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Sample records for pseudacteon tricuspis borgmeier

  1. Fire ant venom alkaloids act as key attractants for the parasitic phorid fly, Pseudacteon tricuspis (Diptera: Phoridae)

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    Chen, Li; Sharma, Kavita R.; Fadamiro, Henry Y.

    2009-12-01

    The phorid fly, Pseudacteon tricuspis Borgmeier, is an introduced parasitoid of imported fire ants, Solenopsis spp., in the USA. Although the assumption that phorid flies use fire ant alarm pheromones for host location is probably true, we demonstrated in a previous study the possible involvement of other ant semiochemicals in the response of P. tricuspis to fire ants. This study was conducted to determine the glandular sources and identity of the semiochemicals mediating this interaction. First, we tested the electroantennogram response of P. tricuspis to extracts of key body parts and glands of workers of the red imported fire ant, S. invicta Buren. The results confirm that the poison (venom) gland/sac is the key source of compounds which elicited strong antennal activity in P. tricuspis. Follow-up studies were conducted by using a combination of bioassay-guided fractionation and behavioral bioassays to test the hypothesis that attraction of this parasitoid to fire ants is mediated by venom alkaloids. The results confirm the response of P. tricuspis to physiologically relevant amounts of the two venom alkaloid fractions ( cis and trans alkaloid fractions) of S. invicta. Further analysis by coupled gas chromatography-electroantennogram detection revealed nine venom alkaloid components including two novel 2,6-dialkylpiperideines that elicited significant antennal activity in P. tricuspis. This is the first demonstration of the role of venom alkaloids of ants as attractants for their natural enemies. We propose a semiochemical-mediated host location mechanism for P. tricuspis involving both alarm pheromones and venom alkaloids. The ecological significance of these findings, including the attraction of male P. tricuspis to fire ant venom alkaloids, possibly for mate location, is discussed.

  2. Cytogenetic analysis of three species of Pseudacteon (Diptera, Phoridae parasitoids of the fire ants using standard and molecular techniques

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    Mónica G. Chirino

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudacteon flies, parasitoids of worker ants, are being intensively studied as potentially effective agents in the biological control of the invasive pest fire ant genus Solenopsis (Hymenoptera: Formicidae. This is the first attempt to describe the karyotype of P. curvatus Borgmeier, P. nocens Borgmeier and P. tricuspis Borgmeier. The three species possess 2n = 6; chromosomes I and II were metacentric in the three species, but chromosome pair III was subtelocentric in P. curvatus and P. tricuspis, and telocentric in P. nocens. All three species possess a C positive band in chromosome II, lack C positive heterochromatin on chromosome I, and are mostly differentiated with respect to chromosome III. P. curvatus and P. tricuspis possess a C positive band, but at different locations, whereas this band is absent in P. nocens. Heterochromatic bands are neither AT nor GC rich as revealed by fluorescent banding. In situ hybridization with an 18S rDNA probe revealed a signal on chromosome II in a similar location to the C positive band in the three species. The apparent lack of morphologically distinct sex chromosomes is consistent with proposals of environmental sex determination in the genus. Small differences detected in chromosome length and morphology suggests that chromosomes have been highly conserved during the evolutionary radiation of Pseudacteon. Possible mechanisms of karyotype evolution in the three species are suggested.

  3. Pseudacteon Parasitoids of Azteca instabilis Ants in Southern Mexico (Diptera: Phoridae; Hymenoptera: Formicidae

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    Brian V. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of the genus Pseudacteon are described, all from Chiapas, Mexico, and all of which are parasitoids of the ant Azteca instabilis. Sternite 6 of Pseudacteon dorymyrmecis Borgmeier is illustrated for the first time, and P. confusus Disney is synonymized with this species. The natural history of the Azteca-Pseudacteon interaction is described.

  4. Pseudacteon Parasitoids of Azteca instabilis Ants in Southern Mexico (Diptera: Phoridae; Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

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    Brown, Brian V.; Philpott, Stacy M.

    2012-01-01

    Three new species of the genus Pseudacteon are described, all from Chiapas, Mexico, and all of which are parasitoids of the ant Azteca instabilis. Sternite 6 of Pseudacteon dorymyrmecis Borgmeier is illustrated for the first time, and P. confusus Disney is synonymized with this species. The natural history of the Azteca-Pseudacteon interaction is described.

  5. Rasgos morfológicos asociados a la viabilidad de pupas en parasitoides del género Pseudacteon (Diptera: Phoridae Morphological traits associated with pupae viability in Pseudacteon (Diptera: Phoridae parasitoids

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    Patricia J. Folgarait

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN. Fóridos del género Pseudacteon Coquillett oviponen en forrajeras del género Solenopsis Westwood y empupan en sus cabezas. Se evaluó la relación entre la viabilidad de los parasitoides, la presencia de cuernos respiratorios y el color en los opérculos de los puparios de cuatro especies de Pseudacteon criados sobre Solenopsis invicta Buren y Solenopsis richteri Forel. La presencia de cuernos respiratorios estuvo asociada a la viabilidad de las pupas para las especies consideradas (p 0,09; excepto cuando Pseudacteon cultellatus Borgmeier se desarrolló sobre hormigas de la reserva y niñeras de S. invicta (p ABSTRACT. Pseudacteon Coquillett phorid flies oviposit on Solenopsis Westwood ants and pupate within the ant's head. We have evaluated the relationship between pupae's viability, presence of respiratory horns and the operculum color in four species of Pseudacteon reared on Solenopsis invicta Buren and Solenopsis richteri Forel ants. The presence of respiratory horns was significantly associated with pupae's viability for all species considered (p 0,09, except (p < 0,01 when Pseudacteon cultellatus Borgmeier had developed on S. invicta nanitic and reserve workers. Pupae with light-colored opercula were more frequent in P. cultellatus, whereas brown opercula were more frequent for the other species that attack bigger ants. Mimetism can be invoked to explain the similarity in opercula color with that of the head of the parasitized ant as a way to avoid recognition by members of the colony. We conclude that the presence of respiratory horns is necessary for pupae survival of most of the pupae and we suggest to use the presence of respiratory horns as an indicator of the efficiency of rearing protocols for this group of parasitoids. We also recommend using forager ants because other casts do not seem to be appropriate hosts.

