quality of the psychiatric care offered. The level of psychiatric care in the social welfare houses is adjusted to the health needs of the patients in the majority of the houses studied. However, the inhabitants have to face the difficulties connected with being admitted to psychiatric hospitals and can have problems with gaining access to medical documentation concerning them. Treatment and rehabilitation of psychic disorders is based on individualized and multi-directional therapeutic interaction. Preparation of the staff providing psychiatric care, especially therapeutic-caring ones, is diversified in individual houses (half of the therapeutic teams do not have a psychiatrist, whose presence seems to be indispensable). The most essential factors reducing the quality of psychiatric care include insufficient financial

  14. Longitudinal study of psychiatric symptoms, disability, mortality, and emigration among Bosnian refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, R F; Sarajlic, N; Chernoff, M; Lavelle, J; Vukovic, I S; Massagli, M P

    2001-08-01

    but was not after statistical adjustment (unadjusted OR, 3.12; 95% CI, 1.55-6.26; adjusted OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 0.82-4.16). Posttraumatic stress disorder was not associated with mortality or emigration. Spending less than 12 months in the refugee camp (OR, 11.30; 95% CI, 6.55-19.50), experiencing 6 or more trauma events (OR, 3.34; 95% CI, 1.89-5.91), having higher education (OR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.10-3.29), and not having an observed handicap (OR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.02-0.52) were associated with higher likelihood of emigration. Depression was not associated with emigration status. Former Bosnian refugees who remained living in the region continued to exhibit psychiatric disorder and disability 3 years after initial assessment. Social isolation, male sex, and older age were associated with mortality. Healthier, better educated refugees were more likely to emigrate. Further research is necessary to understand the associations among depression, emigration status, and mortality over time.

  15. Psychiatric legal investigation for sickness benefits due to disability at the Brazilian Federal Social Security Special Court in Florianópolis, capital city of the State of Santa Catarina, southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo, Roberto; Damas, Fernando Balvedi

    2015-01-01

    To describe the profile of insured individuals that filed claims for sickness benefits and compare the results of the administrative and legal investigations. This case series included 114 insured persons that filed lawsuits against the Brazilian National Institute of Social Security (Instituto Nacional de Seguridade Social, INSS). They underwent psychiatric examinations required by the Brazilian Federal Social Security Special Court in Florianópolis from August to December 2010. Mean age was 47 years, and participant age ranged from 24 to 64 years. Most insured individuals were women (79%), and most were employed (67.5%) and self-employed (26.5%) workers. Mean contribution time was 99.9 months, ranging from 8 to 352 months. Mean benefit duration was 20.4 months, ranging from 2 to 97 months. The most prevalent category of workers was service workers, store and supermarket salespeople (54.4%), followed by administrative workers (19.3%). Only 17 participants were found to be unable to work after benefit cessation, a 14.9% mismatch between administrative and legal investigations. The most frequent diagnoses were mood disorders (59.6%) and anxiety disorders (17.5%).

  16. Psychiatric assessment of severe presentations in autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Bryan H; de Lacy, Nina; Siegel, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum and related disorders and intellectual disability are not protected from the experience of psychiatric illnesses. Many factors can contribute to exacerbation of existing behavioral symptoms or to the emergence of new psychiatric problems. The psychiatric assessment must thus take into account a range of possible etiologic or contributory factors. The approach outlined in this article highlights the value of assessing 4 broad domains, including diagnostic (genetic) factors, medical considerations, developmental influences, and environmental factors. Examples of how the consideration of each of these domains may inform the diagnostic formulation are highlighted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Are social theories still relevant in current psychiatric practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Avasthi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current psychiatric practice is being influenced by advances in the field of molecular biology, genetic studies, neuroimaging, and psychopharmacology and the approach has become "biological." Social theories of mental illness had once revolutionized the field of psychiatry and are currently being somewhat ignored under the dazzle of biological sciences. Main social theories are functionalism, interpersonal theory, attachment theory, stress theory, and labeling theory. Each of these theories had tried to explain the genesis of psychiatric disorders in their own way. However, each theory has its own limitations and critique. Still, for a holistic approach to treat persons with mental illness, it is essential to take a biopsychosocial approach which can only be done if one understands the contribution and relevance of social theories. Nonpharmacological management has been the cornerstone of treatment of any psychiatric disorder and social theories also form the basis of various nonpharmacological modes of treatment. Overall, social theories are still very relevant in current psychiatric practice and should not be neglected. Efforts should be made to integrate social theories with other theories of mental illness for better understanding and treatment.

  18. Reliability and Validity of the SPAID-G Checklist for Detecting Psychiatric Disorders in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, Marco; Scuticchio, Daniela; Ferrandi, Angela, Lassi, Stefano; Mango, Francesco; Ciavatta, Claudio; Porcelli, Cesare; Bianco, Annamaria; Monchieri, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    SPAID (Psychiatric Instrument for the Intellectually Disabled Adult) is the first Italian tool-package for carrying out psychiatric diagnosis in adults with Intellectual Disabilities (ID). It includes the "G" form, for general diagnostic orientation, and specific checklists for all groups of syndromes stated by the available…

  19. Psychiatric Disorders in Adolescents and Adults with Autism and Intellectual Disability: A Representative Study in One County in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Trine L.; Helverschou, Sissel B; Eilertsen, Dag E.; Heggelund, Trond; Myrbakk, Even; Martinsen, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Few studies assess psychiatric disorders in representative samples of individuals with autism and ID. Symptoms of autism and psychiatric disorders have been confounded. PAC, a conceptually analysed and validated screening instrument, was used. Aims: Assess prevalence of psychiatric disorders in individuals with intellectual disability only…

  20. Occupational disability on psychiatric grounds in South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    extra-ordinary levels of stress on people in many occupational sectors, including the teaching ... R Emsley, L Emsley, S Seedat. Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa ... Almost half had a family history of psychiatric disorder, and the majority (N = 66.

  1. Universally design social policy: when disability disappears?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickenbach, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review and evaluate the legal and policy feasibility of applying the principles of Universal Design (UD) to create a "universalised disability policy" that targets the needs and circumstances of persons with disabilities in light of universal human rights, conscious of individual differences. Applying modified versions of the principles of UD to disability social policy and using core interpretative strategies for human rights implementation (used in the United Nations' Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities) to illuminate, by analogy, ways to resolve the dilemma between seeking equality and respecting difference. The aspirations of UD in architecture and planning - namely to design buildings and cities to accommodate the needs of the widest spectrum of abilities as possible - can successfully be applied to social policy that focuses on the needs and circumstances of persons with disabilities, and which underwrites a blueprint for reform in the delivery of social services. "Universal social policy", and UD, are feasible and desirable approaches to their respective domains, if we adopt a strategy derived from the legal interpretation of human rights implementation. The consequence, however, may be a policy that begins a process of social disappearance of disability. Implications for Rehabilitation The well-recognised principles of Universal Design (UD) have analogs for social policy that focuses on the needs of persons with disabilities. Universal social policy is consistent with the rights and aspirations of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Universalising social policy may lead eventually to the disappearance of "disability" as a policy category.

  2. Forensic Psychiatric Perspective on Criminality Associated with Intellectual Disability: A Nationwide Register-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannynsalo, L.; Putkonen, H.; Lindberg, N.; Kotilainen, I.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Contrasting views exist over the association of intellectual disability (ID) and criminal offending. This nationwide study attempts to shed further light to expand understanding to substantiate the relation between socio-demographic characteristics, psychiatric co-morbidity and criminal behaviour among the Finnish forensic population…

  3. New Research into General Psychiatric Services for Adults with Intellectual Disability and Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: There are a variety of models for the mental health care of adults with comorbid intellectual disability (ID) and mental illness. There has been a long-running debate as to whether this should be provided by general psychiatric or specialised ID services. A previous review concluded that there was no clear evidence to support either…

  4. Who Am I? A Life Story Intervention for Persons with Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhof, Gerben J.; Beernink, Janny; Sools, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    This article describes an innovative intervention based on narrative and life review therapy that is tailored to people with intellectual disability (ID) and psychiatric problems. The current study provides a first evaluation of the intervention. A symptom checklist (SCL-90) was used in a pre- and post-follow-up design, and a qualitative…

  5. Perceptions of the worker role among people with psychiatric disabilities: description and investigation of associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentzell, Elisabeth; Eklund, Mona

    2013-01-01

    To investigate how subjective perceptions of everyday occupations, activity level, day centre attendance, social interaction, self-mastery and clinical factors were related to how unemployed people with psychiatric disabilities (PD) envision a future worker role, also controlling for socio-demographic variables. 175 people with PD; 93 attended a day centre and 82 did not. Of the 93 day centre attendees 39 visited meeting place-oriented day centres and 54 attended work-oriented ones. Self-ratings and interview-based instruments were used to assess the view of the worker role, social interaction, subjective perceptions of everyday occupations, activity level, self-mastery, and socio-demographic and clinical factors. Non-parametric statistics were used when analysing the data. A few aspects of the worker role seemed positively influenced by attending a day centre, in particular a work-oriented one. High levels of activity (p=0.009) and self-mastery (p=0.024), being younger (p=0.004) and having less depression (p=0.008) were also associated with a more positive view of the worker role. In order to enhance a future worker role the individual's feeling of control in the rehabilitation process should be highlighted and possibilities for general activity engagement be offered. Since the findings indicate that most aspects of the worker role were not enhanced by day centre attendance community-based care should further concentrate on promoting this future role for people with PD.

  6. Socialization and Sexuality for the Developmentally Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Barbara; West-Tackett, Marsha

    This document presents one module in a set of training resources for trainers to use with parents and/or professionals serving children with disabilities; focus is on socialization and sexuality of the developmentally disabled. The modules stress content and activities that build skills and offer resources to promote parent-professional…

  7. Social Anxiety in Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowden, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Humans experience social anxiety to different degrees and in different areas. In school settings, this can be a barrier to learning. The school is a social place and to experience anxiety around peers can be challenging, especially if the student also has a learning disability. Social anxiety problems are often associated with learning…

  8. Supporting institution-to-community transitions for people with psychiatric disabilities: Findings and implications from a participatory action research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gossett Zakrajsek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite preference for community-based living, large numbers of people with psychiatric disabilities live in nursing homes throughout the US. Community-based services for this population are limited by public policy and service system barriers. This paper summarizes these barriers and presents the second phase of a participatory action research project jointly developed by university-based researchers and two Centers for Independent Living. A qualitative case study methodology was used to understand the experiences of three individuals with psychiatric disabilities reintegrating into the community from nursing homes. Findings revealed themes of social isolation, participation in virtual communities, variability of impairment experiences and unmet needs for community supports. In addition to thematic findings, action products were generated for the benefit of community partners. These products included national best practice resources and a needs assessment survey tool. Study findings and products point to specific systems change and policy recommendations to better support community reintegration for this population. These recommendations are discussed in light of U.S. healthcare reform and broader disability advocacy efforts.

  9. A prospective case control study of psychiatric disorders in adults with epilepsy and intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turky, Amna; Felce, David; Jones, Glyn; Kerr, Mike

    2011-07-01

    No study to date has prospectively investigated the impact of epilepsy on psychiatric disorders among adults with an intellectual disability (ID). This study aimed to determine prospectively the influence of epilepsy on the development of psychiatric disorders in adults with ID. Psychiatric symptoms were measured prospectively over a 1-year period among 45 adults with ID and active epilepsy and 45 adults with ID without epilepsy, matched on level of ID. The 1-year incidence rate (IR) of commonly occurring Axis 1 psychiatric disorders was compared with and without controlling for possible confounding factors. Total psychiatric symptom scores over the period were compared between the two groups using repeated-measures analysis of covariance. Adults with epilepsy and ID had a more than seven times increased risk for developing psychiatric disorders, particularly depression and unspecified disorders of presumed organic origin, including dementia, over a 1-year period compared to those with ID only. Comparison of the psychiatric scores showed the epilepsy group to have significantly higher unspecified disorder and depression symptom scores. The findings point to an increased risk of depression and unspecified disorders, including dementia, among adults with ID and epilepsy. Further exploration of the nature and treatment of these unspecified disorders may help the care of people with epilepsy and ID. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  10. Social Anxiety, Tremor Severity, and Tremor Disability: A Search for Clinically Relevant Measures

    OpenAIRE

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Ament, Patrick A.; Peter Holt

    2013-01-01

    Background. While social anxiety has been reported among essential tremor (ET) patients, very little is known about the relation between self-report measures of social anxiety, tremor severity and disability, and cognition. Methods. Sixty-three individuals diagnosed with ET took part in a comprehensive study examining neurocognition and behavioral functioning. A psychiatric diagnostic interview, three social anxiety questionnaires, and an idiographic-based behavioral assessment to pinpoint a...

  11. Nonverbal Social Skills of Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability Diagnosed with Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Hartley, Sigan L.; Birgenheir, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Depression is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in adults with intellectual disability (ID), yet little is known about depressive behaviors in an ID population. This study examined the nonverbal social skills of 18 adults with mild ID diagnosed with depression and a matched sample of adults with mild ID without depression. Nonverbal social skills were coded from videotapes of actual social interactions. Results indicate that adults with mild ID diagnosed with depression evidence a ...

  12. Psychiatric hospitalisation among individuals with intellectual disability referred to the START crisis intervention and prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, L G; Beasley, J; Klein, A; Hinton, J; Charlot, L

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about inpatient psychiatric hospitalisation among adults with intellectual disability (ID) in the United States. Greater research is, therefore, required to inform efforts aimed at preventing this costly and restrictive form of care. Data were from 3299 individuals with ID (mean age = 31 years; SD = 14 years) who were referred to START (Systemic, Therapeutic, Assessment, Resources, and Treatment), a community-based crisis intervention and prevention programme. A random effects logistic regression model was used to examine the association between 11 factors and caregiver report of psychiatric hospitalisation in the past 12 months. Twenty eight percent of the sample had at least one psychiatric inpatient stay in the prior year. Factors associated with an increased likelihood of prior hospitalisation included: younger age, diagnosis of a psychotic disorder, a score of >30 on the irritability subscale of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist, increasing number of psychiatric diagnoses, less severe ID, Black/AA race and not having a home and community waiver. Among this high-risk referred group, more than 1 in 4 individuals were hospitalised in the year prior to referral. While results from the analyses will help profile those at risk for hospitalisation, the findings suggest that interventions at the policy level may play an important role in reducing psychiatric hospitalisation. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Burden Assessment, Psychiatric Morbidity, and Their Correlates in Caregivers of Patients with Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, M S; Srivastava, S; Gautam, P; Saha, R; Kaur, J

    2015-12-01

    Intellectual disability in a child places great stress on a family and caregiver and this leads to significant socio-occupational dysfunction and impaired quality of life for caregivers. This study aimed to assess socio-demographic characteristics, burden, and psychiatric morbidity of the caregivers of persons with intellectual disability, as well as to determine the variables that correlated with burden and psychiatric morbidity. An observational study was carried out in an outpatient psychiatric unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital in India from October 2014 to April 2015. A total of 100 caregivers of intellectually impaired individuals were assessed for burden and psychiatric morbidity. In all, 39% of the caregivers had a high burden score, 46% perceived mild-to-moderate burden severity, and 15% perceived no to mild burden. Mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms were present in 23% and 16% had severe-to-extremely severe depressive symptoms. Mild-to-moderate anxiety symptoms were evident in 19% of caregivers and a further 19% had severe-to-extremely severe anxiety symptoms. Routine assessment of burden and psychiatric morbidity in the caregiver will help to reduce their burden and thus help them care for their children more appropriately and efficiently.

  14. Striving for meaning-Life in supported housing for people with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolin, Rosita; Brunt, David; Rask, Mikael; Syrén, Susanne; Sandgren, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a grounded theory about people with psychiatric disabilities, living in supported housing. Interviews as well as observations during the interviews were analyzed together with secondary analyses of quantitative and qualitative material from previous studies. Being deprived of self-determination emerged as the main concern for residents in supported housing and striving for meaning emerged as the pattern of behavior through which this group resolves their main concern. Striving for meaning involves living in the present, striving for self-determination, strengthening self-esteem, emotional processing and resting from the present. The strategies facilitate each other and are used singly, together simultaneously, or alternately. If they are successful, a meaning in the present is perceived. If all the strategies fail repeatedly, escaping from the present is used in order to deal with being deprived of self-determination. The implications of the findings suggest prioritizing a reduction of the institutional nature of the social and physical environment, and to support the residents' self-determination.

  15. Factors, process and outcomes of recovery from psychiatric disability: the unity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Li-Yu; Shih, Chaiw-Yi

    2009-07-01

    Despite the fruitful findings on related issues of recovery in the West, some researchers have called for more studies on the factors that facilitate recovery and international literature on recovery to be made available. Moreover, to date, a united model that integrates outcome, component process and contextual factors of recovery has not yet been developed. Thus, this study explored the recovery experiences of persons with psychiatric disabilities (hereinafter called consumers) in Taiwan and extracted the key facilitators for developing a preliminary unity theory of recovery. In-depth qualitative interviews of 15 consumers in recovery and their caregivers were held. Over a research period of two years, consumers were interviewed twice. The dialogue of each interview was transcribed into text and a narrative summary of the storyline for each participant was also prepared. For most consumers, the journey of recovery was an incremental process of progress, yet few of them mentioned a turning point and its significant change on their life. Regaining social roles seemed to be a necessary but not sufficient outcome indicator for recovery. While symptom remission, mental strength and parental support were the cornerstones for recovery, the treatment model and professionals got the credit for it too. The recovery process occurs within a complex context of various stages and multi-facilitators. The forces of three cornerstones, essential components and contextual facilitators all influx into the river of recovery and emerge as one united mechanism that supports the consumer's spiral progress through the journey of striving for autonomy.

  16. Towards a unified program of rehabilitation for those with psychiatric disabilities in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Sally

    2002-01-01

    This paper sets out in detail how the Singapore Anglican Welfare Council (SAWC) has worked from its charter vision to a number of interlocking strategies and programs in the rehabilitation of those with psychiatric disabilities in Singapore. While the pathway toward a holistic and integrated model of rehabilitation may seem, in the body of this paper, to be almost rational-comprehensive in formulation, it has emerged from ongoing diagnosis and assessment of societal needs, and of the needs of those with psychiatric disabilities. It began simply from a compassionate vision but enlarged significantly as the writer continued in a doctor of business and administration program, to sharpen perceptions, purpose change within, and to collaborate with other agencies, both government and private. To facilitate the journey through this paper, the writer speaks of various continua of education and training, of growing the needed employment opportunities for the disabled, and of offering graduated housing and living skills opportunities. In reality, each initiative generated another and fed off one another. But the goal of all the activities described in this paper seems to have emerged as offering a graduated independence to those with psychiatric disabilities at their own choice and pace. They have taught the writer to listen, consult and to act in concert with them.

  17. Improving Psychiatric Hospital Care for Pediatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin L. Gabriels

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and/or intellectual disabilities (ID are at greater risk for psychiatric hospitalization compared to children with other disorders. However, general psychiatric hospital environments are not adapted for the unique learning styles, needs, and abilities of this population, and there are few specialized hospital-based psychiatric care programs in the United States. This paper compares patient outcomes from a specialized psychiatric hospital program developed for pediatric patients with an ASD and/or ID to prior outcomes of this patient population in a general psychiatric program at a children’s hospital. Record review data indicate improved outcomes for patients in the specialized program of reduced recidivism rates (12% versus 33% and decreased average lengths of inpatient stay (as short as 26 days versus 45 days. Available data from a subset of patients (=43 in the specialized program showed a decrease in irritability and hyperactivity behaviors from admission to discharge and that 35 previously undetected ASD diagnoses were made. Results from this preliminary study support specialized psychiatric care practices with this population to positively impact their health care outcomes.

  18. Social class, social mobility and risk of psychiatric disorder--a population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiikkaja, Sanna; Sandin, Sven; Malki, Ninoa; Modin, Bitte; Sparén, Pär; Hultman, Christina M

    2013-01-01

    This study explored how adult social class and social mobility between parental and own adult social class is related to psychiatric disorder. In this prospective cohort study, over 1 million employed Swedes born in 1949-1959 were included. Information on parental class (1960) and own mid-life social class (1980 and 1990) was retrieved from the censuses and categorised as High Non-manual, Low Non-manual, High Manual, Low Manual and Self-employed. After identifying adult class, individuals were followed for psychiatric disorder by first admission of schizophrenia, alcoholism and drug dependency, affective psychosis and neurosis or personality disorder (N=24,659) from the Swedish Patient Register. We used Poisson regression analysis to estimate first admission rates of psychiatric disorder per 100,000 person-years and relative risks (RR) by adult social class (treated as a time-varying covariate). The RRs of psychiatric disorder among the Non-manual and Manual classes were also estimated by magnitude of social mobility. The rate of psychiatric disorder was significantly higher among individuals belonging to the Low manual class as compared with the High Non-manual class. Compared to High Non-manual class, the risk for psychiatric disorder ranged from 2.07 (Low Manual class) to 1.38 (Low Non-manual class). Parental class had a minor impact on these estimates. Among the Non-manual and Manual classes, downward mobility was associated with increased risk and upward mobility with decreased risk of psychiatric disorder. In addition, downward mobility was inversely associated with the magnitude of social mobility, independent of parental class. Independently of parental social class, the risk of psychiatric disorder increases with increased downward social mobility and decreases with increased upward mobility.

  19. Social class, social mobility and risk of psychiatric disorder--a population-based longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Tiikkaja

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study explored how adult social class and social mobility between parental and own adult social class is related to psychiatric disorder. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, over 1 million employed Swedes born in 1949-1959 were included. Information on parental class (1960 and own mid-life social class (1980 and 1990 was retrieved from the censuses and categorised as High Non-manual, Low Non-manual, High Manual, Low Manual and Self-employed. After identifying adult class, individuals were followed for psychiatric disorder by first admission of schizophrenia, alcoholism and drug dependency, affective psychosis and neurosis or personality disorder (N=24,659 from the Swedish Patient Register. We used Poisson regression analysis to estimate first admission rates of psychiatric disorder per 100,000 person-years and relative risks (RR by adult social class (treated as a time-varying covariate. The RRs of psychiatric disorder among the Non-manual and Manual classes were also estimated by magnitude of social mobility. RESULTS: The rate of psychiatric disorder was significantly higher among individuals belonging to the Low manual class as compared with the High Non-manual class. Compared to High Non-manual class, the risk for psychiatric disorder ranged from 2.07 (Low Manual class to 1.38 (Low Non-manual class. Parental class had a minor impact on these estimates. Among the Non-manual and Manual classes, downward mobility was associated with increased risk and upward mobility with decreased risk of psychiatric disorder. In addition, downward mobility was inversely associated with the magnitude of social mobility, independent of parental class. CONCLUSIONS: Independently of parental social class, the risk of psychiatric disorder increases with increased downward social mobility and decreases with increased upward mobility.

  20. [Psychiatric reform and social inclusion for work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rúbia Cristina; Marinho, Tanimar Pereira Coelho; Amorim, Patricia

    2010-06-01

    This study aims at understanding the link among labor, mental distress, and psychosocial rehab from the point of view of people with either mental disorders or psychoactive substance addiction, regarding the meaning of laboring in their lives. The study took place in Psychosocial Attention Centers(CAPS), in the city of Goiânia, State of Goiás, Brazil. There were eight participants of both genders, who would consider labor something important in their daily lives. Two different types of data were used, as to mention, qualitative and exploratory methodology, by means of a focal group. The content analysis was used in evaluating the data provided. The results point at the importance of rescuing the history of labor among CAPS users. It is also of significance the profusion of meanings attributed to working by the users of mental health services. Labor proves to have an interface that is understood as a factor of protection and/or worsening of the condition of the subjects. The exclusion processes are reflected by the difficulty in obtaining social security/welfare benefits.

  1. The Implications of Social Neuroscience for Social Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, James C.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Social disability represents a unifying feature in the diverse group of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Social neuroscience is the study of brain mechanisms supporting interpersonal interaction. In this paper, we review brain imaging studies of the social brain and highlight practical applications of these scientific insights.…

  2. Social distance students' attitudes towards disabled peers

    OpenAIRE

    Golubović, Spela; Milašinović, Srđan; Brkić-Jovanović, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Background: With the development of the society and social care, scientific and technical progress, the attitude towards the people with disabilities has changed. According to the Quebec classification of disability it represents a process created together with risk factors, children's personality, life habits and environmental factors that match child's age, gender and socio-cultural identity. The attitude represents a tendency to react positively or negatively towards certain objects, featu...

  3. Intellectual disability and multiple co morbid psychiatric disorders in a child: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Priyanka; Bhatia, M S; Rathi, Anubhav

    2014-11-01

    Comorbid psychiatric Disorders are seen commonly in people with intellectual disability and in fact they are at greater risk for developing other health disorders. Most prevalent chronic health conditions in children with intellectual disability are epilepsy, cerebral palsy,anxiety disorders, sleep disorders and autism spectrum disorders. Co morbidities multiply the problem of people with intellectual impairment to a great extent and hence an accurate psychological assessment of multiple diagnoses is useful in detecting the specific underlying processes differentiating the co morbid syndrome and in planning an appropriate management and rehabilitation program. This case report is presented to emphasize the fact that though. It is common for intellectually disabled children to have other co-morbid psychiatric disorders, it is important to have accurate, suitable assessment and recording of every co-morbid disorder as it has its own implication in course and outcome of the disability in the child. A comprehensive management approach involving people from various spheres would be required to improve the quality of life and for reduction of burden of care giver.We describe a child of intellectual disability with multiple co morbidities.

  4. Psychiatric evaluation of civil capacity with the new Brazilian Statute of the Person with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla-Filho, Elias

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide an update to psychiatrists regarding the new Brazilian Law for the Inclusion of People with Disabilities (BLI, Law 13,146 of 2015), and, specifically, to discuss potential implications of situations in which examination by a forensic psychiatrist points toward civil incompetence, while the above-mentioned law mandates full civil capacity for disabled persons. A study of Law 13,146/2015 was conducted, including a comparative analysis of legal and psychiatric approaches on the subject. This analysis revealed that the BLI has generated differences of opinion among legislators. However, the greatest difference seems to arise between the justice system and psychiatric expertise in relation to the difference of criteria adopted in the two approaches. The BLI is very recent; it should be revised in response to debates among psychiatrists and the criminal justice system, and especially as jurisprudence is formed over time.

  5. PHYSICAL TRAINING AND SOCIALIZATION OF DISABLED CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Paris PARIZOV; Stefka CINCEVA

    1999-01-01

    Children are born without social experience. It is accumulated in growing up. Socialization is complicated significantly with children with early physical and mental deviation, and is possibly at some cases not to occur at all.Physical training gives many possibilities not only for biological and psychological, but for social influence on disabled children as well and this possibility is not used fully.In the report authors shares thoughts and opinions on the above mentioned problem.

  6. PHYSICAL TRAINING AND SOCIALIZATION OF DISABLED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paris PARIZOV

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Children are born without social experience. It is accumulated in growing up. Socialization is complicated significantly with children with early physical and mental deviation, and is possibly at some cases not to occur at all.Physical training gives many possibilities not only for biological and psychological, but for social influence on disabled children as well and this possibility is not used fully.In the report authors shares thoughts and opinions on the above mentioned problem.

  7. A randomized trial of individual peer support for adults with psychiatric disabilities undergoing civil commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, E Sally; Maru, Mihoko; Johnson, Gene; Cohee, Julie; Hinkel, Jennifer; Hashemi, Lobat

    2016-09-01

    Given the proliferation of peer-delivered services and its growing but insufficient empirical base, we undertook a randomized trial to examine the effects of such services on individuals with severe psychiatric disabilities undergoing a civil commitment. We recruited n = 113 individuals who were civilly committed for inpatient treatment. Randomly assigned experimental participants were paired with a trained peer specialist to receive intensive 1-on-1 support to assist them with both their recovery and the conditions of their mandated court-ordered services. Individuals in the control group were invited to receive other supportive, peer-delivered services, such as social and group educational activities, but excluding individual peer support. We assessed a variety of outcomes including social supports, quality of life, recovery, symptoms, and functioning. Mounting a randomized trial in this setting and with participants who were court-ordered for inpatient treatment proved challenging in terms of recruitment, service provision, retention in the intervention, and attrition from the research. Intent-to-treat analyses revealed no significant differences in outcomes by study condition. As-treated analyses comparing high- and low-use peer support groups with control group participants found significant differences favoring peer support recipients in quality of life and functioning but no differences in other study outcomes. Difficulties with ensuring the quality of the peer support in this study may be in part responsible for our failure to see more-definitive and -positive results. As the peer support specialist profession evolves, an understanding of its effective ingredients and mechanisms must be elucidated to allow for more-rigorous studies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. [Psychiatric reform and social participation: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Alice Guimarães Bottaro; Conciani, Marta Ester

    2009-01-01

    The psychiatric reform in Brazil articulates several dimensions - conceptual, technical, administrative, legislative and cultural. It is aimed at overcoming the psychiatric paradigm based on isolation and exclusion of the mentally ill. The Reform makes part of the Brazilian Health System and presupposes a hierarchical system, municipality, participation and social control. Besides the advances made in the administrative dimension, in the state of Mato Grosso the reform takes place in centralized management contexts, revealing an apparent contradiction. Analyzing the participative processes in the construction of the psychiatric reform in Cuiabá and in the state of Mato Grosso by means of analyses of documents of the Health Councils and Conferences held over the period 2000 to 2005. The fragility of the political processes of the Health Councils hampers their constitution as environments for articulating new practices. The process of changes toward the psychiatric reform is in accordance with a new management, determined by new financing models - reduction of hospitalizations and not hospital-centered care. This is possible because it is not a result of criticisms to the asylum logic represented in the analyzed dimensions of the Brazilian Health System.

  9. Reasons for job separations in a cohort of workers with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Judith A; Burke-Miller, Jane K

    2015-01-01

    We explored the relative effects of adverse working conditions, job satisfaction, wages, worker characteristics, and local labor markets in explaining voluntary job separations (quits) among employed workers with psychiatric disabilities. Data come from the Employment Intervention Demonstration Program in which 2,086 jobs were ended by 892 workers during a 24 mo observation period. Stepped multivariable logistic regression analysis examined the effect of variables on the likelihood of quitting. Over half (59%) of all job separations were voluntary while 41% were involuntary, including firings (17%), temporary job endings (14%), and layoffs (10%). In multivariable analysis, workers were more likely to quit positions at which they were employed for 20 h/wk or less, those with which they were dissatisfied, low-wage jobs, non-temporary positions, and jobs in the structural (construction) occupations. Voluntary separation was less likely for older workers, members of racial and ethnic minority groups, and those residing in regions with lower unemployment rates. Patterns of job separations for workers with psychiatric disabilities mirrored some findings regarding job leaving in the general labor force but contradicted others. Job separation antecedents reflect the concentration of jobs for workers with psychiatric disabilities in the secondary labor market, characterized by low-salaried, temporary, and part-time employment.

  10. [Long-term analysis of disability pensions in survivors of the Holocaust: somatic and psychiatric diagnoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, T; Sperling, W; Müller, H; Schütz, P; Kornhuber, J; Reulbach, U

    2010-12-01

    Survivors of the Holocaust are known to suffer more often from mental as well as somatic consequential illness. The assessment of the degree of disability and invalidity due to the persecution complies with the interaction of directly Holocaust-related mental and somatic primary injuries as well as physical, psychical and psychosocial disadvantages and illnesses acquired later on. The presented descriptive as well as multivariate analyses included complete reports (expertise, medical records, physicians' assessments, witnessed hand-written notes of the patients) of 56 survivors of the Holocaust (36 women and 20 men). The disability pension reports of 56 Holocaust survivors (36 women and 20 men) were analysed referring to the diagnostic groups and socio-demographic aspects. In 92.3 % a psychiatric illness could be diagnosed within the first year after liberation. In a separate analysis of somatic diagnoses, gastrointestinal diseases were statistically significant more often in Holocaust survivors with a degree of disability of more than 30 % (chi-square χ (2) = 4.0; df = 1; p = 0.046). The question of an aggravation of psychiatrically relevant and persecution-associated symptomatology is mainly the objective of the expert opinion taking into account endogenous and exogenous factors such as so-called life events. Above all, newly acquired somatic diseases seem to be responsible for an aggravation of persecution-associated psychiatric symptoms, at least in the presented sample of Holocaust survivors. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. [Fates at the psychiatric hospital of Klagenfurt during National Socialism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlerchner, Herwig; Stromberger, Helge

    2013-01-01

    In this article the fate of Mr. B. is described as an example for the fate of hundreds of mentally ill patients of the "Landes-Irrenanstalt of Klagenfurt", murdered during the era of National Socialism. This extraordinary fate marks two outstanding aspects of history of medicine, the treatment of syphilis with malaria and the organised mass murder of mentally ill people during the cynic era of National Socialism. Beyond this historical perspective reconstructive biographical work together with relatives is presented as a proactive duty of psychiatric institutions.

  12. Prevalence of Psychiatric Diagnoses and Challenging Behaviors in a Community-Based Population of Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, Ian; Pollard, Jill; McClean, Brian; MacAuley, Niall; Hastings, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested substantial variation in prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders in individuals with intellectual disability (ID) and also differential patterns of associations between psychiatric disorders and challenging behaviors in people with ID. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence rate of specific…

  13. Social networks, social support and psychiatric symptoms: social determinants and associations within a multicultural community population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Natasha; Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Hotopf, Matthew; Hatch, Stephani L

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about how social networks and social support are distributed within diverse communities and how different types of each are associated with a range of psychiatric symptoms. This study aims to address such shortcomings by: (1) describing the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of social networks and social support in a multicultural population and (2) examining how each is associated with multiple mental health outcomes. Data is drawn from the South East London Community Health Study; a cross-sectional study of 1,698 adults conducted between 2008 and 2010. The findings demonstrate variation in social networks and social support by socio-demographic factors. Ethnic minority groups reported larger family networks but less perceived instrumental support. Older individuals and migrant groups reported lower levels of particular network and support types. Individuals from lower socioeconomic groups tended to report less social networks and support across the indicators measured. Perceived emotional and instrumental support, family and friend network size emerged as protective factors for common mental disorder, personality dysfunction and psychotic experiences. In contrast, both social networks and social support appear less relevant for hazardous alcohol use. The findings both confirm established knowledge that social networks and social support exert differential effects on mental health and furthermore suggest that the particular type of social support may be important. In contrast, different types of social network appear to impact upon poor mental health in a more uniform way. Future psychosocial strategies promoting mental health should consider which social groups are vulnerable to reduced social networks and poor social support and which diagnostic groups may benefit most.

  14. The Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adult with Developmental Disability (PAS-ADD) Checklist: Reliability and Validity of French Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, F.; Carminati, G. Galli

    2013-01-01

    Background: The lack of psychometric measures of psychopathology especially in intellectual disabilities (ID) population was addressed by creation of the Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adult with Developmental Disability (PAS-ADD-10) in Moss et?al. This schedule is a structured interview designed for professionals in psychopathology. The…

  15. [Prevention -- a topic in social-psychiatric research?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christiane K; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2005-10-01

    Currently, substantial effort is made to establish prevention as one of the main parts of the German health care system. In this context we investigated the current role of prevention in social-psychiatric research. We analysed original papers published in the journal Psychiatrische Praxis in the years 2003-2004 by computer-aided full text analysis. 16.5 % of the studies mentioned prevention, in one fourth of these, prevention was the main topic. Subject of these papers were suicide prevention in psychiatric patients, relapse prevention in mentally ill offenders, and prevention of acute confusional state after hip surgery. Most of the work was dedicated to tertiary prevention, followed by secondary prevention. Two papers mentioned primary preventive aspects and only one report was dedicated to primary prevention as a main topic. Although early diagnosis and intervention as well as rehabilitation of mental disorders are main topics of social psychiatry, only few reports relate explicitly to prevention. The role of social psychiatry in primary prevention has to be defined.

  16. Gender differences in psychiatric diagnoses in older people with intellectual disability: a register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmon, Anna; Sandberg, Magnus; Ahlström, Gerd

    2017-05-22

    Gender differences regarding psychiatric ill-health are well known in the general population. However, not much research is done on people with intellectual disability, and especially not among older people with intellectual disability. People with intellectual disability aged 55+ years in 2012 in Sweden were identified through a register containing information on those receiving support and service for this type of disability. The cohort comprised 3609 women and 4327 men with mean age 65 and 64 years, respectively. Information on psychiatric diagnoses was collected from the National Patient Register for the period 2002-2012. Potential gender differences were evaluated both for diagnostic categories (e.g. affective disorders) and single diagnoses (e.g. depressive episodes). The most common diagnoses among women were in the diagnostic category affective disorders, and among men in psychotic disorders. The majority of both women (72%) and men (71%) had diagnoses in only one diagnostic category. Women were more likely than men to have at least one diagnosis of dementia (odds ratio 1.40, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.83) or affective disorders (1.33, 1.21-1.58) during the study period. They were, however, less likely to have at least one diagnosis of alcohol/substance use related disorder (0.59, 0.43-0.80). No gender differences were found for diagnoses of psychotic (1.04, 0.86-1.27) or anxiety disorders (1.15, 0.94-1.40). Regarding single diagnoses, women were more likely than men to have had at least one diagnosis of unspecified nonorganic psychosis (1.75, 1.23-2.50), depressive episode (1.47, 1.19-1.82), recurrent depressive disorder (1.53, 1.06-2.22), other anxiety disorder (1.34, 1.06-1.69), or dementia in Alzheimer disease (2.50, 1.40-4.49), but less likely to be diagnosed with psychiatric and behavioral disorders due to use of alcohol (0.41, 0.27-0.61). As in the general population, there seem to be gender differences with respect to several types of

  17. Social phobia and other psychiatric problems in children with strabismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumurcu, Tongabay; Cumurcu, Birgul Elbozan; Ozcan, Ozlem; Demirel, Soner; Duz, Cem; Porgalı, Esra; Doganay, Selim

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the rate of social phobia, anxiety, depression, and other psychiatric problems in children with strabismus. Prospective, cross-sectional, case-control study. Forty-two children with strabismus and 47 control subjects 8-13 years of age were enrolled in this study. After the ophthalmologist's examination, all cases were assessed by a psychiatrist based on the structured interview technique of Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Aged Children-Present and Lifetime Version (Kiddie-SADS-PL). The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED) was administered to each subject to evaluate social phobia. All participants completed the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). Age as well as sex and income were comparable between the strabismus patients and control groups. Social phobia was diagnosed in 8 (19.04%) of the 42 strabismic children and in 1 (2.12%) of the control subjects. The CDI and SCARED (total score, social phobia, separation anxiety) scores of strabismus patients were significantly higher than the control group (p = 0.001, p = 0.004, p = 0.0001, p = 0.05, respectively). A relationship between strabismus in children and social phobia, depression, and anxiety on a symptom basis was underlined by our data. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Children's Experiences of Disability: Pointers to a Social Model of Childhood Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Clare; Stalker, Kirsten

    2007-01-01

    The social model of disability has paid little attention to disabled children, with few attempts to explore how far it provides an adequate explanatory framework for their experiences. This paper reports findings from a two-year study exploring the lived experiences of 26 disabled children aged 7-15. They experienced disability in four ways--in…

  19. Psychiatric care utilization among older people with intellectual disability in comparison with the general population: a register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmon, A; Björne, P; Nylander, L; Ahlström, G

    2016-11-09

    People with intellectual disability have been found to have higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders than the general population. However, they do not seem to have a corresponding increase in psychiatric care utilization. The aim of the present study was to investigate psychiatric care utilization among older people with intellectual disability. We used a cohort of people with intellectual disability, 55+ years in 2012 (n = 7936), and an equally sized age and sex matched reference cohort from the general population. Psychiatric care utilization was measured using registrations in the Swedish National Patient register during 2002-2012, where each registration corresponds to a psychiatric care occasion. About 20 % of those with intellectual disability had at least one registration during the study period, compared to some 6 % in the general population sample. In the whole cohort as well as stratified by sex, people with intellectual disability were 3-4 times more likely than those in the general population sample to have had at least one registration during the study period. The effect was, however, only consistent in age groups comprising people younger than 65 years. Among people with intellectual disability, men were more likely than women to have had at least one registration, and people living in special housing (group home or service home) during the entire study period were less likely than those who only lived in special housing for parts of the study or not at all. People with intellectual disability had longer stays per inpatient registration compared with the general population sample. When stratifying on sex, the effect was found only among men, although there were no sex differences within the cohort of people with intellectual disability. Among people with intellectual disability, living in special housing during the entire study period was associated with shorter stays per inpatient registration. Although people with intellectual disability

  20. Affirmative Action For the Physically Disabled in Social Work Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Trova K.

    1978-01-01

    The need for affirmative action measures in social work education for the physically disabled is discussed. Issues and needs that should be considered in developing affirmative action programs for the disabled are described and suggestions are made for identifying and recruiting qualified disabled students for the social work field. (Author/BH)

  1. Social Image of Disability. Vulnerability of the Dignity of Women with Disability and Social Exclusion Contexts

    OpenAIRE

    Monedero, José Antonio Gómez; Cuesta, Concepción Unanue; Angulo, Beatriz Núñez

    2014-01-01

    Disability does not have nor had the same perception in all civilizations. Its treatment and considerations have been very complex and diverse within its regions and have generated multiple discriminatory behaviors. Today, we live in a new social paradigm developed with human rights in mind that people with disabilities enjoy. This new model, more human, has been adopted in most countries of the world. These rights are consistent with equality in opportunities thanks to the support i...

  2. Stressful Social Interactions Experienced by Adults With Mild Intellectual Disability

    OpenAIRE

    Hartley, Sigan L.; MacLean, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Adults with intellectual disability are vulnerable to stressful social interactions. We determined frequency and severity of various stressful social interactions, identified the social partners in these interactions, and examined the specific interpersonal skill difficulties of 114 adults with mild intellectual disability. Participants’ characteristic risk factors for stressful social interactions were also identified. Minor and unintentional negative actions of others had high frequency but...

  3. Assessment of Integration of Disability Content into Social Work Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Lydia; McAllister, Carolyn; Neely-Barnes, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Three hundred members of the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) responded to a survey regarding the inclusion of disability content in social work courses and supports needed to increase disability content. Although respondents generally agreed that disability content is important in social work education, its inclusion is inconsistent, with most frequent inclusion in courses on diversity and least frequent inclusion in courses on research. Respondents identified barriers to increasing disability content, including lack of resources for teaching, lack of relevant faculty expertise, and an overcrowded curriculum. Strategies and resources for infusing disability content into social work education are discussed.

