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Sample records for psittacine polyomavirus antibodies

  1. Molecular characterization of avian polyomavirus isolated from psittacine birds based on the whole genome sequence analysis.

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    Katoh, Hiroshi; Ohya, Kenji; Une, Yumi; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Fukushi, Hideto

    2009-07-02

    Seven avian polyomaviruses (APVs) were isolated from seven psittacine birds of four species. Their whole genome sequences were genetically analyzed. Comparing with the sequence of BFDV1 strain, nucleotide substitutions in the sequences of seven APV isolates were found at 63 loci and a high level of conservation of amino acid sequence in each viral protein (VP1, VP2, VP3, VP4, and t/T antigen) was predicted. An A-to-T nucleotide substitution was observed in non-control region of all seven APV sequences in comparison with BFDV1 strain. Two C-to-T nucleotide substitutions were also detected in non-coding regions of one isolate. A phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome sequences indicated that the sequences from the same species of bird were closely related. APV has been reported to have distinct tropism for cell cultures of various avian species. The present study indicated that a single amino acid substitution at position 221 in VP2 was essential for propagating in chicken embryonic fibroblast culture and this substitution was promoted by propagation on budgerigar embryonic fibroblast culture. For two isolates, three serial amino acids appeared to be deleted in VP4. However, this deletion had little effect on virus propagation.

  2. Antibody response to polyomavirus primary infection: high seroprevalence of Merkel cell polyomavirus and lymphoid tissue involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Carolina; Monasta, Lorenzo; Zanotta, Nunzia; Campisciano, Giuseppina; Maestri, Iva; Tommasino, Massimo; Pawlita, Michael; Villani, Sonia; Comar, Manola; Delbue, Serena

    2018-01-12

    Human polyomaviruses (HPyVs) asymptomatically infect the human population establishing latency in the host, and their seroprevalence can reach 90% in healthy adults. Few studies have focused on the pediatric population, and there are no reports regarding the seroprevalence of all the newly isolated HPyVs among Italian children. Therefore, we investigated the frequency of serum antibodies against 12 PyVs in 182 immunocompetent children from Northeast Italy, by means of a multiplex antibody detection system. Additionally, secondary lymphoid tissues were collected to analyze the presence of HPyV DNA sequences using a specific real-time PCRs or PCRs. Almost 100% of subjects were seropositive for at least one PyV. Seropositivity ranged from 3% for antibodies against simian virus 40 (SV40) in children from 0 to 3 years, to 91% for antibodies against WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) and HPyV10 in children from 8 to 17 years. The mean number of PyV for which children were seropositive increased with the increasing of age: 4 standard deviations (SD) 1.8 in the 0-3-year group, 5 (SD 1.9) in the 4-7-year group, and 6 (SD 2.2) in the 8-17-year group. JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) DNA was detected in 1% of the adenoids, WUPyV in 12% of the tonsils, and 28% of the adenoids, and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) was present in 6 and 2% of the tonsils and adenoids, respectively. Our study gives new insights on the serological evidence of exposure to PyVs during childhood, and on their possible respiratory route of transmission.

  3. Psittacine incubation and pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnano, April

    2012-05-01

    Psittacine pediatric medicine and surgery can only continue to be practiced by avian veterinarians if psittacine aviculture (the successful captive breeding of parrot species) is active and thriving. Although beautiful, intelligent parrots are popular as beloved pets and reside in zoo and private collections around the world, private psittacine aviculture is in a transition period recovering from difficult economic times. Many of the larger aviculturists have left and the rise of the small aviculturist has significantly changed the industry.

  4. Broadly neutralizing human monoclonal JC polyomavirus VP1–specific antibodies as candidate therapeutics for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

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    Jelcic, Ivan; Combaluzier, Benoit; Jelcic, Ilijas; Faigle, Wolfgang; Senn, Luzia; Reinhart, Brenda J.; Ströh, Luisa; Nitsch, Roger M.; Stehle, Thilo; Sospedra, Mireia; Grimm, Jan; Martin, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised individuals, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) may mutate and gain access to the central nervous system resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), an often fatal opportunistic infection for which no treatments are currently available. Despite recent progress, the contribution of JCPyV-specific humoral immunity to controlling asymptomatic infection throughout life and to eliminating JCPyV from the brain is poorly understood. We examined antibody responses against JCPyV major capsid protein VP1 (viral protein 1) variants in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy donors (HDs), JCPyV-positive multiple sclerosis patients treated with the anti-VLA-4 monoclonal antibody natalizumab (NAT), and patients with NAT-associated PML. Before and during PML, CSF antibody responses against JCPyV VP1 variants show “recognition holes”; however, upon immune reconstitution, CSF antibody titers rise, then recognize PML-associated JCPyV VP1 variants, and may be involved in elimination of the virus. We therefore reasoned that the memory B cell repertoire of individuals who recovered from PML could be a source for the molecular cloning of broadly neutralizing antibodies for passive immunization. We generated a series of memory B cell-derived JCPyV VP1-specific human monoclonal antibodies from HDs and a patient with NAT-associated PML-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). These antibodies exhibited diverse binding affinity, cross-reactivity with the closely related BK polyomavirus, recognition of PML-causing VP1 variants, and JCPyV neutralization. Almost all antibodies with exquisite specificity for JCPyV, neutralizing activity, recognition of all tested JCPyV PML variants, and high affinity were derived from one patient who had recovered from PML. These antibodies are promising drug candidates for the development of a treatment of PML. PMID:26400911

  5. Serological cross-reactivity between Merkel cell polyomavirus and two closely related chimpanzee polyomaviruses.

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    Jérôme T J Nicol

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic analyses based on the major capsid protein sequence indicate that Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV and chimpanzee polyomaviruses (PtvPyV1, PtvPyV2, and similarly Trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV and the orangutan polyomavirus (OraPyV1 are closely related. The existence of cross-reactivity between these polyomaviruses was therefore investigated. The findings indicated serological identity between the two chimpanzee polyomaviruses investigated and a high level of cross-reactivity with Merkel cell polyomavirus. In contrast, cross-reactivity was not observed between TSPyV and OraPyV1. Furthermore, specific antibodies to chimpanzee polyomaviruses were detected in chimpanzee sera by pre-incubation of sera with the different antigens, but not in human sera.

  6. Novel Polyomaviruses of Nonhuman Primates: Genetic and Serological Predictors for the Existence of Multiple Unknown Polyomaviruses within the Human Population

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    Scuda, Nelly; Madinda, Nadege Freda; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Adjogoua, Edgard Valerie; Wevers, Diana; Hofmann, Jörg; Cameron, Kenneth N.; Leendertz, Siv Aina J.; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Robbins, Martha; Boesch, Christophe; Jarvis, Michael A.; Moens, Ugo; Mugisha, Lawrence; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are a family of small non-enveloped DNA viruses that encode oncogenes and have been associated, to greater or lesser extent, with human disease and cancer. Currently, twelve polyomaviruses are known to circulate within the human population. To further examine the diversity of human polyomaviruses, we have utilized a combinatorial approach comprised of initial degenerate primer-based PCR identification and phylogenetic analysis of nonhuman primate (NHP) polyomavirus species, followed by polyomavirus-specific serological analysis of human sera. Using this approach we identified twenty novel NHP polyomaviruses: nine in great apes (six in chimpanzees, two in gorillas and one in orangutan), five in Old World monkeys and six in New World monkeys. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that only four of the nine chimpanzee polyomaviruses (six novel and three previously identified) had known close human counterparts. To determine whether the remaining chimpanzee polyomaviruses had potential human counterparts, the major viral capsid proteins (VP1) of four chimpanzee polyomaviruses were expressed in E. coli for use as antigens in enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). Human serum/plasma samples from both Côte d'Ivoire and Germany showed frequent seropositivity for the four viruses. Antibody pre-adsorption-based ELISA excluded the possibility that reactivities resulted from binding to known human polyomaviruses. Together, these results support the existence of additional polyomaviruses circulating within the human population that are genetically and serologically related to existing chimpanzee polyomaviruses. PMID:23818846

  7. 21 CFR 1240.65 - Psittacine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Psittacine birds. 1240.65 Section 1240.65 Food and... DISEASES Specific Administrative Decisions Regarding Interstate Shipments § 1240.65 Psittacine birds. (a) The term psittacine birds shall include all birds commonly known as parrots, Amazons, Mexican double...

  8. Human exposure to bovine polyomavirus: a zoonosis

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    Parry, J.V.; Gardner, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    A competitive-type solid phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed for the detection of antibody to bovine polyomavirus. Comparison of RIA and counter-immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) results on 273 cattle sera indicated that both techniques were detecting antibody of like specificity. Human sera from 256 blood donors, 219 people recently vaccinated against polio, rubella or rabies, 50 immunosuppressed patients and 472 people with various occupational exposure to cattle were tested for antibody to bovine polyomavirus, the foetal rhesus monkey kidney strain, (anti-FRKV) by RIA. Apart from one blood donor and one of 108 rabies vaccinees only those in close contact with cattle possessed anti-FRKV. Compared with 62 per cent seropositive in the natural hosts, cattle, 71 per cent of veterinary surgeons, 50 per cent of cattle farmers, 40 per cent of abattoir workers, 16 per cent of veterinary institute technical staff and 10 per cent of veterinary students were anti-FRKV positive. Our findings indicate that the theoretical hazard of FRKV infection from undetected contamination of current tissue culture derived vaccines may, in practice, be remote. Proposed wider use of primate kidney cells as substrates for new vaccines may increase this risk.

  9. Campylobacter colonization is not associated with proventricular dilatation disease in psittacines

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    Bulbow H

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Holden Bulbow, Jing Wu, Debra Turner, Michael McEntire, Ian Tizard Schubot Exotic Bird Health Center, Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA Abstract: Psittacine proventricular dilatation disease (PDD is a neurological disease caused by parrot bornaviruses. A competing theory suggests that intestinal colonization by Campylobacter species may also be a potential cause of PDD or that their presence may be required for disease development. This theory proposes that PDD results from the activities of antiganglioside antibodies on enteric neurons in a manner similar to the pathogenesis of Guillain–Barré syndrome in humans. We therefore cultured feces from domestic chickens as well as from multiple parrot species to determine whether Campylobacter spp. could be detected in the latter. We failed to detect Campylobacter in a flock of cockatiels known to be highly susceptible to experimental parrot bornavirus-induced PDD. Even in naturally infected psittacines suffering from clinical PDD, no Campylobacter species were detected. Conversely, Campylobacter was readily cultured from domestic poultry samples and confirmed by using matrix-associated laser desorption ionization mass spectroscopy/real-time polymerase chain reaction. We conclude that not only are Campylobacter infections of psittacines uncommon, but also that infection by Campylobacter species is not related to the etiology of PDD. Keywords: bornavirus, campylobacter, proventricular dilatation disease, parrots, chickens

  10. Psittacine wellness management and environmental enrichment.

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    Rupley, Agnes E; Simone-Freilicher, Elisabeth

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this article is to present practical ways to provide a healthier lifestyle to the commonly kept companion psittacine pets. Necessary information for bird owners to provide for the physical and mental health of their bird is presented. This information is exquisitely important for people keeping birds as pets to know and apply. It is the exotic veterinarian's responsibility to educate clients on how to provide properly for the pet's mental and physical well-being. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Reproductive management of captive psittacine collections.

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    Styles, Darrel K

    2002-09-01

    This discussion is intended to stimulate the reader to further investigate avicultural husbandry techniques, flock management procedures, and avian behavior. It is not intended to address in detail all the steps necessary to produce successful reproduction in the aviary, but to encourage more involvement in the study of aviculture and the captive psittacine behaviors. Veterinarians are encouraged to ally themselves with professional or skilled aviculturists and participate in the noble endeavor of aviculture. Only then will the clinician understand the miracle of reproduction beyond that defined by a textbook.

  12. Cryptococcosis outbreak in psittacine birds in Brazil.

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    Raso, T F; Werther, K; Miranda, E T; Mendes-Giannini, M J S

    2004-08-01

    An outbreak of cryptococcosis occurred in a breeding aviary in São Paulo, Brazil. Seven psittacine birds (of species Charmosyna papou, Lorius lory, Trichoglossus goldiei, Psittacula krameri and Psittacus erithacus) died of disseminated cryptococcosis. Incoordination, progressive paralysis and difficulty in flying were seen in five birds, whereas superficial lesions coincident with respiratory alterations were seen in two birds. Encapsulated yeasts suggestive of Cryptococcus sp. were seen in faecal smears stained with India ink in two cases. Histological examination of the birds showed cryptococcal cells in various tissues, including the beak, choana, sinus, lungs, air sacs, heart, liver, spleen, kidneys, intestines and central nervous system. High titres of cryptococcal antigen were observed in the serum of an affected bird. In this case, titres increased during treatment and the bird eventually died. Yeasts were isolated from the nasal mass, faeces and liver of one bird. Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii serovar B was identified based on biochemical, physiological and serological tests. These strains were resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration 64 microg/ml) to fluconazole. This is the first report of C. neoformans var. gattii occurring in psittacine birds in Brazil.

  13. Quill mites in Brazilian psittacine birds (Aves: Psittaciformes).

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    Jardim, Cassius Catão Gomes; Cunha, Lucas Maciel; Rezende, Leandro do Carmo; Teixeira, Cristina Mara; Martins, Nelson Rodrigo da Silva; de Oliveira, Paulo Roberto; Leite, Romário Cerqueira; Faccini, João Luiz Horácio; Leite, Rômulo Cerqueira

    2012-09-01

    The primary and secondary feathers of 170 Brazilian psittacine birds (Aves: Psittaciformes) were examined in order to identify feather quill mite fauna. Birds were held captive in two locations in the state of Minas Gerais (MG), and two in the state of Espirito Santo (ES). The quills were cut longitudinally and were examined under optical microscopy. The genus of quill mites most frequently found was Paralgopsis (Astigmata: Pyrogliphidae), followed by Cystoidosoma (Astigmata: Syringobiidae). Astigmata: Syringophilidae mites were sporadically observed. After analyzing the data using logistic regression models, it was determined that there was higher infestation risk for psittacines in ES state, as compared with those in MG, and a significant increase in risk depending on the psittacine host species. However, the location of captivity did not have a significant effect. Lesions were observed in infested feathers. Cystoidosoma sp. and Paralgopsis sp. were always observed together, with parts of Paralgopsis found inside Cystoidosoma sp., suggesting thanatochresis or predation.

  14. The Role of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus and Other Human Polyomaviruses in Emerging Hallmarks of Cancer

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    Ugo Moens

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyomaviruses are non-enveloped, dsDNA viruses that are common in mammals, including humans. All polyomaviruses encode the large T-antigen and small t-antigen proteins that share conserved functional domains, comprising binding motifs for the tumor suppressors pRb and p53, and for protein phosphatase 2A, respectively. At present, 13 different human polyomaviruses are known, and for some of them their large T-antigen and small t-antigen have been shown to possess oncogenic properties in cell culture and animal models, while similar functions are assumed for the large T- and small t-antigen of other human polyomaviruses. However, so far the Merkel cell polyomavirus seems to be the only human polyomavirus associated with cancer. The large T- and small t-antigen exert their tumorigenic effects through classical hallmarks of cancer: inhibiting tumor suppressors, activating tumor promoters, preventing apoptosis, inducing angiogenesis and stimulating metastasis. This review elaborates on the putative roles of human polyomaviruses in some of the emerging hallmarks of cancer. The reciprocal interactions between human polyomaviruses and the immune system response are discussed, a plausible role of polyomavirus-encoded and polyomavirus-induced microRNA in cancer is described, and the effect of polyomaviruses on energy homeostasis and exosomes is explored. Therapeutic strategies against these emerging hallmarks of cancer are also suggested.

  15. Avian Bornavirus in Free-Ranging Psittacine Birds, Brazil

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    Encinas-Nagel, Nuri; Enderlein, Dirk; Piepenbring, Anne; Herden, Christiane; Heffels-Redmann, Ursula; Felippe, Paulo A.N.; Arns, Clarice; Hafez, Hafez M.

    2014-01-01

    Avian bornavirus (ABV) has been identified as the cause of proventricular dilatation disease in birds, but the virus is also found in healthy birds. Most studies of ABV have focused on captive birds. We investigated 86 free-ranging psittacine birds in Brazil and found evidence for natural, long-term ABV infection. PMID:25417715

  16. Asymptomatic Primary Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Infection among Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Tolstov, Yanis L.; Knauer, Alycia; Chen, Jian?Guo; Kensler, Thomas W.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Moore, Patrick S.; CHANG, YUAN

    2011-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) is a recently discovered virus that causes 80% of Merkel cell carcinomas. We examined data for 564 gay/bisexual male participants >18 years of age in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, and found that 447 (79.3%) were MCV-antibody positive at initial enrollment. Of the 117 MCV-seronegative men, 31 subsequently seroconverted over a 4-year follow-up period, corresponding to a 6.6% annual conversion rate. MCV immunoglobulin G levels ...

  17. Human Merkel cell polyomavirus: virological background and clinical implications.

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    Coursaget, Pierre; Samimi, Mahtab; Nicol, Jérome T J; Gardair, Charlotte; Touzé, Antoine

    2013-08-01

    The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), identified in humans in 2008, is associated with a relatively rare but aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer, the Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). MCC incidence is increasing due to the advancing age of the population, the increase in damaging sun exposure and in the number of immunocompromised individuals. MCPyV must be considered as the etiological agent of MCC and thus is the first example of a human oncogenic polyomavirus. MCPyV infection is common, and seroprevalence studies indicate that widespread exposure begins early in life. The majority of adults have anti-MCPyV antibodies and there is a growing body of evidence that healthy human skin harbors resident or transient MCPyV suggesting that MCPyV infection persists throughout life. However, the mode of transmission, the host cells, and the latency characteristics of this virus remain to be elucidated. In addition, it is still not clear whether MCPyV is associated with diseases or lesions other than Merkel cell carcinoma. The etiologic role of MCPyV in MCC opens up opportunities to improve the understanding of this cancer and to potentially improve its treatment. © 2013 APMIS Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Safety and efficacy of an inactivated Carbopol-adjuvanted goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus vaccine for domestic geese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfi, Jacqueline; Pappalardo, Michael; Claverys, Carine; Peralta, Brigitte; Guerin, Jean-Luc

    2010-04-01

    Haemorrhagic nephritis enteritis of the goose (HNEG) is an epizootic viral disease in domestic geese. The causal agent is a polyomavirus, namely goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus. To help control the disease, an inactivated vaccine was developed, based on viral particles produced in goose kidney cells. Viral material was quantified using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, inactivated with beta-propiolactone and adjuvanted with Carbopol, an acrylic acid polymer. Carbopol proved to be more immunogenic than aluminium hydroxide and was totally safe when administered to young goslings and breeders alike. Carbopol-adjuvanted vaccine induced a high serological response. Moreover, goslings hatched from vaccinated breeders were protected against viral challenge, indicating that maternally-derived neutralizing antibodies (MDA) were efficiently transferred. MDA were still detectable 15 days post-hatch. Clinical trials will be necessary to accurately evaluate a vaccine-based HNEG control strategy under field conditions.

  19. A high prevalence of beak and feather disease virus in non-psittacine Australian birds.

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    Amery-Gale, Jemima; Marenda, Marc S; Owens, Jane; Eden, Paul A; Browning, Glenn F; Devlin, Joanne M

    2017-07-01

    Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) is a circovirus and the cause of psittacine beak and feather disease (PBFD). This disease is characterized by feather and beak deformities and is a recognized threat to endangered Psittaciformes (parrots and cockatoos). The role that non-psittacine birds may play as reservoirs of infection is unclear. This study aimed to begin addressing this gap in our knowledge of PBFD. Liver samples were collected from birds presented to the Australian Wildlife Health Centre at Zoos Victoria's Healesville Sanctuary for veterinary care between December 2014 and December 2015, and tested for BFDV DNA using polymerase chain reaction coupled with sequencing and phylogenetic analyses.Results/Key findings. Overall BFDV was detected in 38.1 % of 210 birds. BFDV was detected at high prevalence (56.2 %) in psittacine birds, in the majority of cases without any observed clinical signs of PBFD. We also found that BFDV was more common in non-psittacine species than previously recognized, with BFDV detected at 20.0 % prevalence in the non-psittacine birds tested, including species with no clear ecological association with psittacines, and without showing any detectable clinical signs of BFDV infection. Further research to determine the infectivity and transmissibility of BFDV in non-psittacine species is indicated. Until such work is undertaken the findings from this study suggest that every bird should be considered a potential carrier of BFDV, regardless of species and clinical presentation. Veterinary clinics and wildlife rehabilitation facilities caring for birds that are susceptible to PBFD should reconsider biosecurity protocols aimed at controlling BFDV.

  20. JC Polyomavirus Infection Is Strongly Controlled by Human Leucocyte Antigen Class II Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundqvist, Emilie; Buck, Dorothea; Warnke, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    mark infection occur only in 50-60% of infected individuals, and high JCV-antibody titers seem to increase the risk of developing PML. We here investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), instrumental in immune defense in JCV antibody response. Anti-JCV antibody status, as a surrogate...... antibody response and human leucocyte antigens supports the notion that CD4+ T cells are crucial in the immune defence to JCV and lays the ground for risk stratification for PML and development of therapy and prevention.......JC polyomavirus (JCV) carriers with a compromised immune system, such as in HIV, or subjects on immune-modulating therapies, such as anti VLA-4 therapy may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) which is a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. Serum antibodies to JCV...

  1. Exposure to raccoon polyomavirus (RacPyV) in free-ranging North American raccoons (Procyon lotor).

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    Church, M E; Dela Cruz, F N; Estrada, M; Leutenegger, C M; Pesavento, P A; Woolard, K D

    2016-02-01

    There is evidence that raccoon polyomavirus is causative for neuroglial brain tumors in the western United States. It is unknown if infection is limited to geographic locales where tumors have been reported or is widespread, like human polyomaviruses. We demonstrate raccoons in western, eastern and midwestern states have been exposed to RacPyV by detection of antibodies to capsid protein, VP1. While raccoons in eastern and midwestern states are seropositive, exposure is lower than in the western states. Additionally, across geographic areas seropositivity is higher in older as compared to younger raccoons, similar to polyomavirus exposure in humans. Serum titers are significantly higher in raccoons with tumors compared to raccoons without. Unlike polyomavirus-associated diseases in humans, we did not detect significant sequence variation between tumor and non-tumor tissue in raccoons with tumors compared to those without tumors. This warrants further investigation into co-morbid diseases or genetic susceptibility studies of the host. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Use of refractometry for determination of psittacine plasma protein concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, Carolyn; Rodriguez, Marilyn; Arheart, Kristopher L

    2008-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated both poor and good correlation of total protein concentrations in various avian species using refractometry and biuret methodologies. The purpose of the current study was to compare these 2 techniques of total protein determination using plasma samples from several psittacine species and to determine the effect of cholesterol and other solutes on refractometry results. Total protein concentration in heparinized plasma samples without visible lipemia was analyzed by refractometry and an automated biuret method on a dry reagent analyzer (Ortho 250). Cholesterol, glucose, and uric acid concentrations were measured using the same analyzer. Results were compared using Deming regression analysis, Bland-Altman bias plots, and Spearman's rank correlation. Correlation coefficients (r) for total protein results by refractometry and biuret methods were 0.49 in African grey parrots (n=28), 0.77 in Amazon parrots (20), 0.57 in cockatiels (20), 0.73 in cockatoos (36), 0.86 in conures (20), and 0.93 in macaws (38) (PMethod and species-specific reference intervals should be used in the interpretation of total protein values.

  3. Renal expression of polyomavirus large T antigen is associated with nephritis in human systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenton, Kristin Andreassen; Mjelle, Janne Erikke; Jacobsen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    ) that these complexes bound induced anti-nucleosome antibodies and finally (iv) that they associated with glomerular membranes as immune complexes. This process may be relevant for human lupus nephritis, since productive polyomavirus infection is associated with this organ manifestation. Here, we compare nephritis...... to the evolution of lupus nephritis in human SLE....... in the T-ag transgenic mouse with nephritis in human SLE. Glomerular sections were analysed by transmission electron microscopy, immune electron microscopy (IEM) and by co-localization IEM and TUNEL IEM assays to compare morphological changes, composition of immune complexes and formation of nucleosome...

  4. Prevalence of Taxa of Pasteurellaceae Among Populations of Healthy Captive Psittacine Birds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, M.; Xin, Di; Bertelsen, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    Sixty-two strains of Pasteurellaceae-like bacteria were isolated from the tracheas of 87 clinically healthy psittacine birds in two Danish zoos. The isolates were identified by a combination of rpoB and 16S rRNA gene sequencing and by matrix-assisted laser desorption–ionization time of flight. Tw...

  5. Pathologic and microbiologic aspects of pet psittacine infected by Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul A.S. Siqueira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The role of Escherichia coli in healthy microbiota of psittacine is controversial, and the presence of Salmonella sp. indicates possible disease. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the presence of E. coli and Salmonella spp. in a psittacine pet that died in Fortaleza, Brazil, correlating pathogenicity aspects of the isolates through the evaluation of lesions and antimicrobial susceptibility. Psittacine pets sent to the Laboratory of Ornithological Studies, State University of Ceará, that died in 2014 and 2015 were necropsied. Fragments of liver, kidneys, intestine, lung, heart, spleen and brain were collected for microbiological and histopathological analyses. Scores were attributed to lesions and isolated strains submitted to antimicrobial susceptibility test. From the seventy necropsied birds, nineteen were positive for E. coli and one for Salmonella Typhimurium. Congestive lesions and lymphoplasmocitic inflammatory infiltrate were observed varying from light to moderate and were the main findings. In the analyzed strains, multidrug resistance against different groups of antibiotics was observed. In conclusion, according to the results, E. coli strains and the Salmonella Typhimurium isolate produced significant lesions in the psittacine pets, and multidrug resistance may hinder treatments with antibiotics used in avian pet medicine.

  6. Antibody

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    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  7. VP1 pseudocapsids, but not a glutathione-S-transferase VP1 fusion protein, prevent polyomavirus infection in a T-cell immune deficient experimental mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, Andrea; Andreasson, Kalle; Tegerstedt, Karin; Holländerová, Dana; Heidari, Shirin; Forstová, Jitka; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Dalianis, Tina

    2003-06-01

    The ability to vaccinate against polyomavirus infection in a T-cell deficient as well as a normal immune context was studied using polyomavirus major capsid protein (VP1) pseudocapsids (VP1-ps) or a glutathione-S-transferase-VP1 (GST-VP1) fusion protein. VP1-ps (1 or 10 microg) were administered subcutaneously, alone or together with Freund's complete and incomplete adjuvant, to CD4(-/-)8(-/-) T-cell deficient or normal C57Bl/6 mice on four occasions. Alternatively, CD4(-/-)8(-/-) and normal mice were inoculated with either GST-VP1 or Py-VP1-ps (5 microg). Following immunisation, antibody titres were tested by ELISA to VP1-ps or GST-VP1 or by haemagglutination inhibition (HAI). Mice were then infected with polyomavirus. Three weeks post-infection, the mice were killed and examined for the presence of polyomavirus DNA by PCR. Viral DNA was not detected in CD4(-/-)8(-/-) mice immunised with either VP1-ps alone or in combination with Freund's complete and incomplete adjuvant, or in any of the normal mice immunised with VP1-ps or GST-VP1. However, viral DNA was detected in 2/5 of the CD4(-/-)8(-/-) mice immunised with GST-VP1 and in non-immunised controls. Greater antibody titres were observed to VP1-ps than to GST-VP1 in CD4(-/-)8(-/-) mice after VP1-ps compared to GST-VP1 immunisation and antibody responses were better in normal than in immune-deficient mice. Only immunisation with VP1-ps resulted in haemagglutination inhibition. Complete protection against polyomavirus infection in the T-cell deficient context was obtained with VP1-ps, but not with GST-VP1, immunisation using the present vaccination protocol. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Molecular Diagnosis of Beak and Feather Disease in Native Brazilian Psittacines

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    AV Araújo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The incidence of the psittacine beak and feather disease virus (BFDV was investigated in Brazilian native parrots with normal feathering arriving at rescue and triage centers for wild animals (CETAS, IBAMA in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. BFDV DNA was investigated by previously described PCR technique for the partial amplification of BFDV ORF-1 in DNA extracts from blood, cloacal swab or liver of psittacines. Some birds provided more than one sample. Nine species of psittacines were sampled between January 2009 and October 2010. Blood (n=46 or cloacal swab (n=128 samples were obtained from psittacines immediately upon arrival at the triage centers. Liver samples were collected from necropsied birds dead on arrival (n=167. All swab samples were negative, except for one Ara ararauna individual (n=3 which blood presented the BFDV DNA. On the other hand, 11 liver samples were positive for BFDV DNA, with a prevalence of 7.8% in Amazona aestiva (n=140. No BFDV DNA was detected in the liver of Amazona amazonica (n=11, A. vinacea (n=5, A. rhodochorytha (n=4, Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus (n=3, Ara ararauna, (n=3, Aratinga leucophtalma (n=2, Guarouba guarouba (n=1 and Pionus maximiliani (n=1. In most cases, alopecia was not associated with BFDV detection in liver, and liver histopathology was inconclusive. Although all cloacal swab samples were negative, a few psittacines (n=19 that died at CETAS-Belo Horizonte were retested, and 21% were detected as positive in liver. A group of psittacines (n=16 was clinically evaluated, and despite showing feather dystrophy, all birds were negative in the cloacal swabs, except for one, which blood sample was positive (A. ararauna. The obtained sequences of the BFDV strains BH 215 and BH 732 were deposited in the GenBank (JQ649409 and JQ649410. A 98% similarity with strain sequences described in Australia, Japan, and New Zealand was observed. It is possible that these strains arrived in Brazil through the

  9. The trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus : infection, pathogenesis, evolution and adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazem, Siamaque

    2015-01-01

    Until a few years ago, only two human polyomaviruses (JC and BK) were known to infect humans and cause severe illness in immunocompromised hosts. Since 2007, at least eleven new polyomaviruses became known that infect humans. Among them is the polyomavirus associated with trichodysplasia spinulosa

  10. Cellular and humoral immune responses to chimeric EGFP-pseudocapsids derived from the mouse polyomavirus after their intranasal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fric, Jan; Marek, Martin; Hrusková, Veronika; Holán, Vladimír; Forstová, Jitka

    2008-06-19

    Mouse polyomavirus (MPyV) VP1-pseudocapsids carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-VLPs) were used for intranasal immunization of mice. EGFP-VLPs induced strong anti-VP1 but not anti-EGFP antibody production. In vitro restimulation with antigen-pulsed bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) induced remarkable T-cell proliferative response specific for both VP1 and EGFP antigen and IL-2 and IFN-gamma production. Surprisingly, no specific cytotoxic activities against VP1 and EGFP proteins were detected. After intranasal administration of EGFP-VLPs, as well as after polyomavirus infection, a moderate reduction of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells was observed in spleens but not in lymph nodes and peripheral blood, suggesting that both MPyV virions and pseudocapsids are able to induce changes in distribution of regulatory T cells. Treatment of EGFP-VLPs pulsed BMDCs with inhibitors of endosomal acidification proved that presentation of peptides on MHCgp class II is dependent on acidic endosomal environment. Substantial decrease of CD4-specific T-cell proliferation in the presence of proteasome inhibitor suggests that MHCgp class II might load VPL-derived peptides processed by proteasomes. Thus, polyomavirus derived VLPs appear to be promising delivery and adjuvant vehicles for therapeutic proteins.

  11. Computed Tomography Findings of Human Polyomavirus BK (BKV)-Associated Cystitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

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    Schulze, M.; Beck, R.; Igney, A.; Vogel, M.; Maksimovic, O.; Claussen, C.D.; Faul, C.; Horger, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dept. of Internal Medicine-Oncology, and Inst. of Medical Virology, Eberhard-Karls Univ., Tbingen (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Background: Over 70% of the general population worldwide is positive for antibodies against polyomavirus hominis type 1 (BKV). Polyomavirus can be reactivated in immunocompromised patients and thereby induce urogenital tract infection, including cystitis. Purpose: To describe the computed tomography (CT) findings of human polyomavirus-induced cystitis in adult patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allogeneic HCT). Material and Methods: The study population was a retrospective cohort of 11 consecutive adult patients (eight men, three women; age range 22-59 years, mean 42.9 years) who received allogeneic HCT between December 2003 and December 2007 and were tested positive for urinary BKV infection. All CT scans were evaluated with regard to bladder wall thickness, mucosal enhancement, distinct layering of thickened bladder wall, and presence of intravesical clots, perivesical stranding as well as attenuation values of intravesical urine. Clinical data concerning transplant and conditioning regimen variables and laboratory parameters were correlated with degree and extent of imaging findings. Results: All patients had clinical signs of cystitis with different degrees of thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Well-delineated urinary bladder layers were present in six patients. Thickening of the urinary bladder wall was continuous in nine of 11 patients. Increased attenuation of intravesical urine was found in seven patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. Four patients had intraluminal clots. Perivesical stranding was not a major CT finding, occurring in a mild fashion in three of 11 patients. The clinical classification of hemorrhagic cystitis did not correlate with the analyzed imaging parameters. Patient outcome was not influenced by this infectious complication. Conclusion: CT findings in patients with polyomavirus BK cystitis consist of different degrees of bladder wall thickening usually with good delineation of all mural layers and

  12. Computed Tomography Findings of Human Polyomavirus BK (BKV)-Associated Cystitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, M.; Beck, R.; Igney, A.; Vogel, M.; Maksimovic, O.; Claussen, C.D.; Faul, C.; Horger, M. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dept. of Internal Medicine-Oncology, and Inst. of Medical Virology, Eberhard-Karls Univ., Tbingen (Germany))

    2008-12-15

    Background: Over 70% of the general population worldwide is positive for antibodies against polyomavirus hominis type 1 (BKV). Polyomavirus can be reactivated in immunocompromised patients and thereby induce urogenital tract infection, including cystitis. Purpose: To describe the computed tomography (CT) findings of human polyomavirus-induced cystitis in adult patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allogeneic HCT). Material and Methods: The study population was a retrospective cohort of 11 consecutive adult patients (eight men, three women; age range 22-59 years, mean 42.9 years) who received allogeneic HCT between December 2003 and December 2007 and were tested positive for urinary BKV infection. All CT scans were evaluated with regard to bladder wall thickness, mucosal enhancement, distinct layering of thickened bladder wall, and presence of intravesical clots, perivesical stranding as well as attenuation values of intravesical urine. Clinical data concerning transplant and conditioning regimen variables and laboratory parameters were correlated with degree and extent of imaging findings. Results: All patients had clinical signs of cystitis with different degrees of thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Well-delineated urinary bladder layers were present in six patients. Thickening of the urinary bladder wall was continuous in nine of 11 patients. Increased attenuation of intravesical urine was found in seven patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. Four patients had intraluminal clots. Perivesical stranding was not a major CT finding, occurring in a mild fashion in three of 11 patients. The clinical classification of hemorrhagic cystitis did not correlate with the analyzed imaging parameters. Patient outcome was not influenced by this infectious complication. Conclusion: CT findings in patients with polyomavirus BK cystitis consist of different degrees of bladder wall thickening usually with good delineation of all mural layers and

  13. Contamination by Aspergillus flavus and A. fumigatus in sunflower seeds used in psittacine bird food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandro Machado Conceição

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Widely distributed in food for psittacine birds due its low price, high palatability, and cultural reasons, the Helianthus annuus, called sunflower, is proving important in clinical influenza as a result of excess calories and high incidence of contamination by some fungi, particularly Aspergillus, specifically A. flavus and A. fumigatus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contamination by Aspergillus spp sunflower seeds for feeding psittacine birds, sold in Aracaju, Sergipe state. The tests were performed in the Laboratory of Microbiology of the Dr. Vicente Borreli Veterinary Hospital in Pio Décimo College. We evaluated four samples of sunflower seeds, soldin a municipal market and in three different supermarkets in bulk and under three bottled trademarks, processed according to Forsythe (2002. Our survey revealed a high development of A. flavus and A. fumigatus sunflower seeds. This contamination may be related to several factors such as inadequate harvest stages of drying, processing and storage of grain. Furthermore, it is important to highlight the need of a better grain storage, with controlled temperature and humidity, to reduce the possibility of contamination by Aspergillus spp. that causes injury in the feeding of psittacine birds and other animal species.

  14. Analysis of exhaled breath condensate in a mixed population of psittacine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foldenauer, Ulrike; Simova-Curd, Stefka; Nitzl, Dagmar; Bogdanova, Anna; Zollinger, Eveline; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2010-09-01

    Collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) and the measurement of inflammatory markers contained therein (eg, hydrogen peroxide [H2O2], leukotriene B4 [LTB4], and pH) have been reported to be noninvasive tools for the investigation of respiratory disease in various species. In this study, the EBC of clinically healthy psittacine birds (n = 15) and psittacine birds with respiratory tract disease (n = 19) was examined, and inflammatory markers contained in the EBC were analyzed and compared. Awake birds were placed in an acrylic container from which the outflow passed through a condensation system that collected the EBC. All samples were analyzed for pH, H2O2, and LTB4. The mean values for each of these components, as well as the mean volume of the total EBC, measured from the apparently healthy birds did not differ significantly from those measured in birds with signs of respiratory tract disease. However, LTB4 in the EBC of diseased birds was higher than that of the apparently healthy birds and showed a trend toward significance. The study demonstrated the establishment of a standardized method for collecting and analyzing EBC in psittacine birds and a measurement protocol for pH, H2O2, and LTB4.

  15. Detection of Mycoplasma gallisepticum in dead captive psittacines in Belo Horizonte, Brazil

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    AM Gomes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma gallisepticum (Mg infection of wild native Brazilian psittacines (Psittaciformes which died of any cause during sorting, rehabilitation, or conservation, was investigated by PCR. Two previously described PCR methodologies using Mg specific primers were employed for the analyses of 140 swab samples (cloaca, trachea, or palatine cleft. Average positive Mg detection in cloacal swabs was 51.9%, with 80.0% (n=5 of Blue-and-yellow Macaws (Ara ararauna, 60.0% (n=3 Dusky Parrots (Pionus fuscus, 52.5% (n=59 Amazon Parrots (Amazona aestiva, 50.0% (n=2 Orange-winged Parrots (Amazona amazonica, 50.0% (n=2 Jandaya Parakeetsor Jandaya Conures (Aratinga jandaya, 0% (n=2 Golden Conures or Golden Parakeets (Guarouba guarouba, and 0% (n=2 Hyacinth Macaws (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus. Palatine cleft swab sampling was more sensitive to detect Mg, with 85.4% (n=17 detection rate, as compared to 67.4% (n=46 obtained with tracheal samples, and 53.5% (n=77 with cloacal swabs. The surprisingly high Mg incidence in psittacines kept in conservation or triage environments is possibly due to the proximity or cohabitation with several bird species during confinement and housing psittacines of different origins together. The implementation of biosecurity measures and species-specific facilities is recommended.

  16. Polyomavirus – an emergent pathogen in transplant recipients

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    Juliana de Moura Montagner

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Medical centers that work with transplants often face opportunisticinfections that demand specific tools to make diagnosis. Theprevalence of latent polyomavirus infections is high, and the mostcommon site of latency of the most prevalent polyomavirus in humans,BK virus (BKV, is the renal tissue. Hence, renal transplanted patientsare particularly vulnerable to the damage caused by viral reactivationduring immunosupression. In such patients BKV is associated toureteral stenosis and/or BKV nephropathy, leading to progressivedysfunction and graft loss, often diagnosed as rejection. In other organsrecipients (namely lung, liver, heart and pancreas, BKN is also the mostimportant clinical manifestation, whereas in bone marrow recipients themost common is hemorrhagic cystitis. This review presents the viralbiology and discusses the pathophysiology of polyomavirus diseasesand the diagnostic efficacy of the laboratory tests available, guidingto the best strategy for assessment and monitoring of patients at riskor under specific treatment.

  17. Multiorgan WU Polyomavirus Infection in Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebrasse, Erica A; Nguyen, Nang L; Willby, Melisa J; Erdman, Dean D; Menegus, Marilyn A; Wang, David

    2016-01-01

    WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) was detected in a bone marrow transplant recipient with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome who died in 2001. Crystalline lattices of polyomavirus-like particles were observed in the patient's lung by electron microscopy. WUPyV was detected in the lung and other tissues by real-time quantitative PCR and identified in the lung and trachea by immunohistochemistry. A subset of WUPyV-positive cells in the lung had morphologic features of macrophages. Although the role of WUPyV as a human pathogen remains unclear, these results clearly demonstrate evidence for infection of respiratory tract tissues in this patient.

  18. Rad51 activates polyomavirus JC early transcription.

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    Martyn K White

    Full Text Available The human neurotropic polyomavirus JC (JCV causes the fatal CNS demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. JCV infection is very common and after primary infection, the virus is able to persist in an asymptomatic state. Rarely, and usually only under conditions of immune impairment, JCV re-emerges to actively replicate in the astrocytes and oligodendrocytes of the brain causing PML. The regulatory events involved in the reactivation of active viral replication in PML are not well understood but previous studies have implicated the transcription factor NF-κB acting at a well-characterized site in the JCV noncoding control region (NCCR. NF-κB in turn is regulated in a number of ways including activation by cytokines such as TNF-α, interactions with other transcription factors and epigenetic events involving protein acetylation--all of which can regulate the transcriptional activity of JCV. Active JCV infection is marked by the occurrence of rapid and extensive DNA damage in the host cell and the induction of the expression of cellular proteins involved in DNA repair including Rad51, a major component of the homologous recombination-directed double-strand break DNA repair machinery. Here we show that increased Rad51 expression activates the JCV early promoter. This activation is co-operative with the stimulation caused by NF-κB p65, abrogated by mutation of the NF-κB binding site or siRNA to NFκB p65 and enhanced by the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate. These data indicate that the induction of Rad51 resulting from infection with JCV acts through NF-κB via its binding site to stimulate JCV early transcription. We suggest that this provides a novel positive feedback mechanism to enhance viral gene expression during the early stage of JCV infection.

  19. A real time genotyping PCR assay for polyomavirus BK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gard, Lilli; Niesters, Hubert G. M.; Riezebos-Brilman, Annelies

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polyomavirus BK (BKV) may cause nephropathy in renal transplant recipients and hemorrhagic cystitis in bone marrow recipients. We developed real-time PCRs (RT-PCR) to determine easily and rapidly the different BKV genotypes (BKGT) (I-IV) Methods: On the VP1 gene a duplex of RT-PCRs was

  20. Isolation and identification of psittacid herpesvirus 1 from imported psittacines in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, R F; Parker, M E; Abrey, A N; Kaleta, E F; Prozesky, L

    1992-06-01

    Acute deaths occurred in 47 out of a total of 131 imported psittacine birds whilst in quarantine. Few and non-specific clinical signs were seen during the course of the disease outbreak, but gross pathology revealed severe hepatomegaly and splenomegaly. A herpes virus was isolated from liver and spleen material taken from 2 birds, an Amazon (Amazona aestiva aestiva) and a Yellow-collared macaw (Ara auricollis). Identification procedures included virus neutralisation tests carried out in chicken embryo fibroblast cultures. Neutralisation of the virus was obtained by antisera to Psittacid herpesvirus type 1 (HV1) but not against HV2 or HV3.

  1. The prevalence of psittacine beak and feather disease virus infection in native parrots in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, H J; Alley, M R; Cahill, J I; Howe, L; Gartrell, B D

    2009-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of psittacine beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) infection in native parrots in New Zealand. One hundred and sixty-nine wild native parrots and 143 captive native parrots throughout New Zealand were examined for the presence of BFDV, from June 2003 to January 2005. Feathers of each bird, and blood samples from 15 birds, were collected and submitted for PCR assay to detect BFDV. All of the samples from wild native parrots were negative for BFDV by PCR assays. Similarly, of the 143 PCR tests from captive native parrots 139 (97%) were negative for BFDV. However, a pair of red-crowned parakeets and two Antipodes Island parakeets from different captive facilities were found to be infected with BFDV. The infected birds showed no clinical signs suggestive of psittacine beak and feather disease (PBFD), although the second Antipodes Island parakeet was found dead, and had pathological changes consistent with acute septicaemia. The results indicate a very low prevalence of BFDV among free-living native parrots although captive birds, in particular native parakeets, are susceptible to BFDV infection, and the Antipodes Island parakeets may be susceptible to PBFD.

  2. Serogroups and virulence genes of Escherichia coli isolated from psittacine birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha Knöbl

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli isolates from 24 sick psittacine birds were serogrouped and investigated for the presence of genes encoding the following virulence factors: attaching and effacing (eae, enteropathogenic E. coli EAF plasmid (EAF, pili associated with pyelonephritis (pap, S fimbriae (sfa, afimbrial adhesin (afa, capsule K1 (neu, curli (crl, csgA, temperature-sensitive hemagglutinin (tsh, enteroaggregative heat-stable enterotoxin-1 (astA, heat-stable enterotoxin -1 heat labile (LT and heat stable (STa and STb enterotoxins, Shiga-like toxins (stx1 and stx2, cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (cnf1, haemolysin (hly, aerobactin production (iuc and serum resistance (iss. The results showed that the isolates belonged to 12 serogroups: O7; O15; O21; O23; O54; O64; O76; O84; O88; O128; O152 and O166. The virulence genes found were: crl in all isolates, pap in 10 isolates, iss in seven isolates, csgA in five isolates, iuc and tsh in three isolates and eae in two isolates. The combination of virulence genes revealed 11 different genotypic patterns. All strains were negative for genes encoding for EAF, EAEC, K1, sfa, afa, hly, cnf, LT, STa, STb, stx1 and stx2. Our findings showed that some E. coli isolated from psittacine birds present the same virulence factors as avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC, uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC and Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC pathotypes.

  3. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

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    Diaz, Jason; Wang, Xin; Tsang, Sabrina H. [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Jiao, Jing [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); You, Jianxin, E-mail: jianyou@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2014-07-08

    Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT) is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells.

  4. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Diaz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells.

  5. Whole-genome characterization of a novel polyomavirus detected in fatally diseased canary birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halami, Mohammad Yahya; Dorrestein, Gerry M; Couteel, Peter; Heckel, Gerald; Müller, Hermann; Johne, Reimar

    2010-12-01

    Polyomaviruses of birds are aetiological agents of acute inflammatory diseases in non-immunocompromised hosts, which is in contrast to mammalian polyomaviruses. VP4, an additional structural protein encoded by the viral genomes of the known avian polyomaviruses, has been suggested to contribute to pathogenicity through loss of cells following induction of apoptosis. Four distinct bird polyomaviruses have been identified so far, which infect crows, finches, geese and parrots. Using broad-spectrum PCR, a novel polyomavirus, tentatively designated canary polyomavirus (CaPyV), was detected in diseased canary birds (Serinus canaria) that died at an age of about 40 days. Intranuclear inclusion bodies were found in the liver, spleen and kidneys. The entire viral genome was amplified from a tissue sample using rolling-circle amplification. Phylogenetic analysis of the genome sequence indicated a close relationship between CaPyV and other avian polyomaviruses. Remarkably, an ORF encoding VP4 could not be identified in the CaPyV genome. Therefore, the mechanism of pathogenicity of CaPyV may be different from that of the other avian polyomaviruses.

  6. Diagnostic Methods for and Clinical Pictures of Polyomavirus Primary Infections in Children, Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Tingting; Tanner, Laura; Simell, Ville; Hedman, Lea; Mäkinen, Marjaana; Sadeghi, Mohammadreza; Veijola, Riitta; Hyöty, Heikki; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Toppari, Jorma; Simell, Olli; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Hedman, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    We used comprehensive serodiagnostic methods (IgM, IgG, and IgG avidity) and PCR to study Merkel cell polyomavirus and trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus infections in children observed from infancy to adolescence. Comparing seroconversion intervals with previous and subsequent intervals, we found that primary infections with these 2 viruses were asymptomatic in childhood.

  7. Detection and characterization of two chimpanzee polyomavirus genotypes from different subspecies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Deuzing (Ilona); Z. Fagrouch (Zahra); M.J. Groenewoud (Marlous); H. Niphuis (Henk); I. Kondova (Ivanela); W. Bogers (Willy); E.J. Verschoor (Ernst)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe complete nucleotide sequences of three chimpanzee polyomavirus genetic variants were determined. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the viruses form two different genotypes of ChPyV. Comparison with other primate polyomaviruses revealed a putative agnogene, and an unusually long

  8. Examining Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Minor Capsid Proteins | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV or MCPyV) is a recently discovered member of the viral family Polyomaviridae. It is a skin-dwelling polyomavirus species that appears to cause a rare but highly lethal form of skin cancer called Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Despite MCC being uncommon, chronic MCV infection of human skin is widespread, and most infected people have no known symptoms. The surface of polyomavirus virions is made up of pentameric knobs of the major capsid protein VP1. VP1 enables attachment of the virus to the cell surface, permitting infectious entry and delivery of the viral genome to host cells. The VP1 protein of previously studied polyomaviruses, such as simian virus 40 and murine polyomavirus, associates with two minor capsid proteins, VP2 and VP3, which are considered to play important roles during the infectious entry process.

  9. Avian malaria in captive psittacine birds: detection by microscopy and 18S rRNA gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, N O; Passos, L F; Júnior, L M C; Goulart, C E; Sherlock, T M; Braga, E M

    2009-03-01

    A cross-sectional survey was conducted to estimate the occurrence of malaria infection among captive psittacine birds (n=127) from three zoological gardens in Brazil. Malaria infection was evaluated by the association of direct examination of blood smears with amplification of the 18SSU rRNA gene of the Plasmodium genus, demonstrating an overall occurrence of 36%. Most infected bird species were Amazona aestiva (28/73), Ara ararauna (6/10), and Amazona amazonica (3/10). The low parasitemias observed among the infected birds suggest a chronic infection. The sequence analyses of 10 isolates indicate a potential occurrence of four distinct Plasmodium lineages. These findings provide new data on malarial infection in captive psittacine birds, and emphasize the need for better control of importation and exportation of these birds.

  10. Selected complete blood cell count and plasma protein electrophoresis parameters in pet psittacine birds evaluated for illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Jeleen A; Rosenthal, Karen L; Shofer, Frances S

    2010-06-01

    Veterinarians rely on results of both the complete blood cell count (CBC) and plasma protein electrophoresis (EPH) in conjunction with the results of the plasma biochemical analysis to evaluate the health status of avian patients. Because the CBC and protein EPH measure different aspects of the immune response to disease, both tests are recommended in avian patients to rule out infectious or inflammatory disease. To evaluate results of the CBC and protein EPH in pet psittacine birds, the records of 144 pet psittacine birds, comprising 11 genera, that were presented for suspected illness were reviewed. Results of the CBC (total white blood cell count and packed cell volume) and protein EPH (alpha, beta, and gamma globulin concentrations) from submitted blood samples from each bird were evaluated. Of the 144 birds, 63 (43.8%) had abnormal CBC results, and 25 (17.4%) had abnormal EPH measurements. Results of the CBC and protein EPH were within reference ranges in 73 birds (50.7%). Abnormal results of the CBC in conjunction with normal EPH results were present in 46 birds (31.9%), compared with 8 birds (5.6%) with normal results of the CBC and abnormal EPH results. The findings of this study could aid practitioners in evaluating psittacine patients and prioritizing the value of individual diagnostic tests.

