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Sample records for pseudoscalar-meson decay constants

  1. Page 1 Weak decay constants of pseudoscalar mesons model with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    required energy conservation at the quark-boson vertex; since the sum total of the kinetic energy of the constituent quark and antiquark in the process in not equal to the mass–energy of the decaying pseudoscalar meson considered in its rest frame. This is a common feature with all the phenomenological models based on ...

  2. Flavour breaking effects in the pseudoscalar meson decay constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornyakov, V.G. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal Univ., Vladivostok (Russian Federation). School of Biomedicine; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Hyogo (Japan); Perlt, H.; Schiller, A. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Pleiter, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Juelich Supercomputing Centre; Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Division; Schierholz, G. [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Stueben, H. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Regionales Rechenzentrum; Zanotti, J.M. [Adelaide Univ. (Australia). CSSM, Dept. of Physics; Collaboration: QCDSF-UKQCD Collaborations

    2016-12-14

    The SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion in up, down and strange quark masses is extended from hadron masses to meson decay constants. This allows a determination of the ratio of kaon to pion decay constants in QCD. Furthermore when using partially quenched valence quarks the expansion is such that SU(2) isospin breaking effects can also be determined. It is found that the lowest order SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion (or Gell-Mann-Okubo expansion) works very well. Simulations are performed for 2+1 flavours of clover fermions at four lattice spacings.

  3. Charmed and light pseudoscalar meson decay constants from HISQ simulations

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    Bazavov, Alexei; et al.

    2014-11-16

    We compute the leptonic decay constants $f_{D^+}$, $f_{D_s}$, and $f_{K^+}$, and the quark-mass ratios $m_c/m_s$ and $m_s/m_l$ in unquenched lattice QCD. We use the MILC highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) ensembles with four dynamical quark flavors. Our primary results are $f_{D^+} = 212.6(0.4)({}^{+1.0}_{-1.2})\\ \\mathrm{MeV}$, $f_{D_s} = 249.0(0.3)({}^{+1.1}_{-1.5})\\ \\mathrm{MeV}$, and $f_{D_s}/f_{D^+} = 1.1712(10)({}^{+29}_{-32})$, where the errors are statistical and total systematic, respectively. We also obtain $f_{K^+}/f_{\\pi^+} = 1.1956(10)({}^{+26}_{-18})$, updating our previous result, and determine the quark-mass ratios $m_s/m_l = 27.35(5)({}^{+10}_{-7})$ and $m_c/m_s = 11.747(19)({}^{+59}_{-43})$. When combined with experimental measurements of the decay rates, our results lead to precise determinations of the CKM matrix elements $|V_{us}| = 0.22487(51) (29)(20)(5)$, $|V_{cd}|=0.217(1) (5)(1)$ and $|V_{cs}|= 1.010(5)(18)(6)$, where the errors are from this calculation of the decay constants, the uncertainty in the experimental decay rates, structure-dependent electromagnetic corrections, and, in the case of $|V_{us}|$, the uncertainty in $|V_{ud}|$, respectively.

  4. Charmed and light pseudoscalar meson decay constants from HISQ simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bazavov, A; Bouchard, C; DeTar, C; Du, D; El-Khadra, A X; Foley, J; Freeland, E D; Gámiz, E; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Kim, J; Komijani, J; Kronfeld, A S; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Mackenzie, P B; Neil, E T; Simone, J N; Sugar, R L; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2014-01-01

    We compute the leptonic decay constants $f_{D^+}$, $f_{D_s}$, and $f_{K^+}$, and the quark-mass ratios $m_c/m_s$ and $m_s/m_l$ in unquenched lattice QCD. We use the MILC highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) ensembles with four dynamical quark flavors. Our primary results are $f_{D^+} = 212.6(0.4)({}^{+1.0}_{-1.2})\\ \\mathrm{MeV}$, $f_{D_s} = 249.0(0.3)({}^{+1.1}_{-1.5})\\ \\mathrm{MeV}$, and $f_{D_s}/f_{D^+} = 1.1712(10)({}^{+29}_{-32})$, where the errors are statistical and total systematic, respectively. We also obtain $f_{K^+}/f_{\\pi^+} = 1.1956(10)({}^{+26}_{-18})$, updating our previous result, and determine the quark-mass ratios $m_s/m_l = 27.35(5)({}^{+10}_{-7})$ and $m_c/m_s = 11.747(19)({}^{+59}_{-43})$. When combined with experimental measurements of the decay rates, our results lead to precise determinations of the CKM matrix elements $|V_{us}| = 0.22487(51) (29)(20)(5)$, $|V_{cd}|=0.217(1) (5)(1)$ and $|V_{cs}|= 1.010(5)(18)(6)$, where the errors are from this calculation of the decay constants, th...

  5. Charmed and strange pseudoscalar meson decay constants from HISQ simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bazavov, A; Bouchard, C; DeTar, C; Du, D; El-Khadra, A X; Foley, J; Freeland, E D; Gamiz, E; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Kim, J; Komijani, J; Kronfeld, A S; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Mackenzie, P B; Neil, E T; Simone, J N; Sugar, R L; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2013-01-01

    We update our determinations of $f_{D^+}$, $f_{D_s}$, $f_K$, and quark mass ratios from simulations with four flavors of HISQ dynamical quarks. The availability of ensembles with light quarks near their physical mass means that we can extract physical results with only small corrections for valence- and sea-quark mass mistunings instead of a chiral extrapolation. The adjusted valence-quark masses and lattice spacings may be determined from an ensemble-by-ensemble analysis, and the results for the quark mass ratios then extrapolated to the continuum limit. Our central values of the charmed meson decay constants, however, come from an alternative analysis, which uses staggered chiral perturbation theory for the heavy-light mesons, and allows us to incorporate data at unphysical quark masses where statistical errors are often smaller. A jackknife analysis propagated through all of these steps takes account of the correlations among all the quantities used in the analysis. Systematic errors from the finite spatia...

  6. Leptonic Decays of Charged Pseudoscalar Mesons - 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosner, Jonathan L. [Chicago U., EFI; Stone, Sheldon [Syracuse U.; Van de Water, Ruth S. [Fermilab

    2015-09-07

    We review the physics of purely leptonic decays of $\\pi^\\pm$, $K^\\pm$, $D^{\\pm}$, $D_s^\\pm$, and $B^\\pm$ pseudoscalar mesons. The measured decay rates are related to the product of the relevant weak-interaction-based CKM matrix element of the constituent quarks and a strong interaction parameter related to the overlap of the quark and antiquark wave-functions in the meson, called the decay constant $f_P$. The leptonic decay constants for $\\pi^\\pm$, $K^\\pm$, $D^{\\pm}$, $D_s^\\pm$, and $B^\\pm$ mesons can be obtained with controlled theoretical uncertainties and high precision from {\\it ab initio} lattice-QCD simulations. The combination of experimental leptonic decay-rate measurements and theoretical decay-constant calculations enables the determination of several elements of the CKM matrix within the standard model. These determinations are competitive with those obtained from semileptonic decays, and also complementary because they are sensitive to different quark flavor-changing currents. They can also be used to test the unitarity of the first and second rows of the CKM matrix. Conversely, taking the CKM elements predicted by unitarity, one can infer "experimental" values for $f_P$ that can be compared with theory. These provide tests of lattice-QCD methods, provided new-physics contributions to leptonic decays are negligible at the current level of precision. This review is the basis of the article in the Particle Data Group's 2016 edition, updating the versions in Refs. [1-3].

  7. Charmed and light pseudoscalar meson decay constants from four-flavor lattice QCD with physical light quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Komijani, J.; Bouchard, C. M.; DeTar, C.; Foley, J.; Levkova, L.; Du, D.; Laiho, J.; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gámiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Kim, J.; Toussaint, D.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Simone, J. N.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, R.; Neil, E. T.; Sugar, R.

    2014-10-30

    We compute the leptonic decay constants fD+, fDs, and fK+ and the quark-mass ratios mc/ms and ms/ml in unquenched lattice QCD using the experimentally determined value of fπ+ for normalization. We use the MILC highly improved staggered quark ensembles with four dynamical quark flavors—up, down, strange, and charm—and with both physical and unphysical values of the light sea-quark masses. The use of physical pions removes the need for a chiral extrapolation, thereby eliminating a significant source of uncertainty in previous calculations. Four different lattice spacings ranging from a0.06 to 0.15 fm are included in the analysis to control the extrapolation to the

  8. Pseudoscalar-Meson Octet-Baryon Coupling Constants from two-flavor Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Toru T; Oka, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the pseudoscalar-meson octet-baryon coupling constants and the corresponding axial charges in eight channels ($\\pi N\\N$, $\\pi\\Sigma\\Sigma$, $\\pi\\Lambda\\Sigma$, $K\\Lambda N$, $K \\Sigma N $, $\\pi\\Xi\\Xi$, $K\\Lambda\\Xi$ and $K\\Sigma\\Xi$) in lattice QCD with two flavors of dynamical quarks. The parameter $\\alpha\\equiv F/(F+D)$ representing the SU(3)-flavor symmetry is computed at each u,d-quark hopping parameter and at the flavor-SU(3) symmetric point where the three quark flavors are degenerate at the physical $s$-quark mass. In particular, we obtain $\\alpha=0.395(6)$ at the SU(3) symmetric limit. The quark-mass dependences of the coupling constants are obtained by changing the $u$- and the $d$-quark masses and we find that the SU(3)-flavor symmetry is broken by only a few percent at each quark-mass we employ.

  9. Application of the light-front holographic wavefunction for heavy-light pseudoscalar meson in Bd,s → Dd,sP decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qin; Xu, Shuai; Chen, Lingxin

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we extend our analyses of the decay constant and distribution amplitude with an improved holographic wavefunction to the heavy-light pseudoscalar mesons. In the evaluations, the helicity-dependence of the holographic wavefunction is considered; and an independent mass scale parameter is employed to moderate the strong suppression induced by the heavy quark. Under the constraints from decay constants and masses of pseudoscalar mesons, the χ2-analyses for the holographic parameters exhibit a rough consistence with the results obtained by fitting the Regge trajectory. With the fitted parameters, the results for the decay constants and distribution amplitudes are presented. We then show their application in evaluating the Bd,s →Dd,s P decays, in which the power-suppressed spectator scattering and weak annihilation corrections are first estimated. Numerically, the spectator scattering and weak annihilation corrections present a negative shift of about 0.7% on the branching fractions; while, the predictions are still larger than the experimental data. Such small negative shift confirms the estimation based on the power counting rules.

  10. Pseudoscalar meson physics with four dynamical quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Bazavov, A; Bouchard, C; DeTar, C; Du, D; El-Khadra, A X; Foley, J; Freeland, E D; Gamiz, E; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Hetrick, J E; Kim, J; Kronfeld, A S; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Lightman, M; Mackenzie, P B; Neil, E T; Oktay, M; Simone, J N; Sugar, R L; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2012-01-01

    We present preliminary results for light, strange and charmed pseudoscalar meson physics from simulations using four flavors of dynamical quarks with the highly improved staggered quark (HISQ) action. These simulations include lattice spacings ranging from 0.15 to 0.06 fm, and sea-quark masses both above and at their physical value. The major results are charm meson decay constants f_D, f_{D_s} and f_{D_s}/f_D and ratios of quark masses. This talk will focus on our procedures for finding the decay constants on each ensemble, the continuum extrapolation, and estimates of systematic error.

  11. Properties of flavour-singlet pseudoscalar mesons from lattice QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbach Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the status of the determination of properties of flavour-singlet pseudoscalar mesons using Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD at maximal twist. As part of project C7, a large number of phenomenologically relevant quantities could be extracted from first principle, from η and η′ masses to decay widths of pseudoscalar mesons to two photons.

  12. Beauty vector meson decay constants from QCD sum rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucha, Wolfgang [Institute for High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); Melikhov, Dmitri [Institute for High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); D. V. Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Simula, Silvano [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146, Roma (Italy)

    2016-01-22

    We present the outcomes of a very recent investigation of the decay constants of nonstrange and strange heavy-light beauty vector mesons, with special emphasis on the ratio of any such decay constant to the decay constant of the corresponding pseudoscalar meson, by means of Borel-transformed QCD sum rules. Our results suggest that both these ratios are below unity.

  13. Electromagnetic structure and weak decay of pseudoscalar mesons in a theory inspired in the QCD; Estrutura eletromagnetica e decaimento fraco de mesons pseudoescalares em uma teoria inspirada na QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcedo, Luiz Alberto de Moraes

    2004-07-01

    The electroweak properties of the ground state of the pseudoscalar mesons, {pi}, K, D, D{sub s}, B e B{sub c} were investigated within a relativistic constituent quark model on the light-front, inspired by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). The dynamics of the original model is given in terms of a mass square operator which contains a Coulomb-like and a singular hyperfine short-range interaction, which was treated using an Hamiltonian renormalization method. In this dissertation, the singular hyperfine interaction was regulated by a separable operator. The regularized model was parameterized to fit the pion mass and weak decay constant. In this way, the experimental values of the mass splitting between the ground states of the pseudoscalar and vector mesons were reasonably reproduced by the model. The results for the weak decay constants of the K, D, Ds, B and B{sub c} were consistent with experimental values and calculations from lattice QCD. The experimental data for the {pi} and K electromagnetic form factors were reproduced as well. (author)

  14. Phase Difference Between the Electromagnetic and Strong Amplitudes for psi(2S) and J/psi Decays into Pairs of Pseudoscalar Mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Metreveli, Z; Tomaradze, A; Xiao, T; Seth, Kamal K; Yelton, J; Asner, D M; Tatishvili, G; Bonvicini, G

    2012-01-01

    Using the data for 24.5x10^6 psi(2S) produced in e^+e^- annihilations at sqrt{s}=3686 MeV at the CESR-c e^+e^- collider and 8.6x10^6 J/psi produced in the decay psi(2S)->pi^+pi^-J/psi, the branching fractions for psi(2S) and J/psi decays to pairs of pseudoscalar mesons, pi^+pi^-, K^+K^-, and K_S K_L, have been measured using the CLEO-c detector. We obtain branching fractions Br(psi(2S)->pi^+pi^-)=(7.6+-2.5+-0.6)x10^-6, Br(psi(2S)->K^+K^-)=(74.8+-2.3+-3.9)x10^-6, Br(psi(2S)->K_S K_L)=(52.8+-2.5+-3.4)x10^-6, and Br(J/psi->pi^+pi^-)=(1.47+-0.13+-0.13)x10^-4, Br(J/psi->K^+K^-)=(2.86+-0.09+-0.19)x10^-4, Br(J/psi+-K_S K_L)=(2.62+-0.15+-0.14)x10^-4, where the first errors are statistical and the second errors are systematic. The phase differences between the amplitudes for electromagnetic and strong decays of psi(2S) and J/psi to 0^{-+} pseudoscalar pairs are determined by a Monte Carlo method to be \\delta(psi(2S)_{PP}=(110.5^{+16.0}_{-9.5})^o and \\delta(J/psi)_{PP}=(73.5^{+5.0}_{-4.5})^o. The difference between the...

  15. QED effects in the pseudoscalar meson sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsley, R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Peter Guthrie Tait Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3FD (United Kingdom); Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0047 (Japan); Perlt, H. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Leipzig, Brüderstrasse 16, Leipzig, 04109 (Germany); Pleiter, D. [Jülich Supercomputer Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich, 52425 (Germany); Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg, Regensburg, 93040 (Germany); Rakow, P.E.L. [Theoretical Physics Division, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Peach Street , Liverpool, L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg, 22603 (Germany); Schiller, A. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Leipzig, Brüderstrasse 16, Leipzig, 04109 (Germany); Stokes, R. [CSSM, Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, 5005 (Australia); Stüben, H. [Regionales Rechenzentrum, Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, 20146 (Germany); Young, R.D.; Zanotti, J.M. [CSSM, Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, 5005 (Australia); Collaboration: the QCDSF and UKQCD collaboration

    2016-04-15

    In this paper we present results on the pseudoscalar meson masses from a fully dynamical simulation of QCD+QED, concentrating particularly on violations of isospin symmetry. We calculate the π{sup +}–π{sup 0} splitting and also look at other isospin violating mass differences. We have presented results for these isospin splittings in http://arxiv.org/abs/1508.06401. In this paper we give more details of the techniques employed, discussing in particular the question of how much of the symmetry violation is due to QCD, arising from the different masses of the u and d quarks, and how much is due to QED, arising from the different charges of the quarks. This decomposition is not unique, it depends on the renormalisation scheme and scale. We suggest a renormalisation scheme in which Dashen’s theorem for neutral mesons holds, so that the electromagnetic self-energies of the neutral mesons are zero, and discuss how the self-energies change when we transform to a scheme such as (MS)-bar , in which Dashen’s theorem for neutral mesons is violated.

  16. Mass spectrum and decay constants of radially excited vector mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Fredy F.; Vera, Carlos E.; Rojas, Eduardo; El-Bennich, Bruno

    2017-07-01

    We calculate the masses and weak decay constants of flavorless and flavored ground and radially excited JP=1- mesons within a Poincaré covariant continuum framework based on the Bethe-Salpeter equation. We use in both the quark's gap equation and the meson bound-state equation an infrared massive and finite interaction in the leading symmetry-preserving truncation. While our numerical results are in rather good agreement with experimental values where they are available, no single parametrization of the QCD inspired interaction reproduces simultaneously the ground and excited mass spectrum, which confirms earlier work on pseudoscalar mesons. This feature being a consequence of the lowest truncation, we pin down the range and strength of the interaction in both cases to identify common qualitative features that may help to tune future interaction models beyond the rainbow-ladder approximation.

  17. Excited scalar and pseudoscalar mesons in the extended linear sigma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parganlija, Denis [Technische Universitaet Wien, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Vienna (Austria); Giacosa, Francesco [Jan Kochanowski University, Institute of Physics, Kielce (Poland); Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    We present an in-depth study of masses and decays of excited scalar and pseudoscalar anti qq states in the Extended Linear Sigma Model (eLSM). The model also contains ground-state scalar, pseudoscalar, vector and axial-vector mesons. The main objective is to study the consequences of the hypothesis that the f{sub 0}(1790) resonance, observed a decade ago by the BES Collaboration and recently by LHCb, represents an excited scalar quarkonium. In addition we also analyse the possibility that the new a{sub 0}(1950) resonance, observed recently by BABAR, may also be an excited scalar state. Both hypotheses receive justification in our approach although there appears to be some tension between the simultaneous interpretation of f{sub 0}(1790)/a{sub 0}(1950) and pseudoscalar mesons η(1295), π(1300), η(1440) and K(1460) as excited anti qq states. (orig.)

  18. Determining pseudoscalar meson photoproduction amplitudes from complete experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandorfi, A. M.; Hoblit, S.; Kamano, H.; Lee, T.-S. H.

    2011-05-01

    A new generation of complete experiments is focused on a high precision extraction of pseudoscalar meson photoproduction amplitudes. Here, we review the development of the most general analytic form of the cross section, dependent upon the three polarization vectors of the beam, target and recoil baryon, including all single-, double- and triple-polarization terms involving 16 spin-dependent observables. We examine the different conventions that have been used by different authors, and we present expressions that allow the direct numerical calculation of any pseudoscalar meson photoproduction observables with arbitrary spin projections from the Chew-Goldberger-Low-Nambu amplitudes. We use this numerical tool to clarify apparent sign differences that exist in the literature, in particular with the definitions of six double-polarization observables. We also present analytic expressions that determine the recoil baryon polarization, together with examples of their potential use with quasi-4π detectors to deduce observables. As an illustration of the use of the consistent machinery presented in this review, we carry out a multipole analysis of the γp → K+Λ reaction and examine the impact of recently published polarization measurements. When combining data from different experiments, we utilize the Fierz identities to fit a consistent set of scales. In fitting multipoles, we use a combined Monte Carlo sampling of the amplitude space, with gradient minimization, and find a shallow χ2 valley pitted with a very large number of local minima. This results in broad bands of multipole solutions that are experimentally indistinguishable. While these bands have been noticeably narrowed by the inclusion of new polarization measurements, many of the multipoles remain very poorly determined, even in sign, despite the inclusion of data on eight different observables. We have compared multipoles from recent PWA codes with our model-independent solution bands and found that such

  19. The charge form factor of pseudoscalar mesons in a relativistic constituent quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardarelli, F.; Pace, E. [Univ. of Rome, Roma (Italy); Grach, I.L. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1994-04-01

    The charge form factor of pseudoscalar mesons has been investigated in the light-cone formalism, up to Q{sup 2} relevant to CEBAF energies. The consequences of adopting the meson wave functions generated through the Godfrey-Isgur q{bar q} potential, which reproduces the mass spectra, are discussed.

  20. Central production of two-pseudoscalar meson systems at the COMPASS experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austregesilo, Alexander

    2014-10-20

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS which recorded a data set with an incident proton beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target in order to study the central production of light scalar mesons. We select events with two protons and two pseudo-scalar mesons in the final state and decompose their angular distribution in terms of partial-wave amplitudes. Fits to the mass-dependence of these amplitudes are used to determine the Breit-Wigner parameters of scalar resonances.

  1. Hard exclusive pseudoscalar meson electroproduction and spin structure of the nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankfurt, L. L.; Pobylitsa, P. V.; Polyakov, M. V.; Strikman, M.

    1999-07-01

    The amplitude for hard exclusive pseudoscalar meson electroproduction off nucleon (nuclear) targets is computed in QCD within the leading αslnQ2/Λ2QCD approximation. We show that the distribution of recoil nucleons depends strongly on the angle between the momentum of the recoil nucleon and the polarization vector of the target (or outgoing nucleon). This dependence is especially sensitive to the spin flip skewed parton distribution (SPD) E~. We argue also that the scaling for this spin asymmetry sets in at lower Q2 than that for the absolute cross section. Based on the chiral quark-soliton model of the nucleon we estimate quantitatively the spin asymmetry. In the case of π+ production this asymmetry is dominated at small t by the contribution of the pion pole in the isovector SPD E~ as required by PCAC. In the case of K0 production off a proton we find a large enhancement of the cross section as compared to the case of π0 production. For the forward production of neutral pseudoscalar mesons off a deuteron target we find the cross section should be zero for the zero deuteron helicity (along the γ*D direction). We consider also cross sections of quasielastic processes off nuclei including the feasibility to implant K+,ρ mesons into nuclear volume.

  2. Deeply Virtual Pseudoscalar Meson Production at Jefferson Lab and Transversity GPDs

    CERN Document Server

    Kubarovsky, Valery

    2016-01-01

    The cross section of the exclusive $\\pi^0$ and $\\eta$ electroproduction reaction $ep\\to e^\\prime p^\\prime \\pi^0/\\eta$ was measured at Jefferson Lab with a 5.75-GeV electron beam and the CLAS detector. Differential cross sections $d^4\\sigma/dtdQ^2dx_Bd\\phi$ and structure functions $\\sigma_T+\\epsilon\\sigma_L, \\sigma_{TT}$ and $\\sigma_{LT}$ as functions of $t$ were obtained over a wide range of $Q^2$ and $x_B$. The data are compared with the GPD based theoretical models. Analyses find that a large dominance of transverse processes is necessary to explain the experimental results. Generalized form factors of the transversity GPDs $H_T^{\\pi,\\eta}$ and $\\bar E_T^{\\pi,\\eta}$ were directly extracted from the experimental observables for the first time. It was found that GPD $\\bar E_T$ dominates in pseudoscalar meson production. The combined $\\pi^0$ and $\\eta$ data opens the way for the flavor decomposition of the transversity GPDs. The first ever evaluation of this decomposition was demonstrated.

  3. $B$- and $D$-meson leptonic decay constants from four-flavor lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazavov, A. [Michigan State U.; Bernard, C. [Washington U., St. Louis; Brown, N. [Washington U., St. Louis; Detar, C. [Utah U.; El-Khadra, A. X. [Fermilab; Gámiz, E. [Granada U., Theor. Phys. Astrophys.; Gottlieb, Steven [Indiana U.; Heller, U. M. [APS, New York; Komijani, J. [TUM-IAS, Munich; Kronfeld, A. S. [TUM-IAS, Munich; Laiho, J. [Syracuse U.; Mackenzie, P. B. [Fermilab; Neil, E. T. [RIKEN BNL; Simone, J. N. [Fermilab; Sugar, R. L. [UC, Santa Barbara; Toussaint, D. [Glasgow U.; Van De Water, R. S. [Fermilab

    2017-12-26

    We calculate the leptonic decay constants of heavy-light pseudoscalar mesons with charm and bottom quarks in lattice quantum chromodynamics on four-flavor QCD gauge-field configurations with dynamical $u$, $d$, $s$, and $c$ quarks. We analyze over twenty isospin-symmetric ensembles with six lattice spacings down to $a\\approx 0.03$~fm and several values of the light-quark mass down to the physical value $\\frac{1}{2}(m_u+m_d)$. We employ the highly-improved staggered-quark (HISQ) action for the sea and valence quarks; on the finest lattice spacings, discretization errors are sufficiently small that we can calculate the $B$-meson decay constants with the HISQ action for the first time directly at the physical $b$-quark mass. We obtain the most precise determinations to-date of the $D$- and $B$-meson decay constants and their ratios, $f_{D^+} = 212.6 (0.5)$~MeV, $f_{D_s} = 249.8(0.4)$~MeV, $f_{D_s}/f_{D^+} = 1.1749(11)$, $f_{B^+} = 189.4(1.4)$~MeV, $f_{B_s} = 230.7(1.2)$~MeV, $f_{B_s}/f_{B^+} = 1.2180(49)$, where the errors include statistical and all systematic uncertainties. Our results for the $B$-meson decay constants are three times more precise than the previous best lattice-QCD calculations, and bring the QCD errors in the Standard-Model predictions for the rare leptonic decays $\\overline{\\mathcal{B}}(B_s \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-) = 3.65(11) \\times 10^{-9}$, $\\overline{\\mathcal{B}}(B^0 \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-) = 1.00(3) \\times 10^{-11}$, and $\\overline{\\mathcal{B}}(B^0 \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-)/\\overline{\\mathcal{B}}(B_s \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-) = 0.00264(7)$ to well below other sources of uncertainty. As a byproduct of our analysis, we also update our previously published results for the light-quark-mass ratios and the scale-setting quantities $f_{p4s}$, $M_{p4s}$, and $R_{p4s}$. We obtain the most precise lattice-QCD determination to date of the ratio $f_{K^+}/f_{\\pi^+} = 1.1950(^{+15}_{-22})$~MeV.

  4. Polarization observables in the longitudinal basis for pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction using a density matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biplab Dey, Michael E. McCracken, David G. Ireland, Curtis A. Meyer

    2011-05-01

    The complete expression for the intensity in pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction with a polarized beam, target, and recoil baryon is derived using a density matrix approach that offers great economy of notation. A Cartesian basis with spins for all particles quantized along a single direction, the longitudinal beam direction, is used for consistency and clarity in interpretation. A single spin-quantization axis for all particles enables the amplitudes to be written in a manifestly covariant fashion with simple relations to those of the well-known CGLN formalism. Possible sign discrepancies between theoretical amplitude-level expressions and experimentally measurable intensity profiles are dealt with carefully. Our motivation is to provide a coherent framework for coupled-channel partial-wave analysis of several meson photoproduction reactions, incorporating recently published and forthcoming polarization data from Jefferson Lab.

  5. The time-like electromagnetic form factors of the charged pseudoscalar mesons from 144 to 90 GeV/sup 2/

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, M; Brunini, P L; Fiorentino, E; Massam, Thomas; Monari, L; Palmonari, F; Rimondi, F; Zichichi, A

    1973-01-01

    The study of 620 hadron pairs produced in the s-range (1.44-9.0) GeV /sup 2/, has yielded 110 collinear hadronic events. Their identification in terms of pi and K mesons allows the determination of the time-like electromagnetic from factors of these pseudoscalar mesons in the above time-like range. The total number of (e/sup +or-/e /sup -/) events observed in the same experimental conditions is 18048. (10 refs).

  6. Determining the dominant partial wave contributions from angular distributions of single- and double-polarization observables in pseudoscalar meson photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, Y.; Afzal, F.; Thiel, A.; Beck, R. [Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    This work presents a simple method to determine the significant partial wave contributions to experimentally determined observables in pseudoscalar meson photoproduction. First, fits to angular distributions are presented and the maximum orbital angular momentum L{sub max} needed to achieve a good fit is determined. Then, recent polarization measurements for γp → π{sup 0}p from ELSA, GRAAL, JLab and MAMI are investigated according to the proposed method. This method allows us to project high-spin partial wave contributions to any observable as long as the measurement has the necessary statistical accuracy. We show, that high precision and large angular coverage in the polarization data are needed in order to be sensitive to high-spin resonance states and thereby also for the finding of small resonance contributions. This task can be achieved via interference of these resonances with the well-known states. For the channel γp → π{sup 0}p, those are the N(1680)(5)/(2){sup +} and Δ(1950)(7)/(2){sup +}, contributing to the F-waves. (orig.)

  7. Pion decay constants in dense skyrmion matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee H.-J.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available According to the QCD, the hadronic matter can have various phases with matter density and temperature. In general, when there is phase transition in a matter, it is known that a symmetry in the matter changes. In case of the hadronic matter, the chiral symmetry in the matter is expected to be restored when the matter density (or temperature increases. The actual order parameter with respect to the chiral symmetry in the hadronic matter is known as the quark condensate from the QCD, but the pion decay constant, corresponding to the radius of the chiral circle, plays the role of the order parameter in an effective field theoretical approach to the QCD. In this paper, by using the skyrmion model which is an effective theory to the QCD, we construct the skyrmion matter as a model of the hadronic matter (nuclear matter and calculate the pion decay constant in the matter. Because of presence of the matter, the pion decay constant is split into the two components, the temporal component and the spatial component. We discuss the phase transition in the skyrmion matter and behavior of the two components of the decay constant for massless pion with density of the skyrmion matter.

  8. Electromagnetic corrections to pseudoscalar decay constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaessle, Benjamin Simon

    2017-03-06

    First principles Lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) calculations enable the determination of low energy hadronic amplitudes. Precision LQCD calculations with relative errors smaller than approximately 1% require the inclusion of electromagnetic effects. We demonstrate that including (quenched) quantum electrodynamics effects in the LQCD calculation effects the values obtained for pseudoscalar decay constants in the per mille range. The importance of systematic effects, including finite volume effects and the charge dependence of renormalization and improvement coefficients, is highlighted.

  9. Observation of electromagnetic Dalitz decays J/psi -> Pe(+)e(-)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J. M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Braun, S.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Chu, Y. P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W. M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. Q.; Fu, C. D.; Fu, J. L.; Fuks, O.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y. P.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, M.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kloss, B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D.; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. J.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, G. R.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, H. L.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, X. R.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Moeini, H.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, N.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yu, S. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zang, S. L.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. B.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, X. H.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Based on a sample of (225.3 +/- 2.8) x 10(6) J/psi events collected with the BESIII detector, the electromagnetic Dalitz decays of J/psi -> Pe(+)e(-)(P = eta'/eta/pi(0)) are studied. By reconstructing the pseudoscalar mesons in various decay modes, the decays J/psi -> eta'e(+)e(-), J/psi -> eta

  10. Photoproduction and Decay of Light Mesons in CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaryan, Moskov Jamalovich [Old Dominion University

    2013-08-01

    We present preliminary experimental results on photoproduction and decay of light mesons measured with CLAS setup at JLAB . This include Dalitz decay of pseudoscalar and vector mesons, radiative decay of pseudoscalar mesons as well hadronic decays of pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The collected high statistics in some of decay channels exceeds the world data by an order of magnitude and some other decay modes are observed for the first time. It is shown how the CLAS data will improve the world data on transition form factors of light mesons, Dalitz plot analyses, branching ratios of rare decay modes and other fundamental properties potentially accessible through the light meson decays.

  11. The decay widths, the decay constants, and the branching fractions of a resonant state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrid, Rafael de la, E-mail: rafael.delamadrid@lamar.edu

    2015-08-15

    We introduce the differential and the total decay widths of a resonant (Gamow) state decaying into a continuum of stable states. When the resonance has several decay modes, we introduce the corresponding partial decay widths and branching fractions. In the approximation that the resonance is sharp, the expressions for the differential, partial and total decay widths of a resonant state bear a close resemblance with the Golden Rule. In such approximation, the branching fractions of a resonant state are the same as the standard branching fractions obtained by way of the Golden Rule. We also introduce dimensionless decay constants along with their associated differential decay constants, and we express experimentally measurable quantities such as the branching fractions and the energy distributions of decay events in terms of those dimensionless decay constants.

  12. Determination of low-energy constants of Wilson chiral perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herdoiza, Gregorio [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst fuer Kernphysik, PRISMA Cluster of Excellence; Univ. Autonoma de Madrid, Contoblanco (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC; Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Univ. Cyprus, Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Michael, Chris [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Division; Ottnad, Konstantin; Urbach, Carsten [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen und Kernphysik; Univ. Bonn (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics; Collaboration: European Twisted Mass Collaboration

    2013-03-15

    By matching Wilson twisted mass lattice QCD determinations of pseudoscalar meson masses to Wilson Chiral Perturbation Theory we determine the low-energy constants W{sub 6}{sup '}, W{sub 8}{sup '} and their linear combination c{sub 2}. We explore the dependence of these low-energy constants on the choice of the lattice action and on the number of dynamical flavours.

  13. Decay constants of heavy mesons from QCD sum rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melikhov, Dmitri [HEPHY, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics - SINP, Moscow State University, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lucha, Wolfgang [HEPHY, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, 1050 Vienna (Austria); Simula, Silvano [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - INFN, Via Enrico Fermi, 40 - 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Universita' degli Studi ' Roma Tre' , via della Vasca Navale, 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    We study the decay constants of D, Ds, B, B{sub s} mesons with Borel QCD sum rules, making use of the recent modifications related to the Borel-parameter-dependent effective continuum threshold. For the fixed values of the QCD parameters, our modifications are shown to lead to a visible shift of the extracted value of the decay constant compared to the standard analysis based on a Borel-parameter-independent threshold. We argue that our modifications allow one to probe the systematic errors of the extracted decay constants. We provide rather accurate results for fD and fDs. We demonstrate that an accurate extraction of fB and fBs is only possible if a very precise value of m{sub b}(m{sub b}) is known. (authors)

  14. Decay constants in soft wall AdS/QCD revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson R.F. Braga

    2016-12-01

    We show here that a modified framework of soft wall AdS/QCD involving an additional dimensionfull parameter, associated with an ultraviolet energy scale, provides decay constants decreasing with radial excitation level. In this version of the soft wall model the two point function of gauge theory operators is calculated at a finite position of the anti-de Sitter space radial coordinate.

  15. Decay constants in soft wall AdS/QCD revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Nelson R.F., E-mail: braga@if.ufrj.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); Diles, Saulo, E-mail: smdiles@if.ufrj.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, RJ 21941-972 (Brazil); Contreras, M.A. Martin, E-mail: ma.martin41@uniandes.edu.co [High Energy Group, Department of Physics, Universidad de los Andes, Carrera 1, No 18A-10, Bloque Ip, ZIP 111711, Bogotá (Colombia)

    2016-12-10

    Phenomenological AdS/QCD models, like hard wall and soft wall, provide hadronic mass spectra in reasonable consistency with experimental and (or) lattice results. These simple models are inspired in the AdS/CFT correspondence and assume that gauge/gravity duality holds in a scenario where conformal invariance is broken through the introduction of an energy scale. Another important property of hadrons: the decay constant, can also be obtained from these models. However, a consistent formulation of an AdS/QCD model that reproduces the observed behavior of decay constants of vector meson excited states is still lacking. In particular: for radially excited states of heavy vector mesons, the experimental data lead to decay constants that decrease with the radial excitation level. We show here that a modified framework of soft wall AdS/QCD involving an additional dimensionfull parameter, associated with an ultraviolet energy scale, provides decay constants decreasing with radial excitation level. In this version of the soft wall model the two point function of gauge theory operators is calculated at a finite position of the anti-de Sitter space radial coordinate.

  16. Cosmological perturbations of axion with a dynamical decay constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Takeshi [SISSA,Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste,Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Takahashi, Fuminobu [Department of Physics, Tohoku University,Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2016-08-25

    A QCD axion with a time-dependent decay constant has been known to be able to accommodate high-scale inflation without producing topological defects or too large isocurvature perturbations on CMB scales. We point out that a dynamical decay constant also has the effect of enhancing the small-scale axion isocurvature perturbations. The enhanced axion perturbations can even exceed the periodicity of the axion potential, and thus lead to the formation of axionic domain walls. Unlike the well-studied axionic walls, the walls produced from the enhanced perturbations are not bounded by cosmic strings, and thus would overclose the universe independently of the number of degenerate vacua along the axion potential.

  17. Evidence against solar influence on nuclear decay constants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pommé

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that proximity to the Sun causes variation of decay constants at permille level has been tested and disproved. Repeated activity measurements of mono-radionuclide sources were performed over periods from 200 days up to four decades at 14 laboratories across the globe. Residuals from the exponential nuclear decay curves were inspected for annual oscillations. Systematic deviations from a purely exponential decay curve differ from one data set to another and are attributable to instabilities in the instrumentation and measurement conditions. The most stable activity measurements of alpha, beta-minus, electron capture, and beta-plus decaying sources set an upper limit of 0.0006% to 0.008% to the amplitude of annual oscillations in the decay rate. Oscillations in phase with Earth's orbital distance to the Sun could not be observed within a 10−6 to 10−5 range of precision. There are also no apparent modulations over periods of weeks or months. Consequently, there is no indication of a natural impediment against sub-permille accuracy in half-life determinations, renormalisation of activity to a distant reference date, application of nuclear dating for archaeology, geo- and cosmochronology, nor in establishing the SI unit becquerel and seeking international equivalence of activity standards.

  18. Search for Lepton Flavor Violating Decays $\\tau^\\pm \\to \\ell^\\pm{\\pi^0}, \\ell^\\pm\\eta, \\ell^\\pm{\\eta^\\prime}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, R; Allen, M T; Allison, J; Altenburg, D D; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arnaud, N; Asgeirsson, D J; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M A; Back, J J; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Battaglia, M; Bauer, J M; Bechtle, P; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Benelli, G; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D S; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Biesiada, J; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P C; Blount, N L; Bomben, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Briand, H; Brown, C M; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Bugg, W; Bukin, A D; Bula, R; Burchat, P R; Burke, J P; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Bóna, M; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Cenci, R; Chai, X; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, C; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chia, Y M; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Clarke, C K; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Corwin, L A; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L; Cunha, A; Curry, S; Côté, D; D'Orazio, A; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; De Nardo, Gallieno; De Sangro, R; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Del Buono, L; Del Re, D; Della Ricca, G; Denig, A G; Di Lodovico, F; Di Marco, E; Dingfelder, J C; Dittongo, S; Dong, L; Dorfan, J; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Ebert, M; Eckhart, E A; Eckmann, R; Edgar, C L; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Eyges, V; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fang, F; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flacco, C J; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Fulsom, B G; Gabathuler, E; Gaidot, A; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; Gaz, A; George, K A; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Golubev, V B; Gowdy, S J; Gradl, W; Graham, M T; Graugès-Pous, E; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Hadavand, H K; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamano, K; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hartfiel, B L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hill, E J; Hirschauer, J F; Hitlin, D G; Hollar, J J; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hopkins, D A; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Höcker, A; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jain, V; Jasper, H; Jawahery, A; Jessop, C P; Judd, D; Kadyk, J A; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Klose, V; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kolb, J A; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kreisel, A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; La Vaissière, C de; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Latour, E; Lau, Y P; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lee, C L; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Lewandowski, B; Li Gioi, L; Li, S; Li, X; Lista, L; Liu, H; Lo Vetere, M; LoSecco, J M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; Long, O; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lopez-March, N; Lou, X C; Lu, M; Luitz, S; Lund, P; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lü, C; Lüth, V; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M M; Mader, W F; Majewski, S A; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marks, J; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Mclachlin, S E; Meadows, B T; Mellado, B; Menges, W; Merkel, J; Messner, R; Meyer, N T; Meyer, W T; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mishra, K; Mohanty, G B; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Nagel, M; Naisbit, M T; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nesom, G; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; Nugent, I M; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Oyanguren, A; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Pacetti, S; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, B; Pan, Y; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Pappagallo, M; Park, W; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Peters, K; Petersen, B A; Petrella, A; Petzold, A; Piatenko, T; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Playfer, S; Poireau, V; Polci, F; Pompili, A; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prencipe, E; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pruvot, S; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rahimi, A M; Rahmat, R; Rama, M; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Regensburger, J J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roberts, D A; Robertson, A I; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Rodier, S; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Roudeau, P; Rubin, A E; Ruddick, W O; Röthel, W; Sacco, R; Saeed, M A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Sanders, D A; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Satpathy, A; Schalk, T; Schenk, S; Schilling, C J; Schindler, R H; Schofield, K C; Schott, G; Schröder, T; Schröder, H; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Serrano, J; Sharma, V; Shen, B C; Sherwood, D J; Simard, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spitznagel, M; Spradlin, P; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stocchi, A; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Strube, J; Stugu, B; Stängle, H; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Sundermann, J E; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Telnov, A V; Teodorescu, L; Ter-Antonian, R; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thompson, J M; Tisserand, V; Todyshev, K Yu; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Ulmer, K A; Uwer, U; Van Bakel, N; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Verderi, M; Viaud, F B; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Volk, A; Wagner, A P; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walker, D; Walsh, J J; Wang, K; Wang, P; Wang, W F; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wren, A C; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Wulsin, H W; Xie, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Yarritu, A K; Ye, S; Yi, J I; Yi, K; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yéche, C; Zain, S B; Zallo, A; Zeng, Q; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Ziegler, V; Zito, M; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; al, et

    2007-01-01

    A search for lepton flavor violating decays of the $\\tau$ lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a pseudoscalar meson has been performed using 339 fb$^{-1}$ of $e^+e^-$ annihilation data collected at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV by the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II storage ring. No evidence of signal has been found, and upper limits on the branching fractions are set at $10^{-7}$ level.

  19. Charmed meson decay constants in three-flavor lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubin, C.; Bernard, C.; DeTar, C.; Di Pierro, M.; Freeland, Elizabeth D.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U.M.; Hetrick, J.E.; El-Khadra, Aida X.; Kronfeld, Andreas S.; Levkova, L.; Mackenzie, P.B.; Menscher, D.; Maresca, F.; Nobes, M.; Okamoto, M.; Renner, D.B.; Simone, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Trottier, H.D.; /Art Inst. of Chicago /Columbia

    2005-06-01

    The authors present the first lattice QCD calculation with realistic sea quark content of the D{sup +}-meson decay constant f{sub D+}. They use the MILC Collaboration's publicly available ensembles of lattice gauge fields, which have a quark sea with two flavors (up and down) much lighter than a third (strange). They obtain f{sub D+} = 201 {+-} 3 {+-} 17 MeV, where the errors are statistical and a combination of systematic errors. They also obtain f{sub D{sub s}} = 249 {+-} 3 {+-} 16 MeV for the D{sub s} meson.

  20. B meson spectrum and decay constant from Nf=2 simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Blossier, Benoit; Della Morte, Michele; Donnellan, Michael; Fritzsch, Patrick; Garron, Nicolas; Heitger, Jochen; von Hippel, Georg; Leder, Bjorn; Simma, Hubert; Sommer, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    We report on the status of an ALPHA Collaboration project to extract quantities for B physics phenomenology from Nf=2 lattice simulations. The framework is Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) expanded up to the first order of the inverse b-quark mass. The couplings of the effective theory are determined by imposing matching conditions of observables computed in HQET with their counterpart computed in QCD. That program, based on Nf=2 simulations in a small physical volume with SF boundary conditions, is now almost finished. On the other side the analysis of configurations selected from the CLS ensembles, in order to measure HQET hadronic matrix elements, has just started recently so that only results obtained at a single lattice spacing, a=0.07 fm, will be discussed. We give our first results for the b-quark mass and for the B meson decay constant.

  1. Analysis of strong decays of charmed mesons D2*(2460 ) , D0(2560 ), D2(2740 ), D1(3000 ), D2*(3000 ), and their spin partners D1*(2680 ), D3*(2760 ), and D0*(3000 )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pallavi; Upadhyay, A.

    2018-01-01

    Using the effective Lagrangian approach, we examine the recently observed charm states DJ*(2460 ), DJ(2560 ), DJ(2740 ), DJ(3000 ), and their spin partners DJ*(2680 ), DJ*(2760 ), and DJ*(3000 ) with JP states 1 P3/22+, 2 S1/20-, 1 D5/22-, 2 P1/21+, and 2 S1/21-, 1 D5/23-, 2 P1/20+ respectively. We study their two body strong decays, coupling constants and branching ratios with the emission of light pseudo-scalar mesons (π ,η ,K ). We also analyze the newly observed charm state D2*(3000 ) and suggest it to be either 1 F (2+) or 2 P (2+) state and justify one of them to be the most favorable assignment for D2*(3000 ). We study the partial and the total decay width of unobserved states D (1 1F3) , Ds(1 1F3) and Ds(1 1F2) as the spin and the strange partners of the D2*(3000 ) charmed meson. The branching ratios and the coupling constants gT H, g˜H H, gY H, g˜S H, and gZ H calculated in this work can be confronted with the future experimental data.

  2. The difficulty in the decay constants and spectra of $D^{*}_{sJ}$

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Ron-Chou; Chen, Chuan-Hung; Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2003-01-01

    We examine the compatibility in predicted masses and the decay constants of $D^{*}_{sJ}$ mesons in terms of two-quark contents. We find that the results of a specific model, which is governed by heavy quark limit, will encounter a challenge to fit both spectra and decay constants simultaneously.

  3. Measurements of branching fractions of leptonic and hadronic meson decays and extraction of the meson decay constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanc, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Bhuyan, B.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, M.-C.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Jaegle, I.; Julius, T.; Kato, E.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kronenbitter, B.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Libby, J.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Prim, M.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Vahsen, S. E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.

    2013-09-01

    We present measurements of absolute branching fractions of hadronic and lep-tonic decays to K - K + π +, K +, ηπ +, μ + ν μ and τ + ν τ and report a search for the leptonic → e + ν e decays. The results are obtained from a data sample of 913 fb-1 collected at or near the (4 S) and (5 S) resonances with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e + e - collider. The branching fractions of hadronic decays are measured to be where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The branching fractions of leptonic decays are measured to be which are combined to determine the meson decay constant We find no significant signal for → e + ν e decays and set an upper limit of < 1 .0(0 .83) × 10-4 at 95% (90%) confidence level. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. B and D meson decay constants from 2+1 flavor improved staggered simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Neil, E T; Bazavov, A; Bernard, C; Bouchard, C M; DeTar, C; Di Pierro, M; El-Khadra, A X; Evans, R T; Freeland, E; Gamiz, E; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Hetrick, J E; Jain, R; Kronfeld, A S; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Mackenzie, P B; Oktay, M B; Simone, J N; Sugar, R; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S

    2011-01-01

    We give an update on simulation results for the decay constants f_B, f_{B_s}, f_D and f_{D_s}. These decay constants are important for precision tests of the standard model, in particular entering as inputs to the global CKM unitarity triangle fit. The results presented here make use of the MILC (2+1)-flavor asqtad ensembles, with heavy quarks incorporated using the clover action with the Fermilab method. Partially quenched, staggered chiral perturbation theory is used to extract the decay constants at the physical point. In addition, we give error projections for a new analysis in progress, based on an extended data set.

  5. Decay constants of the pion and its excitations on the lattice.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastropas, Ekaterina V. [William and Mary College, JLAB; Richards, David G. [JLAB

    2014-07-01

    We present a calculation using lattice QCD of the ratios of decay constants of the excited states of the pion, to that of the pion ground state, at three values of the pion mass between 400 and 700 MeV, using an anisotropic clover fermion action with three flavors of quarks. We find that the decay constant of the first excitation, and more notably of the second, is suppressed with respect to that of the ground-state pion, but that the suppression shows little dependence on the quark mass. The strong suppression of the decay constant of the second excited state is consistent with its interpretation as a predominantly hybrid state.

  6. Leptonic B- and D-Meson Decay Constants with 2+1 Flavors of Asqtad Fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neil, Ethan T.; Simone, James N.; Van de Water, Ruth S.; Kronfeld, Andreas S.

    2015-01-08

    We present the status of our updated D- and B-meson decay-constant analysis, based on the MILC Nf =2+1 asqtad gauge ensembles. Heavy quarks are incorporated using the Wilson clover action with the Fermilab interpretation. This analysis includes ensembles at five lattice spacings from α ≈ 0.045 to 0.15 fm, and light sea-quark masses down to 1/20th of the strange-quark mass. Projected error budgets for ratios of decay constants, in particular between bottom- and charm-meson decay constants, are presented.

  7. Numerical calculation of the decay widths, the decay constants, and the decay energy spectra of the resonances of the delta-shell potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrid, Rafael de la, E-mail: rafael.delamadrid@lamar.edu

    2017-06-15

    We express the resonant energies of the delta-shell potential in terms of the Lambert W function, and we calculate their decay widths and decay constants. The ensuing numerical results strengthen the interpretation of such decay widths and constants as a way to quantify the coupling between a resonance and the continuum. We calculate explicitly the decay energy spectrum of the resonances of the delta-shell potential, and we show numerically that the lineshape of such spectrum is not the same as, and can be very different from, the Breit–Wigner (Lorentzian) distribution. We argue that the standard Golden Rule cannot describe the interference of two resonances, and we show how to describe such interference by way of the decay energy spectrum of two resonant states.

  8. Numerical calculation of the decay widths, the decay constants, and the decay energy spectra of the resonances of the delta-shell potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Madrid, Rafael

    2017-06-01

    We express the resonant energies of the delta-shell potential in terms of the Lambert W function, and we calculate their decay widths and decay constants. The ensuing numerical results strengthen the interpretation of such decay widths and constants as a way to quantify the coupling between a resonance and the continuum. We calculate explicitly the decay energy spectrum of the resonances of the delta-shell potential, and we show numerically that the lineshape of such spectrum is not the same as, and can be very different from, the Breit-Wigner (Lorentzian) distribution. We argue that the standard Golden Rule cannot describe the interference of two resonances, and we show how to describe such interference by way of the decay energy spectrum of two resonant states.

