WorldWideScience

Sample records for pseudowollastonite-type structure space

  1. Grounding of space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosela, P. A.; Fertis, D. G.; Shaker, F. J.

    1992-01-01

    Space structures, such as the Space Station solar arrays, must be extremely light-weight, flexible structures. Accurate prediction of the natural frequencies and mode shapes is essential for determining the structural adequacy of components, and designing a controls system. The tension pre-load in the 'blanket' of photovoltaic solar collectors, and the free/free boundary conditions of a structure in space, causes serious reservations on the use of standard finite element techniques of solution. In particular, a phenomenon known as 'grounding', or false stiffening, of the stiffness matrix occurs during rigid body rotation. This paper examines the grounding phenomenon in detail. Numerous stiffness matrices developed by others are examined for rigid body rotation capability, and found lacking. A force imbalance inherent in the formulations examined is the likely cause of the grounding problem, suggesting the need for a directed force formulation.

  2. Space-time structure

    CERN Document Server

    Schrödinger, Erwin

    1985-01-01

    In response to repeated requests this classic book on space-time structure by Professor Erwin Schrödinger is now available in the Cambridge Science Classics series. First published in 1950, and reprinted in 1954 and 1960, this lucid and profound exposition of Einstein's 1915 theory of gravitation still provides valuable reading for students and research workers in the field.

  3. Precision Composite Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-15

    vertical web on the T-joint. Photogrammetry was used to measure displacements at target points on the vertical web during a 230 °C temperature change...of the photogrammetry equipment. Two aluminum appliqués were bonded to the vertical web in optimized positions. However the test to measure...listed on Table 1. zonta vertica mposi lates ist of structure. Thin film lamin . The tw hesives that connect the ur clived pl uniform temperature

  4. Minimal and Maximal Operator Space Structures on Banach Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    P., Vinod Kumar; Balasubramani, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Given a Banach space $X$, there are many operator space structures possible on $X$, which all have $X$ as their first matrix level. Blecher and Paulsen identified two extreme operator space structures on $X$, namely $Min(X)$ and $Max(X)$ which represents respectively, the smallest and the largest operator space structures admissible on $X$. In this note, we consider the subspace and the quotient space structure of minimal and maximal operator spaces.

  5. Structural design methodology for large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornsife, Ralph J.

    1992-02-01

    The Department of Defense requires research and development in designing, fabricating, deploying, and maintaining large space structures (LSS) in support of Army and Strategic Defense Initiative military objectives. Because of their large size, extreme flexibility, and the unique loading conditions in the space environment, LSS will present engineers with problems unlike those encountered in designing conventional civil engineering or aerospace structures. LSS will require sophisticated passive damping and active control systems in order to meet stringent mission requirements. These structures must also be optimally designed to minimize high launch costs. This report outlines a methodology for the structural design of LSS. It includes a definition of mission requirements, structural modeling and analysis, passive damping and active control system design, ground-based testing, payload integration, on-orbit system verification, and on-orbit assessment of structural damage. In support of this methodology, analyses of candidate LSS truss configurations are presented, and an algorithm correlating ground-based test behavior to expected microgravity behavior is developed.

  6. Structural materials for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Darrel R.

    1989-01-01

    The long-term performance of structural materials in the space environment is a key research activity within NASA. The primary concerns for materials in low Earth orbit (LEO) are atomic oxygen erosion and space debris impact. Atomic oxygen studies have included both laboratory exposures in atomic oxygen facilities and flight exposures using the Shuttle. Characterization of atomic oxygen interaction with materials has included surface recession rates, residual mechanical properties, optical property measurements, and surface analyses to establish chemical changes. The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is scheduled to be retrieved in 1989 and is expected to provide a wealth of data on atomic oxygen erosion in space. Hypervelocity impact studies have been conducted to establish damage mechanisms and changes in mechanical properties. Samples from LDEF will be analyzed to determine the severity of space debris impact on coatings, films, and composites. Spacecraft placed in geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) will be subjected to high doses of ionizing radiation which for long term exposures will exceed the damage threshold of many polymeric materials. Radiation interaction with polymers can result in chain scission and/or cross-linking. The formation of low molecular weight products in the epoxy plasticize the matrix at elevated temperatures and embrittle the matrix at low temperatures. This affects both the matrix-dominated mechanical properties and the dimensional stability of the composite. Embrittlement of the matrix at low temperatures results in enhanced matrix microcracking during thermal cycling. Matrix microcracking changes the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of composite laminates and produces permanent length changes. Residual stress calculations were performed to estimate the conditions necessary for microcrack development in unirradiated and irradiated composites. The effects of UV and electron exposure on the optical properties of transparent

  7. Structural sizing considerations for large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, W. L., Jr.; Bush, H. G.; Walz, J. E.

    1981-02-01

    A number of missions for the space shuttle were proposed which involve placing large truss platforms on-orbit. These platforms range in size from tens of meters in span for reflector application to several thousand meters for solar power collector application. These proposed sizes and the operational requirements considered are unconventional in comparison to Earthbound structures and little information exists concerning efficient proportions of the structural elements forming the framework of the platforms. Such proportions are of major concern because they have a strong influence on the packaging efficiency and, thus, the transportation effectiveness of the shuttle. The present study is undertaken to: (1) identify efficient ranges of application of deployable and erectable platforms configured for shuttle transport to orbit, and (2) determine sensitivity to key parameters of minimum mass deployable and erectable platform designs.

  8. Large-scale film structures in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Kirill

    Up-to-date space technology calls for not only taking account of, but also employment of, specific attributes of the outer space environment such as weightlessness, centrifugal forces, hard vacuum, powerful solar radiation. These specific characteristics of outer space allow the use of various structures in space whose development and operation is impossible and inexpedient on Earth. Currently, interest in large-scale space structures is growing; there are various projects on such multi-body space structures and experiments are being conducted for their development. Such designs are represented by spacecraft with solar sails, orbiting solar reflectors, solar energy concentrators, low frequency antennas and others. This paper examines a large-scale flexible space structure made from thin reflective film used as the working surface of the sunlight reflector or the sailcraft. Specifically, this paper deals with techniques of modeling large-scale space structure attitude motion, numerical calculation of vibrations which occur in the system after a spatial slew is performed, as well as optimal trajectory computations. Various methods of the film structure attitude control and stabilization, including optimal slewing programs, are discussed.

  9. Homogeneous Poisson Structures on Loop Spaces of Symmetric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Pickrell

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a sequel to [Caine A., Pickrell D., Int. Math. Res. Not., to appear, arXiv:0710.4484], where we studied the Hamiltonian systems which arise from the Evens-Lu construction of homogeneous Poisson structures on both compact and noncompact type symmetric spaces. In this paper we consider loop space analogues. Many of the results extend in a relatively routine way to the loop space setting, but new issues emerge. The main point of this paper is to spell out the meaning of the results, especially in the SU(2 case. Applications include integral formulas and factorizations for Toeplitz determinants.

  10. Model Spaces of Regularity Structures for Space-Fractional SPDEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Nils; Kuehn, Christian

    2017-07-01

    We study model spaces, in the sense of Hairer, for stochastic partial differential equations involving the fractional Laplacian. We prove that the fractional Laplacian is a singular kernel suitable to apply the theory of regularity structures. Our main contribution is to study the dependence of the model space for a regularity structure on the three-parameter problem involving the spatial dimension, the polynomial order of the nonlinearity, and the exponent of the fractional Laplacian. The goal is to investigate the growth of the model space under parameter variation. In particular, we prove several results in the approaching subcriticality limit leading to universal growth exponents of the regularity structure. A key role is played by the viewpoint that model spaces can be identified with families of rooted trees. Our proofs are based upon a geometrical construction similar to Newton polygons for classical Taylor series and various combinatorial arguments. We also present several explicit examples listing all elements with negative homogeneity by implementing a new symbolic software package to work with regularity structures. We use this package to illustrate our analytical results and to obtain new conjectures regarding coarse-grained network measures for model spaces.

  11. Geometric Structures on Spaces of Weighted Submanifolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Lee

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use a diffeo-geometric framework based on manifolds that are locally modeled on ''convenient'' vector spaces to study the geometry of some infinite dimensional spaces. Given a finite dimensional symplectic manifold (M,ω, we construct a weak symplectic structure on each leaf I_w of a foliation of the space of compact oriented isotropic submanifolds in M equipped with top degree forms of total measure 1. These forms are called weightings and such manifolds are said to be weighted. We show that this symplectic structure on the particular leaves consisting of weighted Lagrangian submanifolds is equivalent to a heuristic weak symplectic structure of Weinstein [Adv. Math. 82 (1990, 133-159]. When the weightings are positive, these symplectic spaces are symplectomorphic to reductions of a weak symplectic structure of Donaldson [Asian J. Math. 3 (1999, 1-15] on the space of embeddings of a fixed compact oriented manifold into M. When M is compact, by generalizing a moment map of Weinstein we construct a symplectomorphism of each leaf I_w consisting of positive weighted isotropic submanifolds onto a coadjoint orbit of the group of Hamiltonian symplectomorphisms of M equipped with the Kirillov-Kostant-Souriau symplectic structure. After defining notions of Poisson algebras and Poisson manifolds, we prove that each space I_w can also be identified with a symplectic leaf of a Poisson structure. Finally, we discuss a kinematic description of spaces of weighted submanifolds.

  12. The structure of visual spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Koenderink, J.J.; van Doorn, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    The “visual space” of an optical observer situated at a single, fixed viewpoint is necessarily very ambiguous. Although the structure of the “visual field” (the lateral dimensions, i.e., the “image”) is well defined, the “depth” dimension has to be inferred from the image on the basis of “monocular depth cues” such as occlusion, shading, etc. Such cues are in no way “given”, but are guesses on the basis of prior knowledge about the generic structure of the world and the laws of optics. Thus s...

  13. The structure of visual spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, J.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070864543; van Doorn, A.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304091294

    2008-01-01

    The “visual space” of an optical observer situated at a single, fixed viewpoint is necessarily very ambiguous. Although the structure of the “visual field” (the lateral dimensions, i.e., the “image”) is well defined, the “depth” dimension has to be inferred from the image on the basis of “monocular

  14. Interval Valued Fuzzy Neutrosophic Soft Structure Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Arockiarani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce the topological structure of interval valued fuzzy neutrosophic soft sets and obtain some of its properties. We also investigate some operators of interval valued fuzzy neutrosophic soft topological space.

  15. SPACE Approach to Concrete's Space Structure and its Mechanical Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroeven, P.; Stroeven, M.

    2001-01-01

    Structural properties of particulate materials can be described in densities of the particle packing, more generally denoted as particle composition. Obviously, this global measure does not offer information on the way particles are mutually arranged in space. This is associated with particle

  16. Structures on the space of financial events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carfi', David

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we endow the space of financial events with some structures, each of them represents basic facts of financial mathematics. We introduce a preordered structure, that we shall call the usual preorder of the financial events plane, and an algebraic structure, that we call the usual linearoid structure of the financial events plane. The algebraic structures introduced are not void of properties: the usual addition will confer to the space a gruppoid structure and the multiplication by scalars will be a law of action associative and distributive with respect to the addition. We shall prove that these structures are compatible among them and with the standard topology of the plane. Then we show the possibility of defining new (economically relevant preorders by the use of capitalization factors and that there is a manner (the conjunction to obtain the usual preorder from infinite continuous families of these new preorders induced by a capitalization factor.

  17. Structural optimization of some space camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Wu, Mengyuan; Hu, Bin; Li, Xuyang

    2017-03-01

    Based on some space camera structure as the research subject, the statics analysis and modal analysis were studied using HyperMesh software. With the first order natural frequency being as constraint object, the topology optimization design of the original structure was made using OptiStruct software, which made the static deformation decrease by 42.4%; the fundamental frequency increase by 12.1%, effectively resolving the problem of the vibration of the circuit board components. Some further studies are necessary for the structure design of space camera.

  18. Neutral Buoyancy Test - Large Space Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. Construction methods had to be efficient due to the limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia and the MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  19. Numerical simulation of controlled large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Ralph

    1989-01-01

    Large Space Structures do not have much damping, which necessitates the installation of a controller onto the structure. If the controller is improperly designed, the structure may become unstable and be destroyed. Since Large Space Structures are extremely expensive pieces of hardware, new controllers must not be tested first on the structure. They must first be tested in computer simulations. Until now, the usual procedure for simulating controlled Large Space Structures is to compute a reduced order modal representation of the structure and then apply the controller. However, this procedure entails modal truncation error. A new software package which is free from this error is currently under development within the Center for Space Construction. The more accurate finite element representation of the structure is used in the simulation, instead of the less accurate reduced order modal representation. This software also features an efficient matrix storage scheme, which effectively deals with the asymmetric system matrices which occur when control is added to the structure. Also, an integration algorithm was chosen so that the simulation is a reliable indicator of system stability or instability. The software package is fairly general in nature. Linearity of the finite element model and of the controller is the only assumption made. Actuator dynamics, sensor dynamics, noise, and disturbances can be handled by the package. In addition, output feedback of displacement, velocity, and/or acceleration signals can be simulated. Kalman state estimation was also implemented. This software was tested on a finite element model of a real Large Space Structure: The Mini-Mast Truss. Mini-Mast is a testbed at NASA-Langley which is currently under development. A 714 degree of freedom finite element model was computed, and a 19 state controller was designed for it. Torque wheel dynamics were added to the model, and the entire closed loop system was simulated with the software

  20. On the structure of physical space

    CERN Document Server

    Wisnivesky, D

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we develop a theory based on the postulate that the environment where physical phenomena take place is the space of four complex parameters of the linear group of transformations. Using these parameters as fundamental building blocks we construct ordinary space-time and the internal space. Lorentz invariance is built in the definition of external space, while the symmetry of the internal space, S(1)*SU(2) results as a consequence of the identification of the external coordinates. Thus, special relativity and the electroweak interaction symmetry ensue from the properties of the basic building blocks of physical space. Since internal and external space are derived from a common structure, there is no need to bring into the theory any additional hypothesis to account for the microscopic nature of the internal space, nor to introduce symmetry breaking mechanisms that would normally be required to force a splitting of the internal and external symmetries. As an outcome of the existence of a basic str...

  1. Carbon composites in space vehicle structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, N. J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent developments in the technology of carbon or graphite filaments now provide the designer with greatly improved materials offering high specific strength and modulus. Besides these advantages are properties which are distinctly useful for space applications and which provide feasibility for missions not obtainable by other means. Current applications include major and secondary structures of communications satellites. A number of R & D projects are exploring carbon-fiber application to rocket engine motor cases, advanced antenna systems, and space shuttle components. Future system studies are being made, based on the successful application of carbon fibers for orbiting space telescope assemblies, orbital transfer vehicles, and very large deployable energy generation systems. Continued technology development is needed in analysis, material standards, and advanced structural concepts to exploit the full potential of carbon filaments in composite materials.

  2. Periodic orbits and TDHF phase space structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Yukio; Iwasawa, Kazuo [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Physics; Tsukuma, Hidehiko; Sakata, Fumihiko

    1998-03-01

    The collective motion of atomic nuclei is closely coupled with the motion of nucleons, therefore, it is nonlinear, and the contents of the motion change largely with the increase of its amplitude. As the framework which describes the collective motion accompanied by the change of internal structure, time-dependent Hurtley Fock (TDHF) method is suitable. At present, the authors try to make the method for studying the large region structure in quantum system by utilizing the features of the TDHF phase space. The studies made so far are briefed. In this report, the correspondence of the large region patterns appearing in the band structure chart of three-level model with the periodic orbit group in the TDHF phase space is described. The Husimi function is made, and it possesses the information on the form of respective corresponding intrinsic state. The method of making the band structure chart is explained. There are three kinds of the tendency in the intrinsic state group. The E-T charts are made for the band structure charts to quantitatively express the large region tendency. The E-T chart and the T{sub r}-T chart are drawn for a selected characteristic orbit group. It became to be known that the large region properties of the quantum intrinsic state group of three-level model can be forecast by examining the properties of the periodic orbit group in the TDHF phase space. (K.I.)

  3. Design and volume optimization of space structures

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Caigui

    2017-07-21

    We study the design and optimization of statically sound and materially efficient space structures constructed by connected beams. We propose a systematic computational framework for the design of space structures that incorporates static soundness, approximation of reference surfaces, boundary alignment, and geometric regularity. To tackle this challenging problem, we first jointly optimize node positions and connectivity through a nonlinear continuous optimization algorithm. Next, with fixed nodes and connectivity, we formulate the assignment of beam cross sections as a mixed-integer programming problem with a bilinear objective function and quadratic constraints. We solve this problem with a novel and practical alternating direction method based on linear programming relaxation. The capability and efficiency of the algorithms and the computational framework are validated by a variety of examples and comparisons.

  4. Space Shuttle Orbiter Structures and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Adam L.; Estes, Lynda R.; Eilers, James A.; Logan, Jeffrey S.; Evernden, Brent A.; Decker, William S.; Hagen, Jeffrey D.; Davis, Robert E.; Broughton, James K.; Campbell, Carlisle C.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter has performed exceptionally well over its 30 years of flight experience. Among the many factors behind this success were robust, yet carefully monitored, structural and mechanical systems. From highlighting key aspects of the design to illustrating lessons learned from the operation of this complex system, this paper will attempt to educate the reader on why some subsystems operated flawlessly and why specific vulnerabilities were exposed in others. Specific areas to be covered will be the following: high level configuration overview, primary and secondary structure, mechanical systems ranging from landing gear to the docking system, and windows.

  5. Control of nonlinear flexible space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianjun

    With the advances made in computer technology and efficiency of numerical algorithms over last decade, the MPC strategies have become quite popular among control community. However, application of MPC or GPC to flexible space structure control has not been explored adequately in the literature. The work presented in this thesis primarily focuses on application of GPC to control of nonlinear flexible space structures. This thesis is particularly devoted to the development of various approximate dynamic models, design and assessment of candidate controllers, and extensive numerical simulations for a realistic multibody flexible spacecraft, namely, Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO)---a Prometheus class of spacecraft proposed by NASA for deep space exploratory missions. A stable GPC algorithm is developed for Multi-Input-Multi-Output (MIMO) systems. An end-point weighting (penalty) is used in the GPC cost function to guarantee the nominal stability of the closed-loop system. A method is given to compute the desired end-point state from the desired output trajectory. The methodologies based on Fake Algebraic Riccati Equation (FARE) and constrained nonlinear optimization, are developed for synthesis of state weighting matrix. This makes this formulation more practical. A stable reconfigurable GPC architecture is presented and its effectiveness is demonstrated on both aircraft as well as spacecraft model. A representative in-orbit maneuver is used for assessing the performance of various control strategies using various design models. Different approximate dynamic models used for analysis include linear single body flexible structure, nonlinear single body flexible structure, and nonlinear multibody flexible structure. The control laws evaluated include traditional GPC, feedback linearization-based GPC (FLGPC), reconfigurable GPC, and nonlinear dissipative control. These various control schemes are evaluated for robust stability and robust performance in the presence of

  6. Structural Properties of Realistic Cultural Space Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Babeanu, Alexandru-Ionut; Garlaschelli, Diego

    2015-01-01

    An interesting sociophysical research problem consists of the compatibility between collective social behavior in the short term and cultural diversity in the long term. Recently, it has been shown that, when studying a model of short term collective behavior in parallel with one of long term cultural diversity, one is lead to the puzzling conclusion that the 2 aspects are mutually exclusive. However, the compatibility is restored when switching from the randomly generated cultural space distribution to an empirical one for specifying the initial conditions in those models. This calls for understanding the extent to which such a compatibility restoration is independent of the empirical data set, as well as the relevant structural properties of such data. Firstly, this work shows that the restoration patterns are largely robust across data sets. Secondly, it provides a possible mechanism explaining the restoration, for the special case when the cultural space is formulated only in terms of nominal variables. T...

  7. CNT Applique for SHM of Space Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space structures are unique in that once they are deployed, there is little to no opportunity for manual inspection to assess their integrity. Even on the space...

  8. Fairing structure for space launch vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-01

    The feasibility of using composite materials for payload fairing structures is discussed, and focus is placed on a series of studies intended to gather data relative to the materials and processes offering potential application to space-vehicle payload fairing. All trade studies used the baseline geometry consisted of a 4-m-diameter cylinder section with a 15-deg/25-deg biconic nose cone. Materials evaluated include aluminum, titanium, aluminum lithium, and carbon fiber composites. In addition to the trade studies, the effects of various nose-cone shapes on cost, weight, and performance are evaluated. Thermal protection systems, acoustic protection, and a jettison system employing metallic rails or joints to split the fairing are analyzed, and the use of composite structures in many areas is viewed as advantageous.

  9. Phase space structures governing reaction dynamics in rotating molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciftci, Unver; Waalkens, Holger

    Recently, the phase space structures governing reaction dynamics in Hamiltonian systems have been identified and algorithms for their explicit construction have been developed. These phase space structures are induced by saddle type equilibrium points which are characteristic for reaction type

  10. Offloading techniques for large deployable space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaggio, Levino; Golob, Alex

    1992-01-01

    The validation and verification of large deployable space structures are continual challenges which face the integration and test engineer today. Spar Aerospace Limited has worked on various programs in which such structure validation was required and faces similar tasks in the future. This testing is reported and the different offloading and deployment methods which were used, as well as the proposed methods which will be used on future programs, are described. Past programs discussed include the Olympus solar array ambient and thermal vacuum deployments, and the Anik-E array and reflector deployments. The proposed MSAT reflector and boom ambient deployment tests, as well as the proposed RADARSAT Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) ambient and thermal vacuum deployment tests will also be presented. A series of tests relating to various component parts of the offloading equipment systems was required. These tests included the characterization and understanding of linear bearings and large (180 in-lbf) constant force spring motors in a thermal vacuum environment, and the results from these tests are presented.

  11. The Perspective Structure of Visual Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkelens, Casper J

    2015-10-01

    Luneburg's model has been the reference for experimental studies of visual space for almost seventy years. His claim for a curved visual space has been a source of inspiration for visual scientists as well as philosophers. The conclusion of many experimental studies has been that Luneburg's model does not describe visual space in various tasks and conditions. Remarkably, no alternative model has been suggested. The current study explores perspective transformations of Euclidean space as a model for visual space. Computations show that the geometry of perspective spaces is considerably different from that of Euclidean space. Collinearity but not parallelism is preserved in perspective space and angles are not invariant under translation and rotation. Similar relationships have shown to be properties of visual space. Alley experiments performed early in the nineteenth century have been instrumental in hypothesizing curved visual spaces. Alleys were computed in perspective space and compared with reconstructed alleys of Blumenfeld. Parallel alleys were accurately described by perspective geometry. Accurate distance alleys were derived from parallel alleys by adjusting the interstimulus distances according to the size-distance invariance hypothesis. Agreement between computed and experimental alleys and accommodation of experimental results that rejected Luneburg's model show that perspective space is an appropriate model for how we perceive orientations and angles. The model is also appropriate for perceived distance ratios between stimuli but fails to predict perceived distances.

  12. The Perspective Structure of Visual Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Luneburg’s model has been the reference for experimental studies of visual space for almost seventy years. His claim for a curved visual space has been a source of inspiration for visual scientists as well as philosophers. The conclusion of many experimental studies has been that Luneburg’s model does not describe visual space in various tasks and conditions. Remarkably, no alternative model has been suggested. The current study explores perspective transformations of Euclidean space as a model for visual space. Computations show that the geometry of perspective spaces is considerably different from that of Euclidean space. Collinearity but not parallelism is preserved in perspective space and angles are not invariant under translation and rotation. Similar relationships have shown to be properties of visual space. Alley experiments performed early in the nineteenth century have been instrumental in hypothesizing curved visual spaces. Alleys were computed in perspective space and compared with reconstructed alleys of Blumenfeld. Parallel alleys were accurately described by perspective geometry. Accurate distance alleys were derived from parallel alleys by adjusting the interstimulus distances according to the size-distance invariance hypothesis. Agreement between computed and experimental alleys and accommodation of experimental results that rejected Luneburg’s model show that perspective space is an appropriate model for how we perceive orientations and angles. The model is also appropriate for perceived distance ratios between stimuli but fails to predict perceived distances. PMID:27648222

  13. Active rejection of persistent disturbances in flexible space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Cheng-Neng; Jayasuriya, Suhada; Parlos, Alexander G.; Sunkel, John W.

    1990-01-01

    A dynamic compensator for active rejection of persistent disturbances in flexible space structures is designed on the principle of the H(infinity)-optimization of the sensitivity transfer function matrix. A general state space solution is formulated to the multiinput multioutput H(infinity)-optimal control problem, allowing the use of the H(infinity)-optimal synthesis algorithm for the state-space models of space structures that result from model order reduction. Disturbances encountered in flexible space structures, such as shuttle docking, are investigated using the high-mode and the reduced-order models of a cantilevered two-bay truss, demonstrating the applicability of the H(infinity)-optimal approach.

  14. Graphene for Expandable Space Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Graphene's tightly bonded impermeable single atomic layer of carbon offers unrivalled potential for lightweight flexible gas barrier applications. Graphene has been...

  15. The perspective structure of visual space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkelens, C.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069562296

    2015-01-01

    Luneburg’s model has been the reference for experimental studies of visual space for almost seventy years. His claim for a curved visual space has been a source of inspiration for visual scientists as well as philosophers. The conclusion of many experimental studies has been that Luneburg’s model

  16. Ultra-Lightweight Nanocomposite Foams and Sandwich Structures for Space Structures Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space structures that are ultra-lightweight, and have gas barrier property, space durability, radiation resistance and high impact resistance are desirable to...

  17. Ultra-Lightweight Nanocomposite Foams and Sandwich Structures for Space Structures Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space structures that are ultra-lightweight, and have gas barrier property, space durability, radiation resistance, EMI shielding, and high impact resistance are...

  18. Geometric structures on loop and path spaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in M. This is naturally a Fréchet manifold. The tangent space to L(M) at a loop γ is. Tγ L(M) ∼= (S1,γ∗TM). The loop space L(M) is equipped with a natural section of its tangent bundle defined as ξ: L(M) → T L(M) γ ↦→ γ . Whenever we fix a Riemannian metric g on M, we can define an associated weak metric on the space of ...

  19. Schools as Racial Spaces: Understanding and Resisting Structural Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaisdell, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing schools as racial spaces can help researchers examine the role of teachers in the perpetuation of structural racism in schools. Based on ethnographic and autoethnographic work, this article offers examples of schools as racial spaces, spaces where whiteness controlled access. It also highlights four teachers who pursued racial equity in…

  20. Language dynamics in structured form and meaning spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, B.; Verhoef, T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews how the structure of form and meaning spaces influences the nature and the dynamics of the form-meaning mappings in language. In general, in a structured form or meaning space, not all forms and meanings are equivalent: some forms and some meanings are more easily confused with

  1. Large Space Instrumentation to Measure the Interaction between Space Structures and the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    on the various measurements of the interaction between the space structure and the environment . During the first phase, the effort was concentrated on...between space structures and the environment . Four measurements and their instrumentation were conceived and suggested to the IMPS Definition Team. These are summarized here. (Author)

  2. 11th International Space Conference on Protection of Materials and Structures from Space Environment

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The proceedings published in this book document and foster the goals of the 11th International Space Conference on “Protection of Materials and Structures from Space Environment” ICPMSE-11 to facilitate exchanges between members of the various engineering and science disciplines involved in the development of space materials. Contributions cover aspects of interaction with space environment of LEO, GEO, Deep Space, Planetary environments, ground-based qualification and in-flight experiments, as well as lessons learned from operational vehicles that are closely interrelated to disciplines of atmospheric sciences, solar-terrestrial interactions and space life sciences.

  3. Space time manifolds and contact structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Duggal

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A new class of contact manifolds (carring a global non-vanishing timelike vector field is introduced to establish a relation between spacetime manifolds and contact structures. We show that odd dimensional strongly causal (in particular, globally hyperbolic spacetimes can carry a regular contact structure. As examples, we present a causal spacetime with a non regular contact structure and a physical model [Gödel Universe] of Homogeneous contact manifold. Finally, we construct a model of 4-dimensional spacetime of general relativity as a contact CR-submanifold.

  4. PSI-2: structural genomics to cover protein domain family space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessailly, Benoît H; Nair, Rajesh; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Fajardo, J Eduardo; Kouranov, Andrei; Lee, David; Fiser, Andras; Godzik, Adam; Rost, Burkhard; Orengo, Christine

    2009-06-10

    One major objective of structural genomics efforts, including the NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiative (PSI), has been to increase the structural coverage of protein sequence space. Here, we present the target selection strategy used during the second phase of PSI (PSI-2). This strategy, jointly devised by the bioinformatics groups associated with the PSI-2 large-scale production centers, targets representatives from large, structurally uncharacterized protein domain families, and from structurally uncharacterized subfamilies in very large and diverse families with incomplete structural coverage. These very large families are extremely diverse both structurally and functionally, and are highly overrepresented in known proteomes. On the basis of several metrics, we then discuss to what extent PSI-2, during its first 3 years, has increased the structural coverage of genomes, and contributed structural and functional novelty. Together, the results presented here suggest that PSI-2 is successfully meeting its objectives and provides useful insights into structural and functional space.

  5. Redshift-space limits of bound structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duenner, Rolando; Reisenegger, Andreas; Meza, Andres; Araya, Pablo A.; Quintana, Hernan

    2007-01-01

    An exponentially expanding Universe, possibly governed by a cosmological constant, forces gravitationally bound structures to become more and more isolated, eventually becoming causally disconnected from each other and forming so-called 'island universes'. This new scenario reformulates the question

  6. Diaphragm Effect of Steel Space Roof Systems in Hall Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet FENKLİ

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hall structures have been used widely for different purposes. They have are reinforced concrete frames and shear wall with steel space roof systems. Earthquake response of hall structures is different from building type structures. One of the most critical nodes is diaphragm effect of steel space roof on earthquake response of hall structures. Diaphragm effect is depending on lateral stiffness capacity of steel space roof system. Lateral stiffness of steel space roof system is related to modulation geometry, support conditions, selected sections and system geometry. In current paper, three representative models which are commonly used in Turkey were taken in to account for investigation. Results of numerical tests were present comparatively

  7. Simulating Nonlinear Dynamics of Deployable Space Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To support NASA's vital interest in developing much larger solar array structures over the next 20 years, MotionPort LLC's Phase I SBIR project will strengthen...

  8. Track structure model of cell damage in space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Robert; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Ngo, Duc M.

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenological track-structure model of cell damage is discussed. A description of the application of the track-structure model with the NASA Langley transport code for laboratory and space radiation is given. Comparisons to experimental results for cell survival during exposure to monoenergetic, heavy-ion beams are made. The model is also applied to predict cell damage rates and relative biological effectiveness for deep-space exposures.

  9. Fabrication of composite shell structure for advanced space transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penton, A. P.; Johnson, R., Jr.; Freeman, V. L.

    1978-01-01

    It is pointed out that future space missions, such as those involving spacecraft and structural assemblies to be used in geosynchronous orbits, will require ultralightweight composite structures to achieve maximum payloads. Of equal importance is the requirement to provide designs that are cost-competitive with metal designs. For space structures that must resist buckling, graphite-epoxy materials offer an attractive potential for providing lightweight, low-cost structural components that will meet future space mission requirements. A description is presented of a program which was conducted to evaluate the merits of graphite-epoxy cylindrical shells and to continue the development of a design data base for ultralightweight structures. An objective of the program was to design, fabricate, and test a corrugated graphite-epoxy cylinder 10 ft in diameter and 10 ft long.

  10. Structuring virtual spaces as television places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, CarrieLynn D.

    of social interaction.  Cable network SciFi Channel produced “live events” to allow limited narrative interaction.  Independent producer Metanomics created a virtual “talk show” to encourage both social interaction and narrative interaction.  The analysis is set into a larger theoretical framework...... considering how these Internet-based interactive television examples demonstrate the remediation of conventional conceptualizations of television distribution structures and consumption practices, which then indicate the power dynamics of the producer-consumer relationship.  The form in which...

  11. Identification of Large Space Structures on Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    Universal Nonlinear Filter, Predictor and Simulator Which Optimizes Itself by a Learning Process," IEEE, 108B, pp. 422.438. 19. George , D. A., "Continuous...the Astronautical Sciences, Vol. 33, No. 1, Jan-March, 1985, pp. 95-118. 182. Ewins, D.J. and P.T. Gleeson , "A Method for Modal Identification of...Auto. Cont. Vol. AC-22, Pp. 26-35, 1977. Ewins, D. J., and P. T. Gleeson , "A Method for Modal Identification of Lightly Damped Structures", J. Sound

  12. Integrated fiber optic structural health sensors for inflatable space habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohanian, Osgar John; Garg, Naman; Castellucci, Matthew A.

    2017-04-01

    Inflatable space habitats offer many advantages for future space missions; however, the long term integrity of these flexible structures is a major concern in harsh space environments. Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of these structures is essential to ensure safe operation, provide early warnings of damage, and measure structural changes over long periods of time. To address this problem, the authors have integrated distributed fiber optic strain sensors to measure loading and to identify the occurrence and location of damage in the straps and webbing used in the structural restraint layer. The fiber optic sensors employed use Rayleigh backscatter combined with optical frequency domain reflectometry to enable measurement of strain every 0.65 mm (0.026 inches) along the sensor. The Kevlar woven straps that were tested exhibited large permanent deformation during initial cycling and continued to exhibit hysteresis thereafter, but there was a consistent linear relationship between the sensor's measurement and the actual strain applied. Damage was intentionally applied to a tensioned strap, and the distributed strain measurement clearly identified a change in the strain profile centered on the location of the damage. This change in structural health was identified at a loading that was less than half of the ultimate loading that caused a structural failure. This sensing technique will be used to enable integrated SHM sensors to detect loading and damage in future inflatable space habitat structures.

  13. Neutral Buoyancy Test - NB-18 - Large Space Structure Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. Construction methods had to be efficient due to the limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia and the MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  14. High-Resolution Reciprocal Space Mapping for Characterizing Deformation Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Wolfgang; Wejdemann, Christian; Jakobsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    With high-angular resolution three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD), quantitative information is gained about dislocation structures in individual grains in the bulk of a macroscopic specimen by acquiring reciprocal space maps. In high-resolution 3D reciprocal space maps of tensile...... dynamics is followed in situ during varying loading conditions by reciprocal space mapping: during uninterrupted tensile deformation, formation of subgrains is observed concurrently with broadening of Bragg reflections shortly after the onset of plastic deformation. When the traction is terminated, stress...

  15. K-nearest uphill clustering in the protein structure space

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Xuefeng

    2016-08-26

    The protein structure classification problem, which is to assign a protein structure to a cluster of similar proteins, is one of the most fundamental problems in the construction and application of the protein structure space. Early manually curated protein structure classifications (e.g., SCOP and CATH) are very successful, but recently suffer the slow updating problem because of the increased throughput of newly solved protein structures. Thus, fully automatic methods to cluster proteins in the protein structure space have been designed and developed. In this study, we observed that the SCOP superfamilies are highly consistent with clustering trees representing hierarchical clustering procedures, but the tree cutting is very challenging and becomes the bottleneck of clustering accuracy. To overcome this challenge, we proposed a novel density-based K-nearest uphill clustering method that effectively eliminates noisy pairwise protein structure similarities and identifies density peaks as cluster centers. Specifically, the density peaks are identified based on K-nearest uphills (i.e., proteins with higher densities) and K-nearest neighbors. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to apply and develop density-based clustering methods in the protein structure space. Our results show that our density-based clustering method outperforms the state-of-the-art clustering methods previously applied to the problem. Moreover, we observed that computational methods and human experts could produce highly similar clusters at high precision values, while computational methods also suggest to split some large superfamilies into smaller clusters. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  16. A robot in space as a large space structures control experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gran, R.

    1983-01-01

    The control systems design issues for large space structures can be addressed by a robotics experiment which defines a teleoperator or a robot or uses the RMS. The robotics control demonstration brings the large space structures control technology to an effective state of readiness and provides a useful robot when the experiment is finished. Three major options in such an experiment are the RMS, a flexible arm that is going to be put on the Shuttle for other reasons, or a dexetrous manipulator or teleoperator.

  17. Hybrid open public space of landscape elements and built structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Bence

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The trend today in the cities in Europe and elsewhere is in combining landscape elements, built structure and different uses into a complex urban structure. Physical and program interweaving of landscape elements and built structure enables the consumers daily practice of leisure programs – relaxation, recreation and experiencing other cultural, educational and social events in the public green space. On the basis of determinate social changes and new approaches in urban planning practice, analyses of architectural and urban case studies from the point of view of integrating the landscape elements into the urban structure, the article defines the phenomenon of hybrid open public space and proposes methodical guidelines for the planning.

  18. Expert systems for adaptive control of large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Charles F.

    1988-01-01

    It is expected that space systems for the future will evolve to structures of unprecedented size with associated extreme control requirements. A method is necessary that is sufficiently general to initiate stable control of a vehicle and subsequently learn the true nature of the structure. It is suggested that a suitable constructed expert system (ES) would be capable of learning by appending observations to a knowledge base. To verify that an ES can control a large space structure, numerical simulations of a simple structure subjected to periodic vibrations and the performance of a classical controllers were performed. The ES was then exercised to show its ability to truthfully mimic nominal control and to demonstrate its superiority to the classical controller, given sensor failures. An ES generating software package, The Intelligent Machine Model, was employed. It uses the pattern matching technique. Results of this program are discussed.

  19. Structures that Include a Semi-Outdoor Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papachristou, C.; Foteinaki, Kyriaki; Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    2016-01-01

    The thermal environment of buildings with a second "skin" and semi-outdoor space is examined in the present study. A literature review was conducted on similar structures and only a few studies were found focusing on the thermal environment. Two different building case studies were chosen...... with different building and shield geometry, different levels of insulation but same shield material; Dome of Visions (DoV) and EMBRACE. Both buildings were modelled in IDA ICE 4.6.2 simulation software in order to assess the thermal environment of the building and assess how long the semi outdoor space of each...... building can be used by the occupants. The study was based on weather data for Copenhagen. In addition to the simulations, physical measurements were performed in DoV to assess the thermal environment in the semi-outdoor space. Since existing standards are not applicable for semi-outdoor spaces...

  20. Quark mass functions and pion structure in Minkowski space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biernat, Elmer P. [CFTP, Institute Superior Tecnico; Gross, Franz L. [JLAB; Pena, Maria Teresa [CFTP, Institute Superior Tecnico; Stadler, Alfred [University of Evora

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the dressed quark mass function and the pion structure in Minkowski space using the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST). The quark propagators are dressed with the same kernel that describes the interaction between different quarks. We use an interaction kernel in momentum space that is a relativistic generalization of the linear confining q-qbar potential and a constant potential shift that defines the energy scale. The confining interaction has a Lorentz scalar part that is not chirally invariant by itself but decouples from the equations in the chiral limit and therefore allows the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (NJL) mechanism to work. We adjust the parameters of our quark mass function calculated in Minkowski-space to agree with LQCD data obtained in Euclidean space. Results of a calculation of the pion electromagnetic form factor in the relativistic impulse approximation using the same mass function are presented and compared with experimental data.

  1. Identification of structured LTI MIMO state-space models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, C.; Verhaegen, M.H.G.; Kovalsky, S; Basri, R; Valcher, ME; Ohta, Y; Sampei, M

    2015-01-01

    The identification of structured state-space model has been intensively studied for a long time but still has not been adequately addressed. The main challenge is that the involved estimation problem is a non-convex (or bilinear) optimization problem. This paper is devoted to developing an

  2. Assessment of dynamic analyses for deploying space truss structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, D.; Housner, J.

    1984-01-01

    A selected list of references on the analysis of the deployment concepts for large space truss structures are reviewed. The stability of the deployment process is discussed, and stable methods of deployment mentioned. Analytical and experimental needs to assess feasibility and performance of proposed deployment concepts are outlined.

  3. Stationary space-periodic structures with equal diffusion coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Peter Ragnar; Bache, Morten; Mosekilde, Erik

    1999-01-01

    The paper investigates a chemical reaction-diffusion model in an open flow system. It is shown that such a system may, with particular boundary conditions, exhibit stationary space-periodic structures even in the case of equal diffusion coefficients. This is confirmed through numerical simulations....

  4. Three real-space discretization techniques in electronic structure calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torsti, T; Eirola, T; Enkovaara, J; Hakala, T; Havu, P; Havu, [No Value; Hoynalanmaa, T; Ignatius, J; Lyly, M; Makkonen, [No Value; Rantala, TT; Ruokolainen, J; Ruotsalainen, K; Rasanen, E; Saarikoski, H; Puska, MJ

    A characteristic feature of the state-of-the-art of real-space methods in electronic structure calculations is the diversity of the techniques used in the discretization of the relevant partial differential equations. In this context, the main approaches include finite-difference methods, various

  5. "Shell and space structures in modern engineering: Challenges and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    "Shell and space structures in modern engineering: Challenges and opportunities" - An Inaugural Lecture. A Zingoni. Abstract. An Inaugural Lecture Given in the University of Zimbabwe On 4 July 2001. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  6. Practical design of low-cost large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Mikulas, M. M., Jr.; Macneal, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    The practical design of low-cost space structures involves the use of approaches that reduce the cost of the design and development effort itself. Such approaches include: (1) design with criteria arrived at rationally; (2) design for simplicity, repeatability, and modularity; (3) assembly without adjustments; (4) design for testability on the ground; (5) the attainment of structural efficiency by configuration and material choice rather than by squeezing down on the design margins; and (6) prefabrication and preassembly before launch. Attention is given to truss platform designs, and the Seasat Extendible Support Structure is discussed as a particular example.

  7. Adaptive and learning control of large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, R. C.; Thau, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the adaptive learning system for space operations which assumes that structural testing can be conducted during deployment and assembly. Simulation results using the solar electric propulsion array and a novel remote sensor are presented; they involve faster scan television coverage of the motions of the array from four cameras on the corners of the Space Shuttle payload bay. The description of the simulation, the filtering algorithm for processing the TV data, the parameter extraction algorithm, and the simulation results are presented.

  8. Active disturbance rejection in large flexible space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Sunkel, John W.

    1990-01-01

    The design of an active control law for the rejection of persistent disturbances, in large space structures is presented. The control system design approach is based on a deterministic model of the disturbances and it optimizes the magnitude of the disturbance that the structure can tolerate without violating certain predetermined constraints. In addition to closed-loop stability, the explicit treatment of state, control, and control rate constraints, such as structural displacement and control actuator effort, guarantees that the final design will exhibit desired performance characteristics. The technique is applied to a simple two-bay truss structure, and its response is compared with that obtained using a linear-quadratic-Gaussian/loop-transfer-recovery (LQG/LTR) compensator. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed control system can reject persistent disturbances of greater magnitude by utilizing most of the available control, while limiting the structural displacements to within desired tolerances.

  9. Structural Dynamics Experimental Activities in Ultra-Lightweight and Inflatable Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Lassiter, John O.; Ross, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports recently completed structural dynamics experimental activities with new ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures (a.k.a., "Gossamer" spacecraft) at NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Nine aspects of this work are covered: 1) inflated, rigidized tubes, 2) active control experiments, 3) photogrammetry, 4) laser vibrometry, 5) modal tests of inflatable structures, 6) in-vacuum modal tests, 7) tensioned membranes, 8) deployment tests, and 9) flight experiment support. Structural dynamics will play a major role in the design and eventually in-space deployment and performance of Gossamer spacecraft. Experimental research and development such as this is required to validate new analysis methods. The activities discussed in the paper are pathfinder accomplishments. conducted on unique components and prototypes of future spacecraft systems.

  10. Spaced Seed Data Structures for De Novo Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inanç Birol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available De novo assembly of the genome of a species is essential in the absence of a reference genome sequence. Many scalable assembly algorithms use the de Bruijn graph (DBG paradigm to reconstruct genomes, where a table of subsequences of a certain length is derived from the reads, and their overlaps are analyzed to assemble sequences. Despite longer subsequences unlocking longer genomic features for assembly, associated increase in compute resources limits the practicability of DBG over other assembly archetypes already designed for longer reads. Here, we revisit the DBG paradigm to adapt it to the changing sequencing technology landscape and introduce three data structure designs for spaced seeds in the form of paired subsequences. These data structures address memory and run time constraints imposed by longer reads. We observe that when a fixed distance separates seed pairs, it provides increased sequence specificity with increased gap length. Further, we note that Bloom filters would be suitable to implicitly store spaced seeds and be tolerant to sequencing errors. Building on this concept, we describe a data structure for tracking the frequencies of observed spaced seeds. These data structure designs will have applications in genome, transcriptome and metagenome assemblies, and read error correction.

  11. Space Assembly of Large Structural System Architectures (SALSSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, John T.; Watson, Judith J.

    2016-01-01

    Developing a robust capability for Space Assembly of Large Spacecraft Structural System Architectures (SALSSA) has the potential to drastically increase the capabilities and performance of future space missions and spacecraft while significantly reducing their cost. Currently, NASA architecture studies and space science decadal surveys identify new missions that would benefit from SALSSA capabilities, and the technologies that support SALSSA are interspersed throughout the fourteen NASA Technology Roadmaps. However, a major impediment to the strategic development of cross-cutting SALSSA technologies is the lack of an integrated and comprehensive compilation of the necessary information. This paper summarizes the results of a small study that used an integrated approach to formulate a SALSSA roadmap and associated plan for developing key SALSSA technologies.

  12. Multivariate time series with linear state space structure

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive study of multivariate time series with linear state space structure. The emphasis is put on both the clarity of the theoretical concepts and on efficient algorithms for implementing the theory. In particular, it investigates the relationship between VARMA and state space models, including canonical forms. It also highlights the relationship between Wiener-Kolmogorov and Kalman filtering both with an infinite and a finite sample. The strength of the book also lies in the numerous algorithms included for state space models that take advantage of the recursive nature of the models. Many of these algorithms can be made robust, fast, reliable and efficient. The book is accompanied by a MATLAB package called SSMMATLAB and a webpage presenting implemented algorithms with many examples and case studies. Though it lays a solid theoretical foundation, the book also focuses on practical application, and includes exercises in each chapter. It is intended for researchers and students wor...

  13. Structural alphabets derived from attractors in conformational space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The hierarchical and partially redundant nature of protein structures justifies the definition of frequently occurring conformations of short fragments as 'states'. Collections of selected representatives for these states define Structural Alphabets, describing the most typical local conformations within protein structures. These alphabets form a bridge between the string-oriented methods of sequence analysis and the coordinate-oriented methods of protein structure analysis. Results A Structural Alphabet has been derived by clustering all four-residue fragments of a high-resolution subset of the protein data bank and extracting the high-density states as representative conformational states. Each fragment is uniquely defined by a set of three independent angles corresponding to its degrees of freedom, capturing in simple and intuitive terms the properties of the conformational space. The fragments of the Structural Alphabet are equivalent to the conformational attractors and therefore yield a most informative encoding of proteins. Proteins can be reconstructed within the experimental uncertainty in structure determination and ensembles of structures can be encoded with accuracy and robustness. Conclusions The density-based Structural Alphabet provides a novel tool to describe local conformations and it is specifically suitable for application in studies of protein dynamics. PMID:20170534

  14. Structural alphabets derived from attractors in conformational space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandini, Alessandro; Fornili, Arianna; Kleinjung, Jens

    2010-02-20

    The hierarchical and partially redundant nature of protein structures justifies the definition of frequently occurring conformations of short fragments as 'states'. Collections of selected representatives for these states define Structural Alphabets, describing the most typical local conformations within protein structures. These alphabets form a bridge between the string-oriented methods of sequence analysis and the coordinate-oriented methods of protein structure analysis. A Structural Alphabet has been derived by clustering all four-residue fragments of a high-resolution subset of the protein data bank and extracting the high-density states as representative conformational states. Each fragment is uniquely defined by a set of three independent angles corresponding to its degrees of freedom, capturing in simple and intuitive terms the properties of the conformational space. The fragments of the Structural Alphabet are equivalent to the conformational attractors and therefore yield a most informative encoding of proteins. Proteins can be reconstructed within the experimental uncertainty in structure determination and ensembles of structures can be encoded with accuracy and robustness. The density-based Structural Alphabet provides a novel tool to describe local conformations and it is specifically suitable for application in studies of protein dynamics.

  15. Structural alphabets derived from attractors in conformational space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinjung Jens

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hierarchical and partially redundant nature of protein structures justifies the definition of frequently occurring conformations of short fragments as 'states'. Collections of selected representatives for these states define Structural Alphabets, describing the most typical local conformations within protein structures. These alphabets form a bridge between the string-oriented methods of sequence analysis and the coordinate-oriented methods of protein structure analysis. Results A Structural Alphabet has been derived by clustering all four-residue fragments of a high-resolution subset of the protein data bank and extracting the high-density states as representative conformational states. Each fragment is uniquely defined by a set of three independent angles corresponding to its degrees of freedom, capturing in simple and intuitive terms the properties of the conformational space. The fragments of the Structural Alphabet are equivalent to the conformational attractors and therefore yield a most informative encoding of proteins. Proteins can be reconstructed within the experimental uncertainty in structure determination and ensembles of structures can be encoded with accuracy and robustness. Conclusions The density-based Structural Alphabet provides a novel tool to describe local conformations and it is specifically suitable for application in studies of protein dynamics.

  16. Capturing structure-activity relationships from chemogenomic spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Bernd; Uhrig, Ulrike; Bös, Fabian

    2011-04-25

    Modeling off-target effects is one major goal of chemical biology, particularly in its applications to drug discovery. Here, we describe a new approach that allows the extraction of structure-activity relationships from large chemogenomic spaces starting from a single chemical structure. Several public source databases, offering a vast amount of data on structure and activity for a large number of different targets, have been investigated for their usefulness in automated structure-activity relationships (SAR) extraction. SAR tables were constructed by assembling similar structures around each query structure that have an activity record for a particular target. Quantitative series enrichment analysis (QSEA) was applied to these SAR tables to identify trends and to transform these trends into topomer CoMFA models. Overall more than 1700 SAR tables with topomer CoMFA models have been obtained from the ChEMBL, PubChem, and ChemBank databases. These models were able to highlight the structural trends associated with various off-target effects of marketed drugs, including cases where other structural similarity metrics would not have detected an off-target effect. These results indicate the usefulness of the QSEA approach, particularly whenever applicable with public databases, in providing a new means, beyond a simple similarity between ligand structures, to capture SAR trends and thereby contribute to success in drug discovery.

  17. CMsearch: simultaneous exploration of protein sequence space and structure space improves not only protein homology detection but also protein structure prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Xuefeng

    2016-06-15

    Motivation: Protein homology detection, a fundamental problem in computational biology, is an indispensable step toward predicting protein structures and understanding protein functions. Despite the advances in recent decades on sequence alignment, threading and alignment-free methods, protein homology detection remains a challenging open problem. Recently, network methods that try to find transitive paths in the protein structure space demonstrate the importance of incorporating network information of the structure space. Yet, current methods merge the sequence space and the structure space into a single space, and thus introduce inconsistency in combining different sources of information. Method: We present a novel network-based protein homology detection method, CMsearch, based on cross-modal learning. Instead of exploring a single network built from the mixture of sequence and structure space information, CMsearch builds two separate networks to represent the sequence space and the structure space. It then learns sequence–structure correlation by simultaneously taking sequence information, structure information, sequence space information and structure space information into consideration. Results: We tested CMsearch on two challenging tasks, protein homology detection and protein structure prediction, by querying all 8332 PDB40 proteins. Our results demonstrate that CMsearch is insensitive to the similarity metrics used to define the sequence and the structure spaces. By using HMM–HMM alignment as the sequence similarity metric, CMsearch clearly outperforms state-of-the-art homology detection methods and the CASP-winning template-based protein structure prediction methods.

  18. On Weil homomorphism in locally free sheaves over structured spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falkiewicz Ewa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the work of Heller and Sasin [1], we construct in this paper Weil homomorphism in a locally free sheaf W of ϕ-fields [2] over a structured space. We introduce the notion of G-consistent, linear connection on this sheaf, what allows us to clearly define Chern, Pontrjagin and Euler characteristic classes. We also show proper equalities between those classes.

  19. Classification of compact homogeneous spaces with invariant G(2)-structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le, Hong-Van; Munir, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 2 (2012), s. 303-328 ISSN 1615-715X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190701 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : compact homogeneous space * G(2)-structure Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.371, year: 2012 http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/advg.2012.12.issue-2/advgeom.2011.054/advgeom.2011.054. xml

  20. Structural analysis based on state-space modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stultz, C M; White, J V; Smith, T F

    1993-03-01

    A new method has been developed to compute the probability that each amino acid in a protein sequence is in a particular secondary structural element. Each of these probabilities is computed using the entire sequence and a set of predefined structural class models. This set of structural classes is patterned after Jane Richardson's taxonomy for the domains of globular proteins. For each structural class considered, a mathematical model is constructed to represent constraints on the pattern of secondary structural elements characteristic of that class. These are stochastic models having discrete state spaces (referred to as hidden Markov models by researchers in signal processing and automatic speech recognition). Each model is a mathematical generator of amino acid sequences; the sequence under consideration is modeled as having been generated by one model in the set of candidates. The probability that each model generated the given sequence is computed using a filtering algorithm. The protein is then classified as belonging to the structural class having the most probable model. The secondary structure of the sequence is then analyzed using a "smoothing" algorithm that is optimal for that structural class model. For each residue position in the sequence, the smoother computes the probability that the residue is contained within each of the defined secondary structural elements of the model. This method has two important advantages: (1) the probability of each residue being in each of the modeled secondary structural elements is computed using the totality of the amino acid sequence, and (2) these probabilities are consistent with prior knowledge of realizable domain folds as encoded in each model. As an example of the method's utility, we present its application to flavodoxin, a prototypical alpha/beta protein having a central beta-sheet, and to thioredoxin, which belongs to a similar structural class but shares no significant sequence similarity.

  1. Nanotube structures, methods of making nanotube structures, and methods of accessing intracellular space

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDersarl, Jules J.; Xu, Alexander M.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Tayebi, Noureddine

    2016-02-23

    In accordance with the purpose(s) of the present disclosure, as embodied and broadly described herein, embodiments of the present disclosure, in one aspect, relate to methods of making a structure including nanotubes, a structure including nanotubes, methods of delivering a fluid to a cell, methods of removing a fluid to a cell, methods of accessing intracellular space, and the like.

