WorldWideScience

Sample records for prune blueberry pomegranate

  1. Synthesis of Silver and Gold Nanoparticles Using Antioxidants from Blackberry, Blueberry, Pomegranate, and Turmeric Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greener synthesis of Ag and Au nanoparticles is described using antioxidants from blackberry, blueberry, pomegranate, and turmeric extracts. The synthesized particles were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM (HR...

  2. Pomegranate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Those parts include the fruit, seed, seed oil, tannin-rich peel, root, leaf, and flower. The pomegranate ... P, Akhtar S. Pomegranate peel and fruit extracts: a review of potential anti-inflammatory and anti-infective effects . ...

  3. Blueberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)Blueberry leaves might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking blueberry leaves along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go ...

  4. Blueberries for the Upper Piedmont and Mountain Regions. Part 1

    OpenAIRE

    Bratsch, Tony

    2008-01-01

    This publication reviews the main strategies for growing blueberries as a specialty crop, including planting, mulching, irrigation, fertilizing, pruning, harvesting, marketing, and predation, weed, insect and disease control.

  5. Blueberries for the Upper Piedmont and Mountain Regions. Part 2

    OpenAIRE

    Bratsch, Tony

    2008-01-01

    This publication reviews the main strategies for growing blueberries as a specialty crop, including planting, mulching, irrigation, fertilizing, pruning, harvesting, marketing, and predation, weed, insect and disease control.

  6. Specialty Crop Profile: Blueberries for the Upper Piedmont and Mountain Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Bratsch, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Discusses blueberries as a small fruit crop for the upper Piedmont and mountain regions of Virginia. Provides information about best ways to plant the blueberries, mulching, irrigation, fertilization, pruning, harvesting and handling, marketing and more.

  7. Influence on longevity of blueberry, cinnamon, green and black tea, pomegranate, sesame, curcumin, morin, pycnogenol, quercetin, and taxifolin fed iso-calorically to long-lived, F1 hybrid mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Stephen R; Mote, Patricia L; Flegal, James M; Teter, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Phytonutrients reportedly extend the life span of Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila, and mice. We tested extracts of blueberry, pomegranate, green and black tea, cinnamon, sesame, and French maritime pine bark (Pycnogenol and taxifolin), as well as curcumin, morin, and quercetin for their effects on the life span of mice. While many of these phytonutrients reportedly extend the life span of model organisms, we found no significant effect on the life span of male F1 hybrid mice, even though the dosages used reportedly produce defined therapeutic end points in mice. The compounds were fed beginning at 12 months of age. The control and treatment groups were iso-caloric with respect to one another. A 40% calorically restricted and other groups not reported here did experience life span extension. Body weights were un-changed relative to controls for all but two supplemented groups, indicating most supplements did not change energy absorption or utilization. Tea extracts with morin decreased weight, whereas quercetin, taxifolin, and Pycnogenol together increased weight. These changes may be due to altered locomotion or fatty acid biosynthesis. Published reports of murine life span extension using curcumin or tea components may have resulted from induced caloric restriction. Together, our results do not support the idea that isolated phytonutrient anti-oxidants and anti-inflammatories are potential longevity therapeutics, even though consumption of whole fruits and vegetables is associated with enhanced health span and life span.

  8. Blueberry certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certification programs for the production of systemic pathogen-tested blueberry stock require the following two major elements: reliable sources of clean starting material and propagation and maintenance of clean stock. One of the major components of the United States Blueberry National Certificatio...

  9. PP prune users guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N.A. Bolon; R.D. Fight; J.M. Cahill

    1992-01-01

    The PP PRUNE program allows users to conduct a financial analysis of pruning ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.). The increase in product value and rate of return from pruning the butt 16.5-foot log can be estimated. Lumber recovery information is based on actual mill experience with pruned and unpruned logs. Users supply lumber prices...

  10. 7 CFR 457.166 - Blueberry crop insurance provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... marketing. Sale of the insured crop directly to consumers without the intervention of an intermediary such as a wholesaler, retailer, packer, processor, shipper or buyer. Examples of direct marketing include... percentage you elect. Prune. A cultural practice performed to increase blueberry production as follows: (a...

  11. How to Prune Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Bedker; Joseph O' Brien; Manfred Mielke

    2012-01-01

    The objective of pruning is to produce strong, healthy, attractive plants. By understanding how, when and why to prune, and by following a few simple principles, this objective can be achievedHow to Prune Trees (Revised 2012) Agency Publisher: Agriculture Dept., Forest Service, Northeastern Area State and Price forestry USA List Price:$4.00 Sale...

  12. [Comparative study of chemical composition of pomegranate peel pomegranates inside and pomegranate seeds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Sun, Li-Li; Dai, Yan-Peng; Wang, Liang; Su, Ben-Zheng

    2013-07-01

    An HPLC fingerprint of pomegranate peel was established. Using chromatographic conditions, we compared the chemical composition of pomegranate peel, inside and seeds, and simultaneously determined the contents of gallic acid and ellagic acid. By comparison, we found that there were no significant differences between pomegranate peel and inside, but there was a big difference between pomegranate seeds and another two. The contents of gallic acid and ellagic acid of pomegranate peel respectively were 0.33%, 0.59%, while in pomegranate inside the result respectively were 0.52%, 0.38%. Content of ellagic acid from pomegranate seeds was only 0.01%. By study, we thought that when pomegranate peel was processed, pomegranate seeds should be removed, while pomegranate inside could be retained on the premise of full drying.

  13. Pruning Allegheny hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. D. Zeedyk; A. F. Hough

    1958-01-01

    The continuing heavy demand for high-quality Allegheny hardwoods, particularly black cherry and sugar maple, impresses on us the need for more information responses of hardwoods to pruning. Pruning may have beneficial effects: it may increase quality without sacrificing growth. Or it may have detrimental effects: it may cause dieback of cambium, decay, staining and...

  14. Prune belly syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    The causes of prune belly syndrome are unknown. The condition affects mostly boys. While in the womb, the developing baby's abdomen swells with fluid. Often, the cause is a problem in the urinary tract. The fluid disappears after birth, leading ...

  15. 'Blueberry' Exposed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This mosaic of five images taken by the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sol 87 shows the hole drilled by the rover's rock abrasion tool into the rock dubbed 'Pilbara.' A sliced 'blueberry,' or spherule, which is darker and harder than the rest of the rock, can be seen near the center of the hole. The rock abrasion process left a pile of rock powder around the side of the hole, and to a lesser degree, inside the hole. The hole is 7.2 millimeters (about 0.28 inches) deep and 4.5 centimeters (about 1.8 inches) in diameter. Because the original images of this hole had areas of bright sunlight as well as shadow, the images making up this mosaic have been arranged to hide as much of the sunlit area as possible. The white spot is one area that could not be covered by other images. It is possible to stretch the image so that features in this white spot are visible, but this makes the rest of the mosaic harder to view. The bright streaks on the bottom part of the hole are most likely reflections from various parts of the robotic arm. The geometric and brightness seams have been corrected in this image.

  16. Potent health effects of pomegranate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Zarfeshany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating data clearly claimed that Punica granatum L. (pomegranate has several health benefits. Pomegranates can help prevent or treat various disease risk factors including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, oxidative stress, hyperglycemia, and inflammatory activities. It is demonstrated that certain components of pomegranate such as polyphenols have potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic effects. The antioxidant potential of pomegranate juice is more than that of red wine and green tea, which is induced through ellagitannins and hydrosable tannins. Pomegranate juice can reduce macrophage oxidative stress, free radicals, and lipid peroxidation. Moreover, pomegranate fruit extract prevents cell growth and induces apoptosis, which can lead to its anticarcinogenic effects. In addition, promoter inhibition of some inflammatory markers and their production are blocked via ellagitannins. In this article, we highlight different studies on the therapeutic effects of pomegranate and their suggested mechanisms of actions.

  17. Potent health effects of pomegranate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarfeshany, Aida; Asgary, Sedigheh; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjoo

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating data clearly claimed that Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) has several health benefits. Pomegranates can help prevent or treat various disease risk factors including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, oxidative stress, hyperglycemia, and inflammatory activities. It is demonstrated that certain components of pomegranate such as polyphenols have potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic effects. The antioxidant potential of pomegranate juice is more than that of red wine and green tea, which is induced through ellagitannins and hydrosable tannins. Pomegranate juice can reduce macrophage oxidative stress, free radicals, and lipid peroxidation. Moreover, pomegranate fruit extract prevents cell growth and induces apoptosis, which can lead to its anticarcinogenic effects. In addition, promoter inhibition of some inflammatory markers and their production are blocked via ellagitannins. In this article, we highlight different studies on the therapeutic effects of pomegranate and their suggested mechanisms of actions. PMID:24800189

  18. 7 CFR 993.7 - French prunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false French prunes. 993.7 Section 993.7 Agriculture... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 993.7 French prunes. French prunes means: (a) Prunes produced from plums of the following varieties of plums: French (Prune d'Agen, Petite Prune d'Agen), Coates (Cox...

  19. Maintenance and conservation of historical pomegranate tree in the garden of Thessaloniki Ataturk’s House

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Çoban

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical pomegranate tree in the garden of Atatürk’s House in Thessaloniki storied that planted by the father of Ataturk, Ali Rıza Efendi, has been one of the most attractive points at the museum. However, in addition to the problems of natural ageing period, constructional works in the garden during restoration of the museum and unappropriate prunings caused serious health problems on the tree. For this reason, in order to cease or delay tree collapsing period and prolong survival of the tree, regular maintenance treatments have to be conducted. In this study, technical information has been given regarding the precautions of specific tree maintenance and conservation works, which are normally applied to long lived monumental trees in the literature, on the pomegranate tree. However, these precautions have not been previously applied on such a tree, particularly on the pomegranate tree.

  20. Training and Pruning Apple Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Marini, Richard P. (Richard Paul), 1952-

    2009-01-01

    Discusses the pruning and training of apple trees, placing emphasis on proper training of young trees to save time and the expense of future pruning, and to produce earlier profitable crops. Advises about the best techniques for pruning in relation to age of the apple tree.

  1. Coast redwood responses to pruning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin L. O' Hara

    2012-01-01

    A large-scale pruning study was established in the winter of 1999 to 2000 at seven different sites on Green Diamond Resource Company forestlands in Humboldt County. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of pruning on increment, epicormic sprouting, stem taper, heartwood formation, and bear damage on these young trees. Pruning treatments varied...

  2. Pomegranate for Your Cardiovascular Health

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Aviram; Mira Rosenblat

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranate is a source of some very potent antioxidants (tannins, anthocyanins) which are considered to be also potent anti-atherogenic agents. The combination of the above unique various types of pomegranate polyphenols provides a much wider spectrum of action against several types of free radicals. Indeed, pomegranate is superior in comparison to other antioxidants in protecting low-density lipoprotein (LDL, ?the bad cholesterol?) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL, ?the good cholesterol?) ...

  3. Prune Belly Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    a rare case and review of literature. Europe- an Journal of Plastic Surgery 35, 241-243. Moerman P., Fryns J.P., Goddeeris P. and Lau- weryns J.M. (1984) Pathogenesis of the. Prune-Belly Syndrome: A Functional Ure- thral Obstruction Caused by Prostatic Hy- poplasia. PEDIATRICS 73, 470-475. Okeniyi J.A., Ogunlesi T.A, ...

  4. Fighting phytophthora in blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands is a ubiquitous soilborne pathogen associated with root rot in many woody perennial plant species, including highbush blueberry (Vaccinium sp.). To identify genotypes with resistance to the pathogen, cultivars and advanced selections of highbush blueberry were grown in a...

  5. Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Vaccinium consists of approximately 450 species, of which highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) is one of the three major Vaccinium fruit crops (i.e., blueberry, cranberry, and lingonberry) domesticated in the twentieth century. In blueberry the adventitious shoot regeneration using leaf explants has been the most desirable regeneration system to date; Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation is the major gene delivery method and effective selection has been reported using either the neomycin phosphotransferase II gene (nptII) or the bialaphos resistance (bar) gene as selectable markers. The A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation protocol described in this chapter is based on combining the optimal conditions for efficient plant regeneration, reliable gene delivery, and effective selection. The protocol has led to successful regeneration of transgenic plants from leaf explants of four commercially important highbush blueberry cultivars for multiple purposes, providing a powerful approach to supplement conventional breeding methods for blueberry by introducing genes of interest.

  6. Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum)-Scorch

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Blueberry scorch virus (BlScV), which is vectored by aphids, can infect blueberry and cranberry. Once a plant is infected, symptoms may take 1 to 2 years or more to develop. This makes early detection vital for controlling the disease. The virus was first observed in a ‘Berkeley’ blueberry plant...

  7. Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum)-Virus Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    At least six viruses have been found in highbush blueberry plantings in the Pacific Northwest: Blueberry mosaic virus, Blueberry red ringspot virus, Blueberry scorch virus, Blueberry shock virus, Tobacco ringspot virus, and Tomato ringspot virus. Six other virus and virus-like diseases of highbush b...

  8. Aerial pruning mechanism, initial real environment test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Javier; Hirai, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    In this research, a pruning mechanism for aerial pruning tasks is tested in a real environment. Since the final goal of the aerial pruning robot will be to prune tree branches close to power lines, some experiments related to wireless communication and pruning performance were conducted. The experiments consisted of testing the communication between two XBee RF modules for monitoring purposes as well as testing the speed control of the circular saw used for pruning tree branches. Results show that both the monitoring and the pruning tasks were successfully done in a real environment.

  9. Nutrient status of the lowbush blueberry, Lac-Saint-Jean area, Quebec, Canada. [Vaccinium angustifolium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, A.R.; Gagnon, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) is an important commercial crop of the Lac-Saint-Jean area (Quebec, Canada). The major blueberry fields are located on sandy soils relatively poor in available mineral nutrients. The nutrients originate from a thin organic layer found on the top of these sandy soils. The leaf mineral contents (N, P, K, Mg, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and B) were measured in five blueberry fields during 1984 and 1985. Soil pH and soil available P, K, and Mg were also assessed. The results show that the leaf mineral contents are generally adequate. However, K and Zn might be occasionally deficient when compared to the actual established standards. The available Mg in soil was significantly correlated with the leaf Mg concentration. The data also suggest that the influence of the pH following the burn pruning seems to influence the nutrition of this species.

  10. Pomegranate Consumption and Blood Pressure: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, Sedigheh; Keshvari, Mahtab; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2017-01-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is a polyphenol-rich fruit with diverse medicinal properties. Several lines of experimental and clinical evidence have shown that pomegranate intake helps lowering blood pressure (BP) through different mechanisms. This study aimed to present a narrative review on the anti-hypertensive properties of different parts of pomegranate such as pomegranate juice (PJ), pomegranate peels (PP), pomegranate seed oil (PSO), pomegranate fruit extract (PFE) and the mechanisms and phytochemicals responsible for these effects. A review on the efficacy of consuming different parts of pomegranate (juice, peels, fruit extract and seed oil) in lowering BP has been performed. To find relevant studies, a search in PubMed, Science Direct and Scopus up from inception to May 4, 2015 was performed. Human, animals and in vitro studies investigating the anti-hypertensive effects of pomegranate were included in the search. Findings arising from animal and clinical studies have shown pomegranate juice can reduce BP in both short-term and long-term course. These effects are accompanied by antioxidant and anti-atherosclerotic actions that collectively improve cardiovascular health. The anti-hypertensive effects have been reported for both pomegranate juice and seed oil. Both systolic and diastolic pressures are affected. Pomegranate juice possesses antioxidant, anti-hypertensive and anti-atherosclerotic properties. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. 7 CFR 1218.2 - Blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... Blueberries means cultivated blueberries grown in or imported into the United States of the genus Vaccinium Corymbosum and Ashei, including the northern highbush, southern highbush, rabbit eye varieties, and any hybrid, and excluding the lowbush (native) blueberry Vaccinium Angustifolium. ...

  12. Regularization with a pruning prior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the use of a regularization priorthat we show has pruning properties. Analyses areconducted both using a Bayesian framework and withthe generalization method, on a simple toyproblem. Results are thoroughly compared withthose obtained with a traditional weight decay.......We investigate the use of a regularization priorthat we show has pruning properties. Analyses areconducted both using a Bayesian framework and withthe generalization method, on a simple toyproblem. Results are thoroughly compared withthose obtained with a traditional weight decay....

  13. Financial analysis of pruning ponderosa pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Fight; Natalie A. Bolon; James M. Cahill

    1992-01-01

    A recent lumber recovery study of pruned and unpruned ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) was used to project the financial return from pruning ponderosa pine in the Medford District of the Bureau of Land Management and in the Ochoco and Deschutes National Forests. The cost of pruning at which the investment would yield an expected 4-...

  14. 7 CFR 993.5 - Prunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prunes. 993.5 Section 993.5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Regulating Handling Definitions § 993.5 Prunes. Prunes means and includes all sun-dried or artificially...

  15. Development of a Grapevine Pruning Algorithm for Using in Pruning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M Hosseini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Great areas of the orchards in the world are dedicated to cultivation of the grapevine. Normally grape vineyards are pruned twice a year. Among the operations of grape production, winter pruning of the bushes is the only operation that still has not been fully mechanized while it is known as the most laborious jobs in the farm. Some of the grape producing countries use various mechanical machines to prune the grapevines, but in most cases, these machines do not have a good performance. Therefore intelligent pruning machine seems to be necessary in this regard and this intelligent pruning machines can reduce the labor required to prune the vineyards. It this study in was attempted to develop an algorithm that uses image processing techniques to identify which parts of the grapevine should be cut. Stereo vision technique was used to obtain three dimensional images from the bare bushes whose leaves were fallen in autumn. Stereo vision systems are used to determine the depth from two images taken at the same time but from slightly different viewpoints using two cameras. Each pair of images of a common scene is related by a popular geometry, and corresponding points in the images pairs are constrained to lie on pairs of conjugate popular lines. Materials and Methods Photos were taken from gardens of the Research Center for Agriculture and Natural Resources of Fars province, Iran. At first, the distance between the plants and the cameras should be determined. The distance between the plants and cameras can be obtained by using the stereo vision techniques. Therefore, this method was used in this paper by two pictures taken from each plant with the left and right cameras. The algorithm was written in MATLAB. To facilitate the segmentation of the branches from the rows at the back, a blue plate with dimensions of 2×2 m2 were used at the background. After invoking the images, branches were segmented from the background to produce the binary

  16. Pomegranate: a fruit that ameliorates metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Jungbauer, Alois

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranate is an ancient fruit that is still part of the diet in the Mediterranean area, the Middle East, and India. Health-promoting effects have long been attributed to this fruit. Modern research corroborates the use of pomegranate as a folk remedy for diabetes and metabolic syndrome, and is responsible for a new evaluation of nutritional and pharmaceutical aspects of pomegranate in the general public. In the last decade, industry and agricultural production have been adapted to meet higher market demands for pomegranate. In vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated that pomegranate exerts hypoglycaemic effects, including increased insulin sensitivity, inhibition of α-glucosidase, and impact on glucose transporter type 4 function, but is also responsible for a reduction of total cholesterol, and the improvement of blood lipid profiles, as well as anti-inflammatory effects through the modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor pathways. These effects may also explain how pomegranate-derived compounds function in the amelioration of adverse health effects caused by metabolic syndrome. Pomegranate contains polyphenols such as ellagitannins and anthocyanins, as well as phenolic acids, fatty acids and a variety of volatile compounds. Ellagitannins are some of the most prevalent compounds present in pomegranate, and may be responsible for certain benevolent characteristics associated with pomegranate. A brief overview of rising health problems due to obesity will be provided, followed by characterisation of the biological activity, bioavailability, and safety of pomegranate and pomegranate-derived compounds. Although the fruit is consumed in many countries, epidemiological and clinical studies are unavailable. Additional research is necessary to corroborate the promise of current in vivo and in vitro findings.

  17. Efficacy and Safety of Pomegranate Medicinal Products for Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Vlachojannis; Zimmermann, Benno F.; Sigrun Chrubasik-Hausmann

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrate potent effects of pomegranate preparations in cancer cell lines and animal models with chemically induced cancers. We have carried out one systematic review of the effectiveness of pomegranate products in the treatment of cancer and another on their safety. The PubMed search provided 162 references for pomegranate and cancer and 122 references for pomegranate and safety/toxicity. We identified 4 clinical studies investigating 3 pomegranate ...

  18. 7 CFR 1218.15 - Processed blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Processed blueberries. 1218.15 Section 1218.15... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.15...

  19. THE NECESSITY OF DEVELOPING BLUEBERRY PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina BADIU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the advantages of cultivating blueberries, both economically and from an alimentary and therapeutic point of view. By calculating profit per hectare for the most productive varieties of blueberry, it was shown that this culture is particularly profitable for young farmers. In fact, blueberries have significant therapeutic value, being used in food and pharmaceutical industry.

  20. The Over-Pruning Hypothesis of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael S. C.; Davis, Rachael; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Knowland, Victoria C. P.; Charman, Tony

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines the "over-pruning hypothesis" of autism. The hypothesis originates in a neurocomputational model of the regressive sub-type (Thomas, Knowland & Karmiloff-Smith, 2011a, 2011b). Here we develop a more general version of the over-pruning hypothesis to address heterogeneity in the timing of manifestation of ASD,…

  1. Oxidation of fatty acid may be enhanced by a combination of pomegranate fruit phytochemicals and acetic acid in HepG2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Ok, Elly; Kim, You Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Sook

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether the combination of phytochemicals and acetic acid in the form of fruit vinegar provides an additive effect on changes of mRNA levels related to fatty acid oxidation in human hepatocyte (HepG2). Among the seven fruit vinegars (Rubuscoreanus, Opuntia, blueberry, cherry, red ginseng, mulberry, and pomegranate) studied, treatment of HepG2 with pomegranate vinegar (PV) at concentrations containing 1 mM acetic acid showed the highest in vitro potentiating effect on the mRNA expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, carnitinepalmitoyl transferase-1, and acyl-CoA oxidase compared to the control group (P punicalagin B, ellagic acid, and two unidentified compounds) responsible for altered gene expression in HepG2 cells treated with PV as compared with the others. Further investigations are warranted to determine if drinking PV beverages may help to maintain a healthy body weight in overweight subjects. PMID:23766874

  2. Oxidation of fatty acid may be enhanced by a combination of pomegranate fruit phytochemicals and acetic acid in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Ok, Elly; Kim, You Jin; Choi, Kyoung-Sook; Kwon, Oran

    2013-06-01

    We investigated whether the combination of phytochemicals and acetic acid in the form of fruit vinegar provides an additive effect on changes of mRNA levels related to fatty acid oxidation in human hepatocyte (HepG2). Among the seven fruit vinegars (Rubuscoreanus, Opuntia, blueberry, cherry, red ginseng, mulberry, and pomegranate) studied, treatment of HepG2 with pomegranate vinegar (PV) at concentrations containing 1 mM acetic acid showed the highest in vitro potentiating effect on the mRNA expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, carnitinepalmitoyl transferase-1, and acyl-CoA oxidase compared to the control group (P acid, and two unidentified compounds) responsible for altered gene expression in HepG2 cells treated with PV as compared with the others. Further investigations are warranted to determine if drinking PV beverages may help to maintain a healthy body weight in overweight subjects.

  3. Postharvest biology and technology of pomegranate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareek, Sunil; Valero, Daniel; Serrano, María

    2015-09-01

    Pomegranate is a subtropical and tropical fruit of great importance from a health point of view. Despite increasing consumer awareness of the health benefits of pomegranate, consumption of the fruit is still limited owing to poor postharvest handling, storage recommendations, short shelf life and quality deterioration during transportation, storage and marketing. The occurrence of physiological disorders such as husk scald, splitting and chilling injury is another challenge reducing marketability and consumer acceptance. Recently, notable work on postharvest biology and technology has been done. Pomegranate is highly sensitive to low-oxygen (pomegranate fruit is excessive weight loss, which may result in hardening of the husk and browning of the rind and arils. To reduce chilling injury incidence and to extend storability and marketing of pomegranates, good results were obtained with polyamine, heat, salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate or methyl salicylate treatments prior to cold storage. This article reviews the maturity indices, changes during maturation and ripening, postharvest physiology and technology of pomegranate fruit as well as the various postharvest treatments for maintaining fruit quality. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Financial analysis of pruning coast Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Fight; James M. Cahlll; Thomas D. Fahey; Thomas A. Snellgrove

    1987-01-01

    Pruning of coast Douglas-fir was evaluated; recent product recovery information for pruned and unpruned logs for both sawn and peeled products was used. Dimensions of pruned and unpruned trees were simulated with the Douglas-fir stand simulator (DFSIM). Results are presented for a range of sites, ages at time of pruning, ages at time of harvest, product prices, and...

  5. 7 CFR 993.6 - Non-French prunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Non-French prunes. 993.6 Section 993.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 993.6 Non-French prunes. Non-French prunes means prunes commonly...

  6. Antioxidant Extraction and Biogas Production from Pomegranate Marc

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pomegranate marc (PM), by-product from pomegranate juice processing, has not been effectively utilized. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the yields and properties of antioxidants (total phenolics) extracted from peels and seeds of pomegranate marc in wet and dry forms, and (2)...

  7. Wild Vietnamese relatives of blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    rom 25 October to 14 November 2015, wild relatives of cultivated blueberry, Vaccinium corymbosum, were collected during a Vietnamese-US cooperative expedition in Northern Vietnam. The exploration involved representatives of the Plant Resources Center, Vietnam Academy of Agricultural Sciences, in Han...

  8. Megalourethra associated with prune-belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökalp, A; Gültekin, E Y

    1993-01-01

    A 14-day-old male infant with megalourethra is presented because of the rarity of the anomaly and its association with prune-belly syndrome. The lax, wrinkled appearance of the abdomen, bilateral cryptorchidism and severe dilatation of the urinary system are features included in the classic triad of the prune-belly syndrome. Our patient had the scaphoid variety of megalourethra since the penis appeared elongated and floppy in the fusiform form.

  9. The Polyphenolics and Health Effects of Pomegranate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Titin Nge

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. is a useful fruit which mostly consumed as fresh fruit and can also be used as a various of processed products. Reports proved pomegranate were beneficial to health. Polyphenolic compounds in pomegranate especially ellagitannin (hydrolyzed, anthocyanins, gallotannin,and ellagic acid can maintain oral hygiene, healthy skin from the effects of free radicals caused by UV radiation, has the ability to synthesize cholesterol, destroying free radicals in the human vascular system and can prevent prostate cancer. In vitro and in vivo test has shown the fruit is acting as anti diabetic drug, and hypolipidemic, anticarcinogenic, antibacterial, anti inflamation, and antiviral. This review presenting an overview about the bioactive compound contents, physiological and health function of the fruit.

  10. Abdominoplasty in Prune Belly Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dénes, F T; Park, R; Lopes, R I; Moscardi, P R M; Srougi, M

    2015-10-01

    Many patients with Prune Belly Syndrome (PBS) require abdominoplasty alone or in combination with correction of any urogenital abnormalities. This video presents a simplified technique with which to treat the abdominal flaccidity in PBS. A longitudinal xypho-pubic fusiform figure is drawn on the abdomen, based on the area of skin and subcutaneous tissue to be removed. This is performed with preservation of the musculo-fascial layer and the umbilicus. A lateral elliptical single xypho-pubic line is drawn in the most lax side of the fascia, which is incised along this line. After urinary tract reconstruction and orchidopexy, closure is initiated by suturing the medial edge of the wider fascial flap laterally to the peritoneal side of the contralateral flap. Next, the now outer fascial flap is laid over the inner flap, and a buttonhole is made to expose the umbilicus. The subcutaneous tissue of the inner flap is laterally undermined to gain extra distance for the suture of the outer flap over the inner flap. The subcutaneous tissue and skin are sutured in the midline, incorporating the umbilicus. In a 30-year period, 43 PBS patients underwent this procedure with good cosmetic and long-term functional results. This abdominoplasty technique is simple and presents good functional and cosmetic results in PBS patients. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Pomegranate Medicinal Products for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Vlachojannis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrate potent effects of pomegranate preparations in cancer cell lines and animal models with chemically induced cancers. We have carried out one systematic review of the effectiveness of pomegranate products in the treatment of cancer and another on their safety. The PubMed search provided 162 references for pomegranate and cancer and 122 references for pomegranate and safety/toxicity. We identified 4 clinical studies investigating 3 pomegranate products, of which one was inappropriate because of the low polyphenol content. The evidence of clinical effectiveness was poor because the quality of the studies was poor. Although there is no concern over safety with the doses used in the clinical studies, pomegranate preparations may be harmful by inducing synthetic drug metabolism through activation of liver enzymes. We have analysed various pomegranate products for their content of anthocyanins, punicalagin, and ellagic acid in order to compare them with the benchmark doses from published data. If the amount of coactive constituents is not declared, patients risk not benefiting from the putative pomegranate effects. Moreover, pomegranate end products are affected by many determinants. Their declaration should be incorporated into the regulatory guidance and controlled before pomegranate products enter the market.

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Pomegranate Medicinal Products for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachojannis, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrate potent effects of pomegranate preparations in cancer cell lines and animal models with chemically induced cancers. We have carried out one systematic review of the effectiveness of pomegranate products in the treatment of cancer and another on their safety. The PubMed search provided 162 references for pomegranate and cancer and 122 references for pomegranate and safety/toxicity. We identified 4 clinical studies investigating 3 pomegranate products, of which one was inappropriate because of the low polyphenol content. The evidence of clinical effectiveness was poor because the quality of the studies was poor. Although there is no concern over safety with the doses used in the clinical studies, pomegranate preparations may be harmful by inducing synthetic drug metabolism through activation of liver enzymes. We have analysed various pomegranate products for their content of anthocyanins, punicalagin, and ellagic acid in order to compare them with the benchmark doses from published data. If the amount of coactive constituents is not declared, patients risk not benefiting from the putative pomegranate effects. Moreover, pomegranate end products are affected by many determinants. Their declaration should be incorporated into the regulatory guidance and controlled before pomegranate products enter the market. PMID:25815026

  13. Pruning in poplar plantations by mechanized device Stihl HT-75

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilović Milorad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of branch pruning device Stihl HT-75 were researched on sample plots in FA Kupinovo and FA Klenak, in poplar plantations of Populus×euramericana 'I-214', Populus×euramericana 'M1' and Populus deltoides of different planting spaces and different ages. The analysed factors were: pruning method, site conditions, number of pruned branches, pruning height, branch diameter, etc. Time measurement was performed by the flow method, and the required number of measurements was calculated by variation statistics. The results of the analysis of variance show the statistical significance of the differences between pruning times of different clone species, different planting spaces and different plantation ages. The results of the analysis of variance and statistical tests show that there are no statistically significant differences between the average time of poplar pruning in plantations of the same age and different planting spaces. The correlation of branch pruning time and the number of pruned branches is represented by the power function model, which according to the results of the regression analyses, is the best representation of the nature of this dependence. Exponential function represents the correlation of the average diameter of pruned branches and the time of pruning. Also, there is a correlation of the average diameter of pruned branches and fuel consumption. Pruning time of poplar trees increases with the increase of the average diameter of pruned branches.

  14. Applying new technologies to transform blueberry harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    The growth of the blueberry industry in the past three decades has been remarkable. However, labor shortage for hand harvesting, increasingly high labor costs, and low harvest efficiencies are becoming bottlenecks for sustainable development of the fresh market blueberry production. In this study ...

  15. EFFICIENT MARKETING OF BLUEBERRIES IN MISSISSIPPI AND LOUISIANA

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad, Safdar; Allen, Albert J.

    2000-01-01

    Fresh blueberries are sold through a marketing cooperative of the blueberry industry in Mississippi and Louisiana. Blueberry producers have numerous alternatives in assembling blueberries, and the cooperative needs to know the costs of different systems for assembling berries in order to provide better services to its members. The main objective of this study was to determine an efficient system for handling blueberries in Mississippi and Louisiana. Sixteen models with different combinations ...