  4. Disability, psychiatric symptoms, and quality of life in infertile women: a cross-sectional study in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Hacer; Hocaoglu, Cicek; Guvendag-Guven, Emine Seda

    2016-04-25

    Infertility is a major life crisis which can lead to the development of psychiatric symptoms and negative effects on the quality of life of affected couples, but the magnitude of the effects may vary depending on cultural expectations. We compare the level of psychiatric symptoms, disability, and quality of life in fertile and infertile women in urban Turkey. This cross-sectional study enrolled 100 married women being treated for infertility at the outpatient department of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of the Rize Education and Research Hospital and a control group of 100 fertile married women. All study participants were evaluated with a socio-demographic data screening form, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Brief Disability Questionnaire (BDQ), and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). The mean anxiety subscale score and depression subscale score of HADS were slightly higher in the infertile group than in controls, but the differences were not statistically significant. The proportion of subjects with clinically significant anxiety (i.e., anxiety subscale score of HADS ≥11) was significantly higher in infertile women than in fertile women (31% v. 17%, χ (2)=5.37, p=0.020), but the proportion with clinically significant depressive symptoms (i.e., depression subscale score of HADS >8) was not significantly different (43% v. 33%, χ (2)=2.12, p=0.145). Self-reported disability over the prior month was significantly worse in the infertile group than in the controls, and 4 of the 8 subscales of the SF-36 - general health, vitality, social functioning, and mental health - were significantly worse in the infertile group. Compared to infertile women who were currently working, infertile women who were not currently working reported less severe depression and anxiety and better general health, vitality, and mental health. Married women from urban Turkey seeking treatment for infertility do not have significantly more severe depressive

  5. Wellbeing, activity and housing satisfaction - comparing residents with psychiatric disabilities in supported housing and ordinary housing with support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Mona; Argentzell, Elisabeth; Bejerholm, Ulrika; Tjörnstrand, Carina; Brunt, David

    2017-08-30

    The home is imperative for the possibilities for meaningful everyday activities among people with psychiatric disabilities. Knowledge of whether such possibilities vary with type of housing and housing support might reveal areas for improved support. We aimed to compare people with psychiatric disabilities living in supported housing (SH) and ordinary housing with support (OHS) regarding perceived well-being, engaging and satisfying everyday activities, and perceived meaning of activity in one's accommodation. The importance of these factors and socio-demographics for satisfaction with housing was also explored. This naturalistic cross-sectional study was conducted in municipalities and city districts (n = 21) in Sweden, and 155 SH residents and 111 OHS residents participated in an interview that included both self-reports and interviewer ratings. T-test and linear regression analysis were used. The SH group expressed more psychological problems, but better health, quality of life and personal recovery compared to the OHS residents. The latter were rated as having less symptom severity, and higher levels of functioning and activity engagement. Both groups rated themselves as under-occupied in the domains of work, leisure, home management and self-care, but the SH residents less so regarding home management and self-care chores. Although the groups reported similar levels of activity, the SH group were more satisfied with everyday activities and rated their housing higher on possibilities for social interaction and personal development. The groups did not differ on access to activity in their homes. The participants generally reported sufficient access to activity, social interaction and personal development, but those who wanted more personal development in the OHS group outnumbered those who stated they received enough. Higher scores on satisfaction with daily occupations, access to organization and information, wanting more social interaction, and personal

  6. Disability status, disease parameters, defense styles, and ego strength associated with psychiatric complications of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyphantis, Thomas N; Christou, Konstantinos; Kontoudaki, Stavroula; Mantas, Christos; Papamichael, George; Goulia, Panagiota; Konitsiotis, Spyros; Mavreas, Venetsanos

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify disease parameters, defensive styles and ego strength measurements associated with various forms of psychiatric complications in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Seventy-nine patients with MS participated in the study and 158 healthy subjects matched for age and sex served as controls. A wide range of clinical information was collected and the following self-report instruments were used: General Health Questionnaire, Symptom Distress Check List, Defense Style Questionnaire, MMPI Ego Strength Scale and Hostility and Direction of Hostility Questionnaire. The odds of being assessed with a psychiatric diagnosis upon interview were 6.7 times greater among patients compared to controls and 9.3 times greater among patients with recent-onset MS compared to patients with long-term disease. Psychiatric complications of MS were closely associated with age of the disease onset and the degree of disability due to MS. Additionally, higher rates of introverted hostility, adoption of maladaptive ego defenses and weakened ego strength were also closely associated with several forms of psychological distress, especially depressive symptoms. MS patients experience elevated symptoms of psychological distress, especially depressive symptoms, which are most closely associated with disease parameters. However, the crucial role of various personality traits such as ego defenses and hostility features in the psychiatric symptom formation also appear to contribute to the development of depressive symptoms. Clinicians involved in the clinical management of patients with MS should identify and modify treatment if these specific personality markers that indicate the exhaustion of the patient's resources to cope with the physical and psychological stress of the illness are present.

  7. Psychiatric Morbidity and Social Capital in Rural Communities of the Greek North Aegean Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseloni, Andromachi; Zissi, Anastasia; Skapinakis, Petros

    2010-01-01

    Which facets of social capital affect mental health in rural settings? This study explores the association between different aspects of social capital and psychiatric morbidity in rural communities of the Greek North Aegean islands. A large number of individual and community characteristics that may influence psychiatric morbidity are concurrently…

  8. Social model: a new approach of the disability theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bampi, Luciana Neves da Silva; Guilhem, Dirce; Alves, Elioenai Dornelles

    2010-01-01

    The experience of disability is part of the daily lives of people who have a disease, lesion or corporal limitation. Disability is still understood as personal bad luck; moreover, from the social and political points of view, the disabled are seen as a minority. The aim of this study is to contribute to the knowledge about the experience of disability. The research presents a new approach on the theme: the social model. This approach appeared as an alternative to the medical model of disability, which sees the lesion as the primary cause of social inequality and of the disadvantages experienced by the disabled, ignoring the role of social structures in their oppression and marginalization. The study permits reflecting on how the difficulties and barriers society imposed on people considered different make disability a reality and portray social injustice and the vulnerability situation lived by excluded groups.

  9. Stressful Social Interactions Experienced by Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Sigan L.; MacLean, William E., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Adults with intellectual disability are vulnerable to stressful social interactions. We determined frequency and severity of various stressful social interactions, identified the social partners in these interactions, and examined the specific interpersonal skill difficulties of 114 adults with mild intellectual disability. Participants'…

  10. Mental Health: Knowledge, Attitudes and Training of Professionals on Dual Diagnosis of Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, S.; Stawski, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dual diagnosis (DD) refers to the coexistence of intellectual disability and psychiatric disorder. In order to provide individuals with DD with adequate care, it is essential for mental health workers to have adequate knowledge and positive attitudes. These may be achieved through proper training. Aims: To summarise the available…

  11. A Systematic Review of the Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Adults with Intellectual Disability, 2003-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckles, Jason; Luckasson, Ruth; Keefe, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Research regarding the prevalence of psychiatric conditions co-occurring with intellectual disability in adults was reviewed. Particular attention was paid to the qualities of sampling and diagnostic methodology, which have been identified as needs in two recent reviews. Sixteen articles published in peer-reviewed journals between 2003 and 2009…

  12. The Role of Neighborhood Factors and Community Stigma in Predicting Community Participation Among Persons With Psychiatric Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Lauren; Yanos, Philip T; Stefancic, Ana; Alexander, Mary Jane; Harney-Delehanty, Brianna

    2017-09-15

    This study examined the association between neighborhood characteristics, stigma related to mental illness reported by local community members, and measures of perceived stigma and community participation among individuals with psychiatric disabilities living in independent scattered-site housing or in congregate housing in three neighborhoods in the New York City metropolitan area. Neighborhood characteristics were drawn from the 2010 U.S. Census. Surveys focusing on attitudes and intended behavior toward people with mental illness were administered to 608 general community members, and clinical interviews were conducted with 343 persons with psychiatric disabilities. Of neighborhood characteristics, both greater socioeconomic disadvantage and more "suburban values" (lower housing density and greater political conservativism) predicted more perpetrated stigma reported by community members. There was no significant relationship between stigma reported by community members and perceived stigma among participants with psychiatric disabilities. Community stigma predicted vocational involvement and demonstrated interaction effects with housing, such that persons living in congregate housing demonstrated more community participation in communities with more stigma, whereas persons living in scattered-site housing demonstrated less participation in these communities. Perceived stigma was significantly negatively related to community participation. Findings suggest that effects of neighborhood characteristics and community stigma on people with psychiatric disabilities are complex and are partly conditioned by housing context.

  13. Mastering Everyday Life in Ordinary Housing for People with Psychiatric Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosita Brolin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a classic grounded theory about people who have psychiatric disabilities and live in ordinary housing with housing support. Interviews and observations during the interviews were analyzed, and secondary analyses of data from previous studies were performed. The impossible mission in everyday life emerged as the main concern and mastering everyday life as the pattern of behavior through which they deal with this concern. Mastering everyday life can be seen as a process, which involves identifying, organizing, tackling, challenging and boosting. Before the process is started, avoiding is used to deal with the main concern. The community support worker, providing housing support, constitutes an important facilitator during the process, and the continuity of housing support is a prerequisite for the process to succeed. If the process mastering everyday life is interrupted by, for example, changes in housing support, the strategy of avoiding is used.

  14. Towards a critical theory of disability in social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiranandani, Vanmala Sunder

    2005-01-01

    The dominant discourse on disability in social work has been that of an individual/medical model, which largely relegates the ‘problem’ of disability to a deficit within the individual. This paper calls for re-visioning disability: notions of disability in social work are contrasted with alternat...... the foundation of a dynamic critical theory of disability that questions impairment as necessarily a personal tragedy, and asserts that the notion of individual inadequacy is socially reproduced.......The dominant discourse on disability in social work has been that of an individual/medical model, which largely relegates the ‘problem’ of disability to a deficit within the individual. This paper calls for re-visioning disability: notions of disability in social work are contrasted...... with alternative frameworks, such as social and cultural constructions, materialist and political economy perspectives, and critiques of disciplinary power and the discourses of normalcy and measurement. These alternative conceptualizations drawn from humanities, social sciences, and disability studies can form...

  15. Social relations as determinant of onset of disability in aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, Kirsten; Holstein, Bjørn E; Due, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze whether social relations are related to onset of disability among old people at 1.5 year follow-up and whether these relations vary by age and gender. The study is based on baseline and 1.5 year follow-up data on 1396 older non-disabled adults. Social...... relations were measured by questions about diversity in social relations, social participation, satisfaction with social relations and instrumental social support. Onset of disability was described as developing need of help in at least one of six mobility activities. The results showed that a large...... network of social relations provides protection against disability by reducing risk of developing disability....

  16. Social relations as determinant of onset of disability in aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, Kirsten; Lund, Rikke; Holstein, Bjørn E

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze whether social relations are related to onset of disability among old people at 1.5 year follow-up and whether these relations vary by age and gender. The study is based on baseline and 1.5 year follow-up data on 1396 older non-disabled adults. Social...... relations were measured by questions about diversity in social relations, social participation, satisfaction with social relations and instrumental social support. Onset of disability was described as developing need of help in at least one of six mobility activities. The results showed that a large...... network of social relations provides protection against disability by reducing risk of developing disability....

  17. Work experiences among attendees of day centres for people with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Mona; Sandlund, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    It is possible that people with psychiatric disabilities who visit day centres have previous work experiences that may be seen as resources for their current engagement in day centre activities. Research in this respect seems to lack, however. To investigate work experiences among attendees at day centres for people with psychiatric disabilities and relationships with current type of day centre (work-oriented, meeting place-oriented or mixed), engagement in day centre activities, motivation and socio-demographic and health-related factors. Seventy-seven attendees responded to questionnaires. Global Assessment of Functioning, GAF, was also used. Work was categorised into Group I (professionals, semi-professionals), Group II (clerical support, services workers) and Group III (e.g. craft workers, elementary occupations). Almost everyone had previously had open-market employment; more than half for ≥ 10 years. Group I was more common in mixed centres, Group II in meeting place-oriented ones and Group III in work-oriented ones. Group I more frequently had college degree and was rated high on GAF functioning. Women were over-represented in Group II, and men in Group III and in meeting place-oriented centres. Attending mixed centres was more likely when having a college degree, scoring high on GAF functioning and being highly engaged in activities. Attendees at work-oriented day centres were characterised by being motivated for spending time alone and reporting a diagnosis of psychosis. The participants had unused working capacity. No clear-cut relationships were found between work experiences and the investigated correlates.

  18. Supported education for individuals with psychiatric disabilities: State of the practice and policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringeisen, Heather; Langer Ellison, Marsha; Ryder-Burge, Amy; Biebel, Kathleen; Alikhan, Shums; Jones, Emily

    2017-06-01

    Supported education (SEd) is a promising practice that supports and encourages educational goals and attainment among individuals with psychiatric disabilities. This paper provides insights into how SEd objectives are pursued in different settings, assesses the evidence base, and discusses policy implications. Insights from 3 data sources were synthesized: published literature, an environmental scan, and 3 site visits to programs that support the education goals of individuals with psychiatric disabilities. While setting, target populations, level of coordination with supported employment, and financing strategies varied, common SEd components emerged: specialized and dedicated staffing, one-on-one and group skill-building activities, assistance with navigating the academic setting and coordinating different services, and linkages with mental health counseling. The evidence base is growing; however, many published studies to date do not employ rigorous methodology. Conclusions and Implications for Policy and Practice: Continued specification, operationalization, and testing of SEd core components are needed. The components of the evolving SEd model would benefit from rigorous testing to evaluate impact on degree completion and other key impacts such as employment; health, mental health, or recovery; and community participation. In addition to funding streams from special education and Medicaid, new opportunities for increasing the availability of SEd include the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA) reauthorization, which requires state vocational rehabilitation agencies to fund preemployment services for transition-age individuals. New "set-aside" requirements for the Mental Health Services Block Grant will increase funding for early intervention services for individuals with serious mental illness, potentially including SEd. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Teaching the "Invisible" Disabled Students in the Classroom: Disclosure, Inclusion and the Social Model of Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on the insights of critical disability studies, this article addresses anxieties frequently articulated by academic staff around the implementation of the United Kingdom's Disability Discrimination Act: how to accommodate the needs of students with "hidden" impairments. Following the social model of disability, it argues that…

  20. Identity construction and participation in work: Learning from the experiences of persons with psychiatric disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, Lana

    2016-01-01

    In this article constructions of identity, occupation, and performance are explored with a particular focus on the interrelatedness of these concepts. Insights were derived from a study in which the influences that impact on the work-lives of people with a psychiatric disability were explored. An interpretive biography design was utilised. Data construction took the form of narrative interviews and a combination of paradigmatic narrative analysis and narrative analysis was used. Participants, selected by means of purposive maximum variation sampling, had been diagnosed with psychiatric impairment and lived in the Western Cape, South Africa. Identity construction processes were explored, with a particular focus on how these impacted on decisions regarding participation in work. Performance elements of identity, called forth by occupational demands, occurring within work environments were found to be shaped through, and expressed as, doing. The notion of Punctualized Identity was shown to provide a lens that is able to capture the dynamic interplay of identity constructs and provide a synthesised perspective on participation.

  1. Influence of single peer interventions on the recovery attitude of persons with a psychiatric disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenschlag, Franziska; Schusterschitz, Claudia; Conca, Antoinette; Knuf, Andreas; Needham, Ian; Hoffmann, Holger

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the influence of single peer to peer interventions on participants' recovery attitudes. Following a 40-hour training, pairs of individuals with a psychiatric disability offered a session (2.5 hour) in outpatient and residential psychiatric institutions. These peer to peer interventions aimed at inspiring and contributing to participants' recovery process, by introducing them to constituent parts of the concept Recovery. Thirteen of the peer interventions were evaluated by measuring participants' recovery attitudes before (N = 145), just after (N = 115) and at 6 months postintervention (N = 53) using the Recovery Attitudes Questionnaire (RAQ7) and the Recovery Process Inventory (RPI). Wilcoxon tests demonstrated that individuals participating in a peer intervention felt significantly more certain that Recovery is possible (factor 'Recovery is possible') just after the intervention (p = 0.004), but not 6 months later; likewise, the perception of the difficulty of recovery in spite of a mental illness (factor 'Recovery is difficult and differs') was significantly lower 6 months later (p = 0.016), but not from pre to just after. The statistically significant effect of a single recovery-oriented peer intervention on participants' attitude that recovery is possible was not sustainable. These results suggest a possible higher sustainability of repeated or longer-lasting peer interventions. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  2. Disability in Higher Education: A Social Justice Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nancy J.; Broido, Ellen M.; Brown, Kirsten R.; Wilke, Autumn K.

    2017-01-01

    "Disability in Higher Education: A Social Justice Approach" examines how disability is conceptualized in higher education and ways in which students, faculty, and staff with disabilities are viewed and served on college campuses. Drawing on multiple theoretical frameworks, research, and experience creating inclusive campuses, this text…

  3. The role of personal social networks in risk assessment and management of forensic psychiatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pomp, L.; Spreen, M.; Bogaerts, S.; Völkel, B.

    2010-01-01

    Social network factors are usually not accounted for in the clinical practice of risk assessment/management.This article introduces a social network analysis as an instrument to systematically chart the relationships and personal networks of forensic psychiatric patients. During the period 2005 to 2007, the so-called Forensic Social Network Analysis (FSNA) was developed in a Dutch forensic psychiatric hospital. A case study describes the FSNA concepts and shows the benefits of using FSNA as a...

  4. Teaching about Disability in Psychology: An Analysis of Disability Curricula in U.S. Undergraduate Psychology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Nicole M.; Bogart, Kathleen R.; Bonnett, Amy K.; Estill, Mariah C.; Colton, Cassandra E.

    2016-01-01

    Historically, psychology education about disability focused narrowly on psychiatric and cognitive disabilities. Furthermore, disability tends to be viewed from the medical model, rather than the social model endorsed by disability scholars, which describes disability as primarily socially constructed. Course offerings for the psychology…

  5. Social and ethical implications of psychiatric classification for low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Classification of Diseases, currently 10th edition, it is timely to consider the wider societal implications of evolving psychiatric classification, especially within low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The author reviewed developments in psychiatric classification, especially the move from categorical to dimensional ...

  6. [The importance of a developmental approach in psychiatric assessment and treatment of adults with intellectual disability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappok, T; Schade, C; Kaiser, H; Dosen, A; Diefenbacher, A

    2012-03-01

    Mental disorders are 3-4 times more frequent in individuals with intellectual disabilities than in those without. From a developmental perspective the reason for this high prevalence could be, besides biological aberrations, a personality development with a difference between cognitive and emotional developmental levels. This discrepancy renders the person being highly vulnerable for the onset of problem behaviour and psychiatric disorders. For a proper insight into processes which have led to the disorder, it is necessary to evaluate the level of emotional development. This can be determined by the "schema of emotional development (SEO)" developed by A. Dosen. By means of a case description the authors demonstrate the application of SEO in the assessment and utilization of the concept of the level of emotional development in clinical practice. The knowledge of the level of emotional development contributes to the explaining and understanding of the disorder, and also facilitates the establishment of an integrated diagnosis and the creation of appropriate integrated treatment strategies. Hence, temper tantrums, sleep patterns and mood improved in the case described. Besides biopsychosocial aspects, the developmental aspect, and in particular the level of emotional development should be taken into consideration in the diagnostic work-up and treatment of individuals with intellectual disabilities and mental health problems. The data generated by the SEO may help in understanding the disorder and developing a treatment approach for these individuals. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Naturalism and the social model of disability: allied or antithetical?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisti, Dominic A

    2015-07-01

    The question of how disability should be defined is fraught with political, ethical and philosophical complexities. The social model of disability, which posits that disability is socially and politically constructed and is characterised by systemic barriers, has enjoyed broad acceptance that is exemplified by the slow but steady progress in securing civil rights for persons with disabilities. Yet, there remains a palpable tension between disability studies scholars and activists and bioethicists. While philosophers and bioethicists should heed the theories developed from the standpoint of persons with disabilities, disability activists should acknowledge the possibility that philosophical theories about the basic reality of disease, illness, health, function and impairment offer a more steady foundation for social or political critiques of disability. I argue that naturalistic theories of function and dysfunction provide a valuable starting point to clarify questions about the broader concept of disability. A naturalist theory of function may serve as the core of the concept of disability and provide disability scholars and bioethicists alike a stronger set of arguments in analysing real or potential instances of disability. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Challenges to Improve Inter-Professional Care and Service Collaboration for People Living With Psychiatric Disabilities in Ordinary Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ann-Christine; Ainalem, Ingrid; Berg, Agneta; Janlöv, Ann-Christin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe health care- and social service professionals' experiences of a quality-improvement program implemented in the south of Sweden. The focus of the program was to develop inter-professional collaboration to improve care and service to people with psychiatric disabilities in ordinary housing. Focus group interviews and a thematic analysis were used. The result was captured as themes along steps in process. (I) Entering the quality-improvement program: Lack of information about the program, The challenge of getting started, and Approaching the resources reluctantly. (II) Doing the practice-based improvement work: Facing unprepared workplaces, and Doing twice the work. (III) Looking back--evaluation over 1 year: Balancing theoretical knowledge with practical training, and Considering profound knowledge as an integral part of work. The improvement process in clinical practice was found to be both time and energy consuming, yet worth the effort. The findings also indicate that collaboration across organizational boundaries was broadened, and the care and service delivery were improved.

  9. Deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders: Is there an impact on social functioning?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christian Saleh; Gregor Hasler

    2017-01-01

    Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) for refractory psychiatric disorders shows promising effects on symptom-reduction, however, little is known regarding the effects of DBS on social outcome. Methods...

  10. Why We Move: Social Mobility Behaviors of Non-Disabled and Disabled Children across Childcare Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Samuel W; Ross, Samantha Mae; Schreiber, Melynda A; Feldner, Heather A; Lobo, Michele A; Catena, Michele A; MacDonald, Megan; Galloway, James C

    2016-01-01

    Social mobility is defined as the co-occurrence of self-directed locomotion and direct peer interaction. Social mobility is a product of dynamic child-environment interactions and thus likely to vary across contexts (e.g., classroom, gymnasium, and playground). The purpose of this present study was to examine differences in children's social mobility: (1) across contexts by age and (2) between non-disabled and disabled children. Participants ( n  = 55 non-disabled and three disabled children; M age  = 3.1 years, SD = 1.4) were video recorded within a university-based early learning center. Children were recorded for 20 min in each context: classroom, gymnasium, and playground. A 15-s momentary time sampling method was used to code social mobility, the simultaneous occurrence of self-directed locomotion, and direct peer interaction. This variable was calculated as percent time within each context. A planned Friedman's rank ANOVA ( n  = 55), stratified by age, indicated that older children (3-5 years old) differed across contexts in their social mobility [χ 2 (2) ~ 7.3-10.5, p  Social mobility was significantly lower in the classroom compared with the playground and gymnasium (with no difference between the latter contexts) for older children. Visual analysis confirmed that disabled children ( n  = 3) engaged in substantially less time in social mobility (average 0-1%), compared with non-disabled, age-similar peers (2-3 years old average 1-12%) across all contexts. A substantial gap exists between non-disabled and disabled children for social mobility. There is an increase in magnitude and variability of social mobility around age three that suggests the gap between non-disabled and disabled children will continue to widen.

  11. Social Grace or Disgrace: Adolescent Social Skills and Learning Disability Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Marilyn M.

    1987-01-01

    Socialization difficulties encountered by a particular learning disabled adolescent may be related to the type of underlying learning disability. Two subtypes of learning disability are discussed (language disorders and disturbed visual spatial functions) along with implications for problems in development of social skills and for effective…

  12. Learning disabilities and social problem solving skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pina Filippello

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 14 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Recent studies showed that children with learning disabilities present significant difficulties in learning as well as in social skills (Siperstein, 2009.Therefore, it was observed how it is difficult for these children to establish adequate relationships, especially to advise coping strategies to face interpersonal conflicts (Oliva & LaGreca, 1988. Accordingly to this argument and with reference to Agaliotis e Kalyva (2004, 2009, this study examines the preferences for strategies to solve an hypothetical conflict on a sample of children with LD in comparison to typical developing peers. They used the method of social story to conduct this research. In fact, researchers asked to the children, after they have listened a short story describing an interpersonal conflict interaction between adult and peers,  which strategies they would have chosen if they were in the same situation and the strategies that would be most appropriate to resolve a conflict. Results obtained from the experiment corroborated literature data and demonstrated that children with LD, in comparison to typical developing peers, use and prefer dysfunctional coping strategies, aggressive or passive, also in relation to the partner interaction (adult or peers to face interpersonal conflict.

  13. Assessing racial/ethnic differences in the social consequences of early-onset psychiatric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lê Cook, Benjamin; Carson, Nicholas; Alegria, Margarita

    2010-05-01

    Individuals with early onset of psychiatric disorder have worse social outcomes than individuals with adult onset. It is unknown whether this association varies by racial/ ethnic group. Identifying groups at risk for poor social outcomes is important for improving clinical and policy interventions. We compared unemployment, high school dropout, arrest, and welfare participation by race/ethnicity and time of onset using a nationally representative sample of Whites, Blacks, Asians, and Latinos with lifetime psychiatric disorder. Early onset was associated with worse social outcomes than adult onset. Significant Black-White and Latino-White differences in social outcomes were identified. The association between early onset and negative social outcomes was similar across Whites, Latinos, and Blacks. For Asians, the association between unemployment and early onset was opposite that of Whites. Increasing early detection and treatment of psychiatric illness should be prioritized. Further study will clarify the association between onset and social outcomes among sub-ethnic populations.

  14. The Social Construction of Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley-Marling, Curt

    2004-01-01

    Underpinning the technical gaze that dominates learning disabilities theory and practice is the assumption that learning disabilities are a pathology that resides in the heads of individual students, with the corollary that remedial efforts also focus on what goes on in the heads of students classified as learning disabled. This article begins…

  15. ADAPTATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES TO SOCIAL AND HOUSEHOLD ACTIVITIES

    OpenAIRE

    R. A. Akhtaov; V. S. Begidov; M. M. Khakunova

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to the problem of adaptation of children with disabilities to social and domestic activities. An adaptation for disabled children to social and domestic activities is an important part of their socialization in the society. Owning Self skills allow the child to be relatively independent existence; it allows doing without the help of others, which in turn reduces the tension in the family, increases the confidence in the safety and security of the child itself. The autho...

  16. Mobility, disability, and social engagement in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Andrea L; Taylor, Jennifer A; Tabb, Loni Philip; Michael, Yvonne L

    2013-06-01

    To examine cross sectional associations between mobility with or without disability and social engagement in a community-based sample of older adults. Social engagement of participants (n = 676) was outside the home (participation in organizations and use of senior centers) and in home (talking by phone and use of Internet). Logistic or proportional odds models evaluated the association between social engagement and position in the disablement process (no mobility limitations, mobility limitations/no disability, and mobility limitations/disability). Low mobility was associated with lower level of social engagement of all forms (Odds ratio (OR) = 0.59, confidence intervals (CI): 0.41-0.85 for organizations; OR = 0.67, CI: 0.42-1.06 for senior center; OR = 0.47, CI: 0.32-0.70 for phone; OR = 0.38, CI: 0.23-0.65 for Internet). For social engagement outside the home, odds of engagement were further reduced for individuals with disability. Low mobility is associated with low social engagement even in the absence of disability; associations with disability differed by type of social engagement.

  17. MOBILITY, DISABILITY, AND SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT IN OLDER ADULTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Andrea L.; Taylor, Jennifer A.; Tabb, Loni Philip; Michael, Yvonne L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine cross-sectional associations between mobility with or without disability and social engagement in a community-based sample of older adults Methods Social engagement of participants (n=676) was outside the home (participation in organizations and use of senior centers) and in home (talking by phone and use of internet). Logistic or proportional odds models evaluated the association between social engagement and position in the disablement process (no mobility limitations, mobility limitations/no disability, and mobility limitations/disability). Results Low mobility was associated with lower level of social engagement of all forms (OR=0.59, CI: 0.41–0.85 for organizations; OR=0.67, CI: 0.42–1.06 for senior center; OR=0.47, CI: 0.32–0.70 for phone; OR=0.38, CI: 0.23–0.65 for internet). For social engagement outside the home, odds of engagement were further reduced for individuals with disability. Discussion Low mobility is associated with low social engagement even in the absence of disability; associations with disability differed by type of social engagement. PMID:23548944

  18. Web-based support for daily functioning of people with mild intellectual disabilities or chronic psychiatric disorders: A feasibility study in routine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica de Wit

    2015-05-01

    Conclusion: The initial results of the use of web-based support for this client population seem promising and justify further research on online support for clients with mild intellectual disabilities or chronic psychiatric disorders.

  19. Predicting dropout in outpatient dialectical behavior therapy with patients with borderline personality disorder receiving psychiatric disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landes, Sara J; Chalker, Samantha A; Comtois, Katherine Anne

    2016-01-01

    Rates of treatment dropout in outpatient Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) in the community can be as high as 24 % to 58 %, making dropout a great concern. The primary purpose of this article was to examine predictors of dropout from DBT in a community mental health setting. Participants were 56 consumers with borderline personality disorder (BPD) who were psychiatrically disabled participating in a larger feasibility trial of Dialectical Behavior Therapy- Accepting the Challenges of Exiting the System. The following variables were examined to see whether they predicted dropout in DBT: age, education level, baseline level of distress, baseline level of non-acceptance of emotional responses, and skills module in which a consumer started DBT skills group. These variables were chosen based on known predictors of dropout in consumers with BPD and in DBT, as well as an interest in what naturally occurring variables might impact dropout. The dropout rate in this sample was 51.8 %. Results of the logistic regression show that younger age, higher levels of baseline distress, and a higher level of baseline non-acceptance of emotional responses were significantly associated with dropout. The DBT skills module in which an individual started group did not predict dropout. The implications of these findings are that knowledge of consumer age and pretreatment levels of distress and non-acceptance of emotional responses can impact providers' choice of commitment and treatment strategies to reduce dropout. Future research should examine these strategies, as well as the impact of predictor variables on outcome and reasons for dropout.

  20. Deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders: Is there an impact on social functioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Christian; Hasler, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) for refractory psychiatric disorders shows promising effects on symptom-reduction, however, little is known regarding the effects of DBS on social outcome. A PubMed search based on original studies of DBS for psychiatric disorders [treatment resistant depression (TRD), Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (GTS), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)] was conducted. Data on social outcome following surgery were extracted and analyzed. Social functioning was not a primary outcome measure in the reviewed article. The literature is incomplete and inconclusive on this variable, however from the reported data, there is some evidence that DBS has the potential to improve social functioning. More systematic and detailed data gathering and reporting on social outcome with longer follow-ups are needed to evaluate more exhaustively the role of DBS in refractory psychiatric disorders.

  1. [Disability studies: social exclusion a research subject].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The article presents disability studies and elaborates, as their central feature, the distinction between societal disability and impairment which can be described on an individual and medical level. Disability studies define disability as socially caused exclusion. Participation and inclusion, seen as sociopolitical control and counter-terms, do, in fact, have a different content, depending on usage and context. Using the example of the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UN CRPD), the respective understanding of disability is depicted. Against this background, the deficits of implementation of the UN CRPD, as criticized by the responsible UN Committee, are shown. Finally, a research agenda for disability studies is outlined, that deals with, among other things, implementation strategies and conflicts of interest in terms of inclusion, furthering widely unquestioned economic conditions and especially the negative impact of European austerity politics.

  2. A primer: Social Security Act programs to assist the disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This summary is designed for those who are unfamiliar with the many current features of federally sponsored disability and health programs under the Social Security Act, including the Social Security Disability Insurance (DI) program, the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, Medicare, and Medicaid. It provides an overview of the provisions and operations of the programs. Several SSA resources were consulted in compiling the material: Social Security Handbook (available at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/ OP_Home/handbook/handbook.html); Annual Statistical Supplement to the Social Security Bulletin, 2005 (available at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/statcomps/supplement/2005); Trends in the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income Disability Programs, by John Kearney and L. Scott Muller (available at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/chartbooks/disability trends); and Disability program sections of the Social Security Online Web pages (available at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/disability). This summary is intended to assist in understanding the features of these federal disability and health programs. The descriptions are intended for explanatory purposes and do not provide guidance in administrative or claimant actions.

  3. Acceptance of disability: determinants of overcoming social frustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Elena Valeryevna; Shmeleva, Svetlana Vasilyevna; Sorokoumova, Elena Aleksandrovna; Nikishina, Vera Borisovna; Abdalina, Larisa Vasilyevna

    2015-01-25

    The article is devoted to the subjective reaction of patients at different stages of disabling disease, in the context of the formation of a specific cognitive-emotional and motivational model of "internal picture of disability", depending on the severity of social frustration as the most important deconditioning factor. We wanted to identify psychological determinant of the specificity of adaptive activity of the patient to the situation disabling disease, depending on the level of increase social frustration. Nature of adaptation to the disabling disease depending on the level of increase social frustration expressed by: 1) decrease in self-esteem of patient self-efficacy with an increase in subjective experience of disability; 2) the growing tension of personal protective mechanisms; 3) reductions coping competence, which, depending on the rise of frustration, becomes effective instead of the rational-intelligent, more maladaptive emotional.

  4. Psychometric Evaluation of a Dutch Version of the Mini PAS-ADD for Assessing Psychiatric Disorders in Adults with Different Levels of Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, R.; Maes, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disabilities (ID) have an increased vulnerability to develop psychiatric problems. Moreover, the early recognition and the accurate diagnosis of psychiatric disorders in the population of persons with ID are challenging. Method: A Dutch version of the Mini PAS-ADD, which is a screening instrument for…

  5. Reasons for Referral, Intervention Approaches and Demographic Characteristics of Clients with Intellectual Disability Attending Adult Psychiatric Outpatient Services in the Kingdom of Bahrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, I.; Al-Saihati, B. A.; Al-Haddad, M.; McClean, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Relatively little information is available regarding the use of psychiatric services by individuals with intellectual disability (ID) in Arab countries. The current study aimed to identify (1) the reasons for referral; (2) demographic characteristics of individuals referred; (3) previous contact with child psychiatric services; (4)…

  6. Social Workers' Stigmatic Perceptions of Individuals with Disabilities: A Focus on Three Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Shirli; Araten-Bergman, Tal

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: People with disabilities often identify professionals' stigmatic views as significant barriers to accessing mainstream services. This study aimed to examine differences in stigmatic attitudes held by social workers toward individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID), mental illness (MI), or dual diagnosis (DD) of ID and MI.…

  7. The social support network for black psychiatric inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ngubane

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available A survey was carried out of almost 50% of Black inpatients in a state psychiatric hospital to evaluate the level of accessibility of the family network of the patients. Staff were interviewed on the problems they have with contacting families. The survey shows the extent of inadequate access and identifies reasons for the problem.

  8. Social justice and disability policy in Southern Africa | Mugumbate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines Fraser's theory in relation to disability policy in Southern Africa. It begins by outlining core concepts in Fraser's theory of social justice before examining regional and national policy measures designed to improve the lives of people with disabilities in Southern Africa guided by the question: how might ...

  9. Towards a Social Model Approach to Counselling Disabled Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, John; Griffiths, Carol; Heyman, Bob

    2003-01-01

    Explores the possible conflicts between counseling approaches that can individualize and personalize problems and disability as a political issue and illustrates the social construction of disability as an individualized problem within the counseling process. Considering the implications for counseling practice, argues for an approach to…

  10. Social Security Disability Insurance: Time for Fundamental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhauser, Richard V.; Daly, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    The Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program is growing at an unsustainable pace. Over the past 40 years the number of disabled worker beneficiaries has increased nearly sixfold, rising from 1.5 million in 1970 to 8.2 million in 2010. Rapid growth in the rolls has put increasing pressure on program finances. The rapid rise in SSDI…

  11. Social Security Disability Insurance: Essential Protection when Work Incapacity Strikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reno, Virginia P.; Ekman, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is an essential lifeline for millions of Americans. Without it, many families would be in deep financial distress. SSDI is insurance that workers pay for through premiums deducted from their pay. In return, workers gain the right to monthly benefits if a disabling condition ends their capacity to earn a…

  12. Social Competence and Temperament in Children with Chronic Orthopaedic Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagmurlu, Bilge; Yavuz, H. Melis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate social competence in children with orthopaedic disability and its concurrent relations to child's temperament, health condition, and maternal warmth. Participants were 68 Turkish children (mean = 5.94 years) with chronic orthopaedic disability and their mothers coming from disadvantaged backgrounds. Mother…

  13. Social comparisons of learning disabled and nonexceptional adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, E P; Tracy, D B

    1994-08-01

    36 learning disabled high school subjects rated themselves lower on academic, psychomotor, and verbal performance on a social comparisons task than a control group of 53 nonexceptional peers. Learning disabled students tended to see themselves as less able in most areas involving school achievement but not in areas involving extracurricular activities.

  14. PET scan perfusion imaging in the Prader–Willi syndrome: new insights into the psychiatric and social disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantoulan, Carine; Payoux, Pierre; Diene, Gwenaëlle; Glattard, Mélanie; Rogé, Bernadette; Molinas, Catherine; Sevely, Annick; Zilbovicius, Monica; Celsis, Pierre; Tauber, Maïthé

    2011-01-01

    The Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS), a rare multisystem genetic disease, leads to severe disabilities, such as morbid obesity, endocrine dysfunctions, psychiatric disorders, and social disturbances. We explored the whole brain of patients with PWS to detect abnormalities that might explain the behavioral and social disturbances, as well as the psychiatric disorders of these patients. Nine patients with PWS (six males, three females; mean age 16.4 years) underwent a positron emission tomography (PET) scan with H215O as a tracer to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). The images were compared with those acquired from nine controls (six males, three females; mean age 21.2 years). A morphologic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was also performed in PWS patients, and their cognitive and behavioral skills were assessed with Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children III and the Child Behavior Check List (CBCL). The MRI images showed no evident anatomic abnormalities, whereas PET scans revealed hypoperfused brain regions in PWS patients compared with controls, particularly in the anterior cingulum and superior temporal regions. We observed a significant relationship (P<0.05) between rCBF in the hypoperfused regions and CBCL scores. The functional consequences of these perfusion abnormalities in specific brain regions might explain the behavioral and social problems observed in these individuals. PMID:20588317

  15. Health and Social Care Interventions Which Promote Social Participation for Adults with Learning Disabilities: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Sharon; Morris, David; Newlin, Meredith; Webber, Martin

    2016-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are among the most socially excluded in society. There is a significant gap in research evidence showing how health and social care workers can intervene to improve the social participation of adults with learning disabilities. A systematic review and modified narrative synthesis was used to appraise the quality…

  16. The Disablement Score: An Intersubjective Severity Scale of the Social Exclusion of Disabled People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenjiro Sakakibara

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available If a disability is understood as a type of social exclusion, its severity can be gauged from the social aspect. Such measurement is necessary to explore the intersubjective structure of social exclusion associated with bodily functions and structures. This paper presents a sociological and statistical method to rate the severity of a disability as social exclusion. The method is modeled on the rating procedure of occupational prestige. According to this technique, people subjectively rate severity by answering a questionnaire. The ratings are converted into a score (the “disablement score”. The method is applied in a preliminary web survey. The reliability of the scale is examined. People evaluate various conditions very differently, with physical conditions with functional limitations rated as severe and disfigurements as mild. Although the result does not necessarily agree with the objective circumstances, it is meaningful in that it reflects people’s reactions and attitudes toward disabilities.

  17. Disability and social ties: comparative findings of the CLESA study

    OpenAIRE

    Zunzunegui, M.V.; Rodriguez-Laso, A.; Otero, A.; Pluijm, S. M. F.; Nikula, S. (Sakari); Blumstein, T.; Jylhä, M.; Minicuci, N.; Deeg, D. J. H.

    2005-01-01

    The associations between prevalence, incidence and recovery from activities of daily living (ADL) disability and social ties among community-dwelling persons over 65 in Finland, The Netherlands and Spain are examined. Data were harmonized in the CLESA study. The baseline sample was composed of 3,648 subjects between 65 and 85 years old, living in Finland, The Netherlands and Spain. Disability in four activities of daily living was determined at baseline and at follow-up. Social participation,...

  18. The role of personal social networks in risk assessment and management of forensic psychiatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomp, L.; Spreen, M.; Boegarts, S.; Völker, B.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Social network factors are usually not accounted for in the clinical practice of risk assessment/management.This article introduces a social network analysis as an instrument to systematically chart the relationships and personal networks of forensic psychiatric patients. During the period 2005 to

  19. Design for All in Social Research on Persons with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Toboso-Martín

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Social studies on disability have increased in number and importance in Spain and other countries over the last few years. Nevertheless, the majority of the available sources and studies do not adequately represent this heterogeneous group, which currently makes up about 9 per cent of the Spanish population. The implementation of social measures requires representative sources and studies containing relevant information. The aim of this paper is to identify the main diffi culties involved in designing and developing social research methods concerning persons with disabilities, and offer proposals and recommendations in order to advance towards a more inclusive social research using the concepts of accessibility and design for all.

  20. The prospects for universal disability law and social policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome E. Bickenbach

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide disarray of disability social policy and law requires a new foundation to make it coherent and to remedy persistent contradictions, disincentives and other policy anomalies. In this paper we clarify and expand Irving Zola’s call for ‘universalized disability policy’ and develop his insight by drawing upon the well-known principles of Universal Design (UD, or Design for All, in architecture, product development and city planning to formulate analogous principles of universally designed disability social policy and law. Our objective is to show, by means of two examples - one in health care delivery and the other in welfare or social support policy - that ‘universalized’ policy for and on behalf of persons with disabilities is feasible. We find that there are some, albeit limited, examples of universalizing policy in these areas and suggests ways in which the full range of UD principles might be able to be implemented in these two policy areas. What we propose is merely a proof of concept rather than a complete proposal to restructure disability law and policy - which likely not be feasible, given the range of social and economic conditions of countries around the globe. We conclude with some tentative suggestions for areas of empirical research that would further the overall agenda of a universal disability social policy.

  1. [Use of social media by psychiatric in-patients : Case report and further perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, O M; Podoll, K; Schneider, F

    2017-08-03

    Communication by means of social networks and messenger programs as well as the use of smartphones have rapidly increased during recent years and are constantly present in everyday life. We report about a 25-year-old patient with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder who posted photographs of acute self-injuries to a group of fellow patients by means of a messenger app while on weekend leave during psychiatric hospital treatment. The implications about possible effects of the use of social media by psychiatric in-patients on treatment and group dynamics are discussed. Furthermore, social media communication by patients is focused on in general and potential consequences for psychiatric, psychotherapeutic and psychosomatic treatment are discussed.