  2. Unexpected Control Structure Interaction on International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Susan F.; Platonov, Valery; Medina, Elizabeth A.; Borisenko, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    On June 23, 2011, the International Space Station (ISS) was performing a routine 180 degree yaw maneuver in support of a Russian vehicle docking when the on board Russian Segment (RS) software unexpectedly declared two attitude thrusters failed and switched thruster configurations in response to unanticipated ISS dynamic motion. Flight data analysis after the maneuver indicated that higher than predicted structural loads had been induced at various locations on the United States (U.S.) segment of the ISS. Further analysis revealed that the attitude control system was firing thrusters in response to both structural flex and rigid body rates, which resonated the structure and caused high loads and fatigue cycles. It was later determined that the thruster themselves were healthy. The RS software logic, which was intended to react to thruster failures, had instead been heavily influenced by interaction between the control system and structural flex. This paper will discuss the technical aspects of the control structure interaction problem that led to the RS control system firing thrusters in response to structural flex, the factors that led to insufficient preflight analysis of the thruster firings, and the ramifications the event had on the ISS. An immediate consequence included limiting which thrusters could be used for attitude control. This complicated the planning of on-orbit thruster events and necessitated the use of suboptimal thruster configurations that increased propellant usage and caused thruster lifetime usage concerns. In addition to the technical aspects of the problem, the team dynamics and communication shortcomings that led to such an event happening in an environment where extensive analysis is performed in support of human space flight will also be examined. Finally, the technical solution will be presented, which required a multidisciplinary effort between the U.S. and Russian control system engineers and loads and dynamics structural engineers to

  3. Condition Based Maintenance of Space Exploration Vehicles Using Structural Health Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Acellent Technologies proposes to develop an autonomous and automated diagnostic system for condition based maintenance (CBM) of safety critical structures for space...

  4. Structured functional additive regression in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongxiao; Yao, Fang; Zhang, Hao Helen

    2014-06-01

    Functional additive models (FAMs) provide a flexible yet simple framework for regressions involving functional predictors. The utilization of data-driven basis in an additive rather than linear structure naturally extends the classical functional linear model. However, the critical issue of selecting nonlinear additive components has been less studied. In this work, we propose a new regularization framework for the structure estimation in the context of Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces. The proposed approach takes advantage of the functional principal components which greatly facilitates the implementation and the theoretical analysis. The selection and estimation are achieved by penalized least squares using a penalty which encourages the sparse structure of the additive components. Theoretical properties such as the rate of convergence are investigated. The empirical performance is demonstrated through simulation studies and a real data application.

  5. The damper placement problem for large flexible space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1992-01-01

    The damper placement problem for large flexible space truss structures is formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem. The objective is to determine the p truss members of the structure to replace with active (or passive) dampers so that the modal damping ratio is as large as possible for all significant modes of vibration. Equivalently, given a strain energy matrix with rows indexed on the modes and the columns indexed on the truss members, we seek to find the set of p columns such that the smallest row sum, over the p columns, is maximized. We develop a tabu search heuristic for the damper placement problems on the Controls Structures Interaction (CSI) Phase 1 Evolutionary Model (10 modes and 1507 truss members). The resulting solutions are shown to be of high quality.

  6. Dot-Projection Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry of Gossamer Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Black, Jonathan T.; Blandino, Joseph R.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.; Dorrington, Adrian A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper documents the technique of using hundreds or thousands of projected dots of light as targets for photogrammetry and videogrammetry of gossamer space structures. Photogrammetry calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of each target on the structure, and videogrammetry tracks the coordinates versus time. Gossamer structures characteristically contain large areas of delicate, thin-film membranes. Examples include solar sails, large antennas, inflatable solar arrays, solar power concentrators and transmitters, sun shields, and planetary balloons and habitats. Using projected-dot targets avoids the unwanted mass, stiffness, and installation costs of traditional retroreflective adhesive targets. Four laboratory applications are covered that demonstrate the practical effectiveness of white-light dot projection for both static-shape and dynamic measurement of reflective and diffuse surfaces, respectively. Comparisons are made between dot-projection videogrammetry and traditional laser vibrometry for membrane vibration measurements. The paper closes by introducing a promising extension of existing techniques using a novel laser-induced fluorescence approach.

  7. Stable structures in parameter space and optimal ratchet transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestino, A.; Manchein, C.; Albuquerque, H. A.; Beims, M. W.

    2014-01-01

    Optimal ratchet currents are shown to be directly connected, for all parameters combinations of the ratchet model, to Isoperiodic Stable Structures (ISSs), which are believed to be generic in the parameter spaces of nonlinear dynamical systems. As the ratchet current is more efficient inside the ISSs, which usually are located in preferred direction in the parameter space, it allows us to make crucial statements about the relevant parameters combination to obtain an optimal transport. This is important from the theoretical point of view and for possible experimental realization of efficient currents. We provide an extensive numerical description of the ratchet current throughout the parameters and indicate a trio of ISSs (cusp, non-cusp and shrimp-like), which exist in all pairwise combinations of ratchet parameters. This suggests the general behavior of the ISSs in the context of ratchet transport.

  8. Pre-Big Bang, space-time structure, asymptotic Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Mestres Luis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Planck and other recent data in Cosmology and Particle Physics can open the way to controversial analyses concerning the early Universe and its possible ultimate origin. Alternatives to standard cosmology include pre-Big Bang approaches, new space-time geometries and new ultimate constituents of matter. Basic issues related to a possible new cosmology along these lines clearly deserve further exploration. The Planck collaboration reports an age of the Universe t close to 13.8 Gyr and a present ratio H between relative speeds and distances at cosmic scale around 67.3 km/s/Mpc. The product of these two measured quantities is then slightly below 1 (about 0.95, while it can be exactly 1 in the absence of matter and cosmological constant in patterns based on the spinorial space-time we have considered in previous papers. In this description of space-time we first suggested in 1996-97, the cosmic time t is given by the modulus of a SU(2 spinor and the Lundmark-Lemaître-Hubble (LLH expansion law turns out to be of purely geometric origin previous to any introduction of standard matter and relativity. Such a fundamental geometry, inspired by the role of half-integer spin in Particle Physics, may reflect an equilibrium between the dynamics of the ultimate constituents of matter and the deep structure of space and time. Taking into account the observed cosmic acceleration, the present situation suggests that the value of 1 can be a natural asymptotic limit for the product H t in the long-term evolution of our Universe up to possible small corrections. In the presence of a spinorial space-time geometry, no ad hoc combination of dark matter and dark energy would in any case be needed to get an acceptable value of H and an evolution of the Universe compatible with observation. The use of a spinorial space-time naturally leads to unconventional properties for the space curvature term in Friedmann-like equations. It therefore suggests a major modification of

  9. On Space Efficient Two Dimensional Range Minimum Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davoodi, Pooya; Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Rao, S. Srinivasa

    2010-01-01

    The two dimensional range minimum query problem is to preprocess a static two dimensional m by n array A of size N = m · n, such that subsequent queries, asking for the position of the minimum element in a rectangular range within A, can be answered efficiently. We study the trade-off between the...... optimal O(N) bits additional space. For the case where queries can not probe A, we give a data structure of size O(N· min {m,logn}) bits with O(1) query time, assuming m ≤ n. This leaves a gap to the lower bound of Ω(Nlogm) bits for this version of the problem....... the space and query time of the problem. We show that every algorithm enabled to access A during the query and using O(N/c) bits additional space requires Ω(c) query time, for any c where 1 ≤ c ≤ N. This lower bound holds for any dimension. In particular, for the one dimensional version of the problem......, the lower bound is tight up to a constant factor. In two dimensions, we complement the lower bound with an indexing data structure of size O(N/c) bits additional space which can be preprocessed in O(N) time and achieves O(clog2 c) query time. For c = O(1), this is the first O(1) query time algorithm using...

  10. On Space Efficient Two Dimensional Range Minimum Data Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Davoodi, Pooya; Rao, S. Srinivasa

    2012-01-01

    The two dimensional range minimum query problem is to preprocess a static m by n matrix (two dimensional array) A of size N=m⋅n, such that subsequent queries, asking for the position of the minimum element in a rectangular range within A, can be answered efficiently. We study the trade-off betwee...... structure of optimal size O(N) bits. For the case where queries can not probe A, we give a data structure of size O(N⋅min {m,log n}) bits with O(1) query time, assuming m≤n. This leaves a gap to the space lower bound of Ω(Nlog m) bits for this version of the problem...... the space and query time of the problem. We show that every algorithm enabled to access A during the query and using a data structure of size O(N/c) bits requires Ω(c) query time, for any c where 1≤c≤N. This lower bound holds for arrays of any dimension. In particular, for the one dimensional version...

  11. Potentials and problems in space applications of smart structures technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, D. C.; Bashford, D. P.

    1994-09-01

    The well known addage 'don't run before you can walk emerging materials. It typically takes ten years before a material is sufficiently well characterized for commercial aerospace application. Much has to be learnt not only about the material properties and their susceptibility to the effects of their working environment but also about the manufacturing process and the most effective configuration related application. No project will accept a product which has no proven reliability and attractive cost effectiveness in its application. The writers firmly believe that smart structures and their related technologies must follow a similar development pattern. Indeed, faced with a range of interdisciplinary problems it seems likely that 'partially smart' techniques may well be the first applications. These will place emphasis on the more readily realizable features for any structural application. Prior use may well have been achieved in other engineering sectors. Because ground based applications are more readily accessible to check and maintain, these are generally the front runners of smart technology usage. Nevertheless, there is a strong potential for the use of smart techniques in space applications if their capabilities can be advantageously introduced when compared with traditional solutions. This paper endeavors to give a critical appraisal of the possibilities and the accompanying problems. A sample overview of related developing space technology is included. The reader is also referred to chapters 90 to 94 in ESA's Structural Materials Handbook (ESA PSS 03 203, issue 1.). It is envisaged that future space applications may include the realization and maintenance of large deployable reflector profiles, the dimensional stability of optical payloads, active noise and vibration control and in orbit health monitoring and control for largely unmanned spacecraft. The possibility of monitoring the health of items such as large cryogenic fuel tanks is a typical longer

  12. Characterization of Polyimide Foams for Ultra-Lightweight Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meador, Michael (Technical Monitor); Hillman, Keithan; Veazie, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Ultra-lightweight materials have played a significant role in nearly every area of human activity ranging from magnetic tapes and artificial organs to atmospheric balloons and space inflatables. The application range of ultra-lightweight materials in past decades has expanded dramatically due to their unsurpassed efficiency in terms of low weight and high compliance properties. A new generation of ultra-lightweight materials involving advanced polymeric materials, such as TEEK (TM) polyimide foams, is beginning to emerge to produce novel performance from ultra-lightweight systems for space applications. As a result, they require that special conditions be fulfilled to ensure adequate structural performance, shape retention, and thermal stability. It is therefore important and essential to develop methodologies for predicting the complex properties of ultra-lightweight foams. To support NASA programs such as the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), Clark Atlanta University, along with SORDAL, Inc., has initiated projects for commercial process development of polyimide foams for the proposed cryogenic tank integrated structure (see figure 1). Fabrication and characterization of high temperature, advanced aerospace-grade polyimide foams and filled foam sandwich composites for specified lifetimes in NASA space applications, as well as quantifying the lifetime of components, are immensely attractive goals. In order to improve the development, durability, safety, and life cycle performance of ultra-lightweight polymeric foams, test methods for the properties are constant concerns in terms of timeliness, reliability, and cost. A major challenge is to identify the mechanisms of failures (i.e., core failure, interfacial debonding, and crack development) that are reflected in the measured properties. The long-term goal of the this research is to develop the tools and capabilities necessary to successfully engineer ultra-lightweight polymeric foams. The desire is to reduce density

  13. Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure (UCPS) for In-Space Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcosm, in conjunction with the Scoprius Space Launch Company (SSLC), will develop a Unibody Composite Pressurized Structure (UCPS) for in-space propulsion that...

  14. Orbital assembly and maintenance study. Executive summary. [space erectable structures/structural design criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, D.; Grant, C.; Kyrias, G.; Lord, C.; Rombach, J. P.; Salis, M.; Skidmore, R.; Thomas, R.

    1975-01-01

    A sound, practical approach for the assembly and maintenance of very large structures in space is presented. The methods and approaches for assembling two large structures are examined. The maintenance objectives include the investigation of methods to maintain five geosynchronous satellites. The two assembly examples are a 200-meter-diameter radio astronomy telescope and a 1,000-meter-diameter microwave power transmission system. The radio astronomy telescope operates at an 8,000-mile altitude and receives RF signals from space. The microwave power transmission system is part of a solar power satellite that will be used to transmit converted solar energy to microwave ground receivers. Illustrations are included.

  15. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, P. M.; Kumar, V. K.; Krishna, R.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Diarra, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Large, flexible orbiting systems proposed for possible use in communications, electronic orbital based mail systems, and solar energy collection are discussed. The size and low weight to area ratio of such systems indicate that system flexibility is now the main consideration in the dynamics and control problem. For such large, flexible systems, both orientation and surface shape control will often be required. A conceptual development plan of a system software capability for use in analysis of the dynamics and control of large space structures technology (LSST) systems is discussed. This concept can be subdivided into four different stages: (1) system dynamics; (2) structural dynamics; (3) application of control algorithms; and (4) simulation of environmental disturbances. Modeling the system dynamics of such systems in orbit is the most fundamental component. Solar radiation pressure effects and orbital and gravity gradient effects are discussed.

  16. Space Launch System, Core Stage, Structural Test Design and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Ray

    2017-01-01

    As part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Launch System (SLS) Program, engineers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama are working to design, develop and implement the SLS Core Stage structural testing. The SLS will have the capability to return humans to the Moon and beyond and its first launch is scheduled for December of 2017. The SLS Core Stage consist of five major elements; Forward Skirt, Liquid Oxygen (LOX) tank, Intertank (IT), Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) tank and the Engine Section (ES). Structural Test Articles (STA) for each of these elements are being designed and produced by Boeing at Michoud Assembly Facility located in New Orleans, La. The structural test for the Core Stage STAs (LH2, LOX, IT and ES) are to be conducted by the MSFC Test Laboratory. Additionally, the MSFC Test Laboratory manages the Structural Test Equipment (STE) design and development to support the STAs. It was decided early (April 2012) in the project life that the LH2 and LOX tank STAs would require new test stands and the Engine Section and Intertank would be tested in existing facilities. This decision impacted schedules immediately because the new facilities would require Construction of Facilities (C of F) funds that require congressional approval and long lead times. The Engine Section and Intertank structural test are to be conducted in existing facilities which will limit lead times required to support the first launch of SLS. With a SLS launch date of December, 2017 Boeing had a need date for testing to be complete by September of 2017 to support flight certification requirements. The test facilities were required to be ready by October of 2016 to support test article delivery. The race was on to get the stands ready before Test Article delivery and meet the test complete date of September 2017. This paper documents the past and current design and development phases and the supporting processes, tools, and

  17. Experiences with integral microelectronics on smart structures for space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Ted; Casteel, Scott; Navarro, Sergio A.; Kraml, Bob

    1995-05-01

    One feature of a smart structure implies that some computational and signal processing capability can be performed at a local level, perhaps integral to the controlled structure. This requires electronics with a minimal mechanical influence regarding structural stiffening, heat dissipation, weight, and electrical interface connectivity. The Advanced Controls Technology Experiment II (ACTEX II) space-flight experiments implemented such a local control electronics scheme by utilizing composite smart members with integral processing electronics. These microelectronics, tested to MIL-STD-883B levels, were fabricated with conventional thick film on ceramic multichip module techniques. Kovar housings and aluminum-kapton multilayer insulation was used to protect against harsh space radiation and thermal environments. Development and acceptance testing showed the electronics design was extremely robust, operating in vacuum and at temperature range with minimal gain variations occurring just above room temperatures. Four electronics modules, used for the flight hardware configuration, were connected by a RS-485 2 Mbit per second serial data bus. The data bus was controlled by Actel field programmable gate arrays arranged in a single master, four slave configuration. An Intel 80C196KD microprocessor was chosen as the digital compensator in each controller. It was used to apply a series of selectable biquad filters, implemented via Delta Transforms. Instability in any compensator was expected to appear as large amplitude oscillations in the deployed structure. Thus, over-vibration detection circuitry with automatic output isolation was incorporated into the design. This was not used however, since during experiment integration and test, intentionally induced compensator instabilities resulted in benign mechanical oscillation symptoms. Not too surprisingly, it was determined that instabilities were most detectable by large temperature increases in the electronics, typically

  18. A Study of Flexible Composites for Expandable Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Payload volume for launch vehicles is a critical constraint that impacts spacecraft design. Deployment mechanisms, such as those used for solar arrays and antennas, are approaches that have successfully accommodated this constraint, however, providing pressurized volumes that can be packaged compactly at launch and expanded in space is still a challenge. One approach that has been under development for many years is to utilize softgoods - woven fabric for straps, cloth, and with appropriate coatings, bladders - to provide this expandable pressure vessel capability. The mechanics of woven structure is complicated by a response that is nonlinear and often nonrepeatable due to the discrete nature of the woven fiber architecture. This complexity reduces engineering confidence to reliably design and certify these structures, which increases costs due to increased requirements for system testing. The present study explores flexible composite materials systems as an alternative to the heritage softgoods approach. Materials were obtained from vendors who utilize flexible composites for non-aerospace products to determine some initial physical and mechanical properties of the materials. Uniaxial mechanical testing was performed to obtain the stress-strain response of the flexible composites and the failure behavior. A failure criterion was developed from the data, and a space habitat application was used to provide an estimate of the relative performance of flexible composites compared to the heritage softgoods approach. Initial results are promising with a 25% mass savings estimated for the flexible composite solution.

  19. Nucleon structure functions in noncommutative space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiei, A.; Rezaei, Z.; Mirjalili, A. [Yazd University, Physics Department, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    In the context of noncommutative space-time we investigate the nucleon structure functions which play an important role in identifying the internal structure of nucleons. We use the corrected vertices and employ new vertices that appear in two approaches of noncommutativity and calculate the proton structure functions in terms of the noncommutative tensor θ{sub μν}. To check our results we plot the nucleon structure function (NSF), F{sub 2}(x), and compare it with experimental data and the results from the GRV, GJR and CT10 parametrization models. We show that with the new vertex that arises the noncommutativity correction will lead to a better consistency between theoretical results and experimental data for the NSF. This consistency will be better for small values of the Bjorken variable x. To indicate and confirm the validity of our calculations we also act conversely. We obtain a lower bound for the numerical values of Λ{sub NC} scale which correspond to recent reports. (orig.)

  20. Coverage of protein sequence space by current structural genomics targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Nicholas; Raymond, Stéphane; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2003-01-01

    By its purest definition the ultimate goal of structural genomics (SG) is the determination of the structures of all proteins encoded by genomes. Most of these will be obtained by homology modeling using the structures of a set of target proteins for experimental determination. Thanks to the open exchange of SG target information, we are able to analyze the sequences of the current target list to evaluate the extent of its coverage of protein sequence space. The presence of homologous sequences currently either in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) or among SG targets has been determined for each of the protein sequences in several organisms. In this way we are able to evaluate the coverage by existing or targeted structural data for the non-membranous parts of entire proteomes. For small bacterial proteomes such as that of H. influenzae almost all proteins have homologous sequences among SG targets or in the PDB. There is significantly lower coverage for more complex organisms, such as C. elegans. We have mapped the SG target list onto the ProtoMap clustering of protein sequences. Clusters occupied by SG targets represent over 150,000 protein sequences, which is approximately 44% of the total protein sequences classified by ProtoMap. The mapping of SG targets also enables an evaluation of the degree of overlap within the target list. An SG target typically occupies a ProtoMap cluster with more than six other homologous targets.

  1. CMsearch: simultaneous exploration of protein sequence space and structure space improves not only protein homology detection but also protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xuefeng; Lu, Zhiwu; Wang, Sheng; Jing-Yan Wang, Jim; Gao, Xin

    2016-06-15

    Protein homology detection, a fundamental problem in computational biology, is an indispensable step toward predicting protein structures and understanding protein functions. Despite the advances in recent decades on sequence alignment, threading and alignment-free methods, protein homology detection remains a challenging open problem. Recently, network methods that try to find transitive paths in the protein structure space demonstrate the importance of incorporating network information of the structure space. Yet, current methods merge the sequence space and the structure space into a single space, and thus introduce inconsistency in combining different sources of information. We present a novel network-based protein homology detection method, CMsearch, based on cross-modal learning. Instead of exploring a single network built from the mixture of sequence and structure space information, CMsearch builds two separate networks to represent the sequence space and the structure space. It then learns sequence-structure correlation by simultaneously taking sequence information, structure information, sequence space information and structure space information into consideration. We tested CMsearch on two challenging tasks, protein homology detection and protein structure prediction, by querying all 8332 PDB40 proteins. Our results demonstrate that CMsearch is insensitive to the similarity metrics used to define the sequence and the structure spaces. By using HMM-HMM alignment as the sequence similarity metric, CMsearch clearly outperforms state-of-the-art homology detection methods and the CASP-winning template-based protein structure prediction methods. Our program is freely available for download from http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx : xin.gao@kaust.edu.sa Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Ultra-Light ?Photonic Muscle? Space Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fabrication of large space optics that are accurately shaped to better than a 1,000th of the width of a human hair is an enormous challenge. Traditional space...

  3. NASA Office of Aeronautical and Space Technology Summer Workshop. Volume 6: Structures and dynamics panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Structural requirements for future space missions were defined in relation to technology needs and payloads. Specific areas examined include: large area space structures (antennas, solar array structures, and platforms); a long, slender structure or boom used to support large objects from the shuttle or hold two bodies apart in space; and advanced composite structures for cost effective weight reductions. Other topics discussed include: minimum gage concepts, high temperature components, load and response determination and control, and reliability and life prediction.

  4. Cosmic Rays Report from the Structure of Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Annila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectrum of cosmic rays follows a broken power law over twelve orders of magnitude. Since ubiquitous power laws are manifestations of the principle of least action, we interpret the spectrum accordingly. Our analysis complies with understanding that low-energy particles originate mostly from rapidly receding sources throughout the cosmos. The flux peaks about proton rest energy whereafter it decreases because fewer and fewer receding sources are energetic enough to provide particles with high enough velocities to compensate for the recessional velocities. Above 1015.6 eV the flux from the expanding Universe diminishes below the flux from the nearby nonexpanding part of the Universe. In this spectral feature, known as the “knee,” we relate to a distance of about 1.3 Mpc where the gravitational potential tallies the energy density of free space. At higher energies particles decelerate in a dissipative manner to attain thermodynamic balance with the vacuum. At about 1017.2 eV a distinct dissipative mechanism opens up for protons to slow down by electron-positron pair production. At about 1019.6 eV a more effective mechanism opens up via pion production. All in all, the universal principle discloses that the broad spectrum of cosmic rays probes the structure of space from cosmic distances down to microscopic details.

  5. Flexible space structure model reduction by modal cost analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, R. E.; Hughes, P. C.

    1979-01-01

    It is noted that reduced models and reduced controllers for flexible space structures are obtained by retaining those modes which make the greatest contribution to quadratic control objectives. Attention is given to the relative importance of damping, frequency and mode shapes in the mode truncation decisions for the following control objectives: attitude control, vibration suppression and figure control. It is also shown that using Modal Cost Analysis (MCA) on the closed loop modes of the optimally controlled system allows the construction of reduced control policies which feedback only those closed loop coordinates which are most critical to the quadratic control performance criterion. In this manner, the modes which need to be controlled are deduced from truncations of the optimal controller.

  6. Characterizing 3D Vegetation Structure from Space: Mission Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G.; Bergen, Kathleen; Blair, James B.; Dubayah, Ralph; Houghton, Richard; Hurtt, George; Kellndorfer, Josef; Lefsky, Michael; Ranson, Jon; Saatchi, Sasan; hide

    2012-01-01

    Human and natural forces are rapidly modifying the global distribution and structure of terrestrial ecosystems on which all of life depends, altering the global carbon cycle, affecting our climate now and for the foreseeable future, causing steep reductions in species diversity, and endangering Earth s sustainability. To understand changes and trends in terrestrial ecosystems and their functioning as carbon sources and sinks, and to characterize the impact of their changes on climate, habitat and biodiversity, new space assets are urgently needed to produce high spatial resolution global maps of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of vegetation, its biomass above ground, the carbon stored within and the implications for atmospheric green house gas concentrations and climate. These needs were articulated in a 2007 National Research Council (NRC) report (NRC, 2007) recommending a new satellite mission, DESDynI, carrying an L-band Polarized Synthetic Aperture Radar (Pol-SAR) and a multi-beam lidar (Light RAnging And Detection) operating at 1064 nm. The objectives of this paper are to articulate the importance of these new, multi-year, 3D vegetation structure and biomass measurements, to briefly review the feasibility of radar and lidar remote sensing technology to meet these requirements, to define the data products and measurement requirements, and to consider implications of mission durations. The paper addresses these objectives by synthesizing research results and other input from a broad community of terrestrial ecology, carbon cycle, and remote sensing scientists and working groups. We conclude that: (1) current global biomass and 3-D vegetation structure information is unsuitable for both science and management and policy. The only existing global datasets of biomass are approximations based on combining land cover type and representative carbon values, instead of measurements of actual biomass. Current measurement attempts based on radar and multispectral

  7. Phase Space Dissimilarity Measures for Structural Health Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bubacz, Jacob A [ORNL; Chmielewski, Hana T [ORNL; Pape, Alexander E [ORNL; Depersio, Andrew J [ORNL; Hively, Lee M [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Boone, Shane [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    A novel method for structural health monitoring (SHM), known as the Phase Space Dissimilarity Measures (PSDM) approach, is proposed and developed. The patented PSDM approach has already been developed and demonstrated for a variety of equipment and biomedical applications. Here, we investigate SHM of bridges via analysis of time serial accelerometer measurements. This work has four aspects. The first is algorithm scalability, which was found to scale linearly from one processing core to four cores. Second, the same data are analyzed to determine how the use of the PSDM approach affects sensor placement. We found that a relatively low-density placement sufficiently captures the dynamics of the structure. Third, the same data are analyzed by unique combinations of accelerometer axes (vertical, longitudinal, and lateral with respect to the bridge) to determine how the choice of axes affects the analysis. The vertical axis is found to provide satisfactory SHM data. Fourth, statistical methods were investigated to validate the PSDM approach for this application, yielding statistically significant results.

  8. Verification Test of Automated Robotic Assembly of Space Truss Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Quach, Cuong C.

    1995-01-01

    A multidisciplinary program has been conducted at the Langley Research Center to develop operational procedures for supervised autonomous assembly of truss structures suitable for large-aperture antennas. The hardware and operations required to assemble a 102-member tetrahedral truss and attach 12 hexagonal panels were developed and evaluated. A brute-force automation approach was used to develop baseline assembly hardware and software techniques. However, as the system matured and operations were proven, upgrades were incorporated and assessed against the baseline test results. These upgrades included the use of distributed microprocessors to control dedicated end-effector operations, machine vision guidance for strut installation, and the use of an expert system-based executive-control program. This paper summarizes the developmental phases of the program, the results of several assembly tests, and a series of proposed enhancements. No problems that would preclude automated in-space assembly or truss structures have been encountered. The test system was developed at a breadboard level and continued development at an enhanced level is warranted.

  9. Development of load-dependent Ritz vector method for structural dynamic analysis of large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricles, James M.

    1990-01-01

    The development and preliminary assessment of a method for dynamic structural analysis based on load-dependent Ritz vectors are presented. The vector basis is orthogonalized with respect to the mass and structural stiffness in order that the equations of motion can be uncoupled and efficient analysis of large space structure performed. A series of computer programs was developed based on the algorithm for generating the orthogonal load-dependent Ritz vectors. Transient dynamic analysis performed on the Space Station Freedom using the software was found to provide solutions that require a smaller number of vectors than the modal analysis method. Error norm based on the participation of the mass distribution of the structure and spatial distribution of structural loading, respectively, were developed in order to provide an indication of vector truncation. These norms are computed before the transient analysis is performed. An assessment of these norms through a convergence study of the structural response was performed. The results from this assessment indicate that the error norms can provide a means of judging the quality of the vector basis and accuracy of the transient dynamic solution.

  10. Bitopological spaces theory, relations with generalized algebraic structures and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dvalishvili, Badri

    2005-01-01

    This monograph is the first and an initial introduction to the theory of bitopological spaces and its applications. In particular, different families of subsets of bitopological spaces are introduced and various relations between two topologies are analyzed on one and the same set; the theory of dimension of bitopological spaces and the theory of Baire bitopological spaces are constructed, and various classes of mappings of bitopological spaces are studied. The previously known results as well the results obtained in this monograph are applied in analysis, potential theory, general topology, a

  11. Competition for space and the structure of ecological communities

    CERN Document Server

    Yodzis, Peter

    1978-01-01

    This volume is an investigation of interspecific competition for space, particularly among sessile organisms, both plant and animal, and its consequences for community structure. While my own contribu­ tion ----and the bulk of this volume --- lies in mathematical analysis of the phenomenon, I have also tried to summarize the most important natural historical aspects of these communities, and have devoted much effort to relating the mathematical results to observations of the natural world. Thus, the volume has both a synthetic and an analytic aspect. On the one hand, I have been struck by certain similarities among many communities, from forests to mussel beds, in which spatial com­ petition is important. On the other hand, I have analyzed this pheno­ menon by means of reaction-dispersal models. Finally, the mathematical analysis has suggested a conceptual framework for these communities which, I believe, further unifies and illuminates the field data. A focal perception of this work is that, just as niche...

  12. Inherent structure versus geometric metric for state space discretization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanzhong; Li, Minghai; Fan, Jue; Huo, Shuanghong

    2016-05-30

    Inherent structure (IS) and geometry-based clustering methods are commonly used for analyzing molecular dynamics trajectories. ISs are obtained by minimizing the sampled conformations into local minima on potential/effective energy surface. The conformations that are minimized into the same energy basin belong to one cluster. We investigate the influence of the applications of these two methods of trajectory decomposition on our understanding of the thermodynamics and kinetics of alanine tetrapeptide. We find that at the microcluster level, the IS approach and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD)-based clustering method give totally different results. Depending on the local features of energy landscape, the conformations with close RMSDs can be minimized into different minima, while the conformations with large RMSDs could be minimized into the same basin. However, the relaxation timescales calculated based on the transition matrices built from the microclusters are similar. The discrepancy at the microcluster level leads to different macroclusters. Although the dynamic models established through both clustering methods are validated approximately Markovian, the IS approach seems to give a meaningful state space discretization at the macrocluster level in terms of conformational features and kinetics. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Structural Materials and Fuels for Space Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Cheryl; Busby, Jeremy; Porter, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    A fission reactor combined with Stirling convertor power generation is one promising candidate in on-going Fission Surface Power (FSP) studies for future lunar and Martian bases. There are many challenges for designing and qualifying space-rated nuclear power plants. In order to have an affordable and sustainable program, NASA and DOE designers want to build upon the extensive foundation in nuclear fuels and structural materials. This talk will outline the current Fission Surface Power program and outline baseline design options for a lunar power plant with an emphasis on materials challenges. NASA first organized an Affordable Fission Surface Power System Study Team to establish a reference design that could be scrutinized for technical and fiscal feasibility. Previous papers and presentations have discussed this study process in detail. Considerations for the reference design included that no significant nuclear technology, fuels, or material development were required for near term use. The desire was to build upon terrestrial-derived reactor technology including conventional fuels and materials. Here we will present an overview of the reference design, Figure 1, and examine the materials choices. The system definition included analysis and recommendations for power level and life, plant configuration, shielding approach, reactor type, and power conversion type. It is important to note that this is just one concept undergoing refinement. The design team, however, understands that materials selection and improvement must be an integral part of the system development.

  14. Goddard Space Flight Center's Structural Dynamics Data Acquisition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Turnkey Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) data acquisition systems typically perform well and meet most of the objectives of the manufacturer. The problem is that they seldom meet most of the objectives of the end user. The analysis software, if any, is unlikely to be tailored to the end users specific application; and there is seldom the chance of incorporating preferred algorithms to solve unique problems. Purchasing a customized system allows the end user to get a system tailored to the actual application, but the cost can be prohibitive. Once the system has been accepted, future changes come with a cost and response time that's often not workable. When it came time to replace the primary digital data acquisition system used in the Goddard Space Flight Center's Structural Dynamics Test Section, the decision was made to use a combination of COTS hardware and in-house developed software. The COTS hardware used is the DataMAX II Instrumentation Recorder built by R.C. Electronics Inc. and a desktop Pentium 4 computer system. The in-house software was developed using MATLAF3 from The Mathworks. This paper will describe the design and development of the new data acquisition and analysis system.

  15. Modelling of Structural Loads in Drag Augmented Space Debris Removal Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders Schmidt; Nikolajsen, Jan Ánike; Lauridsen, Peter Riddersholm

    2017-01-01

    A Self-deployable Deorbiting Space Structure (SDSS) is used for drag augmented space debris removal. A highly flexible frame allows for a folding of the structure by bifurcation. This research models the structural loads during the deployment and unfolding of the drag sail in Low Earth Orbit (LEO...

  16. Well-posedness, bornologies, and the structure of metric spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Beer

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Given a continuous nonnegative functional λ that makes sense defined on an arbitrary metric space (X, d, one may consider those spaces in which each sequence (xn for which lim n→∞λ(xn = 0 clusters. The compact metric spaces, the complete metric spaces, the cofinally complete metric spaces, and the UC-spaces all arise in this way. Starting with a general continuous nonnegative functional λ defined on (X, d, we study the bornology Bλ of all subsets A of X on which limn→∞λ(an = 0 ⇒ (an clusters, treating the possibility X ∈ Bλ as a special case. We characterize those bornologies that can be expressed as Bλ  for some λ, as well as those that can be so induced by a uniformly continuous λ.

  17. Ultra-Lightweight Nanocomposite Foams and Sandwich Structures for Space Structure Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Seng

    2012-01-01

    Microcellular nanocomposite foams and sandwich structures have been created to have excellent electrical conductivity and radiation-resistant properties using a new method that does not involve or release any toxicity. The nanocomposite structures have been scaled up in size to 12 X 12 in. (30 X 30 cm) for components fabrication. These sandwich materials were fabricated mainly from PE, CNF, and carbon fibers. Test results indicate that they have very good compression and compression-after-impact properties, excellent electrical conductivity, and superior space environment durability. Compression tests show that 1000 ESH (equivalent Sun hours) of UV exposure has no effect on the structural properties of the sandwich structures. The structures are considerably lighter than aluminum alloy (= 36 percent lighter), which translates to 36 percent weight savings of the electronic enclosure and its housing. The good mechanical properties of the materials may enable the electronic housing to be fabricated with a thinner structure that further reduces the weight. There was no difficulty in machining the sandwich specimens into electronic enclosure housing.

  18. Composite load spectra for select space propulsion structural components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, J. F.; Ho, H. W.; Kurth, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The work performed to develop composite load spectra (CLS) for the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) using probabilistic methods. The three methods were implemented to be the engine system influence model. RASCAL was chosen to be the principal method as most component load models were implemented with the method. Validation of RASCAL was performed. High accuracy comparable to the Monte Carlo method can be obtained if a large enough bin size is used. Generic probabilistic models were developed and implemented for load calculations using the probabilistic methods discussed above. Each engine mission, either a real fighter or a test, has three mission phases: the engine start transient phase, the steady state phase, and the engine cut off transient phase. Power level and engine operating inlet conditions change during a mission. The load calculation module provides the steady-state and quasi-steady state calculation procedures with duty-cycle-data option. The quasi-steady state procedure is for engine transient phase calculations. In addition, a few generic probabilistic load models were also developed for specific conditions. These include the fixed transient spike model, the poison arrival transient spike model, and the rare event model. These generic probabilistic load models provide sufficient latitude for simulating loads with specific conditions. For SSME components, turbine blades, transfer ducts, LOX post, and the high pressure oxidizer turbopump (HPOTP) discharge duct were selected for application of the CLS program. They include static pressure loads and dynamic pressure loads for all four components, centrifugal force for the turbine blade, temperatures of thermal loads for all four components, and structural vibration loads for the ducts and LOX posts.

  19. Bethe–Salpeter bound-state structure in Minkowski space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, C. [Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 01156-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gigante, V.; Frederico, T. [Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, DCTA, 12.228-900 São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Salmè, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Viviani, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Tomio, Lauro, E-mail: tomio@ift.unesp.br [Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 01156-970 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, DCTA, 12.228-900 São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2016-08-10

    The quantitative investigation of the scalar Bethe–Salpeter equation in Minkowski space, within the ladder-approximation framework, is extended to include the excited states. This study has been carried out for an interacting system composed by two massive bosons exchanging a massive scalar, by adopting (i) the Nakanishi integral representation of the Bethe–Salpeter amplitude, and (ii) the formally exact projection onto the null plane. Our analysis, on one hand, confirms the reliability of the method already applied to the ground state and, on the other one, extends the investigation from the valence distribution in momentum space to the corresponding quantity in the impact-parameter space, pointing out some relevant features, like (i) the equivalence between Minkowski and Euclidean transverse-momentum amplitudes, and (ii) the leading exponential fall-off of the valence wave function in the impact-parameter space.

  20. A Product Space Perspective on Structural Change in Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio Rodarte, Israel; Lofgren, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on international trade data, this paper uses the product space approach to analyze changes in Morocco’s goods exports in 1990–2010 and future export priorities. The level of Morocco’s gross domestic product and its moderate growth match the predictions of product space analysis, informed by changes in the income potential of Morocco’s export basket, reflecting relatively strong cap...

  1. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator - NB32 - Large Space Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a cooperative program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) to operate a long-lived space-based observatory; it was the flagship mission of NASA's Great Observatories program. The HST program began as an astronomical dream in the 1940s. During the 1970s and 1980s, HST was finally designed and built; and it finally became operational in the 1990s. HST was deployed into a low-Earth orbit on April 25, 1990 from the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31). The design of the HST took into consideration its length of service and the necessity of repairs and equipment replacement by making the body modular. In doing so, subsequent shuttle missions could recover the HST, replace faulty or obsolete parts and be re-released. MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator served as the training facility for shuttle astronauts for Hubble related missions. Shown is astronaut Sharnon Lucid having her life support system being checked prior to entering the NBS to begin training on the space telescope axial scientific instrument changeout.

  2. Optimization procedure to control the coupling of vibration modes in flexible space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Joanne L.

    1987-01-01

    As spacecraft structural concepts increase in size and flexibility, the vibration frequencies become more closely-spaced. The identification and control of such closely-spaced frequencies present a significant challenge. To validate system identification and control methods prior to actual flight, simpler space structures will be flown. To challenge the above technologies, it will be necessary to design these structures with closely-spaced or coupled vibration modes. Thus, there exists a need to develop a systematic method to design a structure which has closely-spaced vibration frequencies. This paper describes an optimization procedure which is used to design a large flexible structure to have closely-spaced vibration frequencies. The procedure uses a general-purpose finite element analysis program for the vibration and sensitivity analyses and a general-purpose optimization program. Results are presented from two studies. The first study uses a detailed model of a large flexible structure to design a structure with one pair of closely-spaced frequencies. The second study uses a simple equivalent beam model of a large flexible structure to obtain a design with two pairs of closely-spaced frequencies.

  3. Properties of Floquet-Bloch space harmonics in 1D periodic magneto-dielectric structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, O.

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a significant research interest in Floquet-Bloch analysis for determining the homogenized permittivity and permeability of metamaterials consisting of periodic structures. This work investigates fundamental properties of the Floquet-Bloch space harmonics in a 1......-dimensional magneto-dielectric lossless structure supporting a transverse-electric-magnetic Floquet-Bloch wave; in particular, the space harmonic permittivity and permeability, as well as the space harmonic Poynting vector....

  4. Dirac structures and their composition on Hilbert spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurula, J.; Kurula, Mikael; Zwart, Heiko J.; van der Schaft, Arjan; Behrndt, Jussi

    2010-01-01

    Dirac structures appear naturally in the study of certain classes of physical models described by partial differential equations and they can be regarded as the underlying power conserving structures. We study these structures and their properties from an operator-theoretic point of view. In

  5. Estimate of technical and economic benefits of a new space composite structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasii Grygorii

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a problem of excessive laboriousness and materials consumption resulting from irrational using of materials in construction. This situation is caused by inconsistencies existing structural concepts to modern requirements of construction industry. It has a direct impact on the overall implementation cost of the project. That is why there is a need for a new structure, which makes it possible to save materials and reduce a construction complexity. Such structure is the new space composite structure. There is summary information about the estimate of technical and economic benefits of a new space composite structure in the paper. Task of paper is arrangement information about estimate of technical and economic benefits of a new space composite structure. Based on the previous research results, there is the optimum ratio for the structure in the paper; also, a relationship between the depth of the module and the span for the new space composite structure were defined. The estimate of both the technical-economic parameters and the advantages of the new space composite structure were described. The estimation results show the effectiveness of the new space composite structure to 10%-37% compared to traditional reinforced concrete structures.

  6. Unveiling the metric structure of internal representations of space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Federico; Cerasti, Erika; Treves, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    How are neuronal representations of space organized in the hippocampus? The self-organization of such representations, thought to be driven in the CA3 network by the strong randomizing input from the Dentate Gyrus, appears to run against preserving the topology and even less the exact metric of physical space. We present a way to assess this issue quantitatively, and find that in a simple neural network model of CA3, the average topology is largely preserved, but the local metric is loose, retaining e.g., 10% of the optimal spatial resolution.

  7. On the differential structure of metric measure spaces and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gigli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The main goals of this paper are: (i) To develop an abstract differential calculus on metric measure spaces by investigating the duality relations between differentials and gradients of Sobolev functions. This will be achieved without calling into play any sort of analysis in charts, our assumptions being: the metric space is complete and separable and the measure is Radon and non-negative. (ii) To employ these notions of calculus to provide, via integration by parts, a general definition of distributional Laplacian, thus giving a meaning to an expression like \\Delta g=\\mu, where g is a functi

  8. Unique Concept for a Low Cost, Light Weight Space Deployable Antenna Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, Robert E.; Bilyeu, Gayle D.; Veal, Gordon R.

    1993-01-01

    Large space deployable antennas are needed for a variety of applications that include Mobile Communications, Radiometry, Active Microwave Sensing, Very Long Baseline Interferometry and DoD Space Based Radar. These user requirements identify the need for structures up to tens of meters in size for operation from 1 to 90 GHz, based on different aperture configurations. However, the one thing the users have in common is a concept selection criteria for low cost, light weight and highly reliable deployable structures. Fortunately, a unique class of space structures has recently emerged that have tremendous potential for satisfying these criteria. They are referred to as inflatable deployable structures.

  9. Structures that Include a Semi-Outdoor Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foteinaki, Kyriaki; Papachristou, C.; Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    2016-01-01

    There are several examples of buildings that are partially or entirely covered by a transparent shield, such that a semi-outdoor space between the building and the shield is created. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of the addition of a shield on the energy use of a ...

  10. Noncommutative geometry, symmetries and quantum structure of space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindarajan, T R [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, CIT Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113 (India); Gupta, Kumar S [Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Harikumar, E [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Meljanac, S, E-mail: trg@imsc.res.in, E-mail: kumars.gupta@saha.ac.in, E-mail: harisp@uohyd.ernet.in, E-mail: meljanac@irb.hr [Rudjer Botkovic Institute, Bijenicka c.54, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-07-08

    We discuss how space-time noncommutativity affects the symmetry groups and particle statistics. Assuming that statistics is superselected under a symmetry transformation, we argue that the corresponding flip operator must be twisted. It is argued that the twisted statistics naturally leads to a deformed oscillator algebra for scalar fields in such a background.

  11. Free vibration analysis of spinning flexible space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1976-01-01

    Efficient computation of natural frequencies and associated free vibration modes of spinning flexible structures is required to accurately determine the nature of interaction between the flexible structure and the attitude control system, which is vital in relating control torques to attitude angles. While structural discretization is effected by the finite element method, the resulting eigenvalue problem is solved by a combined Sturm sequence and inverse iteration procedure that yields a few specified roots and associated vectors. An eigenvalue procedure, based on a simultaneous iteration technique, provides efficient computation of the first few roots and vectors; a modal synthesis procedure proves to be useful for eigenproblem solutions of unusual structures such as spacecraft.

  12. Detecting 3D vegetation structure with the Galileo space probe: Can a distant probe detect vegetation structure on Earth?

    OpenAIRE

    Doughty, Christopher E.; Wolf, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sagan et al. (1993) used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993) could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightn...

  13. The Spacing Effect for Structural Synaptic Plasticity Provides Specificity and Precision in Plastic Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martin, Alvaro; Rela, Lorena; Gelb, Bruce; Pagani, Mario Rafael

    2017-05-10

    In contrast to trials of training without intervals (massed training), training trials spaced over time (spaced training) induce a more persistent memory identified as long-term memory (LTM). This phenomenon, known as the spacing effect for memory, is poorly understood. LTM is supported by structural synaptic plasticity; however, how synapses integrate spaced stimuli remains elusive. Here, we analyzed events of structural synaptic plasticity at the single-synapse level after distinct patterns of stimulation in motoneurons of Drosophila We found that the spacing effect is a phenomenon detected at synaptic level, which determines the specificity and the precision in structural synaptic plasticity. Whereas a single pulse of stimulation (massed) induced structural synaptic plasticity, the same amount of stimulation divided in three spaced stimuli completely prevented it. This inhibitory effect was determined by the length of the interstimulus intervals. The inhibitory effect of the spacing was lost by suppressing the activity of Ras or mitogen-activated protein kinase, whereas the overexpression of Ras-WT enhanced it. Moreover, dividing the same total time of stimulation into five or more stimuli produced a higher precision in the number of events of plasticity. Ras mutations associated with intellectual disability abolished the spacing effect and led neurons to decode distinct stimulation patterns as massed stimulation. This evidence suggests that the spacing effect for memory may result from the effect of the spacing in synaptic plasticity, which appears to be a property not limited to neurons involved in learning and memory. We propose a model of spacing-dependent structural synaptic plasticity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Long-term memory (LTM) induced by repeated trials spaced over time is known as the spacing effect, a common property in the animal kingdom. Altered mechanisms in the spacing effect have been found in animal models of disorders with intellectual

  14. State Space identification of Civil Engineering Structures from Output Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, P.

    This paper presents the results from a state space system identification simulation study of a 5-degrees-of freedom system driven by white noise. The aim of the study is to compare the durability of the fairly new Stochastic Subspace Technique (SST) with more well-known techniques for identificat......This paper presents the results from a state space system identification simulation study of a 5-degrees-of freedom system driven by white noise. The aim of the study is to compare the durability of the fairly new Stochastic Subspace Technique (SST) with more well-known techniques......, it is found that the new SST technique gives quickly good results compared with the PEM which takes more time with only a limited improvement of the fit on data....

  15. State Space identification of Civil Engineering Structures from Output Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results from a state space system identification simulation study of a 5-degrees-of freedom system driven by white noise. The aim of the study is to compare the durability of the fairly new Stochastic Subspace Technique (SST) with more well-known techniques for identificat......This paper presents the results from a state space system identification simulation study of a 5-degrees-of freedom system driven by white noise. The aim of the study is to compare the durability of the fairly new Stochastic Subspace Technique (SST) with more well-known techniques......, it is found that the new SST technique gives quickly good results compared with the PEM which takes more time with only a limited improvement of the fit on data....

  16. Social Structure and Depression in TrevorSpace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Christopher M; Lu, Naiji; Tu, Xin; Lytle, Megan C; Silenzio, Vincent M B

    2014-02-01

    We discover patterns related to depression in the social graph of an online community of approximately 20,000 lesbian, gay, and bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth. With survey data on fewer than two hundred community members and the network graph of the entire community (which is completely anonymous except for the survey responses), we detected statistically significant correlations between a number of graph properties and those TrevorSpace users showing a higher likelihood of depression, according to the Patient Healthcare Questionnaire-9, a standard instrument for estimating depression. Our results suggest that those who are less depressed are more deeply integrated into the social fabric of TrevorSpace than those who are more depressed. Our techniques may apply to other hard-to-reach online communities, like gay men on Facebook, where obtaining detailed information about individuals is difficult or expensive, but obtaining the social graph is not.

  17. Systems definition study for shuttle demonstration flights of large space structures, Volume 2: Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The development of large space structure (LSS) technology is discussed, with emphasis on space fabricated structures which are automatically manufactured in space from sheet-strip materials and assembled on-orbit. It is concluded that an LSS flight demonstration using an Automated Beam Builder and the orbiter as a construction base, could be performed in the 1983-1984 time period. The estimated cost is $24 million exclusive of shuttle launch costs. During the mission, a simple space platform could be constructed in-orbit to accommodate user requirements associated with earth viewing and materials exposure experiments needs.

  18. ACOSS FIVE (Active Control of Space Structures). Phase 1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Again, in this case the specimen had been perturbed by a four-second chirp and then allowed to settle. Once a filter design has been established , the...The control design MKUCTUKAL MOOC L PtRFOHMANCl MÜDtL DISTURBANCE MODEL I ’ II Q|S£) XM=) STATE SPACE MODEL KEDUCED MODELS (HAC... establishing robustness with respect to two "point- design " perturbations. Based on the above results, and in the context of the analysis defined by the

  19. Spinor Structure of P-Oriented Space, Kustaanheimo-Stifel and Hopf Bundle - Connection between Formalisms

    OpenAIRE

    Red'kov, V. M.

    2011-01-01

    In the work some relations between three techniques, Hopf's bundle, Kustaanheimo-Stiefel's bundle, 3-space with spinor structure have been examined. The spinor space is viewed as a real space that is minimally (twice as much) extended in comparison with an ordinary vector 3-space: at this instead of 2\\pi-rotation now only 4\\pi-rotation is taken to be the identity transformation in the geometrical space. With respect to a given P-orientation of an initial unextended manyfold, vector or pseudov...

  20. Modelling of Structural Loads in Drag Augmented Space Debris Removal Concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders Schmidt; Nikolajsen, Jan Ánike; Lauridsen, Peter Riddersholm

    2017-01-01

    A Self-deployable Deorbiting Space Structure (SDSS) is used for drag augmented space debris removal. A highly flexible frame allows for a folding of the structure by bifurcation. This research models the structural loads during the deployment and unfolding of the drag sail in Low Earth Orbit (LEO......). The Spacecraft travels with 7.8 km/s at deployment. As the drag sail unfolds instantaneously the structure must withstand the loads from the unfolding and the drag. Thermal loads are included in the FEA as the temperature varies from -80°C to +80°C during deorbit. The results are used to verify the structural...

  1. Decomposing the space of protein quaternary structures with the interface fragment pair library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhong-Ru; Chen, Jiawen; Zhao, Yilin; Wu, Yinghao

    2015-01-16

    The physical interactions between proteins constitute the basis of protein quaternary structures. They dominate many biological processes in living cells. Deciphering the structural features of interacting proteins is essential to understand their cellular functions. Similar to the space of protein tertiary structures in which discrete patterns are clearly observed on fold or sub-fold motif levels, it has been found that the space of protein quaternary structures is highly degenerate due to the packing of compact secondary structure elements at interfaces. Therefore, it is necessary to further decompose the protein quaternary structural space into a more local representation. Here we constructed an interface fragment pair library from the current structure database of protein complexes. After structural-based clustering, we found that more than 90% of these interface fragment pairs can be represented by a limited number of highly abundant motifs. These motifs were further used to guide complex assembly. A large-scale benchmark test shows that the native-like binding is highly likely in the structural ensemble of modeled protein complexes that were built through the library. Our study therefore presents supportive evidences that the space of protein quaternary structures can be represented by the combination of a small set of secondary-structure-based packing at binding interfaces. Finally, after future improvements such as adding sequence profiles, we expect this new library will be useful to predict structures of unknown protein-protein interactions.

  2. The phase-space structure of tidally stripped haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakos, Nicole E.; Taylor, James E.; Benson, Andrew J.

    2017-06-01

    We propose a new method for generating equilibrium models of spherical systems of collisionless particles that are finite in extent, but whose central regions resemble dark matter haloes from cosmological simulations. This method involves iteratively removing unbound particles from a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile truncated sharply at some radius. The resulting models are extremely stable, and thus provide a good starting point for N-body simulations of isolated haloes. We provide a code to generate such models for NFW and a variety of other common density profiles. We then develop an analytic approximation to this truncated distribution function. Our method proceeds by analogy with the King model, truncating and shifting the original distribution function of an infinitely extended NFW profile in energy space. We show that the density profiles of our models closely resemble the tidally truncated density profiles seen previously in studies of satellite evolution. Pursuing this analogy further with a series of simulations of tidal mass-loss, we find that our models provide a good approximation to the full distribution function of tidally stripped systems, thus allowing theoretically motivated phase-space calculations for such systems.

  3. Raman scattering characterization of space solar cell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintairov, Alexander M.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Paleeva, E. V.; Sorokina, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    A contactless method for the determination of the free-carrier density and the composition distribution across the thickness of 3-5 multi-layer solar cell structures, using the Raman scattering method, is developed. The method includes a step analysis of Raman spectra from optical phonons and phonon-plasmon modes of different layers. The method provides simultaneous measurements of the element composition and the thickness of the structure's layers together with the free-carrier density. The results of measurements of the free-carrier density composition distributions of the liquid phase epitaxy grown AlGaAs/GaAs and GaSb solar cell structures are presented and discussed.

  4. Composite space antenna structures - Properties and environmental effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginty, C. A.; Endres, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal behavior of composite spacecraft antenna reflectors has been investigated with the integrated Composites Analyzer (ICAN) computer code. Parametric studies have been conducted on the face sheets and honeycomb core which constitute the sandwich-type structures. Selected thermal and mechanical properties of the composite faces and sandwich structures are presented graphically as functions of varying fiber volume ratio, temperature, and moisture content. The coefficients of thermal expansion are discussed in detail since these are the critical design parameters. In addition, existing experimental data are presented and compared to the ICAN predictions.

  5. Composite space antenna structures: Properties and environmental effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginty, Carol A.; Endres, Ned M.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal behavior of composite spacecraft antenna reflectors has been investigated with the integrated Composites Analyzer (ICAN) computer code. Parametric studies have been conducted on the face sheets and honeycomb core which constitute the sandwich-type structures. Selected thermal and mechanical properties of the composite faces and sandwich structures are presented graphically as functions of varying fiber volume ratio, temperature, and moisture content. The coefficients of thermal expansion are discussed in detail since these are the critical design parameters. In addition, existing experimental data are presented and compared to the ICAN predictions.

  6. A frequency domain analysis for damped space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagood, Nesbitt W.; Crawley, Edward F.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for the analysis of damped structural systems in which the structural components are represented by impedance models and analyzed in the frequency domain. Methods are presented to assemble and condense system impedance matrices, and then to identify approximate mass, stiffness, and damping matrices for systems whose impedances are complicated functions of frequency. Formulas are derived for determination of approximate values for system natural frequencies and damping using frequency domain quantities. The sensitivities of these approximate values to system parameter changes are analyzed. The implementation of these analysis tools is discussed and applied to a simple mechanical system.

  7. Sensitivity of Space Shuttle Weight and Cost to Structure Subsystem Weights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedge, T. E.; Williamson, R. P.

    1973-01-01

    Quantitative relationships between changes in space shuttle weights and costs with changes in weight of various portions of space shuttle structural subsystems are investigated. These sensitivity relationships, as they apply at each of three points in the development program (preliminary design phase, detail design phase, and test/operational phase) have been established for five typical space shuttle designs, each of which was responsive to the missions in the NASA Shuttle RFP, and one design was that selected by NASA.