  9. B+ and D(S)+ Decay Constants from Belle and BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, A.J.; /Cincinnati U.

    2012-04-09

    The Belle and Babar experiments have measured the branching fractions for B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu} and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu} decays. From these measurements one can extract the B{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} decay constants, which can be compared to lattice QCD calculations. For the D{sub s}{sup +} decay constant, there is currently a 2.1 {sigma} difference between the calculated value and the measured value.

  10. Methodology of measurement of thermal neutron time decay constant in Canberra 35+ MCA system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdowicz, K.; Gabanska, B.; Igielski, A.; Krynicka, E.; Woznicka, U. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    A method of the thermal neutron time decay constant measurement in small bounded media is presented. A 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator is the neutron source. The system of recording of a die-away curve of thermal neutrons consists of a {sup 3}He detector and of a multichannel time analyzer based on analyzer Canberra 35+ with multi scaler module MCS 7880 (microsecond range). Optimum parameters for the measuring system are considered. Experimental verification of a dead time of the instrumentation system is made and a count-loss correction is incorporated into the data treatment. An attention is paid to evaluate with a high accuracy the fundamental mode decay constant of the registered decaying curve. A new procedure of the determination of the decay constant by a multiple recording of the die-away curve is presented and results of test measurements are shown. (author). 11 refs, 12 figs, 4 tabs.

  11. Chiral behaviour of the pion decay constant in N{sub f}=2 QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottini, Stefano [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration

    2013-11-15

    As increased statistics and new ensembles with light pions have become available within the CLS effort, we complete previous work by inspecting the chiral behaviour of the pion decay constant. We discuss the validity of Chiral Perturbation Theory ({chi}PT) and examine the results concerning the pion decay constant and the ensuing scale setting, the pion mass squared in units of the quark mass, and the ratio of decay constants f{sub K}=f{sub {pi}}; along the way, the relevant low-energy constants of SU(2) {chi}PT are estimated. All simulations were performed with two dynamical flavours of nonperturbatively O(a)-improved Wilson fermions, on volumes with m{sub {pi}}L{>=}4, pion masses{>=}192 MeV and lattice spacings down to 0.048 fm. Our error analysis takes into account the effect of slow modes on the autocorrelations.

  12. Search for Lepton Flavor Violating Decays $\\tau^\\pm \\to \\ell^\\pm{\\pi^0}, \\ell^\\pm\\eta, \\ell^\\pm{\\eta^\\prime}$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-11-15

    A search for lepton flavor violating decays of the {tau} lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a pseudoscalar meson has been performed using 339 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data collected at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58GeV by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II storage ring. No evidence of signal has been found, and upper limits on the branching fractions are set at 10{sup -7} level.

  13. Searching for New Physics in Non-Leptonic B Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Robert; Fleischer, Robert; Matias, Joaquim

    2000-01-01

    We present the allowed regions in the space of observables of certain non-leptonic B-meson decays into two light pseudoscalar mesons, which are implied by the Standard-Model expressions for the corresponding transition amplitudes. A future measurement of observables not lying within these regions would immediately indicate the presence of new physics. We give the range for $B\\to\\pi K$ decays, and for the system of $B_d\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $B_s\\to K^+K^-$ decay modes. This approach tells us how much space is left for new physics, showing explicitly the region of observables that can only be explained by new physics. If the measured observables lie within the range implied by the Standard Model, we may extract values for the CKM angle $\\gamma$. Comparing these with values obtained from other strategies we may well encounter discrepancies that could also signal new physics.

  14. Measurements of branching fractions of leptonic and hadronic Ds+ meson decays and extraction of the Ds+ meson decay constant

    CERN Document Server

    Zupanc, A; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Asner, D M; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Bhuyan, B; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chang, M -C; Chang, P; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Chen, P; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Horii, Y; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W -S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Iwashita, T; Jaegle, I; Julius, T; Kato, E; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H O; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, M J; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Klucar, J; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kronenbitter, B; Kuhr, T; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lange, J S; Lee, S -H; Li, J; Libby, J; Liu, Z Q; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nedelkovska, E; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, H K; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Prim, M; Ritter, M; Röhrken, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Saito, T; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Starič, M; Steder, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Uno, S; Usov, Y; Vahsen, S E; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yamashita, Y; Yashchenko, S; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of absolute branching fractions of hadronic and leptonic Ds+ decays to K- K+ pi+, anti-K0 K+, eta pi+, mu+ nu_mu and tau+ nu_tau and report a search for the leptonic Ds+ to e+ nu_e decays. The results are obtained from a large data sample collected at or near the Y(4S) and Y(5S) resonances with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The branching fractions of hadronic decays are measured to be Br(Ds+ -> K- K+ pi+) = (5.06 +- 0.15 +- 0.21)%, Br(Ds+ -> anti-K0 K+) = (2.95 +- 0.11 +- 0.09)%, and Br(Ds+ -> eta pi+) = (1.82 +- 0.14 +- 0.07)%, where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The branching fractions of leptonic decays are measured to be Br(Ds+ -> mu+ nu_mu) = (0.531 +- 0.028 +- 0.020)%, and Br(Ds+ -> tau+ nu_tau) = (5.70 +- 0.21 +0.31-0.30)%, which are combined to determine the Ds+ meson decay constant f_Ds = (255.5 +- 4.2 +- 5.1) MeV. We find no significant signal for Ds+ -> e+ nu_e decays and set an upper limit ...

  15. Extraction of ground-state decay constant from dispersive sum rules: QCD vs potential models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucha, Wolfgang [HEPHY, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); Melikhov, Dmitri, E-mail: dmitri_melikhov@gmx.d [HEPHY, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); SINP, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Simula, Silvano [INFN, Sezione di Roma III, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy)

    2010-04-05

    We compare the extraction of the ground-state decay constant from the two-point correlator in QCD and in potential models and show that the results obtained at each step of the extraction procedure follow a very similar pattern. We prove that allowing for a Borel-parameter-dependent effective continuum threshold yields two essential improvements compared to employing a Borel-parameter-independent quantity: (i) It reduces considerably the (unphysical) dependence of the extracted bound-state mass and the decay constant on the Borel parameter. (ii) In a potential model, where the actual value of the decay constant is known from the Schroedinger equation, a Borel-parameter-dependent threshold leads to an improvement of the accuracy of the extraction procedure. Our findings suggest that in QCD a Borel-parameter-dependent threshold leads to a more reliable and accurate determination of bound-state characteristics by the method of sum rules.

  16. A Search for the Rare and Forbidden Decays $D^0 \\to V l^+l^-$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitala, Eric M. [Mississippi U.

    2003-12-01

    I report the results of a search for flavor-changing neutral current, leptonflavor, and lepton-number violating decays of the 3 and 4-body decay modes of the $D^0$ (and its antiparticle) containing muons and electrons. Using data from Fermilab charm hadroproduction experiment E791, I examine modes with two leptons and either a $p^0, K^{\\ast0}$, or $\\phi$ vector meson or a non-resonant $\\pi\\pi, K\\pi$, or KK pair of pseudoscalar mesons. No evidence for any of these decays is found. Therefore, branching-fraction upper limits, typically at the $10^{-4}$ level, are presented at the 90% confidence level for the 27 decay modes examined. Of these searches, 18 are investigations of decays without previous published results; several others have significantly improved sensitivity over previous results.

  17. Lattice study of the leptonic decay constant of the pion and its excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastropas, Ekaterina; Richard, David

    2014-11-01

    We present a calculation of the decay constant of the pion, and its lowest-lying three excitations, at three values of the pion mass between around 400 and 700 MeV, using anisotropic clover lattices. We use the variational method to determine an optimal interpolating operator for each of the states. We find that the decay constant of the first excitation, and more notably of the second, is suppressed with respect to that of the ground-state pion, but that the suppression shows little dependence on the quark mass.

  18. Decay constants of B-mesons from non-perturbative HQET with two light dynamical quarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardoni, F.; Blossier, B.; Bulava, J.

    2014-01-01

    We present a computation of B-meson decay constants from lattice QCD simulations within the framework of Heavy Quark Effective Theory for the b-quark. The next-to-leading order corrections in the HQET expansion are included non-perturbatively. Based on Nf=2 gauge field ensembles, covering three...

  19. Masses of S and P wave mesons and pseudoscalar decay constants ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the framework of relativistic harmonic confinement model for quarks and antiquarks, the masses of - and -wave mesons and pseudoscalar decay constants from light flavour to heavy flavour sectors are computed. The residual two-body Coulomb interaction and the spin-dependent interaction of the confined one gluon ...

  20. Photoproduction of pseudo-scalar mesons on proton - Use of CLAS detector for E{sub {gamma}}< 1.8 GeV -; Photoproduction de mesons pseudo-scalaires sur le proton - Avec le detecteur CLAS pour E{sub {gamma}}< 1.8 GeV -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, P

    2000-04-19

    The subject of this thesis is an experimental study of the pseudo-scalar mesons photoproduction on the proton in an energy range from {radical}S=1450 MeV to 2100 MeV. It has been realized with the 4{pi} CLAS detector of Th. Jefferson Laboratory. A software has been developed in order to perform the time calibration of the tagging system, and allowed us to measure a time resolution of 150 ps (FWHM). Gla Data have been analyzed. We determine CLAS energy resolution and show that these values are compatible with those given in the detector conceptual design report. Information from the analysis of the neutral mesons photoproduction channels and from the study of the p({gamma}, p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) reaction has been used to develop correction methods, applied to raw data, in order to extract the differential cross-sections for the reactions p({gamma}, p){pi}{sup 0}. New data points are shown and compared to the VPI multipole analysis. A preliminary study of the p({gamma}, p){eta} is stated in order to establish the method limits. An anomaly has been found in the data at a total center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1790 MeV and is discussed. (author)

  1. COUPLING SJÖSTRAND AND FEYNMAN METHODS IN PROMPT NEUTRON DECAY CONSTANT ANALYSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Gabrielli, F.; Rineiski, A; Pyeon, C H

    2016-01-01

    The Sjöstrand and Feynman methods have been widely applied to subcritical assemblies analyses. Within the point kinetics framework, the Sjöstrand method determines the system reactivity by the ratio between the prompt and delayed areas from pulsed neutron source experiments. In addition, the slope of the prompt area gives the prompt neutron decay constant. The latter parameter can be also obtained from fitting the Feynman curve. Consequently, the goal of this work is to combine the Sjöstrand and Feynman methods in order to find the best fitting domain for calculating the prompt neutron decay constant. The experiments and MCNP simulations performed to accomplish this goal have analyzed the KUKA subcritical assembly facility of Japan driven by 100 MeV protons.

  2. HQET at order 1/m. Pt. 3. Decay constants in the quenched approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blossier, Benoit [CNRS et Paris-Sud XI Univ., Orsay (France). Lab. de Physique Theorique; Della Morte, Michele [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Garron, Nicolas [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica e Inst. de Fisica Teorica IFT-UAM/CSIC; Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). SUPA, School of Physics; Hippel, Georg von [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). NIC; Mendes, Tereza [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). NIC; Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos (Brazil). IFSC; Simma, Hubert; Sommer, Rainer [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). NIC

    2010-06-15

    We report on the computation of the B{sub s} meson decay constant in Heavy Quark Effective Theory on the lattice. The next to leading order corrections in the HQET expansion are included non-perturbatively. We estimate higher order contributions to be very small. The results are extrapolated to the continuum limit, the main systematic error affecting the computation is therefore the quenched approximation used here. The Generalized Eigenvalue Problem and the use of all-to-all propagators are important technical ingredients of our approach that allow to keep statistical and systematic errors under control. We also report on the decay constant f{sub B{sub s}{sup '}} of the first radially excited state in the B{sub s} sector, computed in the static limit. (orig.)

  3. Observation of the decay psi(2S)-->K0SK0L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J Z; Ban, Y; Bian, J G; Cai, X; Chang, J F; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J; Chen, J C; Chen, Jun; Chen, M L; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, H L; Dai, Y S; Deng, Z Y; Dong, L Y; Du, S X; Du, Z Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Fu, H Y; Fu, L P; Gao, C S; Gao, M L; Gao, Y N; Gong, M Y; Gong, W X; Gu, S D; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; Guo, Z J; Han, S W; Harris, F A; He, J; He, K L; He, M; He, X; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, L; Huang, X P; Ji, X B; Jia, Q Y; Jiang, C H; Jiang, X S; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jin, Y; Lai, Y F; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, Q J; Li, R B; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X Q; Li, X S; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, C X; Liu, Fang; Liu, F; Liu, H M; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Z X; Lu, G R; Lu, F; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Luo, X L; Ma, F C; Ma, J M; Ma, L L; Ma, X Y; Mao, Z P; Meng, X C; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Nie, Z D; Olsen, S L; Peng, H P; Qi, N D; Qian, C D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, F; Shi, X; Song, L W; Sun, H S; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tao, N; Tian, Y R; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, J Z; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, Meng; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S Z; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Wang, Zhe; Wang, Z; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Z Y; Wei, C L; Wu, N; Wu, Y M; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xin, B; Xu, G F; Xu, H; Xu, Y; Xue, S T; Yan, M L; Yan, W B; Yang, F; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, S D; Yang, Y X; Yi, L H; Yi, Z Y; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yu, C S; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Yue, Q; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J M; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, L S; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X M; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Yiyun; Zhang, Y J; Zhang, Y Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Q; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J B; Zhao, J W; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, X J; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, L S; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, X C; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G M; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zou, B S

    2004-02-06

    The decay psi(2S)-->K(0)(S)K(0)(L) is observed using psi(2S) data collected with the Beijing Spectrometer at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider; the branching fraction is determined to be B(psi(2S)-->K(0)(S)K(0)(L))=(5.24+/-0.47+/-0.48)x10(-5). Compared with J/psi-->K(0)(S)K(0)(L), the psi(2S) branching fraction is enhanced relative to the prediction of the perturbative QCD "12%" rule. The result, together with the branching fractions of psi(2S) decays to other pseudoscalar meson pairs (pi(+)pi(-) and K+K-), is used to investigate the relative phase between the three-gluon and the one-photon annihilation amplitudes of psi(2S) decays.

  4. Isospin violating decays of positive parity B{sub s} mesons in HMχPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajfer, Svjetlana [University of Ljubljana, Department of Physics, Ljubljana (Slovenia); J. Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P. O. Box 3000, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Prapotnik Brdnik, Anita [J. Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, P. O. Box 3000, Ljubljana (Slovenia); University of Maribor, Faculty of Civil Engineering, Transportation Engineering and Architecture, Maribor (Slovenia)

    2016-10-15

    Recent lattice QCD results suggest that the masses of the first two positive parity B{sub s} mesons lie below the BK threshold, similar to the case of D{sup *}{sub s0}(2317){sup +} and D{sub s1}(2460){sup +} mesons. The mass spectrum of B{sub s} mesons seems to follow the pattern of a D{sub s} mass spectrum. As in the case of charmed mesons, the structure of positive parity B{sub s} mesons is very intriguing. To shed more light on this issue, we investigate the strong isospin violating decays B{sub s0}{sup *0} → B{sub s}{sup 0}π{sup 0}, B{sub s1}{sup 0} → B{sub s}{sup *0}π{sup 0}, and B{sub s1}{sup 0} → B{sub s}{sup 0}ππ within heavy meson chiral perturbation theory. The two-body decay amplitude arises at tree level and we show that the loop corrections give significant contributions. On the other hand, in the case of three-body decay B{sub s1}{sup 0} → B{sub s}{sup 0}ππ the amplitude occurs only at loop level. We find that the decay widths for these decays are Γ(B{sub s1}{sup 0} → B{sub s}{sup 0}ππ) ∝ 10{sup -3} keV, and Γ(B{sub s0}{sup *0} → B{sub s}{sup 0}π{sup 0}) ≤ 55 keV, Γ(B{sub s1}{sup 0} → B{sub s}{sup *0}π{sup 0}) ≤ 50 keV. More precise knowledge of the coupling constant describing the interaction of positive and negative parity heavy mesons with light pseudo-scalar mesons would help to increase the accuracy of our calculation. (orig.)

  5. Isospin breaking in the decay constants of heavy mesons from QCD sum rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Lucha

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of the strong isospin-breaking (IB effect, due in QCD to the difference between u- and d-quark masses, in the leptonic decay constants of charmed and beauty pseudoscalar and vector mesons using the method of QCD sum rules. We apply the sum-rule analysis to the decay constants of mesons containing one heavy quark and one light quark with the light mass in the range from the average u/d quark mass to the strange-quark mass. We then analyse the dependence of the decay constants on the light-quark mass and extract with good accuracy the IB ratios of decay constants at leading order in the mass difference (md−mu, obtaining: (fD+−fD0/fD=0.0047(6, (fD⁎+−fD⁎0/fD⁎=0.0068(9, (fB0−fB+/fB=0.0047(6, and (fB⁎0−fB⁎+/fB⁎=0.0045(5, which yield: fD+−fD0=0.97±0.13 MeV, fD⁎+−fD⁎0=1.73±0.27 MeV, fB0−fB+=0.90±0.13 MeV, fB⁎0−fB⁎+=0.81±0.11 MeV. In the case of the D-meson our finding is consistent with recent lattice QCD results, whereas it is much lower in the case of the B-meson showing a tension of ≈3 standard deviations.

  6. The decay constants f(B+) and f(D+) from three-flavor lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, C.; /Washington U., St. Louis; DeTar, Carleton; Levkova, L.; /Utah U.; Di Pierro, Massimo; /DePaul U.; El-Khadra, Aida Xenia; Evans, R.T.; Jain, R.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Freeland, Elizabeth Dawn; /Art Inst. of Chicago; Gottlieb, Steven A.; /Indiana U.; Heller, Urs M.; /APS, New York; Hetrick, James E.; /U. Pacific, Stockton /Fermilab /Simon Fraser U. /Arizona U. /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-01-01

    We present new results for f{sub B+} and f{sub D+} from the MILC 2+1 flavor a = 0.09fm 'fine' lattice. We use clover heavy quarks in the Fermilab interpretation and improved staggered light quarks. Lattice results from partially quenched QCD fix the parameters of staggered chiral perturbation theory which is used in the extrapolation to the physical decay constants.

  7. Measurement of the Decay Constant $f_D{_S^+}$ using $D_S^+ --> ell^+ nu

    CERN Document Server

    Artuso, M

    2007-01-01

    We measure the decay constant fDs using the Ds -> l+ nu channel, where the l+ designates either a mu+ or a tau+, when the tau+ -> pi+ nu. Using both measurements we find fDs = 274 +-13 +- 7 MeV. Combining with our previous determination of fD+, we compute the ratio fDs/fD+ = 1.23 +- 0.11 +- 0.04. We compare with theoretical estimates.

  8. Masses, decay constants and electromagnetic form-factors with twisted boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Bijnens, Johan

    2015-01-01

    We discuss some of the effects of twisted boundary conditions in finite volume using continuum SU(3) Chiral Perturbation Theory. We point out how broken cubic symmetry affects the definitions of quantities such as form-factors. Using the $\\pi^+$ as an example, we give one loop results for the mass, decay constants and electromagnetic form-factor and illustrate how the relevant Ward identities are satisfied.

  9. Isospin breaking in the decay constants of heavy mesons from QCD sum rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri; Simula, Silvano

    2017-02-01

    We present a study of the strong isospin-breaking (IB) effect, due in QCD to the difference between u- and d-quark masses, in the leptonic decay constants of charmed and beauty pseudoscalar and vector mesons using the method of QCD sum rules. We apply the sum-rule analysis to the decay constants of mesons containing one heavy quark and one light quark with the light mass in the range from the average u / d quark mass to the strange-quark mass. We then analyse the dependence of the decay constants on the light-quark mass and extract with good accuracy the IB ratios of decay constants at leading order in the mass difference (md -mu), obtaining: (fD+ -fD0) /fD = 0.0047 (6), (fD*+ -fD*0) /fD* = 0.0068 (9), (fB0 -fB+) /fB = 0.0047 (6), and (fB*0 -fB*+) /fB* = 0.0045 (5), which yield: fD+ -fD0 = 0.97 ± 0.13 MeV, fD*+ -fD*0 = 1.73 ± 0.27 MeV, fB0 -fB+ = 0.90 ± 0.13 MeV, fB*0 -fB*+ = 0.81 ± 0.11 MeV. In the case of the D-meson our finding is consistent with recent lattice QCD results, whereas it is much lower in the case of the B-meson showing a tension of ≈3 standard deviations.

  10. New Methods for B Meson Decay Constants and Form Factors from Lattice NRQCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, C. [Fermilab; Davies, C. T.H. [SUPA, UK; Monahan, C. J. [Washington U., Seattle

    2017-11-27

    We determine the normalisation of scalar and pseudoscalar current operators made from non-relativistic $b$ quarks and Highly Improved Staggered light quarks in lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) through $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s)$ and $\\Lambda_{\\text{QCD}}/m_b$. We use matrix elements of these operators to extract $B$ meson decay constants and form factors, then compare to those obtained using the standard vector and axial-vector operators. This provides a test of systematic errors in the lattice QCD determination of the $B$ meson decay constants and form factors. We provide a new value for the $B$ and $B_s$ meson decay constants from lattice QCD calculations on ensembles that include $u$, $d$, $s$ and $c$ quarks in the sea and those which have the $u/d$ quark mass going down to its physical value. Our results are $f_B=0.196(6)$ GeV, $f_{B_s}=0.236(7)$ GeV and $f_{B_s}/f_B =1.207(7)$, agreeing well with earlier results using the temporal axial current. By combining with these previous results, we provide updated values of $f_B=0.190(4)$ GeV, $f_{B_s}=0.229(5)$ GeV and $f_{B_s}/f_B = 1.206(5)$.

  11. Dark Energy, QCD Axion, and Trans-Planckian-Inflaton Decay Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihn E. Kim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoscalars appear frequently in particle spectra. They can be light if they appear as pseudo-Goldstone bosons from some spontaneously broken global symmetries with the decay constant f. Since any global symmetry is broken at least by quantum gravitational effects, all pseudoscalars are massive. The mass scale of a pseudoscalar is determined by the spontaneous symmetry breaking scale f of the corresponding global symmetry and the explicit breaking terms in the effective potential. The explicit breaking terms can arise from anomaly terms with some non-Abelian gauge groups among which the best-known example is the potential of the QCD axion. Even if there is no breaking terms from gauge anomalies, there can be explicit breaking terms in the potential in which case the leading term suppressed by f determines the pseudoscalar mass scale. If the breaking term is extremely small and the decay constant is trans-Planckian, the corresponding pseudoscalar can be a candidate for a quintessential axion. In the other extreme that the breaking scales are large, still the pseudo-Goldstone boson mass scales are in general smaller than the decay constants. In such a case, still the potential of the pseudo-Goldstone boson at the grand unification scale is sufficiently flat near the top of the potential that it can be a good candidate for an inflationary model. We review these ideas in the bosonic collective motion framework.

  12. Exotic meson decays in the environment with chiral imbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianov, A. A.; Andrianov, V. A.; Espriu, D.; Iakubovich, A. V.; Putilova, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    An emergence of Local Parity Breaking (LPB) in central heavy-ion collisions (HIC) at high energies is discussed. LPB in the fireball can be produced by a difference between the number densities of right- and left-handed chiral fermions (Chiral Imbalance) which is implemented by a chiral (axial) chemical potential. The effective meson lagrangian induced by QCD is extended to the medium with Chiral Imbalance and the properties of light scalar and pseudoscalar mesons (π, α0) are analyzed. It is shown that exotic decays of scalar mesons arise as a result of mixing of π and α0 vacuum states in the presence of chiral imbalance. The pion electromagnetic formfactor obtains an unusual parity-odd supplement which generates a photon polarization asymmetry in pion polarizability. We hope that the above pointed indications of LPB can be identified in experiments on LHC, RHIC, CBM FAIR and NICA accelerators.

  13. Exotic meson decays in the environment with chiral imbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrianov A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An emergence of Local Parity Breaking (LPB in central heavy-ion collisions (HIC at high energies is discussed. LPB in the fireball can be produced by a difference between the number densities of right- and left-handed chiral fermions (Chiral Imbalance which is implemented by a chiral (axial chemical potential. The effective meson lagrangian induced by QCD is extended to the medium with Chiral Imbalance and the properties of light scalar and pseudoscalar mesons (π, α0 are analyzed. It is shown that exotic decays of scalar mesons arise as a result of mixing of π and α0 vacuum states in the presence of chiral imbalance. The pion electromagnetic formfactor obtains an unusual parity-odd supplement which generates a photon polarization asymmetry in pion polarizability. We hope that the above pointed indications of LPB can be identified in experiments on LHC, RHIC, CBM FAIR and NICA accelerators.

  14. An analytic analysis of the pion decay constant in three-flavoured chiral perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ananthanarayan, B.; Ghosh, Shayan [Indian Institute of Science, Centre for High Energy Physics, Bangalore, Karnataka (India); Bijnens, Johan [Lund University, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund (Sweden)

    2017-07-15

    A representation of the two-loop contribution to the pion decay constant in SU(3) chiral perturbation theory is presented. The result is analytic up to the contribution of the three (different) mass sunset integrals, for which an expansion in their external momentum has been taken. We also give an analytic expression for the two-loop contribution to the pion mass based on a renormalized representation and in terms of the physical eta mass. We find an expansion of F{sub π} and M{sub π}{sup 2} in the strange-quark mass in the isospin limit, and we perform the matching of the chiral SU(2) and SU(3) low-energy constants. A numerical analysis demonstrates the high accuracy of our representation, and the strong dependence of the pion decay constant upon the values of the low-energy constants, especially in the chiral limit. Finally, we present a simplified representation that is particularly suitable for fitting with available lattice data. (orig.)

  15. A Search for the rare and forbidden decays D0 → V ℓ+-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitala, Eric M. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States)

    2003-12-01

    I report the results of a search for flavor-changing neutral current, leptonflavor, and lepton-number violating decays of the 3 and 4-body decay modes of the D0 (and its antiparticle) containing muons and electrons. Using data from Fermilab charm hadroproduction experiment E791, I examine modes with two leptons and either a ρ0, $\\bar{K}$0, or Φ vector meson or a non-resonant ππ , Kπ , or KK pair of pseudoscalar mesons. No evidence for any of these decays is found. Therefore, branching-fraction upper limits, typically at the 10-4 level, are presented at the 90% confidence level for the 27 decay modes examined. Of these searches, 18 are investigations of decays without previous published results; several others have significantly improved sensitivity over previous results.

  16. A method for calibrating coil constants by using the free induction decay of noble gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linlin Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We propose a precise method to calibrate the coil constants of spin-precession gyroscopes and optical atomic magnetometers. This method is based on measuring the initial amplitude of Free Induction Decay (FID of noble gases, from which the π/2 pulse duration can be calculated, since it is inversely proportional to the amplitude of the π/2 pulse. Therefore, the coil constants can be calibrated by measuring the π/2 pulse duration. Compared with the method based on the Larmor precession frequency of atoms, our method can avoid the effect of the pump and probe powers. We experimentally validated the method in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG, and the experimental results show that the coil constants are 436.63±0.04 nT/mA and 428.94±0.02 nT/mA in the x and y directions, respectively.

  17. A method for calibrating coil constants by using the free induction decay of noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linlin; Zhou, Binquan; Lei, Guanqun; Wu, Wenfeng; Wang, Jing; Zhai, Yueyang; Wang, Zhuo; Fang, Jiancheng

    2017-07-01

    We propose a precise method to calibrate the coil constants of spin-precession gyroscopes and optical atomic magnetometers. This method is based on measuring the initial amplitude of Free Induction Decay (FID) of noble gases, from which the π /2 pulse duration can be calculated, since it is inversely proportional to the amplitude of the π /2 pulse. Therefore, the coil constants can be calibrated by measuring the π /2 pulse duration. Compared with the method based on the Larmor precession frequency of atoms, our method can avoid the effect of the pump and probe powers. We experimentally validated the method in a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG), and the experimental results show that the coil constants are 436.63 ±0.04 nT/mA and 428.94 ±0.02 nT/mA in the x and y directions, respectively.

  18. Measurement of the Pseudoscalar Decay Constant fDs Using Ds+ -> tau+ nu, tau+ -> rho+ anti-nu Decays

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    Analyzing 600/pb of e+e- collisions at 4170 MeV center-of-mass energy with the CLEO-c detector, we measure the branching fraction B(Ds+ -> tau+ nu)=(5.52\\pm 0.57\\pm 0.21)% using the tau+ -> rho^+ anti-nu decay mode. Combining with other CLEO measurements of B(Ds+ -> tau+ nu) we determine the pseudoscalar decay constant fDs = (259.7\\pm 7.8\\pm 3.4) MeV consistent with the value obtained from our Ds+ -> mu+ nu measurement of (257.6\\pm 10.3\\pm 4.3) MeV. Combining these measurements we find a value of fDs=(259.0 \\pm 6.2\\pm 3.0) MeV, that differs from the most accurate prediction based on unquenched lattice gauge theory of (241\\pm 3) MeV by 2.4 standard deviations. We also present the first measurements of B(Ds+ -> K0 pi+ pi0)=(1.00\\pm0.18\\pm 0.04)%, and B(Ds+ -> pi+ pi0 pi0)=(0.65\\pm0.13\\pm 0.03)%, and measure a new value for B(Ds+ -> eta rho+)=(8.9\\pm0.6\\pm0.5)%.

  19. Systematic and Statistical Errors Associated with Nuclear Decay Constant Measurements Using the Counting Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltick, David; Wang, Haoyu; Liu, Shih-Chieh; Heim, Jordan; Nistor, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Typical nuclear decay constants are measured at the accuracy level of 10-2. There are numerous reasons: tests of unconventional theories, dating of materials, and long term inventory evolution which require decay constants accuracy at a level of 10-4 to 10-5. The statistical and systematic errors associated with precision measurements of decays using the counting technique are presented. Precision requires high count rates, which introduces time dependent dead time and pile-up corrections. An approach to overcome these issues is presented by continuous recording of the detector current. Other systematic corrections include, the time dependent dead time due to background radiation, control of target motion and radiation flight path variation due to environmental conditions, and the time dependent effects caused by scattered events are presented. The incorporation of blind experimental techniques can help make measurement independent of past results. A spectrometer design and data analysis is reviewed that can accomplish these goals. The author would like to thank TechSource, Inc. and Advanced Physics Technologies, LLC. for their support in this work.

  20. Decay angular distributions of K* and D* vector mesons in pion-nucleon scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Ho; Oh, Yongseok; Titov, Alexander I.

    2017-05-01

    The production mechanisms of open strangeness (K*) and open charm (D*) vector mesons in π-p scattering, namely, π-+p →K*0+Λ and π-+p →D*-+Λc+ , are investigated within the modified quark-gluon string model. To identify the major reaction mechanisms, we consider the subsequent decays of the produced vector mesons into two pseudoscalar mesons, i.e., K*→K +π and D*→D +π . We found that the decay distributions and density matrix elements are sensitive to the production mechanisms and can be used to disentangle the vector trajectory and pseudoscalar trajectory exchange models. Our results for K* production are compared with the currently available experimental data and the predictions for D* production process are presented as well. Our predictions can be tested at the present or planned experimental facilities.

  1. Charm quark mass and D-meson decay constants from two-flavour lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Heitger, Jochen; Schaefer, Stefan; Virotta, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We present a computation of the charm quark's mass and the leptonic D-meson decay constants f_D and f_{D_s} in two-flavour lattice QCD with non-perturbatively O(a) improved Wilson quarks. Our analysis is based on the CLS configurations at two lattice spacings (a=0.065 and 0.048 fm, where the lattice scale is set by f_K) and pion masses ranging down to ~ 190 MeV at L*m_pi > 4, in order to perform controlled continuum and chiral extrapolations with small systematic uncertainties.

  2. Uncertainties in constraining low-energy constants from {sup 3}H β decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klos, P.; Carbone, A.; Hebeler, K. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany); Menendez, J. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics, Tokyo (Japan); Schwenk, A. [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    We discuss the uncertainties in constraining low-energy constants of chiral effective field theory from {sup 3}H β decay. The half-life is very precisely known, so that the Gamow-Teller matrix element has been used to fit the coupling c{sub D} of the axial-vector current to a short-range two-nucleon pair. Because the same coupling also describes the leading one-pion-exchange three-nucleon force, this in principle provides a very constraining fit, uncorrelated with the {sup 3}H binding energy fit used to constrain another low-energy coupling in three-nucleon forces. However, so far such {sup 3}H half-life fits have only been performed at a fixed cutoff value. We show that the cutoff dependence due to the regulators in the axial-vector two-body current can significantly affect the Gamow-Teller matrix elements and consequently also the extracted values for the c{sub D} coupling constant. The degree of the cutoff dependence is correlated with the softness of the employed NN interaction. As a result, present three-nucleon forces based on a fit to {sup 3}H β decay underestimate the uncertainty in c{sub D}. We explore a range of c{sub D} values that is compatible within cutoff variation with the experimental {sup 3}H half-life and estimate the resulting uncertainties for many-body systems by performing calculations of symmetric nuclear matter. (orig.)

  3. Branching fractions of semileptonic D and D_s decays from the covariant light-front quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Kang, Xian-Wei

    2017-09-01

    Based on the predictions of the relevant form factors from the covariant light-front quark model, we show the branching fractions for the D (D_s) → (P, S, V, A) ℓ ν _ℓ (ℓ =e or μ ) decays, where P denotes the pseudoscalar meson, S the scalar meson with a mass above 1 GeV, V the vector meson and A the axial-vector one. Comparison with the available experimental results are made, and we find an excellent agreement. The predictions for other decay modes can be tested in a charm factory, e.g., the BESIII detector. The future measurements will definitely further enrich our knowledge of the hadronic transition form factors as well as the inner structure of the even-parity mesons ( S and A).

  4. Branching fractions of semileptonic D and D{sub s} decays from the covariant light-front quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Kang, Xian-Wei [Academia Sinica, Institute of Physics, Taipei (China)

    2017-09-15

    Based on the predictions of the relevant form factors from the covariant light-front quark model, we show the branching fractions for the D(D{sub s}) → (P, S, V, A) lν{sub l} (l = e or μ) decays, where P denotes the pseudoscalar meson, S the scalar meson with a mass above 1 GeV, V the vector meson and A the axial-vector one. Comparison with the available experimental results are made, and we find an excellent agreement. The predictions for other decay modes can be tested in a charm factory, e.g., the BESIII detector. The future measurements will definitely further enrich our knowledge of the hadronic transition form factors as well as the inner structure of the even-parity mesons (S and A). (orig.)

  5. Decay Constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ from HISQ Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazavov, A.; et al.

    2015-11-06

    We give a progress report on a project aimed at a high-precision calculation of the decay constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ from simulations with HISQ heavy and light valence and sea quarks. Calculations are carried out with several heavy valence-quark masses on ensembles with 2+1+1 flavors of HISQ sea quarks at five lattice spacings and several light sea-quark mass ratios $m_{ud}/m_s$, including approximately physical sea-quark masses. This range of parameters provides excellent control of the continuum limit and of heavy-quark discretization errors. We present a preliminary error budget with projected uncertainties of 2.2~MeV and 1.5~MeV for $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$, respectively.

  6. Decay constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ from HISQ simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Lattice, Fermilab; Bazavov, A; Bernard, C; Bouchard, C; Brown, N; DeTar, C; Du, D; El-Khadra, A X; Freeland, E D; Gámiz, E; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Komijani, J; Kronfeld, A S; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Mackenzie, P B; Monahan, C; Primer, T; Na, Heechang; Neil, E T; Simone, J N; Sugar, R L; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2015-01-01

    We give a progress report on a project aimed at a high-precision calculation of the decay constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ from simulations with HISQ heavy and light valence and sea quarks. Calculations are carried out with several heavy valence-quark masses on ensembles with 2+1+1 flavors of HISQ sea quarks at five lattice spacings and several light sea-quark mass ratios $m_{ud}/m_s$, including approximately physical sea-quark masses. This range of parameters provides excellent control of the continuum limit and of heavy-quark discretization errors. We present a preliminary error budget with projected uncertainties of 2.2~MeV and 1.5~MeV for $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$, respectively.

  7. Charm quark mass and D-meson decay constants from two-flavour lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitger, Jochen [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik 1; Hippel, Georg M. von [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Schaefer, Stefan; Virotta, Francesco [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2013-12-15

    We present a computation of the charm quark's mass and the leptonic D-meson decay constants f{sub D} and f{sub D{sub s}} in two-flavour lattice QCD with non-perturbatively O(a) improvedWilson quarks. Our analysis is based on the CLS configurations at two lattice spacings (a=0.065 and 0.048 fm, where the lattice scale is set by f{sub K}) and pion masses ranging down to {proportional_to}190 MeV at Lm{sub {pi}}>or similar 4, in order to perform controlled continuum and chiral extrapolations with small systematic uncertainties.

  8. Decays of open charmed mesons in the extended Linear Sigma Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshraim Walaa I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We enlarge the so-called extended linear Sigma model (eLSM by including the charm quark according to the global U(4r × U(4l chiral symmetry. In the eLSM, besides scalar and pseudoscalar mesons, also vector and axial-vector mesons are present. Almost all the parameters of the model were fixed in a previous study of mesons below 2 GeV. In the extension to the four-flavor case, only three additional parameters (all of them related to the bare mass of the charm quark appear.We compute the (OZI dominant strong decays of open charmed mesons. The results are compatible with the experimental data, although the theoretical uncertainties are still large.

  9. Mass spectrum of vector mesons and their leptonic-decay constants in the bilocal relativistic potential model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablakulov, Kh., E-mail: ablakulov@inp.uz; Narzikulov, Z., E-mail: narzikulov@inp.uz [Uzbek Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Uzbekistan)

    2015-01-15

    A phenomenological model is developed in terms of bilocal meson fields in order to describe a vector meson and its leptonic decays. A new Salpeter equation for this particle and the Schwinger-Dyson equation allowing for the presence of an arbitrary potential and for a modification associated with the renormalization of the quark (antiquark ) wave function within the meson are given. An expression for the constant of the leptonic decay of the charged rho meson is obtained from an analysis of the decay process τ → ρν via parametrizing in it the hadronization of intermediate charged weak W bosons into a bilocal vector meson. The potential is chosen in the form of the sum of harmonic-oscillator and Coulomb potentials, and the respective boundary-value problem is formulated. It is shown that the solutions to this problem describe both the mass spectrum of vector mesons and their leptonic-decay constants.

  10. Consequences of nonzero neutrino masses on the evaluation of the weak coupling constant and on τ leptonic decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, D. A.; Picciotto, C. E.

    1987-12-01

    The effect of the limit of the muon-neutrino mass on the precision with which the weak coupling constant GF can be evaluated from the experimental muon decay rate is calculated and discussed. Present limits allow an effect as large as 23 ppm. In τ leptonic decays the effects of a nonzero τ-neutrino mass amount to a decrease in the branching fraction B(τ-->eνeντ) of ΔB/B<1.2%.

  11. Glueball production via gluonic penguin B decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiao-Gang [INPAC, SKLPPC, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); National Center for Theoretical Sciences and Physics Department of National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu (China); National Taiwan University, Department of Physics, Taipei (China); Yuan, Tzu-Chiang [Academia Sinica, Institute of Physics, Taipei (China)

    2015-03-01

    We study glueball G production in gluonic penguin decay B → G + X{sub s}, using the next-to-leading order b → sg* gluonic penguin interaction and effective couplings of a glueball to two perturbative gluons. Subsequent decays of a scalar glueball are described by using techniques of effective chiralLagrangians to incorporate the interaction between a glueball and pseudoscalar mesons.Mixing effects between the pure glueball with other mesons are considered. Identifying the f{sub 0}(1710) as a scalar glueball, we find that both the top and the charm penguin are important and obtain a sizable branching ratio for B → f{sub 0}(1710) + X{sub s} of order 1.3 x 10{sup -4}(f/0.07 GeV{sup -1}){sup 2}, where the effective coupling strength f is estimated to be 0.07 GeV{sup -1} using experimental data for the branching ratio of f{sub 0}(1710) → K anti K based on a chiral Lagrangian estimate. An alternative perturbative QCD based estimation of f is a factor of 20 larger, which would imply a much enhanced branching ratio. Glueball production from this rare semi-inclusive B decay can be probed at the LHCb and Belle II to narrow down the allowed parameter space. A similar branching ratio is expected for the pseudoscalar glueball. We also briefly comment on the case of vector and tensor glueballs. (orig.)

  12. Meson loops in the f{sub 0}(980) and a{sub 0}(980) radiative decays into {rho},{omega}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagahiro, H. [Ibaraki, Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka (Japan); Roca, L. [Universidad de Murcia, Departamento de Fisica, Murcia (Spain); Kyoto University, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto (Japan); Oset, E. [Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Valencia (Spain)

    2008-04-15

    We calculate the radiative decay widths of the a{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 0}(980) scalar mesons into {rho}{gamma} and {omega}{gamma} considering the dynamically generated nature of these scalar resonances within the realm of the chiral unitary approach. The main ingredient in the evaluation of the radiative width of the scalar mesons are the loops coming from the decay into their constituent pseudoscalar-pseudoscalar components and the subsequent radiation of the photon. The dominant diagrams with only pseudoscalar mesons in the loops are found to be convergent while the divergence of those with a vector meson in the loop are written in terms of the two-meson loop function easily regularizable. We provide results for all the possible charge channels and obtain results, with uncertainties, which differ significantly from quark loops models and some version of vector meson dominance. (orig.)

  13. Hadronic decays of the D/sub s/ meson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasserbaech, S.R.

    1989-06-01

    The D/sub s//sup +/ is the lowest-lying pseudoscalar meson containing charm and anti-strange quarks. Evidence for this state was first reported in 1977, although more recent observations disagree with some of the early results. Since 1983 the weakly decaying D/sub s//sup +/ has been observed in many experiments. Relative branching fractions have been measured for many non-leptonic decay modes, including D/sub s//sup +/ /yields/ /phi//pi//sup +/, /phi//pi//sup +//pi//sup +//pi//sup /minus//, /bar K/*/sup 0/K/sup +/, and f/sub 0/(975)/pi//sup +/. The absolute branching fractions are estimated in high energy e/sup +/e/sup /minus// annihilation from the observed numbers of reconstructed D/sub s//sup +/ decays and the expected D/sub s//sup +/ production cross section. The lowest-lying vector c/bar s/ meson, the D/sub s/*/sup +/, has also been seen in its decay to /gamma/D/sub s//sup +/. Weak decays of the heavy quark and lepton flavors are relevant to the development of the Standard Model of both the electroweak and the strong interactions. Measurements of charmed particle weak decay are useful for determining the parameter of the Standard Model and for testing phenomenological models which include strong effects. 83 refs., 56 figs., 12 tabs.

  14. Low-energy constants and condensates from ALEPH hadronic τ decay data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boito, Diogo; Francis, Anthony; Golterman, Maarten; Hudspith, Renwick; Lewis, Randy; Maltman, Kim; Peris, Santiago

    2015-12-01

    We determine the next-to-leading order chiral low-energy constant L10r , and combinations C12r±C61r+C80r , C13r-C62r+C81r , C61r , and C87r , of the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) chiral low-energy constants incorporating recently revised ALEPH results for the nonstrange vector (V ) and axial-vector (A ) hadronic τ decay distributions and recently updated RBC/UKQCD lattice data for the nonstrange V -A two-point function. In the MS ¯ scheme, at renormalization scale μ =770 MeV , we find L10r=-0.00350 (17 ) , C12r+C61r+C80r=0.00237 (16 ) GeV-2 , C12r-C61r+C80r=-0.00056 (15 ) GeV-2 , C13r-C62r+C81r=0.00046 (9 ) GeV-2 , C61r=0.00146 (15 ) GeV-2 , and C87r=0.00510 (22 ) GeV-2 . With errors here at or below the level expected for contributions of yet higher order in the chiral expansion, the analysis exhausts the possibilities of what can be meaningfully achieved in an NNLO analysis. We also consider the dimension-six and dimension-eight coefficients in the operator product expansion in the V -A channel.

  15. B- and D-meson decay constants from three-flavor lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazavov, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); et al.

    2012-06-01

    We calculate the leptonic decay constants of B_{(s)} and D_{(s)} mesons in lattice QCD using staggered light quarks and Fermilab bottom and charm quarks. We compute the heavy-light meson correlation functions on the MILC asqtad-improved staggered gauge configurations which include the effects of three light dynamical sea quarks. We simulate with several values of the light valence- and sea-quark masses (down to ~m_s/10) and at three lattice spacings (a ~ 0.15, 0.12, and 0.09 fm) and extrapolate to the physical up and down quark masses and the continuum using expressions derived in heavy-light meson staggered chiral perturbation theory. We renormalize the heavy-light axial current using a mostly nonperturbative method such that only a small correction to unity must be computed in lattice perturbation theory and higher-order terms are expected to be small. We obtain f_{B^+} = 196.9(8.9) MeV, f_{B_s} = 242.0(9.5) MeV, f_{D^+} = 218.9(11.3) MeV, f_{D_s} = 260.1(10.8) MeV, and the SU(3) flavor-breaking ratios f_{B_s}/f_{B} = 1.229(26) and f_{D_s}/f_{D} = 1.188(25), where the numbers in parentheses are the total statistical and systematic uncertainties added in quadrature.

  16. B- and D-meson decay constants from three-flavor lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bazavov, A; Bouchard, C M; DeTar, C; Di Pierro, M; El-Khadra, A X; Evans, R T; Freeland, E D; Gamiz, E; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Hetrick, J E; Jain, R; Kronfeld, A S; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Mackenzie, P B; Neil, E T; Oktay, M B; Simone, J N; Sugar, R; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the leptonic decay constants of B_{(s)} and D_{(s)} mesons in lattice QCD using staggered light quarks and Fermilab bottom and charm quarks. We compute the heavy-light meson correlation functions on the MILC asqtad-improved staggered gauge configurations which include the effects of three light dynamical sea quarks. We simulate with several values of the light valence- and sea-quark masses (down to ~m_s/10) and at three lattice spacings (a ~ 0.15, 0.12, and 0.09 fm) and extrapolate to the physical up and down quark masses and the continuum using expressions derived in heavy-light meson staggered chiral perturbation theory. We renormalize the heavy-light axial current using a mostly nonperturbative method such that only a small correction to unity must be computed in lattice perturbation theory and higher-order terms are expected to be small. We obtain f_{B^+} = 196.9(8.9) MeV, f_{B_s} = 242.0(9.5) MeV, f_{D^+} = 218.9(11.3) MeV, f_{D_s} = 260.1(10.8) MeV, and the SU(3) flavor-breaking ratios f_{B...

  17. OPE, charm-quark mass, and decay constants of D and Ds mesons from QCD sum rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri; Simula, Silvano

    2011-06-27

    We present a sum-rule extraction of the decay constants of the charmed mesons D and Ds from the two-point correlator of pseudoscalar currents. First, we compare the perturbative expansion for the correlator and the decay constant performed in terms of the pole and the running MS¯ masses of the charm quark. The perturbative expansion in terms of the pole mass shows no signs of convergence whereas reorganizing this very expansion in terms of the MS¯ mass leads to a distinct hierarchy of the perturbative expansion. Furthermore, the decay constants extracted from the pole-mass correlator turn out to be considerably smaller than those obtained by means of the MS¯-mass correlator. Second, making use of the OPE in terms of the MS¯ mass, we determine the decay constants of both D and Ds mesons with an emphasis on the uncertainties in these quantities related both to the input QCD parameters and to the limited accuracy of the method of sum rules.

  18. OPE, charm-quark mass, and decay constants of D and D{sub s} mesons from QCD sum rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucha, Wolfgang [HEPHY, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); Melikhov, Dmitri, E-mail: dmitri_melikhov@gmx.de [HEPHY, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); SINP, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Simula, Silvano [INFN, Sezione di Roma III, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy)

    2011-06-27

    We present a sum-rule extraction of the decay constants of the charmed mesons D and D{sub s} from the two-point correlator of pseudoscalar currents. First, we compare the perturbative expansion for the correlator and the decay constant performed in terms of the pole and the running MS-bar masses of the charm quark. The perturbative expansion in terms of the pole mass shows no signs of convergence whereas reorganizing this very expansion in terms of the MS-bar mass leads to a distinct hierarchy of the perturbative expansion. Furthermore, the decay constants extracted from the pole-mass correlator turn out to be considerably smaller than those obtained by means of the MS-bar-mass correlator. Second, making use of the OPE in terms of the MS-bar mass, we determine the decay constants of both D and D{sub s} mesons with an emphasis on the uncertainties in these quantities related both to the input QCD parameters and to the limited accuracy of the method of sum rules.

  19. Cross section of pseudoscalar meson photoproduction within the ELA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, J. J.; Tamayo, D. F.; Jaramillo, D. E.; Barbero, C.

    2015-10-01

    We study the contributions of background and resonance terms to the total cross section of photoproduction of mesons off the free nucleon. The model we use is consistent and based on an effective Lagrangian approach (ELA) which includes nucleon Born terms, vector meson exchange terms, and nucleon resonances. The interaction Lagrangians are chiral symmetric, gauge invariant and crossing symmetric. The results we obtain are compared to available experimental data and agreement is found in the energy region from threshold up to 0.55 GeV in the case of π photoproduction. We outline the possibility to extend this calculation to the case of η meson photoproduction.

  20. Electroproduction of pseudoscalar mesons above the resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niczyporuk, B.B. [Continuous Electron beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    1994-04-01

    In this paper, the author has revisited twenty year old data considering the progress achieved in related fields. To make further progress in our understanding of strong interactions, one needs much better quality of exclusive electroproduction data. A measurement of the differential cross section {sigma}(t, W, Q{sup 2}) for the reactions e{sup {minus}} + p {r_arrow} e{sup {minus}} + {pi}{sup +}(K{sup +}) + n({Lambda}{degrees}) at a beam energy of {ge} 4 GeV is proposed. Data will be collected simultaneously for both reactions using the CLAS detector at CEBAF in the following kinematical region: Q{sup 2} > 1 GeV{sup 2} and W > 2 GeV. One of the most interesting aspects of electroproduction is that it can be used to measure photoproduction amplitudes as functions of the photon mass squared Q{sup 2} and momentum transfer t. Emphasis is given to measuring the differential cross sections for t {approximately} m{sup 2}{sub {pi},{kappa}}. Above the resonance region (W > 2 GeV), the cross section is dominated by the amplitudes for scalar photons. Measured angular distributions of produced mesons will be used to estimate the contribution of various amplitudes to the cross sections. High statistics and good quality data collected simultaneously using a large acceptance detector will improve our understanding of nucleon structure as well as the hadronic properties of the photon.