  6. Rasgos morfológicos asociados a la viabilidad de pupas en parasitoides del género Pseudacteon (Diptera: Phoridae

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    Patricia J. FOLGARAIT

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Fóridos del género Pseudacteon Coquillett oviponen en forrajeras del género Solenopsis Westwood y empupan en sus cabezas. Se evaluó la rela- ción entre la viabilidad de los parasitoides, la presencia de cuernos respiratorios y el color en los opérculos de los puparios de cuatro especies de Pseudacteon criados sobre Solenopsis invicta Buren y Solenopsis richteri Forel. La presencia de cuernos respiratorios estuvo asociada a la viabilidad de las pupas para las especies consideradas (p 0,09; excepto cuando Pseudacteon cultellatus Borgmeier se desarrolló sobre hormi- gas de la reserva y niñeras de S. invicta (p < 0,01. Los opérculos claros predomi- naron en P. cultellatus; mientras que en las demás especies, que atacan a hormi- gas más grandes, predominaron los opérculos castaños. Debido a que los opérculos presentaron un color similar al de la hormiga parasitada, esto repre- sentaría un mimetismo por parte del parasitoide para evitar ser detectado por el huésped. Dado que los cuernos respiratorios son necesarios para la superviven- cia de la mayoría de las pupas, sugerimos que sean usados como indicadores de eficiencia en los protocolos de cría. Recomendamos usar solo forrajeras dado que las otras castas no parecen ser huéspedes apropiados.

  7. Parasitoids of the endangered leafcutter ant Atta robusta Borgmeier in urban and natural areas

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    Diego S. Gomes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Parasitoids of the endangered leafcutter ant Atta robusta Borgmeier in urban and natural areas. Hosts of parasitoids in urban areas may suffer from a double threat of habitat destruction by urbanization and parasitism pressure. Moreover, the parasitoids themselves might be at risk if they are specialists. Here, we studied whether Atta robusta (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, which is on the red list of Brazilian threatened species, suffers from higher parasitism pressure in an urban area compared to a natural one. In addition, we determined whether their specialist parasitoids, Eibesfeldtphora breviloba and Myrmosicarius exrobusta (Diptera, Phoridae, are in risk and evaluated whether they are influenced by habitat structure, temperature, humidity, ant traffic, and time of the day. The study was carried out in an urban park and in a natural protected area in the city of Rio de Janeiro. In each site we chose an open area and a closed area (forest and sampled nine nests in each area. We found that parasitism pressure was similar in urban and natural areas, with the same two parasitoid species present in both areas. The main difference was related to habitat structure, since M. exrobusta was mainly present in open areas while E. breviloba was almost exclusively found in closed areas. Myrmosicarius exrobusta was not present during the hottest midday times, and its abundance was negatively correlated to vapor pressure deficit. These results suggest that green areas can be an important component in efforts to conserve diversity in urban areas. However, the complexity of the habitats in those areas is a fundamental issue in designing urban parks.

  8. Gastric Ollulanus tricuspis infection identified in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) with chronic vomiting : case report

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    M.G. Collett; Pomroy, W E; W.G. Guilford; Johnstone, A. C.; Blanchard, B J; S.G. Mirams

    2000-01-01

    Gastritis, vomition and weight loss are common in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). Gastric spiral bacteria (Helicobacter spp.) and the very small, viviparous nematode Ollulanus tricuspis, a stomach worm of cats, are believed to be important causes. Three sibling cheetahs at Wellington Zoo, New Zealand, developed chronic vomiting, diarrhoea and debility. Their parents were both South African-born. Response to antibacterial treatment was poor. Endoscopic examinations revealed chronic lympho...

  9. Gastric Ollulanus tricuspis infection identified in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus with chronic vomiting : case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Collett

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastritis, vomition and weight loss are common in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus. Gastric spiral bacteria (Helicobacter spp. and the very small, viviparous nematode Ollulanus tricuspis, a stomach worm of cats, are believed to be important causes. Three sibling cheetahs at Wellington Zoo, New Zealand, developed chronic vomiting, diarrhoea and debility. Their parents were both South African-born. Response to antibacterial treatment was poor. Endoscopic examinations revealed chronic lymphoplasmacytic gastritis and Ollulanus infection. Treatment with oxfendazole and pyrantel embonate resulted in clinical improvement; however, 1 cheetah, which died 7 months later as a result of a ruptured liver due to hepatic amyloidosis, still had Ollulanus worms present in her stomach. Ollulanus tricuspis is a significant cause of gastritis and vomiting in captive cheetahs, lions and tigers, as well as wild cougars and tigers. The parasite has not yet been found in sub-Saharan Africa. Because of the unusual characteristics of this parasite, the literature on its life history and techniques for diagnosis is reviewed.

  10. Gastric Ollulanus tricuspis infection identified in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) with chronic vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, M G; Pomroy, W E; Guilford, W G; Johnstone, A C; Blanchard, B J; Mirams, S G

    2000-12-01

    Gastritis, vomition and weight loss are common in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). Gastric spiral bacteria (Helicobacter spp.) and the very small, viviparous nematode Ollulanus tricuspis, a stomach worm of cats, are believed to be important causes. Three sibling cheetahs at Wellington Zoo, New Zealand, developed chronic vomiting, diarrhoea and debility. Their parents were both South African-born. Response to antibacterial treatment was poor. Endoscopic examinations revealed chronic lymphoplasmacytic gastritis and Ollulanus infection. Treatment with oxfendazole and pyrantel embonate resulted in clinical improvement; however, 1 cheetah, which died 7 months later as a result of a ruptured liver due to hepatic amyloidosis, still had Ollulanus worms present in her stomach. Ollulanus tricuspis is a significant cause of gastritis and vomiting in captive cheetahs, lions and tigers, as well as wild cougars and tigers. The parasite has not yet been found in sub-Saharan Africa. Because of the unusual characteristics of this parasite, the literature on its life history and techniques for diagnosis is reviewed.

  11. A second species, and first Central American record, of the phorid fly genus Lenkoa Borgmeier (Diptera: Phoridae).

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    Brown, Brian V; Porras, Wendy

    2016-09-16

    A second species, and first Central American record, of the phorid fly genus Lenkoa Borgmeier (Diptera: Phoridae).        Many species of phorid flies have wingless or brachypterous females. Mostly, they belong to a group classified within the subfamily Metopininae corresponding to the Metopina group of genera of Brown (1992a) or the tribe Metopinini of Disney (2003, not 1987). The males of this group are much more typical in appearance, with well-developed wings, larger eyes, and fully developed abdominal tergites. These males carry females during a mating flight, often dispersing them to new breeding sites (Miller 1984). Generally, the sexual dimorphism is so great that the sexes cannot be confidently associated unless they are collected in copula. This has led to a profusion of species being described as males and females in separate genera. Some of these brachypterous females, both within the Metopinini and elsewhere in other Phoridae, have been correctly associated with their males when they are found together (e.g., Brown 1986, 1992b, 1994), but many remain unassociated.