  8. High resolution soil moisture radiometer. [large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilheit, T. T.

    1978-01-01

    An electrically scanned pushbroom phased antenna array is described for a microwave radiometer which can provide agriculturally meaningful measurements of soil moisture. The antenna size of 100 meters at 1400 MHz or 230 meters at 611 MHz requires several shuttle launches and orbital assembly. Problems inherent to the size of the structure and specific instrument problems are discussed as well as the preliminary design.

  9. Space-time-matter analytic and geometric structures

    CERN Document Server

    Brüning, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    At the boundary of mathematics and mathematical physics, this monograph explores recent advances in the mathematical foundations of string theory and cosmology. The geometry of matter and the evolution of geometric structures as well as special solutions, singularities and stability properties of the underlying partial differential equations are discussed.

  10. Accelerated partitioned fluid-structure interaction using space-mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholcz, T.P.; Van Zuijlen, A.H.; Bijl, H.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on acceleration of strong partitioned coupling algorithms for fluid-structure interaction. Strong partitioned coupling requires the solution of a coupled problem at each time step during the simulation. Hereto, an interface residual is defined such that the kinematic and

  11. Homogeneous Quaternionic Kaehler Structures on Eight-Dimensional Non-Compact Quaternion-Kaehler Symmetric Spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castrillon Lopez, M. [Facultad de Matematicas, Departamento de Geometria y Topologia (Spain)], E-mail: mcastri@mat.ucm.es; Gadea, P. M. [CSIC, Institute of Fundamental Physics (Spain)], E-mail: pmgadea@iec.csic.es; Oubina, J. A. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Xeometria e Topoloxia, Facultade de Matematicas (Spain)], E-mail: jaoubina@usc.es

    2009-02-15

    For each non-compact quaternion-Kaehler symmetric space of dimension eight, all of its descriptions as a homogeneous Riemannian space, and the associated homogeneous quaternionic Kaehler structures obtained through the Witte's refined Langlands decomposition, are studied.

  12. 10th meeting of the International Conference on Protection of Materials and Structures from Space Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Tagawa, Masahito; Kimoto, Yugo; Protection of Materials and Structures From the Space Environment

    2013-01-01

    The goals of the 10th International Space Conference on “Protection of Materials and Structures from Space Environment” ICPMSE-10J, since its inception in 1992, have been to facilitate exchanges between members of the various engineering and science disciplines involved in the development of space materials, including aspects of LEO, GEO and Deep Space environments, ground-based qualification, and in-flight experiments and lessons learned from operational vehicles that are closely interrelated to disciplines of the atmospheric sciences, solar-terrestrial interactions and space life sciences. The knowledge of environmental conditions on and around the Moon, Mars, Venus and the low Earth orbit as well as other possible candidates for landing such as asteroids have become an important issue, and protecting both hardware and human life from the effects of space environments has taken on a new meaning in light of the increased interest in space travel and colonization of other planets.  And while many materia...

  13. Power Efficiency of Systems Applied for Heating Building and Structure External Walls with Ventilated Air Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    I. F. Fialko; A. S. Statsenko

    2009-01-01

    The paper considers power-efficient systems applied for heating building and structure external walls with ventilated air spaces and prescribes directions and problems pertaining to power-efficiency improvement of such systems.

  14. Collisionless shocks in space plasmas structure and accelerated particles

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, David

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves are an important feature of solar system plasmas, from the solar corona out to the edge of the heliosphere. This engaging introduction to collisionless shocks in space plasmas presents a comprehensive review of the physics governing different types of shocks and processes of particle acceleration, from fundamental principles to current research. Motivated by observations of planetary bow shocks, interplanetary shocks and the solar wind termination shock, it emphasises the physical theory underlying these shock waves. Readers will develop an understanding of the complex interplay between particle dynamics and the electric and magnetic fields that explains the observations of in situ spacecraft. Written by renowned experts in the field, this up-to-date text is the ideal companion for both graduate students new to heliospheric physics and researchers in astrophysics who wish to apply the lessons of solar system shocks to different astrophysical environments.

  15. Mathematical Structure Common to Animal Growth Analysis and Space Expansion Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shimojo, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate mathematical structures common to animal growth analysis and space expansion analysis. Six particular functions for the growth analysis of the individual animal had a common mathematical structure composed of the respective function and its first and second derivatives. The standard model of the space expansion had a deceleration parameter composed of the scale factor and its first and second derivatives. The results obtained from this study suggested h...

  16. Segmentation of Brain Structures in Presence of a Space-Occupying Lesion

    OpenAIRE

    Pollo, C.; M. Bach Cuadra; Cuisenaire, O.; Villemure, J.; Thiran, J.

    2005-01-01

    Brain deformations induced by space-occupying lesions may result in unpredictable position and shape of functionally important brain structures. The aim of this study is to propose a method for segmentation of brain structures by deformation of a segmented brain atlas in presence of a space-occupying lesion. Our approach is based on an a priori model of lesion growth (MLG) that assumes radial expansion from a seeding point and involves three steps: first, an affine registration bringing the a...

  17. The Evolution of Meaning-Space Structure through Iterated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Simon

    One of the most striking aspects of human linguistic communication is its extensive use of compositionality to convey meaning. When expressing a complex meaning, we tend to use signals whose structure reflects the structure of the meaning to some degree. This property is the foundation upon which the syntax of language is built. It is natural, therefore, that an evolutionary account of human language should contrast compositional communication with a non-compositional, holistic alternative where whole signals map onto whole meanings in an arbitrary, unstructured way. Indeed, Wray (1998) has argued that holistic communication (which is still in evidence in particular contexts today) can be seen as a living fossil of an earlier completely non-compositional protolanguage.

  18. ALICE's main austenitic stainless steel support structure (the Space Frame)

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    This structure is constructed to hold the large volume detectors, such as the Time Projection Chamber, Transition Radiation Detector and Time of Flight inside the ALICE solenoid magnet. After the final assembly at CERN, two large mobile cranes were needed for the job of lifting and turning the 14 tonne frame onto its side. Once shifted, it was placed in Building SX2, one of the surface assembly areas designated for ALICE.

  19. Dynamic Identification for Control of Large Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    This is a compilation of reports by the one author on one subject. It consists of the following five journal articles: (1) A Parametric Study of the Ibrahim Time Domain Modal Identification Algorithm; (2) Large Modal Survey Testing Using the Ibrahim Time Domain Identification Technique; (3) Computation of Normal Modes from Identified Complex Modes; (4) Dynamic Modeling of Structural from Measured Complex Modes; and (5) Time Domain Quasi-Linear Identification of Nonlinear Dynamic Systems.

  20. Searching for the layered structure of space at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Dai, De Chang; Goldberg, Haim; Landsberg, Greg; Shaughnessy, Gabe; Stojkovic, Dejan; Weiler, Thomas J.

    2011-06-01

    Alignment of the main energy fluxes along a straight line in a target plane has been observed in families of cosmic ray particles detected in the Pamir mountains. The fraction of events with alignment is statistically significant for families with superhigh energies and large numbers of hadrons. This can be interpreted as evidence for coplanar hard scattering of secondary hadrons produced in the early stages of the atmospheric cascade development. This phenomenon can be described within the recently proposed “crystal world,” with latticized and anisotropic spatial dimensions. Planar events are expected to dominate particle collisions at a hard-scattering energy exceeding the scale Λ3 at which space transitions from 3D⇌2D. We study specific collider signatures that will test this hypothesis. We show that the energy spectrum of Drell-Yan (DY) scattering is significantly modified in this framework. At the LHC, two jet and three jet events are necessarily planar, but four jet events can test the hypothesis. Accordingly, we study in a model-independent way the 5σ discovery reach of the ATLAS and CMS experiments for identifying four jets coplanarities. For the extreme scenario in which all pp→4 jet scattering processes become coplanar above Λ3, we show that with an integrated luminosity of 10(100)fb-1 the LHC experiments have the potential to discover correlations between jets if Λ3≲1.25(1.6)TeV.

  1. Analytic structure of QCD propagators in Minkowski space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siringo, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Analytical functions for the propagators of QCD, including a set of chiral quarks, are derived by a one-loop massive expansion in the Landau gauge, deep in the infrared. By analytic continuation, the spectral functions are studied in Minkowski space, yielding a direct proof of positivity violation and confinement from first principles. The dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry is described on the same footing of gluon mass generation, providing a unified picture. While dealing with the exact Lagrangian, the expansion is based on massive free-particle propagators, is safe in the infrared and is equivalent to the standard perturbation theory in the UV. By dimensional regularization, all diverging mass terms cancel exactly without including mass counterterms that would spoil the gauge and chiral symmetry of the Lagrangian. Universal scaling properties are predicted for the inverse dressing functions and shown to be satisfied by the lattice data. Complex conjugated poles are found for the gluon propagator, in agreement with the i-particle scenario.

  2. The structure and properties of color spaces and the representation of color images

    CERN Document Server

    Dubois, Eric

    2009-01-01

    This lecture describes the author's approach to the representation of color spaces and their use for color image processing. The lecture starts with a precise formulation of the space of physical stimuli (light). The model includes both continuous spectra and monochromatic spectra in the form of Dirac deltas. The spectral densities are considered to be functions of a continuous wavelength variable. This leads into the formulation of color space as a three-dimensional vector space, with all the associated structure. The approach is to start with the axioms of color matching for normal human vie

  3. Active control synthesis for flexible space structures excited by persistent disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong; Gonzalez, Marcelo

    1990-01-01

    Both classical and state-space synthesis methods for active control of flexible space structures in the presence of persistent disturbances are presented. The methods exploit the so-called internal model principle for asymptotic disturbance rejection. A generic example of flexible space structures is used to illustrate the simplicity of the proposed design methodologies. The concept of a disturbance rejection filter dipole is introduced from a classical control viewpoint. It is shown that the proposed design methods will invariably make use of non-minimum-phase compensation for a class of noncolocated control problems. The need for tradeoffs between performance and parameter robustness is discussed.

  4. Space partitioning strategies for indoor WLAN positioning with cascade-connected ANN structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borenović, Miloš; Nešković, Aleksandar; Budimir, Djuradj

    2011-02-01

    Position information in indoor environments can be procured using diverse approaches. Due to the ubiquitous presence of WLAN networks, positioning techniques in these environments are the scope of intense research. This paper explores two strategies for space partitioning when utilizing cascade-connected Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) structures for indoor WLAN positioning. A set of cascade-connected ANN structures with different space partitioning strategies are compared mutually and to the single ANN structure. The benefits of using cascade-connected ANNs structures are shown and discussed in terms of the size of the environment, number of subspaces and partitioning strategy. The optimal cascade-connected ANN structures with space partitioning show up to 50% decrease in median error and up to 12% decrease in the average error with respect to the single ANN model. Finally, the single ANN and the optimal cascade-connected ANN model are compared against other well-known positioning techniques.

  5. Shear deformation plate continua of large double layered space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefzy, Mohamed Samir; Nayfeh, Adnan H.

    1986-01-01

    A simple method is presented to model large rigid-jointed lattice structures as continuous elastic media with couple stresses using energy equivalence. In the analysis, the transition from the discrete system to the continuous media is achieved by expanding the displacements and the rotations of the nodal points in a Taylor series about a suitable chosen origin. The strain energy of the continuous media with couple stresses is then specialized to obtain shear deformation plate continua. Equivalent continua for single layered grids, double layered grids, and three-dimensional lattices are then obtained.

  6. Spanwise Spacing Effects on the Initial Structure and Decay of Axial Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, B. J.; Reichert, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    The initial structure and axial decay of an array of streamwise vortices embedded in a turbulent pipe boundary layer is experimentally investigated. The vortices are shed in counter-rotating fashion from an array of equally-spaced symmetric airfoil vortex generators. Vortex structure is quantified in terms of crossplane circulation and peak streamwise vorticity. Flow conditions are subsonic and incompressible. The focus of this study is on the effect of the initial spacing between the parent vortex generators. Arrays with vortex generators spaced at 15 and 30 degrees apart are considered. When the spacing between vortex generators is decreased the circulation and peak vorticity of the shed vortices increases. Analysis indicates this strengthening results from regions of fluid acceleration in the vicinity of the vortex generator array. Decreased spacing between the constituent vortices also produces increased rates of circulation and peak vorticity decay.

  7. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures - 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, Peter M.; Li, Feiyue; Xu, Jianke

    1990-01-01

    The optimal control of three-dimensional large angle maneuvers and vibrations of a Shuttle-mast-reflector system is considered. The nonlinear equations of motion are formulated by using Lagrange's formula, with the mast modeled as a continuous beam subject to three-dimensional deformations. Pontryagin's Maximum Principle is applied to the slewing problem, to derive the necessary conditions for the optimal controls, which are bounded by given saturation levels. The resulting two point boundary value problem is then solved by using the quasilinearization algorithm and the method of particular solutions. The study of the large angle maneuvering of the Shuttle-beam-reflector spacecraft in the plane of a circular earth orbit is extended to consider the effects of the structural offset connection, the axial shortening, and the gravitational torque on the slewing motion. Finally the effect of additional design parameters (such as related to additional payload requirement) on the linear quadratic regulator based design of an orbiting control/structural system is examined.

  8. Searching for the layered structure of space at the LHC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anchordoqui, L. A.; Dai, D. C.; Goldberg, H.; Landsberg, G.; Shaughnessy, G.; Stojkovic, D.; Weiler, T. J. (High Energy Physics); (Univ. of Wisconsin at Milwaukee); (State Univ. of New York at Buffalo); (Brown Univ.); (Northeastern Univ.); (Northwestern Univ.); (Vanderbilt Univ.)

    2011-06-23

    Alignment of the main energy fluxes along a straight line in a target plane has been observed in families of cosmic ray particles detected in the Pamir mountains. The fraction of events with alignment is statistically significant for families with superhigh energies and large numbers of hadrons. This can be interpreted as evidence for coplanar hard scattering of secondary hadrons produced in the early stages of the atmospheric cascade development. This phenomenon can be described within the recently proposed 'crystal world,' with latticized and anisotropic spatial dimensions. Planar events are expected to dominate particle collisions at a hard-scattering energy exceeding the scale {Lambda}{sub 3} at which space transitions from 3D{r_equilibrium}2D. We study specific collider signatures that will test this hypothesis. We show that the energy spectrum of Drell-Yan (DY) scattering is significantly modified in this framework. At the LHC, two jet and three jet events are necessarily planar, but four jet events can test the hypothesis. Accordingly, we study in a model-independent way the 5{sigma} discovery reach of the ATLAS and CMS experiments for identifying four jets coplanarities. For the extreme scenario in which all pp {yields} 4 jet scattering processes become coplanar above {Lambda}{sub 3}, we show that with an integrated luminosity of 10(100) fb{sup -1} the LHC experiments have the potential to discover correlations between jets if {Lambda}{sub 3} {approx}< 1.25(1.6) TeV.

  9. Model correlation and damage location for large space truss structures: Secant method development and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Suzanne Weaver; Beattie, Christopher A.

    1991-01-01

    On-orbit testing of a large space structure will be required to complete the certification of any mathematical model for the structure dynamic response. The process of establishing a mathematical model that matches measured structure response is referred to as model correlation. Most model correlation approaches have an identification technique to determine structural characteristics from the measurements of the structure response. This problem is approached with one particular class of identification techniques - matrix adjustment methods - which use measured data to produce an optimal update of the structure property matrix, often the stiffness matrix. New methods were developed for identification to handle problems of the size and complexity expected for large space structures. Further development and refinement of these secant-method identification algorithms were undertaken. Also, evaluation of these techniques is an approach for model correlation and damage location was initiated.

  10. Quantum theory in real Hilbert space: How the complex Hilbert space structure emerges from Poincaré symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Valter; Oppio, Marco

    As earlier conjectured by several authors and much later established by Solèr (relying on partial results by Piron, Maeda-Maeda and other authors), from the lattice theory point of view, Quantum Mechanics may be formulated in real, complex or quaternionic Hilbert spaces only. Stückelberg provided some physical, but not mathematically rigorous, reasons for ruling out the real Hilbert space formulation, assuming that any formulation should encompass a statement of Heisenberg principle. Focusing on this issue from another — in our opinion, deeper — viewpoint, we argue that there is a general fundamental reason why elementary quantum systems are not described in real Hilbert spaces. It is their basic symmetry group. In the first part of the paper, we consider an elementary relativistic system within Wigner’s approach defined as a locally-faithful irreducible strongly-continuous unitary representation of the Poincaré group in a real Hilbert space. We prove that, if the squared-mass operator is non-negative, the system admits a natural, Poincaré invariant and unique up to sign, complex structure which commutes with the whole algebra of observables generated by the representation itself. This complex structure leads to a physically equivalent reformulation of the theory in a complex Hilbert space. Within this complex formulation, differently from what happens in the real one, all selfadjoint operators represent observables in accordance with Solèr’s thesis, and the standard quantum version of Noether theorem may be formulated. In the second part of this work, we focus on the physical hypotheses adopted to define a quantum elementary relativistic system relaxing them on the one hand, and making our model physically more general on the other hand. We use a physically more accurate notion of irreducibility regarding the algebra of observables only, we describe the symmetries in terms of automorphisms of the restricted lattice of elementary propositions of the

  11. Analysis of Pretension and Stress Stiffening in a Self-Deployable Deorbiting Space Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Peter Riddersholm; Nikolajsen, Jan Ánike; Kristensen, Anders Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    In the development of the Self-deployable Deorbiting Space Structure (SDSS) [1][2] FEA are used to determine the stress state during the folding process of a given rectangular Highly Flexible Frame (HFF). The rectangular HFF is the load carrying structure in the SDSS. The stress state changes...

  12. Poverty and macroeconomic performance across space, race, and family structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Craig; Ziliak, James P

    2004-02-01

    We examined the effects of macroeconomic performance and social policy on the extent and depth of poverty in America using state-level panel data from the 1981-2000 waves of the Current Population Survey. We found that a strong macroeconomy at both the state and national levels reduced both the number of families who were living in poverty and the severity of poverty. The magnitude and source of these antipoverty effects, however, were not uniform across family structures and racial groups or necessarily over time. While gains in the eradication of poverty, in general, were tempered by rising wage inequality, simulations indicated that female-headed families and families that were headed by black persons experienced substantial reductions in poverty in the 1990s largely because of the growth in median wages. An auxiliary time-series analysis suggests that the expansions in the federal Earned Income Tax Credit of the 1990s accounted for upward of 50% of the reduction in after-tax income deprivation.

  13. Interset: A natural language interface for teleoperated robotic assembly of the EASE space structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorsma, Daniel K.

    1989-01-01

    A teleoperated robot was used to assemble the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extra-vehicular activity (EASE) space structure under neutral buoyancy conditions, simulating a telerobot performing structural assembly in the zero gravity of space. This previous work used a manually controlled teleoperator as a test bed for system performance evaluations. From these results several Artificial Intelligence options were proposed. One of these was further developed into a real time assembly planner. The interface for this system is effective in assembling EASE structures using windowed graphics and a set of networked menus. As the problem space becomes more complex and hence the set of control options increases, a natural language interface may prove to be beneficial to supplement the menu based control strategy. This strategy can be beneficial in situations such as: describing the local environment, maintaining a data base of task event histories, modifying a plan or a heuristic dynamically, summarizing a task in English, or operating in a novel situation.

  14. Validation of a unique concept for a low-cost, lightweight space-deployable antenna structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, R. E.; Bilyeu, G. D.; Veal, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    An experiment conducted in the framework of a NASA In-Space Technology Experiments Program based on a concept of inflatable deployable structures is described. The concept utilizes very low inflation pressure to maintain the required geometry on orbit and gravity-induced deflection of the structure precludes any meaningful ground-based demonstrations of functions performance. The experiment is aimed at validating and characterizing the mechanical functional performance of a 14-m-diameter inflatable deployable reflector antenna structure in the orbital operational environment. Results of the experiment are expected to significantly reduce the user risk associated with using large space-deployable antennas by demonstrating the functional performance of a concept that meets the criteria for low-cost, lightweight, and highly reliable space-deployable structures.

  15. Guiding exploration in conformational feature space with Lipschitz underestimation for ab-initio protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaohu; Zhang, Guijun; Zhou, Xiaogen

    2018-02-06

    Computing conformations which are essential to associate structural and functional information with gene sequences, is challenging due to the high dimensionality and rugged energy surface of the protein conformational space. Consequently, the dimension of the protein conformational space should be reduced to a proper level, and an effective exploring algorithm should be proposed. In this paper, a plug-in method for guiding exploration in conformational feature space with Lipschitz underestimation (LUE) for ab-initio protein structure prediction is proposed. The conformational space is converted into ultrafast shape recognition (USR) feature space firstly. Based on the USR feature space, the conformational space can be further converted into Underestimation space according to Lipschitz estimation theory for guiding exploration. As a consequence of the use of underestimation model, the tight lower bound estimate information can be used for exploration guidance, the invalid sampling areas can be eliminated in advance, and the number of energy function evaluations can be reduced. The proposed method provides a novel technique to solve the exploring problem of protein conformational space. LUE is applied to differential evolution (DE) algorithm, and metropolis Monte Carlo(MMC) algorithm which is available in the Rosetta; When LUE is applied to DE and MMC, it will be screened by the underestimation method prior to energy calculation and selection. Further, LUE is compared with DE and MMC by testing on 15 small-to-medium structurally diverse proteins. Test results show that near-native protein structures with higher accuracy can be obtained more rapidly and efficiently with the use of LUE. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator: MSFC-Langley joint test of large space structures component assembly:

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA and MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  17. Sparse RNA folding revisited: space-efficient minimum free energy structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Sebastian; Jabbari, Hosna

    2016-01-01

    RNA secondary structure prediction by energy minimization is the central computational tool for the analysis of structural non-coding RNAs and their interactions. Sparsification has been successfully applied to improve the time efficiency of various structure prediction algorithms while guaranteeing the same result; however, for many such folding problems, space efficiency is of even greater concern, particularly for long RNA sequences. So far, space-efficient sparsified RNA folding with fold reconstruction was solved only for simple base-pair-based pseudo-energy models. Here, we revisit the problem of space-efficient free energy minimization. Whereas the space-efficient minimization of the free energy has been sketched before, the reconstruction of the optimum structure has not even been discussed. We show that this reconstruction is not possible in trivial extension of the method for simple energy models. Then, we present the time- and space-efficient sparsified free energy minimization algorithm SparseMFEFold that guarantees MFE structure prediction. In particular, this novel algorithm provides efficient fold reconstruction based on dynamically garbage-collected trace arrows. The complexity of our algorithm depends on two parameters, the number of candidates Z and the number of trace arrows T; both are bounded by [Formula: see text], but are typically much smaller. The time complexity of RNA folding is reduced from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text]; the space complexity, from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text]. Our empirical results show more than 80 % space savings over RNAfold [Vienna RNA package] on the long RNAs from the RNA STRAND database (≥2500 bases). The presented technique is intentionally generalizable to complex prediction algorithms; due to their high space demands, algorithms like pseudoknot prediction and RNA-RNA-interaction prediction are expected to profit even stronger than "standard" MFE folding. SparseMFEFold is free

  18. Finding Chemical Structures Corresponding to a Set of Coordinates in Chemical Descriptor Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyao, Tomoyuki; Funatsu, Kimito

    2017-08-01

    When chemical structures are searched based on descriptor values, or descriptors are interpreted based on values, it is important that corresponding chemical structures actually exist. In order to consider the existence of chemical structures located in a specific region in the chemical space, we propose to search them inside training data domains (TDDs), which are dense areas of a training dataset in the chemical space. We investigated TDDs' features using diverse and local datasets, assuming that GDB11 is the chemical universe. These two analyses showed that considering TDDs gives higher chance of finding chemical structures than a random search-based method, and that novel chemical structures actually exist inside TDDs. In addition to those findings, we tested the hypothesis that chemical structures were distributed on the limited areas of chemical space. This hypothesis was confirmed by the fact that distances among chemical structures in several descriptor spaces were much shorter than those among randomly generated coordinates in the training data range. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Order reduction for models of space structures using modal cost analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, R. E.; Hughes, P. C.; Hablani, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    Modal cost analysis furnishes a promising methodology for developing dynamical models of space structures for use in control systems analysis. Economy and accuracy can be attained by only retaining vibration modes that contribute significantly to an appropriately defined cost function. Expressions for modal costs (especially simple for 'lightly damped' structures) are derived for attitude control, vibration suppression, and shape control. These techniques are illustrated through application to a high-order finite element model of a large platform-type structure.

  20. Mutlifunctional Energy Storage-Structure Modules for Advanced Space Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ITN Energy Systems, Inc., in collaboration with the Center for Composite Materials (CCM) at the University of Delaware, proposes to design and develop...

  1. Einstein equations and conformal structure: Existence of Anti-de Sitter-type space-times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Helmut

    1995-10-01

    We discuss Einstein's equations in the context of normal conformal Cartan connections, derive a new conformal representation of the equations, and express the equations in a conformally invariant gauge. The resulting formulation of the equations is used to show the existence of asymptotically simple solutions to Einstein's equations with a positive cosmological constant. The solutions are characterized by Cauchy data on a space-like slice and by the intrinsic conformal structure on the conformal boundary at space-like and null infinity.

  2. Topology optimization and digital assembly of advanced space-frame structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Asbjørn; Amir, Oded; Michael, Knauss

    2014-01-01

    to normative space truss designs and dimensions. As such, a principal digital fabrication and assembly scheme is developed, where an architectural design methodology relative to the described process is established, and the proposed process demonstrated through scaled digital fabrication experiments.......this paper presents a novel method for integrated design, optimization and fabrication of optimized space-frame structures in an autonomous, digital process. Comparative numerical studies are presented, demonstrating achievable mass reduction by application of the method by comparison to equivalent...

  3. Predictive Measurement of the Structure of Land Use in an Urban Agglomeration Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The scientific measurement of land use in space is an essential task in urban agglomeration studies, and the fractal feature is one of the most powerful tools for describing the phenomenon of space. However, previous research on the fractal feature of land use has mostly been conducted in urban space, and examines the fractal feature of different land use types, respectively; thus, the measurement of the relationship between different land use types was not realized. Meanwhile, previous prediction methods used for spatial land use mostly relied on subjective abstraction of the evolution, theoretically, regardless of whether they were calibrated, so that complete coverage of all the mechanisms could not be guaranteed. Based on this, here, we treat the land use structure in urban agglomeration space as the research object, and attempt to establish a fractal measure method for the relationship between different land use types in the space of urban agglomeration. At the same time, we use the allometric relationship between “entirety” and “local” to establish an objective forecast model for the land use structure in urban agglomeration space based on gray prediction theory, to achieve a predictive measurement of the structure of land use in urban agglomeration space. Finally, this study applied the methods on the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei urban agglomeration to analyze the evolution of the stability of the structure of land use and achieve predictive measurement of the structure of land use. The results of the case study show that the methods proposed in this study can obtain the measurement of the relationship between different land use types and the land use prediction that does not depend on the subjective exploration of the evolution law. Compared with the measurement methods that analyzed the fractal feature of different land types, respectively, and the prediction methods that rely on subjective choice, the methods presented in this

  4. Cosmological special relativity the large scale structure of space, time and velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Carmeli, Moshe

    1997-01-01

    This book deals with special relativity theory and its application to cosmology. It presents Einstein's theory of space and time in detail, and describes the large scale structure of space, time and velocity as a new cosmological special relativity. A cosmological Lorentz-like transformation, which relates events at different cosmic times, is derived and applied. A new law of addition of cosmic times is obtained, and the inflation of the space at the early universe is derived, both from the cosmological transformation. The book will be of interest to cosmologists, astrophysicists, theoretical

  5. Cosmological special relativity the large scale structure of space, time and velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Carmeli, Moshe

    2002-01-01

    This book presents Einstein's theory of space and time in detail, and describes the large-scale structure of space, time and velocity as a new cosmological special relativity. A cosmological Lorentz-like transformation, which relates events at different cosmic times, is derived and applied. A new law of addition of cosmic times is obtained, and the inflation of the space at the early universe is derived, both from the cosmological transformation. The relationship between cosmic velocity, acceleration and distances is given. In the appendices gravitation is added in the form of a cosmological g

  6. Technology for Space Station Evolution. Volume 5: Structures and Materials/Thermal Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) conducted a workshop on technology for space station evolution on 16-19 Jan. 1990. The purpose of this workshop was to collect and clarify Space Station Freedom technology requirements for evolution and to describe technologies that can potentially fill those requirements. These proceedings are organized into an Executive Summary and Overview and five volumes containing the Technology Discipline Presentations. Volume 5 consists of the technology discipline sections for Structures/Materials and the Thermal Control System. For each technology discipline, there is a level 3 subsystem description, along with papers.

  7. Structural Sizing Methodology for the Tendon-Actuated Lightweight In-Space MANipulator (TALISMAN) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas C.; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The Tendon-Actuated Lightweight In-Space MANipulator (TALISMAN) is a versatile long-reach robotic manipulator that is currently being tested at NASA Langley Research Center. TALISMAN is designed to be highly mass-efficient and multi-mission capable, with applications including asteroid retrieval and manipulation, in-space servicing, and astronaut and payload positioning. The manipulator uses a modular, periodic, tension-compression design that lends itself well to analytical modeling. Given the versatility of application for TALISMAN, a structural sizing methodology was developed that could rapidly assess mass and configuration sensitivities for any specified operating work space, applied loads and mission requirements. This methodology allows the systematic sizing of the key structural members of TALISMAN, which include the truss arm links, the spreaders and the tension elements. This paper summarizes the detailed analytical derivations and methodology that support the structural sizing approach and provides results from some recent TALISMAN designs developed for current and proposed mission architectures.

  8. Formation and interaction of multiple coherent phase space structures in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakad, Amar; Kakad, Bharati; Omura, Yoshiharu

    2017-06-01

    The head-on collision of multiple counter-propagating coherent phase space structures associated with the ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) in plasmas composed of hot electrons and cold ions is studied here by using one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulation. The chains of counter-propagating IASWs are generated in the plasma by injecting the Gaussian perturbations in the equilibrium electron and ion densities. The head-on collisions of the counter-propagating electron and ion phase space structures associated with IASWs are allowed by considering the periodic boundary condition in the simulation. Our simulation shows that the phase space structures are less significantly affected by their collision with each other. They emerge out from each other by retaining their characteristics, so that they follow soliton type behavior. We also find that the electrons trapped within these IASW potentials are accelerated, while the ions are decelerated during the course of their collisions.

  9. PREPARING THE PUBLIC FOR COMMERCIALIZATION AND GUIDANCE OF STRUCTURAL MEDIA SPACE TOWARDS ITS FUSION WITH ADVERTISING SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Đukić

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Through genre structure analysis of the Television´s Zagreb First Channel schedule from the beginning of 1970´s till the end of the 1980´s accompanied by analysis of advertising in same period, the paper will examine the ways and intensity of commercialization entrance in Croatian media space dominated then by state media. Television schedule genre change and the broadcast of economic propaganda program will point out the different character of the television. It can be said that it will serve for preparing the public for commercialization entrance and guidance of structural media space towards its fusion with advertising one. The assumption is that in spite of the TV schedule change, which was in economic sense accompanied by economy reforms in order to establish market economy, the public wasn´t yet delivered to advertisers. One of the clarification lies in the role of the media, which then had revolutionary function with main purpose of not the voters’ generation but only to create patriots. The paper will reproduce a kind of public transformation genesis from latent status in state guided media system to same status of latent consumers in dual media model.

  10. Derivation of Field Equations in Space with the Geometric Structure Generated by Metric and Torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Yaremenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the derivation of field equations in space with the geometric structure generated by metric and torsion tensors. We also study the geometry of the space generated jointly and agreed on by the metric tensor and the torsion tensor. We showed that in such space the structure of the curvature tensor has special features and for this tensor we obtained analog Ricci-Jacobi identity and evaluated the gap that occurs at the transition from the original to the image and vice versa, in the case of infinitely small contours. We have researched the geodesic lines equation. We introduce the tensor παβ which is similar to the second fundamental tensor of hypersurfaces Yn-1, but the structure of this tensor is substantially different from the case of Riemannian spaces with zero torsion. Then we obtained formulas which characterize the change of vectors in accompanying basis relative to this basis itself. Taking into considerations our results about the structure of such space we derived from the variation principle the general field equations (electromagnetic and gravitational.

  11. In-situ investigations of structural changes during cyclic loading by high resolution reciprocal space mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichs, Annika M.; Thiel, Felix; Lienert, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    dislocation structures can be identified using advanced electron microscopy and synchrotron techniques. A detailed characterization of the microstructure during cyclic loading by in-situ monitoring the internal structure within individual grains with high energy x-rays can help to understand and predict...... the materials behavior during cyclic deformation and to improve the material design. While monitoring macroscopic stress and strain during cyclic loading, reciprocal space maps of diffraction peaks from single grains are obtained with high resolution. High Resolution Reciprocal Space Mapping was applied...

  12. Interactive computer graphics and its role in control system design of large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper attempts to show the relevance of interactive computer graphics in the design of control systems to maintain attitude and shape of large space structures to accomplish the required mission objectives. The typical phases of control system design, starting from the physical model such as modeling the dynamics, modal analysis, and control system design methodology are reviewed and the need of the interactive computer graphics is demonstrated. Typical constituent parts of large space structures such as free-free beams and free-free plates are used to demonstrate the complexity of the control system design and the effectiveness of the interactive computer graphics.

  13. An optimum organizational structure for a large earth-orbiting multidisciplinary Space Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragusa, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify an optimum hypothetical organizational structure for a large earth-orbiting multidisciplinary research and applications (R&A) Space Base manned by a mixed crew of technologists. Since such a facility does not presently exist, in situ empirical testing was not possible. Study activity was, therefore, concerned with the identification of a desired organizational structural model rather than the empirical testing of it. The essential finding of this research was that a four-level project type 'total matrix' model will optimize the efficiency and effectiveness of Space Base technologists.

  14. Space-planning and structural solutions of low-rise buildings: Optimal selection methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusakova, Natalya; Minaev, Nikolay; Filushina, Kristina; Dobrynina, Olga; Gusakov, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    The present study is devoted to elaboration of methodology used to select appropriately the space-planning and structural solutions in low-rise buildings. Objective of the study is working out the system of criteria influencing the selection of space-planning and structural solutions which are most suitable for low-rise buildings and structures. Application of the defined criteria in practice aim to enhance the efficiency of capital investments, energy and resource saving, create comfortable conditions for the population considering climatic zoning of the construction site. Developments of the project can be applied while implementing investment-construction projects of low-rise housing at different kinds of territories based on the local building materials. The system of criteria influencing the optimal selection of space-planning and structural solutions of low-rise buildings has been developed. Methodological basis has been also elaborated to assess optimal selection of space-planning and structural solutions of low-rise buildings satisfying the requirements of energy-efficiency, comfort and safety, and economical efficiency. Elaborated methodology enables to intensify the processes of low-rise construction development for different types of territories taking into account climatic zoning of the construction site. Stimulation of low-rise construction processes should be based on the system of approaches which are scientifically justified; thus it allows enhancing energy efficiency, comfort, safety and economical effectiveness of low-rise buildings.

  15. Electrofluidics fabricated by space-selective metallization in glass microfluidic structures using femtosecond laser direct writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Wu, Dong; Hanada, Yasutaka; Chen, Chi; Wu, Sizhu; Cheng, Ya; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2013-12-07

    Space-selective metallization of the inside of glass microfluidic structures using femtosecond laser direct-write ablation followed by electroless plating is demonstrated. Femtosecond laser direct writing followed by thermal treatment and successive chemical etching allows us to fabricate three-dimensional microfluidic structures inside photosensitive glass. Then, femtosecond laser ablation followed by electroless metal plating enables flexible deposition of patterned metal films on desired locations of not only the top and bottom walls but also the sidewalls of fabricated microfluidic structures. A volume writing scheme for femtosecond laser irradiation inducing homogeneous ablation on the sidewalls of microfluidic structures is proposed for sidewall metallization. The developed technique is used to fabricate electrofluidics in which microelectric components are integrated into glass microchannels. The fabricated electrofluidics are applied to control the temperature of liquid samples in the microchannels for the enhancement of chemical reactions and to manipulate the movement of biological samples in the microscale space.

  16. Modal test and analysis: Multiple tests concept for improved validation of large space structure mathematical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, B. K.; Kuo, C-P.; Glaser, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    For the structural dynamic analysis of large space structures, the technology in structural synthesis and the development of structural analysis software have increased the capability to predict the dynamic characteristics of the structural system. The various subsystems which comprise the system are represented by various displacement functions; the displacement functions are then combined to represent the total structure. Experience has indicated that even when subsystem mathematical models are verified by test, the mathematical representations of the total system are often in error because the mathematical model of the structural elements which are significant when loads are applied at the interconnection points are not adequately verified by test. A multiple test concept, based upon the Multiple Boundary Condition Test (MBCT), is presented which will increase the accuracy of the system mathematical model by improving the subsystem test and test/analysis correlation procedure.

  17. Robust H infinity control design for the space station with structured parameter uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Kuk-Whan; Wie, Bong; Geller, David; Sunkel, John

    1992-01-01

    A robust H-infinity control design methodology and its application to a Space Station attitude and momentum control problem are presented. This new approach incorporates nonlinear multi-parameter variations in the state-space formulation of H-infinity control theory. An application of this robust H-infinity control synthesis technique to the Space Station control problem yields a remarkable result in stability robustness with respect to the moments-of-inertia variation of about 73% in one of the structured uncertainty directions. The performance and stability of this new robust H-infinity controller for the Space Station are compared to those of other controllers designed using a standard linear-quadratic-regulator synthesis technique.

  18. Segmentation of brain structures in presence of a space-occupying lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, Claudio; Cuadra, Meritxell Bach; Cuisenaire, Olivier; Villemure, Jean-Guy; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2005-02-15

    Brain deformations induced by space-occupying lesions may result in unpredictable position and shape of functionally important brain structures. The aim of this study is to propose a method for segmentation of brain structures by deformation of a segmented brain atlas in presence of a space-occupying lesion. Our approach is based on an a priori model of lesion growth (MLG) that assumes radial expansion from a seeding point and involves three steps: first, an affine registration bringing the atlas and the patient into global correspondence; then, the seeding of a synthetic tumor into the brain atlas providing a template for the lesion; finally, the deformation of the seeded atlas, combining a method derived from optical flow principles and a model of lesion growth. The method was applied on two meningiomas inducing a pure displacement of the underlying brain structures, and segmentation accuracy of ventricles and basal ganglia was assessed. Results show that the segmented structures were consistent with the patient's anatomy and that the deformation accuracy of surrounding brain structures was highly dependent on the accurate placement of the tumor seeding point. Further improvements of the method will optimize the segmentation accuracy. Visualization of brain structures provides useful information for therapeutic consideration of space-occupying lesions, including surgical, radiosurgical, and radiotherapeutic planning, in order to increase treatment efficiency and prevent neurological damage.

  19. Computer-aided design and distributed system technology development for large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Ernest S.; Joshi, Suresh M.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed large space structures have many characteristics that make them difficult to analyze and control. They are highly flexible, with components mathematically modeled by partial differential equations or very large systems of ordinary differential equations. They have many resonant frequencies, typically low and closely spaced. Natural damping may be low and/or improperly modeled. Coupled with stringent operational requirements of orientation, shape control, and vibration suppression, and the inability to perform adequate ground testing, these characteristics present an unconventional identification and control design problem to the systems theorist. Some of the research underway within Langley's Spacecraft Control Branch, Guidance and Control Division aimed at developing theory and algorithms to treat large space structures systems identification and control problems is described. The research areas to be considered are computer-aided design algorithms, and systems identification and control of distributed systems.

  20. Direct space representation of metallicity and structural stability in SiO solids

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, S

    2002-01-01

    First principles calculations are performed on possible structures of silicon monoxide solids. The chemical character of all of the bonding interactions is systematically quantified in real space. It is found that the most stable SiO structure possesses the highest number of inequivalent bond paths. This process reveals a novel metallic Si-Si interaction and provides an explanation for the origin of the unexpectedly high conductivity in thin silicon oxide layers. In this paper a new measure for quantifying metallic character (in direct space) present in a bond has been introduced. Furthermore it has been possible to determine the directional properties of this metallic character in real space using the charge density. This finding is very important for future complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology.

  1. Modelling and Analysis of the Folding Principle used in Selv-Deployable Deorbiting Space Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Jan Ánike; Lauridsen, Peter Riddersholm; Kristensen, Anders Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    An initial prototype of the Self-deployable Deorbiting Space Structure (SDSS) for semi-controlled debris removal was launched in 2014. The SDSS module consists of 3 main systems, i.e. the Drag Sail Unit (DSU), the Release Unit (RU) and the Housing Unit (HU). In the redesign, a storage lid...

  2. Equivalence and Differences between Structural Equation Modeling and State-Space Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Ho, Moon-ho R.; Hamaker, Ellen L.; Dolan, Conor V.

    2010-01-01

    State-space modeling techniques have been compared to structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques in various contexts but their unique strengths have often been overshadowed by their similarities to SEM. In this article, we provide a comprehensive discussion of these 2 approaches' similarities and differences through analytic comparisons and…

  3. Simulations of minor mergers - II. The phase-space structure of thick discs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villalobos, Alvaro; Helmi, Amina

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the phase-space structure of simulated thick discs that are the result of a 5:1 mass-ratio merger between a disc galaxy and a satellite. Our main goal is to establish what would be the imprints of a merger origin for the Galactic thick disc. We find that the spatial distribution predicted

  4. The CFRP primary structure of the MIRI instrument onboard the James Webb Space Telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Niels Christian; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Schroll, J

    2004-01-01

    The design of the Primary Structure of the Mid Infra-Red Instrument (MIRI) onboard the NASA/ESA James Webb Space Telescope will be presented. The main design driver is the energy flow from the 35 K "hot" satellite interface to the 7 K "cold" MIRI interface. Carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP...

  5. System Identification of Civil Engineering Structures using State Space and ARMAV Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Brincker, Rune

    In this paper the relations between an ambient excited structural system, represented by an innovation state space system, and the Auto-Regressive Moving Average Vector (ARMAV) model are considered. It is shown how to obtain a multivariate estimate of the ARMAV model from output measurements, usi...

  6. Phase space interrogation of the empirical response modes for seismically excited structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Bibhas; George, Riya C.; Mishra, Sudib K.

    2017-07-01

    Conventional Phase Space Interrogation (PSI) for structural damage assessment relies on exciting the structure with low dimensional chaotic waveform, thereby, significantly limiting their applicability to large structures. The PSI technique is presently extended for structure subjected to seismic excitations. The high dimensionality of the phase space for seismic response(s) are overcome by the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD), decomposing the responses to a number of intrinsic low dimensional oscillatory modes, referred as Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs). Along with their low dimensionality, a few IMFs, retain sufficient information of the system dynamics to reflect the damage induced changes. The mutually conflicting nature of low-dimensionality and the sufficiency of dynamic information are taken care by the optimal choice of the IMF(s), which is shown to be the third/fourth IMFs. The optimal IMF(s) are employed for the reconstruction of the Phase space attractor following Taken's embedding theorem. The widely referred Changes in Phase Space Topology (CPST) feature is then employed on these Phase portrait(s) to derive the damage sensitive feature, referred as the CPST of the IMFs (CPST-IMF). The legitimacy of the CPST-IMF is established as a damage sensitive feature by assessing its variation with a number of damage scenarios benchmarked in the IASC-ASCE building. The damage localization capability, remarkable tolerance to noise contamination and the robustness under different seismic excitations of the feature are demonstrated.

  7. Development of mechanical structure for the compact space IR camera MIRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bongkon; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Cha, Sang-Mok; Park, Youngsik; Ree, Chang-Hee; Lee, Dae-Hee; Park, Sung-Joon; Nam, Uk-Won; Park, Jang-Hyun; Ka, Nung Hyun; Lee, Mi Hyun; Lee, Duk-Hang; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Rhee, Seung-Woo; Park, Jong-Oh; Lee, Hyung-Mok; Matsumoto, Toshio; Yang, Sun Choel; Han, Wonyong

    2010-07-01

    MIRIS is a compact near-infrared camera with a wide field of view of 3.67°×3.67° in the Korea Science and Technology Satellite 3 (STSAT-3). MIRIS will be launched warm and cool the telescope optics below 200K by pointing to the deep space on Sun-synchronous orbit. In order to realize the passive cooling, the mechanical structure was designed to consider thermal analysis results on orbit. Structural analysis was also conducted to ensure safety and stability in launching environments. To achieve structural and thermal requirements, we fabricated the thermal shielding parts such as Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) pipe supports, a Winston cone baffle, aluminum-shield plates, a sunshade, a radiator and 30 layers of Multi Layer Insulation (MLI). These structures prevent the heat load from the spacecraft and the earth effectively, and maintain the temperature of the telescope optics within operating range. A micro cooler was installed in a cold box including a PICNIC detector and a filter-wheel, and cooled the detector down to a operating temperature range. We tested the passive cooling in the simulated space environment and confirmed that the required temperature of telescope can be achieved. Driving mechanism of the filter-wheel and the cold box structure were also developed for the compact space IR camera. Finally, we present the assembly procedures and the test result for the mechanical parts of MIRIS.

  8. Quantitative structure-interplanar spacing models based on montmorillonite modified with quaternary alkylammonium salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorev, V. Yu.; Grigoreva, L. D.; Salimov, I. E.

    2017-08-01

    Models of the quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) between the structure of 19 alkylammonium cations and the basal distances ( d 001) of Na+ montmorillonite modified with these cations are created. Seven descriptors characterizing intermolecular interaction, including new fractal descriptors, are used to describe the structure of the compounds. It is shown that equations obtained via multiple linear regression have good statistical characteristics, and the calculated d 001 values agree with the results from experimental studies. The quantitative contribution from hydrogen bonds to the formation of interplanar spacing in Na+ montmorillonite is found by analyzing the QSPR models.

  9. Learning the Inverse Dynamics of Robotic Manipulators in Structured Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-An; Huang, Han-Pang; Hsu, Huan-Kun; Lai, Wei-Zh; Cheng, Chih-Chun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the modeling of inverse dynamics without prior kinematic information for holonomic rigid-body robots. Despite success in compensating robot dynamics and friction, general inverse dynamics models are nontrivial. Rigid-body models are restrictive or inefficient; learning-based models are generalizable yet require large training data. The structured kernels address the dilemma by embedding the robot dynamics in reproducing kernel Hilbert space. The proposed kernels autonomously converge to rigid-body models but require fewer samples; with a semi-parametric framework that incorporates additional parametric basis for friction, the structured kernels can efficiently model general rigid-body robots. We tested the proposed scheme in simulations and experiments; the models that consider the structure of function space are more accurate.

  10. Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Nekovee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive radio is being intensively researched as the enabling technology for license-exempt access to the so-called TV White Spaces (TVWS, large portions of spectrum in the UHF/VHF bands which become available on a geographical basis after digital switchover. Both in the US, and more recently, in the UK the regulators have given conditional endorsement to this new mode of access. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in technology, regulation, and standardisation of cognitive access to TVWS. It examines the spectrum opportunity and commercial use cases associated with this form of secondary access.

  11. Recent advance on design and manufacturing of composite anisogrid structures for space launchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totaro, G.; De Nicola, F.

    2012-12-01

    Anisogrid composite shells have been developed and applied since the eighties by the Russian technology aiming at critical weight structures for space launchers, as interstages and cone adapters. The manufacturing process commonly applied is based on the wet filament winding. The paper concerns with some developments of design and manufacturing recently performed at the Italian Aerospace Research Center on a cylindrical structural model representative of this kind of structures. The framework of preliminary design is improved by introducing the concept of suboptimal configuration in order to match the stiffness requirement of the shell and minimise the mass, in conjunction with the typical strength constraints. The undertaken manufacturing process is based on dry robotic winding for the lattice structure and for the outer skin, with the aid of usual rubber tooling and new devices for the automated deposition strategy. Resin infusion under vacuum bag and co-cure of the system of ribs and skin is finally applied out-of-autoclave, with the aid of a heated mandrel. With such approach an interstage structural model (scale factor 1:1.5) has been designed, manufactured and tested. Design requirements and loads refer to a typical space launcher whose baseline configuration is made in aluminium. The global mechanical test of the manufactured structure has confirmed the expected high structural performance. The possibility to reach substantial weight savings in comparison with the aluminium benchmark has been fully demonstrated.

  12. Introduction of a Minkowski space structure for a deeper insight in Euclidean issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Jean-Marie, E-mail: becker@cpe.f [Ecole Superieure de Chimie Physique Electronique de Lyon, 69616 Lyon (France)

    2010-02-01

    nxn symmetrical positive definite matrices are present in many applications. In the n = 2 case, these matrices constitute a 3D-space, denoted by S{sup +}{sub 2}. The determinant of A is an element of S{sub 2}{sup +} a natural quadratic form, giving S{sub 2}{sup +} a Minkowski space structure. This paper shows how this theory quite naturally provides a graphical interpretation to formulas that have been defined elsewhere. An original application to discrete curves is given.

  13. Solving Component Structural Dynamic Failures Due to Extremely High Frequency Structural Response on the Space Shuttle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frady, Greg; Nesman, Thomas; Zoladz, Thomas; Szabo, Roland

    2010-01-01

    For many years, the capabilities to determine the root-cause failure of component failures have been limited to the analytical tools and the state of the art data acquisition systems. With this limited capability, many anomalies have been resolved by adding material to the design to increase robustness without the ability to determine if the design solution was satisfactory until after a series of expensive test programs were complete. The risk of failure and multiple design, test, and redesign cycles were high. During the Space Shuttle Program, many crack investigations in high energy density turbomachines, like the SSME turbopumps and high energy flows in the main propulsion system, have led to the discovery of numerous root-cause failures and anomalies due to the coexistences of acoustic forcing functions, structural natural modes, and a high energy excitation, such as an edge tone or shedding flow, leading the technical community to understand many of the primary contributors to extremely high frequency high cycle fatique fluid-structure interaction anomalies. These contributors have been identified using advanced analysis tools and verified using component and system tests during component ground tests, systems tests, and flight. The structural dynamics and fluid dynamics communities have developed a special sensitivity to the fluid-structure interaction problems and have been able to adjust and solve these problems in a time effective manner to meet budget and schedule deadlines of operational vehicle programs, such as the Space Shuttle Program over the years.

  14. Design, fabrication, and test of lightweight shell structure. [for application to the space tug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    A cylindrical shell skirt structure was subjected to a design and analysis study using a wide variety of structural materials and concepts. The design loading, axial compression, and torsion is representative of that expected on a typical space tug skirt section. Structural concepts evaluated included honeycomb sandwich, truss, isogrid, and skin/stringer/frame. The materials considered included a wide variety of structural metals as well as glass, graphite, and boron-reinforced composites. Honeycomb sandwich with aluminum faceskins, honeycomb sandwich with graphite/epoxy faceskins, and aluminum truss with fiberglass meteoroid protection layers were the designs selected for further evaluation. Procurement of materials required for fabrication is reported and the structural test plan and fabrication drawings are included. Construction of the graphite/epoxy faceskins, chem mill of the aluminum faceskins, chem mill of aluminum truss components, and fabrication of the graphite/epoxy honeycomb sandwich development panel is also reported.

  15. Scaffolding open inquiry: How a teacher provides students with structure and space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte Bjønness

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The present case study examines a teacher’s scaffolding strategies supporting his students during a twelve-week open inquiry project at an upper secondary school. We use interaction analysis to identify how he provides structure and space in the different phases of open inquiry as well as how it constitutes the students’ inquiry process. The study reveals that the teacher scaffolded this open inquiry in two opposing ways; he created space for the students to make their own experiences and ideas, which eventually set up the need for more directed scaffolding to discuss the challenges students experienced, and directing students’ ideas in certain directions in phases with structure. We suggest that the interplay between structure and space creates what can be seen as a driving force providing both exploration and direction for open inquiry. Moreover, we propose that the dual concept of ‘structure and space’ can work as a thinking tool to promote teachers’ competence on how to scaffold more authentic versions of scientific inquiry in schools.

  16. Block-structured grids in full velocity space for Eulerian gyrokinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarema, D.; Bungartz, H. J.; Görler, T.; Jenko, F.; Neckel, T.; Told, D.

    2017-06-01

    Global, i.e., full-torus, gyrokinetic simulations play an important role in exploring plasma microturbulence in magnetic fusion devices with strong radial variations. In the presence of steep temperature profiles, grid-based Eulerian approaches can become quite challenging as the correspondingly varying velocity space structures need to be accommodated and sufficiently resolved. A rigid velocity space grid then requires a very high number of discretization nodes resulting in enormous computational costs. To tackle this issue and reduce the computational demands, we introduce block-structured grids in the all velocity space dimensions. The construction of these grids is based on a general approach, making them suitable for various Eulerian implementations. In the current study, we explain the rationale behind the presented approach, detail the implementation, and provide simulation results obtained with the block-structured grids. The achieved reduction in the number of computational nodes depends on the temperature profile and simulation scenario provided. In the test cases at hand, about ten times fewer grid points are required for nonlinear simulations performed with block-structured grids in the plasma turbulence code GENE (http://genecode.org). With the speed-up found to scale almost exactly reciprocal to the number of grid points, the new implementation greatly reduces the computational costs and therefore opens new possibilities for applications of this software package.

  17. State-Space Approach to Structural Representation of Perturbed Pitch Period Sequences in Voice Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzamendi, Gabriel A; Schlotthauer, Gastón; Torres, María E

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a state space-based approach to model perturbed pitch period sequences (PPSs), extracted from real sustained vowels, combining the principal features of disturbed real PPSs with structural analysis of stochastic time series and state space methods. The PPSs were obtained from a database composed of 53 healthy subjects. State space models were developed taking into account different structures and complexity levels. PPS features such as trend, cycle, and irregular structures were considered. Model parameters were calculated using optimization procedures. For each PPS, state estimates were obtained combining the developed models and diffuse initialization with filtering and smoothing methods. Statistical tests were applied to objectively evaluate the performance of this method. Statistical tests demonstrated that the proposed approach correctly represented more than the 75% of the database with a significance value of 0.05. In the analysis, structural estimates suitably characterized the dynamics of the PPSs. Trend estimates proved to properly represent slow long-term dynamics, whereas cycle estimates captured short-term autoregressive dependencies. The present study demonstrated that the proposed approach is suitable for representing and analyzing real perturbed PPSs, also allowing to extract further information related to the phonation process. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Post-Flight Estimation of Motion of Space Structures: Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Breckenridge, William

    2008-01-01

    A computer program estimates the relative positions and orientations of two space structures from data on the angular positions and distances of fiducial objects on one structure as measured by a target tracking electronic camera and laser range finders on another structure. The program is written specifically for determining the relative alignments of two antennas, connected by a long truss, deployed in outer space from a space shuttle. The program is based partly on transformations among the various coordinate systems involved in the measurements and on a nonlinear mathematical model of vibrations of the truss. The program implements a Kalman filter that blends the measurement data with data from the model. Using time series of measurement data from the tracking camera and range finders, the program generates time series of data on the relative position and orientation of the antennas. A similar program described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article was used onboard for monitoring the structures during flight. The present program is more precise and designed for use on Earth in post-flight processing of the measurement data to enable correction, for antenna motions, of scientific data acquired by use of the antennas.