  11. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase concentrations in psittacine birds: reference values, factors of variation, and association with feather-damaging behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosset, Claire; Bougerol, Christian; Sanchez-Migallon Guzman, David

    2014-03-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase is a glycoprotein enzyme used in the diagnosis of toxicosis by cholinesterase-inhibitor agents like organophosphates and carbamates. In animals, butyrylcholinesterase concentrations have been shown to vary depending on numerous factors such as age, sex, diet, and season of sampling. To establish reference values of plasma butyrylcholinesterase concentrations in common psittacine species, plasma butyrylcholinesterase concentrations were measured in 1942 companion psittacine birds. The birds were classified by age, sex, season, health status, and the presence of feather-damaging behavior. A significant difference was observed among species, with eclectus parrots (Eclectus roratus) having the lowest and African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus) having the highest reference values. Plasma butyrylcholinesterase concentrations varied by age, health status, and season but not by sex. Concentrations were significantly higher during autumn and spring than during winter and summer, and significantly lower in healthy birds than in sick birds. No significant association between butyrylcholinesterase concentrations and feather-damaging behavior could be established except in lovebirds (Agapornis species). Further research is needed to better understand the effect of nutritional and hormonal factors on butyrylcholinesterase concentrations in psittacine birds and its possible effect on bird cognition.

  12. Studies on polyomaviruses in humans : In relation to haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Giraud, Géraldine

    2010-01-01

    The simultaneous discovery of two polyomaviruses in humans in 1971, BK and JC viruses (BKV and JCV), initiated the research on polyomaviruses in relation to human diseases. This has now been intensified with the consecutive discoveries, the last three years, of three new family members, KI, WU and Merkel cell polyomaviruses (KIPyV, WUPyV and MCPyV). Notably, the frequent and reproductive presence of MCPyV in Merkel cell carcinoma, a rare skin cancer of the elderly, has opene...

  13. Newly described human polyomaviruses Merkel Cell, KI and WU are present in urban sewage and may represent potential environmental contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carratala Anna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently, three new polyomaviruses (KI, WU and Merkel cell polyomavirus have been reported to infect humans. It has also been suggested that lymphotropic polyomavirus, a virus of simian origin, infects humans. KI and WU polyomaviruses have been detected mainly in specimens from the respiratory tract while Merkel cell polyomavirus has been described in a very high percentage of Merkel cell carcinomas. The distribution, excretion level and transmission routes of these viruses remain unknown. Here we analyzed the presence and characteristics of newly described human polyomaviruses in urban sewage and river water in order to assess the excretion level and the potential role of water as a route of transmission of these viruses. Nested-PCR assays were designed for the sensitive detection of the viruses studied and the amplicons obtained were confirmed by sequencing analysis. The viruses were concentrated following a methodology previously developed for the detection of JC and BK human polyomaviruses in environmental samples. JC polyomavirus and human adenoviruses were used as markers of human contamination in the samples. Merkel cell polyomavirus was detected in 7/8 urban sewage samples collected and in 2/7 river water samples. Also one urine sample from a pregnant woman, out of 4 samples analyzed, was positive for this virus. KI and WU polyomaviruses were identified in 1/8 and 2/8 sewage samples respectively. The viral strains detected were highly homologous with other strains reported from several other geographical areas. Lymphotropic polyomavirus was not detected in any of the 13 sewage neither in 9 biosolid/sludge samples analyzed. This is the first description of a virus isolated from sewage and river water with a strong association with cancer. Our data indicate that the Merkel cell polyomavirus is prevalent in the population and that it may be disseminated through the fecal/urine contamination of water. The procedure developed may

  14. A lipid receptor sorts polyomavirus from the endolysosome to the endoplasmic reticulum to cause infection.

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    Mengding Qian

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which receptors guide intracellular virus transport are poorly characterized. The murine polyomavirus (Py binds to the lipid receptor ganglioside GD1a and traffics to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER where it enters the cytosol and then the nucleus to initiate infection. How Py reaches the ER is unclear. We show that Py is transported initially to the endolysosome where the low pH imparts a conformational change that enhances its subsequent ER-to-cytosol membrane penetration. GD1a stimulates not viral binding or entry, but rather sorting of Py from late endosomes and/or lysosomes to the ER, suggesting that GD1a binding is responsible for ER targeting. Consistent with this, an artificial particle coated with a GD1a antibody is transported to the ER. Our results provide a rationale for transport of Py through the endolysosome, demonstrate a novel endolysosome-to-ER transport pathway that is regulated by a lipid, and implicate ganglioside binding as a general ER targeting mechanism.

  15. Polyomavirus and Naturally Occuring Neuroglial Tumors in Raccoons (Procyon Lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Patricia A; Brostoff, Terza; Church, Molly E; Dela Cruz, Florante N; Woolard, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    Polyomavirus (PyV) infections are widespread in human populations and, although generally associated with silent persistence, rarely cause severe disease. Among diseases convincingly associated with natural PyV infections of humans, there are remarkably different tissue tropisms and outcomes, including progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, transient or progressive nephropathy, and cancer. The variable character and unpredictable outcomes of infection attest to large gaps in our basic understanding of PyV biology. In particular, the rich history of research demonstrating the oncogenic potential of PyVs in laboratory animals begs the question of why cancer is not more often associated with infection. Raccoon polyomavirus (RacPyV), discovered in 2010, is consistently identified in neuroglial tumors in free-ranging raccoons in the western United States. Exposure to RacPyV is widespread, and RacPyV is detected in tissues of raccoons without tumors. Studying the relationship of RacPyV with its natural host is a unique opportunity to uncover cogent cellular targets and protein interactions between the virus and its host. Our hypothesis is that RacPyV, as an intact episome, alters cellular pathways within neural progenitor cells and drives oncogenesis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Virulence and antimicrobial resistance of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from passerine and psittacine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Y M; Cunha, M P V; Oliveira, M G X; Oliveira, M C V; Philadelpho, N; Romero, D C; Milanelo, L; Guimarães, M B; Ferreira, A J P; Moreno, A M; Sá, L R M; Knöbl, T

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is considered one of the most important Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens. The contact between humans and birds poses health risks to both. The aim of this study was to investigate the resistance and virulence of K. pneumoniae isolates from psittacines and passerines, seized from illegal trade in Brazil. We analysed 32 strains isolated from birds of the orders Psittaciformes and Passeriformes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for virulence factor genes. Antibiotic resistance was assessed by disk diffusion assay and PCR. The results indicated that fimH (100%), uge (96.8%), kfu (81.2%) and irp-2 (68.7%) were the most common virulence genes, followed by kpn (46.8%), K2 (43.7%), mrkD (34.3%) and iroN (15.6%). The combination of virulence genes resulted in a great diversity of genotypes and the heterogeneity of the strains is also confirmed in the analysis by amplified fragment length polymorphism. The susceptibility profiles of the K. pneumoniae showed 25% of multiple antibiotic resistance strains. We identified seven strains that presented non-extended spectrum beta lactamase blaSHV variants SHV-1 and SHV-11 and one strain positive to the blaTEM-1 gene. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance was present in 10 strains (10/32). The data obtained in this study reveal the pathogenic potential of this pathogen and highlight the need for surveillance and monitoring.

  17. Review on the Relationship between Human Polyomaviruses-Associated Tumors and Host Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Delbue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The polyomaviruses are small DNA viruses that can establish latency in the human host. The name polyomavirus is derived from the Greek roots poly-, which means “many,” and -oma, which means “tumours.” These viruses were originally isolated in mouse (mPyV and in monkey (SV40. In 1971, the first human polyomaviruses BK and JC were isolated and subsequently demonstrated to be ubiquitous in the human population. To date, at least nine members of the Polyomaviridae family have been identified, some of them playing an etiological role in malignancies in immunosuppressed patients. Here, we describe the biology of human polyomaviruses, their nonmalignant and malignant potentials ability, and their relationship with the host immune response.

  18. Safety and efficacy of an inactivated Carbopol-adjuvanted Goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus vaccine for domestic geese

    OpenAIRE

    GELFI, Jacqueline; PAPPALARDO, Michael; Claverys, Carine; Peralta, Brigitte; Guerin, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Hemorrhagic Nephritis Enteritis of Goose (HNEG) is an epizootic viral disease in domestic geese. Its agent is a polyomavirus, namely Goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus (GHPV). To help control the disease, an inactivated vaccine was developed, based on viral particles produced in goose kidney cells. Viral material was quantified using real-time quantitative PCR, inactivated with ?-propiolactone and adjuvanted with Carbopol, an acrylic acid polymer. Carbopol proved to be more i...

  19. Discovery of a new human polyomavirus associated with trichodysplasia spinulosa in an immunocompromized patient.

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    Els van der Meijden

    Full Text Available The Polyomaviridae constitute a family of small DNA viruses infecting a variety of hosts. In humans, polyomaviruses can cause infections of the central nervous system, urinary tract, skin, and possibly the respiratory tract. Here we report the identification of a new human polyomavirus in plucked facial spines of a heart transplant patient with trichodysplasia spinulosa, a rare skin disease exclusively seen in immunocompromized patients. The trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSV genome was amplified through rolling-circle amplification and consists of a 5232-nucleotide circular DNA organized similarly to known polyomaviruses. Two putative "early" (small and large T antigen and three putative "late" (VP1, VP2, VP3 genes were identified. The TSV large T antigen contains several domains (e.g. J-domain and motifs (e.g. HPDKGG, pRb family-binding, zinc finger described for other polyomaviruses and potentially involved in cellular transformation. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship of TSV with the Bornean orangutan polyomavirus and, more distantly, the Merkel cell polyomavirus that is found integrated in Merkel cell carcinomas of the skin. The presence of TSV in the affected patient's skin was confirmed by newly designed quantitative TSV-specific PCR, indicative of a viral load of 10(5 copies per cell. After topical cidofovir treatment, the lesions largely resolved coinciding with a reduction in TSV load. PCR screening demonstrated a 4% prevalence of TSV in an unrelated group of immunosuppressed transplant recipients without apparent disease. In conclusion, a new human polyomavirus was discovered and identified as the possible cause of trichodysplasia spinulosa in immunocompromized patients. The presence of TSV also in clinically unaffected individuals suggests frequent virus transmission causing subclinical, probably latent infections. Further studies have to reveal the impact of TSV infection in relation to other

  20. Cellular ras gene activity is required for full neoplastic transformation by polyomavirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Raptis, L; Marcellus, R; Corbley, M J; Krook, A; Whitfield, J.; Anderson, S. K.; Haliotis, T

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the role of ras gene activity in cellular transformation by polyomavirus, murine C3H10T1/2 cells were rendered ras deficient by transfection with an antisense ras gene construct. Ras deficiency resulted in a partial suppression of the polyomavirus-induced transformed phenotype. The production of viral middle T antigen and its association with pp60c-src, increased membrane-associated protein kinase C activity, and morphological transformation were unaffected by the downregulatio...

  1. A novel polyomavirus from the nasal cavity of a giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Dunwu; Shan, Tongling; Liu, Zhijian; Deng, Xutao; Zhang, Zhihe; Bi, Wenlei; Owens, Jacob Robert; Feng, Feifei; Zheng, Lisong; Huang, Feng; Delwart, Eric; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Wen

    2017-10-27

    Polyomaviruses infect a wide variety of mammalian and avian hosts with a broad spectrum of outcomes including asymptomatic infection, acute systemic disease, and tumor induction. Viral metagenomics and general PCR methods were used to detected viral nucleic acid in the samples from a diseased and healthy giant pandas. A novel polyomavirus, the giant panda polyomavirus 1 (GPPyV1) from the nasal cavity of a dead giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) was characterized. The GPPyV1 genome is 5144 bp in size and reveals five putative open-reading frames coding for the classic small and large T antigens in the early region, and the VP1, VP2 and VP3 capsid proteins in the late region. Phylogenetic analyses of the large T antigen of the GPPyV1 indicated GPPyV1 belonged to a putative new species within genus Deltapolyomavirus, clustering with four human polyomavirus species. The GPPyV1 VP1 and VP2 clustered with genus Alphapolyomavirus. Our epidemiologic study indicated that this novel polyomavirus was also detected in nasal swabs and fecal samples collected from captive healthy giant pandas. A novel polyomavirus was detected in giant pandas and its complete genome was characterized, which may cause latency infection in giant pandas.

  2. Pre-transplant immune factors may be associated with BK polyomavirus reactivation in kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWolfe, David; Gandhi, Jinal; Mackenzie, Matthew R; Broge, Thomas A; Bord, Evelyn; Babwah, Amaara; Mandelbrot, Didier A; Pavlakis, Martha; Cardarelli, Francesca; Viscidi, Raphael; Chandraker, Anil; Tan, Chen S

    2017-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) reactivation in kidney transplant recipients can lead to allograft damage and loss. The elements of the adaptive immune system that are permissive of reactivation and responsible for viral control remain incompletely described. We performed a prospective study evaluating BKPyV-specific T-cell response, humoral response and overall T-cell phenotype beginning pre-transplant through one year post-transplant in 28 patients at two centers. We performed an exploratory analysis of risk factors for the development of viremia and viruria as well as compared the immune response to BKPyV in these groups and those who remained BK negative. 6 patients developed viruria and 3 developed viremia. BKPyV-specific CD8+ T-cells increased post-transplant in viremic and viruric but not BK negative patients. BKPyV-specific CD4+ T-cells increased in viremic, but not viruric or BK negative patients. Anti-BKPyV IgG antibodies increased in viruric and viremic patients but remained unchanged in BK negative patients. Viremic patients had a greater proportion of CD8+ effector cells pre-transplant and at 12 months post-transplant. Viremic patients had fewer CD4+ effector memory cells at 3 months post-transplant. Exploratory analysis demonstrated lower CD4 and higher total CD8 proportions, higher anti-BKPyV antibody titers and the cause of renal failure were associated BKPyV reactivation. In conclusion, low CD4, high CD8 and increased effector CD8 cells were found pre-transplant in patients who became viremic, a phenotype associated with immune senescence. This pre-transplant T-cell senescence phenotype could potentially be used to identify patients at increased risk of BKPyV reactivation.

  3. JC polyomavirus infection is strongly controlled by human leucocyte antigen class II variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Sundqvist

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available JC polyomavirus (JCV carriers with a compromised immune system, such as in HIV, or subjects on immune-modulating therapies, such as anti VLA-4 therapy may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML which is a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. Serum antibodies to JCV mark infection occur only in 50-60% of infected individuals, and high JCV-antibody titers seem to increase the risk of developing PML. We here investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA, instrumental in immune defense in JCV antibody response. Anti-JCV antibody status, as a surrogate for JCV infection, were compared to HLA class I and II alleles in 1621 Scandinavian persons with MS and 1064 population-based Swedish controls and associations were replicated in 718 German persons with MS. HLA-alleles were determined by SNP imputation, sequence specific (SSP kits and a reverse PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO method. An initial GWAS screen displayed a strong HLA class II region signal. The HLA-DRB1*15 haplotype was strongly negatively associated to JCV sero-status in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 0.42, p = 7×10(-15 and controls (OR = 0.53, p = 2×10(-5. In contrast, the DQB1*06:03 haplotype was positively associated with JCV sero-status, in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 1.63, p = 0.006, and controls (OR = 2.69, p = 1×10(-5. The German dataset confirmed these findings (OR = 0.54, p = 1×10(-4 and OR = 1.58, p = 0.03 respectively for these haplotypes. HLA class II restricted immune responses, and hence CD4+ T cell immunity is pivotal for JCV infection control. Alleles within the HLA-DR1*15 haplotype are associated with a protective effect on JCV infection. Alleles within the DQB1*06:03 haplotype show an opposite association. These associations between JC virus antibody response and human leucocyte antigens supports the notion that CD4+ T cells are crucial in the immune defence to JCV and

  4. Characterization of California sea lion polyomavirus 1: expansion of the known host range of the Polyomaviridae to Carnivora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellehan, James F X; Rivera, Rebecca; Archer, Linda L; Benham, Celeste; Muller, Jennifer K; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Gulland, Frances M D; St Leger, Judy A; Venn-Watson, Stephanie K; Nollens, Hendrik H

    2011-07-01

    The genome of a novel polyomavirus first identified in a proliferative tongue lesion of a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) is reported. This is only the third described polyomavirus of laurasiatherian mammals, is the first of the three associated with a lesion, and is the first known polyomavirus of a host in the order Carnivora. Predicted large T, small t, VP1, VP2, and VP3 genes were identified based on homology to proteins of known polyomaviruses, and a putative agnoprotein was identified based upon its location in the genome. Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted late region proteins found that the laurasiatherian polyomaviruses, together with Squirrel monkey polyomavirus and Murine pneumotropic virus, form a monophyletic clade. Phylogenetic analysis of the early region was more ambiguous. The noncoding control region of California sea lion polyomavirus 1 is unusual in that only two apparent large T binding sites are present; this is less than any other known polyomavirus. The VP1 of this virus has an unusually long carboxy-terminal region. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction was developed and utilized on various samples from 79 additional animals from either managed or wild stranded California sea lion populations, and California sea lion polyomavirus 1 infection was found in 24% of stranded animals. Sequence of additional samples identified four sites of variation in the t antigens, three of which resulted in predicted coding changes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  6. A retrograde trafficking inhibitor of ricin and Shiga-like toxins inhibits infection of cells by human and monkey polyomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christian D S; Carney, Dan W; Derdowski, Aaron; Lipovsky, Alex; Gee, Gretchen V; O'Hara, Bethany; Williard, Paul; DiMaio, Daniel; Sello, Jason K; Atwood, Walter J

    2013-11-12

    Polyomaviruses are ubiquitous pathogens that cause severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) is the causative agent of the fatal demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), whereas BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) causes polyomavirus-induced nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis. Vaccines or antiviral therapies targeting these viruses do not exist, and treatments focus on reducing the underlying causes of immunosuppression. We demonstrate that retro-2(cycl), an inhibitor of ricin and Shiga-like toxins (SLTs), inhibits infection by JCPyV, BKPyV, and simian virus 40. Retro-2(cycl) inhibits retrograde transport of polyomaviruses to the endoplasmic reticulum, a step necessary for productive infection. Retro-2(cycl) likely inhibits polyomaviruses in a way similar to its ricin and SLT inhibition, suggesting an overlap in the cellular host factors used by bacterial toxins and polyomaviruses. This work establishes retro-2(cycl) as a potential antiviral therapy that broadly inhibits polyomaviruses and possibly other pathogens that use retrograde trafficking. The human polyomaviruses JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) and BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) cause rare but severe diseases in individuals with reduced immune function. During immunosuppression, JCPyV disseminates from the kidney to the central nervous system and destroys oligodendrocytes, resulting in the fatal disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk of BKPyV-induced nephropathy, which results in kidney necrosis and loss of the transplanted organ. There are currently no effective therapies for JCPyV and BKPyV. We show that a small molecule named retro-2(cycl) protects cells from infection with JCPyV and BKPyV by inhibiting intracellular viral transport. Retro-2(cycl) treatment reduces viral spreading in already established infections and may therefore be able to control infection in affected patients. Further optimization of

  7. Evaluation of Trichodysplasia Spinulosa-Associated Polyomavirus Capsid Protein as a New Carrier for Construction of Chimeric Virus-Like Particles Harboring Foreign Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedvilaite, Alma; Kucinskaite-Kodze, Indre; Lasickiene, Rita; Timinskas, Albertas; Vaitiekaite, Ausra; Ziogiene, Danguole; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2015-07-29

    Recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) represent a promising tool for protein engineering. Recently, trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV) viral protein 1 (VP1) was efficiently produced in yeast expression system and shown to self-assemble to VLPs. In the current study, TSPyV VP1 protein was exploited as a carrier for construction of chimeric VLPs harboring selected B and T cell-specific epitopes and evaluated in comparison to hamster polyomavirus VP1 protein. Chimeric VLPs with inserted either hepatitis B virus preS1 epitope DPAFR or a universal T cell-specific epitope AKFVAAWTLKAAA were produced in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Target epitopes were incorporated either at the HI or BC loop of the VP1 protein. The insertion sites were selected based on molecular models of TSPyV VP1 protein. The surface exposure of the insert positions was confirmed using a collection of monoclonal antibodies raised against the intact TSPyV VP1 protein. All generated chimeric proteins were capable to self-assemble to VLPs, which induced a strong immune response in mice. The chimeric VLPs also activated dendritic cells and T cells as demonstrated by analysis of cell surface markers and cytokine production profiles in spleen cell cultures. In conclusion, TSPyV VP1 protein represents a new potential carrier for construction of chimeric VLPs harboring target epitopes.

  8. BK polyomavirus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis among pediatric allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipients: treatment response and evidence for nosocomial transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskenvuo, Minna; Dumoulin, Alexis; Lautenschlager, Irmeli; Auvinen, Eeva; Mannonen, Laura; Anttila, Veli-Jukka; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Saarinen-Pihkala, Ulla M; Hirsch, Hans H

    2013-01-01

    BK polyomavirus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis (BK-PyVHC) is a significant complication of allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but risk factors and treatment are currently unresolved. BK-PyVHC typically presents with clinical cystitis, macrohematuria, and increasing urine and blood BKV loads. Characterization of children undergoing allogeneic HSCT with BK-PyVHC and their clinical and antibody response to cidofovir treatment. By prospective screening of urine and plasma in 50 pediatric allogenic HSCT performed between 2008 and 2010, we identified 6 (12%) children with BK-PyVHC. Cidofovir was administered intravenously to 5 patients and intravesically to 4 patients (3 double treatments). Decreasing BKV viremia of>2log(10)copies/mL and clinical resolution was seen in 4 patients over 5-12 weeks. Responses occurred only in patients mounting BKV-specific IgM and IgG responses. Epidemic curve plots, BKV genotyping and contact tracing provided evidence of transmission between 2 BKV-seronegative patients, but ruled out transmission among the remaining four patients The data suggest that BK-PyVHC may be the result of nosocomial transmission in children with low/undetectable BKV antibodies and raises urgent questions about appropriate infection control measures and the role of cidofovir. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Simultaneous BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV)-associated nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis after living donor kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helanterä, Ilkka; Hirsch, Hans H; Wernli, Marion; Ortiz, Fernanda; Lempinen, Marko; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Auvinen, Eeva; Mannonen, Laura; Lautenschlager, Irmeli

    2016-03-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) commonly reactivates after kidney transplantation, and can cause polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PyVAN), whereas after allogeneic stem cell transplantation the most frequent manifestation of BKPyV is polyomavirus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis (PyVHC). Despite high-level BKPyV replication in both, the pathogenesis and manifestation of both BKPyV entities appears to differ substantially. We describe an unusual case of simultaneous PyVAN and PyVHC presenting with acute symptoms in a BKPyV-IgG positive recipient eight months after kidney transplantation from a haploidentical living donor, who was BKPyV-IgG negative. Symptoms of cystitis and viremia subsided rapidly after reduction of immunosuppression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. [A molecular epidemiological study of KI polyomavirus and WU polyomavirus in children with acute respiratory infection in Tianjin, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Xiang; Wang, Wei; Guo, Wei; Yang, Hong-Jiang; Ma, Bai-Cheng; Fang, Yu-Lian; Xu, Yong-Sheng

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the relationship of KI polyomavirus (KIPyV) and WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) with acute respiratory infection in children in Tianjin, China. A total of 3 730 nasopharyngeal secretions were collected from hospitalized children with acute respiratory infection in Tianjin Children's Hospital from January 2011 to December 2013. Viral nucleic acid was extracted, and virus infection (KIPyV and WUPyV) was determined by PCR. Some KIPyV-positive and WUPyV-positive PCR products were subjected to sequencing. Sequencing results were aligned with the known gene sequences of KIPyV and WUPyV to construct a phylogenetic tree. Amplified VP1 fragments of KIPyV were inserted into the cloning vector (PUCm-T) transformed into E. coli competent cells. Positive clones were identified by PCR and sequencing. The nucleotide sequences were submitted to GenBank. In addition, another seven common respiratory viruses in all samples were detected by direct immunofluorescence assay. In the 3 730 specimens, the KIPyV-positive rate was 12.14% (453/3 730) and the WUPyV-positive rate was 1.69% (63/3 730). The mean infection rate of KIPyV was significantly higher in June and July, while the mean infection rate of WUPyV peaked in February and March. Most of the KIPyV-positive or WUPyV-positive children were infections with KIPyV, WUPyV, and other respiratory viruses were observed in the children. The co-infection rate was 2.31% (86/3 730) and there were nine cases of co-infections with WUPyV and KIPyV. Thirty-five KIPyV-positive and twelve WUPyV-positive PCR products were sequenced and the alignment analysis showed that they had high homology with the known sequences (94%-100% vs 95%-100%). The VP1 gene sequences obtained from two KIPyV strains in this study were recorded in GenBank with the accession numbers of KY465925 and KY465926. For some children with acute respiratory infection in Tianjin, China, the acute respiratory infection may be associated with KIPyV and WUPy

  11. Molecular networks involved in the immune control of BK polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girmanova, Eva; Brabcova, Irena; Klema, Jiri; Hribova, Petra; Wohlfartova, Mariana; Skibova, Jelena; Viklicky, Ondrej

    2012-01-01

    BK polyomavirus infection is the important cause of virus-related nephropathy following kidney transplantation. BK virus reactivates in 30%-80% of kidney transplant recipients resulting in BK virus-related nephropathy in 1%-10% of cases. Currently, the molecular processes associated with asymptomatic infections in transplant patients infected with BK virus remain unclear. In this study we evaluate intrarenal molecular processes during different stages of BKV infection. The gene expression profiles of 90 target genes known to be associated with immune response were evaluated in kidney graft biopsy material using TaqMan low density array. Three patient groups were examined: control patients with no evidence of BK virus reactivation (n = 11), infected asymptomatic patients (n = 9), and patients with BK virus nephropathy (n = 10). Analysis of biopsies from asymptomatic viruria patients resulted in the identification of 5 differentially expressed genes (CD3E, CD68, CCR2, ICAM-1, and SKI) (P < 0.05), and functional analysis showed a significantly heightened presence of costimulatory signals (e.g., CD40/CD40L; P < 0.05). Gene ontology analysis revealed several biological networks associated with BKV immune control in comparison to the control group. This study demonstrated that asymptomatic BK viruria is associated with a different intrarenal regulation of several genes implicating in antiviral immune response.

  12. Molecular Networks Involved in the Immune Control of BK Polyomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Girmanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BK polyomavirus infection is the important cause of virus-related nephropathy following kidney transplantation. BK virus reactivates in 30%–80% of kidney transplant recipients resulting in BK virus-related nephropathy in 1%–10% of cases. Currently, the molecular processes associated with asymptomatic infections in transplant patients infected with BK virus remain unclear. In this study we evaluate intrarenal molecular processes during different stages of BKV infection. The gene expression profiles of 90 target genes known to be associated with immune response were evaluated in kidney graft biopsy material using TaqMan low density array. Three patient groups were examined: control patients with no evidence of BK virus reactivation (n=11, infected asymptomatic patients (n=9, and patients with BK virus nephropathy (n=10. Analysis of biopsies from asymptomatic viruria patients resulted in the identification of 5 differentially expressed genes (CD3E, CD68, CCR2, ICAM-1, and SKI (P<0.05, and functional analysis showed a significantly heightened presence of costimulatory signals (e.g., CD40/CD40L; P<0.05. Gene ontology analysis revealed several biological networks associated with BKV immune control in comparison to the control group. This study demonstrated that asymptomatic BK viruria is associated with a different intrarenal regulation of several genes implicating in antiviral immune response.

  13. Intravesicular cidofovir for the treatment of polyomavirus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Melissa C

    2012-03-01

    To review the literature regarding the use of intravesicular cidofovir in the treatment of polyomavirus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis. Searches of PubMed were conducted, with key search terms including intravesicular cidofovir, polyomavirus, BK virus, JC virus, and hemorrhagic cystitis. Limits were set to include human subjects. All articles identified were evaluated, and one was excluded due to being published only in the German language. All case studies/case series were included if patients received at least 1 dose of intravesicular cidofovir for treatment of cystitis. Polyomavirus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis is more common in immunocompromised patients, particularly those who have undergone stem cell transplantation. Early-onset cystitis is often due to chemotherapy agents, while cystitis that develops 10-14 days into therapy is often associated with infection with polyomavirus, such as BK virus. There is no standard of therapy for polyomavirus-associated cystitis other than hyperhydration and continuous bladder irrigation, and many different therapeutic agents have been used in this setting, with mixed results. One such agent, intravenous cidofovir, provides clinical improvement but carries a risk of renal failure. Intravesicular cidofovir has been reported in case reports/series to provide positive symptomatic improvement; however, it has not been universally found to decrease urine viral load. At this time, it appears that intravesicular cidofovir may be used as an option to provide symptomatic relief in patients with polyomavirus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis. However, it is not definitively known whether its use significantly decreases urine virus load in these patients. Larger clinical trials need to be conducted to fully understand the role of intravesicular cidofovir in this setting.

  14. A novel psittacine adenovirus identified during an outbreak of avian chlamydiosis and human psittacosis: zoonosis associated with virus-bacterium coinfection in birds.

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    Kelvin K W To

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydophila psittaci is found worldwide, but is particularly common among psittacine birds in tropical and subtropical regions. While investigating a human psittacosis outbreak that was associated with avian chlamydiosis in Hong Kong, we identified a novel adenovirus in epidemiologically linked Mealy Parrots, which was not present in healthy birds unrelated to the outbreak or in other animals. The novel adenovirus (tentatively named Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 was most closely related to Duck adenovirus A in the Atadenovirus genus. Sequencing showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome consists of 31,735 nucleotides. Comparative genome analysis showed that the Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 genome contains 23 open reading frames (ORFs with sequence similarity to known adenoviral genes, and six additional ORFs at the 3' end of the genome. Similar to Duck adenovirus A, the novel adenovirus lacks LH1, LH2 and LH3, which distinguishes it from other viruses in the Atadenovirus genus. Notably, fiber-2 protein, which is present in Aviadenovirus but not Atadenovirus, is also present in Psittacine adenovirus HKU1. Psittacine adenovirus HKU1 had pairwise amino acid sequence identities of 50.3-54.0% for the DNA polymerase, 64.6-70.7% for the penton protein, and 66.1-74.0% for the hexon protein with other Atadenovirus. The C. psittaci bacterial load was positively correlated with adenovirus viral load in the lung. Immunostaining for fiber protein expression was positive in lung and liver tissue cells of affected parrots, confirming active viral replication. No other viruses were found. This is the first documentation of an adenovirus-C. psittaci co-infection in an avian species that was associated with a human outbreak of psittacosis. Viral-bacterial co-infection often increases disease severity in both humans and animals. The role of viral-bacterial co-infection in animal-to-human transmission of infectious agents has not received sufficient attention

  15. How does the Merkel polyomavirus lead to a lethal cancer? Many answers, many questions, and a new mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Candice D; Nghiem, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), discovered in 2008, drives the development of most Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs) through several canonical mechanisms. A glaring gap in our knowledge remains the basis by which MCPyV, among all 12 human polyomaviruses, is the only one that causes cancer in humans. Moreover, initial attempts by numerous groups have failed to reproduce MCC in mice using oncoproteins from this polyomavirus. Verhaegen et al. report MCPyV small T-antigen-expressing transgenic mice that now provide insight into in vivo transformation mechanisms.

  16. Association between the JC polyomavirus infection and male infertility.

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    Manola Comar

    Full Text Available In recent years the incidence of male infertility has increased. Many risk factors have been taken into consideration, including viral infections. Investigations into viral agents and male infertility have mainly been focused on human papillomaviruses, while no reports have been published on polyomaviruses and male infertility. The aim of this study was to verify whether JC virus and BK virus are associated with male infertility. Matched semen and urine samples from 106 infertile males and 100 fertile males, as controls, were analyzed. Specific PCR analyses were carried out to detect and quantify large T (Tag coding sequences of JCV and BKV. DNA sequencing, carried out in Tag JCV-positive samples, was addressed to viral protein 1 (VP1 coding sequences. The prevalence of JCV Tag sequences in semen and urine samples from infertile males was 34% (72/212, whereas the BKV prevalence was 0.94% (2/212. Specifically, JCV Tag sequences were detected in 24.5% (26/106 of semen and 43.4% (46/106 of urine samples from infertile men. In semen and urine samples from controls the prevalence was 11% and 28%, respectively. A statistically significant difference (p<0.05 in JCV prevalence was disclosed in semen and urine samples of cases vs. controls. A higher JC viral DNA load was detected in samples from infertile males than in controls. In samples from infertile males the JC virus type 2 strain, subtype 2b, was more prevalent than ubiquitous type 1. JCV type 2 strain infection has been found to be associated with male infertility. These data suggest that the JC virus should be taken into consideration as an infectious agent which is responsible for male infertility.

  17. WU Polyomavirus in Respiratory Epithelial Cells from Lung Transplant Patient with Job Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Siebrasse, Erica A.; Pastrana, Diana V.; Nguyen, Nang L.; Wang, Annie; Roth, Mark J.; Holland, Steven M.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; McDyer, John; Buck, Christopher B.; Wang, David,

    2015-01-01

    We detected WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) in a bronchoalveolar lavage sample from lungs transplanted into a recipient with Job syndrome by using immunoassays specific for the WUPyV viral protein 1. Co-staining for an epithelial cell marker identified most WUPyV viral protein 1?positive cells as respiratory epithelial cells.

  18. Assessing Host-Virus Codivergence for Close Relatives of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Infecting African Great Apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madinda, Nadège F; Ehlers, Bernhard; Wertheim, Joel O; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Bergl, Richard A; Boesch, Christophe; Akonkwa, Dieudonné Boji Mungu; Eckardt, Winnie; Fruth, Barbara; Gillespie, Thomas R; Gray, Maryke; Hohmann, Gottfried; Karhemere, Stomy; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Nishuli, Radar; Pauly, Maude; Petrzelkova, Klara J; Robbins, Martha M; Todd, Angelique; Schubert, Grit; Stoinski, Tara S; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Peeters, Martine; Leendertz, Fabian H; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    It has long been hypothesized that polyomaviruses (PyV; family Polyomaviridae) codiverged with their animal hosts. In contrast, recent analyses suggested that codivergence may only marginally influence the evolution of PyV. We reassess this question by focusing on a single lineage of PyV infecting hominine hosts, the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) lineage. By characterizing the genetic diversity of these viruses in seven African great ape taxa, we show that they exhibit very strong host specificity. Reconciliation analyses identify more codivergence than noncodivergence events. In addition, we find that a number of host and PyV divergence events are synchronous. Collectively, our results support codivergence as the dominant process at play during the evolution of the MCPyV lineage. More generally, our results add to the growing body of evidence suggesting an ancient and stable association of PyV and their animal hosts. The processes involved in viral evolution and the interaction of viruses with their hosts are of great scientific interest and public health relevance. It has long been thought that the genetic diversity of double-stranded DNA viruses was generated over long periods of time, similar to typical host evolutionary timescales. This was also hypothesized for polyomaviruses (family Polyomaviridae), a group comprising several human pathogens, but this remains a point of controversy. Here, we investigate this question by focusing on a single lineage of polyomaviruses that infect both humans and their closest relatives, the African great apes. We show that these viruses exhibit considerable host specificity and that their evolution largely mirrors that of their hosts, suggesting that codivergence with their hosts played a major role in their diversification. Our results provide statistical evidence in favor of an association of polyomaviruses and their hosts over millions of years. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. No evidence for WU polyomavirus infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Ringshausen Felix C

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human polyomaviruses are known to cause persistent or latent infections, which are reactivated under immunosuppression. Polyomaviruses have been found to immortalize cell lines and to possess oncogenic properties. Moreover, the recently discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus shows a strong association with human Merkel cell carcinomas. Another novel human polyomavirus, WU polyomavirus (WUPyV, has been identified in respiratory specimens from patients with acute respiratory tract infections (ARTI. WUPyV has been proposed to be a pathogen in ARTI in early life and immunocompromised individuals, but so far its role as a causative agent of respiratory disease remains controversial. The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of WUPyV infections in adult hospitalized patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and to establish its potential clinical relevance by comparison to patients with stable COPD hospitalized for other reasons than acute exacerbation of COPD (AE-COPD. A total of 378 respiratory specimens, each 189 induced sputum and nasal lavage samples from 189 patients, who had been recruited in a prospective 2:1 ratio case-control set-up between 1999 and 2003, were evaluated for the presence of WUPyV DNA by real-time PCR. In the present study we could not detect WUPyV DNA in 378 respiratory specimens from 189 adult hospitalized patients with AE-COPD and stable COPD in four consecutive years. Persistence of viral replication or reactivation of latent WUPyV infection did not occur. WUPyV may not play a major role in adult immunocompetent patients with AE-COPD and stable COPD.

  20. Polyomavirus-Specific Cellular Immunity: From BK-Virus-Specific Cellular Immunity to BK-Virus-Associated Nephropathy?

    OpenAIRE

    manon edekeyser; helene efrancois; severine ebeaudreuil; Antoine eDurrbach

    2015-01-01

    In renal transplantation, BK-virus-associated nephropathy has emerged as a major complication, with a prevalence of 5–10% and graft loss in >50% of cases. BK-virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family and rarely induces apparent clinical disease in the general population. However, replication of polyomaviruses, associated with significant organ disease, is observed in patients with acquired immunosuppression, which suggests a critical role for virus-specific cellular immunity to control vir...

  1. T-helper cell-mediated proliferation and cytokine responses against recombinant Merkel cell polyomavirus-like particles.

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    Arun Kumar

    Full Text Available The newly discovered Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV resides in approximately 80% of Merkel cell carcinomas (MCC. Causal role of MCPyV for this rare and aggressive skin cancer is suggested by monoclonal integration and truncation of large T (LT viral antigen in MCC cells. The mutated MCPyV has recently been found in highly purified leukemic cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, suggesting a pathogenic role also in CLL. About 50-80% of adults display MCPyV-specific antibodies. The humoral immunity does not protect against the development of MCC, as neutralizing MCPyV antibodies occur in higher levels among MCC patients than healthy controls. Impaired T-cell immunity has been linked with aggressive MCC behavior. Therefore, cellular immunity appears to be important in MCPyV infection surveillance. In order to elucidate the role of MCPyV-specific Th-cell immunity, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of healthy adults were stimulated with MCPyV VP1 virus-like particles (VLPs, using human bocavirus (HBoV VLPs and Candida albicans antigen as positive controls. Proliferation, IFN-γ, IL-13 and IL-10 responses were examined in 15 MCPyV-seropositive and 15 seronegative volunteers. With the MCPyV antigen, significantly stronger Th-cell responses were found in MCPyV-seropositive than MCPyV-seronegative subjects, whereas with the control antigens, the responses were statistically similar. The most readily detectable cytokine was IFN-γ. The MCPyV antigen tended to induce stronger IFN-γ responses than HBoV VLP antigen. Taken together, MCPyV-specific Th-cells elicit vigorous IFN-γ responses. IFN-γ being a cytokine with major antiviral and tumor suppressing functions, Th-cells are suggested to be important mediators of MCPyV-specific immune surveillance.

  2. Evidence of psittacine beak and feather disease virus spillover into wild critically endangered Orange-bellied Parrots (Neophema chrysogaster).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Andrew; Patterson, Edward I; Baker, Barry G B; Holdsworth, Mark; Sarker, Subir; Ghorashi, Seyed A; Raidal, Shane R

    2014-04-01

    We report the recent emergence of a novel beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) genotype in the last remaining wild population of the critically endangered Orange-bellied Parrot (Neophema chrysogaster). This virus poses a significant threat to the recovery of the species and potentially its survival in the wild. We used PCR to detect BFDV in the blood of three psittacine beak and feather disease (PBFD)-affected wild Orange-bellied Parrot fledglings captured as founders for an existing captive breeding recovery program. Complete BFDV genome sequence data from one of these birds demonstrating a 1,993-nucleotide-long read encompass the entire circular genome. Maximum-likelihood (ML) and neighbor-joining (NJ) phylogenetic analysis supported the solitary position of this viral isolate in a genetically isolated branch of BFDV. On Rep gene sequencing, a homologous genotype was present in a second wild orange-bellied parrot and the third bird was infected with a distantly related genotype. These viruses have newly appeared in a population that has been intensively monitored for BFDV for the last 13 yr. The detection of two distinct lineages of BFDV in the remnant wild population of Orange-bellied Parrots, consisting of fewer than 50 birds, suggests a role for other parrot species as a reservoir for infection by spillover into this critically endangered species. The potential for such a scenario to contribute to the extinction of a remnant wild animal population is supported by epidemiologic theory.

  3. Histopathological survey of protozoa, helminths and acarids of imported and local psittacine and passerine birds in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, S S; Hirai, K; Itakura, C

    1992-12-01

    A total of 534 psittacine and passerine birds consisting of 241 imported and 293 local birds were examined histologically. As a result, the following parasites were found: Giardia (86 cases), Knemido-coptes (26 cases), coccidia (10 cases), Ascaridia (6 cases), Cryptosporidium (5 cases), Sarcocystis (5 cases), tapeworm (4 cases), microfilaria (2 cases), Hexamita (1 case), and Spiroptera (1 case). High incidences of giardiasis and knemido-coptic infestation were detected in the local birds, but rarely in the imported birds. Giardial trophozoites were observed mainly in the duodenum of budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus). Knemidocoptic mites burrowed into the epidermis producing proliferative dermatitis in 25 budgerigars and 1 African Grey Parrot (Psittacus erithacus erithacus). This ectoparasite often infested the skin around the cloaca. Coccidiosis was seen only in the small intestines of the finch (Poephila gouldiae gouldiae), African Grey Parrot, Rainbow lory (Trichoglossus haematodus), Indian Ring-necked parakeet (Psittacula krameri manillensis) and peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis). Two parrots (Amazona aestiva aestiva and Psittacus erithacus erithacus) and two budgerigars had intestinal cryptosporidiosis. Conjunctivitis associated with cryptosporidial infection was seen in a lovebird. Sarcocystis cysts containing crescent-shaped bradyzoites were found not only in the thigh and breast but also in the heart and cloacal muscles. Other organisms such as Ascaridia, tapeworm, microfilaria, Hexamita, and Spiroptera were clinically less significant. However, infections such as Giardia and Cryptosporidim might have zoonotic implications.

  4. Histological, Immunohistological, and Clinical Features of Merkel Cell Carcinoma in Correlation to Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jaeger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, but highly malignant tumor of the skin with high rates of metastasis and poor survival. Its incidence rate rises and is currently about 0.6/100000/year. Clinical differential diagnoses include basal cell carcinoma, cyst, amelanotic melanoma, lymphoma and atypical fibroxanthoma. In this review article clinical, histopathological and immunhistochemical features of Merkel cell carcinoma are reported. In addition, the role of Merkel cell polyomavirus is discussed.

  5. Genome Sequence of Bovine Polyomavirus 1 Detected in a Salers Cow (Bos taurus) from Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Nicole; Pérez de Val, Bernat; Martin, Maite; Moens, Ugo; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2016-01-28

    We identified a variant of the first bovine polyomavirus (BPyV1; family Polyomaviridae) in a lymph node of a Salers cow. As the 2 previously published genome sequences of this virus originated from fetal bovine serum and ground beef, respectively, this is the first BPyV1 genome that could be traced back to an individual. Copyright © 2016 Ben Salem et al.

  6. ENDEMIC INFECTION OF STRANDED SOUTHERN SEA OTTERS (ENHYDRA LUTRIS NEREIS) WITH NOVEL PARVOVIRUS, POLYOMAVIRUS, AND ADENOVIRUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Juliana D; Ng, Terry F; Miller, Melissa; Li, Linlin; Deng, Xutao; Dodd, Erin; Batac, Francesca; Delwart, Eric

    2017-07-01

    Over the past century, the southern sea otter (SSO; Enhydra lutris nereis) population has been slowly recovering from near extinction due to overharvest. The SSO is a threatened subspecies under federal law and a fully protected species under California law, US. Through a multiagency collaborative program, stranded animals are rehabilitated and released, while deceased animals are necropsied and tissues are cryopreserved to facilitate scientific study. Here, we processed archival tissues to enrich particle-associated viral nucleic acids, which we randomly amplified and deeply sequenced to identify viral genomes through sequence similarities. Anelloviruses and endogenous retroviral sequences made up over 50% of observed viral sequences. Polyomavirus, parvovirus, and adenovirus sequences made up most of the remaining reads. We characterized and phylogenetically analyzed the full genome of sea otter polyomavirus 1 and the complete coding sequence of sea otter parvovirus 1 and found that the closest known viruses infect primates and domestic pigs ( Sus scrofa domesticus), respectively. We tested archived tissues from 69 stranded SSO necropsied over 14 yr (2000-13) by PCR. Polyomavirus, parvovirus, and adenovirus infections were detected in 51, 61, and 29% of examined animals, respectively, with no significant increase in frequency over time, suggesting endemic infection. We found that 80% of tested SSO were infected with at least one of the three DNA viruses, whose tissue distribution we determined in 261 tissue samples. Parvovirus DNA was most frequently detected in mesenteric lymph node, polyomavirus DNA in spleen, and adenovirus DNA in multiple tissues (spleen, retropharyngeal and mesenteric lymph node, lung, and liver). This study describes the virome in tissues of a threatened species and shows that stranded SSO are frequently infected with multiple viruses, warranting future research to investigate associations between these infections and observed lesions.

  7. Merkel cell polyomavirus: a newly discovered human virus with oncogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurgeon, Megan E; Lambert, Paul F

    2013-01-05

    A marked escalation in the rate of discovery of new types of human polyomavirus has occurred over the last five years largely owing to recent technological advances in their detection. Among the newly discovered viruses, Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV or MCV) has gained the most attention due to its link with a rare human cancer. Infection with MCPyV is common in the human population, and the virus is detected in several anatomical locations, but most frequently in skin. Study of MCPyV molecular virology has been complicated by the lack of straightforward cell culture models, but recent in vitro studies are making strides towards understanding the virus life cycle, its cellular tropism, and mode of transmission. While MCPyV shares several traditional traits with other human polyomaviruses, the burst of research since its discovery reveals insight into a virus with many unique genetic and mechanistic features. The evidence for a causal link between MCPyV and the rare neuroendocrine cancer, Merkel Cell Carcinoma (MCC), is compelling. A majority of MCCs contain clonally integrated viral DNA, express viral T antigen transcripts and protein, and exhibit an addiction to the viral large T and small t antigen oncoproteins. The MCPyV large T antigen contains MCC tumor-specific mutations that ablate its replication capacity but preserve its oncogenic functions, and the small t antigen promotes an environment favorable for cap-dependent translation. The mechanisms of MCPyV-induced transformation have not been fully elucidated, but the likely etiological role of this new polyomavirus in human cancer provides a strong opportunity to expand knowledge of virus-host interactions and viral oncology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Oncogenic Papillomavirus and Polyomavirus in Water Environments: Is There a Potential for Waterborne Transmission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratini, M; Di Bonito, P; La Rosa, G

    2014-03-01

    Waterborne exposure to human viruses through contact with sewage-contaminated water environments can result in infections associated with a wide range of illnesses. Gastrointestinal symptoms are the most commonly encountered manifestations of waterborne viral illness. Respiratory diseases, neurological diseases and paralysis can also occur. Whether viral infections resulting in health outcomes like cancer might also be transmitted by the waterborne route is unknown. Recently, viruses belonging to two oncogenic groups-Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) and Human Polyomaviruses (HPyVs)-have been detected in urban sewages worldwide. The latter have also been identified in other water environments. HPVs are epitheliotropic viruses responsible for several diseases of skin and mucosae, from common warts to squamous intraepithelial lesions that can either heal or progress to invasive carcinoma of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus or oropharynx. Human PyVs infect different tissues and organs, causing infections that are usually subclinical in immunocompetent individuals but can be serious in immunocompromised hosts. These pathogens belong to a family of DNA tumour viruses. Merkel cell polyomavirus, a HPyV identified in recent years, has attracted much attention due to its link with a rare and aggressive form of human cancer. Merkel cell carcinoma, the incidence of which has tripled over the past two decades. JC polyomavirus and BK polyomavirus are also potentially oncogenic. The observed abundance and wide dissemination of HPVs and HPyVs in water environments strongly suggest the need to shed light on the fate of these viruses in water environments and to elucidate their potential for waterborne transmission. Such information is essential for the improvement of wastewater management programs in terms of both sewage treatment and water quality surveillance.

  9. Polyomavirus-induced pilomatricomas in mice: from viral inoculation to tumour development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Símula, Silvina; Ozuna, Paola Villán; Otero, Javier; Casas, José; Sanjuan, Norberto

    2012-05-01

    Polyomavirus has been used extensively to study tumour induction in mice. Although most neoplasms are well characterized, those arising from hair follicles have been referred to by different names during the last four decades. The purpose of this research was to contribute to a more accurate histological characterization of these tumours as well as to study the viral progression from the onset of infection to the development of neoplasms. Polyomavirus A2 was inoculated into newborn C3H/BiDa mice, and at different time-points (from 5 to 70 days post-inoculation) the mice were sacrificed and studied using histological, immunocytochemical, ultrastructural and virological methods. The fully developed hair follicle tumours consisted of a proliferation of matrix cells that evolved into 'shadow' cells with empty nuclei and finally into amorphous keratin; the tumours were therefore diagnosed as pilomatricomas. Viral VP-1 was observed only in fully differentiated cells and not in proliferating-cell-nuclear-antigen (PCNA)-positive cells in the same tumour. In conclusion, Polyomavirus first replicated in the skin, and then disseminated through the blood and reached the outer sheath of the hair follicles and finally infected matrix cells, leading to the development of pilomatricomas from which infectious virus was isolated. © 2011 The Authors. APMIS © 2011 APMIS.

  10. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus: Molecular Insights into the Most Recently Discovered Human Tumour Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stakaitytė, Gabrielė; Wood, Jennifer J.; Knight, Laura M.; Abdul-Sada, Hussein; Adzahar, Noor Suhana; Nwogu, Nnenna; Macdonald, Andrew; Whitehouse, Adrian, E-mail: A.Whitehouse@leeds.ac.uk [School of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Astbury Centre of Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-27

    A fifth of worldwide cancer cases have an infectious origin, with viral infection being the foremost. One such cancer is Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare but aggressive skin malignancy. In 2008, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) was discovered as the causative agent of MCC. It is found clonally integrated into the majority of MCC tumours, which require MCPyV oncoproteins to survive. Since its discovery, research has begun to reveal the molecular virology of MCPyV, as well as how it induces tumourigenesis. It is thought to be a common skin commensal, found at low levels in healthy individuals. Upon loss of immunosurveillance, MCPyV reactivates, and a heavy viral load is associated with MCC pathogenesis. Although MCPyV is in many ways similar to classical oncogenic polyomaviruses, such as SV40, subtle differences are beginning to emerge. These unique features highlight the singular position MCPyV has as the only human oncogenic polyomavirus, and open up new avenues for therapies against MCC.