  12. The first report of the ante-mortem diagnosis of Ollulanus tricuspis infection in two dogs.

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    Kato, Daiki; Oishi, Mariko; Ohno, Koichi; Nakashima, Ko; Wada, Atsuhito; Fukumoto, Shin-Ichiro; Morita, Tatsushi; Imai, Soichi; Tsuboi, Masaya; Chambers, James K; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    NOTE Internal Medicine The first report of the ante-mortem diagnosis of Ollulanus tricuspis infection in two dogs Daiki KATO 1) , Mariko OISHI 1) , Koichi OHNO 1)* , Ko NAKASHIMA 1) , Atsuhito WADA 1) , Tatsushi MORITA 2) , Soichi IMAI 2) , Masaya TSUBOI 3) , James K. CHAMBERS 3) , Kazuyuki UCHIDA 3) and Hajime TSUJIMOTO 1) 1) Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan 2) Division of Veterinary Infectious Disease, Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, 1-7-1 Kyonanchyo Musashino, Tokyo 180-8602, Japan 3) Department of Veterinary Pathology, Graduate School of Agricultural Should have been NOTE Internal Medicine The first report of the ante-mortem diagnosis of Ollulanus tricuspis infection in two dogs Daiki KATO 1) , Mariko OISHI 1) , Koichi OHNO 1)* , Ko NAKASHIMA 1) , Atsuhito WADA 1) , Shin-ichiro FUKUMOTO 2) , Tatsushi MORITA 3) , Soichi IMAI 3) , Masaya TSUBOI 4) , James K. CHAMBERS 4) , Kazuyuki UCHIDA 4) and Hajime TSUJIMOTO 1) 1) ,Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan 2) Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology, Department of Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501, Japan 3) Division of Veterinary Infectious Disease, Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, 1-7-1 Kyonanchyo Musashino, Tokyo 180-8602, Japan 4) Department of Veterinary Pathology, Graduate School of Agricultural.

  13. Cuticular Hydrocarbon Cues Are Used for Host Acceptance by Pseudacteon spp. Phorid Flies that Attack Azteca sericeasur Ants

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    Mathis, KA; Tsutsui, ND

    2016-01-01

    © 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Parasitoids often use complex cues to identify suitable hosts in their environment. Phorid fly parasitoids that develop on one or a few host species often use multiple cues, ranging from general to highly specific, to home in on an appropriate host. Here, we describe the hierarchy of cues that Pseudacteon phorid flies use to identify Azteca ant hosts. We show, through behavioral observations in the field, that phorid flies are attracted to two...

  14. Cuticular Hydrocarbon Cues Are Used for Host Acceptance by Pseudacteon spp. Phorid Flies that Attack Azteca sericeasur Ants.

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    Mathis, Kaitlyn A; Tsutsui, Neil D

    2016-04-01

    Parasitoids often use complex cues to identify suitable hosts in their environment. Phorid fly parasitoids that develop on one or a few host species often use multiple cues, ranging from general to highly specific, to home in on an appropriate host. Here, we describe the hierarchy of cues that Pseudacteon phorid flies use to identify Azteca ant hosts. We show, through behavioral observations in the field, that phorid flies are attracted to two cryptic Azteca species, but only attack Azteca sericeasur (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Dolichoderinae). To test whether the phorid flies use cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) to distinguish between the two Azteca taxa, we first documented and compared cuticular hydrocarbons of the two Azteca taxa using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Then, using cuticular hydrocarbon-transfer experiments with live ants, we characterized the cuticular hydrocarbons of A. sericeasur as a short-range, host location cue used by P. lasciniosus (Diptera: Phoridae) to locate the ants.

  15. Environmental and habitat drivers of relative abundance for a suite of azteca-attacking Pseudacteon phorid flies.

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    Reese, Katlynd M; Philpott, Stacy M

    2012-10-01

    Phoridae (Diptera) have widespread impacts on insect communities by limiting host ant behavior. However, phorid-ant interactions may vary with habitat or environmental conditions. Three Pseudacteon species parasitize Azteca instabilis Fr. Smith, a common ant in coffee agroecosystems, and limit A. instabilis foraging, indirectly benefiting other insects. However, little is known about how phorid abundance, behavior, and effects change with environmental conditions. In shaded coffee systems, coffee (Coffea arabica L.) grows under a range of shade conditions and management changes affect species interactions. For example, Pseudacteon spp. more strongly limit A. instabilis foraging in low-shade coffee habitats. We sampled relative abundance of three phorid species around A. instabilis nests in three coffee habitats varying in shade management during dry and wet seasons. We measured canopy cover, tree richness, tree density, leaf litter depth, and number of nearby trees with A. instabilis to determine whether these habitat factors correlate with phorid abundance. P. laciniosus Brown was the most abundant phorid in both seasons. Phorid relative abundance did not differ by habitat, but did differ by season. P. laciniosus accounted for a higher proportion of phorids in the wet season (91.4%) than in the dry season (78.9%), and P. planidorsalis Brown accounted for a larger percent in the dry season (21.1%) than in the wet season (7.3%). Phorid composition did not differ with habitat type, and none of the measured environmental variables correlated with changes in phorid composition. Thus, phorids in coffee agroecosystems respond to large seasonal differences, but not differences between coffee habitats.

  16. Phylogeography of the heavily poached African common pangolin (Pholidota, Manis tricuspis) reveals six cryptic lineages as traceable signatures of Pleistocene diversification.

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    Gaubert, Philippe; Njiokou, Flobert; Ngua, Gabriel; Afiademanyo, Komlan; Dufour, Sylvain; Malekani, Jean; Bi, Sery Gonedelé; Tougard, Christelle; Olayemi, Ayodeji; Danquah, Emmanuel; Djagoun, Chabi A M S; Kaleme, Prince; Mololo, Casimir Nebesse; Stanley, William; Luo, Shu-Jin; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge on faunal diversification in African rainforests remains scarce. We used phylogeography to assess (i) the role of Pleistocene climatic oscillations in the diversification of the African common pangolin (Manis tricuspis) and (ii) the utility of our multilocus approach for taxonomic delineation and trade tracing of this heavily poached species. We sequenced 101 individuals for two mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), two nuclear DNA and one Y-borne gene fragments (totalizing 2602 bp). We used a time-calibrated, Bayesian inference phylogenetic framework and conducted character-based, genetic and phylogenetic delineation of species hypotheses within African common pangolins. We identified six geographic lineages partitioned into western Africa, Ghana, the Dahomey Gap, western central Africa, Gabon and central Africa, all diverging during the Middle to Late Pleistocene. MtDNA (cytochrome b + control region) was the sole locus to provide diagnostic characters for each of the six lineages. Tree-based Bayesian delimitation methods using single- and multilocus approaches gave high support for 'species' level recognition of the six African common pangolin lineages. Although the diversification of African common pangolins occurred during Pleistocene cyclical glaciations, causative correlation with traditional rainforest refugia and riverine barriers in Africa was not straightforward. We conclude on the existence of six cryptic lineages within African common pangolins, which might be of major relevance for future conservation strategies. The high discriminative power of the mtDNA markers used in this study should allow an efficient molecular tracing of the regional origin of African common pangolin seizures. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Ultrastructure of antennal sensillae of the samsum ant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-10-11

    Oct 11, 2010 ... However, the basiconic sensillae that have been described in Drosophila melanogaster (Shanbhag et al., 1999), phorid fly, Pseudacteon tricuspis (Chen and. Fadamiro, 2008) and Phoracantha semipunctata (Lopes et al., 2002) have not been observed in P. sennaarensis. Heavy density of non-porous ...