  2. Social workers' attributions towards individuals with dual diagnosis of intellectual disability and mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araten-Bergman, T; Werner, S

    2017-02-01

    The present study aimed to explore the applicability of the attribution model to social workers' attributions towards clients with dual diagnosis of intellectual disability and psychiatric illness. Specifically, the study examined the relations between social workers' attribution of responsibility, causality, stereotypes of dangerousness, their emotional reactions and behavioural reactions towards clients with dual diagnosis. Social workers (N = 279) completed questionnaires measuring attributions of responsibility, causation and dangerousness, and reported on their emotional and behavioural reactions to clients diagnosed with DD. Most social workers reported high levels of helping behaviours. The strongest predictor of discriminatory behaviours was the stereotype of dangerousness. Social workers who reported feeling less anger and more pity towards clients with DD tended to report higher levels of helping behaviour. But contrary to attribution theory, fear and anger did not predict discriminatory behaviours. The results are discussed in relation to the core values of social work and to professional identity. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The impact of caring for an adult with intellectual disability and psychiatric comorbidity on carer stress and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, F; Shanahan, S; Fitzsimons, E; O'Malley, G; Mac Giollabhui, N; Bramham, J

    2016-06-01

    Given that carers of individuals with intellectual disability (ID) and carers of individuals with psychiatric disorders experience elevated levels of stress and psychological distress, carers of individuals with both ID and a comorbid psychiatric disorder are potentially at even greater risk for psychological difficulties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the psychological well-being of carers of adults with a dual diagnosis compared with carers of adults with intellectual disability alone. Four-hundred and forty-two questionnaires were sent to four community services and seventy-five family carers of adults with intellectual disability responded. Psychological well-being of carers was assessed using the Questionnaire on Resources and Stress - Friedrich edition (QRS-F) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Comorbid psychopathology for their family member with ID was assessed using the Reiss Screen for Maladaptive Behaviour (RSMB). Twenty-four percent of the individuals with ID were reported to have comorbid psychopathology. Between-group analyses compared carers of people with ID and comorbid psychopathology to carers of people with ID alone. Regression analyses examined the relationship between psychopathology and other care-related variables to carer stress and psychological distress. Carers of people with ID and comorbid psychopathology were found to have significantly higher levels of stress and psychological distress than carers of people with ID alone. Autism was found to be the only significant predictor of both stress and psychological distress among measures of psychopathology. Additional comorbid psychopathology in individuals with intellectual disability has a significant impact on their carers' psychological well-being. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Developing the evidence base for families living with parental psychiatric disabilities: crossing the bridge while we're building it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Joanne; Friesen, Barbara J

    2014-09-01

    For this special issue, the latest research findings on the topic of families living with parental psychiatric disabilities were solicited and compiled, to inform policymakers and practitioners with the best research available, while informing researchers about new developments in the field. The creative efforts of practitioners on the ground who strategically cobble together service responses for parents and families, as well as the extraordinary efforts of parents, adult children, young carers, and advocates who continue to bring attention to family issues in psychiatric rehabilitation, are applauded. These things are happening as we build the evidence base. That is, we are "crossing the bridge" to evidence-based practice while we are "building it." This is not without its challenges, in policy, practice, or research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Critical Disability Studies and Socially Just Change in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liasidou, Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    Social justice is an ambiguous and contested term that is evoked in order to address issues of enhancing participation and eliminating discrimination across various markers of difference linked to race, social class, and so on. Historically, disability has been excluded from these analyses because it has been cast in the sphere of abnormality and…

  6. Social Acknowledgments for Children with Disabilities: Effects of Service Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Bonnie; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined the effect of service dogs on the social acknowledgment of 5 disabled children of 10-17 years in shopping malls and school playgrounds. Social acknowledgments were more frequent when a service dog was present and more pronounced in shopping malls. (RJC)

  7. A Socialization Program for Developmentally Disabled Deaf Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Carole

    This paper describes the need for and the structure of a socialization program designed to provide a social environment for five deaf adults with developmental disabilities residing in two different group homes. The program was developed to address the isolation experienced by such adults living in a community with others who do not use sign…

  8. A Social Emotional/Awareness Program for Learning Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susla, Brenda M.

    The social and emotional development needs of fourth and fifth grade students (N=16) with learning disabilities were addressed through development and implementation of a 12-week awareness program called "Pupils' Over-Whelming Esteem Rise" (Project POWER). This project targeted: (1) self-awareness; (2) social awareness; (3) coping, organizing,…

  9. Social phobia. Helping patients who are disabled by fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J R

    1991-12-01

    Persistent fear of embarrassment or humiliation in social situations can paralyze a person's educational and career advancement and lead to loneliness and isolation. What are the clinical signs of social phobia? How does it lead to disability and impairment? Dr Marshall answers these questions and discusses differential diagnosis and management.

  10. The Social Psychology of Physical Disability: 1948 and 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, Lee

    1988-01-01

    Recalls the publication of the 1948 special issue of "Journal of Social Issues" on the social psychology of disability, speculates on the magazine's influence on changes in the field between 1948 and 1988, and discusses possible future developments. (Author/BJV)

  11. Science and pseudoscience in developmental disabilities: guidelines for social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyer, Bruce A; Pignotti, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with a developmental disability can now be provided a variety of empirically supported treatments that have been shown to be useful in promoting educational attainments, social and vocational skills, and self-care, and in reducing behavioral problems. Unfortunately, a large number of pseudoscientific or bogus therapies continue to be offered to this population and their families. We review the characteristics of pseudoscientific and bogus treatments and provide several examples of unsupported or harmful interventions offered by contemporary social workers and other human service professionals, to the detriment of people with disabilities. We encourage social workers to identify pseudoscientific interventions and avoid providing these, in favor of using empirically supported treatments.

  12. Contribution of Leisure Satisfaction, Acceptance Disability, and Social Relationship to Life Satisfaction among Korean Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhyoung; Schilling, Mary Lou; Kim, May; Han, Areum

    2016-01-01

    There is a dearth of literature that explores the relationships among leisure satisfaction, acceptance of disability, social relationships, and life satisfaction among adults with intellectual disability from Eastern countries. The purpose of this study was to examine how leisure satisfaction, disability acceptance, and social relationships are…

  13. Disability and social ties: comparative findings of the CLESA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunzunegui, M V; Rodriguez-Laso, A; Otero, A; Pluijm, S M F; Nikula, S; Blumstein, T; Jylhä, M; Minicuci, N; Deeg, D J H

    2005-03-01

    The associations between prevalence, incidence and recovery from activities of daily living (ADL) disability and social ties among community-dwelling persons over 65 in Finland, The Netherlands and Spain are examined. Data were harmonized in the CLESA study. The baseline sample was composed of 3,648 subjects between 65 and 85 years old, living in Finland, The Netherlands and Spain. Disability in four activities of daily living was determined at baseline and at follow-up. Social participation, number of family ties and presence of friends were added to obtain a social ties index. Logistic regressions were fitted to the prevalence, incidence and recovery data to estimate the associations between disability and social ties, adjusting for education, co-morbidity and self-rated health. The modifying effects of country, age and sex were tested in all models. For every country, the social ties index, having friends and social participation were negatively associated with ADL disability prevalence. ADL incidence was negatively related to the number of family ties, with a stronger relationship in Spain than in The Netherlands or Finland. ADL recovery was associated with the social ties index. No age or gender differences in these associations were found. Social ties appear to generate a beneficial effect on the maintenance and restoration of ADL function. While social ties play an important role in maintaining and restoring function in all three countries, family ties appear to generate a stronger effect on protection from disability incidence than does social participation, and the strength of this effect varies by culture.

  14. Perceived social support among people with physical disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setareh Forouzan, Ameneh; Mahmoodi, Abolfazl; Jorjoran Shushtari, Zahra; Salimi, Yahya; Sajjadi, Homeira; Mahmoodi, Zohreh

    2013-08-01

    Disability is more based on social, rather than medical aspects. Lack of attention and social support may impact on participation of people with physical disability in various aspects and their return to normal life in the society. This study was conducted to determine perceived social support and related factors among physically disabled in the city of Tehran. This cross-sectional study by using simple random sampling was conducted on 136 people with physically disabled who were covered by Welfare Organization of Tehran. The Norbeck social support questionnaire was used .Multiple linear regression analysis with the backward method was used to identify the adjusted association between perceived social support as dependent variable and demographic variables as independent variables. The present sample comprised of 68 (50%) male and 68 (50%) female with the mean age of 33 (SD = 8.9) years. Based on the results, mean of functional support was 135. 57 (SD = 98.77) and mean of structural support was 77.37 (SD = 52.37). Regression analysis model, demonstrates that variables of age and marital status remained in the model as significant predictors of functional support (P = 0.003, P = 0.004, respectively) and structural support (P = 0.002, P = 0.006, respectively). Based on the results, participants in the study didn't have favorable status with respect to perceived social support (in all dimensions) from their social network members. While, social support as one of the social determinants of health, plays an important role in improving psychological conditions in people's lives; therefore, being aware of social support and designing effective interventions to improve it for the disabled is very important.

  15. ASPECTS OF SOCIAL INTEGRATION OF MENTALLY DISABLED PEOPLE THROUGH SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Dan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Practiced in educational institutions but also in leisure, sport became a profession requiring not only active involvement but also participation to the show offered by him, thus having a large social area. Purpose. Emphasizing the importance of sport as a primary approach of social integration for people with mental disabilities. Methods. We analyzed the specialized literature using bibliographic study and we identified a total of 23 references from which we selected a number of 12 bibliographic materials that were representative to bring an additional argument to the importance of sport as a primary approach of social integration of persons with mental disabilities. In terms of form documents were consulted books and journals, various graphic and electronic information sources (internet. Results. Bibliographic references cited support the idea of the importance of social integration of people with mental disabilities through sports and they are addressing different aspects that together provide an overview of the complexity of this process, emphasizing the necessity to develop the right environment, both in terms of material and human resources, to achieve this goal in optimal conditions. Discussions. Scientific research results and practical experience have shown the importance of exercise practice in general, and sport, especially for people with disabilities, which leads to the idea that the state, society must give more importance to the role of sport in his social policy and strategy regarding the protection of persons with disabilities.

  16. Borderline intellectual functioning is associated with poor social functioning, increased rates of psychiatric diagnosis and drug use--a cross sectional population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigi, Karny; Werbeloff, Nomi; Goldberg, Shira; Portuguese, Shirly; Reichenberg, Abraham; Fruchter, Eyal; Weiser, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Borderline intellectual functioning is defined by the DSM IV as an IQ range that is between one to two standard deviations below the mean (71borderline intellectual functioning is associated with various mental disorders, problems in everyday functioning, social disability and poor academic or occupational achievement. Using data from the Israeli military, we retrieved the social and clinical characteristics of 76,962 adolescents with borderline intellectual functioning and compared their social functioning, psychiatric diagnoses and drug abuse with those of 96,580 adolescents with average IQ (± 0.25 SD from population mean). The results demonstrated that the borderline intellectual functioning group had higher rates of poor social functioning compared to the control group (OR=1.9, 95% CI=1.85-1.94). Individuals with borderline intellectual functioning were 2.37 times more likely to have a psychiatric diagnosis (95% CI=2.30-2.45) and 1.2 times more likely to use drugs (95% CI=1.07-0.35) than those with average IQ. These results suggest that adolescents with borderline intellectual functioning are more likely to suffer from psychiatric disorders, poor social functioning and drug abuse than those with average intelligence, and that borderline intellectual functioning is a marker of vulnerability to these poor outcomes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for children with a psychiatric disorder and mild intellectual disability to borderline intellectual functioning: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Lidwien; van der Waa, Anne; Klip, Helen; Staal, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    Children with intellectual disability frequently have difficulties in adapting to their environment. The extent of the experienced problems does not only depend on cognitive functioning but is influenced by other factors, such as the presence of a psychiatric disorder or other brain disorders, or adverse environmental factors. Several epidemiological studies show that children with intellectual disabilities are at an increased risk to develop psychiatric disorders. This is also true for youth with a mild intellectual disability and even those with borderline intellectual functioning (mild to borderline intellectual disability (MBID)). Psychiatric disorders are often overlooked because behavioral problems are rather attributed to the intellectual disability. Consequently, effective psychiatric interventions, which are needed to improve the level of functioning, are not applied. This review aimed to systematically evaluate the currently available, qualitatively sound research concerning the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions, specifically directed at psychiatric disorders in children with MBID. Assessed for eligibility were 1409 unique reports, and the review ultimately included only 12 reports. Review of the results and meta-analyses showed that the majority of studies suffer from multiple limitations and that methodological variations between studies are extensive. This possibly reflects the high variance of factors that may be involved in MBID. It will be important in future research to address multi-causality. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Social Support Influences on Substance Abuse Outcomes among Sober Living House Residents with Low and Moderate Psychiatric Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcin, Douglas L.; Korcha, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    Social support and psychiatric severity are known to influence substance abuse. However, little is known about how their influences vary under different conditions. We aimed to study how different types of social support were associated with substance abuse outcomes among persons with low and moderate psychiatric severity who entered Sober Living…

  19. Conceptualizing community: a comparison of neighborhood characteristics of supportive housing for persons with psychiatric and developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irene Wong, Yin-Ling; Stanhope, Victoria

    2009-04-01

    Housing and services for persons with developmental disabilities (DD) have been shaped by the normalization approach, a commitment to full integration within the general community. In contrast, housing and services for persons with psychiatric disabilities (PD) have had various and sometimes conflicting goals, including provision of custodial care, promotion of therapeutic community, and community integration. This cross-field study compares the neighborhood characteristics of publicly-funded housing for the PD and DD populations in a metropolitan community. The aim of the study was to examine whether the contrasting housing approaches are reflected at an ecological level and to consider how these findings relate to the goal of community integration for people with PD and DD. Administrative databases provided residential addresses of 1932 residents with PD living in 297 locations and 1716 residents with DD living in 749 locations in the city of Philadelphia. The 2000 U.S. Census and city's police department database provided information on neighborhood characteristics. Geographic information system (GIS) methodology generated maps displaying the distribution of housing locations in relation to spatial dispersion, distress, stability, safety, and race/ethnic diversity. Statistical analyses compared neighborhood characteristics of the DD and PD populations. Findings indicated that the DD population in supportive housing was more spatially dispersed, and lived in less distressed, less unstable, more secure, but equally racially/ethnically diverse neighborhoods when compared to the PD population in supportive housing. Greater geographic dispersal among persons with DD may be the result of more emphasis on normalization within policies and programs determining the location of their housing. The higher funding levels for housing and residential support for persons with DD also provided programs with the option of placing people in higher income neighborhoods. Given that

  20. Implicit attitudes toward violence and their relation to psychopathy, aggression, and socially adaptive behaviors in forensic psychiatric inpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwets, Almar J.; Hornsveld, Ruud H J; Muris, Peter; Huijding, Jorg; Kanters, Thijs; Snowden, Robert J.; van Marle, Hjalmar

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the relation between implicit attitudes toward violence and different aspects of violent and social behavior in Dutch forensic psychiatric inpatients, an implicit association test was related to measures of psychopathy, aggression, and socially adaptive behaviors. Results

  1. A Social Model of Loneliness: The Roles of Disability, Social Resources, and Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burholt, Vanessa; Windle, Gill; Morgan, Deborah J

    2017-11-10

    We consider the points at which cognitive impairment may impact on the pathway to loneliness for older people, through impeding social interaction with family and friends, or by interfering with judgments concerning satisfaction with relationships. We conceptualize a mediation model anticipating that social resources (LSNS-6) will mediate the pathway between disability (Townsend Disability Scale) and loneliness (De Jong Gierveld 6-item scale) and a moderated-mediation model in which we hypothesize that cognitive impairment (MMSE) will moderate the association between disability and social resources and between social resources and loneliness. To validate the hypothesized pathways, we draw on the CFAS Wales data set (N = 3,593) which is a nationally representative study of community-dwelling people aged 65 and older in Wales. Disability had a significant indirect effect on loneliness through the mediating variable social resources. Cognitive impairment was significantly associated with social resources, but did not moderate the relationship between disability and social resources. Cognitive impairment had a significant impact on loneliness, and moderated the effect of social resources on loneliness. Social structures can (dis)empower people with cognitive impairment and lead to exclusion from social resources or impact on the social construction of aging, cognitive impairment, and dementia. The sense of self for an older person with cognitive impairment may be influenced by social norms and stereotypes, or through a temporal social comparison with an "earlier" sense of self. We conclude that loneliness interventions should be theoretically informed to identify key areas for modification.

  2. Social attribution processes and comorbid psychiatric symptoms in children with Asperger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jessica A.; Mundy, Peter C.; Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Durocher, Jennifer Stella

    2009-01-01

    The factors that place children with Asperger syndrome at risk for comorbid psychiatric symptoms, such as anxiety and depression, remain poorly understood. We investigated the possibility that the children’s emotional and behavioral difficulties are associated with social information and attribution processing. Participants were children with either Asperger syndrome (n = 31) or typical development (n = 33).To assess social information and attribution processing, children responded to hypothetical social vignettes.They also completed self-report measures of social difficulties and psychological functioning. Their parents provided information on social competence and clinical presentation. Children with Asperger syndrome showed poor psychosocial adjustment, which was related to their social information and attribution processing patterns. Cognitive and social-cognitive abilities were associated with aspects of social information processing tendencies, but not with emotional and behavioral difficulties. Results suggest that the comorbid symptoms of children with Asperger syndrome may be associated with their social perception, understanding, and experience. PMID:16908481

  3. PHYSICAL TRAINING AND SOCIALIZATION OF DISABLED CHILDREN

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paris PARIZOV; Stefka CINCEVA

    1999-01-01

    Children are born without social experience. It is accumulated in growing up. Socialization is complicated significantly with children with early physical and mental deviation, and is possibly at some cases not to occur...

  4. Disability and Psychiatric Symptoms in Men Referred for Treatment with Work-Related Problems to Primary Mental Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S Kathleen; Mushquash, Christopher J; Haggarty, John M

    2017-03-24

    The relationship between male sex and employment as barriers to accessing mental health care is unclear. The aim of this research was to examine (1) whether the clinical features of men referred to a shared mental health care (SMHC) service through primary care differed when symptoms were affecting them in the work domain; and (2) empirically re-evaluate the effectiveness of a SMHC model for work-related disability using a pre-post chart review of N = 3960 referrals to SMHC. ANOVA and logistic regression were performed to examine symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire, PHQ) and disability (World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule, WHODAS 2) at entry and discharge. Men were RR (relative risk) = 1.8 (95% C.I.: 1.60-2.05) times more likely to be referred to SMHC with work problems than women. Having greater disability and more severe somatic symptoms increased the likelihood of a work-related referral. There were no significant differences after treatment. Problems in the work domain may play an important role in men's treatment seeking and clinicians' recognition of a mental health care need. This study is relevant because men are underrepresented in mental health (MH) treatment and primary care is the main gateway to accessing MH care. Asking men about functioning in the work domain may increase access to helpful psychiatric services.

  5. IMPORTANCE OF SOCIAL WORK IN IMPLEMENTATION OF SOCIAL CARE FOR DISABLED PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velichko ANDREEVSKI

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of social care for disabled people is conditioned by the level of development of the professional services for social care, engagement of medical and special education staff in a very complex process of rehabilitation and education. The organs and services of social care and social work, through legal regulations, are obliged to participate in providing, organization and implementation of social care for disabled people. This process starts with prevention, detection, diagnosis, rehabilitation, realization of their rights and lasts until their inclusion, i.e. social integration and in a large number of cases to the end of their lives.

  6. Simulated job interview skill training for people with psychiatric disability: feasibility and tolerability of virtual reality training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Morris D; Weinstein, Andrea

    2011-09-01

    The job interview is an important step toward successful employment and often a significant challenge for people with psychiatric disability. Vocational rehabilitation specialists can benefit from a systematic approach to training job interview skills. The investigators teamed up with a company that specializes in creating simulated job interview training to create software that provides a virtual reality experience with which learners can systematically improve their job interview skills, reduce their fears, and increase their confidence about going on job interviews. The development of this software is described and results are presented from a feasibility and tolerability trial with 10 participants with psychiatric disability referred from their vocational service programs. Results indicate that this representative sample had a strongly positive response to the prototype job interview simulation. They found it easy to use, enjoyed the experience, and thought it realistic and helpful. Almost all described the interview as anxiety provoking but that the anxiety lessened as they became more skilled. They saw the benefit of its special features such as ongoing feedback from a "coach in the corner" and from being able to review a transcript of the interview. They believed that they could learn the skills being taught through these methods. Participants were enthusiastic about wanting to use the final product when it becomes available. The advantages of virtual reality technology for training important skills for rehabilitation are discussed.

  7. Patient-provider communication over social media: perspectives of adolescents with psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rensburg, Samuel H; Klingensmith, Katherine; McLaughlin, Paige; Qayyum, Zheala; van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I

    2016-02-01

    Social media is an increasingly dominant platform for communication, especially among adolescents. Statements from professional bodies and a growing body of empirical evidence support a role for social media in improving provider-patient interactions. In psychiatry, particular concerns exist about the suitability of this style of communication. Very limited data are available exploring how patients would like to incorporate social media into their communication with their psychiatric providers. We conducted a qualitative study with 20 adolescents attending the Yale Psychiatric Hospital Intensive Outpatient Programme. Interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Participants highlighted how social media could allow for constant access to a mental health provider, provide a less anxiety-provoking mode of communication, and allow for them to be monitored in a more on-going fashion. However, participants also identified many potential risks associated with these applications, including the potential for anxiety if a provider was not able to respond immediately, and a sense that online interactions would be less rich overall. Our findings suggest that adolescents are open to the idea of communicating with mental health providers over social media and are able to describe a number of instances where this could be of value. The risks participants described, as well as concerns raised by existing literature, indicate the need for further work and protocol development in order for social media to be a feasible tool for communication between providers and adolescents with psychiatric illness. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Associations between the social organization of communities and psychiatric disorders in rural Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axinn, William G; Ghimire, Dirgha J; Williams, Nathalie E; Scott, Kate M

    2015-10-01

    We provide rare evidence of factors producing psychiatric variation in a general population sample from rural South Asia. The setting is particularly useful for demonstrating that variations in the social organization of communities, often difficult to observe in rich countries, are associated with important variations in mental health. Clinically validated survey measures are used to document variation in psychiatric disorders among 401 adults. This sample is chosen from a systematic sample of the general population of rural Nepal, in a community-level-controlled comparison design. Multilevel logistic regression is used to estimate multivariate models of the association between community-level nonfamily social organization and individual-level psychiatric disorders. Schools, markets, health services and social support groups each substantially reduce the odds of depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), intermittent explosive disorder and anxiety disorders. Associations between schools, health services and social support groups and depression are statistically significant and independent of each other. The association between access to markets and PTSD is statistically significant and independent of other social organization and support groups. Community integration of some nonfamily social organizations promotes mental health in ways that may go unobserved in settings with many such organizations. More research on the mechanisms producing these associations is likely to reveal potential avenues for public policy and programs to improve mental health in the general population.

  9. The psychological influences on participation in Wheelchair Rugby: a social relational model of disability

    OpenAIRE

    Damian Haslett; Ben Fitzpatrick; Gavin Breslin

    2017-01-01

    Sport and exercise psychology research in disability sport seldom engages with social models of disability. As a result, the socio-historical landscape of disability is underrepresented in sport psychology research. The aim of this study is to interpret influences on participation in disability sport through the conceptual lens of the social relational model (SRM) of disability (Thomas, 1999, 2004, 2007). Ten Irish adult male athletes with physical disabilities participated in semi-structured...

  10. Psychiatric emergency room decision-making, social control and the 'undeserving sick'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Alisa

    2006-01-01

    The influence of social factors on involuntary hospitalisation has been an important and controversial area of sociological focus for many years. Traditionally, social control theory has been used to understand disproportionate rates of involuntary hospitalisation among marginalised and powerless groups. However, dramatic changes in the social context of mental healthcare have necessitated a re-examination of the role of social factors in involuntary hospitalisation. In this study 287 psychiatric emergency room visits were examined in order to test hypotheses for understanding social influences on disposition. Little support for the traditional social control hypothesis was found. People from marginalised groups were not disproportionately involuntarily hospitalised, but instead were disproportionately treated and released from the hospital as people's social resources were used to access care rather than to prevent hospitalisation. This study highlights the importance of the historical relevance of our theoretical understanding of the relationship between social factors and involuntary commitment.

  11. Social protection and people with disabilities in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Nilson do Rosário; Marcelino, Miguel Abud; Duarte, Cristina Maria Rabelais; Uhr, Deborah

    2016-10-01

    The article analyzes the social protection policy for people with disabilities in Brazil. It describes the patterns of demand and eligibility for Continued Benefit of Social Assistance (Benefício de Prestação Continuada - BPC) in the 1996-2014 period. The article argues that BPC is a direct result of the social pact achieved by the Brazilian Federal Constitution of 1988. BPC is a social assistance benefit consisting in an unconditional and monthly transference of the equivalent of a minimum wage, to poor people with deficiency and elders with more than 65 years. Disabled person eligibility depends on means-test, and social and medical evaluation by public bureaucracy. The research strategy was based on time series, and cross-sectional data collection and analysis. Dummy qualitative variables were also used to describe the pattern of demand and eligibility. The article demonstrates that BPC has provided income to disabled and elder people. However, systematic barriers were identified to disabled people's access to BPC. The work suggests that the pattern of refusal could be associated to a means testing application by street-level-bureaucracy. In this sense, the work draws attention to the necessary revision of street-level-bureaucracy tools and procedures to increase BPC positive discrimination.

  12. Social assistance and disability in Brazil: the reflection of the international debate of the rights of people with disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wederson Rufino dos Santos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the debate on the social model of disability has influenced conceptions of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health adopted by the World Health Organization in 2001 and adopted in Brazil in 2007, through the law of the Continuous Cash Benefit. The BPC is a major social policy of income transfer to poor disabled people, affecting over one million and half disabled people in the country. Since 2009, the evaluation of persons with disabilities for the BPC will make by medical and social skills targeted by ICF. Will be demonstrated that, although the adoption of the ICF maybe to represent regard to how to understand disability as social inequality, the adoption of the ICF by the law of the BPC will face challenges in ensuring the right to dignity of disabled people.

  13. Psychiatric disorders in people with intellectual disability (intellectual developmental disorder): forensic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Mark J; Olson, Erick; Drogin, Eric Y

    2014-03-01

    Persons with intellectual disability come into frequent and underreported contact with the legal system. Advances in forensic psychiatry help better identify persons with intellectual disability in forensic contexts, inform evaluation and treatment, and elucidate unique characteristics of this population. With the release of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), forensic psychiatrists must adjust to changes in the diagnostic process. This review examines the past year's contributions to the literature, including predictors among offenders with intellectual disability, concurrent diagnoses, efficacy of competence restoration, means of studying individuals with intellectual disability, and impact of DSM-5. Impoverished personal relationships are found to be an important predictor of offense among persons with intellectual disability. A Personality Disorder Characteristics Checklist allows screening for personality disorders (indicative of increased risk of violence) among intellectual disability offenders. Referrals to specialists for treatment more often occur for violent and sexual offenses than for other offenses. Competence restoration is historically low among those with intellectual disability, specially compared with those referred for substance abuse and personality disorders. However, the Slater Method results in higher rates of restoration than traditional training methods. DSM-5 alters the definition of intellectual disability, moving from an IQ-oriented diagnosis system to a multifaceted approach, introducing more flexibility and nuance.

  14. Psychiatric Services for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Medication Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Andrew T.; Hahn, Joan Earle; Hayward, Katharine

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the medication management and treatment provided in a specialty outpatient psychiatry clinic for 198 community-residing children and adults with intellectual disability and other developmental disabilities (IDD) referred to the clinic and discharged between 1999 and 2008. Using a descriptive design, data…

  15. [Social-psychiatric research in Germany--a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbé, Raoul; Flammer, Erich; Borbé, Susanne; Müller, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    This study aims at analysing content, authorship, type of journal and associated institution of scientific contributions on social psychiatry in 16 German-speaking journals. In order to detect development and change in respect to the aspects mentioned, two time periods are compared systematically (1997-1998/2007-2008). The authors selected all original papers in 16 journals from German-speaking countries along common definitions of social psychiatry. These definitions are made transparent in the study. The systematic comparison of the named time periods resulted in equal numbers of papers contributed. The major part of the publications under study has been contributed by authors associated with universities. Content-wise, articles on matters discussed in the recent past and including topics like migration, subjectivity, parent-child care are increasing. Research on social psychiatry in German-speaking countries today is mainly related to research departments at university clinics. The impact of large centres of psychiatry however is declining. Content-wise, matters at stake during the reform period of psychiatry in German-speaking countries in the 1970 s and 1980 s are of less relevance today. Researches now tend to address research topics more closely related to what can be named patient-centred care. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart.New York.

  16. The impacts of mental disability: implications for social work practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to explore the impacts of mental disability and the social work intervention measures in response to the phenomenon. A descriptive survey research design was adopted for the study. The population of this study consisted of all family members - male and female - of patients with mental disorders ...

  17. Education and Social Services for Disabled Persons in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chermak, Gail D.

    1990-01-01

    Information about education and social services for Spain's disabled children and adults, with emphasis on the hearing-impaired population, is provided. An overview of Spain's demographic and historical background is followed by a broad discussion of policy, legislation, and health and welfare services. (Author/JDD)

  18. Psychiatric disorder and work life: A longitudinal study of intra-generational social mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiikkaja, Sanna; Sandin, Sven; Hultman, Christina M; Modin, Bitte; Malki, Ninoa; Sparén, Pär

    2016-03-01

    Intra-generational social mobility, which describes the mobility within an individual's own working life, is seldom studied among employees with psychiatric disorders (EPD). There is need of knowledge of the intra-generational mobility patterns, in a broader perspective, among EPD. To investigate intra-generational social mobility in employed individuals diagnosed with affective disorder, personality disorder, schizophrenia and drug dependence in a national Swedish cohort. We identified a national sample of employed Swedish adults born in 1939-1949 (N = 876, 738), and among them individuals with a first-time hospital admission for affective psychosis, neurosis and personality disorder, alcoholism, drug dependence or schizophrenia in 1964-1980 (N = 18, 998). Employed individuals without hospital admission for such diagnoses were utilised as a comparison group (N = 866, 442). Intra-individual social class changes between 1980 and 1990 among EPD and the comparison group were described through summary statistics and graphs. EPD more often held Low manual occupations at baseline in 1980 than the comparison group (44% vs. 28%), although parental social class was similar. In 1990, 19% of EPD and 4% of the comparison group had lost contact with the labour market. Social stability was less common among EPD (49 %) than in the comparison group (67%). Mobility out of the labour force increased and social stability decreased by number of inpatient admissions. Employees diagnosed with affective psychosis or neurosis and personality disorder fared better in the labour market than employees with schizophrenia. Employees suffering from psychiatric disorder do not maintain their social class or remain in the labour force to the same extent as individuals without those problems, irrespective of their parental class. Our results support the social drift hypothesis that individuals with poor psychiatric health move downward in the social hierarchy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Moving on from Ramps? The Utility of the Social Model of Disability for Facilitating Experiences of Nature for Disabled Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Benzon, Nadia

    2010-01-01

    Experiences of nature have been shown to be beneficial for disabled children; however, opportunities for disabled children to experience nature are often limited. The social model of disability may provide a theoretical base for increasing access to nature for pupils at Special Educational Needs (SEN) schools. Using results from interviews…

  20. Psychiatric Morbidity and Work and Social Adjustment Among Earthquake Survivors Extricated from under the Rubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Shamaila; Aslam, Naeem

    2012-10-01

    This cross-sectional study examined psychiatric co-morbidity and work and social adjustment after a natural disaster among survivors who were extricated from under the rubble. Individuals (N=40) belonging to district Muzaffarabad, a severely earthquake affected area on 8(th) October 2005, were interviewed. The examination included the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders, Work and Social Adjustment Scale, and questions covering background characteristics and disaster exposure. The most prevalent disorders were posttaumatic stress disorder (32.5%), major depressive disorder (17.5%), dysthymia (15.0%), agoraphobia (25.0%), and panic disorder (20.0%). Moreover, 77% of the respondents have been diagnosed with at least one psychiatric disorder. Work and soical adjustment was found to have an inverse relationship with the psychiatric co-morbidity. Small sample size and lack of comparison group from non-earthquake struck areas may limit the generalizability of the psychatric disorders. Psychiatric disorders other than PTSD, especially depressive and anxiety disorders, are of clinical importance when considering long-term mental health effect of disasters.

  1. Physical and Social Barriers to Social Relationships: Voices of Rural Disabled Women in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Diane E.; McLorg, Penelope A.; Bartnick, April K.

    2009-01-01

    Through exploring the lived experiences of disabled women, this study investigates how physical and social barriers affect their social relationships. In-depth tape-recorded interviews investigating a variety of social and interpersonal issues were conducted with 24 women with physical or visual impairments who lived in a rural region of the…

  2. [Epidemiological study of psychiatric disorders under a social security system (Institute of Social Security and Services for Government Workers)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara Tapia, H; Ramírez de Lara, L

    1975-01-01

    The present study, fourth in the national literature about general psychiatric epidemiology, refers the experience of a social security system through the study of a sample obtained in a year of work of an important neurologic and psychiatric clinic of this system, studying relevant characteristics of 1 054 subjects in a total 7 102 acute and chronic psychiatric patients, showing a prevalence of 180 per 100 000 habitants. We found 36 different psychiatric disorders, most of them psychoneurotic in ambulatory patients and psychotic forms in hospitalized. The last ones made the 0.022% of the total sample. The biggest frecuency is made by young adults with moderate predominance of females than males. The sample is formed near the 10% by patients of 26 states of Mexican Republic. The period of major frecuency are the months of vacations of government workers, most of them of Public Education Secretary (Secretaría de Educación Pública). We comment some epidemiological articles of Mexican medical literature concerning psychiatric disorders and some socioeconomic and cultural characteristics of mental pathology in our country.

  3. Social determinants of health, inequality and social inclusion among people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorati, Regina Celia; Elui, Valeria Meirelles Carril

    2015-01-01

    to analyze the socio-familial and community inclusion and social participation of people with disabilities, as well as their inclusion in occupations in daily life. qualitative study with data collected through open interviews concerning the participants' life histories and systematic observation. The sample was composed of ten individuals with acquired or congenital disabilities living in the region covered by a Family Health Center. The social conception of disability was the theoretical framework used. Data were analyzed according to an interpretative reconstructive approach based on Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action. the results show that the socio-familial and community inclusion of the study participants is conditioned to the social determinants of health and present high levels of social inequality expressed by difficult access to PHC and rehabilitation services, work and income, education, culture, transportation and social participation. there is a need to develop community-centered care programs in cooperation with PHC services aiming to cope with poverty and improve social inclusion.

  4. Social Media Use in Psychiatric Graduate Medical Education: Where We Are and the Places We Could Go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Thomas S; Roy, Durga; Anton, Blair; Chisolm, Margaret S

    2016-02-01

    This commentary discusses the use of social media in psychiatric graduate medical education (GME) based on a systematic search of the literature. The authors conclude that research on social media use in psychiatric GME is in its infancy. For the most part, the few articles that have been published on this topic caution against the use of social media in psychiatric training. However, reports from other specialties, in which social media use in medical education has been more extensively studied, suggest that there may be significant benefits to incorporating social media into medical education. Although additional challenges may exist in implementing these tools in psychiatric education, the authors suggest that this is an emerging field of scholarship that merits further investigation.

  5. Predictors of Diagnosis of Child Psychiatric Disorder in Adult-Infant Social-Communicative Interaction at 12 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwick, H.; Doolin, O.; Allely, C. S.; McConnachie, A.; Johnson, P.; Puckering, C.; Golding, J.; Gillberg, C.; Wilson, P.

    2013-01-01

    To establish which social interactive behaviours predict later psychiatric diagnosis, we examined 180 videos of a parent-infant interaction when children were aged one year, from within the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort. Sixty of the videos involved infants who were later diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder at…

  6. Social Inclusion and People with Intellectual Disability and Challenging Behaviour: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigby, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Background: Social inclusion is central to disability policies internationally. The high risk of social exclusion for people with intellectual disability is compounded for those with challenging behaviour. Method: A systematic literature review examined how social inclusion of people with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour has been…

  7. Social and ethical implications of psychiatric classification for low- and middle-income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K Burns

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition, and the ongoing revision of the International Classification of Diseases, currently 10th edition, it is timely to consider the wider societal implications of evolving psychiatric classification, especially within low- and middle-income countries (LMICs.  The author reviewed developments in psychiatric classification, especially the move from categorical to dimensional approaches based on biobehavioural phenotypes. While research supports this move, there are several important associated ethical challenges. Dimensional classification runs the risk of ‘medicalising’ a range of normality; the broadening of some definitions and the introduction of new disorders means more people are likely to attract psychiatric diagnoses. Many LMICs do not have the political, social, legal and economic systems to protect individuals in society from the excesses of medicalisation, thus potentially rendering more citizens vulnerable to forms of stigma, exploitation and abuse, conducted in the name of medicine and psychiatry. Excessive medicalisation within such contexts is also likely to worsen existing disparities in healthcare and widen the treatment gap, as inappropriate diagnosis and treatment of mildly ill or essentially normal people has an impact on health budgets and resources, leading to relative neglect of those with genuine, severe psychiatric disorders.  In an era of evolving psychiatric classification, those concerned for, and involved in, global mental health should be critically self-reflective of all aspects of the modern psychiatric paradigm, especially changes in classification systems, and should alert the global profession to the sociopolitical, economic and cultural implications of changing nosology for LMIC regions of the world.

  8. Employment of individuals in the Social Security disability programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Paul; Livermore, Gina A; Stapleton, David C

    2011-01-01

    The articles in this special issue present findings from research on the employment and work-related activities of individuals receiving benefits through the Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income programs, and on the factors that hinder their efforts to work at levels that lead to exiting the disability rolls. This article introduces the other articles, highlights their important findings, and discusses the implications for ongoing efforts to increase the earnings and self-sufficiency of these beneficiaries, such as the Ticket to Work program and the Benefit Offset National Demonstration.

  9. Comorbid psychiatric conditions as mediators to predict later social adjustment in youths with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Huey-Ling; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2015-08-06

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience long-term social impairment and their comorbid psychiatric conditions negatively impact adaptive functioning. The aims of the study are to investigate whether comorbid psychopathologies, such as anxiety/depression, inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity, and oppositional behaviors, mediated the link between autistic symptoms and social maladjustment. One hundred and twenty-four youths diagnosed with a clinical diagnosis of DSM-IV ASD (mean age, 10.6 ± 3.3 years) participated in this longitudinal study. They were assessed using semistructured diagnostic interviews on ASD and other psychiatric conditions at recruitment. Follow-up interviews took place approximately 3 years later (37.59 ± 15 months) while the parents reported to the Social Adjustment Inventory for Children and Adolescents on their children's social adjustment. Mediation models were used to examine the mediating effect of comorbid psychopathologies on social adjustment. Youths with ASD had worse school, peer, and home functions than controls at follow-up assessment. In general, comorbid psychiatric conditions mediated the link between autistic symptoms and different domains of social adjustment, independent of age, sex, and full-scale IQ. Additionally, we found specific mediating effects of anxiety/depression and inattention on school functions; anxiety/depression on peer relationships; and oppositional behaviors on home behaviors. Early comorbid psychopathologies may further impair later social adjustment in youths with ASD and an early identification and intervention of these comorbid conditions are suggested. © 2015 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  10. Social Security Administration Retirement, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (RSDI) Improper Payments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset shows improper payment experience for the Social Security Retirement, Survivors, and Disability Insurance program paid to workers, their dependents, and...

  11. Forced residential mobility and social support: impacts on psychiatric disorders among Somali migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhui Kamaldeep

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somali migrants fleeing the civil war in their country face punishing journeys, the loss of homes, possessions, and bereavement. On arrival in the host country they encounter poverty, hostility, and residential instability which may also undermine their mental health. Methods An in-depth and semi-structured interview was used to gather detailed accommodation histories for a five year period from 142 Somali migrants recruited in community venues and primary care. Post-codes were verified and geo-mapped to calculate characteristics of residential location including deprivation indices, the number of moves and the distances between residential moves. We asked about the reasons for changing accommodation, perceived discrimination, asylum status, traumatic experiences, social support, employment and demographic factors. These factors were assessed alongside characteristics of residential mobility as correlates of ICD-10 psychiatric disorders. Results Those who were forced to move homes were more likely to have an ICD-10 psychiatric disorder (OR = 2.64, 1.16-5.98, p = 0.02 compared with those moving through their own choice. A lower risk of psychiatric disorders was found for people with larger friendship networks (0.35, 0.14-0.84, p = 0.02, for those with more confiding emotional support (0.42, 0.18-1.0, p = 0.05, and for those who had not moved during the study period (OR = 0.21, 0.07-0.62, p = 0.01. Conclusions Forced residential mobility is a risk factor for psychiatric disorder; social support may contribute to resilience against psychiatric disorders associated with residential mobility.

  12. Beyond childhood: psychiatric comorbidities and social background of adults with Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Mandy; Prox-Vagedes, Vanessa; Ohlmeier, Martin D; Dillo, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    Over the past few years, our knowledge about Asperger syndrome (AS) has increased enormously. Although it used to be a syndrome mainly encountered in childhood and adolescent psychiatry, it is now increasingly recognized in adult psychiatry. Nevertheless, little is known about psychiatric comorbidities and life course of adults with AS. The current study aimed to gain an insight into comorbidities and the development of the social situation of adults with AS. We investigated psychiatric comorbidities, psychiatric history, professional background, partnerships, and children in 50 adults with AS (34 men and 16 women) over a broad age range (20-62 years). Seventy percent of adults with AS had at least one psychiatric comorbiditiy. Most frequent comorbidities were depression and anxiety disorders. Obsessive-compulsive disorder and alcohol abuse/dependence were also observed. Many adults had previously been treated with psychopharmacological or psychotherapeutic interventions. Although most adults had a high-level school leaving certificate and had gone on to complete training/university studies, less than half were currently in employment. Fourteen adults were living in a partnership and 10 had children. Adults with AS often have psychiatric comorbidities, indicating lower levels of mental health. Additionally, they seem to have severe limitations concerning professional success, despite having a good school education. Their family situation is also impaired with regard to starting a family. These considerable limitations in the life of adults with AS may help to understand their specific problems, and emphasize the importance of developing specific treatments for improving their mental health and social integration.

  13. Screening for Psychiatric Disorders in a Total Population of Adults with Intellectual Disability and Challenging Behaviour Using the PAS-ADD Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David; Lowe, Kathy; Matthews, Helen; Anness, Val

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has suggested a variety of possible relationships between the presence of symptoms of psychiatric disorder and challenging behaviours in people with intellectual disability. This study explores this relationship in a total population sample of adults with challenging behaviour. Materials and Methods: Over 800 service…

  14. "Why Are You Here? Can't You Cope at Home?" The Psychiatric Crisis of People with Intellectual Disabilities and the Community's Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassiani, Natasha; Abou Chacra, Megan Sarah; Lunsky, Yona

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) are high users of emergency mental health services and can experience stigmatization in these circumstances. The purpose of the study was to examine the experiences of people with ID living in the community who interact with emergency services as a result of a psychiatric crisis, from the…

  15. Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities Who Live with Family and Experience Psychiatric Crisis: Who Uses the Emergency Department and Who Stays Home?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan A.; Slusarczyk, Maggie; Lunsky, Yona

    2011-01-01

    Many individuals with intellectual disabilities who live with their families experience mental health problems and ensuing psychiatric emergencies. During periods of crisis, families may require additional services, including going to the emergency department (ED). The goal of this study was to elucidate demographic, clinical, and crisis features…

  16. "We Have to Be Satisfied with the Scraps": South African Nurses' Experiences of Care on Adult Psychiatric Intellectual Disability Inpatient Wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capri, Charlotte; Buckle, Chanellé

    2015-01-01

    Background: Migrating nursing labour inadvertently reinforces South Africa's care drain, contributes to a global care crisis and forces us to reconsider migration motivation. This paper highlights issues that complicate psychiatric intellectual disability nursing care and identifies loci for change in an attempt to redress this care challenge.…

  17. Disability in people affected by leprosy: the role of impairment, activity, social participation, stigma and discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    van Brakel, Wim H.; Sihombing, Benyamin; Djarir, Hernani; Beise, Kerstin; Kusumawardhani, Laksmi; Yulihane, Rita; Kurniasari, Indra; Kasim, Muhammad; Kesumaningsih, Kadek I.; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2012-01-01

    Background: Leprosy-related disability is a challenge to public health, and social and rehabilitation services in endemic countries. Disability is more than a mere physical dysfunction, and includes activity limitations, stigma, discrimination, and social participation restrictions. We assessed the extent of disability and its determinants among persons with leprosy-related disabilities after release from multi drug treatment. Methods: We conducted a survey on disability among persons affecte...