  11. Limited variation during circulation of a polyomavirus in the human population involves the COCO-VA toggling site of Middle and Alternative T-antigen(s)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kazem (Siamaque); C. Lauber (Chris); E. van der Meijden (Els); S. Kooijman (Sander); A.A. Kravchenko (Alexander A.); M.C.W. Feltkamp (Mariet C.W.); A.E. Gorbalenya (Alexander); J.C. Browning (John C.); K. Busam (Klaus); S. Bialasiewicz (Seweryn); T. Benoit (Taylor); P. Fleckman (Philip); L.C. Hughey (Lauren C.); R.W.A. Janssens (René W.A.); F. Mechinaud (Francoise); E. Pope (Elena); A.S. Rosenberg (Arlene S.); E. Rácz (Emoke); G. Sadler (Genevieve); S.N. Tabrizi (Sepehr N.); E. de Vries (E.); R.C. Wang (Richard C.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe have recently shown that the trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV) belongs to a large monophyletic group of mammalian polyomaviruses that experienced accelerated codon-constrained Val-Ala (COCO-VA) toggling at a protein site common to both Middle and Alternative

  12. COINFECTION OF CALIFORNIA SEA LION ADENOVIRUS 1 AND A NOVEL POLYOMAVIRUS IN A HAWAIIAN MONK SEAL (NEOMONACHUS SCHAUINSLANDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Hinojosa, Galaxia; Doescher, Bethany; Kinsel, Michael; Lednicky, John; Loeb, Julia; Waltzek, Thomas; Wellehan, James F X

    2016-06-01

    The Hawaiian monk seal (Neomonachus schauinslandi) is an endangered species. Here, we present a clinical case of a 26-yr-old male Hawaiian monk seal (HMS) kept in an aquarium with a history of intermittent anorexia and evidence of renal disease. Histologic examination revealed eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions in the liver. Conventional nested PCR protocols were used to test for viruses, and it tested positive for adenovirus and polyomavirus, and negative for herpesvirus. The adenovirus partial polymerase gene is 100% homologous to that of California sea lion adenovirus 1 (CSLAdV-1). CSLAdV-1 causes viral hepatitis in CSL, and has recently been reported in different species of otariids in an aquarium in Japan ( Otaria flavescens and Arctocephalus pusillus ) and a sequence from Spain has been submitted in NCBI as Otaria flavescens adenovirus-1. The polyomavirus in this animal is a novel virus, and is the first polyomavirus discovered in Hawaiian monk seals. This new virus is designated Hawaiian monk seal polyomavirus (HMSPyV-1), and is 83% homologous to California sea lion Polyomavirus-1 (CSLPyV-1). This is the first report of viral coinfection in a HMS and clinical significance in this case remains unclear but may be associated with advanced age.

  13. A Case Report of Avian Polyomavirus Infection in a Blue Fronted Parrot (Amazona aestiva Associated with Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Azevedo Philadelpho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An adult Blue Fronted Amazon parrot (A. aestiva presenting with emesis, apathy, undigested seed in feces, and severe anemia was treated for approximately 2 months. Upon radiographic examination, an enlarged kidney was the only alteration. PCR for avian Bornavirus, Circovirus, and Polyomavirus was performed for the feces and blood. The results were positive for APV in both samples and negative for the other viruses. After 6 months, the feces from the same animal were negative for APV. Because the animal was positive for APV in both the feces and the blood, it is likely that these clinical symptoms were due to Polyomavirus infection. Severe anemia is an unusual clinical sign of Polyomavirus, and this study aims to identify novel differential diagnostic criteria for the disease.

  14. Severe BK polyomavirus-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in a kidney transplant recipient with the absence of renal allograft involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Mahwash; Govil, Amit; Anand, Manish; Abu Jawdeh, Bassam G; Shah, Silvi

    2018-02-01

    BK polyomavirus mostly manifests as polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PyVAN) in kidney transplant patients and polyoma virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis (PyVHC) in bone marrow transplant patients. PyVHC in kidney transplant patients is only reported in four cases in the literature. Our patient had severe hemorrhagic cystitis without renal involvement. We postulate that our patient's exposure to ifosfamide and radiation 8 years prior transplantation might predispose him to this disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Viral DNA replication-dependent DNA damage response activation during BK polyomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhalen, Brandy; Justice, Joshua L; Imperiale, Michael J; Jiang, Mengxi

    2015-05-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) reactivation is associated with severe human disease in kidney and bone marrow transplant patients. The interplay between viral and host factors that regulates the productive infection process remains poorly understood. We have previously reported that the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is activated upon lytic BKPyV infection and that its activation is required for optimal viral replication in primary kidney epithelial cells. In this report, we set out to determine what viral components are responsible for activating the two major phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like kinases (PI3KKs) involved in the DDR: ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase. Using a combination of UV treatment, lentivirus transduction, and mutant virus infection experiments, our results demonstrate that neither the input virus nor the expression of large T antigen (TAg) alone is sufficient to trigger the activation of ATM or ATR in our primary culture model. Instead, our data suggest that the activation of both the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR pathways is linked to viral DNA replication. Intriguingly, a TAg mutant virus that is unable to activate the DDR causes substantial host DNA damage. Our study provides insight into how DDRs are activated by polyomaviruses in primary cells with intact cell cycle checkpoints and how the activation might be linked to the maintenance of host genome stability. Polyomaviruses are opportunistic pathogens that are associated with several human diseases under immunosuppressed conditions. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) affects mostly kidney and bone marrow transplant patients. The detailed replication mechanism of these viruses remains to be determined. We have previously reported that BKPyV activates the host DNA damage response (DDR), a response normally used by the host cell to combat genotoxic stress, to aid its own replication. In this study, we identified that the trigger for DDR activation is viral

  16. Phenotypic and functional characterization of circulating polyomavirus BK VP1-specific CD8+ T cells in healthy adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aalderen, Michiel C.; Remmerswaal, Ester B. M.; Heutinck, Kirstin M.; ten Brinke, Anja; Pircher, Hanspeter; van Lier, René A. W.; ten Berge, Ineke J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The human polyomavirus BK virus (BKV) establishes a latent and asymptomatic infection in the majority of the population. In immunocompromised individuals, the virus frequently (re)activates and may cause severe disease such as interstitial nephritis and hemorrhagic cystitis. Currently, the

  17. Vaccine to Prevent BK Polyomavirus-associated Kidney and Bladder Infections in Organ Transplant Recipients | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate or commercialize therapeutic compositions and methods for pre-vaccination of organ transplant recipients against BK polyomavirus (BKV) as well as methods for producing a BKV vaccine against all four known BKV serotypes.

  18. Complete Genome Sequences of BK Polyomavirus Strains from Two Patients with Urinary Tract Infection, Sequenced Using the Ion Torrent Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Graham; Ranellou, Kyriaki; Misra, Raju; Crump, Colin; Wooldridge, David; Parmar, Surendra; Maddren, Christopher; Gharbia, Saheer; Jalal, Hamid

    2017-11-16

    BK polyomavirus is an important pathogen in kidney transplant patients. We report here two complete genome sequences, those of isolates CAMB-1035 and CAMB-1055, identified in two urine samples tested for urinary tract infection at a hospital in eastern England, United Kingdom. Variation and phylogenetic analyses indicate that both isolates belong to subtype Ib-1. Copyright © 2017 Rose et al.

  19. Evaluation of polyomavirus BK reactivation in lupus patients who underwent kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. A pathogenic role for polyomavirus BK in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE has been proposed, however no study evaluated the occurrence of BK replication in renal transplant recipients according to the underlying disease leading to transplantation and its potential impact. Methods. The occurrence of BK reactivation was serially evaluated in 468 renal transplant recipients, including 11 patients with SLE as underlying disease (overall, 2370 serum and 2370 urine specimens; 65 from SLE patients. Results. Considering the overall occurrence of viral reactivation (viremia and/or viruria, 26/65 (40% specimens were positive in four SLE patients (36.3% versus 331/2143 (15.4% in 130/227 (57.3% non-SLE patients. A patient transplanted for class III lupus nephritis evidenced sustained BK viremia and viruria (with viremia values potentially indicative of polyomavirus-associated nephropathy in the absence of clinical features of renal dysfunction or recurrence of lupus nephritis. Conclusions. Further studies on larger populations and for a longer follow-up should be required to evaluate the impact of BKV reactivation in renal transplant patients with SLE as underlying disease, as well as the potential therapeutic implications.

  20. Naturally arising strains of polyomaviruses with severely attenuated microRNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun Jung; Burke, James M; Kincaid, Rodney P; Azarm, Kristopher D; Mireles, Noel; Butel, Janet S; Sullivan, Christopher S

    2014-11-01

    Several different polyomaviruses (PyVs) encode microRNAs (miRNAs) that regulate viral as well as host gene expression. However, the functions of polyomaviral miRNAs, particularly during in vivo infection, remain poorly understood. Here we identify rare naturally arising PyVs that are severely attenuated or null for miRNA expression. We identify hypomorphic or null strains for miRNA expression from rhesus macaque simian virus 40 (SV40) and human JC virus. These strains were isolated from immunocompromised hosts and derive from insertions or deletions in the viral DNA that preserve the amino acid reading frame of opposing-strand large T antigen gene. Characterization of the SV40 miRNA hypomorph, K661, shows that it is inhibited at the early miRNA biogenesis step of Drosha-mediated processing. Despite having a nonrearranged enhancer, which a previous study has shown renders some PyVs more susceptible to the autoregulatory activities of the miRNA, restoring miRNA expression to K661 has little effect on virus growth in either immortalized or primary monkey kidney cells. Thus, in addition to any effect of accompanying genomic elements, these results suggest that the cellular context also determines susceptibility to PyV miRNA-mediated effects. Combined, these results demonstrate that polyomaviruses lacking miRNAs can arise infrequently and that the functional importance of polyomaviral miRNAs is context dependent, consistent with an activity connected to the immune status of the host. Diverse virus families encode miRNAs, yet much remains unknown about viral miRNA function and contribution to the infectious cycle. Polyomaviruses (PyVs) are small DNA viruses, long known to be important as etiological agents of rare diseases and valuable models of DNA virus infection. Here, in immunosuppressed hosts, we uncover rare naturally arising variants of different PyVs that have lost the ability to express miRNAs. This represents some of the only known natural viruses to have lost

  1. Infectious offspring: how birds acquire and transmit an avian polyomavirus in the wild.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Potti

    Full Text Available Detailed patterns of primary virus acquisition and subsequent dispersal in wild vertebrate populations are virtually absent. We show that nestlings of a songbird acquire polyomavirus infections from larval blowflies, common nest ectoparasites of cavity-nesting birds, while breeding adults acquire and renew the same viral infections via cloacal shedding from their offspring. Infections by these DNA viruses, known potential pathogens producing disease in some bird species, therefore follow an 'upwards vertical' route of an environmental nature mimicking horizontal transmission within families, as evidenced by patterns of viral infection in adults and young of experimental, cross-fostered offspring. This previously undescribed route of viral transmission from ectoparasites to offspring to parent hosts may be a common mechanism of virus dispersal in many taxa that display parental care.

  2. BK polyomavirus in Kidney transplant recipients: screening, monitoring and clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Brandão Varella

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BK polyomavirus (BKPyV is a causal agent of nephropathy, ureteral stenosis and hemorrhagic cystitis in kidney transplant recipients, and is considered an important emerging disease in transplantation. Regular screening for BKPyV reactivation mainly during the first 2 years posttransplant, with subsequent pre-emptive reduction of immunosuppression is considered the best option to avoid disease progression, since successful clearance or reduction of viremia is achieved in the vast majority of patients within 6 months. The use of drugs with antiviral properties for patients with persistent viremia has been attempted despite unclear benefits. Clinical manifestations of BKPyV nephropathy, current strategies for diagnosis and monitoring of BKPyV infection, management of immunosuppressive regimen after detection of BKPyV reactivation and the use of antiviral drugs are discussed in this review.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of WU polyomavirus in hospitalized children with acute respiratory tract infection in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Teng; Lu, Qing-Bin; Zhang, Shu-Yan; Wo, Ying; Zhuang, Lu; Zhang, Pan-He; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Wei, Wei; Liu, Wei

    2017-05-01

    To explore the molecular epidemiology and clinical characteristics of Washington University polyomavirus (WUPyV) infection in pediatric patients with acute respiratory tract infections in China. A laboratory surveillance was performed to recruit pediatric patients with acute respiratory tract infections. WUPyV was detected using real-time PCR and complete genome was sequenced for randomly selected positive nasopharyngeal aspirate. Altogether 122 (7.5%) of 1617 children found to be infected with WUPyV and 88 (72.1%) were coinfected with other viruses during 2012-2015. The phylogenetic analysis showed that 14 strains from our study formed two new clusters (Id and IIIc) within the Branch I and Branch III, respectively. WUPyV is persistently circulating in China. Surveillance on WUPyV infection in wider areas and long persistence is warranted.

  4. Surveillance of polyomavirus BK in relation to immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Costa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reactivation of polyomavirus BK in kidney transplant recipients has been associated to the development of nephropathy (polyomavirus-associated nephropathy, PVAN, possibly leading to the loss of the transplanted organ. Immunosuppression is the condicio sine qua non for the onset of PVAN; however, a lower incidence of BK viremia has been reported with low-level tacrolimus based immunosuppressive protocols in comparison to cyclosporine A.Aim of this study was to compare the two immunosuppressive protocols. Methods. Virological monitoring of BK was performed in 468 consecutive renal transplant patients over a period of 3 years (2370 urine e 2370 serum specimens: in particular, 1780 specimens from 362 patients treated with tacrolimus and 590 from 106 treated with cyclosporine A. Results. BK viremia was evidenced in 124 (7.0% and 12 (2.0% specimens from 40 (11.0% and 11 (10.4% patients treated with tacrolimus and cyclosporine A, respectively; similarly, BK viruria in 289 (16.2% and 58 (9.8% specimens from 67 (18.5% and 27 (25.5% patients, being the difference of incidence highly significant (p <0.0001 for both viremia and viruria at comparison between specimens and not significant for patients. No case of PVAN was diagnosed at histophatology evaluation. Conclusions. The incidence of viremia and viruria was similar to that previously reported. Our results evidenced that with low-level tacrolimus-based protocols the overall incidence of reactivation in renal transplant patients is not significantly different and there is no increased risk of PVAN, nevertheless the higher incidence of episodes of reactivation.

  5. Comparative Inactivation of Murine Norovirus, Human Adenovirus, and Human JC Polyomavirus by Chlorine in Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu Corrêa, Adriana; Carratala, Anna; Barardi, Celia Regina Monte; Calvo, Miquel; Bofill-Mas, Sílvia

    2012-01-01

    Viruses excreted by humans affect the commercial and recreational use of coastal water. Shellfish produced in contaminated waters have been linked to many episodes and outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis, as well as other food-borne diseases worldwide. The risk can be reduced by appropriate treatment following harvesting and by depuration. The kinetics of inactivation of murine norovirus 1 and human adenovirus 2 in natural and artificial seawater by free available chlorine was studied by quantifying genomic copies (GC) using quantitative PCR and infectious viral particles (PFU). Human JC polyomavirus Mad4 kinetics were evaluated by quantitative PCR. DNase or RNase were used to eliminate free genomes and assess potential viral infectivity when molecular detection was performed. At 30 min of assay, human adenovirus 2 showed 2.6- and 2.7-log10 GC reductions and a 2.3- and 2.4-log10 PFU reductions in natural and artificial seawater, respectively, and infectious viral particles were still observed at the end of the assay. When DNase was used prior to the nucleic acid extraction the kinetic of inactivation obtained by quantitative PCR was statistically equivalent to the one observed by infectivity assays. For murine norovirus 1, 2.5, and 3.5-log10 GC reductions were observed in natural and artificial seawater, respectively, while no viruses remained infectious after 30 min of contact with chlorine. Regarding JC polyomavirus Mad4, 1.5- and 1.1-log10 GC reductions were observed after 30 min of contact time. No infectivity assays were conducted for this virus. The results obtained provide data that might be applicable to seawater used in shellfish depuration. PMID:22773637

  6. Reactivation of BK polyomavirus in patients with multiple sclerosis receiving natalizumab therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lonergan, Roisin M

    2012-02-01

    Natalizumab therapy in multiple sclerosis has been associated with JC polyomavirus-induced progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy. We hypothesized that natalizumab may also lead to reactivation of BK, a related human polyomavirus capable of causing morbidity in immunosuppressed groups. Patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis treated with natalizumab were prospectively monitored for reactivation of BK virus in blood and urine samples, and for evidence of associated renal dysfunction. In this cohort, JC and BK DNA in blood and urine; cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in blood and urine; CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocyte counts and ratios in peripheral blood; and renal function were monitored at regular intervals. BK subtyping and noncoding control region sequencing was performed on samples demonstrating reactivation. Prior to commencement of natalizumab therapy, 3 of 36 patients with multiple sclerosis (8.3%) had BK viruria and BK reactivation occurred in 12 of 54 patients (22.2%). BK viruria was transient in 7, continuous in 2 patients, and persistent viruria was associated with transient viremia. Concomitant JC and CMV viral loads were undetectable. CD4:CD8 ratios fluctuated, but absolute CD4 counts did not fall below normal limits. In four of seven patients with BK virus reactivation, transient reductions in CD4 counts were observed at onset of BK viruria: these resolved in three of four patients on resuppression of BK replication. No renal dysfunction was observed in the cohort. BK virus reactivation can occur during natalizumab therapy; however, the significance in the absence of renal dysfunction is unclear. We propose regular monitoring for BK reactivation or at least for evidence of renal dysfunction in patients receiving natalizumab.

  7. Polyomavirus specific cellular immunity: from BK-virus-specific cellular immunity to BK-virus-associated nephropathy ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    manon edekeyser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In renal transplantation, BK-virus-associated nephropathy has emerged as a major complication, with a prevalence of 5–10% and graft loss in >50% of cases. BK-virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family and rarely induces apparent clinical disease in the general population. However, replication of polyomaviruses, associated with significant organ disease, is observed in patients with acquired immunosuppression, which suggests a critical role for virus-specific cellular immunity to control virus replication and prevent chronic disease. Monitoring of specific immunity combined with viral load could be used to individually assess the risk of viral reactivation and virus control. We review the current knowledge on BK-virus specific cellular immunity and, more specifically, in immunocompromised patients. In the future, immune-based therapies could allow us to treat and prevent BK-virus-associated nephropathy.

  8. Antimitochondrial antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  9. Asymmetric Assembly of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large T-Antigen Origin Binding Domains at the Viral Origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Harrison; G Meinke; H Kwun; H Rogalin; P Phelan; P Bullock; Y Chang; P Moore; A Bohm

    2011-12-31

    The double-stranded DNA polyomavirus Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes Merkel cell carcinoma, an aggressive but rare human skin cancer that most often affects immunosuppressed and elderly persons. As in other polyomaviruses, the large T-antigen of MCV recognizes the viral origin of replication by binding repeating G(A/G)GGC pentamers. The spacing, number, orientation, and necessity of repeats for viral replication differ, however, from other family members such as SV40 and murine polyomavirus. We report here the 2.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the MCV large T-antigen origin binding domain (OBD) in complex with a DNA fragment from the MCV origin of replication. Consistent with replication data showing that three of the G(A/G)GGC-like binding sites near the center of the origin are required for replication, the crystal structure contains three copies of the OBD. This stoichiometry was verified using isothermal titration calorimetry. The affinity for G(A/G)GGC-containing double-stranded DNA was found to be {approx} 740 nM, approximately 8-fold weaker than the equivalent domain in SV40 for the analogous region of the SV40 origin. The difference in affinity is partially attributable to DNA-binding residue Lys331 (Arg154 in SV40). In contrast to SV40, a small protein-protein interface is observed between MCV OBDs when bound to the central region of the origin. This protein-protein interface is reminiscent of that seen in bovine papilloma virus E1 protein. Mutational analysis indicates, however, that this interface contributes little to DNA binding energy.

  10. KI and WU Polyomaviruses and CD4+ Cell Counts in HIV-1–infected Patients, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Farchi, Francesca; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Cavallo, Rossana; Adorno, Gaspare; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2010-01-01

    To investigate an association between KI and WU polyomavirus (KIPyV and WUPyV) infections and CD4+ cell counts, we tested HIV-1–positive patients and blood donors. No association was found between cell counts and virus infections in HIV-1–positive patients. Frequency of KIPyV infection was similar for both groups. WUPyV was more frequent in HIV-1–positive patients. PMID:20735940

  11. Cellular and humoral immune responses to chimeric EGFP-pseudocapsids derived from the mouse polyomavirus after their intranasal administration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frič, Jan; Marek, M.; Hrušková, V.; Holáň, Vladimír; Forstová, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 26 (2008), s. 3242-3251 ISSN 0264-410X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0506; GA MŠk LC545 Grant - others:GA Mšk(CZ) 1M0508 Program:1M Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : mouse polyomavirus pseudocapsids * chimeric VLPs * antigen carrier and adjuvant Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.298, year: 2008

  12. No Evidence of Human Polyomavirus 9, WU and KI DNA in Kidney and Urinary Bladder Tumour Tissue Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csoma, Eszter; Bidiga, László; Méhes, Gábor; Gergely, Lajos

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of human polyomaviruses (HPyVs) has been proposed, but so far only Merkel cell carcinoma polyomavirus seems to be associated with a human tumour. The role of BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) in human tumourigenesis remains controversial. BKPyV establishes persistent infection in the urinary tract, and renal and bladder neoplasms have been studied extensively, but conflicting prevalence data are reported. KI, WU and HPyV9 were detected in urine samples suggesting that these viruses may also infect the urinary tract, but their presence in urinary tract tumours has not been studied. The aim of this work was to examine the prevalence of KIPyV, WUPyV, HPyV9 and BKPyV by PCR in renal and bladder neoplasms. A total of 190 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded renal neoplasms, bladder cancer and kidney biopsy samples were analysed for the presence of BKPyV, KIPyV, WUPyV and HPyV9 DNA by real-time and nested PCR. Amplifiable DNA was extracted from all the samples, but none of the studied viruses were detected in benign renal neoplasia (0/23), malignant renal tumours (0/89) or bladder cancer (0/76). Our study did not find any evidence that BKPyV, KIPyV, WUPyV or HPyV9 are associated with bladder and renal tumours. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Genetic variability of the VP1 gene of BK and JC polyomaviruses in HIV-infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karalić Danijela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human polyomaviruses, BK virus (BKV and JC virus (JCV, are world widely distributed in human population. After primary infection, BKV and JCV establish latency in kidneys and upper part of urinary tract. In seropositive healthy individuals asymptomatic reactivation of both viruses occurs in in 0.5-20%. On the other hand, reactivation of these viruses in imunosuppressed patients, primarily in patients with T cell immunodeficiency, can lead to development of polyomavirus-associated diseases. Some of these diseases such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML, polyomavirus-induced nephropathy (PVN, hemorrhagic cystitis (HC are life-threatening diseases with high mortality and morbidity rate. However, they do not affect all immunosuppressed patients, suggesting that other factors, such as genetic variability of BKV and JCV, can contribute to their occurrence. Immunosuppression leads to increased levels of replication of both viruses. Increased levels of replication are associated with higher incidence of mutations in the VP1 gene. Mutations, especially those located in outer loops, may lead to changed tropism and generation of more aggressive variants of BKV and JCV. This review is focused on clinical significance of BK and JC virus infection in immunosuppressed patients, especially in HIV-infected, and sequence changes in the VP1 gene that can contribute to selection of more virulent variants of BKV and JCV via adaptive evolution.

  14. Temporal and geographic clustering of polyomavirus-associated olfactory tumors in 10 free-ranging raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannitti, F; Higgins, R J; Pesavento, P A; Dela Cruz, F; Clifford, D L; Piazza, M; Parker Struckhoff, A; Del Valle, L; Bollen, A W; Puschner, B; Kerr, E; Gelberg, H; Mete, A; McGraw, S; Woods, L W

    2014-07-01

    Reports of primary nervous system tumors in wild raccoons are extremely rare. Olfactory tumors were diagnosed postmortem in 9 free-ranging raccoons from 4 contiguous counties in California and 1 raccoon from Oregon within a 26-month period between 2010 and 2012. We describe the geographic and temporal features of these 10 cases, including the laboratory diagnostic investigations and the neuropathologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural characteristics of these tumors in the affected animals. All 9 raccoons from California were found within a localized geographic region of the San Francisco Bay Area (within a 44.13-km radius). The tight temporal and geographic clustering and consistent anatomic location in the olfactory system of tumor types not previously described in raccoons (malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and undifferentiated sarcomas) strongly suggest either a common cause or a precipitating factor leading to induction or potentiation of neuro-oncogenesis and so prompted an extensive diagnostic investigation to explore possible oncogenic infectious and/or toxic causes. By a consensus polymerase chain reaction strategy, a novel, recently reported polyomavirus called raccoon polyomavirus was identified in all 10 tumors but not in the normal brain tissue from the affected animals, suggesting that the virus might play a role in neuro-oncogenesis. In addition, expression of the viral protein T antigen was detected in all tumors containing the viral sequences. We discuss the potential role of raccoon polyomavirus as an oncogenic virus. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. JC polyomavirus expression and bell-shaped regulation of its SF2/ASF suppressor during the follow-up of multiple sclerosis patients treated with natalizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uleri, Elena; Ibba, Gabriele; Piu, Claudia; Caocci, Maurizio; Leoni, Stefania; Arru, Giannina; Serra, Caterina; Sechi, GianPietro; Dolei, Antonina

    2017-04-01

    Natalizumab is effective against multiple sclerosis (MS), but is associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), fatal disease caused by the JCV polyomavirus. The SF2/ASF (splicing factor2/alternative splicing factor) inhibits JCV in glial cells. We wondered about SF2/ASF modulation in the blood of natalizumab-treated patients and if this could influence JCV reactivation. Therefore, we performed a longitudinal study of MS patients under natalizumab, in comparison to patients under fingolimod and to healthy blood donors. Blood samples were collected at time intervals. The expression of SF2/ASF and the presence and expression of JCV in PBMC were analyzed. A bell-shaped regulation of SF2/ASF was observed in patients treated with natalizumab, increased in the first year of therapy, and reduced in the second one, while slightly changed, if any, in patients under fingolimod. Notably, SF2/ASF was up-regulated, during the first year, only in JCV DNA-positive patients, or with high anti-JCV antibody response; the expression of the JCV T-Ag protein in circulating B cells was inversely related to SF2/ASF protein expression. The SF2/ASF reduction, parallel to JCV activation, during the second year of therapy with natalizumab, but not with fingolimod, may help explain the increased risk of PML after the second year of treatment with natalizumab, but not with fingolimod. We propose that SF2/ASF has a protective role against JCV reactivation in MS patients. This study suggests new markers of disease behavior and, possibly, help in re-evaluations of therapy protocols.

  16. Principais processos neoplásicos encontrados em psitacídeos mantidos em cativeiro Main neoplasic processes in psittacines birds kept in captivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Neri Godoy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Um estudo anatomopatológico envolvendo 130 psitacídeos oriundos de centros de triagens, zoológicos e criadouros, visando a determinação da causa de morte destes animais, revelou a presença de neoplasias em sete animais, totalizando 5,4% dos casos. Os processos neoplasicos foram caracterizados como colangiocarcinoma, colangioma, linfoma, hemangiossarcoma e carcinoma renal primário, sendo o colangiocarcinoma o mais freqüentemente encontrado, presente em três animais. Este trabalho descreve estas neoplasias, levando em consideração os aspectos macro e microscópicos, meios de diagnósticos e espécies acometidas.An anatomopathologic study of 130 captivy psittacines from zoos, breeders and rehabilitation centers showed the presence of neoplastic disease in seven birds, totalizing 5.4% of the cases. The neoplasms were identified like cholangiocarcinoma, cholangioma, lymphoma, haemangiosarcoma and renal cell carcinoma. The cholangiocarcinoma was the tumor most commonly observed. it was present in birds. This study describes the macro and microscopic findings of these tumors; also reports diagnostic methods employed to identify these neoplasms.

  17. Dissociation of heterochromatin protein 1 from lamin B receptor induced by human polyomavirus agnoprotein: role in nuclear egress of viral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yuki; Suzuki, Tadaki; Sunden, Yuji; Orba, Yasuko; Kose, Shingo; Imamoto, Naoko; Takahashi, Hidehiro; Tanaka, Shinya; Hall, William W; Nagashima, Kazuo; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2005-05-01

    The nuclear envelope is one of the chief obstacles to the translocation of macromolecules that are larger than the diameter of nuclear pores. Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) bound to the lamin B receptor (LBR) is thought to contribute to reassembly of the nuclear envelope after cell division. Human polyomavirus agnoprotein (Agno) has been shown to bind to HP1alpha and to induce its dissociation from LBR, resulting in destabilization of the nuclear envelope. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed that Agno increased the lateral mobility of LBR in the inner nuclear membrane. Biochemical and immunofluorescence analyses showed that Agno is targeted to the nuclear envelope and facilitates the nuclear egress of polyomavirus-like particles. These results indicate that dissociation of HP1alpha from LBR and consequent perturbation of the nuclear envelope induced by polyomavirus Agno promote the translocation of virions out of the nucleus.

  18. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen Promotes Pro-Glycolytic Metabolic Perturbations Required for Transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Berrios

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV is an etiological agent of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, a highly aggressive skin cancer. The MCPyV small tumor antigen (ST is required for maintenance of MCC and can transform normal cells. To gain insight into cellular perturbations induced by MCPyV ST, we performed transcriptome analysis of normal human fibroblasts with inducible expression of ST. MCPyV ST dynamically alters the cellular transcriptome with increased levels of glycolytic genes, including the monocarboxylate lactate transporter SLC16A1 (MCT1. Extracellular flux analysis revealed increased lactate export reflecting elevated aerobic glycolysis in ST expressing cells. Inhibition of MCT1 activity suppressed the growth of MCC cell lines and impaired MCPyV-dependent transformation of IMR90 cells. Both NF-κB and MYC have been shown to regulate MCT1 expression. While MYC was required for MCT1 induction, MCPyV-induced MCT1 levels decreased following knockdown of the NF-κB subunit RelA, supporting a synergistic activity between MCPyV and MYC in regulating MCT1 levels. Several MCC lines had high levels of MYCL and MYCN but not MYC. Increased levels of MYCL was more effective than MYC or MYCN in increasing extracellular acidification in MCC cells. Our results demonstrate the effects of MCPyV ST on the cellular transcriptome and reveal that transformation is dependent, at least in part, on elevated aerobic glycolysis.

  19. Merkel cell polyomavirus recruits MYCL to the EP400 complex to promote oncogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Cheng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC frequently contains integrated copies of Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA that express a truncated form of Large T antigen (LT and an intact Small T antigen (ST. While LT binds RB and inactivates its tumor suppressor function, it is less clear how ST contributes to MCC tumorigenesis. Here we show that ST binds specifically to the MYC homolog MYCL (L-MYC and recruits it to the 15-component EP400 histone acetyltransferase and chromatin remodeling complex. We performed a large-scale immunoprecipitation for ST and identified co-precipitating proteins by mass spectrometry. In addition to protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A subunits, we identified MYCL and its heterodimeric partner MAX plus the EP400 complex. Immunoprecipitation for MAX and EP400 complex components confirmed their association with ST. We determined that the ST-MYCL-EP400 complex binds together to specific gene promoters and activates their expression by integrating chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq and RNA-seq. MYCL and EP400 were required for maintenance of cell viability and cooperated with ST to promote gene expression in MCC cell lines. A genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screen confirmed the requirement for MYCL and EP400 in MCPyV-positive MCC cell lines. We demonstrate that ST can activate gene expression in a EP400 and MYCL dependent manner and this activity contributes to cellular transformation and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells.

  20. Characterization of self-assembled virus-like particles of Merkel cell polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Iwasaki, Kenji; Katano, Harutaka; Kataoka, Michiyo; Nagata, Noriyo; Kobayashi, Kazumi; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Takeda, Naokazu; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    In our recombinant baculovirus system, VP1 protein of merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), which is implicated as a causative agent in Merkel cell carcinoma, was self-assembled into MCPyV-like particles (MCPyV-LP) with two different sizes in insect cells, followed by being released into the culture medium. DNA molecules of 1.5- to 5-kb, which were derived from host insect cells, were packaged in large, ~50-nm spherical particles but not in small, ~25-nm particles. Structure reconstruction using cryo-electron microscopy showed that large MCPyV-LPs are composed of 72 pentameric capsomeres arranged in a T = 7 icosahedral surface lattice and are 48 nm in diameter. The MCPyV-LPs did not share antigenic determinants with BK- and JC viruses (BKPyV and JCPyV). The VLP-based enzyme immunoassay was applied to investigate age-specific prevalence of MCPyV infection in the general Japanese population aged 1-70 years. While seroprevalence of MCPyV increased with age in children and young individuals, its seropositivity in each age group was lower compared with BKPyV and JCPyV.

  1. Characterization of self-assembled virus-like particles of Merkel cell polyomavirus.

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    Tian-Cheng Li

    Full Text Available In our recombinant baculovirus system, VP1 protein of merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV, which is implicated as a causative agent in Merkel cell carcinoma, was self-assembled into MCPyV-like particles (MCPyV-LP with two different sizes in insect cells, followed by being released into the culture medium. DNA molecules of 1.5- to 5-kb, which were derived from host insect cells, were packaged in large, ~50-nm spherical particles but not in small, ~25-nm particles. Structure reconstruction using cryo-electron microscopy showed that large MCPyV-LPs are composed of 72 pentameric capsomeres arranged in a T = 7 icosahedral surface lattice and are 48 nm in diameter. The MCPyV-LPs did not share antigenic determinants with BK- and JC viruses (BKPyV and JCPyV. The VLP-based enzyme immunoassay was applied to investigate age-specific prevalence of MCPyV infection in the general Japanese population aged 1-70 years. While seroprevalence of MCPyV increased with age in children and young individuals, its seropositivity in each age group was lower compared with BKPyV and JCPyV.

  2. Whole genome sequence of a goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus detected in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehér, Enikő; Lengyel, György; Dán, Adám; Farkas, Szilvia L; Bányai, Krisztián

    2014-06-01

    Goose haemorrhagic polyomavirus (GHPV) provoke haemorrhagic nephritis and enteritis of domestic geese. Outbreaks were detected in European countries and caused economic losses for goose keepers. Domestic ducks may be infected with GHPV without any signs typical for geese. The genomic organisation of some isolates was described but the gene functions and the pathomechanisms of the virus was not precisely defined. Here we describe the genome sequence and structure of GHPV of a goose from a Hungarian goose flock showing characteristics of the haemorrhagic nephritis and enteritis. The GHPV genome investigated in this study was 5252 bp long and was very similar (99% nucleotide identity) to sequences deposited in the GenBank. All the whole GHPV genomes possess the same ORFs in length, including the VP1, VP2, VP3, ORF-X, t and T tumour antigens. Amino acid changes are detected mainly in the putative ORF-X region. Data about the GHPV genome imply a conserved genomic structure among isolates from different countries. Genomic and epidemiological studies may help vaccine development efforts and identify potential heterologous reservoirs of GHPV.

  3. Identification of a genomic subgroup of BK polyomavirus spread in European populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegaya, Hiroshi; Saukko, Pekka J; Tertti, Risto; Metsärinne, Kaj P; Carr, Michael J; Crowley, Brendan; Sakurada, Koichi; Zheng, Huai-Ying; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Yogo, Yoshiaki

    2006-11-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) is highly prevalent in the human population, infecting children without obvious symptoms and persisting in the kidney in a latent state. In immunosuppressed patients, BKV is reactivated and excreted in urine. BKV isolates worldwide are classified into four serologically distinct subtypes, I-IV, with subtype I being the most frequently detected. Furthermore, subtype I is subdivided into subgroups based on genomic variations. In this study, the distribution patterns of the subtypes and subgroups of BKV were compared among four patient populations with various immunosuppressive states and of various ethnic backgrounds: (A) Finnish renal-transplant recipients; (B) Irish/English haematopoietic stem-cell transplant recipients with and without haemorrhagic cystitis; (C) Japanese renal-transplant recipients; and (D) Japanese bone-marrow transplant recipients. The typing sequences (287 bp) of BKV in population A were determined in this study; those in populations B-D have been reported previously. These sequences were subjected to phylogenetic and single nucleotide polymorphism analyses. Based on the results of these analyses, the BKV isolates in the four patient populations were classified into subtypes and subgroups. The incidence of subtype IV varied significantly among patient populations. Furthermore, the incidence of subgroup Ib-2 within subtype I was high in populations A and B, whereas that of Ic was high in populations C and D (PBKV DNA sequences supported the hypothesis that there is geographical separation of European and Asian BKV strains.

  4. Replication, gene expression and particle production by a consensus Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV genome.

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    Friederike Neumann

    Full Text Available Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV genomes are clonally integrated in tumor tissues of approximately 85% of all Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC cases, a highly aggressive tumor of the skin which predominantly afflicts elderly and immunosuppressed patients. All integrated viral genomes recovered from MCC tissue or MCC cell lines harbor signature mutations in the early gene transcript encoding for the large T-Antigen (LT-Ag. These mutations selectively abrogate the ability of LT-Ag to support viral replication while still maintaining its Rb-binding activity, suggesting a continuous requirement for LT-Ag mediated cell cycle deregulation during MCC pathogenesis. To gain a better understanding of MCPyV biology, in vitro MCPyV replication systems are required. We have generated a synthetic MCPyV genomic clone (MCVSyn based on the consensus sequence of MCC-derived sequences deposited in the NCBI database. Here, we demonstrate that transfection of recircularized MCVSyn DNA into some human cell lines recapitulates efficient replication of the viral genome, early and late gene expression together with virus particle formation. However, serial transmission of infectious virus was not observed. This in vitro culturing system allows the study of viral replication and will facilitate the molecular dissection of important aspects of the MCPyV lifecycle.

  5. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  6. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fungal Infections Gout Graves Disease Guillain-Barré Syndrome Hashimoto Thyroiditis Heart Attack and Acute Coronary Syndrome Heart ... hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism , such as Graves disease or Hashimoto thyroiditis . Thyroid antibody tests include: Thyroid peroxidase antibody ( ...

  7. Inhibitory activities of three classes of acyclic nucleoside phosphonates against murine polyomavirus and primate simian virus 40 strains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebeau, I.; Andrei, G.; Krečmerová, Marcela; De Clercq, E.; Holý, Antonín; Snoeck, R.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 6 (2007), s. 2268-2273 ISSN 0066-4804 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS400550501; GA MŠk 1M0508 Grant - others:FWO(BE) G.0267.04; NIH(US) AI 062540-01; René Descartes Prize 2001(XE) HPAV-2002-100096 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * polyomavirus * 5-azacytosine Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.390, year: 2007

  8. Characterizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis-Garcia, Frances; Carnahan, Robert H

    2017-11-01

    Perhaps because they are such commonly used tools, many researchers view antibodies one-dimensionally: Antibody Y binds antigen X. Although few techniques require a comprehensive understanding of any particular antibody's characteristics, well-executed experiments do require a basic appreciation of what is known and, equally as important, what is not known about the antibody being used. Ignorance of the relevant antibody characteristics critical for a particular assay can easily lead to loss of precious resources (time, money, and limiting amounts of sample) and, in worst-case scenarios, erroneous conclusions. Here, we describe various antibody characteristics to provide a more well-rounded perspective of these critical reagents. With this information, it will be easier to make informed decisions on how best to choose and use the available antibodies, as well as knowing when it is essential and how to determine a particular as yet-undefined characteristic. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. MYCOBACTERIOSIS IN CAPTIVE PSITTACINES: A BRIEF REVIEW AND CASE SERIES IN COMMON COMPANION SPECIES (ECLECTUS RORATUS, AMAZONA ORATRIX, AND PIONITES MELANOCEPHALA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRee, Anna Elizabeth; Higbie, Christine T; Nevarez, Javier G; Rademacher, Nathalie T; Tully, Thomas N

    2017-09-01

    In 2015, three psittacines were presented within 30 days, each with differing clinical signs and patient histories. A 13-yr-old male eclectus parrot (Eclectus roratus) was presented for weakness, depression, and acute anorexia. On presentation it was determined to have a heart murmur, severely elevated white blood cell count (93.9 103/μl) with a left shift (2.8 103/μl bands), and anemia (30%). Severe hepatomegaly was noted on radiographs, ultrasonography, and computed tomography. A cytological sample of the liver obtained through a fine needle aspirate revealed intracellular acid-fast bacilli identified as Mycobacterium avium. A 20-yr-old female double yellow-headed Amazon parrot (Amazona oratrix) was presented for a 1-mo history of lethargy and weight loss despite a good appetite. The parrot's total white blood cell count was 16.8 103/μl and the PCV was 35%. Following its death, a necropsy revealed a generalized granulomatous condition that involved the small intestines, lungs, liver, spleen, and medullary cavities of the long bones, with intracellular acid-fast bacilli identified as Mycobacterium genavense. The third case, an 18-mo-old female black-headed caique (Pionites melanocephala), was presented with a 1-day history of lethargy and depression. On presentation, the caique had a heart murmur, distended coelom, palpable thickening of the coelomic organs, and increased lung sounds. Following the caique's death, a complete necropsy revealed mycobacteriosis of the liver, spleen, small intestines, pericardial fat, and bone marrow. The infection was identified as Mycobacterium genavense. The importance of advances in Mycobacterium spp. identification, continued presence of this organism in captive avian populations, difficulty in obtaining a definitive antemortem diagnosis, and conflicting recommendations regarding treatment are thought-provoking areas of focus in this case series.

  10. Ecology of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus in Healthy Skin Among Individuals in an Asian Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashida, Yumiko; Kamioka, Mikio; Tanaka, Moe; Hosokawa, Sena; Murakami, Masanao; Nakajima, Kimiko; Kikuchi, Hiroaki; Fujieda, Mikiya; Sano, Shigetoshi; Daibata, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Despite the oncogenic potential of Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), it has been found in the normal skin of healthy individuals; however, little is known about geographical variations in the ecology of MCPyV in this tissue. This study included 284 Japanese participants. Sun-unexposed arm and sun-exposed forehead skin swab samples were obtained and analyzed for MCPyV infection, using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Phylogenetic analyses were also conducted, based on the full-length genes encoding MCPyV large T antigen and viral protein 1. This study provides the first analyses of the age-specific prevalence and levels of MCPyV infection in normal skin. Steep increases in prevalence and viral load were observed in individuals aged >40 years. MCPyV infections with a high viral load were predominantly observed in the foreheads of subjects aged >60 years, among whom a high burden of MCPyV tended to persist. Phylogenetic analyses showed that all of the gene sequences obtained in this study clustered in a major clade, suggesting the existence of an Asian/Japanese genotype. This large study suggests that MCPyV infection with high viral loads is prevalent in the sun-exposed skin of elderly adults, making it necessary to follow up this cohort for possible transformation of MCPyV to a pathogenetic form. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The decade of polyomavirus BK-associated nephropathy: state of affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Emilio; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Wali, Ravinder; Hirsch, Hans H

    2009-03-15

    In the last 10 years, better immunosuppression drugs have decreased the rates of acute rejection in kidney transplantation but have also led to the emergence of polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN). This occurs in 1% to 10% of patients with kidney transplantion and is caused by BK virus in more than 95% of cases. Less than 5% of cases are attributed to the JC virus. Initially, lack of recognition or late diagnosis of PVAN resulted in rapid loss of graft function in more than 50% of patients. In recent years, it has become clear that early diagnosis and timely reduction in immunosuppression is the only proven measure, which significantly affects the outcome of PVAN. Diverse interventions have been explored including the adjunctive use of cidofovir, leflunomide, fluoroquinolones, and intravenous immunoglobulins. Allograft histology is needed to definitively establish the diagnosis of PVAN, but is of limited sensitivity in the early stage of disease. Well-established techniques and protocols for systematic screening by urine cytology and quantitative molecular-genetic techniques allow now for timely intervention before irreversible parenchymal changes occur. Moreover, preemptive reduction in immunosuppression is most effective in presumptive PVAN as defined by surrogate markers (i.e., high BK virus viremia). In this setting, preservation of graft function can be considered the rule. Nevertheless, the recovery of BK virus-specific T-cell immunity may require prolonged periods during which cytopathic damage may continue to accumulate. Despite remarkable progress in the field, important challenges remain, such as the rare patient with PVAN refractory to any intervention and the newly recognized association of PVAN with urogenital tumors.

  12. Detection of Merkel cell polyomavirus and human papillomavirus DNA in porocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, Carmelo; Pierucci, Federica; Sollai, Mauro; Arvia, Rosaria; Massi, Daniela; Zakrzewska, Krystyna

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidences support the role of Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) in non-cutaneous and cutaneous tumours. Porocarcinoma is a rare malignant neoplasm that arises from the intraepidermal ductal portion of the eccrine sweat glands. The aetiology of porocarcinoma is largely unknown and no systematic studies have been done to investigate the implication of infectious agents in the pathogenesis of this tumour. To investigate the possible association between MCPyV and/or HPV infection and porocarcinoma. Forty-four formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) porocarcinomas (40 primary and 4 metastatic) and 10 healthy skin specimens (controls), were analysed for the presence of MCPyV and HPV DNA using molecular detection methods. MCPyV DNA was found in 27/40 (68%) primary porocarcinomas and in 3/10 (30%) controls (Fisher exact test: phigh-risk HPV16. Cutaneous beta-HPV infection was detected in 16/40 (40%) porocarcinomas and in 6/10 (60%) controls. No particular beta-HPV types were significantly associated with tumour or with healthy skin. Two out of 4 metastatic biopsies were MCPyV DNA positive. All metastatic samples had mixed infections with cutaneous HPV types. This study demonstrated a significantly high prevalence of MCPyV and the presence of a broad spectrum of HPV types in porocarcinoma and provided the first available data about viral infections in this tumour. To understand the role, if any, of viral infections in the pathogenesis of porocarcinoma further studies are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Merkel cell carcinoma: The first human cancer shown to be associated with a polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, Mahtab; Touzé, Antoine

    2014-12-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, malignant primary neuroendocrine cancer of the skin, usually affecting elderly, white people in sun-exposed areas. This is a highly aggressive tumor with strong propensity to metastasize. Surgery and radiation therapy remain the mainstay of treatment, with no curative treatment in case of disseminated metastases. Until 2008, MCC was thought to be caused by the malignant transformation of resident Merkel cells, but no investigation of a predominant molecular pathway that could be involved in MCC pathogenesis was successful. A real revolution in MCC understanding and management occurred in 2008, when a new human polyomavirus (MCPyV) was found to be the main etiological agent of this skin cancer. Following the discovery of MCPyV, the association of MCPyV with MCC has been confirmed worldwide, with detection of MCPyV in about 80% of MCCs. At the same time it had been shown that MCPyV infection is almost ubiquitous in healthy subjects, and MCPyV is thought to be persistent resident of the skin microbiome although the route of transmission, the host cell, the viral cycle and/or latency remain unknown. Most studies suggest that there may be two subtypes of MCC: MCPyV-positive (80%) and MCPyV-negative (20%) MCCs, and various studies have reported a better prognosis associated with MCPyV infection. The discovery of MCPyV in MCC patients opens up new therapeutic insights. The necessity and persistence of expression of MCPyV oncoproteins during MCC development make these proteins promising therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical epidemiology of bocavirus, rhinovirus, two polyomaviruses and four coronaviruses in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected South African children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunes, Marta C.; Kuschner, Zachary; Rabede, Zelda; Madimabe, Richard; Van Niekerk, Nadia; Moloi, Jackie; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Rossen, John W.; Klugman, Keith P.; Adrian, Peter V.; Madhi, Shabir A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Advances in molecular diagnostics have implicated newly-discovered respiratory viruses in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. We aimed to determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of human bocavirus (hBoV), human rhinovirus (hRV), polyomavirus-WU (WUPyV) and -KI (KIPyV) and human

  15. A Role of Sp1 Binding Motifs in Basal and Large T-Antigen-Induced Promoter Activities of Human Polyomavirus HPyV9 and Its Variant UF-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Moens

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Human polyomavirus 9 (HPyV9 was originally detected in the serum of a renal transplant patient. Seroepidemiological studies showed that ~20–50% of the human population have antibodies against this virus. HPyV9 has not yet been associated with any disease and little is known about the route of infection, transmission, host cell tropism, and genomic variability in circulating strains. Recently, the HPyV9 variant UF-1 with an eight base-pair deletion, a thirteen base-pair insertion and with point mutations, creating three putative Sp1 binding sites in the late promoter was isolated from an AIDS patient. Transient transfection studies with a luciferase reporter plasmid driven by HPyV9 or UF1 promoter demonstrated that UF1 early and late promoters were stronger than HPyV9 promoters in most cell lines, and that the UF1 late promoter was more potently activated by HPyV9 large T-antigen (LTAg. Mutation of two Sp1 motifs strongly reduced trans-activation of the late UF1 promoter by HPyV9 LTAg in HeLa cells. In conclusion, the mutations in the UF1 late promoter seem to strengthen its activity and its response to stimulation by HPyV9 LTAg in certain cells. It remains to be investigated whether these promoter changes have an influence on virus replication and affect the possible pathogenic properties of the virus.

  16. JC Polyomavirus Abundance and Distribution in Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML Brain Tissue Implicates Myelin Sheath in Intracerebral Dissemination of Infection.

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    Keith A Wharton

    Full Text Available Over half of adults are seropositive for JC polyomavirus (JCV, but rare individuals develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML, a demyelinating JCV infection of the central nervous system. Previously, PML was primarily seen in immunosuppressed patients with AIDS or certain cancers, but it has recently emerged as a drug safety issue through its association with diverse immunomodulatory therapies. To better understand the relationship between the JCV life cycle and PML pathology, we studied autopsy brain tissue from a 70-year-old psoriasis patient on the integrin alpha-L inhibitor efalizumab following a ~2 month clinical course of PML. Sequence analysis of lesional brain tissue identified PML-associated viral mutations in regulatory (non-coding control region DNA, capsid protein VP1, and the regulatory agnoprotein, as well as 9 novel mutations in capsid protein VP2, indicating rampant viral evolution. Nine samples, including three gross PML lesions and normal-appearing adjacent tissues, were characterized by histopathology and subject to quantitative genomic, proteomic, and molecular localization analyses. We observed a striking correlation between the spatial extent of demyelination, axonal destruction, and dispersion of JCV along white matter myelin sheath. Our observations in this case, as well as in a case of PML-like disease in an immunocompromised rhesus macaque, suggest that long-range spread of polyomavirus and axonal destruction in PML might involve extracellular association between virus and the white matter myelin sheath.

  17. JC Polyomavirus Abundance and Distribution in Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) Brain Tissue Implicates Myelin Sheath in Intracerebral Dissemination of Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Keith A; Quigley, Catherine; Themeles, Marian; Dunstan, Robert W; Doyle, Kathryn; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Wei, Jing; Buko, Alex; Reid, Carl E; Sun, Chao; Carmillo, Paul; Sur, Gargi; Carulli, John P; Mansfield, Keith G; Westmoreland, Susan V; Staugaitis, Susan M; Fox, Robert J; Meier, Werner; Goelz, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Over half of adults are seropositive for JC polyomavirus (JCV), but rare individuals develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a demyelinating JCV infection of the central nervous system. Previously, PML was primarily seen in immunosuppressed patients with AIDS or certain cancers, but it has recently emerged as a drug safety issue through its association with diverse immunomodulatory therapies. To better understand the relationship between the JCV life cycle and PML pathology, we studied autopsy brain tissue from a 70-year-old psoriasis patient on the integrin alpha-L inhibitor efalizumab following a ~2 month clinical course of PML. Sequence analysis of lesional brain tissue identified PML-associated viral mutations in regulatory (non-coding control region) DNA, capsid protein VP1, and the regulatory agnoprotein, as well as 9 novel mutations in capsid protein VP2, indicating rampant viral evolution. Nine samples, including three gross PML lesions and normal-appearing adjacent tissues, were characterized by histopathology and subject to quantitative genomic, proteomic, and molecular localization analyses. We observed a striking correlation between the spatial extent of demyelination, axonal destruction, and dispersion of JCV along white matter myelin sheath. Our observations in this case, as well as in a case of PML-like disease in an immunocompromised rhesus macaque, suggest that long-range spread of polyomavirus and axonal destruction in PML might involve extracellular association between virus and the white matter myelin sheath.