  18. The brain of the tree pangolin (Manis tricuspis). I. General appearance of the central nervous system.

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    Imam, Aminu; Ajao, Moyosore S; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Ihunwo, Amadi O; Manger, Paul R

    2017-08-01

    Here, we describe the superficial appearance of the brain of the rarely studied tree pangolin. Phylogenetic analyses have placed the pangolins, order Pholidota, as a sister group to the order Carnivora. The majority of features visible on the surface of the tree pangolin brain, and its overall appearance can be described as typically mammalian. The pattern of sulci and gyri, while simple, appears very similar to that observed in carnivores. Two derived features of the Pholidota were observed, the first being the rostral decussation of the pyramidal tract, which instead of occurring at the spinomedullary junction, decussates at the level of the caudal pole of the facial nerve nucleus in the rostral medulla oblongata. This appears to be related to the need for voluntary control of the tongue, with a potentially enlarged corticobulbar tract ending in the hypoglossal nucleus. The second derived feature is the very short spinal cord, which terminates midway along the thoracic vertebrae before giving rise to a long and extensive cauda equina. This foreshortened spinal cord appears to be related to anisotropic growth of the somatic and neural elements following early development of the central nervous system. The olfactory system appears to be generally enlarged and is likely the predominant sense used in foraging. Vision and hearing do not appear specialized based on the relative size of the superior and inferior colliculi, but potential somatic specializations indicate that the somatosensory system is heavily relied upon for food consumption and prehensile tail usage. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Chemical and behavioural studies of the trail-following pheromone in the leaf-cutting ant Atta opaciceps, Borgmeier (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Campos, R. S.; Mendonca, A. L.; Cabral Jr, C. R.; Vaníčková, Lucie; do Nascimento, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 86, Mar (2016), s. 25-31 ISSN 0022-1910 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : venom gland * trail pheromone * two-dimensional gas chromatography * leaf- cutting ants Atta sp. Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.227, year: 2016

  20. Potential Impact of Large Scale Abstraction on the Quality of Shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRO

    Hole. PASSIFLORACEAE. 128. Adenia lobata. Aherenyama. Climber. PHYTOLACCACEAE. 129. Parquetiana. Abakamo. Tree nigrescens. PIPERACEAE. 130. .... Cercopithecus Diana. Diana monkey. *. @. 5. Colobus poykomos. Black-and-white. *. * colobus monkey. PHOLIDOTA. 6. Phataginus tricuspis. Tree pangolin.

  1. A new species of Megaselia Rondani (Diptera, Phoridae) with wing-spots from China.

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    Wang, Jian-Feng; Liu, Guang-Chun

    2016-01-26

    The genus Megaselia was established by Rondani in 1856 with the type species Megaselia crassineura Rondani (=Phora costalis Roser, 1840) (Borgmeier 1968). About 1600 species are recorded and distributed all over the world (Fang & Liu 2015). In the genus Megaselia, species with wing-spots are rare. Only six species are recorded with wing-spots worldwide: M. conglomerata (Malloch) from North America (Borgmeier 1964), M. dickoni Wakeford & Disney and M. shadeae Hartop & Brown from Central America (Wakeford & Disney 1994, Hartop & Brown 2014), M. maculifera Beyer from Africa (Beyer 1965), M. chorogi Naumov from Georgia (Naumov 1979), and M. trimacula Fang & Liu from China (Fang & Liu 2015).

  2. Volume 9 No. 9 December 2009 POTENTIAL IMPACT ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-09

    Dec 9, 2009 ... Western Tree- hyrax. Long-tailed/Tree. Pangolin. Dendrohyrax Dorsalis. Manis tricuspis. T. E. C. S. 11. 2. REPTILIA. Reptila. Nile croccodilus. Monitor lizard. Water moccasin. Rock python. Green mamba. Black cobra. Hingeback. Croccodilus niloticus. Veranus niloticus. Python sebae. Dendrospis viridis.

  3. A survey of the parasites of the African white-bellied pangolin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phataginus tricuspis) in Edo State, Nigeria. They were purchased at Ekiuwa Market in Benin City, where they are sold and people consume the meat as a good source of protein and the animal can also be used for medicinal purposes. Four (4) ...

  4. Hymenoptera, Formicidae Latreille, 1809: New records for Atlantic Forest in the state of Rio de Janeiro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veiga-Ferreira, S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Standardized sample design helped to increase our knowledge on the ant fauna of Brazilian biomes, in particularleaf litter ants of Atlantic Forest. In this study are presented the new records of nine ant species for the state of Rio deJaneiro: Amblyopone armigera Mayr, 1897, A. elongata (Santschi, 1912, Prionopelta punctulata Mayr, 1866, Lachnomyrmexplaumanni Borgmeier, 1957, Trachymyrmex iheringi (Emery, 1887, Pachycondyla arhuaca Forel, 1901, P. stigma (Fabricius,1804, Thaumatomyrmex mutilatus Mayr 1887 and Proceratium brasiliense Borgmeier, 1959. They were captured duringthree systematic inventories carried out in Tinguá Biological Reserve, in Restinga da Marambaia and in Vista Chinesa ForestReserve. Winkler’s extractors and pitfall traps were used as sampling techniques to access ants’ fauna.