  19. Permittivity and Permeability for Floquet-Bloch Space Harmonics in Infinite 1D Magneto-Dielectric Periodic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Olav; Yaghjian, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    -Bloch space harmonics. We discuss how space harmonic permittivity and permeability can be expressed in seemingly different though equivalent forms, and we investigate these parameters of the zeroeth order space harmonic for a particular 1D periodic structure that is based on a previously reported 3D periodic...

  20. MIC-Large Scale Magnetically Inflated Cable Structures for Space Power, Propulsion, Communications and Observational Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, James; Maise, George; Rather, John

    2010-01-01

    A new approach for the erection of rigid large scale structures in space-MIC (Magnetically Inflated Cable)-is described. MIC structures are launched as a compact payload of superconducting cables and attached tethers. After reaching orbit, the superconducting cables are energized with electrical current. The magnet force interactions between the cables cause them to expand outwards into the final large structure. Various structural shapes and applications are described. The MIC structure can be a simple flat disc with a superconducting outer ring that supports a tether network holding a solar cell array, or it can form a curved mirror surface that concentrates light and focuses it on a smaller region-for example, a high flux solar array that generates electric power, a high temperature receiver that heats H2 propellant for high Isp propulsion, and a giant primary reflector for a telescope for astronomy and Earth surveillance. Linear dipole and quadrupole MIC structures are also possible. The linear quadrupole structure can be used for magnetic shielding against cosmic radiation for astronauts, for example. MIC could use lightweight YBCO superconducting HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) cables, that can operate with liquid N2 coolant at engineering current densities of ~105 amp/cm2. A 1 kilometer length of MIC cable would weigh only 3 metric tons, including superconductor, thermal insulations, coolant circuits, and refrigerator, and fit within a 3 cubic meter compact package for launch. Four potential MIC applications are described: Solar-thermal propulsion using H2 propellant, space based solar power generation for beaming power to Earth, a large space telescope, and solar electric generation for a manned lunar base. The first 3 applications use large MIC solar concentrating mirrors, while the 4th application uses a surface based array of solar cells on a magnetically levitated MIC structure to follow the sun. MIC space based mirrors can be very large and light

  1. Thermal morphing anisogrid smart space structures: thermal isolation design and linearity evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, Austin A.

    2017-04-01

    To meet the requirements for the next generation of space missions, a paradigm shift is required from current structures that are static, heavy and stiff, toward innovative structures that are adaptive, lightweight, versatile, and intelligent. A novel morphing structure, the thermally actuated anisogrid morphing boom, can be used to meet the design requirements by making the primary structure actively adapt to the on-orbit environment. The anisogrid structure is able to achieve high precision morphing control through the intelligent application of thermal gradients. This active primary structure improves structural and thermal stability performance, reduces mass, and enables new mission architectures. This effort attempts to address limits to the author's previous work by incorporating the impact of thermal coupling that was initially neglected. This paper introduces a thermally isolated version of the thermal morphing anisogrid structure in order to address the thermal losses between active members. To evaluate the isolation design the stiffness and thermal conductivity of these isolating interfaces need to be addressed. This paper investigates the performance of the thermal morphing system under a variety of structural and thermal isolation interface properties.

  2. Momentum-Space Imaging of the Dirac Band Structure in Molecular Graphene via Quasiparticle Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Anna; Gomes, Kenjiro K.; Ko, Wonhee; Mar, Warren; Manoharan, Hari C.

    2014-03-01

    Molecular graphene is a nanoscale artificial lattice composed of carbon monoxide molecules arranged one by one, realizing a dream of exploring exotic quantum materials by design. This assembly is done by atomic manipulation with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) on a Cu(111) surface. To directly probe the transformation of normal surface state electrons into massless Dirac fermions, we map the momentum space dispersion through the Fourier analysis of quasiparticle scattering maps acquired at different energies with the STM. The Fourier analysis not only bridges the real-space and momentum-space data but also reveals the chiral nature of those quasiparticles, through a set of selection rules of allowed scattering involving the pseudospin and valley degrees of freedom. The graphene-like band structure can be reshaped with simple alterations to the lattice, such as the addition of a strain. We analyze the effect on the momentum space band structure of multiple types of strain on our system. Supported by DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  3. Advances in deployable structures and surfaces for large apertures in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Prowald, J.; Baier, H.

    2013-12-01

    Large apertures in space have applications for telecommunications, Earth observation and scientific missions. This paper reviews advances in mechanical architectures and technologies for large deployable apertures for space antennas and telescopes. Two complementary approaches are described to address this challenge: the deployment of structures based on quasi-rigid members and highly flexible structures. Regarding the first approach, deployable articulated structures are classified in terms of their kinematics as 3D or planar linkages in multiple variants, resulting in different architectures of radial, peripheral or modular constructions. A dedicated discussion on the number of degrees of freedom and constraints addresses the deployment reliability and thermo-elastic stability of large elastic structures in the presence of thermal gradients. This aspect has been identified as a design driver for new developments of peripheral ring and modular structures. Meanwhile, other design drivers are maintained, such as the optimization of mass and stiffness, overall accuracy and stability, and pragmatic aspects including controlled industrial development and a commitment to operators' needs. Furthermore, reflecting surface technologies and concepts are addressed with a view to the future, presenting advances in technical solutions for increasing apertures and reducing areal mass densities to affordable levels for future missions. Highly flexible materials capable of producing ultra-stable shells are described with reference to the state of the art and new developments. These concepts may enable large deployable surfaces for antennas and telescopes, as well as innovative optical concepts such as photon sieves. Shape adjustment and shape control of these surfaces are described in terms of available technologies and future needs, particularly for the reconfiguration of telecommunications antennas. In summary, the two complementary approaches described and reviewed cover the

  4. The phase-space structure of nearby dark matter as constrained by the SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Florent; Jasche, Jens; Lavaux, Guilhem; Wandelt, Benjamin; Percival, Will

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies using numerical simulations have demonstrated that the shape of the cosmic web can be described by studying the Lagrangian displacement field. We extend these analyses, showing that it is now possible to perform a Lagrangian description of cosmic structure in the nearby Universe based on large-scale structure observations. Building upon recent Bayesian large-scale inference of initial conditions, we present a cosmographic analysis of the dark matter distribution and its evolution, referred to as the dark matter phase-space sheet, in the nearby universe as probed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey main galaxy sample. We consider its stretchings and foldings using a tetrahedral tessellation of the Lagrangian lattice. The method provides extremely accurate estimates of nearby density and velocity fields, even in regions of low galaxy density. It also measures the number of matter streams, and the deformation and parity reversals of fluid elements, which were previously thought inaccessible using observations. We illustrate the approach by showing the phase-space structure of known objects of the nearby Universe such as the Sloan Great Wall, the Coma cluster and the Boötes void. We dissect cosmic structures into four distinct components (voids, sheets, filaments, and clusters), using the Lagrangian classifiers DIVA, ORIGAMI, and a new scheme which we introduce and call LICH. Because these classifiers use information other than the sheer local density, identified structures explicitly carry physical information about their formation history. Accessing the phase-space structure of dark matter in galaxy surveys opens the way for new confrontations of observational data and theoretical models. We have made our data products publicly available.

  5. A brief comparison between grid based real space algorithms andspectrum algorithms for electronic structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2006-12-01

    Quantum mechanical ab initio calculation constitutes the biggest portion of the computer time in material science and chemical science simulations. As a computer center like NERSC, to better serve these communities, it will be very useful to have a prediction for the future trends of ab initio calculations in these areas. Such prediction can help us to decide what future computer architecture can be most useful for these communities, and what should be emphasized on in future supercomputer procurement. As the size of the computer and the size of the simulated physical systems increase, there is a renewed interest in using the real space grid method in electronic structure calculations. This is fueled by two factors. First, it is generally assumed that the real space grid method is more suitable for parallel computation for its limited communication requirement, compared with spectrum method where a global FFT is required. Second, as the size N of the calculated system increases together with the computer power, O(N) scaling approaches become more favorable than the traditional direct O(N{sup 3}) scaling methods. These O(N) methods are usually based on localized orbital in real space, which can be described more naturally by the real space basis. In this report, the author compares the real space methods versus the traditional plane wave (PW) spectrum methods, for their technical pros and cons, and the possible of future trends. For the real space method, the author focuses on the regular grid finite different (FD) method and the finite element (FE) method. These are the methods used mostly in material science simulation. As for chemical science, the predominant methods are still Gaussian basis method, and sometime the atomic orbital basis method. These two basis sets are localized in real space, and there is no indication that their roles in quantum chemical simulation will change anytime soon. The author focuses on the density functional theory (DFT), which is the

  6. A Rigid and Flexible Structures Combined Deployable Boom for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-09

    to remove the debris in space [3]. N. Brazil et al. designed deployable boom based oil dispersant system for fixed wing aircraft to respond emergency...like oil spill [4]. There are mainly five kinds of deployable booms. The first one is the pantographic structures based booms which consist of...microsatellite gripper,” IEEE ASME Trans Mechatron, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 438−446, Feb. 2015. [4] N. Brazil , S. Nakhla, and S. Kenny, “Deployable oil

  7. Local deformation method for measuring element tension in space deployable structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belov Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the local deformation method to determine the tension of cord and thin membrane elements in space deployable structure as antenna reflector. Possible measuring instrument model, analytical and numerical solutions and experimental results are presented. The boundary effects on measurement results of metallic mesh reflector surface tension are estimated. The study case depicting non-uniform reflector surface tension is considered.

  8. The impact of capillary structure properties on heat transfer from boiling in limited space

    OpenAIRE

    Баскова, Александра Александровна; Кравец, Владимир Юрьевич; Алексеик, Ольга Сергеевна; Лебедь, Наталия Леонидовна

    2015-01-01

    Modern cooling systems for radio and electronic equipment widely use heat pipes. The main element of heat pipes is capillary and porous structure (CPS), on which a heat transfer agent boils and condensates. Previous studies showed that intensity of heat transfer depends on geometric parameters of the CPS. Our research is devoted to analyzing experimental data on the intensity of heat transfer from boiling in limited space on the CPS with various fiber lengths. We have determined the impact of...

  9. Substitutional structures in symple and multi-connected flat spaces and astrophysical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Escudero, Juan Garcia

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Hexagonal, octagonal and dodecagonal tilings of both simply and multiconnected flat spaces in 2D are considered. The tessellations of the euclidean plane have in common arrowed prototiles, which are used for the construction of fundamental polygons for the flat torus and the Klein bottle. Non deterministic derivations in formal grammars, producing non periodic ordered structures, have been introduced recently also for the analysis of variable stars with multiple periods, l...

  10. Space-time structure of particle production in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuka, Naohiko; Ohnishi, Akira [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Nara, Yasushi; Maruyama, Tomoyuki

    1998-07-01

    Space-Time structure of freeze-out of produced particles in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the framework of two different cascade models, either with or without higher baryonic resonances. While higher excited baryonic resonances do not influence the spatial source size of freeze-out point, the freeze-out time distribution is shifted to be later by these resonances. (author)

  11. Nonlinear Structural Health Monitoring of the Responsive Space Satellite Systems Using Magneto Elastic Active Sensors (MEAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    honeycomb and realistic satellite panels, are provided. Nonlinear SHM methodologies using MEAS are considered and its use for acousto-elastic...highlighted. Examples of MEAS-enabled SHM testing in aerospace structures of simple and complex geometry, such a honeycomb and realistic satellite panels...Monitoring of the Responsive Space Satellite Systems using Magneto Elastic Active Sensors (MEAS) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  12. Evaluation of Composite Structures Technologies for Application to NASA's Vision for Space Exploration (CoSTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Ravi; Wang, Donny; Bohlen, Jim; Fukuda, Cliff

    2008-01-01

    A trade study was conducted to determine the suitability of composite structures for weight and life cycle cost savings in primary and secondary structural systems for crew exploration vehicles, crew and cargo launch vehicles, landers, rovers, and habitats. The results of the trade study were used to identify and rank order composite material technologies that can have a near-term impact on a broad range of exploration mission applications. This report recommends technologies that should be developed to enable usage of composites on Vision for Space Exploration vehicles towards mass and life-cycle cost savings.

  13. Preliminary results on the dynamics of large and flexible space structures in Halo orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colagrossi, Andrea; Lavagna, Michèle

    2017-05-01

    The global exploration roadmap suggests, among other ambitious future space programmes, a possible manned outpost in lunar vicinity, to support surface operations and further astronaut training for longer and deeper space missions and transfers. In particular, a Lagrangian point orbit location - in the Earth- Moon system - is suggested for a manned cis-lunar infrastructure; proposal which opens an interesting field of study from the astrodynamics perspective. Literature offers a wide set of scientific research done on orbital dynamics under the Three-Body Problem modelling approach, while less of it includes the attitude dynamics modelling as well. However, whenever a large space structure (ISS-like) is considered, not only the coupled orbit-attitude dynamics should be modelled to run more accurate analyses, but the structural flexibility should be included too. The paper, starting from the well-known Circular Restricted Three-Body Problem formulation, presents some preliminary results obtained by adding a coupled orbit-attitude dynamical model and the effects due to the large structure flexibility. In addition, the most relevant perturbing phenomena, such as the Solar Radiation Pressure (SRP) and the fourth-body (Sun) gravity, are included in the model as well. A multi-body approach has been preferred to represent possible configurations of the large cis-lunar infrastructure: interconnected simple structural elements - such as beams, rods or lumped masses linked by springs - build up the space segment. To better investigate the relevance of the flexibility effects, the lumped parameters approach is compared with a distributed parameters semi-analytical technique. A sensitivity analysis of system dynamics, with respect to different configurations and mechanical properties of the extended structure, is also presented, in order to highlight drivers for the lunar outpost design. Furthermore, a case study for a large and flexible space structure in Halo orbits around

  14. A periodic genetic algorithm with real-space representation for crystal structure and polymorph prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, N. L.; Probert, M. I. J.

    2006-06-01

    A genetic algorithm is described that is suitable for determining the global minimum energy configurations of crystal structures and which can also be used as a polymorph search technique. This algorithm requires no prior assumptions about unit cell size, shape, or symmetry, nor about the ionic configuration within the unit cell. This therefore enables true ab initio crystal structure and polymorph prediction. Our algorithm uses a real-space representation of the population members, and makes use of a periodic cut for the crossover operation. Results on large Lennard-Jones systems with fcc- and hcp-commensurate cells show robust convergence to the bulk structure from a random initial assignment and an ability to successfully discriminate between competing low enthalpy configurations. Results from an ab initio carbon polymorph search show the spontaneous emergence of both Lonsdaleite and graphite-like structures.

  15. Space-Filling Curves as a Novel Crystal Structure Representation for Machine Learning Models

    CERN Document Server

    Jasrasaria, Dipti; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental problem in applying machine learning techniques for chemical problems is to find suitable representations for molecular and crystal structures. While the structure representations based on atom connectivities are prevalent for molecules, two-dimensional descriptors are not suitable for describing molecular crystals. In this work, we introduce the SFC-M family of feature representations, which are based on Morton space-filling curves, as an alternative means of representing crystal structures. Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) was employed in a novel setting to reduce sparsity of feature representations. The quality of the SFC-M representations were assessed by using them in combination with artificial neural networks to predict Density Functional Theory (DFT) single point, Ewald summed, lattice, and many-body dispersion energies of 839 organic molecular crystal unit cells from the Cambridge Structural Database that consist of the elements C, H, N, and O. Promising initial results suggest that the S...

  16. Structuring feature space: a non-parametric method for volumetric transfer function generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Ross; Woo, Insoo; Chen, Wei; Ebert, David S

    2009-01-01

    The use of multi-dimensional transfer functions for direct volume rendering has been shown to be an effective means of extracting materials and their boundaries for both scalar and multivariate data. The most common multi-dimensional transfer function consists of a two-dimensional (2D) histogram with axes representing a subset of the feature space (e.g., value vs. value gradient magnitude), with each entry in the 2D histogram being the number of voxels at a given feature space pair. Users then assign color and opacity to the voxel distributions within the given feature space through the use of interactive widgets (e.g., box, circular, triangular selection). Unfortunately, such tools lead users through a trial-and-error approach as they assess which data values within the feature space map to a given area of interest within the volumetric space. In this work, we propose the addition of non-parametric clustering within the transfer function feature space in order to extract patterns and guide transfer function generation. We apply a non-parametric kernel density estimation to group voxels of similar features within the 2D histogram. These groups are then binned and colored based on their estimated density, and the user may interactively grow and shrink the binned regions to explore feature boundaries and extract regions of interest. We also extend this scheme to temporal volumetric data in which time steps of 2D histograms are composited into a histogram volume. A three-dimensional (3D) density estimation is then applied, and users can explore regions within the feature space across time without adjusting the transfer function at each time step. Our work enables users to effectively explore the structures found within a feature space of the volume and provide a context in which the user can understand how these structures relate to their volumetric data. We provide tools for enhanced exploration and manipulation of the transfer function, and we show that the initial

  17. FlexStem: improving predictions of RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots by reducing the search space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; He, Si-Min; Bu, Dongbo; Zhang, Fa; Wang, Zhiyong; Chen, Runsheng; Gao, Wen

    2008-09-15

    RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots are often predicted by minimizing free energy, which is proved to be NP-hard. Due to kinetic reasons the real RNA secondary structure often has local instead of global minimum free energy. This implies that we may improve the performance of RNA secondary structure prediction by taking kinetics into account and minimize free energy in a local area. we propose a novel algorithm named FlexStem to predict RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots. Still based on MFE criterion, FlexStem adopts comprehensive energy models that allow complex pseudoknots. Unlike classical thermodynamic methods, our approach aims to simulate the RNA folding process by successive addition of maximal stems, reducing the search space while maintaining or even improving the prediction accuracy. This reduced space is constructed by our maximal stem strategy and stem-adding rule induced from elaborate statistical experiments on real RNA secondary structures. The strategy and the rule also reflect the folding characteristic of RNA from a new angle and help compensate for the deficiency of merely relying on MFE in RNA structure prediction. We validate FlexStem by applying it to tRNAs, 5SrRNAs and a large number of pseudoknotted structures and compare it with the well-known algorithms such as RNAfold, PKNOTS, PknotsRG, HotKnots and ILM according to their overall sensitivities and specificities, as well as positive and negative controls on pseudoknots. The results show that FlexStem significantly increases the prediction accuracy through its local search strategy. Software is available at http://pfind.ict.ac.cn/FlexStem/. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. Detecting 3D Vegetation Structure with the Galileo Space Probe: Can a Distant Probe Detect Vegetation Structure on Earth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E Doughty

    Full Text Available Sagan et al. (1993 used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993 could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightness of the Amazon forest (a region where Sagan et al. (1993 noted a red edge in the reflectance spectrum, indicative of photosynthesis as the planet rotates to a common model of reflectance anisotropy and found measured increase of surface reflectance of 0.019 ± 0.003 versus a 0.007 predicted from only anisotropic effects. We hypothesize the difference was due to minor cloud contamination. However, the Galileo dataset had only a small change in phase angle (sun-satellite position which reduced the observed anisotropy signal and we demonstrate that theoretically if the probe had a variable phase angle between 0-20°, there would have been a much larger predicted change in surface reflectance of 0.1 and under such a scenario three-dimensional vegetation structure on Earth could possibly have been detected. These results suggest that anisotropic effects may be useful to help determine whether exoplanets have three-dimensional vegetation structure in the future, but that further comparisons between empirical and theoretical results are first necessary.

  19. Detecting 3D Vegetation Structure with the Galileo Space Probe: Can a Distant Probe Detect Vegetation Structure on Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Christopher E; Wolf, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sagan et al. (1993) used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993) could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightness of the Amazon forest (a region where Sagan et al. (1993) noted a red edge in the reflectance spectrum, indicative of photosynthesis) as the planet rotates to a common model of reflectance anisotropy and found measured increase of surface reflectance of 0.019 ± 0.003 versus a 0.007 predicted from only anisotropic effects. We hypothesize the difference was due to minor cloud contamination. However, the Galileo dataset had only a small change in phase angle (sun-satellite position) which reduced the observed anisotropy signal and we demonstrate that theoretically if the probe had a variable phase angle between 0-20°, there would have been a much larger predicted change in surface reflectance of 0.1 and under such a scenario three-dimensional vegetation structure on Earth could possibly have been detected. These results suggest that anisotropic effects may be useful to help determine whether exoplanets have three-dimensional vegetation structure in the future, but that further comparisons between empirical and theoretical results are first necessary.

  20. A structure-based distance metric for high-dimensional space exploration with multidimensional scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jenny Hyunjung; McDonnell, Kevin T; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, Dan; Mueller, Klaus

    2014-03-01

    Although the euclidean distance does well in measuring data distances within high-dimensional clusters, it does poorly when it comes to gauging intercluster distances. This significantly impacts the quality of global, low-dimensional space embedding procedures such as the popular multidimensional scaling (MDS) where one can often observe nonintuitive layouts. We were inspired by the perceptual processes evoked in the method of parallel coordinates which enables users to visually aggregate the data by the patterns the polylines exhibit across the dimension axes. We call the path of such a polyline its structure and suggest a metric that captures this structure directly in high-dimensional space. This allows us to better gauge the distances of spatially distant data constellations and so achieve data aggregations in MDS plots that are more cognizant of existing high-dimensional structure similarities. Our biscale framework distinguishes far-distances from near-distances. The coarser scale uses the structural similarity metric to separate data aggregates obtained by prior classification or clustering, while the finer scale employs the appropriate euclidean distance.

  1. Time-frequency and space-wavenumber analysis for damage inspection of thin-walled structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, P. Frank; Sundaresan, Mannur J.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents a dynamics-based methodology for accurate damage inspection of thin-walled structures by combining a boundary-effect evaluation method (BEEM) for space-wavenumber analysis of measured operational deflection shapes (ODSs) and a conjugate-pair decomposition (CPD) method for time-frequency analysis of time traces of measured points. BEEM is for locating and estimating small structural damage by processing ODSs measured by a full-field measurement system (e.g., a scanning laser vibrometer or a camera-based motion measurement system). BEEM is a nondestructive spatial-domain method based on area-by-area processing of ODSs and it works without using any structural model or historical data for comparison. Similar to the short-time Fourier transform and wavelet transform, CPD uses adaptive windowed regular harmonics and function orthogonality to perform time-frequency analysis of time traces by extracting time-localized regular and/or distorted harmonics. Both BEEM and CPD are local spectral analysis based on local, adaptive curve fitting. The first estimation of the wavenumber for BEEM and the frequency for CPD is obtained by using a four-point Teager-Kaiser algorithm based on the use of finite difference. Numerical simulations and experimental results show that the combination of BEEM and CPD for space-wavenumber and time-frequency analysis provides an accurate tool for damage inspection of thin-walled structures.

  2. Biased Tracers in Redshift Space in the EFT of Large-Scale Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perko, Ashley [Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Senatore, Leonardo [KIPAC, Menlo Park; Jennings, Elise [Chicago U., KICP; Wechsler, Risa H. [Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2016-10-28

    The Effective Field Theory of Large-Scale Structure (EFTofLSS) provides a novel formalism that is able to accurately predict the clustering of large-scale structure (LSS) in the mildly non-linear regime. Here we provide the first computation of the power spectrum of biased tracers in redshift space at one loop order, and we make the associated code publicly available. We compare the multipoles $\\ell=0,2$ of the redshift-space halo power spectrum, together with the real-space matter and halo power spectra, with data from numerical simulations at $z=0.67$. For the samples we compare to, which have a number density of $\\bar n=3.8 \\cdot 10^{-2}(h \\ {\\rm Mpc}^{-1})^3$ and $\\bar n=3.9 \\cdot 10^{-4}(h \\ {\\rm Mpc}^{-1})^3$, we find that the calculation at one-loop order matches numerical measurements to within a few percent up to $k\\simeq 0.43 \\ h \\ {\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$, a significant improvement with respect to former techniques. By performing the so-called IR-resummation, we find that the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation peak is accurately reproduced. Based on the results presented here, long-wavelength statistics that are routinely observed in LSS surveys can be finally computed in the EFTofLSS. This formalism thus is ready to start to be compared directly to observational data.

  3. Flow structure and unsteadiness in the supersonic wake of a generic space launcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Stephan, Sören; Radespiel, Rolf

    2015-11-01

    At the junction between the rocket engine and the main body of a classical space launcher, a separation-dominated and highly unstable flow field develops and induces strong wall-pressure oscillations. These can excite structural vibrations detrimental to the launcher. It is desirable to minimize these effects, for which a better understanding of the flow field is required. We study the wake flow of a generic axisymmetric space-launcher model with and without propulsive jet (cold air). Experimental investigations are performed at Mach 2.9 and a Reynolds number ReD = 1 . 3 .106 based on model diameter D. The jet exits the nozzle at Mach 2.5. Velocity measurements by means of Particle Image Velocimetry and mean and unsteady wall-pressure measurements on the main-body base are performed simultaneously. Additionally, we performed hot-wire measurements at selected points in the wake. We can thus observe the evolution of the wake flow along with its spectral content. We describe the mean and turbulent flow topology and evolution of the structures in the wake flow and discuss the origin of characteristic frequencies observed in the pressure signal at the launcher base. The influence of a propulsive jet on the evolution and topology of the wake flow is discussed in detail. The German Research Foundation DFG is gratefully acknowledged for funding this research within the SFB-TR40 ``Technological foundations for the design of thermally and mechanically highly loaded components of future space transportation systems.''

  4. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements of reciprocal space structure of 2D materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Y; Guo, F-W; Lu, T-M; Wang, G-C

    2016-12-02

    Knowledge on the symmetry and perfection of a 2D material deposited or transferred to a surface is very important and valuable. We demonstrate a method to map the reciprocal space structure of 2D materials using reflection high energy diffraction (RHEED). RHEED from a 2D material gives rise to 'streaks' patterns. It is shown that from these streaks patterns at different azimuthal rotation angles that the reciprocal space intensity distribution can be constructed as a function of momentum transfer parallel to the surface. To illustrate the principle, we experimentally constructed the reciprocal space structure of a commercial graphene/SiO2/Si sample in which the graphene layer was transferred to the SiO2/Si substrate after it was deposited on a Cu foil by chemical vapor deposition. The result reveals a 12-fold symmetry of the graphene layer which is a result of two dominant orientation domains with 30° rotation relative to each other. We show that the graphene can serve as a template to grow other materials such as a SnS film that follows the symmetry of graphene.

  5. What could the LHC teach us on the structure of space-time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triantaphyllou George

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Collision energies of proton beams now available at the LHC increase the probability of discovering the inner works of the Brout-Englert-Higgs (BEH mechanism within the foreseeable future. Nevertheless, they are still several orders of magnitude below the scale where a possible non-trivial structure of space-time would be detectable. Apart from remaining completely silent on the issue of the fundamental nature of elementary particles and the space in which they propagate, one may try to speculate on this matter by carefully extrapolating existing scientific methods and knowledge to Planck energies. In this talk, an effort is made to logically link some potential discoveries at the LHC with specific space-time structures. Since such links are inevitably weak due to the huge energy hierarchy between the electro-weak and the Planck scales, our goal does not exceed a mere presentation of naturalness and self-consistency arguments in favor of some of the possible outcomes, placing particular emphasis on the scenario of the mirror world.

  6. Topological structure of the space of phenotypes: the case of RNA neutral networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo Aguirre

    Full Text Available The evolution and adaptation of molecular populations is constrained by the diversity accessible through mutational processes. RNA is a paradigmatic example of biopolymer where genotype (sequence and phenotype (approximated by the secondary structure fold are identified in a single molecule. The extreme redundancy of the genotype-phenotype map leads to large ensembles of RNA sequences that fold into the same secondary structure and can be connected through single-point mutations. These ensembles define neutral networks of phenotypes in sequence space. Here we analyze the topological properties of neutral networks formed by 12-nucleotides RNA sequences, obtained through the exhaustive folding of sequence space. A total of 4(12 sequences fragments into 645 subnetworks that correspond to 57 different secondary structures. The topological analysis reveals that each subnetwork is far from being random: it has a degree distribution with a well-defined average and a small dispersion, a high clustering coefficient, and an average shortest path between nodes close to its minimum possible value, i.e. the Hamming distance between sequences. RNA neutral networks are assortative due to the correlation in the composition of neighboring sequences, a feature that together with the symmetries inherent to the folding process explains the existence of communities. Several topological relationships can be analytically derived attending to structural restrictions and generic properties of the folding process. The average degree of these phenotypic networks grows logarithmically with their size, such that abundant phenotypes have the additional advantage of being more robust to mutations. This property prevents fragmentation of neutral networks and thus enhances the navigability of sequence space. In summary, RNA neutral networks show unique topological properties, unknown to other networks previously described.

  7. Topological Structure of the Space of Phenotypes: The Case of RNA Neutral Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Jacobo; Buldú, Javier M.; Stich, Michael; Manrubia, Susanna C.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution and adaptation of molecular populations is constrained by the diversity accessible through mutational processes. RNA is a paradigmatic example of biopolymer where genotype (sequence) and phenotype (approximated by the secondary structure fold) are identified in a single molecule. The extreme redundancy of the genotype-phenotype map leads to large ensembles of RNA sequences that fold into the same secondary structure and can be connected through single-point mutations. These ensembles define neutral networks of phenotypes in sequence space. Here we analyze the topological properties of neutral networks formed by 12-nucleotides RNA sequences, obtained through the exhaustive folding of sequence space. A total of 412 sequences fragments into 645 subnetworks that correspond to 57 different secondary structures. The topological analysis reveals that each subnetwork is far from being random: it has a degree distribution with a well-defined average and a small dispersion, a high clustering coefficient, and an average shortest path between nodes close to its minimum possible value, i.e. the Hamming distance between sequences. RNA neutral networks are assortative due to the correlation in the composition of neighboring sequences, a feature that together with the symmetries inherent to the folding process explains the existence of communities. Several topological relationships can be analytically derived attending to structural restrictions and generic properties of the folding process. The average degree of these phenotypic networks grows logarithmically with their size, such that abundant phenotypes have the additional advantage of being more robust to mutations. This property prevents fragmentation of neutral networks and thus enhances the navigability of sequence space. In summary, RNA neutral networks show unique topological properties, unknown to other networks previously described. PMID:22028856

  8. Efficient eigenvalue assignment by state and output feedback with applications for large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannell, Eric C.; Kenny, Sean P.; Maghami, Peiman G.

    1995-03-01

    The erection and deployment of large flexible structures having thousands of degrees of freedom requires controllers based on new techniques of eigenvalue assignment that are computationally stable and more efficient. Scientists at NASA Langley Research Center have developed a novel and efficient algorithm for the eigenvalue assignment of large, time-invariant systems using full-state and output feedback. The objectives of this research were to improve upon the output feedback version of this algorithm, to produce a toolbox of MATLAB functions based on the efficient eigenvalue assignment algorithm, and to experimentally verify the algorithm and software by implementing controllers designed using the MATLAB toolbox on the phase 2 configuration of NASA Langley's controls-structures interaction evolutionary model, a laboratory model used to study space structures. Results from laboratory tests and computer simulations show that effective controllers can be designed using software based on the efficient eigenvalue assignment algorithm.

  9. Topology Optimization and Robotic Fabrication of Advanced Timber Space-frame Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Asbjørn; Amir, Oded; Eversmann, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for integrated topology optimization and fabrication of advanced timber space-frame structures. The method, developed in research collaboration between ETH Zürich, Aarhus School of Architecture and Israel Institute of Technology, entails the coupling of truss......-based topology optimization with digital procedures for rationalization and robotic assembly of bespoke timber members, through a procedural, cross-application workflow. Through this, a direct chaining of optimization and robotic fabrication is established, in which optimization data is driving subsequent...... processes solving timber joint intersections, robotically controlling member prefabrication, and spatial robotic assembly of the optimized timber structures. The implication of this concept is studied through pilot fabrication and load-testing of a full scale prototype structure....

  10. Structure-From-Motion in 3D Space Using 2D Lidars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Geol Choi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel structure-from-motion methodology using 2D lidars (Light Detection And Ranging. In 3D space, 2D lidars do not provide sufficient information for pose estimation. For this reason, additional sensors have been used along with the lidar measurement. In this paper, we use a sensor system that consists of only 2D lidars, without any additional sensors. We propose a new method of estimating both the 6D pose of the system and the surrounding 3D structures. We compute the pose of the system using line segments of scan data and their corresponding planes. After discarding the outliers, both the pose and the 3D structures are refined via nonlinear optimization. Experiments with both synthetic and real data show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method.

  11. OCCAMS: Optically Controlled and Corrected Active Meta-material Space Structures (Ultra-Lightweight Photonic Muscle Space Structures Phase II) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Photons weigh nothing. Why must even small space telescopes have high mass? Our team has demonstrated this is not the case using a completely novel approach to...

  12. Interactive Spaces Towards Collaborative Structuring and Ubiquitous Presentation in Domestic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaj Grønbæk

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the use of media and material in private homes based on empirical studies in a project on designing interactive domestic environments. Based on the analyses we propose a Domestic Hypermedia infrastructure (DoHM combining spatial, context-aware and physical hypermedia to support collaborative structuring and ubiquitous presentation of materials in private homes. With DoHM we propose establishing new relationship between digital and physical hyperspaces, folding hyperspaces into the physical space of the household. Thus we strive to combine the qualities of physical domestic materials and spaces with the flexibility and dynamics of digital hyperspaces. We propose a variety of new ubiquitous home appliances called MediaWall, MediaTable, MediaTray and MediaPort, which address these issues.

  13. Optics. Spatially structured photons that travel in free space slower than the speed of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Daniel; Romero, Jacquiline; Potoček, Václav; Ferenczi, Gergely; Speirits, Fiona; Barnett, Stephen M; Faccio, Daniele; Padgett, Miles J

    2015-02-20

    That the speed of light in free space is constant is a cornerstone of modern physics. However, light beams have finite transverse size, which leads to a modification of their wave vectors resulting in a change to their phase and group velocities. We study the group velocity of single photons by measuring a change in their arrival time that results from changing the beam's transverse spatial structure. Using time-correlated photon pairs, we show a reduction in the group velocity of photons in both a Bessel beam and photons in a focused Gaussian beam. In both cases, the delay is several micrometers over a propagation distance of ~1 meter. Our work highlights that, even in free space, the invariance of the speed of light only applies to plane waves. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. High Leverage Technologies for In-Space Assembly of Complex Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Doris; Bowman, Lynn M.; Belvin, W. Keith; Gilman, David A.

    2016-01-01

    In-space assembly (ISA), the ability to build structures in space, has the potential to enable or support a wide range of advanced mission capabilities. Many different individual assembly technologies would be needed in different combinations to serve many mission concepts. The many-to-many relationship between mission needs and technologies makes it difficult to determine exactly which specific technologies should receive priority for development and demonstration. Furthermore, because enabling technologies are still immature, no realistic, near-term design reference mission has been described that would form the basis for flowing down requirements for such development and demonstration. This broad applicability without a single, well-articulated mission makes it difficult to advance the technology all the way to flight readiness. This paper reports on a study that prioritized individual technologies across a broad field of possible missions to determine priority for future technology investment.

  15. 3-Space In-Flow Theory of Gravity: Boreholes, Blackholes and the Fine Structure Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A theory of 3-space explains the phenomenon of gravity as arising from the time-dependence and inhomogeneity of the differential flow of this 3-space. The emergent theory of gravity has two gravitational constants: GN — Newton’s constant, and a dimensionless constant α. Various experiments and astronomical observations have shown that α is the fine structure constant ≈ 1/137. Here we analyse the Greenland Ice Shelf and Nevada Test Site borehole g anomalies, and confirm with increased precision this value of α. This and other successful tests of this theory of gravity, including the supermassive black holes in globular clusters and galaxies, and the “dark-matter” effect in spiral galaxies, shows the validity of this theory of gravity. This success implies that the non-relativistic Newtonian gravity was fundamentally flawed from the beginning, and that this flaw was inherited by the relativistic General Relativity theory of gravity.

  16. 3-Space In-Flow Theory of Gravity: Boreholes, Blackholes and the Fine Structure Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A theory of 3-space explains the phenomenon of gravity as arising from the time-dependence and inhomogeneity of the differential flow of this 3-space. The emergent theory of gravity has two gravitational constants: G - Newton's constant, and a dimensionless constant alpha. Various experiments and astronomical observations have shown that alpha is the fine structure constant ~1/137. Here we analyse the Greenland Ice Shelf and Nevada Test Site borehole g anomalies, and confirm with increased precision this value of alpha. This and other successful tests of this theory of gravity, including the supermassive black holes in globular clusters and galaxies, and the "dark-matter" effect in spiral galaxies, shows the validity of this theory of gravity. This success implies that the non-relativistic Newtonian gravity was fundamentally flawed from the beginning, and that this flaw was inherited by the relativistic General Relativity theory of gravity.

  17. Imaging the real space structure of the spin fluctuations in an iron-based superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shun; Aluru, Ramakrishna; Grothe, Stephanie; Kreisel, A; Singh, Udai Raj; Andersen, Brian M; Hardy, W N; Liang, Ruixing; Bonn, D A; Burke, S A; Wahl, Peter

    2017-06-29

    Spin fluctuations are a leading candidate for the pairing mechanism in high temperature superconductors, supported by the common appearance of a distinct resonance in the spin susceptibility across the cuprates, iron-based superconductors and many heavy fermion materials. The information we have about the spin resonance comes almost exclusively from neutron scattering. Here we demonstrate that by using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy we can characterize the spin resonance in real space. We show that inelastic tunnelling leads to the characteristic dip-hump feature seen in tunnelling spectra in high temperature superconductors and that this feature arises from excitations of the spin fluctuations. Spatial mapping of this feature near defects allows us to probe non-local properties of the spin susceptibility and to image its real space structure.

  18. A nonlinear optimization approach for disturbance rejection in flexible space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Sunkel, John W.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the design of an active control law for the rejection of persistent disturbances in large space structures is presented. The control system design approach is based on a deterministic model of the disturbances, with a model-based-compensator (MBC) structure, optimizing the magnitude of the disturbance that the structure can tolerate without violating certain predetermined constraints. In addition to closed-loop stability, the explicit treatment of state, control and control rate constraints, such as structural displacement, control actuator effort, and compensator time guarantees that the final design will exhibit desired performance characteristics. The technique is applied for the vibration damping of a simple two bay truss structure which is subjected to persistent disturbances, such as shuttle docking. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed control system can reject considerable persistent disturbances by utilizing most of the available control, while limiting the structural displacements to within desired tolerances. Further work, however, for incorporating additional design criteria, such as compensator robustness to be traded-off against performance specifications, is warranted.

  19. Cross-over between discrete and continuous protein structure space: insights into automatic classification and networks of protein structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Pascual-García

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Structural classifications of proteins assume the existence of the fold, which is an intrinsic equivalence class of protein domains. Here, we test in which conditions such an equivalence class is compatible with objective similarity measures. We base our analysis on the transitive property of the equivalence relationship, requiring that similarity of A with B and B with C implies that A and C are also similar. Divergent gene evolution leads us to expect that the transitive property should approximately hold. However, if protein domains are a combination of recurrent short polypeptide fragments, as proposed by several authors, then similarity of partial fragments may violate the transitive property, favouring the continuous view of the protein structure space. We propose a measure to quantify the violations of the transitive property when a clustering algorithm joins elements into clusters, and we find out that such violations present a well defined and detectable cross-over point, from an approximately transitive regime at high structure similarity to a regime with large transitivity violations and large differences in length at low similarity. We argue that protein structure space is discrete and hierarchic classification is justified up to this cross-over point, whereas at lower similarities the structure space is continuous and it should be represented as a network. We have tested the qualitative behaviour of this measure, varying all the choices involved in the automatic classification procedure, i.e., domain decomposition, alignment algorithm, similarity score, and clustering algorithm, and we have found out that this behaviour is quite robust. The final classification depends on the chosen algorithms. We used the values of the clustering coefficient and the transitivity violations to select the optimal choices among those that we tested. Interestingly, this criterion also favours the agreement between automatic and expert classifications

  20. Intelligent Flexible Materials for Space Structures: Expandable Habitat Engineering Development Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Jon; Sharpe, George; Lin, John; Wiley, Cliff; Timmers, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Expandable habitable elements are an enabling technology for human exploration in space and on planetary surfaces. Large geometries can be deployed from a small launch volume, allowing greater mission capability while reducing mass and improving robustness over traditional rigid shells. This report describes research performed by ILC Dover under the Intelligent Flexible Materials for Space Structures program on the design and manufacture of softgoods for LaRC's Expandable Habitat Engineering Development Unit (EDU). The EDU is a full-scale structural test article of an expandable hybrid habitat, integrating an expandable softgoods center section with two rigid end caps. The design of the bladder, restraint layer and a mock-up Thermal Micrometeoroid Cover is detailed together with the design of the interface hardware used to attach them to the end caps. The integration and design of two windows and a floor are also covered. Analysis was performed to study the effects of the open weave design, and to determine the correct webbing and fabric configuration. Stress analyses were also carried out on the interfaces between the softgoods and the end caps and windows. Testing experimentally determined the strength of the fabric and straps, and component testing was used to proof several critical parts of the design. This program established new manufacturing and design techniques that can be applied to future applications in expandable structures.

  1. Linear-Space Data Structures for Range Mode Query in Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Timothy M.; Durocher, Stephane; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2012-01-01

    A mode of a multiset S is an element a in S of maximum multiplicity; that is, a occurs at least as frequently as any other element in S. Given an array A[1:n] of n elements, we consider a basic problem: constructing a static data structure that efficiently answers range mode queries on A. Each...... query consists of an input pair of indices (i, j) for which a mode of A[i:j] must be returned. The best previous data structure with linear space, by Krizanc, Morin, and Smid (ISAAC 2003), requires O(sqrt(n) loglog n) query time. We improve their result and present an O(n)-space data structure...... that supports range mode queries in O(sqrt(n / log n)) worst-case time. Furthermore, we present strong evidence that a query time significantly below sqrt(n) cannot be achieved by purely combinatorial techniques; we show that boolean matrix multiplication of two sqrt(n) by sqrt(n) matrices reduces to n range...

  2. Linear-Space Data Structures for Range Mode Query in Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Timothy M.; Durocher, Stephane; Larsen, Kasper Green

    2014-01-01

    A mode of a multiset S is an element a in S of maximum multiplicity; that is, a occurs at least as frequently as any other element in S. Given an array A[1:n] of n elements, we consider a basic problem: constructing a static data structure that efficiently answers range mode queries on A. Each...... query consists of an input pair of indices (i, j) for which a mode of A[i:j] must be returned. The best previous data structure with linear space, by Krizanc, Morin, and Smid (ISAAC 2003), requires O(sqrt(n) loglog n) query time. We improve their result and present an O(n)-space data structure...... that supports range mode queries in O(sqrt(n / log n)) worst-case time. Furthermore, we present strong evidence that a query time significantly below sqrt(n) cannot be achieved by purely combinatorial techniques; we show that boolean matrix multiplication of two sqrt(n) by sqrt(n) matrices reduces to n range...

  3. Diagnosis of Magnetic Structures and Intermittency in Space Plasma Turbulence using the Method of Surrogate Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraoui, Fouad; Goldstein, Melvyn

    2008-01-01

    Several observations in space plasmas have reported the presence of coherent structures at different plasma scales. Structure formation is believed to be a direct consequence of nonlinear interactions between the plasma modes, which depend strongly on phase synchronization of those modes. Despite this important role of the phases in turbulence, very limited work has been however devoted to study the phases as a potential tracers of nonlinearities in comparison with the wealth of literature on power spectra of turbulence where phases are totally missed. We present a method based on surrogate data to systematically detect coherent structures in turbulent signals. The new method has been applied successfully to magnetosheath turbulence (Sahraoui, Phys. Rev. E, 2008, in press), where the relationship between the identified phase coherence and intermittency (classically identified as non Gaussian tails of the PDFs) as well as the energy cascade has been studied. Here we review the main results obtained in that study and show further applications to small scale solar wind turbulence. Implications of the results on theoretical modelling of space turbulence (applicability of weak/wave turbulence, its validity limits and its connection to intermittency) will be discussed.

  4. Exploring Protein Dynamics Space: The Dynasome as the Missing Link between Protein Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensen, Ulf; Meyer, Tim; Haas, Jürgen; Rex, René; Vriend, Gert; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are usually described and classified according to amino acid sequence, structure or function. Here, we develop a minimally biased scheme to compare and classify proteins according to their internal mobility patterns. This approach is based on the notion that proteins not only fold into recurring structural motifs but might also be carrying out only a limited set of recurring mobility motifs. The complete set of these patterns, which we tentatively call the dynasome, spans a multi-dimensional space with axes, the dynasome descriptors, characterizing different aspects of protein dynamics. The unique dynamic fingerprint of each protein is represented as a vector in the dynasome space. The difference between any two vectors, consequently, gives a reliable measure of the difference between the corresponding protein dynamics. We characterize the properties of the dynasome by comparing the dynamics fingerprints obtained from molecular dynamics simulations of 112 proteins but our approach is, in principle, not restricted to any specific source of data of protein dynamics. We conclude that: 1. the dynasome consists of a continuum of proteins, rather than well separated classes. 2. For the majority of proteins we observe strong correlations between structure and dynamics. 3. Proteins with similar function carry out similar dynamics, which suggests a new method to improve protein function annotation based on protein dynamics. PMID:22606222

  5. Cellular Load Responsive MLI: Structural In-air and In-space LH2 Insulation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced space propulsion systems are a critical need for future NASA deep space missions. High thrust or high Isp engines could revolutionize space exploration....

  6. Effect of Space Vehicle Structure Vibration on Control Moment Gyroscope Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrinskaya, Tatiana

    2008-01-01

    Control Moment Gyroscopes (CMGs) are used for non-propulsive attitude control of satellites and space stations, including the International Space Station (ISS). CMGs could be essential for future long duration space missions due to the fact that they help to save propellant. CMGs were successfully tested on the ground for many years, and have been successfully used on satellites. However, operations have shown that the CMG service life on the ISS is significantly shorter than predicted. Since the dynamic environment of the ISS differs greatly from the nominal environment of satellites, it was important to analyze how operations specific to the station (dockings and undockings, huge solar array motion, crew exercising, robotic operations, etc) can affect the CMG performance. This task became even more important since the first CMG failure onboard the ISS. The CMG failure resulted in the limitation of the attitude control capabilities, more propellant consumption, and additional operational issues. Therefore, the goal of this work was to find out how the vibrations of a space vehicle structure, caused by a variety of onboard operations, can affect the CMG dynamics and performance. The equations of CMG motion were derived and analyzed for the case when the gyro foundation can vibrate in any direction. The analysis was performed for unbalanced CMG gimbals to match the CMG configuration on ISS. The analysis showed that vehicle structure vibrations can amplify and significantly change the CMG motion if the gyro gimbals are unbalanced in flight. The resonance frequencies were found. It was shown that the resonance effect depends on the magnitude of gimbal imbalance, on the direction of a structure vibration, and on gimbal bearing friction. Computer modeling results of CMG dynamics affected by the external vibration are presented. The results can explain some of the CMG vibration telemetry observed on ISS. This work shows that balancing the CMG gimbals decreases the effect

  7. Theoretical foundations of cosmology introduction to the global structure of space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The book's principal aim is to clarify fundamental concepts, decipher mathematical structures used to model space-time and relativistic worlds, and to disclose their physical meaning. After each chapter, philosophical implications of the presented material are commented upon.Both special and general theories of relativity are presented in the book with the stress on their global aspects. Although global mathematical methods are extensively used throughout the book, the definitions of new concepts, short comments and examples make reading smooth without the need to consult other textbooks or re

  8. Dynamics of sexual populations structured by a space variable and a phenotypical trait

    KAUST Repository

    Mirrahimi, Sepideh

    2013-03-01

    We study sexual populations structured by a phenotypic trait and a space variable, in a non-homogeneous environment. Departing from an infinitesimal model, we perform an asymptotic limit to derive the system introduced in Kirkpatrick and Barton (1997). We then perform a further simplification to obtain a simple model. Thanks to this simpler equation, we can describe rigorously the dynamics of the population. In particular, we provide an explicit estimate of the invasion speed, or extinction speed of the species. Numerical computations show that this simple model provides a good approximation of the original infinitesimal model, and in particular describes quite well the evolution of the species\\' range. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Mixed H2/H-Infinity Control of a Flexible Space Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whorton, Mark; Calise, Anthony J.

    1997-01-01

    As theory progresses for design and analysis of robust multivariable control laws, synthesis procedures and to a larger extent, experimental verification generally lags behind. Recent developments in robust control theory have extended the H-infinity and mu-synthesis methods to incorporate H2 properties in the control synthesis. A major difficulty in implementing robust controllers is the order of the compensator and associated complexity of the computation required for synthesis, especially when order constraints are imposed. This paper presents results of system identification and robust control design for the Controls/Structures Interaction Ground Test Facility at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.

  10. Development of multi-functional composite structures with embedded electronics for space application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong Jang, Tae; Soo Oh, Dae; Kyu Kim, Jin; In Kang, Kyung; Ho Cha, Won; Woo Rhee, Seung

    2011-01-01

    Conventional spacecraft structural function has been limited to supporting loads and mounting avionics only. In contrast, the technology of 'multi-functional structures' can integrate thermal and electronic functions into the spacecraft's inherent load-bearing capability. In addition, sufficient radiation shielding effectiveness can be provided for the anticipated mission environment. Utilizing this concept, the ratio of electrical functionality to spacecraft volume can be dramatically increased and significant mass savings can be obtained. In this paper, spacecraft electronics are miniaturized using advanced IT applications such as flexible circuitry, miniaturized components, featherweight connectors, and so on, that they can be easily embedded within a structural panel. A sandwich structural panel consists of an aluminum honeycomb core and lightweight CFRP facesheets. Integration of electronics is implemented within the panel by mounting electronics on a multi-layered composite enclosure with multi-materials. This composite enclosure provides a load-bearing, effective thermal conduction, radiation shielding capabilities and an available space for embedding electronics. A series of environmental tests and analyses is carried out to demonstrate that the flight hardware is qualified for the expected mission environments. This approach will be utilized for the advanced small satellite 'STSAT-3' to validate the multi-functional structures concept.

  11. A comparison of Anopheles gambiae and Plasmodium falciparum genetic structure over space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prugnolle, Franck; Durand, Patrick; Jacob, Koella; Razakandrainibe, Fabien; Arnathau, Céline; Villarreal, Diana; Rousset, François; de Meeûs, Thierry; Renaud, François

    2008-03-01

    Population genetic structure and subdivision are key factors affecting the evolution of organisms. In this study, we analysed and compared the population genetic structure of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and its mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae over space and time in the Nianza Province, near Victoria Lake in Kenya. The parasites were collected from mosquitoes caught in six villages separated by up to 68 km in 2002 and 2003. A total of 545 oocysts were dissected from 122 infected mosquitoes and genotyped at seven microsatellite markers. Five hundred and forty-seven mosquitoes, both infected and uninfected, were genotyped at eight microsatellites. For the parasite and the vector, the analysis revealed no (or very little) genetic differentiation among villages. This may be explained by high local population sizes for the parasite and the mosquito. The small level of genetic differentiation observed between populations may explain the speed at which antimalarial drug resistance and insecticide resistance spread into the African continent.

  12. Complete fold annotation of the human proteome using a novel structural feature space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sarah A; Illuminati, Joseph; Kim, Junhyong

    2017-04-13

    Recognition of protein structural fold is the starting point for many structure prediction tools and protein function inference. Fold prediction is computationally demanding and recognizing novel folds is difficult such that the majority of proteins have not been annotated for fold classification. Here we describe a new machine learning approach using a novel feature space that can be used for accurate recognition of all 1,221 currently known folds and inference of unknown novel folds. We show that our method achieves better than 94% accuracy even when many folds have only one training example. We demonstrate the utility of this method by predicting the folds of 34,330 human protein domains and showing that these predictions can yield useful insights into potential biological function, such as prediction of RNA-binding ability. Our method can be applied to de novo fold prediction of entire proteomes and identify candidate novel fold families.

  13. Development and verification testing of automation and robotics for assembly of space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Quach, Cuong C.

    1993-01-01

    A program was initiated within the past several years to develop operational procedures for automated assembly of truss structures suitable for large-aperture antennas. The assembly operations require the use of a robotic manipulator and are based on the principle of supervised autonomy to minimize crew resources. A hardware testbed was established to support development and evaluation testing. A brute-force automation approach was used to develop the baseline assembly hardware and software techniques. As the system matured and an operation was proven, upgrades were incorprated and assessed against the baseline test results. This paper summarizes the developmental phases of the program, the results of several assembly tests, the current status, and a series of proposed developments for additional hardware and software control capability. No problems that would preclude automated in-space assembly of truss structures have been encountered. The current system was developed at a breadboard level and continued development at an enhanced level is warranted.

  14. Complete fold annotation of the human proteome using a novel structural feature space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Sarah A.; Illuminati, Joseph; Kim, Junhyong

    2017-04-01

    Recognition of protein structural fold is the starting point for many structure prediction tools and protein function inference. Fold prediction is computationally demanding and recognizing novel folds is difficult such that the majority of proteins have not been annotated for fold classification. Here we describe a new machine learning approach using a novel feature space that can be used for accurate recognition of all 1,221 currently known folds and inference of unknown novel folds. We show that our method achieves better than 94% accuracy even when many folds have only one training example. We demonstrate the utility of this method by predicting the folds of 34,330 human protein domains and showing that these predictions can yield useful insights into potential biological function, such as prediction of RNA-binding ability. Our method can be applied to de novo fold prediction of entire proteomes and identify candidate novel fold families.

  15. Materials Cartography: Representing and Mining Material Space Using Structural and Electronic Fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oses, Corey; Isayev, Olexandr; Fourches, Denis; Muratov, Eugene; Rasch, Kevin; Tropsha, Alexander; Curtarolo, Stefano; CenterMaterials Genomics, Duke University Collaboration; LaboratoryMolecular Modeling, UNC Chapel Hill Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    As the proliferation of high-throughput approaches in materials science is increasing the wealth of data in the field, the gap between accumulated-information and derived-knowledge widens. We address the issue of scientific discovery in materials databases by introducing novel analytical approaches based on structural and electronic materials fingerprints. The framework is employed to (i) query large databases of materials using similarity concepts, (ii) map the connectivity of the materials space (i.e., as a materials cartogram) for rapidly identifying regions with unique organizations/properties, and (iii) develop predictive Quantitative Materials Structure-Property Relationships (QMSPR) models for guiding materials design. In this study, we test these fingerprints by seeking target material properties. As a quantitative example, we model the critical temperatures of known superconductors. Our novel materials fingerprinting and materials cartography approaches contribute to the emerging field of materials informatics by enabling effective computational tools to analyze, visualize, model, and design new materials.

  16. Teoretski pogled na razvojne strukture slovenskega podeželja = Theoretical view on the development structures of Slovenian rural space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijan M. Klemenčič

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical concepts and research problems of contemporary rural space are presented in the first part of the article, following with the attempt of defining the crucial factors of development and basic structures of Slovenian rural space after the 2nd World War as a starting-point for defining theoretically more advanced concepts in Slovenian geography.