  18. [Detection of DNA of the finch polyomavirus in diseases of various types of birds in the order Passeriformes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, Walter; Hoffmann, Kathrin; Müller, Hermann; Johne, Reimar

    2007-01-01

    Between 2000 and 2004 a disease occurred in an aviary in Germany affecting various bird species belonging to the order Passeriformes including Collared Grosbeaks (Mycerobas affinis), Eurasian Bullfinches (Pyrrhula pyrrhula griseiventris), Brown Bullfinches (Pyrrhula nipalensis), Grey-headed bullfinches (Pyrrhula erythaca) and Yellow-bellied Tits (Periparus venustulus). The major clinical signs included increased mortality of fledglings and young birds, as well as feather disorders and feather loss in adult birds. In addition, adult Eurasian Bullfinches showed in one year a disease course, in which the major symptom was inflammation of the skin beginning on the basis of the beak and spreading over the head occurring a few days before death. Bacteriological and parasitological investigations did not reveal any consistent findings. Using a newly developed polymerase chain reaction protocol, DNA of the recently discovered finch polyomavirus (FPyV) was demonstrated in several affected birds. Because of the consistent detection of FPyV-DNA and the similarity of the symptoms with those observed during infection with the closely related avian polyomavirus in other bird species, an etiological role of FPyV in the observed disease is assumed.

  19. Detection of Merkel cell polyomavirus in cervical squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas from Japanese patients

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    Imajoh Masayuki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV was identified originally in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, a rare form of human skin neuroendocrine carcinoma. Evidence of MCPyV existence in other forms of malignancy such as cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs is growing. Cervical cancers became the focus of our interest in searching for potentially MCPyV-related tumors because: (i the major histological type of cervical cancer is the SCC; (ii the uterine cervix is a common site of neuroendocrine carcinomas histologically similar to MCCs; and (iii MCPyV might be transmitted during sexual interaction as demonstrated for human papillomavirus (HPV. In this study, we aimed to clarify the possible presence of MCPyV in cervical SCCs from Japanese patients. Cervical adenocarcinomas (ACs were also studied. Results Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 48 cervical SCCs and 16 cervical ACs were examined for the presence of the MCPyV genome by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing analyses. PCR analysis revealed that 9/48 cervical SCCs (19% and 4/16 cervical ACs (25% were positive for MCPyV DNA. MCPyV-specific PCR products were sequenced to compare them with reference sequences. The nucleotide sequences in the MCPyV large T (LT-sequenced region were the same among MCPyV-positive cervical SCCs and AC. Conversely, in the MCPyV viral protein 1 (VP1-sequenced region, two cervical SCCs and three cervical ACs showed several nucleotide substitutions, of which three caused amino acid substitutions. These sequencing results suggested that three MCPyV variants of the VP1 were identified in our cases. Immunohistochemistry showed that the LT antigen was expressed in tumor cells in MCPyV-positive samples. Genotyping of human HPV in the MCPyV-positive samples revealed that infected HPVs were HPV types 16, 31 and 58 for SCCs and HPV types 16 and 18 for ACs. Conclusions This study provides the first observation that MCPyV coexists in a subset

  20. Detection of Merkel cell polyomavirus in cervical squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas from Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imajoh, Masayuki; Hashida, Yumiko; Nemoto, Yuiko; Oguri, Hiroyoshi; Maeda, Nagamasa; Furihata, Mutsuo; Fukaya, Takao; Daibata, Masanori

    2012-08-09

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) was identified originally in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare form of human skin neuroendocrine carcinoma. Evidence of MCPyV existence in other forms of malignancy such as cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) is growing. Cervical cancers became the focus of our interest in searching for potentially MCPyV-related tumors because: (i) the major histological type of cervical cancer is the SCC; (ii) the uterine cervix is a common site of neuroendocrine carcinomas histologically similar to MCCs; and (iii) MCPyV might be transmitted during sexual interaction as demonstrated for human papillomavirus (HPV). In this study, we aimed to clarify the possible presence of MCPyV in cervical SCCs from Japanese patients. Cervical adenocarcinomas (ACs) were also studied. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 48 cervical SCCs and 16 cervical ACs were examined for the presence of the MCPyV genome by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing analyses. PCR analysis revealed that 9/48 cervical SCCs (19%) and 4/16 cervical ACs (25%) were positive for MCPyV DNA. MCPyV-specific PCR products were sequenced to compare them with reference sequences. The nucleotide sequences in the MCPyV large T (LT)-sequenced region were the same among MCPyV-positive cervical SCCs and AC. Conversely, in the MCPyV viral protein 1 (VP1)-sequenced region, two cervical SCCs and three cervical ACs showed several nucleotide substitutions, of which three caused amino acid substitutions. These sequencing results suggested that three MCPyV variants of the VP1 were identified in our cases. Immunohistochemistry showed that the LT antigen was expressed in tumor cells in MCPyV-positive samples. Genotyping of human HPV in the MCPyV-positive samples revealed that infected HPVs were HPV types 16, 31 and 58 for SCCs and HPV types 16 and 18 for ACs. This study provides the first observation that MCPyV coexists in a subset of HPV-associated cervical cancers from

  1. [Detection of psittacid herpesvirus 1 in Amazon parrots with cloacal papilloma (internal papillomatosis of parrots, IPP) in an aviary of different psittacine species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legler, Marko; Kothe, Ruth; Rautenschlein, Silke; Kummerfeld, Norbert

    2008-12-01

    Amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva aestiva;Amazona ochrocephala, n=6) from an aviary with different psittacine species (n=100) were submitted to the Clinic for Pet Animals, Reptiles, Pet- and Wild birds with the clinical picture ofa cloacal prolaps. The cloacal mucosa showed papillomas, and internal papillomatosis of parrots (IPP) was suspected. Hepatomegaly was detected in the radiographs of the clinically diseased amazon parrots, indicating the involvement of the liver in the disease process. The cloacal area was enlarged and showed higher densities in the radiographic picture. One of the amazons had an increased level of bile acids in the plasma supporting the suspicion of the involvement of the liver. Macroscopical and histological investigation of amazons with cloacal prolaps revealed a papillomic adenoma of the cloacal mucosa accompanied by varying degrees of bile duct carcinomas in the liver and adenocarcinomas of the pancreas. Herpesvirus genome was detected by nested PCR in cloacal swabs, liver, and cloacal tissue samples. Sequencing of part of the herpesvirus DNA-polymerase gene indicated 95% homology of the detected herpesviruses with the Psittacid Herpesvirus (PsHV) 1. No cytopathic herpesvirus was recovered from cloacal swabs and liver samples after up to four passages in chicken embryofibroblast cultures. Cloacal and choanal swabs, which were taken from the remaining 47 healthy amazon parrots and 5 Green-winged Macaws (Ara chloroptera) of the aviary, were negative for herpesvirus in the nested PCR. Only birds with cloacal papillomas and the Green-winged Macaws were tested positive for herpesvirus DNA in the nested PCR. We may speculate that there is correlation between the infection with PsHV-1 and the development of cloacal adenomas, adenocarcinomas in the pancreas and carcinomas of the bile ducts. Our results indicate that there may be a higher susceptibility in certain amazon species, while other species may not get infected even if housed in close

  2. Resveratrol exhibits a strong cytotoxic activity in cultured cells and has an antiviral action against polyomavirus: potential clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galati Gaspare

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resveratrol is a non flavonoid polyphenol compound present in many plants and fruits and, at especially high concentrations, in the grape berries of Vitis vinifera. This compound has a strong bioactivity and its cytoprotective action has been demonstrated, however at high concentrations the drug exhibits also an effective anti-proliferative action. We recently showed its ability to abolish the effects of oxidative stress in cultured cells. In this work we assayed the bioactivity of resveratrol as antiproliferative and antiviral drug in cultured fibroblasts. Studies by other Authors showed that this natural compound inhibits the proliferation of different viruses such as herpes simplex, varicella-zoster and influenza A. The results presented here show an evident toxic activity of the drug at high concentrations, on the other hand at sub-cytotoxic concentrations, resveratrol can effectively inhibit the synthesis of polyomavirus DNA. A possible interpretation is that, due to the damage caused by resveratrol to the plasma membrane, the transfer of the virus from the endoplasmic reticulum to the nucleus, may be hindered thus inhibiting the production of viral DNA. Methods The mouse fibroblast line 3T6 and the human tumor line HL60 were used throughout the work. Cell viability and vital cell count were assessed respectively, by the MTT assay and Trypan Blue staining. Cytotoxic properties and evaluation of viral DNA production by agarose gel electrophoresis were performed according to standard protocols. Results Our results show a clear dose dependent both cytotoxic and antiviral effect of resveratrol respectively at high and low concentrations. The cytotoxic action is exerted towards a stabilized cell-line (3T6 as well as a tumor-line (HL60. Furthermore the antiviral action is evident after the phase of virion entry, therefore data suggest that the drug acts during the synthesis of the viral progeny DNA. Conclusion Resveratrol is

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geskin, Larisa J

    2015-10-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized cancer therapy. Approaches targeting specific cellular targets on the malignant cells and in tumor microenvironment have been proved to be successful in hematologic malignancies, including cutaneous lymphomas. mAb-based therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma has demonstrated high response rates and a favorable toxicity profile in clinical trials. Several antibodies and antibody-based conjugates are approved for use in clinical practice, and many more are in ongoing and planned clinical trials. In addition, these safe and effective drugs can be used as pillars for sequential therapies in a rational stepwise manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The diagnosis of proventricular dilatation disease: use of a Western blot assay to detect antibodies against avian Borna virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Itamar; Gray, Patricia; Mirhosseini, Negin; Payne, Susan; Hoppes, Sharman; Honkavuori, Kirsi S; Briese, Thomas; Turner, Debra; Tizard, Ian

    2010-07-14

    Avian Borna virus (ABV) has recently been shown to be the causal agent of proventricular dilatation disease (PDD) a lethal neurologic disease of captive psittacines and other birds. An immunoblot assay was used to detect the presence of antibodies against avian Borna virus in the serum of affected birds. A lysate from ABV-infected duck embryo fibroblasts served as a source of antigen. The assay was used to test for the presence of antibodies to ABV in 117 birds. Thirty of these birds had biopsy or necropsy-confirmed proventricular dilatation disease (PDD), while the remaining 87 birds were apparently healthy or were suffering from diseases other than PDD. Sera from 27 of the 30 PDD cases (90%) contained antibodies to ABV. Seventy-three (84%) of the apparently "healthy" birds were seronegative. Additionally, sera from seven macaws and one parrot trapped in the Peruvian Amazon were seronegative. Positive sera recognized the bornaviral nucleoprotein (N-protein). While the presence of antibodies to ABV largely corresponded with the development of clinical PDD, 14 apparently healthy normal birds possessed detectable antibodies to ABV. The existence of a carrier state was confirmed when 13 of 15 apparently healthy cockatiels were shown by PCR to have detectable ABV RNA in their feces. Western blot assays may be of significant assistance in diagnosing proventricular dilatation disease. Many apparently healthy birds may however be seronegative while, at the same time, shedding ABV in their feces. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. New insights on the association between the prostate cancer and the small DNA tumour virus, BK polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognon, Mauro; Provenzano, Maurizio

    2015-12-23

    In recent years the scientific literature in the field of the prostate carcinoma (PCa) pointed out on the genetic heterogeneity and mutations occurring in this tumour, while little attention was given to the causes of PCa onset, in particular infectious agents. In this brief commentary, we wish to point out recent advancements done on the role of the human polyomavirus BK (BKPyV) in the development of PCa by harnessing both humoral and cellular immune responses. Altogether, these new insights suggest that BKPyV is involved in the transforming activity during the multistep process of PCa development. Although these findings do not provide evidence for a causal relationship between BKPyV and PCa development, additional investigations with novel techniques will help to make it a concrete event.

  6. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Factor Antibody Iron Iron Tests JAK2 Mutation Kidney Stone Analysis Kidney Stone Risk Panel KRAS Mutation Lactate Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD) ... gain Fatigue Dry skin Hair loss Intolerance to cold Constipation A high level of thyroid hormone ( hyperthyroidism ) ...

  7. Inhibition of large T antigen ATPase activity as a potential strategy to develop anti-polyomavirus JC drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Parmjeet; Zeng, G; Bueno, M; Salgarkar, A; Lesniak, Andrew; Isse, K; Seyb, K; Perry, A; Charles, I; Hustus, C; Huang, M; Smith, M; Glicksman, Marcie A

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluates polyomavirus JC (JCV) large T antigen (LTA) as a potential target for drug development. LTA is a hexameric protein with a helicase activity that is powered by ATP binding and hydrolysis. The helicase and ATPase function is critical for viral replication. Recombinant JCV LTA was produced in an Escherichia coli based expression plasmid. ATPase activity was measured using the malachite green assay. A high throughput screen was completed using a brain-biased library of 75,000 drug-like compounds selected for physicochemical properties consistent with blood-brain barrier permeability. Five compounds showed non-competitive inhibition of ATPase activity with an EC50 ⩽ 15 μM. Modest antiviral activity was demonstrated in an immunofluorescence assay for JCV VP-1 expression in COS7 cells (EC50 15, 18, 20, 27, and 52 μM respectively). The compounds also inhibited viral replication in a real time PCR assay at comparable concentrations. LD50 in the MTS96 and Cell TiterGlo assays was >100 μM for all compounds in COS7 as well as HEK293 cells. However, two compounds inhibited cell proliferation in culture with IC50 values of 43 and 34 μM respectively. Despite substantial amino acid similarity between polyomavirus JC, BK and SV40 proteins, these compounds differ from those previously reported to inhibit SV40 LTA ATPase in chemical structure as well as a non-competitive mechanism of inhibition. LTA ATPase is a valid target for discovery. Additional screening and chemical optimization is needed to develop clinically useful compounds with less toxicity, which should be measured by metabolic as well as cell proliferation assays. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Neutralizing and IgG antibodies against simian virus 40 in healthy pregnant women in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manola Comar

    Full Text Available Polyomavirus simian virus 40 (SV40 sequences have been detected in various human specimens and SV40 antibodies have been found in human sera from both healthy individuals and cancer patients. This study analyzed serum samples from healthy pregnant women as well as cord blood samples to determine the prevalence of SV40 antibodies in pregnancy.Serum samples were collected at the time of delivery from two groups of pregnant women as well as cord bloods from one group. The women were born between 1967 and 1993. Samples were assayed by two different serological methods, one group by neutralization of viral infectivity and the other by indirect ELISA employing specific SV40 mimotopes as antigens. Viral DNA assays by real-time polymerase chain reaction were carried out on blood samples.Neutralization and ELISA tests indicated that the pregnant women were SV40 antibody-positive with overall prevalences of 10.6% (13/123 and 12.7% (14/110, respectively. SV40 neutralizing antibodies were detected in a low number of cord blood samples. Antibody titers were generally low. No viral DNA was detected in either maternal or cord bloods.SV40-specific serum antibodies were detected in pregnant women at the time of delivery and in cord bloods. There was no evidence of transplacental transmission of SV40. These data indicate that SV40 is circulating at a low prevalence in the northern Italian population long after the use of contaminated vaccines.

  9. Mouse polyomavirus enters early endosomes, requires their acidic pH for productive infection, and meets transferrin cargo in rab11-positive endosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liebl, D.; Difato, F.; Horníková, L.; Mannová, P.; Štokrová, Jitka; Forstová, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 9 (2006), s. 4610-4622 ISSN 0022-538X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/03/0593; GA MŠk(CZ) LC545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Polyomavirus internalization and trafficking * Early endosomes * Dependence of infection on endosomal pH Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.341, year: 2006

  10. New findings about trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV)--novel qPCR detects TSPyV-DNA in blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Paulo R; Nali, Luiz H S; Bicalho, Camila S; Pierrotti, Ligia C; David-Neto, Elias; Pannuti, Cláudio S; Romano, Camila M

    2016-02-01

    A new real-time PCR assay for trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV) DNA detection was designed, and blood samples from kidney transplant recipients and healthy individuals were screened. TSPyV-DNA was not detected in blood from healthy individuals, but 26.8% of kidney recipients presented TSPyV-DNA. This is the first report of TSPyV viremia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Viral-associated trichodysplasia spinulosa: a case with electron microscopic and molecular detection of the trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated human polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Mark R; Wang, Richard C; Reddick, Robert L; Saldivar, Victor A; Browning, John C

    2011-05-01

    Trichodysplasia spinulosa (TS) is a folliculocentric and clinically papular dermatological disorder occurring in the setting of immunosuppression typically in association with solid organ transplantation or hematolymphoid malignancies. We report the occurrence of TS in a 7-year-old girl with Down syndrome and pre-B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia who was completing chemotherapy at onset. The patient's affected follicles were dilated by an expansion of a dystrophic follicular inner root sheath cell population displaying enlarged trichohyaline cytoplasmic granules and progressing centrally to keratotic and parakeratotic debris, and superficially demonstrating some diminutive hair shaft-like material within the keratotic spicules. Electron microscopic studies of a follicular lesion showed extracellular viral particles suggestive of a polyomavirus within the central follicular keratotic debris. DNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing studies, performed on the tissue of the microscopic slide and paraffin block, for the recently identified TS-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV) resulted as positive for TSPyV. PCR for the Merkel cell polyomavirus was negative. To date, this case is unique in representing the first case of TS confirmed by electron microscopy in which a related viral pathogen has been molecularly identified. An additional 19 reported cases classifiable as TS are tabulated and reviewed. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Chimeric antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Kohei; Lin, Waka; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a detailed protocol for the one-step preparation of antigen-specific human chimeric immunoglobulin G (IgG) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) using an in vitro antibody design method referred to as the ADLib (Autonomously Diversifying Library) system. This method employs a chicken B cell line DT40-based library in which the variable regions of the Ig gene loci have been highly diversified by treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitors. DT40 cells express both membrane-bound and secreted forms of chicken IgM. This property allows a rapid screening and selection of antibody-producing B cells from the library by using magnetic beads conjugated with any antigen of interest. To apply the ADLib system to the direct generation of human chimeric antibody, we have inserted a DNA segment coding for the constant region of human IgG into the chicken IgM heavy-chain locus of DT40 cells by homologous gene targeting. By a mechanism of alternative splicing, the resulting DT40 strain simultaneously expresses chimeric human IgG that contain the same Ig variable region sequences as the membrane-bound chicken IgM displayed at the cell surface. Application of the ADLib system to this human Ig-inserted DT40 strain enables the one-step isolation of human chimeric IgG that is specific for any antigen of interest and can be easily purified for immediate use.

  13. Antibody biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... from somatic recombination between variable genes, was made. This topic has preoccupied immunologists includ- ing Ehrlich (side chain theory), Jerne .... natural naïve libraries, syn- thetic naïve and semi-synthetic libraries. Immune antibody libraries. These libraries are constructed with VH (VDJ) and VL.

  14. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. The importance of natural immunological mechanisms in pro- ducing artificial catalysts is exemplified by the reports describing increased synthesis of esterase antibodies in autoimmune mice compared to normal mice in response to transition-state ...

  15. Host DNA damage response factors localize to merkel cell polyomavirus DNA replication sites to support efficient viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sabrina H; Wang, Xin; Li, Jing; Buck, Christopher B; You, Jianxin

    2014-03-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates a role for Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) in the development of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), making MCPyV the first polyomavirus to be clearly associated with human cancer. With the high prevalence of MCPyV infection and the increasing amount of MCC diagnosis, there is a need to better understand the virus and its oncogenic potential. In this study, we examined the relationship between the host DNA damage response (DDR) and MCPyV replication. We found that components of the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR pathways accumulate in MCPyV large T antigen (LT)-positive nuclear foci in cells infected with native MCPyV virions. To further study MCPyV replication, we employed our previously established system, in which recombinant MCPyV episomal DNA is autonomously replicated in cultured cells. Similar to native MCPyV infection, where both MCPyV origin and LT are present, the host DDR machinery colocalized with LT in distinct nuclear foci. Immunofluorescence in situ hybridization and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation analysis showed that these DDR proteins and MCPyV LT in fact colocalized at the actively replicating MCPyV replication complexes, which were absent when a replication-defective LT mutant or an MCPyV-origin mutant was introduced in place of wild-type LT or wild-type viral origin. Inhibition of DDR kinases using chemical inhibitors and ATR/ATM small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown reduced MCPyV DNA replication without significantly affecting LT expression or the host cell cycle. This study demonstrates that these host DDR factors are important for MCPyV DNA replication, providing new insight into the host machinery involved in the MCPyV life cycle. MCPyV is the first polyomavirus to be clearly associated with human cancer. However, the MCPyV life cycle and its oncogenic mechanism remain poorly understood. In this report, we show that, in cells infected with native MCPyV virions, components of the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR

  16. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; ...

  17. Global Analysis of Mouse Polyomavirus Infection Reveals Dynamic Regulation of Viral and Host Gene Expression and Promiscuous Viral RNA Editing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth B Garren

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mouse polyomavirus (MPyV lytically infects mouse cells, transforms rat cells in culture, and is highly oncogenic in rodents. We have used deep sequencing to follow MPyV infection of mouse NIH3T6 cells at various times after infection and analyzed both the viral and cellular transcriptomes. Alignment of sequencing reads to the viral genome illustrated the transcriptional profile of the early-to-late switch with both early-strand and late-strand RNAs being transcribed at all time points. A number of novel insights into viral gene expression emerged from these studies, including the demonstration of widespread RNA editing of viral transcripts at late times in infection. By late times in infection, 359 host genes were seen to be significantly upregulated and 857 were downregulated. Gene ontology analysis indicated transcripts involved in translation, metabolism, RNA processing, DNA methylation, and protein turnover were upregulated while transcripts involved in extracellular adhesion, cytoskeleton, zinc finger binding, SH3 domain, and GTPase activation were downregulated. The levels of a number of long noncoding RNAs were also altered. The long noncoding RNA MALAT1, which is involved in splicing speckles and used as a marker in many late-stage cancers, was noticeably downregulated, while several other abundant noncoding RNAs were strongly upregulated. We discuss these results in light of what is currently known about the MPyV life cycle and its effects on host cell growth and metabolism.

  18. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  19. Quantification of BKV in urine and plasma in renal transplant recipients at PVAN (Polyomavirus-associated nephropathy risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio De Nisco

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. BKV infection usually occurs in early childhood through the respiratory tract.The virus persists in a latent form in the kidney and it could be reactivated under favorable condition.The most important clinical manifestations affect kidney transplanted in which the BK polyomavirus nephropathy (PVAN can lead to kidney failure. Objectives. The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical utility of quantification of BKV viruria and especially viremia detected by real-time PCR method to select the patients at risk of PVAN. Study Design. We carried out a quantitative (dosing assay of BKV-DNA in 24 patients transplanted in Salerno’s hospital, or elsewhere, all treated with cyclosporine or tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil or Prednisolone. The enrollment was made on the basis of impaired renal function, in particular of the values of serum creatinine (> 25% of baseline level and / or appearance of proteinuria. The nucleic acid extraction was performed by EXTRAgen kit (Nanogen; the extracts were submitted to quantitative evaluation by BKV Q-PCR Alert Kit indicare regione target in Real Time PCR (Nanogen using the instrument ABI7300 (Applied Biosystems. Results. 16 patients were negative both for viremia and viruria,4 patients showed positive viruria but viremia <10,000 copies / ml, 4 patients showed positive viruria and viremia > 10,000 copies / ml. In the last group, biopsy, performed to diagnose PVAN was positive and immunosuppressive therapy was reformulate leading to the decline, but never to the negativity of viral load. Conclusions. The renal impairement combined with the quantification of BKV’s viral load in urine and especially in plasma, can also be effective predictors of PVAN.

  20. Point mutation in calcium-binding domain of mouse polyomavirus VP1 protein does not prevent virus-like particle formation, but changes VP1 interactions with Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamec, T.; Palková, Zdena; Velková, K.; Štokrová, Jitka; Forstová, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 5, 4-5 (2005), s. 331-340 ISSN 1567-1356 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/03/0593 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : polyomavirus VP1 * Saccharomyces cerevisiae * heterologous expression Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.477, year: 2005

  1. RBC Antibody Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Indirect Coombs Test; Indirect Anti-human Globulin Test; Antibody Screen Formal name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Screen ...

  2. Evaluation of antibody response to vaccination against West Nile virus in thick billed parrots (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavis, Jennifer; Larsen, R Scott; Lamberski, Nadine; Gaffney, Patricia; Gardner, Ian

    2011-09-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was first documented in North America in New York City in 1999. Several deaths attributable to WNV have been reported in captive thick-billed parrots (Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha), an endangered psittacine native to North America. The serologic responses in 12 captive adult thick-billed parrots after a series of three initial WNV vaccine injections with annual boosters over 6 yr was evaluated. In addition, the serologic responses of 11 thick-billed parrot chicks following an initial vaccination series to determine if there were seroconversions were also reported. Most adults (67%) had seroconverted after 5 yr of annual vaccination, with a median titer of 1:80 (range 1:40-1:160) for those that seroconverted. After the first year, birds were likely naturally exposed to WNV, which limited interpretation of titers. None of the chicks seroconverted during the initial three-vaccine series; only two of four chicks (50%) had seroconverted when tested at the 1-yr yearly booster, and at 2 yr, three of four chicks had seroconverted. Although some birds had detectable antibody titers, it is unclear whether this vaccine can reliably provide protection against WNV in thick-billed parrots.

  3. Discrepancy in the diagnosis of avian Borna disease virus infection of Psittaciformes by protein analysis of feather calami and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of plasma antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Josephine M; de Kloet, Siwo R

    2015-03-01

    The present study compares diagnosis of avian Borna disease virus (ABV) infection of psittacine birds by Western blot of bornaviral proteins in dried feather stems with the detection of anti-bornaviral protein antibodies to bornaviral proteins in plasma by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The detection of ABV proteins P40 and P24 in feather calami by Western blotting was possible even after storage of the dried feathers for several years at ambient temperature. Serological identification of anti-bornaviral antibodies may fail (e.g., in young birds, hatched from infected parents), whereas bornaviral P40 and P24 proteins were detected in feather stems. This failure can last at least 10 months after the birds are hatched. In some older birds (>5 years), ABV protein was only detectable in the brain, but not in some peripheral tissues, suggesting that the immune system had succeeded in removing the infecting ABV from tissues outside the brain. These results show that a combination of feather stem analysis for the presence of bornaviral proteins by Western blot combined with serological detection of anti-bornaviral antibodies by ELISA is the most reliable procedure for the detection of a bornaviral infection. © 2015 The Author(s).

  4. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology.

  5. Production in yeast of pseudotype virus-like particles harboring functionally active antibody fragments neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pleckaityte Milda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant antibodies can be produced in different formats and different expression systems. Single chain variable fragments (scFvs represent an attractive alternative to full-length antibodies and they can be easily produced in bacteria or yeast. However, the scFvs exhibit monovalent antigen-binding properties and short serum half-lives. The stability and avidity of the scFvs can be improved by their multimerization or fusion with IgG Fc domain. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possibilities to produce in yeast high-affinity scFv-Fc proteins neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin (VLY, the main virulence factor of Gardnerella vaginalis. Results The scFv protein derived from hybridoma cell line producing high-affinity neutralizing antibodies against VLY was fused with human IgG1 Fc domain. Four different variants of anti-VLY scFv-Fc fusion proteins were constructed and produced in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The non-tagged scFv-Fc and hexahistidine-tagged scFv-Fc proteins were found predominantly as insoluble aggregates and therefore were not suitable for further purification and activity testing. The addition of yeast α-factor signal sequence did not support secretion of anti-VLY scFv-Fc but increased the amount of its intracellular soluble form. However, the purified protein showed a weak VLY-neutralizing capability. In contrast, the fusion of anti-VLY scFv-Fc molecules with hamster polyomavirus-derived VP2 protein and its co-expression with VP1 protein resulted in an effective production of pseudotype virus-like particles (VLPs that exhibited strong VLY-binding activity. Recombinant scFv-Fc molecules displayed on the surface of VLPs neutralized VLY-mediated lysis of human erythrocytes and HeLa cells with high potency comparable to that of full-length antibody. Conclusions Recombinant scFv-Fc proteins were expressed in yeast with low efficiency. New approach to display the sc

  6. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  7. Antinuclear antibody panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003535.htm Antinuclear antibody panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The antinuclear antibody panel is a blood test that looks at ...

  8. Platelet antibodies blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a part of the blood ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Platelet antibody - blood. In: Chernecky ... caused by platelet destruction, hypersplenism, or hemodilution. ...

  9. Detection of polyomavirus major capsid antigen (VP-1) in human pilomatricomas Detección del antígeno mayor de la cápside de poliomavirus (VP-1) en pilomatricomas humanos

    OpenAIRE

    Norberto A. Sanjuán; Silvina Símula; José Casas; Alberto Woscoff

    2010-01-01

    The family Polyomaviridae is composed of small, non-enveloped, double-stranded DNA viruses widely used to study cell transformation in vitro and tumor induction in vivo. The development of pilomatricomas in mice experimentally infected with polyomavirus led us to detect the viral major capsid protein VP-1 in human pilomatricomas. This tumor, even uncommon, is one of the most frequent benign hair follicle tumors in humans and is composed of proliferating matrix cells that undergo keratinizatio...

  10. Heavy chain only antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2013-01-01

    Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen...

  11. Antibodies Against Melanin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... This study reports on unsuccessful attempts to produce antibodies against melanoprotein in rabbits. Available evidence suggests antibodies against melanocytes in the aetiology of vitiligo, but there is no convincing evidence for antibodies against melanin per se. It is suggested that the demonstration of ...

  12. Studies of human polyomaviruses, with HPyV7, BKPyV, and JCPyV present in urine of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplanted patients with or without hemorrhagic cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzén, J; Ramqvist, T; Bogdanovic, G; Grün, N; Mattson, J; Dalianis, T

    2016-04-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) can cause hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) patients and polyomavirus-associated nephritis in renal transplant patients, while JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) can generate progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in immunocompromised individuals. Since 2007, additional human polyomaviruses (HPyVs) have been identified. In this study, we examined the urines of allo-HSCT patients for possible presence of polyomaviruses BKPyV, JCPyV, KIPyV, WUPyV, MCPyV, HPyV6, HPyV7, TSPyV, HPyV9, and HPyV10 (MWPyV). A total of 185 urinary samples obtained 2002-2007 from 105 allo-HSCT patients, 32/105 with HC, were tested for the above-listed HPyVs by a bead-based multiplex assay. Of these, 142 urine samples had previously been tested for BKPyV and JCPyV by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Aside from BKPyV and JCPyV, which dominated, HPyV7 was detected in 5 BKPyV-positive urinary samples from 1 patient. The multiplex assay was more sensitive and specific than the nested PCR. BKPyV and/or JCPyV were found in all but 1 of the previously BKPyV- or JCPyV-positive samples, although 6 previously BKPyV-positive cases were now JCPyV-positive or the reverse. Furthermore, 18/79 previously negative samples were found to be BKPyV and/or JCPyV positive, and a total of 21 double infections were found. Lastly, in 1/29 HC patients, only JCPyV was detected. HPyV7 was found for the first time in urine of an allo-HSCT patient, and BKPyV and JCPyV were more commonly found in urine samples using the bead-based assay compared to testing by nested PCR. Finally, only JCPyV was detected in the urine of 1 HC patient. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies provide a scaffold for human polyomavirus JC replication and are disrupted after development of viral inclusions in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido-Hara, Yukiko; Higuchi, Kayoko; Ohara, Sinji; Duyckaerts, Charles; Hauw, Jean-Jacques; Uchihara, Toshiki

    2008-04-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy is a fatal demyelinating disorder due to human polyomavirus JC infection in which there are viral inclusions in enlarged nuclei of infected oligodendrocytes. We report that the pathogenesis of this disease is associated with distinct subnuclear structures known as promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs). Postmortem brain tissues from 5 patients with the disease were examined. Affected cells with enlarged nuclei contained distinct dot-like subnuclear PML-NBs that were immunopositive for PML protein and nuclear body protein Sp100. Major and minor viral capsid proteins and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, an essential component for DNA replication, colocalized with PML-NBs. By in situ hybridization, viral genomic DNA showed dot-like nuclear accumulation, and by electron microscopy, virus-like structures clustered in subnuclear domains, indicating that PML-NBs are the site of viral DNA replication and capsid assembly. Molecules involved in the ubiquitin proteosome pathway (i.e. ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier 1) did not accumulate in the nuclei with viral inclusions, indicating that cell degeneration may not be dependent on this pathway. When viral progeny production was advanced, PML-NBs were disrupted. These data suggest that: 1) PML-NBs allow for efficient viral propagation by providing scaffolds, 2) disruption of PML-NBs is independent of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, and 3) this disruption probably heralds oligodendrocyte degeneration and the resulting demyelination.

  14. No association between Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome skin fibrofolliculomas and the first 10 described human polyomaviruses or human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Maria; Nordfors, Cecilia; Vlastos, Andrea; Ferrara, Giovanni; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Dalianis, Tina

    2014-11-01

    The rare autosomal dominant condition Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is attributed to mutations on chromosome 17 in the folliculin (FLCN) gene, but not always diagnosed due to lack of, or a variety of symptoms such as fibrofolliculomas, lung cystic lesions, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal cancer. We hypothesized that the lack of or variability in symptoms could be due to BHD patients potentially being abnormally susceptible to infections with human papillomavirus (HPV) or human polyomavirus (HPyV), which can be associated with skin lesions or latency in the kidneys. Seven fibrofolliculoma skin lesions, one renal cancer and one lung cyst from nine patients with BHD treated at the Karolinska University Hospital were therefore analyzed for cutaneous and mucosal HPV types and 10 HPyVs by bead based multiplex assays or by PCR. All samples were negative for viral DNA. In conclusion, the data suggest that HPV and HPyVs do not contribute to BHD pathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Polyomavirus JC in the Context of Immunosuppression: A Series of Adaptive, DNA Replication-Driven Recombination Events in the Development of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward M. Johnson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyomavirus JC (JCV is the etiological agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML, a demyelinating infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. PML, a frequently fatal opportunistic infection in AIDS, has also emerged as a consequence of treatment with several new immunosuppressive therapeutic agents. Although nearly 80% of adults are seropositive, JCV attains an ability to infect glial cells in only a minority of people. Data suggest that JCV undergoes sequence alterations that accompany this ability, and these changes can be derived from an archetype strain by mutation, deletion, and duplication. While the introductory source and primary tissue reservoir of JCV remain unknown, lymphoid cells have been identified as potential intermediaries in progression of JCV to the brain. This review is focused on sequence changes in the noncoding control region (NCCR of the virus. We propose an adaptive mechanism that involves a sequential series of DNA replication-driven NCCR recombination events involving stalled DNA replication forks at NCCR palindromic secondary structures. We shall describe how the NCCR sequence changes point to a model in which viral DNA replication drives NCCR recombination, allowing JCV adaptation to different cell types in its progression to neurovirulence.

  16. Prevalence of papillomaviruses, polyomaviruses, and herpesviruses in triple-negative and inflammatory breast tumors from algeria compared with other types of breast cancer tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbex, Marilys; Bouzbid, Sabiha; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Aouras, Hayette; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Carreira, Christine; Lankar, Abdelaziz; Tommasino, Massimo; Gheit, Tarik

    2014-01-01

    The possible role of viruses in breast cancer etiology remains an unresolved question. We hypothesized that if some viruses are involved, it may be in a subgroup of breast cancers only. Epidemiological arguments drove our interest in breast cancer subgroups that are more frequent in Africa, namely inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) and triple-negative breast cancer. We tested whether viral prevalence was significantly higher in these subgroups. One hundred fifty-five paraffin-embedded malignant breast tumors were randomly selected at the pathology laboratory of the University Hospital of Annaba (Algeria) to include one third of IBC and two thirds of non-IBC. They were tested for the presence of DNA from 61 viral agents (46 human papillomaviruses, 10 polyomaviruses, and 5 herpesviruses) using type-specific multiplex genotyping assays, which combine multiplex PCR and bead-based Luminex technology. Viral DNA was found in 22 (17.9%) of 123 tumors. The most prevalent viruses were EBV1 and HPV16. IBC tumors carried significantly more viruses (any type) than non-IBC tumors (30% vs. 13%, pbreast cancer phenotypes (IBC, triple-negative). While preliminary, they underline the importance of focusing on subgroups when studying viral etiology in breast cancer. Further studies on viruses in breast cancer should be conducted in much larger samples to confirm these initial findings.

  17. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  18. Expression of recombinant Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André eFrenzel

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with human-like post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  19. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  20. Antibody engineering: methods and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chames, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    "Antibody Engineering: Methods and Protocols, Second Edition was compiled to give complete and easy access to a variety of antibody engineering techniques, starting from the creation of antibody repertoires and efficient...

  1. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  2. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  3. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to confirm the cause of thyroid problems, including Hashimoto thyroiditis . The test is also used to find ... positive test may be due to: Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also ...

  4. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test is Performed A blood sample ... person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  5. ANA (Antinuclear Antibody Test)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver Panel Lp-PLA2 Lupus Anticoagulant Testing Luteinizing ... Scleroderma Elsewhere On The Web Lupus Foundation of America American College of Rheumatology: Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA) American ...

  6. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Kehoe, John [Saint Davids, PA; Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  7. Antibody Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibody Blood Tests Researchers have discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of ... do I do if I have a negative blood test (or panel) but I’m still having symptoms? ...

  8. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    André eFrenzel; Michael eHust; Thomas eSchirrmann

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transg...

  9. The Oncogenic Small Tumor Antigen of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Is an Iron-Sulfur Cluster Protein That Enhances Viral DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sabrina H; Wang, Ranran; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Knight, Simon A B; Buck, Christopher B; You, Jianxin

    2015-11-25

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) plays an important role in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). MCPyV small T (sT) antigen has emerged as the key oncogenic driver in MCC carcinogenesis. It has also been shown to promote MCPyV LT-mediated replication by stabilizing LT. The importance of MCPyV sT led us to investigate sT functions and to identify potential ways to target this protein. We discovered that MCPyV sT purified from bacteria contains iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis showed that MCPyV sT coordinates a [2Fe-2S] and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. We also observed phenotypic conservation of Fe/S coordination in the sTs of other polyomaviruses. Since Fe/S clusters are critical cofactors in many nucleic acid processing enzymes involved in DNA unwinding and polymerization, our results suggested the hypothesis that MCPyV sT might be directly involved in viral replication. Indeed, we demonstrated that MCPyV sT enhances LT-mediated replication in a manner that is independent of its previously reported ability to stabilize LT. MCPyV sT translocates to nuclear foci containing actively replicating viral DNA, supporting a direct role for sT in promoting viral replication. Mutations of Fe/S cluster-coordinating cysteines in MCPyV sT abolish its ability to stimulate viral replication. Moreover, treatment with cidofovir, a potent antiviral agent, robustly inhibits the sT-mediated enhancement of MCPyV replication but has little effect on the basal viral replication driven by LT alone. This finding further indicates that MCPyV sT plays a direct role in stimulating viral DNA replication and introduces cidofovir as a possible drug for controlling MCPyV infection. MCPyV is associated with a highly aggressive form of skin cancer in humans. Epidemiological surveys for MCPyV seropositivity and sequencing analyses of healthy human skin suggest that MCPyV may represent a common component of the human skin microbial flora. However, much of the biology of the virus

  10. Differential patterns of large tumor antigen-specific immune responsiveness in patients with BK polyomavirus-positive prostate cancer or benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sais, Giovanni; Wyler, Stephen; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Banzola, Irina; Mengus, Chantal; Bubendorf, Lukas; Wild, Peter J; Hirsch, Hans H; Sulser, Tullio; Spagnoli, Giulio C; Provenzano, Maurizio

    2012-08-01

    The role of the polyomavirus BK (BKV) large tumor antigen (L-Tag) as a target of immune response in patients with prostate cancer (PCa) has not been investigated thus far. In this study, we comparatively analyzed humoral and cellular L-Tag-specific responsiveness in age-matched patients bearing PCa or benign prostatic hyperplasia, expressing or not expressing BKV L-Tag-specific sequences in their tissue specimens, and in non-age-matched healthy individuals. Furthermore, results from patients with PCa were correlated to 5-year follow-up clinical data focusing on evidence of biochemical recurrence (BR) after surgery (prostate specific antigen level of ≥0.2 ng/ml). In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with PCa with evidence of BR and BKV L-Tag-positive tumors, stimulation with peptides derived from the BKV L-Tag but not those derived from Epstein-Barr virus, influenza virus, or cytomegalovirus induced a peculiar cytokine gene expression profile, characterized by high expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor β1 and low expression of gamma interferon genes. This pattern was confirmed by protein secretion data and correlated with high levels of anti-BKV L-Tag IgG. Furthermore, in PBMC from these PCa-bearing patients, L-Tag-derived peptides significantly expanded an IL-10-secreting CD4(+) CD25(+(high)) CD127(-) FoxP3(+) T cell population with an effector memory phenotype (CD103(+)) capable of inhibiting proliferation of autologous anti-CD3/CD28-triggered CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells. Collectively, our findings indicate that potentially tolerogenic features of L-Tag-specific immune response are significantly associated with tumor progression in patients with BKV(+) PCa.

  11. Prevalence of papillomaviruses, polyomaviruses, and herpesviruses in triple-negative and inflammatory breast tumors from algeria compared with other types of breast cancer tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilys Corbex

    Full Text Available The possible role of viruses in breast cancer etiology remains an unresolved question. We hypothesized that if some viruses are involved, it may be in a subgroup of breast cancers only. Epidemiological arguments drove our interest in breast cancer subgroups that are more frequent in Africa, namely inflammatory breast cancer (IBC and triple-negative breast cancer. We tested whether viral prevalence was significantly higher in these subgroups.One hundred fifty-five paraffin-embedded malignant breast tumors were randomly selected at the pathology laboratory of the University Hospital of Annaba (Algeria to include one third of IBC and two thirds of non-IBC. They were tested for the presence of DNA from 61 viral agents (46 human papillomaviruses, 10 polyomaviruses, and 5 herpesviruses using type-specific multiplex genotyping assays, which combine multiplex PCR and bead-based Luminex technology.Viral DNA was found in 22 (17.9% of 123 tumors. The most prevalent viruses were EBV1 and HPV16. IBC tumors carried significantly more viruses (any type than non-IBC tumors (30% vs. 13%, p<0.04. Similarly, triple-negative tumors displayed higher virus-positivity than non-triple-negative tumors (44% vs. 14%, p<0.009.Our results suggest an association between the presence of viral DNA and aggressive breast cancer phenotypes (IBC, triple-negative. While preliminary, they underline the importance of focusing on subgroups when studying viral etiology in breast cancer. Further studies on viruses in breast cancer should be conducted in much larger samples to confirm these initial findings.

  12. Natural and Man-made Antibody Repertories for Antibody Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C eAlmagro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of human, mice and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process.

  13. Detection of polyomavirus major capsid antigen (VP-1 in human pilomatricomas Detección del antígeno mayor de la cápside de poliomavirus (VP-1 en pilomatricomas humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto A. Sanjuán

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The family Polyomaviridae is composed of small, non-enveloped, double-stranded DNA viruses widely used to study cell transformation in vitro and tumor induction in vivo. The development of pilomatricomas in mice experimentally infected with polyomavirus led us to detect the viral major capsid protein VP-1 in human pilomatricomas. This tumor, even uncommon, is one of the most frequent benign hair follicle tumors in humans and is composed of proliferating matrix cells that undergo keratinization, and form cystic neoplasms. The detection of VP-1 was performed using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique in paraffin-embedded slides with a specific primary serum. Adjacent slides treated with normal rabbit serum as a primary were employed as internal control. Positive and negative controls were also employed as well as slides of lesions caused by human papillomavirus to rule out any unspecific cross-reactivity. In 4 out of 10 cases polyomavirus VP-1 was clearly detected in nuclei of human pilomatricomas proliferating cells, in a patchy pattern of distribution. The controls confirmed the specificity of the immunocytochemical procedure. These results could indicate either an eventual infection of the virus in already developed tumors or alternatively, a direct involvement of polyomavirus in the pathogenesis of some pilomatricomas. The recent discovery of a new human polyomavirus associated with Merkel cell carcinomas has been a strong contribution to better understand the pathogenesis of some human uncommon skin cancers. Hopefully the results reported in this work will encourage further research on the role of polyomavirus in other human skin neoplasms.La familia Poliomaviridae está compuesta por virus oncogénicos pequeños, no envueltos, con ADN de doble cadena. En un modelo experimental murino pudimos desarrollar pilomatricomas inducidos por la inoculación de virus polioma. Eso nos llevó a estudiar la posibilidad de que otro virus polioma

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies production technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Rocha

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the first cells were capable of maintain a continuous antibody supply, developed by Köhler and Milstein in 1975, its use in medicine and industry showed a great potential. New researches were developed to enhance the use of such cells, including immunizations, mieloma cells, fusion methodology, screening techniques, cloning, culture media, among several details which enable and optimizes its use. Nowadays, monoclonal antibodies are a well-established tool for proteomics research and it have countless applications on several knowledge areas, mainly human and/or animal disease diagnostic, identification and tracking of allergenic compounds in food and residues in the environment. This review can be used by professionals, researches and students searching for a compiled papers contributing to the improvement of the monoclonal antibodies technology, used at different knowledge areas such as human diseases and diseases and disorders in agriculture and livestock chain.

  15. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    fragments by in vivo homologous recombination large combinatorial antibody libraries can easily be generated. We have optimized ordered assembly of three CDR fragments into a gapped vector and observed increased transformation efficiency in a yeast strain carrying a deletion of the SGS1 helicase...... surface expression of various antibody formats in the generated knockout strain. Functional scFv and scFab fragments were efficiently displayed on yeast whereas impaired chain assembly and heavy chain degradation was observed for display of full-length IgG molecules. To identify the optimal polypeptide...... linker for yeast surface display of scFv and scFab fragments, we compared a series of different Gly-Ser-based linkers in display and antigen binding proficiency. We show that these formats of the model antibody can accommodate linkers of different lengths and that introduction of alanine or glutamate...

  16. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi

    2014-01-01

    to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic...... infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  17. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies recognize their cognate antigens in a precise and effective way. In order to do so, they target regions of the antigenic molecules that have specific features such as large exposed areas, presence of charged or polar atoms, specific secondary structure elements, and lack of similarity...... to self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin.Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody...

  18. Detecção de fatores de virulência de Escherichia coli e análise de Salmonella spp. em psitacídeos Detection of virulence factors in Escherichia coli and analysis of Salmonella spp. in psittacines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora M. de O. Corrêa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A flora entérica dos psitacídeos é composta principalmente por bactérias Gram positivas. Bactérias Gram negativas, como Escherichia coli e Salmonella spp., apresentam elevado potencial patogênico, sendo consideradas indicativo de problemas de manejo, que poderão culminar em manifestação de doenças em decorrência de fatores estressantes, dietas deficientes e superlotação, combinados com alta carga bacteriana no ambiente. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a presença de Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli e os fatores de virulência dos genes iss e iutA dos isolados de E. coli. Analisou-se um total de 44 amostras provenientes de psitacídeos criados em cativeiro, sendo estas 15 fragmentos de órgãos de aves submetidas a exame de necropsia e também 29 amostras de swabs de cloaca e inglúvio de papagaios-charão (Amazona pretrei criados em cativeiro. Nenhuma amostra foi positiva para Salmonella spp. Nas amostras de E. coli detectou-se ambos os fatores de virulência pesquisados.The enteric flora of psittacines is mainly composed of Gram positive bacteria. Gram negative bacteria, like Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp., have a high pathogenic potential and can be considerate as an indicative of management problems that may culminate in disease manifestation due to stress factors, poor diets and overcrowding, in combination with a high bacterial load on the environment. The objective of this study was evaluated the presence of Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and the virulence genes iss and iutA from E. coli isolates. Forty-four samples were analyzed from psittacines living in captivity, which fifteen samples were from organs fragments of necropsied birds, and twenty-nine were from cloacal and crop swabs of red-spectacled parrots (Amazona pretrei keeping in captivity. No samples were positive for Salmonella spp. In the samples in which E. coli was detected, both virulence factors (genes iss and iutA were present.

  19. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  20. Health evaluation of free-ranging and captive blue-fronted Amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva) in the Gran chaco, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, Sharon L; Noss, Andrew J; Cuéllar, Rosa Leny; Karesh, William B

    2005-12-01

    Bolivia has a total of 47 species of Psittacidae, seven of which have been identified in our study site, the semiarid Gran Chaco of the Isoso. One species, the blue-fronted parrot (Amazona aestiva), is frequently captured by local Isoseño Guaraní Indians for exploitation on the national and international market. These birds are often temporarily housed in small villages under unhygienic conditions with poultry and other domestic species. On occasion, these parrots escape back to the wild. Additionally, many of these birds are kept as pets or are used to lure wild. parrots within slingshot range for subsequent capture. In this study, we evaluated the health status, including the level of exposure to selected infectious agents, in the wild-caught captive birds and free-ranging birds. Physical examinations were performed, and blood was collected, from 54 live birds (20 captive and 34 free-ranging). Feces were collected from 15 birds (seven captive and eight free-ranging). Necropsies were also performed on four recently dead wild-caught birds. On serologic testing, no birds were found to have antibodies to avian influenza virus, Chlamydophila psittaci, infectious bronchitis virus, infectious bursal disease virus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus, Marek's disease virus, paramyxovirus-1, paramyxovirus-2, paramyxovirus-3, polyomavirus, eastern equine encephalitis virus, western equine encephalitis virus, or Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Positive antibody titers were found for psittacine herpesvirus (8/44, 18.2%), Aspergillus spp. (3/51, 5.9%), and Salmonella pullorum (33/49, 67.3%). All three of the birds that tested antibody positive for Aspergillus spp. were captive, whereas six of the eight and 15 of the 33 birds that tested positive for psittacine herpesvirus and S. pullorum, respectively, were wild.

  1. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  2. Prediction of antibody persistency from antibody titres to natalizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Poul Erik H; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sellebjerg, Finn Thorup

    2012-01-01

    In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients.......In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients....