  5. Evolutionary plasticity in coccidia - striking morphological similarity of unrelated coccidia (apicomplexa) from related hosts: Eimeria spp. from African and Asian Pangolins (Mammalia: Pholidota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirků, Miloslav; Kvičerová, Jana; Modrý, David; Hypša, Václav

    2013-07-01

    Two morphologically similar, but phylogenetically unrelated Eimeria species from ancient mammals, African Tree Pangolin Phataginus tricuspis and Sunda Pangolin Manis javanica (Pholidota: Manidae), from two distant biogeographic realms (Afrotropical and Oriental), are characterized and compared morphologically and molecularly. Phylogenetic analyses produced an unstable topology. However, while precise position of the two Eimeria species from pangolins could not be firmly established due to the lack of related taxa, it is evident that they are not closely related and do not fall into any of the so far recognized eimerian lineages. Moreover, an eimerian found in P. tricuspis is described as a new species Eimeria nkaka n. sp., based on morphology of oocysts, endogenous developmental stages and sequence data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Review of the Ambrysus stali La Rivers species complex (Heteroptera: Nepomorpha: Naucoridae) with the description of a new species from Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sites, Robert W; Reynoso-Velasco, Daniel

    2015-09-15

    The Neotropical Ambrysus stali La Rivers species complex is reviewed and includes A. bifidus La Rivers & Nieser, A. scolius La Rivers, A. stali La Rivers, and A. tricuspis La Rivers. Ambrysus oblongulus Montandon is removed as a member of this complex. Features uniting these species are related to male genitalia and associated structures. Ambrysus maya n. sp. is the fifth species in the complex and is described from Belize, Guatemala, and Mexico based on specimens from recent collecting and museum collections.

  7. THE TRUE IDENTITY OF COPELAND'S AQUATIC SCUTTLE FLY (DIPTERA: PHORIDAE) FROM INDIANA AND RECOGNITION OF A SIBLING SPECIES FROM TEXAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, R. Henry L.; Copeland, Robert S.; Murrell, Ebony

    2012-01-01

    Among the insects reported by Copeland (1989) breeding in the waters retained by treeholes in Indiana was a scuttle fly identified by W. H. Robinson as Megaselia scalaris (Loew). It is here reported that in fact this fly, along with fresh material from Illinois and Missouri, is M. imitatrix Borgmeier, whose type series was from Puerto Rico. An aquatic species reported from Texas is recognized as a sibling species of M. imitatrix and is named M. hansonix Disney, sp. nov. A single female from Brazil represents a third species of this complex, thus raising doubts about the identity of specimens from Brazil attributed to M. imitatrix by Benton and Claugher (2000). PMID:22879679

  8. Las hormigas Ecitoninae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae de Morelos, México

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    Luis N Quiroz-Robledo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un inventario de las hormigas ecitoninas del estado de Morelos, ubicado en la región centro-sur de la república mexicana. Los muestreos fueron realizados por medio de colectas directas y del uso de trampas de intercepción; ocasionalmente se capturaron también machos atraidos a la luz. Se encontraron 15 especies de hormigas ecitoninas: Labidus coecus (Latreille, 1802; L. praedator s. str. (Fr. Smith, 1858; Neivamyrmex agilis Borgmeier, 1953; N. cornutus (Watkins, 1975; N. fallax Borgmeier, 1953; N. graciellae (Mann, 1926; N. impudens (Mann, 1922; N. macropterus Borgmeier, 1953; N. melanocephalus (Emery, 1985; N. nigrescens (Cresson, 1872; N. opacithorax (Emery, 1894; N. pauxilus (Wheeler, 1903; N. sumichrasti (Norton, 1868; N. swainsoni (Shuckard, 1840 y Nomamyrmex esenbecki mordax (Santschi, 1928. Doce de estos registros son nuevos para la entidad. Las especies más abundantes fueron L. coecus, N. melanocephalus, N. nigrescens y N. esenbecki. Se proporciona también alguna información sobre la distribución de estas especies en el estado y las fechas de vuelo de los machos que fueron recolectados. Por último, se anexa una clave para la identificación de obreras y machos en la cual se incluye una especie adicional (N. fuscipennis, que no fue recolectada por nosotros pero ha sido informada por otro autor para la entidad.The Ecitoninae ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae from Morelos, México. To produce an inventory of the Ecitoninae ants from Morelos State (south central Mexico, we used direct capture and pit-fall traps. Occasionally, males were also collected near artificial light sources. Fifteen species were found: Labidus coecus, L. praedator s. str., Neivamyrmex agilis, N. cornutus, N. fallax, N. graciellae, N. impudens, N. macropterus, N. melanocephalus, N. nigrescens, N. opacithorax, N. pauxilus, N. sumichrasti, N. swainsoni and Nomamyrmex esenbecki mordax. Twelve of these species are new records for the state. The most

  9. Taxonomy and First Records of Two Megaselia Rondani Species (Diptera: Phoridae) Preying upon Eggs of Phyllomedusa iheringii Boulenger (Anura: Phyllomedusidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, D C; Dos Santos, T G

    2017-06-01

    Non-aquatic reproductive modes have evolved among frogs possibly favored by some advantages such as the avoidance of aquatic predators. These reproductive modes, however, make the egg clutches susceptible to terrestrial predators, among which Diptera larvae are some of the most harmful. The present work reports the predation by phorid flies of 22 egg clutches of Phyllomedusa iheringii Boulenger in the South of Brazil. Phorid specimens were identified as Megaselia bruchiana (Borgmeier & Schmitz) and Megaselia necrophaga (Enderlein), species that were reported previously to be associated with ants and dead beetles, respectively. Frog-feeding in these species is hypothesized to be use of an alternative seasonal food source. We amend the diagnoses of both Megaselia species and provide new illustrations to facilitate their identification. We also describe the male of M. bruchiana for the first time and associate males with females of both species.

  10. Comparison of mitochondrial genome sequences of pangolins (Mammalia, Pholidota).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanin, Alexandre; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; van Vuuren, Bettine Jansen

    2015-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced for three species of pangolins, Manis javanica, Phataginus tricuspis, and Smutsia temminckii, and comparisons were made with two other species, Manis pentadactyla and Phataginus tetradactyla. The genome of Manidae contains the 37 genes found in a typical mammalian genome, and the structure of the control region is highly conserved among species. In Manis, the overall base composition differs from that found in African genera. Phylogenetic analyses support the monophyly of the genera Manis, Phataginus, and Smutsia, as well as the basal division between Maninae and Smutsiinae. Comparisons with GenBank sequences reveal that the reference genomes of M. pentadactyla and P. tetradactyla (accession numbers NC_016008 and NC_004027) were sequenced from misidentified taxa, and that a new species of tree pangolin should be described in Gabon. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Phytochemical Profiles and Antioxidant Activities in Six Species of Ramie Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongsheng; Wang, Gaoyan; Wang, Hong; Cheng, Chaohua; Zang, Gonggu; Guo, Xinbo; Liu, Rui Hai