  17. The Structure and Dynamics of the Main Magnetic Field of the Earth on its Surface and in the Near Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlyuk, M. I.; Romenets, A. A.

    Determination of space-temporal structure of the Earth's magnetic field (EMF) on its surface and in near space is extremely necessary and actual, in connection with its influence on the character of passing of processes in magnetosphere and ionosphere, and on mechanisms and magnetic activity intensity, which are considered as a substantial ecological factor.

  18. Dual-vergence structure from multiple migration of widely spaced OBSs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelisetti, Subbarao; Spence, George D.; Scherwath, Martin; Riedel, Michael; Klaeschen, Dirk

    2017-10-01

    The detailed structure of the northern Cascadia basin and frontal ridge region was obtained using data from several widely spaced ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs). Mirror imaging was used in which the downgoing multiples (mirror signal) are migrated as they provide information about a much larger area than imaging with primary signal alone. Specifically, Kirchhoff time migration was applied to hydrophone and vertical geophone data. Our results indicate remarkable structures that were not observed on the northern Cascadia margin in previous single-channel or multi-channel seismic (MCS) data. Results show that, in these water depths (2.0-2.5 km), an OBS can image up to 5 km on either side of its position on the seafloor and hence an OBS spacing of 5 km is sufficient to provide a two-fold migration stack. Results also show the top of the igneous oceanic crust at 5-6 km beneath the seafloor using only a small airgun source (120 in.3). Specifically, OBS migration results clearly show the continuity of reflectors which enabled the identification of frontal thrusts and a main thrust fault. These faults indicate, for the first time on this margin, the presence of a dual-vergence structure. These kinds of structures have so far been observed in < 0.5% of modern convergent margins and could be related to horizontal compression associated with subduction and low basal shear stress resulting from over-pressure. Reanalysis of previous MCS data from this region augmented the OBS migration results and further suggests that the vergence switches from seaward to landward around central Vancouver Island. Furthermore, fault geometry analyses indicate that the total amount of shortening accommodated due to faulting and folding is about 3 km, which suggest that thrusting would have started at least ∼ 65 ky ago.

  19. Fabrication, characterization, and heuristic trade space exploration of magnetically actuated Miura-Ori origami structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Brett; von Lockette, Paris R.

    2017-04-01

    The authors develop magnetically actuated Miura-Ori structures through observation, experiment, and computation using an initially heuristic strategy followed by trade space visualization and optimization. The work is novel, especially within origami engineering, in that beyond final target shape approximation, Miura-Ori structures in this work are additionally evaluated for the shape approximation while folding and for their efficient use of their embedded actuators. The structures consisted of neodymium magnets placed on the panels of silicone elastomer substrates cast in the Miura-Ori folding pattern. Initially four configurations, arrangements of magnets on the panels, were selected based on heuristic arguments that (1) maximized the amount of magnetic torque applied to the creases and (2) reduced the number of magnets needed to affect all creases in the pattern. The results of experimental and computational performance metrics were used in a weighted sum model to predict the optimum configuration, which was then fabricated and experimentally characterized for comparison to the initial prototypes. As expected, optimization of magnet placement and orientation was effective at increasing the degree of theoretical useful work. Somewhat unexpectedly, however, trade space results showed that even after optimization, the configuration with the most number of magnets was least effective, per magnet, at directing its actuation to the structure’s creases. Overall, though the winning configuration experimentally outperformed its initial, non-optimal counterparts, results showed that the choice of optimum configuration was heavily dependent on the weighting factors. These results highlight both the ability of the Miura-Ori to be actuated with external magnetic stimuli, the effectiveness of a heuristic design approach that focuses on the actuation mechanism, and the need to address path-dependent metrics in assessing performance in origami folding structures.

  20. Baseline tests of an autonomous telerobotic system for assembly of space truss structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Marvin D.; Will, Ralph W.; Quach, Coung

    1994-07-01

    Several proposed space missions include precision reflectors that are larger in diameter than any current or proposed launch vehicle. Most of these reflectors will require a truss structure to accurately position the reflector panels and these reflectors will likely require assembly in orbit. A research program has been conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop the technology required for the robotic assembly of truss structures. The focus of this research has been on hardware concepts, computer software control systems, and operator interfaces necessary to perform supervised autonomous assembly. A special facility was developed and four assembly and disassembly tests of a 102-strut tetrahedral truss have been conducted. The test procedures were developed around traditional 'pick-and-place' robotic techniques that rely on positioning repeatability for successful operation. The data from two of the four tests were evaluated and are presented in this report. All operations in the tests were controlled by predefined sequences stored in a command file, and the operator intervened only when the system paused because of the failure of an actuator command. The tests were successful in identifying potential pitfalls in a telerobotic system, many of which would not have been readily anticipated or incurred through simulation studies. Addressing the total integrated task, instead of bench testing the component parts, forced all aspects of the task to be evaluated. Although the test results indicate that additional developments should be pursued, no problems were encountered that would preclude automated assembly in space as a viable construction method.

  1. Processes of Integration and Fragmentation of Economic Space: The Structure of Settlement Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Pavlovich Goryunov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a study of processes of integration and fragmentation caused by the polarization of economic space. Under integration in economic space the authors understand the formation of new and transformation of existing settlement systems, while fragmentation is the dissolution of settlement systems and their transformation into loosely connected settlement networks. The study focuses on the structure of settlement systems. Authors propose a new method for studying the structure of settlement systems, which combines the use of factor analysis, multidimensional scaling, and cluster analysis. The proposed method utilizes the maximum of available information about the social-economic status of settlements to reveal regularities in their spatial organization. The authors test the proposed method on 35 large cities of the Central and Volga federal districts of Russia, which comprise the spatial surroundings of Moscow. The authors find four groups of cities forming the core of the settlement system centered around Moscow, a group of four cities forming a buffer zone around that system, as well as four cities in the studied sample which do not participate in the settlement system

  2. Designing optimized ultra-lightweighted mirror structures made of Cesic for space and ground based applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofbauer, Peter; Krödel, Matthias R.

    2010-07-01

    Today's space applications increasingly utilize lightweighted construction concepts, motivated by the demands of manufacturing and functionality, and by economics. Particularly for space optics, mirror stability and stiffness need to be maximized, while mass needs to be minimized. Therefore, mirror materials must possess, besides high material strength and manufacturing versatility, high thermal conductivity combined with low heat capacity and long-term stability against varying thermal loads. Additionally, optical surfaces need to be compatible with reflective coating materials. In order to achieve these requirements, the interplay between material properties and mirror design on one hand, and budgetary constraints on the other must be considered. In this paper, we address these issues by presenting an FEM design study of open and closed-back mirror structures with extremely thin reinforcing ribs, with the goal of obtaining optimal physical and optical characteristics. Furthermore, we show that ECM's carbon-fiber reinforced SiC composite, Cesic®, and its newly developed, HB-Cesic® , with their low CTE, low density, and high stiffness, are not only excellent mirror materials, but allow the rapid manufacturing of complex monolithic optical structures at reasonable cost.

  3. Effect of building structure and of space heating installation on furnace/boiler retrofit effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawacki, T.S.; Cole, J.T.; Huang, V.; Macriss, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Analyses of how building structure and other factors influence retrofit performance were carried out through analytical investigations and measurements in homes. A data base of 65 sites was established from screening 2600 sites of the SHEIP effort, an earlier furnace retrofit program of the US gas industry. A comprehensive list of operative factors linking retrofit effectiveness to structural and installation factors was developed and used. The results showed vent dampers were most effective in homes with heated basements and full communication between the furnace and the home, reducing consumption for space heating 10% to 15%. Homes modified by the full derate procedure conserved quantities of energy, and these savings are proportional to the installation factors (level of input derate, furnace steady-state efficiency, and level of vent restriction). Semiempirical relationships were developed to estimate retrofit effectiveness based on easily measured or observed parameters. Both the H-FLAME and SPACE-FI models were shown to provide reasonable estimates of measured energy consumption for homes equipped with furnaces that were retrofit-modified by either of the above approaches.

  4. Integration Assessment of Visiting Vehicle Induced Electrical Charging of the International Space Station Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Leonard; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Galofaro, Joel T.

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) undergoes electrical charging in low Earth orbit (LEO) due to positively biased, exposed conductors on solar arrays that collect electrical charges from the space plasma. Exposed solar array conductors predominately collect negatively charged electrons and thus drive the metal ISS structure electrical ground to a negative floating potential (FP) relative to plasma. This FP is variable in location and time as a result of local ionospheric conditions. ISS motion through Earth s magnetic field creates an addition inductive voltage up to 20 positive and negative volts across ISS structure depending on its attitude and location in orbit. ISS Visiting Vehicles (VVs), such as the planned Orion crew exploration vehicle, contribute to the ISS plasma charging processes. Upon physical contact with ISS, the current collection properties of VVs combine with ISS. This is an ISS integration concern as FP must be controlled to minimize arcing of ISS surfaces and ensure proper management of extra vehicular activity crewman shock hazards. This report is an assessment of ISS induced charging from docked Orion vehicles employing negatively grounded, 130 volt class, UltraFlex (ATK Space Systems) solar arrays. To assess plasma electron current collection characteristics, Orion solar cell test coupons were constructed and subjected to plasma chamber current collection measurements. During these tests, coupon solar cells were biased between 0 and 120 V while immersed in a simulated LEO plasma. Tests were performed using several different simulated LEO plasma densities and temperatures. These data and associated theoretical scaling of plasma properties, were combined in a numerical model which was integrated into the Boeing Plasma Interaction Model. It was found that the solar array design for Orion will not affect the ISS FP by more than about 2 V during worst case charging conditions. This assessment also motivated a trade study to determine

  5. Stochastic Transport Theory for Investigating the Three-Dimensional Canopy Structure from Space Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Wang, Weile; Deering, Donald W,; Stenberg, Pauline; Shabanov, Nikolay; Tan, Bin; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2008-01-01

    Radiation reflected from vegetation canopies exhibits high spatial variation. Satellite-borne sensors measure the mean intensities emanating from heterogeneous vegetated pixels. The theory of radiative transfer in stochastic media provides the most logical linkage between satellite observations and the three-dimensional canopy structure through a closed system of simple equations which contains the mean intensity and higher statistical moments directly as its unknowns. Although this theory has been a highly active research field in recent years, its potential for satellite remote sensing of vegetated surfaces has not been fully realized because of the lack of models of a canopy pair-correlation function that the stochastic radiative transfer equations require. The pair correlation function is defined as the probability of finding simultaneously phytoelements at two points. This paper presents analytical and Monte Carlo generated pair correlation functions. Theoretical and numerical analyses show that the spatial correlation between phytoelements is primarily responsible for the effects of the three-dimensional canopy structure on canopy reflective and absorptive properties. The pair correlation function, therefore, is the most natural and physically meaningful measure of the canopy structure over a wide range of scales. The stochastic radiative transfer equations naturally admit this measure and thus provide a powerful means to investigate the three-dimensional canopy structure from space. Canopy reflectances predicted by the stochastic equations are assessed by comparisons with the PARABOLA measurements from coniferous and broadleaf forest stands in the BOREAS Southern Study Areas. The pair correlation functions are derived from data on tree structural parameters collected during field campaigns conducted at these sites. The simulated canopy reflectances compare well with the PARABOLA data.

  6. Design of Dispersive Delay Structures (DDSs) Formed by Coupled C-Sections Using Predistortion with Space Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Qingfeng; Caloz, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The concept of space mapping is applied, for the first time, to the design of microwave dispersive delay structures (DDSs). DDSs are components providing specified group delay versus frequency responses for real-time radio systems. The DDSs considered in this paper are formed by cascaded coupled C-sections. It is first shown that aggressive space mapping suffers from accuracy issue in the synthesis of DDSs. To address this issue, we propose a predistortion space mapping technique. Compared to aggressive space mapping, this technique provides enhanced accuracy, while compared to output space mapping, it provides greater implementation simplicity. Two full-wave and one experimental examples are provided to illustrate the proposed predistortion space mapping technique.

  7. The Hidden Flow Structure and Metric Space of Network Embedding Algorithms Based on Random Walks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Weiwei; Gong, Li; Lou, Xiaodan; Zhang, Jiang

    2017-10-13

    Network embedding which encodes all vertices in a network as a set of numerical vectors in accordance with it's local and global structures, has drawn widespread attention. Network embedding not only learns significant features of a network, such as the clustering and linking prediction but also learns the latent vector representation of the nodes which provides theoretical support for a variety of applications, such as visualization, link prediction, node classification, and recommendation. As the latest progress of the research, several algorithms based on random walks have been devised. Although those algorithms have drawn much attention for their high scores in learning efficiency and accuracy, there is still a lack of theoretical explanation, and the transparency of those algorithms has been doubted. Here, we propose an approach based on the open-flow network model to reveal the underlying flow structure and its hidden metric space of different random walk strategies on networks. We show that the essence of embedding based on random walks is the latent metric structure defined on the open-flow network. This not only deepens our understanding of random- walk-based embedding algorithms but also helps in finding new potential applications in network embedding.

  8. Fluid bilayer structure determination: Joint refinement in composition space using X-ray and neutron diffraction data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, S.H. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Wiener, M.C. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Experimentally-determined structural models of fluid lipid bilayers are essential for verifying molecular dynamics simulations of bilayers and for understanding the structural consequences of peptide interactions. The extreme thermal motion of bilayers precludes the possibility of atomic-level structural models. Defining {open_quote}the structure{close_quote} of a bilayer as the time-averaged transbilayer distribution of the water and the principal lipid structural groups such as the carbonyls and double-bonds (quasimolecular fragments), one can represent the bilayer structure as a sum of Gaussian functions referred to collectively as the quasimolecular structure. One method of determining the structure is by neutron diffraction combined with exhaustive specific deuteration. This method is impractical because of the expense of the chemical syntheses and the limited amount of neutron beam time currently available. We have therefore developed the composition space refinement method for combining X-ray and minimal neutron diffraction data to arrive at remarkably detailed and accurate structures of fluid bilayers. The composition space representation of the bilayer describes the probability of occupancy per unit length across the width of the bilayer of each quasimolecular component and permits the joint refinement of X-ray and neutron lamellar diffraction data by means of a single quasimolecular structure that is fitted simultaneously to both data sets. Scaling of each component by the appropriate neutron or X-ray scattering length maps the composition-space profile to the appropriate scattering length space for comparison to experimental data. The difficulty with the method is that fluid bilayer structures are generally only marginally determined by the experimental data. This means that the space of possible solutions must be extensively explored in conjunction with a thorough analysis of errors.

  9. STRUCTURAL EVALUATION OF PSSDB WALL PANEL WITH SQUARE OPENING AND VARIED SCREW SPACING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SITI HAWA HAMZAH

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Profiled steel sheet dry boards or PSSDB system is an alternative composite construction system comprising of profiled steel sheet compositely connected to dry boards by self-tapping self-driving screws. PSSDB system was used widely as flooring system in the lightweight construction of buildings and office space in factories. Due to its superiority in the installation techniques, PSSDB system was expanded in the application as load bearing wall panel system in buildings. The PSSDB system is as an alternative construction technique on load bearing wall panel that offers cost savings synonymously with the rapid progress of science and technology which leads to the shift from traditional utilization of construction materials to newer construction techniques. A finite element analysis was carried out to determine the effect of screw spacing on the PSSDB wall panel. The spacing selected was between 100 mm to 500 mm, at an increment of 100 mm in each different model. The wall panel measured 3000 mm by 3000 mm with a 1200 mm square window opening, 78 mm thick and butt joints vertically positioned in the dry boards. This paper looks into the system as load bearing wall panels, analyzing it under axial compressive load using established Finite Element technique. The deformation profile of the PSSDB wall panel system showed a single curvature deformation profile, maximum lateral displacement at two-thirds wall panel height and critical sections at the upper corners of the square opening. The finite element analysis had provided good prediction of the structural behavior of the PSSDB wall panel system and it is concluded that the PW200 model possesses the optimum arrangement of the fixing screws used.

  10. Synchronization in area-preserving maps: Effects of mixed phase space and coherent structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahata, Sasibhusan; Das, Swetamber; Gupte, Neelima

    2016-06-01

    The problem of synchronization of coupled Hamiltonian systems presents interesting features due to the mixed nature (regular and chaotic) of the phase space. We study these features by examining the synchronization of unidirectionally coupled area-preserving maps coupled by the Pecora-Caroll method. The master stability function approach is used to study the stability of the synchronous state and to identify the percentage of synchronizing initial conditions. The transient to synchronization shows intermittency with an associated power law. The mixed nature of the phase space of the studied map has notable effects on the synchronization times as is seen in the case of the standard map. Using finite-time Lyapunov exponent analysis, we show that the synchronization of the maps occurs in the neighborhood of invariant curves in the phase space. The phase differences of the coevolving trajectories show intermittency effects, due to the existence of stable periodic orbits contributing locally stable directions in the synchronizing neighborhoods. Furthermore, the value of the nonlinearity parameter, as well as the location of the initial conditions play an important role in the distribution of synchronization times. We examine drive response combinations which are chaotic-chaotic, chaotic-regular, regular-chaotic, and regular-regular. A range of scaling behavior is seen for these cases, including situations where the distributions show a power-law tail, indicating long synchronization times for at least some of the synchronizing trajectories. The introduction of coherent structures in the system changes the situation drastically. The distribution of synchronization times crosses over to exponential behavior, indicating shorter synchronization times, and the number of initial conditions which synchronize increases significantly, indicating an enhancement in the basin of synchronization. We discuss the implications of our results.

  11. A Novel Double-Piston Magnetorheological Damper for Space Truss Structures Vibration Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The design, fabrication, and testing of a new double-piston MR damper for space applications are discussed. The design concept for the damper is described in detail. The electromagnetic analysis of the design and the fabrication of the MR damper are also presented. The design analysis shows that the damper meets the weight and size requirements for being included in a space truss structure. The prototype design is tested in a damper dynamometer. The test results show that the damper can provide nearly 80 N of damping force at its maximum velocity and current. The test results also show that the seal drag could contribute significantly to the damping forces. Additionally, the test results indicate that both the work by the damper and damping force increase rapidly with increasing current at lower currents and taper off at higher currents as the damper starts to saturate. The damper force versus velocity plots show hysteresis in both pre- and postyield regions and asymmetric forces in jounce and rebound. A model is proposed for representing the force-displacement, force-velocity, and asymmetric forces observed in test results. A comparison of the modeling results and test data indicates that the model accurately represents the force characteristics of the damper.

  12. Study of structural active cooling and heat sink systems for space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    This technology investigation was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of a number of thermal protection systems (TPS) concepts which are alternate candidates to the space shuttle baseline TPS. Four independent tasks were performed. Task 1 consisted of an in-depth evaluation of active structural cooling of the space shuttle orbiter. In Task 2, heat sink concepts for the booster were studied to identify and postulate solutions for design problems unique to heat sink TPS. Task 3 consisted of a feasibility demonstration test of a phase change material (PCM) incorporated into a reusable surface insulation (RSI) thermal protection system for the shuttle orbiter. In Task 4 the feasibility of heat pipes for stagnation region cooling was studied for the booster and the orbiter. Designs were developed for the orbiter leading edge and used in trade studies of leading edge concepts. At the time this program was initiated, a 2-stage fully reusable shuttle system was envisioned; therefore, the majority of the tasks were focused on the fully reusable system environments. Subsequently, a number of alternate shuttle system approaches, with potential for reduced shuttle system development funding requirements, were proposed. Where practicable, appropriate shifts in emphasis and task scoping were made to reflect these changes.

  13. Modeling microbial community structure and functional diversity across time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Peter E; Gibbons, Sean M; Gilbert, Jack A

    2012-07-01

    Microbial communities exhibit exquisitely complex structure. Many aspects of this complexity, from the number of species to the total number of interactions, are currently very difficult to examine directly. However, extraordinary efforts are being made to make these systems accessible to scientific investigation. While recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have improved accessibility to the taxonomic and functional diversity of complex communities, monitoring the dynamics of these systems over time and space - using appropriate experimental design - is still expensive. Fortunately, modeling can be used as a lens to focus low-resolution observations of community dynamics to enable mathematical abstractions of functional and taxonomic dynamics across space and time. Here, we review the approaches for modeling bacterial diversity at both the very large and the very small scales at which microbial systems interact with their environments. We show that modeling can help to connect biogeochemical processes to specific microbial metabolic pathways. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Space structure capturing and assembling by experimental free-floating robot satellite (EFFORTS) simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K.

    1993-09-01

    In order to study and validate practical availability of control schemes for in-orbit operational free-floating robots, a research group at the Tokyo Institute of Technology has developed the Experimental Free-FlOating RoboT Satellite (EFFORTS-I and II) simulators, which enable to examine 2-dimensional pseudo-micro gravity motion dynamics by air lift system. The robot model comprising a satellite base body and articulated manipulator arms with grippers and wrist force sensors, makes horizontal motion without mechanical disturbances or external forces. This paper presents the control methods and experimental results for spacecraft/manipulator control paying attention to the reaction dynamics, and assembly and deployment operation of space structures. The paper focuses the discussion of (1) hardware design of EFFORTS simulators, (2) dynamic modeling and a basic control concept for space free-floating manipulators, (3) satellite attitude control coordinating with manipulator dynamics, (4) practical force control for dexterous manipulation, and (5) experimental results on above topics.

  15. Graph theory approach to the eigenvalue problem of large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Bainum, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Graph theory is used to obtain numerical solutions to eigenvalue problems of large space structures (LSS) characterized by a state vector of large dimensions. The LSS are considered as large, flexible systems requiring both orientation and surface shape control. Graphic interpretation of the determinant of a matrix is employed to reduce a higher dimensional matrix into combinations of smaller dimensional sub-matrices. The reduction is implemented by means of a Boolean equivalent of the original matrices formulated to obtain smaller dimensional equivalents of the original numerical matrix. Computation time becomes less and more accurate solutions are possible. An example is provided in the form of a free-free square plate. Linearized system equations and numerical values of a stiffness matrix are presented, featuring a state vector with 16 components.

  16. Conceptual Design Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Tower Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, Chad

    2002-07-18

    The main objective of this work was to develop a conceptual design and engineering prototype for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) tower structure. This thesis describes the conceptual design of a GLAST tower and the fabrication and testing of a prototype tower tray. The requirements were that the structure had to support GLAST's delicate silicon strip detector array through ground handling, launch and in orbit operations as well as provide for thermal and electrical pathways. From the desired function and the given launch vehicle for the spacecraft that carries the GLAST detector, an efficient structure was designed which met the requirements. This thesis developed in three stages: design, fabrication, and testing. During the first stage, a general set of specifications was used to develop the initial design, which was then analyzed and shown to meet or exceed the requirements. The second stage called for the fabrication of prototypes to prove manufacturability and gauge cost and time estimates for the total project. The last step called for testing the prototypes to show that they performed as the analysis had shown and prove that the design met the requirements. As a spacecraft engineering exercise, this project required formulating a solution based on engineering judgment, analyzing the solution using advanced engineering techniques, then proving the validity of the design and analysis by the manufacturing and testing of prototypes. The design described here met all the requirements set out by the needs of the experiment and operating concerns. This strawman design is not intended to be the complete or final design for the GLAST instrument structure, but instead examines some of the main challenges involved and demonstrates that there are solutions to them. The purpose of these tests was to prove that there are solutions to the basic mechanical, electrical and thermal problems presented with the GLAST project.

  17. Shape memory polymer composite and its application in deployable hinge for space structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanju; Wang, Xiaohua; Lan, Xin; Lv, Haibao; Leng, Jinsong

    2008-03-01

    This paper is concerned about the basic properties of deployment for shape memory polymer composite (SMPC) and its application in deployable hinge for space structure. Shape-memory polymers (SMP) are an emerging class of active polymers that have dual-shape capability. One of another advantage, compared with other traditional material hinge, the SMPC carpenter type hinge is that it will not produce a large shock when it spring into the deployed position. There are several kinds of shape memory polymer composite (fiber reinforced, powder reinforced, etc,). Epoxy SMPs, carbon fibre fabric reinforced SMPC was introduced in this work. In order to investigate the basic performances of SMPC hinge, the experimental methods are used as follows: dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), three point bending test and the radio of shape recovery. In the end, the structure of the carpenter type hinge is introduced. The carpenter type hinge is one mechanism that has the advantage of high-reliability of the deployment; light weighted, and low cost. This SMPC carpenter type hinge performs good deployment performances during numerous thermomechanical cycles. So the potential applications for such materials as active medical devices are highlighted.

  18. Resistive MHD reconstruction of two-dimensional coherent structures in space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-L. Teh

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a reconstruction technique to solve the steady resistive MHD equations in two dimensions with initial inputs of field and plasma data from a single spacecraft as it passes through a coherent structure in space. At least two components of directly measured electric fields (the spacecraft spin-plane components are required for the reconstruction, to produce two-dimensional (2-D field and plasma maps of the cross section of the structure. For convenience, the resistivity tensor η is assumed diagonal in the reconstruction coordinates, which allows its values to be estimated from Ohm's law, E+v×B=η·j. In the present paper, all three components of the electric field are used. We benchmark our numerical code by use of an exact, axi-symmetric solution of the resistive MHD equations and then apply it to synthetic data from a 3-D, resistive, MHD numerical simulation of reconnection in the geomagnetic tail, in a phase of the event where time dependence and deviations from 2-D are both weak. The resistivity used in the simulation is time-independent and localized around the reconnection site in an ellipsoidal region. For the magnetic field, plasma density, and pressure, we find very good agreement between the reconstruction results and the simulation, but the electric field and plasma velocity are not predicted with the same high accuracy.

  19. Structural behavior of the space shuttle SRM tang-clevis joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, William H.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Stockwell, Alan E.

    1988-01-01

    The space shuttle Challenger accident investigation focused on the failure of a tang-clevis joint on the right solid rocket motor. The existence of relative motion between the inner arm of the clevis and the O-ring sealing surface on the tang has been identified as a potential contributor to this failure. This motion can cause the O-rings to become unseated and therefore lose their sealing capability. Finite element structural analyses have been performed to predict both deflections and stresses in the joint under the primary, pressure loading condition. These analyses have demonstrated the difficulty of accurately predicting the structural behavior of the tang-clevis joint. Stresses in the vicinity of the connecting pins, obtained from elastic analyses, considerably exceed the material yield allowables indicating that inelastic analyses are probably necessary. Two modifications have been proposed to control the relative motion between the inner clevis arm and the tang at the O-ring sealing surface. One modification, referred to as the capture feature, uses additional material on the inside of the tang to restrict motion of the inner clevis arm. The other modification uses external stiffening rings above and below the joint to control the local bending in the shell near the joint. Both of these modifications are shown to be effective in controlling the relative motion in the joint.

  20. A Lanczos eigenvalue method on a parallel computer. [for large complex space structure free vibration analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostic, Susan W.; Fulton, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    Eigenvalue analyses of complex structures is a computationally intensive task which can benefit significantly from new and impending parallel computers. This study reports on a parallel computer implementation of the Lanczos method for free vibration analysis. The approach used here subdivides the major Lanczos calculation tasks into subtasks and introduces parallelism down to the subtask levels such as matrix decomposition and forward/backward substitution. The method was implemented on a commercial parallel computer and results were obtained for a long flexible space structure. While parallel computing efficiency is problem and computer dependent, the efficiency for the Lanczos method was good for a moderate number of processors for the test problem. The greatest reduction in time was realized for the decomposition of the stiffness matrix, a calculation which took 70 percent of the time in the sequential program and which took 25 percent of the time on eight processors. For a sample calculation of the twenty lowest frequencies of a 486 degree of freedom problem, the total sequential computing time was reduced by almost a factor of ten using 16 processors.

  1. Structural Mechanism behind Distinct Efficiency of Oct4/Sox2 Proteins in Differentially Spaced DNA Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanusha Yesudhas

    Full Text Available The octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4 and sex-determining region Y (SRY-box 2 (Sox2 proteins induce various transcriptional regulators to maintain cellular pluripotency. Most Oct4/Sox2 complexes have either 0 base pairs (Oct4/Sox2(0bp or 3 base pairs (Oct4/Sox2(3bp separation between their DNA-binding sites. Results from previous biochemical studies have shown that the complexes separated by 0 base pairs are associated with a higher pluripotency rate than those separated by 3 base pairs. Here, we performed molecular dynamics (MD simulations and calculations to determine the binding free energy and per-residue free energy for the Oct4/Sox2(0bp and Oct4/Sox2(3bp complexes to identify structural differences that contribute to differences in induction rate. Our MD simulation results showed substantial differences in Oct4/Sox2 domain movements, as well as secondary-structure changes in the Oct4 linker region, suggesting a potential reason underlying the distinct efficiencies of these complexes during reprogramming. Moreover, we identified key residues and hydrogen bonds that potentially facilitate protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, in agreement with previous experimental findings. Consequently, our results confess that differential spacing of the Oct4/Sox2 DNA binding sites can determine the magnitude of transcription of the targeted genes during reprogramming.

  2. Structural Mechanism behind Distinct Efficiency of Oct4/Sox2 Proteins in Differentially Spaced DNA Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesudhas, Dhanusha; Anwar, Muhammad Ayaz; Panneerselvam, Suresh; Durai, Prasannavenkatesh; Shah, Masaud; Choi, Sangdun

    2016-01-01

    The octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and sex-determining region Y (SRY)-box 2 (Sox2) proteins induce various transcriptional regulators to maintain cellular pluripotency. Most Oct4/Sox2 complexes have either 0 base pairs (Oct4/Sox2(0bp)) or 3 base pairs (Oct4/Sox2(3bp)) separation between their DNA-binding sites. Results from previous biochemical studies have shown that the complexes separated by 0 base pairs are associated with a higher pluripotency rate than those separated by 3 base pairs. Here, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calculations to determine the binding free energy and per-residue free energy for the Oct4/Sox2(0bp) and Oct4/Sox2(3bp) complexes to identify structural differences that contribute to differences in induction rate. Our MD simulation results showed substantial differences in Oct4/Sox2 domain movements, as well as secondary-structure changes in the Oct4 linker region, suggesting a potential reason underlying the distinct efficiencies of these complexes during reprogramming. Moreover, we identified key residues and hydrogen bonds that potentially facilitate protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, in agreement with previous experimental findings. Consequently, our results confess that differential spacing of the Oct4/Sox2 DNA binding sites can determine the magnitude of transcription of the targeted genes during reprogramming.

  3. Structural-electromagnetic bidirectional coupling analysis of space large film reflector antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinghua; Zhang, Shuxin; Cheng, ZhengAi; Duan, Baoyan; Yang, Chen; Li, Meng; Hou, Xinbin; Li, Xun

    2017-10-01

    As used for energy transmission, a space large film reflector antenna (SLFRA) is characterized by large size and enduring high power density. The structural flexibility and the microwave radiation pressure (MRP) will lead to the phenomenon of structural-electromagnetic bidirectional coupling (SEBC). In this paper, the SEBC model of SLFRA is presented, then the deformation induced by the MRP and the corresponding far field pattern deterioration are simulated. Results show that, the direction of the MRP is identical to the normal of the reflector surface, and the magnitude is proportional to the power density and the square of cosine incident angle. For a typical cosine function distributed electric field, the MRP is a square of cosine distributed across the diameter. The maximum deflections of SLFRA linearly increase with the increasing microwave power densities and the square of the reflector diameters, and vary inversely with the film thicknesses. When the reflector diameter becomes 100 m large and the microwave power density exceeds 102 W/cm2, the gain loss of the 6.3 μm-thick reflector goes beyond 0.75 dB. When the MRP-induced deflection degrades the reflector performance, the SEBC should be taken into account.

  4. Efficient use of high performance computers for integrated controls and structures design. [of large space platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvin, W. K.; Maghami, P. G.; Nguyen, D. T.

    1992-01-01

    Simply transporting design codes from sequential-scalar computers to parallel-vector computers does not fully utilize the computational benefits offered by high performance computers. By performing integrated controls and structures design on an experimental truss platform with both sequential-scalar and parallel-vector design codes, conclusive results are presented to substantiate this claim. The efficiency of a Cholesky factorization scheme in conjunction with a variable-band row data structure is presented. In addition, the Lanczos eigensolution algorithm has been incorporated in the design code for both parallel and vector computations. Comparisons of computational efficiency between the initial design code and the parallel-vector design code are presented. It is shown that the Lanczos algorithm with the Cholesky factorization scheme is far superior to the sub-space iteration method of eigensolution when substantial numbers of eigenvectors are required for control design and/or performance optimization. Integrated design results show the need for continued efficiency studies in the area of element computations and matrix assembly.

  5. High Temperature Propulsion System Structural Seals for Future Space Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.

    2004-01-01

    High temperature, dynamic structural seals are required in advanced hypersonic engines to seal the perimeters of movable engine ramps for efficient, safe operation in high heat flux environments at temperatures from 2000 to 2500 F. NASA GRC became involved in the development of high temperature structural seals in the late 1980 s and early 1990 s during the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program. Researchers at GRC carried out an in-house program to develop seals for the NASP hypersonic engine and oversaw industry efforts for airframe and propulsion system seal development for this vehicle. The figure shows one of the seal locations in the NASP engine. Seals were needed along the edges of movable panels in the engine to seal gaps between the panels and adjacent engine sidewalls. Seals developed during the NASP program met many requirements but fell short of leakage, durability, and resiliency goals. Due to program termination the seals could not be adequately matured. To overcome these shortfalls, GRC is currently developing advanced seals and seal preloading devices for the hypersonic engines of future space vehicles as part of NASA s Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program.

  6. Concept-Development of a Structure Supported Membrane for Deployable Space Applications - From Nature to Manufacture and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Martin; Belvin, W. K.

    2012-01-01

    Current space applications of membrane structures include large area solar power arrays, solar sails, antennas, and numerous other large aperture devices like the solar shades of the new James Webb Space Telescope. These expandable structural systems, deployed in-orbit to achieve the desired geometry, are used to collect, reflect and/or transmit electromagnetic radiation. This work, a feasibility study supporting a diploma thesis, describes the systematic process for developing a biologically inspired concept for a structure supported (integrated) membrane, that features a rip stop principle, makes self-deployment possible and is part of an ultra-light weight space application. Novel manufacturing of membrane prototypes and test results are presented for the rip-stop concepts. Test data showed that the new membrane concept has a higher tear resistance than neat film of equivalent mass.

  7. Nano-casted Metal Oxide Aerogels as Dual Purpose Structural Components for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilaras, Plousia E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA missions and space exploration rely on strong, ultra lightweight materials. Such materials are needed for building up past and present space vehicles such as the Sojourner Rover (1997) or the two MERs (2003), but also for a number of components and/or systems including thermal insulators, Solar Sails, Rigid Aeroshells, and Ballutes. The purpose of my internship here at Glenn Research Center is to make dual purpose materials; materials that in addition to being lightweight have electronic, photophysical and magnetic properties and, therefore, act as electronic components and sensors as well as structural components. One type of ultra lightweight material of great interest is aerogels, which have densities ranging from 0.003 g/cc to 0.8 g/cc . However, aerogels are extremely fragile and, as a result, have limited practical applications. Recently, Glenn Research Center has developed a process of nano-casting polymers onto the inorganic network of silica-based aerogels increasing the strength 300 fold while only increasing the density 3 fold. By combining the process of nano-casting polymers with inorganic oxide networks other than silica, we are actively pursuing lightweight dual purpose materials. To date, thirty different inorganic oxide aerogels have been prepared using either standard sol-gel chemistry or a non-alkoxide method involving metal chloride precursors and an epoxide; epichlorohydrin, propylene oxide or trimethylene oxide, as proton scavengers. More importantly, preliminary investigations show that the residual surface hydroxyl groups on each of these inorganic oxide aerogels can be successfully crosslinked with urethane. In addition to characterizing physical and mechanical properties such as density, strength and flexibility, each of these metal oxide aerogels are being characterized for thermal and electronic conductivity and magnetic and optical properties.

  8. Dynamic load synthesis for shock numerical simulation in space structure design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Riccardo; Gasbarri, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    Pyroshock loads are the most stressing environments that a space equipment experiences during its operating life from a mechanical point of view. In general, the mechanical designer considers the pyroshock analysis as a very demanding constraint. Unfortunately, due to the non-linear behaviour of the structure under such loads, only the experimental tests can demonstrate if it is able to withstand these dynamic loads. By taking all the previous considerations into account, some preliminary information about the design correctness could be done by performing ;ad-hoc; numerical simulations, for example via commercial finite element software (i.e. MSC Nastran). Usually these numerical tools face the shock solution in two ways: 1) a direct mode, by using a time dependent enforcement and by evaluating the time-response and space-response as well as the internal forces; 2) a modal basis approach, by considering a frequency dependent load and of course by evaluating internal forces in the frequency domain. This paper has the main aim to develop a numerical tool to synthetize the time dependent enforcement based on deterministic and/or genetic algorithm optimisers. In particular starting from a specified spectrum in terms of SRS (Shock Response Spectrum) a time dependent discrete function, typically an acceleration profile, will be obtained to force the equipment by simulating the shock event. The synthetizing time and the interface with standards numerical codes will be two of the main topics dealt with in the paper. In addition a congruity and consistency methodology will be presented to ensure that the identified time dependent loads fully match the specified spectrum.

  9. The effect of structural complexity, prey density, and "predator-free space" on prey survivorship at created oyster reef mesocosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin T Humphries

    Full Text Available Interactions between predators and their prey are influenced by the habitat they occupy. Using created oyster (Crassostrea virginica reef mesocosms, we conducted a series of laboratory experiments that created structure and manipulated complexity as well as prey density and "predator-free space" to examine the relationship between structural complexity and prey survivorship. Specifically, volume and spatial arrangement of oysters as well as prey density were manipulated, and the survivorship of prey (grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio in the presence of a predator (wild red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus was quantified. We found that the presence of structure increased prey survivorship, and that increasing complexity of this structure further increased survivorship, but only to a point. This agrees with the theory that structural complexity may influence predator-prey dynamics, but that a threshold exists with diminishing returns. These results held true even when prey density was scaled to structural complexity, or the amount of "predator-free space" was manipulated within our created reef mesocosms. The presence of structure and its complexity (oyster shell volume were more important in facilitating prey survivorship than perceived refugia or density-dependent prey effects. A more accurate indicator of refugia might require "predator-free space" measures that also account for the available area within the structure itself (i.e., volume and not just on the surface of a structure. Creating experiments that better mimic natural conditions and test a wider range of "predator-free space" are suggested to better understand the role of structural complexity in oyster reefs and other complex habitats.

  10. Effect of space structures against development of transport infrastructure in Banda Aceh by using the concept of transit oriented development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noer, Fadhly; Matondang, A. Rahim; Sirojuzilam, Saleh, Sofyan M.

    2017-11-01

    Due to the shifting of city urban development causing the shift of city services center, so there is a change in space pattern and space structure in Banda Aceh, then resulting urban sprawl which can lead to congestion problem occurs on the arterial road in Banda Aceh, it can be seen from the increasing number of vehicles per year by 6%. Another issue occurs by urban sprawl is not well organized of settlement due to the uncontrolled use of space so that caused grouping or the differences in socioeconomic strata that can impact to the complexity of population mobility problem. From this background problem considered to be solved by a concept that is Transit Oriented Development (TOD), that is a concept of transportation development in co-operation with spatial. This research will get the model of transportation infrastructure development with TOD concept that can handle transportation problem in Banda Aceh, due to change of spatial structure, and to find whether TOD concept can use for the area that has a population in medium density range. The result that is obtained equation so the space structure is: Space Structure = 0.520 + 0.206X3 + 0.264X6 + 0.100X7 and Transportation Infrastructure Development = -1.457 + 0.652X1 + 0.388X5 + 0.235X6 + 0.222X7 + 0.327X8, So results obtained with path analysis method obtained variable influences, node ratio, network connectivity, travel frequency, travel destination, travel cost, and travel time, it has a lower value when direct effect with transportation infrastructure development, but if the indirect effect through the structure of space has a greater influence, can be seen from spatial structure path scheme - transportation infrastructure development.

  11. Light-Curing Structural Tape for In-Space Repair Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA has numerous requirements for in-space repair capabilities to aid future missions beyond earth orbit. A subset of these requirements is adhesive patch materials...

  12. Space Qualified Non-Destructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Encouraged by Phase I accomplishments, the proposed Phase II program will significantly mature and align the development of a Space Qualified Non-Destructive...

  13. Space Qualified Non-Destructive Evaluation and Structural Health Monitoring Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NextGen Aeronautics is proposing an innovative space qualified non-destructive evaluation and health monitoring technology. The technology is built on concepts...

  14. SpRoUTS (Space Robot Universal Truss System): Reversible Robotic Assembly of Deployable Truss Structures of Reconfigurable Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenett, Benjamin; Cellucci, Daniel; Cheung, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Automatic deployment of structures has been a focus of much academic and industrial work on infrastructure applications and robotics in general. This paper presents a robotic truss assembler designed for space applications - the Space Robot Universal Truss System (SpRoUTS) - that reversibly assembles a truss from a feedstock of hinged andflat-packed components, by folding the sides of each component up and locking onto the assembled structure. We describe the design and implementation of the robot and show that the assembled truss compares favorably with prior truss deployment systems.

  15. Neutron μstiX. Micrometer structure investigation with real space and reciprocal space crossover using neutron imaging detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehlbauer, Martin Johann

    2013-07-19

    This work is concerned with the investigation of inhomogeneities in materials with length scales of the order of micrometers by means of neutrons. In real space this is done by neutron imaging methods measuring the transmitted signal while for Ultra Small Angle Neutron Scattering (USANS) the signal of the scattered neutrons is assigned to a spatial frequency distribution in reciprocal space. The part about neutron imaging is focused on time-resolved neutron radiography on an injection nozzle similar to the ones used for modern diesel truck engines. The associated experiments have been carried out at the neutron imaging facility ANTARES at the Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) of the Technische Universitaet Muenchen in Garching near Munich. Especially the demands on the detector system were high. Therefore different detection methods and detector configurations have been tested. On the one hand the detector should allow for a time resolution high enough to record the injection process lasting about 900 μs. On the other hand it needed to offer a spatial resolution sufficient to resolve the test oil inside the spray hole of a maximum diameter of less than 200 μm. An advanced aim of this work is the visualization of cavitation phenomena which may occur during the injection process inside of the spray hole. In order to operate the injector at conditions as close to reality as possible a high pressure pump supplying the injector with test oil at a pressure of 1600 bar was needed in addition to the specially developed control electronics, the recuperation tank and the exhaust gas equipment for the escaping atomized spray. A second part of the work describes USANS experiments based on the idea of Dr. Roland Gaehler and carried out at the instrument D11 at the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. For this purpose a specific multi-beam geometry was applied, where a multi-slit aperture replaced the standard source aperture and the sample aperture was

  16. Changes in the Fine Structure of Stochastic Distributions as a Consequence of Space-Time Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shnoll S. E.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey of the fine structure stochastic distributions in measurements obtained by me over 50 years. It is shown: (1 The forms of the histograms obtained at each geographic point (at each given moment of time are similar with high probability, even if we register phenomena of completely different nature --- from biochemical reactions to the noise in a gravitational antenna, or alpha-decay. (2 The forms of the histograms change with time. The iterations of the same form have the periods of the stellar day (1.436 min, the solar day (1.440 min, the calendar year (365 solar days, and the sidereal year (365 solar days plus 6 hours and 9 min. (3 At the same instants of the local time, at different geographic points, the forms of the histograms are the same, with high probability. (4 The forms of the histograms depend on the locations of the Moon and the Sun with respect to the horizon. (5 All the facts are proof of the dependance of the form of the histograms on the location of the measured objects with respect to stars, the Sun, and the Moon. (6 At the instants of New Moon and the maxima of solar eclipses there are specific forms of the histograms. (7 It is probable that the observed correlations are not connected to flow power changes (the changes of the gravity force --- we did not find the appropriate periods in changes in histogram form. (8 A sharp anisotropy of space was discovered, registered by alpha-decay detectors armed with collimators. Observations at 54 North (the collimator was pointed at the Pole Star showed no day-long periods, as was also the case for observations at 82 North, near the Pole. Histograms obtained by observations with an Easterly-directed collimator were determined every 718 minutes (half stellar day and with observations using a Westerly-directed collimator. (9 Collimators rotating counter-clockwise, in parallel with the celestial equator, gave the probability of changes in histograms as the number of the

  17. Changes in the Fine Structure of Stochastic Distributions as a Consequence of Space-Time Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shnoll S. E.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey of the fine structure stochastic distributions in measurements obtained by me over 50 years. It is shown: (1 The forms of the histograms obtained at each geographic point (at each given moment of time are similar with high probability, even if we register phenomena of completely different nature — from biochemical reactions to the noise in a gravitational antenna, or α-decay. (2 The forms of the histograms change with time. The iterations of the same form have the periods of the stellar day (1.436 min, the solar day (1.440 min, the calendar year (365 solar days, and the sidereal year (365 solar days plus 6 hours and 9 min. (3 At the same instants of the local time, at different geographic points, the forms of the histograms are the same, with high probability. (4 The forms of the histograms depend on the locations of the Moon and the Sun with respect to the horizon. (5 All the facts are proof of the dependance of the form of the histograms on the location of the measured objects with respect to stars, the Sun, and the Moon. (6 At the instants of New Moon and the maxima of solar eclipses there are specific forms of the histograms. (7 It is probable that the observed correlations are not connected to flow power changes (the changes of the gravity force — we did not find the appropriate periods in changes in histogram form. (8 A sharp anisotropy of space was discovered, registered by α-decay detectors armed with collimators. Observations at 54◦ North (the collimator was pointed at the Pole Star showed no day-long periods, as was also the case for observations at 82◦ North, near the Pole. Histograms obtained by observations with an Easterly-directed collimator were determined every 718 minutes (half stellar day and with observations using a Westerly-directed collimator. (9 Collimators rotating counter-clockwise, in parallel with the celestial equator, gave the probability of changes in histograms as the number of the

  18. Topological Structures of Derivative Weighted Composition Operators on the Bergman Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ce-Zhong Tong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We characterize the difference of derivative weighted composition operators on the Bergman space in the unit disk and determine when linear-fractional derivative weighted composition operators belong to the same component of the space of derivative weighted composition operators on the Bergman space under the operator norm topology.

  19. Next Generation Forest Structure Measurements from Space: Synergism of NASA's NISAR and GEDI Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatchi, S. S.; Xu, L.; Yu, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Post-2020 will witness a series of new observations from NASA and ESA spaceborne missions dedicated to measurements of aboveground forest structure and biomass (AGB). These measurements are designed to significantly reduce the uncertainty in terrestrial carbon cycle by providing globally consistent estimates of forest aboveground carbon stocks and dynamics from land use and climate related changes. NASA's Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI), NASA and ISRO SAR (NISAR), and ESA's BIOMASS (launch in 2020-21) missions, which are scheduled for launch in the next three to five years, share similar objectives for estimation of forest structure and aboveground biomass (AGB). The NISAR mission will measure above ground woody vegetation biomass at spatial resolution of 100 m (1-ha) annually over the lifetime of the mission providing fine grain products of carbon stocks and changes over a range of biomass limited to 100 Mg/ha. The upper threshold of 100 Mg/ha is set to reflect the sensitivity of L-band backscatter measurements to biomass and allowing coverage of more than 50% of the global forests and the entire area of remaining woody vegetation. This sensitivity will allow NISAR to quantify the carbon stocks and changes of the most dynamic and variable component of global vegetation with significant contribution to the global carbon cycle and climate science. We examine the sensitivity of NISAR in estimating AGB in different forest types and demonstrate how the NISAR and GEDI data can be combined in a machine-learning algorithm to develop synergistic products of global forest height and AGB. The synergistic approach extends the range of biomass estimation for NISAR mission and allows extrapolation of GEDI LiDAR samples to contiguous maps of height metrics. AcknowledgementsThe research was carried out partially at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  20. Integrated Orbit, Attitude, and Structural Control Systems Design for Space Solar Power Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong; Roithmayr, Carlos M.

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to develop an integrated orbit, attitude, and structural control systems architecture for very large Space Solar Power Satellites (SSPS) in geosynchronous orbit. This study focuses on the 1.2-GW Abacus SSPS concept characterized by a 3.2 x 3.2 km solar-array platform, a 500-m diameter microwave beam transmitting antenna, and a 500 x 700 m earth-tracking reflector. For this baseline Abacus SSPS configuration, we derive and analyze a complete set of mathematical models, including external disturbances such as solar radiation pressure, microwave radiation, gravity-gradient torque, and other orbit perturbation effects. The proposed control systems architecture utilizes a minimum of 500 1-N electric thrusters to counter, simultaneously, the cyclic pitch gravity-gradient torque, the secular roll torque caused by an offset of the center-of-mass and center-of-pressure, the cyclic roll/yaw microwave radiation torque, and the solar radiation pressure force whose average value is about 60 N.

  1. Integrated Orbit, Attitude, and Structural Control System Design for Space Solar Power Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica (Technical Monitor); Moore, Chris (Technical Monitor); Wie, Bong; Roithmayr, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    The major objective of this study is to develop an integrated orbit, attitude, and structural control system architecture for very large Space Solar Power Satellites (SSPS) in geosynchronous orbit. This study focuses on the 1.2-GW Abacus SSPS concept characterized by a 3.2 x 3.2 km solar-array platform, a 500-m diameter microwave beam transmitting antenna, and a 500 700 m earth-tracking reflector. For this baseline Abacus SSPS configuration, we derive and analyze a complete set of mathematical models, including external disturbances such as solar radiation pressure, microwave radiation, gravity-gradient torque, and other orbit perturbation effects. The proposed control system architecture utilizes a minimum of 500 1-N electric thrusters to counter, simultaneously, the cyclic pitch gravity-gradient torque, the secular roll torque caused by an o.set of the center-of-mass and center-of-pressure, the cyclic roll/yaw microwave radiation torque, and the solar radiation pressure force whose average value is about 60 N.

  2. Development of deployable structures for large space platform systems. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1983-01-01

    The preponderance of study effort was devoted toward the deployable platform systems study which culminated in the detailed design of a ground test article for future development testing. This design is representative of a prototype square-truss, single-fold building-block design that can construct deployable platform structures. This prototype design was selected through a comprehensive and traceable selection process applied to eight competitive designs. The selection process compared the competitive designs according to seven major selection criteria, i.e., design versatility, cost, thermal stability, meteoroid impact significance, reliability, performance predictability, and orbiter integration suitability. In support of the foregoing, a materials data base, and platform systems technology development needs were established. An erectable design of an OTV hangar was selected and recommended for further design development. This design was selected from five study-developed competitive single-fold and double-fold designs including hard-shell and inflatable designs. Also, two deployable manned module configurations, i.e., a hard-shell and an inflatable design were each developed to the same requirements as the composite of two Space station baseline habitat modules.

  3. Development and properties of aluminum-clad graphite/epoxy tubes for space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. R.; Kural, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the development and properties of seamless aluminum-clad P75/Epoxy tubes and the unique manufacturing method used in their production. Thermo-mechanical properties of the tubes were determined analytically and verified by tests. These properties were shown to be suitable for space structures that require high stiffness, low weight and thermal expansion, and dimensional stability during operational life. A special feature of the tubes is the ability to tune the tube for thermal expansion after fabrication by a chemical milling process. The tubes are also resistant to atomic oxygen and handling damage. The toughness of the tubes was demonstrated by impact testing. Cyclic thermal testing showed no adverse effects on the expansion and stiffness behavior of the tubes. The paper also includes a discussion of a joining method that uses aluminum end fittings and an efficient scarf joint configuration. Additional studies considered various adhesives and fitting materials. Joint allowables were higher for titanium and B4C particulate magnesium fittings. The effect of different adhesives under static loading conditions favored the high-strength adhesives.

  4. Space space space

    CERN Document Server

    Trembach, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Space is an introduction to the mysteries of the Universe. Included are Task Cards for independent learning, Journal Word Cards for creative writing, and Hands-On Activities for reinforcing skills in Math and Language Arts. Space is a perfect introduction to further research of the Solar System.

  5. Structural Analysis Peer Review for the Static Display of the Orbiter Atlantis at the Kennedy Space Center Visitors Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minute, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Mr. Christopher Miller with the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) NASA Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) office requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center's (NESC) technical support on March 15, 2012, to review and make recommendations on the structural analysis being performed for the Orbiter Atlantis static display at the KSC Visitor Center. The principal focus of the assessment was to review the engineering firm's structural analysis for lifting and aligning the orbiter and its static display configuration

  6. Acute mental health care according to recent mental health legislation. Part III. Structuring space for acute mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse van Rensburg, A; Janse van Rensburg, A B R

    2011-05-01

    This is the third of three reports on the follow-up review of mental health care at Helen Joseph Hospital (HJH). The study reviewed existing South African standards for mental health care facilities. Architectural principles and implications for the use of space were deducted from recent legislation. Objectives were to evaluate the use of space in the existing physical facilities, to identify appropriate architectural solutions considering identified human rights requirements and to provide provisional cost estimates to align the unit towards its designated functions. Personal interviews were conducted. An on-site assessment and survey was made of existing and potential new spaces. Spatial requirements for implementing the Mental Health Act, No. 17 of 2002 (MHCA) were explored. Principles for spatial design of acute facilities include that: - spaces should communicate clear individual identity; - space should be segregated into zones according to user functionality and privacy; - communal leisure spaces should open into safe contained outdoor spaces; - circulation routes should preferably be circular; - sufficient visual connection should exist between circulation space and group activities; and - open lines of sight should be provided to all access points. The potential options for extension included: - an extensive unused single storey structural shell for a potential office wing on the same floor; - a huge vacant double volume space which could be accessed across the existing flat roof for potential occupational therapy activities; and - the existing roof area could be altered and secured to become an adequate outside leisure and garden area. A proposed concept design in two phases - based on these principles - was submitted to hospital and provincial management. To implement the MHCA without violating the human rights of mental health care users at HJH will require specific adjustment and extension of the current use of space at HJH.