  1. Deep Exclusive Pseudoscalar Meson Production at Jefferson Lab Hall C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basnet, Samip [Univ. of Regina, SK (Canada)

    2017-09-01

    Measurements of exclusive meson production are a useful tool in the study of hadronic structure. In particular, one can discern the relevant degrees of freedom at different distance scales through these studies. In the transition region between low momentum transfer (where a description of hadronic degrees of freedom in terms of effective hadronic Lagrangians is valid) and high momentum transfer (where the degrees of freedom are quarks and gluons), the predictive power of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of the strong interaction, is limited due to the absence of a complete solution. Thus, one has to rely upon experimental data from the non-perturbative intermediate-energy regime to thoroughly understand the onset of perturbative QCD (pQCD) as the momentum transfer is increased. This work involves two deep exclusive meson electroproduction experiments at Jefferson Lab (JLab). The p(e,e'pi+)n reaction is studied at fixed Q^2 and W of 2.5 GeV2 and 2.0 GeV, respectively, while varying the four momentum transfer to the nucleon -t from 0.2 to 2.1 GeV2 . As -t is increased, the hadronic interaction scale is reduced independently of the observation scale of the virtual photon, providing valuable information about the hard- scattering process in general. The data was taken at JLab Hall C in 2003, as a part of the experiment E01-004, Fpi-2, using the High Momentum Spectrometer (HMS) and Short Orbit Spectrometer (SOS), and in this work, the results of the differential cross section analysis are presented and compared to prior data, as well as two theoretical models. Using these results over a wide -t range, the transition from hard to soft QCD is also studied. In addition, the p(e,e'K+)Lambda(Sigma0) reactions are also studied. Despite their importance in elucidating the reaction mechanism underlying strangeness production, we still do not have complete understanding of these reactions above the resonance region. The experiment, E12- 09-011, intends to perform, for the first time, a full Rosenbluth (L/T/LT/TT) separation of p(e,e'K+)Lambda(Sigma0) cross sections above the resonance region using the newly upgraded standard equipment, Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) at JLab Hall C. The separated data will allow us to better understand the Kaon production reaction mechanism and the hard-soft QCD transition in exclusive processes. The kinematic settings being studied in the experiment ranges from Q^2 of 0.4 to 5.5 GeV2, W of 2.3 to 3.1 GeV, and -t of 0.06 to 0.53 GeV2. Here, the results from some pre-experimental studies with regards to estimations of singles rates as well as real and accidental coincidence rates are presented, using two different models. The implications of these projections on the runplan for the experiment are also discussed.

  2. Deeply Pseudoscalar Meson Electroproduction with CLAS and Generalized Parton Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidal, Michel [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay (France); Kubarovsky, Valery P. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    We discuss the recent data of exclusive $\\pi^0$ (and $\\pi^+$) electroproduction on the proton obtained by the CLAS collaboration at Jefferson Lab. It is observed that the cross sections, which have been decomposed in $\\sigma_T+\\epsilon\\sigma_L$, $\\sigma_{TT}$ and $\\sigma_{LT}$ structure functions, are dominated by transverse amplitude contributions. The data can be interpreted in the Generalized Parton Distribution formalism provided that one includes helicity-flip transversity GPDs.

  3. Consequences of nonzero neutrino masses on the evaluation of the weak coupling constant and on tau leptonic decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.A.; Picciotto, C.E.

    1987-12-01

    The effect of the limit of the muon-neutrino mass on the precision with which the weak coupling constant G/sub F/ can be evaluated from the experimental muon decay rate is calculated and discussed. Present limits allow an effect as large as 23 ppm. In tau leptonic decays the effects of a nonzero tau-neutrino mass amount to a decrease in the branching fraction B(tau..-->..e..nu../sub e/..nu../sub tau/) of ..delta..B/B<1.2%.

  4. Search for the Familon via $B^{\\pm}\\to \\pi^{\\pm}X^{0}$, $B^{\\pm}\\to K^{\\pm}X^{0}$, and $B^{0}\\to K_{S}^{0} X^{0}$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Ammar, R

    2001-01-01

    We have searched for the two-body decay of the B meson to a light pseudoscalar meson $h = \\pi^+, K^+, K^0_S$ and a massless neutral weakly-interacting particle $X^0$ such as the familon, the Nambu-Goldstone boson associated with a spontaneously broken global family symmetry. We find no significant signal by analyzing a data sample containing 9.7 million $B\\bar{B}$ mesons collected with the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, and set a 90% C.L. upper limit of $4.9 \\times 10^{-5}$ and $5.3 \\times 10^{-5}$ on the branching fraction for the decays $B^+ \\to h^+ X^0$ and $B^0 \\to K^0_S X^0$, respectively. These upper limits correspond to a lower bound of about $10^{8}$ GeV on the family symmetry breaking scale involving the third generation of quarks.

  5. Application of carbon fiber composite minielectrodes for measurement of kinetic constants of nitric oxide decay in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoping; El-Sherbiny, Gamal A; Collard, Eric; Huang, Xin; Follmer, Douglas; El-Mahdy, Mohamed; Zweier, Jay L

    2010-12-15

    Carbon fiber microelectrodes and carbon fiber composite minielectrodes (CFM/CFCM) have been generally used for measurements of nitric oxide (NO) concentration in chemical and biological systems. The response time of a CFM/CFCM is usually from milliseconds to seconds depending on the electrode size, the thickness of coating layers on the electrode, and NO diffusion coefficients of the coating layers. As a result, the time course of recoded current changes (I-t curves) by the CFM/CFCM may be different from the actual time course of NO concentration changes (c-t curves) if the half-life of NO decay is close to or shorter than the response time of the electrode used. This adds complexity to the process for determining rate constants of NO decay kinetics from the recorded current curves (I-t curves). By computer simulations based on a mathematical model, an approximation method was developed for determining rate constants of NO decay from the recorded current curves. This method was first tested and valuated using a commercial CFCM in several simple reaction systems with known rate constants. The response time of the CFCM was measured as 4.7±0.7 s (n=5). The determined rate constants of NO volatilization and NO autoxidation in our measurement system at 37 °C are (1.9±0.1)×10(-3) s(-1) (n=4) and (2.0±0.3)×10(3) M(-1) s(-1) (n=7), which are close to the reported rate constants. The method was then applied to determine the rate of NO decay in blood samples from control and smoking exposed mice. It was observed that the NO decay rate in the smoking group is >20% higher than that in control group, and the increased NO decay rate in the smoking group was reversed by 10 μM diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI), an inhibitor of flavin enzymes such as leukocyte NADPH oxidase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The $D_s$, $D^+$, $B_s$ and $B$ decay constants from $2+1$ flavor lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bazavov, A; Bouchard, C; DeTar, C; Du, D; El-Khadra, A X; Foley, J; Freeland, E D; Gámiz, E; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Kim, J; Komijani, J; Kronfeld, A S; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Mackenzie, P B; Mohler, D; Neil, E T; Oktay, M B; Qiu, S; Simone, J N; Sugar, R L; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the $D$ and $B$ leptonic decay constants on the MILC $N_f=2+1$ asqtad gauge ensembles using asqtad-improved staggered light quarks and clover heavy quarks in the Fermilab interpretation. Our previous analysis \\cite{Bazavov:2011aa} computed the decay constants at lattice spacings $a \\approx 0.14, 0.11$ and $0.083$ fm. We have extended the simulations to finer $a \\approx 0.058$ and $0.043$ fm lattice spacings, and have also increased statistics; this allows us to address many important sources of uncertainty. Technical advances include a two-step two-point fit procedure, better tuning of the heavy quark masses and a better determination of the axial-vector current matching. The present analysis remains blinded, so here we focus on the improvements and their predicted impact on the error budget compared to the prior analysis.

  7. Measurement of the Ds l(+)ve branching fractions and the decay constant fDs+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bakina, O.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Y.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Andersson, W. Ikegami; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kupsc, A.; Koehn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. B.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shi, M.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zotti, L.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Using 482 pb(-1) of e(+) e(-) collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy of root s = 4.009 GeV with the BESIII detector, we measure the branching fractions of the decays D-s(+) -> u(+)v(u) and D-s(+) -> tau(+)v(tau). By constraining the ratio of decay rates of Ds(+) to tau(+)v(u) and to

  8. Electron spectra of forbidden β decays and the effective value of the axial-vector coupling constant gA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhonen, Jouni

    2017-10-01

    Attempts to measure the neutrinoless ββ decay in the present and future underground experiments constitute an essential and important component of the present-day particle and neutrino physics. Sensitivity of these experiments depends on the values of the nuclear matrix elements that define the eventual half-life of these decays. Consederable effort has been invested in calculating accurately these matrix elements but at the same time it is becoming clear that this is not enough: To have a handle on the exact relationship between the neutrino mass and the expected ββ half-lives one needs to know the effective value of the weak axial-vector coupling constant gA since its value affects strongly the ββ half-life. In order to gain knowledge of the possible quenching of gA in finite nuclei one can study, e.g., allowed Gamow-Teller β decays of forbidden β decays. A particularly appealing method is the spectrum-shape method where comparison of the computed and measured shapes of electron spectra of forbidden non-unique β decays can potentially yield information on the quenching of gA.

  9. Improved Measurement of cal{B}(D^+ --> mu^+ nu) and the Pseudoscalar Decay Constant f_{D^+}

    CERN Document Server

    Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Dorjkhaidav, O; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nandakumar, R; Randrianarivony, K; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Chen, J; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Credé, V; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Phillips, E A; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Shepherd, M R; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Weaver, K M; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Stöck, H; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; White, E J; Williams, J; Wiss, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Li, S Z; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z V; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Zweber, P; Ernst, J; Severini, H; Dytman, S A; Love, W; Mehrabyan, S S; Müller, J A; Savinov, V; Li, Z; López, A; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F

    2005-01-01

    We extract a relatively precise value for the decay constant of the D+ meson by measuring B(D+ -> mu+ nu)=(4.40 +/- 0.66 {+0.09}{-0.12}) x 10^{-4}, using 281 inverse-pb of data taken on the psi(3770) resonance with the CLEO-c detector. We find fD+=(222.6 +/- 16.7 {+2.8}{-3.4}) MeV, and compare with current theoretical calculations. We also set a 90% confidence upper limit on B(D+ -> e+ nu)<2.4 x 10^{-5} which limits contributions from non-standard model physics.

  10. Light quark masses and pseudoscalar decay constants from $N_f = 2$ Lattice QCD with twisted mass fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Blossier, B; Dimopoulos, P; Farchioni, F; Frezzotti, R; Giménez, V; Herdoiza, G; Jansen, K; Lubicz, V; Michael, C; Palao, D; Papinutto, Mauro; Shindler, A; Simula, S; Tarantino, C; Urbach, C; Wenger, U

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of a lattice QCD calculation of the average up-down and strange quark masses and of the light meson pseudoscalar decay constants with Nf=2 dynamical fermions. The simulation is carried out at a single value of the lattice spacing with the twisted mass fermionic action at maximal twist, which guarantees automatic O(a)-improvement of the physical quantities. Quark masses are renormalized by implementing the non-perturbative RI-MOM renormalization procedure. Our results for the light quark masses are m_ud^{msbar}(2 GeV)= 3.85 +- 0.12 +- 0.40 MeV, m_s^{msbar}(2 GeV) = 105 +- 3 +- 9 MeV and m_s/m_ud = 27.3 +- 0.3 +- 1.2. We also obtain fK = 161.7 +- 1.2 +- 3.1 MeV and the ratio fK/fpi=1.227 +- 0.009 +- 0.024. From this ratio, by using the experimental determination of Gamma(K-> mu nu (gamma))/Gamma(pi -> mu nu (gamma)) and the average value of |Vud| from nuclear beta decays, we obtain |Vus|=0.2192(5)(45), in agreement with the determination from Kl3 decays and the unitarity constraint.

  11. Setting the scale for the CLS 2+1 flavor ensembles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Mattia [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.; Korzec, Tomasz [Bergische Univ. Wuppertal (Germany). Dept. of Physics; Schaefer, Stefan [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2016-08-31

    We present measurements of a combination of the decay constants of the light pseudoscalar mesons and the gradient flow scale t{sub 0}, which allow to set the scale of the lattices generated by CLS with 2+1 flavors of non-perturbatively improved Wilson fermions. Mistunings of the quark masses are corrected for by measuring the derivatives of observables with respect to the bare quark masses.

  12. Search for CP Violation in the Decays $D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S P^0$

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, B R

    2011-01-01

    We have searched for CP violation in the decays $D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S P^0$ where $P^0$ denotes a neutral pseudo-scalar meson which is either a $\\pi^0$, $\\eta$, or $\\eta'$ using KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 791 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the Belle detector. No evidence of significant CP violation is observed. We report the most precise CP asymmetry measurement in the decay $D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S\\pi^0$ to date: $A_{CP}^{D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S\\pi^0}=(-0.28\\pm0.19\\pm0.10)%$. We also report the first measurements of CP asymmetries in the decays $D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S\\eta$ and $D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S\\eta'$: $A_{CP}^{D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S\\eta}=(+0.54\\pm0.51\\pm0.16)%$ and $A_{CP}^{D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S\\eta'}=(+0.98\\pm0.67\\pm0.14)%$, respectively.

  13. Observation of Electromagnetic Dalitz decays J/\\psi \\to P e^+e^-

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Braun, S; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feng, C Q; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Fuks, O; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, T; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, L; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Kloss, B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leyhe, M; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, Q J; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, H L; Lu, J G; Lu, X R; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Moeini, H; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Q., N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C B; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2014-01-01

    Based on a sample of (225.3\\pm2.8)\\times 10^{6} J/\\psi events collected with the BESIII detector, the electromagnetic Dalitz decays of J/\\psi \\to P e^+e^-(P=\\eta'/\\eta/\\pi^0) are studied. By reconstructing the pseudoscalar mesons in various decay modes, the decays J/\\psi \\to \\eta' e^+e^-, J/\\psi \\to \\eta e^+e^- and J/\\psi \\to \\pi^0 e^+e^- are observed for the first time. The branching fractions are determined to be \\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to \\eta' e^+e^-) = (5.81\\pm0.16\\pm0.31)\\times10^{-5}, \\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to \\eta e^+e^-) = (1.16\\pm0.07\\pm0.06)\\times10^{-5}, and \\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to \\pi^0 e^+e^-)=(7.56\\pm1.32\\pm0.50)\\times10^{-7}, where the first errors are statistical and the second ones systematic.

  14. Mass of the b quark and B -meson decay constants from Nf=2+1+1 twisted-mass lattice QCD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bussone, A.; Carrasco, N.; Dimopoulos, P

    2016-01-01

    We present precise lattice computations for the b-quark mass, the quark mass ratios mb/mc and mb/ms as well as the leptonic B-decay constants. We employ gauge configurations with four dynamical quark flavors, up-down, strange and charm, at three values of the lattice spacing (a∼0.06-0.09 fm...

  15. Measurement of the D-s Decay Constant fDs and Observation of New Charm Resonances Decaying to D*π

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez, Jose [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2012-03-01

    The absolute branching fractions for the decays D-s → ℓ-$\\bar{v}$-(ℓ = e, μ, or τ) are measured using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 521 fb-1 collected at center of mass energies near 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEPII e+e- collider at SLAC. The number of Ds- mesons is determined by reconstructing the recoiling system DKXγ in events of the type e+e- → DKXD*s-, where D*s- → Ds- γ and X represents additional pions from fragmentation. The Ds- → ℓ-v events are detected by full or partial reconstruction of the recoiling system DKX{gamma}ℓ. The following results are obtained: β(Ds- → μ-v) = (6.02 ± 0.38 ± 0.34) x 10-3, {Beta}(Ds-→ τ-v) = (5.00 ± 0.35 ± 0.49) x 10-2, and B(Ds- → e-ν) < 2.8 x 10-4 at 90% C.L., where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The branching fraction measurements are combined to determine the Ds- decay constant fDs = (258.6 ± 6.4 ± 7.5) MeV. In addition, a study has been performed of the D+π}-, D0π}+, and D*+π- systems in inclusive e+e- → cc interactions in a search for excited D meson states. The dataset used consists of {approx}454 fb-1. The mass spectra for these systems show, for the first time, candidates for the radial excitations of the D0, D*0, and D*+, as well as the L = 2 excited states of the D0 and D-, where L is the orbital angular momentum of the quarks. Finally, a prototype of a

  16. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Marta; Cherubini, Paolo; Fravolini, Giulia; Marchetti, Marco; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Schärer, Michael; Synal, Hans-Arno; Bertoldi, Daniela; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto; Egli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Due to the large size (e.g. sections of tree trunks) and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the timescales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the chronosequence approach and the five-decay class system that is based on a macromorphological assessment. For the decay classes 1-3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose, and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model, a regression approach, and the stage-based matrix model. In the decay classes 1-3, the ages of the CWD were similar and varied between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch, with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative of deadwood age. This seems to be due to a time lag between the death of a standing tree and its contact with the soil. We found distinct tree-species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were estimated to be in the range 0.018 to 0.022 y-1 for spruce and to about 0.012 y-1 for larch. Snapshot sampling (chronosequences) may overestimate the age and mean residence time of CWD. No sampling bias was, however, detectable using the stage-based matrix model. Cellulose and lignin time trends could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 years for spruce and 50 years for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than

  17. Study of the weak annihilation contributions in charmless B{sub s} → VV decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Qin [Henan Normal University, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Henan (China); Central China Normal University, Institute of Particle Physics and Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE), Wuhan, Hubei (China); Li, Xiaonan; Sun, Junfeng [Henan Normal University, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics, Henan (China); Li, Xin-Qiang [Central China Normal University, Institute of Particle Physics and Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE), Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2017-06-15

    In this paper, in order to probe the spectator-scattering and weak annihilation contributions in charmless B{sub s} → VV (where V stands for a light vector meson) decays, we perform the χ{sup 2}-analyses for the endpoint parameters within the QCD factorization framework, under the constraints from the measured anti B{sub s} → ρ{sup 0}φ, φK{sup *0}, φφ and K{sup *0} anti K{sup *0} decays. The fitted results indicate that the endpoint parameters in the factorizable and nonfactorizable annihilation topologies are non-universal, which is also favored by the charmless B → PP and PV (where P stands for a light pseudo-scalar meson) decays observed in previous work. Moreover, the abnormal polarization fractions f{sub L,} {sub perpendicular} {sub to} (anti B{sub s} → K{sup *0} anti K{sup *0}) = (20.1±7.0)%, (58.4±8.5)% measured by the LHCb collaboration can be reconciled through the weak annihilation corrections. However, the branching ratio of anti B{sub s} → φK{sup *0} decay exhibits a tension between the data and theoretical result, which dominates the contributions to χ{sub min}{sup 2} in the fits. Using the fitted endpoint parameters, we update the theoretical results for the charmless B{sub s} → VV decays, which will be further tested by the LHCb and Belle-II experiments in the near future. (orig.)

  18. B s → Kℓν ℓ and B ( s) → π( K) ℓ + ℓ - decays at large recoil and CKM matrix elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodjamirian, Alexander; Rusov, Aleksey V.

    2017-08-01

    We provide hadronic input for the B-meson semileptonic transitions to a light pseudoscalar meson at large recoil. The B s → K form factor calculated from QCD light-cone sum rule is updated, to be used for a | V ub | determination from the B s → Kℓν width. Furthermore, we calculate the hadronic input for the binned observables of B → πℓ + ℓ - and B → Kℓ + ℓ -. In addition to the form factors, the nonlocal hadronic matrix elements are obtained, combining QCD factorization and light-cone sum rules with hadronic dispersion relations. We emphasize that, due to nonlocal effects, the ratio of branching fractions of these decays is not sufficient for an accurate extraction of the | V td /V ts | ratio. Instead, we suggest to determine the Wolfenstein parameters A, ρ, η of the CKM matrix, combining the branching fractions of B → Kℓ + ℓ - and B → πℓ + ℓ - with the direct CP -asymmetry in the latter decay. We also obtain the hadronic matrix elements for a yet unexplored channel B s → Kℓ + ℓ -.

  19. Measurements of $\\psi(2S)$ decays into $\\phi \\pi^0$, $\\phi \\eta$, $\\phi \\eta^{'}$, $\\omega \\eta$, and $\\omega \\eta^{'}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ban, Y; Bian, J G; Cai, X; Chang, J F; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, H L; Dai, Y S; Deng, Z Y; Dong, L Y; Du, S X; Du, Z Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Fu, H Y; Fu, L P; Gao, C S; Gao, M L; Gao, Y N; Gong, M Y; Gong, W X; Gu, S D; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; Guo, Z J; Han, S W; Harris, F A; He, J; He, K L; He, M; He, X; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, L; Huang, X P; Ji, X B; Jia, Q Y; Jiang, C H; Jiang, X S; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jin, Y; Lai, Y F; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, Q J; Li, R B; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X Q; Li, X S; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Liu, H M; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Z X; Lu, G R; Lu, F; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Luo, X L; Ma, F C; Ma, J M; Ma, L L; Ma, X Y; Mao, Z P; Meng, X C; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Nie, Z D; Olsen, S L; Peng, H P; Qi, N D; Qian, C D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, F; Shi, X; Song, L W; Sun, H S; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tao, N; Tian, Y R; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, J Z; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S Z; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Zhe Wang; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wei, C L; Wu, N; Wu, Y M; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xin, B; Xu, G F; Xu, H; Xu, Y; Xue, S T; Yan, M L; Yan, W B; Yang, F; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, S D; Yang, Y X; Yi, L H; Yi, Z Y; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yu, C S; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Yue, Q; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang Bing Yun; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J M; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, L S; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang Xiao Min; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y J; Zhang, Y Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Q; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J B; Zhao, J W; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, X J; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, L S; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, X C; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G M; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zou, B S

    2004-01-01

    Decays of the $\\psi(2S)$ into Vector plus Pseudoscalar meson final states have been studied with 14 million $\\psi(2S)$ events collected with the BESII detector. Branching fractions of $\\psi(2S) \\rar\\phi\\eta$, $\\phi\\etap$, and $\\omega\\etap$, and upper limits of $\\psi(2S) \\rar \\phi\\piz$ and $\\omega\\eta$ are obtained: $B(\\psi(2S) \\rar\\phi\\eta) = 3.5 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.6) \\times 10^{-5}$, $B(\\psi(2S) \\rar\\phi\\etap) = (3.3 \\pm 1.3 \\pm 0.7)\\times 10^{-5}$, and $B(\\psi(2S) \\rar\\omega\\etap) = (3.1 \\pm 2.4 \\pm 0.7) \\times 10^{-5}$; and $B(\\psi(2S) \\rar\\phi\\piz) < 0.3 \\times 10^{-5}$, and $B(\\psi(2S) \\rar\\omega\\eta) < 1.1 \\times 10^{-5}$ at the 90 % C.L.. These results are used to test the pQCD ``12% rule''.

  20. Decay constants of the charmed vector mesons D{sup ⁎} and D{sub s}{sup ⁎} from QCD sum rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucha, Wolfgang [HEPHY, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050, Vienna (Austria); Melikhov, Dmitri [D.V. Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Simula, Silvano [INFN, Sezione di Roma III, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146, Roma (Italy)

    2014-07-30

    We present a sum-rule calculation of the decay constants of the charmed vector mesons D{sup ⁎} and D{sub s}{sup ⁎} from the two-point correlator of vector currents. First, we show that the perturbative expansion in terms of the pole mass exhibits no sign of convergence whereas the reorganization of this expansion in terms of the MS{sup ¯} mass leads to a distinct hierarchy. Second, making use of the operator product expansion in terms of the MS{sup ¯} mass, we determine the decay constants of the D{sup ⁎} and D{sub s}{sup ⁎} mesons with an emphasis on the uncertainties in these theoretically predicted quantities related both to the input QCD parameters and to the limited accuracy of the method of sum rules. Our results are f{sub D{sup ⁎}}=(252.2±22.3{sub OPE}±4{sub syst}) MeV and f{sub D{sub s{sup ⁎}}}=(305.5±26.8{sub OPE}±5{sub syst}) MeV. For the ratios of the vector-to-pseudoscalar decay constants we report f{sub D{sup ⁎}}/f{sub D}=1.221±0.080{sub OPE}±0.008{sub syst} and f{sub D{sub s{sup ⁎}}}/f{sub D{sub s}}=1.241±0.057{sub OPE}±0.007{sub syst}.

  1. Measurement of the Branching Fraction for D8+ rarr tau+nu_tau and Extraction of the Decay Constant f_D_s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley; Hawkes, C.M.; /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-06-04

    The branching fraction for the decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} with {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, is measured using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 427 fb{sup -1} collected at center of mass energies near 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. In the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} {yields} D*{sub s}{sup +} {bar D}{sub TAG}{bar K}X, the D*{sub s}{sup +} meson is reconstructed as a missing particle, and the subsequent decay D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{gamma} yields an inclusive D{sub s}{sup +} data sample. Here {bar D}{sub TAG} refers to a fully reconstructed hadronic {bar D} decay, {bar K} is a K{sup -} or {bar K}{sup 0}, and X stands for any number of charged or neutral pions. The decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} is isolated also, and from ratio of event yields and known branching fractions, {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.3)% is determined. The pseudoscalar decay constant is extracted to be f{sub D{sub s}} = (233 {+-} 13 {+-} 10 {+-} 7) MeV, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third results from the uncertainties on the external measurements used as input to the calculation.

  2. Decay constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ and quark masses $m_b$ and $m_c$ from HISQ simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komijani, J.; et al.

    2016-11-22

    We present a progress report on our calculation of the decay constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ from lattice-QCD simulations with highly-improved staggered quarks. Simulations are carried out with several heavy valence-quark masses on $(2+1+1)$-flavor ensembles that include charm sea quarks. We include data at six lattice spacings and several light sea-quark masses, including an approximately physical-mass ensemble at all but the smallest lattice spacing, 0.03 fm. This range of parameters provides excellent control of the continuum extrapolation to zero lattice spacing and of heavy-quark discretization errors. Finally, using the heavy-quark effective theory expansion we present a method of extracting from the same correlation functions the charm- and bottom-quark masses as well as some low-energy constants appearing in the heavy-quark expansion.

  3. Decay constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ and quark masses $m_b$ and $m_c$ from HISQ simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Komijani, J; Bernard, C; Brambilla, N; Brown, N; DeTar, C; Du, D; El-Khadra, A X; Freeland, E D; Gámiz, E; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Kronfeld, A S; Laiho, J; Mackenzie, P B; Monahan, C; Na, Heechang; Neil, E T; Simone, J N; Sugar, R L; Toussaint, D; Vairo, A; Van de Water, R S

    2016-01-01

    We present a progress report on our calculation of the decay constants $f_B$ and $f_{B_s}$ from lattice-QCD simulations with highly-improved staggered quarks. Simulations are carried out with several heavy valence-quark masses on $(2+1+1)$-flavor ensembles that include charm sea quarks. We include data at six lattice spacings and several light sea-quark masses, including an approximately physical-mass ensemble at all but the smallest lattice spacing, 0.03 fm. This range of parameters provides excellent control of the continuum extrapolation to zero lattice spacing and of heavy-quark discretization errors. Finally, using the heavy-quark effective theory expansion we present a method of extracting from the same correlation functions the charm- and bottom-quark masses as well as some low-energy constants appearing in the heavy-quark expansion.

  4. A Calculation Method of Equivalent Circuit Constants of Synchronous Machines Considering Field Transient Characteristics Using DC Decay Testing Method with Open and Shorted Field Windings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Takashi; Watanabe, Yasutoshi; Ara, Takahiro; Matsumura, Toshiro

    It has been reported that the calculated values of field transient behavior in a synchronous machine differ considerably from the measured values. This discrepancy is caused by the use of equivalent circuit constants in standardized tests provied by JEC2130 and IEC60034-4, in which the mutual leakage reactance between the damper and field windings is not accounted for. The authors have been studying a method for calculating equivalent circuit constants for the accurate simulation of transient behavior including the field winding side, by means of a standstill test with a small-capacity DC power supply (DC decay testing method). The authors have previously presented a calculation method using operational impedances with the field windings opened, shorted, and inserted with an external resistance, obtained by the DC decay test. This paper presents a new method in which the external resistance used in our previous method is no longer needed. Instead, the field winding impedance is determined based on its invariability against slip. The validity of the new method is demonstrated by comparing the calculated and measured values of the armature and field currents during a sudden three-phase short-circuit using 10kVA-200V-31.9A-4P-50Hz test machines.

  5. Masses and decay constants of $D_{(s)}^*$ and $B_{(s)}^*$ mesons in Lattice QCD with $N_f = 2 + 1 + 1$ twisted-mass fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Lubicz, V; Simula, S

    2016-01-01

    We present a lattice calculation of the decay constants and masses of $D_{(s)}^*$ and $B_{(s)}^*$ mesons using the gauge configurations produced by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration (ETMC) with $N_f = 2 + 1 + 1$ dynamical quarks and at three values of the lattice spacing $a \\sim 0.06 - 0.09$ fm. Pion masses are simulated in the range $m_{\\pi} \\sim 210 - 450$ MeV, while the strange and charm quark masses are close to their physical values. We computed the ratios of vector to pseudoscalar decay constants or masses for various values of the heavy-quark mass $m_h$ in the range $0.7 m_c^{phys} \\lesssim m_h \\lesssim 3 m_c^{phys}$. In order to reach the physical b-quark mass, we exploited the HQET prediction that, in the static limit of infinite heavy-quark mass, all the considered ratios are equal to one. We obtain: $ f_{D^*}/f_{D} = 1.078(36),$ $m_{D^*}/m_{D} = 1.0769(79)$, $f_{D^*_{s}}/f_{D_{s}} = 1.087(20)$, $m_{D^*_{s}}m_{D_{s}} = 1.0751(56)$, $f_{B^*}/f_{B} = 0.958(22)$, $m_{B^*}/m_{B} = 1.0078(15)$, $f_...

  6. Chiral low-energy constants L{sub 10} and C{sub 87} from hadronic {tau} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Alonso, Martin [Departament de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Apt. Correus 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: Martin.Gonzalez@ific.uv.es; Pich, Antonio [Departament de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Apt. Correus 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Prades, Joaquim [CAFPE and Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuente Nueva, E-18002 Granada (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    Using recent precise hadronic {tau}-decay data on the V - A spectral function and general properties of QCD such as analyticity, the operator product expansion (OPE) and chiral perturbation theory ({chi}PT), we get accurate values for the QCD chiral order parameters L{sub 10}{sup r} and C{sub 87}{sup r}. At order p{sup 4} we obtain L{sub 10}{sup r}(M{sub {rho}})=-(5.22{+-}0.06).10{sup -3}, whereas at order p{sup 6} we get L{sub 10}{sup r}(M{sub {rho}})=-(4.06{+-}0.39).10{sup -3} and C{sub 87}{sup r}(M{sub {rho}})=(4.89{+-}0.19).10{sup -3}GeV{sup -2}.

  7. Measurements of the Strong Coupling Constant and the QCD Colour Factors using Four-jet Observables from Hadronic Z Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A; Barate, R; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Boix, G; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Pacheco, A; Ruiz, H; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Buchmüller, O L; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Greening, T C; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kado, M; Mato, P; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schneider, O; Sguazzoni, G; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, I; Ward, J; Badaud, F; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Swynghedauw, M; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Halley, A; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Thompson, A S; Wasserbaech, S R; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, P J; Girone, M; Marinelli, N; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Bonissent, A; Coyle, P; Leroy, O; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Ragusa, F; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Settles, Ronald; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Lefrançois, J; Veillet, J J; Yuan, C; Bagliesi, G; Boccali, T; Foà, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Ligabue, F; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, Roberto; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Xie, Z; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Misiejuk, A; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Grupen, Claus; Ngac, A; Prange, G; Sieler, U; Giannini, G; Rothberg, J E; Armstrong, S R; Berkelman, K; Cranmer, K; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y B; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G

    2003-01-01

    Data from e+e- annihilation into hadrons, taken with the ALEPH detector at the Z resonance, are analyzed. The four-jet rate is studied as a function of the resolution parameter and compared to next-to-leading order calculations combined with resummation of large logarithms. Angular correlations in four-jet events are measured and compared to next-to-leading order QCD predictions. With these observables two different measurements are performed. In a first analysis the strong coupling constant is measured from the four-jet rate yielding alpha_s(M_ Z}) = 0.1170 \\pm 0.0001(stat) \\pm 0.0014(sys) In a second measurement the strong coupling constant and the \\textsc{QCD} colour factors are determined simultaneously from a fit to the four-jet rate and the four-jet angular correlations, giving alpha_s(M_ Z) = 0.119 \\pm 0.006(stat) \\pm 0.026 (sys) C_A = 2.93 \\pm 0.14(stat) \\pm 0.58 (sys) C_F} = 1.35 \\pm 0.07 (stat) \\pm 0.26 (sys) in good agreement with the expectation from QCD.

  8. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A; Illman, Walter A

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A.; Illman, Walter A.

    2015-06-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  10. Measurement of the strong coupling constant αs from global event-shape variables of hadronic Z decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decampo, D.; Deschizeaux, B.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Alemany, R.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mato, P.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Tubau, E.; Catanesi, M. G.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Gao, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Lou, J.; Qiao, C.; Ruan, T.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Albrecht, H.; Atwood, W. B.; Bird, F.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Bossi, F.; Brown, D.; Burnett, T. H.; Drevermann, H.; Dydak, F.; Forty, R. W.; Grab, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Haywood, S.; Jost, B.; Kasemann, M.; Kellner, G.; Knobloch, J.; Lacourt, A.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lüke, D.; Marchioro, A.; Martinez, M.; May, J.; Menary, S.; Minten, A.; Miotto, A.; Nash, J.; Palazzi, P.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Roth, A.; Rothberg, J.; Rotscheidt, H.; von Rüden, W.; St. Denis, R.; Schlatter, D.; Takashima, M.; Talby, M.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wheeler, S.; Wiedenmann, W.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Falvard, A.; El Fellous, R.; Gay, P.; Harvey, J.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Stimpfl, G.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nielsen, E. R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Petersen, G.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Bourotte, J.; Braems, F.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Gamess, A.; Guirlet, R.; Rosowsky, A.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Veitch, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Massimo-Brancaccio, F.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Nicoletti, G.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Zografou, P.; Altoon, B.; Boyle, O.; Halley, A. W.; Ten Have, I.; Hearns, J. L.; Lynch, J. G.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geiges, R.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassard, J. F.; Patton, S. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Taylor, G.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Rowlingson, B. S.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Barczewski, T.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Roehn, S.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Albanese, J.-P.; Aubert, J.-J.; Benchouk, C.; Bernard, V.; Bonissent, A.; Courvoisier, D.; Etienne, F.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Qian, Z.; Blum, W.; Cattaneo, P.; Cowan, G.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hauser, G.; Jahn, A.; Kozanecki, W.; Lange, E.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Pan, Y.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Stierlin, U.; Thomas, J.; Wolf, G.; Bertin, V.; de Bouard, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, X.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Ganis, G.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Journé, V.; Kim, D. W.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Amendolia, S. R.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Moneta, L.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Venturi, A.; Walsh, J.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Medcalf, T.; Saich, M. R.; Strong, J. A.; Thomas, R. M.; Wildish, T.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Klopfenstein, C.; Lançon, E.; Locci, E.; Loucatos, S.; Monnier, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dinsdale, M.; Dogru, M.; Hatfield, F.; Martin, J.; Parker, D.; Reeves, P.; Thompson, L. F.; Brandt, S.; Burkhardt, H.; Grupen, C.; Meinhard, H.; Mirabito, L.; Neugebauer, E.; Schäfer, U.; Seywerd, H.; Apollinari, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Liello, F.; Rolandi, L.; Stiegler, U.; Bellantoni, L.; Boudreau, J. F.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Deweerd, A. J.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Harton, J. L.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, J. E.; Jared, R. C.; Johnson, R. P.; Leclaire, B. W.; Pan, Y. B.; Parker, T.; Pater, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Sharma, V.; Wear, J. A.; Weber, F. V.; Wu, Sau Lan; Zobernig, G.

    1991-02-01

    An analysis of global event-shape variables has been carried out for the reaction e+e--->Z0-->hadrons to measure the strong coupling constant αs. This study is based on 52 720 hadronic events obtained in 1989/90 with the ALEPH detector at the LEP collider at energies near the peak of the Z-resonance. In order to determine αs, second order QCD predictions modified by effects of perturbative higher orders and hadronization were fitted to the experimental distributions of event-shape variables. From a detailed analysis of the theoretical uncertainties we find that this approach is best justified for the differential two-jet rate, from which we obtain αs(MZ2) = 0.121 +/- 0.002(stat.)+/-0.003(sys.)+/-0.007(theor.) using a renormalization scale ω = 1/2MZ. The dependence of αs(MZ2) on ω is parameterized. For scales mb<ω

  11. Measurement of the Strong Coupling Constant $\\alpha_s$ and the Vector and Axial-Vector Spectral Functions in Hadronic Tau Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; de Roeck, A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Doucet, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Evans, H G; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1999-01-01

    The spectral functions of the vector current and the axial-vector current have been measured in hadronic tau decays using the OPAL detector at LEP. Within the framework of the Operator Product Expansion a simultaneous determination of the strong coupling constant alpha_s, the non-perturbative operators of dimension 6 and 8 and of the gluon condensate has been performed. Different perturbative descriptions have been compared to the data. The Contour Improved Fixed Order Perturbation Theory gives alpha_s(mtau**2) = 0.348 +- 0.009 +- 0.019 at the tau-mass scale and alpha_s(mz**2) = 0.1219 +- 0.0010 +- 0.0017 at the Z-mass scale. The values obtained for alpha_s(mz**2) using Fixed Order Perturbation Theory or Renormalon Chain Resummation are 2.3% and 4.1% smaller, respectively. The running of the strong coupling between s_0 ~1.3 GeV**2 and s_0 = mtau**2 has been tested from direct fits to the integrated differential hadronic decay rate R_tau. A test of the saturation of QCD sum rules at the tau-mass scale has been...

  12. Scalar meson f{sub 0}(980) in heavy-meson decays.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bennich, B.; Leitner, O.; Dedonder, J.-P.; Loiseau, B.; Physics; Lab. de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies; Lab. Nazionali di Frascati

    2009-04-01

    A phenomenological analysis of the scalar meson f{sub 0}(980) is performed that relies on the quasi-two-body decays D and D{sub s} {yields} f{sub 0}(980)P, with P = {pi}, K. The two-body branching ratios are deduced from experimental data on D or D{sub s} {yields} {pi}{pi}{pi}, K{sup -} K{pi} and from the f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and f{sub 0}(980) {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} branching fractions. Within a covariant quark model, the scalar form factors for the transitions D and D{sub s} {yields} f{sub 0}(980) are computed. The weak D decay amplitudes, in which these form factors enter, are obtained in the naive factorization approach assuming a q{bar q} state for the scalar and pseudoscalar mesons. They allow to extract information on the f{sub 0}(980) wave function in terms of u{bar u}, d{bar d}, and s{bar s} pairs as well as on the mixing angle between the strange and nonstrange components. The weak transition form factors are modeled by the one-loop triangular diagram using two different relativistic approaches: covariant light-front dynamics and dispersion relations. We use the information found on the f{sub 0}(980) structure to evaluate the scalar and vector form factors in the transitions D and D{sub s} {yields} f{sub 0}(980), as well as to make predictions for B and B{sub s} {yields} f{sub 0}(980), for the entire kinematically allowed momentum range of q{sup 2}.

  13. Studies of Final-State Interactions via Helicity Asymmetries in Exclusive Pseudoscalar Meson Photoproduction off Deuteron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, Yordanka

    2017-05-01

    Exclusive meson photoproduction off deuteron is a great tool to study final-state interactions (FSI) between the hadrons produced in the scattering of the incident photon off one of the target nucleons and the spectator nucleon. FSI in the reaction γ d→ K^+Λ n allow to access the dynamics of Λ n elastic scattering and provide a method of studying the hyperon-nucleon ( YN) interaction. Also, as deuteron is often used as a neutron target, FSI contribute to the reaction dynamics in addition to the quasi-free mechanism and their understanding is critical for the estimate of observables off the free neutron. Here we show preliminary results for beam-helicity asymmetries for the reactions {γ } d→ K^+Λ n and {γ } d→ pπ ^+π ^- n and their evolution over the spectator-nucleon momentum. The data were obtained with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). We show how to kinematically select an event sample dominated by a specific FSI mechanism. We also discuss a method to extract polarization observables for photoproduction off the free nucleon using the helicity asymmetries for reactions off the deuteron.

  14. Progress in pseudo-scalar meson photoproduction experiments at MAMI-C in Mainz.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annand, John R.M; Hamilton, David J.; Howdle, David; Livingston, Ken; MacGregor, Ian James Douglas; Mancell, Joe; McNicoll, Eilidh; Robinson, Jamie; Rosner, Guenther [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Since its upgrade in 2007, the Glasgow-Mainz spectrometer has provided a state-of-the-art photon tagger for a series of photo-production experiments at electron beam energies from 200 to 1508 MeV. We report on the operational status of the tagging spectrometer, refitted with a new focal-plane detector to extend its rate capability and improve its timing resolution by a factor 2. This complements the Crystal Ball and TAPS calorimeters, which provide almost 4{pi} detection of both neutral and charged particles. These systems have very high detection efficiency for multi-photon final states. Measurement of pseudo-scalar-meson photo production on the nucleon is a major component of the experimental programme. We have data on {pi}{sup 0}, {pi}{sup +}, {eta}, {eta}{sup '}, K{sup 0}, K{sup +} (single and multiple-meson) final states for {sup 1}H and {sup 2}H targets. The eventual goal is to make complete measurements of the helicity amplitudes, which require at least 8 observables chosen properly from unpolarised, single-spin and double-spin possibilities. The possibilities in Mainz will extend when polarised targets become available in 2009. In December 2008 the maximum MAMI-C energy was raised to 1557 MeV and data taken with an open trigger at tagged-photon energies from 80 to 1447 MeV. We show some first analyses of these tests.

  15. Regge description of two pseudoscalar meson production in antiproton-proton annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiele, J. van de [Universite de Paris-Sud, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Orsay Cedex (France); Ong, S. [Universite de Paris-Sud, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Orsay Cedex (France); Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, Amiens (France)

    2010-11-15

    A Regge-inspired model is used to discuss the hard exclusive two-body hadronic reactions (anti pp{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, K{sup -}K{sup +}, anti K{sup 0}K{sup 0}) for the FAIR facility project at GSI with the PANDA detector. The comparison between the differential cross-sections predictions and the available data is shown to determine the values of the few parameters of the model. (orig.)

  16. Electromagnetic effects on the light pseudoscalar mesons and determination of $m_u/m_d$

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, S; Bernard, C; DeTar, C; Freeland, E; Foley, J; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Komijani, J; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Osborn, J; Sugar, R L; Torok, A; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2016-01-01

    The MILC Collaboration has completed production running of electromagnetic effects on light mesons using asqtad improved staggered quarks. In these calculations, we use quenched photons in the noncompact formalism. We study four lattice spacings from $\\approx\\!0.12\\:$fm to $\\approx\\!0.045\\:$fm. To study finite-volume effects, we used six spatial lattice sizes $L/a=12$, 16, 20, 28, 40, and 48, at $a\\!\\approx\\!0.12\\:$fm. We update our preliminary values for the correction to Dashen's theorem ($\\epsilon$) and the quark-mass ratio $m_u/m_d$.

  17. Central Production of Two-Pseudoscalar Meson Systems at the COMPASS Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Austregesilo, Alexander; Mallot, Gerhard

    The question of the existence of glueballs is one of the unsolved problems in modern particle physics and can be regarded as a stringent test for quantum chromodynamics. Especially the supernumerous states in the light scalar meson spectrum are candidates for the observation of mixing effects between $q\\bar q$ mesons and pure gluonic bound states. On the other hand, the existence and the properties of many resonances in this sector are disputed. The COMPASS experiment was proposed to make significant contributions to this field. COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS which focused on light-quark hadron spectroscopy during the data taking periods in 2008 and 2009. A world-leading data set was collected with a $190\\,\\mathrm{GeV}/c$ hadron beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target in order to study, inter alia, the central production of glueball candidates in the light meson sector. Especially the double-Pomeron exchange mechanism is well suited for the production of mesons without valenc...

  18. Elastic and transition form factors of light pseudoscalar mesons from QCD sum rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakireva, I. A., E-mail: iraxff@mail.ru [Moscow State University, SINP (Russian Federation); Lucha, W., E-mail: Wolfgang.Lucha@oeaw.ac.at [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Institute for High Energy Physics (Austria); Melikhov, D. I., E-mail: dmitri_melikhov@gmx.de [Moscow State University, SINP (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15

    We revisit F{sub {pi}}(Q{sup 2}) and F{sub P{gamma}}(Q{sup 2}), P = {pi}, {eta}, {eta} Prime , making use of the local-duality (LD) version of QCD sum rules. We give arguments that the LD sum rule provides reliable predictions for these form factors at Q{sup 2} {>=} 5-6 GeV{sup 2}, the accuracy of the method increasing with Q{sup 2} in this region. For the pion elastic form factor, the well-measured data at small Q{sup 2} give a hint that the LD limit may be reached already at relatively low values of momentum transfers, Q{sup 2} Almost-Equal-To 4-8 GeV{sup 2}; we therefore conclude that large deviations from LD in the region Q{sup 2} = 20-50 GeV{sup 2} seem very unlikely. The data on the ({eta}, {eta} Prime ) {yields} {gamma}{gamma}* form factors meet the expectations from the LD model. However, the BaBar results for the {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}* form factor imply a violation of LD growing with Q{sup 2} even at Q{sup 2} Almost-Equal-To 40 GeV{sup 2}, at odds with the {eta}, {eta} Prime case and with the general properties expected for the LD sum rule.

  19. Generalized SU(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Pt. 1; Mesonic modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimt, S.; Lutz, M.; Vogl, U.; Weise, W. (Regensburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physik 1 - Theoretische Physik)

    1990-10-08

    We present calculations of mesonic (quark-antiquark) modes in a generalized Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model with three quark flavours. The effective interaction between quarks is symmetric under chiral SU(3){sub L}xSU(3){sub R} and incorporates a U(1){sub A}-breaking six-point interaction as suggested by 't Hooft. We coencentrate on the evaluation of masses and decay constants of pseudoscalar mesons, with special emphasis on the underlying symmetry breaking patterns. Scalar, vector and axial vector mesonic modes are also discussed. (orig.).

  20. 2+1 flavor QCD simulation on a $96^4$ lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Ishikawa, K -I; Kuramashi, Y; Nakamura, Y; Namekawa, Y; Taniguchi, Y; Ukita, N; Yamazaki, T; Yoshie, T

    2015-01-01

    We generate $2+1$ flavor QCD configurations near the physical point on a $96^4$ lattice employing the 6-APE stout smeared Wilson clover action with a nonperturbative $c_{\\rm SW}$ and the Iwasaki gauge action at $\\beta=1.82$. The physical point is estimated based on the chiral perturbation theory using several data points generated by the reweighting technique from the simulation point, wherer $m_\\pi$,$m_K$ and $m_\\Omega$ are used as physical inputs. The physics results include the quark masses, the hadron spectrum, the pseudoscalar meson decay constants and nucleon sigma terms, using the nonperturbative renormalization factors evaluated with the Schrodinger functional method.

  1. B-meson decay constants from 2+1-flavor lattice QCD with domain-wall light quarks and relativistic heavy quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, Norman H. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Flynn, Jonathan M. [Univ. of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom); Izubuchi, Taku [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kawanai, Taichi [RIKEN, Wako (Japan); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lehner, Christoph [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Soni, Amarjit [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Van de Water, Ruth S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Witzel, Oliver [Boston Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-03-10

    We calculate the B-meson decay constants fB, fBs, and their ratio in unquenched lattice QCD using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks. We use gauge-field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations using the domain-wall fermion action and Iwasaki gauge action with three flavors of light dynamical quarks. We analyze data at two lattice spacings of a ≈ 0.11, 0.086 fm with unitary pion masses as light as Mπ ≈ 290 MeV; this enables us to control the extrapolation to the physical light-quark masses and continuum. For the b-quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with the relativistic heavy-quark interpretation, such that discretization errors from the heavy-quark action are of the same size as from the light-quark sector. We renormalize the lattice heavy-light axial-vector current using a mostly nonperturbative method in which we compute the bulk of the matching factor nonperturbatively, with a small correction, that is close to unity, in lattice perturbation theory. We also improve the lattice heavy-light current through O(αsa). We extrapolate our results to the physical light-quark masses and continuum using SU(2) heavy-meson chiral perturbation theory, and provide a complete systematic error budget. We obtain fB0 = 196.2(15.7) MeV, fB+ = 195.4(15.8) MeV, fBs = 235.4(12.2) MeV, fBs/fB0 = 1.193(59), and fBs/fB+ = 1.220(82), where the errors are statistical and total systematic added in quadrature. In addition, these results are in good agreement with other published results and provide an important independent cross check of other three-flavor determinations of B-meson decay constants using staggered light quarks.

  2. Measurement of the Pseudoscalar Decay Constant fDs Using Charm-Tagged Events in e+e- Collisions at \\sqrt{s}=10.58GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le, F; Diberder; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    Using 230.2 fb^(-1) of e+e- annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at and near the peak of the Y(4S) resonance, 489 +/- 55 events containing the pure leptonic decay D_s^+ --> mu^+ nu_mu have been isolated in charm-tagged events. The ratio of partial widths Gamma(D_s^+ --> mu^+ nu_mu)/Gamma(D_s^+ --> phi pi^+) is measured to be 0.143 +/- 0.018 +/- 0.006 allowing a determination of the pseudoscalar decay constant f_{D_s} = (283 +/- 17 +/- 7 +/- 14) MeV. The errors are statistical, systematic, and from the D_s^+ --> phi pi^+ branching ratio, respectively.