  18. Social Work Practice and People with Disabilities: Our Future Selves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa S. Patchner

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available During the past fifty years a revolution in how we recognize advocate, medically treat, and interact with people with disabilities has taken place within contemporary society. From historical civil rights legislation to greater access to society’s rights and benefits, to technological advances and population longevity, people with disabilities are integrating themselves into society. As we begin to explore the 21st Century new concerns regarding the cost of chronic care and society’s desire to fund these costs are beginning to emerge. The desire to qualify the cost of care by functional longevity has begun to emerge in both private and public service delivery systems. As professional social workers begin to expand their sociopolitical influence, they will be challenged to uphold the rights of self-determination that people with disabilities have striven to attain.

  19. [Social participation and vocational integration as an objective of child and adolescent psychiatric rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voll, Renate

    2009-09-01

    In order to avoid threatening social disintegration, it is important for children and adolescents with chronic mental disorders and also for physically disabled children to diagnose disturbances of social participation in an early stage and to commence rehabilitation measures. The need for rehabilitation, the ability to rehabilitate and the rehabilitation prognosis are important for identifying the individual rehabilitation goals. A multi-axial diagnosis according to the ICF with a determination of adaptability, a behavioural analysis, skills, activity and participation is required. For disabled children, there are only a few ICF check lists for diagnosing social participation. Because of this, the ICF check list CASP (Child & Adolescent Scale of Participation) for measuring social participation according to Bedell was translated, which is shown in the appendix.

  20. Psychiatric social workers in legal aid services in hospitals: Exploring roles in Indian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Treesa Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental health and legal problems are interlinked in many ways. People facing legal issues may develop mental health problems, and people with mental illness and family also face legal issues. In India, Legal Services Authorities Act, 1987 gives provision for free legal aid services for the poor sections of society. Authors explain the roles of psychiatric social workers in legal aid services in hospitals. Social case work as a method of social work is suitable in legal aid services. Counseling, referrals, collateral contacts, advocacy and networking are major services from the social work perspective. Knowledge about laws and mental illness is essential for social workers to work in legal aid clinics (LACs.

  1. The impact of social housing on the labour market status of the disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregoir, Stéphane; Maury, Tristan-Pierre

    2013-09-01

    Disability may impact on employment through entitlement to social housing. Estimates of an original dynamic panel data model of disability, labour market and housing tenure transitions in England indicate that up to one-quarter of the lower employment probability of the disabled can be attributed to the effect of qualifying for social housing. Short-lived disabilities can result in long spells in social housing that reduce incentives to participate in the labour market. This suggests that authorities should reform the welfare system and the allocation of social housing to limit the persistent and unfavourable consequences of allocating social housing to the disabled. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Becoming a client of the Danish social service system increases stress in parents of disabled infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graungaard, Anette Hauskov; Skov, Liselotte; Andersen, John Sahl

    2011-01-01

    Parents of a young child with severe disabilities are facing a large range of new challenges; furthermore, most of these families have extended social needs regarding information, financial support, day care facilities, disability aids, etc. Many parents with disabled children have been found...... to be dissatisfied with social services. This study explores parents' experiences with Danish social services during their transition to a new daily life after the birth of a severely disabled child....

  3. "Helicobacter Pylori" Infection in Five Inpatient Units for People with Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David; Vemuri, Murali; Gunatilake, Deepthi; Tewari, Sidhartha

    2008-01-01

    Background: A high prevalence of "Helicobacter pylori" infection has been reported among people with intellectual disability, especially those residing in hospital and similar settings. Surveys of inpatients have found unusually high rates of gastrointestinal malignancy, to which "H. pylori" infection predisposes. Methods: "Helicobacter pylori"…

  4. A Comparison Study of Adults with Intellectual Disability and Psychiatric Disorder with and without Forensic Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, P.; Lunsky, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The current study describes and compares profiles of patients in the same specialized hospital program for patients with intellectual disability with and without forensic involvement. A retrospective chart review of 78 individuals (39 forensic and 39 non-forensic) served between 2006 and 2008 was completed. The forensic sample was more likely to…

  5. A Framework for Assessment and Treatment of Language-Learning Disabled Children with Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, Lisa R.; Hummel, Lauren J.

    1990-01-01

    The paper defines the population of primary school age language/learning-disabled children with communication disorders and emotional/behavioral disorders. It then discusses the language demands of traditional treatment methods, assessment and diagnostic procedures, approaches to communication intervention, and treatment modalities; and offers a…

  6. Oxytocin and vasopressin receptor gene polymorphisms: role in social and psychiatric traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio eAspé Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin (OXT and arginine-vasopressin (AVP are two phylogenetically conserved neuropeptides that have been implicated in a wide range of social behaviors. Although a large body of research, ranging from rodents to humans, has reported on the effects of OXT and AVP administration on affiliative and trust behaviors, and has highlighted the genetic contributions of OXT and AVP receptor polymorphisms to both social behaviors and to diseases related to social deficits, the consequences of peptide administration on psychiatric symptoms, and the impact of receptor polymorphisms on receptor function, are still unclear. Despite the exciting advances that these reports have brought to social neuroscience, they remain preliminary and suffer from the problems that are inherent to monogenetic linkage and association studies. As an alternative, some studies are using polygenic approaches, and consider the contributions of other genes and pathways, including those involving DA, 5-HT, and reelin, in addition to OXT and AVP; a handful of report are also using genome-wide association studies.This review summarizes findings on the associations between OXT and AVP receptor polymorphism, social behavior, and psychiatric diseases. In addition, we discuss reports on the interactions of OXT and AVP receptor genes and genes involved in other pathways (like those

  7. How does the social environment 'get into the mind'? Epigenetics at the intersection of social and psychiatric epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyokawa, Satoshi; Uddin, Monica; Koenen, Karestan C; Galea, Sandro

    2012-01-01

    The social environment plays a considerable role in determining major psychiatric disorders. Emerging evidence suggests that features of the social environment modify gene expression independently of the primary DNA sequence through epigenetic processes. Accordingly, dysfunction of epigenetic mechanisms offers a plausible mechanism by which an adverse social environment gets "into the mind" and results in poor mental health. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the studies suggesting that epigenetic changes introduced by the social environment then manifest as psychological consequences. Our goal is to build a platform to discuss the ways in which future epidemiologic studies may benefit from including epigenetic measures. We focus on schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, anorexia nervosa, and substance dependence as examples that highlight the ways in which social environmental exposures, mediated through epigenetic processes, affect mental health. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Employment among Social Security disability program beneficiaries, 1996-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamun, Arif; O'Leary, Paul; Wittenburg, David C; Gregory, Jesse

    2011-01-01

    We use linked administrative data from program and earnings records to summarize the 2007 employment rates of Social Security disability program beneficiaries at the national and state levels, as well as changes in employment since 1996. The findings provide new information on the employment activities of beneficiaries that should be useful in assessing current agency policies and providing benchmarks for ongoing demonstration projects and future return-to-work initiatives. The overall employment rate--which we define as annual earnings over $1,000--was 12 percent in 2007. Substantial variation exists within the population. Disability Insurance beneficiaries and those younger than age 40 were much more likely to work relative to other Social Security beneficiaries. Additionally, substantial regional variation exists across states; employment rates ranged from 7 percent (West Virginia) to 23 percent (North Dakota). Moreover, we find that the employment rates among beneficiaries were sensitive to the business cycle and persistent over time.

  9. A Social Relational Model of Disability: A Theoretical Framework for Special Needs Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reindal, Solveig Magnus

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses various approaches to the phenomenon of disability in relation to special needs. Ever since disability researchers launched the social model of disability and criticised the field of special education for preserving an understanding of disability in accord with a medical model, the special education field has been in a state…

  10. (Social) Cognitive Skills and Social Information Processing in Children with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, M.; Vriens, A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the unique contributions of (social) cognitive skills such as inhibition, working memory, perspective taking, facial emotion recognition, and interpretation of situations to the variance in social information processing in children with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities. Respondents were 79…

  11. Personality disorders, common mental disorders and receipt of disability benefits: evidence from the British National Survey of Psychiatric Morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, A K; Skogen, J C; Harvey, S B; Stewart, R; Hotopf, M; Moran, P

    2012-12-01

    Common mental disorders (CMDs) are associated with occupational impairment and the receipt of disability benefits (DBs). Little is known about the relationship between personality disorders (PDs) and work disability, and whether the association between CMDs and work disability is affected by the presence of co-morbid PDs. The aim of this study was to examine the association between DB and individual categories of PDs, with special attention to the effect of co-morbid CMDs on this association. The association between DB and PD was examined using data from the 2000 British National Survey of Psychiatric Morbidity. Probable PD caseness was identified using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SCID-II) screening questionnaire. The impact of CMDs, assessed with the revised version of the Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R), was examined as a covariate and in a stratified analysis of co-morbidity. Other covariates included sociodemographic factors, long-standing illnesses and substance use. Probable PD was associated with DB, with the strongest associations found for borderline, dependent and schizotypal PD. Antisocial PD was not associated with DB. The relationship between PD and DB was strongly modified by CMD, reducing the association from an odds ratio (OR) of 2.84 to 1.34 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.79)]. In the stratified analysis, co-morbid PD and CMD showed a stronger association with DB than PD without CMD but, when fully adjusted, this effect was not significantly different from the association between CMD without PD. Individuals screening positive for PD are more likely to experience severe occupational outcomes, especially in the presence of co-morbid CMD.

  12. An evaluation of the Kids are Kids disability awareness program: increasing social inclusion among children with physical disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Despite the intent of integration to promote positive social interactions between children with and without disabilities, there is growing concern that many children with special needs who are in inclusive settings feel socially isolated. The evaluation of interventions designed to promote disability awareness is critical if we are to increase opportunities for social success for these children. This research study was designed to determine whether the Kids Are Kids (KAK) program can positively impact the attitudes of children toward their peers with physical disabilities, as well as increase the social inclusion of these children. Results suggest that the KAK program had a positive impact on the attitudes of children toward their peers with disabilities, immediately following the program. Where social skill building was provided to 1 target child, attitude scores for that class remained elevated 1 month after the program. Two of the 3 target children reported increased social inclusion 1 month after the program.

  13. What is Constructionism in Psychiatry? From Social Causes to Psychiatric Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael evan Riel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available It is common to note that social environment and cultural formation shape mental disorders. The details of this claim are, however, not well understood. The paper takes a look at the claim that culture has an impact on psychiatry from the perspective of metaphysics and the philosophy of science. Its aim is to offer, in a general fashion, partial explications of some significant versions of the thesis that culture and social environment shape mental disorders, and to highlight some of the consequences social constructionism about psychiatry has for psychiatric explanation. In particular, it will be argued that the alleged dependence of facts about particular mental disorders and about the second order property of being a mental disorder on social facts amounts to a robust form of constructivism, whereas the view that clinician-patient interaction is influenced by cultural facts is perfectly compatible with an anti-constructivist stance.

  14. The relationship between social support, help-seeking behavior, and psychological distress in psychiatric clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knisely, J E; Northouse, L

    1994-12-01

    A descriptive exploratory design was used to examine the relationship between the level of social support, the level of psychological distress, and the extent of help-seeking behavior in a nonprobability sample of 53 hospitalized adult psychiatric patients. The subjects completed the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire, the Brief Symptom Inventory, and a researcher-designed Help-Seeking Behavior Questionnaire. The Pearson Product Moment Correlation coefficients and t test were used to analyze the data. No significant correlation was found between the level of psychological distress and either the level of social support or the extent of help seeking. Social support and help seeking were highly correlated. These results have an implication for nursing practice pertaining to the focus of patient treatment both during hospitalization and in postdischarge planning.

  15. Psychiatric disorders in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Ingmar

    2011-07-01

    Recent research has shown that depression, anxiety disorders, and psychosis are more common than previously supposed in elderly populations without dementia. It is unclear whether the frequency of these disorders increases or decreases with age. Clinical expression of psychiatric disorders in old age may be different from that seen in younger age groups, with less and often milder symptoms. Concurrently, comorbidity between different psychiatric disorders is immense, as well as comorbidity with somatic disorders. Cognitive function is often decreased in people with depression, anxiety disorders, and psychosis, but whether these disorders are risk factors for dementia is unclear. Psychiatric disorders in the elderly are often related to cerebral neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular disease, although psychosocial risk factors are also important. Psychiatric disorders, common among the elderly, have consequences that include social deprivation, poor quality of life, cognitive decline, disability, increased risk for somatic disorders, suicide, and increased nonsuicidal mortality.

  16. Straining Psychic and Social Sinew: Trauma among Adolescent Psychiatric Patients in New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Janis H

    2015-03-01

    Drawing on data from a longitudinal study of 47 adolescents of diverse ethnic backgrounds hospitalized for psychiatric disorder in New Mexico, the article critically examines the relevance of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to address anthropological questions of how to define the problem. Factors include the utility/limitation of psychiatric diagnostic categories, the lived experience of severe distress, the socioeconomic and political conditions of suffering, and reciprocal relations between immediate and remote social institutions. I discuss the mental health care system for adolescents and present two case studies of young inpatients, emphasizing the need for dual specification of the conditions of trauma and the structure of experience. I argue for understanding patterns of abandonment that shape the raw existence of young people at both the personal and collective levels to apprehend their depth and durability. © 2014 by the American Anthropological Association.

  17. Social Experiences of Children with Disabilities in Inclusive Portuguese Preschool Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Milene; Aguiar, Cecília; Correia, Nadine; Fialho, Margarida; Pimentel, Júlia Serpa

    2017-01-01

    Based on peer sociometric reports, we examined how number of friendships, social acceptance, and characteristics of social networks vary as a function of disability profile. We also investigated teachers' awareness of the sociometric status of young children with disabilities. Participants were 86 children with disabilities (63 boys) enrolled in…

  18. [Disability as a restriction on social participation: challenges in evaluation since the Brazilian Inclusion of People with Disabilities Act].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Wederson

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses the main advances and challenges for understanding and evaluating disability as a restriction for social participation. This new understanding has its origins in the 2006 WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health - ICF, the 2001 UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and more recently, the July 2015 Brazilian Inclusion of People with Disabilities Act (IPDA), also known as the Statute on Persons with Disabilities. The change in the understanding of disability from a merely biomedical perspective, to an understanding that is based on oppression and social inequality reinforces the idea that disability is not an individual attribute, but the result of a society that is not prepared for human diversity. Based on a legislative analysis of the many documents on policies regarding persons with disabilities, notably the IPDA and the evaluations of disability that the ICF already uses in Brazil, the main contention proposed is that classifying and valuing disability is challenging for professional evaluators as well as for Brazilian public policy. This is mainly due to the challenges of recognizing the barriers and environmental factors that hamper the full participation in society of people with disabilities.

  19. Suicidal behavior in pregnant teenagers in southern Brazil: social, obstetric and psychiatric correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Ricardo Tavares; da Cunha Coelho, Fábio Monteiro; da Silva, Ricardo Azevedo; de Ávila Quevedo, Luciana; de Mattos Souza, Luciano Dias; Castelli, Rochele Dias; de Matos, Mariana Bonati; Pinheiro, Karen Amaral Tavares

    2012-02-01

    Suicidal behavior and its correlates remain relatively understudied in pregnant teenagers. A cross-sectional study with a consecutive sample of pregnant teenagers recipient of prenatal medical assistance by the national public health system in the urban area of Pelotas, southern Brazil. Sample size was estimated in 871 participants. Suicidal behavior and psychiatric disorders were assessed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview; the Abuse Assessment Screen was used to identify physical or sexual abuse; social support was assessed with the Medical Outcomes Survey Social Support Scale; a self-report questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic, obstetric and other psychosocial data. Forty three (4.94%) teenagers refused to participate, resulting in 828 participants. Prevalence of suicidal behavior was 13.3%; lifetime suicide attempts were referred by 7.4%, with 1.3% reporting attempting suicide within the last month. After adjustment, we found significant associations of suicidal behavior with the 18-19 years old subgroup, low education, prior abortion, previous major depression, and physical abuse within the last 12 months. Pregnant teenagers with high social support showed prevalence ratios (PR) 67% lower (PR: 0.33; 95%CI: 0.19-0.56) than those with low social support. Furthermore, a wide range of psychiatric disorders, most notably major depressive disorder (PR: 2.75; 95%CI: 1.34-5.63) and panic disorder (PR: 6.36; 95%CI: 1.61-25.10), remained associated with suicidal behavior after adjustment. The cross-sectional design precludes causal inferences. We found that suicidal behavior is a relatively common feature in pregnant teenagers, frequently associated with psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Extracurricular Activities and the Development of Social Skills in Children with Intellectual and Specific Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, B. A.; Floyd, F.; Robins, D. L.; Chan, W. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children with intellectual disability and specific learning disabilities often lack age-appropriate social skills, which disrupts their social functioning. Because of the limited effectiveness of classroom mainstreaming and social skills training for these children, it is important to explore alternative opportunities for social skill…

  1. (Social) Cognitive skills and social information processing in children with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, M; Vriens, A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the unique contributions of (social) cognitive skills such as inhibition, working memory, perspective taking, facial emotion recognition, and interpretation of situations to the variance in social information processing in children with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities. Respondents were 79 children with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities in the age of 8-12 who were given tasks on social cognitive skills and social information processing. The results from the present study show that emotion recognition, interpretation, working memory and inhibition skills predict social information processing skills. It is concluded that especially emotion recognition and interpretation skills are important cognitive skills that predict social information processing, and therefore should be the focus of treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. "It's the day-to-day living that matters": the meaning and process of community in the lives of a couple with significant psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royce-Davis, J C

    2001-12-01

    This study attempts to define and describe the experience and process of community and community participation using a qualitative case study of a couple labeled with significant psychiatric disabilities. Findings indicate that important influences on perceptions and the process of community belonging include (a) the opportunity to personally define the meaning, limitations, and level of care associated with receiving a psychiatric label; (b) a reciprocal, central relationship; and (c) recognized opportunities for intentional participation in and access to meaningful relationships with other community members, including in the role of coworker or colleague.

  3. Social Security Disability Insurance Enrollment and Health Care Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Lawrence C; Geissler, Kimberley H

    2017-09-21

    To examine the relationship between Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) enrollment and health care employment. State-year level data from government and other publicly available sources for all states (2000-2014). Population-weighted linear regression analyses model associations between each health care employment measure and each SSDI enrollment measure (i.e., SSDI overall, physical, or mental health enrollment rates), controlling for factors associated with health care employment, state fixed effects, and secular time trends. Data are gathered from publicly available sources. A one standard deviation increase in SSDI enrollment per 100,000 population is associated with a statistically significant 2.6 and 4.5 percent increase in the mean employment rate per 100,000 population for health care practitioner and technical occupations and health care support occupations, respectively. The size of this relationship varies by the type of disabling condition for SSDI enrollment (physical versus mental health). Social Security Disability Insurance enrollment is significantly associated with health care employment at the state level. Quantifying the magnitude of this relationship is important given high SSDI enrollment rates as well as evolving policy and demographic shifts related to the SSDI program. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  4. Social inclusion of individuals with intellectual disabilities in the military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Shirli; Hochman, Yael

    2017-06-01

    Despite policies advocating the social inclusion of persons with disabilities in all settings that are a part of everyday life within society, individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) are usually excluded from service in the military. This study examined the meaning of service in the military for individuals with ID from the perspective of various stakeholder groups. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 31 individuals with ID, 36 relatives, and 28 commanders. The recent model for social inclusion developed by Simplican et al. (2015) served as the basis for analyses. Findings suggest a successful social inclusion process for individuals with ID, which resulted in them feeling as an integral part and as contributing members of the military unit and of society at large. Social inclusion in the military was described with reference to two overlapping and interacting domains of interpersonal relationships and community participation. The interaction between interpersonal relationships within the military and community participation has led to positive outcomes for soldiers with ID. Recommendations are provided for the continued inclusion of individuals with ID in the military and in other everyday settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Laughter in a psychiatric ward. Somatic, emotional, social, and clinical influences on schizophrenic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelkopf, M; Kreitler, S; Sigal, M

    1993-05-01

    The study was designed to explore the potential therapeutic effects of humor on hospitalized schizophrenics. For this purpose, in the first stage, we conducted a review of findings in regard to physical health, emotions, psychiatric state, and social behavior. In the second stage, we carried out an experiment with 34 resident patients in two chronic schizophrenic wards who were exposed to 70 movies during 3 months. The experimental group was exposed to humorous movies only, and the control group to different kinds of movies. Before and after the exposure to films for 3 months, both groups were tested on different health, emotional, social, and clinical measures using the Cognitive Orientation of Health Questionnaire, the Shalvata Symptom Rating Scale, blood pressure, heart rate, Perceived Verbal and Motor Aggression (rated by nurses), the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List, the Social Support Questionnaire 6, and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS; rated by psychiatrists). Covariance analyses yielded significant reductions in Perceived Verbal Hostility, BPRS scales (total score, anxiety/depression), and significant increases in BPRS (activation) and degree of staff support experienced by the patients. The results indicate that the effects of exposure to humor may be mediated by the effects on the staff of the incidental exposure to humorous films.

  6. Is disability pension a risk indicator for future need of psychiatric healthcare or suicidal behavior among MS patients- a nationwide register study in Sweden?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkenstam, Charlotte; Tinghög, Petter; Brenner, Philip; Mittendorfer-Rutz, Ellenor; Hillert, Jan; Jokinen, Jussi; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2015-11-16

    Mental disorders and suicidal behavior are common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), they also carry a higher risk of disability pension (DP). Our aim was to investigate if DP and other factors are associated with psychiatric disorders and suicidal behavior among MS patients, and whether DP is a stronger risk indicator among certain groups. A prospective population-based cohort study with six-year follow-up (2005-2010), including 11 346 MS patients who in 2004 were aged 16-64 and lived in Sweden. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. MS patients on DP had a modestly higher risk of requiring psychiatric healthcare, IRR: 1.36 (95 % CI: 1.18-1.58). MS patients with previous psychiatric healthcare had a higher IRR for both psychiatric healthcare and suicidal behavior; 2.32 (2.18-2.47) and 1.91 (1.59-2.30), respectively. DP moderated the association between sex and psychiatric healthcare, where women on DP displayed higher risk than men, X(2) 4.74 (p = 0.03). The findings suggest that losing one's role in work life aggravates rather than alleviates the burden of MS, as MS patients on DP seem to have a higher need for psychiatric healthcare, especially among women; which calls for extra awareness among clinicians.

  7. Perceptions of psychosocial disability amongst psychiatric service users and caregivers in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke-Sumner, Carrie; Lund, Crick; Petersen, Inge

    2014-01-01

    In many parts of South Africa there is little support for people with psychosocial disability caused by schizophrenia, beyond provision of psychotropic medications. Appropriate community-based psychosocial rehabilitation interventions are a crucial element of mental health service development. This study aimed to use an explanatory model of illness framework to document experiences of illness, disability and recovery amongst service users with schizophrenia and their caregivers in a poorly resourced area in the North West Province. Data were used to provide recommendations for a contextually appropriate non-specialist facilitated group psychosocial rehabilitation intervention. Eighteen in-depth individual interviews were conducted: nine with schizophrenia service users and nine with caregivers. Interviews were conducted by two trained field researchers; both clinical psychologists fluent in the first language of participants. All interviews were recorded, translated and transcribed. Data were thematically analysed using NVivo 9. Participants linked the illness to witchcraft, poverty and stress. Family conflict was recognised in the course of the illness, causing stress and challenges for emotional well-being. Knowledge of diagnosis and biomedical treatment was minimal. Key factors recognised by service users as promoting recovery were the ability to work, and the support of traditional healers and religious structures. Based on the findings of this study, a group psychosocial rehabilitation intervention emerged as a recommendation, with the incorporation of psycho-education, adherence support, coping skills, and opportunities for income generation and productive activity. The importance of also enlisting the support of religious leaders and traditional healers in supporting recovery is emphasised.

  8. [Between therapeutic nihilism and social hygiene: psychiatric care in French positivism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas Garcia-Alejo, R

    1993-01-01

    This work attemps to reflect upon the founding theories of psychiatric care in France during the second half of the 19th. The relationship between the medical somaticism and therapeutical fatalism or positivist alienism has been evaluated using the contributions of the degeneratist psychiatricts as the research documentation. The study also covers the principle means of "reaction" to this alienism: the addressing of a certain form of "social hygiene" and the search for new treatments which would allow the alienist to be returned within the asylum walls.

  9. The use of VA Disability Compensation and Social Security Disability Insurance among working-aged veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmoth, Janet M; London, Andrew S; Heflin, Colleen M

    2015-07-01

    Although there is substantial disability among veterans, relatively little is known about working-aged veterans' uptake of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Disability Compensation and Social Security Disability Insurance (DI). This study identifies levels of veteran participation in VA disability and/or DI benefit programs, examines transitions into and out of VA and DI programs among veterans, and estimates the size and composition of the veteran population receiving VA and/or DI benefits over time. Data from the 1992, 1993, 1996, 2001, 2004, and 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) are used to describe VA and DI program participation among veterans under the age of 65. The majority of working-aged veterans do not receive VA or DI benefits and joint participation is low, but use of these programs has increased over time. A higher percentage of veterans receive VA compensation, which ranges from 4.9% in 1992 to 13.2% in 2008, than DI compensation, which ranges from 2.9% in 1992 to 6.7% in 2008. The rate of joint participation ranges from less than 1% in 1992 to 3.6% in 2008. Veterans experience few transitions between VA and DI programs during the 36-48 months they are observed. The number of veterans receiving benefits from VA and/or DI nearly doubled between 1992 and 2008. There have been substantial shifts in the composition of veterans using these programs, as cohorts who served prior to 1964 are replaced by those who served after 1964. The findings suggest potential gaps in veterans' access to disability programs that might be addressed through improved coordination of VA and DI benefits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Women’s demand for late-term abortion: A social or psychiatric issue?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Gordana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Aim. Induced termination of unwanted pregnancy after 12th gestational week (late-term abortion is legally restricted in Serbia as well as in many other countries. On the other hand, unwanted pregnancy very often brings women into the state of personal crisis. Psychiatric indications for legally approved late-term abortion on women’s demand include only severe psychiatric disorders. The aim of this paper was to compare sociodemographic, psychological characteristics and claimed reasons for abortion in the two groups of women with late-term demand for abortion - the group of women satisfying legally prescribed mental health indications, and the group of women not satisfying these indications. The aim of the study was also to determine predictive validity of the abovementioned parameters for late-term abortion as the outcome of unwanted pregnancy. Methods. A total of 62 pregnant women with demand for late-term abortion were divided into two groups according to the criteria of satisfying or not satisfying legally proposed psychiatric indications for late-term abortion after psychiatric evaluation. For the assessment of sociodemographic and psychological parameters sociodemographic questionnaire and symptom checklist - 90 revised (SCL-90® scale were used, respectively. The outcome of unwanted pregnancy was followed 6 months after the initial assessment. Results. The obtained results showed a statistically significant difference between the groups in educational level, satisfaction with financial situation, elevated anxiety and distress reactions. Unfavorable social circumstances were the main reason for an abortion in both groups and were predictive for an abortion. A 6-month follow-up showed that women had abortion despite legal restrictions. Conclusion. Pregnant women with psychiatric indication for late-term abortion belong to lower socioeconomic and educational level group compared to women without this indication who have more

  11. Women's demand for late-term abortion--a social or psychiatric issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, Gordana; Samardzić, Ljiljana; Krstić, Miroslav

    2014-07-01

    Induced termination of unwanted pregnancy after 12th gestational week (late-term abortion) is legally restricted in Serbia as well as in many other countries. On the other hand, unwanted pregnancy very often brings women into the state of personal crisis. Psychiatric indications for legally approved late-term abortion on women's demand include only severe psychiatric disorders. The aim of this paper was to compare sociodemographic, psychological characteristics and claimed reasons for abortion in the two groups of women with late-term demand for abortion--the group of women satisfying legally prescribed mental health indications, and the group of women not satisfying these indications. The aim of the study was also to determine predictive validity of the abovementioned parameters for late-term abortion as the outcome of unwanted pregnancy. A total of 62 pregnant women with demand for late-term abortion were divided into two groups according to the criteria of satisfying or not satisfying legally proposed psychiatric indications for late-term abortion after psychiatric evaluation. For the assessment of sociodemographic and psychological parameters sociodemographic questionnaire and symptom checklist-90 revised (SCL-90) scale were used, respectively. The outcome of unwanted pregnancy was followed 6 months after the initial assessment. The obtained results showed a statistically significant difference between the groups in educational level, satisfaction with financial situation, elevated anxiety and distress reactions. Unfavorable social circumstances were the main reason for an abortion in both groups and were predictive for an abortion. A 6-month follow-up showed that women had abortion despite legal restrictions. Pregnant women with psychiatric indication for late-term abortion belong to lower socioeconomic and educational level group compared to women without this indication who have more frequently elevated anxiety and distress reactions to unwanted pregnancy

  12. Integrating evidence in disability evaluation by social insurance physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Rob; Hoving, Jan L; Verbeek, Jos; Schaafsma, Frederieke G; van Dijk, Frank Jh

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore applying the method of evidence-based medicine (EBM) to resolve common questions in the field of disability evaluation. We used three clinical questions corresponding to problems encountered by insurance physicians in daily practice to explore opportunities for and barriers to the application of EBM. The questions fell under two topics: the prognosis of work ability and the effectiveness of interventions to enhance work participation. We used the four-step EBM strategy: (i) formulation of a clinical question, (ii) searching the literature, (iii) appraisal of the evidence, and (iv) implementation of the findings into clinical practice. We restricted the searches to PubMed (Medline). For rheumatoid arthritis, we found evidence on the prognosis of work disability over a long-term period. For remaining sciatica after lumbar discectomy, we found evidence for the stability of the limitations at this stage. For depression with co-morbid alcoholism, we found evidence that treatment of both conditions would enhance work participation. The searches were effective and efficient. The interpretation of the findings was hampered by a lack of consensus in the literature about outcomes such as the concept of a poor prognosis of work ability. The EBM strategy and methods can be used by social insurance physicians to find and apply evidence for common questions in disability evaluation. The World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) model is instrumental in this, although more consensus on central outcome measures is needed. Further research is needed on the translation of evidence into practice. Development of valid specific search strategies for physicians in disability evaluation would improve the implementation of EBM.

  13. Social inequality in onset of mobility disability among older Danes: the mediation effect of social relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Charlotte Juul; Avlund, Kirsten; Lund, Rikke

    2010-06-01

    This article investigates social inequality in onset of mobility disability and in measures of social relations and whether social relations mediated the effect of socioeconomic status on mobility. A total of 2,825 nondisabled older men and women, enrolled in the Danish Intervention Study on Preventive Home Visits, constituted the study population. Data were obtained by mailed questionnaires in 1998-1999 and 2001-2002 and by merging analyses to registers at Statistics Denmark. There was a social gradient in onset of mobility disability, with odds ratio of 1.11 (1.07-1.15) per step down the deciles of financial assets and in cohabitation status, social participation, and network diversity. Social relations did not mediate the effect of financial assets on onset of mobility disability. The negative effects of low financial assets and poor social relations on mobility appear to be independent. More longitudinal studies on possible mediators of the social gradient in mobility among older people are needed.

  14. Social Security Administration - Quarterly Data for Spoken Language Preferences of Social Security Disability Insurance Claimants (2016-onwards)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This data set provides quarterly volumes for language preferences at the national level of individuals filing initial claims for Disability Insurance benefits from...

  15. Social Security Administration - Quarterly Data for Spoken Language Preferences of Social Security Disability Insurance Claimants (2014-2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This data set provides quarterly volumes for language preferences at the national level of individuals filing initial claims for Disability Insurance benefits for...

  16. Perceptions of psychosocial disability amongst psychiatric service users and caregivers in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Brooke-Sumner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In many parts of South Africa there is little support for people with psychosocial disability caused by schizophrenia, beyond provision of psychotropic medications. Appropriate community-based psychosocial rehabilitation interventions are a crucial element of mental health service development.Objectives: This study aimed to use an explanatory model of illness framework to document experiences of illness, disability and recovery amongst service users with schizophrenia and their caregivers in a poorly resourced area in the North West Province. Data were used to provide recommendations for a contextually appropriate non-specialist facilitated group psychosocial rehabilitation intervention.Method: Eighteen in-depth individual interviews were conducted: nine with schizophrenia service users and nine with caregivers. Interviews were conducted by two trained field researchers; both clinical psychologists fluent in the first language of participants. All interviews were recorded, translated and transcribed. Data were thematically analysed using NVivo 9.Results: Participants linked the illness to witchcraft, poverty and stress. Family conflict was recognised in the course of the illness, causing stress and challenges for emotional well-being. Knowledge of diagnosis and biomedical treatment was minimal. Key factors recognised by service users as promoting recovery were the ability to work, and the support of traditional healers and religious structures.Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, a group psychosocial rehabilitation intervention emerged as a recommendation, with the incorporation of psycho-education, adherence support, coping skills, and opportunities for income generation and productive activity. The importance of also enlisting the support of religious leaders and traditional healers in supporting recovery is emphasised.

  17. Quality of life and standard of living in a randomly selected group of psychiatrically disabled people in Sweden 2 years after a psychiatry reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, I; Frederiksen, S-O; Gottfries, C-G

    2002-07-01

    In Sweden, a psychiatry reform, aimed at improving the living conditions of the psychiatrically disabled, came into force in 1995. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of the reform by investigating quality of life and standard of living 2 years later in a randomly selected group of people with longstanding psychiatric disability. Self-ratings and interviews were conducted in a study group and a control group. The study group consisted of 19 women and 18 men (mean age 46.1 years) diagnosed with neurosis, schizophrenia or affective disorder. The control group consisted of 19 women and 17 men (mean age 48.7 years). Self-rated quality of life was significantly poorer in the study group (P standard of living in either group but a significant negative correlation in the control group (P standard of living.

  18. Oxytocin and Vasopressin Receptor Gene Polymorphisms: Role in Social and Psychiatric Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspé-Sánchez, Mauricio; Moreno, Macarena; Rivera, Maria Ignacia; Rossi, Alejandra; Ewer, John

    2016-01-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) and arginine-vasopressin (AVP) are two phylogenetically conserved neuropeptides that have been implicated in a wide range of social behaviors. Although a large body of research, ranging from rodents to humans, has reported on the effects of OXT and AVP administration on affiliative and trust behaviors, and has highlighted the genetic contributions of OXT and AVP receptor polymorphisms to both social behaviors and to diseases related to social deficits, the consequences of peptide administration on psychiatric symptoms, and the impact of receptor polymorphisms on receptor function, are still unclear. Despite the exciting advances that these reports have brought to social neuroscience, they remain preliminary and suffer from the problems that are inherent to monogenetic linkage and association studies. As an alternative, some studies are using polygenic approaches, and consider the contributions of other genes and pathways, including those involving DA, 5-HT, and reelin, in addition to OXT and AVP; a handful of report are also using genome-wide association studies. This review summarizes findings on the associations between OXT and AVP receptor polymorphism, social behavior, and psychiatric diseases. In addition, we discuss reports on the interactions of OXT and AVP receptor genes and genes involved in other pathways (such as those of dopamine, serotonin, and reelin), as well as research that has shed some light on the impact of gene polymorphisms on the volume, connectivity, and activation of specific neural structures, differential receptor expression, and plasma levels of the OXT and AVP peptides. We hope that this effort will be helpful for understanding the studies performed so far, and for encouraging the inclusion of other candidate genes not explored to date. PMID:26858594

  19. Definitions of Disability in Social Sciences : Methodological Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Grönvik, Lars

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation examines how disability researchers define disability. It is based on four studies. The first describes different definitions of disability in disability research. The second study is a conceptual analysis of the use of disability in a sample of disability research classics. In this study, it is evident that use of the concept is all but clear. It is concluded that especially environmentally based disability definitions would benefit from further empirical investigations. Th...

  20. Gender in relation to work motivation, satisfaction and use of day center services among people with psychiatric disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Mona; Eklund, Lisa

    2017-05-01

    Day centres can prepare for open-market employment, and attendees' work motivation is key in this. Adopting a gender perspective, this study investigated (1) motivation for day centre attendance, satisfaction with the day centre services, number of hours spent there, and number and type of occupations performed; and (2) whether those factors were related with motivation for open-market employment. Women (n = 164) and men (n = 160) with psychiatric disabilities completed self-report questionnaires. There were no gender differences regarding satisfaction with the day centre services or number of hours spent there, but women engaged in more occupations. More women than men performed externally-oriented services and textile work, while men were in the majority in workshops. Externally oriented services, working in workshops, and low satisfaction with the day centre services were associated with higher motivation for employment. Women and men were equally motivated for employment. Women scored higher on motivation for attending the day centre, something that may deter transition into open-market employment. For men, less motivation for attending day centres may reduce their possibilities of gaining skills that can facilitate transitioning to open-market employment. Thus, the possibility for transitioning from day centre activities to open-market employment may be gendered.

  1. Social Interaction with Adults with Severe Intellectual Disability: Having Fun and Hanging Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Hilary; Douglas, Jacinta; Bigby, Christine; Iacono, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Background: Social interaction is integral to social inclusion. Little is known about the nature of social interaction between adults with severe intellectual disability and those with whom they engage. Method: Participants were six adults with intellectual disability and people identified as those with whom they shared demonstrable pleasurable…

  2. Perceived social acceptance, theory of mind and social adjustment in children with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiasse, Catherine; Nader-Grosbois, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Perceived social acceptance, theory of mind (ToM) and social adjustment were investigated in 45 children with intellectual disabilities (ID) compared with 45 typically developing (TD) preschoolers, matched for developmental age assessed by means of the Differential Scales of Intellectual Efficiency-Revised edition (EDEI-R, Perron-Borelli, 1996). Children's understanding of beliefs and emotions was assessed by means of ToM belief tasks (Nader-Grosbois & Thirion-Marissiaux, 2011) and ToM emotion tasks (Nader-Grosbois & Thirion-Marissiaux, 2011). Seven items from the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance for children (PSPCSA, Harter & Pike, 1980) assessed children's perceived social acceptance. Their teachers completed the Social Adjustment for Children Scale (EASE, Hughes, Soares-Boucaud, Hochmann, & Frith, 1997). For both groups together, the results showed that perceived social acceptance mediates the relation between ToM skills and social adjustment. The presence or absence of intellectual disabilities does not moderate the relations either between ToM skills and perceived social acceptance, or between perceived social acceptance and social adjustment. The study did not confirm the difference hypothesis of structural and relational patterns between these three processes in children with ID, but instead supported the hypothesis of a similar structure that develops in a delayed manner. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Should schools expect poor physical and mental health, social adjustment, and participation outcomes in students with disability?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vaz, Sharmila; Cordier, Reinie; Falkmer, Marita; Ciccarelli, Marina; Parsons, Richard; McAuliffe, Tomomi; Falkmer, Torbjorn

    2015-01-01

    The literature on whether students with disabilities have worse physical and mental health, social adjustment, and participation outcomes when compared to their peers without disabilities is largely inconclusive...

  4. Yearly Data for Asian & Pacific Islander Language Preferences of Social Security Disability Insurance Claimants (2016 Onwards)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This data set provides annual volumes for API language preferences at the national level of individuals filing claims for Disability insurance benefits from federal...

  5. From Social Exclusion to Supported Inclusion: Adults with Intellectual Disability Discuss Their Lived Experiences of a Structured Social Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J; Jaques, Hayden; Johnson, Amanda; Brotherton, Michelle L

    2017-09-01

    People with intellectual disability often have few friends and experience social exclusion. Recognising this gap, supported social groups with the aim of inclusion and interdependence were created by a supported employment provider. Interviews were undertaken with 10 adults with intellectual disability exploring their lived experiences of a supported social group. Data were analysed using descriptive phenomenology. Two themes emerged (i) supported engagement fosters wellbeing, and (ii) developing social belonging and connectedness. Participants not only acknowledged the support that they needed to participate, but also that the social group had changed their lives in many ways. Adults with intellectual disability want to socialise, have friends and be part of their community. For this to be achieved, they recognise the need to seek some form of support. With appropriate and targeted support, adults with intellectual disability can move from social exclusion towards supported inclusion and experience richer lives. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Social determinants of health, inequality and social inclusion among people with disabilities1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorati, Regina Celia; Elui, Valeria Meirelles Carril

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze the socio-familial and community inclusion and social participation of people with disabilities, as well as their inclusion in occupations in daily life. METHOD: qualitative study with data collected through open interviews concerning the participants' life histories and systematic observation. The sample was composed of ten individuals with acquired or congenital disabilities living in the region covered by a Family Health Center. The social conception of disability was the theoretical framework used. Data were analyzed according to an interpretative reconstructive approach based on Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action. RESULTS: the results show that the socio-familial and community inclusion of the study participants is conditioned to the social determinants of health and present high levels of social inequality expressed by difficult access to PHC and rehabilitation services, work and income, education, culture, transportation and social participation. CONCLUSION: there is a need to develop community-centered care programs in cooperation with PHC services aiming to cope with poverty and improve social inclusion. PMID:26039305

  7. [Aggregation of social deficits and psychiatric disorders in parents of children with autism: toward a temperamental link?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goussé, V; Galéra, C; Bouvard, M; Michel, G

    2011-04-01

    Autism is a group of neurodevelopmental disorders with heterogeneous phenotypic expression. Twin and family-based studies have demonstrated the importance of genetic factors in the etiology of these disorders. The pioneering work of Folstein and Rutter (1977), showing concordance - 82 % in non affected monozygotic twins and 10 % in non affected dizygotic twins - for cognitive deficits (mostly affecting language), has directed work towards family-based studies aiming at demonstrating the existence of a "broad autism phenotype" (BAP), corresponding to the extension of the "autistic" phenotype in the relatives of affected children (Bailey et al., 1998). This notion of a broad phenotype makes it possible to take into account abnormalities in one or more of the three domains of the syndrome: communication, socialization and restrained and obsessive interest in a succession of subjects, with qualitatively similar but quantitatively smaller difficulties observed in the relatives. We review here previous studies investigating the broad phenotype in the relatives of children with autism. We focus specifically on the hypothesis of a link between the aggregation of social deficits and of psychopathological problems, such problems being more frequently observed in these families than in families with other types of handicap (Abbeduto et al., 2004). Although the difficulties observed in these families may be partly explained by the stress of having to raise a heavily disabled child, genetic susceptibility factors may play a role in the occurrence of these problems in the families of autistic children. Constantino and Todd (2003) support the hypothesis that a single factor is transmitted in families - social reciprocity - and may be responsible for the overall dysfunction in the various domains of the syndrome in affected individuals. However, this susceptibility factor may be linked to other deficits observed in certain psychiatric disorders (e.g., attention deficit in ADHD

  8. Exploring Predictors of Social Actions by General Education Students towards Peers with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpareke, Alicia Wyche; Salisbury, Christine L.