  16. Micropropagation of pomegranate ( Punica granatum L.) 'Bhagava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reliable and reproducible protocols to get healthy and well formed plants from nodal explants of the pomegranate (Punica granatum L) cv 'Bhagava' has been developed. Nodal segments were cultured on two different media at full strength Murashige and Skoog (MS) and Woody Plant Medium (WPM). The media was ...

  17. Enhanced Context Recognition by Sensitivity Pruned Vocabularies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-01-01

    Language independent `bag-of-words' representations are surprisingly effective for text classification. The generic BOW approach is based on a high-dimensional vocabulary which may reduce the generalization performance of subsequent classifiers, e.g., based on ill-posed principal component...... transformations. In this communication our aim is to study the effect of sensitivity based pruning of the bag-of-words representation. We consider neural network based sensitivity maps for determination of term relevancy, when pruning the vocabularies. With reduced vocabularies documents are classified using...... a latent semantic indexing representation and a probabilistic neural network classifier. Pruning the vocabularies to approximately 20% of the original size, we find consistent context recognition enhancement for two mid size data-sets for a range of training set sizes. We also study the applicability...

  18. Effect of different winter pruning systems on grapes produced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Caprara

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of these trials was to evaluate possible effects on properties of grapes, particularly the physical and mechanical features, depending on the winter pruning system. The following pruning techniques were carried out: manual pruning (m; mechanical pruning (M; mechanical pre-pruning and subsequent manual finishing (Mm; mechanical pre-pruning and contemporary fast manual finishing, using a wagon facility with two operators equipped with pneumatic scissors (Mw. The trials were carried out on Sangiovese trained to spurred cordon. During the trials were measured: time and cost of pruning, quality of pruning and the vegetative-productive response of vines. During grape harvesting a consolidated analytical method of texture analysis was applied to evaluate the physical parameters of grapevine cultivar: pedicel detachment, skin perforation, skin thickness, grape features as hardness, cohesiveness, springiness. Analysis of working time showed that the manual pruning (m determined a greater commitment of time, while the mechanized pruning (M presented a time reduction of 95%. The two mechanized pruning associated with manual finishing reduced the time of 21% (Mm and 69% (Mw. The lowering cost is less evident but important anyway. Regarding the quality of pruning, the increase in the level of mechanization has produced an increase of spurs and buds density. It was also detected a higher percentage of damaged spurs and in wrong position. The increasing of mechanization levels of pruning also has produced smaller and sparser bunches with smaller berries. The study of mechanical properties of berries showed significant differences in the mechanical behaviours of the different pruning tests. The mechanized pruning presented higher values for the pedicel detachment, skin perforation and cohesiveness, while it gave lower values for thickness of skin and springiness. The results showed that mechanical pruning can modify properties of the berries which

  19. A Case of Prune Belly Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Prune belly syndrome (PBS is a rare congenital disorder characterized by deficient abdominal wall muscles, urinary tract malformation, and, in males, cryptorchidism. We present a case of PBS in China. The patient was a newborn baby boy who had wrinkled, “prune-like” abdominal skin, bilateral cryptorchidism, and urinary system malformation, complicated with hypoplasia of the lung and branch of the coronary artery–right ventricular fistula. His kidney function was inadequate. The patient subsequently died at age 28 days due to septicemia from a severe urinary tract infection.

  20. Veneer grade yield from pruned Douglas-fir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward J. II Dimock; Henry H. Haskell

    1962-01-01

    This paper reports actual veneer yields obtained from 10 trees pruned at age 38 and harvested 20 years later. Information of this kind is needed to help determine if and when to prune and ultimately will be essential to a thorough economic analysis of expected returns from pruning.

  1. Effects of root pruning in sour cherry (Prunus cersus) "Stevnsbaer"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toldam-Andersen, Torben; Jensen, Nauja Lisa; Dencker, Ivar Blücher

    2007-01-01

    (May), initial and final fruit set (June) were recorded. Root pruning had little effect on fruit set, fruit size and yield in the year of pruning. Only in one plot with a severe root pruning (26 cm from the trunks), negative effects were found. The effects on growth, flowering and fruit set in 2003...

  2. 7 CFR 993.149 - Receiving of prunes by handlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... same procedure shall apply as set forth in paragraph (d)(1) of this section. For each day on which a... and usually received by a handler in any considerable volume as ranch deliveries, and at which there... samples of prunes drawn as prune plums and dehydrated in the same manner as the prunes to which they are...

  3. EFFECTIVE COMPOUNDS OF POMEGRANATE AND THEIR EFFECT ON ANIMAL CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Packová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This review describes possible effects of antioxidant compounds of pomegranate on animal cells. Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. fruits are widely consumed. Pomegranate is one of the oldest known edible fruit. Spain is main producer in the Europe. Pomegranate contains bioactive polyphenols - punicalagin with molecular weight 1084. Part of punicalagin's molecule is ellagic acid. The both substances generate total antioxidant capacity of pomegranate. Punicalagin compounds present high antioxidant capacity - approximately 50%, ellagic acid as single molecule has 3% of antioxidant capacity. Punicalagin is molecule with high molecular weight and have to be hydrolised. Colonic microorganism metabolise yield of pomegranate (punigalagin or ellagic acid to urolithin A and is detected in blood, urine or faeces. Extract from pomegranate can show anticarcinogenic effect, induction of cell - cycle arrest, apoptosis and proliferation. Extract from pomegranate has relieving effect on woman's menopausal symptoms, anxienty disorders, depression or attention deficit disorders. Ellagic acid introduces health benefits against cancer, cardiovascular diseases and other disease. It is possible, that compounds of pomegranates or their metabolites could have impact on different animal cells and regulate their intracellular mechanism.

  4. Pomegranate juice, total pomegranate ellagitannins, and punicalagin suppress inflammatory cell signaling in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Lynn S; Seeram, Navindra P; Aggarwal, Bharat B; Takada, Yasunari; Sand, Daniel; Heber, David

    2006-02-08

    Phytochemicals from fruits such as the pomegranate (Punica granatum L) may inhibit cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis through the modulation of cellular transcription factors and signaling proteins. In previous studies, pomegranate juice (PJ) and its ellagitannins inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in HT-29 colon cancer cells. The present study examined the effects of PJ on inflammatory cell signaling proteins in the HT-29 human colon cancer cell line. At a concentration of 50 mg/L PJ significantly suppressed TNFalpha-induced COX-2 protein expression by 79% (SE = 0.042), total pomegranate tannin extract (TPT) 55% (SE = 0.049), and punicalagin 48% (SE = 0.022). Additionally, PJ reduced phosphorylation of the p65 subunit and binding to the NFkappaB response element 6.4-fold. TPT suppressed NFkappaB binding 10-fold, punicalagin 3.6-fold, whereas ellagic acid (EA) (another pomegranate polyphenol) was ineffective. PJ also abolished TNFalpha-induced AKT activation, needed for NFkappaB activity. Therefore, the polyphenolic phytochemicals in the pomegranate can play an important role in the modulation of inflammatory cell signaling in colon cancer cells.

  5. Pruning the vocabulary for better context recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-01-01

    of term relevancy, when pruning the vocabularies. With reduced vocabularies, documents are classified using a latent semantic indexing representation and a probabilistic neural network classifier. Reducing the bag-of-words vocabularies with 90%-98%, we find consistent classification improvement using two...

  6. Vocabulary Pruning for Improved Context Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-01-01

    of term relevancy, when pruning the vocabularies. With reduced vocabularies documents are classified using a latent semantic indexing representation and a probabilistic neural network classifier. Reducing the bag-of-words vocabularies with 90%-98%, we find consistent classification improvement using two...

  7. 21 CFR 145.190 - Canned prunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned prunes. 145.190 Section 145.190 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...: (1) Natural and artificial flavors. (2) Spice. (3) Vinegar, lemon juice, or organic acids. (4...

  8. Blueberries for fresh market and measure of mechanical impacts in commercial blueberry packing lines and mechanical harvesters and potential damage to blueberry fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the United States of America (USA), fresh blueberries are now available all year round because of significant amount of shipment of fresh blueberries during winter months from Chile and several other countries in South America. Blueberry fruit is susceptible to bruising from mechanical impact. ...

  9. Regulation of acidity and reduction of turbidity in the clarified pomegranate juice production

    OpenAIRE

    ESHMATOV FOZIL KHIDIROVICH; MAKSUMOVA DILRABO KUCHKAROVNA; DODAEVA LAYLO KUCHKAROVNA

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of acidity and reduction of turbidity in the clarified pomegranate juice production. From sour varieties of pomegranates may obtain normal natural pomegranate juice by anion-exchange resin. There are determined problems quantity of precipitate and unstable color in the pomegranate juice and concentrate by experimentally.

  10. Toxigenic Alternaria species from Argentinean blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, M; Patriarca, A; Terminiello, L; Fernández Pinto, V; Pose, G

    2012-03-15

    Blueberries are traditionally consumed in North America, some European countries and Japan. In Argentina, the blueberry crop is profitable because production starts in November, when the northern hemisphere lacks fresh fruit. Fungal contaminants can grow and produce mycotoxins in fresh fruit. The aims of this work were to identify the main genera of the mycobiota of blueberries grown in Argentina and to determine the toxicogenic potential, pathogenicity and host specificity of the species isolated. The genus Alternaria was the main component of the blueberry mycobiota (95%); minor proportions of Phoma spp. (4%) and Penicillium spp. (1%) were also isolated. According to their sporulation patterns, 127 Alternaria isolates belonged to the Alternaria tenuissima species-group, 5 to the Alternaria alternata species-group and 2 to the Alternaria arborescens species-group. The last mentioned species-group was not isolated at 5°C. Of the 134 isolates, 61% were toxicogenic in autoclaved rice; 97% of these produced alternariol (AOH) in a range from 0.14 to 119.18 mg/kg, 95% produced alternariol methylether (AME) in a range from 1.23 to 901.74 mg/kg and 65% produced tenuazonic acid (TA) in a range from 0.13 to 2778 mg/kg. Fifty two isolates co-produced the three mycotoxins. According to the size of the lesion that they caused on blueberries, the isolates were classified as slightly pathogenic, moderately pathogenic and very pathogenic. No significant differences in pathogenicity were found on different blueberry varieties. In this work, high incidence and toxicogenic potential of the Alternaria isolates from blueberries were demonstrated. Thus, more studies should be done to evaluate the health risk posed by the presence of the Alternaria toxins in blueberries and in the manufactured by-products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cronobacter sakazakii reduction by blueberry proanthocyanidins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Snehal S; Howell, Amy B; D'Souza, Doris H

    2014-05-01

    Blueberry juice and blueberry polyphenols reportedly have antimicrobial properties against foodborne pathogens, without much currently known on their effects against Cronobacter sakazakii. This study evaluated the antimicrobial effects of blueberry proanthocyanidins (PAC) and commercial blueberry juice (BJ) against two strains of C. sakazakii, ATCC 29004 and 29544. BJ (pH 2.8), blueberry PAC (5 mg/ml) and controls (phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.2, and malic acid pH 3.0) were mixed with equal volumes of washed overnight cultures of C. sakazakii and incubated for 30 min, 1 h, 3 h and 6 h at 37°C. Reductions of ∼1 and 1.50 log CFU/ml were obtained for strains 29004 and 29544, respectively after 30 min with BJ or blueberry PAC. Both C. sakazakii strains 29004 and 29544 were reduced to undetectable levels from 8.25 ± 0.12 log CFU/ml and 8.48 ± 0.03 log CFU/ml, respectively with BJ (pH 2.8) or blueberry PAC after 1 h, while malic acid (pH 3.0) showed ∼1.3 log CFU/ml reduction for both strains. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed differences in cell membrane morphology with clumping and formation of blebs of the treated strains compared to untreated controls. These results warrant further in vivo studies with blueberry bioactives to determine potential for preventing and treating C. sakazakii infections. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Could Pomegranate Juice Help in the Control of Inflammatory Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Danesi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fruits rich in polyphenols, such as pomegranates, have been shown to have health benefits relating to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Using data obtained from PubMed and Scopus, this article provides a brief overview of the therapeutic effects of pomegranate on chronic inflammatory diseases (CID such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, rheumatoid arthritis (RA, metabolic and cardiovascular disorders, and other inflammatory-associated conditions, with an emphasis on fruit-derived juices. Most studies regarding the effects of pomegranate juice have focused on its ability to treat prostate cancer, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. However, pomegranate juice has shown therapeutic potential for many other illnesses. For instance, a small number of human clinical trials have highlighted the positive effects of pomegranate juice and extract consumption on cardiovascular health. The beneficial effects of pomegranate components have also been observed in animal models for respiratory diseases, RA, neurodegenerative disease, and hyperlipidaemia. Furthermore, there exists strong evidence from rodent models suggesting that pomegranate juice can be used to effectively treat IBD, and as an anti-inflammatory agent to treat CID. The effects of pomegranate intake should be further investigated by conducting larger and more well-defined human trials.

  13. Anti-Oxidant effects of pomegranate juice on Saccharomyces ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pomegranate juice increased vitamins, fatty acids and total protein expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in comparison with the control. Conclusion: Pomegranate juice has a positive effect on fatty acid, vitamin and protein synthesis by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Accordingly, we believe that it has significantly ...

  14. Antimicrobial activity of pomegranate peel extracts as affected by cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Burgos, Ema C; Burgos-Hernández, Armando; Noguera-Artiaga, Luis; Kačániová, Miroslava; Hernández-García, Francisca; Cárdenas-López, José L; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel A

    2017-02-01

    Some studies have reported that different parts of the pomegranate fruit, especially the peel, may act as potential antimicrobial agents and thus might be proposed as a safe natural alternative to synthetic antimicrobial agents. The high tannin content, especially punicalagin, found in pomegranate extracts, has been reported as the main compound responsible for such antimicrobial activity. Because the pomegranate peel chemical composition may vary with the type of cultivar (sweet, sour-sweet and sour), pomegranates may also differ with respect to their antimicrobial capacity. The extract from PTO8 pomegranate cultivar peel had the highest antimicrobial activity, as well as the highest punicalagins (α and β) and ellagic acid concentrations. In the results obtained from both antibacterial and antifungal activity studies, the sour-sweet pomegranate cultivar PTO8 showed the best antimicrobial activity, and the highest ellagic acid concentrations. The results of the present study suggest that ellagic acid content has a significant influence on the antimicrobial activity of the pomegranate extracts investigated. The pomegranate peel of the PTO8 cultivar is a good source of antifungal and antibacterial compounds, and may represent an alternative to antimicrobial agents of synthetic origin. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Could Pomegranate Juice Help in the Control of Inflammatory Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Fruits rich in polyphenols, such as pomegranates, have been shown to have health benefits relating to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Using data obtained from PubMed and Scopus, this article provides a brief overview of the therapeutic effects of pomegranate on chronic inflammatory diseases (CID) such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), metabolic and cardiovascular disorders, and other inflammatory-associated conditions, with an emphasis on fruit-derived juices. Most studies regarding the effects of pomegranate juice have focused on its ability to treat prostate cancer, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. However, pomegranate juice has shown therapeutic potential for many other illnesses. For instance, a small number of human clinical trials have highlighted the positive effects of pomegranate juice and extract consumption on cardiovascular health. The beneficial effects of pomegranate components have also been observed in animal models for respiratory diseases, RA, neurodegenerative disease, and hyperlipidaemia. Furthermore, there exists strong evidence from rodent models suggesting that pomegranate juice can be used to effectively treat IBD, and as an anti-inflammatory agent to treat CID. The effects of pomegranate intake should be further investigated by conducting larger and more well-defined human trials. PMID:28867799

  16. Effect of blueberry extract from blueberry pomace on the microencapsulated fish oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of the addition of blueberry extract (BE) obtained from blueberry pomace on lipid oxidation of pollock liver oil (PO) during microencapsulation was evaluated. An emulsion containing PO and BE (EBE) was prepared and spray dried in a pilot scale spray dryer. Thiobarbituric acids (TBARS) of ...

  17. High Throughput Phenotyping of Blueberry Bush Morphological Traits Using Unmanned Aerial Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Patrick

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenotyping morphological traits of blueberry bushes in the field is important for selecting genotypes that are easily harvested by mechanical harvesters. Morphological data can also be used to assess the effects of crop treatments such as plant growth regulators, fertilizers, and environmental conditions. This paper investigates the feasibility and accuracy of an inexpensive unmanned aerial system in determining the morphological characteristics of blueberry bushes. Color images collected by a quadcopter are processed into three-dimensional point clouds via structure from motion algorithms. Bush height, extents, canopy area, and volume, in addition to crown diameter and width, are derived and referenced to ground truth. In an experimental farm, twenty-five bushes were imaged by a quadcopter. Height and width dimensions achieved a mean absolute error of 9.85 cm before and 5.82 cm after systematic under-estimation correction. Strong correlation was found between manual and image derived bush volumes and their traditional growth indices. Hedgerows of three Southern Highbush varieties were imaged at a commercial farm to extract five morphological features (base angle, blockiness, crown percent height, crown ratio, and vegetation ratio associated with cultivation and machine harvestability. The bushes were found to be partially separable by multivariate analysis. The methodology developed from this study is not only valuable for plant breeders to screen genotypes with bush morphological traits that are suitable for machine harvest, but can also aid producers in crop management such as pruning and plot layout organization.

  18. Pomegranate extract exhibits in vitro activity against Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finegold, Sydney M; Summanen, Paula H; Corbett, Karen; Downes, Julia; Henning, Susanne M; Li, Zhaoping

    2014-10-01

    To determine the possible utility of pomegranate extract in the management or prevention of Clostridium difficile infections or colonization. The activity of pomegranate was tested against 29 clinical C. difficile isolates using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute-approved agar dilution technique. Total phenolics content of the pomegranate extract was determined by Folin-Ciocalteau colorimetric method and final concentrations of 6.25 to 400 μg/mL gallic acid equivalent were achieved in the agar. All strains had MICs at 12.5 to 25 mg/mL gallic acid equivalent range. Our results suggest antimicrobial in vitro activity for pomegranate extract against toxigenic C. difficile. Pomegranate extract may be a useful contributor to the management and prevention of C. difficile disease or colonization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. 7 CFR 993.109 - Modified definition of non-French prunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Modified definition of non-French prunes. 993.109... definition of non-French prunes. The definition of non-French prunes set forth in § 993.6 is modified to read as follows: Non-French Prunes means prunes commonly known as Imperial, Sugar, Robe de Sargent, Burton...

  20. Prune Belly syndrome: A rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    Samal, Sunil Kumar; Rathod, Setu

    2015-01-01

    Prune Belly syndrome (PBS) is a rare congenital anomaly of uncertain etiology almost exclusive to males. We report a case of term male baby born to a 39-year-old grand multipara with previous four normal vaginal births. There was no history of genetic or congenital anomaly in her family. Examination of the baby revealed hypotonia, deficient abdominal muscle, cryptorchidism, palpable kidney, and bladder. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen revealed bilateral gross hydronephrosis and megauret...

  1. Prevalence and incidence of postharvest diseases of blueberries in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent establishment of low-chill southern highbush blueberry cultivars in California’s warm climate has significantly increased the acreage of blueberry production in the Central Valley of California, which is now a major southern highbush blueberry production region in the United States. The vast ...

  2. An overview of extention "all about blueberries" website

    Science.gov (United States)

    The All About Blueberries Community of Practice (CoP) was created to help blueberry growers in the southeastern United States maximize productivity and decrease production costs. This CoP uses novel, diverse educational methods to help its Community of Interest (CoI) increase blueberry production e...

  3. Unusual presentation of prune belly syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Demisse, Abayneh Girma; Berhanu, Ashenafi; Tadesse, Temesgen

    2017-01-01

    Background Prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital malformation of unknown etiology, with the following triad of findings: abdominal muscle wall weakness, undescended testes, and urinary tract abnormalities. In most cases, detection of prune belly syndrome occurs during neonatal or infancy period. In this case report, we describe a 12-year-old boy from Ethiopia with the triad of findings of prune belly syndrome along with skeletal malformations. We are unaware of any previous report of prun...

  4. Potential Effects of Pomegranate Polyphenols in Cancer Prevention and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrini, Eleonora; Ferruzzi, Lorenzo; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death and is becoming the leading one in old age. Vegetable and fruit consumption is inversely associated with cancer incidence and mortality. Currently, interest in a number of fruits high in polyphenols has been raised due to their reported chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic potential. Pomegranate has been shown to exert anticancer activity, which is generally attributed to its high content of polyphenols. This review provides a comprehensive analysis of known targets and mechanisms along with a critical evaluation of pomegranate polyphenols as future anticancer agents. Pomegranate evokes antiproliferative, anti-invasive, and antimetastatic effects, induces apoptosis through the modulation of Bcl-2 proteins, upregulates p21 and p27, and downregulates cyclin-cdk network. Furthermore, pomegranate blocks the activation of inflammatory pathways including, but not limited to, the NF-κB pathway. The strongest evidence for its anticancer activity comes from studies on prostate cancer. Accordingly, some exploratory clinical studies investigating pomegranate found a trend of efficacy in increasing prostate-specific antigen doubling time in patients with prostate cancer. However, the genotoxicity reported for pomegranate raised certain concerns over its safety and an accurate assessment of the risk/benefit should be performed before suggesting the use of pomegranate or its polyphenols for cancer-related therapeutic purposes.

  5. Effect of mechanical pruning on the yield and quality of ‘Fortune’ mandarins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Martin-Gorriz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This work compares mechanical pruning followed up by hand pruning versus manual pruning in the case of ‘Fortune’ mandarins. Yield and fruit quality were measured over a three-year period. Two mechanical pruning intensities were tested, these intensities being measured as the width of the row middles left free after mechanical pruning. Although there were differences in biomass and diameter of the branches that were cut, no differences were observed between the two mechanical pruning intensities in terms of yield or fruit quality. In all pruning treatments, fruit size reached the highest category. The pruning treatments consisted in: (i hand pruning every year, (ii mechanical pruning followed up by hand pruning every year, and (iii alternating the two previous methods over the years studied. On analysing the accumulated fruit production of the three years, it can be observed that there were no significant differences in yield when mechanical pruning was alternated with hand pruning over the years. When only mechanical pruning was used for the three years, however, a 22% reduction in yield was observed with respect to the treatment involving hand pruning alone. From the economic point of view, mechanical pruning shortened the time needed to complete the follow-up hand pruning by 13% with respect to just hand pruning, but this reduction in labour does not offset the cost of the mechanical equipment.

  6. Rabbiteye blueberry prevents osteoporosis in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Wu, Shou-Mian; Xu, Zhi-Yuan; Ou-Yang, Sheng

    2014-08-08

    It has been forecasted that the rabbiteye blueberry could inhibit osteoporosis. However, the inhibition and prevention of osteoporosis via rabbiteye blueberry are still elusive. This study was aim to evaluate the anti-osteoporosis effects of rabbiteye blueberry in ovariectomized rats. Thirty rats were randomly divided into three groups of ten rats each as follows: sham-operated group (SG), ovariectomized model control group (OMG), and ovariectomized rabbiteye blueberry treatment group (OBG). The blood mineral levels, the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and osteoprotegerin (OPG) level were determined. The expression analyses of type I collagen, integrin-β1, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were performed. Besides, the bone mineral density (BMD) and bone histomorphometry (BH) were measured. The ALP activity in SG and OBG was significantly lower than that in OMG. For the OPG level, the significant increase of OPG level in OBG was indicated compared with the other groups. The mRNA expression levels of type I collagen, integrin-β1, and FAK in OMG were significantly lower than those in other groups. The BMD in OMG were all significantly lower than those in SG and OBG. For BH, blueberry significantly improved the trabecular bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness, mean trabecular bone number, and bone formation rate, and decreased the trabecular separation, the percent of bone resorption perimeter, and mean osteoclast number in OBG compared with OMG. The rabbiteye blueberries had an effective inhibition in bone resorption, bone loss, and reduction of bone strength of ovariectomized rats and could improve the BMD, osteogenic activity, and trabecular bone structure.

  7. Prune belly syndrome with pouch colon and absent dermatome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prune belly syndrome with pouch colon and absent dermatome. AA Baba, SA Hussain, AH Shera, R Patnaik. Abstract. Prune belly syndrome (PBS) is a rare congenital constellation of defects in pediatric surgical practice. Although anorectal anomalies have been reported in association with PBS, only few case of pouch ...

  8. Prune belly syndrome: Early management outcome of nine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prune belly syndrome: Early management outcome of nine consecutive cases. ... Background: Prune belly syndrome (PBS) is a rare congenital malformation of unclear etiology. The disease progress and ... The degree of the anterior abdominal wall and the urinary tract morphology varies from patient to patient. Urinary tract ...

  9. Pruning quality affects infection of Acacia mangium and A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pruning (singling) is a common silvicultural practice in commercial Acacia plantations because these trees tend to have multiple stems. The wounds resulting from pruning are susceptible to infection by pathogens. Ceratocystis acaciivora and Lasiodiplodia theobromae have been shown recently to be important pathogens ...

  10. Prune Belly Syndrome | Hammond | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cases of prune belly syndrome in Black infants are presented. The prune belly syndrome, or congenital absence of abdominal muscles, is accompanied by hydro-ureter, hydronephrosis, megalocystis and usually undescended testes. Other associated congenital defects occur, of which orthopaedic defects appear to be ...

  11. Effect of mycorrhiza and pruning regimes on seasonality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of mycorrhiza and pruning regimes on seasonality of hedgerow tree mulch contribution to alley-cropped cassava in Ibadan, Nigeria. ... promoted dry season pruning production which was masked in Leucaena at 3 months by biomass diversion into flowering and in Gliricidia with both flowering and mite infestation.

  12. Pruning Chinese trees : an experimental and modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Bo

    2001-01-01

    Pruning of trees, in which some branches are removed from the lower crown of a tree, has been extensively used in China in silvicultural management for many purposes. With an experimental and modelling approach, the effects of pruning on tree growth and on the harvest of plant material were studied.

  13. Memory boosting effect of Citrus limon, Pomegranate and their combinations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riaz, Azra; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Algahtani, Hussein A

    2014-01-01

    Memory is greatly influenced by factors like food, stress and quality of sleep, hence present study was designed to evaluate the effect of Citrus limon and Pomegranate juices on memory of mice using...

  14. Pomegranate as a functional food and nutraceutical source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanningsmeier, Suzanne D; Harris, G Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pomegranate, a fruit native to the Middle East, has gained widespread popularity as a functional food and nutraceutical source. The health effects of the whole fruit, as well as its juices and extracts, have been studied in relation to a variety of chronic diseases. Promising results against cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and prostate cancer have been reported from human clinical trials. The in vitro antioxidant activity of pomegranate has been attributed to its high polyphenolic content, specifically punicalagins, punicalins, gallagic acid, and ellagic acid. These compounds are metabolized during digestion to ellagic acid and urolithins, suggesting that the bioactive compounds that provide in vivo antioxidant activity may not be the same as those present in the whole food. Anthocyanins and the unique fatty acid profile of the seed oil may also play a role in pomegranate's health effects. A more complete characterization of pomegranate components and their physiological fate may provide mechanistic insight into the potential health benefits observed in clinical trials.

  15. Pomegranate Extracts and Cancer Prevention: Molecular and Cellular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Deeba N.; Chamcheu, Jean-Christopher; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    There is increased appreciation by the scientific community that dietary phytochemicals can be potential weapons in the fight against cancer. Emerging data has provided new insights into the molecular and cellular framework needed to establish novel mechanism-based strategies for cancer prevention by selective bioactive food components. The unique chemical composition of the pomegranate fruit, rich in antioxidant tannins and flavonoids has drawn the attention of many investigators. Polyphenol rich fractions derived from the pomegranate fruit have been studied for their potential chemopreventive and/or cancer therapeutic effects in several animal models. Although data from in vitro and in vivo studies look convincing, well designed clinical trials in humans are needed to ascertain whether pomegranate can become part of our armamentarium against cancer. This review summarizes the available literature on the effects of pomegranate against various cancers. PMID:23094914

  16. Therapeutic applications of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.): a review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jurenka, Julie S

    2008-01-01

    The pomegranate, Punica granatum L., is an ancient, mystical, unique fruit borne on a small, long-living tree cultivated throughout the Mediterranean region, as far north as the Himalayas, in Southeast Asia, and in California...

  17. Nanoencapsulation of pomegranate bioactive compounds for breast cancer chemoprevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirode, Amit B; Bharali, Dhruba J; Nallanthighal, Sameera; Coon, Justin K; Mousa, Shaker A; Reliene, Ramune

    2015-01-01

    Pomegranate polyphenols are potent antioxidants and chemopreventive agents but have low bioavailability and a short half-life. For example, punicalagin (PU), the major polyphenol in pomegranates, is not absorbed in its intact form but is hydrolyzed to ellagic acid (EA) moieties and rapidly metabolized into short-lived metabolites of EA. We hypothesized that encapsulation of pomegranate polyphenols into biodegradable sustained release nanoparticles (NPs) may circumvent these limitations. We describe here the development, characterization, and bioactivity assessment of novel formulations of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)–poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA–PEG) NPs loaded with pomegranate extract (PE) or individual polyphenols such as PU or EA. Monodispersed, spherical 150–200 nm average diameter NPs were prepared by the double emulsion–solvent evaporation method. Uptake of Alexa Fluor-488-labeled NPs was evaluated in MCF-7 breast cancer cells over a 24-hour time course. Confocal fluorescent microscopy revealed that PLGA–PEG NPs were efficiently taken up, and the uptake reached the maximum at 24 hours. In addition, we examined the antiproliferative effects of PE-, PU-, and/or EA-loaded NPs in MCF-7 and Hs578T breast cancer cells. We found that PE, PU, and EA nanoprototypes had a 2- to 12-fold enhanced effect on cell growth inhibition compared to their free counterparts, while void NPs did not affect cell growth. PU-NPs were the most potent nanoprototype of pomegranates. Thus, PU may be the polyphenol of choice for further chemoprevention studies with pomegranate nanoprototypes. These data demonstrate that nanotechnology-enabled delivery of pomegranate polyphenols enhances their anticancer effects in breast cancer cells. Thus, pomegranate polyphenols are promising agents for nanochemoprevention of breast cancer. PMID:25624761

  18. Nanoencapsulation of pomegranate bioactive compounds for breast cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirode, Amit B; Bharali, Dhruba J; Nallanthighal, Sameera; Coon, Justin K; Mousa, Shaker A; Reliene, Ramune

    2015-01-01

    Pomegranate polyphenols are potent antioxidants and chemopreventive agents but have low bioavailability and a short half-life. For example, punicalagin (PU), the major polyphenol in pomegranates, is not absorbed in its intact form but is hydrolyzed to ellagic acid (EA) moieties and rapidly metabolized into short-lived metabolites of EA. We hypothesized that encapsulation of pomegranate polyphenols into biodegradable sustained release nanoparticles (NPs) may circumvent these limitations. We describe here the development, characterization, and bioactivity assessment of novel formulations of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) NPs loaded with pomegranate extract (PE) or individual polyphenols such as PU or EA. Monodispersed, spherical 150-200 nm average diameter NPs were prepared by the double emulsion-solvent evaporation method. Uptake of Alexa Fluor-488-labeled NPs was evaluated in MCF-7 breast cancer cells over a 24-hour time course. Confocal fluorescent microscopy revealed that PLGA-PEG NPs were efficiently taken up, and the uptake reached the maximum at 24 hours. In addition, we examined the antiproliferative effects of PE-, PU-, and/or EA-loaded NPs in MCF-7 and Hs578T breast cancer cells. We found that PE, PU, and EA nanoprototypes had a 2- to 12-fold enhanced effect on cell growth inhibition compared to their free counterparts, while void NPs did not affect cell growth. PU-NPs were the most potent nanoprototype of pomegranates. Thus, PU may be the polyphenol of choice for further chemoprevention studies with pomegranate nanoprototypes. These data demonstrate that nanotechnology-enabled delivery of pomegranate polyphenols enhances their anticancer effects in breast cancer cells. Thus, pomegranate polyphenols are promising agents for nanochemoprevention of breast cancer.