  3. Analysis of the J/ψ and ψ(2S) decay into γπ{sup +}π{sup -}η in BES III and developments for the readout of the Panda-EMC; Analyse des J/ψ- und ψ(2S)-Zerfalls in γπ{sup +}π{sup -}η bei BES III und Entwicklungen zur Auslese des Panda-EMC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyhe, Michael

    2013-07-09

    The present thesis deals with two experiments, which perform on the field of the hadron spectroscopy fundamental research. These are the existing BES III experiment, from which data from charmonium decay are analyzed and the future PANDA experiment, for which in this thesis the readout of the forward end cap of the electromagnetic calorimeter is developed. In the first part the radiative decays of ψ(2S) and J/ψ into γ(π{sup +}π{sup -}η) are analyzed for the study of the η(1405) meson. This state is considered as possible glueball candidate, because among others the pseudoscalar-meson nonet with the η(1405), η(1295), and η(1475) is overoccupied by one particle and other experiments assign to the η(1405) a large gluonic contribution. The production of the η(1475) can, as confirmed by other experiments, ot be observed in the decay into π{sup +}π{sup -}η.The η(1295) however is identified in the framework of a partial-wave analysis in the decay J/ψ→γπ{sup +}π{sup -}η. This succeeded previously only in the DM2 experiment, indeed with distinctly lower statistics and corresponding uncertainties. A possible solution of the problem of the overoccupation, the non-existence of the η(1295), cannot be confirmed by the results presented in this thesis. Furthermore the branching ratios of different decays are determined. The high event-rate allows to determine some decay probabilities for the first time respectively clearly more precisely. The partial waves contributing in the decay J/ψ→γπ{sup +}π{sup -}η can be determined by a mass-independent partial-wave analysis and brought into connection with known resonances. In the second part of the thesis the development and optimization of the photodetector-preamplifier units used for the readout of the forward end cap of the electromagnetic calorimeter are shown. A manifold of these detector-units were produced for a prototype of the forward end cap and tested in subsequent test-beam times under real

  4. $B \\rightarrow \\pi$ and $B \\rightarrow K$ transitions from QCD Sum Rules on the Light-Cone

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, P

    1998-01-01

    I calculate the form factors describing semileptonic and penguin induced decays of B mesons into light pseudoscalar mesons. The form factors are calculated from QCD sum rules on the light-cone including contributions up to twist 4, radiative corrections to the leading twist contribution and SU(3) breaking effects. The theoretical uncertainty is estimated to be $\\sim$ (10-15)%.

  5. Leptonic Charm Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Xin, Bo

    2011-01-01

    We review the recent experimental results on D and Ds meson leptonic decays from CLEO-c, Belle, and BABAR, which results in the decay constants f_D= (206.7 +- 8.9) MeV and f_Ds= (257.3 +- 5.3) MeV. The latter is an average obtained by the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG). Comparisons with Lattice QCD (LQCD) calculations are discussed.

  6. Chiral symmetry breaking in QCD with two light flavors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Georg P; Giusti, Leonardo; Lottini, Stefano; Sommer, Rainer

    2015-03-20

    A distinctive feature of the presence of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in QCD is the condensation of low modes of the Dirac operator near the origin. The rate of condensation must be equal to the slope of M(π)(2)F(π)(2)/2 with respect to the quark mass m in the chiral limit, where M(π) and F(π) are the mass and the decay constant of the Nambu-Goldstone bosons. We compute the spectral density of the (Hermitian) Dirac operator, the quark mass, the pseudoscalar meson mass, and decay constant by numerical simulations of lattice QCD with two light degenerate Wilson quarks. We use lattices generated by the Coordinated Lattice Simulation (CLS) group at three values of the lattice spacing in the range 0.05-0.08 fm, and for several quark masses corresponding to pseudoscalar mesons masses down to 190 MeV. Thanks to this coverage of parameters space, we can extrapolate all quantities to the chiral and continuum limits with confidence. The results show that the low quark modes do condense in the continuum as expected by the Banks-Casher mechanism, and the rate of condensation agrees with the Gell-Mann-Oakes-Renner relation. For the renormalization-group-invariant ratios we obtain [Σ(RGI)](1/3)/F=2.77(2)(4) and Λ(M̅S)/F=3.6(2), which correspond to [Σ(M̅S)(2  GeV)](1/3)=263(3)(4)  MeV and F=85.8(7)(20)  MeV if F(K) is used to set the scale by supplementing the theory with a quenched strange quark.

  7. Neutron Beta Decay Studies with Nab

    CERN Document Server

    Baeßler, S.; Alonzi, L.P.; Balascuta, S.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Bowman, J.D.; Bychkov, M.A.; Byrne, J.; Calarco, J.R.; Chupp, T.; Cianciolo, T.V.; Crawford, C.; Frlež, E.; Gericke, M.T.; Glück, F.; Greene, G.L.; Grzywacz, R.K.; Gudkov, V.; Harrison, D.; Hersman, F.W.; Ito, T.; Makela, M.; Martin, J.; McGaughey, P.L.; McGovern, S.; Page, S.; Penttilä, S.I.; Počanić, D.; Rykaczewski, K.P.; Salas-Bacci, A.; Tompkins, Z.; Wagner, D.; Wilburn, W.S.; Young, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Precision measurements in neutron beta decay serve to determine the coupling constants of beta decay and allow for several stringent tests of the standard model. This paper discusses the design and the expected performance of the Nab spectrometer.

  8. MATHEMATICAL CONSTANTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, H.P.; Potter, Elinor

    1971-03-01

    This collection of mathematical data consists of two tables of decimal constants arranged according to size rather than function, a third table of integers from 1 to 1000, giving some of their properties, and a fourth table listing some infinite series arranged according to increasing size of the coefficients of the terms. The decimal values of Tables I and II are given to 20 D.

  9. Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  10. Convivial Decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohn, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    maintenance may reach the limits of repair and shift from repair-as-sustaining into a mode of repair- into-decay, actively working towards the end-of-life. What this reveals is that, rather than infrastructural decay being a natural by-product of time’s passing, there is active work that goes into producing...

  11. Hadronic {tau} decays and QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davier, M

    1999-12-01

    Hadronic decays of the {tau} lepton provide a clean source to study hadron dynamics in an energy regime dominated by resonances, with the interesting information captured in the spectral functions. Recent results on exclusive channels are reviewed. Inclusive spectral functions are the basis for QCD analyses, delivering an accurate determination of the strong coupling constant and quantitative information on nonperturbative contributions. Strange decays yield a determination of the strange quark mass. (author)

  12. Rare Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, Douglas

    1998-04-01

    Fifty years after the discovery of the strange quark and the first search for lepton flavor violation in muon decay, extraordinary experimental progress continues to be made on measurements and searches for rare kaon and muon decays. Several important new rare kaon decay channels, including the second order weak flavor-changing-neutral-current process K^+arrowπ^+ν\\overlineν, have been reported recently, and further significant advances are anticipated. Although only null results have been found so far in the quest for lepton flavor violation, there are promising prospects for additional gains in sensitivity of orders of magnitude on such processes as μ→ e γ, nuclear μ → e conversion, K^0_Larrowμ e and Karrowπμ^+e^-. In this presentation, the status of experiments on selected rare decays of kaons and muons will be reviewed.

  13. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1992-01-01

    The study of b quarks has now reached a stage where it is useful to review what has been learned so far and also to look at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - measurement of the "B" lifetime, B 0 - B 0 mixing, and the observation of b? u transitions, as well as more mundane results on hadronic and semileptonic transitions - are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. S

  14. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    This book reviews the study of b quarks and also looks at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - including measurement of the ""B"" lifetime and observations of b -> u transitions - as well as the more mundane results of hadronic and semileptonic transitions are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. Synthesizing the experimental and theoretical information, the authors d

  15. Gravitational Waves in Decaying Vacuum Cosmologies

    OpenAIRE

    David Alejandro Tamayo Ramirez

    2015-01-01

    In the present monograph we study in detail the primordial gravitational waves in cosmologies with a decaying vacuum. The decaying vacuum models are an alternative to solve the cosmological constant problem attributing a dynamic to the vacuum energy. The problem of primordial gravitational waves is discussed in the framework of an expanding, flat, spatially homogeneous and isotropic FLRW Universe described by General Relativity theory with decaying vacuum energy density of the type $\\\\Lambda ...

  16. Search for new mechanism of CP violation through tau decay and semileptonic decay at hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Yung Su

    1996-11-01

    If CP is violated in any decay process involving leptons it will signify the existence of a new force (called the X boson) responsible for CP violation that may be the key to understanding matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. The author discusses the signatures of CP violation in (1) the decay of tau lepton, and (2) the semileptonic decay of {pi}, K, D, B and t particles by measuring the polarization of the charged lepton in the decay. The author discusses how the coupling constants and their phases of the coupling of the X boson to 9 quark vertices and 3 lepton vertices can be obtained through 12 decay processes.

  17. Cosmological constant, fine structure constant and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Hao; Zou, Xiao-Bo; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze [Beijing Institute of Technology, School of Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-01-15

    In the present work, we consider the cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α{sup -6}, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the hint of varying fine structure constant α was found in 1998. If Λ ∝ α{sup -6} is right, it means that the cosmological constant Λ should also be varying. Here, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant Λ ∝ α{sup -6}, in which we view it from an interacting vacuum energy perspective. Then we consider the observational constraints on these models by using the 293 Δα/α data from the absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars. We find that the model parameters can be tightly constrained to the very narrow ranges of O(10{sup -5}) typically. On the other hand, we can also view the varying cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α{sup -6} from another perspective, namely it can be equivalent to a model containing ''dark energy'' and ''warm dark matter'', but there is no interaction between them. We find that this is also fully consistent with the observational constraints on warm dark matter. (orig.)

  18. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  19. Cosmological Constant, Fine Structure Constant and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Hao; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider the cosmological constant model $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the evidence of varying fine structure constant $\\alpha$ was found in 1998. If $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$ is right, it means that the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ should be also varying. In this work, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$, in which we view it from an interacting vacuum energy perspective. We propose two types of models to describe the evolutions of $\\Lambda$ and $\\alpha$. Then, we consider the observational constraints on these models, by using the 293 $\\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha$ data from the absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars, and the data of type Ia supernovae (SNIa), cosmic microwave background (CMB), baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO). We find that the model parameters can be tightly constrained to the narrow ranges of ${\\cal O}(10^{-5})$ t...

  20. Semileptonic Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

    2012-10-02

    The following is an overview of the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| that are based on detailed studies of semileptonic B decays by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations and major advances in QCD calculations. In addition, a new and improved measurement of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) is presented. Here D{sup (*)} refers to a D or a D* meson and {ell} is either e or {mu}. The results, R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, they disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. The excess of events cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Double beta decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faessler, Amand; Simkovic, Fedor

    1998-12-01

    We review the recent developments in the field of nuclear double beta decay, which is presently an important topic in both nuclear and particle physics. The mechanism of lepton number violation within the neutrinoless double beta decay (0954-3899/24/12/001/img5-decay) is discussed in the context of the problem of neutrino mixing and the R-parity violating supersymmetric extensions of the standard model. The problem of reliable determination of the nuclear matrix elements governing both two-neutrino and neutrinoless modes of the double beta decay is addressed. The validity of different approximation schemes in the considered nuclear structure studies is analysed and the role of the Pauli exclusion principle for a correct treatment of nuclear matrix elements is emphasized. The constraints on different lepton-number violating parameters such as effective electron neutrino mass, effective right-handed weak interaction parameters, effective Majoron coupling constant and R-parity violating SUSY parameters are derived from the best presently available experimental limits on the half-life of 0954-3899/24/12/001/img5-decay.

  2. Efficient Determination of Reverberation Chamber Time Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Robinson, Martin P.; Flintoft, Ian D.; Dawson, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Determination of the rate of energy loss in a reverberation chamber is fundamental to many different measurements such as absorption cross-section, antenna efficiency, radiated power, and shielding effectiveness. Determination of the energy decay time-constant in the time domain by linear fitting the power delay profile, rather than using the frequency domain quality-factor, has the advantage of being independent of the radiation efficiency of antennas used in the measurement. However, determ...

  3. On Aryabhata's Planetary Constants

    OpenAIRE

    Kak, Subhash

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the theory of a Babylonian origin of Aryabhata's planetary constants. It shows that Aryabhata's basic constant is closer to the Indian counterpart than to the Babylonian one. Sketching connections between Aryabhata's framework and earlier Indic astronomical ideas on yugas and cyclic calendar systems, it is argued that Aryabhata's system is an outgrowth of an earlier Indic tradition.

  4. Generalized Pickands constants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.G. Debicki

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPickands constants play an important role in the exact asymptotic of extreme values for Gaussian stochastic processes. By the {it generalized Pickands constant ${cal H_{eta$ we mean the limit begin{eqnarray* {cal H_{eta= lim_{T to inftyfrac{ {cal H_{eta(T){T, end{eqnarray* where ${cal

  5. Leptonic decays of the $D_s$ meson

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Schneider, O.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.; Badaud, F.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Waananen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.C.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Halley, A.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Veillet, J.J.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-01-01

    The purely leptonic decays Ds -> tau nu and Ds -> mu nu are studied in a sample of four million hadronic Z decays collected with the ALEPH detector at the LEP e+e- collider from 1991 to 1995. The branching fractions are extracted from a combination of two analyses, one optimized to select Ds -> tau nu decays with tau -> e nu nubar or mu nu nubar, and the other optimized for Ds-> mu nu decays. The results are used to evaluate the Ds decay constant, within the Standard Model: fDs = [285 +- 19(stat) +- 40 (syst)] MeV.

  6. Decays of the vector glueball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacosa, Francesco; Sammet, Julia; Janowski, Stanislaus

    2017-06-01

    We calculate two- and three-body decays of the (lightest) vector glueball into (pseudo)scalar, (axial-)vector, as well as pseudovector and excited vector mesons in the framework of a model of QCD. While absolute values of widths cannot be predicted because the corresponding coupling constants are unknown, some interesting branching ratios can be evaluated by setting the mass of the yet hypothetical vector glueball to 3.8 GeV as predicted by quenched lattice QCD. We find that the decay mode ω π π should be one of the largest (both through the decay chain O →b1π →ω π π and through the direct coupling O →ω π π ). Similarly, the (direct and indirect) decay into π K K*(892 ) is sizable. Moreover, the decays into ρ π and K*(892 )K are, although subleading, possible and could play a role in explaining the ρ π puzzle of the charmonium state ψ (2 S ) thanks to a (small) mixing with the vector glueball. The vector glueball can be directly formed at the ongoing BESIII experiment as well as at the future PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility. If the width is sufficiently small (≲100 MeV ) it should not escape future detection. It should be stressed that the employed model is based on some inputs and simplifying assumptions: the value of glueball mass (at present, the quenched lattice value is used), the lack of mixing of the glueball with other quarkonium states, and the use of few interaction terms. It then represents a first step toward the identification of the main decay channels of the vector glueball, but shall be improved when corresponding experimental candidates and/or new lattice results will be available.

  7. Deconstructing the Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Jejjala, V; Minic, D; Jejjala, Vishnu; Leigh, Robert G.; Minic, Djordje

    2003-01-01

    Deconstruction provides a novel way of dealing with the notoriously difficult ultraviolet problems of four-dimensional gravity. This approach also naturally leads to a new perspective on the holographic principle, tying it to the fundamental requirements of unitarity and diffeomorphism invariance, as well as to a new viewpoint on the cosmological constant problem. The numerical smallness of the cosmological constant is implied by a unique combination of holography and supersymmetry, opening a new window into the fundamental physics of the vacuum.

  8. Demkov-Kunike models with decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenmoe, M. B.; Tchapda, A. B.; Fai, L. C.

    2016-12-01

    Exact analytical solutions to the dissipative time-dependent Schrödinger equation are obtained for a decaying two-state system with decay rates Γ1 and Γ2 for the levels with extremal spin projections. The system is coherently driven with a pulse whose detuning is made up of two parts: a time-dependent part (chirp) of hyperbolic-tangent shape and a static part with real and imaginary terms. This gives us a wide range of possibilities to arbitrarily select the interaction terms. We considered two versions which led to decaying Demkov-Kunike (DK) models; the version in which the Rabi frequency (interaction) is a time-dependent hyperbolic-secant function (called decaying DK1 model) and the case when it is constant in time and never turns off (decaying DK2 model). Our analytical solutions account for all possible initial moments instead of only t0 = 0 or t0 = - ∞ as for non-decaying models and may be useful for the experiments on level crossings. Two complementary limits of the pulse detuning are considered and explored: the limit of fast (i) and slow rise (ii). In the case (i), the coupling between level positions in the first DK model collapses, while the second DK model reduces to a Rabi model (constant Hamiltonian), in the case (ii), both DK models reduce to the LZ model. In both cases (i) and (ii), analytical approximated solutions which conveniently approach the exact solutions are derived.

  9. Five-Loop Running of the QCD Coupling Constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikov, P A; Chetyrkin, K G; Kühn, J H

    2017-02-24

    We analytically compute the five-loop term in the beta function which governs the running of α_{s}-the quark-gluon coupling constant in QCD. The new term leads to a reduction of the theory uncertainty in α_{s} taken at the Z-boson scale as extracted from the τ-lepton decays as well as to new, improved by one more order of perturbation theory, predictions for the effective coupling constants of the standard model Higgs boson to gluons and for its total decay rate to the quark-antiquark pairs.

  10. On wave-packet dynamics in a decaying quadratic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    1997-01-01

    We consider the time-dependent Schrodinger equation for a quadratic potential with an exponentially decaying force constant. General analytical solutions are presented and we highlight in particular, the signatures of classical mechanics in the wave packet dynamics.......We consider the time-dependent Schrodinger equation for a quadratic potential with an exponentially decaying force constant. General analytical solutions are presented and we highlight in particular, the signatures of classical mechanics in the wave packet dynamics....

  11. Elastic constants of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  12. Tooth decay - early childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottle mouth; Bottle carries; Baby bottle tooth decay; Early childhood caries (ECC) ... inside of your baby's mouth healthy and prevents tooth decay. If you are bottle-feeding your baby: Give babies, ages newborn to ...

  13. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Contact Us Home Research Data & Statistics Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic disease ... adults, even though it is largely preventable. Although caries has significantly decreased for most Americans over the ...

  14. Algorithm for structure constants

    CERN Document Server

    Paiva, F M

    2011-01-01

    In a $n$-dimensional Lie algebra, random numerical values are assigned by computer to $n(n-1)$ especially selected structure constants. An algorithm is then created, which calculates without ambiguity the remaining constants, obeying the Jacobi conditions. Differently from others, this algorithm is suitable even for poor personal computer. ------------- En $n$-dimensia algebro de Lie, hazardaj numeraj valoroj estas asignitaj per komputilo al $n(n-1)$ speciale elektitaj konstantoj de strukturo. Tiam algoritmo estas kreita, kalkulante senambigue la ceterajn konstantojn, obeante kondicxojn de Jacobi. Malsimile al aliaj algoritmoj, tiu cxi tauxgas ecx por malpotenca komputilo.

  15. Radiographic constant exposure technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1985-01-01

    The constant exposure technique has been applied to assess various industrial radiographic systems. Different X-ray films and radiographic papers of two producers were compared. Special attention was given to fast film and paper used with fluorometallic screens. Radiographic image quality was tes...... was tested by the use of ISO wire IQI's and ASTM penetrameters used on Al and Fe test plates. Relative speed and reduction of kilovoltage obtained with the constant exposure technique were calculated. The advantages of fast radiographic systems are pointed out...

  16. First results from 2+1-Flavor Domain Wall QCD: Mass Spectrum, Topology Change and Chiral Symmetry with $L_s=8$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. J. Antonio; T. Blum; K. C. Bowler; P. A. Boyle; N. H. Christ; S. D. Cohen; M. A. Clark; C. Dawson; A. Hart; K. Hashimoto; T. Izubuchi; B. Joó; C. Jung; A. D. Kennedy; R. D. Kenway; S. Li; H. W. Lin; M.F. Lin; R. D. Mawhinney; C.M. Maynard; J. Noaki; S. Ohta; S. Sasaki; A. Soni; R. J. Tweedie; A. Yamaguchi

    2007-06-01

    We present results for the static interquark potential, light meson and baryon masses, and light pseudoscalar meson decay constants obtained from simulations of domain wall QCD with one dynamical flavour approximating the $s$ quark, and two degenerate dynamical flavours with input bare masses ranging from $m_s$ to $m_s/4$ approximating the $u$ and $d$ quarks. We compare these quantities obtained using the Iwasaki and DBW2 improved gauge actions, and actions with larger rectangle coefficients, on $16^3\\times32$ lattices. We seek parameter values at which both the chiral symmetry breaking residual mass due to the finite lattice extent in the fifth dimension and the Monte Carlo time history for topological charge are acceptable for this set of quark masses at lattice spacings above 0.1 fm. We find that the Iwasaki gauge action is best, demonstrating the feasibility of using QCDOC to generate ensembles which are good representations of the QCD path integral on lattices of up to 3 fm in spatial extent with lattice spacings in the range 0.09-0.13 fm. Despite large residual masses and a limited number of sea quark mass values with which to perform chiral extrapolations, our results for light hadronic physics scale and agree with experimental measurements within our statistical uncertainties.

  17. MODEL RADIOACTIVE RADON DECAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.I. Parovik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In a model of radioactive decay of radon in the sample (222Rn. The model assumes that the probability of the decay of radon and its half-life depends on the fractal properties of the geological environment. The dependencies of the decay parameters of the fractal dimension of the medium.

  18. The Fine Structure Constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    electromagnetic force between subatomic charged parti- cles, and essentially determines how an atom holds to- gether its electrons. It is however not obvious why this constant has this ..... about α in 1948: “The theoretical interpretation of its numerical value is one of the most important unsolved problems of atomic physics.”

  19. Gravitational constant calculation methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    Shakhparonov, V. M.; Karagioz, O. V.; Izmailov, V. P.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the gravitational constant calculation methodologies for a rectangular block of the torsion balance body presented in the papers Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 240801 (2009) and Phys.Rev. D. 82, 022001 (2010). We have established the influence of non-equilibrium gas flows on the obtained values of G.

  20. The Hubble Constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Neal

    2015-01-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H0 values of around 72-74 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), with typical errors of 2-3 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67-68 km s(-1) Mpc(-1) and typical errors of 1-2 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  1. The Hubble Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Jackson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H_0 values of around 72–74 km s^–1 Mpc^–1, with typical errors of 2–3 km s^–1 Mpc^–1. This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67–68 km s^–1 Mpc^–1 and typical errors of 1–2 km s^–1 Mpc^–1. The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  2. Spaces of constant curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Joseph A

    2010-01-01

    This book is the sixth edition of the classic Spaces of Constant Curvature, first published in 1967, with the previous (fifth) edition published in 1984. It illustrates the high degree of interplay between group theory and geometry. The reader will benefit from the very concise treatments of riemannian and pseudo-riemannian manifolds and their curvatures, of the representation theory of finite groups, and of indications of recent progress in discrete subgroups of Lie groups. Part I is a brief introduction to differentiable manifolds, covering spaces, and riemannian and pseudo-riemannian geomet

  3. Rare Decays at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sam

    2014-04-01

    Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons provide an effective method of testing the Standard Model and probing possible new physics scenarios. The LHCb experiment has published a variety of interesting results in this field, some of which are presented here. In particular the measurements of the branching fractions of B(s)0 → μ+μ- which, in combination with CMS, resulted in the first observation of the Bs0 → μ+μ- decay. Other topics include searches for the rare decay D0 → μ+μ-, the lepton flavour violating decays B(s)0 → e±μ∓, and the observation of the ψ(4160) resonance in the region of low recoil in B+ → K+μ+μ- decay. New results on the angular analysis of the decay B0 → K*0μ+μ- with form factor independent observables are also shown.

  4. Rare Decays at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Sam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons provide an effective method of testing the Standard Model and probing possible new physics scenarios. The LHCb experiment has published a variety of interesting results in this field, some of which are presented here. In particular the measurements of the branching fractions of B(s0 → μ+μ− which, in combination with CMS, resulted in the first observation of the Bs0 → μ+μ− decay. Other topics include searches for the rare decay D0 → μ+μ−, the lepton flavour violating decays B(s0 → e±μ∓, and the observation of the ψ(4160 resonance in the region of low recoil in B+ → K+μ+μ− decay. New results on the angular analysis of the decay B0 → K*0μ+μ− with form factor independent observables are also shown.

  5. Yet another partial wave calculator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwald, Daniel; Rauch, Johannes [TUM, Munich (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We will present a new C++ library for partial wave analysis: YAP - yet another partial wave calculator. YAP is intended for amplitude analyses of the decays of spin-0 heavy mesons (principally B and D) to multiple (3, 4, etc.) pseudoscalar mesons but is not hard coded for such situations and is flexible enough to handle other decay scenarios. The library allows for both model dependent and model independent analysis methods. We introduce the software, and demonstrate examples for generating Monte Carlo data efficiently, and for analyzing data (both with the aid of the Bayesian Analysis Toolkit).

  6. Effective Majorana neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Lucia [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria,Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay); Romero, Ismael; Peressutti, Javier; Sampayo, Oscar A. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR) CONICET, UNMDP, Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2016-08-15

    We study the decay of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos according to the interactions obtained from an effective general theory. We describe the two- and three-body decays for a wide range of neutrino masses. The results obtained and presented in this work could be useful for the study of the production and detection of these particles in a variety of high energy physics experiments and astrophysical observations. We show in different figures the dominant branching ratios and the total decay width. (orig.)

  7. Quantum Theory without Planck's Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Ralston, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Planck's constant was introduced as a fundamental scale in the early history of quantum mechanics. We find a modern approach where Planck's constant is absent: it is unobservable except as a constant of human convention. Despite long reference to experiment, review shows that Planck's constant cannot be obtained from the data of Ryberg, Davisson and Germer, Compton, or that used by Planck himself. In the new approach Planck's constant is tied to macroscopic conventions of Newtonian origin, wh...

  8. When constants are important

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiu, V.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors discuss several complexity aspects pertaining to neural networks, commonly known as the curse of dimensionality. The focus will be on: (1) size complexity and depth-size tradeoffs; (2) complexity of learning; and (3) precision and limited interconnectivity. Results have been obtained for each of these problems when dealt with separately, but few things are known as to the links among them. They start by presenting known results and try to establish connections between them. These show that they are facing very difficult problems--exponential growth in either space (i.e. precision and size) and/or time (i.e., learning and depth)--when resorting to neural networks for solving general problems. The paper will present a solution for lowering some constants, by playing on the depth-size tradeoff.

  9. The Hubble Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Neal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. In the last 20 years, much progress has been made and estimates now range between 60 and 75 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, with most now between 70 and 75 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, a huge improvement over the factor-of-2 uncertainty which used to prevail. Further improvements which gave a generally agreed margin of error of a few percent rather than the current 10% would be vital input to much other interesting cosmology. There are several programmes which are likely to lead us to this point in the next 10 years.

  10. Chapter 3: Wood Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of global carbon is sequestered in forest systems. Specialized fungi have evolved to efficiently deconstruct woody plant cell walls. These important decay processes generate litter, soil bound humic substances, or carbon dioxide and water. This chapter reviews the enzymology and molecular genetics of wood decay fungi, most of which are members of...

  11. B decays to excited charm mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colangelo, P.; De Fazio, F.; Paver, N

    1999-04-01

    We review several aspects of the phenomenology of P-wave q-barQ mesons: mass splittings, effective strong couplings and leptonic constants. We also describe a QCD sum rule determination to order {alpha}{sub s} of the form factor {tau}{sub 1/}2(y) governing the semileptonic B decays to the charm doublet with J{sup P} = (0{sup +}{sub 1/2}), 1{sup +}{sub 1/2}))00.

  12. Light stop decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeber, Ramona [INFN, Sezione di Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Muehlleitner, Margarete; Wlotzka, Alexander [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Wolfgang-Gaede Str. 1, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Popenda, Eva [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5323 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    We investigate scenarios in the MSSM with a stop being the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle and a neutralino as lightest supersymmetric particle, where the difference between the stop mass and the neutralino mass is less than the top quark mass. Depending on this mass difference the stop can undergo either a three-body decay into a neutralino, a W boson and a bottom quark, or a four-body decay into a neutralino, a bottom quark and two light fermions, or the stop can decay via flavor-changing neutral currents into an up/charm quark and a neutralino. We improve the calculations of the branching ratios (BRs) of these decay modes by including next-to-leading order corrections for the flavor changing decays and by taking into account the mass of the bottom quark and the tau lepton in the four-body decay. Moreover, flavor effects are incorporated in both the three- and the four-body decay and threshold effects at the W boson threshold are correctly taken into account. We find that the BRs can deviate significantly from one, leading to weaker stop exclusion limits.

  13. Charm Decays at BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, M.

    2004-10-04

    The results of several studies of charmed mesons and baryons at BABAR are presented. First, searches for the rare decays D{sup 0} {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -} are presented and new upper limits on these processes are established. Second, a measurement of the branching fraction of the isospin-violating hadronic decay D*{sub s}(2112){sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} relative to the radiative decay D*{sub s}(2112){sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{gamma} is made. Third, the decays of D*{sub sJ}(2317){sup +} and D{sub sJ}(2460){sup +} mesons are studied and ratios of branching fractions are measured. Fourth, Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} are examined and their branching fractions measured relative to Cabibbo-allowed modes. Fifth, the {Chi}{sub c}{sup 0} is studied through its decays to {Chi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Omega}{sup -}K{sup +}; in addition to measuring the ratio of branching fractions for {Chi}{sub c}{sup 0} produced from the c{bar c} continuum, the uncorrected momentum spectrum is measured, providing clear confirmation of {Chi}{sub c}{sup 0} production in B decays.

  14. Beyond the Hubble Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    about the distances to galaxies and thereby about the expansion rate of the Universe. A simple way to determine the distance to a remote galaxy is by measuring its redshift, calculate its velocity from the redshift and divide this by the Hubble constant, H0. For instance, the measured redshift of the parent galaxy of SN 1995K (0.478) yields a velocity of 116,000 km/sec, somewhat more than one-third of the speed of light (300,000 km/sec). From the universal expansion rate, described by the Hubble constant (H0 = 20 km/sec per million lightyears as found by some studies), this velocity would indicate a distance to the supernova and its parent galaxy of about 5,800 million lightyears. The explosion of the supernova would thus have taken place 5,800 million years ago, i.e. about 1,000 million years before the solar system was formed. However, such a simple calculation works only for relatively ``nearby'' objects, perhaps out to some hundred million lightyears. When we look much further into space, we also look far back in time and it is not excluded that the universal expansion rate, i.e. the Hubble constant, may have been different at earlier epochs. This means that unless we know the change of the Hubble constant with time, we cannot determine reliable distances of distant galaxies from their measured redshifts and velocities. At the same time, knowledge about such change or lack of the same will provide unique information about the time elapsed since the Universe began to expand (the ``Big Bang''), that is, the age of the Universe and also its ultimate fate. The Deceleration Parameter q0 Cosmologists are therefore eager to determine not only the current expansion rate (i.e., the Hubble constant, H0) but also its possible change with time (known as the deceleration parameter, q0). Although a highly accurate value of H0 has still not become available, increasing attention is now given to the observational determination of the second parameter, cf. also the Appendix at the

  15. The specific gamma-ray constant and exposure rate constant of 182Ta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, G P; Dillman, L T

    1982-01-01

    Reported values of the specific gamma-ray constant gamma for 182Ta range from the original value of 6.1 to 7.692 R cm2h-1mCi-1, recommended in NCRP Report No. 41. The original calculation of gamma was based on inadequate nuclear spectroscopy and decay scheme data. The higher value of gamma occurs because of a computational error in the relative intensity of the 1.2575-MeV gamma ray. Using nuclear spectroscopy data from the most recent Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENSDF), gamma is calculated to be 6.71 +/- 0.06 R cm2h-1mCi-1 and the exposure rate constant gamma gamma is 6.87 +/- 0.06 R cm2h-1mCi-1. These new calculations are presented and previously reported values of gamma and gamma gamma are reviewed.

  16. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Deadlines Grant Application Forms Application Receipt Dates Electronic Submission of Applications Grants 101 (How to Write ... before they decay will also save time and money in the long run by avoiding fillings, crowns, ...

  17. Radiative decays at LHCb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giubega, L. E., E-mail: lavinia-elena.giubega@cern.ch [Horia Hulubei Institute for R& D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) (Romania); Collaboration: LHCb Collaboration

    2016-12-15

    Precise measurements on rare radiative B decays are performed with the LHCb experiment at LHC. The LHCb results regarding the ratio of branching fractions for two radiative decays, B{sup 0} → K{sup *0}γ and B{sub s} → ϕγ, the direct CP asymmetry in B{sup 0} → K{sup *0}γ decay channel and the observation of the photon polarization in the B{sup ±} → K{sup ±}π{sup ∓}π{sup ±}γ decay, are included. The first two measurements were performed in 1 fb{sup –1} of pp collisions data and the third one in 3 fb{sup –1} of data, respectively.

  18. Decay ring design

    CERN Document Server

    Chancé, A; Bouquerel, E; Hancock, S; Jensen, E

    The study of the neutrino oscillation between its different flavours needs pureand very intense fluxes of high energy, well collimated neutrinos with a welldetermined energy spectrum. A dedicated machine seems to be necessarynowadays to reach the required flux. A new concept based on the β-decayof radioactive ions which were accelerated in an accelerator chain was thenproposed. After ion production, stripping, bunching and acceleration, the unstableions are then stored in a racetrack-shaped superconducting decay ring.Finally, the ions are accumulated in the decay ring until being lost. The incomingbeam is merged to the stored beam by using a specific RF system, whichwill be presented here.We propose here to study some aspects of the decay ring, such as its opticalproperties, its RF system or the management of the losses which occur in thering (mainly by decay or by collimation).

  19. RARE KAON DECAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITTENBERG, L.

    2005-07-19

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments have probed sensitivities corresponding to mass scales of well over 100 TeV, making life difficult for models predicting accessible LFV in kaon decay and discouraging new dedicated experiments of this type.

  20. Hyperon decays and QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Gaillard, J M; Gastmans, Raymond; Jacob, Maurice René Michel; Speiser, D; Weyers, J

    1980-01-01

    In an experiment in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) charged hyperon beam, 2400 Omega /sup -/ decays have been collected. The analysis of the Omega /sup -/ sample has given an accurate measurement of the Omega /sup -/ lifetime ( tau ( Omega /sup -/)=(0.822+or-0.028) *10/sup -10/ s) and the first determination of the Omega /sup -/ decay branching ratios. In particular the measured ratio Gamma ( Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup 0/ pi /sup -/)/ Gamma ( Omega /sup -/ to Xi /sup -/ pi /sup 0/) is 2.94+or-0.35, while a pure Delta I=1/2 amplitude would have given 2.03. A ratio of about 3 between those two decay modes had in fact been predicted by Finjord using the QCD framework. The author discusses briefly what QCD has to say about hyperon decays, then describes the Omega /sup -/ experiment and the analysis results. (8 refs).

  1. Aspects of B decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, Sven

    2011-03-04

    B-meson decays are a good probe for testing the flavour sector of the standard model of particle physics. The standard model describes at present all experimental data satisfactorily, although some ''tensions'' exist, i.e. two to three sigma deviations from the predictions, in particular in B decays. The arguments against the standard model are thus purely theoretical. These tensions between experimental data and theoretical predictions provide an extension of the standard model by new physics contributions. Within the flavour sector main theoretical uncertainties are related to the hadronic matrix elements. For exclusive semileptonic anti B {yields} D{sup (*)}l anti {nu} decays QCD sum rule techniques, which are suitable for studying hadronic matrix elements, however, with substantial, but estimable hadronic uncertainties, are used. The exploration of new physics effects in B-meson decays is done in an twofold way. In exclusive semileptonic anti B {yields} D{sup (*)}l anti {nu} decays the effect of additional right-handed vector as well as left- and right-handed scalar and tensor hadronic current structures in the decay rates and the form factors are studied at the non-recoil point. As a second approach one studied the non-leptonic B{sup 0}{sub s}{yields}J/{psi}{phi} and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub S,L} decays discussing CP violating effects in the time-dependent decay amplitudes by considering new physics phase in the B{sup 0}- anti B{sup 0} mixing phase. (orig.)

  2. Streamer chamber: pion decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    The real particles produced in the decay of a positive pion can be seen in this image from a streamer chamber. Streamer chambers consist of a gas chamber through which a strong pulsed electric field is passed, creating sparks as a charged particle passes through it. A magnetic field is added to cause the decay products to follow curved paths so that their charge and momentum can be measured.

  3. Double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.; Picciotto, C.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of double beta decay is reviewed with emphasis on its relevance to lepton number conservation. Recently, the ratio of the double beta-decay half-lives of /sup 128/Te and /sup 130/Te has been measured in a geological experiment and a limit for the ratio of the neutrinoless rate to the total rate for /sup 82/Se decay has been obtained from a direct-detection experiment. For the first time, these results show conclusively that double beta decay is not primarily a lepton-number-violating neutrinoless process. However, they also do not agree with calculations which assume that only lepton-number-conserving two-neutrino double beta decay occurs. The conclusion that lepton number conservation is violated is suggested by limited experimental information. By considering contributions to the total rate from both the two-neutrino and the neutrinoless channels, we obtain data which are consistent with a lepton nonconservation parameter of order eta=3.5 x 10/sup -5/. Roughly the same value of eta is obtained by assuming that the decay occurs either via lepton emission from two nucleons or via emission from a resonance in the nucleus.

  4. Removal of inactivation causes time-invariant sodium current decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The kinetic properties of the closing of Na channels were studied in frog skeletal muscle to obtain information about the dependence of channel closing on the past history of the channel. Channel closing was studied in normal and modified channels. Chloramine-T was used to modify the channels so that inactivation was virtually removed. A series of depolarizing prepulse potentials was used to activate Na channels, and a -140-mV postpulse was used to monitor the closing of the channels. Unmodified channels decay via a biexponential process with time constants of 72 and 534 microseconds at 12 degrees C. The observed time constants do not depend upon the potential used to activate the channels. The contribution of the slow component to the total decay increases as the activating prepulse is lengthened. After inactivation is removed, the biexponential character of the decay is retained, with no change in the magnitude of the time constants. However, increases in the duration of the activating prepulse over the range where the current is maximal 1-75 ms) produce identical biexponential decays. The presence of biexponential decays suggests that either two subtypes of Na channels are found in muscle, or Na channels can exist in one of two equally conductive states. The time- invariant decays observed suggest that channel closure does not depend upon their past history. PMID:2852208

  5. Search for $\\eta_b$ in two-photon collisions at LEP II with the DELPHI detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sisakian, A; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2006-01-01

    The pseudoscalar meson \\eta_b has been searched for in two-photon interactions at LEP II. The data sample corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 617 pb^-1 at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 161 to 209 GeV. Upper limits at a confidence level of 95% on the product {\\Gamma_\\gamma\\gamma}(\\eta_b) x BR(\\eta_b)are 190, 470 and 660 eV/c^2 for the \\eta_b decaying into 4, 6 and 8 charged particles, respectively.

  6. CP violation in B decay

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Hitoshi

    2001-01-01

    We review the physics of CP violation in B decays. After introducing the CKM matrix and how it causes CP violation, we cover three types of CP violation that can occur in B decays: CP violation in mixing, CP violation by mixing-decay interference, and CP violation in decay.

  7. Static hyperon properties in a linearized SU(3)-chiral bag model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimt, S.; Weise, W.

    1988-12-01

    We use a linearized Chiral Bag model to describe the strange octet and decuplet baryons. The approach is canonically extended to spontaneously broken chiral SU(3)/sub L/xSU(3)/sub R/, and the corresponding Goldstone Bosons are identified with the pseudoscalar meson octet. We include explicit symmetry breaking corrections both for baryons and mesons. The linearized quark-meson intraction is applied in a self-consistent calculation of the masses and, for ..delta.., ..sigma../sup */ and ..gamma../sup */, of the decay widths. Our special interest is in the influence of the K- and eta-cloud (in addition to the ..pi..) on hyperon static properties. We show results for radii, masses, decay widths and renormalization constants as obtained by a fit to the experimental hyperon spectra. The effects of the K- and eta-mesons are found to be non-negligible, although supressed by symmetry breaking effects. The effective gluon coupling ..cap alpha.. is reduced in comparison to the SU(2)/sub L/xSU(2)/sub R/ case. In addition, we discuss the dependence on the bag constant B. It turns out that the lightest hyperon states, ..lambda.. and ..sigma.. are well described and stable for B/sup 1/4/ < 130 MeV. The heavier strange baryons have stable solutions also for larger values of B. The bag radii determined at the minimal energies are R/sub 0/ approx. = 1.15 fm for the octet and R/sub 0/ approx. = 1.25 fm for the decuplet baryons.

  8. Luminescence decays with underlying distributions: General properties and analysis with mathematical functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberan-Santos, Mario N. [Centro de Quimica-Fisica Molecular, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: berberan@ist.utl.pt; Valeur, Bernard [Laboratoire de Chimie Generale, CNAM, 292 Rue Saint-Martin, 75141 Paris Cedex 03 (France); Laboratoire PPSM, ENS-Cachan, 61 Avenue du President Wilson, 94235 Cachan Cedex (France)

    2007-10-15

    In this work, an analysis of the general properties of the luminescence decay law is carried out. The conditions that a luminescence decay law must satisfy in order to correspond to a probability density function of rate constants are established. From an analysis of the general form of the luminescence decay law, it is concluded that the decay must be either exponential or sub-exponential for all times, in order to be represented by a distribution of rate constants H(k). Sub-exponentiality is nevertheless not a sufficient condition. Only decays that are completely monotonic have a probability density function of rate constants. The construction of the decay function from cumulant and moment expansions is studied, as well as the corresponding calculation of H(k) from a cumulant expansion. The asymptotic behavior of the decay laws is considered in detail, and the relation between this behavior and the form of H(k) for small k is explored. Several generalizations of the exponential decay function, namely the Kohlrausch, Becquerel, Mittag-Leffler and Heaviside decay functions, as well as the Weibull and truncated Gaussian rate constant distributions are discussed.

  9. Flavor Violating Higgs Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnik, Roni [Fermilab; Kopp, Joachim [Fermilab; Zupan, Jure [Cincinnati U.

    2013-03-05

    We study a class of nonstandard interactions of the newly discovered 125 GeV Higgs-like resonance that are especially interesting probes of new physics: flavor violating Higgs couplings to leptons and quarks. These interaction can arise in many frameworks of new physics at the electroweak scale such as two Higgs doublet models, extra dimensions, or models of compositeness. We rederive constraints on flavor violating Higgs couplings using data on rare decays, electric and magnetic dipole moments, and meson oscillations. We confirm that flavor violating Higgs boson decays to leptons can be sizeable with, e.g., h → τμ and h → τe branching ratios of (10%) perfectly allowed by low energy constraints. We estimate the current LHC limits on h → τμ and h → τe decays by recasting existing searches for the SM Higgs in the ττ channel and find that these bounds are already stronger than those from rare tau decays. We also show that these limits can be improved significantly with dedicated searches and we outline a possible search strategy. Flavor violating Higgs decays therefore present an opportunity for discovery of new physics which in some cases may be easier to access experimentally than flavor conserving deviations from the Standard Model Higgs framework.

  10. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  11. Beta and muon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, A.; Pascual, P.

    1967-07-01

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  12. Metastable dark energy with radioactive-like decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafieloo, Arman; Hazra, Dhiraj Kumar; Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2018-01-01

    We propose a new class of metastable dark energy (DE) phenomenological models in which the DE decay rate does not depend on external parameters such as the scalefactor or the curvature of the Universe. Instead, the DE decay rate is assumed to be a constant depending only on intrinsic properties of DE and the type of a decay channel, similar to case of the radioactive decay of unstable particles and nuclei. As a consequence, the DE energy density becomes a function of the proper time elapsed since its formation, presumably in the very early Universe. Such a natural type of DE decay can profoundly affect the expansion history of the Universe and its age. Metastable DE can decay in three distinct ways: (i) exponentially, (ii) into dark matter, (iii) into dark radiation. Testing metastable DE models with observational data, we find that the decay half-life must be many times larger than the age of the Universe. Models in which DE decays into dark matter lead to lower values of the Hubble parameter at large redshifts relative to Λ cold dark matter (CDM). Consequently these models provide a better fit to cosmological BAO data (especially data from high-redshift quasars) than concordance (ΛCDM) cosmology.

  13. Spectrophotometric determination of association constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Least-squares 'Systematic Trial-and-Error Procedure' (STEP) for spectrophotometric evaluation of association constant (equilibrium constant) K and molar absorption coefficient E for a 1:1 molecular complex, A + B = C, with error analysis according to Conrow et al. (1964). An analysis of the Charge...

  14. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-06

    Oct 6, 2012 ... The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given. Keywords. Double beta ...

  15. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Abstract. The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given.

  16. $\\tau$ decays at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Sobie, Randall J

    1997-01-01

    The measurements of the properties of the tau lepton are becoming increasingly more precise. We show that these results can be used to test the Standard Model. In addition, we illustrate how the hadronic decays of the tau can be used to study the strong interaction. (12 refs).

  17. Attention decay in science

    CERN Document Server

    Parolo, Pietro Della Briotta; Ghosh, Rumi; Huberman, Bernardo A; Kaski, Kimmo; Fortunato, Santo

    2015-01-01

    The exponential growth in the number of scientific papers makes it increasingly difficult for researchers to keep track of all the publications relevant to their work. Consequently, the attention that can be devoted to individual papers, measured by their citation counts, is bound to decay rapidly. In this work we make a thorough study of the life-cycle of papers in different disciplines. Typically, the citation rate of a paper increases up to a few years after its publication, reaches a peak and then decreases rapidly. This decay can be described by an exponential or a power law behavior, as in ultradiffusive processes, with exponential fitting better than power law for the majority of cases. The decay is also becoming faster over the years, signaling that nowadays papers are forgotten more quickly. However, when time is counted in terms of the number of published papers, the rate of decay of citations is fairly independent of the period considered. This indicates that the attention of scholars depends on th...

  18. Teleportation via decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We present a rare example of a decay mechanism playing a constructive role in quantum information processing. We show how the state of an atom trapped in a cavity can be teleported to a second atom trapped in a distant cavity by the joint detection of photon leakage from the cavities. The scheme, which is ...

  19. Rare Decays With LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Mancinelli, Giampiero

    2012-01-01

    Rare decays involving leptons or photons in the final states are studied using 1.0 fb^{-1} of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt{s}=7TeV collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011. We present results of measurements of branching ratios, angular distributions, and isospin asymmetries obtained using this data sample.

  20. Discoloration & decay in oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex L. Shigo

    1971-01-01

    Diseases that result in discoloration and decay of wood are major problems affecting all species of oak. Wounds often start the processes that can lead to these diseases. The type and severity of the wound, the vigor of the tree, the environment, and the aggressiveness of microorganisms that infect are some of the most important factors that determine the nature of the...

  1. Rare Kaon Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, Douglas

    2010-06-01

    The prospects for measuring the ultra-rare decays K^ + -> π ^ + ν /line ν and KL0 -> π 0 ν /line ν are discussed. Several new experiments are being constructed or have been proposed at existing facilities and ideas for reaching very high precision experiments at a future high intensity proton source like Project X ICD2 are under discussion.

  2. Leptonic D and D_s Decays near c-cbar Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Blusk, Steven R

    2007-01-01

    We present recent results from the CLEO Collaboration on leptonic decay rates of $D$ and $D_s$ near $c\\bar{c}$ production threshold. From these decay rates, we extract the decay constants, f_D = (222.6+-16.7^{+2.8}_{-3.4}) MeV, f_Ds = (274+-10+-5) MeV, and the ratio f_Ds/f_D = 1.23+-0.11+-0.03.

  3. Identifiability of models for time-resolved fluorescence with underlying distributions of rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boens, Noël; Van der Auweraer, Mark

    2014-02-01

    The deterministic identifiability analysis of photophysical models for the kinetics of excited-state processes, assuming errorless time-resolved fluorescence data, can verify whether the model parameters can be determined unambiguously. In this work, we have investigated the identifiability of several uncommon models for time-resolved fluorescence with underlying distributions of rate constants which lead to non-exponential decays. The mathematical functions used here for the description of non-exponential fluorescence decays are the stretched exponential or Kohlrausch function, the Becquerel function, the Förster type energy transfer function, decay functions associated with exponential, Gaussian and uniform distributions of rate constants, a decay function with extreme sub-exponential behavior, the Mittag-Leffler function and Heaviside's function. It is shown that all the models are uniquely identifiable, which means that for each specific model there exists a single parameter set that describes its associated fluorescence δ-response function.

  4. Cosmological model with decaying vacuum energy from quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szydłowski, Marek

    2015-06-01

    We construct the cosmological model to explain the cosmological constant problem. We built the extension of the standard cosmological model Λ CDM by consideration of decaying vacuum energy represented by the running cosmological term. From the principles of quantum mechanics one can find that in the long-term behavior survival probability of unstable states is a decreasing function of the cosmological time and has the inverse powerlike form. This implies that cosmological constant ρvac=Λ (t )=Λbare+α/t2 where Λbare and α are constants. We investigate the dynamics of this model using dynamical system methods due to a link to the Λ (H ) cosmologies. We have found the exact solution for the scale factor as well as the indicators of its variability like the deceleration parameter and the jerk. From the calculation of the jerk we obtain a simple test of the decaying vacuum in the Friedman-Robertson-Walker universe. Using astronomical data [SNIa, H (z ), CMB, BAO] we have estimated the model parameters and compared this model with the Λ CDM model. Our statistical results indicate that the decaying vacuum model is a little worse than the Λ CDM model. But the decaying vacuum cosmological model explains the small value of the cosmological constant today.

  5. Concerning the variability of nuclear decay rates: Rebuttal of an article by Pomme et al. [1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Steinitz, G.; Fischbach, E.

    2018-03-01

    Pomme et al. have recently analyzed one year of GSI (Geological Survey of Israel) radon data, and claimed that "GSI radon measurements are unsuited for studying the variability of decay constants because the data are strongly influenced by environmental conditions such as solar irradiance and rainfall" [1]. They also claim that "the existence of cyclic variations in the decay constant is refuted." We find that these claims are not supported by analysis of GSI data.