    2014-01-01

    Increased consumption of vegetables or plant food has been associated with decreased risk of developing major chronic diseases, such as cancers, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and age-related functional decline. Ramie leaves are rich in phenolics and flavonoids, which have been suggested for human health benefits. Phenolic contents, flavonoid contents, phenolic compounds, and anti-cancer properties in six species of ramie leaves were analyzed by Folin-reagent method, sodium borohydride/chloranil-based assay (SBC), HPLC method and antiproliferation, cytoxicity, respectively. Antioxidant activities were measured through peroxyl radical scavenging capacity (PSC) method, oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) method, and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA). Research indicated that Boehmeria penduliflora contained the highest total phenolic content (2313.7±27.28 mg GAE/100 g FW), and flavonoid content (1682.4±27.70 mg CAE/100 g FW). Boehmeria tricuspis showed the highest PSC value (9574.8±117.63 µM vit. C equiv./100 g FW), while Boehmeria penduliflora indicated the highest ORAC value (330.44±16.88 µmol Trolox equiv./g FW). The antioxidant activities were correlated with phenolic contents and flavonoid contents. Boehmeria tricuspis had the highest antiproliferative capacity with the lowest EC50 (4.11±0.19 mg/mL). The results for the analyzed ramie for CAA were significantly different from each other (panalysis. Our research is the first report to study the phytochemical profiles and antioxidant activities in different species of ramie leaves for their health benefit. PMID:25243741

  12. Mitochondrial genomes of African pangolins and insights into evolutionary patterns and phylogeny of the family Manidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Toit, Zelda; du Plessis, Morné; Dalton, Desiré L; Jansen, Raymond; Paul Grobler, J; Kotzé, Antoinette

    2017-09-21

    This study used next generation sequencing to generate the mitogenomes of four African pangolin species; Temminck's ground pangolin (Smutsia temminckii), giant ground pangolin (S. gigantea), white-bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis) and black-bellied pangolin (P. tetradactyla). The results indicate that the mitogenomes of the African pangolins are 16,558 bp for S. temminckii, 16,540 bp for S. gigantea, 16,649 bp for P. tetradactyla and 16,565 bp for P. tricuspis. Phylogenetic comparisons of the African pangolins indicated two lineages with high posterior probabilities providing evidence to support the classification of two genera; Smutsia and Phataginus. The total GC content between African pangolins was observed to be similar between species (36.5% - 37.3%). The most frequent codon was found to be A or C at the 3rd codon position. Significant variations in GC-content and codon usage were observed for several regions between African and Asian pangolin species which may be attributed to mutation pressure and/or natural selection. Lastly, a total of two insertions of 80 bp and 28 bp in size respectively was observed in the control region of the black-bellied pangolin which were absent in the other African pangolin species. The current study presents reference mitogenomes of all four African pangolin species and thus expands on the current set of reference genomes available for six of the eight extant pangolin species globally and represents the first phylogenetic analysis with six pangolin species using full mitochondrial genomes. Knowledge of full mitochondrial DNA genomes will assist in providing a better understanding on the evolution of pangolins which will be essential for conservation genetic studies.

  13. Gastrointestinal parasites of cats in Denmark assessed by necropsy and concentration McMaster technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi-Storm, N; Mejer, H; Al-Sabi, M N S; Olsen, C S; Thamsborg, S M; Enemark, H L

    2015-12-15

    The large population of feral cats in Denmark may potentially transmit pathogens to household cats and zoonotic parasites to humans. A total of 99 euthanized cats; feral cats (n=92) and household cats with outdoor access (n=7), were collected from March to May 2014 from the Zealand region, Denmark. The sedimentation and counting technique (SCT) was used to isolate helminths and coproscopy was done by concentration McMaster technique (c-McMaster). Overall, 90.1% of the cats were infected and a total of 10 species were recorded by SCT: 5 nematode species: Toxocara cati (84.8%), Ollulanus tricuspis (13.1%), Aonchotheca putorii (7.1%), Paersonema spp. (3.0%), Strongyloides spp. (1.0%); 3 cestodes: Hydatigera taeniaeformis (36.4%), Mesocestoides sp. (3.0%), Dipylidium caninum (1.0%); and 2 trematodes: Cryptocotyle spp. (5.1%) and Pseudamphistomum truncatum (1.0%). O. tricuspis was the second most common gastrointestinal nematode of cats but had the highest intensity of infection. For T. cati, prevalence and worm burden were significantly higher in feral than household cats. No juvenile cats were infected with H. taeniaeformis, and age thus had a significant effect on prevalence and worm burdens of this species. Rural cats had a higher prevalence and worm burden of A. putorii than urban cats. By c-McMaster, ascarid, capillarid, strongylid or taeniid type eggs were found in 77.9% of the cats while Cystoisospora felis was found in 2.1%. The sensitivity of the c-McMaster was 82.5% for T. cati but 26.5% for taeniid eggs, using the SCT as gold standard. A positive correlation between faecal egg counts and worm burdens was seen for T. cati, but not for taeniid eggs (assumed to be H. taeniaeformis). Coprological examination also detected the eggs of extraintestinal Capillariidae species including Eucoleus aerophilus and Eucoleus boehmi, but further necropsy studies are needed to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Larval endoparasitoids (Hymenoptera of frugivorous flies (Diptera, Tephritoidea reared from fruits of the cerrado of the State of Mato Grosso do Sul , Brazil

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    Manoel A. Uchôa-Fernandes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a five years survey of endoparasitoids obtained from the larvae of frugivorous Tephritidae and Lonchaeidae flies. The insects were reared from cultivated and wild fruits collected in areas of the cerrado in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. The flies obtained from 14 host fruit species were eight Anastrepha species, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann, 1824 (Tephritidae; Dasiops sp. and Neosilba spp. (Lonchaeidae. Eleven parasitoid species were collected: Braconidae - Asobara anastrephae (Muesebek, 1958, Doryctobracon areolatus (Szépligeti, 1911, D. fluminensis (Costa Lima, 1938, Opius bellus Gahan, 1930 and Utetes anastrephae (Viereck, 1913; Figitidae - Aganaspis nordlanderi Wharton, 1998, Lopheucoila anastrephae (Rhower, 1919, Odontosema anastrephae (Borgmeier, 1935 and Trybliographa infuscata Gallardo, Díaz & Uchôa-Fernandes, 2000 and, Pteromalidae - Spalangia gemina Boucek, 1963 and S. endius Walker, 1839. In all cases only one parasitoid emerged per puparium. D. areolatus was the most abundant and frequent parasitoid of fruit fly species, as was L. anastrephae in Neosilba spp. larvae. This is the first record of A. nordlanderi in the midwestern Brazilian region.