  19. The Requirements of Organic Pomegranate Marketing from Paveh Growers’ Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Farhad Lashgarara; Shaghayegh Ehtesham; Maryam Omidi

    2015-01-01

    One factor that has highlighted the role of agriculture in the economy is to make the marketing system of agricultural products more efficient. The main purpose of this study was to identify the requirements of marketing the organic pomegranate of Paveh, Kermanshah Province, Iran, from the perspective of farmers. In order to identify contributing factors, an exploratory factor analysis was used. The population of this study consisted of the pomegranate growers of Paveh (N...

  20. A Comparison of Conventional, Integrated and Organic Management Systems on the Quality of Pomegranate Fruit cv. “Rabbab-e- Shiraz”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisam Ahmadi

    2017-02-01

    4 replications. Results and discussion: The results showed that fruit, arils and peel weight and fresh weight of peel were significantly higher in conventional system than organic management system. Fruit weight depends on plant nutrition, which, in turn, significantly influences postharvest quality. It is possibly due to smaller cells and less intercellular spaces in organic fruits. In this study, fruit size in organic management system was significantly lower than conventional system; our results in this regard are in accordance with the previous studies reported on kiwifruit, apple and grape . Fruit taste is determined mainly by juice TSS and the ratios between TSS and TA. In this study, juice TSS in conventional and integrated management systems was higher than organic fruits at harvest time. Our findings are in agreement with Beng et al. (6, who reported higher amount of TSS in kiwifruit obtained from conventional system than organic system due to more mature fruit and greater use of nitrogen fertilizers. No difference was found for pH, TA, TSS/TA, seed firmness, total anthocyanin and flavonoid content among the three management systems. The antioxidant activity properties of pomegranate juice were attributed to polyphenols, sugar-containing polyphenolic tannins and anthocyanins. In this study, total phenolic content and antioxidant activity in fruits obtained from organic management system were greater than conventional management system. These results are in agreement with the findings reported in blueberry, peach and grape, apple, kiwifruit and strawberry fruits. Mineral nutrient analysis showed that the concentrations of P, Ca and Mg in peel, and N, P, K, Ca and Mg in aril of organic fruits were lower than fruits of conventional system, but the ratio of Ca to other elements in the arils of organic fruits was significantly higher than conventional system fruits. In apple, N concentration of conventionally grown fruits was higher, while K, Ca, Na and Mg

  1. Total phenolic contents, antioxidant activities, and bioactive ingredients of juices from pomegranate cultivars worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaycıoğlu, Zeynep; Erim, F Bedia

    2017-04-15

    Numerous recent scientific publications investigating the health benefits of pomegranate juice have greatly increased consumer interest in this fruit. The primary cause of the positive health effect of pomegranate is the unique antioxidant activity of this fruit. As a result of the increased attention given to pomegranate, the number of countries producing pomegranate has increased and new cultivars are appearing. The purpose of this review is to quantitatively establish the antioxidant activities, the total phenolic contents which are highly correlated to antioxidant activities, and the other important ingredients of pomegranate juices obtained from cultivars of different regions. Pomegranate wine, vinegar, and sour sauce obtained directly from pomegranate juice are included in this review. Comparison of aril juices with peel and seed extracts is also given. This data could be useful to the pomegranate industry in identifying and developing cultivars having commercial value. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF CELLULOSE BASED BIO-POLYMER AEROGEL ISOLATED FROM WASTE OF BLUEBERRY TREE (VACCINIUM MYRTILLUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet KAYA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose aerogel (CA has highly porous structure, environmentally friendly, thermally stable and flame retardant properties. These properties in material worlds have attracted large interest as a potentially industrial material. In this paper, cellulose aerogel with flame retardant was produced from pruned branches and bushes of blueberries wastes (PBBW. Firstly, cellulose raw material these wastes was obtained and then, cellulose aerogel via freeze-drying, followed by cellulose hydrogel production. Our reports showed that three dimensionally network aerogel structure prepared from NaOH/Urea as scaffold solution. The present cellulose aerogel has excellent flame retardancy, which can extinguish within 140 s. By the way, it was inferred thermal stability performance of cellulose aerogel could be efficient potential thermal insulating material. Besides, this process are sustainable, easily available at low cost and suitable for industrial applications.

  3. ‘Baby Blues’ highbush blueberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Baby Blues’ is a new highbush blueberry from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR, released in cooperation with Oregon State University’s Agricultural Experiment Station. ‘Baby Blues’ is a vigorous, high-yielding, very small-f...

  4. Effect of substituted gelling agents from pomegranate peel on colour, textural and sensory properties of pomegranate jam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Mouna; Yaich, Héla; Hidouri, Hayfa; Attia, Hamadi; Ayadi, M A

    2018-01-15

    A series of pomegranate jams were prepared from a Tunisian ecotype (Tounsi) with different amounts of sugar (10, 20 and 30%) and low-methoxylated pectin (0.2, 0.7 and 1.2%). The most appreciated formulation was that contaning 30% sugars and 0.2% pectin. Then, commercial pectin was substituted by other gelling agents (pomegranate peel powders dried at 50°C vs lyophilized, pectin and fibre extracted from pomegranate peel) for the preparation of pomegranate peel-based jams. The elaborated jams were evaluated for physichochemical, colour, texture and sensory characteristics. Results revealed that the jam (JPP2) elaborated with 0.2% pectin extracted from pomegranate peel exhibited similar overall acceptability to that prepared with commercial pectin. However, it was more acceptable than other pomegranate peel-based jams, which was related to a better appreciation of sweetness and colour. According to the colour and texture measurements, this sample (JPP2) was more reddish and less firm than other samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development and evaluation of a vibratory-pneumatic pomegranate arils extractor

    OpenAIRE

    S.M Nassiri; Samsami, S.; M Loghavi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Iran is a frontier of pomegranate fruit production in the world (with almost 40 % of the world`s production). However due to traditional processing operations is not ranked as the largest pomegranate exporter. Saveh, Neyriz and Ferdows are the top pomegranate producing cities in Iran. Pomegranate is consumed as a fresh fruit as well as processed product as food additive, paste, syrup, jelly, pectin, jam, beverage, essence, vinegar and concentrate. Aril extraction is the first...

  6. Blueberries? Impact on Insulin Resistance and Glucose Intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    April J. Stull

    2016-01-01

    Blueberries are a rich source of polyphenols, which include anthocyanin bioactive compounds. Epidemiological evidence indicates that incorporating blueberries into the diet may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). These findings are supported by pre-clinical and clinical studies that have shown improvements in insulin resistance (i.e., increased insulin sensitivity) after obese and insulin-resistant rodents or humans consumed blueberries. Insulin resistance was assessed by hom...

  7. DEMAND FOR WILD BLUEBERRIES AT FARM AND PROCESSOR LEVELS

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Hsiang-Tai; Peavey, Stephanie R.; Kezis, Alan S.

    2000-01-01

    The wild blueberry crop harvested in Maine and eastern Canada has increased considerably in recent years. The purpose of this study is to understand the recent trends in demand for wild blueberries with particular attention to the effects of production and the marketing of wild and cultivated blueberries. A price response model was developed to analyze farm-gate price and the processor price, using annual data from 1978 through 1997. Key explanatory variables in the model include quantity of ...

  8. Prune Belly syndrome: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Sunil Kumar; Rathod, Setu

    2015-01-01

    Prune Belly syndrome (PBS) is a rare congenital anomaly of uncertain etiology almost exclusive to males. We report a case of term male baby born to a 39-year-old grand multipara with previous four normal vaginal births. There was no history of genetic or congenital anomaly in her family. Examination of the baby revealed hypotonia, deficient abdominal muscle, cryptorchidism, palpable kidney, and bladder. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen revealed bilateral gross hydronephrosis and megaureter. Provisional diagnosis of PBS was made and the baby was admitted in neonatal intensive care units for further management. Routine antenatal care with ultrasonography will help in detecting renal anomalies, which can be followed postnatally. Early diagnosis of this syndrome and determining its optimal treatment are very important in helping to avoid its fatal course.

  9. BBGD: an online database for blueberry genomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews Benjamin F

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blueberry is a member of the Ericaceae family, which also includes closely related cranberry and more distantly related rhododendron, azalea, and mountain laurel. Blueberry is a major berry crop in the United States, and one that has great nutritional and economical value. Extreme low temperatures, however, reduce crop yield and cause major losses to US farmers. A better understanding of the genes and biochemical pathways that are up- or down-regulated during cold acclimation is needed to produce blueberry cultivars with enhanced cold hardiness. To that end, the blueberry genomics database (BBDG was developed. Along with the analysis tools and web-based query interfaces, the database serves both the broader Ericaceae research community and the blueberry research community specifically by making available ESTs and gene expression data in searchable formats and in elucidating the underlying mechanisms of cold acclimation and freeze tolerance in blueberry. Description BBGD is the world's first database for blueberry genomics. BBGD is both a sequence and gene expression database. It stores both EST and microarray data and allows scientists to correlate expression profiles with gene function. BBGD is a public online database. Presently, the main focus of the database is the identification of genes in blueberry that are significantly induced or suppressed after low temperature exposure. Conclusion By using the database, researchers have developed EST-based markers for mapping and have identified a number of "candidate" cold tolerance genes that are highly expressed in blueberry flower buds after exposure to low temperatures.

  10. Microbial degradation of phosmet on blueberry fruit and in aqueous systems by indigenous bacterial flora on lowbush blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, K M; Bushway, A A; Bushway, R J; Davis-Dentici, K

    2007-10-01

    Phosmet-adapted bacteria isolated from lowbush blueberries (Vaccinium angustifolium) were evaluated for their ability to degrade phosmet on blueberry fruit and in minimal salt solutions. Microbial metabolism of phosmet by isolates of Enterobacter agglomerans and Pseudomonas fluorescens resulted in significant reductions (P blueberries and in minimal salt solutions. Thus, the role of adapted strains of E. agglomerans and P. fluorescens in degrading phosmet on blueberries represents an extensive plant-microorganism relationship, which is essential to determination of phosmet persistence under pre- and postharvest conditions.

  11. Possible synergistic prostate cancer suppression by anatomically discrete pomegranate fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansky, Ephraim P; Jiang, Wenguo; Mo, Huanbiao; Bravo, Lou; Froom, Paul; Yu, Weiping; Harris, Neil M; Neeman, Ishak; Campbell, Moray J

    2005-01-01

    We investigated whether dissimilar biochemical fractions originating in anatomically discrete sections of the pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit might act synergistically against proliferation, metastatic potential, and phosholipase A2 (PLA2) expression of human prostate cancer cells in vitro . Proliferation of DU 145 human prostate cancer cells was measured following treatment with a range of therapeutically active doses of fermented pomegranate juice polyphenols (W) and sub-therapeutic doses of either pomegranate pericarp (peel) polyphenols (P) or pomegranate seed oil (Oil). Invasion across Matrigel by PC-3 human prostate cancer cells was measured following treatment with combinations of W, P and Oil such that the total gross weight of pomegranate extract was held constant. Expression of PLA2, associated with invasive potential, was measured in the PC-3 cells after treatment with the same dosage combinations as per invasion. Supra-additive, complementary and synergistic effects were proven in all models by the Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric H test at p < 0.001 for the proliferation tests, p < 0.01 for invasion, and p < 0.05 for PLA2 expression. Proliferation effects were additionally evaluated with CompuSyn software median effect analysis and showed a concentration index CI < 1, confirming synergy. The results suggest vertical as well as the usual horizontal strategies for discovering pharmacological actives in plants.

  12. Preventive and Prophylactic Mechanisms of Action of Pomegranate Bioactive Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viladomiu, Monica; Hontecillas, Raquel; Lu, Pinyi; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranate fruit presents strong anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiobesity, and antitumoral properties, thus leading to an increased popularity as a functional food and nutraceutical source since ancient times. It can be divided into three parts: seeds, peel, and juice, all of which seem to have medicinal benefits. Several studies investigate its bioactive components as a means to associate them with a specific beneficial effect and develop future products and therapeutic applications. Many beneficial effects are related to the presence of ellagic acid, ellagitannins (including punicalagins), punicic acid and other fatty acids, flavonoids, anthocyanidins, anthocyanins, estrogenic flavonols, and flavones, which seem to be its most therapeutically beneficial components. However, the synergistic action of the pomegranate constituents appears to be superior when compared to individual constituents. Promising results have been obtained for the treatment of certain diseases including obesity, insulin resistance, intestinal inflammation, and cancer. Although moderate consumption of pomegranate does not result in adverse effects, future studies are needed to assess safety and potential interactions with drugs that may alter the bioavailability of bioactive constituents of pomegranate as well as drugs. The aim of this review is to summarize the health effects and mechanisms of action of pomegranate extracts in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:23737845

  13. Efficient Pruning Method for Ensemble Self-Generating Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Inoue

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, multiple classifier systems (MCS have been used for practical applications to improve classification accuracy. Self-generating neural networks (SGNN are one of the suitable base-classifiers for MCS because of their simple setting and fast learning. However, the computation cost of the MCS increases in proportion to the number of SGNN. In this paper, we propose an efficient pruning method for the structure of the SGNN in the MCS. We compare the pruned MCS with two sampling methods. Experiments have been conducted to compare the pruned MCS with an unpruned MCS, the MCS based on C4.5, and k-nearest neighbor method. The results show that the pruned MCS can improve its classification accuracy as well as reducing the computation cost.

  14. Partial prune belly syndrome: A rare case report

    OpenAIRE

    Aditya Pratap Singh; Vinay Mathur; Ramesh Tanger; Arun Kumar Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Prune belly syndrome (PBS) is characterized by deficient development of abdominal muscles that causes the skin of the abdomen to wrinkle like a prune, bilateral cryptorchidism, abnormalities of the urinary tract. The etiology of PBS is unclear and possible familial genetic inheritance was reported in some of the studies. We are presenting here a case with the absence of the muscle in the right side of the abdomen as hernia, thinning of the muscle on left side with bilateral cryptorchidism, an...

  15. 75 FR 7985 - Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Withdrawal of a Proposed Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1218 Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Withdrawal... 36955), to amend the Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order (Order) by increasing the... blueberries annually from $12 to $24 per ton. The Order is administered by the U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council...

  16. 76 FR 16324 - Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Continuance Referendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1218 Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order... blueberries to determine whether they favor continuance of the Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information... 26, 2011. To be eligible to vote in this referendum, blueberry producers and importers must have...

  17. NMR methodologies in the analysis of blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitani, Donatella; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Delfini, Maurizio; Vista, Silvia; Antiochia, Riccarda; Proietti, Noemi; Bubici, Salvatore; Ferrante, Gianni; Carradori, Simone; De Salvador, Flavio Roberto; Mannina, Luisa

    2014-06-01

    An NMR analytical protocol based on complementary high and low field measurements is proposed for blueberry characterization. Untargeted NMR metabolite profiling of blueberries aqueous and organic extracts as well as targeted NMR analysis focused on anthocyanins and other phenols are reported. Bligh-Dyer and microwave-assisted extractions were carried out and compared showing a better recovery of lipidic fraction in the case of microwave procedure. Water-soluble metabolites belonging to different classes such as sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and phenolic compounds, as well as metabolites soluble in organic solvent such as triglycerides, sterols, and fatty acids, were identified. Five anthocyanins (malvidin-3-glucoside, malvidin-3-galactoside, delphinidin-3-glucoside, delphinidin-3-galactoside, and petunidin-3-glucoside) and 3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl quercetin were identified in solid phase extract. The water status of fresh and withered blueberries was monitored by portable NMR and fast-field cycling NMR. (1) H depth profiles, T2 transverse relaxation times and dispersion profiles were found to be sensitive to the withering. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Blueberry Galaxies: The Lowest Mass Young Starbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Wang, Junxian

    2017-09-01

    Searching for extreme emission line galaxies allows us to find low-mass metal-poor galaxies that are good analogs of high redshift Lyα emitting galaxies. These low-mass extreme emission line galaxies are also potential Lyman-continuum leakers. Finding them at very low redshifts (z≲ 0.05) allows us to be sensitive to even lower stellar masses and metallicities. We report on a sample of extreme emission line galaxies at z≲ 0.05 (blueberry galaxies). We selected them from SDSS broadband images on the basis of their broadband colors and studied their properties with MMT spectroscopy. From the entire SDSS DR12 photometric catalog, we found 51 photometric candidates. We spectroscopically confirm 40 as blueberry galaxies. (An additional seven candidates are contaminants, and four remain without spectra.) These blueberries are dwarf starburst galaxies with very small sizes (<1 kpc) and very high ionization ([O III]/[O II] ˜ 10-60). They also have some of the lowest stellar masses ({log}(M/{M}⊙ )˜ 6.5{--}7.5) and lowest metallicities (7.1< 12+{log}({{O}}/{{H}})< 7.8) of starburst galaxies. Thus, they are small counterparts to green pea galaxies and high redshift Lyα emitting galaxies.

  19. Blueberry Metabolites Attenuate Lipotoxicity-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, Divya; Cavalcanti, Rafaela Ramos Mororo; Petersen, Chrissa; Begaye, Nathan; Cutler, Brett Ronald; Costa, Marcella Melo Assis; Ramos, Renata Kelly Luna Gomes; Ferreira, Marina Ramos; Li, Youyou; Bharath, Leena P; Toolson, Emma; Sebahar, Paul; Looper, Ryan E; Jalili, Thunder; Rajasekaran, Namakkal S; Jia, Zhenquan; Symons, J David; Pon Velayutham, Anandh Babu

    2017-10-12

    Lipotoxicity-induced endothelial dysfunction is an important vascular complication associated with diabetes. Clinical studies support the vascular benefits of blueberry anthocyanins, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that metabolites of blueberry anthocyanins attenuate lipotoxicity-induced endothelial dysfunction. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were treated for 6 h with either: (i) the parent anthocyanins (malvidin-3-glucoside and cyanidin-3-glucoside); or (ii) the blueberry metabolites (hydroxyhippuric acid, hippuric acid, benzoic acid-4-sulfate, isovanillic acid-3-sulfate, and vanillic acid-4-sulfate), at concentrations known to circulate in humans following blueberry consumption. For the last 5 h HAECs were treated with palmitate or vehicle. HAECs treated with palmitate displayed elevated reactive oxygen species generation, increased mRNA expression of Nox4, chemokines, adhesion molecules, and IκBα, exaggerated monocyte binding, and suppressed nitric oxide production. Of note, the damaging effects of palmitate were ameliorated in HAECs treated with blueberry metabolites but not parent anthocyanins. Further, important translational relevance of these results was provided by our observation that palmitate-induced endothelial dysfunction was lessened in arterial segments that incubated concurrently with blueberry metabolites. Our findings indicate that the vascular benefits of blueberry anthocyanins are mediated by their metabolites. Blueberries might complement existing therapies to improve vascular complications. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Salmonella spp. dynamics in wild blueberry, Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton

    Science.gov (United States)

    A six-year field study was conducted in the two major wild, or lowbush, blueberry growing regions in Maine, Midcoast and Downeast. This study used data from two cropping cycles (four years) to model the dynamics of Salmonella spp. prevalence in wild blueberry fields (Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton). ...

  1. Effect of fermentation and sterilization on anthocyanins in blueberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Qixing; Feng, Lei; Hu, Jielun; Wang, Sunan; Chen, Haihong; Huang, Xiaojun; Nie, Shaoping; Xiong, Tao; Xie, Mingyong

    2017-03-01

    Blueberry products have various health benefits due to their high content of dietary anthocyanins. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of fermentation and sterilization on total anthocyanin content, composition and some quality attributes of blueberry puree. The blueberry puree used here was fermented for 40 h at 37 °C by Lactobacillus after sterilization. The method of ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was optimized for the rapid analysis of anthocyanins. Quality attributes including pH, color, total soluble solids and viscosity were measured. A total of 21 anthocyanins and five anthocyanidins were quantified by ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Fermented blueberry had reduced total anthocyanin content (29%) and levels of individual anthocyanins compared with fresh blueberry. Total anthocyanin content was decreased 46% by sterilization, and different degradation behavior of individual anthocyanin was appeared between fermented and sterilized-fermented blueberry puree. Fermentation and sterilization decreased the total soluble solids and pH and changed color parameters, while minimally influencing viscosity. The loss of total anthocyanin content by fermentation was related to the unstable structure of blueberry anthocyanins. Anthocyanins are sensitive to temperature (>80 °C), and degradation of anthocyanins by sterilization in blueberry should be considered in the fermentation procedure. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Chemical characteristics of custom compost for highbush blueberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent development of markets for blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) produced under Organic certification has stimulated interest in production of composts specifically tailored to its edaphic requirements. Blueberry is a calcifuge (acid-loving) plant that responds favorably to mulching and incorpo...

  3. Evaluation of alternative mulches for blueberry over five production seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) is a calcifuge (acid-loving) plant that responds favorably to mulching with organic matter (OM). Until recently, most blueberry plantings in our region were grown with a mulch of douglas-fir sawdust, with additional nitrogen (N) fertilizer applied to comp...

  4. DANNP: an efficient artificial neural network pruning tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Alshahrani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Artificial neural networks (ANNs are a robust class of machine learning models and are a frequent choice for solving classification problems. However, determining the structure of the ANNs is not trivial as a large number of weights (connection links may lead to overfitting the training data. Although several ANN pruning algorithms have been proposed for the simplification of ANNs, these algorithms are not able to efficiently cope with intricate ANN structures required for complex classification problems. Methods We developed DANNP, a web-based tool, that implements parallelized versions of several ANN pruning algorithms. The DANNP tool uses a modified version of the Fast Compressed Neural Network software implemented in C++ to considerably enhance the running time of the ANN pruning algorithms we implemented. In addition to the performance evaluation of the pruned ANNs, we systematically compared the set of features that remained in the pruned ANN with those obtained by different state-of-the-art feature selection (FS methods. Results Although the ANN pruning algorithms are not entirely parallelizable, DANNP was able to speed up the ANN pruning up to eight times on a 32-core machine, compared to the serial implementations. To assess the impact of the ANN pruning by DANNP tool, we used 16 datasets from different domains. In eight out of the 16 datasets, DANNP significantly reduced the number of weights by 70%–99%, while maintaining a competitive or better model performance compared to the unpruned ANN. Finally, we used a naïve Bayes classifier derived with the features selected as a byproduct of the ANN pruning and demonstrated that its accuracy is comparable to those obtained by the classifiers trained with the features selected by several state-of-the-art FS methods. The FS ranking methodology proposed in this study allows the users to identify the most discriminant features of the problem at hand. To the best of our knowledge

  5. DANNP: an efficient artificial neural network pruning tool

    KAUST Repository

    Alshahrani, Mona

    2017-11-06

    Background Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are a robust class of machine learning models and are a frequent choice for solving classification problems. However, determining the structure of the ANNs is not trivial as a large number of weights (connection links) may lead to overfitting the training data. Although several ANN pruning algorithms have been proposed for the simplification of ANNs, these algorithms are not able to efficiently cope with intricate ANN structures required for complex classification problems. Methods We developed DANNP, a web-based tool, that implements parallelized versions of several ANN pruning algorithms. The DANNP tool uses a modified version of the Fast Compressed Neural Network software implemented in C++ to considerably enhance the running time of the ANN pruning algorithms we implemented. In addition to the performance evaluation of the pruned ANNs, we systematically compared the set of features that remained in the pruned ANN with those obtained by different state-of-the-art feature selection (FS) methods. Results Although the ANN pruning algorithms are not entirely parallelizable, DANNP was able to speed up the ANN pruning up to eight times on a 32-core machine, compared to the serial implementations. To assess the impact of the ANN pruning by DANNP tool, we used 16 datasets from different domains. In eight out of the 16 datasets, DANNP significantly reduced the number of weights by 70%–99%, while maintaining a competitive or better model performance compared to the unpruned ANN. Finally, we used a naïve Bayes classifier derived with the features selected as a byproduct of the ANN pruning and demonstrated that its accuracy is comparable to those obtained by the classifiers trained with the features selected by several state-of-the-art FS methods. The FS ranking methodology proposed in this study allows the users to identify the most discriminant features of the problem at hand. To the best of our knowledge, DANNP (publicly

  6. Tissue culture-mediated biotechnological intervention in pomegranate: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Soumendra K; Chand, Pradeep K

    2011-05-01

    The past 30 years have witnessed a series of systematic biotechnological advances made in pomegranate. These encompass optimization and establishment of in vitro culture techniques including micropropagation, somatic embryogenesis, synthetic seed production, plant regeneration via callus-mediated shoot organogenesis, adventitious shoot regeneration, anther culture, tetraploid induction and genetic transformation. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive account on the tissue culture-mediated biotechnological interventions made in pomegranate aimed at complementing conventional programmes for improvement of this nutraceutically important fruit crop.

  7. Identifying blueberry germplasm that is slow to get Blueberry shock virus in the Pacific Northwest United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueberry shock virus (BlShV) is a serious problem in blueberry production in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) region of North America. Infection occurs during bloom and the virus moves into other parts of the plant in an uneven but steady manner and may take several years to become fully systemic in mat...

  8. Resveratrol in raw and baked blueberries and bilberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Mary M; Yu, Chongwoo; Toma, R B; Cho, Sool Yeon; Reiboldt, Wendy; Lee, Jacqueline; van Breemen, Richard B

    2003-09-24

    Resveratrol in the fruits of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.), the lowbush "wild" blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton), the rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium ashei Reade), and the highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) were measured using a new assay based on high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The LC-MS/MS assay provided lower limits of detection than previous methods for resveratrol measurement, 90 fmol of trans-resveratrol injected on-column, and a linear standard curve spanning >3 orders of magnitude. The recoveries of resveratrol from blueberries spiked with 1.8, 3.6, or 36 ng/g were 91.5 +/- 4.5, 95.6 +/- 6.5, and 88.0 +/- 3.6%, respectively. trans-Resveratrol but not cis-resveratrol was detected in both blueberry and bilberry samples. The highest levels of trans-resvertatrol in these specimens were 140.0 +/- 29.9 pmol/g in highbush blueberries from Michigan and 71.0 +/- 15.0 pmol/g in bilberries from Poland. However, considerable regional variation was observed; highbush blueberries from British Columbia contained no detectable resveratrol. Because blueberries and bilberries are often consumed after cooking, the effect of baking on resveratrol content was investigated. After 18 min of heating at 190 degrees C, between 17 and 46% of the resveratrol had degraded in the various Vaccinium species. Therefore, the resveratrol content of baked or heat-processed blueberries or bilberries should be expected to be lower than in the raw fruit. Although blueberries and bilberries were found to contain resveratrol, the level of this chemoprotective compound in these fruits was <10% that reported for grapes. Furthermore, cooking or heat processing of these berries will contribute to the degradation of resveratrol.

  9. Antioxidant and sensorial properties of acacia honey supplemented with prunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumbas Vesna T.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The changes in total phenol and flavonoid content, as well as antioxidant activity was monitored in acacia honey supplemented with prunes in 20, 30 and 40% mass concentrations. The total phenolic content increased by 2.5 times (from 16.18 to 41.64 mg GAE/100 g with increasing concentration of prunes in honey, while the increase in flavonoid content was even higher, approximately 11.5-fold (from 2.65 to 30.86 mg RE/100 g. The addition of prunes also improved the antioxidant activity of acacia honey. The honey samples with highest content of prunes, 40%, exhibited the best antioxidant activity measured by hydroxyl radical sacvenging assay (EC50 •OH=4.56 mg/ml, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free radical scavenging assay (EC50 DPPH=16.48 mg/ml, and reducing power (EC50 RP=81.17 mg/ml. Judging from the high correlation coefficients, ranging from 0.771 to 0.947 for total phenolics, and from 0.862 to 0.993 for total flavonoids, it is obvious that these compounds were associated with the antioxidant mechanisms. On the other hand, sensorial properties of supplemented honeys were lower than that of pure acacia honey, where flavor of supplemented honey was the least affected. Our results indicate that the supplementation of honey with prunes improves antioxidant activity of honey by enriching the phenolic composition, with slight modifications in sensorial characteristics.

  10. Energy potential of fruit tree pruned biomass in Croatia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilandzija, N.; Voca, N.; Kricka, T.; Martin, A.; Jurisic, V.

    2012-11-01

    The world's most developed countries and the European Union (EU) deem that the renewable energy sources should partly substitute fossil fuels and become a bridge to the utilization of other energy sources of the future. This paper will present the possibility of using pruned biomass from fruit cultivars. It will also present the calculation of potential energy from the mentioned raw materials in order to determine the extent of replacement of non-renewable sources with these types of renewable energy. One of the results of the intensive fruit-growing process, in post pruning stage, is large amount of pruned biomass waste. Based on the calculated biomass (kg ha{sup 1}) from intensively grown woody fruit crops that are most grown in Croatia (apple, pear, apricots, peach and nectarine, sweet cherry, sour cherry, prune, walnut, hazelnut, almond, fig, grapevine, and olive) and the analysis of combustible (carbon 45.55-49.28%, hydrogen 5.91-6.83%, and sulphur 0.18-0.21%) and non-combustible matters (oxygen 43.34-46.6%, nitrogen 0.54-1.05%, moisture 3.65-8.83%, ashes 1.52-5.39%) with impact of lowering the biomass heating value (15.602-17.727 MJ kg{sup 1}), the energy potential of the pruned fruit biomass is calculated at 4.21 PJ. (Author) 31 refs.

  11. Effect Of Walnut Leaf, Coriander And Pomegranate On Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mechanism of most of herbal used for diabetes mellitus treatment has not been well defined. This study was performed to investigate hypoglycemic effect of walnut leaf (Juglans regia L.), coriander leaf (Coriandrum sativum L.) or pomegranate seed (Punica granatum L.), and their possible role on pancreatic tissue. Diabetes ...

  12. Extraction kinetics and properties of proanthocyanidins from pomegranate peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    With an objective of developing a safe and efficient method to extract proanthocyanidins products from pomegranate peel for use in nutraceuticals or as food additives, the effects of extraction parameters on the production efficiency, product properties, and extraction kinetics were systematically s...

  13. Pomegranate and licorice juices modulate metformin pharmacokinetics in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Riad; Mallah, Eyad; Khawaja, Bayan Al; Dayyih, Wael Abu; El-Hajji, Feras; Matalka, Khalid Z; Arafat, Tawfiq

    2016-07-01

    Food or drinks may significantly alter the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs which may lead to adverse events. A drug such as metformin is widely used to regulate plasma glucose level and pomegranate and licorice have been identified to help in type-2 diabetes management. However, the interactions of the latter on metformin pharmacokinetics were not studied. Therefore, we aimed here to study the impact of pomegranate and licorice on metformin pharmacokinetics in rats. Juices were given to rats for two days and half an hour before metformin (20 mg/kg) oral administration. Blood samples, then, were collected at different time intervals, processed and analyzed using validated reliable HPLC method. Plasma profile and pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated for each group. Pre-administration of pomegranate significantly reduced metformin maximum plasma concentration from 1410 to 1031 ng/ml. On the other hand, pre-administration of licorice significantly delayed metformin reaching its maximum plasma concentration. In conclusion, pre-administration of pomegranate may potentially reduce efficacy of metformin while licorice might delay metformin action. Thus, both juices should be cautiously administrated with metformin, the mainstay drug for type-2 diabetes mellitus management.

  14. Pomegranate seed oil rich in conjugated linolenic acids reduces in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2016-10-01

    Oct 1, 2016 ... The objective of this study was to determine the effect of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) seed oil ... stopped, and methane production, pH, volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and microbial counts were measured in the ... Plant oil extracts that are rich in unsaturated fatty acids could alter rumen fermentation. The.