  3. Human monoclonal antibodies: the residual challenge of antibody immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Herman

    2014-01-01

    One of the major reasons for seeking human monoclonal antibodies has been to eliminate immunogenicity seen with rodent antibodies. Thus far, there has yet been no approach which absolutely abolishes that risk for cell-binding antibodies. In this short article, I draw attention to classical work which shows that monomeric immunoglobulins are intrinsically tolerogenic if they can be prevented from creating aggregates or immune complexes. Based on these classical studies two approaches for active tolerization to therapeutic antibodies are described.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies in haematopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grignani, F.; Martelli, M.F.; Mason, D.Y.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Oncogene (c-myc, c-myb) amplification in acute myelogenous leukaemia; Ultrastructural characterization of leukaemic cells with monoloclonal antibodies; Origin of B-cell malignancies; Immunohistology of gut lymphomas; and Spurious evidence of lineage infidelity in monocytic leukaemia.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  6. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    biomarkers. We have developed a new technique allowing for discovery of new antibodies that disrupt a key process in cancer progression termed...14 post Twist induction to trigger EMT. 7 within CDRH3s, the RGD motif could be indicative of ligand mimetic integrin binding properties of these

  7. Specific Detection of Serum Antibodies against BKPyV, A Small DNA Tumour Virus, in Patients Affected by Choroidal Nevi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pietrobon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ocular or choroidal nevus (CN is a rare benign neoplastic lesion of the eye. The cause of CN onset/progression, which arises from the transformation of ocular melanocytes, is not known. A fraction of CN patients may develop uveal melanoma. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between CN and BK polyomavirus (BKPyV, a small DNA tumor virus. Serum IgG antibodies which react with BKPyV antigens were analyzed. An indirect E.L.I.S.A. using synthetic peptides that mimic BKPyV antigens was employed. Serum antibodies against BKPyV were also investigated by haemagglutination inhibition (HAI assay. Sera were from CN patients and healthy subject (HS were the control. A statistically significant higher prevalence of antibodies against BKPyV capsid protein antigens in serum samples from CN patients was detected, compared to HS, using two independent techniques, indirect E.L.I.S.A. and HAI (87.3% CN vs. 62.1% HS and 91.5% CN vs. 64.4% HS, respectively; p < 0.005. Our data suggest an association exists between CN and BKPyV indicating that this small DNA tumor virus could be responsible in the onset of this benign neoplastic lesion affecting eye melanocytes. This investigation reports the association between choroidal nevi and BKPyV infection for the first time. These data are innovative in this field and may represent a starting point for further investigation into the putative role of BKPyV in CN onset/progression.

  8. Detection of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus and Human Papillomavirus in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinomas and Non-Cancerous Esophageal Samples in Northern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahyapour, Yousef; Sadeghi, Farzin; Alizadeh, Ahad; Rajabnia, Ramazan; Siadati, Sepideh

    2016-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is one of the hypothesized causes of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), but the etiological association remains uncertain. It was postulated that other infectious agents together with HPV may increase the risk of ESCC. The current investigation aimed to explore the presence of a new human tumor virus, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), together with HPV in ESCC tumors and non-cancerous esophageal samples in northern Iran. In total, 96 esophageal samples (51 with ESCC, and 45 without esophageal malignancy) were examined. HPV DNA was detected in esophageal specimens of 16 out of the 51 ESCC cases (31.4 %) and 20 out of the 45 non-cancerous samples (44.4 %). Untypable HPV genotypes were recognized in high rates in cancerous (75.0 %) and non-cancerous (55.0 %) esophageal specimens. MCPyV DNA was detected in esophageal specimens of 23 out of the 51 ESCC cases (45.1 %) and 16 out of the 45 non-cancerous samples (35.6 %). The mean MCPyV DNA copy number was 1.0 × 10(-5) ± 2.4 × 10(-5) and 6.0 × 10(-6) ± 1.3 × 10(-5) per cell in ESCC cases and non-cancerous samples, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between cancerous and non-cancerous samples regarding mean MCPyV DNA load (P = 0.353). A bayesian logistic regression model adjusted to the location of esophageal specimen and MCPyV infection, revealed a significant association between HPV and odds of ESCC (OR, 2.45; 95 % CI: 1.01-6.16). This study provides the evidence of the detection of the MCPyV DNA at a low viral copy number in cancerous and non- cancerous esophageal samples.

  9. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  10. Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003553.htm Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Sputum direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) is a lab test that looks for micro- ...

  11. Antineurofilament antibodies in postpolio syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drory, V E; Shapira, A; Korczyn, A D; Shavit, S; Kushnir, M; Michaelson, D M; Chapman, J

    1998-10-01

    We determined the levels of antineurofilament antibodies in 29 patients with postpolio syndrome (PPS), 26 stable postpolio (PP) patients, 22 patients with ALS, and 20 normal controls (NCs). Patients with PPS had higher antibody levels to cholinergic neurofilaments than did all other groups. PP patients and those with ALS had antibody levels similar to those of NCs. The antibody binding level showed no relation to the age of the patients, duration of disease, or motor score.

  12. Production of antibodies and antibody fragments in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, K; De Wilde, C; De Jaeger, G; Angenon, G; Depicker, A

    2001-03-21

    Our current knowledge allows the generation of transgenic plants that efficiently produce heterologous proteins from plant, bacterial, fungal or animal origin. Among all types of recombinant proteins, antibodies are particularly attractive because of their ability to specifically recognize and bind virtually any type of antigen. Plants show several advantages as a large-scale antibody production system: they can be grown easily and inexpensively in large quantities that can be harvested, stored and processed by using existing infrastructures. Isolation and purification of plant-made antibodies, if necessary, allow fundamental, industrial, and therapeutical applications. In the past, we and others have successfully generated antibody-producing plants. The maximal accumulation levels of antibodies and antibody fragments that we observed are 1-5% of the extracted proteins. Currently, several biotechnological companies grow field crops to produce antibodies for ex planta applications on an industrial scale.

  13. Plant antibodies for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J K; Hein, M B

    1995-01-01

    The original report of Hiatt (1989) initiated a wave of excitement at the realization that a complex mammalian protein such as immunoglobulin could be assembled within a plant cell. The general reaction was one of amazement, but interest in exploiting the possibilities arising from the discovery, for example to make antibodies of therapeutic value, has taken a considerable time to develop. In the meantime, other recombinant expression systems and traditional cell culture techniques have advanced and overcome some of their problems, particularly those associated with yields. Plants, however, still offer unique advantages, especially in their ability to match the protein assembly capabilities of mammalian cells (as demonstrated by the assembly of SIgA molecules), as well as to provide antibodies in bulk at low cost. In addition, the area of "immunization" of plants holds great promise and will surely be a field of enormous growth for the future. PMID:7480334

  14. Cooperation between the polyomavirus Middle-T-antigen gene and the human c-myc oncogene in a rat thyroid epithelial differentiated cell line: Model of in vitro progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlingieri, M.T.; Portella, G.; Grieco, M.; Santoro, M.; Fusco, A.

    1988-05-01

    Two rat thyroid epithelial differentiated cell lines, PC CI 3 and PC myc, were infected with the polyoma murine leukemia virus (PyMLV) carrying the Middle-T-antigen gene of polyomavirus. After infection, both cell lines acquired the typical markers of neoplastic transformation; however, the PC myc cells showed a greater malignant phenotype. Furthermore, the thyroid differentiated functions were completely suppressed in PC myc cells transformed by PyMLV, whereas they were, at least partially, retained in PC CI 3 cells transformed by PyMLV, and in particular, thyroglobulin synthesis and secretion were not affected at all. Since no differences in the expression of the middle-T-antigen gene were observed in the two PyMLV-transformed cell lines, the different properties shown by these two infected cell lines must be ascribed to the expression of the c-myc oncogene.

  15. Second antibody clearance of radiolabeled antibody in cancer radioimmunodetection.

    OpenAIRE

    Sharkey, R.M.; Primus, F J; Goldenberg, D M

    1984-01-01

    The imaging of tumors using radiolabeled antibodies previously has required the implementation of computer-assisted subtraction techniques to reduce background radioactivity. A decrease in radioactivity in the blood of hamsters bearing human colonic tumor xenografts has been achieved by administering a second antibody directed against a radiolabeled primary antibody to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). This method was found to reduce the level of blood radioactivity by a factor of 4 within 2 hr...

  16. Comparative evaluation of laboratory developed real-time PCR assays and RealStar(®) BKV PCR Kit for quantitative detection of BK polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad R; Tan, Rusung; Al-Rawahi, Ghada; Thomas, Eva; Tilley, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative, viral load monitoring for BK virus (BKV) by real-time PCR is an important tool in the management of polyomavirus associated nephropathy in renal transplant patients. However, variability in PCR results has been reported because of polymorphisms in viral genes among different subtypes of BKV, and lack of standardization of the PCR assays among different laboratories. In this study we have compared the performance of several laboratory developed PCR assays that target highly conserved regions of BKV genome with a commercially available, RealStar(®) BKV PCR Kit. Three real-time PCR assays (i) VP1 assay: selected from the literature that targets the major capsid protein (VP1) gene (ii) VP1MOD assay: VP1 assay with a modified probe, and (iii) BKLTA assay: newly designed assay that targets the large T antigen gene were assessed in parallel, using controls and clinical specimens that were previously tested using RealStar(®) BKV PCR Kit (Altona Diagnostics GmbH, Hamburg, Germany). Nucleic acid from all samples were extracted using the QIA symphony virus/bacteria kit on an automated DNA extraction platform QIA symphony SP (Qiagen). Primer and probe concentration, and reaction conditions for laboratory developed assays were optimized and the limit of detection of different assays was determined. Positive control for laboratory developed BK assays was prepared through construction of a plasmid carrying respective amplicon sequences. The 95% detection limit of VP1, VP1MOD and BKLTA assays were 1.8×10(2), 3×10(3) and 3.5×10(2) genomic copies/ml, respectively, as determined by Probit regression analysis of data obtained by testing a dilution series of a titered patient specimen, using RealStar(®) BKV PCR Kit. The inter-assay and intra-assay, coefficient of variations of these assays using calibrated, plasmid standards were PCR assay, were highly specific when tested against a panel of external proficiency specimens containing both BK and JC viruses. All

  17. Human antibody technology and the development of antibodies against cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlin, Mats; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus that causes chronic infections in a large set of the population. It may cause severe disease in immunocompromised individuals, is linked to immunosenescence and implied to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Modulation of the immune system's abilities to manage the virus represent a highly viable therapeutic option and passive immunotherapy with polyclonal antibody preparations is already in clinical use. Defined monoclonal antibodies offer many advantages over polyclonal antibodies purified from serum. Human CMV-specific monoclonal antibodies have consequently been thoroughly investigated with respect to their potential in the treatment of diseases caused by CMV. Recent advances in human antibody technology have substantially expanded the breadth of antibodies for such applications. This review summarizes the fundamental basis for treating CMV disease by use of antibodies, the basic technologies to be used to develop such antibodies, and relevant human antibody specificities available to target this virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Halpern, J L; Lundgren, B

    1989-01-01

    To increase understanding of the antigenic structure of Pneumocystis carinii, we developed monoclonal antibodies to rat and human P. carinii. The specificity of the antibodies was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and immunoblot studies. Only one of five monoclonal antibodies to rat P. carinii...... reacted with human P. carinii, and none of four monoclonal antibodies to human P. carinii reacted with rat P. carinii. Two antibodies to human P. carinii reacted by immunofluorescence with only one human P. carinii isolate. Immunoblot studies identified major antigens of rat P. carinii with molecular...... antigenically different. Further studies with these antibodies should increase understanding of the antigenic nature of P. carinii and of the interaction of P. carinii with its host....

  20. The future of monoclonal antibody technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zider, Alexander; Drakeman, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid growth of monoclonal antibody-based products, new technologies have emerged for creating modified forms of antibodies, including fragments, conjugates and multi-specific antibodies. We created a database of 450 therapeutic antibodies in development to determine which technologies and indications will constitute the “next generation” of antibody products. We conclude that the antibodies of the future will closely resemble the antibodies that have already been approved for commer...

  1. Antibodies against antibodies: immunogenicity of adalimumab as a model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schouwenburg, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Upon repeated adalimumab exposure part of the patients start to produce ADA. The antibody response is polyclonal and consists mainly of antibodies of IgG1 and IgG4 isotype. In the majority of ADA positive patients ADA are already produced within the first 28 weeks of treatment and in part of the

  2. Theranostics Using Antibodies and Antibody-Related Therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moek, Kirsten L; Giesen, Danique; Kok, Iris C; de Groot, Derk Jan A; Jalving, Mathilde; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Brouwers, Adrienne H; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    In theranostics, radiolabeled compounds are used to determine a treatment strategy by combining therapeutics and diagnostics in the same agent. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody-related therapeutics represent a rapidly expanding group of cancer medicines. Theranostic approaches using these

  3. Educational paper: Primary antibody deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies and are characterized by a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen-specific antibodies. PADs represent a heterogeneous spectrum of conditions, ranging from often asymptomatic selective IgA

  4. Antibodies and Plasmodium falciparum merozoites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramasamy, R; Ramasamy, M; Yasawardena, S

    There is considerable interest in using merozoite proteins in a vaccine against falciparum malaria. Observations that antibodies to merozoite surface proteins block invasion are a basis for optimism. This article draws attention to important and varied aspects of how antibodies to Plasmodium

  5. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antibodies may or may not be associated with adverse reactions, and identification of the specific type of RBC ... the only things that can cause a transfusion reaction. The recipient's immune ... or to drugs that the donor may have taken. Rarely, antibodies in the plasma ...

  6. Production systems for recombinant antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirrmann, Thomas; Al-Halabi, Laila; Dübel, Stefan; Hust, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Recombinant antibodies are the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Furthermore, antibodies are key detection reagents in research and diagnostics. The increasing demand for antibodies with regards to amount and quality resulted in the development of a variety of recombinant production systems employing gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, yeast and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines as well as mammalian cell lines. More recently, antibodies were also successfully produced in transgenic plants and animals. Currently, the production of recombinant antibodies for therapy is performed in mammalian cell lines to reduce the risk of immunogenicity caused by non-human post-translational modifications, in particular glycosylation. However, novel strategies already allow human-like glycosylation patterns in yeast, insect cell lines and transgenic plants. Furthermore, therapeutic strategies not requiring glycosylation of the Fc portion have been conceived, most prominently using bispecific antibodies or scFv fusion proteins, which can be produced in bacteria. Here, we review all current antibody production systems considering their advantages and limitations with respect to intended applications.

  7. La dicotomía de los virus polioma: ¿Infección lítica o inducción de neoplasias? The paradox of polyomaviruses Lytic infection or tumor induction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norberto A. Sanjuan

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Los virus Polioma murinos provocan infecciones líticas en cultivos de células de ratón y transforman in vitro células de rata a través de la interacción de su oncogén mT con diversos reguladores celulares. Luego de su inoculación en ratones neonatos inducen neoplasias epiteliales y mesenquimáticas. Se ha propuesto que las cepas de polioma más oncogénicas son aquellas que previamente replican más en el ratón. Sin embargo, a nivel de una sola célula la infección lítica y la transformación deberían ser mutuamente excluyentes. En cada neoplasia han sido descriptos 3 tipos celulares según expresen el DNA viral solo o concomitantemente con la proteína mayor de la cápside VP1, o que no contengan DNA viral ni VP-1. En nuestro laboratorio detectamos la existencia de un cuarto tipo celular en las neoplasias, en el que se expresa la totalidad del genoma viral pero no ocurre el ensamblaje, probablemente por alteraciones en la fosforilación de VP-1. Se discuten los mecanismos de migración intracelular de Polioma, la diseminación en el ratón y los factores que podrían estar involucrados en la inducción de neoplasias o en la infección lítica inducidas por el virus.Murine polyomaviruses can produce lytic infections in mouse cell cultures or transform in vitro rat fibroblasts through a complex interaction with key cellular regulators. After infection of newborn mice, some strains of polyomavirus induce epithelial and mesenchymal tumors. It has been described that there is a direct relationship between viral dissemination in the mouse and tumor induction. However, at a single cell level lytic infection and transformation would not be able to coexist. The existence of 3 distinct cell populations in polyoma-induced tumors, classified according to the presence or absence of viral DNA and viral capsid protein VP-1 have been described. We have reported a fourth type of cell in the neoplasms, that can express the early and the late viral

  8. Precipitating antibodies in mycoplasma infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menonna, J; Chmel, H; Menegus, M; Dowling, P; Cook, S

    1977-01-01

    The effectiveness of counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) for detecting human precipitating antibodies to mcyoplasma antigen was compared with the conventional complement fixation (CF) method in a double-blind experiment. Fifty-one sera from patients suspected of having acute mycoplasma infection were tested by both techniques. Dense precipitin lines to mycoplasma antigen developed in 28 sera with CIEP. Twenty-six of 28 had elevated CF titers to this antigen. No precipitin bands were observed in sera with low antibody titers to mycoplasma. These findings indicate that the CIEP test is a specific method for reliably detecting elevated serum CF antibody levels in patients with acute or recent mycoplasma infection. PMID:328527

  9. Infecção por C. psittaci: uma revisão com ênfase em psitacídeos C. psittaci infection: a review with emphasis in psittacines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Maftoum Proença

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A clamidiose ou ornitose é uma doença infecciosa, causada pela bactéria Chlamydophila psittaci, que acomete aves e mamíferos. Trata-se de uma das principais zoonoses de origem aviária. A transmissão ocorre principalmente por inalação de secreções contaminadas. Os sinais clínicos mais comuns incluem alterações no sistema gastrointestinal, respiratório e ocular, porém é possível encontrar aves infectadas sem sinais aparentes, dificultando a identificação da doença. O diagnóstico definitivo em aves vivas pode ser difícil, devido às características da infecção pela bactéria. Há duas principais abordagens para o diagnóstico, a primeira envolve a detecção direta da bactéria e a segunda implica a detecção de anticorpos anti-Chlamydophila sp. O tratamento é longo e envolve o uso de tetraciclinas, quinolonas ou macrolídeos, durante 21-45 dias, dependendo da espécie e do fármaco de escolha. Atualmente, o Brasil não dispõe de medidas padronizadas que visam a guiar o clínico na identificação, manejo e tratamento para a doença. Tais medidas tornam-se necessárias, bem como a pesquisa de novos métodos diagnósticos e auxiliares para a doença.Chlamydiosis or ornitosis is an infectious disease which affects birds and mammals caused by the bacteria Chlamydophila psittaci. It is one of the most important avian zoonosis. The transmission occurs through inhalation of infected secretions. The most common clinical signs include problems in the gastrointestinal, respiratory and ocular tracts. However, it is possible to find infected birds with no clinical signs, which hinders the diagnosis. Definitive diagnosis in live birds can be difficult, because of the bacteria's infection characteristic. There are two main approaches to the diagnosis, the first one involves the direct detection of the bacteria, the second one involves the detection of antibodies anti-Chlamydophila sp. The treatment is long and includes the use of

  10. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... specialize in treating these types of disorders. Medical History Some people have APS antibodies but no signs ... warfarin starts to work, the heparin is stopped. Aspirin also thins the blood and helps prevent blood ...

  11. Antisperm antibodies and fertility association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, B; Cardona-Maya, W

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the relation between antisperm antibodies (ASA) and human fertility by reviewing the scientific literature of the last 45 years. We carried out a review of scientific literature about antisperm antibodies and infertility published in spanish or english in databases as Pubmed, Medline, Scielo, some books and another gray literature include information related to this review and that is published in the last 45 years. Infertile couples suffer infertility by immunological mechanisms mainly by the presence of antisperm antibodies ASA in blood, semen or cervicovaginal secretions; the formation of ASA in men and women may be associated with disturbance in immunomodulatory mechanisms that result in functional impairment of sperm and thus its inability to fertilize the oocyte. Immunological infertility caused by ASA is the result of interference of these antibodies in various stages of fertilization process, inhibiting the ability of interaction between sperm and oocyte. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 5–6; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  13. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  14. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-02-01

    Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  16. Neutralising Antibodies against Ricin Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, Julie; Panigai, Laetitia; Lamourette, Patricia; Sauvaire, Didier; Devilliers, Karine; Plaisance, Marc; Volland, Hervé; Créminon, Christophe; Simon, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have listed the potential bioweapon ricin as a Category B Agent. Ricin is a so-called A/B toxin produced by plants and is one of the deadliest molecules known. It is easy to prepare and no curative treatment is available. An immunotherapeutic approach could be of interest to attenuate or neutralise the effects of the toxin. We sought to characterise neutralising monoclonal antibodies against ricin and to develop an effective therapy. For this purpose, mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced against the two chains of ricin toxin (RTA and RTB). Seven mAbs were selected for their capacity to neutralise the cytotoxic effects of ricin in vitro. Three of these, two anti-RTB (RB34 and RB37) and one anti-RTA (RA36), when used in combination improved neutralising capacity in vitro with an IC50 of 31 ng/ml. Passive administration of association of these three mixed mAbs (4.7 µg) protected mice from intranasal challenges with ricin (5 LD50). Among those three antibodies, anti-RTB antibodies protected mice more efficiently than the anti-RTA antibody. The combination of the three antibodies protected mice up to 7.5 hours after ricin challenge. The strong in vivo neutralising capacity of this three mAbs combination makes it potentially useful for immunotherapeutic purposes in the case of ricin poisoning or possibly for prevention. PMID:21633505

  17. Neutralising antibodies against ricin toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Prigent

    Full Text Available The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have listed the potential bioweapon ricin as a Category B Agent. Ricin is a so-called A/B toxin produced by plants and is one of the deadliest molecules known. It is easy to prepare and no curative treatment is available. An immunotherapeutic approach could be of interest to attenuate or neutralise the effects of the toxin. We sought to characterise neutralising monoclonal antibodies against ricin and to develop an effective therapy. For this purpose, mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs were produced against the two chains of ricin toxin (RTA and RTB. Seven mAbs were selected for their capacity to neutralise the cytotoxic effects of ricin in vitro. Three of these, two anti-RTB (RB34 and RB37 and one anti-RTA (RA36, when used in combination improved neutralising capacity in vitro with an IC(50 of 31 ng/ml. Passive administration of association of these three mixed mAbs (4.7 µg protected mice from intranasal challenges with ricin (5 LD(50. Among those three antibodies, anti-RTB antibodies protected mice more efficiently than the anti-RTA antibody. The combination of the three antibodies protected mice up to 7.5 hours after ricin challenge. The strong in vivo neutralising capacity of this three mAbs combination makes it potentially useful for immunotherapeutic purposes in the case of ricin poisoning or possibly for prevention.

  18. Characterization of highly frequent epitope-specific CD45RA+/CCR7+/- T lymphocyte responses against p53-binding domains of the human polyomavirus BK large tumor antigen in HLA-A*0201+ BKV-seropositive donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Maurizio; Bracci, Laura; Wyler, Stephen; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Sais, Giovanni; Gosert, Rainer; Zajac, Paul; Palu', Giorgio; Heberer, Michael; Hirsch, Hans H; Spagnoli, Giulio C

    2006-11-10

    Human polyomavirus BK (BKV) has been implicated in oncogenic transformation. Its ability to replicate is determined by the binding of its large tumor antigen (LTag) to products of tumor-suppressor genes regulating cell cycle, as specifically p53. We investigated CD8+ T immune responses to BKV LTag portions involved in p53 binding in HLA-A*0201+ BKV LTag experienced individuals. Peptides selected from either p53-binding region (LTag351-450 and LTag533-626) by current algorithms and capacity to bind HLA-A*0201 molecule were used to stimulate CD8+ T responses, as assessed by IFN-gamma gene expression ex vivo and detected by cytotoxicity assays following in vitro culture. We observed epitope-specific immune responses in all HLA-A*0201+ BKV LTag experienced individuals tested. At least one epitope, LTag579-587; LLLIWFRPV, was naturally processed in non professional antigen presenting cells and induced cytotoxic responses with CTL precursor frequencies in the order of 1/20'000. Antigen specific CD8+ T cells were only detectable in the CD45RA+ subset, in both CCR7+ and CCR7- subpopulations. These data indicate that widespread cellular immune responses against epitopes within BKV LTag-p53 binding regions exist and question their roles in immunosurveillance against tumors possibly associated with BKV infection.

  19. Characterization of highly frequent epitope-specific CD45RA+/CCR7+/- T lymphocyte responses against p53-binding domains of the human polyomavirus BK large tumor antigen in HLA-A*0201+ BKV-seropositive donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zajac Paul

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human polyomavirus BK (BKV has been implicated in oncogenic transformation. Its ability to replicate is determined by the binding of its large tumor antigen (LTag to products of tumor-suppressor genes regulating cell cycle, as specifically p53. We investigated CD8+ T immune responses to BKV LTag portions involved in p53 binding in HLA-A*0201+ BKV LTag experienced individuals. Peptides selected from either p53-binding region (LTag351–450 and LTag533–626 by current algorithms and capacity to bind HLA-A*0201 molecule were used to stimulate CD8+ T responses, as assessed by IFN-γ gene expression ex vivo and detected by cytotoxicity assays following in vitro culture. We observed epitope-specific immune responses in all HLA-A*0201+ BKV LTag experienced individuals tested. At least one epitope, LTag579–587; LLLIWFRPV, was naturally processed in non professional antigen presenting cells and induced cytotoxic responses with CTL precursor frequencies in the order of 1/20'000. Antigen specific CD8+ T cells were only detectable in the CD45RA+ subset, in both CCR7+ and CCR7- subpopulations. These data indicate that widespread cellular immune responses against epitopes within BKV LTag-p53 binding regions exist and question their roles in immunosurveillance against tumors possibly associated with BKV infection.

  20. Replacing reprogramming factors with antibodies selected from combinatorial antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Joel W; Xie, Jia; El-Mecharrafie, Nadja; Gross, Simon; Lee, Sohyon; Lerner, Richard A; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2017-10-01

    The reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is usually achieved by exogenous induction of transcription by factors acting in the nucleus. In contrast, during development, signaling pathways initiated at the membrane induce differentiation. The central idea of this study is to identify antibodies that can catalyze cellular de-differentiation and nuclear reprogramming by acting at the cell surface. We screen a lentiviral library encoding ∼100 million secreted and membrane-bound single-chain antibodies and identify antibodies that can replace either Sox2 and Myc (c-Myc) or Oct4 during reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts into iPSCs. We show that one Sox2-replacing antibody antagonizes the membrane-associated protein Basp1, thereby de-repressing nuclear factors WT1, Esrrb and Lin28a (Lin28) independent of Sox2. By manipulating this pathway, we identify three methods to generate iPSCs. Our results establish unbiased selection from autocrine combinatorial antibody libraries as a robust method to discover new biologics and uncover membrane-to-nucleus signaling pathways that regulate pluripotency and cell fate.

  1. Antibody-Directed Phototherapy (ADP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adil Butt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinically-approved but rather under-exploited treatment modality for cancer and pre-cancerous superficial lesions. It utilises a cold laser or LED to activate a photochemical reaction between a light activated drug (photosensitiser-drug and oxygen to generate cytotoxic oxygen species. These free radical species damage cellular components leading to cell death. Despite its benefits, the complexity, limited potency and side effects of PDT have led to poor general usage. However, the research area is very active with an increasing understanding of PDT-related cell biology, photophysics and significant progress in molecular targeting of disease. Monoclonal antibody therapy is maturing and the next wave of antibody therapies includes antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs, which promise to be more potent and curable. These developments could lift antibody-directed phototherapy (ADP to success. ADP promises to increase specificity and potency and improve drug pharmacokinetics, thus delivering better PDT drugs whilst retaining its other benefits. Whole antibody conjugates with first generation ADP-drugs displayed problems with aggregation, poor pharmacokinetics and loss of immuno-reactivity. However, these early ADP-drugs still showed improved selectivity and potency. Improved PS-drug chemistry and a variety of conjugation strategies have led to improved ADP-drugs with retained antibody and PS-drug function. More recently, recombinant antibody fragments have been used to deliver ADP-drugs with superior drug loading, more favourable pharmacokinetics, enhanced potency and target cell selectivity. These improvements offer a promise of better quality PDT drugs.

  2. Antibodies from plants for bionanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgue, Gueven; Twyman, Richard M; Beiss, Veronique; Fischer, Rainer; Sack, Markus

    2017-11-01

    Antibodies are produced as part of the vertebrate adaptive immune response and are not naturally made by plants. However, antibody DNA sequences can be introduced into plants, and together with laboratory technologies that allow the design of antibodies recognizing any conceivable molecular structure, plants can be used as 'green factories' to produce any antibody at all. The advent of plant-based transient expression systems in particular allows the rapid, convenient, and safe production of antibodies, ranging from laboratory-scale expression to industrial-scale manufacturing. The key features of plant-based production include safety, speed, low cost, and convenience, allowing newcomers to rapidly master the technology and use it to its full advantage. Manufacturing in plants has recently achieved significant milestones and offers more than just an alternative to established microbial and mammalian cell platforms. The use of plants for product development in particular offers the power and flexibility to easily coexpress many different genes, allowing the plug-and-play construction of novel bionanomaterials, perfectly complementing existing approaches based on plant virus-like particles. As well as producing single antibodies for applications in medicine, agriculture, and industry, plants can be used to produce antibody-based supramolecular structures and scaffolds as a new generation of green bionanomaterials that promise a bright future based on clean and renewable nanotechnology applications. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1462. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1462 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 The Authors. WIREs Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Influence of Acyclovir on Antibody Production of Antibody to Chickenpox

    OpenAIRE

    Atsutoshi, Tsuji; Takayoshi, Tsuchiya; Yuuko, Nagaoka; Toshiro, Nagai; Department of Pediatrics, Saitama Municipal Hospital; College of Health Professions, Toho University; Department of Pediatrics, Dokkyo University, Koshigaya Hospital

    2003-01-01

    Titers of immunoglobulin (Ig) G and 1gM antibody to varicella zoster virus (VZV) were measured in 20 pediatric patients with chickenpox during treatment with acyclovir, an antiviral agent. Acyclovir doses, each 80 mg/kg/day, were administered for 5 days, beginning within 4 days after the onset of the rash. All patients displayed positive IgG and/or 1gM anti-VZV antibodies. No significant difference was noted in the IgG (p = 0.417) or IgM titer (p = 0.846) between patients treated within 24 ho...

  4. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can...... elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity...... into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive...

  5. Antiphospholipid antibody in localised scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, S; Fujimoto, M; Hasegawa, M; Takehara, K

    2003-08-01

    To investigate the prevalence and clinical correlation of antiphospholipid antibodies in localised scleroderma. Antibodies against cardiolipin (aCL) or beta(2)-glycoprotein I were examined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 48 patients with localised scleroderma (18 patients with generalised morphoea, 20 with linear scleroderma, and 10 with morphoea). Twenty one of these patients were investigated for lupus anticoagulant (LAC) by screening and confirmatory coagulation tests. Patients with generalised morphoea, the severest form of localised scleroderma, had significantly raised levels of IgM or IgG aCL relative to normal controls (n=21) and patients with systemic sclerosis (n=20). The IgM isotype was predominant, with the frequency of IgM aCL (61%) higher than that of IgG aCL (28%). Levels of aCL were similar for patients with linear scleroderma or morphoea and normal controls. IgM aCL were associated with a greater number of lesions, especially plaque lesions, wider distribution of lesions, and the presence of immunological abnormalities including antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, IgM antihistone antibodies, IgG anti-single stranded DNA antibodies, and raised serum interleukin 6 levels in patients with localised scleroderma. LAC was detected in 5/7 (71%) patients with generalised morphoea. However, pulmonary embolism was seen in only one patient with generalised morphoea. None of patients with localised scleroderma exhibited anti-beta(2)-glycoprotein I antibodies. These results suggest that aCL and LAC are the major autoantibodies in patients with generalised morphoea.

  6. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  7. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  8. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2017-03-28

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  9. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  10. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  11. Antiphospholipid antibody in localised scleroderma

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, S.; Fujimoto, M; Hasegawa, M.; Takehara, K.

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Antibodies against cardiolipin (aCL) or ß2-glycoprotein I were examined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 48 patients with localised scleroderma (18 patients with generalised morphoea, 20 with linear scleroderma, and 10 with morphoea). Twenty one of these patients were investigated for lupus anticoagulant (LAC) by screening and confirmatory coagulation tests.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies to Treponema Pallidum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.M. van de Donk; J.D.A. van Embden; M.F. van Olderen; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.C. de Jong (Jan)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThree successive fusions of mouse myeloma cells and spleen lymphocytes of a mouse immunized with Treponema Pallidum resulted in one hybridoma producing anti T. pallidum antibodies for each fusion. The mice were immunized with live pallidum cells respectively 1, 3 and 5 months before

  13. antibodies against Herpes simplex virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types -1 and -2 in pregnant women in. Port Harcourt, Nigeria. ... Cite as: Okonko IO, Cookey TI. Seropositivity and determinants of immunoglobulin-G (IgG) antibodies against Herpes simplex virus (HSV) ..... zadeh, Z. and Akbari, S. Seroepidemiology of Herpes. Simplex Virus Type 1 and 2 in ...

  14. Polymyalgia rheumatica and antimitochondrial antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, M A; Cawley, M I; Hamblin, T J; Robertson, J C

    1984-01-01

    Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) were detected in the sera of 11 of 36 patients with a clinical diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) in whom comprehensive autoantibody screening had been performed. AMA did not correlate with biochemical changes of hepatic dysfunction, which are common in PMR, nor with parameters of musculoskeletal inflammation. Possible explanations are discussed. PMID:6712299

  15. Polymyalgia rheumatica and antimitochondrial antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Sattar, M A; Cawley, M I; Hamblin, T J; Robertson, J C

    1984-01-01

    Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) were detected in the sera of 11 of 36 patients with a clinical diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) in whom comprehensive autoantibody screening had been performed. AMA did not correlate with biochemical changes of hepatic dysfunction, which are common in PMR, nor with parameters of musculoskeletal inflammation. Possible explanations are discussed.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies: application in radiopharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligiero, Thais Braga; de Souza Albernaz, Marta; de Carvalho, Samira Marques; de Oliveira, Silvia Maria Velasques; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2013-12-01

    In this study was carried on a systematic review of the data was carried out in the topic of monoclonal antibodies in the last 40 years. All the data collected and summarized revealed that this new class of medicine may bring great advance in the field of radiopharmacy, oncology and imaging.

  17. Bispecific antibodies: design, therapy, perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedykh SE

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sergey E Sedykh, Victor V Prinz, Valentina N Buneva, Georgy A Nevinsky Laboratory of Repair Enzymes, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, Russia Abstract: Antibodies (Abs containing two different antigen-binding sites in one molecule are called bispecific. Bispecific Abs (BsAbs were first described in the 1960s, the first monoclonal BsAbs were generated in the 1980s by hybridoma technology, and the first article describing the therapeutic use of BsAbs was published in 1992, but the number of papers devoted to BsAbs has increased significantly in the last 10 years. Particular interest in BsAbs is due to their therapeutic use. In the last decade, two BsAbs – catumaxomab in 2009 and blinatumomab in 2014, were approved for therapeutic use. Papers published in recent years have been devoted to various methods of BsAb generation by genetic engineering and chemical conjugation, and describe preclinical and clinical trials of these drugs in a variety of diseases. This review considers diverse BsAb-production methods, describes features of therapeutic BsAbs approved for medical use, and summarizes the prospects of practical application of promising new BsAbs. Keywords: bispecific antibodies, therapeutic antibodies, monoclonal antibodies

  18. Antibody Repertoire Development in Swine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Butler, J. E.; Wertz, N.; Šinkora, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, FEB 17 (2017), s. 255-279 ISSN 2165-8102 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02274S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09296S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : swine * pre-immune antibody repertoire * ileal Peyer's patches Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.708, year: 2016

  19. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  20. Therapeutic Antibodies to Ganglioside GD2 Evolved from Highly Selective Germline Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Sterner

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies play a crucial role in host defense and are indispensable research tools, diagnostics, and therapeutics. Antibody generation involves binding of genomically encoded germline antibodies followed by somatic hypermutation and in vivo selection to obtain antibodies with high affinity and selectivity. Understanding this process is critical for developing monoclonal antibodies, designing effective vaccines, and understanding autoantibody formation. Prior studies have found that antibodies to haptens, peptides, and proteins evolve from polyspecific germline antibodies. The immunological evolution of antibodies to mammalian glycans has not been studied. Using glycan microarrays, protein microarrays, cell binding studies, and molecular modeling, we demonstrate that therapeutic antibodies to the tumor-associated ganglioside GD2 evolved from highly specific germline precursors. The results have important implications for developing vaccines and monoclonal antibodies that target carbohydrate antigens. In addition, they demonstrate an alternative pathway for antibody evolution within the immune system that is distinct from the polyspecific germline pathway.

  1. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  2. Humanization and simultaneous optimization of monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi, T; Igawa, T; Tsunoda, H; Hattori, K

    2014-01-01

    Antibody humanization is an essential technology for reducing the potential risk of immunogenicity associated with animal-derived antibodies and has been applied to a majority of the therapeutic antibodies on the market. For developing an antibody molecule as a pharmaceutical at the current biotechnology level, however, other properties also have to be considered in parallel with humanization in antibody generation and optimization. This section describes the critical properties of therapeutic antibodies that should be sufficiently qualified, including immunogenicity, binding affinity, physiochemical stability, expression in host cells and pharmacokinetics, and the basic methodologies of antibody engineering involved. By simultaneously optimizing the antibody molecule in the light of these properties, it should prove possible to shorten the research and development period necessary to identify a highly qualified clinical candidate and consequently accelerate the start of the clinical trial.

  3. Antibody therapeutics - the evolving patent landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petering, Jenny; McManamny, Patrick; Honeyman, Jane

    2011-09-01

    The antibody patent landscape has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years, particularly in areas of technology relating to antibody modification to reduce immunogenicity in humans or improve antibody function. In some cases antibody techniques that were developed in the 1980s are still the subject of patent protection in the United States or Canada. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. ANCA / MPO / PR3 Antibodies Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... palpath.com . Accessed June 2010. (© 1995–2010) Unit Code 83012: Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies Vasculitis Panel, Serum. Mayo ...

  5. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... Sources Used in Previous Reviews (© 1995-2011). Unit Code 81904: Heparin-PF4 Antibody (HIT), Serum. Mayo Clinic ...

  6. Antibodies Against Melanin | Wassermann | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reports on unsuccessful attempts to produce antibodies against melanoprotein in rabbits. Available evidence suggests antibodies against melanocytes in the aetiology of vitiligo, but there is no convincing evidence for antibodies against melanin per se. It is suggested that the demonstration of antibodif's against ...

  7. Plumage disorders in psittacine birds - part 1: feather abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zeeland, Y.R.A.; Schoemaker, N.J.

    2014-01-01

    Plumage disorders in parrots represent one of the more common, but also one of the more challenging and frustrating problems that veterinarians dealing with parrots in their daily practice face on a day-to-day basis. Various types of plumage disorders may be identified, including stress marks,

  8. Plumage disorders in psittacine birds - part 2: feather damaging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zeeland, Y.R.A.; Schoemaker, N.J.

    2014-01-01

    Plumage disorders in parrots represent one of the more common, but also one of the more challenging and frustrating problems that veterinarians dealing with parrots in their daily practice face on a day-to-day basis. This second part of the review will deal with diseases causing lack of feather

  9. Novel borna virus in psittacine birds with proventricular dilatation disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkavuori, Kirsi S; Shivaprasad, H L; Williams, Brent L; Quan, Phenix Lan; Hornig, Mady; Street, Craig; Palacios, Gustavo; Hutchison, Stephen K; Franca, Monique; Egholm, Michael; Briese, Thomas; Lipkin, W Ian

    2008-12-01

    Pyrosequencing of cDNA from brains of parrots with proventricular dilatation disease (PDD), an unexplained fatal inflammatory central, autonomic, and peripheral nervous system disease, showed 2 strains of a novel Borna virus. Real-time PCR confirmed virus presence in brain, proventriculus, and adrenal gland of 3 birds with PDD but not in 4 unaffected birds.

  10. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    OpenAIRE

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140?250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such a...

  11. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  12. Theranostic applications of antibodies in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleuren, Emmy D G; Versleijen-Jonkers, Yvonne M H; Heskamp, Sandra; van Herpen, Carla M L; Oyen, Wim J G; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Boerman, Otto C

    2014-06-01

    Targeted therapies, including antibodies, are becoming increasingly important in cancer therapy. Important limitations, however, are that not every patient benefits from a specific antibody therapy and that responses could be short-lived due to acquired resistance. In addition, targeted therapies are quite expensive and are not completely devoid of side-effects. This urges the need for accurate patient selection and response monitoring. An important step towards personalizing antibody treatment could be the implementation of theranostics. Antibody theranostics combine the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of an antibody, thereby selecting those patients who are most likely to benefit from antibody treatment. This review focuses on the clinical application of theranostic antibodies in oncology. It provides detailed information concerning the suitability of antibodies for theranostics, the different types of theranostic tests available and summarizes the efficacy of theranostic antibodies used in current clinical practice. Advanced theranostic applications, including radiolabeled antibodies for non-invasive functional imagining, are also addressed. Finally, we discuss the importance of theranostics in the emerging field of personalized medicine and critically evaluate recent data to determine the best way to apply antibody theranostics in the future. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of Monoclonal Antibodies in Veterinary Parasitology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of hybridoma technology by Kohler and Milstein in 1975, heralded a new era in antibody research. Mouse hybridomas were the first reliable source of monoclonal antibodies. The generation of monoclonal antibodies from species other than rats and mice, has developed slowly over the last 30 years. The advent of antibody engineering and realization of the advantages of non murine antibodies has increased their relevance recently. However, in the area of veterinary parasitology, monoclonal antibodies are just beginning to fulfill the promises inherent in their great specificity for recognizing and selectively binding to antigens. This review describes the recent advances in the application of monoclonal antibodies for immunodiagnosis / prophylaxis and immunotherapy of parasitic diseases. [Vet. World 2011; 4(4.000: 183-188

  14. Clinical correlation of antimitochondrial antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, M A; Recktenwald, C

    2003-02-21

    Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are a hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). They are believed to be absolutely disease specific. It does occur that patients with positive AMA are diagnosed with PBC in the absence of liver specific signs and symptoms. The aim of the present study was to examine the disease spectrum of unselected AMA positive patients of an university hospital. All of the AMA tests performed in the immunological laboratory of the hospital between 1992 and 1998 were examined for positivity. 100 patients with a positive result were analyzed retrospectively for diagnosis, clinical and laboratory features. 61 patients suffered from liver diseases and 39 from non-liver diseases. The patients with liver diseases were 36 patients with PBC, 2 patients with PBC/PSC-overlap syndrome, 4 patients with autoimmune hepatitis and 19 patients with different liver diseases of other than autoimmune origin. The 39 patients with non-liver diseases included 9 patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, 3 patients with organ-specific autoimmune diseases, 8 patients with carcinoma and 19 patients with different diseases. 97 patients had an ELISA test for antibodies to the mitochondrial antigen M2 performed in addition to the immunofluorescence test for AMA. 73 patients had positive values for anti-M2 antibodies and 24 patients had negative results. Anti-M2 antibody values were divided in negative, low (5-100 U/ml), medium (101-1000 U/ml), high (1001-10000 U/ml) and very high (>10000 U/ml). Very high and high anti-M2 values were present mainly in patients with PBC and some patients with other liver diseases, medium high and low values in patients with different disease groups. In this unselected patient population only one third of AMA positive patients had an established diagnosis of PBC, about 10% a diagnosis of a systemic autoimmune disease and 3 % had other organ-specific autoimmune diseases. It can be concluded that, although high titers of antibodies against

  15. Neutralising Antibodies against Ricin Toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Prigent; Laetitia Panigai; Patricia Lamourette; Didier Sauvaire; Karine Devilliers; Marc Plaisance; Hervé Volland; Christophe Créminon; Stéphanie Simon

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have listed the potential bioweapon ricin as a Category B Agent. Ricin is a so-called A/B toxin produced by plants and is one of the deadliest molecules known. It is easy to prepare and no curative treatment is available. An immunotherapeutic approach could be of interest to attenuate or neutralise the effects of the toxin. We sought to characterise neutralising monoclonal antibodies against ricin and to develop an effective therapy. For this pur...

  16. History of the antibody workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Melvin

    2017-11-02

    At a critical period in the history of contemporary immunology, a handful of biochemists and fringe immunologists formed a group known as the Antibody Workshop. They had a major impact on the field by attracting molecular biologists who worked to reduce the study of cellular and organ level immunology to the molecular level. This had a dramatic effect on the field both conceptually and practically by providing the targets for clinical manipulation. The story of the origin and development of this group over time is recounted here.

  17. [Evolution of monoclonal antibodies in cancer treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubczak, Małgorzata; Rogalińska, Małgorzata

    Since late 90s of last century the new age of directed therapy began using mainly biological constructs produced in rodents called monoclonal antibodies. The side effects of monoclonal antibodies were a challenge for pharmaceutical companies to improve the biological properties of these biological drugs. The humanization of monoclonal constructs was an idea to improve monoclonal antibodies next generation activity cancer cell reduction in humans. Moreover for some other patients sensitive for monoclonal antibodies therapy could also potentially induce immunological differences that might imply on human health. The new idea related to monoclonal antibodies was to design a small molecule constructs of nanoantibodies with ability to enter into cells. Such small molecules could find their targets inside human cells, even in nuclei leading to differences in cancer cells expression. The existing knowledge on monoclonal antibodies as well as directed activity of nanoantibodies could improve anticancer treatment efficancy of diseases.

  18. Conference scene: progress with promising human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrick, James W

    2012-03-01

    Antibodies and antibody-based therapeutics have become big business, with annual sales over US$50 billion, accounting for >6% of worldwide pharmaceutical revenues. Ten molecules have blockbuster status (>US$1 billion), with six generating more than US$6 billion in sales. In excess of 300 products based on this rapidly maturing technology are in clinical trials. The generation and manufacture of human antibodies is now routine, although the cost of goods remains an issue. Optimizing combinations of antibodies with other therapeutics (e.g., chemotherapy) is a major short-term goal, while target validation and product differentiation remain significant hurdles if growth is to continue. Some of the notable highlights of the recent 16th International Conference on Human Antibodies and Hybridomas meeting in Cannes, France are described below. The conference was sponsored by the international journal Human Antibodies, in association with the Integrative Medical Sciences Association (IMSA). The Program Chairman was Professor Mark Glassy, IMSA, San Diego, CA, USA.

  19. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  20. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, P. R.; Houen, G.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies...... are powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors......, including solid-phase peptide-carrier conjugation and peptide-carrier conjugation in solution. Upon immunization, adjuvants such as Al(OH)(3) are added together with the immunogenic peptide-carrier conjugate, which usually leads to high-titred antisera. Following immunization and peptide antibody...

  1. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Rok Razpotnik; Neža Novak; Vladka Čurin Šerbec; Uros Rajcevic

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood–brain barrier (BBB) makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain deli...

  2. Theranostic applications of antibodies in oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Fleuren, E.D.G.; Versleijen-Jonkers, Y.M.H.; Heskamp, S.; van Herpen, C M L; Oyen, W J G; van der Graaf, W T A; Boerman, O C

    2014-01-01

    Targeted therapies, including antibodies, are becoming increasingly important in cancer therapy. Important limitations, however, are that not every patient benefits from a specific antibody therapy and that responses could be short-lived due to acquired resistance. In addition, targeted therapies are quite expensive and are not completely devoid of side-effects. This urges the need for accurate patient selection and response monitoring. An important step towards personalizing antibody treatme...

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to immunodeterminants of lipoteichoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D E; Wong, W; Largen, M T; Shockman, G D

    1984-03-01

    Murine hybrid cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies directed against determinants present on lipoteichoic acids were generated. Hapten inhibition studies showed that one group of monoclonal antibodies was inhibited by deacylated cardiolipin, and the second group was inhibited by kojibiose. Thus, antibodies directed against the polyglycerophosphate chain, which is common to the lipoteichoic acids of many gram-positive species, and against the streptococcal group D antigen were obtained.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to immunodeterminants of lipoteichoic acids.

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, D E; Wong, W; Largen, M T; Shockman, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    Murine hybrid cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies directed against determinants present on lipoteichoic acids were generated. Hapten inhibition studies showed that one group of monoclonal antibodies was inhibited by deacylated cardiolipin, and the second group was inhibited by kojibiose. Thus, antibodies directed against the polyglycerophosphate chain, which is common to the lipoteichoic acids of many gram-positive species, and against the streptococcal group D antigen were obtained.

  5. Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfa, Theodosia A

    2016-12-02

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare and heterogeneous disease that affects 1 to 3/100 000 patients per year. AIHA caused by warm autoantibodies (w-AIHA), ie, antibodies that react with their antigens on the red blood cell optimally at 37°C, is the most common type, comprising ∼70% to 80% of all adult cases and ∼50% of pediatric cases. About half of the w-AIHA cases are called primary because no specific etiology can be found, whereas the rest are secondary to other recognizable underlying disorders. This review will focus on the postulated immunopathogenetic mechanisms in idiopathic and secondary w-AIHA and report on the rare cases of direct antiglobulin test-negative AIHA, which are even more likely to be fatal because of inherent characteristics of the causative antibodies, as well as because of delays in diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. Then, the characteristics of w-AIHA associated with genetically defined immune dysregulation disorders and special considerations on its management will be discussed. Finally, the standard treatment options and newer therapeutic approaches for this chronic autoimmune blood disorder will be reviewed. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  6. Snake venom antibodies in Ecuadorian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theakston, R D; Reid, H A; Larrick, J W; Kaplan, J; Yost, J A

    1981-10-01

    Serum samples from 223 Waorani Indians, a tribe in eastern Ecuador, were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for antibodies to snake venom. Seventy-eight per cent were positive, confirming the highest incidence and mortality from snake bite poisoning yet recorded in the world. Most samples were positive for more than one venom antibody. Antibodies were found to venoms of Bothrops viper in 60% of positive cases, of Micrurus coral snake in 21%, and of the bushmaster, Lachesis muta, in 18%. Further studies are needed to determine whether high venom-antibody levels afford protection against further snake envenoming.

  7. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    T. Ziglioli; S. Cartella; Casu, C.; Tincani, A; Cattaneo, R

    2011-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI), prothrombin (PT), activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC), a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL) and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI), which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). Clinically aPL are ass...

  8. Onconeural Antibodies in Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sæther, Sverre Georg; Schou, Morten; Stoecker, Winfried

    2017-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological disorders associated with onconeural antibodies often appear with neuropsychiatric symptoms. To study the prevalence of onconeural antibodies in patients admitted to acute psychiatric inpatient care, the serum of 585 such patients was tested for antibodies targeting MOG......, GLRA1B, DPPX, GRM1, GRM5, DNER, Yo, ZIC4, GAD67, amphiphysin, CV2, Hu, Ri, Ma2, and recoverin. Only one sample was positive (antirecoverin IgG). The present findings suggest that serum onconeural antibody positivity is rare among patients acutely admitted for inpatient psychiatric care. The clinical...

  9. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Gearhart

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations.

  10. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearhart, Patricia J; Castiblanco, Diana P; Russell Knode, Lisa M

    2015-12-01

    Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations.

  11. Antiphospholipid antibodies among women experiencing fetal loss

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ching, Y M; Arip, M; Jegasothy, R; Baskaran, T P; Yusof, A Y; Bakhtiar, F; Mustafa, N

    2013-01-01

    The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) is closely associated with thrombotic events and pregnancy complications such as recurrent pregnancy loss, preeclampsia and placental insufficiency...