  6. Rare B decays at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kluit, P M

    2001-01-01

    The results of the LEP experiments for rare B decays will be reviewed, covering hadronic final states, radiative and other rare decays and results for the inclusive charmless branching ratio. (8 refs).

  7. Visible neutrino decay at DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma, Pilar [Fermilab; Peres, Orlando G. [ICTP, Trieste

    2017-05-09

    If the heaviest neutrino mass eigenstate is unstable, its decay modes could include lighter neutrino eigenstates. In this case part of the decay products could be visible, as they would interact at neutrino detectors via mixing. At neutrino oscillation experiments, a characteristic signature of such \\emph{visible neutrino decay} would be an apparent excess of events at low energies. We focus on a simple phenomenological model in which the heaviest neutrino decays as $\

  8. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  9. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Uzan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  10. Learning Read-constant Polynomials of Constant Degree modulo Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chattopadhyay, Arkadev; Gavaldá, Richard; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt

    2011-01-01

    Boolean functions that have constant degree polynomial representation over a fixed finite ring form a natural and strict subclass of the complexity class \\textACC0ACC0. They are also precisely the functions computable efficiently by programs over fixed and finite nilpotent groups. This class...... is not known to be learnable in any reasonable learning model. In this paper, we provide a deterministic polynomial time algorithm for learning Boolean functions represented by polynomials of constant degree over arbitrary finite rings from membership queries, with the additional constraint that each variable...... in the target polynomial appears in a constant number of monomials. Our algorithm extends to superconstant but low degree polynomials and still runs in quasipolynomial time....

  11. Electroweak penguin B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Nikodem, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Flavour Changing Neutral Currents (FCNC) are sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), so-called New Physics. An example of a FCNC is the $b \\to s$ quark transition described by the electroweak penguin Feynman diagram shown in Figure 1. In the SM such FCNC are only allowed with a loop structure (as e:g: shown in the figure) and not by tree level processes. In the loops heavy particles appear virtually and do not need to be on shell. Therefore also not yet discovered heavy particles with up to a mass $\\mathcal{O}$(TeV) could virtually contribute significantly to observables. Several recent measurements of electroweak penguin B decays exhibit interesting tensions with SM predictions, most prominently in the angular observable $P'_5$ 5 of the decay $B^0 \\to K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^1$[1], which triggered a lot of discussion in the theory community [2]-[14].

  12. Fast proton decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianjun; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.; Walker, Joel W.

    2010-10-01

    We consider proton decay in the testable flipped SU(5)×U(1)X models with TeV-scale vector-like particles which can be realized in free fermionic string constructions and F-theory model building. We significantly improve upon the determination of light threshold effects from prior studies, and perform a fresh calculation of the second loop for the process p→eπ from the heavy gauge boson exchange. The cumulative result is comparatively fast proton decay, with a majority of the most plausible parameter space within reach of the future Hyper-Kamiokande and DUSEL experiments. Because the TeV-scale vector-like particles can be produced at the LHC, we predict a strong correlation between the most exciting particle physics experiments of the coming decade.

  13. Charmless B decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martens Aurélien

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available During 2011, LHCb has collected an integrated luminosity of 1.1 fb−1, giving rise to a large variety of measurements. Amongst these, measurements of CP violation in B decays play a central role. In particular CP violation measurements in charmless transitions of B mesons are of interest since they provide new or improved constraints on new physics contributions. These proceedings concentrate on LHCb results made publicin the first half of the year 2012.

  14. Decays of s neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Barradas, J E

    2003-01-01

    Based on the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), we discussed possible two body decay modes for the s neutrino v, one charged and other neutral: v -> l sub x sub 1 sup + sup - and v -> vx sub 1 sup 0 , respectively. Exploring a range of possible values for its mass, and for the chargino x sub i sup + sup - and neutralino x sub j sup 0 masses as well. We present the specific calculation for branching ratios, which are analyzed numerically. (Author)

  15. Effective cosmological constant induced by stochastic fluctuations of Newton's constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco de Cesare

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider implications of the microscopic dynamics of spacetime for the evolution of cosmological models. We argue that quantum geometry effects may lead to stochastic fluctuations of the gravitational constant, which is thus considered as a macroscopic effective dynamical quantity. Consistency with Riemannian geometry entails the presence of a time-dependent dark energy term in the modified field equations, which can be expressed in terms of the dynamical gravitational constant. We suggest that the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe may be ascribed to quantum fluctuations in the geometry of spacetime rather than the vacuum energy from the matter sector.

  16. Radioactive decay data tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

  17. Rare kaon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Major advances spanning several orders of magnitude in sensitivity are anticipated in the current round of experiments with rare kaon decays. Observations of allowed processes, like /Kappa//sup +/ /yields/ /pi//sup +/ /nu//nu/-bar and /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /mu//sup +//mu//sup -/, shed light on detailed aspects of the standard model. New sources of T or CP violation could be manifested by measurements of muon polarization in /Kappa/ /yields/ /delta//mu//nu//sub /mu// and /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /mu//sup +//mu//sup -/ decays and by studies of reactions like /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /pi//sup 0/e/sup +/e/sup -/. Evidence for new particlews and new interactions could appear in advanced efforts to observe /Kappa/ /yields/ /pi/chichi' and /Kappa/ /yields/ /pi/chi decays, where chi and chi' represent hypothethetical neutral particles, and in searches for lepton flavor violating processes /Kappa//sup 0//sub L/ /yields/ /mu/e and /Kappa//sup +/ /yields/ /pi//sup +/ /mu/e. The experiments are reviewed and their theoretical context is discussed.

  18. Higgs inflation and the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegerlehner, Fred [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    The Higgs not only induces the masses of all SM particles, the Higgs, given its special mass value, is the natural candidate for the inflaton and in fact is ruling the evolution of the early universe, by providing the necessary dark energy which remains the dominant energy density. SM running couplings not only allow us to extrapolate SM physics up to the Planck scale, but equally important they are triggering the Higgs mechanism. This is possible by the fact that the bare mass term in the Higgs potential changes sign at about μ{sub 0}≅1.40 x 10{sup 16} GeV and in the symmetric phase is enhanced by quadratic terms in the Planck mass. Such a huge Higgs mass term is able to play a key role in triggering inflation in the early universe. In this article we extend our previous investigation by working out the details of a Higgs inflation scenario. We show how different terms contributing to the Higgs Lagrangian are affecting inflation. Given the SM and its extrapolation to scales μ>μ{sub 0} we find a calculable cosmological constant V(0) which is weakly scale dependent and actually remains large during inflation. This is different to the Higgs fluctuation field dependent ΔV(φ), which decays exponentially during inflation, and actually would not provide a sufficient amount of inflation. The fluctuation field has a different effective mass which shifts the bare Higgs transition point to a lower value μ'{sub 0} ≅7.7 x 10{sup 14} GeV. The vacuum energy V(0) being proportional to M{sub Pl}{sup 4} has a coefficient which vanishes near the Higgs transition point, such that the bare and the renormalized cosmological constant match at this point. The role of the Higgs in reheating and baryogenesis is emphasized.

  19. Column: Factors Affecting Data Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fairbanks

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear physics, the phrase decay rate is used to denote the rate that atoms and other particles spontaneously decompose. Uranium-235 famously decays into a variety of daughter isotopes including Thorium and Neptunium, which themselves decay to others. Decay rates are widely observed and wildly different depending on many factors, both internal and external. U-235 has a half-life of 703,800,000 years, for example, while free neutrons have a half-life of 611 seconds and neutrons in an atomic nucleus are stable.We posit that data in computer systems also experiences some kind of statistical decay process and thus also has a discernible decay rate. Like atomic decay, data decay fluctuates wildly. But unlike atomic decay, data decay rates are the result of so many different interplaying processes that we currently do not understand them well enough to come up with quantifiable numbers. Nevertheless, we believe that it is useful to discuss some of the factors that impact the data decay rate, for these factors frequently determine whether useful data about a subject can be recovered by forensic investigation.(see PDF for full column

  20. Rare B decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Puig Navarro, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Rare decays are flavour changing neutral current processes that allow sensitive searches for phenomena beyond the Standard Model (SM). In the SM, rare decays are loop-suppressed and new particles in SM extensions can give significant contributions. The very rare decay $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ in addition helicity suppressed and constitutes a powerful probe for new (pseudo) scalar particles. Of particular interest are furthermore tests of lepton universality in rare $b\\to s\\ell^+\\ell^-$ decays. The LHCb experiment is designed for the study of b-hadron decays and ideally suited for the analysis of rare decays due to its high trigger efficiency, as well as excellent tracking and particle identification performance. Recent results from the LHCb experiment in the area of rare decays are presented, including tests of lepton universality and searches for lepton flavour violation.

  1. Systematics of constant roll inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguelova, Lilia; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2018-02-01

    We study constant roll inflation systematically. This is a regime, in which the slow roll approximation can be violated. It has long been thought that this approximation is necessary for agreement with observations. However, recently it was understood that there can be inflationary models with a constant, and not necessarily small, rate of roll that are both stable and compatible with the observational constraint ns ≈ 1. We investigate systematically the condition for such a constant-roll regime. In the process, we find a whole new class of inflationary models, in addition to the known solutions. We show that the new models are stable under scalar perturbations. Finally, we find a part of their parameter space, in which they produce a nearly scale-invariant scalar power spectrum, as needed for observational viability.

  2. From the Rydberg constant to the fundamental constants metrology; De la constante de Rydberg a la metrologie des constantes fondamentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nez, F

    2005-06-15

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author since the beginning of his scientific career. This document is dedicated to the spectroscopy of hydrogen, deuterium and helium atoms. The first part is divided into 6 sub-sections: 1) the principles of hydrogen spectroscopy, 2) the measurement of the 2S-nS/nD transitions, 3) other optical frequency measurements, 4) our contribution to the determination of the Rydberg constant, 5) our current experiment on the 1S-3S transition, 6) the spectroscopy of the muonic hydrogen. Our experiments have improved the accuracy of the Rydberg Constant by a factor 25 in 15 years and we have achieved the first absolute optical frequency measurement of a transition in hydrogen. The second part is dedicated to the measurement of the fine structure constant and the last part deals with helium spectroscopy and the search for optical references in the near infrared range. (A.C.)

  3. Mirror QCD and Cosmological Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Pasechnik

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An analog of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD sector known as mirror QCD (mQCD can affect the cosmological evolution due to a non-trivial contribution to the Cosmological Constant analogous to that induced by the ground state in non-perturbative QCD. In this work, we explore a plausible hypothesis for trace anomalies cancellation between the usual QCD and mQCD. Such an anomaly cancellation between the two gauge theories, if it exists in Nature, would lead to a suppression or even elimination of their contributions to the Cosmological Constant. The trace anomaly compensation condition and the form of the non-perturbative mQCD coupling constant in the infrared limit have been proposed by analysing a partial non-perturbative solution of the Einstein–Yang-Mills equations of motion.

  4. The Henry's constant of monochloramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Miguel A; Anderson, Michael A

    2018-02-01

    Monochloramine is a secondary disinfectant used in drinking water and is also formed in chlorinated wastewater. While known to hydrolyze over time and react with dissolved organic matter, its partitioning between the aqueous and gas phase has not been extensively studied. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that monochloramine concentrations in solutions open to the atmosphere or actively aerated decreased more rapidly than in sealed solutions, indicating significant losses to the atmosphere. For example, a monochloramine solution open to the atmosphere yielded a loss rate constant of 0.08 d-1, a value twice that for sealed samples without headspace (0.04 d-1) where loss occurs exclusively as a result of hydrolysis. A solution aerated at 10 mL s-1 had a loss rate constant nearly 10× greater than that for hydrolysis alone (0.35 d-1). To better understand partitioning of monochloramine to the gas phase and potential for volatilization, the dimensionless Henry's law constants of monochloramine (KH) were determined using an equilibrium headspace technique at five different temperatures (11, 16, 21, 27, and 32 °C). The resulting values ranged from 8 × 10-3 to 4 × 10-2, indicating a semi-volatile compound, and were found to be consistent with quantitative structure activity relationship predictions. At 20 °C, monochloramine exhibits a dimensionless Henry's constant of about 1.7 × 10-2 which is 35 times greater than ammonia but comparable to the Henry's constant of inorganic semi-volatile compounds such sulfur dioxide. The Henry's constant values for monochloramine suggests that volatilization could be a relevant loss process in open systems such as rivers receiving chlorinated wastewater effluent, swimming pools and cooling towers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Specific gamma-ray constant and exposure rate constant of 192Ir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, G P; Dillman, L T

    1979-01-01

    Calculated values of the 192Ir specific gamma-ray constant, Gamma range from the low value of 3.948 R cm2h-1mCi-1 recommended in NCRP No. 41 to a high of 4.89 R cm2h-1mCi-1. Measured values of Gamma range only from 4.85 to 5.0 Rcm2h-1mCi-1. Discrepancies in reported calculated values exist because the isotope decay scheme and other nuclear spectroscopy data pertinent to these calculations were not well known. Using the 28 gamma rays and relative intensities from the most recent Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), Gamma is calculated to be 4.62 +/- 0.05 Rcm2h-1mCi-1 and the exposure rate constant Gamma delta is 4.69 +/- 0.05 Rcm2h-1mCi-1. These new calculations are presented and previously reported values of Gamma and Gamma delta are reviewed.

  6. Constant Proportion Debt Obligations (CPDOs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cont, Rama; Jessen, Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    Constant Proportion Debt Obligations (CPDOs) are structured credit derivatives that generate high coupon payments by dynamically leveraging a position in an underlying portfolio of investment-grade index default swaps. CPDO coupons and principal notes received high initial credit ratings from...

  7. GRAPHICAL DETERMINATION OF DISSOCIATION CONSTANT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The dissociation constant (pKa) of non – polar amino acids including (alanine, glycine, valine phenylalanine and tryptophan) were determined by potentiometric titration technique. The pKa values obtained by extrapolation for alanine, glycine, and valine were 10.29, 9.87 and 9.91 respectively. The implications ...

  8. GRAPHICAL DETERMINATION OF DISSOCIATION CONSTANT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    3: Plot of pH versus Log [HA]/[A-] for pKa of Valine. CONCLUSION. The acid dissociation constant of non polar amino acids determined graphically for the first time from the available literature were found to be similar with corresponding calculated values reported in the literature. Therefore the graphical approach is ...

  9. Semileptonic kaon decays

    CERN Document Server

    Bijnens, J; Gasser, J

    1992-01-01

    We present the matrix elements for the semileptonic kaon decays $K_{l2\\gamma}$, $K_{l2l^+l^-}$, $K_{l2l'^+l'^-}$, $K_{l3}$, $K_{l3\\gamma}$ and $K_{l4}$ at next-to-leading order in chiral perturbation theory and compare the predictions with experimental data. Monte Carlo event generators are used to calculate the corresponding rates at DAFNE. We discuss the possibilities to improve our knowledge of the low-energy structure of the Standard Model at this and similar machines.

  10. Telling tails in the presence of a cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Patrick R.; Chambers, Chris M.; Krivan, William; Laguna, Pablo

    1997-06-01

    We study the evolution of massless scalar waves propagating on spherically symmetric spacetimes with a nonzero cosmological constant. Considering test fields on both Schwarzschild-de Sitter and Reissner-Nordström-de Sitter backgrounds, we demonstrate the existence of exponentially decaying tails at late times. Interestingly, the l=0 mode asymptotes to a nonzero value, contrasting the asymptotically flat situation. We also compare these results, for l=0, with a numerical integration of the Einstein-scalar field equations, finding good agreement between the two. Finally, the significance of these results to the study of the Cauchy horizon stability in black-hole-de Sitter spacetimes is discussed.

  11. Decay of charge deposited on the wall of gaseous void

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1992-01-01

    constant, the decay can take a considerable amount of time. The decay rate is significantly reduced by an increase in the permittivity of the bulk medium. The dominating influence of this permittivity is likewise reflected in the increased duration and thereby prolonged inhomogeneity of the electric field...... sustained in the void. However, the absolute value of this field is reduced with an increase in bulk permittivity. It is concluded that the present choice of a point charge to simulate the wall charge has the disadvantage that such a source is associated with a field singularity, and thus it is not possible...

  12. The neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT: Latest results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Hans-Friedrich; Angerer, Heinz; Konorov, Igor; Petzoldt, Gerd; Simson, Martin; Zimmer, Oliver [Physik-Department, Technische Universtitaet Muenchen (Germany); Ayala Guardia, Fidel; Borg, Michael; Glueck, Ferenc; Heil, Werner; Konrad, Gertrud; Munoz Horta, Raquel; Sobolev, Yury [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Baessler, Stefan [Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville (United States); Eberhardt, Klaus [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT was designed to measure accurately the proton spectrum of the free neutron decay. The knowledge of the proton spectrum allows to extract the neutrino electron angular correlation coefficient a, from which we will determine with highest accuracy the ratio {lambda}= g{sub A}/g{sub V} of the weak coupling constants of the nucleon. After successful beamtimes in 2005/06 at the FRM-II near Munich we continue the measurements at the ILL in Grenoble. Latest results and experiences with a new proton detector, which is a silicon drift detector, are presented.

  13. On the claim of modulations in radon decay and their association with solar rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommé, S.; Lutter, G.; Marouli, M.; Kossert, K.; Nähle, O.

    2018-01-01

    Claims were made by Sturrock et al. that radioactive decay can be induced by interaction of the nucleus with solar neutrinos and that cyclic modulations in decay rates are indicative of the dynamics of the solar interior. They analysed a series of measurements of gamma radiation associated with the emanation and decay of radon in a sealed container at the Geological Survey of Israel (GSI) laboratory. The integral count rates in the NaI detector showed strong variations in time of year and time of day. From time-series analysis, Sturrock et al. claim the presence of small oscillations at frequencies in a range between 7.4 a-1 and 12.5 a-1, which they speculatively associated with rotational influence on the solar neutrino flux. In this work, it is argued that the GSI radon measurements are unsuited for studying the variability of decay constants, because the data are strongly influenced by environmental conditions, such as solar irradiance and rainfall. At the JRC and PTB, decay rate measurements of the radon decay chain were performed with ionisation chambers, gamma-ray spectrometers and an alpha spectrometer. No deviation from the exponential-decay law was observed. The existence of cyclic variations in the decay constants is refuted, as well as the concept of measuring solar rotation through radioactive decay.

  14. SUSY decays of Higgs particles

    CERN Document Server

    Djouadi, Abdelhak; Kalinowski, Jan; Zerwas, Peter M

    1996-01-01

    Among the possible decay modes of Higgs particles into supersymmetric states, neutralino and chargino decays play a prominent rôle. The experimental opportunities of observing such decay modes at LEP2 and at future $\\ee$ linear colliders are analyzed within the frame of the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. For heavy Higgs particles, the chargino/neutralino decay modes can be very important, while only a small window is open for the lightest CP--even Higgs particle. If charginos/neutralinos are found at LEP2, such decay modes can be searched for in a small area of the parameter space, and invisible decays may reduce the exclusion limits of the lightest CP-even Higgs particle slightly; if charginos/neutralinos are not found at LEP2 in direct searches, the Higgs search will not be affected by the SUSY particle sector.

  15. The Strong Decay Properties of the 1−+ Hybrid Mesons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hua-Xing

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the coupling constants of the decay modes 1−+ → ρπ, f1π, b1π, ηπ, ήπ, a1π, f1η within the framework of the light-cone QCD sum rule. Then we calculate the partial widths of these decay channels, which differ greatly from the existing calculations using phenomenological models. For the isovector 1−+ state, the dominant decay modes are ρπ, f1π. For its isoscalar partner, its dominant decay mode is a1π. We also discuss the possible search of the 1−+ state at BESIII, for example through the decay chains J/ψ(ψ’ → π1 + γ or J/ψ(ψ’ → π1 + ρ where π1 can be reconstructed through the decay modes π1 → ρπ → π+π-π0 or π1 → f1(1285π0. Hopefully the present work will be helpful to the experimental establishment of the 1−+ hybrid meson.

  16. Rare beauty and charm decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, T.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Rare beauty and charm decays can provide powerful probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. These proceedings summarise the latest measurements of rare beauty and charm decays from the LHCb experiment at the end of Run 1 of the LHC. Whilst the majority of the measurements are consistent with SM predictions, small differences are seen in the rate and angular distribution of ℓ- decay processes.

  17. Wormholes and the cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanov, Igor; Susskind, Leonard; Banks, Tom

    1989-05-01

    We review Coleman's wormhole mechanism for the vanishing of the cosmological constant. We show that in a minisuperspace model wormhole-connected universes dominate the path integral. We also provide evidence that the euclidean path integral over geometries with spherical topology is unstable with respect to formation of infinitely many wormhole-connected 4-spheres. Consistency is restored by summing over all topologies, which leads to Coleman's result. Coleman's argument for determination of other parameters is reviewed and applied to the mass of the pion. A discouraging result is found that the pion mass is driven to zero. We also consider qualitatively the implications of the wormhole theory for cosmology. We argue that a small number of universes containing matter and energy may exist in contact with infinitely many cold and empty universe. Contact with the cold universe insures that the cosmological constant in the warm ones in zero.

  18. Wormholes and the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klebanov, I.; Susskind, L.; Banks, T.

    1989-05-08

    We review Coleman's wormhole mechanism for the vanishing of the cosmological constant. We show that in a minisuperspace model wormhole-connected universes dominate the path integral. We also provide evidence that the euclidean path integral over geometries with spherical topology is unstable with respect to formation of infinitely many wormhole-connected 4-spheres. Consistency is restored by summing over all topologies, which leads to Coleman's result. Coleman's argument for determination of other parameters is reviewed and applied to the mass of the pion. A discouraging result is found that the pion mass is driven to zero. We also consider qualitatively the implications of the wormhole theory for cosmology. We argue that a small number of universes containing matter and energy may exist in contact with infinitely many cold and empty universes. Contact with the cold universes insures that the cosmological constant in the warm ones is zero.

  19. A new cosmological constant model

    CERN Document Server

    López, J L; Lopez, J; Nanopoulos, D

    1996-01-01

    We propose a new cosmological model with a time-dependent cosmological constant (\\Lambda\\propto 1/t^2), which starting at the Planck time as \\Lambda_{Pl}\\sim M^2_{Pl}, evolves to the present-day allowed value of \\Lambda_0\\sim10^{-120}M^2_{Pl}. This scenario is supported by non-critical string theory considerations. We compute the age of the Universe and the time-dependence of the scale factor in this model, and find general agreement with recent determinations of the Hubble parameter for substantial values of \\Omega_{\\rm \\Lambda}. This effectively low-density open Universe model differs from the traditional cosmological constant model, and has observable implications for particle physics and cosmology.

  20. Cosmological Constant and Local Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bernabeu, Jose; Mavromatos, Nick E

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the linearization of Einstein equations in the presence of a cosmological constant, by expanding the solution for the metric around a flat Minkowski space-time. We demonstrate that one can find consistent solutions to the linearized set of equations for the metric perturbations, in the Lorentz gauge, which are not spherically symmetric, but they rather exhibit a cylindrical symmetry. We find that the components of the gravitational field satisfying the appropriate Poisson equations have the property of ensuring that a scalar potential can be constructed, in which both contributions, from ordinary matter and $\\Lambda > 0$, are attractive. In addition, there is a novel tensor potential, induced by the pressure density, in which the effect of the cosmological constant is repulsive. We also linearize the Schwarzschild-de Sitter exact solution of Einstein's equations (due to a generalization of Birkhoff's theorem) in the domain between the two horizons. We manage to transform it first to a gauge in whic...

  1. Supersymmetric cascade decays at NLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popenda, Eva; Muehlleitner, Margarete; Hangst, Christian [KIT, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany); Kraemer, Michael [RWTH Aachen University, Institut fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie (Germany); Spira, Michael [Paul Scherrer Institut, Theory Group LTP (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The search for supersymmetric particles and determination of their properties is a major task at the LHC and is based on the analysis of the cascade decay chains in which SUSY particles are produced. This project aims at improving predictions for SUSY cascade decays through the inclusion of higher-order corrections in the production and decay processes and by embedding them in a fully flexible Monte Carlo program. In this talk we report on the progress of the implementation of squark pair production followed by the decay into a quark and the lightest neutralino including supersymmetric QCD corrections at next-to-leading order in a completely differential form.

  2. JENDL decay data file 2015

    OpenAIRE

    片倉 純一; 湊 太志

    2016-01-01

    JENDL Decay Data File 2015 (JENDL/DDF-2015) has been produced. The decay data of nuclides with mass numbers from 1 to 260 are included. The nuclides with unknown gamma- and/or beta-emission are also included in order to keep decay chains. The data of 1,284 fission product nuclides with mass from 66 to 172 remain unchanged from JENDL/FPD-2011 except several corrections which had been claimed by users, and those of the newly added 1,953 nuclides are taken from ENSDF. Finally, the decay data of ...

  3. Precision Light Flavor Physics from Lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, David

    In this thesis we present three distinct contributions to the study of light flavor physics using the techniques of lattice QCD. These results are arranged into four self-contained papers. The first two papers concern global fits of the quark mass, lattice spacing, and finite volume dependence of the pseudoscalar meson masses and decay constants, computed in a series of lattice QCD simulations, to partially quenched SU(2) and SU(3) chiral perturbation theory (chiPT). These fits determine a subset of the low energy constants of chiral perturbation theory -- in some cases with increased precision, and in other cases for the first time -- which, once determined, can be used to compute other observables and amplitudes in chiPT. We also use our formalism to self-consistently probe the behavior of the (asymptotic) chiral expansion as a function of the quark masses by repeating the fits with different subsets of the data. The third paper concerns the first lattice QCD calculation of the semileptonic K0 → pi-l +nul ( Kl3) form factor at vanishing momentum transfer, f+Kpi(0), with physical mass domain wall quarks. The value of this form factor can be combined with a Standard Model analysis of the experimentally measured K0 → pi -l+nu l decay rate to extract a precise value of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element Vus, and to test unitarity of the CKM matrix. We also discuss lattice calculations of the pion and kaon decay constants, which can be used to extract Vud through an analogous Standard Model analysis of experimental constraints on leptonic pion and kaon decays. The final paper explores the recently proposed exact one flavor algorithm (EOFA). This algorithm has been shown to drastically reduce the memory footprint required to simulate single quark flavors on the lattice relative to the widely used rational hybrid Monte Carlo (RHMC) algorithm, while also offering modest O(20%) speed-ups. We independently derive the exact one flavor action, explore its

  4. Searching for Kaprekar's constants: algorithms and results

    OpenAIRE

    Walden, Byron L.

    2005-01-01

    We examine some new results on Kaprekar's constants, specifically establishing the unique 7-digit (in base 4) and 9-digit (in base 5) Kaprekar's constants and showing that there are no 15-, 21-, 27-, or 33-digit Kaprekar's constants.

  5. Decay of oscillating universes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithani, Audrey Todhunter

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested by Ellis et al that the universe could be eternal in the past, without beginning. In their model, the "emergent universe'' exists forever in the past, in an "eternal'' phase before inflation begins. We will show that in general, such an "eternal'' phase is not possible, because of an instability due to quantum tunneling. One candidate model, the "simple harmonic universe'' has been shown by Graham et al to be perturbatively stable; we find that it is unstable with respect to quantum tunneling. We also investigate the stability of a distinct oscillating model in loop quantum cosmology with respect to small perturbations and to quantum collapse. We find that the model has perturbatively stable and unstable solutions, with both types of solutions occupying significant regions of the parameter space. All solutions are unstable with respect to collapse by quantum tunneling to zero size. In addition, we investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and the Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. Finally, we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe. Although the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence in canonical quantum cosmology, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. Here, we apply this approach to the simple harmonic universe, by extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field φ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock''.

  6. Polarization in heavy quark decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimujiang, K.

    2006-07-01

    In this thesis I concentrate on the angular correlations in top quark decays and their next.to.leading order (NLO) QCD corrections. I also discuss the leading.order (LO) angular correlations in unpolarized and polarized hyperon decays. In the first part of the thesis I calculate the angular correlation between the top quark spin and the momentum of decay products in the rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a charged Higgs boson and a bottom quark in Two-Higgs-Doublet-Models: t({up_arrow}) {yields} b + H{sup +}. I provide closed form formulae for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized and the polar correlation functions for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the second part I concentrate on the semileptonic rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a bottom quark and a lepton pair: t({up_arrow}){yields}X{sub b}+l{sup +}+{nu}{sub l}. I present closed form expressions for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized part and the polar and azimuthal correlations for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the last part I turn to the angular distribution in semileptonic hyperon decays. Using the helicity method I derive complete formulas for the leading order joint angular decay distributions occurring in semileptonic hyperon decays including lepton mass and polarization effects. (orig.)

  7. Beauty hadron decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Poluektov, Anton

    2016-01-01

    In these proceedings, I will report the recent results on properties, production and decays of beauty baryons, as well as measurements of B + c meson decays, based on data collected by the LHCb collaboration at the LHC collider in 2011–2012.

  8. Status of rare decay experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Littenberg, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    Some results are given for rare muon decay experiments currently running. Also, plans are discussed for rare kaon decay experiments. Some of the events sought come from processes which violate lepton flavor conservation. Several apparatuses used in the search are described. 35 references. (LEW)

  9. Relativistic 2-body Bottomonium decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barducci Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We calculate some radiative decays of Bottomonium in a covariant scheme for two interacting fermions. We present their branching ratios and their absolute widths. A comparison with experimental data shows a good agreement with our results. Some decays for which data are not available are compared with other theoretical previsions.

  10. Welding the CNGS decay tube

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    3.6 km of welds were required for the 1 km long CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) decay tube, in which particles produced in the collision with a proton and a graphite target will decay into muons and muon neutrinos. Four highly skilled welders performed this delicate task.

  11. Exact constants in approximation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Korneichuk, N

    1991-01-01

    This book is intended as a self-contained introduction for non-specialists, or as a reference work for experts, to the particular area of approximation theory that is concerned with exact constants. The results apply mainly to extremal problems in approximation theory, which in turn are closely related to numerical analysis and optimization. The book encompasses a wide range of questions and problems: best approximation by polynomials and splines; linear approximation methods, such as spline-approximation; optimal reconstruction of functions and linear functionals. Many of the results are base

  12. Cryptography in constant parallel time

    CERN Document Server

    Applebaum, Benny

    2013-01-01

    Locally computable (NC0) functions are 'simple' functions for which every bit of the output can be computed by reading a small number of bits of their input. The study of locally computable cryptography attempts to construct cryptographic functions that achieve this strong notion of simplicity and simultaneously provide a high level of security. Such constructions are highly parallelizable and they can be realized by Boolean circuits of constant depth.This book establishes, for the first time, the possibility of local implementations for many basic cryptographic primitives such as one-way func

  13. New analysis of the {delta}I equal to 1/2 rule in Kaon decays and the B{sub K} parameter.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hambye, T [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati; Koehler, G.O.; Soldan, P.H. [Dortmund Univ., Dortmund (Germany). Inst. fuer Phisik

    1999-07-01

    It is used the 1/N{sub c} expansion within the effective chiral lagrangian for pseudoscalar mesons and compute the hadronic matrix elements at leading and next-to-leading order in the chiral and the 1/N{sub c} expansions. Numerically, our calculation reproduces the dominant {delta}I = 1/2 K{yields} {pi}{pi} amplitude. The result depends only moderately on the choice of the cutoff scale in the chiral loops. The {delta}I = 3/2 amplitude emerges sufficiently suppressed but shows a significant dependence on the cutoff. The B{sub K} parameter turns out to be smaller than the value previously obtained in the 1/N{sub c} approach. It also shows a significant dependence on the choice of the cutoff scale. The results indicate that corrections from higher order terms and/or higher resonances are large for the {delta}I = 3/2 K {yields} {pi}{pi} amplitude and the (|{delta}S| = 2) K{sup 0} - K{sup 0} transition amplitude.

  14. Baryon helicity in B decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mahiko [Department of Physics and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    The unexpectedly large transverse polarization measured in the decay B {yields} {phi}K* poses the question whether it is accounted for as a strong interaction effect or possibly points to a hidden nonstandard weak interaction. We extend here the perturbative argument to the helicity structure of the two-body baryonic decay and discuss qualitatively on how the baryonic B decay modes might help us in understanding the issue raised by B {yields} {phi}K*. We find among others that the helicity +1/2 amplitude dominates the leading order in the B(b-barq) decay and that unlike the B {yields} VV decay the dominant amplitude is sensitive to the right-handed b {yields} s current, if any, in the penguin interaction.

  15. Radioactive Decays in Geant4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauf, Steffen; Kuster, Markus; Batič, Matej; Bell, Zane W.; Hoffmann, Dieter H. H.; Lang, Philipp M.; Neff, Stephan; Pia, Maria Grazia; Weidenspointner, Georg; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    The simulation of radioactive decays is a common task in Monte-Carlo systems such as Geant4. Usually, a system either uses an approach focusing on the simulations of every individual decay or an approach which simulates a large number of decays with a focus on correct overall statistics. The radioactive decay package presented in this work permits, for the first time, the use of both methods within the same simulation framework - Geant4. The accuracy of the statistical approach in our new package, RDM-extended, and that of the existing Geant4 per-decay implementation (original RDM), which has also been refactored, are verified against the ENSDF database. The new verified package is beneficial for a wide range of experimental scenarios, as it enables researchers to choose the most appropriate approach for their Geant4-based application.

  16. Radioactive Decays in Geant4

    CERN Document Server

    Hauf, Steffen; Batič, Matej; Bell, Zane W; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Lang, Philipp M; Neff, Stephan; Pia, Maria Grazia; Weidenspointner, Georg; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The simulation of radioactive decays is a common task in Monte-Carlo systems such as Geant4. Usually, a system either uses an approach focusing on the simulations of every individual decay or an approach which simulates a large number of decays with a focus on correct overall statistics. The radioactive decay package presented in this work permits, for the first time, the use of both methods within the same simulation framework - Geant4. The accuracy of the statistical approach in our new package, RDM-extended, and that of the existing Geant4 per-decay implementation (original RDM), which has also been refactored, are verified against the ENSDF database. The new verified package is beneficial for a wide range of experimental scenarios, as it enables researchers to choose the most appropriate approach for their Geant4-based application.

  17. Semileptonic B Decays at BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenegger, U

    2004-02-17

    We present results on semileptonic B decays obtained with the BABAR detector. The large data set accumulated at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B-Factory allows a new measurement technique, where the hadronic decay of one B meson is fully reconstructed and the semileptonic decay of the recoiling B meson is studied. Traditional analysis techniques of inclusive and exclusive B decays complement this approach with very high statistics data samples. These measurements play an important role in the tests of the description of CP violation in the Standard Model: The determinations of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| provide constraints on the unitarity of the CKM triangle. Furthermore, the experimental measurement of parameters of Heavy Quark Effective Theory test the consistency of the theoretical description of semileptonic B decays.

  18. Anthropics of aluminum-26 decay and biological homochirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandora, McCullen

    2017-11-01

    Results of recent experiment reinstate feasibility to the hypothesis that biomolecular homochirality originates from beta decay. Coupled with hints that this process occurred extraterrestrially suggests aluminum-26 as the most likely source. If true, then its appropriateness is highly dependent on the half-life and energy of this decay. Demanding that this mechanism hold places new constraints on the anthropically allowed range for multiple parameters, including the electron mass, difference between up and down quark masses, the fine structure constant, and the electroweak scale. These new constraints on particle masses are tighter than those previously found. However, one edge of the allowed region is nearly degenerate with an existing bound, which, using what is termed here as `the principle of noncoincident peril', is argued to be a strong indicator that the fine structure constant must be an environmental parameter in the multiverse.

  19. The magnetic dipole transitions in the ( c bar b ) binding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Hongwei; Wang, Guoli; Li, Xueqian; Chang, Chaohsi

    2010-11-01

    The magnetic dipole transitions between the vector mesons B* c and their relevant pseudoscalar mesons B c ( B c , B* c , B c (2 S), B* c (2 S), B c (3 S), B* c (3 S) etc., the binding states of ( c bar b ) system) of the B c family are interesting. The ‘hyperfine’ splitting due to spin-spin interaction is an important topic for understanding the spin-spin interaction and the spectrum of the the ( c bar b ) binding system. The knowledge about the magnetic dipole transitions is also very useful for identifying the vector boson B* c mesons experimentally, whose masses are just slightly above the masses of their relevant pseudoscalar mesons B c . Considering the possibility to observe the vector mesons via the transitions at Z 0 factory and the potential use of the theoretical estimate on the transitions, we fucus our efforts on calculating the magnetic dipole transitions, i.e. a precise calculation of the rates for the transitions such as decays B* c → B c γ and B* c → B c e + e -, and particularly work in the Bethe-Salpeter framework. As a typical example, we carefully investigate the dependence of the rate Γ( B* c → B c γ) on the mass difference Δ M = M_{B_c^* } - M_{B_c }.

  20. Formas estructurales de fuerza constante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalewski, Waclaw

    1963-05-01

    Full Text Available The author seeks to prove the need to obtain the most essential form in the various types of structures by applying a number of rational principles, of which the constant stress principle is one of the most decisive. The structural form should be a logical consequence of all its functional circumstances, and this requires a clear understanding of the general behaviour of each part of the structure, and also of the main stresses which operate on it, considered as a unitary whole. To complete his theoretical argument, the author gives some examples, in the design of which the criterion of constant stress has been adopted. The author considers the various aspects which are involved in obtaining a structural design that satisfies given functional and aesthetic requirements. In doing so he refers to his personal experience within Poland, and infers technical principles of general validity which should determine the rational design of the form, as an integrated aspect of the structural pattern. The projects which illustrate this paper are Polish designs of undoubted constructive significance, in which the principle of constant stress has been applied. Finally the author condenses his whole theory in a simple and straightforward practical formula, which should be followed if a truly rational form is to be achieved: the constancy of stress in the various structural elements.El autor se esfuerza en mostrar la necesidad de llegar a la forma real en las distintas estructuras siguiendo una serie de principios racionales, entre los que domina el criterio de la fuerza constante. La forma ha de ser una consecuencia lógica en todos sus aspectos, y esto exige un claro conocimiento del comportamiento general de cada una de las partes de la estructura, y de los esfuerzos generales que dominan en la misma al considerarla como un todo. Para completar la exposición de orden teórico, el autor presenta algunos ejemplos en cuyo proyecto se ha seguido el criterio de

  1. Graphs with constant μ and μ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, E.R.; Haemers, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    A graph G has constant u = u(G) if any two vertices that are not adjacent have u common neighbours. G has constant u and u if G has constant u = u(G), and its complement G has constant u = u(G). If such a graph is regular, then it is strongly regular, otherwise precisely two vertex degrees occur. We

  2. Stability constant estimator user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, B.P.; Castleton, K.J.; Rustad, J.R.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of the Stability Constant Estimator (SCE) program is to estimate aqueous stability constants for 1:1 complexes of metal ions with ligands by using trends in existing stability constant data. Such estimates are useful to fill gaps in existing thermodynamic databases and to corroborate the accuracy of reported stability constant values.

  3. Measurement of Angular Correlations in the Decay of Polarized Neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Carl Jørgen; Krohn, V.E.; Ringo, G.R.

    1970-01-01

    The electron-momentum-neutron-spin correlation coefficient was found to be A=-0.115±0.008, and the antineutrino-momentum-neutron-spin correlation coefficient was found to be B=1.00±0.05. The value of A leads to |GA/GV|=1.26±0.02 for the ratio of Gamow-Teller-to-Fermi coupling constants in β decay...

  4. Constant training in direct ophthalmoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younan HC

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Helen-Cara Younan, Rishi Iyer, Janaki Natasha DesaiFaculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKWe read with great interest the review by Ricci and Ferraz on the advances in training and practice in ophthalmoscopy simulation.1As final year medical students, we have recently experienced direct ophthalmoscopy teaching and agree with the authors that “simulation is a helpful tool in ophthalmoscopy training”.1 Indeed, in our experience, simulation is useful in teaching a wide variety of clinical skills including venepuncture, intravenous cannulation, and catheterization. We were taught all of these clinical skills in our first clinical year of study through use of simulation models. With regards to our direct ophthalmoscopy teaching, we were first taught to recognize the normal retina and different retinal pathologies using images, before practicing our technique and recognition of those images in a model similar to the THELMA (The Human Eye Learning Model Assistant described by the authors.1However, we feel that the use of simulation models alone is not enough to provide confidence and competency in direct ophthalmoscopy among medical students. The authors conclude that “constant training is a well-known strategy for skill enhancement”,1 and we have found that a lack of constant training in direct ophthalmoscopy is evident. After learning venepuncture, cannulation, and catheterization on the simulation models, we were able to observe doctors performing these skills before performing them on patients either in the wards or in theatre. These are skills that we are constantly trained in across a wide variety of medical and surgical attachments. However, opportunities to observe and practice ophthalmoscopy during our attachments are more limited, and thus we are not continuing to use the skills we learn.Authors' replyLucas Holderegger Ricci,1 Caroline Amaral Ferraz21Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, Laureate

  5. The fundamental constants a mystery of physics

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsch, Harald

    2009-01-01

    The speed of light, the fine structure constant, and Newton's constant of gravity — these are just three among the many physical constants that define our picture of the world. Where do they come from? Are they constant in time and across space? In this book, physicist and author Harald Fritzsch invites the reader to explore the mystery of the fundamental constants of physics in the company of Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, and a modern-day physicist

  6. Masses of S and P wave mesons and pseudoscalar decay constants ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. C3, 1 (1998). [5] S Godfrey and J Napolitano, Rev. Mod. Phys. 71, 1411 (1999). [6] F Iachello, N C Mukhopadhyay and L Zhang, Phys. Rev. D44, 898 (1991). [7] C Quigg and J Rosner, Phys. Rep. 56, 167, 222 (1979). [8] Buchmüller and Tye, Phys. Rev. D24, 132 (1981). [9] N Isgur and G Karl, Phys. Rev. D18, 4187 (1997).

  7. Evaluation Of Landfill Gas Decay Constant For Municipal Solid Waste Landfills Operated As Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prediction of the rate of gas production from bioreactor landfills is important to optimize energy recovery and to estimate greenhouse gas emissions. Landfill gas (LFG) composition and flow rate were monitored for four years for a conventional and two bioreactor landfill landfil...

  8. Omnidirectional antenna having constant phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, Matthew

    2017-04-04

    Various technologies presented herein relate to constructing and/or operating an antenna having an omnidirectional electrical field of constant phase. The antenna comprises an upper plate made up of multiple conductive rings, a lower ground-plane plate, a plurality of grounding posts, a conical feed, and a radio frequency (RF) feed connector. The upper plate has a multi-ring configuration comprising a large outer ring and several smaller rings of equal size located within the outer ring. The large outer ring and the four smaller rings have the same cross-section. The grounding posts ground the upper plate to the lower plate while maintaining a required spacing/parallelism therebetween.

  9. Henry's law constants of polyols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compernolle, S.; Müller, J.-F.

    2014-12-01

    Henry's law constants (HLC) are derived for several polyols bearing between 2 and 6 hydroxyl groups, based on literature data for water activity, vapour pressure and/or solubility. While deriving HLC and depending on the case, also infinite dilution activity coefficients (IDACs), solid state vapour pressures or activity coefficient ratios are obtained as intermediate results. An error analysis on the intermediate quantities and the obtained HLC is included. For most compounds, these are the first values reported, while others compare favourably with literature data in most cases. Using these values and those from a previous work (Compernolle and Müller, 2014), an assessment is made on the partitioning of polyols, diacids and hydroxy acids to droplet and aqueous aerosol.

  10. Henry's law constants of polyols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Compernolle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Henry's law constants (HLC are derived for several polyols bearing between 2 and 6 hydroxyl groups, based on literature data for water activity, vapour pressure and/or solubility. While deriving HLC and depending on the case, also infinite dilution activity coefficients (IDACs, solid state vapour pressures or activity coefficient ratios are obtained as intermediate results. An error analysis on the intermediate quantities and the obtained HLC is included. For most compounds, these are the first values reported, while others compare favourably with literature data in most cases. Using these values and those from a previous work (Compernolle and Müller, 2014, an assessment is made on the partitioning of polyols, diacids and hydroxy acids to droplet and aqueous aerosol.

  11. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    The mechanistic model of Organic Chemistry is based on relationships between rate and equilibrium constants. Thus, strong bases are generally considered to be good nucleophiles and poor nucleofuges. Exceptions to this rule have long been known, and the ability of iodide ions to catalyze nucleophilic substitutions, because they are good nucleophiles as well as good nucleofuges, is just a prominent example for exceptions from the general rule. In a reaction series, the Leffler-Hammond parameter α = δΔG(⧧)/δΔG° describes the fraction of the change in the Gibbs energy of reaction, which is reflected in the change of the Gibbs energy of activation. It has long been considered as a measure for the position of the transition state; thus, an α value close to 0 was associated with an early transition state, while an α value close to 1 was considered to be indicative of a late transition state. Bordwell's observation in 1969 that substituent variation in phenylnitromethanes has a larger effect on the rates of deprotonation than on the corresponding equilibrium constants (nitroalkane anomaly) triggered the breakdown of this interpretation. In the past, most systematic investigations of the relationships between rates and equilibria of organic reactions have dealt with proton transfer reactions, because only for few other reaction series complementary kinetic and thermodynamic data have been available. In this Account we report on a more general investigation of the relationships between Lewis basicities, nucleophilicities, and nucleofugalities as well as between Lewis acidities, electrophilicities, and electrofugalities. Definitions of these terms are summarized, and it is suggested to replace the hybrid terms "kinetic basicity" and "kinetic acidity" by "protophilicity" and "protofugality", respectively; in this way, the terms "acidity" and "basicity" are exclusively assigned to thermodynamic properties, while "philicity" and "fugality" refer to kinetics

  12. MIRD radionuclide data and decay schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Eckerman, Keith F

    2007-01-01

    For all physicians, scientists, and physicists working in the nuclear medicine field, the MIRD: Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes updated edition is an essential sourcebook for radiation dosimetry and understanding the properties of radionuclides. Includes CD Table of Contents Decay schemes listed by atomic number Radioactive decay processes Serial decay schemes Decay schemes and decay tables This essential reference for nuclear medicine physicians, scientists and physicists also includes a CD with tabulations of the radionuclide data necessary for dosimetry calculations.

  13. Tritium decay helium-3 effects in tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shimada

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tritium (T implanted by plasmas diffuses into bulk material, especially rapidly at elevated temperatures, and becomes trapped in neutron radiation-induced defects in materials that act as trapping sites for the tritium. The trapped tritium atoms will decay to produce helium-3 (3He atoms at a half-life of 12.3 years. 3He has a large cross section for absorbing thermal neutrons, which after absorbing a neutron produces hydrogen (H and tritium ions with a combined kinetic energy of 0.76 MeV through the 3He(n,HT nuclear reaction. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the 3He produced in tungsten by tritium decay compared to the neutron-induced helium-4 (4He produced in tungsten. This is important given the fact that helium in materials not only creates microstructural damage in the bulk of the material but alters surface morphology of the material effecting plasma-surface interaction process (e.g. material evolution, erosion and tritium behavior of plasma-facing component materials. Effects of tritium decay 3He in tungsten are investigated here with a simple model that predicts quantity of 3He produced in a fusion DEMO FW based on a neutron energy spectrum found in literature. This study reveals that: (1 helium-3 concentration was equilibrated to ∼6% of initial/trapped tritium concentration, (2 tritium concentration remained approximately constant (94% of initial tritium concentration, and (3 displacement damage from 3He(n,HT nuclear reaction became >1 dpa/year in DEMO FW.

  14. Higgs decay to fermions (CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxena Pooja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A search for high mass Higgs boson of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model decaying into two fermions using the first 2015 data at 13 TeV is presented. The four final decay channels of μτh, eτh, τhτh and eμ is used. The limits on production cross section times branching ratio has been set. Other results from Run1 and different searches and measurements involving Higgs decays fermions will also be reviewed.

  15. Charm counting in b decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z → b overlineb decays has been measured from the yield of D0, D+, Ds+ and Λc+ decays in a sample of q overlineq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be nc = 1.230 ± 0.036 ± 0.038 ± 0.053, where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  16. Charm counting in b decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Carrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Walsh, J; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z -> bb decays has been measured from the yield of D^0, D^+, D^+_s and Lambda_{c}^+ decays in a sample of qq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be n_c = 1.230 \\pm 0.036 \\pm 0.038 \\pm 0.053 where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  17. Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komech, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A simplified, yet rigorous treatment of scattering theory methods and their applications Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory provides thorough, easy-to-understand guidance on the application of scattering theory methods to modern problems in mathematics, quantum physics, and mathematical physics. Introducing spectral methods with applications to dispersion time-decay and scattering theory, this book presents, for the first time, the Agmon-Jensen-Kato spectral theory for the Schr?dinger equation, extending the theory to the Klein-Gordon equation. The dispersion decay plays a crucial role i

  18. RARE DECAYS INCLUDING PENGUINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eigen, G

    2003-12-04

    The authors present a preliminary measurement of the exclusive charmless semileptonic B decays, B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}, and the extraction of the CKM parameters V{sub ub}. IN a data sample of 55 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} {rho}{ell}{nu}) = (3.39 {+-} 0.44{sub stat} {+-} 0.52{sub sys} {+-} 0.60{sub th}) x 10{sup -4} yielding |V{sub ub}| = (3.69 {+-} 0.23{sub stat} {+-} 0.27{sub sys -0.59th}{sup +0.40}) x 10{sup -3}. Next, they report on a preliminary study of the radiative penguin modes B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}. In a data sample of 84 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events they observe a significant signal (4.4{sigma}) in B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, yielding a branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (0.78{sub -0.20-0.18}{sup +0.24+0.11}) x 10{sup -6}. In B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} the observed yield is not yet significant (2.8{sigma}), yielding an upper limit of the branching fraction of {Beta}(B {yields} K*{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) 3.0 x 10{sup -6} {at} 90% confidence level. Finally, they summarize preliminary results of searches for B {yields} {rho}({omega}){gamma}, B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  19. The decay of hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs.