  15. Mass transfer kinetics during osmotic dehydration of pomegranate arils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundada, Manoj; Hathan, Bahadur Singh; Maske, Swati

    2011-01-01

    The mass transfer kinetics during osmotic dehydration of pomegranate arils in osmotic solution of sucrose was studied to increase palatability and shelf life of arils. The freezing of the whole pomegranate at -18 °C was carried out prior to osmotic dehydration to increase the permeability of the outer cellular layer of the arils. The osmotic solution concentrations used were 40, 50, 60°Bx, osmotic solution temperatures were 35, 45, 55 °C. The fruit to solution ratio was kept 1:4 (w/w) during all the experiments and the process duration varied from 0 to 240 min. Azuara model and Peleg model were the best fitted as compared to other models for water loss and solute gain of pomegranate arils, respectively. Generalized Exponential Model had an excellent fit for water loss ratio and solute gain ratio of pomegranate arils. Effective moisture diffusivity of water as well as solute was estimated using the analytical solution of Fick's law of diffusion. For above conditions of osmotic dehydration, average effective diffusivity of water loss and solute gain varied from 2.718 × 10(-10) to 5.124 × 10(-10) m(2)/s and 1.471 × 10(-10) to 5.147 × 10(-10) m(2)/s, respectively. The final product was successfully utilized in some nutritional formulations such as ice cream and bakery products.

  16. Pomegranate for Prevention and Treatment of Cancer: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, and those who survive cancer may experience lasting difficulties, including treatment side effects, as well as physical, cognitive, and psychosocial struggles. Naturally-occurring agents from dietary fruits and vegetables have received considerable attention for the prevention and treatment of cancers. These natural agents are safe and cost efficient in contrast to expensive chemotherapeutic agents, which may induce significant side effects. The pomegranate (Punica granatum L. fruit has been used for the prevention and treatment of a multitude of diseases and ailments for centuries in ancient cultures. Pomegranate exhibits strong antioxidant activity and is a rich source of anthocyanins, ellagitannins, and hydrolysable tannins. Studies have shown that the pomegranate fruit as well as its juice, extract, and oil exert anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, and anti-tumorigenic properties by modulating multiple signaling pathways, which suggest its use as a promising chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic agent. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical studies highlighting the role of pomegranate in prevention and treatment of skin, breast, prostate, lung, and colon cancers.

  17. Quantitative determination of major polyphenol constituents in pomegranate products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wenjuan; Breksa Iii, Andrew P; Pan, Zhongli; Ma, Haile

    2012-06-01

    The anti-oxidant content and potential health benefits associated with consuming pomegranate and pomegranate-containing products has lead to increased consumer demand for this crop resulting in it becoming a high value crop. The potential health benefits and high anti-oxidant content of this fruit is attributed to the polyphenolic compounds it contains, including the ubiquitous phenolic acids, gallic acid and ellagic acid, and punicalagin A and punicalagin B, two polyphenolics unique to this fruit. A rapid HPLC-UV method targeting these four metabolites requiring minimal sample cleanup and offering runtimes half as long as existing methods was established. Within day and inter-day run-to-run variability for the four metabolites ranged from 1.9% to 6.6% and 5.3% to 11.4%, respectively. Spike recovery percentages for gallic acid, punicalagin A, punicalagin B and ellagic acid were found to be 98.5%, 92.4%, 95.5%, and 96.5%, respectively. This method was applied to the evaluation of various pomegranate products, including commercial drinks, handmade juice, and marc extracts. This method may be readily used to verify the presence of pomegranate metabolites in juices, extracts, and other products. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Green extraction of polyphenols from whole pomegranate fruit using cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamanti, Amalia C; Igoumenidis, Panagiotis E; Mourtzinos, Ioannis; Yannakopoulou, Konstantina; Karathanos, Vaios T

    2017-01-01

    Pomegranate is a source of bioactive phytochemicals. The objective of this study was the derivation of a sustainable method to exploit the whole fruit, both edible and non-edible parts, as a source of polyphenols. Pomegranate peel contains a 10-fold higher phenolic content than the pulp. The fruit was freeze-dried and the resulting dry matter was extracted with solid-liquid percolation equipment using non-toxic and eco-friendly extraction solvents: either deionized water or aqueous solutions of cyclodextrins. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are known molecular encapsulators and our results prove enhancement of the extraction of pomegranate polyphenols by 20%. In order to examine the formation of inclusion complexes between CD's and polyphenols of the extract, polyphenols were isolated using solid-phase extraction. NMR studies with the purified extracts and the individual CDs confirmed inclusion complex formation in water. Pomegranate liquid extracts may be used as raw materials for several end-users in the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pomegranate and its components as alternative treatment for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2014-08-25

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States. There is a major need for less toxic but yet effective therapies to treat prostate cancer. Pomegranate fruit from the tree Punica granatum has been used for centuries for medicinal purposes and is described as "nature's power fruit". Recent research has shown that pomegranate juice (PJ) and/or pomegranate extracts (PE) significantly inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells in culture. In preclinical murine models, PJ and/or PE inhibit growth and angiogenesis of prostate tumors. More recently, we have shown that three components of PJ, luteolin, ellagic acid and punicic acid together, have similar inhibitory effects on prostate cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Results from clinical trials are also promising. PJ and/or PE significantly prolonged the prostate specific antigen (PSA) doubling time in patients with prostate cancer. In this review we discuss data on the effects of PJ and PE on prostate cancer. We also discuss the effects of specific components of the pomegranate fruit and how they have been used to study the mechanisms involved in prostate cancer progression and their potential to be used in deterring prostate cancer metastasis.

  20. Pomegranate and Its Components as Alternative Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States. There is a major need for less toxic but yet effective therapies to treat prostate cancer. Pomegranate fruit from the tree Punica granatum has been used for centuries for medicinal purposes and is described as “nature’s power fruit”. Recent research has shown that pomegranate juice (PJ and/or pomegranate extracts (PE significantly inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells in culture. In preclinical murine models, PJ and/or PE inhibit growth and angiogenesis of prostate tumors. More recently, we have shown that three components of PJ, luteolin, ellagic acid and punicic acid together, have similar inhibitory effects on prostate cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Results from clinical trials are also promising. PJ and/or PE significantly prolonged the prostate specific antigen (PSA doubling time in patients with prostate cancer. In this review we discuss data on the effects of PJ and PE on prostate cancer. We also discuss the effects of specific components of the pomegranate fruit and how they have been used to study the mechanisms involved in prostate cancer progression and their potential to be used in deterring prostate cancer metastasis.

  1. Pomegranate MR images analysis using ACM and FCM algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morad, Ghobad; Shamsi, Mousa; Sedaaghi, M. H.; Alsharif, M. R.

    2011-10-01

    Segmentation of an image plays an important role in image processing applications. In this paper segmentation of pomegranate magnetic resonance (MR) images has been explored. Pomegranate has healthy nutritional and medicinal properties for which the maturity indices and quality of internal tissues play an important role in the sorting process in which the admissible determination of features mentioned above cannot be easily achieved by human operator. Seeds and soft tissues are the main internal components of pomegranate. For research purposes, such as non-destructive investigation, in order to determine the ripening index and the percentage of seeds in growth period, segmentation of the internal structures should be performed as exactly as possible. In this paper, we present an automatic algorithm to segment the internal structure of pomegranate. Since its intensity of stem and calyx is close to the internal tissues, the stem and calyx pixels are usually labeled to the internal tissues by segmentation algorithm. To solve this problem, first, the fruit shape is extracted from its background using active contour model (ACM). Then stem and calyx are removed using morphological filters. Finally the image is segmented by fuzzy c-means (FCM). The experimental results represent an accuracy of 95.91% in the presence of stem and calyx, while the accuracy of segmentation increases to 97.53% when stem and calyx are first removed by morphological filters.

  2. Pomegranate and Its Components as Alternative Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States. There is a major need for less toxic but yet effective therapies to treat prostate cancer. Pomegranate fruit from the tree Punica granatum has been used for centuries for medicinal purposes and is described as “nature’s power fruit”. Recent research has shown that pomegranate juice (PJ) and/or pomegranate extracts (PE) significantly inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells in culture. In preclinical murine models, PJ and/or PE inhibit growth and angiogenesis of prostate tumors. More recently, we have shown that three components of PJ, luteolin, ellagic acid and punicic acid together, have similar inhibitory effects on prostate cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Results from clinical trials are also promising. PJ and/or PE significantly prolonged the prostate specific antigen (PSA) doubling time in patients with prostate cancer. In this review we discuss data on the effects of PJ and PE on prostate cancer. We also discuss the effects of specific components of the pomegranate fruit and how they have been used to study the mechanisms involved in prostate cancer progression and their potential to be used in deterring prostate cancer metastasis. PMID:25158234

  3. Anticancer Activity of Punica granatum (Pomegranate): A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panth, Nisha; Manandhar, Bikash; Paudel, Keshav Raj

    2017-04-01

    Cancer is a pathological condition where excessive and abnormal cell growth leads to widespread invasion within the body to affect various organ functions. It is known that chemotherapeutic agents are themselves possible candidate of cancer generation as they can kill normal cells. So, therapeutic approach for cancer treatment and prevention is weighed in terms of benefit to risk ratio. Nowadays, there is an immense interest for the search herbal formulation with cancer preventive effect because of the problems, generated with existing chemotherapeutic regimens. Research interest in fruits rich in polyphenols is increasing because of their anticancer potential. In this review, we highlight the potential health benefits of pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit and the underlying mechanism of its inhibition of cancer progression. Pomegranate has demonstrated anti-proliferative, anti-metastatic and anti-invasive effects on various cancer cell line in vitro as well as in vivo animal model or human clinical trial. Although several clinical trials are in progress for identifying the pomegranate as a candidate for various cancer treatment. It is necessary to replicate and validate its therapeutic efficacy by multiple clinical studies in order to formulate pomegranate products as an integral part of the dietary and pharmacological intervention in anticancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Pomegranate for Prevention and Treatment of Cancer: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pooja; McClees, Sarah F; Afaq, Farrukh

    2017-01-24

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, and those who survive cancer may experience lasting difficulties, including treatment side effects, as well as physical, cognitive, and psychosocial struggles. Naturally-occurring agents from dietary fruits and vegetables have received considerable attention for the prevention and treatment of cancers. These natural agents are safe and cost efficient in contrast to expensive chemotherapeutic agents, which may induce significant side effects. The pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruit has been used for the prevention and treatment of a multitude of diseases and ailments for centuries in ancient cultures. Pomegranate exhibits strong antioxidant activity and is a rich source of anthocyanins, ellagitannins, and hydrolysable tannins. Studies have shown that the pomegranate fruit as well as its juice, extract, and oil exert anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, and anti-tumorigenic properties by modulating multiple signaling pathways, which suggest its use as a promising chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic agent. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical studies highlighting the role of pomegranate in prevention and treatment of skin, breast, prostate, lung, and colon cancers.

  5. Pomegranate seed oil rich in conjugated linolenic acids reduces in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) seed oil (PSO) on gas and methane (CH4) production, ruminal fermentation and microbial populations under in vitro conditions. Three treatments consisting of a control diet containing 10 mg tallow (CON); the control diet with 5 mg ...

  6. Effects of storage conditions on transpiration rate of pomegranate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effects of temperature (5, 10, 15 and 22 °C) and relative humidity (RH) (76%, 86% and 96%) on the transpiration rate (TR) of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) cv. Bhagwa fruit fractions, namely arils and aril-sac. Both temperature and RH had significant effects on the TR of fruit fractions. The TR ...

  7. Pomegranate as a cosmeceutical source: pomegranate fractions promote proliferation and procollagen synthesis and inhibit matrix metalloproteinase-1 production in human skin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Lansky, Ephraim Philip; Varani, James

    2006-02-20

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum) is an ancient fruit with exceptionally rich ethnomedical applications. The peel (pericarp) is well regarded for its astringent properties; the seeds for conferring invulnerability in combat and stimulating beauty and fertility. Here, aqueous fractions prepared from the fruit's peel and fermented juice and lipophilic fractions prepared from pomegranate seeds were examined for effects on human epidermal keratinocyte and human dermal fibroblast function. Pomegranate seed oil, but not aqueous extracts of fermented juice, peel or seed cake, was shown to stimulate keratinocyte proliferation in monolayer culture. In parallel, a mild thickening of the epidermis (without the loss of ordered differentiation) was observed in skin organ culture. The same pomegranate seed oil that stimulated keratinocyte proliferation was without effect on fibroblast function. In contrast, pomegranate peel extract (and to a lesser extent, both the fermented juice and seed cake extracts) stimulated type I procollagen synthesis and inhibited matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1; interstitial collagenase) production by dermal fibroblasts, but had no growth-supporting effect on keratinocytes. These results suggest heuristic potential of pomegranate fractions for facilitating skin repair in a polar manner, namely aqueous extracts (especially of pomegranate peel) promoting regeneration of dermis, and pomegranate seed oil promoting regeneration of epidermis.

  8. Applying New Technologies to Transform Blueberry Harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiomi Takeda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The growth of the blueberry industry in the past three decades has been remarkably robust. However, a labor shortage for hand harvesting, increasingly higher labor costs, and low harvest efficiencies are becoming bottlenecks for sustainable development of the fresh market blueberry production. In this study, we evaluated semi-mechanical harvesting systems consisting of a harvest-aid platform with soft fruit catching surfaces that collected the fruit detached by portable, hand-held, pneumatic shakers. The softer fruit catching surfaces were not glued to the hard sub-surfaces of the harvest-aid platform, but suspended over them. Also, the ergonomic aspect of operating powered harvesting equipment was determined. The pneumatic shakers removed 3.5 to 15 times more fruit (g/min than by hand. Soft fruit catching surfaces reduced impact force and bruise damage. Fruit firmness was higher in fruit harvested by hand compared to that by pneumatic shakers in some cultivars. The bruise area was less than 8% in fruit harvested by hand and with semi-mechanical harvesting system. The percentage of blue, packable fruit harvested by pneumatic shakers comprised as much as 90% of the total, but less than that of hand-harvested fruit. The ergonomic analysis by electromyography showed that muscle strain in the back, shoulders, and forearms was low in workers operating the light-weight, pneumatic shakers that were tethered to the platform with a tool balancer. The new harvesting method can reduce the labor requirement to about 100 hour/hectare/year and help to mitigate the rising labor cost and shortage of workers for harvesting fresh-market quality blueberries.

  9. Pomegranate juice and prostate cancer: importance of the characterisation of the active principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrubasik-Hausmann, Sigrun; Vlachojannis, Christian; Zimmermann, Benno

    2014-11-01

    Two exploratory clinical studies investigating proprietary pomegranate products showed a trend of effectiveness in increasing prostate-specific antigen doubling time in patients with prostate cancer. A recent clinical study did not support these results. We therefore analysed a lot of the marketed pomegranate blend for co-active pomegranate compounds. The high-performance liquid chromatography method was used to detect punicalagin, ellagic acid and anthocyanins. Total polyphenoles were determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method using gallic acid as reference. The results show that the co-active compounds in the daily dose of the pomegranate blend were far below those previously tested and that the photometric assessment is not reliable for the standardisation of study medications. Not pomegranate but the low amount of co-active compounds in the proprietary pomegranate blend was responsible for its clinical ineffectiveness. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) extract rich in ellagitannins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Trujano, María Eva; Pellicer, Francisco; Mena, Pedro; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) has been used for centuries for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, there is a lack of comprehensive information focused on the properties of a certain pomegranate (poly)phenolic profile to cure pain and gastric injury induced by anti-inflammatory drugs. This study investigated the systemic effects of different doses of a HPLC-characterized pomegranate extract on the formalin-induced nociceptive behavior in mice. The effect of the extract against gastric injury caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and ethanol was also assessed. Pomegranate reduced nociception in both phases of the formalin test, suggesting central and peripheral activities to inhibit nociception. Indomethacin-induced gastric injury was not produced in the presence of pomegranate, which also protected against ethanol-induced gastric lesions. The present results reinforce the benefits of pomegranate (poly)phenolics in the treatment of pain as well as their anti-inflammatory properties.

  11. Psychoanalytic Interpretation of Blueberries by Susan Gibb

    OpenAIRE

    Zalbidea Paniagua, Maya

    2014-01-01

    [ES] La obra de ficción digital titulada Blueberries (2009) de Susan Gibb, publicada en la ELO (Organización de literatura electrónica) invita al lector/a a viajar dentro de la mente de la protagonista para descubrir sus experiencias reales e imaginarias en las que se examinan las nociones de género, sexo, cuerpo e identidad de una mujer traumatizada. En este artículo se exploran los modos verbales y visuales en esta ficción digital breve siguiendo patrones semióticos así como se interpretan ...

  12. Ensemble Pruning for Glaucoma Detection in an Unbalanced Data Set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Werner; Gefeller, Olaf; Gul, Asma; Horn, Folkert K; Khan, Zardad; Lausen, Berthold

    2016-12-07

    Random forests are successful classifier ensemble methods consisting of typically 100 to 1000 classification trees. Ensemble pruning techniques reduce the computational cost, especially the memory demand, of random forests by reducing the number of trees without relevant loss of performance or even with increased performance of the sub-ensemble. The application to the problem of an early detection of glaucoma, a severe eye disease with low prevalence, based on topographical measurements of the eye background faces specific challenges. We examine the performance of ensemble pruning strategies for glaucoma detection in an unbalanced data situation. The data set consists of 102 topographical features of the eye background of 254 healthy controls and 55 glaucoma patients. We compare the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), and the Brier score on the total data set, in the majority class, and in the minority class of pruned random forest ensembles obtained with strategies based on the prediction accuracy of greedily grown sub-ensembles, the uncertainty weighted accuracy, and the similarity between single trees. To validate the findings and to examine the influence of the prevalence of glaucoma in the data set, we additionally perform a simulation study with lower prevalences of glaucoma. In glaucoma classification all three pruning strategies lead to improved AUC and smaller Brier scores on the total data set with sub-ensembles as small as 30 to 80 trees compared to the classification results obtained with the full ensemble consisting of 1000 trees. In the simulation study, we were able to show that the prevalence of glaucoma is a critical factor and lower prevalence decreases the performance of our pruning strategies. The memory demand for glaucoma classification in an unbalanced data situation based on random forests could effectively be reduced by the application of pruning strategies without loss of performance in a population with increased

  13. Beneficial effects of blueberries in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Junping; Feinstein, Douglas L; Hejna, Matthew J; Lorens, Stanley A; McGuire, Susan O

    2012-06-13

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of autoimmune disease that presents with pathological and clinical features similar to those of multiple sclerosis (MS) including inflammation and neurodegeneration. This study investigated whether blueberries, which possess immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective properties, could provide protection in EAE. Dietary supplementation with 1% whole, freeze-dried blueberries reduced disease incidence by >50% in a chronic EAE model (p blueberries, which are easily administered orally and well-tolerated, may provide benefit to MS patients.

  14. Effect of drying on the bioactive compounds, antioxidant, antibacterial and antityrosinase activities of pomegranate peel

    OpenAIRE

    Mphahlele, Rebogile R.; Fawole, Olaniyi A; Makunga, Nokwanda P.; Opara, Umezuruike L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of pomegranate peel is highly associated with its rich phenolic concentration. Series of drying methods are recommended since bioactive compounds are highly sensitive to thermal degradation. The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of drying on the bioactive compounds, antioxidant as well as antibacterial and antityrosinase activities of pomegranate peel. Methods Dried pomegranate peels with the initial moisture content of 70.30?% wet basis were prepared by freeze an...

  15. Partial prune belly syndrome: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Pratap Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prune belly syndrome (PBS is characterized by deficient development of abdominal muscles that causes the skin of the abdomen to wrinkle like a prune, bilateral cryptorchidism, abnormalities of the urinary tract. The etiology of PBS is unclear and possible familial genetic inheritance was reported in some of the studies. We are presenting here a case with the absence of the muscle in the right side of the abdomen as hernia, thinning of the muscle on left side with bilateral cryptorchidism, and abnormalities of the urinary tract. It is the partial presentation of the PBS.

  16. Black Walnut on Kansas Strip Mine Spoils: Some Observations 25 Years after Pruning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex L. Shigo; Nelson F. Rogers; E. Allen, Jr. McGinnes; David T. Funk

    1978-01-01

    Dissections of 14 slow-growing black walnut trees on a strip-mine site revealed that bands of discolored heartwood were associated with pruned and nonpruned branch stubs. Ring shakes were associated with a few pruned and nonpruned stubs, especially with groups of stubs at the same position on the stem. The advantage of early pruning was that even the defects that...

  17. Effect of Root Pruning and Irrigation Regimes on Yield and Physiology of Pear Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yufei

    Clara Frijs’ is the dominant pear (Pyrus communis L.) cultivar in Denmark. It is vigorous with long annual shoots, and therefore can be difficult to prune. Root pruning has been widely used to control the canopy size of fruit trees including pears. However, root pruned trees are more likely to su...

  18. Breast cancer chemopreventive properties of pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit extracts in a mouse mammary organ culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, R; Lansky, E P

    2004-08-01

    We previously reported anticancer effects of pomegranate extracts in human breast cancer cells in vitro and also chemopreventive activity of pomegranate fermented juice polyphenols (W) in a mouse mammary organ culture (MMOC). In the present study we decided to expand the MMOC investigations to also include an evaluation of the potential chemopreventive efficacy of a purified chromatographic peak of W (Peak B), and also of whole pomegranate seed oil. In brief, an MMOC was established according to a known method. For the first 10 days of culture, the glands were treated with pomegranate fermented juice polyphenols (W), a high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) peak separated from W (peak B), or pomegranate seed oil (Oil, and on day 3, exposed to the carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), and for 10 days treated with the putative pomegranate chemopreventive. The glands were subsequently harvested and tumours counted by visual inspection. While W effected a 42% reduction in the number of lesions compared with control, peak B and pomegranate seed oil each effected an 87% reduction. The results highlight enhanced breast cancer preventive potential both for the purified compound peak B and for pomegranate seed oil, both greater than that previously reported for pomegranate fermented juice polyphenols.

  19. Antibacterial, antioxidant and tyrosinase-inhibition activities of pomegranate fruit peel methanolic extract

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fawole, Olaniyi A; Makunga, Nokwanda P; Opara, Umezuruike Linus

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated, using in vitro assays, the antibacterial, antioxidant, and tyrosinase-inhibition activities of methanolic extracts from peels of seven commercially grown pomegranate cultivars...

  20. Structure Learning by Pruning in Independent Component Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Andreas; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2006-01-01

    We discuss pruning as a means of structure learning in independent component analysis. Sparse models are attractive in both signal processing and in analysis of abstract data, they can assist model interpretation, generalizability and reduce computation. We derive the relevant saliency expressions...

  1. Structure learning by pruning in independent component analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Andreas Brinch; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2008-01-01

    We discuss pruning as a means of structure learning in independent component analysis (ICA). Learning the structure is attractive in both signal processing and in analysis of abstract data, where it can assist model interpretation, generalizability and reduce computation. We derive the relevant...

  2. Pathophysiologic and anesthetic correlations of the prune-belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, J P

    1989-04-01

    "Prune-Belly" is the name given to the disease which is characterized by a congenital wrinkled appearance of the abdomen. Usually, a triad of congenital anomalies highlights the components of the prune-belly syndrome. This triad consists of undescended testicles, abdominal musculature deficiency and urinary tract abnormalities. The previously described triad of the syndrome is by no means the total spectrum of the disease. Prune-belly syndrome is also associated with diseases of the respiratory, cardiovascular, skeletal, gastrointestinal and central nervous systems. Associated diseases of major body systems which are caused by renal and cardiopulmonary anomalies, as well as the surgical procedure to be performed, influence the plan for the administration of anesthesia. The nature of the genitourinary diseases in the prune-belly baby may obviate the need for surgical intervention as early as the neonatal period of life. Although this congenital disease occurs with some rarity, the gravity of the syndrome demands an in-depth knowledge of its pathophysiology in order to assure uncomplicated anesthetic care. Astute surveillance during preanesthetic, anesthetic, and postanesthetic management is germane to the prevention of mishaps.

  3. On the use of a pruning prior for neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutte, Cyril

    1996-01-01

    We address the problem of using a regularization prior that prunes unnecessary weights in a neural network architecture. This prior provides a convenient alternative to traditional weight-decay. Two examples are studied to support this method and illustrate its use. First we use the sunspots...

  4. Prune-Belly Syndrome: A Case Report from Rwanda | Ngendahayo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prune-Belly syndrome, Eagle-Barret syndrome and triad syndrome, all refer to congenital anomalies involving abdominal musculature, urinary tract and testicles. The syndrome consists of a triad of abdominal muscle aplasia, massive ureteral and bladder dilatation and cryptorchidism. Kidneys are often affected ...

  5. Effect of mycorrhiza and pruning regimes on seasonality of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-07-16

    Jul 16, 2006 ... Effect of mycorrhiza and pruning regimes on seasonality of hedgerow tree mulch contribution to .... Mycorrhizae are symbiotic association between plant roots and certain soil fungi (Sieverding, 1991). ..... inoculum was put under the seeds in the polythene bags for inoculated hedgerow tree seedlings and ...

  6. Chemical root pruning of conifer seedlings in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnulfo Aldrete; John G. Mexal

    2002-01-01

    Many countries grow seedlings for reforestation in polybags where root spiraling and root egression can decrease seedling survival and growth following outplanting. The overall objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of chemical root pruning on root spiraling, root egression, and nursery performance of Pinus pseudostrobus, P...

  7. 7 CFR 993.150 - Disposition of prunes by handlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... manifest or billing number; and (2) receive from the inspection service a DFA Form P-5 “Shipping Inspection...)(iii) of this section) the Committee's approval of his application to do so. (ii) Application for approval. The handler's application to ship or otherwise make final disposition of any such prunes shall be...

  8. influence of cassava planting patterns and pruning methods on crop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-12-03

    Dec 3, 2003 ... Field experiments were conducted at the University of Ibadan, Ni geria on the effect ofcassava (Manihot esculenta. Crantz) planting pattern and pruning methods on eassava yield and yield ofassociated crops, namely, maize (Zea mays L. ), melon (Colocynthis vulgaris L.) and cowpea ( Vigna unguiculaia) in ...

  9. Growth responses of Eucalyptus globulus and E. nitens to pruning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The responses of Eucalyptus globulus and E. nitens to pruning (removal of 0 or 60% of the green crown depth) in two lifts and nitrogen (N) fertiliser application (0 [N0], 100 [N1], 300 [N3] and 500 [N5] kg N ha–1) were compared at a site in south-east Tasmania under conditions where both species can be successfully grown.

  10. Evaluation of anthocynin changes in blueberries and in blueberry jam after the processing and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Czako

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. is worldwide famous as the healthy and desirable fruit. The most valuable nutritional components of fruits are polyphenols, which include anthocyanins. The aim of the study was to assess the content of anthocyanin dyes in selected varieties of blueberry fruit. We evaluated the changes in the content of colorants that occur after treatment for fruit jam and its subsequent storage at 21°C under the light. Varieties Ramcocas, Record, Iranka, Nelson, Pemberton, Jersey and Coville were observed. Content of anthocyanins was determined spectrophotometrically. In fresh fruits anthocyanin content ranged from 9.878 g kg-1 of dry matter (Jersey variety to 18.555 g kg-1 of dry matter (Nelson variety. After treatment there was found a decrease in the anthocyanins content, in the product's content were determined in the amount 1.645 g kg-1 of dry matter (Jersey variety to 3.476 g kg-1 of dry matter (variety Ramcocas. The decrease was due to decomposition of anthocyans at high temperatures in processed products and also by the replacement of dry matter by sucrose in the product. Mean color decrease in blueberry jam was 84.5%. After storage of the product, there were found further degradations of colorants, evaluated at 34.9%. The content of anthocyanin in jam was found to be 1.089 g kg-1 of dry matter (Jersey variety to 2.199 g kg-1 of dry matter (Ramcocas variety.

  11. Performance of blueberry cultivars under mild winter conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Gilberto Sousa Medeiros

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Evaluation of yield performance is important to find the most adapted blueberry cultivars in a particular region. This research aimed to evaluate the flowering and hasvesting periods, the production per plant, and fruit quality of eight rabbiteye blueberry cultivars (Aliceblue, Bluebelle, Bluegem, Briteblue, Climax, Delite, Powderblue, and Woodard and two highbush blueberries (Georgiagem and O’Neal, in mild winter conditions in Pinhais-PR. Flowering and harvesting periods, production, berry weight, size, pH, soluble solids, titratable acidity, ratio and color of the fruits were evaluated in the 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 growing seasons, when the plants had two and three years old, respectively. Cultivars flowered from August to September, and harvest was concentrated in November and December. Berry weight, size, pH, soluble solids and acidity varied among the cultivars. The average ratios of 14.97 and 13.39 for each crop proved that the cultivars have good fruit quality. There was little variation in fruit color in the two years evaluated. Blueberry cultivars showed the staining characteristics and physical and chemical attributes of quality compatible to blueberry from other traditional regions. Under mild winter conditions, young plants of rabbiteye blueberry cultivars, Climax, Delite, Bluegem and Powderblue, are the most productive, while the highbusch cultivars bear few fruits.

  12. Breeding highbush blueberry cultivars adapted to machine harvest for the fresh market

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, world blueberry production has been split evenly between processing and fresh fruit markets. Machine harvest of highbush blueberry [northern highbush (NHB, Vaccinium corymbosum L.), southern highbush (SHB, Vaccinium corymbosum interspecific hybrids), and rabbiteye (RE, Vaccinium vi...

  13. Antibacterial characteristics of anthocyanins extracted from wild blueberries against foodborne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild blueberries have rich bioactive compounds, such as polyphenols, phenolics and organic acids. Previous studies demonstrated the antibacterial activity of blueberries against the growth of pathogenic bacteria. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial characteristics and mech...

  14. New lipase assay using Pomegranate oil coating in microtiter plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ülker, Serdar; Placidi, Camille; Point, Vanessa; Gadenne, Benoît; Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Canaan, Stéphane; Carrière, Frédéric; Cavalier, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Lipases play various roles in fat digestion, lipoprotein metabolism, and in the mobilization of fat stored in lipid bodies in animals, plants and microorganisms. In association with these physiological functions, there is an important field of research for discovering lipase inhibitors and developing new treatments of diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis, diabetes and tuberculosis. In this context, the development of convenient, specific and sensitive analytical methods for the detection and assay of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors is of major importance. It is shown here that purified triacylglycerols (TAGs) from Punica granatum (Pomegranate) seed oil coated on microtiter plates can be used for the continuous assay of lipase activity by recording the variations with time of the UV absorption spectra at 275 nm. UV absorption is due the release of punicic acid (9Z,11E,13Z-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), a conjugated triene contained in Pomegranate oil. This new microtiter plate assay allows to accurately measure the activity of a wider range of lipases compared to the similar assay previously developed with Tung oil containing α-eleostearic acid (9Z,11E,13E-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), including the LipY lipase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although punicic acid is a diastereoisomer of α-eleostearic acid, the Δ(13)cis double bound found in punicic acid gives a different structure to the acyl chain that probably favours the interaction of Pomegranate TAGs with the lipase active site. The microplate lipase assay using Pomegranate TAGs shows high sensitivity, reproducibility and remarkable relevance for the high-speed screening of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors directly from raw culture media without any purification step. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  15. BBGD454: A database for transcriptome analysis of blueberry using 454 sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Darwish, Omar; Rowland, L Jeannine; Alkharouf, Nadim W

    2013-01-01

    Blueberry is an economically and nutritionally important small fruit crop, native to North America. As with many crops, extreme low temperature can affect blueberry crop yield negatively and cause major losses to growers. For this reason, blueberry breeding programs have focused on developing improved cultivars with broader climatic adaptation. To help achieve this goal, the blueberry genomic database (BBGD454) was developed to provide the research community with valuable resources to identif...

  16. Bioactive Compounds of Blueberries: Post-Harvest Factors Influencing the Nutritional Value of Products

    OpenAIRE

    Michalska, Anna; Łysiak, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Blueberries, besides having commonly-recognized taste properties, are also a valuable source of health-promoting bioactive compounds. For several decades, blueberries have gained in popularity all over the world, and recent years have seen not only an increase in fresh consumption, but also in the importance of blueberries for the processing industry. Blueberry processing mostly consists of freezing and juicing. Recently, more attention has been drawn to dewatering and drying, which are pro...