  12. High throughput discovery of influenza virus neutralizing antibodies from phage-displayed synthetic antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Chien; Chiu, Yi-Kai; Yu, Chung-Ming; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Tung, Chao-Ping; Tsou, Yueh-Liang; Huang, Yi-Jen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chen, Hong-Sen; Wang, Andrew H-J; Yang, An-Suei

    2017-10-31

    Pandemic and epidemic outbreaks of influenza A virus (IAV) infection pose severe challenges to human society. Passive immunotherapy with recombinant neutralizing antibodies can potentially mitigate the threats of IAV infection. With a high throughput neutralizing antibody discovery platform, we produced artificial anti-hemagglutinin (HA) IAV-neutralizing IgGs from phage-displayed synthetic scFv libraries without necessitating prior memory of antibody-antigen interactions or relying on affinity maturation essential for in vivo immune systems to generate highly specific neutralizing antibodies. At least two thirds of the epitope groups of the artificial anti-HA antibodies resemble those of natural protective anti-HA antibodies, providing alternatives to neutralizing antibodies from natural antibody repertoires. With continuing advancement in designing and constructing synthetic scFv libraries, this technological platform is useful in mitigating not only the threats of IAV pandemics but also those from other newly emerging viral infections.

  13. An efficient method for isolating antibody fragments against small peptides by antibody phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We generated monoclonal scFv (single chain variable fragment) antibodies from an antibody phage display library towards three small synthetic peptides derived from the sequence of s1-casein. Key difficulties for selection of scFv-phages against small peptides were addressed. Small peptides do....... The scFvs were sequenced and characterized, and specificity was characterized by ELISA. The methods developed in this study are universally applicable for antibody phage display to efficiently produce antibody fragments against small peptides....

  14. Human anti-Dectin-1 antibody, hybridoma producing said antibody and applications thereof

    OpenAIRE

    Kremer, Leonor; Llorente Gómez, María de las Mercedes; Casasnovas, José María; Fernández Ruíz, Elena; Galán Díez, Marta

    2008-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to hybridoma MGD3 and the monoclonal antibody produced thereby (also called MGD3), which specifically recognises the human Dectin-1 membrane receptor. Antibody MGD3 is capable of inhibiting the binding of Dectin-1 to the natural ligand thereof, the ss-glucans that are components of the fungal wall. In addition, the aforementioned antibody specifically blocks binding to Candida albicans and the secretion of cytokines induced thereby. The MGD3 antibody obtained enable...

  15. Similar Idiotypes in Antibody-Forming Cells and in Cells Synthesizing Immunoglobulins Without Detectable Antibody Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazenave, P. -A.; Ternynck, T.; Avrameas, S.

    1974-01-01

    The occurrence of immunoglobulins with and without antibody specificity and with and without idiotypic specificity was studied, by use of enzyme-labeled antigen and antibodies, in lymph node cells of rabbits immunized with horse-radish peroxidase and hen ovalbumin. Some cells, containing immunoglobulins without detectable antibody function, were shown to contain idiotypes similar to those found in antibody-producing cells. PMID:4140504

  16. The production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Lokman, C.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this review we will focus on the current status and views concerning the production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi. We will focus on single-chain antibody fragment production (scFv and VHH) by these lower eukaryotes and the possible applications

  17. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera of...

  18. Antibody Characterization Process | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of the NCI's Antibody Characterization Program (ACP) is to have three monoclonal antibodies produced for each successfully expressed/purified recombinant antigen and one antibody per peptide (1 to 3 peptides per protein). To date, over 4000 clones have been screened before selecting the current 393 antibodies. They are winnowed down based on the projected end use of the antibody.

  19. Antibody humanization methods for development of therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Farajnia, Safar; Feizi, Mohammad Ali Hosseinpour; Nejad, Ramezan Ali Khavari

    2014-04-01

    Recombinant antibody technologies are rapidly becoming available and showing considerable clinical success. However, the immunogenicity of murine-derived monoclonal antibodies is restrictive in cancer immunotherapy. Humanized antibodies can overcome these problems and are considered to be a promising alternative therapeutic agent. There are several approaches for antibody humanization. In this article we review various methods used in the antibody humanization process.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies in pediatric allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Licari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs involving human-mouse hybrid cells was first described in 1970s, but these biologics are now used for a variety of diseases including cancers, autoimmune disorders and allergic diseases. The aim of this article is to review current and future applications of mAbs, in particular focusing on anti-IgE therapy, in the field of pediatric allergy. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  1. Detection Of Haemagglutination–Inhibition Antibodies Against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of haemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibodies against influenza A virus was carried out on pigs sera collected at Bodija abattoir, Ibadan between December, 2001 and August 2002. Out of the 107 sera tested, 101 (94.39%) had HI antibodies to influenza A (H1N1) human strain while the remaining 6 (5.61%) were ...

  2. Quantitative Changes In Antibodies Against Onchocercal Native ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum antibodies to Onchocerca volvulus native sodium duodecylsulphate slat extracted antigens and epitopes recognized by three monoclonal antibodies designated Cam8, Cam22, and Cam28 were measured using indirect (sandwich) and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Paired serum ...

  3. The Relationship between Antisperm Antibodies Prevalence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    17. Bohring C and Krause W (2003b): Characterization of spermatozoa surface antigens by antisperm antibodies and its influence on acrosomal exocytosis. AJRI.; 50: 411–419. 18. Bohring C and Krause W (2005): The role of antisperm antibodies during fertilization and for immunological infertility Chem Immunol Allergy.;.

  4. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  5. Antibody-drug conjugates: Intellectual property considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates are highly complex entities that combine an antibody, a linker and a toxin. This complexity makes them demanding both technically and from a regulatory point of view, and difficult to deal with in their patent aspects. This article discusses different issues of patent protection and freedom to operate with regard to this promising new class of drugs.

  6. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  7. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  8. Receptor antibodies as novel therapeutics for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussar, Siegfried; Vienberg, Sara Gry; Kahn, C Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to receptors can block or mimic hormone action. Taking advantage of receptor isoforms, co-receptors, and other receptor modulating proteins, antibodies and other designer ligands can enhance tissue specificity and provide new approaches to the therapy of diabetes and other diseases....

  9. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  10. Antibody-drug conjugates in cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goeij, Bart Egbertus Cornelis Gijsbertus de

    2016-01-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) are emerging as powerful anti-cancer treatments. They are designed to combine the tumor specificity, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution properties of antibodies with the potent cell-killing activity of small molecules. The approval of brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris)

  11. Antibody biotechnology | Benjouad | African Journal of Biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (mAbs) have continuously stimulated the development of antibody engineering especially after the discovery hybridoma by Köhler and Milstein (1975). This review summarize the main antibody biotechnology approaches that have lead to the development of murine mAbs, chimeric mAbs, humanized mAbs , combinatorial ...

  12. Antibody humanization methods - a review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, Yaghoub; Farajnia, Safar; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Khalili, Masoumeh

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances achieved during recent years on various aspects of antibody humanization theories and techniques. Common methods for producing humanized antibodies including framework-homology-based humanization, germline humanization, complementary determining regions (CDR)-homology-based humanization and specificity determining residues (SDR) grafting, as well as advantages and disadvantages of each of these methods and their applications are discussed.

  13. Theranostic applications of antibodies in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleuren, E.D.G.; Versleijen-Jonkers, Y.M.H.; Heskamp, S.; Herpen, C.M.L. van; Oyen, W.J.G.; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Boerman, O.C.

    2014-01-01

    Targeted therapies, including antibodies, are becoming increasingly important in cancer therapy. Important limitations, however, are that not every patient benefits from a specific antibody therapy and that responses could be short-lived due to acquired resistance. In addition, targeted therapies

  14. Photonic crystal fiber based antibody detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duval, A; Lhoutellier, M; Jensen, J B

    2004-01-01

    An original approach for detecting labeled antibodies based on strong penetration photonic crystal fibers is introduced. The target antibody is immobilized inside the air-holes of a photonic crystal fiber and the detection is realized by the means of evanescent-wave fluorescence spectroscopy...

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus Antibodies Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Antibody Tests Send Us Your Feedback ... Antigen D, EA-D IgG Ab Formal Name Epstein-Barr Virus Antibodies This article was last reviewed on ...

  16. Preparation and identification of monoclonal antibodies against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    The hybridoma cell lines were screened for HN-specific antibodies by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and anti-HN mAb-producing hybridoma clones were obtained using a limiting dilution assay. The specificity and affinity of the antibodies were characterized by western blot assays and indirect ELISA ...

  17. ANTI-SULFATIDE ANTIBODIES IN PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBERG, LH; LANKAMP, CLAM; DEJAGER, AEJ; NOTERMANS, NC; SODAAR, P; MARRINK, J; DEJONG, HJ; BAR, PR; WOKKE, JHJ

    1993-01-01

    A study was carried out on 135 patients with chronic idiopathic neuropathy (63), neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy (51, including eight with anti-MAG antibody activity) and the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) (21). Serum IgM, IgG and IgA anti-sulphatide antibody titres were compared

  18. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  19. Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Rasmussen, J W; Ciofu, Oana

    1994-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-chromosomal beta-lactamase antibody was developed and an immunoblotting technique was used to study the presence of serum and sputum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal group 1 beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The serum antibody...... response was studied with serum samples collected in 1992 from 56 CF patients in a cross-sectional study and with serum samples from 18 CF patients in a longitudinal study. Anti-beta-lactamase immunoglobulin G antibodies were present in all of the serum samples from the patients with chronic...... bronchopulmonary P. aeruginosa infection (CF + P) but in none of the CF patients with no or intermittent P. aeruginosa infection. Anti-beta-lactamase antibodies were present in serum from CF + P patients after six antipseudomonal courses (median) and correlated with infection with a beta-lactam-resistant strain...

  20. Monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Multiple options are now available for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Over the last 10 years, monoclonal antibodies have become an integral part of the management of this disease. Alemtuzumab has received approval for use in patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Rituximab has been investigated extensively in chronic lymphocytic leukemia both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy and other monoclonal antibodies. Epratuzumab and lumiliximab are newer monoclonal antibodies in the early phase of clinical development. This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the results obtained with monoclonal antibodies as single agents and in combination with chemotherapy, and other biological agents and newer compounds undergoing clinical trials.

  1. Isolation of Balamuthia mandrillaris-specific antibody fragments from a bacteriophage antibody display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Kulsoom, Huma; Lalani, Salima; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is a protist pathogen that can cause encephalitis with a mortality rate of more than 95%. Early diagnosis followed by aggressive treatment is a pre-requisite for successful prognosis. Current methods for identifying this organism rely on culture and microscopy, antibody-based methods using animals, or involve the use of molecular tools that are expensive. Here, we describe the isolation of antibody fragments that can be used for the unequivocal identification of B. mandrillaris. B. mandrillaris-specific antibody fragments were isolated from a bacteriophage antibody display library. Individual clones were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunofluorescence. Four antibody clones showed specific binding to B. mandrillaris. The usefulness of phage antibody display technology as a diagnostic tool for isolating antibody fragments against B. mandrillaris antigens and studying their biological role(s) is discussed further. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. High level transient production of recombinant antibodies and antibody fusion proteins in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Volker; Büssow, Konrad; Wagner, Andreas; Weber, Susanne; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-06-26

    The demand of monospecific high affinity binding reagents, particularly monoclonal antibodies, has been steadily increasing over the last years. Enhanced throughput of antibody generation has been addressed by optimizing in vitro selection using phage display which moved the major bottleneck to the production and purification of recombinant antibodies in an end-user friendly format. Single chain (sc)Fv antibody fragments require additional tags for detection and are not as suitable as immunoglobulins (Ig)G in many immunoassays. In contrast, the bivalent scFv-Fc antibody format shares many properties with IgG and has a very high application compatibility. In this study transient expression of scFv-Fc antibodies in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells was optimized. Production levels of 10-20 mg/L scFv-Fc antibody were achieved in adherent HEK293T cells. Employment of HEK293-6E suspension cells expressing a truncated variant of the Epstein Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen (EBNA) 1 in combination with production under serum free conditions increased the volumetric yield up to 10-fold to more than 140 mg/L scFv-Fc antibody. After vector optimization and process optimization the yield of an scFv-Fc antibody and a cytotoxic antibody-RNase fusion protein further increased 3-4-fold to more than 450 mg/L. Finally, an entirely new mammalian expression vector was constructed for single step in frame cloning of scFv genes from antibody phage display libraries. Transient expression of more than 20 different scFv-Fc antibodies resulted in volumetric yields of up to 600 mg/L and 400 mg/L in average. Transient production of recombinant scFv-Fc antibodies in HEK293-6E in combination with optimized vectors and fed batch shake flasks cultivation is efficient and robust, and integrates well into a high-throughput recombinant antibody generation pipeline.

  3. DARPA ANTIBODY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM STANDARDIZED TEST BED FOR ANTIBODY CHARACTERIZATION: CHARACTERIZATION OF TWO MS2 SCFV ANTIBODIES PRODUCED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    ECBC-TR-1434 DARPA ANTIBODY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM STANDARDIZED TEST BED FOR...COVERED (From - To) Oct 2010 – Sep 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DARPA Antibody Technology Program Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization...Characterization of Two MS2 scFv Antibodies Produced by the University of Texas 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  4. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Parodis

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204 or without (n = 294 LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous, before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes. Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3-18.8. Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all, but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1-2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are

  5. Antibody repertoire development in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John E; Sun, Jishan; Wertz, Nancy; Sinkora, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Swine belong to the Order Artiodactyla and like mice and humans, express IgM, IgD, IgG, IgE and IgA antibodies but a larger number of IgG subclasses. Like rabbits and chickens, expressed V(H) genes belong to the ancestral V(H)3 family and only 5 comprise >80% of the pre-immune repertoire. Since they use primarily two D(H) segments and have a single J(H) like chickens, junctional diversity plays a relatively greater role in repertoire formation than in humans and mice. Proportional light chain usage surprisingly resembles that in humans and is therefore distinctly different from the predominant kappa chain usage (>90%) of lab rodents and predominant lambda chain usage in other ungulates (>90%). The pre-immune V(kappa) repertoire also appears restricted since >95% of V(kappa)J(kappa) rearrangements use only a few members of the IGKV2 family and only J(kappa)2. Two V(lambda) families (IGLV3 and IGLV8) are used in forming the pre-immune repertoire. Antibodies that do not utilize light chains as in camelids, or the lengthy CDR3 regions seen in cattle that use V(H)4 family genes, have not been reported in swine. B cell lymphogenesis first occurs in the yolk sac but early VDJ rearrangements differ from mice and humans in that nearly 100% are in-frame and N-region additions are already present. Swine possess ileal Peyers patches like sheep which may be important for antigen-independent B cell repertoire diversification. The presence of pro B-like cells in interlobular areas of thymus and mature B cells in the thymic medulla that have switched to especially IgA in early gestation, is so far unique among mammals. The offspring of swine are believed to receive no passive immunity in utero and are precosial. Thus, they are a useful model for studies on fetal-neonatal immunological development. The model has already shown that: (a) colonization of the gut is required for responsiveness to TD and TI-2 antigens, (b) responsiveness due to colonization depends on bacterial PAMPs

  6. HIV antibodies for treatment of HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, David M.; Koup, Richard A.; Ferrari, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Summary The bar is high to improve on current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), now highly effective, safe, and simple. However antibodies that bind the HIV envelope are able to uniquely target the virus as it seeks to enter new target cells, or as it is expressed from previously infected cells. Further, the use of antibodies against HIV as a therapeutic may offer advantages. Antibodies can have long half-lives, and are being considered as partners for long-acting antiretrovirals for use in therapy or prevention of HIV infection. Early studies in animal models and in clinical trials suggest that such antibodies can have antiviral activity but, as with small molecule antiretrovirals, the issues of viral escape and resistance will have to be addressed. Most promising, however, are the unique properties of anti-HIV antibodies: the potential ability to opsonize viral particles, to direct antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against actively infected cells, and ultimately the ability to direct the clearance of HIV-infected cells by effector cells of the immune system. These distinctive activities suggest that HIV antibodies and their derivatives may play an important role in the next frontier of HIV therapeutics, the effort to develop treatments that could lead to an HIV cure. PMID:28133794

  7. Structure Based Antibody-Like Peptidomimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I. Greene

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biologics such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb and soluble receptors represent new classes of therapeutic agents for treatment of several diseases. High affinity and high specificity biologics can be utilized for variety of clinical purposes. Monoclonal antibodies have been used as diagnostic agents when coupled with radionuclide, immune modulatory agents or in the treatment of cancers. Among other limitations of using large molecules for therapy the actual cost of biologics has become an issue. There is an effort among chemists and biologists to reduce the size of biologics which includes monoclonal antibodies and receptors without a reduction of biological efficacy. Single chain antibody, camel antibodies, Fv fragments are examples of this type of deconstructive process. Small high-affinity peptides have been identified using phage screening. Our laboratory used a structure-based approach to develop small-size peptidomimetics from the three-dimensional structure of proteins with immunoglobulin folds as exemplified by CD4 and antibodies. Peptides derived either from the receptor or their cognate ligand mimics the functions of the parental macromolecule. These constrained peptides not only provide a platform for developing small molecule drugs, but also provide insight into the atomic features of protein-protein interactions. A general overview of the reduction of monoclonal antibodies to small exocyclic peptide and its prospects as a useful diagnostic and as a drug in the treatment of cancer are discussed.

  8. Antibodies to Trichomonas vaginalis surface glycolipid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida-Corcuera, F D; Singh, B N; Gray, G C; Stamper, P D; Davuluri, M; Schlangen, K; Corbeil, R R; Corbeil, L B

    2015-01-01

    Background Human trichomoniasis is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease, yet immune responses are not well studied. Methods Since the Trichomonas vaginalis lipophosphoglycan (TvLPG) is an important virulence factor, a bank of eight monoclonal antibodies was generated to define the antigen in clinical isolates. The TvLPG-specific antibody response of women who were culture positive (n=33) or negative (n=33) for T vaginalis infection was determined by isotype-specific ELISA. Results The bank of monoclonal antibodies reacted with conserved surface TvLPG epitopes in 27 isolates from pregnant women at their first prenatal visit. Conserved TvLPG epitopes were shown to be surface exposed by immunofluorescence. Sera collected from the same patients at the same time were assayed for specific antibodies. Serum and vaginal secretions from 33 T vaginalis-positive women had statistically higher IgG anti-TvLPG levels than age-matched and race-matched negative controls in the same clinical study (ptrichomoniasis were almost significantly higher than controls (p=0.055). Infected women with normal pregnancies had significantly higher vaginal IgG anti-TvLPG values than infected women with adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Conclusions These antibody responses show that infected women can respond to the conserved TvLPG antigen. Since antibodies to trichomonad surface LPG protect in a bovine model of trichomoniasis, the role of these antibodies in the human disease should be investigated. PMID:23785040

  9. Glycosylation of plant produced human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallolimath, Somanath; Steinkellner, Herta

    2015-12-23

    Human immunoglobulins circulate as highly heterogeneously glycosylated mixture of otherwise homogeneous protein backbones. A series of studies, mainly on IgG, have unequivocally proven that antibodies modulate their effector function through sugars present in the Fc domain. However, our limited technology in producing complex proteins such as antibodies, with defined glycan structures hamper in depths studies. This review introduces a plant based expression platform enabling engineering of antibody glycans. The procedure is based on the simultaneous delivery of appropriate constructs, carrying cDNAs of target proteins (e.g. heavy and light chain of antibodies) in combination with human glycosylation enzymes into plant leaves. Harvesting of recombinant proteins one week post construct delivery allows high speed and flexibility. Major achievements include the production of functional active slialylated pentameric IgMs in tobacco leaves. The system provides a viable approach to the generation of antibodies with defined glycoforms on demand, contributing to studies on antibody glycans and the development of novel antibody based drugs.

  10. Distinct Therapeutic Mechanisms of Tau Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Kristen E.; Mirbaha, Hilda; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of Tau amyloids, and include Alzheimer disease and certain frontotemporal dementias. Trans-neuronal propagation of amyloid mediated by extracellular Tau may underlie disease progression. Consistent with this, active and passive vaccination studies in mouse models reduce pathology, although by unknown mechanisms. We previously reported that intracerebroventricular administration of three anti-Tau monoclonal antibodies (HJ8.5, HJ9.3, and HJ9.4) reduces pathology in a model overexpressing full-length mutant (P301S) human Tau. We now study effects of these three antibodies and a negative control antibody (HJ3.4) on Tau aggregate uptake into BV2 microglial-like cells and primary neurons. Antibody-independent Tau uptake into BV2 cells was blocked by heparin, consistent with a previously described role for heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Two therapeutic antibodies (HJ8.5 and HJ9.4) promoted uptake of full-length Tau fibrils into microglia via Fc receptors. Surprisingly, HJ9.3 promoted uptake of fibrils composed of the Tau repeat domain or Alzheimer disease-derived Tau aggregates, but failed to influence full-length recombinant Tau fibrils. Size fractionation of aggregates showed that antibodies preferentially promote uptake of larger oligomers (n ≥∼20-mer) versus smaller oligomers (n ∼10-mer) or monomer. No antibody inhibited uptake of full-length recombinant fibrils into primary neurons, but HJ9.3 blocked neuronal uptake of Tau repeat domain fibrils and Alzheimer disease-derived Tau. Antibodies thus have multiple potential mechanisms, including clearance via microglia and blockade of neuronal uptake. However these effects are epitope- and aggregate size-dependent. Establishing specific mechanisms of antibody activity in vitro may help in design and optimization of agents that are more effective in vivo. PMID:26126828

  11. Molecular stabilization effects of interactions between anti-metatype antibodies and liganded antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, K M; Denzin, L K; Voss, E W

    1992-05-25

    Anti-metatype antibodies have been described as antibodies which recognize ligand-induced conformational changes in the antibody variable region. Additionally, anti-metatype antibodies, produced by multiple immunizations with liganded high affinity monoclonal anti-fluorescein antibody 4-4-20, enhanced the lifetime of monoclonal antibody 4-4-20-fluorescein complex. To better understand the mechanism of the delayed dissociation rate, deuterium oxide was used to probe the liganded active site. The rate and extent of deuterium oxide-mediated fluorescence enhancement of bound ligand served to monitor the conformational dynamics of the active site in the presence and absence of anti-metatype antibodies. Results showed that anti-metatype antibodies reduced the rate and extent of deuterium oxide-mediated fluorescence enhancement of 4-4-20, a single-chain derivative of 4-4-20 (consisting of the variable domains and a polylinker), and idiotypically related monoclonal anti-fluorescein antibodies suggesting that anti-metatype stabilized the liganded active site. Size exclusion liquid chromatography was utilized to isolate the liganded antibody-anti-metatype complex. Liganded single chain antibody 4-4-20 was mixed with 10-fold molar excess anti-metatype Fab fragments, and a major complex eluted with an apparent M(r) 249,000. The apparent molecular weight of this complex inferred that one liganded single chain antibody was bound by five antimetatype Fab fragments. Spectral analysis confirmed these results and the characteristic delayed rate of ligand dissociation was also observed for the isolated complex. The results suggest that anti-metatype antibodies stabilize the liganded conformation by forming a large, stable, macromolecular complex.

  12. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  13. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  14. Intellectual property protection: strategies for antibody inventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storz, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, therapeutic antibodies have become one of the commercially most successful classes of biopharmaceutical drugs. Major drug manufacturers who have successfully managed to occupy this new market, as well as biotechnology firms, some of which have experienced a quick growth and are now on par with the former, owe part of their success to suitable intellectual property strategies. This article provides an overview of the current thinking on antibody-related patents, and discusses strategies for protecting the antibody products of the future.

  15. Uses of monoclonial antibody 8H9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-06-23

    This invention provides an antibody that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the heavy chain CDR (Complementary Determining Region)1 comprises NYDIN, heavy chain CDR2 comprises WIFPGDGSTQY, heavy chain CDR3 comprises QTTATWFAY, and the light chain CDR1 comprises RASQSISDYLH, light chain CDR2 comprises YASQSIS, and light chain CDR3 comprises QNGHSFPLT. In another embodiment, there is provided a polypeptide that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the polypeptide comprises NYDIN, WIFPGDGSTQY, QTTATWFAY, RASQSISDYLH, YASQSIS, and QNGHSFPLT.

  16. Engineering bispecific antibodies with defined chain pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krah, Simon; Sellmann, Carolin; Rhiel, Laura; Schröter, Christian; Dickgiesser, Stephan; Beck, Jan; Zielonka, Stefan; Toleikis, Lars; Hock, Björn; Kolmar, Harald; Becker, Stefan

    2017-10-25

    Bispecific IgG-like antibodies can simultaneously interact with two epitopes on the same or on different antigens. Therefore, these molecules facilitate novel modes of action, which cannot be addressed by conventional monospecific IgGs. However, the generation of such antibodies still appears to be demanding due to their specific architecture comprising four different polypeptide chains that need to assemble correctly. This review focusses on different strategies to circumvent this issue or to enforce a correct chain association with a focus on common-chain bispecific antibodies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Anti-idiotype antibodies in cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Daniel Fernando; Vázquez, Ana María; Alonso, Daniel Fernando; Macías, Amparo

    2015-01-01

    Anti-idiotype antibodies (anti-Id Abs) are antibodies to idiotopes that are located in the variable region, including the antigen binding site, of another antibody. When the last is the case, these anti-Id Abs can act as surrogates of the original antigen. The capability of anti-Id Abs to modulate the immune response has been the basis for the development of anti-Id vaccines against different antigens, including tumor-associated antigens. Over the years, its use in cancer has been demonst...

  18. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  19. Antibody-scanning and epitope-tagging methods; molecular mapping of proteins using antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, T; Masunaga, K; Ohtsu, Y; Hara, K; Hamada, N; Kashiwagi, T; Iwahashi, J

    2000-11-01

    Because synthetic short peptides bearing critical binding residues, can chemically mimic the folded antigenic determinants on proteins, short synthetic peptides can generate antibodies that react with cognate sequences in intact folded proteins. According to this mimotope theory, we produced site-specific antibodies by immunization with short peptides which overlapped each other and covered the entire protein, and used them for domain mapping of influenza virus RNA polymerase (antibody-scanning method). We also used a tagged-epitope and its monoclonal antibodies for topology mapping of clathrin light chains in clathrin triskelions by electron microscopy. Both methods using specific epitopes in combination with their antibodies enable us to determine the domains of interesting proteins systematically without the need to generate monoclonal antibodies or mutant proteins.

  20. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  1. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2015-11-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Polynucleotides encoding anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Kehoe, John [Saint Davids, PA; Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-01-11

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  3. Characterization of methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolate specific polyclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Nadia Muhammad Akram; Schulz, Alexander; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    that it was highly selective for methionine-derived aliphatic glucosinolates with a methyl-sulfinyl group in the side chain. Use of crude plant extracts from Arabidopsis mutants with different glucosinolate profiles showed that the antibodies recognized aliphatic glucosinolates in a plant extract and did not cross......Antibodies towards small molecules, like plant specialized metabolites, are valuable tools for developing quantitative and qualitative analytical techniques. Glucosinolates are the specialized metabolites characteristic of the Brassicales order. Here we describe the characterization of polyclonal...... rabbit antibodies raised against the 4-methylsulfinylbutyl glucosinolate, glucoraphanin that is one of the major glucosinolates in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (hereafter Arabidopsis). Analysis of the cross-reactivity of the antibodies against a number of glucosinolates demonstrated...

  4. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razpotnik, Rok; Novak, Neža; Čurin Šerbec, Vladka; Rajcevic, Uros

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood-brain barrier (BBB) makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain delivery platforms for antibodies have been studied such as liposomes, nanoparticle-based systems, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), and cell-based approaches. We have already shown the successful delivery of single-chain fragment variable (scFv) with CPP as a linker between two variable domains in the brain. Antibodies normally face poor penetration through the BBB, with some variants sufficiently passing the barrier on their own. A "Trojan horse" method allows passage of biomolecules, such as antibodies, through the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis (RMT). Such examples of therapeutic antibodies are the bispecific antibodies where one binding specificity recognizes and binds a BBB receptor, enabling RMT and where a second binding specificity recognizes an antigen as a therapeutic target. On the other hand, cell-based systems such as stem cells (SCs) are a promising delivery system because of their tumor tropism and ability to cross the BBB. Genetically engineered SCs can be used in gene therapy, where they express anti-tumor drugs, including antibodies. Different types and sources of SCs have been studied for the delivery of therapeutics to the brain; both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs) show great potential. Following the success in treatment of leukemias and lymphomas, the adoptive T-cell therapies, especially the chimeric antigen receptor-T cells (CAR-Ts), are making their way into glioma treatment as another type of cell-based therapy using the

  5. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Razpotnik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood–brain barrier (BBB makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain delivery platforms for antibodies have been studied such as liposomes, nanoparticle-based systems, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs, and cell-based approaches. We have already shown the successful delivery of single-chain fragment variable (scFv with CPP as a linker between two variable domains in the brain. Antibodies normally face poor penetration through the BBB, with some variants sufficiently passing the barrier on their own. A “Trojan horse” method allows passage of biomolecules, such as antibodies, through the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis (RMT. Such examples of therapeutic antibodies are the bispecific antibodies where one binding specificity recognizes and binds a BBB receptor, enabling RMT and where a second binding specificity recognizes an antigen as a therapeutic target. On the other hand, cell-based systems such as stem cells (SCs are a promising delivery system because of their tumor tropism and ability to cross the BBB. Genetically engineered SCs can be used in gene therapy, where they express anti-tumor drugs, including antibodies. Different types and sources of SCs have been studied for the delivery of therapeutics to the brain; both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs show great potential. Following the success in treatment of leukemias and lymphomas, the adoptive T-cell therapies, especially the chimeric antigen receptor-T cells (CAR-Ts, are making their way into glioma treatment as another type of cell

  6. Cold denaturation of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Kristi L; Patapoff, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to undergo cold denaturation remains unexplored. In this study, the phenomenon of cold denaturation was investigated for a mAb, mAb1, through thermodynamic and spectroscopic analyses. tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were recorded for the guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl)-induced unfolding of mAb1 at pH 6.3 at temperatures ranging from −5 to 50°C. A three-state unfolding model incorporating the linear extrapolation method was fit to the fluorescence data to obtain an apparent free energy of unfolding, ΔGu, at each temperature. CD studies revealed that mAb1 exhibited polyproline II helical structure at low temperatures and at high GuHCl concentrations. the Gibbs-Helmholtz expression fit to the ΔGu versus temperature data from fluorescence gave a ΔCp of 8.0 kcal mol−1 K−1, a maximum apparent stability of 23.7 kcal mol−1 at 18°C, and an apparent cold denaturation temperature (TCD) of −23°C. ΔGu values for another mAb (mAb2) with a similar framework exhibited less stability at low temperatures, suggesting a depressed protein stability curve and a higher relative TCD. Direct experimental evidence of the susceptibility of mAb1 and mAb2 to undergo cold denaturation in the absence of denaturant was confirmed at pH 2.5. thus, mAbs have a potential to undergo cold denaturation at storage temperatures near −20°C (pH 6.3), and this potential needs to be evaluated independently for individual mAbs. PMID:20093856

  7. Anticardiolipin antibodies in pathogenesis of infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Lončar Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aim. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder clinically characterized by arterial or venous thrombosis and/or specific obstetric complications and presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in the serum. It occurs in 0.3% of pregnant women, while 1% of them have two spontaneous abortions. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of biphospholipid antibodies in pregnant women with recurrent spontaneous abortions. Methods. We analyzed 60 pregnant women ...

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies as Diagnostics; an Appraisal

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui M

    2010-01-01

    Ever since the development of Hybridoma Technology in 1975 by Kohler and Milstein, our vision for antibodies as tools for research for prevention, detection and treatment of diseases, vaccine production, antigenic characterization of pathogens and in the study of genetic regulation of immune responses and disease susceptibility has been revolutionized. The monoclonal antibodies being directed against single epitopes are homogeneous, highly specific and can be produced in unlimited quantities....

  9. Radioimmunoassay of measles virus antibodies in SSPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowski, M.A.; Gut, W.; Kantoch, M. (Department of Virology, National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw (Poland))

    1982-12-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA) was introduced for detecting measles virus IgG and IgM antibodies. The hyperimmune response to the measles virus could be demonstrated more accurately by RIA than by haemagglutination inhibition (HI). The ratio between RIA and HI antibody titres was decidedly higher in sera and cerebrospinal fluids of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis than in those of other groups tested.

  10. prevalence of cytomegalovirus antibodies in blood donors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... Majority of the participants, 382 (97% with 95% CI. 96.45-97.53%) had CMV IgG antibodies. Only 14. (3.6% with 95% CI 1.7-5.2%) were CMV IgM antibody positive. Table 1 summarises CMV positivity among different age groups while Table 2 shows frequency of seropositivity among two genders. 16-20.

  11. Principles for computational design of binding antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Dror; Pszolla, M Gabriele; Lapidoth, Gideon D; Norn, Christoffer; Dym, Orly; Unger, Tamar; Albeck, Shira; Tyka, Michael D; Fleishman, Sarel J

    2017-10-10

    Natural proteins must both fold into a stable conformation and exert their molecular function. To date, computational design has successfully produced stable and atomically accurate proteins by using so-called "ideal" folds rich in regular secondary structures and almost devoid of loops and destabilizing elements, such as cavities. Molecular function, such as binding and catalysis, however, often demands nonideal features, including large and irregular loops and buried polar interaction networks, which have remained challenging for fold design. Through five design/experiment cycles, we learned principles for designing stable and functional antibody variable fragments (Fvs). Specifically, we (i) used sequence-design constraints derived from antibody multiple-sequence alignments, and (ii) during backbone design, maintained stabilizing interactions observed in natural antibodies between the framework and loops of complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 2. Designed Fvs bound their ligands with midnanomolar affinities and were as stable as natural antibodies, despite having >30 mutations from mammalian antibody germlines. Furthermore, crystallographic analysis demonstrated atomic accuracy throughout the framework and in four of six CDRs in one design and atomic accuracy in the entire Fv in another. The principles we learned are general, and can be implemented to design other nonideal folds, generating stable, specific, and precise antibodies and enzymes.

  12. Molecular farming of recombinant antibodies in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillberg, S; Fischer, R; Emans, N

    2003-03-01

    Antibodies represent a large proportion of therapeutic drugs currently in development. In most cases, they are produced in mammalian cell lines or transgenic animals because these have been shown to fold and assemble the proteins correctly and generate authentic glycosylation patterns. However, such expression systems are expensive, difficult to scale up and there are safety concerns due to potential contamination with pathogenic organisms or oncogenic DNA sequences. Plants represent an inexpensive, efficient and safe alternative for the production of recombinant antibodies. Research over the last 10 years has shown that plants can produce a variety of functional antibodies and there is now intense interest in scaling up production to commercial levels. In this review, we discuss the advantages of plants over traditional expression systems, describe how antibody expression in plants is achieved and optimized and then consider the practical issues concerning large-scale molecular farming in plants. The first plant-produced therapeutic antibodies are already in clinical trials, and, given the economic benefits of this production system, we are likely to see many more recombinant antibodies produced in this manner in the future.

  13. Antibody-mediated resistance against plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarnejad, Mohammad Reza; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Tabatabaie, Meisam; Twyman, Richard M; Schillberg, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Plant diseases have a significant impact on the yield and quality of crops. Many strategies have been developed to combat plant diseases, including the transfer of resistance genes to crops by conventional breeding. However, resistance genes can only be introgressed from sexually-compatible species, so breeders need alternative measures to introduce resistance traits from more distant sources. In this context, genetic engineering provides an opportunity to exploit diverse and novel forms of resistance, e.g. the use of recombinant antibodies targeting plant pathogens. Native antibodies, as a part of the vertebrate adaptive immune system, can bind to foreign antigens and eliminate them from the body. The ectopic expression of antibodies in plants can also interfere with pathogen activity to confer disease resistance. With sufficient knowledge of the pathogen life cycle, it is possible to counter any disease by designing expression constructs so that pathogen-specific antibodies accumulate at high levels in appropriate sub-cellular compartments. Although first developed to tackle plant viruses and still used predominantly for this purpose, antibodies have been targeted against a diverse range of pathogens as well as proteins involved in plant-pathogen interactions. Here we comprehensively review the development and implementation of antibody-mediated disease resistance in plants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Antibody-Conjugated Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Arruebo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have found their way into the fields of Biotechnology and Medicine. Nanoparticles by themselves offer specific physicochemical properties that they do not exhibit in bulk form, where materials show constant physical properties regardless of size. Antibodies are nanosize biological products that are part of the specific immune system. In addition to their own properties as pathogens or toxin neutralizers, as well as in the recruitment of immune elements (complement, improving phagocytosis, cytotoxicity antibody dependent by natural killer cells, etc., they could carry several elements (toxins, drugs, fluorochroms, or even nanoparticles, etc. and be used in several diagnostic procedures, or even in therapy to destroy a specific target. The conjugation of antibodies to nanoparticles can generate a product that combines the properties of both. For example, they can combine the small size of nanoparticles and their special thermal, imaging, drug carrier, or magnetic characteristics with the abilities of antibodies, such as specific and selective recognition. The hybrid product will show versatility and specificity. In this review, we analyse both antibodies and nanoparticles, focusing especially on the recent developments for antibody-conjugated nanoparticles, offering the researcher an overview of the different applications and possibilities of these hybrid carriers.

  15. Antibody or Antibody Fragments: Implications for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina T. Xenaki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibody-based therapeutics has proven very promising for clinical applications in cancer patients, with multiple examples of antibodies and antibody–drug conjugates successfully applied for the treatment of solid tumors and lymphomas. Given reported recurrence rates, improvements are clearly still necessary. A major factor limiting the efficacy of antibody-targeted cancer therapies may be the incomplete penetration of the antibody or antibody–drug conjugate into the tumor. Incomplete tumor penetration also affects the outcome of molecular imaging, when using such targeting agents. From the injection site until they arrive inside the tumor, targeting molecules are faced with several barriers that impact intratumoral distribution. The primary means of antibody transport inside tumors is based on diffusion. The diffusive penetration inside the tumor is influenced by both antibody properties, such as size and binding affinity, as well as tumor properties, such as microenvironment, vascularization, and targeted antigen availability. Engineering smaller antibody fragments has shown to improve the rate of tumor uptake and intratumoral distribution. However, it is often accompanied by more rapid clearance from the body and in several cases also by inherent destabilization and reduction of the binding affinity of the antibody. In this perspective, we discuss different cancer targeting approaches based on antibodies or their fragments. We carefully consider how their size and binding properties influence their intratumoral uptake and distribution, and how this may affect cancer imaging and therapy of solid tumors.

  16. Antibody Scientific Committee | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Antibody Scientific Committee provides scientific insight and guidance to the NCI's Antibody Characterization Program. Specifically, the members of this committee evaluate request from the external scientific community for development and characterization of antibodies by the program. The members of the Antibody Scientific Committee include:

  17. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  18. Antibody Fragments and Their Purification by Protein L Affinity Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav Rodrigo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies and related proteins comprise one of the largest and fastest-growing classes of protein pharmaceuticals. A majority of such molecules are monoclonal antibodies; however, many new entities are antibody fragments. Due to their structural, physiological, and pharmacological properties, antibody fragments offer new biopharmaceutical opportunities. In the case of recombinant full-length antibodies with suitable Fc regions, two or three column purification processes centered around Protein A affinity chromatography have proven to be fast, efficient, robust, cost-effective, and scalable. Most antibody fragments lack Fc and suitable affinity for Protein A. Adapting proven antibody purification processes to antibody fragments demands different affinity chromatography. Such technology must offer the unit operation advantages noted above, and be suitable for most of the many different types of antibody fragments. Protein L affinity chromatography appears to fulfill these criteria—suggesting its consideration as a key unit operation in antibody fragment processing.

  19. Potential therapeutic roles for antibody mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, T Shantha; Strohl, William R

    2013-10-01

    With the enormous success of recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rMAbs) as human therapeutics, there are increasing efforts underway to explore new molecular entities that mimic rMAbs to replicate this huge success. In addition to naked intact rMAbs, antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), FAb and F(ab')2 fragments and also Fc fusion proteins have been developed and/or marketed as human therapeutics to treat different human diseases, including life-threatening diseases such as cancer. Several hundreds more intact rMAbs, ADCs, FAb, F(ab')2 fragments and Fc fusion proteins are currently undergoing human clinical trials. In addition to these molecules, new type of antibody fragments such as single-chain Fvs (scFvs), VH, scFv-Fc, scFv-CH, scFAb, scFv-zipper, diabodies, bispecific antibodies and similar types of constructs are also being investigated to be developed as human monotherapeutics. Further, there are quite a few current examples of combinations of biologics being developed. For example, currently, several biopharmaceutical companies are developing combinations of antibody mixtures as human therapeutics. Accordingly, the question posed here is whether it is time to consider the possibility of developing a broader range of combinations of therapeutic biologics. Combinations of small organic molecules have been successfully used as therapeutics for many years to treat many diseases, so the context of using polypharmacology to treat human diseases is not novel. For the past several decades, intravenous immunoglobulins have successfully been used in treating various autoimmune diseases. In this context, several biotechnology companies are exploring the use of combinations of antibody mixtures as human therapeutics. This editorial discusses these current efforts and the potential future role of antibody mixtures as human therapeutics.

  20. A recombinant, fully human monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity constructed from phage-displayed antibody fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, GA; Heijnen, IAFM; Cuomo, ME; Koningsberger, JC; Boel, E; de Vries, ARV; Loyson, SAJ; Helfrich, W; Henegouwen, GPV; van Meijer, M; de Kruif, J; Logtenberg, T

    A single-chain Fv antibody fragment specific for the tumor-associated Ep-CAM molecule was isolated from a semisynthetic phage display library and converted into an intact, fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (huMab), The purified huMab had an affinity of 5 nM and effectively mediated tumor cell

  1. Anti-HIV-1 antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity: is there more to antibodies than neutralization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen Shi; Kent, Stephen J

    2017-11-30

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that nonneutralizing Fc effector functions including antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) contribute to protection against HIV-1 acquisition. We discuss recent advances in anti-HIV-1 ADCC research with a particular focus on ADCC mediated by Env-specific antibodies in vitro and in vivo, the curative potential of HIV-1-specific ADCC antibodies and the mechanisms of HIV-1 resistance to ADCC. ADCC activities of broadly neutralizing and nonneutralizing monoclonal antibody panels were recently characterized in vitro against several lab-adapted and primary isolates of HIV-1. ADCC activity of these monoclonal antibodies generally correlated with binding to infected cells and were greater against the lab-adapted strains compared with primary HIV-1 isolates. Several recent studies in mouse and macaque models of HIV-1 infection suggest Fc-mediated effector functions contribute to the protective efficacy of broadly neutralizing antibodies and exert immune pressure on HIV-1 in vivo. An increasing body of evidence suggests that ADCC-mediating antibodies, particularly when combined with neutralizing functions, can facilitate prevention and control of HIV-1. The precise mechanisms of partial protection conferred by nonneutralizing antibodies in vivo remain unclear and will need to be fully investigated in order to realize their full potential for HIV-1 vaccines.

  2. Discovery of diverse and functional antibodies from large human repertoire antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwimmer, Lauren J; Huang, Betty; Giang, Hoa; Cotter, Robyn L; Chemla-Vogel, David S; Dy, Francis V; Tam, Eric M; Zhang, Fangjiu; Toy, Pamela; Bohmann, David J; Watson, Susan R; Beaber, John W; Reddy, Nithin; Kuan, Hua-Feng; Bedinger, Daniel H; Rondon, Isaac J

    2013-05-31

    Phage display antibody libraries have a proven track record for the discovery of therapeutic human antibodies, increasing the demand for large and diverse phage antibody libraries for the discovery of new therapeutics. We have constructed naïve antibody phage display libraries in both Fab and scFv formats, with each library having more than 250 billion clones that encompass the human antibody repertoire. These libraries show high fidelity in open reading frame and expression percentages, and their V-gene family distribution, VH-CDR3 length and amino acid usage mirror the natural diversity of human antibodies. Both the Fab and scFv libraries show robust sequence diversity in target-specific binders and differential V-gene usage for each target tested, supporting the use of libraries that utilize multiple display formats and V-gene utilization to maximize antibody-binding diversity. For each of the targets, clones with picomolar affinities were identified from at least one of the libraries and for the two targets assessed for activity, functional antibodies were identified from both libraries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The antibody mining toolbox: an open source tool for the rapid analysis of antibody repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Sara; Glanville, Jacob; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Gleasner, Cheryl D; Shen, Xiaohong; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Kiss, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection has been an essential tool in the development of recombinant antibodies against various antigen targets. Deep sequencing has recently been gaining ground as an alternative and valuable method to analyze such antibody selections. The analysis provides a novel and extremely detailed view of selected antibody populations, and allows the identification of specific antibodies using only sequencing data, potentially eliminating the need for expensive and laborious low-throughput screening methods such as enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. The high cost and the need for bioinformatics experts and powerful computer clusters, however, have limited the general use of deep sequencing in antibody selections. Here, we describe the AbMining ToolBox, an open source software package for the straightforward analysis of antibody libraries sequenced by the three main next generation sequencing platforms (454, Ion Torrent, MiSeq). The ToolBox is able to identify heavy chain CDR3s as effectively as more computationally intense software, and can be easily adapted to analyze other portions of antibody variable genes, as well as the selection outputs of libraries based on different scaffolds. The software runs on all common operating systems (Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), on standard personal computers, and sequence analysis of 1-2 million reads can be accomplished in 10-15 min, a fraction of the time of competing software. Use of the ToolBox will allow the average researcher to incorporate deep sequence analysis into routine selections from antibody display libraries.

  4. Presence of non-maternal antibodies in newborns of mothers with antibody deficiencies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hahn-Zoric; B. Carlsson; J. Bjö rkander; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); L. Mellander; L.A. Hanson

    1992-01-01

    textabstractTo explain the mechanism for induction and production of specific antibodies found in the newborn already at birth, without previous known exposure to the antigen, we chose a model that presumably excluded the possibility of specific antibodies being transferred from the mother to the

  5. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T.; Dennison, S. Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  7. Fixed Dosing of Monoclonal Antibodies in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikx, Jeroen J M A; Haanen, John B A G; Voest, Emile E; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2017-10-01

    Most monoclonal antibodies in oncology are administered in body-size-based dosing schedules. This is believed to correct for variability in both drug distribution and elimination between patients. However, monoclonal antibodies typically distribute to the blood plasma and extracellular fluids only, which increase less than proportionally with the increase in body weight. Elimination takes place via proteolytic catabolism, a nonspecific immunoglobulin G elimination pathway, and intracellular degradation after binding to the target. The latter is the primary route of elimination and is related to target expression levels rather than body size. Taken together, the minor effects of body size on distribution and elimination of monoclonal antibodies and their usually wide therapeutic window do not support body-size-based dosing. We evaluated effects of body weight on volume of distribution and clearance of monoclonal antibodies in oncology and show that a fixed dose for most of these drugs is justified based on pharmacokinetics. A survey of the savings after fixed dosing of monoclonal antibodies at our hospital showed that fixed dosing can reduce costs of health care, especially when pooling of preparations is not possible (which is often the case in smaller hospitals). In conclusion, based on pharmacokinetic parameters of monoclonal antibodies, there is a rationale for fixed dosing of these drugs in oncology. Therefore, we believe that fixed dosing is justified and can improve efficiency of the compounding. Moreover, drug spillage can be reduced and medication errors may become less likely. The currently available knowledge of elimination of monoclonal antibodies combined with the publicly available data from clinical trials and extensive population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) modeling justifies fixed dosing. Interpatient variation in exposure is comparable after body weight and fixed dosing and most monoclonal antibodies show relatively flat dose-response relationships

  8. Antibody engineering using phage display with a coiled-coil heterodimeric Fv antibody fragment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Wang

    Full Text Available A Fab-like antibody binding unit, ccFv, in which a pair of heterodimeric coiled-coil domains was fused to V(H and V(L for Fv stabilization, was constructed for an anti-VEGF antibody. The anti-VEGF ccFv showed the same binding affinity as scFv but significantly improved stability and phage display level. Furthermore, phage display libraries in the ccFv format were constructed for humanization and affinity maturation of the anti-VEGF antibody. A panel of V(H frameworks and V(H-CDR3 variants, with a significant improvement in affinity and expressibility in both E. coli and yeast systems, was isolated from the ccFv phage libraries. These results demonstrate the potential application of the ccFv antibody format in antibody engineering.

  9. Technetium-99m labeled 50H. 19 antibody fragments: interaction of the antibody with platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valone, F.H.; Stricker, R.B.; Zamora, P.O.; Shah, V.O.; Mann, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody 50H.19 recognized three antigens (Msub(tau) = 31-, 40-, 45-K) on normal and thromboasthenic platelets, but only one (Msub(tau) = 31-K) on Bernard-Soulier platelets. The intact antibody and its F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments, had direct platelet-aggregating activity, and induced the platelet release reaction. The intact antibody potentiated platelet aggregation induced by platelet-activating factor or thrombin. Additions of indomethacin did not inhibit aggregation: addition of PGI/sub 2/, or a calcium channel blocker completely inhibited aggregation. A reduced amount of platelet-aggregating activity was observed with antibody fragments prepared for labeling with sup(99m)Tc by pre-exposure to stannous ions, and herein used in biodistribution studies and elsewhere in thrombus imaging studies. Antibody fragments radiolabeled with sup(99m)Tc bound to isolated platelets and to clots containing platelets.

  10. Metabolic engineering of monoclonal antibody carbohydrates for antibody-drug conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeley, Nicole M; Toki, Brian E; Zhang, Xinqun; Jeffrey, Scott C; Burke, Patrick J; Alley, Stephen C; Senter, Peter D

    2013-10-16

    The role that carbohydrates play in antibody function and pharmacokinetics has made them important targets for modification. The terminal fucose of the N-linked glycan structure, which has been shown to be involved in modulation of antibody-directed cellular cytotoxicity, is a particularly interesting location for potential modification through incorporation of alternative sugar structures. A library of fucose analogues was evaluated for their ability to incorporate into antibody carbohydrates in place of the native fucose. A number of efficiently incorporated molecules were identified, demonstrating the ability of fucosyltransferase VIII to utilize a variety of non-natural sugars as substrates. Among these structures was a thiolated analogue, 6-thiofucose, which was incorporated into the antibody carbohydrate with good efficiency. This unnatural thio-sugar could then be used for conjugation using maleimide chemistry to produce antibody-drug conjugates with pronounced cytotoxic activities and improved homogeneity compared to drug attachment through hinge disulfides.

  11. [Characterisation of a monoclonal antibody against Trypanosoma evansi and its application for detecting circulating antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzón, C M

    2006-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were obtained against Trypanosoma evansi. The 2-4F6 IgM monoclonal antibody (Mab) was chosen for the study because of its ability to detect antigens and its specificity (as it did not recognise T. cruzi, T. equiperdum, Babesia equi or B. caballi). The immunoblot test revealed that the 2-4F6 IgM Mab recognises epitopes in two antigenic bands, one measuring 85 kDa and the other 122 kDa. An immunoassay for antigen detection in serum using polyclonal antibodies for capture, the Mab 2-4F6 as primary antibody and an antimouse IgM as secondary antibody gave positive results in 10 of the 11 equidae infected with T. evansi, whereas 20 controls gave negative results. These research results show that the Mab 2-4F6 and the antigen it recognises are useful in identifying equidae infected with T. evansi.