    2018-01-01

    This study deepens the field's understanding about factors that contribute to positive social engagement between students without disabilities and their peers with mild disabilities in general education classrooms. A sample of 68 seventh grade students with and without disabilities was drawn from general education classrooms in a suburban, Midwest…

  9. Attitudes of College Students toward People with Disabilities in Various Social Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar, Azzahrah

    2013-01-01

    Individuals' feelings, beliefs and attitudes toward people with disabilities have an influence on their willingness to engage in the social relationship with people with disabilities such as forming friendship at the workplace or romantic relationship with people with disabilities. This study explored the attitudes of students toward people with…

  10. The Social Status of Children with Disabilities and Their Families as Determined by Census Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndik, A. O.; Vasin, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Russia's ratification of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) has necessitated that regular monitoring studies of the social situation of people with disabilities and families with disabled members be conducted. These studies have exacerbated the issue of obtaining accessible data that is suitable for these purposes.…

  11. Supporting the Social Lives of Secondary Students with Severe Disabilities: Considerations for Effective Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Erik W.

    2018-01-01

    For adolescents with severe disabilities, efforts to enhance the social dimensions of schooling are widely advocated, yet rarely implemented. The peer interactions and relationships so critical to school success and individual well-being can be elusive for many students with intellectual disability, autism, and multiple disabilities. This article…

  12. Head Start Impact on Social-Emotional Outcomes for Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyunghee; Calkins, Andrea; Shin, Tae Seob

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Using the Head Start Impact Study data, this study examines Head Start's impacts on social-emotional outcomes for children with disabilities. Method: Among 4,442 children, 570 children were reported to have disabilities. Ordinary least squares regression was used to determine whether the number of disabilities, having an individualized…

  13. Can the social model explain all of disability experience? Perspectives of persons with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Renee R

    2005-01-01

    The social model of disability has had a major influence on the academic field of disability studies and on contemporary understandings of the causes and experience of disability. The purpose of this study was to examine the adequacy of the social model for explaining the disability experience of persons with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). This qualitative study examined the experiences of 47 adults with CFS participating in a research project that aimed to evaluate a participant-designed rehabilitation program. Data were aggregated from focus group interviews, open-ended questionnaires, progress notes, and from a program evaluation questionnaire. Data analysis was based on a grounded theory approach and used triangulation of multiple data sources and member checks to assure dependability of findings. Four themes emerged from the analysis: (1) minimization and mistrust of the disability; (2) negative experiences of impairment; (3) lack of identification with the disability community; and (4) the focus on advocacy as a quest for legitimacy. These themes varied in the extent to which they conformed to the principles set forth by the social model. Although the social model has important contributions to lend to occupational therapy practice, it is important to recognize that it may not capture the full reality of disability. In particular, the social model has serious limitations in describing the disability experience of individuals with disabilities who do not have visibly obvious disabilities and whose impairments do not conform to the traditional viewpoint of disability.

  14. Factors associated with work, social life and family life disability in bipolar disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Rojas, Luis; Jurado, Dolores; Gurpegui, Manuel

    2011-04-30

    We analyzed the presence of work, social life and family life disability in 108 outpatients with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-IV) diagnosis of bipolar disorder and their association with previous course-of-illness variables and current psychopathology. Work disability was pragmatically defined as being on a disability pension or in the process of obtaining it; social life or family life disability was defined by a score ≥ 7 in the respective subscales of the Sheehan Disability Scale. At least one type of disability (for work, social life or family life) affected 52-54% of the patients; and two types, 37%. By logistic regression and multiple linear regression analyses we determined the variables independently associated with each type of disability: 1) Work disability was significantly associated with previous repeated manic episodes, three or more hospitalizations, with current depressive symptoms and inversely with the educational attainment. 2) Social life disability significantly increased with the number of hospitalizations and was associated with previous repeated depressive episodes and current depressive symptoms. In alternative models, nicotine dependence and lack of social support were significantly associated with work and social life disability respectively. And 3) family life disability significantly increased with number of hospitalizations, CAGE questionnaire score and age; and was associated with previous repeated manic episodes and current depressive symptoms. In conclusion, previous course-of-illness variables, particularly a high number of manic episodes, and current psychopathology - as indicated by the presence of nicotine dependence or depressive symptoms - may be indicators of disability; previous manic episodes appear to affect disability at work or at family life whereas previous depressive episodes seem to be related with social life disability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. From Social Exclusion to Supported Inclusion: Adults with Intellectual Disability Discuss Their Lived Experiences of a Structured Social Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J.; Jaques, Hayden; Johnson, Amanda; Brotherton, Michelle L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability often have few friends and experience social exclusion. Recognising this gap, supported social groups with the aim of inclusion and interdependence were created by a supported employment provider. Methods: Interviews were undertaken with 10 adults with intellectual disability exploring their lived…

  16. The Effects of Social Reforms on Mental Disability in China: Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenjie; Zhang, Lei; Li, Ning; Guo, Chao; Chen, Gong; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have explored how mental disabilities have changed with the waves of Chinese social reforms that occurred between 1912 and 2006. The present study evaluated population-based data from the Second China National Sample Survey on Disability to investigate these trends and their effects on mental disabilities. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the association between social reforms and mental disabilities. The confounding variables considered were as follows: survey age, gender, residence in 2006, ethnicity, and living arrangements in 2006. The highest risks of mental disabilities were observed in subjects born during the Mao Zedong era. Subjects who experienced social turbulence during their early development may have increased risks of mental disabilities in adulthood. The results and discussion herein contribute to our understanding of mental disabilities in China within the context of changing political, socioeconomic, and health system conditions and a developing mental health system. © 2016 APJPH.

  17. Living with a disability: a qualitative study of associations between social relations, social participation and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Louise Norman; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Svensson, Marie Kofod; Holstein, Bjørn Evald; Due, Pernille

    2018-01-22

    We explored which shared aspects of social relations were considered important to the quality of life of persons between the ages of 10 and 40 years living with a disability. We examined how social relations were experienced as affecting quality of life and social participation. Fifteen focus groups involving 48 persons with disabilities were conducted using photo elicitation, preference ranking and props. Focus group interviews were supplemented with seven individual interviews with individuals unable to participate in focus groups. All focus group interviews and individual interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and thematic data analysis was conducted. We identified caregiving, dependency, and understanding as essential for quality of life. Acceptance from society, discrimination and prejudice, and the ability to participate in society were also highlighted as affecting quality of life. The use of social tactics to avoid confrontation with certain aspects of their disability was common among participants. Across disabilities, caregiving, dependency, understanding and acceptance, and discrimination and prejudice were all important aspects for the quality of life of the individuals. Social relations were closely related to social participation, and the latter affected the quality of life of the participants. Social tactics were used to navigate social relations. Implications for rehabilitation We suggest to formalize the concept of social tactics and use it in patient education to enhance quality of life in individuals living with disabilities. People may accept and learn to cope with the impact of their disability, but how they maintain their social participation and social relations also impact on their quality of life. In their assessment, professionals working with individuals with disabilities should, therefore, give more priority to analyze the impact of social relations. When intervening, an effort to establish and maintain social relations should be

  18. An elective psychiatric course to reduce pharmacy students' social distance toward people with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipaula, Bethany A; Qian, Jingjing; Mehdizadegan, Niki; Simoni-Wastila, Linda

    2011-05-10

    To determine whether an elective course on mental health could reduce pharmacy students' social distance toward people with severe mental illness. Course activities included assigned readings, class discussions, student presentations, review of video and other media for examples of social distance, presentations by patients with mental illness, and visits to hospitalized patients in a variety of psychiatric settings. The Social Distance Scale (SDS) was administered at the beginning and end of the semester to students enrolled in the elective and to a comparator group of students not enrolled in the course. Pharmacy students who did not complete the elective had significantly higher SDS scores than students who completed the elective (18.7 vs. 15.6, p < 0.001). Students enrolled in the course had lower precourse SDS scores, were more likely than their peers to have a personal association with mental illness, and had a decrease in precourse to postcourse scores. A course designed to reduce stigma towards the mentally ill can reduce pharmacy students' social distance.

  19. Bullying among special education students with intellectual disabilities: differences in social adjustment and social skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Shunit; Lapidot-Lefler, Noam

    2007-06-01

    Harassment and bullying among 186 students with intellectual disabilities, ages 12 to 21 years, in special education schools were examined. The differences between bullies and victims in terms of social adjustment and social skills were investigated. No prototypes characterizing differences in social skills were found between the three subgroups: victim, bully, and victim-bully. However, bullies and victim-bullies exhibited significantly higher levels of challenging behaviors, such as temper tantrums, unruly and quarrelsome behavior, and a tendency to lie and steal. Significant correlations were also found among actions as a bully, violent behavior, and hyperactivity. Being a victim was correlated with emotional and interpersonal problems.

  20. Extracurricular activities and the development of social skills in children with intellectual and specific learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, B A; Floyd, F; Robins, D L; Chan, W Y

    2015-07-01

    Children with intellectual disability and specific learning disabilities often lack age-appropriate social skills, which disrupts their social functioning. Because of the limited effectiveness of classroom mainstreaming and social skills training for these children, it is important to explore alternative opportunities for social skill acquisition. Participation in social activities is positively related to children's social adjustment, but little is known about the benefits of activity participation for children with intellectual and specific learning disabilities. This study investigated the association between frequency and type of social activity participation and the social competence of 8-11-year-old children with intellectual disability (n = 40) and specific learning disabilities (n = 53), in comparison with typically developing peers (n = 24). More time involved in unstructured activities, but not structured activities, was associated with higher levels of social competence for all children. This association was strongest for children with intellectual disability, suggesting that participation in unstructured social activities was most beneficial for these children. Future research on the quality of involvement is necessary to further understand specific aspects of unstructured activities that might facilitate social development. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. The mental health of young people with disabilities: impact of social conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Anne; Emerson, Eric; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth

    2011-01-01

    Young people with disabilities have poorer mental health than their non-disabled peers. However, people with disabilities are more likely than others to experience financial hardship and low social support, both of which have been linked with poor mental health outcomes. This article explores the extent to which the relatively poor mental health of young people with disabilities is related to the social conditions in which they live. Secondary analysis was performed on Wave 6 (2006) of the survey of Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA). This nationally representative sample included 3,392 young Australians, aged 15-29, of whom 475 reported having a long-term health condition, impairment or disability. Young people with disabilities reported poorer mental health than their non-disabled peers. However, this relationship was moderated by both social adversity and social support, with minimal differences in mental health observed between the groups under conditions of high social support and low financial hardship. The results suggest that disability represents a potential adversity that may be exacerbated or ameliorated by the effects of wealth/financial hardship and social support. It may be possible to improve the mental health of disabled people by addressing their social exclusion.

  2. Becoming a client of the Danish social service system increases stress in parents of disabled infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graungaard, Anette Hauskov; Skov, Lotte; Andersen, John Sahl

    2011-01-01

    parents of a severely disabled young child during the first two years after the diagnosis of the child's disabilities. Data were analysed using grounded theory. RESULTS: We found that the encounter with the social services increased stress in the families. Parental expectations were not met, especially......INTRODUCTION: Parents of a young child with severe disabilities are facing a large range of new challenges; furthermore, most of these families have extended social needs regarding information, financial support, day care facilities, disability aids, etc. Many parents with disabled children have...... been found to be dissatisfied with social services. This study explores parents' experiences with Danish social services during their transition to a new daily life after the birth of a severely disabled child. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Repeated qualitative interviews were performed individually with 16...

  3. Support networks and people with physical disabilities: social inclusion and access to health services

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holanda, Cristina Marques de Almeida; De Andrade, Fabienne Louise Juvêncio Paes; Bezerra, Maria Aparecida; Nascimento, João Paulo da Silva; Neves, Robson da Fonseca; Alves, Simone Bezerra; Ribeiro, Kátia Suely Queiroz Silva

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to identify the formation of social support networks of people with physical disabilities, and how these networks can help facilitate access to health services and promote social inclusion...

  4. Leveraging Social Capital of Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities through Participation on Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpigelman, Carmit-Noa

    2018-01-01

    Participation in social networking sites has considerable potential to leverage the individual's social capital, including persons with intellectual disabilities, whose real-world social networks are fairly limited. This study aimed to understand how individuals with intellectual disabilities use Facebook to access social capital benefits, if at all. Qualitative interviews and observations were conducted with 20 adult Facebook users with intellectual disabilities. The online participation enhanced their bonding social capital as well as contributed to their psychological well-being through increasing their online visibility, popularity and sense of belonging. At the same time, they experienced stress and frustration due to usage difficulties, which prevented them from enhancing their bridging social capital. Participation in social networking sites may also leverage bridging social capital of persons with intellectual disabilities, but they need a more accessible platform and ongoing support to ensure safe and fruitful participation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The impact of Disability Studies curriculum on education professionals' perspectives and practice: Implications for education, social justice, and social change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Pearson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As a field, Disability Studies has gained ground in the past few decades by highlighting alternative ways of thinking about disability as a social, cultural, and political phenomenon. As more education professionals pursue advanced degrees with a Disability Studies framework, there is a need to understand how, if at all, Disability Studies influences their perspectives and practices. This study employed semi-structured interviews with nine doctoral students enrolled in a Doctorate of Philosophy in Education program that used the framework of Disability Studies, who are also practicing education professionals, to explore how gaining knowledge about Disability Studies impacted their daily work in the field of education. Through their experiences, they indicated that Disability Studies has transformed their conceptualization of disability, their practices, and themselves.

  6. [Everything OK?! Introduction of quality management in the social psychiatric service in Berlin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagel, D E; Rottig, M

    2011-02-01

    With the help of a structured quality report (SQR) the first assessment on the quality of task fulfillment in the 12 social psychiatric services (SPS) in Berlin was carried out. 102 standardised questions in 10 dimensions were posed. The results show that in the important dimensions which depict the core tasks of the SPS, in general a good quality was documented. At the same time deficiencies and deficits were mentioned (e. g., lack of check-lists, poor cooperation with the clinics, inadequate supervision). For the further development of SQR an adaptation to the Berlin situation as well as progress documentation in the individual SPS will be of major importance. Furthermore, a modification for other services in the public health-care system such as, e. g., child and adolescent health care should be considered. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. The psychological influences on participation in Wheelchair Rugby: a social relational model of disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Haslett

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sport and exercise psychology research in disability sport seldom engages with social models of disability. As a result, the socio-historical landscape of disability is underrepresented in sport psychology research. The aim of this study is to interpret influences on participation in disability sport through the conceptual lens of the social relational model (SRM of disability (Thomas, 1999, 2004, 2007. Ten Irish adult male athletes with physical disabilities participated in semi-structured interviews exploring the barriers and facilitators that influence participation in Wheelchair Rugby. Deductive thematic analysis produced four themes influenced by the social relational model: impairment effects; societal attitudes and discourse; opportunities and access; and psychological well-being. Links were made to the experience of embodied impairment, classification, oppression, inequality, media, independence, and self-efficacy. The analysis illustrates how cultural constructions of disability are inextricably linked to individual influences on participation in Wheelchair Rugby. The results indicate that in disability sport participation, the experience of social oppression, inequality and cultural stereotypes of disability can be synonymous with the personal experience of physical impairment. The implication of this research is that there is a value in sport and exercise psychology practitioners utilising the social relational model as a tool to conceptualise the lived experience of physical disability.

  8. Defining social inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities: an ecological model of social networks and community participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simplican, Stacy Clifford; Leader, Geraldine; Kosciulek, John; Leahy, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Social inclusion is an important goal for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, families, service providers, and policymakers; however, the concept of social inclusion remains unclear, largely due to multiple and conflicting definitions in research and policy. We define social inclusion as the interaction between two major life domains: interpersonal relationships and community participation. We then propose an ecological model of social inclusion that includes individual, interpersonal, organizational, community, and socio-political factors. We identify four areas of research that our ecological model of social inclusion can move forward: (1) organizational implementation of social inclusion; (2) social inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities living with their families, (3) social inclusion of people along a broader spectrum of disability, and (4) the potential role of self-advocacy organizations in promoting social inclusion. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. The Social Inclusion of People with Disabilities: A Qualitative Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sarah A.

    2009-01-01

    Though social inclusion is essential to enhancing a person's quality of life, people with disabilities continue to face many barriers. The purpose of this qualitative meta-analysis was to describe the elements and experiences of social inclusion for people with disabilities. The study analyzed data from 15 primary research reports through thematic…

  10. Social and Emotional Learning for Children with Learning Disability: Implications for Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavioni, Valeria; Grazzani, Ilaria; Ornaghi, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the key role of social and emotional learning programmes for children with Learning Disability (LD). The first part of the paper discusses the difficulties students with learning disability may encounter in their education, such as issues related to peer group acceptance, friendship and social isolation, low self-efficacy and…

  11. Social Shyness among Mothers of Children with Disabilities Based on Some Variables in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allala, Saeb; Alzubairi, Sharefa

    2016-01-01

    The current study is an attempt to identify social shyness among mothers of children with disabilities based on (Disability type, mother's academic qualification, and family's economic level) in Riyadh. Thus, Social Shyness Scale was prepared of (28) paragraphs according to five-point Likert Scale. The reliability coefficient of the scale rated…

  12. Talking (and Not Talking) about Race, Social Class and Dis/Ability: Working Margin to Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Beth A.; Connor, David J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we examine some of the omnipresent yet unacknowledged discourses of social and economic disadvantage and dis/ability within schools in the US. First, we document ways that social class, race, and dis/ability function within schools to further disadvantage and exclude already marginalized students. Next, we show how particular ways…

  13. The Social Experience of Early Childhood for Children with Learning Disabilities: Inclusion, Competence and Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nind, Melanie; Flewitt, Rosie; Payler, Jane

    2010-01-01

    This paper tells of the social experiences of three four-year-old children with learning disabilities as they negotiate their daily lives in their homes and early education settings in England. We apply a social model of childhood disability to the relatively unexplored territory of young children and use vignettes drawn from video observation to…

  14. Parents of Children with Asperger Syndrome or with Learning Disabilities: Family Environment and Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Tali; Berger, Ornit

    2008-01-01

    The study examined the family environment and perceived social support of 33 parents with a child diagnosed with Asperger syndrome and 43 parents with a child with learning disability, which were compared to 45 parents of children without disabilities as a control group. Parents completed the Family Environment Scale and Social Support Scale…

  15. Efficacy and Social Validity of Peer Network Interventions for High School Students with Severe Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, Jennifer M.; Carter, Erik W.; Moss, Colleen K.; Biggs, Elizabeth E.; Bolt, Daniel M.; Born, Tiffany L.; Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Brock, Matthew E.; Cattey, Gillian N.; Cooney, Molly; Fesperman, Ethan S.; Hochman, Julia M.; Huber, Heartley B.; Lequia, Jenna L.; Lyons, Gregory L.; Vincent, Lori B.; Weir, Katie

    2017-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial examined the efficacy of peer network interventions to improve the social connections of 47 high school students with severe disabilities. School staff invited, trained, and supported 192 peers without disabilities to participate in individualized social groups that met throughout one semester. Compared to…

  16. Participation in programs designed to improve employment outcomes for persons with psychiatric disabilities: evidence from the New York WORKS demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Quintanilla, S Antonio; Weathers, Robert R; Melburg, Valerie; Campbell, Kimberly; Madi, Nawaf

    The New York WORKS demonstration project was designed to improve employment outcomes for persons with psychiatric disabilities receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability payments. This article shows how the individual characteristics of participants were related to outcomes at each stage of the multistage recruitment process used in the project and how those characteristics contributed to enrollment. The findings are important to program administrators who are interested in ensuring that SSI recipients receive equal access to employment-related services and who want to improve recruitment strategies for future demonstration projects. The New York WORKS recruitment process used administrative records from the Social Security Administration (SSA) to identify the population of over 68,000 SSI recipients with a diagnosis of a psychiatric disability in Erie County and New York City. Staff involved in the project documented the results of each stage of the recruitment process. The New York WORKS project included four stages: (1) the provision of information (sending a letter and information packet); (2) demonstrated awareness of the project (response to a letter containing an overview of the project); (3) expression of interest (indication of interest in the project, using a postmarked form returned to New York WORKS project staff); and (4) participation (actual enrollment in the program). The project staff members were also able to identify data from administrative records that described the characteristics of the population, including age, sex, type of psychiatric diagnosis, the number of months that the person collected benefits before the recruitment process, employment experience before the recruitment process, and annual earnings in the year before the recruitment process. The data on outcomes at each stage of the recruitment process and the characteristics of SSI recipients were analyzed using an empirical method recently suggested by Heckman and

  17. Benefits and barriers to physical activity for individuals with disabilities: a social-relational model of disability perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey J

    2013-01-01

    To provide a qualitative overview of selected research on physical activity (PA) engagement by people with physical disabilities (1) from a social relational model perspective. Selected articles that exemplify some of the paradoxes, nuances, contrasting perspectives and complexities of the knowledge base in this area are discussed within a disability studies framework. PA is arguably more important for people with disabilities relative to people without disabilities although they are quite inactive. Individuals who are physically activity enjoy a range of benefits spanning physiological, emotional, cognitive and social categories. Unfortunately many people cannot enjoy the benefits of PA because of the many medical, psychological, social and environmental barriers they face making PA quite difficult. Rehabilitation professionals can provide a better standard of care to clients if they are aware of the benefits and barriers of PA. Rehabilitation professionals should understand behavior change strategies and their application to people with disabilities in order to help their clients initiate and maintain physical activity (PA). Rehabilitation professionals should be aware of how they might convey low PA expectations to their clients and simultaneously understand the unique challenges faced by their clients in attempting to incorporate PA into their lives on a regular basis. Rehabilitation professionals should be familiar with local disability friendly exercise facilities and adapted sport programs in order to steer their clients towards such opportunities.

  18. Discourse in Action: Parents' use of medical and social models to resist disability stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manago, Bianca; Davis, Jenny L; Goar, Carla

    2017-07-01

    For parents of children with disabilities, stigmatization is part of everyday life. To resist the negative social and emotional consequences of stigma, parents both challenge and deflect social devaluations. Challenges work to upend the stigmatizing structure, while deflections maintain the interaction order. We examine how parents of children with disabilities deploy deflections and challenges, and how their stigma resistance strategies combine with available models of disability discourse. Disability discourse falls into two broad categories: medical and social. The medical model emphasizes diagnostic labels and treats impairment as an individual deficit, while the social model centralizes unaccommodating social structures. The social model's activist underpinnings make it a logical frame for parents to use as they challenge disability stigma. In turn, the medical model's focus on individual "improvement" seems to most closely align with stigma deflections. However, the relationship between stigma resistance strategies and models of disability is an empirical question not yet addressed in the literature. In this study, we examine 117 instances of stigmatization from 40 interviews with 43 parents, and document how parents respond. We find that challenges and deflections do not map cleanly onto the social or medical models. Rather, parents invoke medical and social meanings in ways that serve diverse ends, sometimes centralizing a medical label to challenge stigma, and sometimes recognizing disabling social structures, but deflecting stigma nonetheless. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The impact on social capital of mobility disability and weight status: the Stockholm Public Health Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrbäck, Mattias; de Munter, Jeroen; Tynelius, Per; Ahlström, Gerd; Rasmussen, Finn

    2015-04-01

    People with mobility disability are more often overweight or obese and have lower social capital than people without mobility disability. It is unclear whether having a combination of mobility disability and overweight or obesity furthers negative development of social capital over time. To explore whether there were differences in social capital between normal-weight, overweight and obese people with or without mobility disability over a period of 8 years. We included 14,481 individuals (18-64 at baseline) from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort that started in 2002. Mobility disability, weight status, and social capital (structural: social activities, voting; cognitive: trust in authorities, and trust in people) were identified from self-reports. Risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals were estimated in multivariate longitudinal regression analyses. We found no significant differences in social activities and voting between the groups over time. However, when compared with the reference group, the groups with mobility disability had less trust in authorities and public institutions over time. Notably, obese people with mobility disability showed the largest decrease in trust in the police (RR = 2.29; 1.50-3.50), the parliament (RR = 2.00; 1.31-3.05), and local politicians (RR = 2.52; 1.61-3.94). People with mobility disability experience lower cognitive social capital over time than people without mobility disability. Being burdened by both mobility disability and obesity may be worse in terms of social capital than having just one of the conditions, especially regarding cognitive social capital. This finding is of public health importance, since social capital is related to health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Social-ecological influences on interpersonal support in people with physical disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Paul G; Bullock, Charles C; Gibb, Zebbedia G; Himler, Heidi

    2015-10-01

    People with physical disability report lower amounts of emotional and informational social support compared with other populations but it is unclear how influences at the broader societal level impact support in this population. To address this question, Berkman and Glass's social-ecological model was used to examine the influence of upstream factors on interpersonal support in people with physical disability. It was predicted that these factors would influence support even after controlling for the traditional measures linked to social support. 331 adult participants with physical disability (43% female; mean age = 42.7; 88% White) completed an online cross-sectional survey measuring types and sources of social support, social integration, disability impact in social domains, environmental barriers, and relevant psychosocial variables such as depression. A hierarchical linear regression analysis showed that level of disability, perceived tangible support, social integration, depressive symptoms, environmental barriers, occupational independence, and having family or friends as primary support sources were significantly associated with perceived support at the final step (R(2) = .60, F(22, 255) = 17.68, p social-ecological measures, environmental barriers and social integration, had the largest associations with interpersonal support. Results demonstrate the importance of measuring distinct support constructs and how the broader social environment may matter more in interpersonal support perceptions for people with disability than typical measures studied in the literature. Improving environmental factors will help improve social support. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prediction of changes in self-stigma among veterans participating in partial psychiatric hospitalization: The role of disability status and military cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J Irene; Farchmin, Leah; Stull, Laura; Boyd, Jennifer; Schumacher, Marianne; Drapalski, Amy L

    2015-06-01

    Interventions addressing internalized stigma are a new area of research, and it is important to identify the types of clientele who derive benefit from existing interventions. Information was provided by 235 veterans attending a partial psychiatric hospitalization program, regarding their levels of internalized stigma on admission and discharge from a 3-week program that included interventions targeting internalized stigma. Upon discharge, veterans receiving disability benefits demonstrated less reduction in internalized stigma than those not receiving disability benefits. Time of service moderated the relationship between disability status and change in internalized stigma, such that veterans serving in the more recent Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND) cohort who received disability benefits had a more difficult time resolving internalized stigma. Further analyses suggested that OEF/OIF/OND cohort veterans receiving disability benefits have more difficulty developing effective stigma resistance, and more difficulty resolving stigma-related alienation, than other veterans. Based on this research, particular attention should be devoted to internalized stigma among OEF/OIF/OND veterans. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. From neural signatures of emotional modulation to social cognition: individual differences in healthy volunteers and psychiatric participants

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez, Agustín; Aguado, Jaume; Baez, Sandra; Huepe, David; Lopez, Vladimir; Ortega, Rodrigo; Sigman, Mariano; Mikulan, Ezequiel; Lischinsky, Alicia; Torrente, Fernando; Cetkovich, Marcelo; Torralva, Teresa; Bekinschtein, Tristan; Manes, Facundo

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that early emotional signals provide relevant information for social cognition tasks. The goal of this study was to test the association between (a) cortical markers of face emotional processing and (b) social-cognitive measures, and also to build a model which can predict this association (a and b) in healthy volunteers as well as in different groups of psychiatric patients. Thus, we investigated the early cortical processing of emotional stimuli (N170, using a face an...

  3. Somatization Increases Disability Independent of Comorbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orav, E. John; Bates, David W.; Barsky, Arthur J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Somatoform disorders are an important factor in functional disability and role impairment, though their independent contribution to disability has been unclear because of prevalent medical and psychiatric comorbidity. Objectives To assess the extent of the overlap of somatization with other psychiatric disorders and medical problems, to compare the functional disability and role impairment of somatizing and non-somatizing patients, and to determine the independent contribution of somatization to functional disability and role impairment. Design Patients were surveyed with self-report questionnaires assessing somatization, psychiatric disorder, and role impairment. Medical morbidity was indexed with a computerized medical record audit. Participants Consecutive adults making scheduled visits to their primary care physicians at two hospital-affiliated primary care practices on randomly chosen days. Measurements Intermediate activities of daily living, social activities, and occupational disability. Results Patients with somatization, as well as those with serious medical and psychiatric illnesses, had significantly more impairment of activities of daily life and social activities. When these predictors were considered simultaneously in a multivariable regression, the association with somatization remained highly significant and was comparable to or greater than many major medical conditions. Conclusions Patients with somatization had substantially greater functional disability and role impairment than non-somatizing patients. The degree of disability was equal to or greater than that associated with many major, chronic medical disorders. Adjusting the results for psychiatric and medical co-morbidity had little effect on these findings. PMID:19031038

  4. [Validation of the QFS measuring the frequency and satisfaction in social behaviours in psychiatric adult population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, A; Weber Rouget, B; Gex-Fabry, M; Maercker, A; Guimon, J

    2006-01-01

    Although everyone working in routine mental health services recognizes the scientific and ethical importance to ensure that treatments being provided are of highest quality, there is a clear lack of consensus regarding what outcome domains to include, what measure of assessment to use and, moreover, who to question when assessing. Since the fifties, social functioning is considered as an important dimension to take into account for treatment planning and outcome measuring. But for many years, symptoms scales have been considered as sufficient outcome measures and social functioning improvement expected on the basis of symptoms alleviation. As symptoms and social adjustment sometimes appear relatively independent, no accurate conclusion concerning the patient's social functioning can so be driven on the basis of his clinical symptoms. More attention has then been directed toward the development of instruments specifically intended to measure the extent and nature of social functioning impairments observed in most psychiatric syndromes. Many of these instruments are designed to be completed by caregivers or remain time consuming and difficult to use routinely. Presently, in clinical practice, there is a need to rely on simple and brief instruments considering patients'perspective about their social adjustment as a function of time. The aim of this study is to present a new instrument, the QFS, initially developed in order to assess social functioning in patients involved in group psychotherapy programs conducted in a specialist mental health setting, as well as its psychometric characteristics. It was designed to be completed in less than 10 minutes and the questions are phrased in a simple and redundant way, in order to limit problems inherent to illiteracy or language comprehension. The QFS is a 16 items self-report instrument that assesses both the frequency of (8 items) and the satisfaction with (8 items) various social behaviours adopted during the 2 weeks

  5. An end to psychiatric detention? Implications of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brendan D

    2014-03-01

    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is a welcome articulation of the rights of the disabled. However, as its definition of disability appears to include mental illness, the UK appears to violate it by linking mental illness with detention. Clarity and, possibly, change are needed.

  6. Examining More Inclusive Approaches to Social Work, Physical Disability, and Sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattari, Shanna K; Turner, George

    2017-01-01

    People with disabilities often experience the idea that those with disabilities are not, or should not be, sexual beings. This article examines how people with physical disabilities define sexual activity, their levels of sexual satisfaction, group differences in how people define different acts as sexual activities, and the differences in levels of sexual satisfaction. Additionally, this study (N = 450) looks at the correlations between levels of independence in multiple contexts. Levels of independence are also assessed in relationship to severity of disability and sexual satisfaction. Implications for social work and social service practice, education, and policy are discussed.

  7. Perceptions of Social Support among Male and Female Students with Specific Learning Disabilities and in General Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Jennifer Short

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has recognized the significant relationship between perceived social support and resiliency in children and adolescents without disabilities, but less is known about the perceptions of social support among youth with disabilities. Available research suggests that students with disabilities report lower levels of social support…

  8. 42 CFR 406.12 - Individual under age 65 who is entitled to social security or railroad retirement disability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... is entitled to social security or railroad retirement disability benefits. (a) Basic requirements. An...) Entitled or deemed entitled to social security disability benefits as an insured individual, child, widow... 202(g) of the Social Security Act cannot at the same time be entitled to disabled widow's benefits...

  9. Narcissism at the crossroads: phenotypic description of pathological narcissism across clinical theory, social/personality psychology, and psychiatric diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Nicole M; Pincus, Aaron L; Ansell, Emily B

    2008-04-01

    This review documents two themes of emphasis found in phenotypic descriptions of pathological narcissism across clinical theory, social/personality psychology, and psychiatric diagnosis. Clinical theories of narcissism spanning 35 years consistently describe variations in the expression of pathological narcissism that emphasize either grandiosity or vulnerable affects and self-states. Recent research in social/personality psychology examining the structure of narcissistic personality traits consistently finds two broad factors representing Grandiosity-Exhibitionism and Vulnerability-Sensitivity-Depletion respectively. However, the majority of psychiatric criteria for narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) emphasize expressions of grandiosity. By placing most of the diagnostic emphasis on overt grandiosity, DSM NPD has been limited by poor discriminant validity, modest levels of temporal stability, and the lowest prevalence rate on Axis II. Despite converging support for two phenotypic themes associated with pathological narcissism, psychiatric diagnosis and social/personality psychology research often focus only on grandiosity in the assessment of narcissism. In contrast, clinical theory struggles with a proliferation of labels describing these broad phenotypic variations. We conclude that the construct of pathological narcissism is at a crossroads and provide recommendations for diagnostic assessment, clinical conceptualization, and future research that could lead to a more integrated understanding of narcissistic personality and narcissistic personality pathology.

  10. Social Frailty and Functional Disability: Findings From the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Nigel; Gao, Qi; Nyunt, Ma Shwe Zin; Wee, Shiou Liang; Ng, Tze-Pin

    2017-07-01

    To examine the association between the social frailty (SF) phenotype and functional disability, independently of the physical frailty (PF) phenotype, and compare the abilities of the PF, SF, and combined social and physical (PSF) indexes for predicting functional disability. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of a population-based cohort (Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Study, SLAS-1) of 2406 community-dwelling older adults with 3 years of follow-up (N = 1254 and N = 1557 for instrumental activity of daily living (IADL) disability and severe disability (≥3 basic ADL) respectively). Seven-item social frailty index (living arrangements, education, socioeconomic status, and social network and support, 0 = nil SF, 1 = low, 2-7 = high), PF phenotype (Fried criteria), and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) disability and severe disability (≥3 basic ADLs). Compared to nil SF, low and high SF were significantly associated with 1.3 to 2.4 fold increased prevalence and incidence of IADL disability, and 6.3 fold increase in severe disability. Frail individuals with and without SF stood out with 5-11 fold increased prevalence and incidence of IADL disability and 21-25 fold increased prevalence and incidence of severe disability, compared to robust individuals without SF. A combined PSF index more accurately identified individuals with increased risk of functional disability (ROC = 64%) and severe disability (ROC = 81%) than either the SF or the PF indexes alone (55% to 68%). The SF index alone or in combination with the PF index has clinical relevance and utility for identifying and stratifying older people at risk of disability. The mental frailty construct is closely related to SF and should be further investigated in future studies. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Paralympic Movement: using sports to promote health, disability rights, and social integration for athletes with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blauwet, Cheri; Willick, Stuart E

    2012-11-01

    Competitive sports for people with disabilities has grown rapidly over the past several decades, and opportunities for participation are increasingly available throughout the spectrum from developmental to elite. The Paralympic Games, seen as the pinnacle sporting event that represents the broader Paralympic Movement, has provided a platform to showcase the abilities of people with disabilities while also serving as a catalyst for disability rights through ensuring integration, equality of opportunity, and accessibility of the built environment. Concurrently, media coverage of the Paralympic Games has led to an increased awareness of opportunities for sport participation for individuals with disabilities and, with it, the adjustment of norms regarding expectations for exercise as a component of preventive health. In addition, there is evidence of the power of sports to stimulate confidence, self-efficacy, and a self-perceived high quality of life for individuals with disabilities above and beyond the basic benefits to cardiometabolic fitness. When taken together, the promotion of health, disability rights, and social integration through sports has the power to transform the lives of those who participate and to further stimulate the expansion of opportunities available to the next generation of athletes with disabilities. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stigma and restriction on the social life of families of children with intellectual disabilities in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Hong; Shin, Jin Y; Nhan, Nguyen Viet; Yang, Lawrence H

    2012-07-01

    Intellectual disabilities are as prevalent in East Asian countries as in the West (0.06%-1.3%). Widespread discrimination against intellectual disabilities in Asia may initiate stigma that places unfair restrictions on the social life of these individuals and their caregivers. We utilised established stigma frameworks to assess the extent to which a child's intellectual disability contributes to the social exclusion of caregivers in Vietnam. A mixed quantitative and qualitative approach was employed to examine the experience of social life restriction among parents of children with intellectual disabilities. The child's disability level and restrictions on caregivers' social experiences were assessed among 70 mothers and fathers recruited from schools in Hue City, Vietnam. Qualitative responses describing social exclusion were also recorded. Caregivers reported elevated levels of social exclusion. As hypothesised, parents of children with greater intellectual disability experienced more restrictions on their social life (Beta = 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.27-1.30, standard error = 0.26, p stigma, which in turn restricts key social interactions among caregivers. Psycho-educational interventions may address the social domains in which caregivers are impacted and encourage sustained help-seeking among caregivers for their children.

  13. [Our social dilemma: prison or psychiatric hospital? Is the Penrose thesis valid for Hungary at the turn of the millennium?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapos, Miklós Péter

    2007-10-07

    According to the Penrose's law, outlined on the basis of a comparative study of European statistics, there is an inverse relationship between the number of psychiatric beds and prison population in a given country. The paper examines the relationship between the number of psychiatric beds and prison population in Hungary in the period of 1990 and 2005. Data are taken from the databases of the Central Bureau of Statistics. To analyze the relationships among the data, mathematical statistical methods are applied. An inverse relationship between the number of psychiatric beds and prison population is seen in Hungary, too. The number of involuntarily treated patients has risen in parallel with the increase of the prison population and has shown an inverse relationship with the number of psychiatric beds. Both the prison and the treatment in a psychiatric department are presented for the public as applicable segregation techniques in order to give a response to a social phenomenon. On the basis of data, it can be assumed that the members of pretty much the same population are confined to both systems. To get to the core of essential relationships of the phenomenon, a nationwide examination seems to be necessary.

  14. [Socialization of athletes with disabilities in adapted physical activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsoniene, Laimute; Adomaitiene, Rūta; Kriviciūte, Jurga; Jankauskiene, Konstancija; Jurkstiene, Vilma; Kevelaitis, Egidijus

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of the impairment of the body functions on the participation of people with disabilities in sports activities. The study was carried out in the institutions mostly attended by people with severe physical disabilities. The participants took a modified Kenny test and answered the questions of a questionnaire. The study sample consisted of 35 persons with severe physical disabilities. The findings of this study showed that people with disabilities who were not engaged in sports were of much worse opinion about their health condition (P=0.02) and they needed more help from family or friends (P=0.035) compared to the disabled who were not engaged in sports, but in the group of people with disabilities who were engaged in sports, the correlations of those indicators were statistically significant (r=0.59 and r=0.68, respectively). The main motivation of sports participation of people with disabilities (about 80%) was the need for communication and gaining independence. Health improvement was mentioned by less than half of people with disabilities (about 41%) engaged in sports. The syndrome of movement function impairment, duration of impairment, marital status, the age of persons with disabilities, and objectively determined impairment of biosocial self-service functions did not impact sports participation of people with disabilities. However, subjective sensation of pain and the need of medical aid, which did not match the objective functional impairments, could be the obstacle for people with disabilities to participate in sports.

  15. Strategies for improving disability awareness and social inclusion of children and young people with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, S; McPherson, A C

    2012-11-01

    Children and youth with disabilities are at a higher risk of being socially excluded or bullied while at school compared with their typically developing peers. This study explored disabled children's suggestions for improving social inclusion. Fifteen children with cerebral palsy were interviewed or took part in a group discussion about social inclusion and bullying. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The children and youth described several strategies to help improve social inclusion at school including: (1) disclosure of condition and creating awareness of disability; (2) awareness of bullying; (3) developing a peer support network and building self-confidence; and (4) suggestions on what teachers can do. It is recommended that children's suggestions be considered within the classroom context to enhance the social inclusion and participation of children with disabilities. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. [10 theses of the disabled persons' organizations - why participation research with a social perspective is needed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, T

    2012-12-01

    The 5 professional associations for the disabled and the self-help organisations of disabled people state that in Germany a general concept for "participation research" is needed. This concept should address expectations and processes in developing aid services and improve self-determined participation of people with disabilities according to the human rights postulated in the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities (2006). A concept of "participation research" will go beyond the objectives and methods of i. e., disability studies - it is a focus in the context of which the social and equal participation of the disabled (especially those with multiple and/or intellectual handicaps) has to be addressed. In this context the 5 professional associations for the disabled have drafted 10 theses which are presented in the following article. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Social Distance and Community Attitudes Towards People with Psycho-Social Disabilities in Uttarakhand, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, K; Kermode, M; Goicolea, I; Seefeldt, L; Shidhaye, R; San Sebastian, M

    2017-11-15

    Stigma is an important contributor to the large treatment gap for people with mental and psycho-social disabilities (PPSD) in India. Social distance as assessed by willingness to engage in relationships with PPSD is a proxy measure of stigma and potential discrimination. In North India, investigations of community attitudes towards PPSD have been limited. To describe attitudes towards people with depression and psychosis, a community sample of 960 adults in Dehradun district, India from 30 randomised clusters, was surveyed using a validated tool to assess social distance, beliefs and attitudes related to mental illness. Participants preferred greater social distance from a person with psychosis than a person with depression. Beliefs and attitudes around mental illness were diverse reflecting a wide spread of belief frameworks. After controlling for confounding, there was increased social distance among people who believed PPSD were dangerous. Factors that reduced social distance included familiarity with PPSD, and belief that PPSD can recover. Attitudes to PPSD, stigma and social distance are complex and likely to require complex responses that include promoting awareness of mental health and illness, direct contact with PPSD and increasing access to care for PPSD.

  18. A peer-mediated social network intervention to enhance the social integration of persons with moderate and severe disabilities.

    OpenAIRE

    Haring, T G; Breen, C G

    1992-01-01

    Increasingly, parents, teachers, and students with disabilities are advocating for interventions that go beyond skill training to provide support for participation in integrated environments and support for friendships. The present research demonstrated a social network intervention for youths with moderate and severe disabilities. Two groups of nondisabled peers were recruited to participate in weekly discussions with an adult integration facilitator to increase opportunities for social inte...