  17. Memory boosting effect of Citrus limon, Pomegranate and their combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Azra; Khan, Rafeeq Alam; Algahtani, Hussein A

    2014-11-01

    Memory is greatly influenced by factors like food, stress and quality of sleep, hence present study was designed to evaluate the effect of Citrus limon and Pomegranate juices on memory of mice using Harvard Panlab Passive Avoidance response apparatus controlled through LE2708 Programmer. Passive avoidance is fear-motivated tests used to assess short or long-term memory of small animals, which measures latency to enter into the black compartment. Animals at MCLD showed highly significant and significant increase in latency to enter into the black compartment after 3 and 24 hours respectively than control, animals at HCLD showed significant increase in latency only after 3hours. Animals both at low and moderate doses of pomegranate showed significant increase in test latency after 3 hours, while animals at high dose showed highly significant and significant increase in latency after 3 and 24 hours respectively. There was highly significant and significant increase in latency in animals at CPJ-1 combination after 3 and 24 hours respectively; however animals received CPJ-2 combination showed significant increase in latency only after 3 hours as compare to control. These results suggest that Citrus limon and Pomegranate has phytochemicals and essential nutrients which boost memory, particularly short term memory. Hence it may be concluded that flavonoids in these juices may be responsible for memory enhancing effects and a synergistic effect is observed by CPJ-1 and CPJ-2 combinations.

  18. Gas phase plasma impact on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Zoran; Kovačević, Danijela Bursać; Kljusurić, Jasenka Gajdoš; Jambrak, Anet Režek; Zorić, Zoran; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of gas phase plasma on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice. The potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy combined with partial least squares for monitoring the stability of phenolic compounds during plasma treatment was explored, too. Experiments are designed to investigate the effect of plasma operating conditions (treatment time 3, 5, 7 min; sample volume 3, 4, 5 cm(3); gas flow 0.75, 1, 1.25 dm(3) min(-1)) on phenolic compounds and compared to pasteurized and untreated pomegranate juice. Pasteurization and plasma treatment resulted in total phenolic content increasing by 29.55% and 33.03%, respectively. Principal component analysis and sensitivity analysis outputted the optimal treatment design with plasma that could match the pasteurized sample concerning the phenolic stability (5 min/4 cm(3)/0.75 dm(3) min(-1)). Obtained results demonstrate the potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy that can be successfully used to evaluate the quality of pomegranate juice upon plasma treatment considering the phenolic compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Physical and chemical properties of pomegranate fruit accessions from Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radunić, Mira; Jukić Špika, Maja; Goreta Ban, Smiljana; Gadže, Jelena; Díaz-Pérez, Juan Carlos; MacLean, Dan

    2015-06-15

    The objective was to evaluate physical and chemical properties of eight pomegranate accessions (seven cultivars and one wild genotype) collected from the Mediterranean region of Croatia. Accessions showed high variability in fruit weight and size, calyx and peel properties, number of arils per fruit, total aril weight, and aril and juice yield. Variables that define sweet taste, such as low total acidity (TA; 0.37-0.59%), high total soluble solids content (TSS; 12.5-15.0%) and their ratio (TSS/TA) were evaluated, and results generally aligned with sweetness classifications of the fruit. Pomegranate fruit had a high variability in total phenolic content (1985.6-2948.7 mg/L). HPLC-MALDI-TOF/MS analysis showed that accessions with dark red arils had the highest total anthocyanin content, with cyanidin 3-glucoside as the most abundant compound. Principal component analysis revealed great differences in fruit physical characteristics and chemical composition among pomegranate accessions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pomegranate Fruit as a Rich Source of Biologically Active Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekumar, Sreeja; Sithul, Hima; Muraleedharan, Parvathy; Azeez, Juberiya Mohammed; Sreeharshan, Sreeja

    2014-01-01

    Pomegranate is a widely used plant having medicinal properties. In this review, we have mainly focused on the already published data from our laboratory pertaining to the effect of methanol extract of pericarp of pomegranate (PME) and have compared it with other relevant literatures on Punica. Earlier, we had shown its antiproliferative effect using human breast (MCF-7, MDA MB-231), and endometrial (HEC-1A), cervical (SiHa, HeLa), and ovarian (SKOV3) cancer cell lines, and normal breast fibroblasts (MCF-10A) at concentration of 20–320 μg/mL. The expressions of selected estrogen responsive genes (PR, pS2, and C-Myc) were downregulated by PME. Unlike estradiol, PME did not increase the uterine weight and proliferation in bilaterally ovariectomized Swiss-Albino mice models and its cardioprotective effects were comparable to that of 17β-estradiol. We had further assessed the protective role of PME on skeletal system, using MC3T3-E1 cells. The results indicated that PME (80 μg/mL) significantly increased ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) activity, supporting its suggested role in modulating osteoblastic cell differentiation. The antiosteoporotic potential of PME was also evaluated in ovariectomized (OVX) rodent model. The results from our studies and from various other studies support the fact that pomegranate fruit is indeed a source of biologically active compounds. PMID:24818149

  1. Diverse Phytochemicals and Bioactivities in the Ancient Fruit and Modern Functional Food Pomegranate (Punica granatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Wu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Having served as a symbolic fruit since ancient times, pomegranate (Punica granatum has also gained considerable recognition as a functional food in the modern era. A large body of literature has linked pomegranate polyphenols, particularly anthocyanins (ATs and hydrolyzable tannins (HTs, to the health-promoting activities of pomegranate juice and fruit extracts. However, it remains unclear as to how, and to what extent, the numerous phytochemicals in pomegranate may interact and exert cooperative activities in humans. In this review, we examine the structural and analytical information of the diverse phytochemicals that have been identified in different pomegranate tissues, to establish a knowledge base for characterization of metabolite profiles, discovery of novel phytochemicals, and investigation of phytochemical interactions in pomegranate. We also assess recent findings on the function and molecular mechanism of ATs as well as urolithins, the intestinal microbial derivatives of pomegranate HTs, on human nutrition and health. A better understanding of the structural diversity of pomegranate phytochemicals as well as their bioconversions and bioactivities in humans will facilitate the interrogation of their synergistic/antagonistic interactions and accelerate their applications in dietary-based cancer chemoprevention and treatment in the future.

  2. Integrated extraction and anaerobic digestion process for recovery of nutraceuticals and biogas from pomegranate marcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomegranate marc (PM), a by-product from pomegranate juice processing, has not been effectively utilized. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the yields and properties of antioxidants (henceforth referring to total phenolics in terms of tannic acid equivalent) and oil extracted from v...

  3. The protective effect of pomegranate extract against cisplatin toxicity in rat liver and kidney tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakır, Salih; Yazgan, Ümit Can; İbiloğlu, İbrahim; Elbey, Bilal; Kızıl, Murat; Kelle, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a histopathological investigation, at the light microscopy level, of the protective effects of pomegranate extract in cisplatin-induced liver and kidney damage in rats. Twenty-eight adult male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into four groups of seven animals: Group 1: Control; Group 2: Treated for 10 consecutive days by gavage with pomegranate juice (2 ml/kg/day); Group 3: Injected intraperitoneally with cisplatin (8 mg/kg body weight, single dose) onset of the day 5, and Group 4: Treated by gavage with pomegranate juice 10 days before and after a single injection of cisplatin onset of the day 5. After 10 days, the animals were sacrificed and their kidneys and liver tissue samples were removed from each animal after experimental procedures. Cisplatin-induced renal and hepatic toxicity and the effect of pomegranate juice were evaluated by histopatological examinations. In the kidney tissue, pomegranate juice significantly ameliorated cisplatin-induced structural alterations when compared with the cisplatin alone group. But in the liver tissue, although pomegranate juice attenuated the cisplatin-induced toxicity only in two rats, significant improvement was not observed. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that the anti-oxidant pomegranate juice might have a protective effect against cisplatin-induced toxicity in rat kidney, but not in liver. Pomegranate juice could be beneficial as a dietary supplement in patients receiving chemotherapy medications.

  4. The Pomegranate: Effects on Bacteria and Viruses That Influence Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Amy B.; D'Souza, Doris H.

    2013-01-01

    Pomegranates have been known for hundreds of years for their multiple health benefits, including antimicrobial activity. The recent surge in multidrug-resistant bacteria and the possibility of widespread global virus pandemics necessitate the need for additional preventative and therapeutic options to conventional drugs. Research indicates that pomegranates and their extracts may serve as natural alternatives due to their potency against a wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. Nearly every part of the pomegranate plant has been tested for antimicrobial activities, including the fruit juice, peel, arils, flowers, and bark. Many studies have utilized pomegranate peel with success. There are various phytochemical compounds in pomegranate that have demonstrated antimicrobial activity, but most of the studies have found that ellagic acid and larger hydrolyzable tannins, such as punicalagin, have the highest activities. In some cases the combination of the pomegranate constituents offers the most benefit. The positive clinical results on pomegranate and suppression of oral bacteria are intriguing and worthy of further study. Much of the evidence for pomegranates' antibacterial and antiviral activities against foodborne pathogens and other infectious disease organisms comes from in vitro cell-based assays, necessitating further confirmation of in vivo efficacy through human clinical trials. PMID:23762148

  5. Determination of the major phenolic compounds in pomegranate juices by HPLC−DAD−ESI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Verardo, Vito; Toselli, Moreno; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza

    2013-06-05

    Traditionally, pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) has been consumed as fresh fruit or as pomegranate juice. In this study, the main phenolic compounds of 12 pomegranate varieties and 5 pomegranate clones were determined by HPLC−DAD−ESI-MS. Two chromatographic methods with a fused-core C18 column and a classical HPLC system were developed. Thirteen anthocyanins and fourteen other phenolic compounds were determined in the pomegranate juices. As far as we are concerned, a new flavonol-glycoside, phellatin or its isomer amurensin, has been tentatively identified for the first time in pomegranate juices. Total phenolic content ranged from 580.8 to 2551.3 mg/L of pomegranate juice. Anthocyanins varied between 20 to 82% of total phenolic content. Flavonoids were 1.6-23.6% of total phenolic compounds, while phenolic acids and ellagitannins were in the range 16.4-65.8%. The five clones reported a phenolic content comparable with that of the other pomegranate samples.

  6. First report of Pilidiella granati causing dieback and fruit rot of pomegranate (Punica granatum) in Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirabolfathy, M.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Iran is the largest producer of pomegranate (Punica granatum) in the world, with more than 60,000 ha currently in production. In the spring of 2011, a decline and dieback of young pomegranate trees (7 to 10 years old) were observed in the Kheir area of Fars Province. Dieback and twig blight

  7. Blueberries and Tofu: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ascoli, Jennifer; Lee, Susanne

    2004-03-01

    Two flavonoids, naringenin and genistein found in blueberries and soybeans, respectively, scavenge free radicals and exhibit anti- breast and prostate cancer properties. When consumed in foods, these flavonoids usually are subject to heat, yet all biological studies have been performed with unheated molecules. We have explored and will report on the three-dimensional, molecular structure changes we have thermally-induced in naringenin and genistein. We have measured and will discuss the flavonoids' thermodynamic properties as a function of temperature. Several endothermic transformations were observed along with a marked color change that remained when the flavonoids were dissolved in a solvent, indicating their molecular structures had been altered by the heat. Ultraviolet-Visible spectroscopy, and proton and carbon 1-D nuclear magnetic resonance will be presented that show the change was associated with a decrease in electron localization within the molecules. We will explain how such modified structures could scavenge free radicals more effectively and affect breast cancer cell proliferation.

  8. Xylella fastidiosa in rabbiteye blueberry: A newly studied host of an old foe

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa causes a number of plant diseases, including bacterial leaf scorch of southern highbush blueberry. In Louisiana, X. fastidiosa has been detected in rabbiteye blueberry orchards, and we wanted to know if it affected yield in rabbiteye blueberry plants. We detected X...

  9. 78 FR 59775 - Blueberry Promotion, Research and Information Order; Assessment Rate Increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1218 Blueberry Promotion, Research and Information Order; Assessment Rate... Blueberry Promotion, Research and Information Order (Order) to increase the assessment rate from $12 to $18 per ton (an increase of $0.003 per pound). The Order is administered by the U.S. Highbush Blueberry...

  10. 75 FR 12707 - Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Increase Membership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-17

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1218 Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Increase... to add two importer members and their alternates to the U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council (Council) to reflect changes in the quantity of highbush blueberry imports in the past three years. The change was...

  11. 7 CFR 1218.23 - U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council. 1218.23 Section 1218... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions...

  12. Diagnosis and management of new and re-emerging diseases of highbush blueberries in Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueberries are an important commodity in Michigan and disease management is crucial for production of high-quality fruit. Over the past 6 years, a number of new and re-emerging diseases have been diagnosed in the state. In 2009, Blueberry scorch virus (BlScV) and Blueberry shock virus (BlShV) were ...

  13. Mechanical harvesting of blueberries with extended shelf life: impact damage and suggestions for reducing bruise injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern highbush blueberries (SHB) (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) are mostly hand harvested for the fresh market. Hand harvesting of blueberry is labor intensive (over 500 hours/acre) and costly. With the uncertainty of labor availability in the near future, efforts are under way to develop blueberry ...

  14. A novel Caulimovirus associated with a complete fruit drop symptom in ‘Bluecrop’ blueberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we describe the nucleotide sequence and genome organization of a novel virus in the family Caulimoviridae from ‘Bluecrop’ blueberry plants that exhibited fruit drop symptoms. The virus is tentatively named Blueberry fruit drop associated virus (BFDaV). Blueberry fruit drop disease (BFDD) was fi...

  15. Inhibition of nonenzymatic protein glycation by pomegranate and other fruit juices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Pamela Garner; Greenspan, Phillip

    2014-04-01

    The nonenzymatic glycation of proteins and the formation of advanced glycation endproducts in diabetes leads to the crosslinking of proteins and disease complications. Our study sought to demonstrate the effect of commonly consumed juices (pomegranate, cranberry, black cherry, pineapple, apple, and Concord grape) on the fructose-mediated glycation of albumin. Albumin glycation decreased by 98% in the presence of 10 μL of pomegranate juice/mL; other juices inhibited glycation by only 20%. Pomegranate juice produced the greatest inhibition on protein glycation when incubated at both the same phenolic concentration and the same antioxidant potential. Both punicalagin and ellagic acid significantly inhibited the glycation of albumin by ~90% at 5 μg/mL. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that pomegranate, but not apple juice, protected albumin from modification. These results demonstrate that pomegranate juice and two of its major constituents are potent inhibitors of fructose-mediated protein glycation.

  16. Inhibition of Nonenzymatic Protein Glycation by Pomegranate and Other Fruit Juices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Pamela Garner; Greenspan, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The nonenzymatic glycation of proteins and the formation of advanced glycation endproducts in diabetes leads to the crosslinking of proteins and disease complications. Our study sought to demonstrate the effect of commonly consumed juices (pomegranate, cranberry, black cherry, pineapple, apple, and Concord grape) on the fructose-mediated glycation of albumin. Albumin glycation decreased by 98% in the presence of 10 μL of pomegranate juice/mL; other juices inhibited glycation by only 20%. Pomegranate juice produced the greatest inhibition on protein glycation when incubated at both the same phenolic concentration and the same antioxidant potential. Both punicalagin and ellagic acid significantly inhibited the glycation of albumin by ∼90% at 5 μg/mL. Sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that pomegranate, but not apple juice, protected albumin from modification. These results demonstrate that pomegranate juice and two of its major constituents are potent inhibitors of fructose-mediated protein glycation. PMID:24433074

  17. Unusual presentation of prune belly syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demisse, Abayneh Girma; Berhanu, Ashenafi; Tadesse, Temesgen

    2017-12-04

    Prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital malformation of unknown etiology, with the following triad of findings: abdominal muscle wall weakness, undescended testes, and urinary tract abnormalities. In most cases, detection of prune belly syndrome occurs during neonatal or infancy period. In this case report, we describe a 12-year-old boy from Ethiopia with the triad of findings of prune belly syndrome along with skeletal malformations. We are unaware of any previous report of prune belly syndrome in Ethiopia. A 12-year-old Amhara boy from the Northwest Gondar Amhara regional state presented to our referral hospital with a complaint of swelling over his left flank for the past 3 months. Maternal pregnancy course and medical history were noncontributory, and he had an attended birth at a health center. He has seven siblings, none of whom had similar symptoms. On examination he had a distended abdomen, asymmetric with bulging left flank, visible horizontal line, upward umbilical slit, and absent rectus abdominis muscles. His abdomen was soft with a tender cystic, bimanually palpable mass on the left flank measuring 13 × 11 cm. Both testes were undescended and he also has developmental dysplasia of the hips. An abdominal ultrasound revealed a large cystic mass in his left kidney area with echo debris and a hip X-ray showed bilateral developmental dysplasia of the hip. Intraoperative findings were cystic left kidney, both testes were intraperitoneal, tortuous left renal vein, enlarged bladder reaching above umbilicus, and left megaureter. bilateral orchidectomy and left nephrectomy were done. He was given intravenously administered antibiotics for treatment of pyelonephritis and discharged home with an appointment for follow up and possible abdominoplasty. In the current report delayed presentation contributed to testicular atrophy and decision for orchidectomy. Furthermore, he will be at potential risk for sex hormone abnormality. Therefore, diagnosis of prune

  18. Enrichment of functional properties of ice cream with pomegranate by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çam, Mustafa; Erdoğan, Fatma; Aslan, Duygu; Dinç, Merve

    2013-10-01

    Pomegranate peel rich in phenolics, and pomegranate seed which contain a conjugated fatty acid namely punicic acid in lipid fraction remain as by-products after processing the fruit into juice. Ice cream is poor in polyunsaturated fatty acids and phenolics, therefore, this study was conducted to improve the functional properties of ice cream by incorporating pomegranate peel phenolics and pomegranate seed oil. Incorporation of the peel phenolics into ice cream at the levels of 0.1% and 0.4% (w/w) resulted in significant changes in the pH, total acidity, and color of the samples. The most prominent outcomes of phenolic incorporation were sharp improvements in antioxidant and antidiabetic activities as well as the phenolic content of ice creams. Replacement of pomegranate seed oil by milk fat at the levels of 2.0% and 4.0% (w/w) increased the conjugated fatty acid content. However, perception of oxidized flavor increased with the additional seed oil. When one considers the functional and nutritional improvements in the enrichment of the ice cream together with overall acceptability results of the sensory analysis, then it follows from this study that ice creams enriched with pomegranate peel phenolics up to 0.4% (w/w) and pomegranate seed oil up to 2.0% (w/w) could be introduced to markets as functional ice cream. Enrichment of ice creams with pomegranate by-products might provide consumers health benefits with striking functional properties of punicalagins in pomegranate peel, and punicic acid in pomegranate seed oil. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Protective effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) juice on testes against carbon tetrachloride intoxication in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Olayan, Ebtesam M; El-Khadragy, Manal F; Metwally, Dina M; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2014-05-22

    Pomegranate fruit has been extensively used as a natural medicine in many cultures. The present study was aimed at evaluating the protective effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) juice against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced oxidative stress and testes injury in adult Wistar rats. Twenty eight Wistar albino male rats were divided equally into 4 groups for the assessment of protective potential of pomegranate juice. Rats of group I (control) received only vehicles and had free access to food and water. Rats of groups II and IV were treated with CCl4 (2 ml/kg bwt) via the intraperitoneal route once a week for ten weeks. The pomegranate juice was supplemented via drinking water 2 weeks before and concurrent with CCl4 treatment to group IV. Group III was supplemented with pomegranate juice for twelve weeks. The protective effects of pomegranate on serum sex hormones, oxidative markers, activities of antioxidant enzymes and histopathology of testes were determined in CCl4-induced reproductive toxicity in rats. Pomegranate juice showed significant elevation in testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) those depleted by the injection of CCl4. Activity levels of endogenous testesticular antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione (GSH) contents were increased while lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO) were decreased with pomegranate juice. Moreover, degeneration of germ and Leydig cells along with deformities in spermatogenesis induced after CCl4 injections were restored with the treatment of pomegranate juice. The results clearly demonstrated that pomegranate juice augments the antioxidant defense mechanism against carbon tetrachloride-induced reproductive toxicity and provides evidence that it may have a therapeutic role in free radical mediated diseases.

  20. Estimation of soil coverage of chopped pruning residues in olive orchards by image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jiménez-Jiménez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Residue chopping from orchard pruning is becoming a common practice in conservation agriculture after the establishment of eco-conditionality policies in the European Union. This type of residue is used to protect the soil from erosion and improve the water balance and fertility of soils by improving the organic matter content. However, no studies have evaluated the influence of pruning residues and size on soil coverage. This study examines the effect of different treatments on pruning residue soil coverage in an olive orchard (cv. Picual. Treatments consisted of two quantities of pruning residues, specifically, high (2.04 kg m-2 and low (1.02 kg m-2, and two chopping speeds, low (2.4 km h-1 and high (3.2 km h-1. The different treatments were evaluated by image analysis and pixel counting to determine the soil cover percentage, size, number and distribution of the pruning residues after chopping. After chopping, the soil cover percentage was 39% higher in the high quantity pruning residue treatments but was not significantly influenced by the chopping speed. The size and number of lignified residues was quantified via pixel counting. In the high quantity pruning residue treatments, the number of large lignified residues (> 6 cm2 was higher, and the number of pruning residues smaller than 2 cm2 was lower, when compared with low quantity pruning residue treatments. The high chopping speed treatments produced more smaller-sized pruning residues.

  1. [A case of Prune Belly Syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, S; Palomo Góngora, E; García, V

    1995-09-01

    Prune Belly Syndrome is a rare and complicated condition affecting the genitourinary organs and abdominal wall, it was named after the aspect of the abdomen after the bladder has been drained. In its fully developed form presents with the triad: megalocyst, abdominal muscle deficiency and cryptorchidism. We present a case of a patient with 22 weeks of gestation with ultrasonographic diagnosis of a large thoracoabdominal cyst. The delivery was by cesarean operation. We analyzed the literature.

  2. Critical Dynamics of the k-Core Pruning Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Baxter

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the theory of the k-core pruning process (progressive removal of nodes with degree less than k in uncorrelated random networks. We derive exact equations describing this process and the evolution of the network structure and solve them numerically and, in the critical regime of the process, analytically. We show that the pruning process exhibits three different behaviors depending on whether the mean degree ⟨q⟩ of the initial network is above, equal to, or below the threshold ⟨q⟩_{c} corresponding to the emergence of the giant k-core. We find that above the threshold the network relaxes exponentially to the k-core. The system manifests the phenomenon known as “critical slowing-down,” as the relaxation time diverges when ⟨q⟩ tends to ⟨q⟩_{c}. At the threshold, the dynamics become critical, characterized by a power-law relaxation (∝1/t^{2}. Below the threshold, a long-lasting transient process (a “plateau” stage occurs. This transient process ends with a collapse in which the entire network disappears completely. The duration of the process diverges when ⟨q⟩→⟨q⟩_{c}. We show that the critical dynamics of the pruning are determined by branching processes of spreading damage. Clusters of nodes of degree exactly k are the evolving substrate for these branching processes. Our theory completely describes this branching cascade of damage in uncorrelated networks by providing the time-dependent distribution function of branching. These theoretical results are supported by our simulations of the k-core pruning in Erdős-Rényi graphs.

  3. Dietary Blueberry and Bifidobacteria Attenuate Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Rats by Affecting SIRT1-Mediated Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Tingting; Huang, Chao; Cheng, Mingliang

    2014-01-01

    NAFLD model rats were established and divided into NAFLD model (MG group), SIRT1 RNAi (SI group), blueberry juice (BJ group), blueberry juice + bifidobacteria (BJB group), blueberry juice + SIRT1 RNAi (BJSI group), and blueberry juice + bifidobacteria + SIRT1 RNAi groups (BJBSI group). A group with normal rats was a control group (CG). BJB group ameliorated NAFLD, which was better than BJ group (P Blueberry juice and bifidobacteria improve NAFLD by activating SIRTI-mediating signaling pathway. PMID:25544867

  4. Superior Cross-Species Reference Genes: A Blueberry Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Die, Jose V.; Rowland, Lisa J.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of affordable Next Generation Sequencing technologies has had major impact on studies of many crop species, where access to genomic technologies and genome-scale data sets has been extremely limited until now. The recent development of genomic resources in blueberry will enable the application of high throughput gene expression approaches that should relatively quickly increase our understanding of blueberry physiology. These studies, however, require a highly accurate and robust workflow and make necessary the identification of reference genes with high expression stability for correct target gene normalization. To create a set of superior reference genes for blueberry expression analyses, we mined a publicly available transcriptome data set from blueberry for orthologs to a set of Arabidopsis genes that showed the most stable expression in a developmental series. In total, the expression stability of 13 putative reference genes was evaluated by qPCR and a set of new references with high stability values across a developmental series in fruits and floral buds of blueberry were identified. We also demonstrated the need to use at least two, preferably three, reference genes to avoid inconsistencies in results, even when superior reference genes are used. The new references identified here provide a valuable resource for accurate normalization of gene expression in Vaccinium spp. and may be useful for other members of the Ericaceae family as well. PMID:24058469

  5. Superior cross-species reference genes: a blueberry case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose V Die

    Full Text Available The advent of affordable Next Generation Sequencing technologies has had major impact on studies of many crop species, where access to genomic technologies and genome-scale data sets has been extremely limited until now. The recent development of genomic resources in blueberry will enable the application of high throughput gene expression approaches that should relatively quickly increase our understanding of blueberry physiology. These studies, however, require a highly accurate and robust workflow and make necessary the identification of reference genes with high expression stability for correct target gene normalization. To create a set of superior reference genes for blueberry expression analyses, we mined a publicly available transcriptome data set from blueberry for orthologs to a set of Arabidopsis genes that showed the most stable expression in a developmental series. In total, the expression stability of 13 putative reference genes was evaluated by qPCR and a set of new references with high stability values across a developmental series in fruits and floral buds of blueberry were identified. We also demonstrated the need to use at least two, preferably three, reference genes to avoid inconsistencies in results, even when superior reference genes are used. The new references identified here provide a valuable resource for accurate normalization of gene expression in Vaccinium spp. and may be useful for other members of the Ericaceae family as well.

  6. Physicochemical, Antioxidant and Sensory Quality of Brazilian Blueberry Wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROBERTA O. SANTOS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Currently, Rio Grande do Sul state is the main producer of blueberry in Brazil. Practically all production is commercialized in fresh state and only a small portion is subject to processing. The blueberry wine making process is an alternative to expand the beverage industry and offers to the consumer a value-added product as well as a new market for Brazilian blueberry producers. The objectives of this study were to produce wines from blueberries and to evaluate the effect of deacidification (with calcium carbonate and chaptalization (with glucose syrup or sucrose on physicochemical characteristics, antioxidant content, and sensory parameters. Samples were analyzed for total soluble solids, pH, total titratable acidity, total sugar content, alcohol content, monomeric and total anthocyanin, total flavonols, total phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity by DPPH and FRAP methods. The use of calcium carbonate caused a reduction in total titratable acidity, while the use of glucose syrup resulted in wines with low alcohol content. The blueberries wine from Climax and Aliceblue cultivars had higher content of anthocyanin when produced with glucose syrup. The use of calcium carbonate and glucose syrup also provided wines more appreciated by tasters in relation to color. With regard to flavor, George and Aliceblue were the cultivars with lower preference under the control treatments (without carbonate and sugar. The presence of phenolic compounds may have provided a positive influence on wine flavor, once the more preferred wines presented the greater phenolic content.

  7. The Stability and Antioxidant Activity of Anthocyanins from Blueberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui He

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanins from highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. have tremendous potential as natural colorants and functional food with pharmaceutical purposes in food applications. To exploit the potential for food applications, the stability and antioxidant activity of anthocyanins present in blueberries have been studied. The results indicate that anthocyanins from blueberry were stable against the low pH (≤5.0, NaCl (0.125–0.500 mol/L, sucrose (0.584–2.336 mol/L and preservative (sodium benzoate, 0.035–0.140 mol/L, but were sensitive to alkaline conditions (≥7.0, high temperature (≥80 °C, light (natural light, oxidizing agent (H2O2, 0.5–2.0 % and reducing agent (Na2SO3, 0.005–0.040 mol/L. At concentrations of 25 and 50 mg/mL, anthocyanins from blueberry could protect ECV-304 cells against oxidative damage induced by H2O2. These results suggest that anthocyanins from blueberry can be regarded as a potential colorant for some acidic (pH≤5.0 food products and could be used as health food to prevent diseases arising from oxidative processes.

  8. Characterization of blueberry fruits (Vaccinium spp. and derived products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Magro Reque

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to physicochemically characterize and determine the antioxidant activities and anthocyanin contents of organic Rabbiteye blueberries grown in Southern Brazil and its derived products, in order to investigate the utility of food processing wastes as raw materials for developing products with beneficial health properties. The antioxidant capacity of the blueberries was superior to that of other fruits and juices. The pomace exhibited high activity, albeit lower than that of the fruit, while the flour and the dried blueberries lost 66% and 46% of the original antioxidant activity, respectively. The average anthocyanin contents of the fruits were moderate compared to other sources and species of blueberries. The pomace contains a large amount of anthocyanins while the flour and dried blueberries exhibited a 32% and 42% loss in anthocyanin content, respectively. The use of agro-industrial residues, in addition to adding value and minimizing the impact caused by the accumulation in the environment, can be directed toward the development of new products with bioactive properties.

  9. Partial polygon pruning of hydrographic features in automated generalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stum, Alexander K.; Buttenfield, Barbara P.; Stanislawski, Larry V.

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a working method to automatically detect and prune portions of waterbody polygons to support creation of a multi-scale hydrographic database. Water features are known to be sensitive to scale change; and thus multiple representations are required to maintain visual and geographic logic at smaller scales. Partial pruning of polygonal features—such as long and sinuous reservoir arms, stream channels that are too narrow at the target scale, and islands that begin to coalesce—entails concurrent management of the length and width of polygonal features as well as integrating pruned polygons with other generalized point and linear hydrographic features to maintain stream network connectivity. The implementation follows data representation standards developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). Portions of polygonal rivers, streams, and canals are automatically characterized for width, length, and connectivity. This paper describes an algorithm for automatic detection and subsequent processing, and shows results for a sample of NHD subbasins in different landscape conditions in the United States.

  10. On the use of inexact, pruned hardware in atmospheric modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düben, Peter D; Joven, Jaume; Lingamneni, Avinash; McNamara, Hugh; De Micheli, Giovanni; Palem, Krishna V; Palmer, T N

    2014-06-28

    Inexact hardware design, which advocates trading the accuracy of computations in exchange for significant savings in area, power and/or performance of computing hardware, has received increasing prominence in several error-tolerant application domains, particularly those involving perceptual or statistical end-users. In this paper, we evaluate inexact hardware for its applicability in weather and climate modelling. We expand previous studies on inexact techniques, in particular probabilistic pruning, to floating point arithmetic units and derive several simulated set-ups of pruned hardware with reasonable levels of error for applications in atmospheric modelling. The set-up is tested on the Lorenz '96 model, a toy model for atmospheric dynamics, using software emulation for the proposed hardware. The results show that large parts of the computation tolerate the use of pruned hardware blocks without major changes in the quality of short- and long-time diagnostics, such as forecast errors and probability density functions. This could open the door to significant savings in computational cost and to higher resolution simulations with weather and climate models.