  12. Clinical significance of antiphospholipid antibody measured by EliA anticardiolipin antibodies and anti-β2Glycoprotein I antibodies in antiphospholipid syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fujieda, Yuichiro; Shida, Haruki; Oku, Kenji; Bohgaki, Toshiyuki; Amengual, Olga; Horita, Tetsuya; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    Anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL-IgG/IgM) and anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies (aβ2GPI-IgG/IgM) are laboratory tests included in the current classification criteria for definite antiphospholipid syndrome...

  13. What does the antimitochondrial antibody mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triger, D R; Charlton, C A; Ward, A M

    1982-01-01

    In a prospective survey positive antimitochondrial antibodies have been detected in 69/4200 (1.64%) of all sera submitted to a routine immunology laboratory. Of the 69, only nine patients had uniquivocal primary biliary cirrhosis, six others had chronic active hepatitis, 10 had abnormal liver function tests without evidence of primary biliary cirrhosis, while the remaining 44 had no clinical or biochemical evidence of liver disease. Outside the context of liver disease antimitochondrial antibodies were observed with similar frequency in patients with autoimmune disorders as in other conditions. It was not possible to distinguish primary biliary cirrhosis from patients without liver disease by antibody titre or by immunoglobulin subclass. The positive antimitochondrial antibody patients without liver disease were uniformly distributed throughout the city of Sheffield, in contrast with the marked clustering of cases of primary biliary cirrhosis. We conclude that, in the absence of clinical liver disease, the antimitochondrial antibody test alone (as detected by routine immunofluorescent techniques) does not appear to be a specific screening test for primary biliary cirrhosis. While we cannot exclude the possibility that the autoantibody indicates a predisposition to develop primary biliary cirrhosis, further prospective studies are needed to determine which patients will progress in this manner. The possibility that environmental factors may be implicated cannot be discounted. PMID:7117900

  14. Specificity of the autologous neutralizing antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Penny L; Gray, Elin S; Morris, Lynn

    2009-09-01

    It has long been known that autologous neutralizing antibodies (AnAbs) exert pressure on the envelope of HIV, resulting in neutralization escape. However, recently, progress has been made in uncovering the precise targets of these potent early antibodies. AnAbs primarily target variable regions of the HIV-1 envelope, explaining the strain-specificity of these antibodies. Despite high neutralizing potential and cross-reactivity, anti-V3 antibodies do not contribute to autologous neutralization. The V1V2 is commonly immunogenic in early HIV-1 and simian human immunodeficiency virus infections, though the nature of these epitopes remains to be determined. In subtype C viruses, the C3 region is a neutralization target, possibly as a result of its more exposed and amphipathic structure. Autologous neutralization appears to be mediated by very few AnAb specificities that develop sequentially suggesting the possibility of immunological hierarchies for both binding and neutralizing antibodies. The role of AnAbs in preventing superinfection and in restricting virus replication is reexamined in the context of recent data. New studies have greatly contributed toward our understanding of the specificities mediating autologous neutralization and highlighted potential vulnerabilities on transmitted viruses. However, the contribution of AnAbs to the development of neutralization breadth remains to be characterized.

  15. Imaging spectrum of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Won, Jong Jin [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Jeong Gon; Ki, Won Woo; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-04-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is recognized as one of the most important causes of hypercoagulability. It can be clinically diagnosed if patients have experienced unexplained recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss, or thrombocytopenia in the presence of circulating autoantibodies to phospholipids, such as anticardiolipin antibody or lupus anticoagulant. Approximately half of all patients with this syndrome do not have associated systemic disease, and their condition is described as primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). In the remainder, the syndrome is accompanied by systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective tissue diseases, and is known as secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (1). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the systemic manifestation of PAPS, focusing on the radiological findings of CT, MR and angiography in clinically proven patients. (author). 8 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Patent disclosure requirements for therapeutic antibody patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Carmela; Trifonova, Anastassia

    2017-08-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have grown to become an important product class within the biopharmaceutical market. A prerequisite to their commercialization is adequate patent protection. Disclosure requirements and the types of claims available in different jurisdictions can impact the scope of protection available for antibodies. Areas covered: A comparative review of statutory bases, patent office practices and selected decisions in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom related to disclosure requirements is provided. Expert opinion: Differences in disclosure requirements exist in different jurisdictions which can impact the type of claims obtained and their survival when attacked in litigation. Including a wide variety of claim types is a key strategy to ensuring therapeutic antibodies are adequately protected. Method of use claims may provide advantages and broader protection in some circumstances and should also be considered.

  17. Production of therapeutic antibodies in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölke, Greta; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2003-10-01

    Antibodies are versatile tools for the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Their use has increased dramatically with the advent of recombinant antibody (rAb) technology, allowing the production of immunological reagents with improved and novel properties. The main challenge now lies in achieving cost-effective production on a large scale. Over the past 15 years, the potential of plants for the production of pharmaceutical proteins has become well-established. Plants represent an inexpensive, efficient and safe alternative to traditional systems used for the commercial-scale synthesis of rAbs. This review describes the current status of antibody production in plants, focusing on their advantages compared with other expression systems and the remaining obstacles to widespread acceptance.

  18. Antibody-Mediated Pathogen Resistance in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschen, Dieter; Schillberg, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The methods described in this chapter were developed in order to produce transgenic plants expressing pathogen-specific single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies fused to antifungal peptides (AFPs), conferring resistance against fungal pathogens. We describe the selection from a phage display library of avian scFv antibodies that recognize cell surface proteins on fungi from the genus Fusarium, and the construction of scFv-AFP fusion protein constructs followed by their transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana spp.) plants and stable expression in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Using these techniques, the antibody fusion with the most promising in vitro activity can be used to generate transgenic plants that are resistant to pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. matthiolae.

  19. Human antibody production in transgenic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Marianne; Osborn, Michael J; Ma, Biao; Hayre, Jasvinder; Avis, Suzanne; Lundstrom, Brian; Buelow, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Fully human antibodies from transgenic animals account for an increasing number of new therapeutics. After immunization, diverse human monoclonal antibodies of high affinity can be obtained from transgenic rodents, while large animals, such as transchromosomic cattle, have produced respectable amounts of specific human immunoglobulin (Ig) in serum. Several strategies to derive animals expressing human antibody repertoires have been successful. In rodents, gene loci on bacterial artificial chromosomes or yeast artificial chromosomes were integrated by oocyte microinjection or transfection of embryonic stem (ES) cells, while ruminants were derived from manipulated fibroblasts with integrated human chromosome fragments or human artificial chromosomes. In all strains, the endogenous Ig loci have been silenced by gene targeting, either in ES or fibroblast cells, or by zinc finger technology via DNA microinjection; this was essential for optimal production. However, comparisons showed that fully human antibodies were not as efficiently produced as wild-type Ig. This suboptimal performance, with respect to immune response and antibody yield, was attributed to imperfect interaction of the human constant region with endogenous signaling components such as the Igα/β in mouse, rat or cattle. Significant improvements were obtained when the human V-region genes were linked to the endogenous CH-region, either on large constructs or, separately, by site-specific integration, which could also silence the endogenous Ig locus by gene replacement or inversion. In animals with knocked-out endogenous Ig loci and integrated large IgH loci, containing many human Vs, all D and all J segments linked to endogenous C genes, highly diverse human antibody production similar to normal animals was obtained.

  20. Anticardiolipin antibodies in patients with Behcet's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Zivkovic

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study are to determine anticardiolipin antibodies in patients with Sy Behcet and to determine correlation between the levels of anticardiolipin antibodies in serum in patients with clinic systemic and ocular manifestations. The study was conducted on 11 patients with Behcet disease (group I, and on 11 healthy subjects (group II. Anticardiolipin antibodies –aCL were determined by the standard ELISA method, where 1GPL= 1 microgram/ml IgG aCL and 1 MPL= 1 microgram/ml IgM, and were considered negative < 10 GPL or MPL, low positive (10-40 GPL and MPL, or high positive (>40 GPL and MPL. In the group of 11 patients with the diagnosis Sy Behcet, 6 of them were (54.5% with values of anticardiolipin antibodies over 10 positive. In the control group of the healthy examinees aCl were positive in 2 cases (18.2%. There are no statistically significant differences in the presence of systemic clinic characteristics between aCl positive and negative patients. All the patients with SY Behcet in whom anticardiolipn antibodies were found have extremely severe visual damage which is not present in the group of those patients where the values of aCl were low. The difference is statistically significant. The level of anticardiolipin antibodies is increased in the patients with Behcet. There are no statistically significant differences in the presence of systemic clinical characteristics between aCL positive and negative patients. Visual acuity in patients with SY Behcet is statistically significantly much lower in patients who had increased values of aCL.

  1. Utility of feline coronavirus antibody tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addie, Diane D; le Poder, Sophie; Burr, Paul; Decaro, Nicola; Graham, Elizabeth; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Jarrett, Oswald; McDonald, Michael; Meli, Marina L

    2015-02-01

    Eight different tests for antibodies to feline coronavirus (FCoV) were evaluated for attributes that are important in situations in veterinary practice. We compared four indirect immunofluorescent antibody tests (IFAT), one enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (FCoV Immunocomb; Biogal) and three rapid immunochromatographic (RIM) tests against a panel of samples designated by consensus as positive or negative. Specificity was 100% for all but the two IFATs based on transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), at 83.3% and 97.5%. The IFAT and ELISA tests were best for obtaining an antibody titre and for working in the presence of virus. The RIM tests were the best for obtaining a result quickly (10-15 mins); of these, the Speed F-Corona was the most sensitive, at 92.4%, followed by FASTest feline infectious peritonitis (FIP; 84.6%) and Anigen Rapid FCoV antibody test (64.1%). Sensitivity was 100% for the ELISA, one FCoV IFAT and one TGEV IFAT; and 98.2% for a second TGEV IFA and 96.1% for a second FCoV IFAT. All tests worked with effusions, even when only blood products were stipulated in the instruction manual. The ELISA and Anigen RIM tests were best for small quantities of sample. The most appropriate FCoV antibody test to use depends on the reason for testing: in excluding a diagnosis of FIP, sensitivity, specificity, small sample quantity, rapidity and ability to work in the presence of virus all matter. For FCoV screening, speed and sensitivity are important, and for FCoV elimination antibody titre is essential. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  2. Prenatal toxoplasmosis antibody and childhood autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Marisa N; Sourander, Andre; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; Brown, Alan S

    2017-05-01

    There is evidence that some maternal infections during the prenatal period are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, such as childhood autism. However, the association between autism and Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), an intracellular parasite, remains unclear. The authors examined whether serologically confirmed maternal antibodies to T. gondii are associated with odds of childhood autism in offspring. The study is based on a nested case-control design of a large national birth cohort (N = 1.2 million) and the national psychiatric registries in Finland. There were 874 cases of childhood autism and controls matched 1:1 on date of birth, sex, birthplace and residence in Finland. Maternal sera were prospectively assayed from a national biobank for T. gondii IgM and IgG antibodies; IgG avidity analyses were also performed. High maternal T. gondii IgM antibody was associated with a significantly decreased odds of childhood autism. Low maternal T. gondii IgG antibody was associated with increased offspring odds of autism. In women with high T. gondii IgM antibodies, the IgG avidity was high for both cases and controls, with the exception of three controls. The findings suggest that the relationship between maternal T. gondii antibodies and odds of childhood autism may be related to the immune response to this pathogen or the overall activation of the immune system. Autism Res 2017, 10: 769-777. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Production of camel-like antibodies in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Buck, Sylvie; Virdi, Vikram; De Meyer, Thomas; De Wilde, Kirsten; Piron, Robin; Nolf, Jonah; Van Lerberge, Els; De Paepe, Annelies; Depicker, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic plants for the production of high-value recombinant complex and/or glycosylated proteins are a promising alternative for conventional systems, such as mammalian cells and bacteria. Many groups use plants as production platform for antibodies and antibody fragments. Here, we describe how bivalent camel-like antibodies can be produced in leaves and seeds. Camel-like antibodies are fusions of the antigen-binding domain of heavy chain camel antibodies (VHH) with an Fc fragment of choice. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves allows the production of VHH-Fc antibodies within a few days after the expression plasmid has been obtained. Generation of stable Arabidopsis thaliana transformants allows production of scalable amounts of VHH-Fc antibodies in seeds within a year. Further, we describe how the in planta-produced VHH-Fc antibodies can be quantified by Western blot analysis with Fc-specific antibodies.

  4. Nuclear oncology with monoclonal antibodies and peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosono, Makoto [Saitama Medical School, Kawagoe (Japan). Saitama Medical Center

    1998-10-01

    Imaging and therapy using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies have proved useful in many clinical studies. However, immunogenicity of mouse antibodies to human and insufficient tumor-to-normal tissue ratios remained to be solved. Chimerization and humanization by genetic engineering, and multistep targeting techniques have enabled lower immunogenicity and higher tumor-to-normal tissue contrast. Peptides like somatostatin-analogs have been reportedly useful in imaging tumors, which are either somatostatin receptor positive or negative. Elevated normal tissue accumulation of radiolabeled peptides is a drawback in aiming internal radiation therapy. (author). 51 refs.

  5. Antibody-Based Protective Immunity against Helminth Infections: Antibody Phage Display Derived Antibodies against BmR1 Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anizah Rahumatullah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Helminth parasite infections are significantly impacting global health, with more than two billion infections worldwide with a high morbidity rate. The complex life cycle of the nematodes has made host immune response studies against these parasites extremely difficult. In this study, we utilized two phage antibody libraries; the immune and naïve library were used to identify single chain fragment variable (scFv clones against a specific filarial antigen (BmR1. The V-gene analysis of isolated scFv clones will help shed light on preferential VDJ gene segment usage against the filarial BmR1 antigen in healthy and infected states. The immune library showed the usage of both lambda and kappa light chains. However, the naïve library showed preferential use of the lambda family with different amino acid distributions. The binding characteristics of the scFv clones identified from this work were analyzed by immunoassay and immunoaffinity pull down of BmR1. The work highlights the antibody gene usage pattern of a naïve and immune antibody library against the same antigen as well as the robust nature of the enriched antibodies for downstream applications.

  6. Beyond Antibodies as Binding Partners: The Role of Antibody Mimetics in Bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaowen; Yang, Yu-Ping; Dikici, Emre; Deo, Sapna K; Daunert, Sylvia

    2017-06-12

    The emergence of novel binding proteins or antibody mimetics capable of binding to ligand analytes in a manner analogous to that of the antigen-antibody interaction has spurred increased interest in the biotechnology and bioanalytical communities. The goal is to produce antibody mimetics designed to outperform antibodies with regard to binding affinities, cellular and tumor penetration, large-scale production, and temperature and pH stability. The generation of antibody mimetics with tailored characteristics involves the identification of a naturally occurring protein scaffold as a template that binds to a desired ligand. This scaffold is then engineered to create a superior binder by first creating a library that is then subjected to a series of selection steps. Antibody mimetics have been successfully used in the development of binding assays for the detection of analytes in biological samples, as well as in separation methods, cancer therapy, targeted drug delivery, and in vivo imaging. This review describes recent advances in the field of antibody mimetics and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry, specifically in diagnostics and other analytical methods.

  7. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies from single rhesus macaque antibody secreting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Weixu; Li, Leike; Xiong, Wei; Fan, Xuejun; Deng, Hui; Bett, Andrew J; Chen, Zhifeng; Tang, Aimin; Cox, Kara S; Joyce, Joseph G; Freed, Daniel C; Thoryk, Elizabeth; Fu, Tong-Ming; Casimiro, Danilo R; Zhang, Ningyan; A Vora, Kalpit; An, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are used as a preclinical model for vaccine development, and the antibody profiles to experimental vaccines in NHPs can provide critical information for both vaccine design and translation to clinical efficacy. However, an efficient protocol for generating monoclonal antibodies from single antibody secreting cells of NHPs is currently lacking. In this study we established a robust protocol for cloning immunoglobulin (IG) variable domain genes from single rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) antibody secreting cells. A sorting strategy was developed using a panel of molecular markers (CD3, CD19, CD20, surface IgG, intracellular IgG, CD27, Ki67 and CD38) to identify the kinetics of B cell response after vaccination. Specific primers for the rhesus macaque IG genes were designed and validated using cDNA isolated from macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cloning efficiency was averaged at 90% for variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) domains, and 78.5% of the clones (n = 335) were matched VH and VL pairs. Sequence analysis revealed that diverse IGHV subgroups (for VH) and IGKV and IGLV subgroups (for VL) were represented in the cloned antibodies. The protocol was tested in a study using an experimental dengue vaccine candidate. About 26.6% of the monoclonal antibodies cloned from the vaccinated rhesus macaques react with the dengue vaccine antigens. These results validate the protocol for cloning monoclonal antibodies in response to vaccination from single macaque antibody secreting cells, which have general applicability for determining monoclonal antibody profiles in response to other immunogens or vaccine studies of interest in NHPs.

  8. [Preparation of clenbuterol monoclonal antibody with subtractive immunization method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Li; Li, Xiao-Fang; Ning, Bao-An; Wu, Da-Cheng; Wang, Hong-Yong; Chen, Xiang; Ma, Xin-Hua; Ou, Guo-Rong; Gau, Zhi-Xian

    2009-11-01

    To obtain Clenbuterol monoclonal antibodies. Clenbuterol complete antigen was prepared with diazotization method. BALB/c mice was immunized with subtractive immunization, Clenbuterol monoclonal antibody was prepared with rule hybridoma technique. The mice obtained tolerance to BSA by subtractive immunization. The rate of the hybridoma cell with positive reaction which had obtained was 8.2%, and the specific clenbuterol monoclonal antibody was obtained at last. Monoclonal antibodies to micromolecule contaminant be prepared by subtractive immunization, could decrease the workload in the bolting of monoclonal antibodies, and increase the chance to obtain the antibody of expected.

  9. Antibody inhibition of protein activity in starfish oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Eiichi; Hara, Masatoshi; Kishimoto, Takeo

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are widely utilized in cell and molecule biology for immunoblots, immunostaining, immunoprecipitation, immunoaffinity purification, and immunoassay. Some antibodies can be used for in vivo inhibition experiments. These antibodies bind to their target molecules and neutralize their functions, providing functional information in the study of their biological role. Here, we describe our methods for obtaining inhibitory antibodies against desired proteins. We then describe in the starfish oocyte system how to inhibit a target protein, even in the nucleus, by injection of antibody into the cytoplasm, and how to evaluate antibody inhibition of cell cycle regulators in small numbers of oocytes.

  10. Antibody-mediated immune suppression is improved when blends of anti-RBC monoclonal antibodies are used in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Lidice; Amash, Alaa; Marjoram, Danielle; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-08-25

    Although the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is highly effective using polyclonal anti-D, a recombinant alternative is long overdue. Unfortunately, anti-D monoclonal antibodies have been, at best, disappointing. To determine the primary attribute defining an optimal antibody, we assessed suppression of murine red blood cell (RBC) immunization by single-monoclonal antibodies vs defined blends of subtype-matched antibodies. Allogeneic RBCs expressing the HOD antigen (hen egg lysozyme [HEL]-ovalbumin-human transmembrane Duffy(b)) were transfused into naïve mice alone or together with selected combinations of HEL-specific antibodies, and the resulting suppressive effect was assessed by evaluating the antibody response. Polyclonal HEL antibodies dramatically inhibited the antibody response to the HOD antigen, whereas single-monoclonal HEL antibodies were less effective despite the use of saturating doses. A blend of monoclonal HEL-specific antibodies reactive with different HEL epitopes significantly increased the suppressive effect, whereas a blend of monoclonal antibodies that block each other's binding to the HEL protein did not increase suppression. In conclusion, these data show that polyclonal antibodies are superior to monoclonal antibodies at suppressing the immune response to the HOD cells, a feature that can be completely recapitulated using monoclonal antibodies to different epitopes. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  11. Antimitochondrial antibodies and other antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis: diagnostic and prognostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Luigi; Granito, Alessandro; Muratori, Paolo; Pappas, Georgios; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-05-01

    Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are the serologic cornerstone in the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), even if they are not detectable in a proportion of patients, notwithstanding the most sensitive and sophisticated technologies used. To fill in the serologic gap in AMA-negative PBC, there is sound evidence to consider antinuclear antibody (ANA) patterns, such as anti-multiple nuclear dots and anti-membranous/rim-like, as PBC-specific surrogate hallmarks of the disease, and their detection can be considered virtually diagnostic. Furthermore, particular ANA specificities, such as anti-gp210, anti-p62, anticentromere antibodies, and anti-dsDNA, may provide additional diagnostic and prognostic information.

  12. Antibodies are forever: a study using 12-26-year-old expired antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argentieri, Maria C; Pilla, Daniela; Vanzati, Alice; Lonardi, Silvia; Facchetti, Fabio; Doglioni, Claudio; Parravicini, Carlo; Cattoretti, Giorgio

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the shelf-life of diagnostic antibodies is longer than the expiry date on the label. Four independent laboratories tested a small number of diagnostic antibodies kept at +4°C for 12-26 years, and found them to work perfectly on routine histology sections. Diagnostic antibodies may have a workable half-life in excess of 10 years, and the emphasis on performance should shift to the preservation of antigenic targets in the tissue. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Preparation and identification of monoclonal antibodies against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HN), BALB/c mice were immunized with the purified pet-44a-HN in adjuvant and their splenic lymphocytes were fused with myeloma SP2/0 cells. The hybridoma cell lines were screened for HN-specific antibodies by indirect enzyme-linked ...

  14. prevalence of cytomegalovirus antibodies in blood donors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... 86 (Supplement) December 2009. PREVALENCE OF CYTOMEGALOVIRUS ANTIBODIES IN BLOOD DONORS AT THE NATIONAL BLOOD. TRANSFUSION CENTRE, NAIROBI. D. G. Njeru, MBChB, MMed (Path), Dip. Forensic Med (SA), Registrar, Department of Human Pathology, W. O. Mwanda,. MBChB ...

  15. Sneddon's syndrotne with anticardiolipin antibodies complications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract We investigated 2 patients with Sneddon's syn- drome, elevated anticardiolipin antibodies and systemic complications, which included stroke, habitual abortions, cardiac valvular lesions, acro- cyanosis, hypertension and renal insufficiency. TreatInent with a combination of hnmunosup- pressive agents and warfarin ...

  16. Developing a Salivary Antibody Multiplex Immunoassay to ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The etiology and impacts of human exposure to environmental pathogens are of major concern worldwide and, thus, the ability to assess exposure and infections using cost effective, high-throughput approaches would be indispensable. The principal objective of this work is to develop an immunoassay capable of measuring the presence of antibodies in human saliva to multiple pathogens simultaneously. Saliva is particularly attractive in this application because it is noninvasive, cheaper and easier to collect than serum. Antigens from environmental pathogens were coupled to carboxylated microspheres (beads) and used to measure antibodies in very small volumes of human saliva samples using the Luminex xMAP solution-phase assay. Beads were coupled to antigens from Campylobacter jejuni, Helicobacter pylori, Toxoplasma gondii, noroviruses (G I.1 and G II.4) and hepatitis A virus. To ensure that the antigens were sufficiently coupled to the beads, coupling was confirmed using species-specific, animal-derived primary detection antibodies, followed by incubation with biotinylated anti-species secondary detection antibodies and streptavidin-R-phycoerythrin reporter (SAPE). As a control to measure non-specific binding, one bead set was treated identically to the others except it was not coupled to any antigen. The antigen coupled and control beads were then incubated with prospectively-collected human saliva samples, analyzed on a Luminex 100 platform, and the presence

  17. The emergence of antibody therapies for Ebola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael; Whaley, Kevin; Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary; Zeitlin, Larry

    2015-12-23

    This review describes the history of Ebola monoclonal antibody (mAb) development leading up to the recent severe Ebola outbreak in West Africa. The Ebola virus has presented numerous perplexing challenges in the long effort to develop therapeutic antibody strategies. Since the first report of a neutralizing human anti-Ebola mAb in 1999, the straightforward progression from in vitro neutralization resulting in in vivo protection and therapy has not occurred. A number of mAbs, including the first reported, failed to protect non-human primates (NHPs) in spite of protection in rodents. An appreciation of the role of effector functions to antibody efficacy has contributed significantly to understanding mechanisms of in vivo protection. However a crucial contribution, as measured by post-exposure therapy of NHPs, involved the comprehensive testing of mAb cocktails. This effort was aided by the use of plant production technology where various combinations of mAbs could be rapidly produced and tested. Introduction of appropriate modifications, such as specific glycan profiles, also improved therapeutic efficacy. The resulting cocktail, ZMapp™, consists of three mAbs that were identified from numerous mAb candidates. ZMapp™ \\ is now being evaluated in human clinical trials but has already played a role in bringing awareness to the potential of antibody therapy for Ebola.

  18. seroprevalence survey of rubella antibodies among pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    arteriosus, cardiomegaly, thrombocytopenia, pneumonitis, anemia, and liver dysfunction. Approximately 1 month later, the infant was transferred to a pediatric hospital, where the infant died in April 2012. Cause of death was recorded as CRS (1). No serological evaluation of combined IgG and. IgM antibodies for previous ...

  19. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Presenting with Hemichorea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yezenash Ayalew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old Bangladeshi lady presented to neurology with a three-month history of involuntary movements of her right arm, associated with loss of power. There was progression to the right leg, and she subsequently developed episodes of slurred speech and blurred vision. At the time of presentation, she was 12 weeks pregnant and the symptoms were reported to have started at conception. Past medical history was unremarkable apart from one first trimester miscarriage and there was no significant family history suggestive of a hereditary neurological condition. MRI of the head revealed no abnormalities but serology showed positive antinuclear antibodies (ANAs at a titre of 1/400. Further investigations revealed strongly positive anticardiolipin antibodies (>120 and positive lupus anticoagulant antibodies. The patient had a second miscarriage at 19 weeks gestation strengthening the possibility that the chorea was related to antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and she was started on a reducing dose of Prednisolone 40 mg daily and aspirin 300 mg daily. Six months later, she had complete resolution of neurological symptoms. There are several reports of chorea as a feature of antiphospholipid syndrome, but no clear consensus on underlying pathophysiology.

  20. When binding is enough: nonactivating antibody formats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labrijn, Aran F.; Aalberse, Rob C.; Schuurman, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Most therapeutic antibodies currently used in the clinic are based on the human IgG1 format, which is a bivalent molecule that efficiently interacts with the immune system's effector functions. In clinical applications where binding to the target alone is sufficient for therapeutic efficacy;

  1. IgA as therapeutic antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leusen, Jeanette H W

    2015-01-01

    This review is focused on the promises of IgA as a new therapeutic antibody. For more than 30 years IgG molecules have been used in the clinic in the fields of oncology, hematology, auto immune diseases and infections. However, IgA might be a good alternative, since it recruits different effector

  2. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy...

  3. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. The hypothesis of this application is that the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) can be quantitatively determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The major thrusts during the third year include the continued development and evaluation of improved 3D SPECT acquisition and reconstruction approaches to improve quantitative imaging of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), and the implementation and evaluation of algorithms to register serial SPECT image data sets, or to register 3D SPECT images with 3D image data sets acquired from positron emission tomography (PEI) and magnetic resonance images (MRI). The research has involved the investigation of statistical models and iterative reconstruction algorithms that accurately account for the physical characteristics of the SPECT acquisition system. It is our belief that SPECT quantification can be improved by accurately modeling the physical processes such as attenuation, scatter, geometric collimator response, and other factors that affect the measured projection data.

  4. Antiphospholipids antibodies and migraine | Nyandaiti | Sahel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Similarly, antiphospholipid antibodies was significantly elevated in migraine patients with aura compared to those without aura, ( 2=0.037; p<0.05). The frequency of migraine attacks correlated positively with the concentration of lgG anti β2GP1; ( p<0.05). Conclusion: We demonstrated increased serum level of lgG anti ...

  5. Single Domain Antibodies as New Biomarker Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiuan Herng Leow

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are defined as indicators of biological processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacological responses to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers have been widely used for early detection, prediction of response after treatment, and for monitoring the progression of diseases. Antibodies represent promising tools for recognition of biomarkers, and are widely deployed as analytical tools in clinical settings. For immunodiagnostics, antibodies are now exploited as binders for antigens of interest across a range of platforms. More recently, the discovery of antibody surface display and combinatorial chemistry techniques has allowed the exploration of new binders from a range of animals, for instance variable domains of new antigen receptors (VNAR from shark and variable heavy chain domains (VHH or nanobodies from camelids. These single domain antibodies (sdAbs have some advantages over conventional murine immunoglobulin owing to the lack of a light chain, making them the smallest natural biomarker binders thus far identified. In this review, we will discuss several biomarkers used as a means to validate diseases progress. The potential functionality of modern singe domain antigen binders derived from phylogenetically early animals as new biomarker detectors for current diagnostic and research platforms development will be described.

  6. Strain differentiation of polioviruses with monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A.L. van Wezel; A.J.H. Stegmann; J.A.A.M. van Asten (Jack)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractPanels of monoclonal antibodies raised against different poliovirus type 1, 2 and 3 strains, were tested in a micro-neutralization test and in a micro-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay against a large number of poliovirus strains. The results were compared with those obtained with the

  7. Enhanced Phagocytosis and Antibody Production by Tinospora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tinospora cordifolia (guduchi) is a widely used shrub in ayurvedic systems of medicine known to possess immunomodulatory properties. In the present study the aqueous extract of T. cordifolia was found to enhance phagocytosis in vitro. The aqueous and ethanolic extracts also induced an increase in antibody production ...

  8. The Relationship between Antisperm Antibodies Prevalence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    DNA extraction was performed using QIA amp Viral. RNA Mini kit as the AVL buffer used in this kit, inactivates the numerous unidentified PCR inhibitors found in urine. Frozen specimens were thawed and tested on the same day 15, 16. III. Antisperm Antibody (IgG class) testing: Blood for determination of circulating ASA was.

  9. Epitope focused immunogens and recombinant antibody ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Combining cutting-edge immunology and protein engineering methods, this collaborative research project aims to develop affordable antibody-based therapies for dengue patients and improved vaccines for the control of dengue fever and East Coast fever in both humans and animals. The core technologies that will be ...

  10. CHLAMYDIA TRACHOMATIS IgG ANTIBODIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-12-31

    Dec 31, 2014 ... Chlamydia infection is a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in humans caused by the bacterium. Chlamydia trachomatis. This study assessed the seroprevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies among students in two tertiary institutions in Anambra State, Nigeria. It was a comparative ...

  11. Research Paper Polyclonal antibodies production against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main aim of this project is to produce polyclonal antibodies directed against the Staphylococcus aureus protein A and their use to appreciate bacteriological analysis of milk quality. In this context, an immunization produce was set up to test and detect in a batch of animals the convenient responder to the injected ...

  12. Orthobunyavirus Antibodies in Humans, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiyasombat, Rungrat; Talavera-Aguilar, Lourdes G.; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E.; Farfan-Ale, Jose A.; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Loroño-Pino, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    We performed a serologic investigation to determine whether orthobunyaviruses commonly infect humans in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. Orthobunyavirus-specific antibodies were detected by plaque reduction neutralization test in 146 (18%) of 823 persons tested. Further studies are needed to determine health risks for humans from this potentially deadly group of viruses. PMID:23017592

  13. Polyclonal antibodies production against Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-01

    Feb 1, 2010 ... The main aim of this project is to produce polyclonal antibodies directed against the Staphylococcus aureus protein A and their use to appreciate bacteriological analysis of milk quality. In this context, an immunization produce was set up to test and detect in a batch of animals the convenient responder to.

  14. Evaluation of an Antigen-Antibody

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    detect samples with high viral loads have a significant implication for this assay designed to detect both antigen and antibody proteins. Arguably, HCV as a member of Flaviviridae family has an icosahedral capsid of T3 or T4 symmetry with 180 or 240 core protein subunits. Since one RNA genome contains 240 subunits of.

  15. New Antibody Conjugates in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serengulam V. Govindan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting of radiation, drugs, and protein toxins to cancers selectively with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs has been a topic of considerable interest and an area of continued development. Radioimmunotherapy (RAIT of lymphoma using directly labeled MAbs is of current interest after approval of two radiolabeled anti-CD20 MAbs, as illustrated with the near 100% overall response rate obtained in a recent clinical trial using an investigational radiolabeled anti-CD22 MAb, 90Y-epratuzumab. The advantage of pretargeted RAIT over directly labeled MAbs is continuing to be validated in preclinical models of lymphoma and solid tumors. Importantly, the advantages of combining RAIT with radiation sensitizers, with immunotherapy, or a drug conjugate targeting a different antigen are being studied clinically and preclinically. The area of drug-conjugated antibodies is progressing with encouraging data published for the trastuzumab-DM1 conjugate in a phase I clinical trial in HER2-positive breast cancer. The Dock-and-Lock platform technology has contributed to the design and the evaluation of complex antibody-cytokine and antibody-toxin conjugates. This review describes the advances made in these areas, with illustrations taken from advances made in the authors' institutions.

  16. Aggregates in monoclonal antibody manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Rey, María; Lang, Dietmar A

    2011-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proved to be a highly successful class of therapeutic products. Large-scale manufacturing of pharmaceutical antibodies is a complex activity that requires considerable effort in both process and analytical development. If a therapeutic protein cannot be stabilized adequately, it will lose partially or totally its therapeutic properties or even cause immunogenic reactions thus potentially further endangering the patients' health. The phenomenon of protein aggregation is a common issue that compromises the quality, safety, and efficacy of antibodies and can happen at different steps of the manufacturing process, including fermentation, purification, final formulation, and storage. Aggregate levels in drug substance and final drug product are a key factor when assessing quality attributes of the molecule, since aggregation might impact biological activity of the biopharmaceutical. In this review it is analyzed how aggregates are formed during monoclonal antibody industrial production, why they have to be removed and the manufacturing process steps that are designed to either minimize or remove aggregates in the final product. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Reactivity of commercially available monoclonal antibodies to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to cell surface molecules have been proven as a key tool for phenotypic and functional characterization of the cellular immune response. One of the major difficulties in studying camel cellular immunity consists in the lack of mAbs that dtect their leukocyte differentiation antigens. In the present ...

  18. Bispecific antibody platforms for cancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lameris, R.; de Bruin, Renee; Schneiders, F.L.; van Bergen en Henegouwen, P; Verheul, H.M.; de Gruijl, T.D.; van der Vliet, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    165AbstractOver the past decades advances in bioengineering and expanded insight in tumor immunology have resulted in the emergence of novelbispecific antibody (bsAb) constructs that are capable of redirecting immune effector cells to the tumor microenvironment. (Pre-) clinicalstudies of various

  19. Antibody-based metabolic engineering in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölke, Greta; Fischer, Rainer; Schillberg, Stefan

    2006-06-25

    Genetic engineering is a powerful tool for the manipulation of cellular metabolism and the development of plant varieties with enhanced biological and nutrional functions. Several strategies are available for the in vivo modulation of enzymatic activities, allowing metabolic flux to be directed towards desired biochemical products. Such strategies include the simultaneous expression and/or suppression of multiple genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes, ectopic expression of transcription factors, and the RNA-based inhibition of catabolic enzymes. As an alternative approach, recombinant antibodies expressed in plants have been used to inactivate or sequestrate specific host proteins or compounds, resulting in significant changes to metabolic pathways. The impact of this approach depends on prudent selection of the target antigen, careful antibody design, appropriate subcellular targeting and stable accumulation of the recombinant antibodies in planta. Here, we describe the current status of antibody-based metabolic engineering in plants, discuss procedures for the optimisation of this technology and consider the remaining challenges to its widespread use.

  20. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  1. Antibody-Based Cancer Therapy: Successful Agents and Novel Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, D; Choi, G; de Bruyn, M; Wiersma, V R; Bremer, E

    2017-01-01

    Since their discovery, antibodies have been viewed as ideal candidates or "magic bullets" for use in targeted therapy in the fields of cancer, autoimmunity, and chronic inflammatory disorders. A wave of antibody-dedicated research followed, which resulted in the clinical approval of a first generation of monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy such as rituximab (1997) and cetuximab (2004), and infliximab (2002) for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. More recently, the development of antibodies that prevent checkpoint-mediated inhibition of T cell responses invigorated the field of cancer immunotherapy. Such antibodies induced unprecedented long-term remissions in patients with advanced stage malignancies, most notably melanoma and lung cancer, that do not respond to conventional therapies. In this review, we will recapitulate the development of antibody-based therapy, and detail recent advances and new functions, particularly in the field of cancer immunotherapy. With the advent of recombinant DNA engineering, a number of rationally designed molecular formats of antibodies and antibody-derived agents have become available, and we will discuss various molecular formats including antibodies with improved effector functions, bispecific antibodies, antibody-drug conjugates, antibody-cytokine fusion proteins, and T cells genetically modified with chimeric antigen receptors. With these exciting advances, new antibody-based treatment options will likely enter clinical practice and pave the way toward more successful control of malignant diseases. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Phase Transitions in Antibody Solutions: from Pharmaceuticals to Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Benedek, George; Dana Farber Cancer Institute Collaboration; Amgen Inc. Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Antibodies are very important proteins. Natural antibodies play essential role in the immune system of human body. Pharmaceutical antibodies are used as drugs. Antibodies are also indispensable tools in biomedical research and diagnostics. Recently, a number of observations of phase transitions of pharmaceutical antibodies have been reported. These phase transitions are undesirable from the perspective of colloid stability of drug solutions in processing and storage, but can be used for protein purification, X-ray crystallography, and improving pharmokinetics of drugs. Phase transitions of antibodies can also take place in human body, particularly in multiple myeloma patients who overproduce monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies, in some cases, crystallize at body temperature and cause severe complications called cryoglobulinemia. I will present the results of our current studies on phase transitions of both pharmaceutical antibodies and cryoglobulinemia-associated antibodies. These studies have shown that different antibodies have different propensity to undergo phase transitions, but their phase behavior has universal features which are remarkably different from those of spherical proteins. I will discuss how studies of phase behavior can be useful in assessing colloid stability of pharmaceutical antibodies and in early diagnostics of cryoglobulinemia, as well as general implications of the fact that some antibodies can precipitate at physiological conditions.

  3. Anticardiolipin antibodies in pathogenesis of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncar, Dragan

    2010-03-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder clinically characterized by arterial or venous thrombosis and/or specific obstetric complications and presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in the serum. It occurs in 0.3% of pregnant women, while 1% of them have two spontaneous abortions. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of biphospholipid antibodies in pregnant women with recurrent spontaneous abortions. We analyzed 60 pregnant women who had two or more recurrent miscarriages. The control group included 60 healthy pregnant women. We analyzed titres of anticardiolipin (aCL) IgG and/or IgM with high titres (> 20 U/mL), lupus anticoagulant (LAC) antibodies and anti-beta-2 glycoprotein (b2-GP1) IgG as well as parameters of coagulation status of pregnant women. Analyzing Spearman's rank correlation coefficient in a group of affected patients, we noticed a slightly positive correlation of lupus anticoagulants (LAC) with aCL antibodies of both classes, while the correlation with b2GP1 IgG was negative. Both classes of aCL antibodies and anti-b2GP1 IgG were in a discrete positive correlation with the given variables. In the control group, there was a lack of consistency in correlation of the study variables with LAC-aCl IgG, compared to the affected patients, and there was a standard negative coefficient of correlation with anti-b2GP1 IgG. The correlation ratio of anti-b2GP1 IgG was negative for all studied test parameters. Analysis of hemostatic parameters showed a statistically significant difference in the concentration of fibrinogen (p anticoagulant activity. In pregnant women with spontaneous abortions compared to healthy pregnant women slightly positive correlation of LAC with aCL antibodies of both classes, as well as a positive correlation of aCL antibodies with anti-b2GP1 IgG exist. On the other hand, hemostatic parameters values suggest an anticoagulatnt status in the blood of pregnant women with spontaneous abortions.

  4. B cells contribute to MS pathogenesis through antibody-dependent and antibody-independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson HL

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Heather L Wilson1,21Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Center, 2Department of Biochemistry, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CanadaAbstract: For many years, central dogma defined multiple sclerosis (MS as a T cell-driven autoimmune disorder; however, over the past decade there has been a burgeoning recognition that B cells contribute to the pathogenesis of certain MS disease subtypes. B cells may contribute to MS pathogenesis through production of autoantibodies (or antibodies directed at foreign bodies, which unfortunately cross-react with self-antigens, through promotion of T cell activation via antigen presentation, or through production of cytokines. This review highlights evidence for antibody-dependent and antibody-independent B cell involvement in MS pathogenesis.Keywords: autoantibodies, antibody targets, clinically isolated MS, primary progressive MS, secondary progressive MS, relapsing and remitting MS, T cells, T regulatory cells

  5. Antibodies to poliovirus detected by immunoradiometric assay with a monoclonal antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitz, M.; Fossati, C.A.; Schild, G.C.; Spitz, L.; Brasher, M. (National Inst. for Biological Standards and Control, London (UK))

    1982-10-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for the assay of antibodies to poliovirus antigens is described. Dilutions of the test sera or whole (finger prick) blood samples were incubated with the poliovirus antigen bound to a solid phase and the specific antibody was detected by the addition of a mouse anti-human IgG monoclonal antibody (McAb), which was itself revealed by iodinated sheep IgG antimouse F(ab). The authors have shown that this technique is suitable for the estimation of IgG anti-poliovirus antibodies induced in children following polio vaccine. The present study shows that SPRIA provides a simple and inexpensive method for serological studies with poliovirus particularly for use in large-scale surveys.

  6. Antibody Characterization Lab | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Antibody Characterization Lab (ACL), an intramural reference laboratory located at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research in Frederick, Maryland, thoroughly characterizes monoclonal antibodies or other renewable affinity binding reagents for use in cancer related research.

  7. Antibody-IL2 Fusion Protein Delivery by Gene Transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicolet, Charles

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the work described is to assess the feasibility of a gene therapy approach to deliver a specific antibody cytokine fusion protein called CC49-1L2 to a tumor expressing antigen reactive with the antibody...

  8. What is the significance of onconeural antibodies for psychiatric symptomatology?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sæther, Sverre Georg; Schou, Morten; Kondziella, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with intracellular onconeural antibodies may present with neuro-psychiatric syndromes. We aimed to evaluate the evidence for an association between well-characterized onconeural antibodies and psychiatric symptoms in patients with and without paraneoplastic central nervous sy...

  9. Graves' Disease Associated with Cerebrovascular Disease and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Khochtali

    2010-01-01

    have increased risk for developing thromboembolic accidents, which are favoured by a simultaneous presence of antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome. in this paper, we describe the case of a patient with Graves' disease, who developed strokes with antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome.

  10. Construction of Synthetic Antibody Phage-Display Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilvebrant, Johan; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2018-01-01

    Synthetic antibody libraries provide a vast resource of renewable antibody reagents that can rival or exceed those of natural antibodies and can be rapidly isolated through controlled in vitro selections. Use of highly optimized human frameworks enables the incorporation of defined diversity at positions that are most likely to contribute to antigen recognition. This protocol describes the construction of synthetic antibody libraries based on a single engineered human autonomous variable heavy domain scaffold with diversity in all three complementarity-determining regions. The resulting libraries can be used to generate recombinant domain antibodies for a wide range of protein antigens using phage display. Furthermore, analogous methods can be used to construct antibody libraries based on larger antibody fragments or second-generation libraries aimed to fine-tune antibody characteristics including affinity, specificity, and manufacturability. The procedures rely on standard reagents and equipment available in most molecular biology laboratories.

  11. A generalized quantitative antibody homeostasis model: maintenance of global antibody equilibrium by effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, József

    2017-11-01

    The homeostasis of antibodies can be characterized as a balanced production, target-binding and receptor-mediated elimination regulated by an interaction network, which controls B-cell development and selection. Recently, we proposed a quantitative model to describe how the concentration and affinity of interacting partners generates a network. Here we argue that this physical, quantitative approach can be extended for the interpretation of effector functions of antibodies. We define global antibody equilibrium as the zone of molar equivalence of free antibody, free antigen and immune complex concentrations and of dissociation constant of apparent affinity: [Ab]=[Ag]=[AbAg]= K D . This zone corresponds to the biologically relevant K D range of reversible interactions. We show that thermodynamic and kinetic properties of antibody-antigen interactions correlate with immunological functions. The formation of stable, long-lived immune complexes correspond to a decrease of entropy and is a prerequisite for the generation of higher-order complexes. As the energy of formation of complexes increases, we observe a gradual shift from silent clearance to inflammatory reactions. These rules can also be applied to complement activation-related immune effector processes, linking the physicochemical principles of innate and adaptive humoral responses. Affinity of the receptors mediating effector functions shows a wide range of affinities, allowing the continuous sampling of antibody-bound antigen over the complete range of concentrations. The generation of multivalent, multicomponent complexes triggers effector functions by crosslinking these receptors on effector cells with increasing enzymatic degradation potential. Thus, antibody homeostasis is a thermodynamic system with complex network properties, nested into the host organism by proper immunoregulatory and effector pathways. Maintenance of global antibody equilibrium is achieved by innate qualitative signals modulating a

  12. Improved antibody coating protocol using a second antibody antiserum. Application to total thyroxin immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, P S; Kakabakos, S E; Koupparis, M A; Christofidis, I

    2001-01-01

    A complete antibody coating protocol for the preparation of dry antibody coated tubes is presented. This protocol is based on a recently described antibody immobilization principle. We modify this immobilization principle in order to improve and simplify the coating procedure. In addition, we propose a drying procedure that provides long-term storage stability of the antibody coated tubes. According to the modified protocol, polystyrene plastic tubes are first coated with rabbit gamma-globulins. The tubes are incubated with a sheep anti-rabbitIgG antiserum dilution. After incubation, antigen-specific antibody antiserum raised in rabbits is added directly into the tubes containing the sheep anti-rabbit IgG antiserum solution (difference from the original protocol). Finally, the tubes are washed, blocked, and dried following the drying procedure developed. The suitability of the modified protocol for the development of immunoassays requiring high loading of antibody was exemplified through the development of a RIA for total thyroxin. The estimated assay characteristics (detection limit 4 microg/L, dynamic range up to 210 microg/L, within-run CV 2.7-5.7%, between-run CV 5.1-7.3%, recovery 84.4-112%, cross-reactivity for T3 1.9%) were comparable with those provided by commercially available RIA kits for the determination of thyroxin.

  13. Application of cyclodextrins in antibody microparticles: potentials for antibody protection in spray drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Vahid; Vatanara, Alireza; Seyedabadi, Mohammad; Nabi Meibodi, Mohsen; Fanaei, Hamed

    2017-07-01

    Dry powder formulations are extensively used to improve the stability of antibodies. Spray drying is one of important methods for protein drying. This study investigated the effects of trehalose, hydroxypropyl beta cyclodextrin (HPBCD) and beta cyclodextrin (BCD) on the stability and particle properties of spray-dried IgG. D-optimal design was employed for both experimental design and analysis and optimization of the variables. The size and aerodynamic behavior of particles were determined using laser light scattering and glass twin impinger, respectively. In addition, stability, ratio of beta sheets and morphology of antibody were analyzed using size exclusion chromatography, IR spectroscopy and electron microscopy, respectively. Particle properties and antibody stability were significantly improved in the presence of HPBCD. In addition, particle aerodynamic behavior, in terms of fine-particle fraction (FPF), enhanced up to 52.23%. Furthermore, antibody was better preserved not only during spray drying, but also during long-term storage. In contrast, application of BCD resulted in the formation of larger particles. Although trehalose caused inappropriate aerodynamic property, it efficiently decreased antibody aggregation. HPBCD is an efficient excipient for the development of inhalable protein formulations. In this regard, optimal particle property and antibody stability was obtained with proper combination of cyclodextrins and simple sugars, such as trehalose.

  14. Reshaped Human Monoclonal Antibodies for Therapy and Passive Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Monoclonal Antibodies for Therapy and Passive Immunisation by Reshaping Rodent Monoclonal Antibodies". Two mouse monoclonal antibody producing cell...could be simply extended to make human monoclonals, but this has proved not to be the case. There are difficulties in finding appropriately immunised ...human donors and suitable fusion partners for the antibody producing cells. In vitro immunisation techniques have been tried, but only low affinity 1gM

  15. C4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection with high anti-angiotensin II type I receptor antibodies in absence of donor-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Alexander; Hope, Christopher M; Deayton, Susan; Bennett, Greg Donald; Holdsworth, Rhonda; Carroll, Robert P; Coates, P Toby H

    2015-07-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection can occur in absence of circulating donor-specific antibodies. Agonistic antibodies targeting the anti-angiotensin II type 1 receptor (anti-AT1 R) are emerging as important non-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Elevated levels of anti-angiotensin II receptor antibodies were first observed in kidney transplant recipients with malignant hypertension and allograft rejection. They have now been studied in three separate kidney transplant populations and associate to frequency of rejection, severity of rejection and graft failure. We report 11 cases of biopsy-proven, Complement 4 fragment d (C4d)-negative, acute rejection occurring without circulating donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies. In eight cases, anti-angiotensin receptor antibodies were retrospectively examined. The remaining three subjects were identified from our centre's newly instituted routine anti-angiotensin receptor antibody screening. All subjects fulfilled Banff 2013 criteria for antibody-mediated rejection and all responded to anti-rejection therapy, which included plasma exchange and angiotensin receptor blocker therapy. These cases support the routine assessment of anti-AT1 R antibodies in kidney transplant recipients to identify subjects at risk. Further studies will need to determine optimal assessment protocol and the effectiveness of pre-emptive treatment with angiotensin receptor blockers. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies and method for detecting dioxins and dibenzofurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Stanker, Larry H.; Watkins, Bruce E.; Bailey, Nina R.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions of matter are described which include five monoclonal antibodies that react with dioxins and dibenzofurans, and the five hybridomas that produce these monoclonal antibodies. In addition, a method for the use of these antibodies in a sensitive immunoassay for dioxins and dibenzofurans is given, which permits detection of these pollutants in samples at concentrations in the range of a few parts per billion.

  17. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to attain... proficiency testing event. (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of three...

  18. Antibody Based Surgical Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    In 1944 Albert Coons was the first to show that a fluorescent molecule could be conjugated directly to an antibody made against a target site of interest. This binding does not affect antibody specificity so that labeled antibodies can be used to visualize the location and distribution of the target

  19. Relevance of anti-myelin antibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breij, E.C.W.

    2005-01-01

    Antibodies directed against myelin antigens have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). Although anti-myelin antibodies have been implicated in central nervous system (CNS) demyelination, it is unclear to what extent anti-myelin antibodies contribute to MS pathogenesis. In this dissertation,

  20. Multiple antibody detection in 'seronegative' myasthenia gravis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Y; Zisimopoulou, P; Trakas, N; Karagiorgou, K; Stergiou, C; Skeie, G O; Hao, H-J; Gao, X; Owe, J F; Zhang, X; Yue, Y-X; Romi, F; Wang, Q; Li, H-F; Gilhus, N E; Tzartos, S J

    2017-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease caused by antibody mediated impairment in the neuromuscular junction. Seronegative MG (SNMG) without antibodies against acetylcholine receptor (AChR) and muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) by routine assays accounts for about 20% of all MG patients. Plasma from 81 Chinese MG patients previously found to be seronegative was tested by routine assays for AChR and MuSK antibodies. These samples were screened by (i) a novel, highly sensitive radioimmunoassay for AChR antibodies; (ii) cell-based assays for clustered AChR, MuSK and lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) antibodies; (iii) a radioimmunoassay for titin antibodies. Antibodies to AChR, MuSK, LRP4 and titin were found in 25% (20/81), 4% (3/81), 7% (6/81) and 6% (5/78) of SNMG patients, respectively. In total, 37% of SNMG patients were found to be positive for at least one of the tested antibodies. AChR antibody positive patients had more severe disease (P = 0.008) and a trend towards fewer remissions/minimal manifestations than AChR antibody negative patients. The four patients with coexistence of antibodies had more severe disease, whilst the seronegative patients had milder MG (P = 0.015). Detection of multiple muscle antibodies by more sensitive assays provides additional information in diagnosing and subgrouping of MG and may guide MG treatment. © 2017 EAN.