  7. Crossing Phenomena in Overhead Line Equipment (OHLE) Structure in 3D Space Considering Soil-Structure Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngamkhanong, Chayut; Kaewunruen, Sakdirat; Baniotopoulos, Charalampos; Papaelias, Mayorkinos

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, the electric train becomes one of the efficient railway systems that are lighter, cleaner, quieter, cheaper and faster than a conventional train. Overhead line equipment (OHLE), which supplies electric power to the trains, is designed on the principle of overhead wires placed over the railway track. The OHLE is supported by mast structure which located at the lineside along the track. Normally, mast structure is a steel column or truss structure which supports the overhead wire carrying the power. Due to the running train and severe periodic force, such as an earthquake, in surrounding area may cause damage to the OHLE structure especially mast structure which leads to the failure of the electrical system. The mast structure needs to be discussed in order to resist the random forces. Due to the vibration effect, the natural frequencies of the structure are necessary. This is because when the external applied force occurs within a range of frequency of the structure, resonance effect can be expected which lead to the large oscillations and deflections. The natural frequency of a system is dependent only on the stiffness of the structure and the mass which participates with the structure, including self-weight. The modal analysis is used in order to calculate the mode shapes and natural frequencies of the mast structure during free vibration. A mast structure with varying rotational soil stiffness is used to observe the influence of soil-structure action. It is common to use finite element analysis to perform a modal analysis. This paper presents the fundamental mode shapes, natural frequencies and crossing phenomena of three-dimensional mast structure considering soil-structure interaction. The sensitivity of mode shapes to the variation of soil-structure interaction is discussed. The outcome of this study will improve the understanding of the fundamental dynamic behaviour of the mast structure which supports the OHLE. Moreover, this study will be a

  8. Exploring the Structure of Library and Information Science Web Space Based on Multivariate Analysis of Social Tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Soohyung; Kipp, Margaret E. I.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study examines the structure of Web space in the field of library and information science using multivariate analysis of social tags from the Website, Delicious.com. A few studies have examined mathematical modelling of tags, mainly examining tagging in terms of tripartite graphs, pattern tracing and descriptive statistics. This…

  9. Enhancing k-space quantitative susceptibility mapping by enforcing consistency on the cone data (CCD) with structural priors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yan; Wang, Yi; Liu, Tian

    2016-02-01

    The inversion from the magnetic field to the magnetic susceptibility distribution is ill-posed because the dipole kernel, which relates the magnetic susceptibility to the magnetic field, has zeroes at a pair of cone surfaces in the k-space, leading to streaking artifacts on the reconstructed quantitative susceptibility maps (QSM). A method to impose consistency on the cone data (CCD) with structural priors is proposed to improve the solutions of k-space methods. The information in the cone region is recovered by enforcing structural consistency with structural prior, while information in the noncone trust region is enforced to be consistent with the magnetic field measurements in k-space. This CCD method was evaluated by comparing the initial results of existing QSM algorithms to the QSM results after CCD enhancement with respect to the COSMOS results in simulation, phantom, and in vivo human brain. The proposed method demonstrated suppression of streaking artifacts and the resulting QSM showed better agreement with reference standard QSM compared with other k-space based methods. By enforcing consistency with structural priors in the cone region, the missing data in the cone can be recovered and the streaking artifacts in QSM can be suppressed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Nonlinear dust-acoustic structures in space plasmas with superthermal electrons, positrons, and ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saberian, E., E-mail: e.saberian@neyshabur.ac.ir [University of Neyshabur, Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A.; Afsari-Ghazi, M. [Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Some features of nonlinear dust-acoustic (DA) structures are investigated in a space plasma consisting of superthermal electrons, positrons, and positive ions in the presence of negatively charged dust grains with finite-temperature by employing a pseudo-potential technique in a hydrodynamic model. For this purpose, it is assumed that the electrons, positrons, and ions obey a kappa-like (κ) distribution in the background of adiabatic dust population. In the linear analysis, it is found that the dispersion relation yield two positive DA branches, i.e., the slow and fast DA waves. The upper branch (fast DA waves) corresponds to the case in which both (negatively charged) dust particles and (positively charged) ion species oscillate in phase with electrons and positrons. On the other hand, the lower branch (slow DA waves) corresponds to the case in which only dust particles oscillate in phase with electrons and positrons, while ion species are in antiphase with them. On the other hand, the fully nonlinear analysis shows that the existence domain of solitons and their characteristics depend strongly on the dust charge, ion charge, dust temperature, and the spectral index κ. It is found that the minimum/maximum Mach number increases as the spectral index κ increases. Also, it is found that only solitons with negative polarity can propagate and that their amplitudes increase as the parameter κ increases. Furthermore, the domain of Mach number shifts to the lower values, when the value of the dust charge Z{sub d} increases. Moreover, it is found that the Mach number increases with an increase in the dust temperature. Our analysis confirms that, in space plasmas with highly charged dusts, the presence of superthermal particles (electrons, positrons, and ions) may facilitate the formation of DA solitary waves. Particularly, in two cases of hydrogen ions H{sup +} (Z{sub i} = 1) and doubly ionized Helium atoms He{sup 2+} (Z{sub i} = 2), the mentioned results are the same

  11. About Fixed Points in CAT(0 Spaces under a Combined Structure of Two Self-Mappings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel De la Sen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates some fixed point-related questions including the sequence boundedness and convergence properties of mappings QtSx,Ty=tSx⊕1-tTy defined in CAT0 spaces, which are parameterized by a scalar t∈0,1, where S,T:  X→X are nonexpansive Lipschitz-continuous mappings and X,d is a metric space which is a CAT0 space.

  12. Chapter 1. Target selection in structural genomics projects to increase knowledge of protein structure and function space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Phil; Lee, David; Orengo, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Structural genomics aims to solve the three-dimensional structures of proteins at a rapid rate and in a cost-effective manner, with the hope of significantly impacting on the life sciences, biotechnology, and drug discovery in the long-term. Structural genomics initiatives started in Japan in 1997 with the advent of the Protein Folds Project. Since then many new initiatives have begun worldwide, with diverse aims motivating the selection of proteins for structure determination. In this chapter, we consider the biological goals of high-throughput structural biology, while focusing on the Protein Structure Initiative in the United States. This is the most productive of the structural genomics initiatives, having solved 3,363 new structures between September 2000 and October 2008.

  13. Asymptotic structure of space-time with a positive cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavan, Aruna

    In general relativity a satisfactory framework for describing isolated systems exists when the cosmological constant Lambda is zero. The detailed analysis of the asymptotic structure of the gravitational field, which constitutes the framework of asymptotic flatness, lays the foundation for research in diverse areas in gravitational science. However, the framework is incomplete in two respects. First, asymptotic flatness provides well-defined expressions for physical observables such as energy and momentum as 'charges' of asymptotic symmetries at null infinity, [special character omitted] +. But the asymptotic symmetry group, called the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs group is infinite-dimensional and a tensorial expression for the 'charge' integral of an arbitrary BMS element is missing. We address this issue by providing a charge formula which is a 2-sphere integral over fields local to the 2-sphere and refers to no extraneous structure. The second, and more significant shortcoming is that observations have established that Lambda is not zero but positive in our universe. Can the framework describing isolated systems and their gravitational radiation be extended to incorporate this fact? In this dissertation we show that, unfortunately, the standard framework does not extend from the Lambda = 0 case to the Lambda > 0 case in a physically useful manner. In particular, we do not have an invariant notion of gravitational waves in the non-linear regime, nor an analog of the Bondi 'news tensor', nor positive energy theorems. In addition, we argue that the stronger boundary condition of conformal flatness of intrinsic metric on [special character omitted]+, which reduces the asymptotic symmetry group from Diff([special character omitted]) to the de Sitter group, is insufficient to characterize gravitational fluxes and is physically unreasonable. To obtain guidance for the full non-linear theory with Lambda > 0, linearized gravitational waves in de Sitter space-time are analyzed in

  14. Facebook for Supervision? Research Education Shaped by the Structural Properties of a Social Media Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimmer, Christoph; Chipps, Jennifer; Brysiewicz, Petra; Walters, Fiona; Linxen, Sebastian; Gröhbiel, Urs

    2017-01-01

    This study analyses the use of a group space on the social networking site Facebook as a way to facilitate research supervision for teams of learners. Borrowing Lee's framework for research supervision, the goal was to understand how supervision and learning was achieved in, and shaped by, the properties of a social networking space. For this…

  15. Smart Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel - Integrated Structural Health Monitoring System to Meet Space Exploration and International Space Station Mission Assurance Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Nichols, Charles; Waller, Jess

    2012-01-01

    Currently there are no integrated NDE methods for baselining and monitoring defect levels in fleet for Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs) or related fracture critical composites, or for performing life-cycle maintenance inspections either in a traditional remove-and-inspect mode or in a more modern in situ inspection structural health monitoring (SHM) mode. Implicit in SHM and autonomous inspection is the existence of quantitative accept-reject criteria. To be effective, these criteria must correlate with levels of damage known to cause composite failure. Furthermore, implicit in SHM is the existence of effective remote sensing hardware and automated techniques and algorithms for interpretation of SHM data. SHM of facture critical composite structures, especially high pressure COPVs, is critical to the success of nearly every future NASA space exploration program as well as life extension of the International Space Station. It has been clearly stated that future NASA missions may not be successful without SHM [1]. Otherwise, crews will be busy addressing subsystem health issues and not focusing on the real NASA mission

  16. Adaptive/learning control of large space structures - System identification techniques. [for multi-configuration flexible spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thau, F. E.; Montgomery, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques developed for the control of aircraft under changing operating conditions are used to develop a learning control system structure for a multi-configuration, flexible space vehicle. A configuration identification subsystem that is to be used with a learning algorithm and a memory and control process subsystem is developed. Adaptive gain adjustments can be achieved by this learning approach without prestoring of large blocks of parameter data and without dither signal inputs which will be suppressed during operations for which they are not compatible. The Space Shuttle Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) experiment is used as a sample problem for the testing of adaptive/learning control system algorithms.

  17. A coupled fluid-structure dynamic analysis for water impact loads. [for Space Shuttle recoverable booster design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herting, D. N.

    1975-01-01

    In this paper a nonlinear transient, hydroelastic method is developed for response analysis of the Space Shuttle recoverable booster on water impact. At each time step, coupled equations of fluid flow and structure dynamics are solved with an iterative, self-correcting process. Rigid body motions are represented by large angle equations. Local deformations are represented by a NASTRAN-generated model of the three-dimensional structure. The fluid is represented by series solutions of the potential flow equation which include the effects of the local structure motions. The resulting water loads and structural stresses obtained will aid in qualification of the final structural design. Comparisons are made to experimental impact data to validate the method.

  18. Camps 2.0: exploring the sequence and structure space of prokaryotic, eukaryotic, and viral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Sindy; Hartmann, Holger; Martin-Galiano, Antonio J; Fuchs, Angelika; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2012-03-01

    Structural bioinformatics of membrane proteins is still in its infancy, and the picture of their fold space is only beginning to emerge. Because only a handful of three-dimensional structures are available, sequence comparison and structure prediction remain the main tools for investigating sequence-structure relationships in membrane protein families. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the structural families corresponding to α-helical membrane proteins with at least three transmembrane helices. The new version of our CAMPS database (CAMPS 2.0) covers nearly 1300 eukaryotic, prokaryotic, and viral genomes. Using an advanced classification procedure, which is based on high-order hidden Markov models and considers both sequence similarity as well as the number of transmembrane helices and loop lengths, we identified 1353 structurally homogeneous clusters roughly corresponding to membrane protein folds. Only 53 clusters are associated with experimentally determined three-dimensional structures, and for these clusters CAMPS is in reasonable agreement with structure-based classification approaches such as SCOP and CATH. We therefore estimate that ∼1300 structures would need to be determined to provide a sufficient structural coverage of polytopic membrane proteins. CAMPS 2.0 is available at http://webclu.bio.wzw.tum.de/CAMPS2.0/. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. almaBTE : A solver of the space-time dependent Boltzmann transport equation for phonons in structured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrete, Jesús; Vermeersch, Bjorn; Katre, Ankita; van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Wang, Tao; Madsen, Georg K. H.; Mingo, Natalio

    2017-11-01

    almaBTE is a software package that solves the space- and time-dependent Boltzmann transport equation for phonons, using only ab-initio calculated quantities as inputs. The program can predictively tackle phonon transport in bulk crystals and alloys, thin films, superlattices, and multiscale structures with size features in the nm- μm range. Among many other quantities, the program can output thermal conductances and effective thermal conductivities, space-resolved average temperature profiles, and heat-current distributions resolved in frequency and space. Its first-principles character makes almaBTE especially well suited to investigate novel materials and structures. This article gives an overview of the program structure and presents illustrative examples for some of its uses. PROGRAM SUMMARY Program Title:almaBTE Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/8tfzwgtp73.1 Licensing provisions: Apache License, version 2.0 Programming language: C++ External routines/libraries: BOOST, MPI, Eigen, HDF5, spglib Nature of problem: Calculation of temperature profiles, thermal flux distributions and effective thermal conductivities in structured systems where heat is carried by phonons Solution method: Solution of linearized phonon Boltzmann transport equation, Variance-reduced Monte Carlo

  20. Aluminum-Lithium Alloy 2050 for Reduced-Weight, Increased-Stiffness Space Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Touchstone Research Laboratory, along with Alcan Rolled Products ? Ravenswood WV, has identified the Aluminum-Lithium Alloy 2050 as a potentially game-changing...

  1. On-orbit validation system for space structure composite actuators Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project delivers an On-orbit Validation System (OVS) that provides performance and durability data for Macro Fiber Composite (MFC) active piezocomposite...

  2. Lost in folding space? Comparing four variants of the thermodynamic model for RNA secondary structure prediction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Janssen, Stefan; Schudoma, Christian; Steger, Gerhard; Giegerich, Robert

    2011-01-01

    ... simplifications used by the programs on the outcome of the analysis. We extract four different models of the thermodynamic folding space which underlie the programs RNAFOLD, RNASHAPES, and RNASUBOPT...

  3. Growth Adapted Tensegrity Structures - A New Calculus for the Space Economy Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Tensegrity engineering is a newly established discipline pioneered by one of the authors - with the mathematical rigor to deliver safe minimal mass...

  4. Structural Verification of the First Orbital Wonder of the World - The Structural Testing and Analysis of the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipay, John J.; Bernstein, Karen S.; Bruno, Erica E.; Deloo, Phillipe; Patin, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) can be considered one of the structural engineering wonders of the world. On par with the World Trade Center, the Colossus of Rhodes, the Statue of Liberty, the Great Pyramids, the Petronas towers and the Burj Khalifa skyscraper of Dubai, the ambition and scope of the ISS structural design, verification and assembly effort is a truly global success story. With its on-orbit life projected to be from its beginning in 1998 to the year 2020 (and perhaps beyond), all of those who participated in its development can consider themselves part of an historic engineering achievement representing all of humanity. The structural design and verification of the ISS could be the subject of many scholarly papers. Several papers have been written on the structural dynamic characterization of the ISS once it was assembled on-orbit [1], but the ground-based activities required to assure structural integrity and structural life of the individual elements from delivery to orbit through assembly and planned on-orbit operations have never been totally summarized. This paper is intended to give the reader an overview of some of the key decisions made during the structural verification planning for the elements of the U.S. On-Orbit Segment (USOS) as well as to summarize the many structural tests and structural analyses that were performed on its major elements. An effort is made for this paper to be summarily comprehensive, but as with all knowledge capture efforts of this kind, there are bound to be errors of omission. Should the reader discover any of these, please feel free to contact the principal author. The ISS (Figure 1) is composed of pre-integrated truss segments and pressurized elements supplied by NASA, the Russian Federal Space Agency (RSA), the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Each of these elements was delivered to orbit by a launch vehicle and connected to one another either robotically or

  5. The Structure of Glycine Dihydrate: Implications for the Crystallization of Glycine from Solution and Its Structure in Outer Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wenqian [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Zhu, Qiang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas NV 89154 USA; Department of Geosciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook NY 11794 USA; Hu, Chunhua Tony [Department of Chemistry, New York University, 100 Washington Square East New York NY 10003 USA

    2017-01-18

    Glycine, the simplest amino acid, is also the most polymorphous. Herein, we report the structure determination of an unknown phase of glycine which was firstly reported by Pyne and Suryanarayanan in 2001. To date, the new phase has only been prepared at 208 K as nanocrystals within ice. Through computational crystal structure prediction and powder X-ray diffraction methods, we identified this elusive phase as glycine dihydrate (GDH), representing a first report on a hydrated glycine structure. The structure of GDH has important implications for the state of glycine in aqueous solution, and the mechanisms of glycine crystallization. GDH may also be the form of glycine that comes to Earth from extraterrestrial sources.

  6. A Basic Study of Metaheuristics Based on Higher Level Structure in Solution Space of Combinatorial Optimization Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Takahiko; Yasuda, Keiichiro

    Metaheuristics is a new paradigm that aims to obtain an approximate solution within a feasible computation time. To design the effective metaheuristics, strategies of intensification and diversification are essential. This paper proposes an algorithm that has long term policy for realizing intensification and diversification based on higher level structure in solution space. In order to verify the performance, the proposed algorithm is applied to some traveling salesman problems which are typical combinatorial optimization problems.

  7. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods for select space propulsion system components (PSAM). Volume 3: Literature surveys and technical reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The technical effort and computer code developed during the first year are summarized. Several formulations for Probabilistic Finite Element Analysis (PFEA) are described with emphasis on the selected formulation. The strategies being implemented in the first-version computer code to perform linear, elastic PFEA is described. The results of a series of select Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) component surveys are presented. These results identify the critical components and provide the information necessary for probabilistic structural analysis.

  8. Performance Evaluation of Engineered Structured Sorbents for Atmosphere Revitalization Systems On Board Crewed Space Vehicles and Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David F.; Perry, Jay L.; Knox, James C.; Junaedi, Christian; Roychoudhury, Subir

    2011-01-01

    Engineered structured (ES) sorbents are being developed to meet the technical challenges of future crewed space exploration missions. ES sorbents offer the inherent performance and safety attributes of zeolite and other physical adsorbents but with greater structural integrity and process control to improve durability and efficiency over packed beds. ES sorbent techniques that are explored include thermally linked and pressure-swing adsorption beds for water-save dehumidification and sorbent-coated metal meshes for residual drying, trace contaminant control, and carbon dioxide control. Results from sub-scale performance evaluations of a thermally linked pressure-swing adsorbent bed and an integrated sub-scale ES sorbent system are discussed.

  9. Experimental demonstration of a classical approach for flexible space structure control: NASA CSI testbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Wie

    1991-01-01

    The results of active control experiments performed for the Mini-Mast truss structure are presented. The primary research objectives were: (1) to develop active structural control concepts and/or techniques; (2) to verify the concept of robust non-minimum-phase compensation for a certain class of non-colocated structural control problems through ground experiments; (3) to verify a 'dipole' concept for persistent disturbance rejection control of flexible structures; and (4) to identify CSI (Control Structure Interaction) issues and areas of emphasis for the next generation of large flexible spacecraft. The classical SISO (Single Input and Single Output) control design approach was employed.

  10. Structural Synaptic Plasticity Has High Memory Capacity and Can Explain Graded Amnesia, Catastrophic Forgetting, and the Spacing Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, Andreas; Körner, Edgar; Körner, Ursula; Sommer, Friedrich T.

    2014-01-01

    Although already William James and, more explicitly, Donald Hebb's theory of cell assemblies have suggested that activity-dependent rewiring of neuronal networks is the substrate of learning and memory, over the last six decades most theoretical work on memory has focused on plasticity of existing synapses in prewired networks. Research in the last decade has emphasized that structural modification of synaptic connectivity is common in the adult brain and tightly correlated with learning and memory. Here we present a parsimonious computational model for learning by structural plasticity. The basic modeling units are “potential synapses” defined as locations in the network where synapses can potentially grow to connect two neurons. This model generalizes well-known previous models for associative learning based on weight plasticity. Therefore, existing theory can be applied to analyze how many memories and how much information structural plasticity can store in a synapse. Surprisingly, we find that structural plasticity largely outperforms weight plasticity and can achieve a much higher storage capacity per synapse. The effect of structural plasticity on the structure of sparsely connected networks is quite intuitive: Structural plasticity increases the “effectual network connectivity”, that is, the network wiring that specifically supports storage and recall of the memories. Further, this model of structural plasticity produces gradients of effectual connectivity in the course of learning, thereby explaining various cognitive phenomena including graded amnesia, catastrophic forgetting, and the spacing effect. PMID:24858841

  11. Structural synaptic plasticity has high memory capacity and can explain graded amnesia, catastrophic forgetting, and the spacing effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Knoblauch

    Full Text Available Although already William James and, more explicitly, Donald Hebb's theory of cell assemblies have suggested that activity-dependent rewiring of neuronal networks is the substrate of learning and memory, over the last six decades most theoretical work on memory has focused on plasticity of existing synapses in prewired networks. Research in the last decade has emphasized that structural modification of synaptic connectivity is common in the adult brain and tightly correlated with learning and memory. Here we present a parsimonious computational model for learning by structural plasticity. The basic modeling units are "potential synapses" defined as locations in the network where synapses can potentially grow to connect two neurons. This model generalizes well-known previous models for associative learning based on weight plasticity. Therefore, existing theory can be applied to analyze how many memories and how much information structural plasticity can store in a synapse. Surprisingly, we find that structural plasticity largely outperforms weight plasticity and can achieve a much higher storage capacity per synapse. The effect of structural plasticity on the structure of sparsely connected networks is quite intuitive: Structural plasticity increases the "effectual network connectivity", that is, the network wiring that specifically supports storage and recall of the memories. Further, this model of structural plasticity produces gradients of effectual connectivity in the course of learning, thereby explaining various cognitive phenomena including graded amnesia, catastrophic forgetting, and the spacing effect.

  12. Structure of the harmonic oscillator in the space of n-particle Glauber correlators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubizarreta Casalengua, E.; López Carreño, J. C.; del Valle, E.; Laussy, F. P.

    2017-06-01

    We map the Hilbert space of the quantum harmonic oscillator to the space of Glauber's nth-order intensity correlators, in effect showing "the correlations between the correlators" for a random sampling of the quantum states. In particular, we show how the popular g(2) function is correlated to the mean population and how a recurrent criterion to identify single-particle states or emitters, namely, g ( 2 ) physically more intuitive way that can be used to classify quantum sources by surveying which territory they can access.

  13. Protein folding in mode space: a collective coordinate approach to structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abseher, Roger; Nilges, Michael

    2002-11-15

    Does the dynamics of a protein encode its structure? Many studies have addressed the inverse of this question-how a three-dimensional structure determines its dynamics-using molecular dynamics simulation, normal mode analysis, and similar methods. Recently we have developed a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method to impose dynamic properties on ensembles of MD trajectories in the form of restraints on structural diversity in the directions of the principal components of motion of the molecule. In the current work, we investigate if these restraints in combination with a standard MD force field are sufficient to generate native structure in disordered structural ensembles. We present simulations from a series of increasingly disordered structural ensembles obtained by thermal unfolding or randomization of the coordinates of the native structure of two src-homology 3 (SH3) domains. Native structure formation is observed under the sole action of the diversity restraint and the MD force field. We investigate the importance of accuracy of the description of native dynamics. Protein folding is a highly cooperative process. The dynamic restraints may enforce long-range cooperativity and thus speed up the folding from unstructured states. Applications of the restraints to structure refinement and structure prediction are possible. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Some applications of nanometer scale structures for current and future X-ray space research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Abdali, S; Frederiksen, P K

    1994-01-01

    Institute in collaboration with the FOM Institute for Plasma Physics, Nieuwegein, the Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Aussenstelle Berlin, the Space Research Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Ovonics Synthetic Materials Company and Lawrence...

  15. The Structure of Finitely Generated Shift-Invariant Spaces in L2(IR(d))

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    bounded), vanishes on ’S, and provides an isormorphisin (resp., an isometry ) between CS and S. We begin with a Lemma that makes the above discussion...gener- ated. Indeed, let S be a closed shift-invariant space and Ps its corresponding orthogonal projector. For /3 E 2ir7Zd, let Cg be the cube

  16. A geo-computational algorithm for exploring the structure of diffusion progression in time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Wei-Chien-Benny; Wen, Tzai-Hung; Sabel, Clive E; Wang, I-Hsiang

    2017-10-03

    A diffusion process can be considered as the movement of linked events through space and time. Therefore, space-time locations of events are key to identify any diffusion process. However, previous clustering analysis methods have focused only on space-time proximity characteristics, neglecting the temporal lag of the movement of events. We argue that the temporal lag between events is a key to understand the process of diffusion movement. Using the temporal lag could help to clarify the types of close relationships. This study aims to develop a data exploration algorithm, namely the TrAcking Progression In Time And Space (TaPiTaS) algorithm, for understanding diffusion processes. Based on the spatial distance and temporal interval between cases, TaPiTaS detects sub-clusters, a group of events that have high probability of having common sources, identifies progression links, the relationships between sub-clusters, and tracks progression chains, the connected components of sub-clusters. Dengue Fever cases data was used as an illustrative case study. The location and temporal range of sub-clusters are presented, along with the progression links. TaPiTaS algorithm contributes a more detailed and in-depth understanding of the development of progression chains, namely the geographic diffusion process.

  17. Phase-space structures - I. A comparison of 6D density estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, M.; Colombi, S.; Alard, C.; Bouchet, F.; Pichon, C.

    2009-03-01

    In the framework of particle-based Vlasov systems, this paper reviews and analyses different methods recently proposed in the literature to identify neighbours in 6D space and estimate the corresponding phase-space density. Specifically, it compares smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) methods based on tree partitioning to 6D Delaunay tessellation. This comparison is carried out on statistical and dynamical realizations of single halo profiles, paying particular attention to the unknown scaling, SG, used to relate the spatial dimensions to the velocity dimensions. It is found that, in practice, the methods with local adaptive metric provide the best phase-space estimators. They make use of a Shannon entropy criterion combined with a binary tree partitioning and with subsequent SPH interpolation using 10-40 nearest neighbours. We note that the local scaling SG implemented by such methods, which enforces local isotropy of the distribution function, can vary by about one order of magnitude in different regions within the system. It presents a bimodal distribution, in which one component is dominated by the main part of the halo and the other one is dominated by the substructures of the halo. While potentially better than SPH techniques, since it yields an optimal estimate of the local softening volume (and therefore the local number of neighbours required to perform the interpolation), the Delaunay tessellation in fact generally poorly estimates the phase-space distribution function. Indeed, it requires, prior to its implementation, the choice of a global scaling SG. We propose two simple but efficient methods to estimate SG that yield a good global compromise. However, the Delaunay interpolation still remains quite sensitive to local anisotropies in the distribution. To emphasize the advantages of 6D analysis versus traditional 3D analysis, we also compare realistic 6D phase-space density estimation with the proxy proposed earlier in the literature, Q = ρ/σ3

  18. Validation of missed space-group symmetry in X-ray powder diffraction structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempler, Daniela; Schmidt, Martin U; van de Streek, Jacco

    2017-08-01

    More than 600 molecular crystal structures with correct, incorrect and uncertain space-group symmetry were energy-minimized with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D, PBE-D3). For the purpose of determining the correct space-group symmetry the required tolerance on the atomic coordinates of all non-H atoms is established to be 0.2 Å. For 98.5% of 200 molecular crystal structures published with missed symmetry, the correct space group is identified; there are no false positives. Very small, very symmetrical molecules can end up in artificially high space groups upon energy minimization, although this is easily detected through visual inspection. If the space group of a crystal structure determined from powder diffraction data is ambiguous, energy minimization with DFT-D provides a fast and reliable method to select the correct space group.

  19. Marginal space learning for medical image analysis efficient detection and segmentation of anatomical structures

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Yefeng

    2014-01-01

    Presents an award winning image analysis technology (Thomas Edison Patent Award, MICCAI Young Investigator Award) that achieves object detection and segmentation with state-of-the-art accuracy and efficiency Flexible, machine learning-based framework, applicable across multiple anatomical structures and imaging modalities Thirty five clinical applications on detecting and segmenting anatomical structures such as heart chambers and valves, blood vessels, liver, kidney, prostate, lymph nodes, and sub-cortical brain structures, in CT, MRI, X-Ray and Ultrasound.

  20. Uncertainty Quantification for Complex RF-structures Using the State-space Concatenation Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, Johann; Schmidt, Christian; Van Rienen, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    as well as to employ robust optimizations, a so-called uncertainty quantification (UQ) is applied. For large and complex structures such computations are heavily demanding and cannot be carried out using standard brute-force approaches. In this paper, we propose a combination of established techniques to perform UQ for long and complex structures, where the uncertainty is located only in parts of the structure. As exemplary structure, we investigate the third-harmonic cavity, which is being used at the FLASH accelerator at DESY, assuming an uncertain...

  1. A Structure-Based Distance Metric for High-Dimensional Space Exploration with Multi-Dimensional Scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jenny Hyunjung; McDonnell, Kevin T; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, Dan; Mueller, Klaus

    2013-07-11

    Although the Euclidean distance does well in measuring data distances within high-dimensional clusters, it does poorly when it comes to gauging inter-cluster distances. This significantly impacts the quality of global, low-dimensional space embedding procedures such as the popular multi-dimensional scaling (MDS) where one can often observe non-intuitive layouts. We were inspired by the perceptual processes evoked in the method of parallel coordinates which enables users to visually aggregate the data by the patterns the polylines exhibit across the dimension axes. We call the path of such a polyline its structure and suggest a metric that captures this structure directly in high-dimensional space. This allows us to better gauge the distances of spatially distant data constellations and so achieve data aggregations in MDS plots that are more cognizant of existing high-dimensional structure similarities. Our bi-scale framework distinguishes far-distances from near-distances. The coarser scale uses the structural similarity metric to separate data aggregates obtained by prior classification or clustering, while the finer scale employs the appropriate Euclidean distance.

  2. Structural Framework for Flight: NASA's Role in Development of Advanced Composite Materials for Aircraft and Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Darrel R.; Davis, John G., Jr.; Johnston, Norman J.; Pipes, R. Byron; McGuire, Jack F.

    2011-01-01

    This serves as a source of collated information on Composite Research over the past four decades at NASA Langley Research Center, and is a key reference for readers wishing to grasp the underlying principles and challenges associated with developing and applying advanced composite materials to new aerospace vehicle concepts. Second, it identifies the major obstacles encountered in developing and applying composites on advanced flight vehicles, as well as lessons learned in overcoming these obstacles. Third, it points out current barriers and challenges to further application of composites on future vehicles. This is extremely valuable for steering research in the future, when new breakthroughs in materials or processing science may eliminate/minimize some of the barriers that have traditionally blocked the expanded application of composite to new structural or revolutionary vehicle concepts. Finally, a review of past work and identification of future challenges will hopefully inspire new research opportunities and development of revolutionary materials and structural concepts to revolutionize future flight vehicles.

  3. Predicting free-space occupancy on novel artificial structures by an invasive intertidal barnacle using a removal experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally A Bracewell

    Full Text Available Artificial structures can create novel habitat in the marine environment that has been associated with the spread of invasive species. They are often located in areas of high disturbance and can vary significantly in the area of free space provided for settlement of marine organisms. Whilst correlation between the amount of free space available and recruitment success has been shown in populations of several marine benthic organisms, there has been relatively little focus on invasive species, a group with the potential to reproduce in vast numbers and colonise habitats rapidly. Invasion success following different scales of disturbance was examined in the invasive acorn barnacle, Austrominiusmodestus, on a unique art installation located in Liverpool Bay. Population growth and recruitment success were examined by comparing recruitment rates within disturbance clearings of 4 different sizes and by contrasting population development with early recruitment rates over a 10 week period. Disturbed areas were rapidly recolonised and monocultures of A. modestus formed within 6 weeks. The size of patch created during disturbance had no effect on the rate of recruitment, while a linear relationship between recruit density and patch size was observed. Density-dependent processes mediated initial high recruitment resulting in population stability after 8-10 weeks, but densities continued to greatly exceed those reported in natural habitats. Given that artificial structures are likely to continue to proliferate in light of climate change projections, free-space is likely to become more available more frequently in the future supporting the expansion of fast-colonising species.

  4. Exploring Deep Space - Uncovering the Anatomy of Periventricular Structures to Reveal the Lateral Ventricles of the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colibaba, Alexandru S; Calma, Aicee Dawn B; Webb, Alexandra L; Valter, Krisztina

    2017-10-22

    Anatomy students are typically provided with two-dimensional (2D) sections and images when studying cerebral ventricular anatomy and students find this challenging. Because the ventricles are negative spaces located deep within the brain, the only way to understand their anatomy is by appreciating their boundaries formed by related structures. Looking at a 2D representation of these spaces, in any of the cardinal planes, will not enable visualisation of all of the structures that form the boundaries of the ventricles. Thus, using 2D sections alone requires students to compute their own mental image of the 3D ventricular spaces. The aim of this study was to develop a reproducible method for dissecting the human brain to create an educational resource to enhance student understanding of the intricate relationships between the ventricles and periventricular structures. To achieve this, we created a video resource that features a step-by-step guide using a fiber dissection method to reveal the lateral and third ventricles together with the closely related limbic system and basal ganglia structures. One of the advantages of this method is that it enables delineation of the white matter tracts that are difficult to distinguish using other dissection techniques. This video is accompanied by a written protocol that provides a systematic description of the process to aid in the reproduction of the brain dissection. This package offers a valuable anatomy teaching resource for educators and students alike. By following these instructions educators can create teaching resources and students can be guided to produce their own brain dissection as a hands-on practical activity. We recommend that this video guide be incorporated into neuroanatomy teaching to enhance student understanding of the morphology and clinical relevance of the ventricles.

  5. BILL-E: Robotic Platform for Locomotion and Manipulation of Lightweight Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenett, Benjamin; Cheung, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    We describe a robotic platform for traversing and manipulating a modular 3D lattice structure. The robot is designed to operate within a specifically structured environment, which enables low numbers of degrees of freedom (DOF) compared to robots performing comparable tasks in an unstructured environment. This allows for simple controls, as well as low mass and cost. This approach, designing the robot relative to the local environment in which it operates, results in a type of robot we call a "relative robot." We describe a bipedal robot that can locomote across a periodic lattice structure, as well as being able to handle, manipulate, and transport building block parts that compose the lattice structure. Based on a general inchworm design, the robot has added functionality for traveling over and operating on a host structure.

  6. Reference Management Methodologies for Large Structural Models at Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Corey; Bingham, Ryan; Schmidt, Rick

    2011-01-01

    There have been many challenges associated with modeling some of NASA KSC's largest structures. Given the size of the welded structures here at KSC, it was critically important to properly organize model struc.ture and carefully manage references. Additionally, because of the amount of hardware to be installed on these structures, it was very important to have a means to coordinate between different design teams and organizations, check for interferences, produce consistent drawings, and allow for simple release processes. Facing these challenges, the modeling team developed a unique reference management methodology and model fidelity methodology. This presentation will describe the techniques and methodologies that were developed for these projects. The attendees will learn about KSC's reference management and model fidelity methodologies for large structures. The attendees will understand the goals of these methodologies. The attendees will appreciate the advantages of developing a reference management methodology.

  7. The Methods of Hilbert Spaces and Structure of the Fixed-Point Set of Lipschitzian Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Górnicki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to prove, by asymptotic center techniques and the methods of Hilbert spaces, the following theorem. Let H be a Hilbert space, let C be a nonempty bounded closed convex subset of H, and let M=[an,k]n,k≥1 be a strongly ergodic matrix. If T:C→C is a lipschitzian mapping such that lim⁡inf⁡n→∞inf⁡m=0,1,...∑k=1∞an,k·‖Tk+m‖2<2, then the set of fixed points Fix T={x∈C:Tx=x} is a retract of C. This result extends and improves the corresponding results of [7, Corollary 9] and [8, Corollary 1].

  8. Low cost fabrication of graphite epoxy column elements for large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluck, R. M.; Johnson, R.

    1979-01-01

    A procedure for fabricating graphite epoxy column elements used in the construction of large space platforms is described. Dry fiber is wound on a tapered aluminum mandrel in the LMSC vertical winding machine, and resin is injected between the mandrel and an outer sleeve. The winding and injection take place at elevated temperature to minimize the thermal expansion problems that arise in curing a tube on an aluminum mandrel when the end fittings are integrally wound.

  9. Space grating optical structure of the retina and RGB-color vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauinger, Norbert

    2017-02-01

    Diffraction of light at the spatial cellular phase grating outer nuclear layer of the retina could produce Fresnel near-field interferences in three RGB diffraction orders accessible to photoreceptors (cones/rods). At perpendicular light incidence the wavelengths of the RGB diffraction orders in photopic vision-a fundamental R-wave with two G+B-harmonics-correspond to the peak wavelengths of the spectral brightness sensitivity curves of the cones at 559 nmR, 537 nmG, and 447 nmB. In scotopic vision the R+G diffraction orders optically fuse at 512 nm, the peak value of the rod's spectral brightness sensitivity curve. The diffractive-optical transmission system with sender (resonator), space waves, and receiver antennae converts the spectral light components involved in imaging into RGB space. The colors seen at objects are diffractive-optical products in the eye, as the German philosopher A. Schopenhauer predicted. They are second related to the overall illumination in object space. The RGB transmission system is the missing link optically managing the spectral tuning of the RGB photopigments.

  10. Toward defining deep brain stimulation targets in MNI space: A subcortical atlas based on multimodal MRI, histology and structural connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Siobhan; Plettig, Philip; Li, Ningfei; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Collins, D Louis; Herrington, Todd M; Kühn, Andrea A; Horn, Andreas

    2017-05-20

    Three-dimensional atlases of subcortical brain structures are valuable tools to reference anatomy in neuroscience and neurology. For instance, they can be used to study the position and shape of the three most common deep brain stimulation (DBS) targets, the subthalamic nucleus (STN), internal part of the pallidum (GPi) and ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus (VIM) in spatial relationship to DBS electrodes. Here, we present a composite atlas based on manual segmentations of a multimodal high resolution brain template, histology and structural connectivity. In a first step, four key structures were defined on the template itself using a combination of multispectral image analysis and manual segmentation. Second, these structures were used as anchor points to coregister a detailed histological atlas into standard space. Results show that this approach significantly improved coregistration accuracy over previously published methods. Finally, a sub-segmentation of STN and GPi into functional zones was achieved based on structural connectivity. The result is a composite atlas that defines key nuclei on the template itself, fills the gaps between them using histology and further subdivides them using structural connectivity. We show that the atlas can be used to segment DBS targets in single subjects, yielding more accurate results compared to priorly published atlases. The atlas will be made publicly available and constitutes a resource to study DBS electrode localizations in combination with modern neuroimaging methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Organization of the state space of a simple recurrent network before and after training on recursive linguistic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernanský, Michal; Makula, Matej; Benusková, Lubica

    2007-03-01

    Recurrent neural networks are often employed in the cognitive science community to process symbol sequences that represent various natural language structures. The aim is to study possible neural mechanisms of language processing and aid in development of artificial language processing systems. We used data sets containing recursive linguistic structures and trained the Elman simple recurrent network (SRN) for the next-symbol prediction task. Concentrating on neuron activation clusters in the recurrent layer of SRN we investigate the network state space organization before and after training. Given a SRN and a training stream, we construct predictive models, called neural prediction machines, that directly employ the state space dynamics of the network. We demonstrate two important properties of representations of recursive symbol series in the SRN. First, the clusters of recurrent activations emerging before training are meaningful and correspond to Markov prediction contexts. We show that prediction states that naturally arise in the SRN initialized with small random weights approximately correspond to states of Variable Memory Length Markov Models (VLMM) based on individual symbols (i.e. words). Second, we demonstrate that during training, the SRN reorganizes its state space according to word categories and their grammatical subcategories, and the next-symbol prediction is again based on the VLMM strategy. However, after training, the prediction is based on word categories and their grammatical subcategories rather than individual words. Our conclusion holds for small depths of recursions that are comparable to human performances. The methods of SRN training and analysis of its state space introduced in this paper are of a general nature and can be used for investigation of processing of any other symbol time series by means of SRN.

  12. GARN: Sampling RNA 3D Structure Space with Game Theory and Knowledge-Based Scoring Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudard, Mélanie; Bernauer, Julie; Barth, Dominique; Cohen, Johanne; Denise, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Cellular processes involve large numbers of RNA molecules. The functions of these RNA molecules and their binding to molecular machines are highly dependent on their 3D structures. One of the key challenges in RNA structure prediction and modeling is predicting the spatial arrangement of the various structural elements of RNA. As RNA folding is generally hierarchical, methods involving coarse-grained models hold great promise for this purpose. We present here a novel coarse-grained method for sampling, based on game theory and knowledge-based potentials. This strategy, GARN (Game Algorithm for RNa sampling), is often much faster than previously described techniques and generates large sets of solutions closely resembling the native structure. GARN is thus a suitable starting point for the molecular modeling of large RNAs, particularly those with experimental constraints. GARN is available from: http://garn.lri.fr/.

  13. Development of deployable structures for large space platform systems, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, R. L.; Nelson, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Eight deployable platform design objectives were established: autodeploy/retract; fully integrated utilities; configuration variability; versatile payload and subsystem interfaces; structural and packing efficiency; 1986 technology readiness; minimum EVA/RMS; and Shuttle operational compatibility.

  14. Cannibals in space: the coevolution of cannibalism and dispersal in spatially structured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Volker H W; Kamo, Masashi; Boots, Mike

    2010-05-01

    The propensity for cannibalism varies considerably both within and between species. Currently we have little understanding of both the causes of this variation and its evolutionary consequences for other life-history traits. We examine how different levels of spatial structure affect the evolution of cannibalism and how cannibalism in turn drives the evolution of dispersal. Using pair approximations and simulations, we show that cannibalism can easily evolve in spatially structured populations as long as some dispersal exists. Furthermore, for a wide range of intermediate levels of spatial structure, we find the possibility of evolutionary branching leading to polymorphism in cannibalism. We also show that cannibalism itself can have important evolutionary consequences and select for increased dispersal rates, thus helping to determine the spatial structure of populations. The coevolution of cannibalism and dispersal results in the evolution of various alternative life-history strategies with different dispersal and cannibalism regimes. Which strategy evolves depends on the environmental conditions that determine initial cannibalism rates. Our results therefore suggest that differences in spatial structure could explain variation in the propensity for cannibalism and cannibalistic polyphenism. Furthermore, results emphasize that cannibalism can drive the evolution of other life-history traits and determine the spatial structure of natural populations.

  15. Jubilite: A 4-,8-connected Cubic Structural Pattern in Space Group Pm3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo A. Castro

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In the course of investigating structural modifications of the 3-,4-connected net known as the Pt3O4 structure-type (waserite, a novel 4-,8-connected structure-type was discovered. This lattice is generated by replacing the 3-connected trigonal planar vertices of the Pt3O4 structure-type with 4-connected tetrahedral vertices, to achieve a structure which possesses a generic empirical formula of JK6L8. In such a topological modification, the four 3-fold axes of the parent cubic, Pm3n, Pt3O4 structure-type are retained. Thus the 4-connected tetrahedral vertices are oriented so as to preserve cubic symmetry in the resulting Pm3, JK6L8 (jubilite lattice. The unit cell contains a single 8-connected cubecentered vertex, six 4-connected distorted square planar vertices and eight 4-connected distorted tetrahedral vertices. It is a Wellsean structure with a Wells point symbol given by (4166484(42826(43838 and a Schläfli symbol of (53/4, 4.2667. This latter index reveals a decrease in the lattice’s polygonality and concomitant increase in the connectivity through the transformation from waserite to jubilite. The topology of the parent waserite lattice (Pt3O4 corresponds to that of the Catalan structures with the Wells point symbol (843(834, which has the Schläfli symbol (8, 3.4285. Finally, it can be seen that a sequence of structure-types starting with waserite (Pt3O4 and moving to jubilite (JK6L8 and finally to fluorite (CaF2 represents a continuous crystallographic structural transformation in which the symmetry and topology undergo concomitant changes from one structure-type (waserite to the other structure-types. The topology of the fluorite lattice, represented by the Wells point symbol (424(462, and the Schläfli symbol (4, 51/3, indicates a discontinuous topological transformation from the intermediate jubilite lattice; like the discontinuous topological transformation from Pt3O4 to JK6L8; in which the

  16. Structures of the fractional spaces generated by the difference neutron transport operator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen [Department of Elementary Mathematics Education, Fatih University, 34500, Istanbul (Turkey); Department of Mathematics, ITTU, Ashgabat (Turkmenistan); Taskin, Abdulgafur [Department of Mathematics, Fatih University, 34500, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-09-18

    The initial boundary value problem for the neutron transport equation is considered. The first, second and third order of accuracy difference schemes for the approximate solution of this problem are presented. Highly accurate difference schemes for neutron transport equation based on Padé approximation are constructed. In applications, stability estimates for solutions of difference schemes for the approximate solution of the neutron transport equation are obtained.The positivity of the neutron transport operator in Slobodeckij spaces is proved. Numerical techniques are developed and algorithms are tested on an example in MATLAB.

  17. Nonlinear Attitude Control of Planar Structures in Space Using Only Internal Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Mcclamroch, N. Harris

    1993-01-01

    An attitude control strategy for maneuvers of an interconnection of planar bodies in space is developed. It is assumed that there are no exogeneous torques and that torques generated by joint motors are used as means of control so that the total angular momentum of the multibody system is a constant, assumed to be zero. The control strategy utilizes the nonintegrability of the expression for the angular momentum. Large angle maneuvers can be designed to achieve an arbitrary reorientation of the multibody system with respect to an inertial frame. The theoretical background for carrying out the required maneuvers is summarized.

  18. Interactive Spaces: Towards Collaborative Structuring and Ubiquitous Presentation in Domestic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses the use of media and material in private homes based on empirical studies in a project on designing interactive domestic environments. Based on the analyses we propose a Domestic Hypermedia infrastructure (DoHM) combining spatial, context-aware and physical hypermedia to support...... and spaces with the flexibility and dynamics of digital hyperspaces. We propose a variety of new ubiquitous home appliances called MediaWall, MediaTable, MediaTray and MediaPort, which address these issues....

  19. Interactive Spaces: Towards Collaborative structuring and Ubiquitous Presentation in Domestic Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses the use of media and material in private homes based on empirical studies in a project on designing interactive domestic environments. Based on the analyses we propose a Domestic Hypermedia infrastructure (DoHM) combining spatial, context-aware and physical hypermedia to support...... and spaces with the flexibility and dynamics of digital hyperspaces. We propose a variety of new ubiquitous home appliances called MediaWall, MediaTable, MediaTray and MediaPort, which address these issues....

  20. Structural Parameters of Faint Galaxies from Prerefurbishment Hubble Space Telescope Medium Deep Survey Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casertano, S.; Ratnatunga, K. U.; Griffiths, R. E.; Im, M.; Neuschaefer, L. W.; Ostrander, E. J.; Windhorst, R. A.

    1995-11-01

    We present a statistical study of the properties of faint galaxies from a large catalog of about 13,500 objects found in 112 random fields observed with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera before refurbishment. The majority of the objects are faint galaxies with 18 20 mag. Typical half-light radii of faint galaxies are somewhat smaller than spirals. Half-light radius is not correlated with (V - I) color for I ≲ 21 mag; at fainter magnitudes, a weak correlation in the sense of larger galaxies being redder is marginally detected.

  1. Intermediate Filaments as Organizers of Cellular Space: How They Affect Mitochondrial Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Schwarz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments together with actin filaments and microtubules form the cytoskeleton, which is a complex and highly dynamic 3D network. Intermediate filaments are the major mechanical stress protectors but also affect cell growth, differentiation, signal transduction, and migration. Using intermediate filament-mitochondrial crosstalk as a prominent example, this review emphasizes the importance of intermediate filaments as crucial organizers of cytoplasmic space to support these functions. We summarize observations in different mammalian cell types which demonstrate how intermediate filaments influence mitochondrial morphology, subcellular localization, and function through direct and indirect interactions and how perturbations of these interactions may lead to human diseases.

  2. On the use of pairwise balanced designs and closure spaces in the construction of structures of degree at least 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Teirlinck

    1990-05-01

    Full Text Available We prove that a set of v-2 symmetric idempotent latin squares of order v, such that no two of them agree in a off-diagonal position, exists for all odd v>>0. We describe how the techniques used in the proof relate to techniques used in [17] to construct generalised idempotent ternary quasigroups whose conjugate invariant group contains some specific subgroup. We also showhow these techniques fit into the more general context of trying to extend group divisible design methods to combinatorial structures, using closure spaces.

  3. Thermal and Structural Analysis Conducted on Hollow-Core Turbine Blade of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Hot-section components of spacecraft engines are exposed to severe thermal-structural loading conditions, especially during the startup and shutdown portions of the engine cycle. For instance, the thermal transient during startup within the space shuttle main engine (SSME) can lead to a gas temperatures in excess of 3000 C, affecting the operating life of key components, such as the turbine blades. To improve the durability of these components and in particular the turbine blade, single crystal superalloys have been considered. PWA-1480, a nickel-base superalloy, has been used as the turbine blade material for the Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) program for the SSME.

  4. Observability of ionospheric space-time structure with ISR: A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, John; Semeter, Joshua; Zettergren, Matthew; Erickson, Philip J.

    2017-02-01

    The sources of error from electronically steerable array (ESA) incoherent scatter radar (ISR) systems are investigated both theoretically and with use of an open-source ISR simulator, developed by the authors, called Simulator for ISR (SimISR). The main sources of error incorporated in the simulator include statistical uncertainty, which arises due to nature of the measurement mechanism and the inherent space-time ambiguity from the sensor. SimISR can take a field of plasma parameters, parameterized by time and space, and create simulated ISR data at the scattered electric field (i.e., complex receiver voltage) level, subsequently processing these data to show possible reconstructions of the original parameter field. To demonstrate general utility, we show a number of simulation examples, with two cases using data from a self-consistent multifluid transport model. Results highlight the significant influence of the forward model of the ISR process and the resulting statistical uncertainty on plasma parameter measurements and the core experiment design trade-offs that must be made when planning observations. These conclusions further underscore the utility of this class of measurement simulator as a design tool for more optimal experiment design efforts using flexible ESA class ISR systems.

  5. Design and optimization for main support structure of a large-area off-axis three-mirror space camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Gong, Xiaoxue; Ma, Dong-Mei

    2017-02-01

    To ensure excellent dynamic and static performance of large-area, off-axis three-mirror anastigmat (TMA)-space cameras, and to realize a lighter weight for the entire system, a truss support structure design is applied in this study. In contrast to traditional methods, this paper adopts topology optimization based on the solid isotropic materials with penalization method on the truss structure design. Through reasonable object function and constraint choice, optimal topology results that have concerned the effect of gravity in the X, Y, and Z axis are achieved. Subsequently, the initial truss structure is designed based on the results and manufacturing technology. Moreover, to reduce the random vibration response of the secondary mirror and fold mirror without mechanical performance decline of the whole truss, a weighted optimization of truss size is proposed and the final truss structure is achieved. Finite element analysis and experiments have confirmed the reliability of the design and optimization method. The designed truss-structure camera maintains excellent static performance with the relative optical axis angle between the primary mirror and corresponding mirrors (secondary mirror and fold mirror) being less than 5.3 in. Dynamic performances, such as random and sinusoidal vibration responses, also met the requirements that the acceleration RMS value for mount points of the fold mirror should be less than 20 g and the primary frequency reached 97.2 Hz.

  6. Photoelectron diffraction k-space volumes of the c(2x2) Mn/Ni(100) structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, S.; Denlinger, J.; Chen, X. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Traditionally, x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) studies have either been done by scanning the diffraction angle for fixed kinetic energy (ADPD), or scanning the kinetic energy at fixed exit angle (EDPD). Both of these methods collect subsets of the full diffraction pattern, or volume, which is the intensity of photoemission as a function of momentum direction and magnitude. With the high density available at the Spectromicroscopy Facility (BL 7.0) {open_quotes}ultraESCA{close_quotes} station, the authors are able to completely characterize the photoelectron diffraction patterns of surface structures, up to several hundred electron volts kinetic energy. This large diffraction `volume` can then be analyzed in many ways. The k-space volume contains as a subset the energy dependent photoelectron diffraction spectra along all emission angles. It also contains individual, hemispherical, diffraction patterns at specific kinetic energies. Other `cuts` through the data set are also possible, revealing new ways of viewing photoelectron diffraction data, and potentially new information about the surface structure being studied. In this article the authors report a brief summary of a structural study being done on the c(2x2) Mn/Ni(100) surface alloy. This system is interesting for both structural and magnetic reasons. Magnetically, the Mn/Ni(100) surface alloy exhibits parallel coupling of the Mn and Ni moments, which is opposite to the reported coupling for the bulk, disordered, alloy. Structurally, the Mn atoms are believed to lie well above the surface plane.

  7. Evaluation of Advanced Composite Structures Technologies for Application to NASA's Vision for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Ross

    2008-01-01

    An assessment was performed to identify the applicability of composite material technologies to major structural elements of the NASA Constellation program. A qualitative technology assessment methodology was developed to document the relative benefit of 24 structural systems with respect to 33 major structural elements of Ares I, Orion, Ares V, and Altair. Technology maturity assessments and development plans were obtained from more than 30 Boeing subject matter experts for more than 100 technologies. These assessment results and technology plans were combined to generate a four-level hierarchy of recommendations. An overarching strategy is suggested, followed by a Constellation-wide development plan, three integrated technology demonstrations, and three focused projects for a task order follow-on.

  8. Inertia and gravitation the fundamental nature and structure of space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Pfister, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on the phenomena of inertia and gravitation, one objective being to shed some new light on the basic laws of gravitational interaction and the fundamental nature and structures of spacetime. Chapter 1 is devoted to an extensive, partly new analysis of the law of inertia. The underlying mathematical and geometrical structure of Newtonian spacetime is presented from a four-dimensional point of view, and some historical difficulties and controversies - in particular the concepts of free particles and straight lines - are critically analyzed, while connections to projective geometry are also explored. The relativistic extensions of the law of gravitation and its intriguing consequences are studied in Chapter 2. This is achieved, following the works of Weyl, Ehlers, Pirani and Schild, by adopting a point of view of the combined conformal and projective structure of spacetime. Specifically, Mach’s fundamental critique of Newton’s concepts of ‘absolute space’ and ‘absolute time’ was a d...

  9. Design and analysis of aerospace structures at elevated temperatures. [aircraft, missiles, and space platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. I.

    1989-01-01

    An account is given of approaches that have emerged as useful in the incorporation of thermal loading considerations into advanced composite materials-based aerospace structural design practices. Sources of structural heating encompass not only propulsion system heat and aerodynamic surface heating at supersonic speeds, but the growing possibility of intense thermal fluxes from directed-energy weapons. The composite materials in question range from intrinsically nonheat-resistant polymer matrix systems to metal-matrix composites, and increasingly to such ceramic-matrix composites as carbon/carbon, which are explicitly intended for elevated temperature operation.

  10. Thermodynamic and real-space structural evidence of a 2D critical point in phospholipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars K.; Bjørnholm, Thomas; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2007-01-01

    The two-dimensional phase diagram of phospholipid monolayers at air-water interfaces has been constructed from Langmuir compression isotherms. The coexistence region between the solid and fluid phases of the monolayer ends at the critical temperature of the transition. The small-scale lateral...... structure of the monolayers has been imaged by atomic force microscopy in the nm to mu m range at distinct points in the phase diagram. The lateral structure is immobilized by transferring the monolayer from an air-water interface to a solid mica support using Langmuir-Blodgett techniques. A transfer...

  11. Spatial education: improving conservation delivery through space-structured decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Clinton T.; Shaffer, Terry L.; Gannon, Jill J.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive management is a form of structured decision making designed to guide management of natural resource systems when their behaviors are uncertain. Where decision making can be replicated across units of a landscape, learning can be accelerated, and biological processes can be understood in a larger spatial context. Broad-based partnerships among land management agencies, exemplified by Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (conservation partnerships created through the U.S. Department of the Interior), are potentially ideal environments for implementing spatially structured adaptive management programs.