  11. The effect of dropping impact on bruising pomegranate fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mohammad Shafie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The pomegranate journey from orchard to supermarket is very complex and pomegranates are subjected to the variety of static and dynamic loads that could result in this damage and bruise occurring. Bruise area and bruise volume are the most important parameters to evaluate fruit damage occurred in harvest and postharvest stages. The bruising is defined as damage to fruit flesh usually with no abrasion of the peel. The two different types of dynamic loading which can physically cause fruit bruising are impact and vibration. The impact and vibration loadings may occur during picking or sorting as the pomegranates are dropped into storage bins and during transportation. The focus of this work was on the impact loading as this appeared to be the most prevalent. In view of the limitations of conventional testing methods (ASTM D3332 Standard Test Methods for Mechanical Shock Fragility of Products, the method and procedure for determining dropping bruise boundary of fruit were also established by adapting free-fall dropping tests. Materials and Methods: After the ‘Malas-e-Saveh’ pomegranates had been selected, they were numbered, and the weight and dimension of each sample were measured and recorded. Firmness in cheek region of each fruit was also measured. Fruit firmness was determined by measuring the maximum force during perforating the sample to a depth of 10 mm at a velocity of 100 mm min-1 with an 8 mm diameter cylindrical penetrometer mounted onto a STM-5 Universal Testing Machine (SANTAM, Design CO. LTD., England. Free-fall dropping tests with a series of drop heights (6, 7, 10, 15, 30 and 60 cm were conducted on fresh ‘Malas-e-Saveh’ pomegranates. Three samples were used for each dropping height, and each sample was subjected to impact on two different positions. Before the test was started, it was necessary to control the sample's drop position. The cheek of sample was placed on the fruit holder. An aluminum plate mounted

  12. Distribution and phenology of Dasineura oxycoccana (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in Michigan blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Noel G; Isaacs, Rufus

    2012-06-01

    The blueberry gall midge, Dasineura oxycoccana Johnson, is a serious pest of rabbiteye blueberries in Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi, and a potential pest of southern and northern highbush blueberries. Its damage has been observed with increasing frequency in highbush blueberry plantings in the Great Lakes region, including in Wisconsin and in Michigan. Unlike in rabbiteye blueberry plantings, where blueberry gall midge primarily damages flowering buds, it is found to damage only the vegetative shoots of northern highbush blueberry. In this study, farms throughout Michigan were surveyed for the presence of blueberry gall midge and it was found in 43 of 46 sampled farms in 11 counties. From 2009-2011, several monitoring techniques, including yellow sticky traps, emergence traps, observational sampling, and vegetative shoot dissections were used to determine the ecology of this species in blueberry fields in southwest Michigan. Emergence traps were most useful in early detection of blueberry gall midge in April, and observational sampling for damage symptoms and vegetative shoot dissections revealed multiple population peaks throughout July and August. Infestation was detected in vegetative shoot tips in all parts of the bushes, with initial infestation greatest at the base of bushes. Degree day accumulations until first midge detection and peak infestation suggest some potential for predicting key events in the pest's phenology. This information about the distribution and timing of infestation will be useful in developing management strategies for blueberry gall midge infestation.

  13. Síndrome de prune belly: presentación de caso Prune belly syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    María Elena Toledo Lamela; Orlando Rafael Expósito Reyes; Roberto E Segura Figueredo; Elsa M Díaz Suárez; Carlos Tornés Salgado

    2008-01-01

    El síndrome de prune belly es una rara enfermedad congénita de causa desconocida. Se presenta el caso de un recién nacido a término, del sexo masculino y de un día de nacido, que fue remitido al servicio de urología pediátrica por presentar ausencia de los músculos de la pared anterior del abdomen (rectos anteriores), criptorquidia bilateral y gran globo vesical. A partir de los hallazgos del examen físico se planteó el diagnóstico de síndrome de prune belly. Se encontraron anomalías asociada...

  14. The Pomegranate: Effects on Bacteria and Viruses That Influence Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy B. Howell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pomegranates have been known for hundreds of years for their multiple health benefits, including antimicrobial activity. The recent surge in multidrug-resistant bacteria and the possibility of widespread global virus pandemics necessitate the need for additional preventative and therapeutic options to conventional drugs. Research indicates that pomegranates and their extracts may serve as natural alternatives due to their potency against a wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. Nearly every part of the pomegranate plant has been tested for antimicrobial activities, including the fruit juice, peel, arils, flowers, and bark. Many studies have utilized pomegranate peel with success. There are various phytochemical compounds in pomegranate that have demonstrated antimicrobial activity, but most of the studies have found that ellagic acid and larger hydrolyzable tannins, such as punicalagin, have the highest activities. In some cases the combination of the pomegranate constituents offers the most benefit. The positive clinical results on pomegranate and suppression of oral bacteria are intriguing and worthy of further study. Much of the evidence for pomegranates’ antibacterial and antiviral activities against foodborne pathogens and other infectious disease organisms comes from in vitro cell-based assays, necessitating further confirmation of in vivo efficacy through human clinical trials.

  15. The protective effects of pomegranate on liver and remote organs caused by experimental obstructive jaundice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, E E; Arikanoğlu, Z; Turkoğlu, A; Kiliç, E; Yüksel, H; Gümüş, M

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the protective potential of pomegranate extract on the liver and remote organs in rats with obstructive jaundice. The rats were split into 4 groups. In Group 1 (G1) (sham group) rats, the common bile duct was mobilized without any ligation. Group 2 (G2) received a combination of the sham operation and synchronous treatment with pomegranate. Group 3 (G3) received common bile duct ligation (CBDL). Group 4 (G4) were subjected to CBDL and treatment with pomegranate. After 8 days, we measured total oxidative status (TOS) and antioxidant capacity in the rats' liver tissue and remote organs, and evaluated blood levels of malondialdehyde and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). G3 rats showed significantly raised malondialdehyde level as compared to G1 rats (p pomegranate therapy, a decrease in malondialdehyde was observed (p = 0.015). TAC levels were significantly raised in the G3 rats compared to the G1 rats (p = 0.004). TAC levels dropped after pomegranate therapy (p = 0.011). CBDL caused elevated TOS levels in the liver and remote organs, with a statistically significant increase in the lung tissue (p = 0.002). TOS levels in the CBDL groups decreased after pomegranate treatment (p pomegranate on the liver and remote organs in obstructive jaundice.

  16. Residue level and dissipation of carbendazim in/on pomegranate fruits and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Soudamini; S, Lekha

    2016-07-01

    Carbendazim is widely used on pomegranate for control of a large number of fungal diseases. Its residue levels in/on pomegranate fruits and soil were evaluated under field conditions. The quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) method in conjunction with liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry was used for analysis of carbendazim. Recovery of carbendazim was within 78.92-96.28 % and relative standard deviation within 3.8-10.9 % (n = 6). Carbendazim residues on pomegranate fruits dissipated at the half lives of 17.3 and 22.8 days from treatments at 500 and 1000 g active ingredient (a.i.) ha(-1), respectively. Its residues in pomegranate aril were highest on the tenth day and reduced thereafter. The residue level of carbendazim on pomegranate whole fruits from standard dose treatment was less than the EU maximum residue limit (MRL) of 0.1 mg kg(-1) at harvest. The carbendazim residues were pomegranate were 65.4 and 103.4 days. The results of this study can be used to determine the judicious use of carbendazim for plant protection of pomegranate crop.

  17. Bioactive properties of commercialised pomegranate (Punica granatum) juice: antioxidant, antiproliferative and enzyme inhibiting activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Les, Francisco; Prieto, Jose M; Arbonés-Mainar, Jose Miguel; Valero, Marta Sofía; López, Víctor

    2015-06-01

    Pomegranate juice and related products have long been used either in traditional medicine or as nutritional supplements claiming beneficial effects. Although there are several studies on this food plant, only a few studies have been performed with pomegranate juice or marketed products. The aim of this work is to evaluate the antioxidant effects of pomegranate juice on cellular models using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidizing agent or DPPH and superoxide radicals in cell free systems. The antiproliferative effects of the juice were measured on HeLa and PC-3 cells by the MTT assay and pharmacologically relevant enzymes (cyclooxygenases, xanthine oxidase, acetylcholinesterase and monoamine oxidase A) were selected for enzymatic inhibition assays. Pomegranate juice showed significant protective effects against hydrogen peroxide induced toxicity in the Artemia salina and HepG2 models; these effects may be attributed to radical scavenging properties of pomegranate as the juice was able to reduce DPPH and superoxide radicals. Moderate antiproliferative activities in HeLa and PC-3 cancer cells were observed. However, pomegranate juice was also able to inhibit COX-2 and MAO-A enzymes. This study reveals some mechanisms by which pomegranate juice may have interesting and beneficial effects in human health.

  18. The protective role of pomegranate juice against carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirinççioğlu, Mihdiye; Kızıl, Göksel; Kızıl, Murat; Kanay, Zeki; Ketani, Aydın

    2014-11-01

    Most pomegranate (Punica granatum Linn., Punicaceae) fruit parts are known to possess enormous antioxidant activity. The present study was carried out to determine the phenolic and flavonoid contents of Derik pomegranate juice and determine its effect against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced toxicity in rats. Animals were divided into four groups (n = 6): group I: control, group II: CCl4 (1 ml/kg), group III: CCl4 + pomegranate juice and group IV: CCl4 + ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Treatment duration was 4 weeks, and the dose of CCl4 was administered once a week to groups II, III and IV during the experimental period. CCl4-treated rats caused a significant increase in serum enzyme levels, such as aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and total bilirubin, and decrease in albumin, when compared with control. Administration of CCl4 along with pomegranate juice or UDCA significantly reduces these changes. Analysis of lipid peroxide (LPO) levels by thiobarbutiric acid reaction showed a significant increase in liver, kidney and brain tissues of CCl4-treated rats. However, both pomegranate juice and UDCA prevented the increase in LPO level. Histopathological reports also revealed that there is a regenerative activity in the liver and kidney cells. Derik pomegranate juice showed to be hepatoprotective against CCl4-induced hepatic injury. In conclusion, present study reveals a biological evidence that supports the use of pomegranate juice in the treatment of chemical-induced hepatotoxicity. © The Author(s) 2012.

  19. conservation and nutritional quality of blueberry treated with eatable covering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcibela Stülp

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lengthening the post-harvest life of fruits from temperate climates is one of the greatest challenges of modern agriculture, which aims at diminishing the losses and increasing the offer period of the product in national and international market. The use of eatable pellicles has been explored to cover fruits, since its usage represents an economical advantage, due to its low price and reduction of post-harvest losses. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate the quality of blueberry, cultivar Florida M, produced in an organic production system and covered with eatable covering based on kefir grains associated with different storage temperatures. Thus, it was observed that the most efficient treatment to reduce blueberry post-harvest loss was the combination of kefir grains in association with storage cooled at 5 ºC, not changing the chemical composition and nutritional of blueberry.

  20. Effects of different plant growth regulators on blueberry fruit quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. C.; Zhu, Y. Q.; Wang, Y. N.; Luo, C.; Wang, X.

    2017-08-01

    In order to understand the effects of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) on blueberry fruit growth, various concentrations of Abscisic acid (ABA), Methyl jasmonate (MJ), Brassinolide (BR), Melatonin (MT) were sprayed on blueberry cv. ‘Brigita’ fruits. The results showed that all the PGRs put into effect on improving the quality of blueberry fruit. Comparing with the control plants no PGR spraying,300 mg/L of MT treatment promoted effectively accumulation of the soluble sugar. ABA 20mg/L treatment in-creased effectively accumulation of anthocyanin, and significantly decreased titratable acid content. The treatment of MJ 10mg/L improved significantly the soluble solid content. The effect of the four PGRs treatments on appearance did not show obvious difference.

  1. A new ophiovirus is associated with blueberry mosaic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekke-Veetil, Thanuja; Ho, Thien; Keller, Karen E; Martin, Robert R; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E

    2014-08-30

    Blueberry mosaic disease (BMD) was first described more than 60 years ago and is caused by a yet unidentified graft transmissible agent. A combination of traditional methods and next generation sequencing disclosed the presence of a new ophiovirus in symptomatic plants. The virus was detected in all BMD samples collected from several production areas of North America and was thus named blueberry mosaic associated virus. Phylogenetic analysis, supported by high bootstrap values, places the virus within the family Ophioviridae. The genome organization resembles that of citrus psorosis virus, the type member of the genus Ophiovirus. The implications of this discovery in BMD control and blueberry virus certification schemes are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Quality Parameters of Six Cultivars of Blueberry Using Computer Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiacevich, Silvia; Celis Cofré, Daniela; Silva, Patricia; Enrione, Javier; Osorio, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Background. Blueberries are considered an important source of health benefits. This work studied six blueberry cultivars: "Duke," "Brigitta", "Elliott", "Centurion", "Star," and "Jewel", measuring quality parameters such as °Brix, pH, moisture content using standard techniques and shape, color, and fungal presence obtained by computer vision. The storage conditions were time (0-21 days), temperature (4 and 15°C), and relative humidity (75 and 90%). Results. Significant differences (P computer vision, which is important to determine a shelf life of 14 days for all cultivars. Similar behavior during storage was obtained for all cultivars. Conclusion. Computer vision proved to be a reliable and simple method to objectively determine blueberry decay during storage that can be used as an alternative approach to currently used subjective measurements.

  3. Influence of soil type on half-highbush blueberry productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tea Tasa

    2012-12-01

    Vaccinium spp. cultivars (five- and six-year-old plants were used in the experiment: ‘Aino’, ‘Alvar’, ‘Arne’, and ‘Northblue’. Environmental conditions exercised a considerable influence on biological processes of half-highbush blueberry, at the same time, a genotype-based variation was observed. Cultivar ‘Northblue’ had a higher yield in mineral soil and ‘Aino’ had the highest yield in peat soil considering the average of two years. The peat soil condition in the harvested peat field provided a better supply of nutrients for blueberry bushes compared to mineral soil and this, in its turn, secured better growth and a higher yield of blueberry bushes.

  4. PHENOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF GENOTYPES FROM CATTLEY GUAVA AND GUAVA TREES SUBMITTED TO FRUCTIFICATION PRUNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CINTIA APARECIDA BREMENKAMP

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Psidium cattleianum Sabine is a species from the Myrtaceae family that serves as an option for the native fruits cultivation, besides being considered a source of resistance to the Meloidogyne enterolobii nematode. Although cattley guava trees from this species produce flower buds in young branches, there are no reports of response to fructification pruning or phenological synchronism with the guava tree. The objective of this paper was the comparative evaluation of the genotype response of strawberry guava trees and guava cultivars to fructification pruning, thus, describing the phenology of both species under the same cultivation conditions. The experiment was conducted under an entirely randomized outline, in 7x2 factorial scheme, being evaluated seven genotypes (three from strawberry guava and four from guava trees, and with pruning performed in two seasons (May 2012 and March 2013, with three repetitions. Fructification pruning was executed by a lopping on all mature branches, from the last growth flow in the woody branch region. Were evaluated budding characteristics and fruit harvesting, as well as number of days from pruning to the observation of the phenological event. Cattley guava tree pruning stimulated fructification of all three genotypes after pruning done on May and two genotypes after the March’s pruning. There has been a sync between the guava cultivars’ flowering and both strawberry guava trees genotypes, when those were pruned on May.

  5. Pomegranate juice inhibits sulfoconjugation in Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruwatari, Ayako; Okamura, Shigeaki; Nakajima, Yoko; Narukawa, Yuji; Takeda, Tadahiro; Tamura, Hiroomi

    2008-12-01

    Several fruit juices have been reported to cause food-drug interactions, mainly affecting cytochrome P450 activity; however, little is known about the effects of fruit juices on conjugation reactions. Among several fruit juices tested (apple, peach, orange, pineapple, grapefruit, and pomegranate), pomegranate juice potently inhibited the sulfoconjugation of 1-naphthol in Caco-2 cells. This inhibition was both dose- and culture time-dependent, with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value calculated at 2.7% (vol/vol). In contrast, no obvious inhibition of glucuronidation of 1-naphthol in Caco-2 cells was observed by any of the juices examined. Punicalagin, the most abundant antioxidant polyphenol in pomegranate juice, was also found to strongly inhibit sulfoconjugation in Caco-2 cells with an IC(50) of 45 microM, which is consistent with that of pomegranate juice. These data suggest that punicalagin is mainly responsible for the inhibition of sulfoconjugation by pomegranate juice. We additionally demonstrated that pomegranate juice and punicalagin both inhibit phenol sulfotransferase activity in Caco-2 cells in vitro, at concentrations that are almost equivalent to those used in the Caco-2 cells. Pomegranate juice, however, shows no effects on the expression of the sulfotransferase SULT1A family of genes (SULT1A1 and SULT1A3) in Caco-2 cells. These results indicate that the inhibition of sulfotransferase activity by punicalagin in Caco-2 cells is responsible for the reductions seen in 1-naphthyl sulfate accumulation. Our data also suggest that constituents of pomegranate juice, most probably punicalagin, impair the enteric functions of sulfoconjugation and that this might have effects upon the bioavailability of drugs and other compounds present in food and in the environment. These effects might be related to the anticarcinogenic properties of pomegranate juice.

  6. Bibliometric Analysis On Research Study of Pomegranate: A Review Towards New Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Farhan Md Ariffin

    2015-06-01

    Abstract : Pomegranates are an antioxidant-rich superfood with alternative and natural medicine resources for the natural health community. From the perspective of ancient medical practice, pomegranate is in a highest ranking of healthy fruits because of its diverse beneficial in curing diseases. Trend research publications pomegranates were studied. The study focused on content analysis, especially in the field of primary research on pomegranate. Referring to the results of 'literature review' on pomegranate, researchers found that the majority of previous research on pomegranate dominated by journal articles by 85.5 percent. Research on the method of analysis conducted in the previous studies found that most studies on pomegranate done on a scientific analysis (laboratory studies. Studies on aspects of science has been divided into seven areas. Focus areas include scientific discussion of pomegranate is pharmaceutical, Food Science, Botany, Bio-Medical, Bio-Chemistry and Microbiology. Only one field of study that focuses on the analysis of Islamic view focusing on Islamic Education. Additional fields of Environmental Education (Flora are also included by researchers to collect data and find a results on plants that contain pomegranate. Comparative evaluation of research found that a total of 188 kinds of studies involves the study of the scientific aspects compared to only 11 studies based on Islam (Islamic Education and 10 studies based on environmental education. Thus, the efforts of researchers from Universiti Malaya through grants TRGS (TR001A-2014 entitled 'Safe and Health Uses of Fruits and Herbs Mentioned in Al-Quran and Ahadith: An Analysis of ethnomedicinal Importance in Islamic Products in Malaysia' are very significant in the development of science. Advanced new study of henna is expected to produce benefits to Malaysia as a whole.

  7. Is pomegranate peels infusion effective for disinfection of toothbrushes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Lima de Luna FREIRE

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Methods of decontamination or sanitization of toothbrushes have been questioned. Objective This study assessed the effectiveness of pomegranate peels infusion as a disinfectant of toothbrushes against Streptococcus mutans. Material and method A sample of 16 schoolchildren aged between 7 and 9 years performed brushing 5 days/week, with a careful brushing once a day. After each day of brushing, the toothbrushes were washed and sprayed with one disinfectant solution. This procedure was repeated for 4 weeks using one of the different solutions per week: distilled water (G1; negative control, pomegranate (Punica granatum Linn peels infusion (G2, 1% sodium hypochlorite (G3 and 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate (G4. After the fifth day, toothbrushes were collected for laboratory analysis. Toothbrushes heads were subjected to agitation in saline dilution of 10–1, 10–2,10–3, and 25 μL of each dilution were seeded in mitis salivarius agar culture medium for S. mutans colony-forming unit (CFU counting. One calibrated examiner (Kappa = 0.91 performed the CFU (mL–1 × 104 counts. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn Multiple Comparison tests were used at a significance level of 5%. Result G1 presented the highest number of CFU (3.9 ± 8.4, followed by G2 (3.2 ± 4.0. No S. mutans growth was observed in G3 and G4. There was no statistically significant difference between G1 and G2 and between G3 and G4 (p>0.05. Conclusion Pomegranate infusion was completely ineffective for the disinfection of toothbrushes against S. mutans when compared with 1% sodium hypochlorite and 0.12% chlorhexidine digluconate solutions.

  8. Elevated Genetic Diversity in the Emerging Blueberry Pathogen Exobasidium maculosum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E Stewart

    Full Text Available Emerging diseases caused by fungi are increasing at an alarming rate. Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot of blueberry, caused by the fungus Exobasidium maculosum, is an emerging disease that has rapidly increased in prevalence throughout the southeastern USA, severely reducing fruit quality in some plantings. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic diversity of E. maculosum in the southeastern USA to elucidate the basis of disease emergence and to investigate if populations of E. maculosum are structured by geography, host species, or tissue type. We sequenced three conserved loci from 82 isolates collected from leaves and fruit of rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium virgatum, highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum, and southern highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum hybrids from commercial fields in Georgia and North Carolina, USA, and 6 isolates from lowbush blueberry (V. angustifolium from Maine, USA, and Nova Scotia, Canada. Populations of E. maculosum from the southeastern USA and from lowbush blueberry in Maine and Nova Scotia are distinct, but do not represent unique species. No difference in genetic structure was detected between different host tissues or among different host species within the southeastern USA; however, differentiation was detected between populations in Georgia and North Carolina. Overall, E. maculosum showed extreme genetic diversity within the conserved loci with 286 segregating sites among the 1,775 sequenced nucleotides and each isolate representing a unique multilocus haplotype. However, 94% of the nucleotide substitutions were silent, so despite the high number of mutations, selective constraints have limited changes to the amino acid sequences of the housekeeping genes. Overall, these results suggest that the emergence of Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot is not due to a recent introduction or host shift, or the recent evolution of aggressive genotypes of E. maculosum, but more likely as a result of an increasing

  9. Elevated Genetic Diversity in the Emerging Blueberry Pathogen Exobasidium maculosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jane E.; Brooks, Kyle; Brannen, Phillip M.; Cline, William O.; Brewer, Marin T.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging diseases caused by fungi are increasing at an alarming rate. Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot of blueberry, caused by the fungus Exobasidium maculosum, is an emerging disease that has rapidly increased in prevalence throughout the southeastern USA, severely reducing fruit quality in some plantings. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic diversity of E. maculosum in the southeastern USA to elucidate the basis of disease emergence and to investigate if populations of E. maculosum are structured by geography, host species, or tissue type. We sequenced three conserved loci from 82 isolates collected from leaves and fruit of rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium virgatum), highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum), and southern highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum hybrids) from commercial fields in Georgia and North Carolina, USA, and 6 isolates from lowbush blueberry (V. angustifolium) from Maine, USA, and Nova Scotia, Canada. Populations of E. maculosum from the southeastern USA and from lowbush blueberry in Maine and Nova Scotia are distinct, but do not represent unique species. No difference in genetic structure was detected between different host tissues or among different host species within the southeastern USA; however, differentiation was detected between populations in Georgia and North Carolina. Overall, E. maculosum showed extreme genetic diversity within the conserved loci with 286 segregating sites among the 1,775 sequenced nucleotides and each isolate representing a unique multilocus haplotype. However, 94% of the nucleotide substitutions were silent, so despite the high number of mutations, selective constraints have limited changes to the amino acid sequences of the housekeeping genes. Overall, these results suggest that the emergence of Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot is not due to a recent introduction or host shift, or the recent evolution of aggressive genotypes of E. maculosum, but more likely as a result of an increasing host population

  10. CAN BE BLUEBERRIES THE RISK FOOD AND RAW MATERIAL?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Medvecký2

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fruits of the highbush blueberries are popular for their beneficial effects on human health and for their excellent sweet-vine taste. Our work is focused on risk assessment of selected elements in relation to the content of bioactive compounds in wild and cultivated of highbush blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.. Anthocyanins are polyphenols that are widely distributed in plants, and contribute to the brilliant blue, red or purple colour in leaves, flowers or fruits. In the samples the antioxidant capacity by the method of Brand – Williams using DPPH (2,2–difenyl-1-pikrylhydrazyl and the content of anthocyanins by the modified method Lapornik in two samples of wild blueberries from different areas of Slovakia (Čertovica and Oravské Veselé and in 6 cultivated varieties highbush blueberry (Bluejay, Bluecrop, Patriot, Berkeley, Brigitta, Nelson were determined. The contents of risky elements - Cd, Pb were assessed by AAS method. The contents of Pb were in all observed samples higher than the maximum limit given by the legislation (cultivated: 0.5612 – 0.9912 mg.kg-1, wild: 0.792 – 0.874 mg.kg-1. The measured content values of Cd were in all samples of blueberries lower than hygienic limit. The highest content of anthocyanins from analysed samples was in wild blueberries from surrouding Čertovica 4870.125 ± 22.803 mg.dm-3, but in this sample was simultaneously the lowest antioxidant capacity of 61.15 ± 1.002 %. The highest antioxidant capacity was measured in sample of cultivated variety Bluejay 87.175 ± 0.45 %. It is important to carry out monitoring of heavy metals to consumption of safe food raw materials and foodstuffs.

  11. Psychoanalytic Interpretation of Blueberries by Susan Gibb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Zalbidea Paniagua

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Blueberries (2009 by Susan Gibb, published in the ELO (Electronic Literature Organization, invites the reader to travel inside the protagonist’s mind to discover real and imaginary experiences examining notions of gender, sex, body and identity of a traumatised woman. This article explores the verbal and visual modes in this digital short fiction following semiotic patterns as well as interpreting the psychological states that are expressed through poetical and technological components. A comparative study of the consequences of trauma in the protagonist will be developed including psychoanalytic theories by Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan and the feminist psychoanalysts: Melanie Klein and Bracha Ettinger. The reactions of the protagonist will be studied: loss of reality, hallucinations and Electra Complex, as well as the rise of defence mechanisms and her use of the artistic creativity as a healing therapy. The interactivity of the hypermedia, multiple paths and endings will be analyzed as a literary strategy that increases the reader’s capacity of empathizing with the speaker.

  12. Pollination Reservoirs in Lowbush Blueberry (Ericales: Ericaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, F. A.; Hoshide, A. K.; Dibble, A. C.; Stack, L. B.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pollinator-dependent agriculture heavily relies upon a single pollinator—the honey bee. To diversify pollination strategies, growers are turning to alternatives. Densely planted reservoirs of pollen- and nectar-rich flowers (pollination reservoirs, hereafter “PRs”) may improve pollination services provided by wild bees. Our focal agroecosystem, lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton), exists in a simple landscape uniquely positioned to benefit from PRs. First, we contrast bee visitation rates and use of three types of PR. We consider the effects of PRs on wild bee diversity and the composition of bumble bee pollen loads. We contrast field-level crop pollination services between PRs and controls four years postestablishment. Last, we calculate the time to pay for PR investment. Social bees preferentially used clover plantings; solitary bees preferentially used wildflower plantings. On average, bumble bee pollen loads in treatment fields contained 37% PR pollen. PRs significantly increased visitation rates to the crop in year 4, and exerted a marginally significant positive influence on fruit set. The annualized costs of PRs were covered by the fourth year using the measured increase in pollination services. Our findings provide evidence of the positive impact of PRs on crop pollination services. PMID:28069631

  13. Small molecule inhibitors of HCV replication from Pomegranate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, B. Uma; Mullick, Ranajoy; Kumar, Anuj; Sudha, Govindarajan; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Das, Saumitra

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the causative agent of end-stage liver disease. Recent advances in the last decade in anti HCV treatment strategies have dramatically increased the viral clearance rate. However, several limitations are still associated, which warrant a great need of novel, safe and selective drugs against HCV infection. Towards this objective, we explored highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitors, the ellagitannins, from the crude extract of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit peel. The pure compounds, punicalagin, punicalin, and ellagic acid isolated from the extract specifically blocked the HCV NS3/4A protease activity in vitro. Structural analysis using computational approach also showed that ligand molecules interact with the catalytic and substrate binding residues of NS3/4A protease, leading to inhibition of the enzyme activity. Further, punicalagin and punicalin significantly reduced the HCV replication in cell culture system. More importantly, these compounds are well tolerated ex vivo and`no observed adverse effect level' (NOAEL) was established upto an acute dose of 5000 mg/kg in BALB/c mice. Additionally, pharmacokinetics study showed that the compounds are bioavailable. Taken together, our study provides a proof-of-concept approach for the potential use of antiviral and non-toxic principle ellagitannins from pomegranate in prevention and control of HCV induced complications.

  14. Environmental conditions affect the color, taste, and antioxidant capacity of 11 pomegranate accessions' fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Elinor; Tzulker, Revital; Glazer, Ira; Bar-Ya'akov, Irit; Wiesman, Zeev; Tripler, Effi; Bar-Ilan, Igal; Fromm, Hillel; Borochov-Neori, Hamutal; Holland, Doron; Amir, Rachel

    2009-10-14

    The well-established health beneficial value of pomegranate juice is leading to increased demand for pomegranate products and to the expansion of pomegranate orchards worldwide. The current study describes differences in the chemical composition of major ingredients of the arils and peels of 11 accessions grown in Mediterranean and desert climates in Israel. In most of the accessions, the levels of antioxidant activity and content of total phenolics, total anthocyanins, total soluble solids, glucose, fructose, and acidity were higher in the aril juice of fruit grown in the Mediterranean climate compared to those grown in the desert climate. However, the peels of fruit grown in the desert climate exhibited higher antioxidant activity, and the levels of total phenolics, including the two hydrolyzable tannins, punicalagin and punicalin, were higher compared to those in the peels of fruit grown in the Mediterranean climate. The results indicate that environmental conditions significantly affect pomegranate fruit quality and health beneficial compounds.

  15. Evaluation of antioxidant capacity and flavor profile change of pomegranate wine during fermentation and aging process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yongli; Wu, Jin; Wang, Xuejiao; Sun, Xuchun; Hackman, Robert M; Li, Zhixi; Feng, Xianchao

    2017-10-01

    Antioxidant properties and flavor characteristic profile of pomegranate wine during winemaking were investigated. The total phenol content and radical scavenging activity exhibited a slightly decrease in the end edge. Punicalagins and gallic acid were revealed to be the most abundant phenolic compounds, followed by ellagic acid and vanillic acid. These constituents were mainly responsible for the effective antioxidant capacity of pomegranate wine. The major changes of flavor qualities occurred in the initial stage, particularly 0-4day of fermentation. Fermentation significantly reduced the relative content of aldehydes, ketones, heterocyclic and aromatic compounds, but promoted the generation of esters and alcohols. This is the first time of using E-nose and E-tongue to monitor odour and taste changes in the brewing process of pomegranate wine. The study may provide a promising instruction for improving functional features and quality control of the pomegranate wine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fatty acids from Tunisian and Chinese pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfalleh, Walid; Ying, Ma; Nasri, Nizar; Sheng-Hua, He; Guasmi, Ferdaous; Ferchichi, Ali

    2011-05-01

    Pomegranate seed oil is considered a powerful health-benefiting agent due to its anti-oxidative and anticarcinogenic properties. Lipids from 21 pomegranate cultivars (15 Tunisian and 6 Chinese) were extracted and fatty acids were identified. Total lipids (16% on a dry weight basis) are mainly unsaturated (ca. 88%). Qualitatively, the pomegranate fatty acid composition is identical. Quantitatively, the predominant fatty acid was linolenic acid (44.51-86.14%), followed by linoleic acid (3.57-13.92%), oleic acid (3.03-12.88%), palmitic acid (3.13-11.82%), stearic acid (1.68-15.64%), gadoleic acid (0.50-4.91%), lignoceric acid ( < 2.53%), arachidic acid ( < 1.70%) and myristic acid ( < 0.85%). Statistical methods revealed how Chinese and Tunisian pomegranate fatty acid contents may be affected by the sampling location.

  17. Synthetic Textile Red Dye Removal From Aqueous Solution by Adsorption onto Pomegranate Peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundus Saleh Nehaba

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is conducted to evaluate the ability of using pomegranate peel as low cost material for adsorption one of synthetic textile dye (C.I.Direct Red 89 dye. The removal of dye from aqueous solution is done by using pomegranate peel with two forms, as raw pomegranate peel (RPP and activated carbon prepared from pomegranate peel(ACPP. Some operational factors like contact time, pH, adsorbent dosage , and temperature were investigated in experimental work. Also the thermodynamic parameters ΔH, ΔG, and ΔS were calculated, the result shows that the adsorption process of dye onto two forms of adsorbents was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. Finally, the adsorption isotherm of experimental data we refitted for the Langmuir, and Freundlich equations

  18. Abdominal wall reconstruction in the prune belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, J; Cavett, C; Eng, G

    1981-12-01

    In our institution, 12 patients have been encountered with prune belly syndrome. Eight children have undergone evaluation of their abdominal musculature by electromyography. Results of their studies show that major functioning or recoverable muscle exists in the lateral and upper sector of the abdomen, but that little or no muscle exists in the lower central abdomen. Based in part on these findings, an operation has been devised which spares all potentially functioning musculature and corresponding motor nerves, and disposes of nonfunctioning and nonrecoverable muscle. In terms of cosmetic appearance and gross motor testing, these growing boys show significant improvement.