  20. Weak Decays of Charmed Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Marc Gilles [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)

    1986-05-01

    The lifetimes of charmed particles produced in interactions of high energy neutrinos with nucleons have been measured using a combination of a very high resolution emulsion-based vertex detector and a spectrometer allowing full kinematical reconstruction of the decays.

  1. Measuring Uranium Decay Rates for Advancement of Nuclear Forensics and Geochronology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons-Davis, Tashi [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-10-31

    Radioisotopic dating techniques are highly valuable tools for understanding the history of physical and chemical processes in materials related to planetary sciences and nuclear forensics, and rely on accurate knowledge of decay constants and their uncertainties. The decay constants of U-238 and U-235 are particularly important to Earth science, and often the measured values with lowest reported uncertainties are applied, although they have not been independently verified with similar precision. New direct measurements of the decay constants of U-238, Th-234, U-235, and U-234 were completed, using a range of analytical approaches. An overarching goal of the project was to ensure the quality of results, including metrological traceability to facilitate implementation across diverse disciplines. This report presents preliminary results of these experiments, as a few final measurements and calculations are still in progress.

  2. Update and evaluation of decay data for spent nuclear fuel analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Teodosi; Wemple, Charles

    2017-09-01

    Studsvik's approach to spent nuclear fuel analyses combines isotopic concentrations and multi-group cross-sections, calculated by the CASMO5 or HELIOS2 lattice transport codes, with core irradiation history data from the SIMULATE5 reactor core simulator and tabulated isotopic decay data. These data sources are used and processed by the code SNF to predict spent nuclear fuel characteristics. Recent advances in the generation procedure for the SNF decay data are presented. The SNF decay data includes basic data, such as decay constants, atomic masses and nuclide transmutation chains; radiation emission spectra for photons from radioactive decay, alpha-n reactions, bremsstrahlung, and spontaneous fission, electrons and alpha particles from radioactive decay, and neutrons from radioactive decay, spontaneous fission, and alpha-n reactions; decay heat production; and electro-atomic interaction data for bremsstrahlung production. These data are compiled from fundamental (ENDF, ENSDF, TENDL) and processed (ESTAR) sources for nearly 3700 nuclides. A rigorous evaluation procedure of internal consistency checks and comparisons to measurements and benchmarks, and code-to-code verifications is performed at the individual isotope level and using integral characteristics on a fuel assembly level (e.g., decay heat, radioactivity, neutron and gamma sources). Significant challenges are presented by the scope and complexity of the data processing, a dearth of relevant detailed measurements, and reliance on theoretical models for some data.

  3. Update and evaluation of decay data for spent nuclear fuel analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeonov Teodosi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studsvik’s approach to spent nuclear fuel analyses combines isotopic concentrations and multi-group cross-sections, calculated by the CASMO5 or HELIOS2 lattice transport codes, with core irradiation history data from the SIMULATE5 reactor core simulator and tabulated isotopic decay data. These data sources are used and processed by the code SNF to predict spent nuclear fuel characteristics. Recent advances in the generation procedure for the SNF decay data are presented. The SNF decay data includes basic data, such as decay constants, atomic masses and nuclide transmutation chains; radiation emission spectra for photons from radioactive decay, alpha-n reactions, bremsstrahlung, and spontaneous fission, electrons and alpha particles from radioactive decay, and neutrons from radioactive decay, spontaneous fission, and alpha-n reactions; decay heat production; and electro-atomic interaction data for bremsstrahlung production. These data are compiled from fundamental (ENDF, ENSDF, TENDL and processed (ESTAR sources for nearly 3700 nuclides. A rigorous evaluation procedure of internal consistency checks and comparisons to measurements and benchmarks, and code-to-code verifications is performed at the individual isotope level and using integral characteristics on a fuel assembly level (e.g., decay heat, radioactivity, neutron and gamma sources. Significant challenges are presented by the scope and complexity of the data processing, a dearth of relevant detailed measurements, and reliance on theoretical models for some data.

  4. Arrhenius Rate: constant volume burn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-06

    A constant volume burn occurs for an idealized initial state in which a large volume of reactants at rest is suddenly raised to a high temperature and begins to burn. Due to the uniform spatial state, there is no fluid motion and no heat conduction. This reduces the time evolu tion to an ODE for the reaction progress variable. With an Arrhenius reaction rate, two characteristics of thermal ignition are illustrated: induction time and thermal runaway. The Frank-Kamenetskii approximation then leads to a simple expression for the adiabatic induction time. For a first order reaction, the analytic solution is derived and used to illustrate the effect of varying the activation temperature; in particular, on the induction time. In general, the ODE can be solved numerically. This is used to illustrate the effect of varying the reaction order. We note that for a first order reaction, the time evolution of the reaction progress variable has an exponential tail. In contrast, for a reaction order less than one, the reaction completes in a nite time. The reaction order also affects the induction time.

  5. The investigation of CP violation through the decay of polarized tau leptons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Y.S.

    1996-03-01

    Under the assumption that CP violation is caused by exchange of a new boson, the author proposes to measure the magnitudes and CP-violating phases of the coupling constants of this boson to five different vertices in tau decay. This can be accomplished by studying the decays of polarized tau leptons produced at an e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} collider whose beams are polarized. He points out that CP violation in the tau decay tests most directly the assumption in the standard theory that the imaginary numbers in the mass matrix is the sole cause of CP violation.

  6. First observation of psi(2S)-->K_S K_L

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, J Z; Bian, J G; Cai, X; Chang, J F; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, H L; Dai, Y S; Deng, Z Y; Dong, L Y; Du, S X; Du, Z Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Fu, H Y; Fu, L P; Gao, C S; Gao, M L; Gao, Y N; Gong, M Y; Gong, W X; Gu, S D; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; Guo, Z J; Han, S W; Harris, F A; He, J; He, K L; He, M; He, X; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, L; Huang, X P; Ji, X B; Jia, Q Y; Jiang, C H; Jiang, X S; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jin, Y; Lai, Y F; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, Q J; Li, R B; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X Q; Li, X S; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Liu, H M; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Z X; Lu, G R; Lu, F; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Luo, X L; Ma, F C; Ma, J M; Ma, L L; Ma, X Y; Mao, Z P; Meng, X C; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Nie, Z D; Olsen, S L; Peng, H P; Qi, N D; Qian, C D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, F; Shi, X; Song, L W; Sun, H S; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tao, N; Tian, Y R; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, J Z; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S Z; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wei, C L; Wu, N; Wu, Y M; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xin, B; Xu, G F; Xu, H; Xu, Y; Xue, S T; Yan, M L; Yan, W B; Yang, F; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, S D; Yang, Y X; Yi, L H; Yi, Z Y; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yu, C S; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Yue, Q; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang Bing Yun; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J M; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J W; Zhang, L S; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang Xiao Min; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y J; Zhang, Y Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Q; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J B; Zhao, J W; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, X J; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, L S; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, X C; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G M; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zou, B S

    2003-01-01

    The decay psi(2S)-->K_S K_L is observed for the first time using psi(2S) data collected with the Beijing Spectrometer (BESII) at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC); the branching ratio is determined to be B(psi(2S)-->K_S K_L) = (5.24\\pm 0.47 \\pm 0.48)\\times 10^{-5}. Compared with J/psi-->K_S K_L, the psi(2S) branching ratio is enhanced relative to the prediction of the perturbative QCD ``12%'' rule. The result, together with the branching ratios of psi(2S) decays to other pseudoscalar meson pairs (\\pi^+\\pi^- and K^+K^-), is used to investigate the relative phase between the three-gluon and the one-photon annihilation amplitudes of psi(2S) decays.

  7. The fundamental constants and quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Barry N; Langenberg, D N

    1969-01-01

    Introduction ; review of experimental data ; least-squares adjustment to obtain values of the constants without QED theory ; implications for quantum electrodynamics ; final recommended set of fundamental constants ; summary and conclusions.

  8. Capacitive Cells for Dielectric Constant Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    A simple capacitive cell for dielectric constant measurement in liquids is presented. As an illustrative application, the cell is used for measuring the degradation of overheated edible oil through the evaluation of their dielectric constant.

  9. ESR melting under constant voltage conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlienger, M.E.

    1997-02-01

    Typical industrial ESR melting practice includes operation at a constant current. This constant current operation is achieved through the use of a power supply whose output provides this constant current characteristic. Analysis of this melting mode indicates that the ESR process under conditions of constant current is inherently unstable. Analysis also indicates that ESR melting under the condition of a constant applied voltage yields a process which is inherently stable. This paper reviews the process stability arguments for both constant current and constant voltage operation. Explanations are given as to why there is a difference between the two modes of operation. Finally, constant voltage process considerations such as melt rate control, response to electrode anomalies and impact on solidification will be discussed.

  10. A method for an improved measurement of the electron-antineutrino correlation in free neutron beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wietfeldt, F.E. [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States)]. E-mail: few@tulane.edu; Fisher, B.M. [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Trull, C. [Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States); Jones, G.L. [Physics Department, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323 (United States); Collet, B. [Physics Department, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323 (United States); Goldin, L. [Physics Department, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Yerozolimsky, B.G. [Physics Department, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Wilson, R. [Physics Department, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Balashov, S. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Mostovoy, Yu. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Komives, A. [Physics Department, DePauw University, Greencastle, IN 46135 (United States); Leuschner, M. [Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Byrne, J. [University of Sussex (United Kingdom); Bateman, F.B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Dewey, M.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Nico, J.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Thompson, A.K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2005-06-11

    The angular correlation between the beta electron and antineutrino in nuclear beta decay is characterized by the dimensionless parameter a. The value of a for free neutron decay, when combined with other neutron decay parameters, can be used to determine the weak vector and axial vector coupling constants g{sub V} and g{sub A} and test the validity and self-consistency of the Electroweak Standard Model. Previous experiments that measured a in neutron decay relied on precise proton spectroscopy and were limited by systematic effects at about the 5% level. We present a new approach to measuring a for which systematic uncertainties promise to be much smaller.

  11. Critical survey of stability constants of EDTA complexes critical evaluation of equilibrium constants in solution stability constants of metal complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Anderegg, G

    2013-01-01

    Critical Survey of Stability Constants of EDTA Complexes focuses on the computations, values, and characteristics of stability constants. The book emphasizes that for a critical discussion of experimentally determined stability constants, it is important to consider the precision of the values that manifests the self-consistency of the constant, taking into consideration the random errors. The publication reviews the stability constants of metal complexes. The numerical calculations affirm the reactions and transformations of metal ions when exposed to varying conditions. The text also present

  12. Surprises in numerical expressions of physical constants

    OpenAIRE

    Amir, Ariel; Lemeshko, Mikhail; Tokieda, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    In science, as in life, `surprises' can be adequately appreciated only in the presence of a null model, what we expect a priori. In physics, theories sometimes express the values of dimensionless physical constants as combinations of mathematical constants like pi or e. The inverse problem also arises, whereby the measured value of a physical constant admits a `surprisingly' simple approximation in terms of well-known mathematical constants. Can we estimate the probability for this to be a me...

  13. Searching for Kaprekar's constants: algorithms and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron L. Walden

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine some new results on Kaprekar's constants, specifically establishing the unique 7-digit (in base 4 and 9-digit (in base 5 Kaprekar's constants and showing that there are no 15-, 21-, 27-, or 33-digit Kaprekar's constants.

  14. Untangling Fixed Effects and Constant Regressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, F.; Teulings, R.

    2015-01-01

    Fixed effects (FE) in panel data models overlap each other and prohibit the identification of the impact of "constant" regressors. Think of regressors that are constant across countries in a country-time panel with time FE. The traditional approach is to drop some FE and constant regressors by

  15. In-trap decay spectroscopy for {beta}{beta} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Thomas

    2011-01-18

    The presented work describes the implementation of a new technique to measure electron-capture (EC) branching ratios (BRs) of intermediate nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. This technique has been developed at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada. It facilitates one of TRIUMF's Ion Traps for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN), the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) that is used as a spectroscopy Penning trap. Radioactive ions, produced at the radioactive isotope facility ISAC, are injected and stored in the spectroscopy Penning trap while their decays are observed. A key feature of this technique is the use of a strong magnetic field, required for trapping. It radially confines electrons from {beta} decays along the trap axis while X-rays, following an EC, are emitted isotropically. This provides spatial separation of X-ray and {beta} detection with almost no {beta}-induced background at the X-ray detector, allowing weak EC branches to be measured. Furthermore, the combination of several traps allows one to isobarically clean the sample prior to the in-trap decay spectroscopy measurement. This technique has been developed to measure ECBRs of transition nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. Detailed knowledge of these electron capture branches is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying nuclear physics in {beta}{beta} decays. These branches are typically of the order of 10{sup -5} and therefore difficult to measure. Conventional measurements suffer from isobaric contamination and a dominating {beta} background at theX-ray detector. Additionally, X-rays are attenuated by the material where the radioactive sample is implanted. To overcome these limitations, the technique of in-trap decay spectroscopy has been developed. In this work, the EBIT was connected to the TITAN beam line and has been commissioned. Using the developed beam diagnostics, ions were injected into the Penning trap and systematic studies on injection and storage optimization were performed. Furthermore, Ge

  16. Producing the deuteron in stars: anthropic limits on fundamental constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Luke A.; Lewis, Geraint F.

    2017-07-01

    Stellar nucleosynthesis proceeds via the deuteron (D), but only a small change in the fundamental constants of nature is required to unbind it. Here, we investigate the effect of altering the binding energy of the deuteron on proton burning in stars. We find that the most definitive boundary in parameter space that divides probably life-permitting universes from probably life-prohibiting ones is between a bound and unbound deuteron. Due to neutrino losses, a ball of gas will undergo rapid cooling or stabilization by electron degeneracy pressure before it can form a stable, nuclear reaction-sustaining star. We also consider a less-bound deuteron, which changes the energetics of the pp and pep reactions. The transition to endothermic pp and pep reactions, and the resulting beta-decay instability of the deuteron, do not seem to present catastrophic problems for life.

  17. The Decay Data Evaluation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, E.

    1999-10-01

    Nuclear scientists from France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States have joined their efforts to evaluate decay data for radionuclides specifically used in applied research and detector calibrations. The purpose of this collaboration, the Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP), is to produce recommended values, and to suggest new measurements for data that are unsatisfactory. Uniformity and reproducibility are features of importance for this work. These features, as well as the general scope of this project and its relation to the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) will be presented and illustrated with examples. This work is presented on behalf of the Decay Data Evaluation Project. Work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under contract number DEAC03-76SF00098.

  18. Decay spectroscopy of $^{178}$Au

    CERN Document Server

    Whitmore, B

    In this thesis, the neutron-deficient nucleus $^{178}$Au is investigated through decay spectroscopy. Si and HPGe detectors were used to analyse the decay radiation of $^{178}$Au and its daughter nuclei. Previous studies have been unable to distinguish decay radiation from different isomeric states of this nucleus. This thesis represents the first time such isomeric discrimination has been achieved, and presents tentative spin assignments of both the ground state and an isomer. The neutron-deficient gold isotopes are an area of interest for the study of shape coexistence. This is the phenomenon exhibited by nuclei able to exist at a number of close lying energy minima, each reflecting a distinct type of deformation. It is hoped that studies such as this can help identify the evolution of nuclear deformation in this region of the nuclear chart.

  19. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs.

  20. Resonant Auger decay driving intermolecular Coulombic decay in molecular dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinter, F; Schöffler, M S; Kim, H-K; Sturm, F P; Cole, K; Neumann, N; Vredenborg, A; Williams, J; Bocharova, I; Guillemin, R; Simon, M; Belkacem, A; Landers, A L; Weber, Th; Schmidt-Böcking, H; Dörner, R; Jahnke, T

    2014-01-30

    In 1997, it was predicted that an electronically excited atom or molecule placed in a loosely bound chemical system (such as a hydrogen-bonded or van-der-Waals-bonded cluster) could efficiently decay by transferring its excess energy to a neighbouring species that would then emit a low-energy electron. This intermolecular Coulombic decay (ICD) process has since been shown to be a common phenomenon, raising questions about its role in DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, in which low-energy electrons are known to play an important part. It was recently suggested that ICD can be triggered efficiently and site-selectively by resonantly core-exciting a target atom, which then transforms through Auger decay into an ionic species with sufficiently high excitation energy to permit ICD to occur. Here we show experimentally that resonant Auger decay can indeed trigger ICD in dimers of both molecular nitrogen and carbon monoxide. By using ion and electron momentum spectroscopy to measure simultaneously the charged species created in the resonant-Auger-driven ICD cascade, we find that ICD occurs in less time than the 20 femtoseconds it would take for individual molecules to undergo dissociation. Our experimental confirmation of this process and its efficiency may trigger renewed efforts to develop resonant X-ray excitation schemes for more localized and targeted cancer radiation therapy.

  1. Rate constant and thermochemistry for K + O2 + N2 = KO2 + N2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorvajärvi, Tapio; Viljanen, Jan; Toivonen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    in the form of double exponential decays of [K], which yielded both kR1 and the equilibrium constant for KO2 formation. kR1 can be summarized as 1.07 × 10-30(T/1000 K)-0.733 cm6 molecule-2 s-1. Combination with literature values leads to a recommended kR1 of 5.5 × 10-26T-1.55 exp(-10/T) cm6 molecule-2 s-1...... line width diode laser. Experiments were carried out with O2/N2 mixtures at a total pressure of 1 bar, over 748-1323 K. At the lower temperatures single exponential decays of [K] yielded the third-order rate constant for addition, kR1, whereas at higher temperatures equilibration was observed...

  2. Reaction rate constant of HO2+O3 measured by detecting HO2 from photofragment fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzanares, E. R.; Suto, Masako; Lee, Long C.; Coffey, Dewitt, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A room-temperature discharge-flow system investigation of the rate constant for the reaction 'HO2 + O3 yields OH + 2O2' has detected HO2 through the OH(A-X) fluorescence produced by photodissociative excitation of HO2 at 147 nm. A reaction rate constant of 1.9 + or - 0.3 x 10 to the -15th cu cm/molecule per sec is obtained from first-order decay of HO2 in excess O3; this agrees well with published data.

  3. Random numbers spring from alpha decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigerio, N.A.; Sanathanan, L.P.; Morley, M.; Clark, N.A.; Tyler, S.A.

    1980-05-01

    Congruential random number generators, which are widely used in Monte Carlo simulations, are deficient in that the number they generate are concentrated in a relatively small number of hyperplanes. While this deficiency may not be a limitation in small Monte Carlo studies involving a few variables, it introduces a significant bias in large simulations requiring high resolution. This bias was recognized and assessed during preparations for an accident analysis study of nuclear power plants. This report describes a random number device based on the radioactive decay of alpha particles from a /sup 235/U source in a high-resolution gas proportional counter. The signals were fed to a 4096-channel analyzer and for each channel the frequency of signals registered in a 20,000-microsecond interval was recorded. The parity bits of these frequency counts (0 for an even count and 1 for an odd count) were then assembled in sequence to form 31-bit binary random numbers and transcribed to a magnetic tape. This cycle was repeated as many times as were necessary to create 3 million random numbers. The frequency distribution of counts from the present device conforms to the Brockwell-Moyal distribution, which takes into account the dead time of the counter (both the dead time and decay constant of the underlying Poisson process were estimated). Analysis of the count data and tests of randomness on a sample set of the 31-bit binary numbers indicate that this random number device is a highly reliable source of truly random numbers. Its use is, therefore, recommended in Monte Carlo simulations for which the congruential pseudorandom number generators are found to be inadequate. 6 figures, 5 tables.

  4. Uniform Decay for Solutions of an Axially Moving Viscoelastic Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelleche, Abdelkarim, E-mail: kellecheabdelkarim@gmail.com [Université des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Faculté des Mathématiques (Algeria); Tatar, Nasser-eddine, E-mail: tatarn@Kfupm.edu.sa [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Department of Mathematics and Statistics (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-06-15

    The paper deals with an axially moving viscoelastic structure modeled as an Euler–Bernoulli beam. The aim is to suppress the transversal displacement (transversal vibrations) that occur during the axial motion of the beam. It is assumed that the beam is moving with a constant axial speed and it is subject to a nonlinear force at the right boundary. We prove that when the axial speed of the beam is smaller than a critical value, the dissipation produced by the viscoelastic material is sufficient to suppress the transversal vibrations. It is shown that the rate of decay of the energy depends on the kernel which arise in the viscoelastic term. We consider a general kernel and notice that solutions cannot decay faster than the kernel.

  5. Streamwise decay of localized states in channel flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zammert, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Channel flow, the pressure driven flow between parallel plates, has exact coherent structures that show various degrees of localization. For states which are localized in streamwise direction but extended in spanwise direction, we show that they are exponentially localized, with decay constants that are different on the upstream and downstream side. We extend the analysis of Brand and Gibson, J. Fluid Mech. 750, R1 (2014), for stationary states to the case of advected structures that is needed here, and derive expressions for the decay in terms of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of certain second order differential equations. The results are in very good agreement with observations on exact coherent structures of different transversal wave length.

  6. Beta-decay branching ratios of {sup 62}Ga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bey, A.; Blank, B.; Canchel, G.; Dossat, C.; Giovinazzo, J.; Matea, I. [Universite Bordeaux 1 - UMR 5797 CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, Gradignan Cedex (France); Elomaa, V.V.; Eronen, T.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilae, H.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Saastamoinen, A.; Sonoda, T.; Aeystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Adimi, N. [Faculte de Physique, USTHB, El Alia, B.P. 32, Bab Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria); France, G. de; Thomas, J.C.; Voltolini, G. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM - CNRS/IN2P3, B.P. 55027, Caen Cedex 5 (France)

    2008-05-15

    Beta-decay branching ratios of {sup 62}Ga have been measured at the IGISOL facility of the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyvaeskylae. {sup 62}Ga is one of the heavier T{sub z}=0, 0{sup +}{yields}0{sup +}{beta}-emitting nuclides used to determine the vector coupling constant of the weak interaction and the V{sub ud} quark-mixing matrix element. For part of the experimental studies presented here, the JYFLTRAP facility has been employed to prepare isotopically pure beams of {sup 62}Ga. The branching ratio obtained, BR=99.893(24) %, for the super-allowed branch is in agreement with previous measurements and allows to determine the ft value and the universal Ft value for the super-allowed {beta} -decay of {sup 62}Ga. (orig.)

  7. Optimal micronutrients delay mitochondrial decay and age-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Bruce N

    2010-01-01

    Three of our research efforts are reviewed, which suggest that optimizing metabolism will delay aging and the diseases of aging in humans. (1) Research on delay of the mitochondrial decay of aging by supplementing rats with lipoic acid and acetyl carnitine. (2) The triage theory, which posits that modest micronutrient deficiencies (common in much of the population) accelerate molecular aging, including mitochondrial decay, and supportive evidence, including an analysis in depth of vitamin K, that suggests the importance of achieving optimal micronutrient intake for longevity. (3) The finding that decreased enzyme binding constants (increased Km) for coenzymes (or substrates) can result from protein deformation and loss of function due to loss of membrane fluidity with age, or to polymorphisms or mutation. The loss of enzyme function can be ameliorated by high doses of a B vitamin, which raises coenzyme levels, and indicates the importance of understanding the effects of age, or polymorphisms, on micronutrient requirements. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurement of the Michel Parameters in Leptonic Tau Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Doucet, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    The Michel parameters of the leptonic tau decays are measured using the OPAL detector at LEP. The Michel parameters are extracted from the energy spectra of the charged decay leptons and from their energy-energy correlations. A new method involving a global likelihood fit of Monte Carlo generated events with complete detector simulation and background treatment has been applied to the data recorded at center-of-mass energies close to sqrt(s) = M(Z) corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 155 pb-1 during the years 1990 to 1995. If e-mu universality is assumed and inferring the tau polarization from neutral current data, the measured Michel parameters are extracted. Limits on non-standard coupling constants and on the masses of new gauge bosons are obtained. The results are in agreement with the V-A prediction of the Standard Model.

  9. Two-loop QCD corrections to Bc meson leptonic decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-Bin Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The two-loop quantum chromodynamics (QCD radiative corrections to the Bc meson leptonic decay rate are calculated in the framework of the non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD factorization formalism. Two types of master integrals appearing in the calculation are obtained analytically for the first time. We calculate the short-distance coefficient of the leading matrix element to order αs2 by matching the full perturbative QCD calculation results to the corresponding NRQCD results. The result presented in this work helps the evaluation of both the Bc leptonic decay constant and the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa (CKM matrix element |Vcb| to the full next-to-next-to-leading-order (NNLO degree of accuracy.

  10. Superheavy elements and decay properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-04

    Aug 4, 2015 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 85; Issue 3. Superheavy elements and decay properties. K P Santhosh. Volume 85 Issue 3 ... Author Affiliations. K P Santhosh1. School of Pure and Applied Physics, Kannur University, Swami Anandatheertha Campus, Payyanur 670 327, India ...

  11. Observations of offshore bar decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Kroon, Aart; Greenwood, Brian

    2010-01-01

    the upper shoreface, and finally a stage of decaying bar form through loss of sediment volume at the outer boundary of the upper shoreface. The phenomenon has been previously documented in the Netherlands, the USA, the Canadian Great Lakes, and in New Zealand, but our present understanding...

  12. Superheavy elements and decay properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S) are the one-dimensional slab-on-slab function. 3. Results and discussions. The Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN) was used to evaluate the α decay properties of the isotopes of the SHN with Z = 115, ...

  13. Rare decays of b hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Koppenburg, Patrick; Smizanska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Rare decays of b hadrons provide a powerful way of identifying contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model, in particular from new hypothetical particles too heavy to be produced at colliders. The most relevant experimental measurements are reviewed and possible interpretations are briefly discussed.

  14. Rare pion and kaon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryman, D.

    1984-05-01

    Some rare pion and kaon decays, which provide clues to the generation puzzle, are discussed. The ..pi.. ..-->.. e ..nu../..pi.. ..-->.. ..mu nu.. branching ratio test of universality and the status of searches for K/sup +/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..nu..nu-bar are reviewed.

  15. Rare pion and kaon decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryman, Douglas

    1984-05-01

    Some rare pion and kaon decays, which provide clues to the generation puzzle, are discussed. The π → e ν/π → μν branching ratio test of universality and the status of searches for K+ → π+νν¯ are reviewed.

  16. Rare B decays at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrington, Sinead M.; /Liverpool U.

    2006-10-01

    The confidence level limits of the CDF search for the B{sub s}{sup 0} and B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} rare decays and the branching ratio measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +} D{sub s}{sup -} are presented.

  17. Salt decay of Morley limestone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Van Hees, R.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Salt weathering is one of the main causes of decay of natural stone, and by consequence a major problem to the conservation of cultural heritage. In the present case, the performance of Morley limestone from the Département Meuse, France, as a replacement stone under saltloaded conditions is

  18. Hadronic decays of $W$ bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkinson, III, Richard Paul [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    We present evidence for hadronic W decays in t$\\bar{t}$ → lepton + neutrino + ≥ 4 jet events using a 109 pb -1 data sample of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.8 TeV collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF).

  19. Axiomatic approach to the cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian

    2009-09-01

    A theory of the cosmological constant Λ is currently out of reach. Still, one can start from a set of axioms that describe the most desirable properties a cosmological constant should have. This can be seen in certain analogy to the Khinchin axioms in information theory, which fix the most desirable properties an information measure should have and that ultimately lead to the Shannon entropy as the fundamental information measure on which statistical mechanics is based. Here we formulate a set of axioms for the cosmological constant in close analogy to the Khinchin axioms, formally replacing the dependence of the information measure on probabilities of events by a dependence of the cosmological constant on the fundamental constants of nature. Evaluating this set of axioms one finally arrives at a formula for the cosmological constant given by Λ=1ħG(, where G is the gravitational constant, me the electron mass, and α the low-energy limit of the fine structure constant. This formula is in perfect agreement with current WMAP data. Our approach gives physical meaning to the Eddington-Dirac large-number hypothesis and suggests that the observed value of the cosmological constant is not at all unnatural.

  20. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastase, Horatiu, E-mail: nastase@ift.unesp.br [Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271, Bl. II, Sao Paulo 01140-070, SP (Brazil); Weltman, Amanda, E-mail: amanda.weltman@uct.ac.za [Astrophysics, Cosmology & Gravity Center, Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa)

    2015-07-30

    We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru–Kallosh–Linde–Trivedi (KKLT)-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why Λ is so small, yet nonzero) and the coincidence problem (why Λ is comparable to the matter density now)

  1. A natural cosmological constant from chameleons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horatiu Nastase

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple model where the effective cosmological constant appears from chameleon scalar fields. For a Kachru–Kallosh–Linde–Trivedi (KKLT-inspired form of the potential and a particular chameleon coupling to the local density, patches of approximately constant scalar field potential cluster around regions of matter with density above a certain value, generating the effect of a cosmological constant on large scales. This construction addresses both the cosmological constant problem (why Λ is so small, yet nonzero and the coincidence problem (why Λ is comparable to the matter density now.

  2. Observation of Pseudoscalar and Axial Vector Resonances in pi- p -> K+ K- pi0 n at 18 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.S. Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J.M. Bishop; V.A. Bodyagin; D.S. Brown; N.M. Cason; S.U. Chung; J.P. Cummings; K. Danyo; A.I. Demianov; S. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J.P. Dowd; P. Eugenio; X.L. Fan; A.M. Gribushin; R.W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; J. Hu; E.I. Ivanov; D. Joffe; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O.L. Kodolova; V.L. Korotkikh; M.A. Kostin; Joachim Kuhn; V. Lipaev; J.M. Losecco; M. Lu; J.J. Manak; J. Napolitano; M. Nozar; C. Olchanski; A.I. Ostrovidov; T.K. Pedlar; A. Popov; D. Ryabchikov; A.H. Sanjari; L.I. Sarycheva; K.K. Seth; N. Shenhav; X. Shen; W.D. Shephard; N.B. Sinev; D.L. Stienike; S.A. Taegar; D.R. Thompson; A. Tomaradze; I.N. Vardanyan; D.P. Weygand; D. White; H.J. Willutzki; A.A. Yershov

    2001-09-01

    The number of pseudoscalar mesons in the mass range from 1400 to 1500 MeV/c{sup 2} has been a subject of considerable interest for many years, with several experiments having presented evidence for two closely spaced states. A new measurement of the reaction {pi}{sup -} p {yields} K{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}n has been made at a beam energy of 18 GeV. A partial wave analysis of the K{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup 0} system shows evidence for three pseudoscalar resonances, {eta}(1295), {eta}(1416), and {eta}(1485), as well as two axial vectors, f{sub 1}(1285), and f{sub 1}(1420). Their observed masses, widths and decay properties are reported. No signal was observed for C(1480), an I{sub G} J{sup PC} = 1{sup +} 1{sup --} state previously reported in {phi}{pi}{sup 0} decay.

  3. Test of fundamental symmetries via the Primakoff effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Liping

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The three neutral pseudoscalar mesons, π0, η and η′, represent one of the most interesting systems in strong interaction physics. A study of the electromagnetic properties of these mesons provides a sensitive probe of the symmetry structure of QCD at low energy. A comprehensive experimental program at Jefferson Laboratory (Jlab is aimed at gathering high precision measurements on the two-photon decay widths and transition form factors at low Q2 of π0, η and η′ via the Primakoff effect. The completed experiments on the π0 radiative decay width at Jlab 6 GeV, and other planned measurements at Jlab 12 GeV will provide a rich laboratory to test the chiral anomaly and to study the origin and dynamics of chiral symmetry breaking at the confinement scale of QCD.

  4. A streamwise-constant model of turbulent pipe flow

    CERN Document Server

    Bourguignon, Jean-Loup

    2011-01-01

    A streamwise-constant model is presented to investigate the basic mechanisms responsible for the change in mean flow occuring during pipe flow transition. Using a single forced momentum balance equation, we show that the shape of the velocity profile is robust to changes in the forcing profile and that both linear non-normal and nonlinear effects are required to capture the change in mean flow associated with transition to turbulence. The particularly simple form of the model allows for the study of the momentum transfer directly by inspection of the equations. The distribution of the high- and low-speed streaks over the cross-section of the pipe produced by our model is remarkably similar to one observed in the velocity field near the trailing edge of the puff structures present in pipe flow transition. Under stochastic forcing, the model exhibits a quasi-periodic self-sustaining cycle characterized by the creation and subsequent decay of "streamwise-constant puffs", so-called due to the good agreement betwe...

  5. Measurement of A and B coefficients in the decay of polarized neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Carl Jørgen; Krohn, V.E.; Ringo, G.R.

    1969-01-01

    The coefficients found were A = −0.115 ± 0.008 and B = 1.01 ± 0.04. The value of A leads to |GA/GV| = = 1.26 ± 0.02 for the ratio of coupling constants in beta decay, and B is consistent with GS = GT = 0....

  6. The investigation of CP violation through the decay of polarized tau leptons II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Y.S.

    1996-05-01

    Under the assumption that CP violation is caused by exchange of anew boson, the authors propose to measure the magnitudes and CP-violating phases of the coupling constants of this boson to five different vertices in tau decay. This can be accomplished by studying the decay of polarized tau leptons produced at an e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider whose beams are polarized. These five coupling constants could be used to construct a future theory of CP violation. If CP is violated in any channel of tau decay, it will imply that there exists a new charged boson other than the W boson responsible for CP violation. It will also imply that CP violation is much more prevalent than the standard theory predicts and this may enable one to understand the preponderance of matter over antimatter in the present universe.

  7. Rare decay π0→e+e-: Theory confronts KTeV data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorokhov, Alexander E.; Ivanov, Mikhail A.

    2007-06-01

    Within the dispersive approach to the amplitude of the rare decay π0→e+e- the nontrivial dynamics is contained only in the subtraction constant. We express this constant, in the leading order in (me/Λ)2 perturbative series, in terms of the inverse moment of the pion transition form factor given in symmetric kinematics. By using the CELLO and CLEO data on the pion transition form factor given in asymmetric kinematics, the lower bound of the decay branching ratio is found. The restrictions following from QCD allow us to make a quantitative prediction for the branching B(π0→e+e-)=(6.2±0.1)·10-8 which is 3σ below the recent KTeV measurement. We confirm our prediction by using the quark models and phenomenological approaches based on the vector meson dominance. The decays η→l+l- are also discussed.

  8. Mathematical analysis of the Photovoltage Decay (PVD) method for minority carrier lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonroos, O. H.

    1982-01-01

    When the diffusion length of minority carriers becomes comparable with or larger than the thickness of a p-n junction solar cell, the characteristic decay of the photon-generated voltage results from a mixture of contributions with different time constants. The minority carrier recombination lifetime tau and the time constant l(2)/D, where l is essentially the thickness of the cell and D the minority carrier diffusion length, determine the signal as a function of time. It is shown that for ordinary solar cells (n(+)-p junctions), particularly when the diffusion length L of the minority carriers is larger than the cell thickness l, the excess carrier density decays according to exp (-t/tau-pi(2)Dt/4l(2)), tau being the lifetime. Therefore, tau can be readily determined by the photovoltage decay method once D and L are known.

  9. Mechanism of the Decay of Thymine Triplets in DNA Single Strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilles, Bert M; Bucher, Dominik B; Liu, Lizhe; Clivio, Pascale; Gilch, Peter; Zinth, Wolfgang; Schreier, Wolfgang J

    2014-05-01

    The decay of triplet states and the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) after UV excitation of the all-thymine oligomer (dT)18 and the locked dinucleotide TLpTL were studied by nanosecond IR spectroscopy. IR marker bands characteristic for the CPD lesion and the triplet state were observed from ∼1 ns (time resolution of the setup) onward. The amplitudes of the CPD marker bands remain constant throughout the time range covered (up to 10 μs). The triplet decays with a time constant of ∼10 ns presumably via a biradical intermediate (lifetime ∼60 ns). This biradical has often been invoked as an intermediate for CPD formation via the triplet channel. The present results lend strong support to the existence of this intermediate, yet there is no indication that its decay contributes significantly to CPD formation.

  10. Constant Width Planar Computation Characterizes ACC0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    We obtain a characterization of ACC 0 in terms of a natural class of constant width circuits, namely in terms of constant width polynomial size planar circuits. This is shown via a characterization of the class of acyclic digraphs which can be embedded on a cylinder surface in such a way that all...

  11. Stability constants for silicate adsorbed to ferrihydrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun; Wetche, T.P.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    1994-01-01

    Intrinsic surface acidity constants (K(a1)intr, K(a2)intr) and surface complexation constant for adsorption of orthosilicate onto synthetic ferrihydrite (K(Si) for the complex = FeOSi(OH)3) have been determined from acid/base titrations in 0.001-0.1 m NaClO4 electrolytes and silicate adsorption e...

  12. The case for the cosmological constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I present a short overview of current observational results and theoretical models for a cosmological constant. The main motivation for invoking a small cosmological constant (or -term) at the present epoch has to do with observations of high redshift Type Ia supernovae which suggest an accelerating universe.

  13. The case for the cosmological constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. I present a short overview of current observational results and theoretical models for a cosmological constant. The main motivation for invoking a small cosmological constant (orA-term) at the present epoch has to do with observations of high redshift Type Ia supernovae which suggest an accelerating universe.

  14. DETERMINATION OF STABILITY CONSTANTS OF MANGANESE (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Keywords: Amino acids, dissociation constant, potentiometry, stability constant. INTRODUCTION. Acids – base titration involves the gradual addition or removal of protons for example using the deprotic form of glycine. The plot has two distinct stages corresponding to the deprotonation of the two different groups on glycine.

  15. Some zero-sum constants with weights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 118; Issue 2. Some Zero-Sum Constants with Weights. S D Adhikari ... Motivated by some recent developments around the notion of Davenport constant with weights, we study them in some basic cases. We also define a new combinatorial invariant related to ...

  16. Fullerene derivatives with increased dielectric constants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jahani, Fatemeh; Torabi, Solmaz; Chiechi, Ryan C; Koster, L Jan Anton; Hummelen, Jan C

    2014-01-01

    The invention of new organic materials with high dielectric constants is of extreme importance for the development of organic-based devices such as organic solar cells. We report on a synthetic way to increase the dielectric constant of fullerene derivatives. It is demonstrated that introducing

  17. Electromechanical systems generating constant frequency alternating current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т.А. Мазур

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available  In the article we consider the usage of electromechanical drivers of constant speed rotation, which is based on many stepped electrodynamic reduction unit, in onboard main systems of electric supply of alternative current with constant frequency.

  18. Shapley value for constant-sum games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khmelnitskaya, Anna Borisovna

    2003-01-01

    It is proved that Young’s [4] axiomatization for the Shapley value by marginalism, efficiency, and symmetry is still valid for the Shapley value defined on the class of nonnegative constant-sum games with nonzero worth of grand coalition and on the entire class of constant-sum games as well.

  19. Chromaticity decay due to superconducting dipoles on the injection plateau of the Large Hadron Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Aquilina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that in a superconducting accelerator a significant chromaticity drift can be induced by the decay of the sextupolar component of the main dipoles. In this paper we give a brief overview of what was expected for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC on the grounds of magnetic measurements of individual dipoles carried out during the production. According to this analysis, the decay time constants were of the order of 200 s: since the injection in the LHC starts at least 30 minutes after the magnets are at constant current, the dynamic correction of this effect was not considered to be necessary. The first beam measurements of chromaticity showed significant decay even after a few hours. For this reason, a dynamic correction of decay on the injection plateau was implemented based on beam measurements. This means that during the injection plateau the sextupole correctors are powered with a varying current to cancel out the decay of the dipoles. This strategy has been implemented successfully. A similar phenomenon has been observed for the dependence of the decay amplitude on the powering history of the dipoles: according to magnetic measurements, also in this case time constants are of the order of 200 s and therefore no difference is expected between a one hour or a ten hours flattop. On the other hand, the beam measurements show a significant change of decay for these two conditions. For the moment there is no clue of the origin of these discrepancies. We give a complete overview of the two effects, and the modifications that have been done to the field model parameters to be able to obtain a final chromaticity correction within a few units.

  20. Electroweak radiative corrections in Z-boson decays

    CERN Document Server

    Vysotsky, M I; Okun, Lev Borisovich; Rozanov, A N

    1996-01-01

    We present a detailed review of the electroweak radiative corrections to the Z-boson decay, in the framework of the minimal standard model (MSM). After a short historical introduction, we describe the optimal parametrization of the MSM, especially of the Born approximation, and derive expressions for the one-loop electroweak corrections. Finally a global fit of all relevant experimental data is performed, resulting in fitted values of the t-quark mass, m/sub t/, and strong coupling constant alpha /sub s/. The allowed range for the value of the Higgs boson mass, m/sub H/, is discussed. Various details of calculations are described in 16 appendices. (83 refs).

  1. Power Spectrum Analyses of Nuclear Decay Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Javorsek, D.; Sturrock, P. A.; Lasenby, R. N.; Lasenby, A. N.; Buncher, J. B.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, J. T.; Hoft, A. W.; Horan, T. J.; Jenkins, J. H.; Kerford, J. L.; Lee, R.H.; Longman, A.; Mattes, J. J.; Morreale, B. L.

    2010-01-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay data displaying annually varying periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data were obtained from three distinct data sets: Si-32 and (CI)-C-36 decays reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Mn-56 decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), but also performed at BNL, and Ra-226 decay reported...

  2. Graviton fluctuations erase the cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, C.

    2017-10-01

    Graviton fluctuations induce strong non-perturbative infrared renormalization effects for the cosmological constant. The functional renormalization flow drives a positive cosmological constant towards zero, solving the cosmological constant problem without the need to tune parameters. We propose a simple computation of the graviton contribution to the flow of the effective potential for scalar fields. Within variable gravity, with effective Planck mass proportional to the scalar field, we find that the potential increases asymptotically at most quadratically with the scalar field. The solutions of the derived cosmological equations lead to an asymptotically vanishing cosmological ;constant; in the infinite future, providing for dynamical dark energy in the present cosmological epoch. Beyond a solution of the cosmological constant problem, our simplified computation also entails a sizeable positive graviton-induced anomalous dimension for the quartic Higgs coupling in the ultraviolet regime, substantiating the successful prediction of the Higgs boson mass within the asymptotic safety scenario for quantum gravity.

  3. Chlorine decay and trihalomethane formation following ferrate(VI) preoxidation and chlorination of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cong; Luo, Feng; Dong, Feilong; Zhao, Jingguo; Zhang, Tuqiao; He, Guilin; Cizmas, Leslie; Sharma, Virender K

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the effect of preoxidation with ferrate(VI) (FeVIO42-, Fe(VI)) prior to chlorination on chlorine decay and formation of disinfection by-products in filtered raw water from a full-scale drinking water treatment plant. The rate of chlorine decay became significantly faster as the concentration of ferrate(VI) increased. Chlorine degradation followed two first-order decay reactions with rate constants k1 and k2 for fast and slow decay, respectively. Kinetic modeling established the relationships between k1 and k2 and varying dosages of chlorine and ferrate(VI). When ferrate(VI) was used as a pre-oxidant, the levels of trihalomethanes (trichloromethane (TCM), dichlorobromomethane (DCBM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and tribromomethane (TBM)) in water samples decreased as the ferrate(VI) concentration increased. The concentrations of these trihalomethanes followed the order TCM > DCBM ≈ DBCM > TBM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nonexponential sound decay in concert halls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanev, N. G.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents acoustic measurement results for two concert halls in which nonexponential sound decay is observed. Quantitative estimates are given for how the obtained decay laws differ from exponential. Problems are discussed that arise when using reverberation time to assess the quality of room acoustics with nonexponential sound decay.

  5. CP-violations in B decays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recent results on CP-violation measurements in decays from energy asymmetric -factory experiments are reported. Thanks to large accumulated data samples, CP-violations in decays in mixing-decay interference and direct CP-violation are now firmly established. The measurements of three angles of the unitarity ...

  6. Decay of eigenfunctions of elliptic PDE's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Ira; Skibsted, Erik

    We study exponential decay of eigenfunctions of self-adjoint higher order elliptic operators on Rd. We show that the possible critical decay rates are determined algebraically. In addition we show absence of super-exponentially decaying eigenfunctions and a refined exponential upper bound....

  7. The event generator DECAY4 for simulation of double beta processes and decay of radioactive nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ponkratenko, O A; Zdesenko, Y G; Zdesenko, Yu.G.

    2000-01-01

    The computer code DECAY4 is developed to generate initial energy, time and angular distributions of particles emitted in radioactive decays of nuclides and nuclear (atomic) deexcitations. Data for description of nuclear and atomic decay schemes are taken from the ENSDF and EADL database libraries. The examples of use of the DECAY4 code in several underground experiments are described.

  8. The event generator DECAY4 for simulation of double beta processes and decay of radioactive nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Ponkratenko, O. A.; Tretyak, V I; Zdesenko, Yu. G.

    2001-01-01

    The computer code DECAY4 is developed to generate initial energy, time and angular distributions of particles emitted in radioactive decays of nuclides and nuclear (atomic) deexcitations. Data for description of nuclear and atomic decay schemes are taken from the ENSDF and EADL database libraries. The examples of use of the DECAY4 code in several underground experiments are described.

  9. Decay data evaluation project (DDEP): updated evaluations of the 233Th and 241Am decay characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechev, Valery P; Kuzmenko, Nikolay K

    2010-01-01

    The results of new decay data evaluations are presented for (233)Th (beta(-)) decay to nuclear levels in (233)Pa and (241)Am (alpha) decay to nuclear levels in (237)Np. These evaluated data have been obtained within the Decay Data Evaluation Project using information published up to 2009. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Decay of Ultralight Axion Condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eby, Joshua; Ma, Michael; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C.R.

    2017-05-15

    Axion particles can form macroscopic condensates, whose size can be galactic in scale for models with very small axion masses $m\\sim10^{-22}$ eV, and which are sometimes referred to under the name of Fuzzy Dark Matter. Many analyses of these condensates are done in the non-interacting limit, due to the weakness of the self-interaction coupling of axions. We investigate here how certain results change upon inclusion of these interactions, finding a decreased maximum mass and a modified mass-radius relationship. Further, these condensates are, in general, unstable to decay through number-changing interactions. We analyze the stability of galaxy-sized condensates of axion-like particles, and sketch the parameter space of stable configurations as a function of a binding energy parameter. We find a strong lower bound on the size of Fuzzy Dark Matter condensates which are stable to decay, with lifetimes longer than the age of the universe.

  11. $\\tau$ decays with neutral kaons

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    The branching ratio of the tau lepton to a neutral K meson is measured from a sample of approximately 200,000 tau decays recorded by the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies near the Z0 resonance. The measurement is based on two samples which identify one-prong tau decays with KL and KS mesons. The combined branching ratios are measured to be B(tau- -->pi- K0bar nutau) = (9.33+-0.68+-0.49)x10^-3 B(tau- -->pi- K0bar [>=1pi0] nutau) = (3.24+-0.74+-0.66)x10^-3 B(tau- -->K- K0bar [>=0pi0] nutau) = (3.30+-0.55+-0.39)x10^-3 where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  12. Rare B decays at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Linwei

    2017-01-01

    The flavour changing neutral current decays can be interesting probes for searching for New Physics. Angular distributions of the decay $\\mathrm{B}^0 \\to \\mathrm{K}^{*0} \\mu^ +\\mu^-$ are studied using a sample of proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $20.5~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. An angular analysis is performed to determine $P_1$ and $P_5'$, where $P_5'$ is of particular interest due to recent measurements that indicate a potential discrepancy with the standard model. Based on a sample of 1397 signal events, $P_1$ and $P_5'$ angular parameters are determined as a function of the dimuon invariant mass squared. The measurements are in agreement with standard model predictions.

  13. Digging the CNGS decay tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    Products of the collision between a proton beam and a graphite target will pass through a horn containing an electric field that will produce a focused beam. These particles will decay into muon neutrinos within the tunnel that is being constructed in these images. The neutrinos will then travel 730 km to Gran Sasso in Italy where huge detectors will observe the beam to study a process called neutrino oscillation.

  14. Improved β Decay Branching Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, J. C.; Golovko, V.

    2008-04-01

    The work we report here aims at increasing the precision possible in the measurement of branching ratios for superallowed β^+decays. Such highly accurate values are essential in generating precise ft-values for 0^+->0^+decays, which can then be used to test the Standard Model via the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix [1]. The required precision is ˜0.1% or better. While this limit was already achieved in the case of ^34Ar [2], it would have been very difficult, if not impossible, to achieve it for other β^+-decays without an upgrade to our acquisition and data-reduction systems. We have thus improved the controls over all the key elements in our experimental set-up: we now have direct control over the dead-time for the singles and coincidence channels and <0.1 mm control over the source-detector distance. In addition, we have extensively studied the efficiency of the β-detector with source-measurements tested against various Monte Carlo programs [3]. We have tested our new acquisition set-up on ^60Co and ^22Na (β^- and β^+ emitters respectively) to validate our new methods. Preliminary results on the two sources are statistically consistent with the expected values. An ^34Ar decay experiment using the new experimental configuration has already been performed and is currently analyzed. [1] J.C. Hardy and I.S. Towner, PRC 71, 055501 (2005) [2] V. Iacob et al., BAPS 52(3)B16; BAPS 52(9)HF3 [3] V. Golovko et al., BAPS 52(9)DH4; this BAPS

  15. LHCb: Rare Decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Teodorescu, E

    2011-01-01

    The decay modes $B_d\\to K^*\\gamma$ and $B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$ are promising laboratories for the search of New Physics effects, their properties being particularly sensitive to the presence of new heavy particles that may propagate virtually within the one-loop process involved in penguin diagrams. The penguin $B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$ decay has been observed by Belle with rather poor precision, $\\mathcal{B}$($B_s \\to \\phi \\gamma$) = 57$^{+22}_{-19}$ x 10$^{-6}$, therefore, additional measurements are expected for this channel. With a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of ~36 pb$^{-1}$ collected in 2010, a clear and promising signal has been observed for the $B_d\\to K^*\\gamma$. The mass resolution is dominated by the electromagnetic calorimeter energy resolution (ECAL is inter-calibrated at the ~2% level). A first hint of the $B_s \\to \\Phi \\gamma$  decay has also been observed. Given this preliminary results and the theory predictions, we expect that, with the data we will record in 2011, th...