  19. The Social Model in the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGUSTINA PALACIOS

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Any analysis to be performed regarding disabilities requires a philosophical, sociological and regulatory framework. This paper takes as a starting point a philosophical framework which arises from those values and principles on which human rights are grounded. The sociological framework is built through the social model of disability, and the regulatory framework is provided by the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

  20. Access to Higher Education for Disabled Students in South Africa: A Contradictory Conjuncture of Benevolence, Rights and the Social Model of Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matshedisho, Knowledge Rajohane

    2007-01-01

    The structures of support services for disabled students in the South African higher education system find themselves in a contradictory conjuncture of rights, benevolence and the social model of disability. To elucidate this argument, this paper (a) outlines the status of support provisions for disabled students in South Africa; (b) compares the…

  1. Development of the ITHACA Toolkit for monitoring human rights and general health care in psychiatric and social care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, J; Thornicroft, G; Burti, L; Katschnig, H; Lewis, O; Russo, J; Shaw, T; Wahlbeck, K; Rose, D

    2013-09-01

    Background. Human rights violations are commonly experienced by people in psychiatric and social care institutions. States and private organizations providing such health and social services must comply with international human rights law. Monitoring of such compliance is increasingly recognized as a vital component in ensuring that rights are respected and violations are brought out in the open, remedied and prevented. Aims. The Institutional Treatment, Human Rights and Care Assessment (ITHACA) project produced a method to document violations and good practice with the aim of preventing human rights violations and improving general health care practice in psychiatric and social care institutions (www.ithacastudy.eu). Methods. A methodological and implementation study conducted across 15 European countries developed and assessed the ITHACA Toolkit in monitoring visits to 87 mental health organizations. Results. The toolkit is available in 13 European languages and has demonstrated applicability in a range of contexts and conditions. The information gathered through monitoring visits can document both good practice and areas for improvement. Conclusions. The ITHACA Toolkit is an acceptable and feasible method for the systematic monitoring of human rights and general health care in psychiatric and social care institutions that explicitly calls for the participation of service users in the monitoring of human rights violations and general health care practice.

  2. Loaded Pistols: The Interplay of Social Intervention and Anti-Aesthetic Tradition in Learning Disabled Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Dave

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the aesthetics of applied performance with people with learning disabilities. Focusing on the integrated punk band Heavy Load, it explores how the aesthetic structure reconstructs notions of learning disability and intervenes in its social experience. It argues that this is facilitated through the punk form which positions…

  3. Hybridising Sport Education and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility to Include Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Jose Ignacio; Fernandez-Rio, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the impact of the combination of two pedagogical models, Sport Education and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility, for learners with disabilities experiencing a contactless kickboxing learning unit. Twelve secondary education students agreed to participate. Five had disabilities (intellectual and…

  4. Increasing Understanding and Social Acceptance of Individuals with Disabilities through Exploration of Comics Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Ewa; Rieger, Alicja

    2016-01-01

    Research supports the inclusion of children with disabilities in general education classrooms as a way to boost academic and social development, not only for children with disabilities, but also for typically developing children. A wide variety of perspectives and abilities in the classroom builds empathy, understanding, and creativity--all…

  5. Disability Studies and Inclusive Teacher Preparation: A Socially Just Path for Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the benefits and challenges of operating an inclusive elementary and special education teacher preparation program within a disability studies framework. How does such a program balance issues of theory and practice? How does it provide students with a critical approach that essentially views disability as a social and…

  6. The Meaning of Social Inclusion for People with Disabilities in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Mee; Shin, Yu Ri; Yu, Dong Chul; Kim, Dong Ki

    2017-01-01

    This study sets out to examine and understand the meaning of social inclusion for people with disabilities, as constructed by people with disabilities themselves. Focus group interviews with 34 people who have physical impairments, cerebral palsy, or hearing or visual impairments were conducted for the study. Using the data obtained from these…

  7. Walking the Walk: Modeling Social Model and Universal Design in the Disabilities Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Melanie; Downs, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Making the shift from the medical model of disability to the social model requires postsecondary disabilities offices to carefully examine and revise policies and procedures to reflect this paradigm shift, which gives them the credibility to work toward such change on the campus level. The process followed by one university is covered in-depth, as…

  8. Beyond the Far Too Incessant Schism: Special Education and the Social Model of Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Deborah J.; Connor, David J.; Ferri, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    Special education critics' vigorous appraisals of the social model of disability, along with their analysis of its implications for special education, provide a valuable forum for meaningful dialogue about how educators are to understand the nature of disability. In this article, we offer our response to their recent articles. As advocates of the…

  9. Social and Self-Perceptions of Adolescents Identified as Gifted, Learning Disabled, and Twice-Exceptional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Carolyn; Mueller, Conrad T.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the social and self-perceptions of twice-exceptional "students", those students who meet criteria for being identified as both gifted and learning disabled. In particular, we focus on how twice-exceptional students are similar to, or different from, students with only a learning disability or who…

  10. Social Anxiety among Arab Adolescents with and without Learning Disabilities in Various Educational Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Ora

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to examine differences in social anxiety between learning disabled (LD) and non-learning disabled (non-LD) students, taking into account educational placement. The present research is the first to consider the above relations among Christian Arab adolescents living in Israel as an Eastern collectivist minority. On…

  11. Coping with Social Stigma: People with Intellectual Disabilities Moving from Institutions and Family Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahoda, A.; Markova, I.

    2004-01-01

    Social stigma and its impact on the life opportunities and emotional well-being of people with intellectual disabilities (IDs) are a subject of both practical and theoretical importance. The disability movement and evolving theories of self, now point to individuals ability to develop positive identities and to challenge stigmatizing views and…

  12. Importance of social attitudes towards people with disabilities in the realization of educational inclusion in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimoski Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the social attitude towards persons with disabilities and the importance of this relationship for the implementation of educational inclusion in Serbia. The society attitude is discussed through the attitudes towards persons with disabilities, and attitudes towards educational inclusion. Persons with disabilities occupy a marginalized position that is a multiple determined. Education of this group have a significant impact on the process of marginalization - poor education deepens, quality education helps to overcome marginalized social positions. Attitude towards persons with disabilities are characterized by the presence of bias, lack of information and rare contacts. Research in our community do not give consistent results, and there is also tendency of respondents to give socially acceptable answers. Assessment of attitudes and work on the development of more tolerant attitudes towards persons with disabilities is are essential in creating the conditions for the implementation of educational inclusion. Educational inclusion, embedded in the philosophy of social model of disability, implies environment that adapts to persons with disabilities. These environmental preparations lacked during the process of introducing inclusive education in our country. In the implementation of educational inclusion is necessary to work on the conditions for adequate reception of such children to regular school system, which includes work on the development of tolerant attitudes towards persons with disabilities.

  13. The Structure of Informal Social Networks of Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, A.; van der Putten, A. A. J.; Vlaskamp, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Persons with less severe disabilities are able to express their needs and show initiatives in social contacts, persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD), however, depend on others for this. This study analysed the structure of informal networks of persons with PIMD. Materials and Methods: Data concerning the…

  14. Social Network to Support Parents and Teachers of Students with Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Clarisse; Miranda, Guilhermina Lobato; Amaral, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze how the Social Software tools could respond to the needs of parents and teachers of students with multiple disabilities in improving their practices, as well as provide information and resources related to the topic of multiple disabilities. The study was implemented in Portugal and involved 45 participants: 25 special…

  15. The Neurobiology and Psychiatric Perspective of Vaginismus: Linking the Pharmacological and Psycho-Social Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Zuri Shahidii; Sidi, Hatta; Kumar, Jaya; Das, Srijit; Midin, Marhani; Baharuddin, Najwa

    2017-02-22

    Vaginismus is an involuntary muscle contraction of the outer third of vaginal barrel causing sexual penetration almost impossible. It is generally classified under sexual pain disorder (SPD). In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition, it is classified under the new rubric of Genito-Pelvic Pain/Sexual Penetration Disorder. This fear-avoidance condition poses an ongoing significant challenge to the medical and health professionals due to the very demanding needs in health care despite its unpredictable prognosis. The etiology of vaginismus is complex: through multiple bio-psycho-social processes, involving bidirectional connections between pelvic-genital (local) and higher mental function (central regulation). It has robust neural and psychological-cognitive loop feedback involvement. The internal neural circuit involvess an inter-play of at least two-pathway systems, i.e. both "quick threat assessment" of occipital-limbic-occipital-prefrontal-pelvic-genital; and the chronic pain pathways through the genito-spinothalamic-parietal-pre-frontal system, respectively. In this review, a neurobiology root of vaginismus is deliberated with the central role of an emotional-regulating amygdala, and other neural loop, i.e. hippocampus and neo-cortex in the core psychopathology of fear, disgust, and sexual avoidance. Many therapists view vaginismus as a neglected art-and-science which demands a better and deeper understanding on the clinico-pathological correlation to enhance an effective model for the bio-psycho-social treatment. As vaginismus has a strong presentation in psychopathology, i.e. fear of penetration, phobic avoidance, disgust, and anticipatory anxiety, we highlighted a practical psychiatric approach to the clinical management of vaginismus, based on the current core knowledge in the perspective of neuroscience. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Motivations of persons with psychiatric disabilities to work in mental health peer services: a qualitative study using self-determination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Galia Sharon; Russinova, Zlatka; Yim, Jung Yeon; Sprague, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    Individuals with psychiatric disabilities have low rates of employment and occupational rehabilitation success. Mental health peer services are a new occupational modality that opened a promising occupational path: persons with serious mental illnesses employed to provide support to others with psychiatric conditions. However challenges to successful peer work exist. Work motivation is central to understanding and supporting peer workers, yet little is known about sources of motivation to work as mental health peer providers. The aim of this study was to identify what drives individuals to mental health peer work using self determination theory (SDT). Motivations of 31 mental health peer workers were explored as part of a larger study. A theory driven approach was employed to emerging qualitative data using SDT concepts: external motivation and internally regulated motivations derived from basic needs (autonomy, competence, relatedness). External motivations included generic occupational goals and getting away from negative work experiences. Internal motivations corresponded with SDT basic needs: autonomy met-needs was reflected in having freedom to disclose and finding that work accords with personal values; competence met-needs was reflected in using personal experience as a resource to help others; and relatedness met-needs were reflected in having opportunity to connect intimately and reciprocate with consumers. This study identified external and internal motivations of persons with psychiatric disabilities to work as peer providers-a novel occupation in mental health. Employing personal experience and enabling peer contact emerge as major motivational tenets of mental health peer work. According to SDT instrumental occupational goals are considered more external than satisfaction of basic psychological needs. The study demonstrates the applicability of SDT in the design of autonomy supported environments to promote work engagement and sustenance of mental

  17. Relation of Late-Life Social Activity With Incident Disability Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Patricia A.; Buchman, Aron S.; Bennett, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. We tested the hypothesis that a higher level of social activity was associated with decreased risk of incident disability in older adults. Methods. Data came from older adults in the Rush Memory and Aging Project, an ongoing longitudinal cohort study of aging. Analyses were restricted to persons without clinical dementia and reporting no need for help performing any task in the particular functional domain assessed. Participants were followed for an average of 5.1 years (SD = 2.5). Social activity, based on 6 items (visiting friends or relatives; going to restaurants, sporting events, or playing games; group meetings; church/religious services; day or overnight trips; unpaid community/volunteer work), was assessed at baseline. Disability in basic activities of daily living, mobility disability, and instrumental activities of daily living was assessed annually. Proportional hazard models adjusted for age, sex, and education were used to examine the association between social activity and incident disability. Fully adjusted models included terms for depression, vascular diseases and risk factors, body mass index, social networks, and self-reported physical activity. Results. In fully adjusted models, among 954 persons without baseline disability, the risk of developing disability in activities of daily living decreased by 43% (hazard ratio = 0.57, 95% confidence interval = 0.46, 0.71) for each additional unit of social activity. Social activity was also associated with decreased risk of developing mobility disability (hazard ratio = 0.69, 95% confidence interval = 0.54, 0.88) and disability in instrumental activities of daily living (hazard ratio = 0.71, 95% confidence interval = 0.55, 0.93). Conclusions. Social activity is associated with a decreased risk of incident disability in activities of daily living, mobility, and instrumental activities of daily living, among community-dwelling older adults. PMID:21300745

  18. Rethinking Social Network Assessment for Students with Intellectual Disabilities (ID) in Postsecondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, Laura T.; Farley-Ripple, Elizabeth; Culnane, Mary; Freedman, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Social networks of persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) have been characterized as smaller and less diverse than those of typical peers. Advocates have focused on strengthening those social networks by expanding circles of social support, protection, and friendship. As young adults with ID experience increasing levels of community…

  19. The Social Inclusion of Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Phenomenology of Their Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sarah A.

    2010-01-01

    Social inclusion enhances the quality of life of young adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). Young adults with ID continue to face prejudice and discrimination that limit their social inclusion. They experience limited social inclusion because there are not enough appropriate activities available and they have limited opportunities to…

  20. The Effects of Creative Drama on Social and Oral Language Skills of Children with Learning Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, Rey E.; Lian, Ming-Gon John; Morreau, Lanny E.

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates quantitatively that children with learning disabilities can improve and maintain social and oral expressive language (speaking) skills through a creative drama program with an emphasis on specific social and oral language usage. Demonstrates how social skills may be targeted successfully by developing instruments appropriate to…

  1. Compulsury intervension towards adult substance abusers and mentally disabled people in scandinavian social law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilssen, Even

    as the basic principle in social law. This does not mean, however, that the use of coercive measures is removed from social law. In this paper our focus is on two social groups who historically have been the target of comprehensive compulsory interventions – adult substance abusers and mentally disabled people...

  2. Social skills in children with intellectual disabilities with and without autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bildt, A; Serra, M; Luteijn, E; Kraijer, D; Sytema, S; Minderaa, R

    Background Social skills were studied in 363 children with mild intellectual disabilities (ID) and 147 with moderate ID with and without autism (age 4 through 18). The objective was to investigate the value of the Children's Social Behaviour Questionnaire (CSBQ), as a measure of subtle social

  3. Using the Teaching Interactions Procedure to Teach Social Skills to Children With Autism and Intellectual Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui Shyuan Ng, Aubrey; Schulze, Kim; Rudrud, Eric; Leaf, Justin B

    2016-11-01

    This study implemented a modified teaching interaction procedure to teach social skills to 4 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder with an intellectual disability. A multiple baseline design across social skills and replicated across participants was utilized to evaluate the effects of the modified teaching interaction procedure. The results demonstrated that the teaching interaction procedure resulted in all participants acquiring targeted social skills, maintaining the targeted social skills, and generalizing the targeted social skills.

  4. The social meaning of disability: a reflection on categorisation, stigma and identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grue, Jan

    2016-07-01

    As disability becomes an ever more salient concept in international political and legal discourse, its social meaning must be better understood. Traditionally defined in medical terms and as an individual problem, it has for the last several decades increasingly become a socio-politically defined phenomenon. Disability pride has emerged as a social movement patterned after ethnic minority and sexual orientation movements. The one billion people who count as disabled nevertheless have illnesses and impairments that are largely understood as medical problems. Medicine continues to exert great influence on the social meaning of disability in general and the social valuation of various illnesses and impairments in particular. Whereas specific conditions may be socially valued, the overall category and label of disability connotes marginality and stigma. Under these conditions, disability policy, which ought to be a universal concern, risks being construed as a marginal and special-interest issue rather than a broadly relevant topic; this has potentially negative consequences for the majority of disabled people. © 2016 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  5. Social construction of disability and its potential impacts to welfare practice in Vietnamese contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kham V

    2014-01-01

    From the survey responses and the policy analysis, the initial findings on this paper present some aspects of knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) on disability which are presented as following: Firstly, there is a significant changes in legal documents and social policies related to disability in Vietnam, especially from 2006, in terms of its name and contents for improving the life of PWD with inclusive approach, however the meaning of disability is not clear in policies. Secondly, the understanding on disability is mainly based on medical/individual model which focuses on the disability's causes in words of health or individual problem rather than viewing the social causes in aspects of the social barriers and restriction, in addition almost policies focus on the problems of PWD rather than the social aspects. Thirdly, social attitude toward disability and PWD seems to be very empathetic, however it is less regard to CWD's ability as well as there are more attitudes on charity giving and supporting than helping them to be independent in their life. Finally, in spite of positive knowledge and attitudes on disability, there is still limitation on practical activities towards CWD/PWD from society in daily life.

  6. The effect of social and token economy reinforcements on academic achievement of students with intellectual disabilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mirzamani, S Mahmood; Ashoori, Mohammad; Sereshki, Narges Adib

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of social and token economy reinforcements on academic achievement of 9th grade boy students with intellectual disabilities in an experimental science class in Tehran Province...

  7. The Social Networks of Children With and Without Disabilities in Early Childhood Special Education Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Lin, Tzu-Jung; Justice, Laura; Sawyer, Brook

    2017-09-01

    Interaction with peers is an important contributor to young children's social and cognitive development. Yet, little is known about the nature of social networks within preschool inclusive classrooms. The current study applied a social network analysis to characterize children's peer interactions in inclusive classrooms and their relations with children's disability status. The participants were 485 preschoolers from 64 early childhood special education (ECSE) inclusive classrooms. Results from teachers' report of children's social networks showed that children with disabilities formed smaller play networks compared to their typically developing peers in the classroom, but no evidence indicated that children with disabilities engaged in more conflict networks than their counterparts. Children's play and conflict networks were segregated by children's disability status.

  8. Alcohol abuse in developed and developing countries in the World Mental Health Surveys: Socially defined consequences or psychiatric disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glantz, Meyer D; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Petukhova, Maria; Andrade, Laura Helena; Anthony, James C; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Graaf, Ron; Degenhardt, Louisa; Demyttenaere, Koen; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep Maria; Horiguchi, Itsuko; Karam, Elie G; Kostyuchenko, Stanislav; Lee, Sing; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Matschinger, Herbert; Neumark, Yehuda; Posada-Villa, Jose; Sagar, Rajesh; Stein, Dan J; Tomov, Toma; Wells, J Elisabeth; Chatterji, Somnath; Kessler, Ronald C

    2014-01-01

    Previous single country research has raised concerns that: (1) the DSM-IV diagnosis of alcohol abuse (AA) is met primarily through the hazardous use criterion related to drinking and driving and (2) that the hazardous use and social consequences AA criteria primarily reflect varying socioeconomic and cultural factors rather than psychiatric disorder. Using representative cross-national data from the 21 countries in the World Mental Health surveys, adults meeting DSM-IV lifetime criteria for AA but not dependence from 10 developed (n=46,071) and 11 developing (n=49,761) countries were assessed as meeting AA with the hazardous use or the social consequences criteria. Between 29.3% (developed) and 16.2% (developing) of respondents with AA met only the hazardous use criterion. AA cases with and without hazardous use were similar in age-of-onset, course, predictors, and psychopathological consequences in both developed and developing countries. Despite some associations of the AA criteria with socioeconomic factors, the hazardous use and social consequences criteria were significantly associated with psychiatric predictors and sequelae. The findings indicate that these criteria reflect psychiatric disorder and are appropriate for inclusion as DSM-5 Alcohol Use Disorder criteria. These findings support a psychiatric rather than a sociocultural view of the hazardous use and social consequences symptoms and provide evidence that they are appropriate diagnostic criteria cross-nationally with utility in a wide range of socioeconomic environments. This suggests consideration for their adoption by ICD-11. Further research is needed on the implications of these results for prevention and treatment. Copyright © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  9. Supporting the well-being of people with mobility disabilities through social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Mee; Canda, Edward R

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this insight generating study was to explore the viewpoints of people with mobility disabilities (PWMD) about ways for social workers to promote their well-being through social work practice. A qualitative participant action style methodology encouraged PWMDto voice their concerns and recommendations. Eighteen PWMD were interviewed, including nine consumers and nine social workers. Participants indicated from their experiences that social workers commonly are not sufficiently cognizant of the personal goals, perspectives, and health potentials of PWMD. Overall, they suggested that the social work practice approach for people with disabilities should become more holistic and proactive. Their recommendations are consistent with current ideas about best practice in the social work and disabilities literature and they reinforce the importance of making these ideas more widely practiced.

  10. Disability Simulations: Using the Social Model of Disability to Update an Experiential Educational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Keith W.

    2012-01-01

    Disability simulation as a form of experiential learning has been a popular way for students to "learn what it is like to have a disability" in many different educational curricula from nursing to recreation. There is a lack of research detailing the efficacy of such activities, and some researchers have noted the possibility of negative results.…

  11. SOCIAL ADAPTATION OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES THROUGH ESTABLISHMENT OF PUBLIC REHABILITATION CENTRES

    OpenAIRE

    Tesler Kirill Igorevich

    2012-01-01

    Despite the ever improving living conditions and the quality of medical care, the percentage of disabled people in the society is now as high as it was in the past. Social adaptation and accessibility of the urban environment for people with disabilities remains the most important problem of contemporary architecture. The solution is to establish public rehabilitation centres that perform recreational, educational, sports, cultural, social, technological and production functions. This solu...

  12. Perceived stigma, self-esteem and social comparison of people with intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Ivana; Milačić-Vidojević Ivona

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between self-esteem, perceived stigma and social comparison of persons with intellectual disabilities. The sample consisted of 100 persons with mild and moderate intellectual disability, aged 18 years and older, of different sexes, with or without stigmatized characteristics, who lived in an institution or in a family. We used questionnaires of Perceived stigma, Adapted Scale of Social Comparison and Adapted Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. ...

  13. 20 CFR 220.37 - When a child's disability determination is governed by the regulations of the Social Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Inclusion as a disabled child in the employee's annuity rate under the social security overall minimum. (2... found disabled under the Railroad Retirement Act. However, in addition to this determination, the child must be found disabled under the Social Security Act in order to qualify for Medicare based upon...

  14. [Discussion of medically supervised family care in Germany. Historical development of a policy for social integration of psychiatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddies, T; Schmiedebach, H P

    2001-01-01

    This article is based on the thesis that family care in the 20th century was practiced mainly under pragmatical/economical and therapeutical aspects. Depending on time and place, one of the two aspects would dominate while the other would serve as supporting motive. The subject of this article is to examine selected models of family care in Germany at different times as to their aim regarding the social integration of psychiatric patients. The family care patients not only lived outside the psychiatric hospitals, but were usually employed in household, farming or trade of the foster home. So the integrative potential of family care was, and still is, aimed at establishing a living and working condition as "normal" as possible. Until 1945, patients who could not or were not allowed to return to a completely independent lifestyle, family care offered them the widest range of integration and freedom. The often observed long lasting stays in families, reflect this rise in quality of life, although many were formally still associated with the mental institution. Up to the fifties, family care can be evaluated as an attempt of psychiatric hospitals to encounter the social isolation of the mentally ill. Nowadays family care is seeing a certain renaissance as part of social psychiatry. It is however not always clear whether family care can serve as a mean of real integration in the sense of a completely independent living and working condition, or whether it leads only to an, even if permanent, extramural accommodation of the chronically ill patients.

  15. Does social support modify the effect of disability acquisition on mental health? A longitudinal study of Australian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Zoe; Krnjacki, Lauren; Kavanagh, Anne Marie; LaMontagne, Anthony Daniel; Milner, Allison

    2017-10-01

    Disability acquisition in adulthood is associated with deterioration in mental health. Social support may act as a "buffer" against poor mental health following disability acquisition. We tested the hypothesis that women and men with low social support experienced larger declines in mental health on acquisition of a disability compared to women and men with high social support. We assessed whether social support, measured both prior and subsequent to disability acquisition, modified the association between disability acquisition and mental health using 14 annual waves of data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey. Participants reported at least two consecutive waves of disability preceded by at least two consecutive waves without disability (2200 participants, 15,724 observations). Fixed-effects linear regression models were used to estimate average differences in mental health between waves with and without disability, for women and men separately. We tested for effect measure modification of the association by social support, including a three-way interaction between disability and social support prior and subsequent to disability acquisition. Though the effects of disability acquisition on mental health were much larger for women, for both women and men there was a consistent pattern of association with social support. There was evidence that social support modified the association between disability acquisition and mental health, with the largest effects for those experiencing a change from high to low social support subsequent to disability and for people with consistently low social support. These findings highlight the importance of developing new policy and practice strategies to improve the mental health of people with disabilities, including interventions to promote social support at the time of disability acquisition.

  16. Impairment, disability, social support and depression among older parents in rural Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttajit, S.; Punpuing, S.; Jirapramukpitak, T.; Tangchonlatip, K.; Darawuttimaprakorn, N.; Stewart, R.; Dewey, M. E.; Prince, M.; Abas, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background It is not known whether social support modifies the association between depression and impairment or disability in older people from developing countries in Asia. Method We used a Thai version of the EURO-D scale to measure depression in 1104 Thai rural community-dwelling parents aged ⩾60 years. These were all those providing data on depression who were recruited as part of a study of older adults with at least one living child (biological, stepchild or adopted child). Logistic regression modelling was used to determine: (a) whether impairment, disability and social support deficits were associated with depression; (b) whether social support modified this association. Results There were strong graded relationships between impairment, disability, social support deficits and EURO-D caseness. Level of impairment, but not disability, interacted with poor social support in that depression was especially likely in those who had more physical impairments as well as one or more social support deficits (p value for interaction=0.018), even after full adjustment. Conclusions Social support is important in reducing the association between physical impairment and depression in Thai older adults, especially for those with a large number of impairments. Enhancing social support as well as improving healthcare and disability facilities should be emphasized in interventions to prevent depression in older adults. PMID:20056022

  17. [Social disability and public hospitals: towards a model of resource allocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiel, Didier; Bréchat, Pierre-Henri; Mathieu-Grenouilleau, Marie-Christine; Rymer, Roland

    2009-01-01

    A recent study to measure social disability used the results of a questionnaire administered to 696 patients between March 14th and April 7th 2007 which showed that three-quarters of the population surveyed have a social disability. Major determinants of social disadvantage are found using three specific indicators: income, assets and home-interior comfort. A greater deterioration of poor health status was not particularly noted within the most socially disadvantage group of patients, and social disability did not lead to actual over-consumption of medical products or services. People with social disabilities remained hospitalised more than 1.5 days over the average length of hospital stay which accounts for an inferred additional costs to hospital budgets equivalent to 10.3 million ?. The article proposes a model for measuring social disability that can be used routinely upon patient admission to identify socially disadvantaged cases in order to offer those patients specific and tailored assistance and reduce the length of their stay. This model may also support public health policy monitoring.

  18. Social exclusion in households with members with disabilities during the Spanish economic crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagrario Anaut Bravo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the impact that the economic crisis has had on discrimination, poverty and social exclusion among people with disabilities and households with members with disabilities. For this analysis, a series of surveys conducted by the FOESSA Foundation in 2007, 2009 and 2013 were used. The effect of the economic crisis has not been as great among people with disabilities and households that include members with disabilities as among the overall Spanish population. However, the fact that poverty and exclusion levels among the former group remained higher than those of the overall Spanish population reflects the limitations of current social policies in changing this situation that affects the human rights of people with disabilities.

  19. A psychiatric and social matched case series comparison of victims of criminal homicide and homicide perpetrators in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anders; Andersson, Susanne; Persson, Maj-Liz

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the psychosocial profiles of criminal homicide victims with those of a matched sample of perpetrators. The hypothesis was that chance determines whether someone becomes a victim or a perpetrator. In a retrospective examination of forensic psychiatric records as well as hospital records, the following variables were studied: nationality, education, substance abuse and psychiatric diagnoses. A comparative study was performed of 88 perpetrators and 83 victims in Sweden during a time period of 17 years (1978-1994). All subjects had been treated as psychiatric inpatients before the homicide. The results support the hypothesis that perpetrators and victims of homicide are similar with regard to psychiatric morbidity and social functioning. The majority were born in Sweden, and the educational level was low in both groups. Substance abuse was common in both groups: 96.7% of male and 65.3% of female victims compared with 76.6% of male and 75% of female perpetrators. Many in both of the groups had criminal records. The only major difference between the groups was recorded for psychotic disorder diagnoses, with a higher rate among perpetrators as well as a lower rate of substance abuse in this group.

  20. Psychiatric impairment and

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-12-03

    Dec 3, 2002 ... Impairment and disability assessment on psychiatric grounds has always been subjective, controversial ... informed medical advisors doing their disability assessments. Many of these advisors have expressed ..... that will empower the affected employee and that is non- stigma- tising. In order to do so it is ...

  1. Socialization patterns and sexual problems of the institutionalized chronically ill and physically disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradowski, W

    1977-02-01

    A post hoc survey of spontaneous remarks and actions bearing on social and sexual adjustment was done on 155 long-term physically disabled patients in a chronic-care hospital. Thirty-five percent were found to be involved in an active dyadic relationship; the great majority of these were between unmarried patients within the hospital. The remaining 65% were socially unattached. A large proportion of both socially attached and socially unattached patients acknowledged achieving some sort of sexual outlet. The importance of opportunity for sexual activity is discussed as it relates to traditional methods for dealing with the problems of personal confidence and physical competence of the physically disabled.

  2. Protective effects of social networks on disability among older adults in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Bravo, Miguel-Ángel; Puga-González, Dolores; Martín-Baranera, Monserrat

    2012-01-01

    The loss of autonomy at advanced ages is not only associated with ageing, but also with the characteristics of the physical and social environment. Recent investigations have shown that social networks, social engagement and participation act like predictors of disability among the elderly. The aim of this study is to determine whether social networks are related to the development and progression of disability in the early years of old age. The source of data is the first wave of the survey "Processes of Vulnerability among Spanish Elderly", carried out in 2005 to a sample of 1244 individuals. The population object of study is the cohort aged 70-74 years in metropolitan areas (Madrid and Barcelona) and not institutionalized. Disability is measured by the development of basic activities of daily life (ADL), and instrumental activities of daily life (IADL). The structural aspects of the social relationships are measured through the diversity of social networks and participation. We used the social network index (SNI). For each point over the SNI, the risk of developing any type of disability decreased by 49% (HR=0.51, 95%CI=0.31-0.82). The SNI was a decisive factor in all forecasting models constructed with some hazard ratios (HR) that ranged from 0.29 (95%CI=0.14-0.59) in the first model to 0.43 (95%CI 0.20-0.90) in the full model. The results of the present study showed a strong association between an active social life, emotional support provided by friends and confidents and disability. These findings suggest a protective effect of social networks on disability. Also, these results indicate that some family and emotional ties have a significant effect on both the prevalence and the incidence of disability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of coping with stress training on the social adjustment of students with learning disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifolah Khodadadi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Learning disability includes wide range of educational problems which treating these problems need child's social, emotional and behavior treatment. As prevalence of learning disabilities among children and their difficulties, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of coping with stress training on social adjustment of students with learning disabilities. The statistical population consists of all boy student with learning disabilities in learning disabilities center, in which 34 students were selected by convenience sampling. The social adjustment questionnaire was used. The experimental group had coping strategies training in 9 sessions for 90 minutes every week. Covariance analysis was used to compare the scores. The results showed that there was significant difference in pretest and posttest of experimental group. The findings also indicated that coping strategies training increased social adjustment, affective and educational adjustments of experimental group in comparison of control group. Appropriate strategies can be used for dealing with stress in students with learning disabilities. Coping training can be used as supplemental program in schools and centers of learning disabilities to improve the adjustment problems of these students.

  4. Disability in people affected by leprosy: the role of impairment, activity, social participation, stigma and discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Brakel, Wim H; Sihombing, Benyamin; Djarir, Hernani; Beise, Kerstin; Kusumawardhani, Laksmi; Yulihane, Rita; Kurniasari, Indra; Kasim, Muhammad; Kesumaningsih, Kadek I; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy-related disability is a challenge to public health, and social and rehabilitation services in endemic countries. Disability is more than a mere physical dysfunction, and includes activity limitations, stigma, discrimination, and social participation restrictions. We assessed the extent of disability and its determinants among persons with leprosy-related disabilities after release from multi drug treatment. We conducted a survey on disability among persons affected by leprosy in Indonesia, using a Rapid Disability Appraisal toolkit based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The toolkit included the Screening of Activity Limitation and Safety Awareness (SALSA) scale, Participation Scale, Jacoby Stigma Scale (anticipated stigma), Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue (EMIC) stigma scale and Discrimination assessment. Community members were interviewed using a community version of the stigma scale. Multivariate linear regression was done to identify factors associated with social participation. Overall 1,358 persons with leprosy-related disability (PLD) and 931 community members were included. Seventy-seven percent of PLD had physical impairments. Impairment status deteriorated significantly after release from treatment (from 59% to 77%). Around 60% of people reported activity limitations and participation restrictions and 36% anticipated stigma. As for participation restrictions and stigma, shame, problems related to marriage and difficulties in employment were the most frequently reported problems. Major determinants of participation were severity of impairment and level of education, activity and stigma. Reported severity of community stigma correlated with severity of participation restrictions in the same districts. The majority of respondents reported problems in all components of disability. The reported physical impairment after release from treatment justifies ongoing monitoring to facilitate early prevention

  5. Disability in people affected by leprosy: the role of impairment, activity, social participation, stigma and discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim H. van Brakel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy-related disability is a challenge to public health, and social and rehabilitation services in endemic countries. Disability is more than a mere physical dysfunction, and includes activity limitations, stigma, discrimination, and social participation restrictions. We assessed the extent of disability and its determinants among persons with leprosy-related disabilities after release from multi drug treatment. Methods: We conducted a survey on disability among persons affected by leprosy in Indonesia, using a Rapid Disability Appraisal toolkit based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The toolkit included the Screening of Activity Limitation and Safety Awareness (SALSA scale, Participation Scale, Jacoby Stigma Scale (anticipated stigma, Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue (EMIC stigma scale and Discrimination assessment. Community members were interviewed using a community version of the stigma scale. Multivariate linear regression was done to identify factors associated with social participation. Results: Overall 1,358 persons with leprosy-related disability (PLD and 931 community members were included. Seventy-seven percent of PLD had physical impairments. Impairment status deteriorated significantly after release from treatment (from 59% to 77%. Around 60% of people reported activity limitations and participation restrictions and 36% anticipated stigma. As for participation restrictions and stigma, shame, problems related to marriage and difficulties in employment were the most frequently reported problems. Major determinants of participation were severity of impairment and level of education, activity and stigma. Reported severity of community stigma correlated with severity of participation restrictions in the same districts. Discussion: The majority of respondents reported problems in all components of disability. The reported physical impairment after release from treatment

  6. Disability in people affected by leprosy: the role of impairment, activity, social participation, stigma and discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Brakel, Wim H.; Sihombing, Benyamin; Djarir, Hernani; Beise, Kerstin; Kusumawardhani, Laksmi; Yulihane, Rita; Kurniasari, Indra; Kasim, Muhammad; Kesumaningsih, Kadek I.; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2012-01-01

    Background Leprosy-related disability is a challenge to public health, and social and rehabilitation services in endemic countries. Disability is more than a mere physical dysfunction, and includes activity limitations, stigma, discrimination, and social participation restrictions. We assessed the extent of disability and its determinants among persons with leprosy-related disabilities after release from multi drug treatment. Methods We conducted a survey on disability among persons affected by leprosy in Indonesia, using a Rapid Disability Appraisal toolkit based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The toolkit included the Screening of Activity Limitation and Safety Awareness (SALSA) scale, Participation Scale, Jacoby Stigma Scale (anticipated stigma), Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue (EMIC) stigma scale and Discrimination assessment. Community members were interviewed using a community version of the stigma scale. Multivariate linear regression was done to identify factors associated with social participation. Results Overall 1,358 persons with leprosy-related disability (PLD) and 931 community members were included. Seventy-seven percent of PLD had physical impairments. Impairment status deteriorated significantly after release from treatment (from 59% to 77%). Around 60% of people reported activity limitations and participation restrictions and 36% anticipated stigma. As for participation restrictions and stigma, shame, problems related to marriage and difficulties in employment were the most frequently reported problems. Major determinants of participation were severity of impairment and level of education, activity and stigma. Reported severity of community stigma correlated with severity of participation restrictions in the same districts. Discussion The majority of respondents reported problems in all components of disability. The reported physical impairment after release from treatment justifies ongoing

  7. Women with a history of childhood sexual abuse. Long-term social and psychiatric aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ellids; Lau, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    The socio-demographics and psychiatric diagnoses in a clinical sample of women with a history of mainly intrafamilial childhood sexual abuse (CSA) are described. The women were referred to five psychiatric centres for incest group psychotherapy. Data were gathered using interviews and self......-administered questionnaires. Over a period of 2.5 years, 385 women with mean age of 33 years were referred with a history of CSA. Three hundred and forty of those had experienced intrafamilial CSA. The average age at first abuse was 6.8 years, and it lasted for a mean of 6 years. The women had been abused by a mean of 1...... was a brother. The women suffered from a broad spectrum of psychiatric symptoms and illnesses. More than half of the women had previously received psychiatric treatment. Compared to a random sample of the general female population, these women were less advantaged with regards to education, financial...

  8. Should Schools Expect Poor Physical and Mental Health, Social Adjustment, and Participation Outcomes in Students with Disability?: e0126630

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sharmila Vaz; Reinie Cordier; Marita Falkmer; Marina Ciccarelli; Richard Parsons; Tomomi McAuliffe; Torbjorn Falkmer

    2015-01-01

      The literature on whether students with disabilities have worse physical and mental health, social adjustment, and participation outcomes when compared to their peers without disabilities is largely inconclusive...

  9. The Relationship between Social Participation and Social Skills of Pupils with an Intellectual Disability: A Study in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrote, Ariana

    2017-01-01

    Researchers claim that a lack of social skills might be the main reason why pupils with special educational needs (SEN) in inclusive classrooms often experience difficulties in social participation. However, studies that support this assumption are scarce, and none include pupils with an intellectual disability (ID). This article seeks to make an…

  10. The Combined Use of Video Modeling and Social Stories in Teaching Social Skills for Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, Seray Olçay

    2016-01-01

    There are many studies in the literature in which individuals with intellectual disabilities exhibit social skills deficits and which show the need for teaching these skills systematically. This study aims to investigate the effects of an intervention package of consisting computer-presented video modeling and Social Stories on individuals with…

  11. Disability and sexuality as right to quality of life aspects view of social workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available All people – including young people – are sexual beings, regardless of whether or not they live with physical, mental, or emotional disabilities. And, all people need affection, love and intimacy, acceptance, and companionship. In this light, sex education plays a key role in acknowledging matters related not only with sexual activities, but also contraception, personal hygiene, sexual feelings, sexual education, masturbation, friendship, sex, marriage so as motherhood and parenthood. Without appropriate social skills, people with disabilities may have difficulty making and maintaining relations and feel lonely and ‘different’. Without important sexual health knowledge, people with disabilities may make unwise decisions and/or take sexual health risks. Hence, the key understanding is that everyone, including a person with mental disability, is sexual – and has sexuality related emotions and desires. Several foreign scholars have already emphasized the need of sex education for the people with mental, physical and/or emotional challenges, however Lithuanian scholars seem reluctant to analyse such issues and acknowledge the need of sex education for people with mental disabilities. For the last two decades, there has been more focus to promote healthy lifestyle, which in turn influences the sex education programs. Naturally, people with mental disabilities face different challenges than those without disabilities, because they are less informed about sexuality, have less sexual experience and are more prone to sexual exploitation. Hence, the questions under consideration in this paper remain whether sex education is important and necessary to an individual who has mental disabilities? Should parents be concerned about sex education for their disabled children? How issues on disability and sexuality are addressed in Lithuania and elsewhere? How sexuality is related with the quality of life for people with disabilities? The aim – to

  12. Children of low-income depressed mothers: psychiatric disorders and social adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Adriana; Alonso, Angelique; Tang, Min; Liriano, Wanda; Warner, Virginia; Pilowsky, Daniel; Barranco, Eva; Wang, Yanping; Verdeli, Helena; Wickramaratne, Priya; Weissman, Myrna M

    2009-01-01

    Although several studies have documented a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders in children of depressed than nondepressed parents, previous research was conducted in predominantly White, middle, or upper-middle class populations. Only limited information is available on psychiatric disorders and psychosocial functioning in children of low-income depressed mothers. We report the findings in children of mothers with and without a lifetime history of major depressive disorder, who were recruited from a large urban primary-care practice. Bilingual clinical interviewers assessed 58 children with structured diagnostic interviews administered to most children (90%) and to their mothers as informants. Diagnostic assessments and best estimate diagnoses of the children were blind to the mothers' diagnostic status. The families were poor and predominantly Hispanic, more than half of them headed by single mothers. After adjusting for child age and gender, and for any possible sibling correlation, children of depressed mothers had significantly higher rates of lifetime depressive, separation anxiety, oppositional defiant, and any psychiatric disorders than children of control mothers, with a lifetime prevalence of any psychiatric disorder of 84.6 versus 50.0%, respectively. Children of depressed mothers also reported significantly lower psychosocial functioning and had higher rates of psychiatric treatment. We conclude that the risk for psychiatric disorders may be particularly high in children of low-income depressed mothers. The primary-care setting offers a unique opportunity for early intervention with this underserved group. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. THE ROLE OF THE SOCIAL MEDIATOR WITHIN THE DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT SUPPORT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dorina PASCA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available For people with disabilities, to find a way to improve life quality by having a job and by developing independent living skills is a “sine qua non” condition for their social integration. The social mediator working within a disability employment support system facilitates the logistic implementation of a viable and plausible program, which can identify, and maintain a workplace for people with disabilities, and acts as a motivational guarantee of these persons’ chance for a better life while also providing life lessons to all of us. Hence, the major role of the social mediator is to develop a new cognitive structure of communication for disabled people so that they can act as our equals and not as marginalized human beings.

  14. Efficiency of hippotherapy for the physically disabled children coping with social isolation : parents’ perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Večkienė, Nijolė; Anužienė, Ieva

    2011-01-01

    Article examines hippotherapy as an alternative social work method that is effective in medical and social rehabilitation purposes. While assessing the physically disabled children the specialists recognize the insufficient quality of the assessment methods applied and the necessity to perfect the development of the rehabilitation programmes which should be directed towards the closest social environment of a child, assistance provided for a child in a family and its inclusion in child social...

  15. A role for autonomic cardiac control in the effects of oxytocin on social behaviour and psychiatric illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S Quintana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cumulative evidence over the last decade indicates that intranasally administered oxytocin (OT has a major impact on social behavior and cognition. In parallel, researchers have also highlighted the effects of OT on cardiovascular and autonomic nervous system regulation. Taken at face value, these two streams of research appear largely unrelated. However, another line of evidence highlights a key role for autonomic cardiac control in social behavior and cognition. In this review, we suggest that autonomic cardiac control may moderate the relationship between OT and social behavior. We also highlight the importance of autonomic cardiac control in psychiatric disorders of social dysfunction and suggest that heart rate variability (HRV – an index of autonomic cardiac control – may play a key role in patient response in treatment trials of OT.