  1. Immunogenicity of therapeutic antibodies : Immunological mechanisms & clinical consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, K.A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody therapy has revolutionized the treatment of many diseases, including chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Antibody therapy can unfortunately also elicit an unwanted immune response, leading to anti-drug antibodies (ADA). It is well known that ADA can lower the level of free

  2. Behavioral and Psychological Responses to HIV Antibody Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Paul B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Considers effects of informing individuals of their antibody status as determined by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody testing. Reviews research examining changes in psychological distress and in behaviors associated with HIV infections among individuals who have undergone antibody testing. Identifies methodological issues in studying…

  3. Stability of llama heavy chain antibody fragments under extreme conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, E.

    2004-01-01

    Camelids have next to their normal antibodies, a unique subset of antibodies lacking light chains. The resulting single binding domain, VHH, of these heavy chain antibodies consequently have unique properties. A high stability is one of these properties, which was investigated in this thesis. The

  4. Association of ribosomal anti-P antibodies with different parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antibodies with neuropsychiatric lupus manifestations and to find out the relationship of ribosomal anti-P antibodies with other autoimmune parameters of lupus. Ribosomal anti-P antibodies were evaluated in the serum of 41 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients as well as ANA, dsDNA, anti- Sm, anti-SSA, anti-SSB, ...

  5. Antibodies to some enteropathogenic bacteria in serum of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antigens were prepared from bacteria isolates and were used for tile/passive haemagglutination. Results showed that 74, 66, 60 and 50% of the study subjects had antibodies to E. coli, Proteus, Ktebsiella and Shigella spp. respectively. Antibody to E. coli was highest. The highest antibody titre recorded was 1 in 8 for E. coli.

  6. Competitive Elisa Rinderpest Virus Antibody in Slaughtered Camels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred and twenty camel sera were tested for presence of RP and Pestes des petits ruminants (PPR) antibodies in a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA). Of the sera tested, 20 (9.3%) were found to be positive for RP antibody. None of the sera tested positive for PPR antibody. Camels could ...

  7. Immunobiology of Primary Antibody Deficiencies: Towards a new classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies. The hallmark of PADs is a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen specific antibodies. These antibodies or immunoglobulins are indispensible for the adaptive immune response against a wide

  8. Analysis of immunoglobulins in chicken antibody to avian leucosis viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, P.; Dougherty, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    Fractionations of chicken sera containing antibody to the avian leucosis viruses, RAV—1 or RAV—6 were carried out. A small proportion of antibody activity was found in the serum IgM fractions from the majority of birds, but most of the antibody activity was recovered in the serum IgG fractions. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:4339847

  9. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. 113.452 Section 113.452 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae...

  10. Pathogenesis and mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Willy A

    2015-07-01

    The clinical consequences of antibodies to red blood cells (RBCs) have been studied for a century. Most clinically relevant antibodies can be detected by sensitive in vitro assays. Several mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis are well understood. Such hemolysis after transfusion is reliably avoided in a donor-recipient pair, if one individual is negative for the cognate antigen to which the other has the antibody. Mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis were reviewed based on a presentation at the Strategies to Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions Workshop addressing intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and ABO antibodies. The presented topics included the rates of intravascular and extravascular hemolysis; immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG isoagglutinins; auto- and alloantibodies; antibody specificity; A, B, A,B, and A1 antigens; A1 versus A2 phenotypes; monocytes-macrophages, other immune cells, and complement; monocyte monolayer assay; antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; and transfusion reactions due to ABO and other antibodies. Several clinically relevant questions remained unresolved, and diagnostic tools were lacking to routinely and reliably predict the clinical consequences of RBC antibodies. Most hemolytic transfusion reactions associated with IVIG were due to ABO antibodies. Reducing the titers of such antibodies in IVIG may lower the frequency of this kind of adverse event. The only way to stop these events is to have no anti-A or anti-B in the IVIG products. © 2015 AABB.

  11. [Reactivity of antibodies to collagen types I to IV and antibodies to chondroitin sulfate in the spleen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbavý, S; Ruzicková, M; Surmíková, E; Danihel, L; Porubský, J; Papincák, J; Holesa, S; Trnka, J

    1996-02-01

    Antibodies to collagen type I and III reacted negatively, antibodies to collagen type IV positively with reticulin, trabeculae and circumferent reticulum of lymphatic sheaths, poorly positively with capsula, strongly positively with subcapsular zone. Antibodies to collagen type II reacted positively with capsula, poorly with subcapsular zone, strongly with sinus wall and poorly with trabeculae. They did not react with circumferent reticulum of periarterial lymphoid sheaths. Antibodies to collagen type II and IV reacted positively with central arteries. Antibodies to chondroitinsulphate C reacted poorly and antibodies to chondroitinsulphate B strongly positively with sinus walls and oval cells spread in the white and red pulpa. Antibodies to chondroitin sulphate A reacted similarly as antibodies to chondroitinsulphate B.

  12. A monoclonal antibody toolkit for C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayla Hadwiger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies are critical tools in many avenues of biological research. Though antibodies can be produced in the research laboratory setting, most research labs working with vertebrates avail themselves of the wide array of commercially available reagents. By contrast, few such reagents are available for work with model organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of proteins that label specific subcellular and cellular components, and macromolecular complexes. Antibodies were made to synaptobrevin (SNB-1, a component of synaptic vesicles; to Rim (UNC-10, a protein localized to synaptic active zones; to transforming acidic coiled-coil protein (TAC-1, a component of centrosomes; to CENP-C (HCP-4, which in worms labels the entire length of their holocentric chromosomes; to ORC2 (ORC-2, a subunit of the DNA origin replication complex; to the nucleolar phosphoprotein NOPP140 (DAO-5; to the nuclear envelope protein lamin (LMN-1; to EHD1 (RME-1 a marker for recycling endosomes; to caveolin (CAV-1, a marker for caveolae; to the cytochrome P450 (CYP-33E1, a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum; to beta-1,3-glucuronyltransferase (SQV-8 that labels the Golgi; to a chaperonin (HSP-60 targeted to mitochondria; to LAMP (LMP-1, a resident protein of lysosomes; to the alpha subunit of the 20S subcomplex (PAS-7 of the 26S proteasome; to dynamin (DYN-1 and to the alpha-subunit of the adaptor complex 2 (APA-2 as markers for sites of clathrin-mediated endocytosis; to the MAGUK, protein disks large (DLG-1 and cadherin (HMR-1, both of which label adherens junctions; to a cytoskeletal linker of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM-1, which localized to apical membranes; to an ERBIN family protein (LET-413 which localizes to the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells and to an adhesion molecule (SAX-7 which localizes to the plasma membrane at cell-cell contacts. In addition to

  13. Detection of antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) using monoclonal antibody and the avidin-biotin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korec, E; Hlozánek, I; Mach, O; Stará, J; Nĕmecek, V; König, J

    1986-01-01

    A direct ELISA using biotinylated HBsAg and a competitive ELISA using biotinylated monoclonal antibody were developed for the detection of antibodies to HBsAg. Both tests are capable of detecting 0.1 I.U. of anti-HBsAg antibody/ml. The direct ELISA was compared with a SPRIA test for anti-HBsAg antibody in human sera.

  14. High throughput screening for antibody induced complement-dependent cytotoxicity in early antibody discovery using homogeneous macroconfocal fluorescence imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, Arnout F.; Bosch, Martijn; de Weers, Michel; van de Winkel, Jan G. J.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2010-01-01

    Complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) represents an important Fc-mediated effector function of antibodies and is a quality often sought in candidates for therapeutic antibody development in cancer. Antibodies inducing potent CDC are relatively rare as the ability to induce CDC is strongly

  15. Induction and characterization of monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies reactive with idiotopes of canine parvovirus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. van Es (Johan); G.A. Drost; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractMonoclonal anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) antibodies (Ab2) were generated against idiotypes (Id) of canine parvovirus (CPV) specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs). The binding of most of these anti-Id antibodies to their corresponding Id could be inhibited by antigen, thus classifying these

  16. Molecular aspects of antibody-antigen interactions : size reduction of a herpes simplex virus neutralizing antibody and its antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Gerardus Antonius

    1996-01-01

    Antibody molecules, produced as a response against foreign substances, interact with their antigen in a very specific manner. Antibodies with a predetermined specificity (monoclonal antibodies) can be produced and are widely used in medicine and science as indicator molecules. Genetic engineering of

  17. [A therapeutic Trojan horse: intracellular antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teillaud, J L

    1999-10-01

    Intracellular immunization is a novel therapeutic approach based on intracellular expression of recombinant antibody fragments, either Fab or single chain Fv (scFv generated by the assembly of the VH with the VL region), targeted to the desired cell compartment (cytosol, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum ...) using appropriate targeting sequences. Due to their exquisite specificity, these intracellular antibodies can be used to neutralize or modulate the functional activity of the target molecule. Intracellular immunization strategies currently under investigation in the field of oncology are directed against mutated oncogenic molecules such as ErbB-2, p21ras, and p53, as well as against apoptosis-inhibiting molecules such as Bcl-2. The first Phase I clinical trials on intracellular immunization are under way in the United States.

  18. [Biophysical Characterization of Biopharmaceuticals, Including Antibody Drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals, including antibody drugs, are now popular because of their high specificity with low adverse effects, especially in the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases. However, because the active pharmaceutical ingredients of biopharmaceuticals are proteins, biophysical characterization of these therapeutic proteins should be required. In this manuscript, methods of chemical and physical characterization of therapeutic proteins are described. In terms of chemical characterization, analysis of chemical modifications of the constituent amino acids is explained. Physical characterization includes higher order structural analysis and assessment of protein aggregates. Quantification methods of aggregates with different sizes, recently encouraged by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), are introduced. As for the stability of therapeutic proteins, the importance of chemical and physical stability is explained. Finally, the contribution of colloidal and structural stability to the production of an antibody drug less prone to aggregation is introduced.

  19. Poliarterite nodosa due to anti elastase antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Defendenti

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The Authors related one case of polyarteritis nodosa occurred to a men forty eight years old.The clinical was characterized by mesenteric and femoral arteries occlusion and chronic cutaneous ulcers to legs. There were bioptical aspects of systemic vasculitis with necrotizing inflammation and a paucity of immune deposit. It was effective oral cyclophosphamide plus steroids. This disease was closely associated with antibodies anti elastase (HLE.The patient had not a history of cocaine abuse or LES disease but the nucleolar pattern ANA was positive >1:640 (anti-nDNA negative. Similar case ANA positive associated with the anti-elastase antibodies, was described by Nassberger (Lancet 1989 for 6/104 patients with LES, anti-nDNA negative. The patient with the highest anti-elastase concentration subsequentely died after very rapid development of severe brain and kidney involvement.

  20. Antimitochondrial antibodies in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranua, Jouni; Luoma, Katja; Auvinen, Anssi; Haapala, Anna-Maija; Mäki, Markku; Peltola, Jukka; Raitanen, Jani; Isojärvi, Jouko I

    2005-08-01

    Immune mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. An increased prevalence of autoantibodies, as well as changes in serum immunoglobulin concentrations, has been reported in patients with epilepsy. The presence of unspecific antimitochondrial antibodies (AMAs) and their possible associations with other immunological markers were evaluated in a cohort of 1386 adult patients with epilepsy and population-based reference subjects. Unspecific AMAs were more frequent in epilepsy patients than in the reference group. Thirty-seven epilepsy patients (3.9%) and eleven control subjects (1.9%) had unspecific AMAs (RR 2.1, CI 1.05-4.1, P=0.03). These antibodies were associated with long duration of epilepsy and old age at the onset of epilepsy among patients with epilepsy. Their presence was independent of other immunological markers, comorbidity, and epilepsy medications.

  1. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  2. Development of Antibody Arrays for Monoclonal Antibody Higher Order Structure Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing eWang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibody arrays were developed to probe a monoclonal antibody’s three-dimensional structure (3-D structure. Peptides with overlapping regions were designed to cover the whole mAb light chain and heavy chain respectively and used to generate polyclonal antibodies after the conjugation of the peptides to a carrier protein, KLH. It was shown that good peptide specificity was achieved from the antibodies generated. Using more than 30 different polyclonal antibodies to measure the surface epitope distribution, it was shown that the mAb antibody array can detect epitope exposure as low as 0.1% of defined mAb populations. This ELISA-based analysis of mAb epitope exposure can be considered as a measurement of conformational impurity in biologics development, similar to the analysis of other product-related impurities such as different forms of glycosylation, deamidation and oxidation. This analysis of conformational impurity could provide valuable information on the mAb conformational comparability for biosimilar mAbs as well as novel mAbs, especially in the area of protein immunogenicity. Furthermore, stability studies indicated that there are several conformational hot spots in many mAbs tested, especially in the hinge region. This antibody array technology can be used for novel mAb Higher Order Structure (HOS analysis during process and formulation development. Another important area of application is for biosimilar mAb development where the innovator molecule and biosimilar molecule could be compared based on their systemic fingerprint from the 30 plus antibodies.

  3. Antiphospholipid antibodies: evaluation of the thrombotic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devreese, Katrien M J

    2012-10-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) via antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) tests, including lupus anticoagulant (LAC), anti-cardiolipin (aCL), or anti-beta2 glycoprotein I (aβ2GPI) antibodies remains a challenge. Coagulation tests for LAC as well as solid phase assays for aCL and aβ2GPI have methodological shortcomings, although for LAC large progress have been made in standardization. All assays are associated with clinical APS-criteria (thrombotic and/or pregnancy complications) but with limited specificity. Besides, clinical studies demonstrating the association between the presence of aPL and thrombosis are not always well designed and result in wide ranges of odds ratio with large variation between studies. The best association between thrombotic complications and aPL is found for LAC. The association between thrombosis and aCL or aβ2GPI is at least inconsistent. The inclusion of more specific assays, such as the domain-I-β2GPI.antibodies is too premature and depends on further investigation in large clinical studies and the commercial availability. The search for new assays should proceed to identify patients with aPL with increased risk for thrombosis, preferable in large prospective studies. Meanwhile, with the current available LAC, aCL and aβ2GPI assays it is strongly recommended to make antibody profiles. Multiple positivity of tests seems clinically more relevant. The strengths and weaknesses of the current laboratory criteria for APS are discussed in view of their role in risk stratification of patients with thrombotic events. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies, Autoimmune Neutropenia, and Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Peter C.; Sloan, J. Mark; Niles, John L.; Monach, Paul A.; Merkel, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Reports of an association between antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and autoimmune neutropenia have rarely included cases of proven vasculitis. A case of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) with recurrent neutropenia is described and relevant literature on the association between ANCA, neutropenia, and vasculitis is reviewed. Methods Longitudinal clinical assessments and laboratory findings are described in a patient with AAV and recurrent episodes of profound neutropenia from December 2008 – October 2010. A PubMed database search of the medical literature was performed for papers published from 1960 through October 2010 to identify all reported cases of ANCA and neutropenia. Results A 49 year-old man developed recurrent neutropenia, periodic fevers, arthritis, biopsy-proven cutaneous vasculitis, sensorineural hearing loss, epididymitis, and positive tests for ANCA with specificity for antibodies to both proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase. Antineutrophil membrane antibodies were detected during an acute neutropenic phase and were not detectable in a post-recovery sample, whereas ANCA titers did not seem to correlate with neutropenia. An association between ANCA and neutropenia has been reported in 74 cases from 24 studies in the context of drug/toxin exposure, underlying autoimmune disease, or chronic neutropenia without underlying autoimmune disease. In these cases, the presence of atypical ANCA patterns and other antibodies were common; however, vasculitis was uncommon and when it occurred was usually limited to the skin and in cases of underlying toxin exposure. Conclusions ANCA is associated with autoimmune neutropenia, but systemic vasculitis rarely occurs in association with ANCA and neutropenia. The interaction between neutrophils and ANCA may provide insight into understanding both autoimmune neutropenia and AAV. PMID:21507463

  5. Seroprevalence Survey of Rubella Antibodies among Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Rubella virus, teratogen, antibodies, Maiduguri. La rubéole est une infection virale évitable par la vaccination. Son agent étiologique, virus de la rubéole a été identifié comme un tératogène humain capable de provoquer le spectre de malformation congénitale décrite comme le syndrome de rubéole congénitale ...

  6. Dengue virus antibodies enhance Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Lauren M; Carlin, Eric R; Jenkins, Meagan M; Tan, Amanda L; Barcellona, Carolyn M; Nicholson, Cindo O; Michael, Scott F; Isern, Sharon

    2016-12-01

    For decades, human infections with Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, were sporadic, associated with mild disease, and went underreported since symptoms were similar to other acute febrile diseases. Recent reports of severe disease associated with ZIKV have greatly heightened awareness. It is anticipated that ZIKV will continue to spread in the Americas and globally where competent Aedes mosquito vectors are found. Dengue virus (DENV), the most common mosquito-transmitted human flavivirus, is both well-established and the source of outbreaks in areas of recent ZIKV introduction. DENV and ZIKV are closely related, resulting in substantial antigenic overlap. Through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), anti-DENV antibodies can enhance the infectivity of DENV for certain classes of immune cells, causing increased viral production that correlates with severe disease outcomes. Similarly, ZIKV has been shown to undergo ADE in response to antibodies generated by other flaviviruses. We tested the neutralizing and enhancing potential of well-characterized broadly neutralizing human anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) and human DENV immune sera against ZIKV using neutralization and ADE assays. We show that anti-DENV HMAbs, cross-react, do not neutralize, and greatly enhance ZIKV infection in vitro. DENV immune sera had varying degrees of neutralization against ZIKV and similarly enhanced ZIKV infection. Our results suggest that pre-existing DENV immunity may enhance ZIKV infection in vivo and may lead to increased disease severity. Understanding the interplay between ZIKV and DENV will be critical in informing public health responses and will be particularly valuable for ZIKV and DENV vaccine design and implementation strategies.

  7. Non-antibody protein-based biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrigno, Paul?Ko

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors that depend on a physical or chemical measurement can be adversely affected by non-specific interactions. For example, a biosensor designed to measure specifically the levels of a rare analyte can give false positive results if there is even a small amount of interaction with a highly abundant but irrelevant molecule. To overcome this limitation, the biosensor community has frequently turned to antibody molecules as recognition elements because they are renowned for their exquisite...

  8. Antibody induction therapy for lung transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Møller, Christian H; Penninga, Ida Elisabeth Irene

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation has become a valuable and well-accepted treatment option for most end-stage lung diseases. Lung transplant recipients are at risk of transplanted organ rejection, and life-long immunosuppression is necessary. Clear evidence is essential to identify an optimal, safe...... and effective immunosuppressive treatment strategy for lung transplant recipients. Consensus has not yet been achieved concerning use of immunosuppressive antibodies against T-cells for induction following lung transplantation....

  9. Generation of monoclonal antibodies to native active human glycosyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Christensen, Malene Bech; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    using monoclonal antibodies therefore provides an excellent strategy to analyze the glycosylation process in cells. A major drawback has been difficulties in generating antibodies to glycosyltransferases and validating their specificities. Here we describe a simple strategy for generating...... and characterizing monoclonal antibodies to human glycosyltransferases. This strategy includes a process for recombinant production and purification of enzymes for immunization, a simple selection strategy for isolation of antibodies with optimal properties for in situ detection of enzyme expression......, and a comprehensive strategy for characterizing the fine specificity of such antibodies....

  10. Docking of Antibodies into Cavities in DNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quyang, X; Stefano, Mattia De; Krissanaprasit, Abhichart

    2017-01-01

    -selective immobilization of antibodies in designed cavities in 2D and 3D DNA origami structures. Two tris(NTA) modified strands are inserted into the cavity to form NTA-metal complexes with histidine clusters on the Fc domain. Subsequent covalent linkage to the antibody was achieved by coupling to lysines. Atomic force...... microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) validated efficient antibody immobilization in the origami structures. The increased ability to control the orientation of antibodies in nanostructures and at surfaces has potential for directing the interactions of antibodies with targets...

  11. Antibody-Based Therapies in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tzu Tai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The unmet need for improved multiple myeloma (MM therapy has stimulated clinical development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs targeting either MM cells or cells of the bone marrow (BM microenvironment. In contrast to small-molecule inhibitors, therapeutic mAbs present the potential to specifically target tumor cells and directly induce an immune response to lyse tumor cells. Unique immune-effector mechanisms are only triggered by therapeutic mAbs but not by small molecule targeting agents. Although therapeutic murine mAbs or chimeric mAbs can cause immunogenicity, the advancement of genetic recombination for humanizing rodent mAbs has allowed large-scale production and designation of mAbs with better affinities, efficient selection, decreasing immunogenicity, and improved effector functions. These advancements of antibody engineering technologies have largely overcome the critical obstacle of antibody immunogenicity and enabled the development and subsequent Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval of therapeutic Abs for cancer and other diseases.

  12. Emerging monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péchiné, Séverine; Janoir, Claire; Collignon, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are characterized by a high recurrence rate despite antibiotic treatments and there is an urgent need to develop new treatments such as fecal transplantation and immonotherapy. Besides active immunotherapy with vaccines, passive immunotherapy has shown promise, especially with monoclonal antibodies. Areas covered: Herein, the authors review the different assays performed with monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and surface proteins to treat or prevent primary or recurrent episodes of C. difficile infection in animal models and in clinical trials as well. Notably, the authors lay emphasis on the phase III clinical trial (MODIFY II), which allowed bezlotoxumab to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. They also review new strategies for producing single domain antibodies and nanobodies against C. difficile and new approaches to deliver them in the digestive tract. Expert opinion: Only two human Mabs against TcdA and TcdB have been tested alone or in combination in clinical trials. However, many animal model studies have provided rationale for the use of Mabs and nanobodies in C. difficile infection and pave the way for further clinical investigation.

  13. Cytokine and antibody production during murine leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marinho

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the kinetics of humoral and cellular responses during leptospirosis. We observed that the presence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and interleukin-6 (IL-6 was associated with antibody production and bacterial recovery, and the compromising of both TNF-alpha and IL-6 in the immunopathogenesis of leptospirosis during an experimental infection of BALB/c mice inoculated with Leptospira interrogans serovar Canicola was verified. Results showed higher levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in the initial phase of infection, in which the greatest bacterial clearance was observed. However, when the bacterial recovery was compared with the kinetics of the production of antibodies, the results revealed a kinetics proportionally inverted to antibody production. This fact may be related to some inhibitory factor which could be responsible for the selective suppression of the cellular immune response. We concluded that during leptospirosis there was a greater mobilization of the cellular immune response activity, mainly in the initial phase of the infectious process, for posterior involvement of the humoral response, and that both TNF-alpha and IL-6 could be associated with the immunopathogenesis of the disease.

  14. Universal influenza virus vaccines and therapeutic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbagauer, R; Krammer, F

    2017-04-01

    Current influenza virus vaccines are effective when well matched to the circulating strains. Unfortunately, antigenic drift and the high diversity of potential emerging zoonotic and pandemic viruses make it difficult to select the right strains for vaccine production. This problem causes vaccine mismatches, which lead to sharp drops in vaccine effectiveness and long response times to manufacture matched vaccines in case of novel pandemic viruses. To provide an overview of universal influenza virus vaccines and therapeutic antibodies in preclinical and clinical development. PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov were used as sources for this review. Universal influenza virus vaccines that target conserved regions of the influenza virus including the haemagglutinin stalk domain, the ectodomain of the M2 ion channel or the internal matrix and nucleoproteins are in late preclinical and clinical development. These vaccines could confer broad protection against all influenza A and B viruses including drift variants and thereby abolish the need for annual re-formulation and re-administration of influenza virus vaccines. In addition, these novel vaccines would enhance preparedness against emerging influenza virus pandemics. Finally, novel therapeutic antibodies against the same conserved targets are in clinical development and could become valuable tools in the fight against influenza virus infection. Both universal influenza virus vaccines and therapeutic antibodies are potential future options for the control of human influenza infections. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. IgE antibodies in toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matowicka-Karna, Joanna; Kemona, Halina

    2014-05-15

    Toxoplasmosis is a worldwide infection caused by the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. At least a third of the world human population is infected with the parasite, making it one of the most successful parasitic infections. Primary maternal infection may cause health-threatening sequelae for the fetus, or even cause death of the uterus. Reactivation of a latent infection in immune deficiency conditions such as AIDS and organ transplantation can cause fatal toxoplasmic encephalitis. Toxoplasmosis is a major cause of chorioretinitis, especially in individuals with impaired immune systems. In the acute phase, directly after invading the body, T. gondii begins to multiply rapidly. In the majority of cases acquired toxoplasmosis is asymptomatic. In the second week of infection, specific IgM antibodies are present in the blood. IgE antibodies appear at the same time, slightly preceding specific IgA antibodies. The concentration of IgE can be one of the parameters used for diagnosing an infection with T. gondii. Laboratory diagnosis, i.e. IgE and serologic assays, plays the main role in the diagnosis of congenital infection and assists in the confirmatory diagnosis of toxoplasmic encephalitis and ocular toxoplasmosis. This article is a review of IgE in toxoplasmosis.

  16. Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody: positivity and clinical correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Téllez, Goitybell; Torres Rives, Bárbara; Rangel Velázquez, Suchiquil; Sánchez Rodríguez, Vicky; Ramos Ríos, María Antonia; Fuentes Smith, Lisset Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    To determine positivity and clinical correlation of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), taking into account the interference of antinuclear antibodies (ANA). A prospective study was conducted in the Laboratory of Immunology of the National Cuban Center of Medical Genetic during one year. Two hounded sixty-seven patients with indication for ANCA determination were included. ANCA and ANA determinations with different cut off points and assays were determined by indirect immunofluorescense. Anti proteinase 3 and antimyeloperoxidase antibodies were determined by ELISA. Most positivity for ANCA was seen in patients with ANCA associated, primary small-vessel vasculitides, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Presence of ANCA without positivity for proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase was higher in patients with ANA and little relation was observed between the perinuclear pattern confirmed in formalin and specificity by myeloperoxidase. Highest sensibility and specificity values for vasculitides diagnostic were achieved by ANCA determination using indirect immunofluorescense with a cut off 1/80 and confirming antigenic specificities with ELISA. ANCA can be present in a great number of chronic inflammatory or autoimmune disorders in the population studied. This determination using indirect immunofluorescence and following by ELISA had a great value for vasculitis diagnosis. Anti mieloperoxidasa assay has a higher utility than the formalin assay when ANA is present. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. [Antinuclear antibodies: immunological characteristics and clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, V; Cyna, J; Ryckewaert, A; Peltier, A P

    1979-06-01

    Fifty sera containing antinucleolar antibodies were o gathered in a routine laboratory during testing for antinuclear antibodies with indirect immun-fluorescence over a five-year period. The patients involved were suffering from sclerodermia (13 cases), rheumatoid arthritis (7 cases), polymyositis (3 cases), lupus (2 cases), various rhumatismal disease (59 cases) and non rhumatismal diseases in 16 cases, including 5 malignant diseases. In 80 per cent of the cases nucleolar fluorescence was combined with nuclear fluorescence of another type. The antibodies were almost always of the IgG category and belonged in 2/3 of cases to several immunoglobulin categories, most often IgG-IgA. Pretreatment of the liver cuttings with RNase always modifies the nucleolar fluorescence, most often making it negative, and pretreatment with DNase using a combination of enzymes 10 times higher also modifies it (more often decreasing it than making it negative), which indicates that the nucleolar antigen, probably an ARN with a low molecular weight, also depends upon the ADN.

  18. Polyclonal Antibody Therapies for Clostridium difficile Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Simon

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection has emerged as a growing worldwide health problem. The colitis of Clostridium difficile infection results from the synergistic action of C. difficile secreted toxins A and B upon the colon mucosa. A human monoclonal IgG anti-toxin has demonstrated the ability in combination therapy to reduce mortality in C. difficile challenged hamsters. This antibody is currently in a clinical trial for the treatment of human Clostridium difficile infection. More than one group of investigators has considered using polyclonal bovine colostral antibodies to toxins A and B as an oral passive immunization. A significant proportion of the healthy human population possesses polyclonal antibodies to the Clostridium difficile toxins. We have demonstrated that polyclonal IgA derived from the pooled plasma of healthy donors possesses specificity to toxins A and B and can neutralize these toxins in a cell-based assay. This suggests that secretory IgA prepared from such pooled plasma IgA may be able to be used as an oral treatment for Clostridium difficile infection.

  19. [Generation of recombinant human antibodies for EV71 virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Na; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Fu-Shun; Li, Chuan; Zhang, Quan-Fu; Li, De-Xin; Liang, Mi-Fang

    2011-06-01

    To obtain recombinant human anti-EV71 antibodies from a EV71-associated hand-foot-and-mouth disease patient-derived antibody phage library. A combinatorial human scFv library to enterovirus 71 (EV71) virus was constructed using antibody genes harvested from the blood of EV71 virus patients. The library was panned and selected by using purified VP1 protein of EV71 virus with phage display. After that the specific antibody was converted to full human IgG antibody with recombinant baculovirus/insect cell system. One unique human scFv antibody specific for EV71 virus VP1 protein was obtained by ELISA, IFA and analysis of the antibody DNA sequence. The specific anti-VP1 human scFv antibody was converted to full human IgG antibody with recombinant baculovirus/insect cell system. The full human IgG antibody was tested in vitro for EV71 virus neutralization, resulting in no neutralizing activity with EV71 A type and EV71 C4 subtype. The obtained human anti-EV71 antibodies without neutralizing activity laid the foundation for diagnosis of human EV71-associated hand-foot-and-mouth disease.

  20. Serum Antibody Repertoire Profiling Using In Silico Antigen Screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyue Liu

    Full Text Available Serum antibodies are valuable source of information on the health state of an organism. The profiles of serum antibody reactivity can be generated by using a high throughput sequencing of peptide-coding DNA from combinatorial random peptide phage display libraries selected for binding to serum antibodies. Here we demonstrate that the targets of immune response, which are recognized by serum antibodies directed against sequential epitopes, can be identified using the serum antibody repertoire profiles generated by high throughput sequencing. We developed an algorithm to filter the results of the protein database BLAST search for selected peptides to distinguish real antigens recognized by serum antibodies from irrelevant proteins retrieved randomly. When we used this algorithm to analyze serum antibodies from mice immunized with human protein, we were able to identify the protein used for immunizations among the top candidate antigens. When we analyzed human serum sample from the metastatic melanoma patient, the recombinant protein, corresponding to the top candidate from the list generated using the algorithm, was recognized by antibodies from metastatic melanoma serum on the western blot, thus confirming that the method can identify autoantigens recognized by serum antibodies. We demonstrated also that our unbiased method of looking at the repertoire of serum antibodies reveals quantitative information on the epitope composition of the targets of immune response. A method for deciphering information contained in the serum antibody repertoire profiles may help to identify autoantibodies that can be used for diagnosing and monitoring autoimmune diseases or malignancies.

  1. IBC's 23rd Antibody Engineering and 10th Antibody Therapeutics Conferences and the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society: December 2-6, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, John; Begent, Richard H J; Chester, Kerry; Huston, James S; Bradbury, Andrew; Scott, Jamie K; Thorpe, Philip E; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M; Weiner, Louis M

    2012-01-01

    Now in its 23rd and 10th years, respectively, the Antibody Engineering and Antibody Therapeutics conferences are the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society. The scientific program covers the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development from basic science through clinical development. In this preview of the conferences, the chairs provide their thoughts on sessions that will allow participants to track emerging trends in (1) the development of next-generation immunomodulatory antibodies; (2) the complexity of the environment in which antibodies must function; (3) antibody-targeted central nervous system (CNS) therapies that cross the blood brain barrier; (4) the extension of antibody half-life for improved efficacy and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD); and (5) the application of next generation DNA sequencing to accelerate antibody research. A pre-conference workshop on Sunday, December 2, 2012 will update participants on recent intellectual property (IP) law changes that affect antibody research, including biosimilar legislation, the America Invents Act and recent court cases. Keynote presentations will be given by Andreas Plückthun (University of Zürich), who will speak on engineering receptor ligands with powerful cellular responses; Gregory Friberg (Amgen Inc.), who will provide clinical updates of bispecific antibodies; James D. Marks (University of California, San Francisco), who will discuss a systems approach to generating tumor targeting antibodies; Dario Neri (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich), who will speak about delivering immune modulators at the sites of disease; William M. Pardridge (University of California, Los Angeles), who will discuss delivery across the blood-brain barrier; and Peter Senter (Seattle Genetics, Inc.), who will present his vision for the future of antibody-drug conjugates. For more information on these meetings or to register to attend, please visit www.IBCLifeSciences.com/Antibody

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  3. Docking of Antibodies into Cavities in DNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quyang, X; Stefano, Mattia De; Krissanaprasit, Abhichart

    2017-01-01

    Immobilized antibodies are extensively employed for medical diagnostics such as in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Despite their widespread use the ability to control the orientation on surfaces of immobilized antibodies is very limited. Herein, we report a method for covalent and orientation......-selective immobilization of antibodies in designed cavities in 2D and 3D DNA origami structures. Two tris(NTA) modified strands are inserted into the cavity to form NTA-metal complexes with histidine clusters on the Fc domain. Subsequent covalent linkage to the antibody was achieved by coupling to lysines. Atomic force...... microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) validated efficient antibody immobilization in the origami structures. The increased ability to control the orientation of antibodies in nanostructures and at surfaces has potential for directing the interactions of antibodies with targets...

  4. Production and Purification of Antibodies Against Histone Modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemette, Benoit; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Wurtele, Hugo; Verreault, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies that recognize specific histone modifications are invaluable tools to study chromatin structure and function. There are numerous commercially available antibodies that recognize a remarkable diversity of histone modifications. Unfortunately, many of them fail to work in certain applications or lack the high degree of specificity required of these reagents. The production of affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies against histone modifications demands a little effort but, in return, provides extremely valuable tools that overcome many of the concerns and limitations of commercial antibodies. We present a series of protocols and guidelines for the production and use of large amounts of polyclonal antibodies that recognize modifications of canonical histones. Our protocols can be applied to obtain antibodies that occur in histone variants and proteins other than histones. In addition, some of our protocols are compatible with the production of monoclonal or recombinant antibodies.

  5. Quantitative assessment of antibody internalization with novel monoclonal antibodies against Alexa fluorophores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindy Liao-Chan

    Full Text Available Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of internalization of labeled antibodies, an assay based on internalized and quenched fluorescence was developed. For this approach, we generated novel anti-Alexa Fluor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that effectively and specifically quench cell surface-bound Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorescence. Utilizing Alexa Fluor-labeled mAbs against the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, we showed that the anti-Alexa Fluor reagents could be used to monitor internalization quantitatively over time. The anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs were also validated in a proof of concept dual-label internalization assay with simultaneous exposure of cells to two different mAbs. Importantly, the unique anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs described here may also enable other single- and dual-label experiments, including label detection and signal enhancement in macromolecules, trafficking of proteins and microorganisms, and cell migration and morphology.

  6. Anticardiolipin antibodies in pathogenesis of infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lončar Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disorder clinically characterized by arterial or venous thrombosis and/or specific obstetric complications and presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL in the serum. It occurs in 0.3% of pregnant women, while 1% of them have two spontaneous abortions. The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of biphospholipid antibodies in pregnant women with recurrent spontaneous abortions. Methods. We analyzed 60 pregnant women who had two or more recurrent miscarriages. The control group included 60 healthy pregnant women. We analyzed titres of anticardiolipin (aCL IgG and/or IgM with high titres (> 20 U/mL, lupus anticoagulant (LAC antibodies and anti-beta-2 glycoprotein (b2-GP1 IgG as well as parameters of coagulation status of pregnant women. Results. Analyzing Spearman's rank correlation coefficient in a group of affected patients, we noticed a slightly positive correlation of lupus anticoagulants (LAC with aCL antibodies of both classes, while the correlation with b2GP1 IgG was negative. Both classes of aCL antibodies and antib2GP1 IgG were in a discrete positive correlation with the given variables. In the control group, there was a lack of consistency in correlation of the study variables with LAC-aCl IgG, compared to the affected patients, and there was a standard negative coefficient of correlation with anti-b2GP1 IgG. The correlation ratio of anti-b2GP1 IgG was negative for all studied test parameters. Analysis of hemostatic parameters showed a statistically significant difference in the concentration of fibrinogen (p < 0.01 and thrombocyte count (p < 0.05 between the study and the control group of pregnant women. Lower mean values of fibrinogen (2.90 ± 0.45 g/L and lower thrombocyte count [(179.20 ± 6.00 × 109] were found in the study group of pregnant women with secondary infertility compared to the mean values of fibrinogen (3.60 ± 0.55 g/L and thrombocyte count

  7. Substantially increased sensitivity of the spot-ELISA for the detection of anti-insulin antibody-secreting cells using a capture antibody and enzyme-conjugated insulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Vos (Quirijn); H.J.H.M. Claassen (Eric); R. Benner (Robbert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThis paper describes an antibody capture spot-ELISA for the detection of anti-insulin antibody-secreting cells. The assay is based on the binding of secreted antibodies by immobilised isotype-specific capture antibodies and subsequent detection of insulin-specific antibodies with a

  8. Hybridization-based antibody cDNA recovery for the production of recombinant antibodies identified by repertoire sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Alemán, Javier; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Ovilla-Muñoz, Marbella; Godoy-Lozano, Elizabeth; Velázquez-Ramírez, Daniel; Valdovinos-Torres, Humberto; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa E; Martinez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire is enabling a thorough analysis of B cell diversity and clonal selection, which may improve the novel antibody discovery process. Theoretically, an adequate bioinformatic analysis could allow identification of candidate antigen-specific antibodies, requiring their recombinant production for experimental validation of their specificity. Gene synthesis is commonly used for the generation of recombinant antibodies identified in silico. Novel strategies that bypass gene synthesis could offer more accessible antibody identification and validation alternatives. We developed a hybridization-based recovery strategy that targets the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDRH3) for the enrichment of cDNA of candidate antigen-specific antibody sequences. Ten clonal groups of interest were identified through bioinformatic analysis of the heavy chain antibody repertoire of mice immunized with hen egg white lysozyme (HEL). cDNA from eight of the targeted clonal groups was recovered efficiently, leading to the generation of recombinant antibodies. One representative heavy chain sequence from each clonal group recovered was paired with previously reported anti-HEL light chains to generate full antibodies, later tested for HEL-binding capacity. The recovery process proposed represents a simple and scalable molecular strategy that could enhance antibody identification and specificity assessment, enabling a more cost-efficient generation of recombinant antibodies.

  9. Utilisation of antibody microarrays for the selection of specific and informative antibodies from recombinant library binders of unknown quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kibat, Janek; Schirrmann, Thomas; Knape, Matthias J

    2016-01-01

    Many diagnostic and therapeutic concepts require antibodies of high specificity. Recombinant binder libraries and related selection approaches allow the efficient isolation of antibodies against almost every target of interest. Nevertheless, it cannot be guaranteed that selected antibodies perform...... well and interact specifically enough with analytes unless an elaborate characterisation is performed. Here, we present an approach to shorten this process by combining the selection of suitable antibodies with the identification of informative target molecules by means of antibody microarrays, thereby...... with more than one of the scFvs binding to these targets. Only the relevant antibodies were then characterised further on antigen microarrays and by surface plasmon resonance experiments so as to select the most specific and highest affinity antibodies. These binders were in turn used to confirm...

  10. Low-titer anti-GAD-antibody-positive cerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanri, Kazunori; Niwa, Hisayoshi; Mitoma, Hiroshi; Takei, Asako; Ikeda, Junko; Harada, Toshihide; Okita, Mitsunori; Takeguchi, Masafumi; Taguchi, Takeshi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2013-04-01

    The majority of cases of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)-antibody-positive cerebellar ataxia are reported to have high levels of anti-GAD antibody, and the diagnostic value of low titers of anti-GAD antibody in a patient with cerebellar ataxia is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to verify the characteristics of low-titer-anti-GAD-antibody-positive cerebellar ataxia patients and the diagnostic value of low titers of anti-GAD antibody in patients with cerebellar ataxia. The subjects were six patients positive for low-titer GAD antibody (cerebellar atrophy. The GAD antibody index in three of the five patients reviewed was >1.0. Two of the six patients were thyroid antibody-positive, and one was both antinuclear- and anti-SS-A antibody-positive. After the administration of immunotherapy to three patients, two showed clear effectiveness, and one, transient effectiveness. Effectiveness was greatest in the two patients with familial occurrence of the disease. In cerebellar ataxia, regardless of family history or isolated illness, it is critical to measure the GAD antibody level, and, even with a low titer level, if the result is positive, immunotherapy should be considered.

  11. The state-of-play and future of antibody therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgundi, Zehra; Reslan, Mouhamad; Cruz, Esteban; Sifniotis, Vicki; Kayser, Veysel

    2017-12-01

    It has been over four decades since the development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) using a hybridoma cell line was first reported. Since then more than thirty therapeutic antibodies have been marketed, mostly as oncology, autoimmune and inflammatory therapeutics. While antibodies are very efficient, their cost-effectiveness has always been discussed owing to their high costs, accumulating to more than one billion dollars from preclinical development through to market approval. Because of this, therapeutic antibodies are inaccessible to some patients in both developed and developing countries. The growing interest in biosimilar antibodies as affordable versions of therapeutic antibodies may provide alternative treatment options as well potentially decreasing costs. As certain markets begin to capitalize on this opportunity, regulatory authorities continue to refine the requirements for demonstrating quality, efficacy and safety of biosimilar compared to originator products. In addition to biosimilars, innovations in antibody engineering are providing the opportunity to design biobetter antibodies with improved properties to maximize efficacy. Enhancing effector function, antibody drug conjugates (ADC) or targeting multiple disease pathways via multi-specific antibodies are being explored. The manufacturing process of antibodies is also moving forward with advancements relating to host cell production and purification processes. Studies into the physical and chemical degradation pathways of antibodies are contributing to the design of more stable proteins guided by computational tools. Moreover, the delivery and pharmacokinetics of antibody-based therapeutics are improving as optimized formulations are pursued through the implementation of recent innovations in the field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationship between natural and heme-mediated antibody polyreactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadzhieva, Maya; Vassilev, Tchavdar [Stephan Angelov Institute of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, F-75006 Paris (France); INSERM, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Dimitrov, Jordan D., E-mail: jordan.dimitrov@crc.jussieu.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, F-75006 Paris (France); INSERM, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France)

    2016-03-25

    Polyreactive antibodies represent a considerable fraction of the immune repertoires. Some antibodies acquire polyreactivity post-translationally after interaction with various redox-active substances, including heme. Recently we have demonstrated that heme binding to a naturally polyreactive antibody (SPE7) results in a considerable broadening of the repertoire of recognized antigens. A question remains whether the presence of certain level of natural polyreactivity of antibodies is a prerequisite for heme-induced further extension of antigen binding potential. Here we used a second monoclonal antibody (Hg32) with unknown specificity and absence of intrinsic polyreactivity as a model to study the potential of heme to induce polyreactivity of antibodies. We demonstrated that exposure to heme greatly extends the antigen binding potential of Hg32, suggesting that the intrinsic binding promiscuity is not a prerequisite for the induction of polyreactivity by heme. In addition we compared the kinetics and thermodynamics of the interaction of heme-exposed antibodies with a panel of unrelated antigens. These analyses revealed that the two heme-sensitive antibodies adopt different mechanisms of binding to the same set of antigens. This study contributes to understanding the phenomenon of induced antibody polyreactivity. The data may also be of importance for understanding of physiological and pathological roles of polyreactive antibodies. - Highlights: • Exposure of certain monoclonal IgE antibodies to heme results in gain of antigen binding polyreactivity. • Natural polyreactivity of antibodies is dispensable for acquisition of polyreactivity through interaction with heme. • Heme-induced monoclonal IgE antibodies differ in their thermodynamic mechanisms of antigen recognition.

  13. Food related antibodies in headache patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Merrett, J; Peatfield, R C; Rose, F C; Merrett, T G

    1983-01-01

    Highly sensitive and specific methods for assaying IgE and IgG4 for antibodies in serum have been developed in order to test a recent suggestion that food allergy is a major cause of migraine. Sera were collected from 208 adults--74 with dietary migraine, 45 with non-dietary migraine, 29 with cluster headache and 60 controls. No significant differences were identified between any of the groups with the one exception that cluster headache patients had significantly raised levels of total serum...

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies for Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blinkenberg, Morten; Soelberg Sørensen, Per

    2017-01-01

    leading to chronic central nervous system (CNS) demyelination, neural loss, and, finally, neurological disability. Although a number of disease-modifying treatments are available for the treatment of the inflammatory phase of MS, there is still a need for highly efficacious therapies with an acceptable...... safety profile in order to gain therapeutic control early in the disease course. Monoclonal antibodies have proven to be some of the most efficacious disease-modifying therapies in the field of MS, and recent developments in clinical research hold promise for new compounds fulfilling the need...

  15. Presence of Autoimmune Antibody in Chikungunya Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirach Maek-a-nantawat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya infection has recently re-emerged as an important arthropod-borne disease in Thailand. Recently, Southern Thailand was identified as a potentially endemic area for the chikungunya virus. Here, we report a case of severe musculoskeletal complication, presenting with muscle weakness and swelling of the limbs. During the investigation to exclude autoimmune muscular inflammation, high titers of antinuclear antibody were detected. This is the report of autoimmunity detection associated with an arbovirus infection. The symptoms can mimic autoimmune polymyositis disease, and the condition requires close monitoring before deciding to embark upon prolonged specific treatment with immunomodulators.

  16. Antimitochondrial antibody-negative primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Flavia; Lindor, Keith D

    2008-06-01

    There is a subset of patients who have biochemical and histologic features consistent with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) who lack antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). This entity is usually referred to as AMA-negative PBC or alternatively autoimmune cholangitis. Patients who have AMA-negative PBC are believed to have a similar clinical course, response to treatment, and prognosis as their AMA-positive counterparts. As more sensitive and specific serologic tests are developed to detect serum AMA, it is possible we may find that these patients initially believed to be AMA-negative are indeed AMA-positive, suggesting a single disease process.

  17. Biomarkers in Multiple Sclerosis: Role of Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Berger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The first international workshop on “Biomarkers in Multiple Sclerosis” was organized by B. Bielekova, R. Hohlfeld, R. Martin and U. Utz from April 14–16, 2004, in Washington, DC. The workshop intended to discuss the current status and potential applicability of biological markers for the understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and therapy of multiple sclerosis. The present review summarizes the presentation on the potential role of antibodies as biomarkers for diagnosis, disease activity, classification and prediction of clinical courses in multiple sclerosis.

  18. Functional optimization of agonistic antibodies to OX40 receptor with novel Fc mutations to promote antibody multimerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Armstrong, Anthony A.; Luo, Jinquan; Chiu, Mark L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immunostimulatory receptors belonging to the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily are emerging as promising targets for cancer immunotherapies. To optimize the agonism of therapeutic antibodies to these receptors, Fc engineering of antibodies was applied to facilitate the clustering of cell surface TNFRs to activate downstream signaling pathways. One engineering strategy is to identify Fc mutations that facilitate antibody multimerization on the cell surface directly. From the analyses of the crystal packing of IgG1 structures, we identified a novel set of Fc mutations, T437R and K248E, that facilitated antibody multimerization upon binding to antigens on cell surface. In a NF-κB reporter assay, the engineered T437R/K248E mutations could facilitate enhanced agonism of an anti-OX40 antibody without the dependence on FcγRIIB crosslinking. Nonetheless, the presence of cells expressing FcγRIIB could facilitate a boost of the agonism of the engineered antibody with mutations on IgG1 Fc, but not on the silent IgG2σ Fc. The Fc engineered antibody also showed enhanced effector functions, including antibody-dependent cell-meditated cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis, and complement-dependent cytotoxicity, depending on the IgG subtypes. Also, the engineered antibodies showed normal FcRn binding and pharmacokinetic profiles in mice. In summary, this study elucidated a novel Fc engineering approach to promote antibody multimerization on a cell surface, which could enhance agonism and improve effector function for anti-TNFR antibodies as well as other therapeutic antibodies. PMID:28758875

  19. Specificity of anti-phospholipid antibodies in infectious mononucleosis: a role for anti-cofactor protein antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorice, M; Pittoni, V; Griggi, T; Losardo, A; Leri, O; Magno, M S; Misasi, R; Valesini, G

    2000-01-01

    The antigen specificity of anti-phospholipid antibodies in infectious mononucleosis (IM) was studied using ELISA for the detection of anti-β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI), anti-annexin V, anti-protein S and anti-prothrombin antibodies and TLC immunostaining for the detection of anti-phospholipid antibodies. This technique enabled us to look at antibodies reacting to ‘pure’ phospholipid antigens in the absence of protein contamination. Sera from 46 patients with IM, 18 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 21 with primary anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS), 50 with Helicobacter pylori infection and 30 healthy blood donors were tested. This study highlights anti-phospholipid antibodies in patients with IM as specific ‘pure’ anti-cardiolipin antibodies, while in PAPS and SLE patients anti-phosphatidylserine and anti-phosphatidylethanolamine antibodies were also found. This investigation also shows that the anti-cardiolipin antibodies found in IM can be present with anti-cofactor protein antibodies. The higher prevalence of anti-cofactor antibodies found in IM sera than in Helicobacter pylori sera may be due to the immunostimulatory effect and/or the polyclonal activation often observed in course of Epstein–Barr virus infection. However, anti-β2-GPI and, to a lesser extent, anti-prothrombin antibodies occur with a significantly lower prevalence in IM than in PAPS patients. This finding suggests that these antibodies should be regarded as the expression of the broad autoimmune syndrome involving the phospholipid-binding plasma proteins. PMID:10792380

  20. Antibody specific epitope prediction-emergence of a new paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela-Culang, Inbal; Ofran, Yanay; Peters, Bjoern

    2015-04-01

    The development of accurate tools for predicting B-cell epitopes is important but difficult. Traditional methods have examined which regions in an antigen are likely binding sites of an antibody. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that most antigen surface residues will be able to bind one or more of the myriad of possible antibodies. In recent years, new approaches have emerged for predicting an epitope for a specific antibody, utilizing information encoded in antibody sequence or structure. Applying such antibody-specific predictions to groups of antibodies in combination with easily obtainable experimental data improves the performance of epitope predictions. We expect that further advances of such tools will be possible with the integration of immunoglobulin repertoire sequencing data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.