  16. Charmless B Decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Carson, L

    2010-01-01

    The potential of the LHCb experiment to test the Standard Model and probe New Physics effects by making precision measurements using decays of $B$ hadrons to charmless hadronic final states is explored. The CKM angle $\\gamma$ can be measured using NP-sensitive decays involving penguin amplitudes. A U-spin analysis of the time-dependent CP asymmetries in the decays $B_d \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $B_s\\rightarrow K^{-}K^{+}$ is expected to give a total uncertainty on $\\gamma$ of $\\simeq$ 7° with one nominal year of data. A similar sensitivity is achievable via a Dalitz analysis of $B^{+} \\rightarrow K^{+} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and $B_d \\rightarrow K_S \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$. With relatively small amounts of data, discoveries of the rare modes $B_d\\rightarrow K^{+} K^{-}, B_s \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $B_d \\rightarrow p\\bar{p}$ are expected. The ultra-rare modes $B^{+} \\rightarrow K^{-}\\pi ^{+}\\pi^{+}$ and $B^{+} \\rightarrow K^{+} K^{+}\\pi^{-}$ may be observed if their branching ratios are significantly enhance...

  17. Constraints on hadronically decaying dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garny, Mathias [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Ibarra, Alejandro [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Tran, David [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). School of Physics and Astronomy

    2012-05-15

    We present general constraints on dark matter stability in hadronic decay channels derived from measurements of cosmic-ray antiprotons.We analyze various hadronic decay modes in a model-independent manner by examining the lowest-order decays allowed by gauge and Lorentz invariance for scalar and fermionic dark matter particles and present the corresponding lower bounds on the partial decay lifetimes in those channels. We also investigate the complementarity between hadronic and gamma-ray constraints derived from searches for monochromatic lines in the sky, which can be produced at the quantum level if the dark matter decays into quark-antiquark pairs at leading order.

  18. Three-body charmless B decays workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Haim, E.; Chauveau, J.; Hartfiel, B.; Ocariz, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies (LPNHE), 75 - Paris (France); Charles, J. [LPT, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this workshop was multifarious: -) to present and discuss the current experimental perspectives based on the full expected statistics from B-factories by 2008, -) to share and further develop analysis methods, -) to present and discuss the theoretical work on the subject, -) to discuss the future of B-factories, and -) to establish a work plan until 2009. The contributions have focused on 3 body charmless B decays and mostly 3 body hadronic charmless B decays, they have also dealt with semileptonic decays, radiative decays, charm and charmonium decays, and scattering processes. This document gathers the slides of the presentations.

  19. Constants and Pseudo-Constants of Coupled Beam Motion in the PEP-II Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decker, F.J.; Colocho, W.S.; Wang, M.H.; Yan, Y.T.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-01

    Constants of beam motion help as cross checks to analyze beam diagnostics and the modeling procedure. Pseudo-constants, like the betatron mismatch parameter or the coupling parameter det C, are constant till certain elements in the beam line change them. This can be used to visually find the non-desired changes, pinpointing errors compared with the model.

  20. Competing bounds on the present-day time variation of fundamental constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Thomas; Stern, Steffen; Wetterich, Christof

    2009-04-01

    We compare the sensitivity of a recent bound on time variation of the fine structure constant from optical clocks with bounds on time-varying fundamental constants from atomic clocks sensitive to the electron-to-proton mass ratio, from radioactive decay rates in meteorites, and from the Oklo natural reactor. Tests of the weak equivalence principle also lead to comparable bounds on present variations of constants. The “winner in sensitivity” depends on what relations exist between the variations of different couplings in the standard model of particle physics, which may arise from the unification of gauge interactions. Weak equivalence principle tests are currently the most sensitive within unified scenarios. A detection of time variation in atomic clocks would favor dynamical dark energy and put strong constraints on the dynamics of a cosmological scalar field.

  1. Interacting universes and the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso-Serrano, A. [Centro de Física “Miguel Catalán”, Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Estación Ecológica de Biocosmología, Pedro de Alvarado 14, 06411 Medellín (Spain); Bastos, C. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Bertolami, O. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Robles-Pérez, S., E-mail: salvarp@imaff.cfmac.csic.es [Centro de Física “Miguel Catalán”, Instituto de Física Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Estación Ecológica de Biocosmología, Pedro de Alvarado 14, 06411 Medellín (Spain); Física Teórica, Universidad del País Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-02-12

    In this Letter it is studied the effects that an interaction scheme among universes can have in the values of their cosmological constants. In the case of two interacting universes, the value of the cosmological constant of one of the universes becomes very close to zero at the expense of an increasing value of the cosmological constant of the partner universe. In the more general case of a chain of N interacting universes with periodic boundary conditions, the spectrum of the Hamiltonian splits into a large number of levels, each of them associated with a particular value of the cosmological constant, that can be occupied by single universes revealing a collective behavior that plainly shows that the multiverse is much more than the mere sum of its parts.

  2. Graviton fluctuations erase the cosmological constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wetterich

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Graviton fluctuations induce strong non-perturbative infrared renormalization effects for the cosmological constant. The functional renormalization flow drives a positive cosmological constant towards zero, solving the cosmological constant problem without the need to tune parameters. We propose a simple computation of the graviton contribution to the flow of the effective potential for scalar fields. Within variable gravity, with effective Planck mass proportional to the scalar field, we find that the potential increases asymptotically at most quadratically with the scalar field. The solutions of the derived cosmological equations lead to an asymptotically vanishing cosmological “constant” in the infinite future, providing for dynamical dark energy in the present cosmological epoch. Beyond a solution of the cosmological constant problem, our simplified computation also entails a sizeable positive graviton-induced anomalous dimension for the quartic Higgs coupling in the ultraviolet regime, substantiating the successful prediction of the Higgs boson mass within the asymptotic safety scenario for quantum gravity.

  3. The time constant of the somatogravic illusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correia Grácio, B.J.; Winkel, K.N. de; Groen, E.L.; Wentink, M.; Bos, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Met desdemona hebben we gevonden dat de tijd constante van de somatografische illusie rond twee seconden is. Dit resultaat verschilt van wat was gevonden in ander onderzoek dat gebruikt maakt van een gewone centrifuge

  4. Building evolutionary architectures support constant change

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, Neal; Kua, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    The software development ecosystem is constantly changing, providing a constant stream of new tools, frameworks, techniques, and paradigms. Over the past few years, incremental developments in core engineering practices for software development have created the foundations for rethinking how architecture changes over time, along with ways to protect important architectural characteristics as it evolves. This practical guide ties those parts together with a new way to think about architecture and time.

  5. Trialogue on the number of fundamental constants

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, Michael J; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2002-01-01

    This paper consists of three separate articles on the number of fundamental dimensionful constants in physics. We started our debate in summer 1992 on the terrace of the famous CERN cafeteria. In the summer of 2001 we returned to the subject to find that our views still diverged and decided to explain our current positions. LBO develops the traditional approach with three constants, GV argues in favor of just two, while MJD advocates zero.

  6. Factorization for radiative heavy quarkonium decays into scalar Glueball

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Ruilin [INPAC, Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology,Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University,Dongchuan RD 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics,Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Zhongguancun E. St. 55, Beijing 100190 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics,Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Yuquan RD 19B, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-09-24

    We establish the factorization formula for scalar Glueball production through radiative decays of vector states of heavy quarkonia, e.g. J/ψ, ψ(2S) and Υ(nS), where the Glueball mass is much less than the parent heavy quarkonium mass. The factorization is demonstrated explicitly at one-loop level through the next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections to the hard kernel, the non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD) long-distance matrix elements (LDMEs) of the heavy quarkonium, and the light-cone distribution amplitude (LCDA) of scalar Glueball. The factorization provides a comprehensive theoretical approach to investigate Glueball production in the radiative decays of vector states of heavy quarkonia and determine the physic nature of Glueball. We discuss the scale evolution equation of LCDA for scalar Glueball. In the end, we extract the value of the decay constant of Scalar Glueball from Lattice QCD calculation and analyze the mixing effect among f{sub 0}(1370), f{sub 0}(1500) and f{sub 0}(1710).

  7. Comparison of decay and yield data between JNDC2 and ENDF/B-VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyamatsu, K.; Sagosaka, M.; Miyazono, T. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This work is intended to be our first step to solve disagreements of the decay heat powers between measurements and summation calculations. We examine differences between nuclear data libraries to complement our uncertainty evaluation of the decay heat summation calculations only with ENDF/B-VI. The comparison is made mainly between JNDC2 and ENDF/B-VI while JEF2.2 decay data is also discussed. In this study, we propose and use a simple method which is an analogue of the overlap integral of two wave functions in quantum mechanics. As the first step, we compare the whole input nuclear data for the summation calculations as a whole. We find a slight difference of the fission yields especially for high-energy neutron induced fissions between JNDC2 and ENDF/B-VI. As for the decay energies, JNDC2, ENDF/B-VI are quite similar while JEF2.2 is found significantly different from these two libraries. We find substantial differences in the decay constant values among the three libraries. As the second step, we calculate the decay heat powers with FPGS90 using JNDC2 and ENDF/B-VI. The total decay heat powers with the two libraries differ by more than 10% at short cooling times while they agree well on the average at cooling times longer that 100 (s). We also point out nuclides whose contributions are significantly different between the two libraries even though the total decay heats agree well. These nuclides may cause some problems in predicting aggregate spectra of {beta} and {gamma} rays as well as delayed neutrons, and are to be reviewed in the future revision of decay and yield data. (author)

  8. Chromaticity decay due to superconducting dipoles on the injection plateau of the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Aquilina, N; Sammut, N; Strzeclzyk, M; Todesco, E

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that in a superconducting accelerator a significant chromaticity drift can be induced by the decay of the sextupolar component of the main dipoles. In this paper we give a brief overview of what was expected for the Large Hadron Collider on the grounds of magnetic measurements of individual dipoles carried out during the production. According to this analysis, the decay time constants were of the order of 200 s: since the injection in the LHC starts at least 30 minutes after the magnets are at constant current, the dynamic correction of this effect was not considered to be necessary. The first beam measurements of chromaticity showed significant decay even after few hours. For this reason, a dynamic correction of decay on the injection plateau was implemented based on beam measurements. This means that during the injection plateau the sextupole correctors are powered with a varying current to cancel out the decay of the dipoles. This strategy has been implemented successfully. A similar pheno...

  9. Application of a sine transform method to experiments of single-photon-decay spectroscopy: Single exponential decay signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, R. J.; González, F.; Moreno, F.

    1992-06-01

    In this article we present as an experiment in single-photon-decay spectroscopy an alternative method to that based on the measurement of the probability distribution function, Pf(t), of the time intervals for the time of arrival of the first photon after the excitation pulse. We propose the measurement of the sine transform of Pf(t), which gives a maximum when the fluorescence signal is of the single exponential decay type. The existence of this maximum allows us to determine very accurately the value of the decay constant using a number of measurements which is lower than that required to establish a Pf(t) that is accurate enough to draw the same conclusions. A theoretical model of the error is studied and is compared by means of a computer simulation with the usual method of measuring Pf(t). An experiment is performed using a TMMC crystal to verify the validity of the theoretical predictions and of the simulation results.

  10. Rare beauty and charm decays at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Johannes

    2013-05-01

    Rare heavy flavor decays are an ideal place to search for the effects of potential new particles that modify the decay rates or the Lorentz structure of the decay vertices. The LHCb experiment, a dedicated heavy flavour experiment at the LHC at CERN. It has recorded the worlds largest sample of heavy meson and lepton decays. The status of the rare decay analyses with 1 fb-1 of √s = 7 TeV and 1.1 fb-1 of √s = 8 TeV of pp-collisions collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011 and 2012 is reviewed. The worlds most precise measurements of the angular structure of B0 → K*0μ+μ- and B+ → K+μ+μ- decays is discussed, as well as the isospin asymmetry measurement in B → K(*)μ+μ- decays. The first evidence for the very rare decay Bs0 → µ+µ- is presented together with the most stringent upper exclusion limits on the branching fraction of decays of B0, D0 and Ks0 mesons into two muons. This note finishes with the discussion of searches for lepton number and lepton flavor violating τ decays.

  11. Rare beauty and charm decays at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Johannes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rare heavy flavor decays are an ideal place to search for the effects of potential new particles that modify the decay rates or the Lorentz structure of the decay vertices. The LHCb experiment, a dedicated heavy flavour experiment at the LHC at CERN. It has recorded the worlds largest sample of heavy meson and lepton decays. The status of the rare decay analyses with 1 fb−1 of √s = 7 TeV and 1.1 fb−1 of √s = 8 TeV of pp–collisions collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011 and 2012 is reviewed. The worlds most precise measurements of the angular structure of B0 → K*0μ+μ− and B+ → K+μ+μ− decays is discussed, as well as the isospin asymmetry measurement in B → K(*μ+μ− decays. The first evidence for the very rare decay Bs0 → µ+µ− is presented together with the most stringent upper exclusion limits on the branching fraction of decays of B0, D0 and Ks0 mesons into two muons. This note finishes with the discussion of searches for lepton number and lepton flavor violating τ decays.

  12. JENDL FP decay data file 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katakura, Jun-ichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Yoshida, Tadashi [Musashi Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan); Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro [Aichi Shukutoku Univ., Nagakute, Aichi (Japan); Tachibana, Takahiro [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A decay data file of fission product (FP) nuclides has been developed for the use in nuclear technology field as one of special purpose files of JENDL (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) in the format of ENDF/B and it is called JENDL FP Decay Data File 2000. The file includes the decay data for 1229 fission product nuclides: 142 stable and 1087 unstable nuclides. The data included for a nuclide are decay modes, their Q values and branching ratios, average decay energy values of beta-rays, gamma-rays and alpha-particles and their spectral data. The primary source of the decay data is ENSDF (Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File), which is the internationally recognized data file of nuclear structure properties. The data in ENSDF, however, cover only measured ones. The data of the short-lived nuclides needed for the application fields such as decay heat prediction are often incomplete or not measured because of their short half-lives. For such nuclides a theoretical model calculation is applied to derive the needed data such as average decay energies and spectral data. The data in JENDL FP Decay Data File 2000 have been tested by summation calculation comparing its results with measured data of decay heat values and aggregate fission product spectra of various fissioning nuclei. The comparison showed good agreement between the calculated results and the measured values. (author)

  13. Experiments on double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busto, J. [Neuchatel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The Double Beta Decay, and especially ({beta}{beta}){sub 0{nu}} mode, is an excellent test of Standard Model as well as of neutrino physics. From experimental point of view, a very large number of different techniques are or have been used increasing the sensitivity of this experiments quite a lot (the factor of 10{sup 4} in the last 20 years). In future, in spite of several difficulties, the sensitivity would be increased further, keeping the interest of this very important process. (author) 4 figs., 5 tabs., 21 refs.

  14. Charm lifetimes and semileptonic decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianco, S. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1995-12-01

    The study of lifetimes and semileptonic (SL) decays of charmed mesons and baryons is currently the goal of several experiments all around the world. This paper is focussed on giving an overview of current status and open questions, and on reviewing new results by E687 and CLEO presented as contributed papers at the 1995 international europhysics conference on high energy physics, held at Brussel (Belgium), July 27-August 2, 1995. A wealth of detailed reviews exists on both charm lifetime up-to-date, which the reader can refer to for details.

  15. {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon} in the 1/N{sub c} expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hambye, T. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati, RM (Italy). Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati; Soldan, P.H. [Dortmund Univ., Dortmund (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    1999-07-01

    It is here presented a new analysis of the ratio {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon} which measures the direct CP violation in K {yields} {pi}{pi} decays. It is used the 1/N{sub c} expansion within the framework of the effective chiral lagrangian for pseudoscalar mesons. From general counting arguments it is showed that the matrix element of the operator Q{sub 6} is not protected from possible large 1/N{sub c} corrections beyond its large-N{sub c} or VSA value. Calculating the 1/N{sub c} corrections, it is explicity found that the they are large and positive. Our result indicates that a {delta}I = 1/2 enhancement is amplitude. This enhances {epsilon}{sup '}/{epsilon} and can bring the standard model prediction close to the measured value for central values of the parameters.

  16. Baryonic resonances from the interactions of the baryon decuplet and meson octet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oset, E.; Sarkar, S.; Vicente Vacas, M.J. [Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Valencia (Spain). Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna. Dept. de Fisica Teorica; Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), Valencia (Spain). Centro Mixto

    2005-07-01

    We study S-wave interactions of the baryon decuplet with the octet of pseudoscalar mesons using the lowest order chiral Lagrangian. We find two bound states in the SU(3) limit corresponding to the octet and decuplet representations. These are found to split into eight different trajectories in the complex plane when the SU(3) symmetry is broken gradually. Finally, we are able to provide a reasonable description for a good number of 4-star 3{sup -}/2 resonances listed by the Particle Data Group. In particular, the {xi}(1820), the {lambda}(1520) and the {sigma}(1670) states are well reproduced. We predict a few other resonances and also evaluate the couplings of the observed resonances to the various channels from the residues at the poles of the scattering matrix from where partial decay widths into different channels can be evaluated. (author)

  17. Baryonic Resonances from Baryon Decuplet-Meson Octet Interactions and the Exotic Resonance S=1, I=1, J{sup P}=32{sup -}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Sourav [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutes de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptd. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Oset, E. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutes de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptd. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Vacas, M.J. Vicente [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Institutes de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptd. 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2005-06-13

    Using the lowest order chiral Lagrangian we study s-wave interactions of the baryon decuplet with the octet of pseudoscalar mesons. We find two bound states in the flavour SU(3) limit corresponding to the octet and decuplet representations. These are found to split into eight different trajectories in the complex plane when the SU(3) symmetry is broken gradually. Finally, we are able to provide a reasonable description for a good number of 4-star 32{sup -} resonances listed by the Particle Data Group. In particular, the {xi}(1820), the {lambda}1520) and the {sigma}(1670) states are well reproduced. We predict a few other resonances and also evaluate the couplings of the observed resonances to the various channels from the residues at the poles of the scattering matrix from where partial decay widths into different channels can be evaluated.

  18. Cosmological models with running cosmological term and decaying dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szydłowski, Marek; Stachowski, Aleksander

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the generalized ΛCDM model, which the Λ term is running with the cosmological time. On the example of the model Λ(t) =Λbare + α2/t2 we show the existence of a mechanism of the modification of the scaling law for energy density of dark matter: ρdm ∝a - 3 + λ(t). We use an approach developed by Urbanowski in which properties of unstable vacuum states are analyzed from the point of view of the quantum theory of unstable states. We discuss the evolution of Λ(t) term and pointed out that during the cosmic evolution there is a long phase in which this term is approximately constant. We also present the statistical analysis of both the Λ(t) CDM model with dark energy and decaying dark matter and the ΛCDM standard cosmological model. We use data such as Planck, SNIa, BAO, H(z) and AP test. While for the former we find the best fit value of the parameter Ωα2,0 is negative (energy transfer is from the dark matter to dark energy sector) and the parameter Ωα2,0 belongs to the interval (- 0 . 000040 , - 0 . 000383) at 2- σ level. The decaying dark matter causes to lowering a mass of dark matter particles which are lighter than CDM particles and remain relativistic. The rate of the process of decaying matter is estimated. Our model is consistent with the decaying mechanism producing unstable particles (e.g. sterile neutrinos) for which α2 is negative.

  19. Acidity decay of above-drainage underground mines in West Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, B; McDonald, L M; Skousen, J

    2010-01-01

    Acidity of water from abandoned underground mines decreases over time, and the rate of decrease can help formulate remediation approaches and treatment system designs. The objective of this study was to determine an overall acidity decay rate for above-drainage underground mines in northern West Virginia from a large data set of mines that were closed 50 to 70 yr ago. Water quality data were obtained from 30 Upper Freeport and 7 Pittsburgh coal seam mines in 1968, 1980, 2000, and 2006, and acidity decay curves were calculated. The mean decay constant, k, for Upper Freeport mines was 2.73 x 10(-2) yr(-1), with a 95% confidence interval of +/- 0.0052, whereas the k value for Pittsburgh mines was not significantly different at 4.26 x 10(-2) yr(-1) +/- 0.017. Acidity from the T&T mine, which was closed 12 yr ago, showed a k value of 11.25 x 10(-2) yr(-1). This higher decay rate was likely due to initial flushing of accumulated metal salts on reaction surfaces in the mine, rapid changes in mine hydrology after closure, and treatment. Although each site showed a specific decay rate (varying from 0.04 x 10(-2) yr(-1) to 13.1 x 10(-2) yr(-1)), the decay constants of 2.7 x 10(-2) yr(-1) to 4.3 x 10(-2) yr(-1) are useful for predicting water quality trends and overall improvements across a wide spectrum of abandoned underground mines. We found first-order decay models improve long-term prediction of acidity declines from above-drainage mines compared with linear or percent annual decrease models. These predictions can help to select water treatment plans and evaluate costs for these treatments over time.

  20. Characteristics of Viscoelastic Crustal Deformation Following a Megathrust Earthquake: Discrepancy Between the Apparent and Intrinsic Relaxation Time Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Matsu'ura, Mitsuhiro

    2017-12-01

    The viscoelastic deformation of an elastic-viscoelastic composite system is significantly different from that of a simple viscoelastic medium. Here, we show that complicated transient deformation due to viscoelastic stress relaxation after a megathrust earthquake can occur even in a very simple situation, in which an elastic surface layer (lithosphere) is underlain by a viscoelastic substratum (asthenosphere) under gravity. Although the overall decay rate of the system is controlled by the intrinsic relaxation time constant of the asthenosphere, the apparent decay time constant at each observation point is significantly different from place to place and generally much longer than the intrinsic relaxation time constant of the asthenosphere. It is also not rare that the sense of displacement rate is reversed during the viscoelastic relaxation. If we do not bear these points in mind, we may draw false conclusions from observed deformation data. Such complicated transient behavior can be explained mathematically from the characteristics of viscoelastic solution: for an elastic-viscoelastic layered half-space, the viscoelastic solution is expressed as superposition of three decaying components with different relaxation time constants that depend on wavelength.

  1. Sequential Decay of 26F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrick, Hayden; Frank, Nathan; Kuchera, Anthony; Sword, Caleb; Brett, Jaclyn; Deyoung, Paul; Thoennessen, Michael; Mona Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Unstable neutron rich nuclides show interesting characteristics including multi-neutron emission. By using Jacobi coordinates, multi-neutron emissions from unstable nuclides may be characterized. At the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory experiment, a 101.3 MeV/u 27Ne ion beam hit a liquid deuterium target, causing reactions which produced several nuclides. Many of these nuclides decayed, resulting in a charged fragment and one or more neutrons. A superconducting dipole magnet bent the path of the fragments into a series of charged-particle detectors. Neutrons from these decays were measured as they interacted with arrays of scintillating plastic bars called the MoNA-LISA. The four-momentum vectors of the charged particle and neutron(s) were used to reconstruct the invariant mass. 26F was formed by 1-proton stripping from the 27Ne beam, which resulted in either one or two neutrons emission. A GEANT4 simulation comparison to the experimental data shows that sequential neutron emission resulted from some of the 26F produced. The results of these comparisons will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant PHY-1404236.

  2. Challenges in Double Beta Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliviero Cremonesi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past ten years, neutrino oscillation experiments have provided the incontrovertible evidence that neutrinos mix and have finite masses. These results represent the strongest demonstration that the electroweak Standard Model is incomplete and that new Physics beyond it must exist. In this scenario, a unique role is played by the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay searches which can probe lepton number conservation and investigate the Dirac/Majorana nature of the neutrinos and their absolute mass scale (hierarchy problem with unprecedented sensitivity. Today Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay faces a new era where large-scale experiments with a sensitivity approaching the so-called degenerate-hierarchy region are nearly ready to start and where the challenge for the next future is the construction of detectors characterized by a tonne-scale size and an incredibly low background. A number of new proposed projects took up this challenge. These are based either on large expansions of the present experiments or on new ideas to improve the technical performance and/or reduce the background contributions. In this paper, a review of the most relevant ongoing experiments is given. The most relevant parameters contributing to the experimental sensitivity are discussed and a critical comparison of the future projects is proposed.

  3. Decay heat curve evaluation test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, M.; Doda, K.; Ida, T.; Hashidura, H.; Oka, M.; Yasu, N.

    1981-03-01

    Fission-product decay energy release rates were measured for fast neutron fissions of U-235, Pu-239, U-238, Th-232 and natural uranium for gamma-ray, and U-235 and Pu-239 for beta-ray. Gamma-ray energy spectra were measured using a NaI scintillation detector and beta ray energy spectra were obtained using a plastic scintillation detector combined with a transmission type proportional counter to eliminate gamma-ray effects. The measuremens were made covering times following irradiations from 19 to 24,000 seconds. The spectra data were integrated to provide total energy release rates as a function of time after fission. The present data of beta ray energy release rates are preliminary due to current carrying out of the data analyses. Typical uncertainties in the present data are approximately 5 percent (1 sigma) except for Th-232, and approximately 8 percent for Th-232. The present results were compared with the results of summation calculations using the TASAKA, ENDF/B-IV and JNDC decay data files.

  4. Suppressed B decays at CDF

    CERN Document Server

    Rescigno, M

    2011-01-01

    We present two recent results obtained by the CDF collaboration at the Tevatron collider. New Cabibbo suppresed B_s decay modes have been observed using 5.9 inverse fb of data: B_s-> J/psi Ks and B_s->J/psi K*0. We report also on masurement of the ratios of the branching ratios (BR) of the new modes to those of the B^0-meson to the same final states: BR(B_s->J/psi K*0)/BR(B^0->J/psi K*0) = 0.062 \\pm 0.009 (stat.) \\pm 0.025 (sys.) \\pm 0.008 (frag.) and BR(B_s->J/psi Ks)/BR(B^0->J/psi Ks) = 0.041 \\pm 0.007 (stat.) \\pm 0.004 (sys.) \\pm 0.005 (frag.). Then we discuss the first polarization measurement in a charmless B_s decay in two light vector mesons, B_s->phi phi, using 2.9 \\inverse fb of data. An angular analysis of the final state particles allows CDF to determine a longitudinal polarization fraction f_L = 0.348 \\pm 0.041 (stat.) \\pm 0.021 (syst.), which is inconsistent with na\\"{\\i}ve expectations based on the V-A nature of weak currents and confirms the pattern of lower than expected longitudinal polarizat...

  5. LHCb: Radiative Decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Orlandea, M

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present a measurement of the ratio of the branching fraction of the radiative decays $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma$ and $B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow \\phi\\gamma$ using 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of data taken with the LHCb detector. The value obtained is \\begin{equation} \\frac{B\\left(B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma\\right)}{B\\left(B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow \\phi\\gamma\\right)}=1.23\\pm0.06(stat.)\\pm0.04(syst.)\\pm0.10\\left(f_s/f_d\\right) \\end{equation} Using the world average value $B\\left(B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma\\right)=\\left(4.33\\pm0.15\\right)\\times10^{-5}$ branching fraction is determined to be $B\\left(B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow \\phi\\gamma\\right)=3.5\\pm0.4\\times10^{-5}$. A measurement of the direct CP asymmetry of the decay $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma$ is also presented. Both measurements are the most precise to date and are in agreement with the previous experimental results and theoretical expectations.

  6. Heavy neutrino decay at SHALON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinitsyna V.Y.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The SHALON Cherenkov telescope has recorded over 2 × 106 extensive air showers during the past 17 years. The analysis of the signal at different zenith angles has included observations from the sub-horizontal direction Θ = 97° This inclination defines an Earth skimming trajectory with 7 km of air and around 1000 km of rock in front of the telescope. During a period of 324 hours of observation, after a cut of shower-like events that may be caused by chaotic sky flashes or reflections on the snow of vertical showers, we have detected 5 air showers of TeV energies. We argue that these events may be caused by the decay of a long-lived penetrating particle entering the atmosphere from the ground and decaying in front of the telescope. We show that this particle can it not be a muon or a tau lepton. As a possible explanation, we discuss two scenarios with an unstable neutrino of mass m ≈ 0.5 GeV and cτ ≈ 30 m. Remarkably, one of these models has been recently proposed to explain an excess of electron-like neutrino events at MiniBooNE.

  7. Charmless B-decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Eklund, Lars

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings summarise three recent papers from the LHCb Collaboration in the area of charmless b-decays. The branching fraction for the decay $\\text{B}_{s}^{0}\\rightarrow \\phi \\phi$ is measured and a search for the highly suppressed decay $\\text{B}^{0}\\rightarrow \\phi \\phi$ is performed. The decay $\\text{B}_{s}^{0}\\rightarrow {\\eta}'{\\eta}'$ is observed for the first time and the CP asymmetries in the decays $\\text{B}^{+}\\rightarrow {\\eta}'\\text{K}^{+}$ and $\\text{B}^{+}\\rightarrow \\phi \\text{K}^{+}$ are measured. Finally, the decay $\\text{B}^{0}\\rightarrow \\rho^{0}\\rho^{0}$ is observed for the first time and its longitudinal polarisation is measured.

  8. Power Spectrum Analyses of Nuclear Decay Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Javorsek, D; Lasenby, R N; Lasenby, A N; Buncher, J B; Fischbach, E; Gruenwald, J T; Hoft, A W; Horan, T J; Jenkins, J H; Kerford, J L; Lee, R H; Longman, A; Mattes, J J; Morreale, B L; Morris, D B; Mudry, R N; Newport, J R; O'Keefe, D; Petrelli, M A; Silver, M A; Stewart, C A; Terry, B; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2010.06.011

    2010-01-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay data displaying annually varying periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data were obtained from three distinct data sets: 32Si and 36Cl decays reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), but also performed at BNL, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. All three data sets exhibit the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additional spectral comparisons of the data to local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and their reciprocals were performed. No common phases were found between the factors investigated and those exhibited by the nuclear decay data. This suggests that either a combination of factors was responsible, or that, if it was a single factor, its effects on the decay rate experiments are n...

  9. The time dependence of fundamental constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udem, Thomas [Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Since Webb et al. have detected a slightly smaller fine structure constant by quasar absorption spectra about 10 billion years ago an old idea of P.A.M. Dirac from 1937 was revived. Using arguments philosophical in nature he speculated that fundamental constants should vary along with the expanding universe. For a long time the only possibility to search for these minute changes was to exploit the large look-back time of astronomical or geological observations. With the advent of frequency combs the possibility to check for these time variations in the laboratory with optical transitions in atoms, ions and molecules became readily available. Even though the time period covered by these laboratory measurements is typically 10 orders of magnitude shorter than for astronomical observations, they can be 10 orders of magnitude more accurate to provide comparable sensitivity. The question of the time dependence of fundamental constants is of high relevance in the context of modern cosmological models.

  10. Vanishing cosmological constant in elementary particles theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisano, F. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tonasse, M.D. [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1997-01-01

    The quest of a vanishing cosmological constant is considered in the simplest anomaly-free chiral gauge extension of the electroweak standard model where the new physics is limited to a well defined additional flavordynamics above the Fermi scale, namely up to a few TeVs by matching the gauge coupling constants at the electroweak scale, and with an extended Higgs structure. In contrast to the electroweak standard model, it is shown how the extended scalar sector of the theory allows a vanishing or a very small cosmological constant. the details of the cancellation mechanism are presented. At accessible energies the theory is indistinguishable from the standard model of elementary particles and it is in agreement with all existing data. (author). 32 refs. 32 refs.

  11. On the Claim of Modulations in 36Cl Beta Decay and Their Association with Solar Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommé, S.; Kossert, K.; Nähle, O.

    2017-11-01

    Recently, claims were made by Sturrock et al. ( Astropart. Phys. 42, 62, 2013), Sturrock, Fischbach, and Scargle ( Solar Phys. 291, 3467, 2016; arXiv http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1705.03010, 2017) that beta decay can be induced by interaction of the nucleus with solar neutrinos and that cyclic modulations in decay rates are indicative of the dynamics of the solar interior. Transient modulations in residuals from a purely exponential decay curve were observed at frequencies near 11 a^{-1} and 12.7 a^{-1} in repeated activity measurements of a 36Cl source by Alburger, Harbottle, and Norton ( Earth Planet Sci. Lett. 78, 168, 1986) at Brookhaven National Laboratory in a period from 1984 to 1985. Sturrock et al. have speculatively associated them with rotational influence on the solar neutrino flux. In this work, more accurate 36Cl decay-rate measurements - performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Braunschweig in the period 2010 - 2013 by means of the triple-to-double coincidence ratio measurement technique - are scrutinised. The residuals from an exponential decay curve were analysed by a weighted Lomb-Scargle periodogram. The existence of modulations in the frequency range between 0.2 a^{-1} and 20 a^{-1} could be excluded down to an amplitude of about 0.0016%. The invariability of the 36Cl decay constant contradicts the speculations made about the deep solar interior on the basis of instabilities in former activity measurements.

  12. Charmless B_{(s)}→ VV decays in factorization-assisted topological-amplitude approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Qi-An; Li, Ying; Lü, Cai-Dian

    2017-05-01

    Within the factorization-assisted topological-amplitude approach, we studied the 33 charmless B_{(s)} → VV decays, where V stands for a light vector meson. According to the flavor flows, the amplitude of each process can be decomposed into eight different topologies. In contrast to the conventional flavor diagrammatic approach, we further factorize each topological amplitude into decay constant, form factors and unknown universal parameters. By χ ^2 fitting 46 experimental observables, we extracted 10 theoretical parameters with χ ^2 per degree of freedom around 2. Using the fitted parameters, we calculated the branching fractions, polarization fractions, CP asymmetries and relative phases between polarization amplitudes of each decay mode. The decay channels dominated by tree diagram have large branching fractions and large longitudinal polarization fraction. The branching fractions and longitudinal polarization fractions of color-suppressed decays become smaller. Current experimental data of large transverse polarization fractions in the penguin dominant decay channels can be explained by only one transverse amplitude of penguin annihilation diagram. Our predictions of the not yet measured channels can be tested in the ongoing LHCb experiment and the Belle-II experiment in the future.

  13. Charmless B{sub (s)} → VV decays in factorization-assisted topological-amplitude approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Qi-An [CAS, Institute of High Energy Physics, P.O. Box 918, Beijing (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, School of Physics, Beijing (China); Li, Ying [Yantai University, Department of Physics, Yantai (China); CAS, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Lue, Cai-Dian [CAS, Institute of High Energy Physics, P.O. Box 918, Beijing (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, School of Physics, Beijing (China); CAS, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-05-15

    Within the factorization-assisted topological-amplitude approach, we studied the 33 charmless B{sub (s)} → VV decays, where V stands for a light vector meson. According to the flavor flows, the amplitude of each process can be decomposed into eight different topologies. In contrast to the conventional flavor diagrammatic approach, we further factorize each topological amplitude into decay constant, form factors and unknown universal parameters. By χ{sup 2} fitting 46 experimental observables, we extracted 10 theoretical parameters with χ{sup 2} per degree of freedom around 2. Using the fitted parameters, we calculated the branching fractions, polarization fractions, CP asymmetries and relative phases between polarization amplitudes of each decay mode. The decay channels dominated by tree diagram have large branching fractions and large longitudinal polarization fraction. The branching fractions and longitudinal polarization fractions of color-suppressed decays become smaller. Current experimental data of large transverse polarization fractions in the penguin dominant decay channels can be explained by only one transverse amplitude of penguin annihilation diagram. Our predictions of the not yet measured channels can be tested in the ongoing LHCb experiment and the Belle-II experiment in the future. (orig.)

  14. Bs mesons: semileptonic and nonleptonic decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albertus C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we compute some nonleptonic and semileptonic decay widths of Bs mesons, working in the context of constituent quark models [1, 2]. For the case of semileptonic decays we consider reactions leading to kaons or different Jπ Ds mesons. The study of nonleptonic decays has been done in the factorisation approximation and includes the final states enclosed in Table 2.

  15. $K^{0}_{S}$ production in $\\tau$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Boix, G; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Casper, David William; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Boccali, T; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Marinelli, N; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Williams, M I; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Etienne, F; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1998-01-01

    From a sample of about 160k $\\mbox{Z}\\!\\!\\to\\!\\!\\tau^+\\tau^-$ candidates collected with the ALEPH detector at LEP between 1991 and 1995, $\\tau$ lepton decays involving $K^0_S\\!\\to\\!\\pi^+\\pi^-$ are studied. The $K^0_SK^0_L$ associated production in $\\tau$ decays is also investigated. The branching ratios are measured for the inclusive decay $B(\\tau^-\\!\\!\\to\\!\\!K^0_SX^-\

  16. Nonexponential Quantum Decay under Environmental Decoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beau, M.; Kiukas, J.; Egusquiza, I. L.; del Campo, A.

    2017-09-01

    A system prepared in an unstable quantum state generally decays following an exponential law, as environmental decoherence is expected to prevent the decay products from recombining to reconstruct the initial state. Here we show the existence of deviations from exponential decay in open quantum systems under very general conditions. Our results are illustrated with the exact dynamics under quantum Brownian motion and suggest an explanation of recent experimental observations.

  17. A Non-anthropic Solution to the Cosmological Constant Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spivey R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accelerating cosmological expansion is driven by a minuscule vacuum energy density possibly seeking opportunities to decay to a true ground state. Quasar characteristics imply their central engines possess an intrinsic magnetic field compatible with the pres- ence of an electrically charged toroidal dark hole, an eternally collapsing structure lack- ing an event horizon. The possibility is consistent with the inability of black holes to capture particles in a universe of finite age, Einstein’s dismissal of the Schwarzschild metric as unphysical and the implausibility of the various paradoxes invoked by black hole existence. The uncloaked innards of these dark holes would expose immense vac- uum accelerations at their cores, inevitably tempered by Planck scale physics. The Unruh effect predicts that intense yet highly localised heating should occur there. As thermal energy gradually amasses and dissipates, radiation would eventually start to escape into the surrounding environment. Virtual from the d ark hole perspective, the emissions could not decrease the dark hole’s mass: the energy source must instead be the universal vacuum, the likely repository of dark energy. In analogy with core- collapse supernovae, neutrinos should dominate the cooling flows. Red-shifting to low energies upon escape, quantum degenerate haloes should for m predominantly around the largest galaxies. This mechanism is promising from the perspective of enabling the future universe to efficiently sustain aquatic life before stars become scarce, offering a biological yet decidedly non-anthropic solution to the cosmological constant problem.

  18. Our Universe from the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrau, Aurélien; Linsefors, Linda, E-mail: Aurelien.Barrau@cern.ch, E-mail: linda.linsefors@lpsc.in2p3.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, Université Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS-IN2P3, 53, avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-12-01

    The issue of the origin of the Universe and of its contents is addressed in the framework of bouncing cosmologies, as described for example by loop quantum gravity. If the current acceleration is due to a true cosmological constant, this constant is naturally conserved through the bounce and the Universe should also be in a (contracting) de Sitter phase in the remote past. We investigate here the possibility that the de Sitter temperature in the contracting branch fills the Universe with radiation that causes the bounce and the subsequent inflation and reheating. We also consider the possibility that this gives rise to a cyclic model of the Universe and suggest some possible tests.

  19. f( R) constant-roll inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2017-08-01

    The previously introduced class of two-parametric phenomenological inflationary models in general relativity in which the slow-roll assumption is replaced by the more general, constant-roll condition is generalized to the case of f( R) gravity. A simple constant-roll condition is defined in the original Jordan frame, and exact expressions for a scalaron potential in the Einstein frame, for a function f( R) (in the parametric form) and for inflationary dynamics are obtained. The region of the model parameters permitted by the latest observational constraints on the scalar spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio of primordial metric perturbations generated during inflation is determined.

  20. Cosmological constant, supersymmetry, nonassociativity, and big numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir [KazNU, Department of Theoretical and Nuclear Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); IETP, Al-Farabi KazNU, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2015-02-01

    The nonassociative generalization of supersymmetry is considered. It is shown that the associator of four supersymmetry generators has the coefficient ∝ ℎ/l{sub 0}{sup 2} where l0 is some characteristic length. Two cases are considered: (a) l{sub 0}{sup -2} coincides with the cosmological constant; (b) l{sub 0} is the classical radius of the electron. It is also shown that the scaled constant is of the order of 10{sup -120} for the first case and 10{sup -30} for the second case. The possible manifestation and smallness of nonassociativity is discussed. (orig.)

  1. Flexible alternatives to constant frequency systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-Wilson, John

    The use of hybrid systems in which variable frequency is used as generated, with a proportion being converted to constant frequency by electronic conversion, is examined as a flexible alternative to constant frequency systems. Here, some practical solutions to the technical issues raised by adopting the more flexible approach to electrical system generation are presented. In particular, attention is given to the frequency ranges used, impact on aircraft equipment, motor-driven equipment, transformer rectifier units, lighting, and avionics. The discussion also covers fan-assisted galley ovens, system architecture, special airworthiness requirements, and power quality.

  2. The Cosmological Constant Problem (1/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I will review the cosmological constant problem as a serious challenge to our notion of naturalness in Physics. Weinberg’s no go theorem is worked through in detail. I review a number of proposals possibly including Linde's universe multiplication, Coleman's wormholes, the fat graviton, and SLED, to name a few. Large distance modifications of gravity are also discussed, with causality considerations pointing towards a global modification as being the most sensible option. The global nature of the cosmological constant problem is also emphasized, and as a result, the sequestering scenario is reviewed in some detail, demonstrating the cancellation of the Standard Model vacuum energy through a global modification of General Relativity.

  3. The Cosmological Constant Problem (2/2)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I will review the cosmological constant problem as a serious challenge to our notion of naturalness in Physics. Weinberg’s no go theorem is worked through in detail. I review a number of proposals possibly including Linde's universe multiplication, Coleman's wormholes, the fat graviton, and SLED, to name a few. Large distance modifications of gravity are also discussed, with causality considerations pointing towards a global modification as being the most sensible option. The global nature of the cosmological constant problem is also emphasized, and as a result, the sequestering scenario is reviewed in some detail, demonstrating the cancellation of the Standard Model vacuum energy through a global modification of General Relativity.

  4. Reconstruction of constant slow-roll inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qing

    2017-09-01

    Using the relations between the slow-roll parameters and the power spectra for the single field slow-roll inflation, we derive the scalar spectral tilt n s and the tensor to scalar ratio r for the constant slow-roll inflation, and obtain the constraint on the slow-roll parameter η from the Planck 2015 results. The inflationary potential for the constant slow-roll inflation is then reconstructed in the framework of both general relativity and the scalar-tensor theory of gravity, and compared with the recently reconstructed E model potential. In the strong coupling limit, we show that the η attractor is reached.

  5. Rate constant for the reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L.

    1986-01-01

    The rate of the radical-radical reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br has been determined at 298 K in a discharge flow system near 1 torr pressure with detection of SO and BrO via collision-free sampling mass spectrometry. The rate constant was determined using two different methods: measuring the decay of SO radicals in the presence of an excess of BrO and measuring the decay of BrO radicals in excess SO. The results from the two methods are in reasonable agreement and the simple mean of the two values gives the recommended rate constant at 298 K, k = (5.7 + or - 2.0) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s. This represents the first determination of this rate constant and it is consistent with a previously derived lower limit based on SO2 formation. Comparison is made with other radical-radical reactions involving SO or BrO. The reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br is of interest for models of the upper atmosphere of the earth and provides a potential coupling between atmospheric sulfur and bromine chemistry.

  6. Rare beauty and charm decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Rare heavy flavor decays are an ideal place to search for the effects of potential new particles that modify the decay rates or the Lorentz structure of the decay vertices. The LHCb experiment, a dedicated heavy flavour experiment at the LHC at CERN. It has recorded the worlds largest sample of heavy meson and lepton decays. The status of the rare decay analyses with 1\\,fb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt s = 7\\,$TeV and 1.1\\,fb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt s = 8\\,$TeV of $pp$--collisions collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011 and 2012 is reviewed. The worlds most precise measurements of the angular structure of $B^0\\rightarrow K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $B^+\\rightarrow K^{+} \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ decays is discussed, as well as the isospin asymmetry measurement in $B\\rightarrow K^{(*)} \\mu^+ \\mu^-}$ decays. The first evidence for the very rare decay $B^0_s \\rightarrow \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ is presented together with the most stringent upper exclusion limits on the branching fraction of decays of $B^0$, $D^0$ and $K^0_s$ mesons into two muons. This note f...

  7. Charmless Hadronic Beauty Decays at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Timothy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A summary of six LHCb results on the topic of charmless hadronic b-hadron decays is presented. These are comprised of: a search for the decay Bs0→Ks0K+K− and updated branching fraction measurements of B(s0→Ks0h+h′− decays (h=K,π [1]; the first observation of the decays B0→pp¯π+π−,  Bs0→pp¯K+K−,Bs0→pp¯K+π− and strong evidence for the decay B0→pp¯K+K− [2]; the first observation of the decay Bs0→pΛ¯K− [3]; a search for the decay Bs0→φη′ [4]; the first observation of the decay Ξb−→pK−K− [5] and evidence for CP-violation in Λb0→pπ−π+π− decays [6].

  8. Spectroscopy of element 115 decay chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, Dirk [Lund University, Sweden; Forsberg, U. [Lund University, Sweden; Golubev, P. [Lund University, Sweden; Sarmiento, L. G. [Lund University, Sweden; Yakushev, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Andersson, L.-L. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Di Nitto, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Duehllmann, Ch. E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Gates, J. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gregorich, K. E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Hessberger, F. P. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Herzberg, R.-D [University of Liverpool; Khuyagbaatar, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Kratz, J. V. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Schaedel, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Aberg, S. [Lund University, Sweden; Ackermann, D. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Block, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Brand, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Carlsson, B. G. [Lund University, Sweden; Cox, D. [University of Liverpool; Derkx, X. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Eberhardt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Even, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Fahlander, C. [Lund University, Sweden; Gerl, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Jaeger, E. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kindler, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Krier, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kojouharov, I. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Kurz, N. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Lommel, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mistry, A. [University of Liverpool; Mokry, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Nitsche, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Omtvedt, J. P. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Papadakis, P. [University of Liverpool; Ragnarsson, I. [Lund University, Sweden; Runke, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schaffner, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schausten, B. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Thoerle-Pospiech, P. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Torres, T. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Traut, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Trautmann, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Tuerler, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Ward, A. [University of Liverpool; Ward, D. E. [Lund University, Sweden; Wiehl, N. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

    2013-01-01

    A high-resolution a, X-ray and -ray coincidence spectroscopy experiment was conducted at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fu r Schwerionenforschung. Thirty correlated a-decay chains were detected following the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am. The observations are consistent with previous assignments of similar decay chains to originate from element Z = 115. The data includes first candidates of fingerprinting the decay step Mt --> Bh with characteristic X rays. For the first time, precise spectroscopy allows the derivation of excitation schemes of isotopes along the decay chains starting with elements Z > 112. Comprehensive Monte-Carlo simulations accompany the data analysis. Nuclear structure models provide a first level interpretation.

  9. Heavy Flavour Production and Decay at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, RWL; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    ATLAS is taking advantage of its large integrated luminosity band sophisticated muon and dimuon triggers to make competitive measurements of heavy flavour production and decay. Inclusive production and heavy flavour jet production is discussed before turning to charm and onium production. The production and decay of individual B hadron species is then addressed, including the current best measurement of the Λb lifetime. A much improved analysis of CP related quantities in Bs decays is presented, before turning to recent results and prospects for rare B decays.

  10. Decay kinetics of benzophenone triplets and corresponding free radicals in soft and rigid polymers studied by laser flash photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Peter P; Efremkin, Alexei F; Sultimova, Natalie B; Kasparov, Valery V; Khudyakov, Igor V

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of transients formed under photoexcitation of benzophenone (B) dissolved in three different polymers was studied by ns laser flash photolysis. These polymers were the soft rubbers poly (ethylene-co-butylene) (EB), polystyrene block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene (SEBS) and hard polystyrene (PS). We monitored the decay kinetics of triplet state (3)B(*) and of ketyl radicals BH(●). We observed exponential decay of (3)B(*) and two-stage decay kinetics of BH(●) in EB. The first stage is a fast cage recombination of a radical pair (BH(●), radical of polymer R(●)). The second slow stage of BH(●) decay follows the second-order law with a relatively high rate constant, which corresponds to recombination of BH(●) in a homogeneous liquid with a viscosity of only ~0.1 P (about five times of 2-propanol viscosity). Application of a magnetic field (MF) of 0.2 T leads to deceleration of both stages of BH(●) decay in EB by approximately 20%. Decay kinetics of both transients were observed in SEBS. There was no MF effect on BH(●) decay in SEBS. We only observed (3)B(*) in PS. Decay kinetics of (3)B(*) in this case were described as polychromatic dispersive first-order kinetics. We discuss the effects of polymer structure on transient kinetics and the MF effect. © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  11. Union-Find with Constant Time Deletions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Thorup, Mikkel; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    modification of the classical union-find data structure that supports delete, as well as makeset and union operations, in constant worst-case time, while still supporting find operations in O(log n) worst-case time and O(α_M/N_(n)) amortized time. Our analysis supplies, in particular, a very concise potential...

  12. Timelike Constant Mean Curvature Surfaces with Singularities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Svensson, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We use integrable systems techniques to study the singularities of timelike non-minimal constant mean curvature (CMC) surfaces in the Lorentz–Minkowski 3-space. The singularities arise at the boundary of the Birkhoff big cell of the loop group involved. We examine the behavior of the surfaces...

  13. Some zero-sum constants with weights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    imsc.res.in. MS received 28 February 2007. Abstract. For an abelian group G, the Davenport constant D(G) is defined to be the smallest natural number k such that any sequence of k elements in G has a non- empty subsequence whose sum is ...

  14. Benjamin Constant. Ontdekker van de moderne vrijheid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, Paul; Kinneging, A.; Colette, M.

    2015-01-01

    In 1806 analyseerde de Zwitsers-Franse politicus, filosoof en essayist Benjamin Constant (1767-1830) de moderne samenleving in zijn bekende boek Principes de politique. Uit dit klassiek geworden werk spreekt Constant’s ambivalentie en gevoel van nuance en subtiliteit. De “moderne” individuele

  15. Experimental Determination of the Avogadro Constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    obtained from a frame-by-frame analysis of the video over a suffi- ciently long period of time. The diffusion coefficient D is given by σ 2/(2∆t). Once again using Stokes–Einstein relation (equation 6) we can obtain the Boltzmann constant and hence the Avogadro number. Counting α Particles. Rutherford in 1903 demonstrated ...