  16. Attitudes towards people with physical or intellectual disabilities among nursing, social work and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsotakis, George; Galanis, Petros; Papastefanakis, Emmanouil; Meidani, Flora; Philalithis, Anastas E; Kalokairinou, Athena; Sourtzi, Panayota

    2017-08-03

    To examine and compare undergraduate healthcare students' attitudes towards people with physical or intellectual disabilities in Greece. The experience that people with disabilities have with health care is a complex interaction between their medical condition and the social and physical environment. Attitudes of the nursing and healthcare staff affect the quality of care and people's adaptation to their disability, self-image and rehabilitation outcomes. Descriptive cross-sectional survey. Nursing, Social Work and Medicine students (N = 1007, 79.4% female) attending three universities (Athens, Crete) completed during 2014-2016 two standardised scales regarding physical (ATDP-B) and intellectual disability (CLAS-ID). Descriptive and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Attitudes towards people with physical disabilities in Greece (ATDP-B scores) were poor with scores just above the mid-point. Medical studies and higher knowledge and work with individuals with physical disabilities signified marginally more positive attitudes. Gender and age displayed no associations with attitudes. Regarding intellectual disability (CLAS-ID scores), nursing students had slightly less positive attitudes in "Similarity" but more positive attitudes in "Sheltering" subscales. Previous work and contact was related to more favourable and higher age to less favourable "Similarity" and "Sheltering" attitudes. Males had higher "Exclusion" scores. Those who knew people with intellectual disabilities had less favourable "Empowerment" attitudes. Knowledge was related to more positive attitudes in all four CLAS-ID subscales. Greek health and social care students showed poor attitudes towards people with physical and intellectual disability. When holding unfavourable attitudes, healthcare professionals become less involved with the people they care for and they do not provide nursing care to the best of their abilities. Undergraduate and continuing education, along with

  17. Social support, depression, and physical disability: age and diagnostic group effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark P; Smith, Amanda E; Bombardier, Charles H; Yorkston, Kathryn M; Miró, Jordi; Molton, Ivan R

    2014-04-01

    Social support is an important resource that may benefit individuals aging with physical disabilities, although its effects may vary depending on age, sex, and type of disability. To (1) examine differences in social support--and how support might vary as a function of age and sex--in samples of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), spinal cord injury (SCI), and muscular dystrophy (MD) and (2) understand the extent that associations between different support domains and depression might be moderated by disability diagnosis, sex and age. A convenience sample (N = 1416) of individuals with MS, SCI, and MD completed surveys that included measures of perceived social support and depressive symptoms. No significant support differences were found between diagnostic groups. There was a gradual decrease in social support with chronological age, and women reported more support than men, particularly friend support. Levels of perceived friend support were negatively associated with depression, and the associations between social support and depression did not differ as a function of age, sex, or diagnosis. Social support is similarly associated with lower levels of depression for men and women, across disability diagnoses and all ages. Being a man and being older may be associated with lower levels of perceived support. Research is needed to determine if interventions that improve support will decrease depression and improve quality of life in persons with disabilities, particularly for men and individuals who are aging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Avaliação das limitações no comportamento social em pacientes psiquiátricos de longa permanência The assessment of social role functioning impairments in long-stay psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Gonçalves

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Este texto trata de uma avaliação do comportamento social de pacientes psiquiátricos de longa permanência. Estudos recentes concentram-se nesse tema, considerando-o relevante na transferência do eixo da atenção do hospital para a comunidade. Para avaliar dificuldades e limitações de uma população com longo período de institucionalização, utiliza-se a Social Behavioural Schedule (SBS, que cobre áreas do comportamento referentes às principais dificuldades de pacientes crônicos. Selecionou-se uma amostra de 46 pacientes de uma população de 200 mulheres, com longa história de internação psiquiátrica, residentes em duas moradias protegidas e quatro pavilhões do Núcleo Franco da Rocha (NFR, do Instituto Municipal Juliano Moreira, no Rio de Janeiro. Os resultados obtidos foram comparados aos dados de uma amostra de moradores em um albergue de sem tetos e aos de pacientes de um hospital psiquiátrico, ambos situados em Londres. Os resultados sugerem que significativo percentual dos pacientes que vivem longo tempo em hospitais teriam condições de viver em residências na comunidade.This paper describes an assessment of social role functioning impairments in long-stay psychiatric patients. Most recent studies have concentrated on this theme and these measures are very important to the transfer of care from hospitals to community facilities. In order to assess the long term impairments or disabilities, we have used the Social Behavioural Schedule (SBS that covers behaviour areas which have been shown in previous research to describe the major difficulties exhibited by patients with long-term impairments. Forty-six women were randomized from a range of two hundred women living at the Núcleo Franco da Rocha, a hospitalar unit of Instituto Municipal Juliano Moreira in Rio de Janeiro. The NFR results were compared with a homeless hostels sample and a long stay wards sample, both in London. Despite the average age and the long term

  19. Social factors ameliorate psychiatric disorders in community-based asylum seekers independent of visa status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Debbie C; Kennedy, Gerard A; Sundram, Suresh

    2015-12-15

    The impact of industrialised host nations' deterrent immigration policies on the mental health of forced migrants has not been well characterised. The present study investigated the impact of Australia's refugee determination process (RDP) on psychiatric morbidity in community-based asylum-seekers (AS) and refugees. Psychiatric morbidity was predicted to be greater in AS than refugees, and to persist or increase as a function of time in the RDP. The effect on mental health of demographic and socio-political factors such as health cover and work rights were also investigated. Psychiatric morbidity was measured prospectively on five mental health indices at baseline (T1, n=131) and an average of 15.7 months later (T2, n=56). Psychiatric morbidity in AS significantly decreased between time points such that it was no longer greater than that of refugees at T2. Caseness of PTSD and demoralisation reduced in AS who gained protection; however, those who maintained asylum-seeker status at T2 also had a significant reduction in PTS and depression symptom severity. Reduced PTS and demoralisation symptoms were associated with securing work rights and health cover. Living in the community with work rights and access to health cover significantly improves psychiatric symptoms in forced migrants irrespective of their protection status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Inequity in the use of health and social care services for disabled individuals in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Quevedo, Cristina; Jiménez Rubio, Dolores

    2011-12-01

    The objective of "equal access for equal need" is part of the policy agenda of most European countries. Several studies have provided evidence of equity in the use of healthcare services by the adult population in Spain. However, less attention has been paid to equity in access to health and social care services among the disabled population. In this study, we present an analysis of the distribution of unmet need for a set of economic, health and social care services by the disabled population in Spain. Horizontal inequity in unmet need for various socioeconomic services was measured by using data from the EDAD2008 survey conducted in the disabled population in Spain and methods based on the Concentration Index. In Spain the distribution of unmet need among disabled individuals is not equitable. The greatest proportion of unmet needs is concentrated among individuals at the bottom of the income distribution. In addition, the level of horizontal inequity differs depending on the individual's gender and age, together with the specific service analyzed and the reasons giving rise to this unmet need. Socioeconomic status is important in access to health and social care services by the disabled. These results will allow policymakers to design policies aimed at reducing barriers to health and social care services among the disabled population in Spain. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of Social Factors on Student Satisfaction among College Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Allison R.; Oertle, Kathleen Marie; Plotner, Anthony J.; Hakun, Jonathan G.

    2017-01-01

    A significant body of research on student retention reflects that social and environmental factors influence continued enrollment in postsecondary education and academic success. Yet, for students with disabilities, more emphasis is placed on accommodations, access, and support services without sufficient attention to the social aspect of the…

  2. Virtual Friendships and Social Distress among Adolescents with and without Learning Disabilities: The Subtyping Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharabi, Adi; Margalit, Malka

    2011-01-01

    Many adolescents spend time online, communicating with friends, family members and strangers, and these social activities have been often related with their loneliness experience. The goals of this study were to examine the social distress expressed by adolescents with and without learning disabilities (LD) and to distinguish between unique…

  3. Video Modeling to Teach Social Safety Skills to Young Adults with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Corrine E.; Mechling, Linda C.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of video modeling with a constant time delay procedure to teach social safety skills to three young women with intellectual disability. A multiple probe design across three social safety skills (responding to strangers who: requested personal information; requested money; and entered the participant's…

  4. The Role of Social Media Tools: Accessible Tourism for Disabled Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinay, Zehra; Saner, Tulen; Bahçelerli, Nesrin M.; Altinay, Fahriye

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge sharing becomes important to accomplish digital citizenship. Social media tools become popular to share and diffuse the knowledge in the digitalization. This social media learning and knowledge sharing platforms provides accessibility to the services within societies especially for disabled citizens. This research study aims to evaluate…

  5. Attitudes of Social Service Providers towards the Sexuality of Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzo, Giuseppe; Nota, Laura; Soresi, Salvatore; Ferrari, Lea; Minnes, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Background: The sexual lives of people with intellectual disability is made complex by the involvement and influence of social service providers, whose beliefs and values have a great impact on the support they provide. We hypothesized that social service providers' role, educational level and service in which they worked could affect attitudes…

  6. Social Exclusion and People with Intellectual Disabilities: A Rural-Urban Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, L.; Cooper, S.-A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research suggests that social exclusion is a problem both for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and for people living in rural areas. This may give rise to a double disadvantage for people with ID living in rural areas. Conversely, aspects of rural life such as community spirit and social support may protect against social…

  7. Study of Personal and Social Adjustment Ability of the Disabled Pupils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabova, Natalia Vladimirovna; Parfyonova, Tatyana Aleksandrovna

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of experimental work aimed at studying personal and social adjustment of a child with disabilities. Analysis of domestic and foreign psychological and educational literature allowed us to determine the key concept of the study, namely "social and personal orientation", as a trait of a human's personality,…

  8. Social Information Processing in Boys with Autistic Spectrum Disorder and Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embregts, P.; van Nieuwenhuijzen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and mild to borderline intellectual disability (ID) have less adaptive behaviour and more behaviour problems than children with mild to borderline ID. Social information processing appears to be an important mechanism in the explanation of the socially inadequate behaviour of children…

  9. Race, Disability, and Grade: Social Relationships in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Gazi F.; Locke, Jill; Kasari, Connie; Mandell, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Race is associated with social relationships among typically developing children; however, studies rarely examine the impact of race on social outcomes for children with autism spectrum disorder. This study examined how race (African American, Latino, Asian, or White) in conjunction with disability status (autism spectrum disorders or typically…

  10. Using the Teaching Interactions Procedure to Teach Social Skills to Children with Autism and Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Aubrey Hui Shyuan; Schulze, Kim; Rudrud, Eric; Leaf, Justin B.

    2016-01-01

    This study implemented a modified teaching interaction procedure to teach social skills to 4 children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder with an intellectual disability. A multiple baseline design across social skills and replicated across participants was utilized to evaluate the effects of the modified teaching interaction procedure. The…

  11. Is There Evidence to Support the Use of Social Skills Interventions for Students with Emotional Disabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Amanda L.; Sadeh, Shanna S.

    2014-01-01

    Scholars and practitioners advocate for the use of social skills interventions for students with emotional disabilities because significant social skills deficits are common among these students. Yet contemporary practices must be vetted for empirical evidence of their efficacy and effectiveness to ensure students are provided appropriate…

  12. INTERDEPENDENCE, INDIVISIBILITY AND THE SOCIAL RIGHTS OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES IN THE LAW OF QATAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA DEL CARMEN BARRANCO AVILÉS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the description of the situation of some social rights of persons with disability in Qatar, this article is aimed to highlight the need to address the protection of human rights from interdependence and indivisibility. The analysis of Qatar Law reveals that social protection alone is not sufficient guarantee of dignity, as would not be a system based exclusively on freedom as not interference. Although providing noteworthy resources for persons with disabilities along with a good level of social protection and health care, Qatar does not base its system on autonomy and inclusion and this is a shortcoming to move towards a human rights-based approach.

  13. Educators' evaluations of children's ideas on the social exclusion of classmates with intellectual and learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Elizabeth A; Brown, Jason D; Dare, Lynn

    2018-01-01

    Reasons underlying the social exclusion of children with intellectual or learning disabilities are not entirely understood. Although it is important to heed the voices of children on this issue, it is also important to consider the degree to which these ideas are informed. The present authors invited educators to evaluate the content of children's ideas on the causes of social exclusion. Educators thematically sorted and rated children's ideas on why classmates with intellectual or learning disabilities are socially excluded. Sorted data were analysed with multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis. Six thematic clusters were identified differing in content to those provided by children in an earlier study. Educators generally rated children's ideas as showing somewhat uninformed ideas about why social exclusion occurs. Educators indicated that children need to be better informed about intellectual and learning disabilities. Limitations and implications are discussed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Social determinants of health and disability: updating the model for determination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Mauro; Besoaín, Álvaro; Rebolledo, Jaime

    Social determinants of health (SDH) are conditions in which people live. These conditions impact their lives, health status and social inclusion level. In line with the conceptual and comprehensive progression of disability, it is important to update SDH due to their broad implications in implementing health interventions in society. This proposal supports incorporating disability in the model as a structural determinant, as it would lead to the same social inclusion/exclusion of people described in other structural SDH. This proposal encourages giving importance to designing and implementing public policies to improve societal conditions and contribute to social equity. This will be an act of reparation, justice and fulfilment with the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. The Pearl in the Middle: A Case Study of Social Interactions in an Individual with a Severe Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Hilary; Douglas, Jacinta; Bigby, Christine; Iacono, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Background: People with severe intellectual disability have limited communication skills, small social networks, and may experience isolation. Little is known about how interactions occur with social network members and the role of social support. Method: An adult with a severe intellectual disability was observed in her daily environments. Her…

  16. Social Connections for Older People with Intellectual Disability in Ireland: Results from Wave One of IDS-TILDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCausland, Darren; McCallion, Philip; Cleary, Eimear; McCarron, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background: The literature on influences of community versus congregated settings raises questions about how social inclusion can be optimised for people with intellectual disability. This study examines social contacts for older people with intellectual disability in Ireland, examining differences in social connection for adults with intellectual…

  17. Social Sustainability and Its Indicators through a Disability Studies and an Ability Studies Lens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Rybchinski

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The present journal recently stated in the call for a special issue on social sustainability, “[t]hough sustainable development is said to rest on ‘three pillars’, one of these—social sustainability—has received significantly less attention than its bio-physical environmental and economic counterparts”. The current issue promises to engage the concepts of “development sustainability”, “bridge sustainability” and “maintenance sustainability” and the tensions between these different aspects of social sustainability. The aim of the present study is to identify the visibility of disabled people in the academic social sustainability literature, to ascertain the impact and promises of social sustainability indicators put forward in the same literature and to engage especially with the concepts of “development sustainability”, “bridge sustainability” and “maintenance sustainability” through disability studies and ability studies lenses. We report that disabled people are barely covered in the academic social sustainability literature; of the 5165 academic articles investigated only 26 had content related to disabled people and social sustainability. We also conclude that social sustainability indicators evident in the 1909 academic articles with the phrase “social sustainability” in the abstract mostly focused on products and did not reflect yet the goals outlined in the “development sustainability” aspect of social sustainability proposed by Vallance such as basic needs, building social capital, justice and so on. We posit that if the focus within the social sustainability discourse shifts more toward the social that an active presence of disabled people in this discourse is essential to disabled people. We showcase the utility of an ability studies lens to further the development and application of the “development sustainability”, “bridge sustainability” and “maintenance sustainability

  18. Historical approach to the treatment of people with disability as an indicator of their social positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimoski Sanja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the historical approach to the study of disability, and attempts of its use in explaining the modern trends that determine the position of people with disability in society. Historical approach, through monitoring the chronological position of persons with disability, from ancient times until the present day, suggests the complexity of status of these persons in society, and their constant discrimination. The position of these people in modern society is significantly changed, but still, in addition to transparent right to equality, one can hardly speak of substantial equality. The essential equality would imply greater inclusion of persons with disability themselves, that began through the development of the social model of disability, as well as a multidisciplinary scientific approach to this problem.

  19. [Disability certification as a tool for gaining access to human rights and social participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Suárez, Olga B

    2013-01-01

    Given that one of the main reasons prioritising public policy agendas is related to implementing action responding to the increase in the prevalence of disability and the violation people of such people's rights, governments in many parts of the world have advanced disability certification as a tool for claiming rights, seeking to comply with the principles of dignity, liberty, equality and non-discrimination regarding this population. Certification of disability In Colombia is novel and has been introduced to meet the provisions of national and international standards regarding handicapped people's rights. A first approach has thus been made through developing a disability certification manual aimed at healthcare institutions and professionals forming interdisciplinary teams; it was developed by assessing disabled people voluntarily undergoing certification and thus becoming a tool for claiming rights, facilitating access to services and benefits in terms of equity and social inclusion.

  20. [Social inclusion of disabled people: achievements, challenges and implications for the nursing area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de França, Inacia Sátiro Xavier; Pagliuca, Lorita Marlena Freitag

    2009-03-01

    This study aimed to understand the testimonies of disabled people about the concreteness of the social inclusion process, as well as to articulate their testimonies with the directives of Law 3289/99. Eighteen people were interviewed, six of which were physically disabled, six visually disabled, and six had hearing disabilities. Data were standardized and categorized in two meaning cores: pre-inclusivist and inclusivist guidelines of the disabled person. The methodological perspective was discourse analysis. In conclusion, these subjects had achievements in legislation that guarantees their rights to citizenship, but there are challenges in the areas of healthcare, education, professional training and insertion in the job market. The rehabilitation nurses must know the experiences of these subjects and their relatives to help them with strategies of coping for the problems affecting their inclusion, and consequently their health.

  1. Interrelationships between education, occupational social class, and income as determinants of disability retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Taina; Martikainen, Pekka; Lahelma, Eero

    2012-03-01

    The association between a low socioeconomic position and disability retirement is established in the literature, but the interrelationships between various subdomains of socioeconomic position are poorly understood. We examined the independent and interdependent effects of education, social class, and income on disability retirement. Using nationally representative register data we followed up over 260,000 Finns aged 30-63 at the end of 1995 for disability retirement from 1996 to 2004. Cox regression analysis was used to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and relative indices of inequality (RII). Each socioeconomic indicator had a linear negative association with disability retirement. The socioeconomic gradients were stronger in the younger age groups. The effect of education was largely mediated through succeeding social class. Social class was largely explained by preceding education, but was only moderately mediated through income. Income was largely explained by education, and even further by social class. The independent effects of education, social class, and income on disability retirement as measured by the RII were 1.74 (95% CI 1.60-1.90), 1.95 (1.78-2.15), and 1.35 (1.25-1.47) for men and 1.76 (1.61-1.92), 2.14 (1.95-2.34), and 1.14 (1.05-1.24) for women. The effects of socioeconomic position on disability retirement may not be fully captured if the pathways between the various subdomains are disregarded. Our results suggest that efforts to delay and prevent disability retirement should focus on lifestyle and cognitive factors associated with education, as well as on factors associated with social class such as working conditions and power resources.

  2. Disability, social functioning and school inclusion among older children and adolescents living with HIV in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukuni, Ruramayi; McHugh, Grace; Majonga, Edith; Kranzer, Katharina; Mujuru, Hilda; Munyati, Shungu; Nathoo, Kusum; Gregson, Celia L; Kuper, Hannah; Ferrand, Rashida A

    2018-02-01

    Increasing numbers of children with HIV are surviving to adolescence and encountering multiple clinical and social consequences of long-standing HIV infection. We aimed to investigate the association between HIV and disability, social functioning and school inclusion among 6- to 16-year-olds in Zimbabwe. HIV-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy from a public-sector HIV clinic and HIV-uninfected children attending primary care clinics in the same catchment area were recruited. Standardised questionnaires were used to collect socio-demographic, social functioning and disability data. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between HIV status and disability and functioning. We recruited 202 HIV-infected and 285 HIV-uninfected children. There was no difference in age and gender between the two groups, but a higher proportion of HIV-infected children were orphaned. The prevalence of any disability was higher in HIV-infected than uninfected children (37.6% vs. 18.5%, P < 0.001). HIV-infected children were more likely to report anxiety (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4.4; 95% CI 2.4, 8.1), low mood (aOR 4.2; 2.1, 8.4) and difficulty forming friendships (aOR 14.8; 1.9, 116.6) than uninfected children. Children with HIV also reported more missed school days, repeating a school year and social exclusion in class. These associations remained apparent when comparing children with HIV and disability to those with HIV but no disabilities. Children with HIV commonly experience disabilities, and this is associated with social and educational exclusion. Rehabilitation and support services are needed to facilitate educational attainment and social participation in this group. © 2017 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Use of Social Media During Public Emergencies by People with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T. Morris

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People with disabilities are generally more vulnerable during disasters and public emergencies than the general population. Physical, sensory and cognitive impairments may result in greater difficulty in receiving and understanding emergency alert information, and greater difficulty in taking appropriate action. The use of social media in the United States has grown considerably in recent years. This has generated increasing interest on the part of national, state and local jurisdictions in leveraging these channels to communicate public health and safety information. How and to what extent people with disabilities use social and other communications media during public emergencies can help public safety organizations understand the communication needs of the citizens in their jurisdictions, and plan their social media and other communications strategies accordingly. Methods: This article presents data from a survey on the use of social media and other communications media during public emergencies by people with disabilities conducted from November 1, 2012 through March 30, 2013. Results: The data presented here show four key results. First, levels of use of social media in general are high for people with disabilities, as well as for the general population. Second, use of social media during emergencies is still low for both groups. Third, levels of use of social media are not associated with income levels, but are significantly and strongly associated with age: younger people use social media at higher rates than older people in both groups (p,0.001. Fourth, differences in the use of social media during emergencies across disability types are slight, with the exception of deaf and hard-of-hearing respondents, the former more likely to have used social media to receive (p¼0.002, verify (p¼0.092 and share (p¼0.007 emergency information . Conclusion: These last two results suggest that effective emergency communications

  4. a New Ontological Perspective for Integration of Social and Physical Environments: Disability and Rehabilitation Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharebaghi, Amin; Abolfazl Mostafavi, Mir

    2016-06-01

    Social dimension of environment is an important aspect that should be reflected in research works related to studying the interactions between human and the environment. However, this dimension is usually neglected when representing the environment in geographic information systems for different applications. For instance, disability as a result of the interaction between human and environment is influenced by social and physical dimensions of environment. Although, this aspect is highlighted in most conceptual disability models by defining various taxonomies of the environment, from ontological perspective justifying and connecting social dimension to the physical dimension of the environment is not clearly determined. Integrating social dimension of the environment with its physical dimension for disability studies is a challenging task, which is the main objective of the present study. Here, we review some of the disability models and their perspective about classifying the environment. Then, from ontological perspective, their limitations are discussed and a new approach for the classification of concepts form the environment is presented. This approach facilitates and simplifies integration of social dimension in ontologies for more effective assessment of disability issue in Geographic Information System.

  5. The Effect of Social and Token Economy Reinforcements on Academic Achievement of Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashoori, Mohammad; Sereshki, Narges Adib

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study investigates the effect of social and token economy reinforcements on academic achievement of 9th grade boy students with intellectual disabilities in an experimental science class in Tehran Province. Method The method used for this study was experimental by pre-test, post- test with a control group. The boy students with intellectual disabilities from three junior high schools participated in this study. The sample consisted of thirty, 9th grade boy students with intellectual disabilities in the selected schools; the schools were chosen by the multi-stage cluster method. To measure the progress of students in the science class, a teacher made test and the Wechsler intelligence test for matching the groups for IQ were used. To ensure validity, the content validity criteria depended tests calculated by the Lashe method and teachers' perspective were used. The reliability coefficient was obtained by the reliability coefficient of related tests; the percent agreement method and the obtained data were analyzed using one-way variance analysis and Shefe prosecution test. Results The results showed that there was a significant increase in academic achievement of students with intellectual disabilities when using token economy than using social reinforcements compared with the control group. Also, when using social reinforcements, the academic achievement of students was more than the control group. Conclusion Token economy and social reinforcements increased the academic achievement of students with intellectual disabilities in the science class; and also the effect of token economy reinforcements was more than social reinforcements on the subjects. PMID:22952517

  6. Yearly Data for Asian & Pacific Islander Language Preferences of Social Security Disability Insurance Claimants (FY 2016, including 53rd week)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset provides annual volumes for API language preferences at the national level of individuals filing claims for Disability insurance benefits for federal...

  7. Concordance of the Mini-Psychiatric Assessment Schedule for Adults Who Have Developmental Disabilities (PASADD) and the Brief Symptom Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beail, N.; Mitchell, K.; Vlissides, N.; Jackson, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: When assessing the mental health needs of people who have intellectual disabilities (ID) it is important to use measures that have good validity and reliability to ensure accurate case recognition and reliable and valid outcome data. Measures developed for this purpose tend to be self-report or by informant report. Multi-trait…

  8. Behavior Problems, Psychiatric Symptoms, and Quality of Life for Older Adults with Intellectual Disability with and without Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totsika, Vasiliki; Felce, David; Kerr, Michael; Hastings, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    The evidence base on outcomes associated with autism in older adulthood is limited. The expected increase in the prevalence of older adults with autism highlights the need to describe their profiles and service needs. Adults 50 years or older with an intellectual disability (ID) and the triad of impairments characteristic of autism spectrum…

  9. The Potential Utility of the Patient Health Questionnaire as a Screener for Psychiatric Comorbidity in a Chronic Disabling Occupational Musculoskeletal Disorder Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asih, Sali; Mayer, Tom G; Bradford, E McKenna; Neblett, Randy; Williams, Mark J; Hartzell, Meredith M; Gatchel, Robert J

    2016-02-01

    The patient health questionnaire (PHQ) is designed for screening psychopathology in primary care settings. However, little is known about its clinical utility in other chronic pain populations, which usually have high psychiatric comorbidities. A consecutive cohort of 546 patients with chronic disabling occupational musculoskeletal disorder (CDOMD) was administered and compared upon psychosocial assessments, including the PHQ and a structured clinical interview for DSM-IV (SCID). Four PHQ modules were assessed: major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and alcohol use disorders (AUD) [including both alcohol abuse and dependence]. Based on the SCID diagnosis, sensitivity and specificity were determined. The specificity of the PHQ ranged from moderate to high for all 4 PHQ modules (MDD, 0.79; GAD, 0.67; PD, 0.89; AUD, 0.97). However, the sensitivity was relatively low: MDD (0.58); GAD (0.61); PD (0.49); and AUD (0.24). The PHQ was also associated with psychosocial variables. Patients whose PHQ showed MDD, GAD, or PD reported significantly more depressive symptoms and perceived disability than patients who did not (Ps pain than those without (Ps comorbidity in patients with CDOMD. The low sensitivity of the PHQ in this population, however, remains a weakness of the PHQ. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  10. General condition of hikikomori (prolonged social withdrawal) in Japan: psychiatric diagnosis and outcome in mental health welfare centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Naoji; Sakai, Motohiro; Kuroda, Yasukazu; Kiyota, Yoshikazu; Kitabata, Yuji; Kurosawa, Mie

    2013-02-01

    The issue of hikikomori (prolonged social withdrawal) among Japanese youth has attracted attention from international experts. In previous research, the unique cultural and social factors of Japanese society have been the focus; however, in order to resolve the problem of hikikomori, individual mental health problems must be included. We examined the psychiatric background of individuals with hikikomori. We recruited 337 individuals with hikikomori; 183 subjects who utilized the centres were designated as the help-seeking group. We examined the multi-axial psychiatric diagnosis based on the DSM-IV-TR, treatment policies and treatment outcomes. We also examined 154 subjects who did not utilize the centers (non-help-seeking group). Most of the subjects in the utilization group were classified into one of the diagnostic categories. Forty-nine (33.3%) subjects were diagnosed with schizophrenia, mood disorders or anxiety disorders, and this group needed pharmacotherapy. Other subjects were diagnosed with personality disorders or pervasive developmental disorders, and they mainly needed psycho-social support. The Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scores of the non-help-seeking group were significantly lower than the GAF scores of those who used treatments. Most hikikomori cases can be diagnosed using current diagnostic criteria. Individuals with hikikomori are much worse if they do not seek help.

  11. The Health and Social Isolation of American Veterans Denied Veterans Affairs Disability Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Dennis Adrian; Passannante, Marian; Helmer, Drew; Holland, Bart K; Halperin, William E

    2017-02-01

    Authors comparatively analyzed health and social isolation between U.S. military veterans denied Veterans Affairs (VA) disability compensation and veterans awarded VA disability compensation. The 2001 National Survey of Veterans was used to create a sample of 4,522 veterans denied or awarded VA disability compensation. Using the Andersen health services utilization model as a conceptual framework, multivariate logistic regression was applied to assess relationships between VA disability compensation award status, three separate domains of health, and correlates of social isolation. Results indicate that denied applicants were more likely than those awarded to have poor overall health (odds ratio [OR] = 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23, 1.70), and limitations in activities of daily living (OR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.21). Denied applicants' physical functioning (40.3) and mental functioning (41.2) composite summary scores were not clinically different from those of awarded applicants (39.0 and 40.1, respectively), indicating that both were comparably impaired. Veterans denied VA disability compensation had poor health and functional impairments. They also experienced poverty and isolation, suggesting that they may be in need of additional supportive services. Connecting veterans to community resources could be a vital service to provide to all veterans applying for disability compensation. © 2016 National Association of Social Workers.

  12. Relation between paralinguistic skills and social skills in adults with mild and moderate intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial expressions and prosodic acoustic characteristics jointly present paralinguistic features of communication. By analyzing literature, we observe that respondents with intellectual disabilities manifest emphasized difficulties in detecting emotions in tasks of facial and vocal expression. However, we do not know if there are data on how paralinguistic abilities correlate with social skills in adults with intellectual disabilities. This research was conducted in order to determine the relation between the ability of paralinguistic production and paralinguistic understanding, on one side, and social skills on the other side. The sample consisted of 44 adults of both genders with mild (N=22 and moderate intellectual disabilities (N=22, aged between 20 and 50 (M=32.41, SD=9.36. The Paralinguistic scale from the battery for the assessment of communication (The Assessment Battery for Communication, Abaco, Sacco et al., 2008 was used for the assessment of paralinguistic skills, and three subscales of Vineland adaptive behavior scale - teaching form (Sparrow, Cicchetti & Balla, 2006 were used for the assessment of social skills. The results show that the achievement on subscales of Playing and leisure time positively correlated with the ability to understand emotions in communication (r = 0.486, p < 0.05 in respondents with mild intellectual disability. Achievements on the subscales Skills of adapting had a moderate and positive correlation with the ability to understand emotions in communication (r=0.522, p<0.05 in subjects with mild intellectual disability. Statistically significant correlations between the examined variables were not observed in the group of respondents with moderate intellectual disability. We can conclude that in adults with mild intellectual disability the ability to understand emotional paralinguistic elements significantly correlates with the ability to organize social activities and to adapt behavior in social interactions.

  13. Use of social media during public emergencies by people with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, John T; Mueller, James L; Jones, Michael L

    2014-08-01

    People with disabilities are generally more vulnerable during disasters and public emergencies than the general population. Physical, sensory and cognitive impairments may result in greater difficulty in receiving and understanding emergency alert information, and greater difficulty in taking appropriate action. The use of social media in the United States has grown considerably in recent years. This has generated increasing interest on the part of national, state and local jurisdictions in leveraging these channels to communicate public health and safety information. How and to what extent people with disabilities use social and other communications media during public emergencies can help public safety organizations understand the communication needs of the citizens in their jurisdictions, and plan their social media and other communications strategies accordingly. This article presents data from a survey on the use of social media and other communications media during public emergencies by people with disabilities conducted from November 1, 2012 through March 30, 2013. The data presented here show four key results. First, levels of use of social media in general are high for people with disabilities, as well as for the general population. Second, use of social media during emergencies is still low for both groups. Third, levels of use of social media are not associated with income levels, but are significantly and strongly associated with age: younger people use social media at higher rates than older people in both groups (psocial media during emergencies across disability types are slight, with the exception of deaf and hard-of-hearing respondents, the former more likely to have used social media to receive (p=0.002), verify (p=0.092) and share (p=0.007) emergency information. These last two results suggest that effective emergency communications strategies need to rely on multiple media types and channels to reach the entire community.

  14. Social support and subsequent disability: it is not the size of your network that counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Deirdre; Leung, Janni; Pachana, Nancy; Flicker, Leon; Hankey, Graeme; Dobson, Annette

    2012-09-01

    high levels of social support and engagement may help sustain good health and functional ability. However, the definition of social support in previous research has been inconsistent and findings are mixed. The aim of this analysis was to explore the effect of two aspects of social support on subsequent disability in a group of community dwelling older women and men. data were drawn from two concurrent prospective observational cohort studies of community-based older Australian women (N = 2,013) and men (N = 680). Baseline and follow-up data were drawn from the second (1999) and fifth (2008) surveys of the women and the second (2001) and third (2008) surveys of the men. At baseline, social support was measured by the two subscales (social network and subjective support) of the Duke Social Support Index (DSSI). The outcome measure was Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs). overall, social network size was not associated with subsequent disability in either women or men. After adjusting for health status at baseline, lack of satisfaction with social support was associated with greater difficulties in ADLs and IADLs for both women and men. our results suggest that the provision of social support is insufficient to limit subsequent disability: support provided must be subjectively perceived to be relevant and adequate.

  15. Integration of the social environment in a mobility ontology for people with motor disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharebaghi, Amin; Mostafavi, Mir-Abolfazl; Edwards, Geoffrey; Fougeyrollas, Patrick; Gamache, Stéphanie; Grenier, Yan

    2017-07-07

    Our contemporary understanding of disability is rooted in the idea that disability is the product of human-environment interaction processes. People may be functionally limited, but this becomes a disability only when they engage with their immediate social and physical environments. Any attempt to address issues of mobility in relation to people with disabilities should be grounded in an ontology that encompasses this understanding. The objective of this study is to provide a methodology to integrate the social and physical environments in the development of a mobility ontology for people with motor disabilities (PWMD). We propose to create subclasses of concepts based on a Nature-Development distinction rather than creating separate social and physical subclasses. This allows the relationships between social and physical elements to be modelled in a more compact and efficient way by specifying them locally within each entity, and better accommodates the complexities of the human-environment interaction as well. Based on this approach, an ontology for mobility of PWMD considering four main elements - the social and physical environmental factors, human factors, life habits related to mobility and possible goals of mobility - is presented. We demonstrate that employing the Nature-Development perspective facilitates the process of developing useful ontologies, especially for defining the relationships between the social and physical parts of the environment. This is a fundamental issue for modelling the interaction between humans and their social and physical environments for a broad range of applications, including the development of geospatial assistive technologies for navigation of PWMD. Implications for rehabilitation The proposed perspective may actually have much broader interests beyond the issue of disability - much of the interesting dynamics in city development arises from the interaction between human-developed components - the built environment and its

  16. Effects of macroeconomic trends on social security spending due to sickness and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Jahangir; Gerdtham, Ulf-G; Jansson, Bjarne

    2004-11-01

    We analyzed the relationship between macroeconomic conditions, measured as unemployment rate and social security spending, from 4 social security schemes and total spending due to sickness and disability. We obtained aggregated panel data from 13 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development member countries for 1980-1996. We used regression analysis and fixed effect models to examine spending on sickness benefits, disability pensions, occupational-injury benefits, survivor's pensions, and total spending. A decline in unemployment increased sickness benefits spending and reduced disability pension spending. These effects reversed direction after 4 years of unemployment. Inclusion of mortality rate as an additional variable in the analysis did not affect the findings. Macroeconomic conditions influence some reimbursements from social security schemes but not total spending.

  17. The contribution from psychological, social, and organizational work factors to risk of disability retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knardahl, Stein; Johannessen, Håkon A.; Sterud, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Background: Previous studies indicate that psychological, social, and organizational factors at work contribute to health, motivation, absence from work, and functional ability. The objective of the study was to assess the current state of knowledge of the contribution of psychological, social...... social support from ones superior. Conclusions: Psychological and organizational factors at work contribute to disability retirement with the most robust evidence for the role of work control. We recommend the measurement of specific exposure factors in future studies......., and organizational factors to disability retirement by a systematic review and meta-analyses. Methods: Data sources: A systematic literature search for studies of retirement due to disability in Medline, Embase, and PsychINFO was performed. Reference lists of relevant articles were hand-searched for additional...

  18. School Inclusion of People With Physical Disabilities: The Role of Social Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mírian Daniela Matos Campos Andrade

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study sought out to understand the process of school inclusion of a student with physical disabilities in a public school in the Federal District of Brazil (Distrito Federal, with an emphasis on social interactions. Under this perspective, it was retrospectively analyzed the student's social position relative to their peers in order to identify elements that could contribute to the process of school inclusion of a physically disabled student. The theoretical reference had as input the bioecological model of human development followed by fundamental concepts of disability, social and educational inclusion. The social position of the person with disability related to her classmates in the classroom context was identified by means of sociometric test. The main results showed unfavorable social position of the student related to her peers and the lack of cohesion of the group as hindering her process of inclusion in the school. It was concluded that attitudinal barriers made it impossible her full integration in school. The possible impact of the poor quality of social interactions of the student for the student's development was discussed.

  19. Sexual Understanding, Sources of Information and Social Networks; the Reports of Young People with Intellectual Disabilities and Their Non-Disabled Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahoda, A.; Pownall, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sexual development plays a vital part in young people's emotional adjustment. Method: This study compared the sexual understanding of 30 adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities (ID) and 30 non-disabled adolescents, along with their reports of where they obtained sexual information, and the nature of their social networks…

  20. Efficacy of nursing interventions in reducing social and occupational disabilities among patients with neurosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajaiah; Jothimani, G; Parthasarathi, R; Reddemma, K; Giri, A T S

    2012-01-01

    Individuals suffering from neurosis suffer from social and occupational disabilities similar to that of psychoses. Though understanding of disabilities in neurosis is essential in management of the clients, the relevant interventional studies are very limited. The present study attempted to evaluate the effect of nursing interventions in reducing social and occupational disabilities in neurotic patients. Sixty neurotic patients diagnosed as per ICD 9 criteria were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups followed by pre-assessment by Groningen social disability schedule. Of the 10 sessions of nursing intervention, 3 were individual sessions with clients, 5 with clients and family members and 2 with small group of clients with similar problems; nursing intervention group and non-nursing intervention group received the routine drug treatment at rural community mental health centre, NIMHANS, Bengaluru. The post-assessment was carried out first, second, and the third month followed by the nursing intervention. The findings revealed statistically significant reduction in social and occupational disabilities. A community-based psychosocial intervention led by community health nurses catering to the needs of neurotic patients is indicated by the results.

  1. Social marketing strategies for reaching older people with disabilities: findings from a survey of centers for independent living participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moone, Rajean Paul; Lightfoot, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Centers for independent living (CILs) provide critical supports, services, and advocacy for assisting people with disabilities in living independently. As there is a rapidly increasing population of older people with disabilities, many CILs are now considering how to actively engage older adults in their organizations. This study utilized a survey of older people with disabilities to help identify social marketing techniques that community organizations like CILs can use to effectively reach older people with disabilities. Utilizing the components of the social marketing mix in designing outreach efforts, including a critical examination of product, place, price, participants, and partnering, CILs and other community agencies can better reach older adults with disabilities.

  2. The role of pain-related anxiety in adolescents' disability and social impairment: ALSPAC data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caes, L; Fisher, E; Clinch, J; Tobias, J H; Eccleston, C

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety, in particular pain-related anxiety, plays an important role in explaining the severity of pain complaints and pain-related disability in both adults and children with chronic pain. The fear-avoidance model (FAM) describes how pain-related anxiety plays a critical role in the maintenance of pain-avoidance behaviour, which in turn influences pain-related disability. However, the FAM does not take into account broader aspects of adolescence, such as social functioning, which could be negatively impacted by anxiety. In addition, most studies examining the role of anxiety in pain have used small convenience or clinical samples. By using a large UK epidemiological database, this study investigated the associations between pain-related anxiety, disability and judgements of social impairment. Participants (n = 856) with recurrent pain were selected from a larger epidemiological study (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children) of adolescents attending a research clinic at the age of 17 (n = 5170). Adolescents completed a self-report questionnaire on pain-related anxiety, disability and perceived social impairment. High levels of pain-related anxiety were associated with more disability. In girls, higher levels of pain-related anxiety were also related to the self-perception of greater impairment in social functioning compared with their peers. Pain-related anxiety was associated with greater pain-related disability and impaired social functioning. Social functioning should be explored as an integral part of fear-avoidance models of adolescent chronic pain. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  3. Social Frailty in Community-Dwelling Older Adults as a Risk Factor for Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makizako, Hyuma; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Lee, Sanyoon; Doi, Takehiko; Nakakubo, Sho; Hotta, Ryo; Suzuki, Takao

    2015-11-01

    To determine social frailty status using simple questions and to examine the association between social frailty and disability onset among community-dwelling older adults. Prospective cohort study. Japanese community. A total of 4304 adults age ≥65 years living in the community participated in a baseline assessment from 2011 to 2012. They were followed monthly for incident certification of care needs during the 2 years after the baseline assessment. Care-needs certification in the national long-term care insurance system of Japan; a self-reported questionnaire including 7 items to define social frailty status, adjustment for several potential confounders such as demographic characteristics; and Kaplan-Meier survival curves for disability incidence by social frailty. During the 2 years, 144 participants (3.3%) were certified as requiring long-term care insurance in accordance with incident disability. Five of the 7 items in the self-reported questionnaire were significantly associated with disability incidence. In the adjusted model including potential covariates, participants who were defined as having social frailty (≥2/5) (hazard ratio 1.66, 95% confidence interval 1.00-2.74) and prefrailty (=1/5) (hazard ratio 1.53, 95% confidence interval 1.02-2.531), based on 5 items at the baseline assessment, had an increased risk of disability compared with nonfrail participants (=0/5). Social frailty, assessed using simple questions regarding living alone, going out less frequently compared with the prior year, visiting friends sometimes, feeling helpful to friends or family, and talking with someone every day, has a strong impact on the risk of future disability among community-dwelling older people. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Promoting social inclusion through Unified Sports for youth with intellectual disabilities: a five-nation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConkey, R; Dowling, S; Hassan, D; Menke, S

    2013-10-01

    Although the promotion of social inclusion through sports has received increased attention with other disadvantaged groups, this is not the case for children and adults with intellectual disability who experience marked social isolation. The study evaluated the outcomes from one sports programme with particular reference to the processes that were perceived to enhance social inclusion. The Youth Unified Sports programme of Special Olympics combines players with intellectual disabilities (called athletes) and those without intellectual disabilities (called partners) of similar skill level in the same sports teams for training and competition. Alongside the development of sporting skills, the programme offers athletes a platform to socialise with peers and to take part in the life of their community. Unified football and basketball teams from five countries--Germany, Hungary, Poland, Serbia and Ukraine--participated. Individual and group interviews were held with athletes, partners, coaches, parents and community leaders: totalling around 40 informants per country. Qualitative data analysis identified four thematic processes that were perceived by informants across all countries and the two sports to facilitate social inclusion of athletes. These were: (1) the personal development of athletes and partners; (2) the creation of inclusive and equal bonds; (3) the promotion of positive perceptions of athletes; and (4) building alliances within local communities. Unified Sports does provide a vehicle for promoting the social inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities that is theoretically credible in terms of social capital scholarship and which contains lessons for advancing social inclusion in other contexts. Nonetheless, certain limitations are identified that require further consideration to enhance athletes' social inclusion in the wider community. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSID.