  19. REDUCING COMPETITION IN AGROFORESTRY BY PRUNING NATIVE TREES

    OpenAIRE

    Nicodemo,Maria Luiza Franceschi; Castiglioni, Paula Priscila; Pezzopane,José Ricardo Macedo; Tholon, Patrícia; Carpanezzi, Antônio Aparecido

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The degree to which pruning helps reestablish balance in agroforestry was assessed in a system established in São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil, in 2008. Seven native tree species were planted at a density of 600 trees/ha in five strips of three rows each, and annual crops were cultivated in the 17-m crop strips between the tree strips. Competition was established after 35 months, decreasing the aboveground biomass production of corn planted close to the trees. An assessment of black oat...

  20. The effects of blueberries on cognition and neuroplasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been demonstrated that consuming blueberries can prevent and even reverse the occurrence of neurochemical and behavioral changes associated with aging. Recent research suggests that consuming a high-fat diet (HFD) may result in behavioral deficits similar to those observed in aging animals. T...

  1. Pollen loads and specificity of native pollinators of lowbush blueberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisan-Deserres, J; Girard, M; Chagnon, M; Fournier, V

    2014-06-01

    The reproduction of lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton) is closely tied to insect pollination, owing to self-incompatibility. Many species are known to have greater pollination efficiency than the introduced Apis mellifera L., commonly used for commercial purposes. In this study, we measured the pollen loads of several antophilous insect species, mostly Apoidea and Syrphidae, present in four lowbush blueberry fields in Lac-St-Jean, Québec. To measure pollen loads and species specificity toward V. angustifolium, we net-collected 627 specimens of pollinators, retrieved their pollen loads, identified pollen taxa, and counted pollen grains. We found that the sizes of pollen loads were highly variable among species, ranging from a few hundred to more than 118,000 pollen grains per individual. Bombus and Andrena species in particular carried large amounts of Vaccinium pollen and thus may have greater pollination efficiency. Also, two species (Andrena bradleyi Viereck and Andrena carolina Viereck) showed nearly monolectic behavior toward lowbush blueberry. Finally, we identified alternative forage plants visited by native pollinators, notably species of Acer, Rubus, Ilex mucronata, Ledum groenlandicum, and Taraxacum. Protecting these flowering plants should be part of management practices to maintain healthy pollinator communities in a lowbush blueberry agroecosystem.

  2. Inferior Blueberries and Other Excuses I've Heard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Winkle, David

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author relates the blueberry story, as one of many excuses for barely advancing the status quo, and suggests a workable framework that is common to both education and business. Unfortunately, many business and education leaders seem intent on fixing specific issues and fail to acquire a systemic perspective. These isolated…

  3. Breeding blueberries for a changing global environment: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A. Lobos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, blueberries are recognized worldwide as one of the foremost health foods, becoming one of the crops with the highest productive and commercial projections. Over the last hundred years, the geographical area where highbush blueberries are grown has extended dramatically into hotter and drier environments. The expansion of highbush blueberry growing into warmer regions will be challenged in the future by increases in average global temperature and extreme fluctuations in temperature and rainfall patterns. Considerable genetic variability exists within the blueberry gene pool that breeders can use to meet these challenges, but traditional selection techniques can be slow and inefficient and the precise adaptations of genotypes often remain hidden. Marker assisted breeding (MAB and phenomics could aid greatly in identifying those individuals carrying adventitious traits, increasing selection efficiency and shortening the rate of cultivar release. While phenomics have begun to be used in the breeding of grain crops in the last 10 years, their use in fruit breeding programs it is almost non-existent.

  4. Detection of internally bruised blueberries using hyperspectral transmittance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    The consumption of the blueberries all over the world has been constantly increasing over the past three decades due to its health benefits. The internal bruising damage during harvesting and postharvest handling lower overall quality and cause significant economic losses. The main goal of this st...

  5. Breeding blueberries for a changing global environment: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos, Gustavo A.; Hancock, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Today, blueberries are recognized worldwide as one of the foremost health foods, becoming one of the crops with the highest productive and commercial projections. Over the last 100 years, the geographical area where highbush blueberries are grown has extended dramatically into hotter and drier environments. The expansion of highbush blueberry growing into warmer regions will be challenged in the future by increases in average global temperature and extreme fluctuations in temperature and rainfall patterns. Considerable genetic variability exists within the blueberry gene pool that breeders can use to meet these challenges, but traditional selection techniques can be slow and inefficient and the precise adaptations of genotypes often remain hidden. Marker assisted breeding (MAB) and phenomics could aid greatly in identifying those individuals carrying adventitious traits, increasing selection efficiency and shortening the rate of cultivar release. While phenomics have begun to be used in the breeding of grain crops in the last 10 years, their use in fruit breeding programs it is almost non-existent. PMID:26483803

  6. Fusarium branch blight on highbush blueberry in Argentina | Wright ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Argentina, highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) is grown in Tucumán, Entre Ríos and Buenos Aires provinces. In the 2010 to 2011 cropping season, a new disease with 10% incidence was observed on the foliage of “Emerald” plants in Concordia, Entre Rios. Symptoms included acropetal blight and premature ...

  7. Extraction, Separation, and Purification of Blueberry Anthocyanin Using Ethyl Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Gao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Blueberry contains many substances that are important to the human body and can prevent cardiovascular diseases, protect the retina, and soften blood vessels. Anthocyanin, which is extracted from blueberry, can activate the retina, strengthen vision, reduce serum cholesterol, triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein, and protect cell nucleus tissues from radical oxidation; hence, blueberry is of importance to scientists from different countries. In this study, anthocyanin was extracted and separated from blueberry using ethyl alcohol to investigate the effects of factors, such as ethyl alcohol volume ratio on anthocyanin extraction and separation technologies. The extracting solution was then purified using the macroreticular resin purification method to investigate the effects of ethyl alcohol concentration and eluent dosage on anthocyanin extraction during purification. The research results demonstrated that 60 % ethyl alcohol volume fraction, 1 : 10 mass ratio of solid to liquid, and 60 °C ultrasonic temperature were the best conditions for anthocyanin extraction. The best purification conditions were 95 % ethyl alcohol, which had been acidized by 0.3 % hydrochloric acid and 70 ml of eluent. This work provides a reference for the application of ethyl alcohol in anthocyanin extraction.

  8. Optimization of the alcoholic fermentation of blueberry juice by AS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-02-21

    Feb 21, 2012 ... juice by AS 2.316 Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast .... slant culture into 25 ml of the sterile YM liquid medium taken in 100 ... cerevisiae AS2.316. The impact of fermentation temperature, pH and inoculums size level on ethanol content and volatile acidity of blueberry wine fermented with S. cerevisiae ...

  9. Blueberry-enriched diet protects rat heart from ischemic damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: to assess the cardioprotective properties of a blueberry enriched diet (BD). Background: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a major role in ischemia-related myocardial injury. The attempts to use synthetic antioxidants to block the detrimental effects of ROS have produced mixed or negati...

  10. Anti-coccidial, anthelmintic and antioxidant activities of pomegranate (Punica granatum) peel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dkhil, Mohammed A

    2013-07-01

    Coccidiosis and helminthosis in poultry are responsible for worldwide economic losses. The methanolic extract of Punica granatum (pomegranate) peel was used in vivo for its pharmacological, antioxidant and anti-coccidial properties and in vitro for its anthelmintic activity. For the in vivo study, four groups of mice were investigated. The first group was inoculated only with sterile saline and served as the control group. The second group was treated by oral gavage with pomegranate extract (300 mg/kg) daily for 5 days. The third and fourth groups were infected with 10(3) sporulated oocysts of Eimeria papillata. The fourth group was also treated once daily with pomegranate peel extract for 5 days. For the in vitro study, the anthelmintic effect of pomegranate peel extract was observed on live adult Allolobophora caliginosa. Paraffin sections from jejunum as well as jejunal homogenate were prepared for the histopathological and biochemical investigations, respectively. The data showed that mice infected with E. papillata revealed an output of approximately 2.9 × 10(5) oocysts per gram faeces on day 5 p.i. This output is significantly decreased to 50 % in pomegranate-treated mice. Infection with E. papillata induced marked histopathological alterations in jejunum in the form of inflammation, vacuolation of the epithelium and destruction of some villi. In addition, pomegranate extract caused a great diminish in body weight loss of infected mice. Moreover, the number of goblet cells stained with Alcian blue within the infected villi was significantly increased by about 26 % after pomegranate treatment. In addition, Pomegranate significantly lowered the increased number of apoptotic cells due to E. papillata infection by about 36 %. The results showed that E. papillata enhanced hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide production with concomitant reduction in glutathione. Pomegranate induced marked improvements in all of the studied parameters as well as

  11. Influence of plant prunings on soil properties and yield of yam minisett

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of the application of agroforestry prunings on improvement of the soil organic matter cannot be overemphasized. The study focused on the influence of plant prunings on soil properties and yield of yam minisett. There is no doubt that effective production of seed yam through minisett technique requires ...

  12. Prune belly syndrome associated with bilateral multicystic dysplastic kidneys and urethral obstruction: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Akdag

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital disorder defined by a characteristic clinical triad: Abdominal muscle deficiency, severe urinary tract abnormalities, and bilateral cryptorchidism. We describe a preterm neonate of Prune Belly syndrome who had abdominal muscle deficiency, multicystic dysplastic kidney, urethral hypoplasia and pulmonary hypoplasia. We presented this rare case with the data gathered from the literatüre.

  13. Source-Sink Relations in Fruits VII. Effects of Pruning in Sour Cherry and Plum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toldam-Andersen, Torben Bo; Hansen, P.

    1993-01-01

    Sour cherries cv. 'Stevnsbær' and plums cv. 'Victoria' were heavily pruned in 1987. Fruit samples were collected during the growing season and concentrations of different quality components were determined. Pruning resulted in a small increase in fruit size, the effect being greater on the older...

  14. Response of smaller European elm bark beetles to pruning wounds on American elm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack H. Barger; William N. Cannon

    1987-01-01

    From 1982 to 1984, inflight smaller European elm bark beetles, Scolytus multistriatus, were captured on American elms, Ulmus americana, that were therapeutically pruned for Dutch elm disease control. Pruning wounds were treated with wound dressing or left untreated to determine effects of the treatments on beetle attraction....

  15. EVALUATION OF THE CUTTING FORCE ON VINE BRANCHES IN WINTER PRUNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Pezzi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical pruning, usually integrated with manual finishing, still excites some doubts regarding the quality of the cut which appears not to be the best as precision and cleanliness. This aspect, probably conditioned by the model and the application of pruning machines, might also be affected by the characteristics of the vine branches in particular by their cutting force. In order to evaluate the cutting force on different vine type, laboratory and field trails were carried out. The experiments were set in order to evaluate this parameter during winter pruning in relation to three variables: vine type; branch size; pruning time. The results show how the cutting resistance of vine branches during vegetative rest depends on vine variety (Trebbiano 675 N Cabernet 1175 N, on the diameter of the canes (increase of force from 56 % to 86 % between the classes of diameter and on the pruning date (26% decrease of the cutting force in the latest period for Trebbiano and Sangiovese, and 32 % for Cabernet Sauvignon. Such variations, which can be considerable, affect directly the pruning results. High values of cutting force can generate tiring of operator in manual pruning or cutting damages on the vegetation during mechanical pruning.

  16. An Integrated Pruning Criterion for Ensemble Learning Based on Classification Accuracy and Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Bin; Wang, Zhihai; Pan, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Ensemble pruning is an important issue in the field of ensemble learning. Diversity is a key criterion to determine how the pruning process has been done and measure what result has been derived. However, there is few formal definitions of diversity yet. Hence, three important factors that should......-climbing search, compared with other definitions of diversity and other criteria....

  17. Lipid composition of seed oils of different pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) cultivars from Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Luana Fernandes; Pereira, José A.; Isabel Lopéz-Cortés; Salazar, Domingo M.; Elsa Ramalhosa; Susana Casal

    2015-01-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is an ancient fruit tree traditionally cultivated in the Near and Middle East. Presently, its most important growing regions include Afghanistan, Iran, Israel, USA, Italy and Spain, the latter country the largest European exporter. The pomegranate fruit can be divided into several anatomical compartments: outside peel, inside peel, and arils (pulp and seeds), the last part being usually used for consumption as is or for juice, jams and jellies production. Even...

  18. Characterisation of Pomegranate-Husk Polyphenols and Semi-Preparative Fractionation of Punicalagin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Zárate, Pedro; Wong-Paz, Jorge E; Michel, Mariela; Buenrostro-Figueroa, Juan; Díaz, Hugo R; Ascacio, Juan A; Contreras-Esquivel, Juan C; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo; Aguilar, Cristóbal N

    2017-09-01

    Pomegranate-husk is the main by-product generated from the pomegranate industry. It is a potential source of compounds highly appreciated by different costumers. Punicalagin is the main compound present in pomegranate-husk. To characterise the pomegranate-husk total polyphenols by HPLC-ESI-MS and to establish a method for the recovery of punicalagin using a medium pressure liquid chromatography (MPLC) system. The characterisation of total pomegranate-husk polyphenols was carried out using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Thus, 200 mg of pomegranate-husk polyphenols were fractionated by MPLC. The isolated punicalagin was characterised by HPLC-MS and was tested as standard reagent for the measurement of its scavenging capacity reducing DPPH and ABTS radicals. Twenty peaks were identified by analytical HPLC-MS analysis from the pomegranate-husk polyphenols. The main compounds were the punicalagin anomers, punicalin and ellagic acid. The MPLC method allowed three fractions to be obtained. In fraction three 39.40 ± 8.06 mg of punicalagin anomers (purity > 97.9%) were recovered. The scavenging capacity of punicalagin showed an IC 50 of 109.53 and 151.50 μg/mL for DPPH and ABTS radicals, respectively. The MPLC system was an excellent tool for the separation of the main ellagitannins from pomegranate husk and for the isolation of punicalagin anomers. Fraction three was rich in high purity punicalagin anomers. The IC 50 was obtained for DPPH and ABTS radicals. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Punicalagin, an active component in pomegranate, ameliorates cardiac mitochondrial impairment in obese rats via AMPK activation

    OpenAIRE

    Ke Cao; Jie Xu; Wenjun Pu; Zhizhong Dong; Lei Sun; Weijin Zang; Feng Gao; Yong Zhang; Zhihui Feng; Jiankang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increasing prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome. It is of paramount importance to reduce obesity-associated cardiac dysfunction and impaired energy metabolism. In this study, the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway by punicalagin (PU), a major ellagitannin in pomegranate was investigated in the heart of a rat obesity model. In male SD rats, eight-week administration of 150 mg/kg pomegranate extract (PE) containing...

  20. Pomegranate extract protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and preserves brain DNA integrity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Maha A E; El Morsy, Engy M; Ahmed, Amany A E

    2014-08-21

    Interruption to blood flow causes ischemia and infarction of brain tissues with consequent neuronal damage and brain dysfunction. Pomegranate extract is well tolerated, and safely consumed all over the world. Interestingly, pomegranate extract has shown remarkable antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in experimental models. Many investigators consider natural extracts as novel therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the protective effects of standardized pomegranate extract against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion-induced brain injury in rats. Adult male albino rats were randomly divided into sham-operated control group, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) group, and two other groups that received standardized pomegranate extract at two dose levels (250, 500 mg/kg) for 15 days prior to ischemia/reperfusion (PMG250+I/R, and PMG500+I/R groups). After I/R or sham operation, all rats were sacrificed and brains were harvested for subsequent biochemical analysis. Results showed reduction in brain contents of MDA (malondialdehyde), and NO (nitric oxide), in addition to enhancement of SOD (superoxide dismutase), GPX (glutathione peroxidase), and GRD (glutathione reductase) activities in rats treated with pomegranate extract prior to cerebral I/R. Moreover, pomegranate extract decreased brain levels of NF-κB p65 (nuclear factor kappa B p65), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-alpha), caspase-3 and increased brain levels of IL-10 (interleukin-10), and cerebral ATP (adenosine triphosphate) production. Comet assay showed less brain DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) damage in rats protected with pomegranate extract. The present study showed, for the first time, that pre-administration of pomegranate extract to rats, can offer a significant dose-dependent neuroprotective activity against cerebral I/R brain injury and DNA damage via antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and ATP-replenishing effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc

  1. Pomegranate juice does not affect the disposition of simvastatin in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Yeo, Chang-Woo; Shim, Eon-Jeong; Kim, Hyunmi; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Shin, Jae-Gook; Shon, Ji-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Previous in vitro and in vivo investigations reported controversial results for the inhibitory potential of pomegranate on Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A activity. This study evaluated the effect of pomegranate juice on the disposition of simvastatin, a CYP3A4 substrate, and simvastatin acid, its active metabolite, compared with grapefruit juice in healthy subjects. A single oral pharmacokinetic study of 40 mg simvastatin was conducted as a three-way crossover (control, pomegranate, and grapefruit juices) in 12 healthy male subjects. The subjects took pomegranate or grapefruit juice three times per day for 3 days (900 mL/day) and on the third day, the pharmacokinetic study was executed. Blood samples were collected to 24 h post-dose and the pharmacokinetic parameters of simvastatin and simvastatin acid were compared among the study periods. In the period of grapefruit juice, the mean C max and AUCinf of simvastatin [the geometric mean ratio (90 % CI) 15.6 (11.6-21.0) and 9.1 (6.0-13.7)] were increased significantly when compared with the control period, whereas they were not significantly different in the period of pomegranate juice [C max and AUCinf 1.20 (0.89-1.62) and 1.29 (0.85-1.94)]. The mean C max and AUCinf of simvastatin acid were increased significantly after intake of grapefruit juice, but not pomegranate juice. These results suggest that pomegranate juice affects little on the disposition of simvastatin in humans. Pomegranate juice does not seem to have a clinically relevant inhibitory potential on CYP3A4 activity.

  2. Evaluation of soil carbon pools after the addition of prunings in subtropical orchards placed in terraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez San Emeterio, Layla; Martín Reyes, Marino Pedro; Ortiz Bernad, Irene; Fernández Ondoño, Emilia; Sierra Aragón, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    The amount of carbon that can be stored in a soil depends on many factors, such as the type of soil, the chemical composition of plant rests and the climate, and is also highly affected by land use and soil management. Agricultural ecosystems are proved to absorb a large amount of CO2 from the atmosphere through several sustainable management practices. In addition, organic materials such as leaves, grass, prunings, etc., comprise a significant type of agricultural practices as a result of waste recycling. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of the addition of different organic prunings on the potential for carbon sequestration in agricultural soils placed in terraces. Three subtropical orchards were sampled in Almuñécar (Granada, S Spain): mango (Mangifera indica L.), avocado (Persea americana Mill.) and cherimoya (Annonacherimola Mill.). The predominant climate is Subtropical Mediterranean and the soil is an Eutric Anthrosol. The experimental design consisted in the application of prunings from avocado, cherimoya and mango trees, placed on the surface soil underneath their correspondent trees, as well as garden prunings from the green areas surrounding the town center on the surface soils under the three orchard trees. Control experiences without the addition of prunings were also evaluated. These experiences were followed for three years. Soil samples were taken at4 cm depth. They were dried for 3-4 days and then sieved (avocado prunings and their control soil, and between soils under garden prunings with cherimoya and their control soil. Regarding the water-soluble soil organic carbon, low differences were shown. Differences in mineral-associated and non-oxidable organic carbon fractions were also statistically significant between soils under avocado prunings and their control soil, and between soils under garden prunings with cherimoya and their control soil. No significant differences in any organic carbon pool were founded for the soils

  3. Evaluation of pomegranate (Punica granatum pericarp aqueous extract on Eimeria spp. from Japanese quails (Coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno P. Berto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and antiparasitic properties have been associated with the extract of pomegranate (Punica granatum in several animals and conditions. The Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica, originated from North Africa, Europe and Asia, is used worldwide as an experimental animal and model for aviculture. The current study investigated the effects of the pomegranate pericarp aqueous extract on the shedding, viability and morphometry of three Eimeria spp. from Japanese quails, besides the weight gain and genotoxic activity. Although the pomegranate is recognized by multiple properties, including anti-coccidial, in the current study the results are contrary. The treated group shed greater amount of oocysts; the sporulation times and viability were similar in both groups; despite some morphometric differences, these were not expressive; weight gains were similar; and the pomegranate had insignificant effect genotoxic. Finally, these results suggest that the pomegranate pericarp extract did not influence on Eimeira spp. from Japanese quails; therefore, the pomegranate pericarp extract is not suggested in the prevention/treatment of coccidiosis in Japanese quails, or at least not using methods of preparation and administration applied in this study.

  4. Antioxidant activity of pomegranate juice and its relationship with phenolic composition and processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, M I; Tomás-Barberán, F A; Hess-Pierce, B; Holcroft, D M; Kader, A A

    2000-10-01

    The antioxidant activity of pomegranate juices was evaluated by four different methods (ABTS, DPPH, DMPD, and FRAP) and compared to those of red wine and a green tea infusion. Commercial pomegranate juices showed an antioxidant activity (18-20 TEAC) three times higher than those of red wine and green tea (6-8 TEAC). The activity was higher in commercial juices extracted from whole pomegranates than in experimental juices obtained from the arils only (12-14 TEAC). HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS analyses of the juices revealed that commercial juices contained the pomegranate tannin punicalagin (1500-1900 mg/L) while only traces of this compound were detected in the experimental juice obtained from arils in the laboratory. This shows that pomegranate industrial processing extracts some of the hydrolyzable tannins present in the fruit rind. This could account for the higher antioxidant activity of commercial juices compared to the experimental ones. In addition, anthocyanins, ellagic acid derivatives, and hydrolyzable tannins were detected and quantified in the pomegranate juices.

  5. Antimicrobial effect of sour pomegranate sauce on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kışla, Duygu; Karabıyıklı, Şeniz

    2013-05-01

    Pomegranate sauce is one of the most popular pomegranate products produced in Turkey. This study was conducted to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of both traditional and commercial sour pomegranate sauce samples on Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895). The initial microflora of the pomegranate sauce samples was determined by performing the enumerations of total aerobic mesophilic bacteria, yeast and mold, S. aureus, E. coli, and the determination of Salmonella spp. MIC tests were applied to the neutralized and the original (unneutralized) sour pomegranate sauce samples in order to put forth the inhibition effect depending on low pH value. It was found that inhibitory effect of the traditional and the commercial samples, except one sample, on pathogens was not only due to the acidity of the products. The results of MIC tests indicated that although both traditional and commercial samples showed a considerable inhibitory effect on test microorganisms, the traditional pomegranate sauce samples were more effective than the commercial ones. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. [Mass Transfer Kinetics Model of Ultrasonic Extraction of Pomegranate Peel Polyphenols].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhan-yi; Zhang, Li-hua; Wang, Yu-hai; Zhang, Yuan-hu; Ma, Li; Zheng, Dan-dan

    2015-05-01

    The dynamic mathematical model of ultrasonic extraction of polyphenols from pomegranate peel was constructed with the Fick's second law as the theoretical basis. The spherical model was selected, with mass concentrations of pomegranate peel polyphenols as the index, 50% ethanol as the extraction solvent and ultrasonic extraction as the extraction method. In different test conditions including the liquid ratio, extraction temperature and extraction time, a series of kinetic parameters were solved, such as the extraction process (k), relative raffinate rate, surface diffusion coefficient(D(S)), half life (t½) and the apparent activation energy (E(a)). With the extraction temperature increasing, k and D(S) were gradually increased with t½ decreasing,which indicated that the elevated temperature was favorable to the extraction of pomegranate peel polyphenols. The exponential equation of relative raffinate rate showed that the established numerical dynamics model fitted the extraction of pomegranate peel polyphenols, and the relationship between the reaction conditions and pomegranate peel polyphenols concentration was well reflected by the model. Based on the experimental results, a feasible and reliable kinetic model for ultrasonic extraction of polyphenols from pomegranate peel is established, which can be used for the optimization control of engineering magnifying production.

  7. Herbivore-induced blueberry volatiles and intra-plant signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar R

    2011-12-18

    Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) are commonly emitted from plants after herbivore attack. These HIPVs are mainly regulated by the defensive plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) and its volatile derivative methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Over the past 3 decades researchers have documented that HIPVs can repel or attract herbivores, attract the natural enemies of herbivores, and in some cases they can induce or prime plant defenses prior to herbivore attack. In a recent paper, I reported that feeding by gypsy moth caterpillars, exogenous MeJA application, and mechanical damage induce the emissions of volatiles from blueberry plants, albeit differently. In addition, blueberry branches respond to HIPVs emitted from neighboring branches of the same plant by increasing the levels of JA and resistance to herbivores (i.e., direct plant defenses), and by priming volatile emissions (i.e., indirect plant defenses). Similar findings have been reported recently for sagebrush, poplar, and lima beans. Here, I describe a push-pull method for collecting blueberry volatiles induced by herbivore (gypsy moth) feeding, exogenous MeJA application, and mechanical damage. The volatile collection unit consists of a 4 L volatile collection chamber, a 2-piece guillotine, an air delivery system that purifies incoming air, and a vacuum system connected to a trap filled with Super-Q adsorbent to collect volatiles. Volatiles collected in Super-Q traps are eluted with dichloromethane and then separated and quantified using Gas Chromatography (GC). This volatile collection method was used in my study to investigate the volatile response of undamaged branches to exposure to volatiles from herbivore-damaged branches within blueberry plants. These methods are described here. Briefly, undamaged blueberry branches are exposed to HIPVs from neighboring branches within the same plant. Using the same techniques described above, volatiles emitted from branches after exposure to HIPVs are collected and

  8. Phenotype profiling and multivariate statistical analysis of Spur-pruning type Grapevine in National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR, Davis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most Korean vineyards employed spur-pruning type modified-T trellis system. This produce system is suitable to spur-pruning type cultivars. But most European table grape is not adaptable to this produce system because their fruitfulness is sufficient to cane-pruning type system. Total 20 of fruit ch...

  9. Síndrome de prune belly: presentación de caso Prune belly syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Toledo Lamela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de prune belly es una rara enfermedad congénita de causa desconocida. Se presenta el caso de un recién nacido a término, del sexo masculino y de un día de nacido, que fue remitido al servicio de urología pediátrica por presentar ausencia de los músculos de la pared anterior del abdomen (rectos anteriores, criptorquidia bilateral y gran globo vesical. A partir de los hallazgos del examen físico se planteó el diagnóstico de síndrome de prune belly. Se encontraron anomalías asociadas como escoliosis y agenesia del pie derecho. En el estudio radiológico del tracto urinario se confirmaron malformaciones congénitas como valva de uretra posterior y megavejiga con uretero-hidronefrosis bilateral. Los análisis de laboratorio confirmaron la afectación de la función renal y una infección urinaria asociada. Se practicó una cistostomía a cielo abierto. El paciente falleció a los 10 días a causa de las complicaciones de la insuficiencia renalThe prune belly syndrome is a congenital rare disease of unknown origin. The case of a one-day-old full- term male newborn infant that was referred to the pediatric urology service for presenting absence of the muscles of the anterior abdomen wall (anterior rectus muscle, bilateral cryptochordism and big vesical globe, was presented. Starting from the findings of the physical examination, the prune belly syndrome was diagnosed. Associated abnormalities such as scoliosis and agenesis of the right leg were found. In the radiological study of the urinary tract, congenital malformations as posterior urethra valve and megabladder with bilateral ureterohydronephrosis were confirmed. The lab tests corroborated the affectation of the renal function and an associated urinary infection. The patient died at 10 days as a result of the complications of renal failure

  10. Oviposition efficacy of Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) on different cultivars of blueberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Hirotoshi; Kunimi, Yasuhisa; Ban, Takuya; Nakai, Madoka

    2013-08-01

    Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) is an important pest of thin-skinned fruits including blueberry, raspberry, strawberry, and cherry. Blueberry was introduced into Japan in the 1950s, and severe economic losses attributable to D. suzukii were first reported in 2002. The objective of this study was to elucidate whether oviposition behavior varies among blueberry cultivars having different firmness of fruit. Fruit firmness in 12 cultivars of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) and rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium virgatum Aiton) was determined using a rheometer. More eggs tended to be laid in berries of cultivars possessing softer fruits than in those having firmer fruits. Choice tests, where one female was allowed to oviposit on blueberry fruits with different firmness, showed that softer fruits were more vulnerable to D. suzukii females than firmer fruits.

  11. Comparison of phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and cellular antioxidant activities of different varieties of blueberry (Vaccinium spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huailing; Guo, Xinbo; Hu, Xiaodan; Li, Tong; Fu, Xiong; Liu, Rui Hai

    2017-02-15

    Numerous reports have demonstrated that the consumption of fruits and vegetables is beneficial for the human health. Blueberries, in particular, are rich in phytochemicals including free and bound forming. Phytochemical profiles of 14 varieties of blueberry were compared in this study. 12 compounds were analyzed and had significant changes in blueberry fruits. Total antioxidant activities in different blueberry varieties varied about 2.6times by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay, and 2times by peroxyl radical scavenging capacity (PSC) assay. The cellular antioxidant activities (CAA) in different varieties varied about 3.9times without phosphate buffer saline (PBS) wash, and 4.7times with PBS wash by CAA assay. Blueberry extracts had potent antiproliferative activities against HepG2 human liver cancer cells, indicating the potential protective benefits associated with their use as functional foods. The anti-proliferative activity was observed to be dose-dependent in blueberry extracts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Xylella fastidiosa in rabbiteye blueberry in Louisiana is genetically similar to a strain found in Southern highbush blueberry in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the past ten years, Xylella fastidiosa has been confirmed as a pathogen of Southern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum interspecific hybrids) in Georgia and Florida. Recent work in Louisiana has shown that it is also associated with reduced yield and altered fruit quality in ‘Tifblue’ ...

  13. Pruning method for a cluster-based neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Kenneth I.; Khatri, Hiralal; Nguyen, Lam H.; Sichina, Jeffrey

    2000-08-01

    Many radar automatic target detection (ATD) algorithms operate on a set of data statistics or features rather than on the raw radar sensor data. These features are selected based on their ability to separate target data samples from background clutter samples. The ATD algorithms often operate on the features through a set of parameters that must be determined from a set of training data that are statistically similar to the data set to be encountered in practice. The designer usually attempts to minimize the number of features used by the algorithm -- a process commonly referred to as pruning. This not only reduces the computational demands of the algorithm, but it also prevents overspecialization to the samples from the training data set. Thus, the algorithm will perform better on a set of test data samples it has not encountered during training. The Optimal Brain Surgeon (OBS) and Divergence Method provide two different approaches to pruning. We apply the two methods to a set of radar data features to determine a new, reduced set of features. We then evaluate the resulting feature sets and discuss the differences between the two methods.

  14. A Pruning Neural Network Model in Credit Classification Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajiao Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, credit classification models are widely applied because they can help financial decision-makers to handle credit classification issues. Among them, artificial neural networks (ANNs have been widely accepted as the convincing methods in the credit industry. In this paper, we propose a pruning neural network (PNN and apply it to solve credit classification problem by adopting the well-known Australian and Japanese credit datasets. The model is inspired by synaptic nonlinearity of a dendritic tree in a biological neural model. And it is trained by an error back-propagation algorithm. The model is capable of realizing a neuronal pruning function by removing the superfluous synapses and useless dendrites and forms a tidy dendritic morphology at the end of learning. Furthermore, we utilize logic circuits (LCs to simulate the dendritic structures successfully which makes PNN be implemented on the hardware effectively. The statistical results of our experiments have verified that PNN obtains superior performance in comparison with other classical algorithms in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency.