  16. Redundant internal coordinates, compliance constants and non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    If chosen properly, the internal coordinates will have minimum mixing in the normal mode representation. This can in principle lead to an automation ... It was shown in the literature that the relaxed force constants could be used as a measure of bond order in all atom-atom distance coordinates. Some of the bonded and ...

  17. Redundant internal coordinates, compliance constants and non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Redundant internal coordinates, compliance constants and non-bonded interactions – some new insights. MOUMITA MAJUMDER and SADASIVAM MANOGARAN. ∗. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016, India e-mail: sm@iitk.ac.in. MS received 21 February 2012; revised 8 July ...

  18. Teaching Nanochemistry: Madelung Constants of Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Mark D.; Baker, A. David

    2010-01-01

    The Madelung constants for binary ionic nanoparticles are determined. The computational method described here sums the Coulombic interactions of each ion in the particle without the use of partial charges commonly used for bulk materials. The results show size-dependent lattice energies. This is a useful concept in teaching how properties such as…

  19. Optical Constants of Cometary Ice Tholins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, B. N.; Cruikshank, D.; Arakawa, E. T.; McDonald, G. D.

    1997-07-01

    We have previously reported the optical constants from 0.06 to 40 mu m of ice tholin I, produced by plasma irradiation of 1:6 ethane:water frost at 77K (Khare et al. 1993, Icarus 103, 290). Such ices containing water and small amounts of simple hydrocarbons either in the form of clathrates or intimate physical mixtures are thought to be common outer solar system condensates that were incorporated into comets and other bodies. For the imaginary part of the refractive index (k)index n is not affected by these changes since the k values are small. Here we present our revised optical constants for ice tholin I, and compare with optical constants of ice tholin II, produced by plasma irradiation of ices made from a 80:16:3.2:0.8 water:methanol:carbon dioxide:ethane gas mixture (McDonald et al. 1996, Icarus 122, 107), a first order approximation to known and inferred cometary compositions. These additional data on the optical constants of ice tholin II will provide another choice for comparison with spectra of comets and other icy solar system bodies.

  20. Constant force extensional rheometry of polymer solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; McKinley, Gareth H.; Clasen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We revisit the rapid stretching of a liquid filament under the action of a constant imposed tensile force, a problem which was first considered by Matta and Tytus [J. Non-Newton. Fluid Mech. 35 (1990) 215–229]. A liquid bridge formed from a viscous Newtonian fluid or from a dilute polymer solution...

  1. dielectric constants of irradiated and carbonated polymers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1985-09-01

    Sep 1, 1985 ... irradiated and carbonated polymers as a function of carbon concentration are investigated. Both low and high density polymers are used. Results predict a quadratic increase in the dielectric constant of specimen as the percentage concentration of carbon is increased. This may be due to the formation of ...

  2. $\\beta$ decay of $^{47}$Ar

    CERN Document Server

    Weissman, L; Bergmann, U C; Brown, B A; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Dillmann, I; Hallmann, O; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Gaudefroy, L; Köster, U; Kratz, K L; Pfeiffer, B; Sorlin, O; 10.1103/PhysRevC.70.024304

    2004-01-01

    Information on beta -decay properties of neutron-rich /sup 47/Ar was obtained at the ISOLDE facility at CERN using isobaric selectivity. This was achieved by a combination of a plasma-ion source with a cooled transfer line and subsequent mass separation. A doubly charged beam was used in order to improve the signal-to-background ratio associated with multi-charged noble gas fission products. The identification of the /sup 47/Ar gamma -ray transitions was performed by comparing the spectra obtained from direct proton bombardment of the target and of the neutron converter. New excited levels in the daughter /sup 47/K nucleus corresponding to the negative-parity states were observed. The obtained data are compared to the result of large-scale shell model calculations and quasiparticle random-phase approximation predictions. (29 refs).

  3. Precise α from τ Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaescu, B.

    2009-01-01

    An updated measurement of α(mτ2) from ALEPH τ hadronic spectral functions is presented. We report a study of the perturbative prediction(s) showing that the fixed-order perturbation theory manifests convergence or principle problems not presented in the contour-improved calculation. Potential systematic effects from quark-hadron duality violations are estimated to be within the quoted systematic errors. The fit result is α(mτ2)=0.344±0.005±0.007, where the first error is experimental and the second theoretical. After evolution, the α(mZ2) determined from τ data is one of the most precise to date, in agreement with the corresponding NLO value derived from Z decays.

  4. To decay or not to decay - or both ! quantum mechanics of spontaneous emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Lodahl, Peter; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    We discuss calculations of spontaneous emission from quantum dots in photonic crystals and show how the decay depends on the intrinsic properties of the emitter as well as the position. A number of fundamentally different types of spontaneous decay dynamics are shown to be possible, including...... counter intuitive situations in which the quantum dot decays only partially....

  5. Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP): Evaluation of the main {sup 233}Pa decay characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chechev, Valery P. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, 28 Second Murinsky Ave., St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: chechev@atom.nw.ru; Kuzmenko, Nikolay K. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, 28 Second Murinsky Ave., St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2006-10-15

    The results of a decay data evaluation are presented for {sup 233}Pa ({beta} {sup -}) decay to nuclear levels in {sup 233}U. These evaluated data have been obtained within the Decay Data Evaluation Project using information published up to 2005.

  6. Construction of Lines of Constant Density and Constant Refractive Index for Ternary Liquid Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasic, Aleksandar Z.; Djordjevic, Bojan D.

    1983-01-01

    Demonstrates construction of density constant and refractive index constant lines in triangular coordinate system on basis of systematic experimental determinations of density and refractive index for both homogeneous (single-phase) ternary liquid mixtures (of known composition) and the corresponding binary compositions. Background information,…

  7. Molecular equilibrium structures from experimental rotational constants and calculated vibration-rotation interaction constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, F; Jorgensen, P; Olsen, Jeppe

    2002-01-01

    A detailed study is carried out of the accuracy of molecular equilibrium geometries obtained from least-squares fits involving experimental rotational constants B(0) and sums of ab initio vibration-rotation interaction constants alpha(r)(B). The vibration-rotation interaction constants have been...... calculated for 18 single-configuration dominated molecules containing hydrogen and first-row atoms at various standard levels of ab initio theory. Comparisons with the experimental data and tests for the internal consistency of the calculations show that the equilibrium structures generated using Hartree......-Fock vibration-rotation interaction constants have an accuracy similar to that obtained by a direct minimization of the CCSD(T) energy. The most accurate vibration-rotation interaction constants are those calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ level. The equilibrium bond distances determined from these interaction...

  8. Time place learning and activity profile under constant light and constant dark in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Clarissa de Almeida; Lima, Jéssica Polyana da Silva; Silveira, Vanessa Augusta Magalhães; Miguel, Mário André Leocadio; Luchiari, Ana Carolina

    2017-05-01

    The ability to learn about the signs of variability in space and time is known as time place learning (TPL). To adjust their circadian rhythms, animals use stimuli that change regularly, such as the light-dark cycle, temperature, food availability or even social stimuli. Because light-dark cycle is the most important environmental temporal cue, we asked how a diurnal animal would perform TPL if this cue was removed. Zebrafish has been extensively studied in the chronobiology area due to it diurnal chronotype, thus, we studied the effects of constant light and constant dark on the time-place learning and activity profile in zebrafish. Our data show that while under constant light and dark condition zebrafish was not able of TPL, after 30days under the constant conditions, constant light led to higher activity level and less significant (robust) 24h rhythm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Phasor plots of luminescence decay functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberan-Santos, Mário N., E-mail: berberan@tecnico.ulisboa.pt

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • First complete study of the phasor plots of a sum of two exponentials (2E). • The existence of a 2E limiting curve (outer boundary) is demonstrated. • A generalization of the lever rule is presented. • Virtual phasor concept. • Study of several decay laws displaying a diversity of patterns. - Abstract: Luminescence decay functions describe the time dependence of the intensity of radiation emitted by electronically excited species. Decay phasor plots (plots of the Fourier sine transform vs. the Fourier cosine transform, for one or several angular frequencies) are being increasingly used in fluorescence, namely in lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In this work, a detailed study of the sum of two exponentials decay function is carried out revealing that sub-exponential, super-exponential and unimodal decays have different phasor signatures. A generalization of the lever rule is obtained, and the existence of an outermost phasor curve corresponding to intermediate-like decays is demonstrated. A study of the behavior of more complex decay functions (sum of three exponentials, stretched and compressed exponentials, phosphorescence with reabsorption and triplet–triplet annihilation, fluorescence with quantum beats) allows concluding that a rich diversity of phasor plot patterns exists. In particular, super-exponential decays can present complex shapes, spiraling at high frequencies. The concept of virtual phasor is also introduced.

  10. Hadronic b decays and $\\gamma$ at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067638

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is ideally suited to the study of decays involving b quarks to fully hadronic final states. In these proceedings I summarise the status of the LHCb $\\gamma$ combination and present several recent analyses involving beauty baryon and meson decays.

  11. Neutrinoless double beta decay and nuclear environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šimkovic, F.; Krivoruchenko, M. I.; Kovalenko, S.

    2017-09-01

    We show that the presence in the nuclear medium of lepton number violating four-fermion interactions of neutrinos with quarks from a decaying nucleus could account for an apparent incompatibility among the 0 νββ searches in the laboratory, the direct neutrino mass measurement with the nuclear β-decay and cosmological data.

  12. Addressing Tooth Decay in Head Start Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay is the most prevalent chronic disease of childhood. Oral health education and dental services are crucial to reducing the number of children afflicted with dental cavities. Due to limited access to preventative care, Head Start children are particularly vulnerable to tooth decay. This article outlines practical implications of a…

  13. Radiative B Decays -- an Experimental Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Thorndike, Edward H.

    2002-01-01

    An informal review is given of the status and direction of experiments on radiative B decays -- b -> s gamma and b -> d gamma. Branching fractions for exclusive and inclusive b -> s gamma decays, CP asymmetry limits, the photon energy spectrum, and limits on the b -> d gamma exclusive branching fractions are covered, and implications of the measurements discussed.

  14. Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-10-01

    After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays.

  15. Rare B Decays at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, M

    2005-03-14

    The authors present recent results on rare B meson decays based on data taken by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. Included in this report are measurements of branching fractions and other quantities of interest for several hadronic, radiative, electroweak, and purely leptonic decays of B mesons.

  16. Wood decay and the cleanup crew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Jessie A. Glaeser

    2017-01-01

    Arborists are encouraged to recognize the wood-decay process as an important factor in tree health and public safety. Technical experts who develop training materials to recognize wood-decay processes in living trees are frequently forest pathologists. Much of the history of forest pathology was to support production of sound, high-quality timber. That heritage is...

  17. Radioactive decays at limits of nuclear stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfützner, M.; Karny, M.; Grigorenko, L. V.

    2012-01-01

    , and their relative probabilities. When approaching limits of nuclear stability, new decay modes set in. First, beta decays are accompanied by emission of nucleons from highly excited states of daughter nuclei. Second, when the nucleon separation energy becomes negative, nucleons start being emitted from the ground...

  18. Limiting conditions for decay in wood systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul I. Morris; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2002-01-01

    Hygrothermal models can predict temperature and moisture conditions in wall components subjected to real weather data, but specific data and a fundamental understanding of how temperature and wood moisture content dictate the progression of decay under these conditions is required for modellers to predict consequences of decay on building performance. It is well...

  19. QCD in heavy quark production and decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiss, J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The author discusses how QCD is used to understand the physics of heavy quark production and decay dynamics. His discussion of production dynamics primarily concentrates on charm photoproduction data which are compared to perturbative QCD calculations which incorporate fragmentation effects. He begins his discussion of heavy quark decay by reviewing data on charm and beauty lifetimes. Present data on fully leptonic and semileptonic charm decay are then reviewed. Measurements of the hadronic weak current form factors are compared to the nonperturbative QCD-based predictions of Lattice Gauge Theories. He next discusses polarization phenomena present in charmed baryon decay. Heavy Quark Effective Theory predicts that the daughter baryon will recoil from the charmed parent with nearly 100% left-handed polarization, which is in excellent agreement with present data. He concludes by discussing nonleptonic charm decay which is traditionally analyzed in a factorization framework applicable to two-body and quasi-two-body nonleptonic decays. This discussion emphasizes the important role of final state interactions in influencing both the observed decay width of various two-body final states as well as modifying the interference between interfering resonance channels which contribute to specific multibody decays. 50 refs., 77 figs.

  20. Precise measurement of the decay $K_{L} \\to \\pi^{0}\\gamma\\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, A; Bevan, A; Dosanjh, R S; Gershon, T J; Hay, B; Kalmus, George Ernest; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Needham, M D; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; White, T O; Wotton, S A; Barr, Giles David; Bocquet, G; Ceccucci, Augusto; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Cundy, Donald C; D'Agostini, Giulio; Doble, Niels T; Falaleev, V P; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Gorini, B; Govi, G; Grafström, P; Kubischta, Werner; Lacourt, A; Lenti, M; Luitz, S; Mikulec, I; Norton, Alan Robert; Palestini, S; Panzer-Steindel, B; Tatishvili, G T; Taureg, Hans; Velasco, M; Wahl, H; Cheshkov, C; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, V D; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Zinchenko, A I; Knowles, I; Martin, V; Sacco, R; Walker, A; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Duclos, J; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savrié, M; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Veltri, M; Becker, H G; Eppard, M; Fox, H; Holtz, K; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Lopes da Silva, P; Maruelli, P; Pellmann, I A; Peters, A; Renk, B; Schmidt, S A; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Chollet, J C; Fayard, Louis; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Nappi, A; Pepé, M; Piccini, M; Carosi, R; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Giudici, Sergio; Mannelli, I; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Chèze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Formica, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Maier, A; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Clemencic, M; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Pastrone, N; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, Ewa; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Neuhofer, Günther; Pernicka, Manfred; Taurok, Anton; Widhalm, L

    2002-01-01

    The decay rate of $\\klpgg$ has been measured with the NA48 detector at the CERN SPS. A total of $2558$ $\\klpgg$ candidates have been observed with a residual background of $3.2\\%$. The branching ratio is determined to be $(1.36 \\pm0.03_{(stat)} \\pm0.03_{(syst)}\\pm 0.03_{(norm)})\\times10^{-6}$ and the vector coupling constant $a_v = -0.46 \\pm0.03_{(stat)} \\pm0.04_{(syst)}$. This result suggests that the CP-violation effects are dominating in the $\\klpee$ decay. An upper limit for the $\\klpgg$ decay rate in the two photon mass region $m_{\\gamma\\gamma}

  1. Z{sub c}(4200){sup +} decay width as a charmonium-like tetraquark state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei; Steele, T. G. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, S7N 5E2, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Chen, Hua-Xing, E-mail: hxchen@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering and International Research Center for Nuclei and Particles in the Cosmos, Beihang University, 100191, Beijing (China); Zhu, Shi-Lin, E-mail: zhusl@pku.edu.cn [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100871, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, 100871, Beijing (China); Center of High Energy Physics, Peking University, 100871, Beijing (China)

    2015-08-05

    To identify the nature of the newly observed charged resonance Z{sub c}(4200){sup +}, we study its hadronic decays Z{sub c}(4200){sup +}→J/ψπ{sup +},Z{sub c}(4200){sup +}→η{sub c}ρ{sup +} and Z{sub c}(4200){sup +}→D{sup +}D{sup -bar∗0} as a charmonium-like tetraquark state. In the framework of the QCD sum rules, we calculate the three-point functions and extract the coupling constants and decay widths for these interaction vertices. Including all these channels, the full decay width of the Z{sub c}(4200){sup +} state is consistent with the experimental value reported by the Belle Collaboration, supporting the tetraquark interpretation of this state.

  2. Z{sub c}(4200){sup +} decay width as a charmonium-like tetraquark state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei; Steele, T.G. [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Chen, Hua-Xing [Beihang University, School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering and International Research Center for Nuclei and Particles in the Cosmos, Beijing (China); Zhu, Shi-Lin [Peking University, School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Beijing (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Peking University, Center of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2015-08-15

    To identify the nature of the newly observed charged resonance Z{sub c}(4200){sup +}, we study its hadronic decays Z{sub c}(4200){sup +} → J/ψπ{sup +}, Z{sub c}(4200){sup +} @→ η{sub c}ρ{sup +} and Z{sub c}(4200){sup +} → D{sup +} anti D{sup *0} as a charmonium-like tetraquark state. In the framework of the QCD sum rules, we calculate the three-point functions and extract the coupling constants and decay widths for these interaction vertices. Including all these channels, the full decay width of the Z{sub c}(4200){sup +} state is consistent with the experimental value reported by the Belle Collaboration, supporting the tetraquark interpretation of this state. (orig.)

  3. Complete O(αs4) QCD corrections to hadronic Z decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikov, P A; Chetyrkin, K G; Kühn, J H; Rittinger, J

    2012-06-01

    Corrections of order α(s)(4) for the axial singlet contributions for the decay rate of the Z boson into hadrons are evaluated in the limit of the heavy top quark mass. Combined with recently finished O(α(s)(4)) calculations of the nonsinglet corrections, the new results directly lead us to the first complete O(α(s)(4)) prediction for the total hadronic decay rate of the Z boson. The new O(α(s)(4)) term in Z-decay rate leads to a significant stabilization of the perturbative series, to a reduction of the theory uncertainty in the strong coupling constant α(s), as extracted from these measurements, and to a small shift of the central value.

  4. Decay heat uncertainty quantification of MYRRHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorito Luca

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available MYRRHA is a lead-bismuth cooled MOX-fueled accelerator driven system (ADS currently in the design phase at SCK·CEN in Belgium. The correct evaluation of the decay heat and of its uncertainty level is very important for the safety demonstration of the reactor. In the first part of this work we assessed the decay heat released by the MYRRHA core using the ALEPH-2 burnup code. The second part of the study focused on the nuclear data uncertainty and covariance propagation to the MYRRHA decay heat. Radioactive decay data, independent fission yield and cross section uncertainties/covariances were propagated using two nuclear data sampling codes, namely NUDUNA and SANDY. According to the results, 238U cross sections and fission yield data are the largest contributors to the MYRRHA decay heat uncertainty. The calculated uncertainty values are deemed acceptable from the safety point of view as they are well within the available regulatory limits.

  5. Radioactive decays of highly-charged ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao B. S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Access to stored and cooled highly-charged radionuclides offers unprecedented opportunities to perform high-precision investigations of their decays. Since the few-electron ions, e.g. hydrogen- or helium-like ions, are quantum mechanical systems with clear electronic ground state configurations, the decay studies of such ions are performed under well-defined conditions and allow for addressing fundamental aspects of the decay process. Presented here is a compact review of the relevant experiments conducted at the Experimental Storage Ring ESR of GSI. A particular emphasis is given to the investigations of the two-body beta decay, namely the bound-state β-decay and its time-mirrored counterpart, orbital electron-capture.

  6. Observation of charmless hadronic B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    Four candidates for charmless hadronic B decay are observed in a data sample of four million hadronic Z decays recorded by the {\\sc aleph} detector at {\\sc lep} . The probability that these events come from background sources is estimated to b e less than $10^{-6}$. The average branching ratio of weakly decaying B hadrons (a mixture of $\\bd$, $\\bs$ and $\\lb$ weighted by their production cross sections and lifetimes , here denoted B) into two long-lived charged hadrons (pions, kaons or protons) is measured to be $\\Br(\\btohh) = \\resultBR$. The relative branching fraction $\\rratio$, where $\\rs$ is the ratio of $\\bs$ to $\\bd$ decays in the sample, is measured to be $\\resultR$. %Branching ratio upper limits are also obtained for a variety In addition, branching ratio upper limits are obtained for a variety of exclusive charmless hadronic two-body decays of B hadrons.

  7. Decay heat uncertainty quantification of MYRRHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorito, Luca; Buss, Oliver; Hoefer, Axel; Stankovskiy, Alexey; Eynde, Gert Van den

    2017-09-01

    MYRRHA is a lead-bismuth cooled MOX-fueled accelerator driven system (ADS) currently in the design phase at SCK·CEN in Belgium. The correct evaluation of the decay heat and of its uncertainty level is very important for the safety demonstration of the reactor. In the first part of this work we assessed the decay heat released by the MYRRHA core using the ALEPH-2 burnup code. The second part of the study focused on the nuclear data uncertainty and covariance propagation to the MYRRHA decay heat. Radioactive decay data, independent fission yield and cross section uncertainties/covariances were propagated using two nuclear data sampling codes, namely NUDUNA and SANDY. According to the results, 238U cross sections and fission yield data are the largest contributors to the MYRRHA decay heat uncertainty. The calculated uncertainty values are deemed acceptable from the safety point of view as they are well within the available regulatory limits.

  8. The dielectric constant of 3M VHB: a parameter in dispute

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Thomas G.; Calius, Emilio; Anderson, Iain A.

    2009-03-01

    Dielectric Elastomer (DE) transducers are essentially compliant capacitors fabricated from highly flexible materials that can be used as sensors, actuators and generators. The energy density of DE is proportional to their dielectric constant (ɛr), therefore an understanding of the dielectric constant and how it can be influenced by the stretch state of the material is required to predict or optimize DE device behavior. DE often operate in a stretched state. Wissler and Mazza, Kofod et al., and Choi et al. all measured an ɛr of approximately 4.7 for virgin VHB, but their results for prestretched DE showed that the dielectric constant decayed to varying degrees. Ma and Cross measured a dielectric constant of 6 for the same material with no mention of prestretch. In an attempt to resolve this discrepancy, ɛr measurements were performed on parallel plate capacitors consisting of virgin and stretched VHB4905 tape electroded with either gold sputtered coatings or Nyogel 756G carbon grease. For an unstretched VHB tape, an ɛr of 4.5 was measured with both electrode types, but the measured ɛr of equibiaxially stretched carbon specimens was lower by between 10 to 15%. The dielectric constant of VHB under high fields was assessed using blocked force measurements from a dielectric elastomer actuator. Dielectric constants ranging from 4.6-6 for stretched VHB were calculated using the blocked force tests. Figure of merits for DE generators and actuators that incorporate their nonlinear behavior were used to assess the sensitivity of these systems to the dielectric constant.

  9. Multiphoton amplitude in a constant background field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aftab; Ahmadiniaz, Naser; Corradini, Olindo; Kim, Sang Pyo; Schubert, Christian

    2018-01-01

    In this contribution, we present our recent compact master formulas for the multiphoton amplitudes of a scalar propagator in a constant background field using the worldline fomulation of quantum field theory. The constant field has been included nonperturbatively, which is crucial for strong external fields. A possible application is the scattering of photons by electrons in a strong magnetic field, a process that has been a subject of great interest since the discovery of astrophysical objects like radio pulsars, which provide evidence that magnetic fields of the order of 1012G are present in nature. The presence of a strong external field leads to a strong deviation from the classical scattering amplitudes. We explicitly work out the Compton scattering amplitude in a magnetic field, which is a process of potential relevance for astrophysics. Our final result is compact and suitable for numerical integration.

  10. f(R) constant-roll inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motohashi, Hayato [Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), Valencia (Spain); Starobinsky, Alexei A. [L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-08-15

    The previously introduced class of two-parametric phenomenological inflationary models in general relativity in which the slow-roll assumption is replaced by the more general, constant-roll condition is generalized to the case of f(R) gravity. A simple constant-roll condition is defined in the original Jordan frame, and exact expressions for a scalaron potential in the Einstein frame, for a function f(R) (in the parametric form) and for inflationary dynamics are obtained. The region of the model parameters permitted by the latest observational constraints on the scalar spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio of primordial metric perturbations generated during inflation is determined. (orig.)

  11. BOREAS RSS-17 Dielectric Constant Profile Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); McDonald, Kyle C.; Zimmerman, Reiner; Way, JoBea

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-17 team acquired and analyzed imaging radar data from the ESA's ERS-1 over a complete annual cycle at the BOREAS sites in Canada in 1994 to detect shifts in radar backscatter related to varying environmental conditions. This data set consists of dielectric constant profile measurements from selected trees at various BOREAS flux tower sites. The relative dielectric constant was measured at C-band (frequency = 5 GHz) as a function of depth into the trunk of three trees at each site, Measurements were made during April 1994 with an Applied Microwave Corporation field PDP fitted with a 0.358-cm (0.141-inch) diameter coaxial probe tip. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  12. Mixed quantum states with variable Planck constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gosson, Maurice A.

    2017-09-01

    Recent cosmological measurements tend to confirm that the fine structure constant α is not immutable and has undergone a tiny variation since the Big Bang. Choosing adequate units, this could also reflect a variation of Planck's constant h. The aim of this Letter is to explore some consequences of such a possible change of h for the pure and mixed states of quantum mechanics. Surprisingly enough it is found that not only is the purity of a state extremely sensitive to such changes, but that quantum states can evolve into classical states, and vice versa. A complete classification of such transitions is however not possible for the moment being because of yet unsolved mathematical difficulties related to the study of positivity properties of trace class operators.

  13. Benjamin Constant. Libertad, democracia y pluralismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Patricia Fonnegra Osorio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de un enfoque interpretativo, en este artículo se aborda por qué para Benjamin Constant la democracia solo puede darse en donde se presenta una relación necesaria entre la libertad entendida como defensa de los derechos individuales -libertad como independencia o negativa- y la libertad concebida como principio de la participación pública -libertad como autonomía o positiva-. Asimismo, se presenta la importancia que atribuye el autor a las tradiciones que dan vida a la configuración del universo cultural de un pueblo. Se concluye que en la obra de Constant se encuentra una clara defensa del Estado de derecho y del pluralismo, la cual puede iluminar la comprensión de los problemas políticos de la contemporaneidad.

  14. Some Dynamical Effects of the Cosmological Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axenides, M.; Floratos, E. G.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    Newton's law gets modified in the presence of a cosmological constant by a small repulsive term (antigravity) that is proportional to the distance. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data (Λ~=10-52 m-2), we investigate the significance of this term on various astrophysical scales. We find that on galactic scales or smaller (less than a few tens of kpc), the dynamical effects of the vacuum energy are negligible by several orders of magnitude. On scales of 1 Mpc or larger however we find that the vacuum energy can significantly affect the dynamics. For example we show that the velocity data in the local group of galaxies correspond to galactic masses increased by 35% in the presence of vacuum energy. The effect is even more important on larger low density systems like clusters of galaxies or superclusters.

  15. Daylight calculations using constant luminance curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betman, E. [CRICYT, Mendoza (Argentina). Laboratorio de Ambiente Humano y Vivienda

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents a simple method to manually estimate daylight availability and to make daylight calculations using constant luminance curves calculated with local illuminance and irradiance data and the all-weather model for sky luminance distribution developed in the Atmospheric Science Research Center of the University of New York (ARSC) by Richard Perez et al. Work with constant luminance curves has the advantage that daylight calculations include the problem's directionality and preserve the information of the luminous climate of the place. This permits accurate knowledge of the resource and a strong basis to establish conclusions concerning topics related to the energy efficiency and comfort in buildings. The characteristics of the proposed method are compared with the method that uses the daylight factor. (author)

  16. Quarkonia and heavy-light mesons in a covariant quark model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitão Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary calculations using the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST employed a scalar linear confining interaction and an additional constant vector potential to compute the mesonic mass spectra. In this work we generalize the confining interaction to include more general structures, in particular a vector and also a pseudoscalar part, as suggested by a recent study [1]. A one-gluon-exchange kernel is also implemented to describe the short-range part of the interaction. We solve the simplest CST approximation to the complete Bethe-Salpeter equation, the one-channel spectator equation, using a numerical technique that eliminates all singularities from the kernel. The parameters of the model are determined through a fit to the experimental pseudoscalar meson spectra, with a good agreement for both quarkonia and heavy-light states.

  17. Disturbing Implications of a Cosmological Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Lisa; Kleban, Matthew; Susskind, Leonard

    2002-10-01

    In this paper we consider the implications of a cosmological constant for the evolution of the universe, under a set of assumptions motivated by the holographic and horizon complementarity principles. We discuss the ``causal patch'' description of spacetime required by this framework, and present some simple examples of cosmologies described this way. We argue that these assumptions inevitably lead to very deep paradoxes, which seem to require major revisions of our usual assumptions.

  18. Gravitation, the Quantum, and Cosmological Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Mazur, Pawel O.

    1996-01-01

    The arguments of statistical nature for the existence of constituents of active gravitational masses are presented. The present paper proposes a basis for microscopic theory of universal gravitation. Questions like the relation of cosmological constant and quantum theory, black hole radiance and the nature of inertia are addressed. This paper is the second in the series of papers published in Acta Physica Polonica {\\bf B}.

  19. Decay of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) wood in moist and dry boreal, temperate, and tropical forest fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizelle Gonzalez; William Gould; Andrew T. Hudak; Teresa Nettleton Hollingsworth

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we set up a wood decomposition experiment to i) quantify the percent of mass remaining, decay constant and performance strength of aspen stakes (Populus tremuloides) in dry and moist boreal (Alaska and Minnesota, USA), temperate (Washington and Idaho, USA), and tropical (Puerto Rico) forest types, and ii) determine the effects of...

  20. Constant load and constant volume response of municipal solid waste in simple shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekkos, Dimitrios; Fei, Xunchang

    2017-05-01

    Constant load and constant volume simple shear testing was conducted on relatively fresh municipal solid waste (MSW) from two landfills in the United States, one in Michigan and a second in Texas, at respective natural moisture content below field capacity. The results were assessed in terms of two failure strain criteria, at 10% and 30% shear strain, and two interpretations of effective friction angle. Overall, friction angle obtained assuming that the failure plane is horizontal and at 10% shear strain resulted in a conservative estimation of shear strength of MSW. Comparisons between constant volume and constant load simple shear testing results indicated significant differences in the shear response of MSW with the shear resistance in constant volume being lower than the shear resistance in constant load. The majority of specimens were nearly uncompacted during specimen preparation to reproduce the state of MSW in bioreactor landfills or in uncontrolled waste dumps. The specimens had identical percentage of waste. The results of these tests suggest the possibility of significantly lower shear strength of MSW in bioreactor landfills where waste is placed with low compaction effort and constant volume, i.e., "undrained", conditions may occur. Compacted MSW specimens resulted in shear strength parameters that are higher than uncompacted specimens and closer to values reported in the literature. However, the normalized undrained shear strength in simple shear for uncompacted and compacted MSW was still higher than the normalized undrained shear strength reported in the literature for clayey and silty soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship of coagulation constant to time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadirov, N.K.; Anisimov, B.F.; Borodkin, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    Tests were carried out for the purpose of constructing mathematical models of electrodehydration of petroleum. Work was performed in electric fields with constant current. A 1% emulsion ''water in vaseline oil'' was placed into a cell after a 5 minute treatment in a UZDN-1 ultrasound disperser. Distance between electrodes was held at 25 mm. The cell was fed high voltage current from the source (VS-20-10), which was held constant throughout the entire test period. Current was measured with a microampermeter type M266M. Changes in the emulsion were observed using a KM-6 cathetometer. It was shown that the character of changes in function M(t), are dependent on the voltage of the electric field, viscosity of the media, initial concentration and initial distribution of particles according to size. The constant of kinetic coagulation is dependent on time: during the initial moment of electro-treatment of a reverse emulsion, thermal coagulation was observed, which gradually is replaced with electro-gravitational coagulation.

  2. Thermodynamic binding constants for gallium transferrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, W.R.; Pecoraro, V.L.

    1983-01-18

    Gallium-67 is widely used as an imaging agent for tumors and inflammatory abscesses. It is well stablished that Ga/sup 3 +/ travels through the circulatory system bound to the serum iron transport protein transferrin and that this protein binding is an essential step in tumor localization. However, there have been conflicting reports on the magnitude of the gallium-transferrin binding constants. Therefore, thermodynamic binding constants for gallium complexation at the two specific metal binding sites of human serum transferrin at pH 7.4 and 5 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ have been determined by UV difference spectroscopy. The conditional constants calculated for 27 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ are log K/sub 1/* = 20.3 and log K/sub 2/* = 19.3. These results are discussed in relation to the thermodynamics of transferrin binding of Fe/sup 3 +/ and to previous reports on gallium binding. The strength of transferrin complexation is also compared to that of a series of low molecular weight ligands by using calculated pM values (pM = -log (Ga(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6/)) to express the effective binding strength at pH 7.4.

  3. Emergent gravity in spaces of constant curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Orlando; Haddad, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    In physical theories where the energy (action) is localized near a submanifold of a constant curvature space, there is a universal expression for the energy (or the action). We derive a multipole expansion for the energy that has a finite number of terms, and depends on intrinsic geometric invariants of the submanifold and extrinsic invariants of the embedding of the submanifold. This is the second of a pair of articles in which we try to develop a theory of emergent gravity arising from the embedding of a submanifold into an ambient space equipped with a quantum field theory. Our theoretical method requires a generalization of a formula due to by Hermann Weyl. While the first paper discussed the framework in Euclidean (Minkowski) space, here we discuss how this framework generalizes to spaces of constant sectional curvature. We focus primarily on anti de Sitter space. We then discuss how such a theory can give rise to a cosmological constant and Planck mass that are within reasonable bounds of the experimental values.

  4. Emergent gravity in spaces of constant curvature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Orlando; Haddad, Matthew [Department of Physics, University of Miami,1320 Campo Sano Ave, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States)

    2017-03-07

    In physical theories where the energy (action) is localized near a submanifold of a constant curvature space, there is a universal expression for the energy (or the action). We derive a multipole expansion for the energy that has a finite number of terms, and depends on intrinsic geometric invariants of the submanifold and extrinsic invariants of the embedding of the submanifold. This is the second of a pair of articles in which we try to develop a theory of emergent gravity arising from the embedding of a submanifold into an ambient space equipped with a quantum field theory. Our theoretical method requires a generalization of a formula due to by Hermann Weyl. While the first paper discussed the framework in Euclidean (Minkowski) space, here we discuss how this framework generalizes to spaces of constant sectional curvature. We focus primarily on anti de Sitter space. We then discuss how such a theory can give rise to a cosmological constant and Planck mass that are within reasonable bounds of the experimental values.

  5. Strain sweeps from Oldroyd 8-constant framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengow, Chaimongkol; Giacomin, Alan Jeffrey

    2017-05-01

    Large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow is a popular experiment for studying the nonlinear physics of complex fluids. Specifically, the strain sweep is used routinely to identify when a complex fluid begins to exhibit nonlinear behavior. In this paper, we give the exact shear stress expression for the Oldroyd 8-constant framework evaluated for large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow (LAOS). We choose the Oldroyd 8-constant framework for its rich diversity of popular special cases (we list 14 of these cases). From our shear stress expression, we get exact expressions for the real and imaginary parts of the complex viscosity as functions of both the test frequency, and the shear rate amplitude. We then demonstrate the use of our results for our favorite special case of the Oldroyd 8-constant framework, the corotational Jeffreys model. In our Worked Example, we use this case to explore the influence of η∞ on the strain sweep response. We find that increasing η∞ raises the real part of the complex viscosity, and decreases its imaginary part.

  6. Quark mass dependence of pseudo-scalar masses and coupling constants qq+q Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farchioni, F.; Gebert, C.; Montvay, I.; Scholz, E.; Scorzato, L.

    2004-03-01

    The dependence of pseudo-scalar masses and decay constants on the sea and valence quark masses is investigated in the pseudo- Goldstone boson sector of QCD with two light quark flavours. The sea quark masses are at present in the range {1}/{3}m s ≤ m ud ≤ {2}/{3}m s whereas the valence quark masses satisfy {1}/{2}m sea ≤ m val ≤ 2m sea. The values of the Gasser-Leutwyler low energy constants L4, L5, L6 and L8 are estimated. The computation is done with the Wilson-quark lattice action at gauge coupling β = 5.1 on 16 4 lattices. O(a) effects are taken into account by applying chiral perturbation theory for the Wilson lattice action as proposed by Rupak and Shoresh.

  7. Clogging of granular material in vertical pipes discharged at constant velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Rodríguez Diego

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an experimental study on the flow of spherical particles through a vertical pipe discharged at constant velocity by means of a conveyor belt placed at the bottom. For a pipe diameter 3.67 times the diameter of the particles, we observe the development of hanging arches that stop the flow as they are able to support the weight of the particles above them. We find that the distribution of times that it takes until a stable clog develops, decays exponentially. This is compatible with a clogging probability that remains constant during the discharge. We also observe that the probability of clogging along the pipe decreases with the height, i.e. most of the clogs are developed near the bottom. This spatial dependence may be attributed to different pressure values within the pipe which might also be related to a spontaneous development of an helical structure of the grains inside the pipe.

  8. B, D and K Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M.; Asner, D.M.; Ball, P.; Baracchini, E.; Bell, G.; Beneke, M.; Berryhill, J.; Bevan, A.; Bigi, I.I.; Blanke, M.; Bobeth, Ch.; Bona, M.; Borzumati, F.; Browder, T.; Buanes, T.; Buchalla, G.; Buchmuller, O.; Buras, A.J.; Burdin, S.; Cassel, D.G.; Cavanaugh, R.; /Syracuse U. /Carleton U. /Durham U., IPPP /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Karlsruhe U. /RWTH Aachen U. /Fermilab /Queen Mary, U. of London /Notre Dame U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Dortmund U. /Annecy, LAPP /ICTP, Trieste /Taiwan, Natl. Central U. /Hawaii U. /Bergen U. /Munich U. /CERN /Liverpool U.

    2008-03-07

    The present report documents the results of Working Group 2: B, D and K decays, of the workshop on Flavor in the Era of the LHC, held at CERN from November 2005 through March 2007. With the advent of the LHC, we will be able to probe New Physics (NP) up to energy scales almost one order of magnitude larger than it has been possible with present accelerator facilities. While direct detection of new particles will be the main avenue to establish the presence of NP at the LHC, indirect searches will provide precious complementary information, since most probably it will not be possible to measure the full spectrum of new particles and their couplings through direct production. In particular, precision measurements and computations in the realm of flavor physics are expected to play a key role in constraining the unknown parameters of the Lagrangian of any NP model emerging from direct searches at the LHC. The aim of Working Group 2 was twofold: on one hand, to provide a coherent, up-to-date picture of the status of flavor physics before the start of the LHC; on the other hand, to initiate activities on the path towards integrating information on NP from high-p{sub T} and flavor data. This report is organized as follows. In Sec. 1, we give an overview of NP models, focusing on a few examples that have been discussed in some detail during the workshop, with a short description of the available computational tools for flavor observables in NP models. Sec. 2 contains a concise discussion of the main theoretical problem in flavor physics: the evaluation of the relevant hadronic matrix elements for weak decays. Sec. 3 contains a detailed discussion of NP effects in a set of flavor observables that we identified as 'benchmark channels' for NP searches. The experimental prospects for flavor physics at future facilities are discussed in Sec. 4. Finally, Sec. 5 contains some assessments on the work done at the workshop and the prospects for future developments.

  9. Search for R-parity Violating Decays of Supersymmetric Particles in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Ewers, A.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofiev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Roux, B.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2002-01-01

    A search, in $e^+ e^-$ collisions, for chargino, neutralino, scalar lepton and scalar quark pair-production is performed, without assuming R-parity conservation in decays, in the case that only one of the coupling constants $\\lambda_{ijk}$ or $\\lambda''_{ ijk}$ is non-negligible. No signal is found in data up to a centre-of-mass energy of 208 \\GeV. Limits on the production cross sections and on the masses of supersymmetric particles are derived.

  10. Model of Decaying Dark Energy Based on the Kaluza-Klein Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirov, U. N.

    2017-08-01

    On the basis of a scalar potential associated with Beltrami's geometry - manifolds of constant negative curvature, the Klein-Gordon problem has been solved, making it possible, under the assumption of a physical structure of the fifth dimension (presumably a rich form of matter), to model on the basis of the Kaluza-Klein theory the hypothesis of decaying dark energy configuring the rates of expansion of the Universe.

  11. Electromagnetic structure and weak decay of meson K in a light-front QCD-inspired

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, Fabiano P; Frederico, T; Tomio, Lauro

    2007-01-01

    The kaon electromagnetic (e.m.) form factor is reviewed considering a light-front constituent quark model. In this approach, it is discussed the relevance of the quark-antiquark pair terms for the full covariance of the e.m. current. It is also verified, by considering a QCD dynamical model, that a good agreement with experimental data can be obtained for the kaon weak decay constant once a probability of about 80% of the valence component is taken into account.

  12. Analysis of the chemical equilibrium of combustion at constant volume

    OpenAIRE

    Marius BREBENEL

    2014-01-01

    Determining the composition of a mixture of combustion gases at a given temperature is based on chemical equilibrium, when the equilibrium constants are calculated on the assumption of constant pressure and temperature. In this paper, an analysis of changes occurring when combustion takes place at constant volume is presented, deriving a specific formula of the equilibrium constant. The simple reaction of carbon combustion in pure oxygen in both cases (constant pressure and constant ...

  13. Decay property of Timoshenko system in thermoelasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2011-12-30

    We investigate the decay property of a Timoshenko system of thermoelasticity in the whole space for both Fourier and Cattaneo laws of heat conduction. We point out that although the paradox of infinite propagation speed inherent in the Fourier law is removed by changing to the Cattaneo law, the latter always leads to a solution with the decay property of the regularity-loss type. The main tool used to prove our results is the energy method in the Fourier space together with some integral estimates. We derive L 2 decay estimates of solutions and observe that for the Fourier law the decay structure of solutions is of the regularity-loss type if the wave speeds of the first and the second equations in the system are different. For the Cattaneo law, decay property of the regularity-loss type occurs no matter what the wave speeds are. In addition, by restricting the initial data to U 0∈H s(R)∩L 1,γ(R) with a suitably large s and γ ∈ [0,1], we can derive faster decay estimates with the decay rate improvement by a factor of t -γ/2. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Measurement of Vud with 0+→0+ nuclear beta decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, J. C.; Towner, I. S.

    2013-10-01

    Results from superallowed 0+→0+ nuclear beta decays today provide the best value for Vud, with an uncertainty of ±0.02%. Some 150 independent measurements of 13 separate superallowed transitions covering a wide range of parent nuclei from 10C to 74Rb constitute a very robust data set. Excellent consistency among the average results for all 13 transitions - an expected consequence of the conservation of vector current (CVC) - also confirms the validity of the small transition-dependent theoretical corrections that have been applied to account for isospin-symmetry breaking. With CVC consistency established, the value of the vector coupling constant, GV, has been extracted from the data and used to determine |Vud| = 0.97425 (22).

  15. Studies of Three-Body Decay of B to J/ψηK and B(Bs to ηcπK*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Mohammadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the B0→J/ψηK0 and B+→J/ψηK+ decay by using the Dalitz plot analysis. As we know there are tree, penguin, emission, and emission-annihilation diagrams for these decay modes in the factorization approach. The transition matrix element is factorized into a B→ηK form factor multiplied by J/ψ decay constant and also a B→K form factor multiplied by J/ψη decay constant. According to QCD factorization approach and using the Dalitz plot analysis, we calculate the branching ratios of the B0→J/ψηK0 and B+→J/ψηK+ three-body decay in view of the η-η' mixing and obtain the value of the (9.22-1.47+2.67×10-5, while the experimental results of them are (8±4×10-5 and (10.8±3.3×10-5, respectively. In this research we also analyze the B(Bs→ηcπK* decay which is similar to the previous decay, but there is no experimental data for the last decay. Since for calculations of the B(Bs→ηcπK* decay we use assumptions of the B→J/ψηK decay, we hope that if this decay will be measured by the LHCb in the future, the experimental results will be in agreement with our calculations.

  16. Approximate solutions of range for constant altitude - constant high subsonic speed flight of transport aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavcar, A.; Cavcar, M. [Anadolu Univ., School of Civil Aviation, Eskisehir, (Turkey)

    2004-09-01

    Approximate cruise range solutions are introduced for the constant altitude constant high subsonic speed flight of turbojet/fan transport aircraft with cambered wing design. The variation of the specific fuel consumption with Mach number is also considered in derivation of the approximate solutions. The method aims at estimation of the cruise range of aircraft during conceptual or preliminary design phase. An application of the solutions is also presented. (author)

  17. Decaying leptophilic dark matter at IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucenna, Sofiane M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati,C.P. 13, Frascati, I-00044 (Italy); Chianese, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II”,Complesso Univ. Monte S. Angelo, Via Cinthia, Napoli, I-80126 (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Univ. Monte S. Angelo,Via Cinthia, Napoli, I-80126 (Italy); Mangano, Gianpiero [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Univ. Monte S. Angelo,Via Cinthia, Napoli, I-80126 (Italy); Miele, Gennaro; Morisi, Stefano; Pisanti, Ofelia [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II”,Complesso Univ. Monte S. Angelo, Via Cinthia, Napoli, I-80126 (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Univ. Monte S. Angelo,Via Cinthia, Napoli, I-80126 (Italy); Vitagliano, Edoardo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II”,Complesso Univ. Monte S. Angelo, Via Cinthia, Napoli, I-80126 (Italy)

    2015-12-29

    We present a novel interpretation of IceCube high energy neutrino events (with energy larger than 60 TeV) in terms of an extraterrestrial flux due to two different contributions: a flux originated by known astrophysical sources and dominating IceCube observations up to few hundreds TeV, and a new flux component where the most energetic neutrinos come from the leptophilic three-body decays of dark matter particles with a mass of few PeV. Differently from other approaches, we provide two examples of elementary particle models that do not require extremely tiny coupling constants. We find the compatibility of the theoretical predictions with the IceCube results when the astrophysical flux has a cutoff of the order of 100 TeV (broken power law). In this case the most energetic part of the spectrum (PeV neutrinos) is due to an extra component such as the decay of a very massive dark matter component. Due to the low statistics at our disposal we have considered for simplicity the equivalence between deposited and neutrino energy, however such approximation does not affect dramatically the qualitative results. Of course, a purely astrophysical origin of the neutrino flux (no cutoff in energy below the PeV scale — unbroken power law) is still allowed. If future data will confirm the presence of a sharp cutoff above few PeV this would be in favor of a dark matter interpretation.

  18. Decaying leptophilic dark matter at IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucenna, Sofiane M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Frascati, I-00044 Italy (Italy); Chianese, Marco; Miele, Gennaro; Morisi, Stefano; Pisanti, Ofelia; Vitagliano, Edoardo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli ' ' Federico II' ' , Complesso Univ. Monte S. Angelo, Via Cinthia, Napoli, I-80126 Italy (Italy); Mangano, Gianpiero, E-mail: boucenna@lnf.infn.it, E-mail: chianese@na.infn.it, E-mail: mangano@na.infn.it, E-mail: miele@na.infn.it, E-mail: stefano.morisi@gmail.com, E-mail: pisanti@na.infn.it, E-mail: ed.vitagliano@studenti.unina.it [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Univ. Monte S. Angelo, Via Cinthia, Napoli, I-80126 Italy (Italy)

    2015-12-01

    We present a novel interpretation of IceCube high energy neutrino events (with energy larger than 60 TeV) in terms of an extraterrestrial flux due to two different contributions: a flux originated by known astrophysical sources and dominating IceCube observations up to few hundreds TeV, and a new flux component where the most energetic neutrinos come from the leptophilic three-body decays of dark matter particles with a mass of few PeV. Differently from other approaches, we provide two examples of elementary particle models that do not require extremely tiny coupling constants. We find the compatibility of the theoretical predictions with the IceCube results when the astrophysical flux has a cutoff of the order of 100 TeV (broken power law). In this case the most energetic part of the spectrum (PeV neutrinos) is due to an extra component such as the decay of a very massive dark matter component. Due to the low statistics at our disposal we have considered for simplicity the equivalence between deposited and neutrino energy, however such approximation does not affect dramatically the qualitative results. Of course, a purely astrophysical origin of the neutrino flux (no cutoff in energy below the PeV scale—unbroken power law) is still allowed. If future data will confirm the presence of a sharp cutoff above few PeV this would be in favor of a dark matter interpretation.

  19. Radiative Decay Widths of Ground and Excited States of Vector Charmonium and Bottomonium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hluf Negash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the radiative decay widths of vector quarkonia for the process of J/ψ(nS→ηc(nSγ and Υ(nS→ηb(nSγ (for principal quantum numbers n=1,2,3 in the framework of Bethe-Salpeter equation under the covariant instantaneous ansatz using a 4×4 form of BSE. The parameters of the framework were determined by a fit to the mass spectrum of ground states of pseudoscalar and vector quarkonia, such as ηc, ηb, J/ψ, and Υ. These input parameters so fixed were found to give good agreements with data on mass spectra of ground and excited states of pseudoscalar and vector quarkonia, leptonic decay constants of pseudoscalar and vector quarkonia, two-photon decays, and two-gluon decays of pseudoscalar quarkonia in our recent paper. With these input parameters so fixed, the radiative decay widths of ground (1S and excited (2S,3S states of heavy vector quarkonia (J/Ψ and Υ are calculated and found to be in reasonable agreement with data.

  20. Temperature-dependent electronic decay profiles in CZT: probe of bulk and surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessick, Royal; Maupin, Hugh; Tepper, Gary C.; Szeles, Csaba

    2003-01-01

    The electronic performance of CZT-based gamma radiation spectrometers is governed by a synergism of bulk and surface properties. Compensation is used to increase the bulk resistivity of Cd1-xZnxTe (x~0.1), but the same electronic states that are introduced to increase the material resistivity can also trap charge and reduce the carrier lifetime. Electrical and mechanical surface defects introduced during or subsequent to crystal harvesting are also known to interfere with device performance. Using a contactless, pulsed laser microwave cavity perturbation technique, electronic decay profiles were studied in high pressure Bridgman CZT as a function of temperature. The electronic decay profile was found to depend very strongly on temperature and was modeled using a function consisting of two exponential terms with temperature-dependent amplitudes and time constants. The model was used to relate the observed temperature dependent decay kinetics in CZT to specific trap energies. It was found that, at low temperatures, the electronic decay process is dominated by a deep trap with an energy of approximately 0.69 +/- 0.1 eV from the band edge. As the temperature is increased, the charge trapping becomes dominated by a second trap with an energy of approximately 0.60 +/- 0.1 eV from the band edge. Surface damage introduces additional charge traps that significantly alter the decay kinetics particularly at low temperatures.