  15. Northeastern Chukchi Sea demersal fishes and associated environmental characteristics, 2009-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, Brenda L.; Raborn, Scott W.; Holladay, Brenda A.; Gallaway, Benny J.; Crawford, Stephen T.; Priest, Justin T.; Edenfield, Lorena E.; Meyer, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Three closely-spaced study areas in the northeastern Chukchi Sea off of Alaska provided a opportunity to examine demersal fish communities over a small spatial scale as part of a multidisciplinary program. During 2009 and 2010, fishes in the three study areas (Klondike, Burger, and Statoil) were sampled at 37 stations with a plumb staff beam trawl and a 3 m beam trawl; 70% of stations were sampled during all three cruises. Fish catches were dominated by small fishes (modeling of the data suggested that overall fish density, species richness, and density of Arctic staghorn sculpin (Gymnocanthus tricuspis) and Bering flounder (Hippoglossoides robustus) were higher in the more southerly Klondike study area than in the more northerly Burger and Statoil study areas. Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida) was abundant throughout the study region. Richness and density could be explained by the environmental variables that defined the overall study area. The Klondike study area was warmer and erosional in nature with higher proportions of gravel sediment. Other study areas were colder and more depositional in nature with muddier sediment and were characterized by high densities of megafaunal invertebrates such as brittle stars. There appeared to be a lack of ecological homogeneity across these three closely-spaced study areas of the Chukchi Sea.

  16. Forensic application of DNA barcoding for identification of illegally traded African pangolin scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwale, Monica; Dalton, Desire L; Jansen, Raymond; De Bruyn, Marli; Pietersen, Darren; Mokgokong, Prudent S; Kotzé, Antoinette

    2017-03-01

    The escalating growth in illegal wildlife trade and anthropogenic habitat changes threaten the survival of pangolin species worldwide. All eight extant species have experienced drastic population size reductions globally with a high extinction risk in Asia. Consequently, forensic services have become critical for law enforcement, with a need for standardised and validated genetic methods for reliable identifications. The seizure of three tonnes of pangolin scales, believed to have originated from Africa, by Hong Kong Customs Authorities provided an opportunity for the application of DNA barcoding in identifying scales. Three mitochondrial DNA gene regions (COI, Cyt b, and D-loop) were amplified for a subsample of the confiscated material and compared with taxonomically verified references. All four African species were recovered as monophyletic with high interspecific uncorrected p-distance estimates (0.048-0.188) among genes. However, only three of four African species (Phataginus tricuspis, Phataginus tetradactyla, and Smutsia gigantea, originating from West and Central Africa) and one of four Asian species (Manis javanica from Southeast Asia) were identified among scales. Although the assignment of unknown scales to specific species was reliable, additional genetic tools and representative reference material are required to determine geographic origins of confiscated pangolin specimens.

  17. A Review of the Tawny Crazy Ant, Nylanderia fulva, an Emergent Ant Invader in the Southern United States: Is Biological Control a Feasible Management Option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zinan; Moshman, Lori; Kraus, Emily C; Wilson, Blake E; Acharya, Namoona; Diaz, Rodrigo

    2016-12-15

    The tawny crazy ant, Nylanderia fulva (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), has invaded states of the U.S. including Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, and Georgia. Native to South America, N. fulva is considered a pest in the U.S. capable of annoying homeowners and farmers, as well as displacing native ant species. As it continues to expand its range, there is a growing need to develop novel management techniques to control the pest and prevent further spread. Current management efforts rely heavily on chemical control, but these methods have not been successful. A review of the biology, taxonomy, ecology, and distribution of N. fulva, including discussion of ecological and economic consequences of this invasive species, is presented. Options for future management are suggested focusing on biological control, including parasitoid flies in the genus Pseudacteon, the microsporidian parasite Myrmecomorba nylanderiae, and a novel polynucleotide virus as potential biological control agents. We suggest further investigation of natural enemies present in the adventive range, as well as foreign exploration undertaken in the native range including Paraguay, Brazil, and Argentina. We conclude that N. fulva may be a suitable candidate for biological control.

  18. A review of scuttle fly genera of Israel (Diptera: Phoridae), with new records and an identification key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostovski, Mike B

    2016-07-08

    A brief review of Israeli scuttle flies is given. The following genera are new records for the country: Arabiphora, Billotia, Chonocephalus, Menozziola, Phalacrotophora, Pseudacteon, Psyllomyia, and Puliciphora. Eighteen species-Arabiphora tenuifemorata, Chonocephalus depressus, Conicera floricola, Conicera similis, Gymnophora integralis, Gymnophora perpropinqua, Megaselia scalaris, Megaselia stigmatica, Menozziola schmitzi, Metopina formicomendicula, Phalacrotophora beuki, Phalacrotophora fasciata, Phora limpida, Phora tincta, Psyllomyia braunsi, Puliciphora rufipes, Spiniphora bergenstammi, and Tubicera lichtwardi-are added to the list of 56 phorid species previously known from Israel. Two species, Conicera similis and Megaselia scalaris, are recorded in association with the summer truffle Tuber aestivum commercially grown in northern Israel. The status of the Afrotropical Phora congolensis Beyer, 1965 is designated as nomen dubium. A lapsius calami, which led to an erroneous generic attribution of Metopina braueri in the paper on Israeli Metopina (Mostovski, 2016), is noted here. An identification key to the Israeli genera of scuttle flies, as well as notes on recognition and/or biology of individual species, are provided.

  19. Revision of the fungus-farming ant genus Sericomyrmex Mayr (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Myrmicinae

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    Ana Ješovnik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The genus Sericomyrmex Mayr (Formicidae: Myrmicinae: Attini is a Neotropical group of fungus-farming ants known for its problematic taxonomy, caused by low morphological variability across the species, vague and old species descriptions, and an outdated and incomplete key published in 1916. Recent molecular studies revealed that Sericomyrmex is the product of a rapid recent radiation, with a divergence date of 4.3 million years ago. Here we present a comprehensive taxonomic revision of the genus Sericomyrmex based on morphology and a recently published molecular phylogeny. We discuss and illustrate morphological characters for Sericomyrmex workers, males, queens, and larvae. We report 18 standard morphological measurements and 5 indices for 529 workers, 50 queens, and 39 males, which we employ in morphometric analyses. The revised genus Sericomyrmex comprises eleven species, including three new species, here described as S. maravalhas sp. n., S. radioheadi sp. n., and S. saramama sp. n. We also redescribe S. amabilis Wheeler, S. bondari Borgmeier, S. lutzi Wheeler, S. mayri Forel, S. opacus Mayr, S. parvulus Forel, S. saussurei Emery, and S. scrobifer Forel. The number of recognized species (11 is lower than the previously recognized 19 species and 3 subspecies. The following species and subspecies are synonymized: under S. opacus [=S. aztecus Forel syn. n., S. zacapanus Wheeler syn. n., and S. diego Forel syn. n.]; under S. bondari [=S. beniensis Weber syn. n.]; under S. mayri [=S. luederwaldti Santschi syn. n., S. moreirai Santschi syn. n., S. harekulli Weber syn. n., S. harekulli arawakensis Weber syn. n., S. urichi Forel syn. n.]; under S. saussurei [=S. burchelli Forel syn. n., S. impexus Wheeler syn. n., S. urichi maracas Weber syn. n.]; and under S. parvulus [=S. myersi Weber syn. n.]. We provide a key to Sericomyrmex species for the worker caste and information on the geographic distributions of all species.