  12. Structural analysis of three extensional detachment faults with data from the 2000 Space-Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    The Space-Shuttle Radar Topography Mission provided geologists with a detailed digital elevation model of most of Earth's land surface. This new database is used here for structural analysis of grooved surfaces interpreted to be the exhumed footwalls of three active or recently active extensional detachment faults. Exhumed fault footwalls, each with an areal extent of one hundred to several hundred square kilometers, make up much of Dayman dome in eastern Papua New Guinea, the western Gurla Mandhata massif in the central Himalaya, and the northern Tokorondo Mountains in central Sulawesi, Indonesia. Footwall curvature in profile varies from planar to slightly convex upward at Gurla Mandhata to strongly convex upward at northwestern Dayman dome. Fault curvature decreases away from the trace of the bounding detachment fault in western Dayman dome and in the Tokorondo massif, suggesting footwall flattening (reduction in curvature) following exhumation. Grooves of highly variable wavelength and amplitude reveal extension direction, although structural processes of groove genesis may be diverse.

  13. Bela Crkva urban morphology analysis with aim of improving urban structure and built space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niković Ana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents an analysis of the emergence and development of the urban structure of Bela Crkva, small town in southern Banat Danube area, and gives its urban morphology analysis, in order to make recommendations for future development and improvement of the quality of the built environment. Urban planning models upon which this settlement was developped and the factors that led to deviations from the initial planning concepts, along with a brief overview of the emergence and development of the planned settlements in present-day Vojvodina are explored and presented. Specific factors that led to the emergence of atypical elements in Bela Crkva urban structure are pointed out, and the relationship between typical and specific is analysed. Particular attention was given to the most important factors that led to deviations from strict geometric form, such as topography, climate, transportation, economy and demographics. Problems plaguing Bela Crkva today - negative demographic balance, the economic crisis and the deterioration of the existing built structure - are identified. The authors conclude that one can not expect further development of the urban structure of this settlement in the horizontal direction, but the transformation within the existing urban matrix, in the field of urban reconstruction. Some recommendations for further planning and development planning policies that are used for logical development and growth of settlements, in particular in order to preserve the identity of the village, are proposed.

  14. Vibroacoustic Response of Pad Structures to Space Shuttle Launch Acoustic Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margasahayam, R. N.; Caimi, Raoul E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a deterministic theory for the random vibration problem for predicting the response of structures in the low-frequency range (0 to 20 hertz) of launch transients. Also presented are some innovative ways to characterize noise and highlights of ongoing test-analysis correlation efforts titled the Verification Test Article (VETA) project.

  15. Structure and dynamics of colloidal hard spheres in real-space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullens, Roel P.A.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis deals with various aspects of the structure and dynamics of colloidal hard spheres. A general introduction on colloids as experimental realization of hard spheres is presented in Chapter 1. The basic principles of confocal microscopy, the main technique used in this thesis, as well as

  16. Amphiphilic polypeptoids connect lipid bilayers to rearrange unilamellar liposomes to closely spaced multilayered structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Vijay; Zhang, Yueheng; Xuan, Sunting; Zhang, Donghui; Omarova, Marzhana

    Hydrophobically modified polypeptoids (HMPs) are amphiphilic pseudo-peptidic macromolecules with hydrophobic groups attached randomly along the polypeptoid backbone. We show that these biocompatible polymers connect across lipid bilayers and thus form layered structures on liposomes. The transition from single bilayer to multiple bilayer structures is characterized by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). We propose a mechanism whereby the HMPs insert their hydrophobic tails into adjacent bilayers and thereby serve as the connective glue between bilayers. At higher HMP concentrations, the liposomes are entirely disrupted into much smaller micelle-like structures through extensive hydrophobe insertion. Interestingly, these small structures can reattach to fresh unilamellar liposomes and self-assemble to form new two-bilayered liposomes reminiscent of two-bilayered organelles such as the nucleus in eukaryotic cells. The observations have significance to designing new nanoscale drug delivery carriers. Replace this text with your abstract body. U.S. Department of Energy under EPSCoR Grant No. DE-SC0012432.

  17. Parabolic section and distance excess of space curves applied to protein structure classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter; Karlsson, Per W.

    2008-01-01

    Proteins are long chain molecules that fold up into beautiful and complicated three-dimensional structures before fulfilling their biological functions in the living organisms. With the aim of providing an efficient tool for describing the proteins' native folds, we present a global geometric...

  18. Development of deployable structures for large space platforms. Volume 2: Design development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1983-01-01

    Design evolution, test article design, test article mass properties, and structural analysis of deployable platform systems are discussed. Orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) hangar development, OTV hangar concept selection, and manned module development are discussed. Deployable platform systems requirements, material data base, technology development needs, concept selection and deployable volume enclosures are also discussed.

  19. Analysis and trade-off studies of large lightweight mirror structures. [large space telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soosaar, K.; Grin, R.; Ayer, F.

    1975-01-01

    A candidate mirror, hexagonally lightweighted, is analyzed under various loadings using as complete a procedure as possible. Successive simplifications are introduced and compared to an original analysis. A model which is a reasonable compromise between accuracy and cost is found and is used for making trade-off studies of the various structural parameters of the lightweighted mirror.

  20. Clonal structure through space and time: High stability in the holothurianStichopus chloronotus(Echinodermata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirog, Agathe; Gélin, Pauline; Bédier, Alexandre; Bianchetti, Grégoire; Georget, Stéphane; Frouin, Patrick; Magalon, Hélène

    2017-09-01

    Sea cucumbers are increasingly exploited for human consumption and for their curative properties, and many wild populations are now depleted or in danger of extinction. While aquaculture is seen as an alternative to fisheries and as a mean to restore wild populations, more knowledge is needed on their reproductive strategies to render this practice efficient, notably for fissiparous holothurians, which are some of the mobile animals able of asexual reproduction by transverse fission. Little information is available on their population genetic diversity and structure. Here, the clonal structure of populations of the fissiparous sea cucumber Stichopus chloronotus has been investigated using nine microsatellite loci and a random sampling, at different spatial (intra-reef and inter-reef) and temporal (inter-season and inter-year) scales. Our findings highlight the importance of asexual reproduction in maintaining these populations, and the prevalence of the "initial seedling recruitment" strategy (ISR), leading to a high stability of clonal composition over seasons and years. It also seemed that clonal propagation was limited to the reef scale (<10 km) while reefs were connected by sexual dispersal. This is the first time that clonal structure in sea cucumbers has been studied at such a fine scale, with a specific sampling strategy. It provides key findings on the genetic diversity and structure of fissiparous sea cucumbers, which will be useful for the management of wild populations and aquaculture.

  1. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL MONITORING OF EXTRAMACULAR CYSTOID SPACES IN A CASE OF X-LINKED RETINOSCHISIS TREATED WITH ACETAZOLAMIDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Frederick T; Fishman, Gerald A

    2016-12-13

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) have been shown to have a beneficial effect on cystoid macular edema in X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) and other inherited retinal conditions. The effect of CAIs outside the macula has been less well studied. Snellen visual acuity, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), kinetic visual field, and dark-adapted single-flash full-field electroretinogram (ERG) testing were all done at baseline and at least one follow-up visit. A 55-year-old male diagnosed with XLRS exhibited extensive macular and extramacular cystoid splitting in the right eye and was treated with oral extended-release acetazolamide 500 mg/day. By 6 months of follow-up on acetazolamide treatment, SD-OCT demonstrated resolution of cystoid spaces both within the macula and out to the midperiphery. Visual acuity improved from 20/70 to 20/30. The full-field ERG was distinctly electronegative at both baseline and at a follow-up visit, with oscillatory potentials becoming more apparent at the follow-up visit. Peripheral visual field boundaries did not change significantly. This report demonstrates structural resolution of cystoid spaces throughout much of the retina in a patient with XLRS, adding to a published case report in which we first noted that extramacular cystoid spaces observed in XLRS may respond to CAI treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study of follow-up functional studies (ERG and perimetry) in a CAI treatment responder with XLRS.

  2. Learning Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Falmagne, Jean-Claude

    2011-01-01

    Learning spaces offer a rigorous mathematical foundation for practical systems of educational technology. Learning spaces generalize partially ordered sets and are special cases of knowledge spaces. The various structures are investigated from the standpoints of combinatorial properties and stochastic processes. Leaning spaces have become the essential structures to be used in assessing students' competence of various topics. A practical example is offered by ALEKS, a Web-based, artificially intelligent assessment and learning system in mathematics and other scholarly fields. At the heart of A

  3. Space, time and aliens: charting the dynamic structure of Galápagos pollination networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traveset, Anna; Chamorro, Susana; Olesen, Jens M; Heleno, Ruben

    2015-06-23

    Oceanic archipelagos are threatened by the introduction of alien species which can severely disrupt the structure, function and stability of native communities. Here we investigated the pollination interactions in the two most disturbed Galápagos Islands, comparing the three main habitats and the two seasons, and assessing the impacts of alien plant invasions on network structure. We found that the pollination network structure was rather consistent between the two islands, but differed across habitats and seasons. Overall, the arid zone had the largest networks and highest species generalization levels whereas either the transition between habitats or the humid habitat showed lower values. Our data suggest that alien plants integrate easily into the communities, but with low impact on overall network structure, except for an increase in network selectiveness. The humid zone showed the highest nestedness and the lowest modularity, which might be explained by the low species diversity and the higher incidence of alien plants in this habitat. Both pollinators and plants were also more generalized in the hot season, when networks showed to be more nested. Alien species (both plants and pollinators) represented a high fraction (∼56 %) of the total number of interactions in the networks. It is thus likely that, in spite of the overall weak effect we found of alien plant invasion on pollination network structure, these introduced species influence the reproductive success of native ones, and by doing so, they affect the functioning of the community. This certainly deserves further investigation. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  4. A simple method for designing structural models with closely spaced modes of vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallauer, W. L., Jr.; Weisshaar, T. A.; Shostak, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    A simple method for designing a mathematical model with closely spaced vibration modes is described. The design process begins with a reference model having specified geometry, continuous inertia and stiffness distributions, and degrees of freedom, all of which remain unchanged. Two natural frequencies of this model are then forced together by means of systematic perturbation of the model's discrete inertia and stiffness parameters. There is only one eigenvalue solution per design cycle, and the gradient vector is calculated directly from the resulting modal quantities. The minimization procedure employed is unconstrained. As applications, a cantilevered plane grid model with five degrees of freedom and a bending-torsion-oscillator with eleven degrees of freedom are treated.

  5. Structuring Visualization Mock-ups at the Graphical Level by Dividing the Display Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillemot, Romain; Boy, Jeremy

    2017-08-29

    Mock-ups are rapid, low fidelity prototypes, that are used in many design-related fields to generate and share ideas. While their creation is supported by many mature methods and tools, surprisingly few are suited for the needs of information visualization. In this article, we introduce a novel approach to creating visualizations mock-ups, based on a dialogue between graphic design and parametric toolkit explorations. Our approach consists in iteratively subdividing the display space, while progressively informing each division with realistic data. We show that a wealth of mock-ups can easily be created using only temporary data attributes, as we wait for more realistic data to become available. We describe the implementation of this approach in a D3-based toolkit, which we use to highlight its generative power, and we discuss the potential for transitioning towards higher fidelity prototypes.

  6. NIAC Phase I Study Final Report on Large Ultra-Lightweight Photonic Muscle Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Joe

    2016-01-01

    The research goal is to develop new tools support NASA's mission of understanding of the Cosmos by developing cost effective solutions that yield a leap in performance and science data. 'Maikalani' in Hawaiian translates to, "knowledge we gain from the cosmos." Missions like Hubble have fundamentally changed humanity's view of the cosmos. Last year's Nobel prize in physics was a result of astronomical discoveries. $9B class JWST size (6.5 meter diameter) space telescopes, when launched are anticipated to rewrite our knowledge of physics. Here we report on a neoteric meta-material telescope mirror technology designed to enable a factor of 100 or more reduction in areal density, a factor of 100 reduction in telescope production and launch costs as well as other advantages; a leap to enable missions to image the cosmos in unprecedented detail, with the associated gain in knowledge. Whether terahertz, visible or X-ray, reflectors used for high quality electromagnetic imaging require shape accuracy (surface figure) to far better than 1 wavelength (lambda) of the incident photons, more typically lambda/10 or better. Imaging visible light therefore requires mirror surfaces that approximate a desired curve (e.g. a sphere or paraboloid) with smooth shape deviation of th less than approximately 1/1000 the diameter of a human hair. This requires either thick high modulus material like glass or metal, or actuators to control mirror shape. During Phase I our team studied a novel solution to this systems level design mass/shape tradespace requirement both to advance the innovative space technology concept and also to help NASA and other agencies meet current operational and future mission requirements. Extreme and revolutionary NASA imaging missions such as Terrestrial Planet Imager (TPI) require lightweight mirrors with minimum diameters of 20 to 40 meters. For reference, NASA's great achievement; the Hubble space telescope, is only 2.4 meters in diameter. What is required is a

  7. Nearest neighbor search in general metric spaces using a tree data structure with a simple heuristic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huafeng; Agrafiotis, Dimitris K

    2003-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for nearest neighbor search in general metric spaces. The algorithm organizes the database into recursively partitioned Voronoi regions and represents these partitions in a tree. The separations between the Voronoi regions as well as the radius of each region are used with triangular inequality to derive the minimum possible distance between any point in a region and the query and to discard the region from further search if a smaller distance has already been found. The algorithm also orders the search sequence of the tree branches using the estimate of the minimum possible distance. This simple heuristic proves to considerably enhance the pruning of the search tree. The efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated on several artificial data sets and real problems in computational chemistry.

  8. Linking Environmental Régimes, Space and Time: Interpretations of Structural and Functional Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, J.; Ibrahim, T. G.; Lexartza-Artza, I.; Turnbull, L.

    2008-12-01

    Traditional approaches to environmental systems have been heavily constrained by separate disciplinary frameworks within ecology, hydrology and geomorphology. Within these disciplines, there has been a significant amount of attention recently to different ideas of connectivity. These differences have reflected different concepts of structural and functional connectivity, and problems of interpretation have been further exacerbated by a lack of attention to systems connectivity. For example, structural connectivity has tended to focus on static representations of the state of the environment and thereby fail to capture the dynamic behaviour of the system. Approaches to functional connectivity have usually failed to appreciate that this connectivity is process-specific and it is thus difficult to generalize from one disciplinary area to another, and indeed in some cases even within the same disciplinary framework (e.g. dissolved pollutants or eroded soil moving in different ways from the water body). A lack of consideration of connectivity between systems can cause serious misinterpretations of system function due to the importance of what essentially become ill- posed boundary conditions. We argue that a more holistic and transdisciplinary approach to connectivity, based on the integration of a range of structural, functional and systems approaches is fundamental for improved understanding of environmental systems across a wide range of scales. We will illustrate the potential of this holistic approach with reference to a wide range of examples relating to our ongoing work. These examples will include groundwater-stream interactions, slope-channel interactions and land degradation. In all of these settings, there are important interactions in the longitudinal, lateral and vertical dimensions. For the former, the capacity of the hyporheic zone to control the fate of contaminants of stream and groundwater origin in contact with riverbed sediments is critical. Key

  9. Form and function in gene regulatory networks: the structure of network motifs determines fundamental properties of their dynamical state space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, S E; Fink, T M A

    2016-07-01

    Network motifs have been studied extensively over the past decade, and certain motifs, such as the feed-forward loop, play an important role in regulatory networks. Recent studies have used Boolean network motifs to explore the link between form and function in gene regulatory networks and have found that the structure of a motif does not strongly determine its function, if this is defined in terms of the gene expression patterns the motif can produce. Here, we offer a different, higher-level definition of the 'function' of a motif, in terms of two fundamental properties of its dynamical state space as a Boolean network. One is the basin entropy, which is a complexity measure of the dynamics of Boolean networks. The other is the diversity of cyclic attractor lengths that a given motif can produce. Using these two measures, we examine all 104 topologically distinct three-node motifs and show that the structural properties of a motif, such as the presence of feedback loops and feed-forward loops, predict fundamental characteristics of its dynamical state space, which in turn determine aspects of its functional versatility. We also show that these higher-level properties have a direct bearing on real regulatory networks, as both basin entropy and cycle length diversity show a close correspondence with the prevalence, in neural and genetic regulatory networks, of the 13 connected motifs without self-interactions that have been studied extensively in the literature. © 2016 The Authors.

  10. Fitting state-space integral projection models to size-structured time series data to estimate unknown parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J Wilson; Nickols, Kerry J; Malone, Daniel; Carr, Mark H; Starr, Richard M; Cordoleani, Flora; Baskett, Marissa L; Hastings, Alan; Botsford, Louis W

    2016-12-01

    Integral projection models (IPMs) have a number of advantages over matrix-model approaches for analyzing size-structured population dynamics, because the latter require parameter estimates for each age or stage transition. However, IPMs still require appropriate data. Typically they are parameterized using individual-scale relationships between body size and demographic rates, but these are not always available. We present an alternative approach for estimating demographic parameters from time series of size-structured survey data using a Bayesian state-space IPM (SSIPM). By fitting an IPM in a state-space framework, we estimate unknown parameters and explicitly account for process and measurement error in a dataset to estimate the underlying process model dynamics. We tested our method by fitting SSIPMs to simulated data; the model fit the simulated size distributions well and estimated unknown demographic parameters accurately. We then illustrated our method using nine years of annual surveys of the density and size distribution of two fish species (blue rockfish, Sebastes mystinus, and gopher rockfish, S. carnatus) at seven kelp forest sites in California. The SSIPM produced reasonable fits to the data, and estimated fishing rates for both species that were higher than our Bayesian prior estimates based on coast-wide stock assessment estimates of harvest. That improvement reinforces the value of being able to estimate demographic parameters from local-scale monitoring data. We highlight a number of key decision points in SSIPM development (e.g., open vs. closed demography, number of particles in the state-space filter) so that users can apply the method to their own datasets. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  11. Space structure vibration modes: How many exist? Which ones are important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, P. C.

    1984-01-01

    This report attempts to shed some light on the two issues raised in the title, namely, how many vibration modes does a real structure have, and which of these modes are important? The surprise-free answers to these two questions are, respectively, an infinite number and the first several modes. The author argues that the absurd subspace (all but the first billion modes) is not a strength of continuum modeling, but, in fact, a weakness. Partial differential equations are not real structures, only mathematical models. This note also explains (1) that the PDE model and the finite element model are, in fact, the same model, the latter being a numerical method for dealing with the former, (2) that modes may be selected on dynamical grounds other than frequency alone, and (3) that long slender rods are useful as primitive cases but dangerous to extrapolate from.

  12. Prediction of Optimal Design and Deflection of Space Structures Using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Kamyab Moghadas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the present work is to determine the optimal design and maximum deflection of double layer grids spending low computational cost using neural networks. The design variables of the optimization problem are cross-sectional area of the elements as well as the length of the span and height of the structures. In this paper, a number of double layer grids with various random values of length and height are selected and optimized by simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation algorithm. Then, radial basis function (RBF and generalized regression (GR neural networks are trained to predict the optimal design and maximum deflection of the structures. The numerical results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed methodology.

  13. Space-Time Fluid-Structure Interaction Computation of Flapping-Wing Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    can add heave, sway , surge , roll, pitch, and yaw, and in- vestigate their effect on the forces generated by the MAV, assuming that the MAV somehow...dt2 + η dy dt − f s ) −∇ · σs = 0, (2.3) where ρs, y, η, f s and σs are the material density, structural displacement, damping coefficient, external

  14. 3D printing the pterygopalatine fossa: a negative space model of a complex structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Ross; Parihar, Shivani; Skarparis, Yiannis; Varsou, Ourania; Cezayirli, Enis

    2017-08-30

    The pterygopalatine fossa is one of the most complex anatomical regions to understand. It is poorly visualized in cadaveric dissection and most textbooks rely on schematic depictions. We describe our approach to creating a low-cost, 3D model of the pterygopalatine fossa, including its associated canals and foramina, using an affordable "desktop" 3D printer. We used open source software to create a volume render of the pterygopalatine fossa from axial slices of a head computerised tomography scan. These data were then exported to a 3D printer to produce an anatomically accurate model. The resulting 'negative space' model of the pterygopalatine fossa provides a useful and innovative aid for understanding the complex anatomical relationships of the pterygopalatine fossa. This model was designed primarily for medical students; however, it will also be of interest to postgraduates in ENT, ophthalmology, neurosurgery, and radiology. The technical process described may be replicated by other departments wishing to develop their own anatomical models whilst incurring minimal costs.

  15. Controlled supramolecular structure of guanosine monophosphate in the interlayer space of layered double hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyeong-Hyeon Gwak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Guanosine monophosphates (GMPs were intercalated into the interlayer space of layered double hydroxides (LDHs and the molecular arrangement of GMP was controlled in LDHs. The intercalation conditions such as GMP/LDH molar ratio and reaction temperature were systematically adjusted. When the GMP/LDH molar ratio was 1:2, which corresponds to the charge balance between positive LDH sheets and GMP anions, GMP molecules were well-intercalated to LDH. At high temperature (100 and 80 °C, a single GMP molecule existed separately in the LDH interlayer. On the other hand, at lower temperature (20, 40 and 60 °C, GMPs tended to form ribbon-type supramolecular assemblies. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the ribbon-type GMP assembly had an intermolecular interaction energy of ≈101 kJ/mol, which corresponds to a double hydrogen bond between guanosine molecules. Once stabilized, the interlayer GMP orientations, single molecular and ribbon phase, were successfully converted to the other phase by adjusting the external environment by stoichiometry or temperature control.

  16. ON THE SAMPLING OF SERIAL SECTIONING TECHNIQUE FOR THREE DIMENSIONAL SPACE-FILLING GRAIN STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoquan Liu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Serial sectioning technique provides plenty of quantitative geometric information of the microstructure analyzed, including those unavailable from stereology with one- and two-dimensional probes. This may be why it used to be and is being continuously served as one of the most common and invaluable methods to study the size and the size distribution, the topology and the distribution of topology parameters, and even the shape of three-dimensional space filling grains or cells. On the other hand, requiring tedious lab work, the method is also very time and energy consuming, most often only less than one hundred grains per sample were sampled and measured in almost all reported practice. Thus, a question is often asked: for typical microstructures in engineering materials, are so many grains or cells sampled adequate to obtain reliable results from this technique? To answer this question, experimental data of 1292 contiguous austenite grains in a low-carbon steel specimen obtained from the serial sectioning analysis are presented in this paper, which demonstrates the effect of sampling on the measurement of various parameters of grain size distribution and of the grain topology distribution. The result provides one of rules of thumb for grain stereology of similar microstructures.

  17. Cost comparisons for the use of nonterrestrial materials in space manufacturing of large structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, E. H.; Risley, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study sponsored by NASA to evaluate the relative merits of constructing solar power satellites (SPS) using resources obtained from the earth and from the moon. Three representative lunar resources utilization (LRU) concepts are developed and compared with a previously defined earth baseline concept. Economic assessment of the alternatives includes cost determination, economic threshold sensitivity to manufacturing cost variations, cost uncertainties, program funding schedule, and present value of costs. Results indicate that LRU for space construction is competitive with the earth baseline approach for a program requiring 100,000 metric tons per year of completed satellites. LRU can reduce earth-launched cargo requirements to less than 10% of that needed to build satellites exclusively from earth materials. LRU is potentially more cost-effective than earth-derived material utilization, due to significant reductions in both transportation and manufacturing costs. Because of uncertainties, cost-effectiveness cannot be ascertained with great confidence. The probability of LRU attaining a lower total program cost within the 30-year program appears to range from 57 to 93%.

  18. Travelling Wave Concepts for the Modeling and Control of Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-31

    Waiting hehaviour, solmale o 6*/ &w is 10~ha valaeofAm w2, vuy aeertdoeweal "adeus bemendh b me iM eAnnalule. melee 1kM thine isla amin veim..., abd dafte...84-1039-CP, Proceedings, AIAA Dynamics Specialists Con- Disordered Multi-Span Beams: Theory and Experiment’, Pro. ference, Palm Springs, CA, May 1984...Response of Flexible Structures’, AIAA 84-1044- CP, Proceedings, AIAA Dynamics Specialists Conference, Palm Springs, CA, May 1984 14 N. S. Khot, F, E

  19. Reference Controls Methodologies for Large Structural Models at Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Corey; LaPha, Steven

    2013-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the methodology behind Model Class Definition--the use of separate model assemblies of the same product, at different fidelities, driven by the same skeleton files. These fidelities can be used to convey only the detail that the end user needs, by allowing the end user to pick and choose between model classes for assembly creation. The usefulness of MPA for the Windchill Release Process will be demonstrated, along with its usefulness in minimizing CPU resources during design. The presentation will include an overview the ML product, how to structure complex products in a flexible modular architecture, and how to maximize system resources.

  20. ASTRO-ENTOMOLOGY? ANT-LIKE SPACE STRUCTURE PREVIEWS DEATH OF OUR SUN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    From ground-based telescopes, the so-called 'ant nebula' (Menzel 3, or Mz 3) resembles the head and thorax of a garden-variety ant. This dramatic NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, showing 10 times more detail, reveals the 'ant's' body as a pair of fiery lobes protruding from a dying, Sun-like star. The Hubble images directly challenge old ideas about the last stages in the lives of stars. By observing Sun-like stars as they approach their deaths, the Hubble Heritage image of Mz 3 -- along with pictures of other planetary nebulae -- shows that our Sun's fate probably will be more interesting, complex, and striking than astronomers imagined just a few years ago. Though approaching the violence of an explosion, the ejection of gas from the dying star at the center of Mz 3 has intriguing symmetrical patterns unlike the chaotic patterns expected from an ordinary explosion. Scientists using Hubble would like to understand how a spherical star can produce such prominent, non-spherical symmetries in the gas that it ejects. One possibility is that the central star of Mz 3 has a closely orbiting companion that exerts strong gravitational tidal forces, which shape the outflowing gas. For this to work, the orbiting companion star would have to be close to the dying star, about the distance of the Earth from the Sun. At that distance the orbiting companion star wouldn't be far outside the hugely bloated hulk of the dying star. It's even possible that the dying star has consumed its companion, which now orbits inside of it, much like the duck in the wolf's belly in the story 'Peter and the Wolf.' (See http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/qt/ssudec.mov for an animation that shows how this might work.) A second possibility is that, as the dying star spins, its strong magnetic fields are wound up into complex shapes like spaghetti in an eggbeater. Charged winds moving at speeds up to 1000 kilometers per second from the star, much like those in our sun's solar wind but millions of

  1. Adaptive reconstruction of radar reflectivity maps based on their space-time structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shinju; Berenguer, Marc

    2013-04-01

    The production of Radar Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) requires processing the observations to ensure their quality and its conversion into the variable of interest (i.e. precipitation rates). This processing is done through a chain of algorithms applied to mitigate the sources of uncertainty affecting radar observations. Some algorithms involve the reconstruction of the meteorological signal in areas where the signal is lost or strongly contaminated, for instance in areas affected by ground, sea clutter, total beam blockage or severe path attenuation by heavy rain. For post-processing of radar uncorrected moment data, the reconstruction has been done with spatial interpolation after the identification of clutter based on the analysis of statistical properties of radar measurements. The aim of this work has been to develop an improved reconstruction method that adapts to the different rainfall situations by using the information of the time and space variability of the rainfall field. The n-dimensional semi-variogram is formulated to reconstruct the radar fields in a n-Dimensional Ordinary Kriging framework: i.e., (i) the horizontal plane, (ii) the closest non-contaminated PPI, and (iii) the closest radar volume scan in time. The last one takes into account the effect of the motion that is very similar to the extrapolation of reflectivity observations to the future in many nowcasting algorithms. Each formulation of the reconstruction methods and their combinations have been studied. The radar fields have been reconstructed over the areas labeled as clutter (with a fuzzy logic algorithm) under different rainfall situations, including scattered convection, organized convection, and widespread precipitation. Also, the comparison between the reconstructed radar rainfall accumulations and collocated raingauge observations have been used for the evaluation.

  2. A review of advanced metallic and ceramic materials suitable for high temperature use in space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashford, David

    Spacecraft, satellites and launch vehicles require efficient, lightweight structural materials. At present, the structural requirements can be largely met by aluminium alloys and polymeric matrix composites based on carbon fibres. However, increasingly there will be a need to specify materials capable of sustaining operational use at temperatures in excess of 250°C and towards 2000°C. Ambitious spaceplane projects such as Hermes, HOTOL, Sanger, HOPE and NASP have highlighted this need. Within the operational temperature band 250°C to 2000°C various metallic and ceramic materials are appropriate for consideration, either in alloy or composite form. This review paper identifies the status of technology on the following: i) Aluminium and titanium alloys and their composites. ii) Superalloys and their composites. iii) Carbon, glass-ceramic and ceramic matrix composites. The development of more weight efficient and thermally stable metallic and ceramic materials has centred on a number of key areas (1). For metallics, improved alloy composition and grain refinement from Rapidly Solidified Powders have given improvements in strength retention at high temperatures (a). The introduction of reinforcements, either particulate, whisker or continuous fibre, have improved the basic alloys by reducing density, increasing stiffness and strength and extending thermal capabilities. Monolithic ceramics possess thermal stability but are inherently brittle and crack sensitive. The addition of ceramic fibres and whiskers has the effect of modifying fracture characteristics by introducing "pseudo-ductility" to raise apparent toughness. In the foreseeable future the emerging high temperature materials will find uses in: Spaceplane substructures and control surfaces; Thermal protection systems and insulation; Propulsion plants and thruster units; Air breathing engines.

  3. Extraction of Structural System Matrices from AN Identified State-Space System Using the Combined Measurements of Dva

    Science.gov (United States)

    KO, W. J.; HUNG, C. F.

    2002-01-01

    A time domain method for the extraction of the structural system matrices (mass, damping and stiffness matrices) from an identified state-space system is proposed in this paper using the combined measurements of displacement, velocity and acceleration (DVA) together with the input excitations. The method is based on the invariance of continuous-time Markov parameters. An explicit expression of the relationship between the continuous-time Markov parameters, the structural system matrices, and the influence matrices for output DVA as well as the input force has been derived. The determination of structural system matrices is also valid when only the displacement, velocity or acceleration responses are measured. In this paper, the equivalent state system matrices are obtained by an algorithm, which combines the eigensystem realization algorithm (ERA) and the autoregressive with exogeneous (ARX) model. The ARX model provides the necessary discrete-time Markov parameters from the measured input and output data, and then the equivalent state system matrices are identified from discrete-time Markov parameters by using the ERA. A lumped mass model with three degrees of freedom is employed to illustrate the accuracy and feasibility of the presented method.

  4. Real-space and plane-wave hybrid method for electronic structure calculations for two-dimensional materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, V. Nam; Le, H. Anh; Vu, V. Thieu

    2017-04-01

    We propose a computational approach to combining the plane-wave method and the real-space treatment to describe the periodic variation in the material plane and the decay of wave functions from the material surfaces. The proposed approach is natural for two-dimensional material systems and thus may circumvent some intrinsic limitations involving the artificial replication of material layers in traditional supercell methods. In particular, we show that the proposed method is easy to implement and, especially, computationally effective since low-cost computational algorithms, such as iterative and recursive techniques, can be used to treat matrices with block tridiagonal structure. Using this approach we show first-principles features that supplement the current knowledge of some fundamental issues in bilayer graphene systems, including the coupling between the two graphene layers, the preservation of the σ band of monolayer graphene in the electronic structure of the bilayer system, and the differences in low-energy band structure between the AA- and AB-stacked configurations.

  5. From households to urban structures: space representations as engine of dynamics in multi-agent simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Bonnefoy

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available L'idée principale de ce texte est de simuler la construction d'une ségrégation urbaine via des représentations spatiales. Pour faire aboutir ce projet, le modèle doit être très simple parce que nous souhaitons plus simuler et comprendre les processus de production d'espace, leurs temporalités et leur influence dynamique sur l'apprentissage de l’espace par les individus, que reproduire une situation réelle. En outre, ce travail est inclus dans une recherche de l'UMR 6012, qui pratique une analyse spatiale centrée sur l’analyse des processus dans un contexte de faible quantification. Aussi, nous employons un système multi-agents pour mettre en oeuvre une hiérarchie enchevêtrée propre aux processus complexes caractéristiques des sciences sociales : une structure spatiale au niveau macro émergeant de règles simples établies au niveau micro et une rétro-action du niveau macro agissant à son tour sur le niveau micro. Le modèle est construit comme suit : des agents ménages parcourent l'univers multi-agents pour trouver le meilleur domicile selon des contraintes comme leurs revenus ou le prestige des lieux. Ils apprennent cet espace par la pratique et, consécutivement, construisent des représentations spatiales individuelles variées qui vont participer à la construction de représentations collectives de l'espace. Ces deux types de représentations contribueront à aider les agents ménages à trouver le meilleur choix résidentiel. Puis, ces choix modifieront les caractéristiques des espaces et les nouvelles structures spatiales contraindront les agents ménages dans leurs pratiques de cet espace, leurs représentations individuelles et leurs choix. Ces rétro-actions basées sur des représentations spatiales contribuent en grande partie à la construction d’une ségrégation urbaine.

  6. Analysis of the intellectual structure of human space exploration research using a bibliometric approach: Focus on human related factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tai Sik; Lee, Yoon-Sun; Lee, Jaeho; Chang, Byung Chul

    2018-02-01

    Human space exploration (HSE) is an interdisciplinary field composed of a range of subjects that have developed dramatically over the last few decades. This paper investigates the intellectual structure of HSE research with a focus on human related factors. A bibliometric approach with quantitative analytical techniques is applied to study the development and growth of the research. This study retrieves 1921 papers on HSE related to human factors from the year 1990 to the year 2016 from Web of Science and constructs a critical citation network composed of 336 papers. Edge-betweenness-based clustering is used to classify the citation network into twelve distinct research clusters based on four research themes: "biological risks from space radiation," "health and performance during long-duration spaceflight," "program and in-situ resources for HSE missions," and "habitat and life support systems in the space environment." These research themes are also similar to the classification results of a co-occurrence analysis on keywords for a total of 1921 papers. Papers with high centrality scores are identified as important papers in terms of knowledge flow. Moreover, the intermediary role of papers in exchanging knowledge between HSE sub-areas is identified using brokerage analysis. The key-route main path highlights the theoretical development trajectories. Due to the recent dramatic increase in investment by international governments and the private sector, the theoretical development trajectories of key research themes have been expanding from furthering scientific and technical knowledge to include various social and economic issues, thus encouraging massive public participation. This study contributes to an understanding of research trends and popular issues in the field of HSE by introducing a powerful way of determining major research themes and development trajectories. This study will help researchers seek the underlying knowledge diffusion flow from multifaceted

  7. The dynamics and control of large flexible space structures, part 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainum, P. M.; Reddy, A. S. S. R.; Krishna, R.; Diarra, C. M.; Ananthakrishnan, S.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary Eulerian formulation of the in-plane dynamics of the proposed spacecraft control laboratory experiment configuration is undertaken when the mast is treated as a cantilever type beam and the reflector as a lumped mass at the end of the beam. Frequency and mode shapes are obtained for the open loop model of the beam system and the stability of closed loop control systems is analyzed by both frequency and time domain techniques. Environmental disturbances due to solar radiation pressure are incorporated into models of controlled large flexible orbiting platforms. Thermally induced deformations of simple beam and platform type structures are modelled and expressions developed for the disturbance torques resulting from the interaction of solar radiation pressure. Noise effects in the deterministic model of the hoop/column antenna system are found to cause a degradation in system performance. Appropriate changes in the ratio of plant noise to the measurement noise and/or changes in the control weighting matrix elements can improve transient and steady state performance.

  8. Photonic Integrated Circuit (PIC) Device Structures: Background, Fabrication Ecosystem, Relevance to Space Systems Applications, and Discussion of Related Radiation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Electronic integrated circuits are considered one of the most significant technological advances of the 20th century, with demonstrated impact in their ability to incorporate successively higher numbers transistors and construct electronic devices onto a single CMOS chip. Photonic integrated circuits (PICs) exist as the optical analog to integrated circuits; however, in place of transistors, PICs consist of numerous scaled optical components, including such "building-block" structures as waveguides, MMIs, lasers, and optical ring resonators. The ability to construct electronic and photonic components on a single microsystems platform offers transformative potential for the development of technologies in fields including communications, biomedical device development, autonomous navigation, and chemical and atmospheric sensing. Developing on-chip systems that provide new avenues for integration and replacement of bulk optical and electro-optic components also reduces size, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C) limitations, which are important in the selection of instrumentation for specific flight projects. The number of applications currently emerging for complex photonics systems-particularly in data communications-warrants additional investigations when considering reliability for space systems development. This Body of Knowledge document seeks to provide an overview of existing integrated photonics architectures; the current state of design, development, and fabrication ecosystems in the United States and Europe; and potential space applications, with emphasis given to associated radiation effects and reliability.

  9. Pillared Structure Design of MXene with Ultralarge Interlayer Spacing for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jianmin; Zhang, Wenkui; Yuan, Huadong; Jin, Chengbin; Zhang, Liyuan; Huang, Hui; Liang, Chu; Xia, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Gan, Yongping; Tao, Xinyong

    2017-03-28

    Two-dimensional transition-metal carbide materials (termed MXene) have attracted huge attention in the field of electrochemical energy storage due to their excellent electrical conductivity, high volumetric capacity, etc. Herein, with inspiration from the interesting structure of pillared interlayered clays, we attempt to fabricate pillared Ti3C2 MXene (CTAB-Sn(IV)@Ti3C2) via a facile liquid-phase cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) prepillaring and Sn(4+) pillaring method. The interlayer spacing of Ti3C2 MXene can be controlled according to the size of the intercalated prepillaring agent (cationic surfactant) and can reach 2.708 nm with 177% increase compared with the original spacing of 0.977 nm, which is currently the maximum value according to our knowledge. Because of the pillar effect, the assembled LIC exhibits a superior energy density of 239.50 Wh kg(-1) based on the weight of CTAB-Sn(IV)@Ti3C2 even under higher power density of 10.8 kW kg(-1). When CTAB-Sn(IV)@Ti3C2 anode couples with commercial AC cathode, LIC reveals higher energy density and power density compared with conventional MXene materials.

  10. The numerical field calculation in structures with the space-uniform quadruple focusing by the method of auxiliary charges

    CERN Document Server

    Tishkin, S S

    2001-01-01

    In the paper the procedure of solving integral equations with the use of auxiliary charges is used. The electrostatic field potential is presented in the form of superposition of the fields of point sources located out of the investigated region at some distance from it. The values of N charges are determined from the boundary conditions at N points of the boundary. The definition of the point sources is equivalent to using some function of the charge density at the boundary of the region.This approach was used for the calculation of structures with the space-uniform quadruple focusing with sinusoidal and trapezoidal modulation, and also a section of the transverse matching of the 'funnel'.

  11. The effect of temperature on generic stable periodic structures in the parameter space of dissipative relativistic standard map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Ana C. C.; Albuquerque, Holokx A.; Manchein, Cesar

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we have characterized changes in the dynamics of a two-dimensional relativistic standard map in the presence of dissipation and specially when it is submitted to thermal effects modeled by a Gaussian noise reservoir. By the addition of thermal noise in the dissipative relativistic standard map (DRSM) it is possible to suppress typical stable periodic structures (SPSs) embedded in the chaotic domains of parameter space for large enough temperature strengths. Smaller SPSs are first affected by thermal effects, starting from their borders, as a function of temperature. To estimate the necessary temperature strength capable to destroy those SPSs we use the largest Lyapunov exponent to obtain the critical temperature (TC) diagrams. For critical temperatures the chaotic behavior takes place with the suppression of periodic motion, although the temperature strengths considered in this work are not so large to convert the deterministic features of the underlying system into a stochastic ones.

  12. Confined Solid Electrolyte Interphase Growth Space with Solid Polymer Electrolyte in Hollow Structured Silicon Anode for Li-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tianyi; Yu, Xiangnan; Cheng, Xiaolu; Li, Huiyu; Zhu, Wentao; Qiu, Xinping

    2017-04-19

    Silicon anodes for lithium-ion batteries are of much interest owing to their extremely high specific capacity but still face some challenges, especially the tremendous volume change which occurs in cycling and further leads to the disintegration of electrode structure and excessive growth of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI). Here, we designed a novel approach to confine the inward growth of SEI by filling solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) into pores of hollow silicon spheres. The as-prepared composite delivers a high specific capacity of more than 2100 mAh g -1 and a long-term cycle stability with a reversible capacity of 1350 mAh g -1 over 500 cycles. The growing behavior of SEI was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, and the results revealed that SPE occupies the major space of SEI growth and thus confines its excessive growth, which significantly improves cycle performance and Coulombic efficiency of cells embracing hollow silicon spheres.

  13. Assessment of current state of the art in modeling techniques and analysis methods for large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Advances in continuum modeling, progress in reduction methods, and analysis and modeling needs for large space structures are covered with specific attention given to repetitive lattice trusses. As far as continuum modeling is concerned, an effective and verified analysis capability exists for linear thermoelastic stress, birfurcation buckling, and free vibration problems of repetitive lattices. However, application of continuum modeling to nonlinear analysis needs more development. Reduction methods are very effective for bifurcation buckling and static (steady-state) nonlinear analysis. However, more work is needed to realize their full potential for nonlinear dynamic and time-dependent problems. As far as analysis and modeling needs are concerned, three areas are identified: loads determination, modeling and nonclassical behavior characteristics, and computational algorithms. The impact of new advances in computer hardware, software, integrated analysis, CAD/CAM stems, and materials technology is also discussed.

  14. A general model for detecting genetic determinants underlying longitudinal traits with unequally spaced measurements and nonstationary covariance structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wei; Garvan, Cynthia W; Zhao, Wei; Behnke, Marylou; Eyler, Fonda Davis; Wu, Rongling

    2005-07-01

    A mixture model for determining quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting growth trajectories has been proposed in the literature. In this article, we extend this model to a more general situation in which longitudinal traits for each subject are measured at unequally spaced time intervals, different subjects have different measurement patterns, and the residual correlation within subjects is nonstationary. We derive an EM-simplex hybrid algorithm to estimate the allele frequencies, Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium, and linkage disequilibrium between QTL in the original population and parameters contained in the growth equation and in the covariance structure. A worked example of head circumference growth in 145 children is used to validate our extended model. A simulation study is performed to examine the statistical properties of the parameter estimation obtained from this example. Finally, we discuss the implications and extensions of our model for detecting QTL that affect growth trajectories.

  15. Foraging in space and time structure an African small mammal community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Baker, Mohammad A; Brown, Joel S

    2014-06-01

    We used live-trapping and foraging to test for the effect of habitat selection and diet on structuring a community of six small mammals and one bird within the Soutpansberg, South Africa. We established grids that straddled adjacent habitats: woodland, rocky hillside, and grassland. Trapping and foraging were used to estimate abundance, habitat use, and species-specific foraging costs. The species with the highest abundance and foraging activity in a habitat, activity time, or food was considered the most efficient and presumed to have a competitive advantage. All species exhibited distinct patterns of spatial and temporal habitat preference which provided the main mechanism of coexistence, followed by diet selection. The study species were organized into three assemblages (α diversity): grassland, Rhabdomys pumilio, Dendromus melanotis, and Mus minutoides.; woodland, Aethomys ineptus and Micaelamys namaquensis; and rock-dwelling, M. namaquensis and Elephantulus myurus. Francolinus natalensis foraged in open rocky areas and under wooded islands within the grassland. Species organization across the habitats suggested that feeding opportunities are available within all habitats; however, distinct habitat preferences resulted from differing foraging aptitudes and efficiencies of the competing species. At Lajuma, species distribution and coexistence are promoted through distinct habitat preferences that were shaped by competition and species-specific foraging costs. The combination of trapping and foraging provided a mechanistic approach that integrates behavior into community ecology by 'asking' the animal to reveal its perspective of the environment. Using spatial and temporal foraging decisions-as behavioral indicators-enables us to guide our understanding for across-taxa species coexistence.

  16. Influence of jet thrust on penetrator penetration when studying the structure of space object blanket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Fedorova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the calculation-and-theory-based research results to examine the possibility for using the jet thrust impulse to increase a penetration depth of high-velocity penetrator modules. Such devices can be used for studies of Earth surface layer composition, and in the nearest future for other Solar system bodies too. Research equipment (sensors and different instruments is housed inside a metal body of the penetrator with a sharpened nose that decreases drag force in soil. It was assumed, that this penetrator is additionally equipped with the pulse jet engine, which is fired at a certain stage of penetrator motion into target.The penetrator is considered as a rigid body of variable mass, which is subjected to drag force and reactive force applied at the moment the engine fires. A drag force was represented with a binomial empirical law, and penetrator nose part was considered to be conical. The jet thrust force was supposed to be constant during its application time. It was in accordance with assumption that mass flow and flow rate of solid propellant combustion products were constant. The amount of propellant in the penetrator was characterized by Tsiolkovsky number Z, which specifies the ratio between the fuel mass and the penetrator structure mass with no fuel.The system of equations to describe the penetrator dynamics was given in dimensionless form using the values aligned with penetration of an equivalent inert penetrator as the time and penetration depth scales. Penetration dynamics of penetrator represented in this form allowed to eliminate the influence of penetrator initial mass and its cross-section diameter on the solution results. The lack of such dependency is convenient for comparing the calculation results since they hold for penetrators of various initial masses and cross-sections.To calculate the penetration a lunar regolith was taken as a soil material. Calculations were carried out for initial velocities of

  17. Ducks in space: from nonlinear absolute instability to noise-sustained structures in a pattern-forming system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitabile, D.; Desroches, M.; Knobloch, E.; Krupa, M.

    2017-11-01

    A subcritical pattern-forming system with nonlinear advection in a bounded domain is recast as a slow-fast system in space and studied using a combination of geometric singular perturbation theory and numerical continuation. Two types of solutions describing the possible location of stationary fronts are identified, whose origin is traced to the onset of convective and absolute instability when the system is unbounded. The former are present only for non-zero upstream boundary conditions and provide a quantitative understanding of noise-sustained structures in systems of this type. The latter correspond to the onset of a global mode and are present even with zero upstream boundary conditions. The role of canard trajectories in the nonlinear transition between these states is clarified and the stability properties of the resulting spatial structures are determined. Front location in the convective regime is highly sensitive to the upstream boundary condition, and its dependence on this boundary condition is studied using a combination of numerical continuation and Monte Carlo simulations of the partial differential equation. Statistical properties of the system subjected to random or stochastic boundary conditions at the inlet are interpreted using the deterministic slow-fast spatial dynamical system.

  18. K-OPLS package: kernel-based orthogonal projections to latent structures for prediction and interpretation in feature space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylesjö, Max; Rantalainen, Mattias; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Holmes, Elaine; Trygg, Johan

    2008-02-19

    Kernel-based classification and regression methods have been successfully applied to modelling a wide variety of biological data. The Kernel-based Orthogonal Projections to Latent Structures (K-OPLS) method offers unique properties facilitating separate modelling of predictive variation and structured noise in the feature space. While providing prediction results similar to other kernel-based methods, K-OPLS features enhanced interpretational capabilities; allowing detection of unanticipated systematic variation in the data such as instrumental drift, batch variability or unexpected biological variation. We demonstrate an implementation of the K-OPLS algorithm for MATLAB and R, licensed under the GNU GPL and available at http://www.sourceforge.net/projects/kopls/. The package includes essential functionality and documentation for model evaluation (using cross-validation), training and prediction of future samples. Incorporated is also a set of diagnostic tools and plot functions to simplify the visualisation of data, e.g. for detecting trends or for identification of outlying samples. The utility of the software package is demonstrated by means of a metabolic profiling data set from a biological study of hybrid aspen. The properties of the K-OPLS method are well suited for analysis of biological data, which in conjunction with the availability of the outlined open-source package provides a comprehensive solution for kernel-based analysis in bioinformatics applications.

  19. Materials and structure synergistic with in-space materials utilization. [as means of reducing costs of space missions, colonization, and settlements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, Kumar; Shadman, Farhang; Sridhar, K. R.

    1992-01-01

    The significant advances made recently toward actual hardware realizations of various concepts for the application of in-space materials utilization (ISMU) are demonstrated. The overall plan for taking innovative concepts through technical feasibility, small-scale tests, scale-up, computer modeling, and larger-scale execution is outlined. Two specific fields of endeavor are surveyed: one has direct applications to construction on the moon, while the other has more basic implications, in addition to the practical aspects of lunar colonies. Several fundamental scientific advances made in the characterization of the physical and chemical processes that need to be elucidated for any intelligent application of the ISMU concepts in future space missions are described. A rigorous quantitative technique for the unambiguous evaluation of various components and component technology that form any space (or terrestrial mission) is also described.

  20. Microlith-based Structured Sorbent for Carbon Dioxide, Humidity, and Trace Contaminant Control in Manned Space Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaedi, Christian; Roychoudhury, SUbir; Howard, David F.; Perry, Jay L.; Knox, James C.

    2011-01-01

    To support continued manned space exploration, the development of atmosphere revitalization systems that are lightweight, compact, durable, and power efficient is a key challenge. The systems should be adaptable for use in a variety of habitats and should offer operational functionality to either expel removed constituents or capture them for closedloop recovery. As mission durations increase and exploration goals reach beyond low earth orbit, the need for regenerable adsorption processes for continuous removal of CO2 and trace contaminants from cabin air becomes critical. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) and NASA Marshall (MSFC) have been developing an Engineered Structured Sorbents (ESS) approach based on PCI s patented Microlith technology to meet the requirements of future, extended human spaceflight explorations. This technology offers the inherent performance and safety attributes of zeolite and other sorbents with greater structural integrity, regenerability, and process control, thereby providing potential durability and efficiency improvements over current state-of-the-art systems. The major advantages of the ESS explored in this study are realized through the use of metal substrates to provide structural integrity (i.e., less partition of sorbents) and enhanced thermal control during the sorption process. The Microlith technology also offers a unique internal resistive heating capability that shows potential for short regeneration time and reduced power requirement compared to conventional systems. This paper presents the design, development, and performance results of the integrated adsorber modules for removing CO2, water vapor, and trace chemical contaminants. A related effort that utilizes the adsorber modules for sorption of toxic industrial chemicals is also discussed. Finally, the development of a 4-person two-leg ESS system for continuous CO2 removal is also presented.

  1. Historical volume estimation and a structured method for calculating habitable volume for in-space and surface habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M.; Bobskill, M. R.; Wilhite, A.

    2012-11-01

    Habitable volume is an important spacecraft design figure of merit necessary to determine the required size of crewed space vehicles, or habitats. In order to design habitats for future missions and properly compare the habitable volumes of future habitat designs with historical spacecraft, consistent methods of both defining the required amount of habitable volume and estimating the habitable volume for a given layout are required. This paper provides a brief summary of historical habitable volume requirements and describes the appropriate application of requirements to various types of missions, particularly highlighting the appropriate application for various gravity environments. Then the proposed "Marching Grid Method", a structured automatic, numerical method to calculate habitable volume for a given habitat design, is described in detail. This method uses a set of geometric Boolean tests applied to a discrete set of points within the pressurized volume to numerically estimate the functionally usable and accessible space that comprises the habitable volume. The application of this method to zero gravity and nonzero gravity environments is also discussed. This proposed method is then demonstrated by calculating habitable volumes using two conceptual-level layouts of habitat designs, one for each type of gravity environment. These include the US Laboratory Module on ISS and the Scenario 12.0 Pressurized Core Module from the recent NASA Lunar Surface Systems studies. Results of this study include a description of the effectiveness of this method for various resolutions of the investigated grid, and commentary highlighting the use of this method to determine the overall utility of interior configurations for automatically evaluating interior layouts.

  2. Investigation of Structure, Thermal Protection System, and Passenger Stage Integration for the Hypersonic Transport System SpaceLiner

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, Alexander; Garbers, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Suborbital high speed transport is a technology that could significantly impact space transportation, since mass production of rocket propelled aircraft and their engines, as well as operating them on a routinely basis, promises reductions in the manufacturing and launching costs for space launchers. With this vision in mind, the SpaceLiner concept was developed in the Space Launcher Systems Analysis group (SART) of DLR in 2005. Since then, the original design has evolved into several success...

  3. An optimum organizational structure for a large earth-orbiting multidisciplinary space base. Ph.D. Thesis - Fla. State Univ., 1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragusa, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An optimum hypothetical organizational structure was studied for a large earth-orbiting, multidisciplinary research and applications space base manned by a crew of technologists. Because such a facility does not presently exist, in situ empirical testing was not possible. Study activity was, therefore, concerned with the identification of a desired organizational structural model rather than with the empirical testing of the model. The essential finding of this research was that a four-level project type total matrix model will optimize the efficiency and effectiveness of space base technologists.