  5. Impact of psychiatric and social characteristics on HIV sexual risk behavior in Puerto Rican women with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaphy, Emily Lenore Goldman; Loue, Sana; Sajatovic, Martha; Tisch, Daniel J

    2010-11-01

    Latinos in the United States have been identified as a high-risk group for depression, anxiety, and substance abuse. HIV/AIDS has disproportionately impacted Latinos. Review findings suggest that HIV-risk behaviors among persons with severe mental illness (SMI) are influenced by a multitude of factors including psychiatric illness, cognitive-behavioral factors, substance use, childhood abuse, and social relationships. To examine the impact of psychiatric and social correlates of HIV sexual risk behavior in Puerto Rican women with SMI. Data collected longitudinally (from 2002 to 2005) in semi-structured interviews and from non-continuous participant observation was analyzed using a cross-sectional design. Bivariate associations between predictor variables and sexual risk behaviors were examined using binary and ordinal logistic regression. Linear regression was used to examine the association between significant predictor variables and the total number of risk behaviors the women engaged in during the 6 months prior to baseline. Just over one-third (35.9%) of the study population (N = 53) was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and GAF scores ranged from 30 to 80 with a median score of 60. Participants ranged in age from 18 to 50 years (M = 32.6 ± 8.7), three-fourths reported a history of either sexual or physical abuse or of both in childhood, and one-fourth had abused substances in their lifetimes. Bivariate analyses indicated that psychiatric and social factors were differentially associated with sexual risk behaviors. Multivariate linear regression models showed that suffering from increased severity of psychiatric symptoms and factors and living below the poverty line are predictive of engagement in a greater number of HIV sexual risk behaviors. Puerto Rican women with SMI are at high risk for HIV infection and are in need of targeted sexual risk reduction interventions that simultaneously address substance abuse prevention and treatment, childhood abuse, and the

  6. Connectedness and citizenship: redefining social integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Norma C; Hopper, Kim; Tugenberg, Toni; Dickey, Barbara; Fisher, Daniel

    2007-04-01

    Despite decades of deinstitutionalization, individuals with psychiatric disabilities living outside the hospital may be described as in the community, but not of it. To effectively address the persisting problem of social exclusion of persons with psychiatric disabilities, new conceptual tools are needed. To address this need, a new definition of social integration is offered. The definition is based on data from a qualitative study. Data collection consisted of individual, unstructured interviews with 56 adults who have been psychiatrically disabled (N=78 interviews) as well as ethnographic visits to five service sites working to promote social integration for their users (N=8 visits). An interpretive approach was used to analyze the data. Social integration is defined as a process, unfolding over time, through which individuals who have been psychiatrically disabled increasingly develop and exercise their capacities for connectedness and citizenship. Connectedness denotes the construction and successful maintenance of reciprocal interpersonal relationships. Social, moral, and emotional competencies are required to sustain connectedness. Citizenship refers to the rights and privileges enjoyed by members of a democratic society and to the responsibilities these rights engender. The definition calls for full rights and responsibilities of citizenship. The new definition sets an ideal, but not unrealistic, standard for social integration in the context of psychiatric disability. High standards encourage mental health professionals and policy makers to rethink what is possible for mental health services and to raise expectations for connectedness and citizenship among persons once disabled by mental illness.

  7. The formation of social reintegration strategies of the psychic suffering carrier: new directions for psychiatric nursing in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Emilia Jales Simões de; Moreira, Lilian Hortale de Oliveira; Cardoso, Maria Manuela Vila Nova; Ferreira, Rosa Gomes dos Santos; Silva, Thuany Cristine Santos da

    2014-09-01

    This is an exploratory and descriptive study of a qualitative nature. Its objective is to analyse the formation of strategies for social reintegration of the psychic suffering carrier in the practice of nurses working in hospital psychiatric institutions. For this study, we use, as a basis, the concepts and processes of the formation of strategies presented by Isabel Nicholau, 2001. Twelve nurses with health care experience in hospital psychiatric institutions participated in this study, and data collection occurred through semi-structured interviews in the year 2013. The data revealed that, in addition to human, material, and financial resources, institutional support is needed as is articulation and interaction among professionals and services. The importance of the social dimension and of the negotiation process depicts the development of conception of collective and integrated work. We conclude that strategies are emerging from the daily life of work and are not limited to a rational logic of cost and fundraising, but instead are developed through a negotiated process.

  8. Yearly Data for Spoken Language Preferences of Social Security Disability Insurance Claimants (FY 2016, including 53rd week)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset provides annual volume of the Social Security Disability initial claims at the national level from federal fiscal year 2016 shown two ways—we base one...

  9. Quarterly Data for Asian & Pacific Islander Languages, Social Security Disability Insurance Initial Claims (FY 2016, including 53rd week)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset provides quarterly volumes of the Social Security Disability initial claims at the national level from federal fiscal year 2016 with quarter 4 shown two...

  10. Quarterly Data for Spoken Language Preferences of Social Security Disability Insurance Claimants (FY 2016, including 53rd week)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset provides quarterly volumes of the Social Security Disability initial claims at the national level for federal fiscal year 2016 with quarter 4 shown two...

  11. Stigma, Social Structure, and the Biomedical Framework: Exploring the Stigma Experiences of Inpatient Service Users in Two Belgian Psychiatric Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sercu, Charlotte; Bracke, Piet

    2017-07-01

    The study discusses the stigma experiences of service users in mental health care, within the debate on the role of the biomedical framework for mental health care and power relations in society. Interview data of inpatient users ( n = 42) and care providers ( n = 43) from two Belgian psychiatric hospitals were analyzed using a constructivist grounded theory approach: Findings offer insight into how stigma experiences are affected by social structure. Stigma seemed to be related to the relation between care providers and service users their social position. The concept "mental health literacy" is used to frame this finding. In paying attention to the specific cultural and normative context, which influences the relationship between mental health literacy and stigma, it is further possible to cast some light on the meaning of the biomedical model for the construction and maintenance of power relations in mental health care and broader society.

  12. Integration of Religion and Spirituality With Social Work Practice in Disability Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masateru Higashida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This case study examines the integration of religion and spirituality (RS into disability issues from the perspective of social work in Sri Lanka. Participant observation was applied in the model administrative division of the national community-based rehabilitation (CBR program in Anuradhapura from February 2013 to January 2015. Theravada Buddhists constitute more than 99% of the population in the area studied. The participation opportunities included group activities, home visits to disabled people, and informal interviews with stakeholders. This study used the author’s field notes, which were based on the participant observation. By applying qualitative analysis, episodes and narratives were summarized into two main categories: RS-related activities and secondary RS-related phenomena. We found that the possible functions of RS practices, by disabled people and the other stakeholders, were alternative education, promotion of participation, and a sense of unity. These findings suggest that integration can be the practice to reconstruct RS aspects in disability issues.

  13. Causal beliefs about intellectual disability and schizophrenia and their relationship with awareness of the condition and social distance

    OpenAIRE

    Scior, K.; Furnham, A.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on mental illness stigma abounds yet little is known about public perceptions of intellectual disability. This study examined causal beliefs about intellectual disability and schizophrenia and how these relate to awareness of the condition and social distance. UK lay people aged 16+(N=1752), in response to vignettes depicting intellectual disability and schizophrenia, noted their interpretation of the difficulties, and rated their agreement with 22 causal and four social distance ite...

  14. Encounter as a Dimension of Social Inclusion for People with Intellectual Disability: Beyond and between Community Presence and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigby, Christine; Wiesel, Ilan

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides the conceptual foundations for a study funded by the Australian Research Council and industry partners Yooralla and Jewish Care titled "Understanding 'encounter' as a dimension of social inclusion for people with intellectual disability." Since the early 1980s, disability policy has envisioned the social inclusion of people…

  15. Relationship Depth and Associative Stigma of Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Nieweglowski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Family, friends and acquaintances of people with disabilities may be viewed or treated differently by the public due to their association with a stigmatized person. Previous research finds that the public are more willing to engage in relationships with people with physical disability than with mental illness. In addition, attitudes towards associating with people with disabilities has been found to vary by depth of the chosen relationship. The current study sought to examine the connections between relationship depth (friend/romantic partner/acquaintance, disability type (physical/psychiatric and associative stigma. Adult participants (N=345 were randomly presented with vignettes varying in relationship depth and disability type via an online survey platform. Analyses found no differences in associative stigma between physical and psychiatric disabilities. Participants viewed the vignette actor Rachel as socially warmer when she was a friend or romantic partner of a person with a disability than when she was an acquaintance. Participants rated Rachel as different from themselves when she was romantically involved with the person with disability and were more willing to engage socially with Rachel when she befriended the person with disability rather than when she was a mere acquaintance.

  16. Social Skills Training for Adolescents With Intellectual Disabilities: A School-Based Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Handley, Roderick D; Ford, W Blake; Radley, Keith C; Helbig, Kate A; Wimberly, Joy K

    2016-07-01

    Individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) often demonstrate impairments in social functioning, with deficits becoming more apparent during adolescence. This study evaluated the effects of the Superheroes Social Skills program, a program that combines behavioral skills training and video modeling to teach target social skills, on accurate demonstration of three target social skills in adolescents with ID. Skills taught in the present study include Expressing Wants and Needs, Conversation, and Turn Taking. Four adolescents with ID participated in a 3-week social skills intervention, with the intervention occurring twice per week. A multiple baseline across skills design was used to determine the effect of the intervention on social skill accuracy in both a training and generalization setting. All participants demonstrated substantial improvements in skill accuracy in both settings, with teacher ratings of social functioning further suggesting generalization of social skills to nontraining settings. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Social capital and mental health among mothers in Vietnam who have children with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thi Minh Thuy

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Having a child with a disability is a heavy burden for mothers, especially in developing countries, where there is little available financial or other government support. Having a child with a disability is also linked to mental health problems and poor quality of life. Communities rich in social capital and individuals who have high levels of personal social capital generally enjoy day-to-day and long-term health and social benefits but this has not been investigated in Vietnam among mothers of children with disabilities. This study aims to investigate these mothers’ distress in terms of their social capital. Methods: A cross-sectional study based on an interviewer-assisted survey included 172 mothers of children with moderate/severe disabilities in two provinces of Vietnam (one in the North and one in central Vietnam, using a newly translated and modified version of the Australian community participation questionnaire, several measures of personal social cohesion, and Kessler's 10-item measure of general psychological distress. Hierarchical linear regression modelling was used to explore the relationships among socio-demographic factors, multiple components of structural and cognitive social capita, and mothers’ distress controlling for a wide range of socio-demographic characteristics, the nature of the child's disability, and mothers’ personality (extroversion. Results: Mothers in this study were highly and multiply disadvantaged, and they had very high levels of distress and low levels of community participation. Furthermore, most forms of participation were associated with greater, not less, distress. Socio-demographic characteristics, child's disability, and mothers’ personality did little to explain variance in mothers’ distress, but types and amounts of participation were important predictors. The final regression model explained 29% of variance in distress, with major contributions made by living in a mountainous

  18. Social capital and mental health among mothers in Vietnam who have children with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuy, Nguyen Thi Minh; Berry, Helen L

    2013-02-11

    Having a child with a disability is a heavy burden for mothers, especially in developing countries, where there is little available financial or other government support. Having a child with a disability is also linked to mental health problems and poor quality of life. Communities rich in social capital and individuals who have high levels of personal social capital generally enjoy day-to-day and long-term health and social benefits but this has not been investigated in Vietnam among mothers of children with disabilities. This study aims to investigate these mothers' distress in terms of their social capital. A cross-sectional study based on an interviewer-assisted survey included 172 mothers of children with moderate/severe disabilities in two provinces of Vietnam (one in the North and one in central Vietnam), using a newly translated and modified version of the Australian community participation questionnaire, several measures of personal social cohesion, and Kessler's 10-item measure of general psychological distress. Hierarchical linear regression modelling was used to explore the relationships among socio-demographic factors, multiple components of structural and cognitive social capita, and mothers' distress controlling for a wide range of socio-demographic characteristics, the nature of the child's disability, and mothers' personality (extroversion). Mothers in this study were highly and multiply disadvantaged, and they had very high levels of distress and low levels of community participation. Furthermore, most forms of participation were associated with greater, not less, distress. Socio-demographic characteristics, child's disability, and mothers' personality did little to explain variance in mothers' distress, but types and amounts of participation were important predictors. The final regression model explained 29% of variance in distress, with major contributions made by living in a mountainous area, having a 'reserved' personality, and frequency and

  19. Methodological procedures for the development of conceptual and social skills in people with intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaljača Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary approach in treating people with intellectual disability is aimed at the development and implementation of methodological procedures, which should provide them with academic knowledge and skills, as well as with the development of adaptive skills. The development of these skills improves functional usage of the acquired academic knowledge in everyday life. This paper presents some methodological procedures which are applied in stimulating the development of certain conceptual and social skills in children and youth with intellectual disabilities. By analyzing the available studies, it can be concluded that the usage of new technological achievements improves standard behavioral procedures for the development of conceptual and social skills in people with intellectual disability. Simultaneous application of behavioral procedures and assistive technologies allows a high degree of individualization, fast and continuous feedback, saving resources and time, as well as optimal functional preparedness of these people to live in a community.

  20. Service Dogs, Psychiatric Hospitalization, and the ADA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muramatsu, Russ S; Thomas, Kelly Jones; Leong, Stephanie L; Ragukonis, Frank

    A service dog is defined as “any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability...

  1. E-Inclusion: Social Inclusion of Young Adults with Intellectual Disabilities - A Participatory Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Julia S

    2017-01-01

    By examining the role of digital tools and social media, this paper discusses an innovative prospective research study to enhance social inclusion of young adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). The paper begins with an overview of how individuals with disabilities have historically been excluded from society based on limited access and minimal opportunities afforded to them. Next, the paper presents the caveats that may hinder the improvement of social inclusion of young adults with ID and the oversights when developing digital technologies. Details about a prospective intervention research study are described that include a mobile application and a social media component. Finally, implications for research and practice are highlighted to emphasize the fundamental call for an insightful deliberation of these caveats that needs to be addressed in the design of a research study of this nature.

  2. Social aspect of art and problems of inclusion in people with health disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehorina A. V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The review analyzes foreign studies over the period of 2005—2011 on socially focused art projects. It also regards the ways of art utilization for the purposes of social integration of people with health disabilities in inclusive education and in projects aimed at health promotion in various groups of population. The article emphasizes the tendency of social turn in art and in public health service to come closer together. It also stresses the link of this turn with the ideology of inclusion as based on criticism of «disability» discourse. The article also draws attention to a tendency of unification of therapeutic, educational, social and personality-related orientation in utilization of art practices.

  3. Assessing work disability for social security benefits: international models for the direct assessment of work capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Ben Baumberg; Garthwaite, Kayleigh; Warren, Jon; Bambra, Clare

    2017-08-25

    It has been argued that social security disability assessments should directly assess claimants' work capacity, rather than relying on proxies such as on functioning. However, there is little academic discussion of how such assessments could be conducted. The article presents an account of different models of direct disability assessments based on case studies of the Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, Norway, the United States of America, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, utilising over 150 documents and 40 expert interviews. Three models of direct work disability assessments can be observed: (i) structured assessment, which measures the functional demands of jobs across the national economy and compares these to claimants' functional capacities; (ii) demonstrated assessment, which looks at claimants' actual experiences in the labour market and infers a lack of work capacity from the failure of a concerned rehabilitation attempt; and (iii) expert assessment, based on the judgement of skilled professionals. Direct disability assessment within social security is not just theoretically desirable, but can be implemented in practice. We have shown that there are three distinct ways that this can be done, each with different strengths and weaknesses. Further research is needed to clarify the costs, validity/legitimacy, and consequences of these different models. Implications for rehabilitation It has recently been argued that social security disability assessments should directly assess work capacity rather than simply assessing functioning - but we have no understanding about how this can be done in practice. Based on case studies of nine countries, we show that direct disability assessment can be implemented, and argue that there are three different ways of doing it. These are "demonstrated assessment" (using claimants' experiences in the labour market), "structured assessment" (matching functional requirements to workplace demands), and "expert assessment" (the

  4. "It was just realizing ... that life isn't one big horror": a qualitative study of supported socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, L; Haglund, K E; Stayner, D A; Rakfeldt, J; Chinman, M J; Tebes, J K

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the qualitative component of a large-scale study of supported socialization. Paralleling the recent advances made through supported housing, supported employment, and supported education, this approach seeks to increase the involvement of individuals with psychiatric disabilities in naturally occurring social and recreational activities in community settings of their choice. After a review of social relationships and psychiatric disability, we describe the Partnership Project and present findings from a series of qualitative interviews conducted with a subsample of participants. We then discuss the implications of these findings for the community integration of individuals with psychiatric disabilities.

  5. "Our child's significant disability shapes our lives": experiences of family social participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Heather; Imms, Christine; Fossey, Ellie

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the stories of parents of youth with severe physical disabilities to understand how they viewed the quality of their family social participation; the barriers to social participation faced as families and the strategies and supports that might be used to reduce these barriers. Ten parents of youth (10-18 years) with severe physical disabilities, recruited through specialist schools, health and disability services, were interviewed using a narratively-oriented interview tool: the Occupational Performance History Interview-II. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Narrative and thematic analytic approaches were used to construct each parent's story of family social participation issues, and to identify themes across stories. Parents used highly structured routines and required substantial resources, particularly adult assistance and financial means, to facilitate family social participation. Needs were greater when the youth was more severely impaired, heavier, incontinent or had fragile health. Parents' choice of family activities and belief that they could influence the quality, enjoyment and satisfaction derived from family social participation were shaped by past experiences and the perceived benefits of participation. Family social participation relied on flexible supports tailored to families' needs and preferences. Greater choice and control of resources are central to enabling valued participation. Implications for Rehabilitation Government resources need to be directed towards improving community based wheelchair accessibility and public toilet facilities for youth with Level V GMFCS-E&R impairments and their families. Disability service delivery models need to enable families to choose the types of high quality care and support that will facilitate valued family social participation. Clinicians need to be aware that families of the most severely impaired children, who are heavier, incontinent or in fragile health, will

  6. Stigma, Social Comparison and Self-Esteem in Adults with an Intellectual Disability

    OpenAIRE

    Paterson, Lucy; McKenzie, Karen; Lindsay, William

    2012-01-01

    Background: The paper examines the perception of stigma in 43 adults with an intellectual disability, the relationship this has with their psychological well-being and whether the process of social comparison has a moderating effect on this relationship.\\ud \\ud Materials and Methods: A questionnaire-based, within-participant design was used. Participants completed three self-report measures of perception of stigma, self-esteem and social comparison.\\ud \\ud Results: Perception of stigma was fo...

  7. Stigma, Social Comparison and Self-Esteem in Adults with an Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Lucy; McKenzie, Karen; Lindsay, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Background: The paper examines the perception of stigma in 43 adults with an intellectual disability, the relationship this has with their psychological well-being and whether the process of social comparison has a moderating effect on this relationship. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire-based, within-participant design was used. Participants…

  8. Living Arrangements, Social Integration, and Loneliness in Later Life: The Case of Physical Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, David

    2009-01-01

    Despite the theoretical linkages between household composition and social integration, relatively limited research has considered how living arrangements affect risk for loneliness in later life. Prior work has also failed to consider whether physical disability moderates this potentially important relationship. Using data from a sample of older…

  9. Social Inclusion and Community Participation of Individuals with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, Angela Novak; Stancliffe, Roger J.; McCarron, Mary; McCallion, Philip

    2013-01-01

    As more individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities are physically included in community life, in schools, neighborhoods, jobs, recreation, and congregations, the challenge of going beyond physical inclusion to true social inclusion becomes more apparent. This article summarizes the status of the research about community participation…

  10. Teachers' and Parents' Views on the Internet and Social Media Usage by Pupils with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molin, Martin; Sorbring, Emma; Löfgren-Mårtenson, Lotta

    2015-01-01

    This article reports experiences from a Swedish study, discussing teachers' and parents' views on how young people with intellectual disabilities use the Internet and social media. Five semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with teachers (n = 8) in special programmes in upper secondary schools for pupils with intellectual…

  11. Social-Skill Interventions for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students with Disabilities: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunyoung; Yan, Min-Chi; Kulkarni, Saili S.

    2017-01-01

    Teachers and researchers have considered social-skill interventions to be an essential component in the development and progress of students with disabilities. However, there is still relatively limited research on these interventions for individuals from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds. This literature review was conducted…

  12. [SOCIAL SERVICES ORGANIZATION FOR ELDERLY CITIZENS AND DISABLED PERSONS IN SOUTH FEDERAL DISTRICT OF RUSSIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkireva, A S; Bogdanov, E A; Shestakov, V P; Svintsov, A A; Chernova, G I; Cherniakina, T S

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a comparative analysis of the effectiveness of the individual rehabilitation programs among elderly citizens and disabled persons of the Astrakhan region, the part of the South Federal District of Russia. We analyzed the data of the statistical survey of the social services provided rehabilitation facilities for the elderly and disabled people in the Astrakhan region. Analytical results thus obtained shown that the network of agencies and centers of social rehabilitation in the Astrakhan region did not correspond to the needs of elderly people and disabled persons. The negative dynamics in the number of social care centers as well as in the number of people who were provided with their services revealed the need for optimization of the institutional structure and its management. These specific characteristics of the social rehabilitation services in the Astrakhan region thus identified should be taken into consideration in order to improve the rehabilitation programs among elderly citizens and disabled persons in the South Region of the Russian Federation.

  13. The Social and Recreational Characteristics of Adults with Intellectual Disability and Pica Living in Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Melody; Hirdes, John P.; Martin, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the social life of adults with intellectual disability (ID) who engage in pica behaviour (i.e., ingestion of non-food items). Secondary analyses were conducted on the population of adults residing in Ontario's three remaining specialized institutions for persons with ID (N = 1008); 220 individuals (21.8%) had pica. All…

  14. Social information processing in boys with autistic spectrum disorder and mild to borderline intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Nieuwenhuijzen, M. van

    2009-01-01

    Background - Children with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) and mild to borderline intellectual disability (ID) have less adaptive behaviour and more behaviour problems than children with mild to borderline ID. Social information processing appears to be an important mechanism in the explanation of

  15. Motor interventions in children with severe or profound intellectual disabilities: motor, cognitive and social effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwen, Suzanne; van der Putten, Annette; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is generally agreed that motor activity promotes motor, cognitive, and social development, but the specific benefits in children with severe or profound intellectual disabilities (S-PID) are as yet unknown. The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidence related to

  16. Connecting stories: a narrative approach of social inclusion of persons with intellectual disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meininger, H.P.

    2010-01-01

    Social inclusion is a leading goal of policy and practice in care and support for persons with intellectual disabilities. However, its conceptualization, moral presuppositions and effects are far from clear. In answering the call for reconceptualization, the author refers to cultural-historical,

  17. Employing a Social Justice Framework to Promote Postsecondary Transition for Students with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Amy L.

    2017-01-01

    Transition from high school to postsecondary education (PSE) and employment can be challenging for all youth, and particularly for youth with intellectual disability (ID). Promoting equity and access to PSE for students with ID is a social justice mandate, and high school counselors are uniquely positioned to assist youth with ID in accessing…

  18. Social Support in the Structure of Personality Resources in Individuals with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Leontiev

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the issues of social support of individuals with disabilities and describes its role in the development and maintenance of subjective well-being of persons in situations of disability. A special external resource for overcoming unfavorable developmental conditions, social support is interlocked in a continuous relationship with psychological resources of personality. One of its distinctive features is that it implies the subject's activity aimed at overcoming difficult life situation on his/her own. When the person's bodily resources are insufficient (as it happens in situations of physical disabilities, the role of macro- and microsocial resources in supporting his/her well-being naturally increases. However, when both social and bodily resources are scarce, it is the individual's personality that stands in the gap. The research described in the paper explored the relationship between microsocial resources (support of family and friends, satisfaction with this support and psychological resources of resistance and self-regulation of personality. The sample consisted of 210 subjects (48 students with disabilities, 162 healthy subjects. The outcomes revealed certain differences between the subsamples with low and high rates of social support which suggest that the subjects' perceptions and evaluations of the support contribute to their psychological resources of coping and self-regulation, activating and/or reinforcing the existing potential of their personalities.

  19. Social Competence of Students with Learning Disabilities Using a Risk-Resilience Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Alison Joy

    2010-01-01

    Children with learning disabilities (LD) makeup 50.5% of all children identified for special services in the schools. Research has found that children with LD have difficulties in areas of functioning related to social competence. This study is based on a risk and resilience model to explore external protective factors (friendships and social…

  20. Unmet Healthcare and Social Services Needs of Older Canadian Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shooshtari, Shahin; Naghipur, Saba; Zhang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    The authors sought to create a demographic, socioeconomic, and health-related profile of older (40+) Canadian adults with developmental disabilities (DD) residing in their communities, and to enhance current knowledge of their unmet health and social support services needs. They provide a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from the 2001…

  1. Adolescent Judgments and Reasoning about the Failure to Include Peers with Social Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Li, Zhushan

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents with autism spectrum disorder often do not have access to crucial peer social activities. This study examines how typically developing adolescents evaluate decisions not to include a peer based on disability status, and the justifications they apply to these decisions. A clinical interview methodology was used to elicit judgments and…

  2. Self-Reported Life Events, Social Support and Psychological Problems in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert-Williams, Lee; Hastings, Richard P.; Crowe, Rachel; Pemberton, Jemma

    2011-01-01

    Background: Several studies have reported relationships between life events and psychological problems in people with intellectual disabilities. In contrast to the general literature, data have consistently been collected via proxy informants and putative moderator variables such as social support have not been examined. Materials and Methods:…

  3. Social Peer Interactions in Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Sara; Maes, Bea

    2014-01-01

    Social interactions may positively influence developmental and quality of life outcomes. Research in persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) mostly investigated interactions with caregivers. This literature review focuses on peer interactions of persons with PIMD. A computerized literature search of three databases was…

  4. Social network of family caregivers of disabled and dependent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Hitomi Yamashita

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional study that used the Social Network Index and the genogram to assess the social network of 110 family caregivers of dependent patients attended by a Home Care Service in São Paulo, Brazil. Data were analyzed using the test U of Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman correlation. Results were considered statistically significant when p<0,05. Few caregivers participated in activities outside the home and the average number of people they had a bond was 4,4 relatives and 3,6 friends. Caregivers who reported pain and those who had a partner had higher average number of relatives who to trust. The average number of friends was higher in the group that reported use of medication for depression. Total and per capita incomes correlated with the social network. It was found that family members are the primary caregiver’s social network.

  5. Psychiatric diagnoses and risk of suicidal behaviour in young disability pensioners: prospective cohort studies of all 19-23 year olds in Sweden in 1995, 2000, and 2005, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Ulf; Alexanderson, Kristina; Kjeldgård, Linnea; Mittendorfer-Rutz, Ellenor

    2014-01-01

    Increasing rates of disability pension (DP) have been observed among young adults. We studied specific psychiatric DP diagnoses and subsequent risk of suicidal behaviour in a series of three cohorts of young adult in Sweden. In a nationwide register study, we included all young adults who in 1995, 2000, and 2005, respectively, were 19-23 years old and lived in Sweden (n≈500,000 per cohort). Rates of DP and specific psychiatric DP diagnoses were recorded in each cohort. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for suicidal behaviour during the following five years, with the corresponding age group as reference, were calculated by Cox proportional hazard regression, adjusted for demographic variables and previous own and parental suicidal behaviour. The overall proportion with DP in this age group increased from 0.92% in 1995 to 2.29% in 2005, with particularly large increases in psychiatric diagnoses such as hyperkinetic disorders, pervasive developmental disorders, and depression/anxiety. The overall proportion of young disability pensioners attempting suicide during the five-year follow-up increased from 2.21% in the 1995 cohort to 3.81% in the 2005 cohort. Within most psychiatric DP diagnoses, the risk of attempted suicide did not change significantly over time, whereas suicide attempts increased in the reference group. Accordingly, the HRs for suicide attempt decreased in some psychiatric DP diagnoses. The highest adjusted HRs were observed for depression/anxiety (16.41; CI: 9.06 to 29.74) and schizophrenia (9.37; 6.13 to 14.31) in the 1995 cohort. The rate of suicide among young disability pensioners during follow-up ranged from 0.19% in 1995 to 0.37% in 2005, mainly occurring in individuals with psychiatric diagnoses. Suicidal behaviour has become more prevalent among young disability pensioners, which co-occurred with an increased tendency to grant DP in psychiatric diagnoses with a known high risk of suicidal behaviour. Preventive measures

  6. Social Tie Characteristics and Psychiatric Rehabilitation Outcomes among Adults with Serious Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chih-Chin; Chronister, Julie Ann

    2012-01-01

    Social support has achieved national attention as a key component of the mental health recovery paradigm for persons with serious mental illness (SMI). The aim of this study was to investigate the amount of variance accounted for by four social tie characteristics (social network orientation, emotional support, tangible support, and negative…

  7. Aspects of Social Phobia

    OpenAIRE

    Marteinsdóttir, Ína

    2003-01-01

    Social phobia is a disabling, lifelong disorder characterised by fear in social settings. The aim of the present study was to gain more knowledge about diagnostic, neurobiologic and epidemiologic aspects of social phobia. Thirty-two individuals were assessed by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I and II psychiatric disorders, the Karolinska Scales of Personality and the Temperament and Character Inventory. Social phobia was accompanied by concurrent axis I disorders in about 2...

  8. Social relationships, mental health and wellbeing in physical disability: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tough, Hannah; Siegrist, Johannes; Fekete, Christine

    2017-05-08

    Research has consistently found that favourable exchange with one's proximal social environment has positive effects on both mental health and wellbeing. Adults with physical disabilities may have fewer opportunities of favourable exchange, and therefore the effects on mental health and wellbeing may be less advantageous. The aim of this study is to systematically review quantitative studies exploring associations of social relationships with mental health and wellbeing in persons with physical disabilities. The databases PubMed, PsycINFO and Scopus were searched for relevant studies published between 1995 and 2016. Data was extracted on study and participants' characteristics, independent and dependent variables, used measures and effects sizes of associations between social relationships and mental health or wellbeing. A narrative review was performed to synthesize findings along the constructs social support, social networks, negative social interactions, family functioning and relationship quality. Of the 63 included studies, 47 were cross-sectional and 16 longitudinal. Most studies included a measure of social support (n = 58), while other concepts were less often studied (social networks n = 6; negative social interaction n = 3; family functioning n = 2; relationship quality n = 1). Over half of studies included depression as outcome (n = 33), followed by wellbeing (n = 14), composite mental health measures (n = 10), anxiety (n = 8), psychological distress (n = 7), posttraumatic stress disorder (n = 3), and hopelessness (n = 1). Although trends for associations of social support with mental health and wellbeing were consistent, around a quarter of studies failed to report significant associations. Social networks were related to depression, but not to other mental health or wellbeing measures. Family functioning, negative social interactions and relationship quality showed consistent associations with mental health and wellbeing

  9. Social relationships, mental health and wellbeing in physical disability: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Tough

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research has consistently found that favourable exchange with one’s proximal social environment has positive effects on both mental health and wellbeing. Adults with physical disabilities may have fewer opportunities of favourable exchange, and therefore the effects on mental health and wellbeing may be less advantageous. The aim of this study is to systematically review quantitative studies exploring associations of social relationships with mental health and wellbeing in persons with physical disabilities. Methods The databases PubMed, PsycINFO and Scopus were searched for relevant studies published between 1995 and 2016. Data was extracted on study and participants’ characteristics, independent and dependent variables, used measures and effects sizes of associations between social relationships and mental health or wellbeing. A narrative review was performed to synthesize findings along the constructs social support, social networks, negative social interactions, family functioning and relationship quality. Results Of the 63 included studies, 47 were cross-sectional and 16 longitudinal. Most studies included a measure of social support (n = 58, while other concepts were less often studied (social networks n = 6; negative social interaction n = 3; family functioning n = 2; relationship quality n = 1. Over half of studies included depression as outcome (n = 33, followed by wellbeing (n = 14, composite mental health measures (n = 10, anxiety (n = 8, psychological distress (n = 7, posttraumatic stress disorder (n = 3, and hopelessness (n = 1. Although trends for associations of social support with mental health and wellbeing were consistent, around a quarter of studies failed to report significant associations. Social networks were related to depression, but not to other mental health or wellbeing measures. Family functioning, negative social interactions and relationship quality showed consistent

  10. Social participation for people with communication disability in coffee shops and restaurants is a human right.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Clare; Guinan, Nicole; Kinneen, Libby; Mulheir, Denise; Loughnane, Hannah; Joyce, Orla; Higgins, Elaine; Boyle, Emma; Mullarney, Margaret; Lyons, Rena

    2017-12-01

    Although Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that "everyone has a right to freedom of opinion and expression", for people with communication disability this may not be a reality. This commentary shares a practical example of how people with communication disabilities together with speech-language pathology (SLP) students, academics and clinical staff co-designed and co-implemented a Communication Awareness Training Programme for catering staff to enable communication access in coffee shops and restaurants. This is an example of how SLPs can embrace their social responsibility to break down barriers for people with communication disabilities. This commentary shares the reflections of those involved and how they felt empowered because they had learned new skills and made a difference. This commentary highlights the need for co-design and co-delivery of programs to raise awareness of communication disability among catering staff and how the stories of people with communication disabilities served as a catalyst for change. It also highlights the need to SLPs to move intervention to a social and community space.

  11. The unfinished body: the medical and social reshaping of disabled young bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Janice; Coleman-Fountain, Edmund

    2014-11-01

    Stories about disability are heavily shaped by the narratives offered by medicine and society. Those narratives enact an 'anomalous' body that is constructed as distant from the norm and therefore 'damaged' but also fixable. In this paper we explore how such narratives, and the practices they encompass, influence the stories disabled young people tell about their bodies and impairment. We do so by drawing on narrative qualitative interviews and visual practices carried out with seventeen disabled young people in a project funded by the Economic and Social Research Council that took place between 2011 and 2012 in the North East of England. The findings discussed here focus on how medical and societal responses to bodily difference become part of the stories disabled young people tell about their bodies, and influence the way they work with the body as something which remains 'unfinished' and therefore both fixable and flawed. Our conclusion is that a narrative of an unfinished body is produced, as young people manage their bodies as something that is integral to their emerging identity, but also as a potential threat that could undermine and give away their labour in making an 'ordinary' functioning body and life. The paper contributes to medical sociology and sociology of the body by producing new knowledge about how disabled embodiment is lived and framed by disabled young people in the context of ongoing attempts to change the body. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Does social capital affect the incidence of functional disability in older Japanese? A prospective population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Jun; Kondo, Katsunori; Kawachi, Ichiro; Subramanian, S V; Ichida, Yukinobu; Hirai, Hiroshi; Kondo, Naoki; Osaka, Ken; Sheiham, Aubrey; Tsakos, Georgios; Watt, Richard G

    2013-01-01

    Recent increases in numbers of older people have been accompanied by increases in those with functional disability. No study has examined the association between community social capital and the onset of functional disability. The association between community social capital and the onset of functional disability was examined using data from the Aichi Gerontological Evaluation Study, a prospective cohort established in 2003 in Japan. Perceptions of community social capital (indicators of social cohesion such as trust of others and extent of social participation) in 6953 men and 7636 women aged 65 years or older were surveyed. Multilevel survival analysis using the discrete-time hazard model was applied. During 4-year follow-up, onset of functional disability occurred in 759 men and 1146 women. Women living in communities with higher mistrust had 1.68 (95% CI 1.14 to 2.49) times higher OR of onset of disability, even after adjusting for covariates. Mediators did not substantially change this association. Lack of social participation seemed to affect the health of women, though the effect was marginal (OR for covariates adjusted model =1.12 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.31)). There were no significant ORs among men. Lower community social capital was associated with higher incidence of onset of functional disability among older women but not among men. Community-based interventions to promote social capital may be useful for preventing functional disability of older Japanese women.

  13. Disabled and Non-Disabled Actors Working in Partnership for a Theatrical Performance: A Research on Theatrical Partnerships as Enablers of Social and Behavioural Skills for Persons with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenakakis, Antonis; Koltsida, Maria

    2017-01-01

    This case study investigates the working conditions of a mixed theatre group and its impact on its disabled members. The qualitative research aims to explore the impact of drama work, rehearsals and performances on the disabled members' social skills, and behavioural and emotional difficulties. Data collection methods included semi-structured…

  14. Features and Basic Directions of Social Protection of Disabled People: International Experience and Possibilities of its Application in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinska Yanina V

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to study foreign experience in the functioning of social protection of disabled people and determine the possibilities of its use in Ukraine. As a result of the study there identified the features and main directions of social protection of disabled people in foreign countries, including assistance in daily life; provision of support of income, living standards, and employment. The basic model of social protection in countries of the European Union is considered and the distribution of expenditure on social protection in the EU is analyzed. It is found that social protection of disabled people should be directed at social support of this category of citizens because the degree of state social protection of the disabled is a clear indicator of the level of development and civilization of a particular society, the level of its responsibility. Based on the analysis of foreign experience in social protection of people with disabilities, there made conclusions about the need to direct today’s Ukraine policy at strengthening social, economic, and legal status of people with disabilities; improving the conditions of their life; providing for their self-realization, achievement of their financial independence and full social integration, taking into account the best international experience.

  15. 78 FR 12130 - Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-3p; Appeal of an Initial Medical Disability Cessation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION Social Security Ruling, SSR 13-3p; Appeal of an Initial Medical Disability Cessation Determination or Decision AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Notice of Social Security Ruling (SSR...

  16. [Working disability evaluation of mentally ill persons in times of socioeconomic crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skakić, Olivera; Trajanović, Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Mental disorders reduce social functioning of ill persons in general and often cause permanent work disability. Psychiatric services try to solve individual professional or financial status in economic crisis conditions. The possible causes of disability in psychiatric patients, besides illness, are psychosocial factors. The aim of this research was to determine the number of mentally ill persons as well as morbidity structure changes in work disability evaluation in the last five years. The research included 617 psychiatric patients referred for work disability evaluation in this five-year period (2004-2008). The data contained gender, age, psychiatric diagnosis and the suggested level of disability. In the morbidity structure, a significant increase was found in the group of patients with psychoactive substance abuse, in whom the likelihood of permanent work disability was frequent. A significant decrease was observed in the group of patients with mental retardation. The number of patients with schizophrenia was similar in the study period. The patients with mood disorders, neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders were present in a relatively high number. The evaluation and suggestion for permanent work disability increased statistically significantly, while the number of patients in need for material security decreased in the period of socioeconomic crisis. Disability trend in the population of mentally ill patients is still not favourable, and therefore, their work disability monitoring is an adequate parameter which identifies work inefficacy and unemployment as an important factor of a poor life quality in psychiatric patients.

  17. Psychological, social, and mechanical work exposures and disability retirement: a prospective registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emberland, Jan S; Nielsen, Morten Birkeland; Knardahl, Stein

    2017-01-10

    Relations between several occupational psychological and social factors and disability retirement remain largely unexplored. Knowledge of which specific aspects of the work environment that affect risk of disability is a prerequisite for the success of organizational interventions aiming to prevent premature work force exit. The objective of the present study was to determine contributions to registered disability retirement by a broad range of psychological and social work exposures while taking into account effects of mechanical exposure. Written consent was obtained from 13 012 employees (96 organizations) representing a wide range of occupations, to link their survey responses to data from the Norwegian national registry of disability compensation. Median follow-up time was 5.8 years. To determine effects of self-reported work exposures on risk of disability retirement hazard ratios (HR) and 99% confidence intervals (99% CI) were calculated with Cox regression analysis. Effects of sex, age group, skill level, sickness absence in the last three years, and work exposures estimated to be confounders were accounted for. Post hoc stratification by sex was conducted to explore if identified predictors affected risk of disability retirement differently in men compared to women. Contributors to higher risk of disability retirement were "role conflict" (high level HR 1.55 99% CI 1.07 to 2.24) and "physical workload" (high level HR 1.93 99% CI 1.39 to 2.68). Contributors to lower risk of disability retirement were "positive challenge" (high level HR 0.56 99% CI 0.34 to 0.93), "fair leadership" (high level HR 0.56 99% CI 0.39 to 0.81), and "control over work intensity" (high level HR 0.62, 99% CI 0.47 to 0.82). Direction of effects was not dependent on sex in any of the five identified predictors. Several specific psychological and social work factors are independent contributors to risk of disability retirement. In order to prevent premature work force exit workplace

  18. Psychological, social, and mechanical work exposures and disability retirement: a prospective registry study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan S. Emberland

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relations between several occupational psychological and social factors and disability retirement remain largely unexplored. Knowledge of which specific aspects of the work environment that affect risk of disability is a prerequisite for the success of organizational interventions aiming to prevent premature work force exit. The objective of the present study was to determine contributions to registered disability retirement by a broad range of psychological and social work exposures while taking into account effects of mechanical exposure. Methods Written consent was obtained from 13 012 employees (96 organizations representing a wide range of occupations, to link their survey responses to data from the Norwegian national registry of disability compensation. Median follow-up time was 5.8 years. To determine effects of self-reported work exposures on risk of disability retirement hazard ratios (HR and 99% confidence intervals (99% CI were calculated with Cox regression analysis. Effects of sex, age group, skill level, sickness absence in the last three years, and work exposures estimated to be confounders were accounted for. Post hoc stratification by sex was conducted to explore if identified predictors affected risk of disability retirement differently in men compared to women. Results Contributors to higher risk of disability retirement were “role conflict” (high level HR 1.55 99% CI 1.07 to 2.24 and “physical workload” (high level HR 1.93 99% CI 1.39 to 2.68. Contributors to lower risk of disability retirement were “positive challenge” (high level HR 0.56 99% CI 0.34 to 0.93, “fair leadership” (high level HR 0.56 99% CI 0.39 to 0.81, and “control over work intensity” (high level HR 0.62, 99% CI 0.47 to 0.82. Direction of effects was not dependent on sex in any of the five identified predictors. Conclusions Several specific psychological and social work factors are independent contributors to risk of

  19. Reformulating Psychological Difficulties in People with Parkinson’s Disease: The Potential of a Social Relational Approach to Disablism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Simpson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Research investigating the psychological difficulties experienced by people with Parkinson's disease (PD is dominated by individualistic neurobiological and psychological perspectives. Therefore, this opinion paper draws on a reformulation of the social model of disability, Thomas' (1999 and (2007 social relational approach to disablism, to offer an alternative way of conceptualising psychological difficulties experienced by people with PD. This opinion paper explores the ways in which socially imposed restrictions and stigma may contribute to psychological difficulties by using Thomas' (2007 concept of psychoemotional disablism. By using the lens of psychoemotional disablism, this paper demonstrates that people with PD can be exposed to stigmatising attitudes and interactions which could contribute to restrictions, feelings of shame, and psychological difficulties such as depression. Accordingly, it is argued that further attention to the link between psychological difficulties and social dimensions of disablism in PD is needed in both research arenas and clinical practice to broaden understandings and interventions for people with PD.

  20. An Institutionalist Explanation of the Evolution of Taiwan’s Disability Movement: From the Charity Model to the Social Model

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    I-lun Tsai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we analyze the process of institutional change in Taiwan’s disability field by focusing on the role of social movements. An institutional perspective emphasizes how a particular logic in an organizational field generates formal and informal institutions that define how persons with disabilities are treated in a society. Before the 1990s, the charity model was dominant, and later it came to be challenged by the disability movement, which advocated for the social model. We argue that the transition to a social model was a major achievement by disability organizations, which successfully combined the dual roles of advocate and service provider. By making strategic use of welfare privatization in the 1990s, they were able to mobilize a series of lobbying campaigns. Their efforts culminated in the passing of the Physically and Mentally Disabled Citizens Protection Act in 1997, which marked the beginning of the social model in Taiwan.