  20. The complete phylogeny of pangolins: scaling up resources for the molecular tracing of the most trafficked mammals on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaubert, Philippe; Antunes, Agostinho; Meng, Hao; Miao, Lin; Peigné, Stéphane; Justy, Fabienne; Njiokou, Flobert; Dufour, Sylvain; Danquah, Emmanuel; Alahakoon, Jayanthi; Verheyen, Erik; Stanley, William T; O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E; Luo, Shu-Jin

    2017-11-13

    Pangolins, considered the most-trafficked mammals on Earth, are rapidly heading to extinction. Eight extant species of these African and Asian scale-bodied anteaters are commonly recognized, but their evolutionary relationships remain largely unexplored. Here we present the most comprehensive phylogenetic assessment of pangolins, based on genetic variation of complete mitogenomes and nine nuclear genes. We confirm deep divergence among Asian and African pangolins occurring not later than the Oligocene-Miocene boundary ca. 23 million-years-ago (Ma) (95% HPD=18.7-27.2), limited fossil evidence suggesting dispersals from Europe. We recognize three genera including Manis (Asian pangolins), Smutsia (large African pangolins) and Phataginus (small African pangolins), which first diversified in the Middle-Upper Miocene (9.8-13.3 Ma) through a period of gradual cooling coinciding with a worldwide taxonomic diversification among mammals. Based on large mitogenomic distances among the three genera (18.3-22.8%) and numerous (18) morphological traits unique to Phataginus, we propose the subfamily Phatagininae subfam. nov. to designate small African pangolins. In contrast with the morphological-based literature, our results establish that the thick-tailed pangolin (M.crassicaudata) is sister-species of the Sunda (M. javanica) and Palawan (M. culionensis) pangolins. Mitogenomic phylogenetic delineations supported additional pangolin species subdivisions (n=13), including six African common pangolin (P. tricuspis) lineages, but these patterns were not fully supported by our multi-locus approach. Finally, we identified over 5,000 informative mitogenomic sites and diagnostic variation from five nuclear genes among all species and lineages of pangolins, providing an important resource for further research and for effectively tracing the worldwide pangolin trade. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Arcellacea (testate amoebae) as bio-indicators of road salt contamination in lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Helen M; Patterson, R Timothy

    2014-08-01

    Winter deicing operations occur extensively in mid- to high-latitude metropolitan regions around the world and result in a significant reduction in road accidents. Deicing salts can, however, pose a major threat to water quality and aquatic organisms. In this paper, we examine the utility of Arcellacea (testate amoebae) for monitoring lakes that have become contaminated by winter deicing salts, particularly sodium chloride. We analysed 50 sediment samples and salt-related water property variables (chloride concentrations; conductivity) from 15 lakes in the Greater Toronto Area and adjacent areas of southern Ontario, Canada. The sampled lakes included lakes in proximity to major highways and suburban roads and control lakes in forested settings away from road influences. Samples from the most contaminated lakes, with chloride concentrations in excess of 400 mg/l and conductivities of >800 μS/cm, were dominated by species typically found in brackish and/or inhospitable lake environments and by lower faunal diversities (lowest Shannon diversity index values) than samples with lower readings. Q-R-mode cluster analysis and detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) resulted in the recognition of four assemblage groupings. These reflect varying levels of salt contamination in the study lakes, along with other local influences, including nutrient loading. The response to nutrients can, however, be isolated if the planktic eutrophic indicator species Cucurbitella tricuspis is removed from the counts. The findings show that the group has considerable potential for biomonitoring in salt-contaminated lakes, and their presence in lake sediment cores may provide significant insights into long-term benthic community health, which is integral for remedial efforts.

  2. Taxonomic review of the New World spider genus Elaver O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898 (Araneae, Clubionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturnino, Regiane; Bonaldo, Alexandre Bragio

    2015-11-23

    Elaver O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898 is characterized and redescribed, including 49 species occurring from the United States to Argentina. Thirty seven previously known species are redescribed: Elaver achuca (Roddy, 1966) revalidated, E. balboae (Chickering, 1937), E. barroana (Chickering, 1937), E. calcarata (Kraus, 1955), E. carlota (Bryant, 1940), E. chisosa (Roddy, 1966), E. crinophora (Franganillo, 1934), E. crocota (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896), E. albicans (Franganillo, 1930) name restored, E. depuncta O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898, E. elaver (Bryant, 1940), E. excepta (L. Koch, 1866), E. grandivulva (Mello-Leitão, 1930), E. hortoni (Chickering, 1937), E. implicata (Gertsch, 1941), E. juana (Bryant, 1940), E. kohlsi (Gertsch & Jellison, 1939), E. linguata (F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1900), E. madera (Roddy, 1966), E. mirabilis (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896) new. comb., E. mulaiki (Gertsch, 1935), E. multinotata (Chickering, 1937), E. orvillei (Chickering, 1937), E. placida O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898, E. portoricensis (Petrunkevitch, 1930), E. quadrata (Kraus, 1955), E. richardi (Gertsch, 1941), E. sericea O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898, E. sigillata (Petrunkevitch, 1925), E. simplex (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1896), E. texana (Gertsch, 1933), E. tigrina O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1898 name restored, E. tricuspis (F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1900), E. tristani (Banks, 1909), E. tumivulva (Banks, 1909), E. valvula (F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1900) and E. wheeleri (Roewer, 1933). Ten new species are described: E. candelaria n. sp. and E. helenae n. sp. from Mexico; E. arawakan n. sp. from Haiti; E. lizae n. sp. from Costa Rica; E. darwichi n. sp. from Ecuador; E. juruti n. sp., E. tourinhoae n. sp. and E. vieirae n. sp. from Brazil; E. shinguito n. sp. from Peru and E. beni n. sp. from Bolivia. The female of E. hortoni is described for the first time. Lectotypes are designated for E. sigillata and its actual female is described for the first time. Four new synonyms are proposed: E. languida