  4. Tripartite-to-Bipartite Entanglement Transformation by Stochastic Local Operations and Classical Communication and the Structure of Matrix Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinan; Qiao, Youming; Wang, Xin; Duan, Runyao

    2018-01-01

    We study the problem of transforming a tripartite pure state to a bipartite one using stochastic local operations and classical communication (SLOCC). It is known that the tripartite-to-bipartite SLOCC convertibility is characterized by the maximal Schmidt rank of the given tripartite state, i.e. the largest Schmidt rank over those bipartite states lying in the support of the reduced density operator. In this paper, we further study this problem and exhibit novel results in both multi-copy and asymptotic settings, utilizing powerful results from the structure of matrix spaces. In the multi-copy regime, we observe that the maximal Schmidt rank is strictly super-multiplicative, i.e. the maximal Schmidt rank of the tensor product of two tripartite pure states can be strictly larger than the product of their maximal Schmidt ranks. We then provide a full characterization of those tripartite states whose maximal Schmidt rank is strictly super-multiplicative when taking tensor product with itself. Notice that such tripartite states admit strict advantages in tripartite-to-bipartite SLOCC transformation when multiple copies are provided. In the asymptotic setting, we focus on determining the tripartite-to-bipartite SLOCC entanglement transformation rate. Computing this rate turns out to be equivalent to computing the asymptotic maximal Schmidt rank of the tripartite state, defined as the regularization of its maximal Schmidt rank. Despite the difficulty caused by the super-multiplicative property, we provide explicit formulas for evaluating the asymptotic maximal Schmidt ranks of two important families of tripartite pure states by resorting to certain results of the structure of matrix spaces, including the study of matrix semi-invariants. These formulas turn out to be powerful enough to give a sufficient and necessary condition to determine whether a given tripartite pure state can be transformed to the bipartite maximally entangled state under SLOCC, in the asymptotic

  5. Cloud Structure of Three Galactic Infrared Dark Star-forming Regions from Combining Ground- and Space-based Bolometric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuxin; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Dale, James E.; Li, Di; Busquet, Gemma; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ginsburg, Adam; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Kovács, Attila; Koch, Eric; Qian, Lei; Wang, Ke; Longmore, Steve; Chen, Huei-Ru; Walker, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    We have modified the iterative procedure introduced by Lin et al., to systematically combine the submillimeter images taken from ground-based (e.g., CSO, JCMT, APEX) and space (e.g., Herschel, Planck) telescopes. We applied the updated procedure to observations of three well-studied Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs): G11.11-0.12, G14.225-0.506, and G28.34+0.06, and then performed single-component, modified blackbody fits to each pixel to derive ˜10″ resolution dust temperature and column density maps. The derived column density maps show that these three IRDCs exhibit complex filamentary structures embedded with rich clumps/cores. We compared the column density probability distribution functions (N-PDFs) and two-point correlation (2PT) functions of the column density field between these IRDCs with several OB-cluster-forming regions. Based on the observed correlation between the luminosity-to-mass ratio and the power-law index of the N-PDF, and complementary hydrodynamical simulations for a 104 {M}⊙ molecular cloud, we hypothesize that cloud evolution can be better characterized by the evolution of the (column) density distribution function and the relative power of dense structures as a function of spatial scales, rather than merely based on the presence of star-forming activity. An important component of our approach is to provide a model-independent quantification of cloud evolution. Based on the small analyzed sample, we propose four evolutionary stages, namely, cloud integration, stellar assembly, cloud pre-dispersal, and dispersed cloud. The initial cloud integration stage and the final dispersed cloud stage may be distinguished from the two intermediate stages by a steeper than -4 power-law index of the N-PDF. The cloud integration stage and the subsequent stellar assembly stage are further distinguished from each other by the larger luminosity-to-mass ratio (>40 {L}⊙ /{M}⊙ ) of the latter. A future large survey of molecular clouds with high angular

  6. Continuum of haptic space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappers, A.M.L.; Koenderink, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The structure of haptic space has first received serious attention in 1937 by Blumenfeld. Haptic space, as used in this chapter and indeed also by Blumenfeld, involves the space around us which we can reach by touch from a fixed position. How this space is related to the space through which we

  7. Mechanical analysis of carbon fiber reinforced shape memory polymer composite for self-deployable structure in space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok Bin; Ahn, Yong San; Jang, Joon Hyeok; Kim, Jin-Gyun; Goo, Nam Seo; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory polymer (SMP) is one of smart polymers which exhibit shape memory effect upon external stimuli. Reinforcements as carbon fiber had been used for making shape memory polymer composite (CF-SMPC). This study investigated a possibility of designing self-deployable structures in harsh space condition using CF-SMPCs and analyzed their shape memory behaviors with constitutive equation model.CF-SMPCs were prepared using woven carbon fabrics and a thermoset epoxy based SMP to obtain their basic mechanical properties including actuation in harsh environment. The mechanical and shape memory properties of SMP and CF-SMPCs were characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and universal tensile machine (UTM) with an environmental chamber. The mechanical properties such as flexural strength and tensile strength of SMP and CF-SMPC were measured with simple tensile/bending test and time dependent shape memory behavior was characterized with designed shape memory bending test. For mechanical analysis of CF-SMPCs, a 3D constitutive equation of SMP, which had been developed using multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient and shape memory strains, was used with material parameters determined from CF-SMPCs. Carbon fibers in composites reinforced tensile and flexural strength of SMP and acted as strong elastic springs in rheology based equation models. The actuation behavior of SMP matrix and CF-SMPCs was then simulated as 3D shape memory bending cases. Fiber bundle property was imbued with shell model for more precise analysis and it would be used for prediction of deploying behavior in self-deployable hinge structure.

  8. Increasing the space-time product of super-resolution structured illumination microscopy by means of two-pattern illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inochkin, F. M.; Pozzi, P.; Bezzubik, V. V.; Belashenkov, N. R.

    2017-06-01

    Superresolution image reconstruction method based on the structured illumination microscopy (SIM) principle with reduced and simplified pattern set is presented. The method described needs only 2 sinusoidal patterns shifted by half a period for each spatial direction of reconstruction, instead of the minimum of 3 for the previously known methods. The method is based on estimating redundant frequency components in the acquired set of modulated images. Digital processing is based on linear operations. When applied to several spatial orientations, the image set can be further reduced to a single pattern for each spatial orientation, complemented by a single non-modulated image for all the orientations. By utilizing this method for the case of two spatial orientations, the total input image set is reduced up to 3 images, providing up to 2-fold improvement in data acquisition time compared to the conventional 3-pattern SIM method. Using the simplified pattern design, the field of view can be doubled with the same number of spatial light modulator raster elements, resulting in a total 4-fold increase in the space-time product. The method requires precise knowledge of the optical transfer function (OTF). The key limitation is the thickness of object layer that scatters or emits light, which requires to be sufficiently small relatively to the lens depth of field. Numerical simulations and experimental results are presented. Experimental results are obtained on the SIM setup with the spatial light modulator based on the 1920x1080 digital micromirror device.

  9. Fabrication of Al2O3 Nano-Structure Functional Film on a Cellulose Insulation Polymer Surface and Its Space Charge Suppression Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose insulation polymer (paper/pressboard has been widely used in high voltage direct current (HVDC transformers. One of the most challenging issues in the insulation material used for HVDC equipment is the space charge accumulation. Effective ways to suppress the space charge injection/accumulation in insulation material is currently a popular research topic. In this study, an aluminium oxide functional film was deposited on a cellulose insulation pressboard surface using reactive radio frequency (RF magnetron sputtering. The sputtered thin film was characterized by the scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM/EDS, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The influence of the deposited functional film on the dielectric properties and the space charge injection/accumulation behaviour was investigated. A preliminary exploration of the space charge suppression effect is discussed. SEM/EDS, XPS, and XRD results show that the nano-structured Al2O3 film with amorphous phase was successfully fabricated onto the fibre surface. The cellulose insulation pressboard surface sputtered by Al2O3 film has lower permittivity, conductivity, and dissipation factor values in the lower frequency (<103 Hz region. The oil-impregnated sputtered pressboard presents an apparent space-charge suppression effect. Compared with the pressboard sputtered with Al2O3 film for 90 min, the pressboard sputtered with Al2O3 film for 60 min had a better space charge suppression effect. Ultra-small Al2O3 particles (<10 nm grew on the surface of the larger nanoparticles. The nano-structured Al2O3 film sputtered on the fibre surface could act as a functional barrier layer for suppression of the charge injection and accumulation. This study offers a new perspective in favour of the application of insulation pressboard with a nano-structured function surface against space charge injection/accumulation in HVDC equipment.

  10. Impact interaction of shells and structural elements of spacecrafts with the particles of space debris and micrometeoroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimov, A. V.; Pashkov, S. V.; Khristenko, Yu. F.

    2017-10-01

    Space debris formed during the launch and operation of spacecrafts in the circumterrestrial space, and the flows of micrometeoroids from the depths of space pose a real threat to manned and automatic vehicles. Providing the fracture resistance of aluminum, glass and ceramic spacecraft elements is an important practical task. These materials are widely used in spacecraft elements such as bodies, tanks, windows, glass in optical devices, heat shields, etc.

  11. Futurepath: The Story of Research and Technology at NASA Lewis Research Center. Structures for Flight Propulsion, ARC Sprayed Monotape, National Aero-Space Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The story of research and technology at NASA Lewis Research Center's Structures Division is presented. The job and designs of the Structures Division needed for flight propulsion is described including structural mechanics, structural dynamics, fatigue, and fracture. The video briefly explains why properties of metals used in structural mechanics need to be tested. Examples of tests and simulations used in structural dynamics (bodies in motion) are briefly described. Destructive and non-destructive fatigue/fracture analysis is also described. The arc sprayed monotape (a composite material) is explained, as are the programs in which monotape plays a roll. Finally, the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP or x-30) is introduced, including the material development and metal matrix as well as how NASP will reduce costs for NASA.

  12. Polarity correspondence in metaphor congruency effects: structural overlap predicts categorization times for bipolar concepts presented in vertical space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakens, Daniël

    2012-05-01

    Previous research has shown that words presented on metaphor congruent locations (e.g., positive words UP on the screen and negative words DOWN on the screen) are categorized faster than words presented on metaphor incongruent locations (e.g., positive words DOWN and negative words UP). These findings have been explained in terms of an interference effect: The meaning associated with UP and DOWN vertical space can automatically interfere with the categorization of words with a metaphorically incongruent meaning. The current studies test an alternative explanation for the interaction between the vertical position of abstract concepts and the speed with which these stimuli are categorized. Research on polarity differences (basic asymmetries in the way dimensions are processed) predicts that +polar endpoints of dimensions (e.g., positive, moral, UP) are categorized faster than -polar endpoints of dimensions (e.g., negative, immoral, DOWN). Furthermore, the polarity correspondence principle predicts that stimuli where polarities correspond (e.g., positive words presented UP) provide an additional processing benefit compared to stimuli where polarities do not correspond (e.g., negative words presented UP). A meta-analysis (Study 1) shows that a polarity account provides a better explanation of reaction time patterns in previous studies than an interference explanation. An experiment (Study 2) reveals that controlling for the polarity benefit of +polar words compared to -polar words did not only remove the main effect of word polarity but also the interaction between word meaning and vertical position due to polarity correspondence. These results reveal that metaphor congruency effects should not be interpreted as automatic associations between vertical locations and word meaning but instead are more parsimoniously explained by their structural overlap in polarities. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. The role of structural dynamics in the design and operations of space systems: The history, the lessons, the technical challenges of the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Structural dynamics and its auxiliary fields are the most progressive and challenging areas space system engineering design and operations face. Aerospace systems are dependent on structural dynamicists for their success. Past experiences (history) are colored with many dynamic issues, some producing ground or flight test failures. The innovation and creativity that was brought to these issues and problems are the aura from the past that lights the path to the future. Using this illumination to guide understanding of the dynamic phenomena and designing for its potential occurrence are the keys to successful space systems. Our great paradox, or challenge, is how we remain in depth specialists, yet become generalists to the degree that we make good team members and set the right priorities. This paper will deal with how we performed with acclaim in the past, the basic characteristics of structural dynamics (loads cycle, for example), and the challenges of the future.

  14. Vol. 33 - Compact State-Space Models for Complex Superconducting Radio-Frequency Structures Based on Model Order Reduction and Concatenation Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Flisgen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The modeling of large chains of superconducting cavities with couplers is a challeng- ing task in computational electrical engineering. The direct numerical treatment of these structures can easily lead to problems with more than ten million degrees of freedom. Problems of this complexity are typically solved with the help of parallel programs running on supercomputing infrastructures. However, these infrastructures are expensive to purchase, to operate, and to maintain. The aim of this thesis is to introduce and to validate an approach which allows for modeling large structures on a standard workstation. The novel technique is called State-Space Concatena- tions and is based on the decomposition of the complete structure into individual segments. The radio-frequency properties of the generated segments are described by a set of state-space equations which either emerge from analytical considera- tions or from numerical discretization schemes. The model order of these equations is reduced...

  15. A Poroelastic Fluid/Structure-Interaction Model of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics in the Cord With Syringomyelia and Adjacent Subarachnoid-Space Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, C D; Heil, M

    2017-01-01

    An existing axisymmetric fluid/structure-interaction (FSI) model of the spinal cord, pia mater, subarachnoid space, and dura mater in the presence of syringomyelia and subarachnoid-space stenosis was modified to include porous solids. This allowed investigation of a hypothesis for syrinx fluid ingress from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Gross model deformation was unchanged by the addition of porosity, but pressure oscillated more in the syrinx and the subarachnoid space below the stenosis. The poroelastic model still exhibited elevated mean pressure in the subarachnoid space below the stenosis and in the syrinx. With realistic cord permeability, there was slight oscillatory shunt flow bypassing the stenosis via the porous tissue over the syrinx. Weak steady streaming flow occurred in a circuit involving craniocaudal flow through the stenosis and back via the syrinx. Mean syrinx volume was scarcely altered when the adjacent stenosis bisected the syrinx, but increased slightly when the syrinx was predominantly located caudal to the stenosis. The fluid content of the tissues over the syrinx oscillated, absorbing most of the radial flow seeping from the subarachnoid space so that it did not reach the syrinx. To a lesser extent, this cyclic swelling in a boundary layer of cord tissue just below the pia occurred all along the cord, representing a mechanism for exchange of interstitial fluid (ISF) and cerebrospinal fluid which could explain recent tracer findings without invoking perivascular conduits. The model demonstrates that syrinx volume increase is possible when there is subarachnoid-space stenosis and the cord and pia are permeable.

  16. Neighborhood behavior of in silico structural spaces with respect to in vitro activity spaces--a benchmark for neighborhood behavior assessment of different in silico similarity metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Dragos; Jeandenans, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    In a previous work, we have introduced Neighborhood Behavior (NB) criteria for calculated molecular similarity metrics, based on the analysis of in vitro activity spaces that simultaneously monitor the responses of a compound with respect to an entire panel of biologically relevant receptors and enzymes. Now, these novel NB criteria will be used as a benchmark for the comparison of different in silico molecular similarity metrics, addressing the following topics: (1) the relative performance of 2D vs 3D descriptors, (2) the importance of the similarity scoring function for a given descriptor set, and (3) binary or Fuzzy Pharmacophore Fingerprints-can they capture the similarity of the spatial distribution of pharmacophoric groups despite different molecular connectivity? It was found that fuzzy pharmacophore descriptors (FBPA) displayed an optimal NB and, unlike their binary counterparts, were successful in evidencing pharmacophore pattern similarity independently of topological similarity. Topological FBPA, identical to the former except for the use of topological instead of 3D atom pair distances, display a somehow weaker, but significant NB. Metrics based on "classical" global 2D and 3D molecular descriptors and a Dice scoring function also performed well. The choice of the similarity scoring function is therefore as important as the choice of the appropriate molecular descriptors.

  17. Space Transportation Booster Engine Configuration Study. Volume 3: Program Cost estimates and work breakdown structure and WBS dictionary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Space Transportation Booster Engine Configuration Study is to contribute to the ALS development effort by providing highly reliable, low cost booster engine concepts for both expendable and reusable rocket engines. The objectives of the Space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) Configuration Study were: (1) to identify engine development configurations which enhance vehicle performance and provide operational flexibility at low cost; and (2) to explore innovative approaches to the follow-on Full-Scale Development (FSD) phase for the STBE.

  18. Cloud Structure of Galactic OB Cluster-forming Regions from Combining Ground- and Space-based Bolometric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuxin; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Li, Di; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ginsburg, Adam; Pineda, Jaime E.; Qian, Lei; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; McLeod, Anna Faye; Rosolowsky, Erik; Dale, James E.; Immer, Katharina; Koch, Eric; Longmore, Steve; Walker, Daniel; Testi, Leonardo

    2016-09-01

    We have developed an iterative procedure to systematically combine the millimeter and submillimeter images of OB cluster-forming molecular clouds, which were taken by ground-based (CSO, JCMT, APEX, and IRAM-30 m) and space telescopes (Herschel and Planck). For the seven luminous (L\\gt {10}6 L ⊙) Galactic OB cluster-forming molecular clouds selected for our analyses, namely W49A, W43-Main, W43-South, W33, G10.6-0.4, G10.2-0.3, and G10.3-0.1, we have performed single-component, modified blackbody fits to each pixel of the combined (sub)millimeter images, and the Herschel PACS and SPIRE images at shorter wavelengths. The ˜10″ resolution dust column density and temperature maps of these sources revealed dramatically different morphologies, indicating very different modes of OB cluster-formation, or parent molecular cloud structures in different evolutionary stages. The molecular clouds W49A, W33, and G10.6-0.4 show centrally concentrated massive molecular clumps that are connected with approximately radially orientated molecular gas filaments. The W43-Main and W43-South molecular cloud complexes, which are located at the intersection of the Galactic near 3 kpc (or Scutum) arm and the Galactic bar, show a widely scattered distribution of dense molecular clumps/cores over the observed ˜10 pc spatial scale. The relatively evolved sources G10.2-0.3 and G10.3-0.1 appear to be affected by stellar feedback, and show a complicated cloud morphology embedded with abundant dense molecular clumps/cores. We find that with the high angular resolution we achieved, our visual classification of cloud morphology can be linked to the systematically derived statistical quantities (I.e., the enclosed mass profile, the column density probability distribution function (N-PDF), the two-point correlation function of column density, and the probability distribution function of clump/core separations). In particular, the massive molecular gas clumps located at the center of G10.6-0.4 and

  19. Study on spatial structure of large scale retail stores based on space syntax: case study in Wuhan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Qingming; Zhou, Jingnan; Sliuzas, Richard

    2009-10-01

    This research analyzes the spatial pattern of large-scale stores based on space syntax theory and explores the correlation between the variations in syntax accessibility and the spatial pattern of large-scale stores. This research develops a framework of spatial topology analysis based on the space syntax theory, which includes the following modifications: the trail to break the traditional long axial line network of space syntax and apply this partitioned network in the topological analysis; the trail to analyze the bus route network; By taking both the syntax accessibility of road and bus network into consideration, we produce the scopes of urban syntax centers of city level, local level and sub local level respectively. In the analysis of the retail distribution pattern, the city level, local level and sub local level urban retail centers are suggested respectively according to the spatial distributions of the quantity and scale of the retail stores. The spatial distribution pattern of each retail format is studied as spatial correlations between the retail locations and the urban space syntax centers based on a case study in Wuhan, China. The Space Syntax can be a useful tool to explain the allocation logic of urban retail space in large cities. We suggest to apply the partitioned transportation network instead of the traditional long axial line network.

  20. Comparative study between 2D and 3D FEM techniques in single bolt, single lap, composite bolted joints for space structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calin-Dumitru COMAN

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element models have been developed to study the effects of bolt-hole clearance on the mechanical behavior of bolted composites (graphite/epoxy joints in space structures. The type of the studied joint was single bolt, single lap, and the geometry is a standard type for these kind of composite joints space structures. In this study, two approaches, 2D (linear analysis and 3D (nonlinear analysis were developed and the results were compared to numerical and experiment results from literature. The contact between the parts affecting the accuracy and efficiency of the models is detailed. The model’s capability to predict the three-dimensional effects such as secondary bending and through-thickness variations of the stress and stain tensor fields is presented.

  1. The use of random decrement technique for identification of structural modes of vibration. [tested on a generalized payload and the space shuttle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, S. R.

    1977-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to obtain the free responses of a structure from its random responses due to some unknown or known random input or inputs, using the random-decrement technique without changing time correlation between signals. The algorithm is tested using random responses from a 'generalized payload' model and from the 'Space Shuttle' model. The resulting free responses are then used to identify the modal characteristics of the two systems.

  2. Reliability of posterior-left atrium space index measurements during 20-24 weeks of gestation in structurally normal fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkurt, Mehmet Ozgur; Yavuz, And; Akkurt, Iltac; Karakoc, Gokhan; Sezik, Mekin

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to evaluate the correlation between clinical parameters and the post-left atrium (LA) space index, which is a candidate screening marker for total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC). We also calculated the inter- and intra-observer variabilities of measurements for this parameter. The LA-descending aorta distance/descending aorta diameter ratios (post-LA space index) were obtained from 165 fetuses between 20 and 24 weeks of gestation. Regression analyses were utilized to evaluate the correlations across clinical parameters and the post-LA space index. Intraclass correlations coefficients were calculated for the intra- and inter-observer agreements of three examiners with different sonographic experience. The mean (±SD) maternal and gestational age (GA) was 28.6±4.9 years and 21.7±0.9 weeks of gestation, respectively. In multivariate analyses, there was no correlation between post-LA space index and maternal age, fetal gender, or GA at cardiac scan. There were moderate to strong correlations across the measurements by different examiners, indicating good inter- and intra-observer agreements. The post-LA space index during 20-24 weeks of gestation is a simple and reliable marker that is not affected by GA. However, its potential as a screening tool for TAPVC warrants further clinical investigation.

  3. Solubility-Parameter-Guided Solvent Selection to Initiate Ostwald Ripening for Interior Space-Tunable Structures with Architecture-Dependent Electrochemical Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Baoguang; Guo, Donglei; Qin, Jinwen; Meng, Tao; Wang, Xin; Cao, Minhua

    2018-01-08

    Despite significant advancement in preparing various hollow structures by Ostwald ripening, one common problem is the intractable uncontrollability of initiating Ostwald ripening due to the complexity of the reaction processes. Here, a new strategy on Hansen solubility parameter (HSP)-guided solvent selection to initiate Ostwald ripening is proposed. Based on this comprehensive principle for solvent optimization, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) was screened out, achieving accurate synthesis of interior space-tunable MoSe 2 spherical structures (solid, core-shell, yolk-shell and hollow spheres). The resultant MoSe 2 structures exhibit architecture-dependent electrochemical performances towards hydrogen evolution reaction and sodium-ion batteries. This pre-solvent selection strategy can effectively provide researchers great possibility in efficiently synthesizing various hollow structures. This work paves a new pathway for deeply understanding Ostwald ripening. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Probabilistic metric spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Schweizer, B

    2005-01-01

    Topics include special classes of probabilistic metric spaces, topologies, and several related structures, such as probabilistic normed and inner-product spaces. 1983 edition, updated with 3 new appendixes. Includes 17 illustrations.

  5. What Does Syntax Say about Space? 2-Year-Olds Use Sentence Structure to Learn New Prepositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Cynthia; Klingler, Stacy L.; Song, Hyun-joo

    2006-01-01

    Children as young as two use sentence structure to learn the meanings of verbs. We probed the generality of sensitivity to sentence structure by moving to a different semantic and syntactic domain, spatial prepositions. Twenty-six-month-olds used sentence structure to determine whether a new word was an object-category name ("This is a corp!") or…

  6. Numerical simulation of the effect of wind removing the corona space charge over grounded structures under thunderstorm conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stephan; Lopez, Javier; Holbøll, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    agrounded object under thunderstorm conditions. The electric fieldcreated by the charge distribution in the thundercloud above theobject, which is in first place enhanced by its geometry, leadsto the generation and secondly upward propagation of chargefrom the object. Recent investigations underline...... that the effectof the removal of the corona space charge by the wind leadsto a higher field strength at the grounded object and, therefore,it becomes easier for it to initiate an upward connecting leadercompared to a situation where the space charge is present. Inthis work, a simplified space charge drift model...... quantifies thedifference between static towers and rotating wind turbines whichare influenced by different resultant wind velocities. The voltagedistribution and ion drift velocities in the vicinity of the groundedstructures are illustrated. The results show a higher voltagegradient at the side of the object...

  7. Structure and properties of polymeric composite materials during 1501 days outer space exposure at Salyut-7 orbital station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Startsev, Oleg V.; Nikishin, Eugene F.

    1995-01-01

    Specimens of polymeric composite materials for aviation and space applications such as glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP), carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP), organic fiber reinforced plastics (OFRP), and hybrid plastics (HP) based on epoxy compounds were exposed to the space environment on the surface of Salyut-7 orbital station. The space exposure lasted 1501 days as a maximum. The data relating to the change in mechanical properties, mass losses, glass transition temperature, linear thermal expansion coefficient, and microstructure after various periods of exposure are given. It has been found that the change in properties is caused by the processes of binder postcuring and microerosion of the exposed surface of plastics. The phenomenon of strengthening of the surface layer of hybrid composites, due to which the nature of destruction changes at bending loads, has been revealed.

  8. Looking for prebiotic species in space: a theoretical study of molecular structures of interest for the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinger, Y.; Berthier, G.; Lattelais, M.; Chiaramello, Jm.

    The simplest possible species containing the peptide bond, NH2-CH=O, was identified in space more than thirty years ago (Rubin et al. (1971)). About the same time, a precursor of the peptide bond, HNCO, was also identified (Snyder et al. (1972)) and later confirmed (Brown (1981)) in the interstellar medium (ISM). The same molecule has been recently observed in the comets Hyakutake (Lis et al. (1997)) and Hale-Bopp (Lis et al. (1998)). More elaborate material, including the 20 aminoacids present in living organisms (Cooper et al. (1992)), has only been found associated with solids, namely in the meteorites collected on Earth, not in the ISM. Before designing complex chemical models for astrobiology, we considered the two following questions: i) what is the relative stability of the peptide bond compared to other types of bonds? ii) what is the relative stability of aminoacids compared to other possible isomers? In order to be able to perform calculations at the same level of theory for all compounds, whatever the size, we employed a unique approach based on the B3LYP formulation of density functional theory (DFT). Vibrational frequencies have been calculated for asserting the nature of the stationary points and evaluation of zero-point energy corrections. A systematic investigation of the structure and relative stability of all the isomers that may possibly form in the six atom system [C,3H,N,O] has been carried out. The most stable compound is formamide, NH2-CH=O, i.e. the one with the peptide bond. The same study was done for the systems where one of the heavy atoms C, N or O is replaced by its second row analogue. From this comprehensive study it can be concluded that the species containing the peptide type of linkage are the most stable, namely: NH2-SiH=O and NH2-CH=S. The exception is CH3-P=O that is more stable than PH2-CH=O. The same type of study has been performed on glycine, that is the simplest α amino acid that has been identified in chondrites of the

  9. Electronic structure calculations with GPAW: a real-space implementation of the projector augmented-wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enkovaara, J.; Rostgaard, Carsten; Mortensen, Jens Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    challenges. In this article we present the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method as implemented in the GPAW program package (https://wiki.fysik.dtu.dk/gpaw) using a uniform real-space grid representation of the electronic wavefunctions. Compared to more traditional plane wave or localized basis set...

  10. Wigner’s phase-space function and atomic structure: II. Ground states for closed-shell atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Springborg, Michael; Dahl, Jens Peder

    1987-01-01

    display and analyze the function for the closed-shell atoms helium, beryllium, neon, argon, and zinc in the Hartree-Fock approximation. The quantum-mechanical exact results are compared with those obtained with the approximate Thomas-Fermi description of electron densities in phase space....

  11. Modeling Fluid’s Dynamics with Master Equations in Ultrametric Spaces Representing the Treelike Structure of Capillary Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Khrennikov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a new conceptual approach for modeling of fluid flows in random porous media based on explicit exploration of the treelike geometry of complex capillary networks. Such patterns can be represented mathematically as ultrametric spaces and the dynamics of fluids by ultrametric diffusion. The images of p-adic fields, extracted from the real multiscale rock samples and from some reference images, are depicted. In this model the porous background is treated as the environment contributing to the coefficients of evolutionary equations. For the simplest trees, these equations are essentially less complicated than those with fractional differential operators which are commonly applied in geological studies looking for some fractional analogs to conventional Euclidean space but with anomalous scaling and diffusion properties. It is possible to solve the former equation analytically and, in particular, to find stationary solutions. The main aim of this paper is to attract the attention of researchers working on modeling of geological processes to the novel utrametric approach and to show some examples from the petroleum reservoir static and dynamic characterization, able to integrate the p-adic approach with multifractals, thermodynamics and scaling. We also present a non-mathematician friendly review of trees and ultrametric spaces and pseudo-differential operators on such spaces.

  12. Putting "Structure within the Space": Spatially Un/Responsive Pedagogic Practices in Open-Plan Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltmarsh, Sue; Chapman, Amy; Campbell, Matthew; Drew, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Non-traditional open-plan schools and classrooms are currently enjoying a resurgence in Australia, with proponents arguing for the necessity of educational spaces that more readily accommodate the needs of twenty-first century learners. However, these learning environments can pose considerable pedagogic challenges for teachers who must balance…

  13. Light-induced space-charge fields for the structuration of dielectric materials; Lichtinduzierte Raumladungsfelder zur Strukturierung dielektrischer Materialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, H.A.

    2006-11-15

    Light-induced space-charge fields in lithium-niobate crystals are used for patterning of dielectric materials. This includes tailored ferroelectric domains in the bulk of the crystal, different sorts of micro and nanoparticles on a crystal surface, as well as poling of electrooptic chromophores. A stochastical model is introduced, which can describe the spatial inhomogeneous domain inversion. (orig.)

  14. Protecting Neural Structures and Cognitive Function During Prolonged Space Flight by Targeting the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Molecular Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M. A.; Goodwin, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the main activity-dependent neurotrophin in the human nervous system. BDNF is implicated in production of new neurons from dentate gyrus stem cells (hippocampal neurogenesis), synapse formation, sprouting of new axons, growth of new axons, sprouting of new dendrites, and neuron survival. Alterations in the amount or activity of BDNF can produce significant detrimental changes to cortical function and synaptic transmission in the human brain. This can result in glial and neuronal dysfunction, which may contribute to a range of clinical conditions, spanning a number of learning, behavioral, and neurological disorders. There is an extensive body of work surrounding the BDNF molecular network, including BDNF gene polymorphisms, methylated BDNF gene promoters, multiple gene transcripts, varied BDNF functional proteins, and different BDNF receptors (whose activation differentially drive the neuron to neurogenesis or apoptosis). BDNF is also closely linked to mitochondrial biogenesis through PGC-1alpha, which can influence brain and muscle metabolic efficiency. BDNF AS A HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT COUNTERMEASURE TARGET Earth-based studies reveal that BDNF is negatively impacted by many of the conditions encountered in the space environment, including oxidative stress, radiation, psychological stressors, sleep deprivation, and many others. A growing body of work suggests that the BDNF network is responsive to a range of diet, nutrition, exercise, drug, and other types of influences. This section explores the BDNF network in the context of 1) protecting the brain and nervous system in the space environment, 2) optimizing neurobehavioral performance in space, and 3) reducing the residual effects of space flight on the nervous system on return to Earth

  15. Tsirelson's space

    CERN Document Server

    Casazza, Peter G

    1989-01-01

    This monograph provides a structure theory for the increasingly important Banach space discovered by B.S. Tsirelson. The basic construction should be accessible to graduate students of functional analysis with a knowledge of the theory of Schauder bases, while topics of a more advanced nature are presented for the specialist. Bounded linear operators are studied through the use of finite-dimensional decompositions, and complemented subspaces are studied at length. A myriad of variant constructions are presented and explored, while open questions are broached in almost every chapter. Two appendices are attached: one dealing with a computer program which computes norms of finitely-supported vectors, while the other surveys recent work on weak Hilbert spaces (where a Tsirelson-type space provides an example).

  16. Controlled crystal dehydration triggers a space-group switch and shapes the tertiary structure of cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 (IE1) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingl, Stefan; Scherer, Myriam; Stamminger, Thomas; Muller, Yves A

    2015-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 (IE1) protein is a key viral effector protein that reprograms host cells. Controlled dehydration experiments with IE1 crystals not only extended their diffraction limit from 2.85 to 2.3 Å resolution but also triggered a monoclinic to tetragonal space-group transition with only minor alterations in the unit-cell parameters. An analysis of the pre-dehydration and post-dehydration crystal structures shows how dehydration rearranges the packing of IE1 molecules to meet the unit-cell constraints of the higher lattice symmetry. The transition from P21 to P43 reduces the number of copies in the asymmetric unit from four to two, and molecules previously related by noncrystallographic symmetry merge into identical crystallographic copies in the tetragonal space group. At the same time, dehydration considerably alters the tertiary structure of one of the two remaining IE1 chains in the asymmetric unit. It appears that this conformational switch is required to compensate for a transition that is assumed to be unfavourable, namely from a highly preferred to a rarely observed space group. At the same time, the dehydration-triggered molecular reshaping could reveal an inherent molecular flexibility that possibly informs on the biological function of IE1, namely on its binding to target proteins from the host cell.

  17. A SPH Method-based Numerical Simulation of the Space Debris Fragments Interaction with Spacecraft Structure Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Zelentsov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant amount of space debris available in the near-Earth space is a reason to protect space vehicles from the fragments of space debris. Existing empirical calculation methods do not allow us to estimate quality of developed protection. Experimental verification of protection requires complex and expensive installations that do not allow having a desirable impact velocity. The article proposes to use the ANSYS AUTODYN software environment – a software complex of the nonlinear dynamic analysis to evaluate quality of developed protection. The ANSYS AUTODYN environment is based on the integration methods of a system of equations of continuum mechanics. The SPH (smoothed particle method method is used as a solver. The SPH method is based on the area of sampling by a finite set of the Lagrangian particles that can be represented as the elementary volumes of the medium. In modeling the targets were under attack of 2 and 3 mm spheres and cylinders with 2 mm in bottom diameter and with generator of 2 and 3 mm. The apheres and cylinders are solid and hollow, with a wall thickness of 0.5 mm. The impact velocity of the particles with a target was assumed to be 7.5 km / s. The number of integration cycles in all cases of calculation was assumed to be 1000. The rate of flying debris fragments of the target material as a function of the h / d ratio (h - the thickness of the target, / d - the diameter of a sphere or a cylinder end is obtained. In simulation the sample picture obtained coincides both with results of experimental study carried out at the Tomsk State Technical University and  with results described in the literature.

  18. Library design using BCUT chemistry-space descriptors and multiple four-point pharmacophore fingerprints: simultaneous optimization and structure-based diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, J S; Beno, B R

    2000-01-01

    New applications of fingerprints of multiple potential 4-point three-dimensional (3D) pharmacophores in combinatorial library design and virtual screening are presented. Preliminary results demonstrating the feasibility of a simulated annealing process for combinatorial reagent selection that concurrently optimizes product diversity in BCUT chemistry space and in terms of unique 4-point pharmacophores are discussed, and the advantage of using a customized chemistry-space derived for the library design is demonstrated. In addition, an extension to the multiple pharmacophore method for structure-based design that uses the shape of the target site as an additional constraint is presented. This development enables the docking process to be quantified in terms of the number and identities of the pharmacophoric hypotheses that can be matched by a compound or a library of compounds. The design of an example combinatorial library based on the Ugi condensation reaction and a serine protease active site is described.

  19. Effects of soil and space on the woody species composition and vegetation structure of three Cerrado phytophysiognomies in the Cerrado-Amazon transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maracahipes-Santos, L; Lenza, E; Santos, J O; Mews, H A; Oliveira, B

    2017-11-01

    The Cerrado Biome is considered one of the world's biodiversity hotspots because of its rich biodiversity, the high level of endemism and the increasing threat. The Cerrado is composed by a mosaic of different vegetation types, including physiognomies that vary from grasslands (campo limpo) to savannas (typical cerrado or cerrado sensu stricto) and cerrado woodlands (cerradão). However, the factors that determine the composition of the Cerrado's flora and the structure of the physiognomies that compose this biome are still poorly understood. Here, we investigate the influence of the chemical and granulometric properties of the soil and the effect of geographic distance on the occurrence and abundance of woody species in three Cerrado phytophysiognomies - cerrado woodland (cerradão), dense cerrado savanna and typical cerrado savanna - in the Cerrado-Amazon transition. We tested the hypothesis that the edaphic characteristics and geographic space determine the species composition and the structure of the woody vegetation of these three phytophysiognomies. We demonstrate that the dissimilarities in the structure and composition of the three sites were determined more by space (13% of explanation) than edaphic properties (1%), but primarily by the interaction between these two factors (26%). We conclude that, in situations where the chemical and granulometric properties of the soil are relatively homogeneous, as we found in the present study, geographic distance between sites has a greater influence than variation in the substrate's properties on modelling the occurrence and abundance of the woody plant species in the Cerrado.

  20. Monuments in the Structure of an Urban Environment: The Source of Social Memory and the Marker of the Urban Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, N.; Grunt, E.; Merenkov, A.

    2017-10-01

    The major research objective was to analyze the role of monuments in the formation of local residents’ and guests’ representations about the city, its history and traditions. The authors consider the system of monuments’ location in the urban space as a way of its social construction, as the system of influence on citizens’ aesthetic feelings, as the formation of their attitudes towards maintaining of continuity in the activities of different generations for the improvement of the territory of their permanent residence. Methodology. An urban monument is considered in two ways: as a transfer of historical memory and as a social memory transfer, which includes the experience of previous generations. One of the main provisions of the study is the idea that monuments can lose their former social value, transforming into “simple” objects of a public place. The study was conducted in the city of Yekaterinburg, one of the largest, cultural, scientific and industrial Russian megalopolises in 2015. The primary data was collected using standardized interviews. Four hundred and twenty respondents at the age of and above 18 were questioned on the basis of quota sampling. Interviews with respondents were conducted in order to identify key problems involved and reasons for shaping respondents’ representations of monuments in the urban environment typical for the population of Russian megalopolises. The standardized interview guide included 15 questions. Findings and discussion. Our investigation has revealed that different monuments fulfil various functions in an urban environment (ideological, aesthetic, transferring, valuable, etc.). The study has unequivocally confirmed that objects in the urban space have a different emotional colour background: people paint them in accordance with the feelings that arise in their perception. Hence, some monuments effectively fulfil the functions of social memory transfer: they are remembered, they tell us about the events to

  1. A State Space Model Exhibiting a Cyclic Structure with an Application to Progesterone Concentration in Cow Milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Vinsløv; Jensen, Jens Ledet; Højsgaard, Søren

    Progesterone is a hormone linked to the reproductive status of dairy cows. Hence, with the increasing availability of on-line records of the concentration of progesterone in cow milk, there is a need for new tools to analyse such data. The aim is to find techniques for better determination...... of the time when cows are in oestrus to increase the rate of succesful inseminations. In this paper we propose a state space model for data with a continuous and cyclic trend in the mean. Furthermore a matching Kalman filter is developed. The model is tested on progesterone data from 112 cow...

  2. Investigation of the structure of the few body kaonic nuclei using the method of hyperspherical functions in momentum space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezerashvili Roman Ya.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The kaonic clusters K̄NN and K̄NNN are studied within the method of hyperspherical functions in the momentum representation. Binding energies and widths of three- and four-body nuclear quasibound states are calculated by employing realistic NN potentials and the energy dependent chiral K̄N interaction, as well as a phenomenological K̄N potential. The comparison of the results of calculations obtained in the framework of the variational method, Faddeev, Faddeev-Yakubovsky equations, and method of hyperspherical functions in configuration space are discussed.

  3. [Effect of space flight factors simulated in ground-based experiments on the behavior, discriminant learning, and exchange of monoamines in different brain structures of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtemberg, A S; Lebedeva-Georgievskaia, K V; Matveeva, M I; Kudrin, V S; Narkevich, V B; Klodt, P M; Bazian, A S

    2014-01-01

    Experimental treatment (long-term fractionated γ-irradiation, antiorthostatic hypodynamia, and the combination of these factors) simulating the effect of space flight in ground-based experiments rapidly restored the motor and orienting-investigative activity of animals (rats) in "open-field" tests. The study of the dynamics of discriminant learning of rats of experimental groups did not show significant differences from the control animals. It was found that the minor effect of these factors on the cognitive performance of animals correlated with slight changes in the concentration ofmonoamines in the brain structures responsible for the cognitive, emotional, and motivational functions.

  4. The nuclear structure and related properties of some low-lying isomers of free-space O{sub n} clusters (n=6,8,12)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forte, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Università di Catania, Viale A. Doria, 6, I-95126 Catania (Italy); Angilella, G.G.N., E-mail: giuseppe.angilella@ct.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Scuola Superiore di Catania, Università di Catania, Via Valdisavoia, 9, I-95123 Catania (Italy); CNISM, UdR Catania, Via S. Sofia, 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); INFN, Sez. Catania, Via S. Sofia, 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); March, N.H. [Department of Physics, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan, 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Oxford University, Oxford (United Kingdom); Pucci, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia, 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); CNISM, UdR Catania, Via S. Sofia, 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2013-04-01

    After some introductory comments relating to antiferromagnetism of crystalline O{sub 2}, and brief remarks on the geometry of ozone, Hartree–Fock (HF) theory plus second-order Møller–Plesset (MP2) corrections are used to predict the nuclear structure of low-lying isomers of free-space O{sub n} clusters, for n=6,8, and 12. The equilibrium nuclear–nuclear potential energy is also discussed in relation to the number n of oxygen atoms in the cluster.

  5. Pappus in optical space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, Jan J.; van Doorn, Andrea J.; Kappers, Astrid M L; Todd, James T.

    Optical space differs from physical space. The structure of optical space has generally been assumed to be metrical. In contradistinction, we do not assume any metric, but only incidence relations (i.e., we assume that optical points and lines exist and that two points define a unique line, and two

  6. The effect of conical dimple spacing on flow structure and heat transfer characteristics of internal flow using CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemin, O.; Wae-Hayee, M.; Narato, P.; Yerane, K.; Abdullah, K.; Nuntadusit, C.

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, heat transfer and flow characteristics simulations over the surface of conical dimple were investigated. Single dimple row with inline arrangement was formed on the internal surface of the 3-D rectangular wind tunnel model. The air flow was perpendicular to the centre line of every dimple and the printed diameter of dimples on the surface was D=26.4mm. The depth of dimple on the surface of wind tunnel was H/D=2. The space between dimple-to-dimple was varied for S/D=1.125, 1.25,1.5, and 2. The Reynold number based on the hydraulic diameter of internal air flow was 20,000 depending on the wind tunnel hydraulic diameter. The numerical computation was applied with a Shear Stress Transport (SST) k-ω turbulence model. The average Nusselt number for the S/D=1.125 case is the highest. When the spacing becomes increase, the value of average Nusselt number tends to decrease.

  7. When Policy Structures Technology: Balancing upfront decomposition and in-process coordination in Europe's decentralized space technology ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrolijk, Ademir; Szajnfarber, Zoe

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the decentralization of European space technology research and development through the joint lenses of policy, systems architecture, and innovation contexts. It uses a detailed longitudinal case history of the development of a novel astrophysics instrument to explore the link between policy-imposed institutional decomposition and the architecture of the technical system. The analysis focuses on five instances of collaborative design decision-making and finds that matching between the technical and institutional architectures is a predictor of project success, consistent with the mirroring hypothesis in extant literature. Examined over time, the instances reveal stability in the loosely coupled nature of institutional arrangements and a trend towards more integral, or tightly coupled, technical systems. The stability of the institutional arrangements is explained as an artifact of the European Hultqvist policy and the trend towards integral technical systems is related to the increasing complexity of modern space systems. If these trends persist, the scale of the mismatch will continue to grow. As a first step towards mitigating this challenge, the paper develops a framework for balancing upfront decomposition and in-process coordination in collaborative development projects. The astrophysics instrument case history is used to illustrate how collaborations should be defined for a given inherent system complexity.

  8. Dynamic profile of a prototype pivoted proof-mass actuator. [damping the vibration of large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    A prototype of a linear inertial reaction actuation (damper) device employing a flexure-pivoted reaction (proof) mass is discussed. The mass is driven by an electromechanic motor using a dc electromagnetic field and an ac electromagnetic drive. During the damping process, the actuator dissipates structural kinetic energy as heat through electromagnetic damping. A model of the inertial, stiffness and damping properties is presented along with the characteristic differential equations describing the coupled response of the actuator and structure. The equations, employing the dynamic coefficients, are oriented in the form of a feedback control network in which distributed sensors are used to dictate actuator response leading to a specified amount of structural excitation or damping.

  9. A multi-model incremental adaptive strategy to accelerate partitioned fluid-structure algorithms using space-mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholcz, T.P.; Van Zuijlen, A.H.; Bijl, H.

    2011-01-01

    High fidelity analysis of fluid-structure interaction systems is often too timeconsuming when a large number of model evaluations are required. The choice for a solution procedure depends often on the efficiency of the method and the possibility of reusing existing field solvers. Aggressive

  10. Demonstration and challenges for joining technology based on direct bonding usable for construction of (large) structures in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Hartmut R.; Gelinck, Edwin; Semprimoschnig, Christopher; van Munster, Marc; van der Heijden, John

    2015-03-01

    A direct bonding process relying on van der Waals forces offers an ideal combination of easiness to assemble and material compatibility. Such a bonding procedure, also denoted as optical bonding, is already known and used frequently in different applications. However, there are strict requirements to achieve optical bonding: (1) a high level of cleanliness of the surfaces and (2) low roughness (RMS roughness <2 nm and preferably <0.5 nm). The first condition will be possible to realize in space, since the vacuum prevents the absorption of a thin water layer present on all surfaces under atmospheric conditions and forces a desorption of all residual water. Also, particle contamination will be minimized, due to the absence of strong capillary forces which attract particles if present and the absence of particles in space, providing a suitable and without residue removable protection prior to bonding. The second condition is now state of the art of silicon carbide (SiC) polishing and can hence be realized. While meeting the requirements, theoretically very large adhesion forces can be realized in vacuum. Surfaces have been polished according to the requirements. The forces measured on these surfaces are nearly as high as theoretically predicted and demonstrate the proof of principle of direct bonding of SiC under ambient conditions and in vacuum. However, the realization of the required flatness over large contact areas is still a challenge. Furthermore, since the surfaces display a really low roughness, extremely clean handling and bonding conditions need to be realized to avoid the spontaneous adhesion of small particles which would as such prevent direct bonding of larger areas.

  11. The Argos-CLS Kalman Filter: Error Structures and State-Space Modelling Relative to Fastloc GPS Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Lowther

    Full Text Available Understanding how an animal utilises its surroundings requires its movements through space to be described accurately. Satellite telemetry is the only means of acquiring movement data for many species however data are prone to varying amounts of spatial error; the recent application of state-space models (SSMs to the location estimation problem have provided a means to incorporate spatial errors when characterising animal movements. The predominant platform for collecting satellite telemetry data on free-ranging animals, Service Argos, recently provided an alternative Doppler location estimation algorithm that is purported to be more accurate and generate a greater number of locations that its predecessor. We provide a comprehensive assessment of this new estimation process performance on data from free-ranging animals relative to concurrently collected Fastloc GPS data. Additionally, we test the efficacy of three readily-available SSM in predicting the movement of two focal animals. Raw Argos location estimates generated by the new algorithm were greatly improved compared to the old system. Approximately twice as many Argos locations were derived compared to GPS on the devices used. Root Mean Square Errors (RMSE for each optimal SSM were less than 4.25 km with some producing RMSE of less than 2.50 km. Differences in the biological plausibility of the tracks between the two focal animals used to investigate the utility of SSM highlights the importance of considering animal behaviour in movement studies. The ability to reprocess Argos data collected since 2008 with the new algorithm should permit questions of animal movement to be revisited at a finer resolution.

  12. Elements of linear space

    CERN Document Server

    Amir-Moez, A R; Sneddon, I N

    1962-01-01

    Elements of Linear Space is a detailed treatment of the elements of linear spaces, including real spaces with no more than three dimensions and complex n-dimensional spaces. The geometry of conic sections and quadric surfaces is considered, along with algebraic structures, especially vector spaces and transformations. Problems drawn from various branches of geometry are given.Comprised of 12 chapters, this volume begins with an introduction to real Euclidean space, followed by a discussion on linear transformations and matrices. The addition and multiplication of transformations and matrices a

  13. A Conceptual Space Logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jørgen Fischer

    1999-01-01

    Conceptual spaces have been proposed as topological or geometric means for establishing conceptual structures and models. This paper, after briey reviewing conceptual spaces, focusses on the relationship between conceptual spaces and logical concept languages with operations for combining concepts...... to form concepts. Speci cally is introduced an algebraic concept logic, for which conceptual spaces are installed as semantic domain as replacement for, or enrichment of, the traditional....

  14. Structural Design of a 4-Meter Off-Axis Space Telescope for the Habitable-Zone Exoplanet Direct Imaging Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, William, Sr.; Stahl, H Philip

    2017-01-01

    This design study was conducted to support the HABEX project. There are a number of companion papers at this conference which go into detail on what all the HABEX goals are. The objective of this paper is to establish a baseline primary mirror design which satisfies the following structural related requirements. The designs in this study have a high TRL (Technology Readiness Level), realistic manufacturing limits and performance in line with the HABEX mission. A secondary goal of the study was to evaluate a number competing criteria for the selection. Questions such as differences in the on axis versus off axis static and dynamic response to disturbances. This study concentrates on the structural behavior, companion papers cover thermal and long term stability aspects of the problem.

  15. Real-space imaging of molecular structure and chemical bonding by single-molecule inelastic tunneling probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chi-lun; Xu, Chen; Han, Zhumin; Ho, W

    2014-05-23

    The arrangement of atoms and bonds in a molecule influences its physical and chemical properties. The scanning tunneling microscope can provide electronic and vibrational signatures of single molecules. However, these signatures do not relate simply to the molecular structure and bonding. We constructed an inelastic tunneling probe based on the scanning tunneling microscope to sense the local potential energy landscape of an adsorbed molecule with a carbon monoxide (CO)-terminated tip. The skeletal structure and bonding of the molecule are revealed from imaging the spatial variations of a CO vibration as the CO-terminated tip probes the core of the interactions between adjacent atoms. An application of the inelastic tunneling probe reveals the sharing of hydrogen atoms among multiple centers in intramolecular and extramolecular bonding. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Probing the structural dependence of carbon space lengths of poly(N-hydroxyalkyl acrylamide)-based brushes on antifouling performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jintao; Zhang, Mingzhen; Chen, Hong; Chang, Yung; Chen, Zhan; Zheng, Jie

    2014-08-11

    Numerous biocompatible antifouling polymers have been developed for a wide variety of fundamental and practical applications in drug delivery, biosensors, marine coatings, and many other areas. Several antifouling mechanisms have been proposed, but the exact relationship among molecular structure, surface hydration property, and antifouling performance of antifouling polymers still remains elusive. Here this work strives to provide a better understanding of the structure-property relationship of poly(N-hydroxyalkyl acrylamide)-based materials. We have designed, synthesized, and characterized a series of polyHAAA brushes of various carbon spacer lengths (CSLs), that is, poly(N-hydroxymethyl acrylamide) (polyHMAA), poly(N-(2-hydroxyethyl)acrylamide) (polyHEAA), poly(N-(3-hydroxypropyl)acrylamide) (polyHPAA), and poly(N-(5-hydroxypentyl)acrylamide) (polyHPenAA), to study the structural dependence of CSLs on their antifouling performance. HMAA, HEAA, HPAA, and HPenAA monomers contained one, two, three, and five methylene groups between hydroxyl and amide groups, while the other groups in polymer backbones were the same as each other. The relation of such small structural differences of polymer brushes to their surface hydration and antifouling performance was studied by combined experimental and computational methods including surface plasmon resonance sensors, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, cell adhesion assay, and molecular simulations. Antifouling results showed that all polyHAAA-based brushes were highly surface resistant to protein adsorption from single protein solutions, undiluted blood serum and plasma, as well as cell adhesion up to 7 days. In particular, polyHMAA and polyHEAA with the shorter CSLs exhibited higher surface hydration and better antifouling ability than polyHPMA and polyHPenAA. SFG and molecular simulations further revealed that the variation of CSLs changed the ratio of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of polymers

  17. Hubble Space Telescope scale 3D simulations of MHD disc winds: a rotating two-component jet structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staff, J. E.; Koning, N.; Ouyed, R.; Thompson, A.; Pudritz, R. E.

    2015-02-01

    We present the results of large scale, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of disc winds for different initial magnetic field configurations. The jets are followed from the source to 90 au scale, which covers several pixels of Hubble Space Telescope images of nearby protostellar jets. Our simulations show that jets are heated along their length by many shocks. We compute the emission lines that are produced, and find excellent agreement with observations. The jet width is found to be between 20 and 30 au while the maximum velocities perpendicular to the jet are found to be up to above 100 km s-1. The initially less open magnetic field configuration simulations result in a wider, two-component jet; a cylindrically shaped outer jet surrounding a narrow and much faster, inner jet. These simulations preserve the underlying Keplerian rotation profile of the inner jet to large distances from the source. However, for the initially most open magnetic field configuration the kink mode creates a narrow corkscrew-like jet without a clear Keplerian rotation profile and even regions where we observe rotation opposite to the disc (counter-rotating). The RW Aur jet is narrow, indicating that the disc field in that case is very open meaning the jet can contain a counter-rotating component that we suggest explains why observations of rotation in this jet have given confusing results. Thus magnetized disc winds from underlying Keplerian discs can develop rotation profiles far down the jet that is not Keplerian.

  18. Structural Verification of the Space Shuttle's External Tank Super LightWeight Design: A Lesson in Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Neil

    1997-01-01

    The Super LightWeight Tank (SLWT) team was tasked with a daunting challenge from the outset: boost the payload capability of the Shuttle System by safely removing 7500 lbs. from the existing 65,400 lb. External Tank (ET). Tools they had to work with included a promising new Aluminum Lithium alloy, the concept of a more efficient structural configuration for the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) tank, and a highly successful, mature Light Weight Tank (LWT) program. The 44 month schedule which the SLWT team was given for the task was ambitious by any measure. During this time the team had to not only design, build, and verify the new tank, but they also had to move a material from the early stages of development to maturity. The aluminum lithium alloy showed great promise, with an approximately 29% increase in yield strength, 15% increase in ultimate strength, 5 deg/O increase in modulus and 5 deg/O decrease in density when compared to the current 2219 alloy. But processes had to be developed and brought under control, manufacturing techniques perfected, properties characterized, and design allowable generated. Because of the schedule constraint, this material development activity had to occur in parallel with design and manufacturing. Initial design was performed using design allowable believed to be achievable with the Aluminum Lithium alloy system, but based on limited test data. Preliminary structural development tests were performed with material still in the process of iteration. This parallel path approach posed obvious challenges and risks, but also allowed a unique opportunity for interaction between the structures and materials disciplines in the formulation of the material.

  19. Evolution of dislocation structures following a change in loading conditions studied by in situ high resolution reciprocal space mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wejdemann, Christian

    corresponding to the contributions from the subgrains and the walls. The analysis showed that the morphology of the dislocation structures is almost unchanged during the micro-plastic range of the in situ deformation, and during the macroplastic range the evolution occurs in a gradual manner without any sudden......-granular stresses are substantially redistributed during the micro-plastic range. In a few individual subgrains it was possible to follow the evolution of the elastic back-strain from the tensile to the compressive case. Following an increase in temperature from -196 ○C to room temperature, both the average intra...

  20. Reflection of hierarchical medium structures of different scales in the space time data of wave fields distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachay, Olga; Khachay, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    The last decades are characterized by active development of Earth's sciences. The modern research methods and technologies give the opportunity to obtain new data about the Earth's structure and processes, which occur in its interior. The conception development about the nonlinear geodynamics practically coincides with research of nonlinear processes in different parts of physics. In geology soliton and auto wave conceptions are developed, principles of synergetic and self organization become be used, in geodynamics the macro quantum behavior of large mass matter, which are in critical state, in geophysics the auto wave nature of geophysical fields is researched in a frame of a new structural model with hierarchical inclusions. It is very significant to define the time of reaction lagging, in spite of the influence on the massif can be assumed as elastic. The unique model which can explain that effect is a model of the massif with a hierarchic structure. We developed a mathematical algorithm using integral and integral-differential equations for 2-D model for two problems in a frequency domain: diffraction a sound wave and linear polarized transverse wave through a arbitrary hierarchy rank inclusion plunged in an N-layered medium. That algorithm differs from the fractal model approach by a freer selecting of heterogeneities position of each rank. And the second, the problem is solved in the dynamical approach. The higher the amount of the hierarchic ranks the more is the degree of nonlinearity of the massive response and the longer can be the time of massive reaction lag of the influence. For research of hierarchic medium we had developed an iterative algorithm for electromagnetic and seismic fields in the problem setting similar to analyze higher for layered-block models with homogeneous inclusions. We had developed an iterative algorithm of inverse problem solution for the same models, using the approach of three stage interpretation. For that we had developed a