  15. Effects of pomegranate and pomegranate-apple blend juices on the growth characteristics of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris DSM 3922 type strain vegetative cells and spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molva, Celenk; Baysal, Ayse Handan

    2015-05-04

    The present study examined the growth characteristics of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris DSM 3922 vegetative cells and spores after inoculation into apple, pomegranate and pomegranate-apple blend juices (10, 20, 40 and 80%, v/v). Also, the effect of sporulation medium was tested using mineral [Bacillus acidoterrestris agar (BATA) and Bacillus acidocaldarius agar (BAA)] and non-mineral containing media [potato dextrose agar (PDA) and malt extract agar (MEA)]. The juice samples were inoculated separately with approximately 10(5)CFU/mL cells or spores from different sporulation media and then incubated at 37°C for 336 h. The number of cells decreased significantly with increasing pomegranate juice concentration in the blend juices and storage time (ppomegranate juices, respectively while the cell counts attained approximately 7.17 log CFU/mL in apple juice after 336 h. On the other hand, the cell growth was inhibited for a certain time, and then the numbers started to increase after 72 and 144 h in 10% and 20% blend juices, respectively. After 336 h, total population among spores produced on PDA, BATA, BAA and MEA indicated 1.49, 1.65, 1.67, and 1.28 log reductions in pomegranate juice; and 1.51, 1.38, 1.40 and 1.16 log reductions in 80% blend juice, respectively. The inhibitory effects of 10%, 20% and 40% blend juices varied depending on the sporulation media used. The results obtained in this study suggested that pomegranate and pomegranate-apple blend juices could inhibit the growth of A. acidoterrestris DSM 3922 vegetative cells and spores. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Storage stability of sterilized liquid extracts from pomegranate peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wenjuan; Breksa Iii, Andrew P; Pan, Zhongli; Ma, Haile; McHugh, Tara H

    2012-07-01

    Pomegranate marc, a byproduct of commercial juice production, has shown promise as a starting material for the recovery of health promoting phenolic compounds. The stability of aqueous extracts prepared from pomegranate marc was evaluated in preparation to directly using these extracts as nutraceuticals or food additives. The liquid extracts were produced under extraction conditions of 25 °C, water to peel ratio of 50 : 1 (w/w) for 2 min, and then sterilized at 121 °C for 10 s. Storage conditions tested included 3 different pH values (3.5, 5.0, and 7.0) and 2 packaging methods (no light and exposure to light). The extracts were evaluated for industrial (pH, total soluble solid content, and clarity), color, spectral, and antioxidant characteristics over a period of 180 d. The results showed that both pH value and packaging method significantly influenced the industrial and color characteristics of the extracts. The high pH had a negative effect on spectral and antioxidant characteristics. Therefore, the recommended storage conditions are low pH and with dark packaging to maintain the high storage stability. After 180 d of storage, extracts stored at low pH (3.5) in dark packaging still retained 67% and 58% of their total soluble phenolic concentration and antioxidant activity, compared with 61% and 43% for high pH (7.0) samples, and were composed of high concentrations of punicalagins A and B, gallic, and ellagic acids. The present research developed an effective recovery of phenolic compounds from pomegranate marc to be used as nutraceuticals or food additives. The aqueous extract product has good quality characteristics with high industrial and color stability, and total phenolic content and antioxidant activity, when stored at pH 3.5 in dark packaging for up to 180 d. The evaluation results of storage stability reported here are important for commercialization. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Quality factors, antioxidant activity, and sensory properties of jet-tube dried rabbiteye blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallas, Laura A; Pegg, Ronald B; Kerr, William L

    2013-06-01

    Rabbiteye blueberries are an excellent source of nutrients and phytochemicals. They are often dried, which can degrade health-promoting compounds. Means of shortening exposure to high-temperature drying air are desirable. Five cultivars of rabbiteye blueberries ('Premier', 'Tifblue', 'Brightwell', 'Alapaha', and 'Powderblue') were dried in a jet-tube fluidized bed air dryer with varying pretreatments including mechanical abrasion and osmotic dehydration. Drying time ranged from 66 to 95 min at 107 °C, achieving a final water activity of 0.347-0.605. Prior osmotic dehydration significantly reduced the drying time. Vacuum osmotic dehydration for 70 min achieved similar moisture contents to soaking blueberries for 24 h. Jet-tube dried blueberries exhibited greater color saturation than commercially available blueberries. While drying reduced the total monomeric anthocyanin (TMA) content, this occurred to a lesser extent than by other processing methods. The total phenolics content (TPC) and antioxidant capacity (H-ORACFL values) increased after drying. 'Premier' was the most preferred vacuum-infused dried blueberry, with a water activity (aw) of 0.53 and 157 g H2O kg(-1). 'Tifblue' was most preferred amongst the overnight-infused and also unsweetened dried blueberries. Jet-tube drying can substantially reduce drying times while yielding blueberries with good color, sensory properties, TMA, TPC, and H-ORACFL values. Furthermore, some cultivars produce better-quality dried blueberries than others. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Field type, trap type and field-edge characteristics affect Rhagoletis mendax captures in lowbush blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkema, Justin M; Cutler, G Christopher; Gaul, Sonia O

    2014-11-01

    Blueberry maggot, Rhagoletis mendax Curran (Diptera: Tephritidae), is the most important pest of blueberries in eastern North America. Insecticide use in fruit-bearing lowbush blueberry fields could be reduced with management strategies focused on vegetative fields. Fly distribution and fruit infestation levels were assessed where fruit-bearing and vegetative fields adjoin and along forested edges of vegetative fields. Along adjoining edges, immature female flies were captured in fruiting fields and mature females in vegetative fields throughout the season. Male fly captures and fruit infestation levels were greater at 5 m than at 30 m from the edge. Along forested edges, fly captures were best predicted by densities of ripe lowbush blueberries and large coniferous trees. Maggot infestation level in lowbush blueberries was best predicted by blueberry density and small deciduous trees. Bunchberry, Cornus canadensis L., was the only non-crop host in which blueberry maggot was found. We have shown that relatively high numbers of flies occur in vegetative fields and at edges of fruiting fields. Ripe blueberries and certain vegetation in forested edges affect fly distribution and probably maintain populations. These results may help to predict where controls for blueberry maggot should be targeted and suggest that management strategies focused on vegetative fields and field edges may be worthwhile. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Effect of operating conditions in freeze-drying on the nutritional properties of blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Alejandro; Evseev, Agnes; Mahn, Andrea; Bubnovich, Valeri; Bustos, Rubén; Scheuermann, Erick

    2011-05-01

    The effect of particle size, use of infrared radiation, and type of freeze-drying (vacuum or atmospheric) on some nutritional properties of blueberries was investigated. Ascorbic acid was decreased in freeze-dried blueberries compared with fresh fruit, while polyphenols were decreased in atmospheric freeze-drying-unlike in vacuum freeze-drying, where this nutritional property was increased. Antioxidant activity of freeze-dried blueberries did not differ significantly from that found in fresh fruits. In order to minimize the impairment of the nutritional properties of freeze-dried blueberries, it is suggested to use infrared radiation, a relatively small particle size and vacuum freeze-drying.

  20. First steps in translating human cognitive processes of cane pruning grapevines into AI rules for automated robotic pruning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saxton Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cane pruning of grapevines is a skilled task for which, internationally, there is a dire shortage of human pruners. As part of a larger project developing an automated robotic pruner, we have used artificial intelligence (AI algorithms to create an expert system for selecting new canes and cutting off unwanted canes. A domain and ontology has been created for AI, which reflects the expertise of expert human pruners. The first step in the creation of an expert system was to generate virtual vines, which were then ‘pruned’ by human pruners and also by the expert system in its infancy. Here we examined the decisions of 12 human pruners, for consistency of decision, on 60 virtual vines. 96.7% of the 12 pruners agreed on at least one cane choice after which there was diminishing agreement on which further canes to select for laying. Our results indicate that techniques developed in computational intelligence can be used to co-ordinate and synthesise the expertise of human pruners into a best practice format. This paper describes first steps in this knowledge elicitation process, and discusses the fit between cane pruning expertise and the expertise that can be elicited using AI based expert system techniques.

  1. LC-MS/MS and UPLC-UV evaluation of anthocyanins and anthocyanidins during rabbiteye blueberry juice processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueberry juice processing includes multiple steps and each affect the chemical composition of the berries, including thermal degradation of anthocyanins. Not from concentrate juice was made by heating and enzyme processing blueberries before pressing followed by ultrafiltration and pasteurization. ...

  2. Pomegranate juice enhances healthy lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavathy eVenkatasubramanian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Exploring innovative ways to ensure healthy ageing of populations is a pre-requisite to contain rising healthcare costs. Scientific research into the principles and practices of traditional medicines can provide new insights and simple solutions to lead a healthy life. Rasayana is a dedicated branch of Ayurveda (an Indian medicine that deals with methods to increase vitality and delay aging through the use of diet, herbal supplements and other lifestyle practices. The life-span and health-span enhancing actions of the fruits of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L., a well-known Rasayana, were tested on Drosophila melanogaster (fruitfly model. Supplementation of standard corn meal with 10% (v/v pomegranate juice (PJ extended the life-span of male and female flies by 18% and 8% respectively. When male and female flies were mixed and reared together, there was 19% increase in the longevity of PJ fed flies, as assessed by MSD, the median survival day (24.8. MSD for control and resveratrol (RV groups was at 20.8 and 23.1 days respectively. A two-fold enhancement in fecundity, improved resistance to oxidative stress (H2O2 and paraquat induced and to Candida albicans infection were observed in PJ fed flies. Further, the flies in the PJ fed group were physically active over an extended period of time, as assessed by the climbing assay. PJ thus outperformed both control and RV groups in the life-span and health-span parameters tested. This study provides the scope to explore the potential of PJ as a nutraceutical to improve health span and lifespan in humans.

  3. Determining quality and maturity of pomegranates using multispectral imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Khodabakhshian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigated the use of multispectral imaging technique to quantify pomegranate fruit quality. Three quality factors including total soluble solids (TSS, pH and firmness were studied at four different maturity stages of 88, 109, 124 and 143 days after full bloom (DAFB and were correlated with the spectral information extracted from images taken at four wavelength spectra. TSS, pH and firmness of the same samples were recorded using nondestructive methods and then modeled with their corresponding spectral data using partial least squire regression (PLSR. The correlation coefficient (r, RMSEC and RPD for the calibration models was found to be: r = 0.97, RMSEC = 0.21 °Brix and RPD = 6.7 °Brix for TSS; r = 0.93, RMSEC = 0.035 and RPD = 5.01 for pH; r = 0.95, RMSEC = 0.65 N and RPD = 5.65 N for firmness. Also these parameters for the validation models were as follows: r = 0.97, RMSEP = 0.22 °Brix and RPD = 5.77 °Brix for TSS; r = 0.94, RMSEP = 0.038 and RPD = 4.98 for pH; r = 0.94, RMSEP = 0.68 N and RPD = 5.33 N for firmness. The results demonstrated the capability of multispectral imaging and chemometrics as useful techniques to nondestructively monitoring pomegranate main quality attributes.

  4. Effects of pruning in Monterey pine plantations affected by Fusarium circinatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezos, D.; Lomba, J. M.; Martinez-Alvarez, P.; Fernandez, M.; Diez, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    Fusarium circinatum Nirenberg and O'Donnell (1998) is the causal agent of Pitch Canker Disease (PCD) in Pinus species, producing damage to the main trunk and lateral branches as well as causing branch dieback. The disease has been detected recently in northern Spain in Pinus spp. seedlings at nurseries and in Pinus radiata D. Don adult trees in plantations. Fusarium circinatum seems to require a wound to enter the tree, not only that as caused by insects but also that resulting from damage by humans, i.e. mechanical wounds. However, the effects of pruning on the infection process have yet to be studied. The aim of the present study was to know how the presence of mechanical damage caused by pruning affects PCD occurrence and severity in P. radiata plantations. Fifty P. radiata plots (pruned and unpruned) distributed throughout 16 sites affected by F. circinatum in the Cantabria region (northern Spain) were studied. Symptoms of PCD presence, such as dieback, oozing cankers and trunk deformation were evaluated in 25 trees per plot and related to pruning effect. A significant relationship between pruning and the number of cankers per tree was observed, concluding that wounds caused by pruning increase the chance of pathogen infection. Other trunk symptoms, such as the presence of resin outside the cankers, were also higher in pruned plots. These results should be taken into account for future management of Monterey Pine plantations. (Author) 36 refs.

  5. Engulfing action of glial cells is required for programmed axon pruning during Drosophila metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasaki, Takeshi; Ito, Kei

    2004-04-20

    Axon pruning is involved in establishment and maintenance of functional neural circuits. During metamorphosis of Drosophila, selective pruning of larval axons is developmentally regulated by ecdysone and caused by local axon degeneration. Previous studies have revealed intrinsic molecular and cellular mechanisms that trigger this pruning process, but how pruning is accomplished remains essentially unknown. Detailed analysis of morphological changes in the axon branches of Drosophila mushroom body (MB) neurons revealed that during early pupal stages, clusters of neighboring varicosities, each of which belongs to different axons, disappear simultaneously shortly before the onset of local axon degeneration. At this stage, bundles of axon branches are infiltrated by the processes of surrounding glia. These processes engulf clusters of varicosities and accumulate intracellular degradative compartments. Selective inhibition of cellular functions, including endocytosis, in glial cells via the temperature-sensitive allele of shibire both suppresses glial infiltration and varicosity elimination and induces a severe delay in axon pruning. Selective inhibition of ecdysone receptors in the MB neurons severely suppressed not only axon pruning but also the infiltration and engulfing action of the surrounding glia. These findings strongly suggest that glial cells are extrinsically activated by ecdysone-stimulated MB neurons. These glial cells infiltrate the mass of axon branches to eliminate varicosities and break down axon branches actively rather than just scavenging already-degraded debris. We therefore propose that neuron-glia interaction is essential for the precisely coordinated axon-pruning process during Drosophila metamorphosis.

  6. Rootstock on vine performance and wine quality of ‘Syrah’ under double pruning management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Alcântara Novelli Dias

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the Brazilian Southeast, the production of high quality wines is attained by a new management approach called double pruning. This management changes the harvesting of wine grape (Vitis vinifera L. from wet summer to dry winter through a two pruning procedures carried out during the year. The first pruning is done during the winter to induce a vegetative cycle (all clusters are removed and a second pruning is done during the summer to induce the reproductive cycle. In this study, ten different rootstocks were compared in order to optimize yield and wine quality of Syrah vines conducted under autumn-winter season by double pruning approach. Syrah grapevines grafted onto ‘Rupestris du Lot’ and ‘IAC 766’ showed the highest pruning weight, while ‘110 Richter’ and ‘161-49 Courdec’ induced the lowest cane vigor. The average production of two seasons identified ‘IAC 766’, ‘Kober 5BB’ and ‘Rupestris du Lot’ as the most productive rootstocks. In both seasons, the grape quality was more influenced by the plant development status than by rootstocks. ‘Syrah’ wine from vigorous and high yielding rootstocks, ‘IAC 766’ and ‘Rupestris du Lot’, showed satisfactory wine phenolic composition and alcohol/acidity balance. This study showed that vigorous rootstock increased yield without compromising grape and winter wine quality of Syrah grapevines subjected to double pruning management in the Brazilian Southeast.

  7. Effect of root pruning and irrigation regimes on leaf water relations and xylem ABA and ionic concentrations in pear trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yufei; Bertelsen, Marianne G.; Petersen, Karen Koefoed

    2014-01-01

    pruning caused water deficit stress in pear trees. Further RP trees had significantly lower concentrations of total cations and anions and the sum of cations and anions than the NP trees implying root pruning decreased acquisition of nutrients from the soil. In the root pruned trees, the leaf water......Root pruning is an effective approach for controlling vegetative growth of pear trees (Pyrus communis L.), yet the underlying mechanisms for such effect remain largely elusive. A two-year field experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of root pruning and irrigation regimes on leaf water...... relation characteristics, stomatal conductance and xylem sap abscisic acid (ABA) and ionic concentrations. Results showed that leaf water potential, leaf turgor and stomatal conductance of root pruning (RP) treatment was significantly lower than those of non-root pruning (NP) treatment indicating that root...

  8. Qualitative Analysis of Polyphenols in Macroporous Resin Pretreated Pomegranate Husk Extract by HPLC-QTOF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Rahima; Mansur, Sanawar; Lai, Haizhong; Ubul, Ablikim; Sun, Guangying; Huang, Guozheng; Aisa, Haji Akber

    2017-09-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) husk is a traditional herbal medicine abundant in phenolic compounds and plays some roles in the treatment of oxidative stress, bacterial and viral infection, diabetes mellitus, and acute and chronic inflammation. Identification and determination of polyphenols in macroporous resin pretreated pomegranate husk extract by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-QTOF-MS). The total polyphenols of pomegranate husk were prepared by ethanol extraction followed by pretreatment with HPD-300 macroporous resin. The polyphenolic compounds were qualitatively analysed by HPLC-QTOF-MS in negative electrospray ionisation (ESI) mode at different collision energy (CE) values. A total of 50 polyphenols were detected in the extract of pomegranate husk, including 35 hydrolysable tannins and 15 flavonoids with distinct retention time, fragmentation behaviours and characteristics, and the accurate mass-to-charge ratios at low, moderate and high CE values. Of these, we identified nine compounds for the first time in the pomegranate husk, including hexahydroxydiphenoyl-valoneoyl-glucoside (HHDP-valoneyl-glucoside), galloyl-O-punicalin, rutin, hyperoside, quercimeritrin, kaempferol-7-O-rhahmano-glucoside, luteolin-3'-O-arabinoside, luteolin-3'-O-glucoside, and luteolin-4'-O-glucoside. To validate the specificity and accuracy of mass spectrometry in the detection of polyphenols, as compared to the fragmentation pathways of granatin B in detail, including the HHDP-valoneyl- glucoside was first identified from pomegranate husk. The study provides evidence for the quality control and development of novel drugs based on polyphenols from the pomegranate husk. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Candidate Genes for Female Sterility in Pomegranate Flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Chen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pomegranate has two types of flowers on the same plant: functional male flowers (FMF and bisexual flowers (BF. BF are female-fertile flowers that can set fruits. FMF are female-sterile flowers that fail to set fruit and that eventually drop. The putative cause of pomegranate FMF female sterility is abnormal ovule development. However, the key stage at which the FMF pomegranate ovules become abnormal and the mechanism of regulation of pomegranate female sterility remain unknown. Here, we studied ovule development in FMF and BF, using scanning electron microscopy to explore the key stage at which ovule development was terminated and then analyzed genes differentially expressed (differentially expressed genes – DEGs between FMF and BF to investigate the mechanism responsible for pomegranate female sterility. Ovule development in FMF ceased following the formation of the inner integument primordium. The key stage for the termination of FMF ovule development was when the bud vertical diameter was 5.0–13.0 mm. Candidate genes influencing ovule development may be crucial factors in pomegranate female sterility. INNER OUTER (INO/YABBY4 (Gglean016270 and AINTEGUMENTA (ANT homolog genes (Gglean003340 and Gglean011480, which regulate the development of the integument, showed down-regulation in FMF at the key stage of ovule development cessation (ATNSII. Their upstream regulator genes, such as AGAMOUS-like (AG-like (Gglean028014, Gglean026618, and Gglean028632 and SPOROCYTELESS (SPL homolog genes (Gglean005812, also showed differential expression pattern between BF and FMF at this key stage. The differential expression of the ethylene response signal genes, ETR (ethylene-resistant (Gglean022853 and ERF1/2 (ethylene-responsive factor (Gglean022880, between FMF and BF indicated that ethylene signaling may also be an important factor in the development of pomegranate female sterility. The increase in BF observed after spraying with ethephon supported this

  10. Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Juices from Ten Iranian Pomegranate Cultivars Depend on Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Akhavan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities of ten juices from arils and whole pomegranate cultivars grown in Iran were studied. Phenolic contents and antioxidant activities of juices from whole pomegranate fruit were significantly higher than juices from pomegranate arils, but the variety has a greater influence than the processing method. The main phenolics in the studied juices were punicalagin A (5.40–285 mg/L, punicalagin B (25.9–884 mg/L, and ellagic acid (17.4–928 mg/L. The major and minor anthocyanins of cyanidin 3,5-diglucoside (0.7–94.7 mg/L, followed by cyanidin 3-glucoside (0.5–52.5 mg/L, pelargonidin 3,5-diglucoside + delphinidin 3-glucoside (0–10.3 mg/L, delphinidin 3,5-diglucoside (0–7.68 mg/L, pelargonidin 3-glucoside (0–9.40 mg/L, and cyanidin-pentoside (0–1.13 mg/L were identified; the latter anthocyanin as well as cyanidin-pentoside-hexoside and delphinidin-pentoside were detected for the first time in Iranian pomegranates. The total phenolic contents were in the range of 220–2931 mg/100 mL. The results indicate that the pomegranate phenolics are not only influenced by extraction method but also—and even more—affected by the cultivar. Moreover, a good correlation was observed between total phenolic content and ABTS and FRAP methods in all pomegranate juices (>0.90. The results of current research can help to select the pomegranate cultivars for commercial juice production.

  11. Chemical Characterization of Different Sumac and Pomegranate Extracts Effective against Botrytis cinerea Rots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora V. Romeo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. peel and sumac (Rhus coriaria L. fruit and leaf extracts were chemically characterized and their ability to inhibit table grape (cv. Italia rots caused by Botrytis cinerea was evaluated on artificially inoculated berries. Different extraction methods were applied and extracts were characterized through Ultra Fast High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to Photodiode array detector and Electrospray ionization Mass spectrometer (UPLC-PDA-ESI/MSn for their phenol and anthocyanin contents. The concentrated pomegranate peel extract (PGE-C was the richest in phenols (66.97 g gallic acid equivalents/kg while the concentrated sumac extract from fruits (SUF-C showed the highest anthocyanin amount (171.96 mg cyanidin 3-glucoside equivalents/kg. Both phenolic and anthocyanin profile of pomegranate and sumac extracts were quite different: pomegranate extract was rich in cyanidin 3-glucoside, pelargonidin 3-glucoside and ellagic acid derivatives, while sumac extract was characterized by 7-methyl-cyanidin 3-galactoside and gallic acid derivatives. The concentrated extracts from both pomegranate peel and sumac leaves significantly reduced the development of Botrytis rots. In particular, the extract from pomegranate peel completely inhibited the pathogen at different intervals of time (0, 12, and 24 h between treatment and pathogen inoculation on fruits maintained at 22–24 °C and high relative humidity (RH. This extract may represent a valuable alternative to control postharvest fungal rots in view of its high efficacy because of the low cost of pomegranate peel, which is a waste product of processing factories.

  12. Post-pruning shoot growth increases fruit abscission and reduces stem carbohydrates and yield in macadamia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadyen, Lisa M; Robertson, David; Sedgley, Margaret; Kristiansen, Paul; Olesen, Trevor

    2011-05-01

    There is good evidence for deciduous trees that competition for carbohydrates from shoot growth accentuates early fruit abscission and reduces yield but the effect for evergreen trees is not well defined. Here, whole-tree tip-pruning at anthesis is used to examine the effect of post-pruning shoot development on fruit abscission in the evergreen subtropical tree macadamia (Macadamia integrifolia, M. integrifolia × tetraphylla). Partial-tree tip-pruning is also used to test the localization of the effect. In the first experiment (2005/2006), all branches on trees were tip-pruned at anthesis, some trees were allowed to re-shoot (R treatment) and shoots were removed from others (NR treatment). Fruit set and stem total non-structural carbohydrates (TNSC) over time, and yield were measured. In the second experiment (2006/2007), upper branches of trees were tip-pruned at anthesis, some trees were allowed to re-shoot (R) and shoots were removed from others (NR). Fruit set and yield were measured separately for upper (pruned) and lower (unpruned) branches. In the first experiment, R trees set far fewer fruit and had lower yield than NR trees. TNSC fell and rose in all treatments but the decline in R trees occurred earlier than in NR trees and coincided with early shoot growth and the increase in fruit abscission relative to the other treatments. In the second experiment, fruit abscission on upper branches of R trees increased relative to the other treatments but there was little difference in fruit abscission between treatments on lower branches. This study is the first to demonstrate an increase in fruit abscission in an evergreen tree in response to pruning. The effect appeared to be related to competition for carbohydrates between post-pruning shoot growth and fruit development and was local, with shoot growth on pruned branches having no effect on fruit abscission on unpruned branches.

  13. Growing degree-days for the `Niagara Rosada' grapevine pruned in different seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpare, Fábio Vale; Scarpare Filho, João Alexio; Rodrigues, Alessandro; Reichardt, Klaus; Angelocci, Luiz Roberto

    2012-09-01

    Plant growth and development are proportional to biological time, or the thermal time of the species, which can be defined as the integral of the temperature over time between the lower and upper temperature developmental thresholds. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficiency of the growing degree-day (GDD) approach for vines of the `Niagara Rosada' cultivar pruned in winter and summer seasons, and physiological phases (mobilisation and reserve accumulation) in a humid subtropical region. The experiment was carried out on 13-year-old plants in Piracicaba, São Paulo State-Brazil, evaluating 24 production cycles, 12 from the winter pruning, and 12 from the summer pruning. The statistical design was comprised of randomised blocks, using the pruning dates as treatment: 20 July, 4 August, 19 August, and 3 September (winter); 1 February, 15 February, 2 March, and 16 March (summer). Comparison of the mean values of GDD among pruning dates was evaluated by the Tukey test, and comparison between pruning seasons was made by the F test for orthogonal contrasts, both at the 5% probability level. The results showed good agreement between the values of GDD required to complete the cycle from the winter pruning until harvest when compared with other studies performed with the same cultivar grown in the Southern and Southeastern regions of Brazil. However, there was a consistent statistical difference between GDD computed for winter and summer pruning, which allowed us to conclude that this bio-meteorological index is not sufficient to distinguish vines pruned in different seasons and physiological phases applied in humid subtropical climates.

  14. Growing degree-days for the 'Niagara Rosada' grapevine pruned in different seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpare, Fábio Vale; Scarpare Filho, João Alexio; Rodrigues, Alessandro; Reichardt, Klaus; Angelocci, Luiz Roberto

    2012-09-01

    Plant growth and development are proportional to biological time, or the thermal time of the species, which can be defined as the integral of the temperature over time between the lower and upper temperature developmental thresholds. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficiency of the growing degree-day (GDD) approach for vines of the 'Niagara Rosada' cultivar pruned in winter and summer seasons, and physiological phases (mobilisation and reserve accumulation) in a humid subtropical region. The experiment was carried out on 13-year-old plants in Piracicaba, São Paulo State-Brazil, evaluating 24 production cycles, 12 from the winter pruning, and 12 from the summer pruning. The statistical design was comprised of randomised blocks, using the pruning dates as treatment: 20 July, 4 August, 19 August, and 3 September (winter); 1 February, 15 February, 2 March, and 16 March (summer). Comparison of the mean values of GDD among pruning dates was evaluated by the Tukey test, and comparison between pruning seasons was made by the F test for orthogonal contrasts, both at the 5% probability level. The results showed good agreement between the values of GDD required to complete the cycle from the winter pruning until harvest when compared with other studies performed with the same cultivar grown in the Southern and Southeastern regions of Brazil. However, there was a consistent statistical difference between GDD computed for winter and summer pruning, which allowed us to conclude that this bio-meteorological index is not sufficient to distinguish vines pruned in different seasons and physiological phases applied in humid subtropical climates.

  15. Ability of chestnut oak to tolerate acorn pruning by rodents: The role of the cotyledonary petiole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xianfeng; Curtis, Rachel; Bartlow, Andrew W; Agosta, Salvatore J; Steele, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Acorns of many white oak species germinate soon after autumn seed fall, a characteristic widely interpreted as a general adaptation to escape predation by small rodents. However, the mechanism by which early, rapid germination allows escape and/or tolerance of seed damage remains unclear. Here we reported how specific germination traits of chestnut oak (Quercus montana) acorns, and those of other white oak species, allow successful escape from acorn pruning by rodents. During germination, chestnut oak acorns develop elongated cotyledonary petioles, which extend beyond the distal end of the acorn (1-2 cm) to the point at which the epicotyl and radicle diverge. However, granivorous rodents often prune the taproots above or below the plumule when eating or caching these germinated acorns in autumn. Hence, we hypothesized elongation of cotyledonary petioles allows chestnut oaks to escape acorn pruning by rodents. We simulated pruning by rodents by cutting the taproot at different stages of germination (radicle length) to evaluate the regeneration capacity of four resulting seedling remnants following taproot pruning: acorns with the plumule (remnant I), acorns without the plumule (remnant II), and pruned taproots with (remnant III) or without the plumule (remnant IV). Our results showed that remnant I germinated into seedlings regardless of the length of the taproot previously pruned and removed. Remnant III successfully germinated and survived provided that taproots were ≥6 cm in length, whereas remnant IV was unable to produce seedlings. Remnant II only developed adventitious roots near the severed ends of the cotyledonary petioles. Field experiments also showed that pruned taproots with the plumule successfully regenerated into seedlings. We suggest that the elongated cotyledonary petioles, typical of most white oak species in North America, represent a key adaptation that allows frequent escape from rodent damage and predation. The ability of pruned taproots to

  16. Ability of chestnut oak to tolerate acorn pruning by rodents. The role of the cotyledonary petiole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xianfeng; Curtis, Rachel; Bartlow, Andrew W.; Agosta, Salvatore J.; Steele, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Acorns of many white oak species germinate soon after autumn seed fall, a characteristic widely interpreted as a general adaptation to escape predation by small rodents. However, the mechanism by which early, rapid germination allows escape and/or tolerance of seed damage remains unclear. Here we reported how specific germination traits of chestnut oak ( Quercus montana) acorns, and those of other white oak species, allow successful escape from acorn pruning by rodents. During germination, chestnut oak acorns develop elongated cotyledonary petioles, which extend beyond the distal end of the acorn (1-2 cm) to the point at which the epicotyl and radicle diverge. However, granivorous rodents often prune the taproots above or below the plumule when eating or caching these germinated acorns in autumn. Hence, we hypothesized elongation of cotyledonary petioles allows chestnut oaks to escape acorn pruning by rodents. We simulated pruning by rodents by cutting the taproot at different stages of germination (radicle length) to evaluate the regeneration capacity of four resulting seedling remnants following taproot pruning: acorns with the plumule (remnant I), acorns without the plumule (remnant II), and pruned taproots with (remnant III) or without the plumule (remnant IV). Our results showed that remnant I germinated into seedlings regardless of the length of the taproot previously pruned and removed. Remnant III successfully germinated and survived provided that taproots were ≥6 cm in length, whereas remnant IV was unable to produce seedlings. Remnant II only developed adventitious roots near the severed ends of the cotyledonary petioles. Field experiments also showed that pruned taproots with the plumule successfully regenerated into seedlings. We suggest that the elongated cotyledonary petioles, typical of most white oak species in North America, represent a key adaptation that allows frequent escape from rodent damage and predation. The ability of pruned taproots to

  17. Feticismo e desiderio in Poulet aux prunes di Marjane Satrapi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Rimini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Il saggio si propone di individuare e descrivere le sfumature erotiche e sentimentali del film Poulet aux prunes di Marjane Satrapi, felice adattamento dell’omonima graphic novel. Il racconto procede per scarti, ellissi, anticipazioni e flasback, dando luogo a una narrazione labirintica dalla singolare trama arabescante. Le sottili dinamiche seduttive messe in campo dal complesso stile di regia di Satrapi-Paronnaud vengono analizzate alla luce delle categorie feticistiche individuate da Massimo Fusillo, che offrono interessanti modelli di interazione fra desiderio e creatività. L’esito di tale indagine consente di ampliare il dibattito relativo al rapporto di scambio e interferenza fra oggetti, pulsioni e sguardi nel cinema contemporaneo.

  18. Generalized k-core pruning process on directed networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin-Hua

    2017-06-01

    The resilience of a complex interconnected system concerns the size of the macroscopic functioning node clusters after external perturbations based on a random or designed scheme. For a representation of interconnected systems with directional or asymmetrical interactions among constituents, the directed network is a convenient choice. Yet, how the interaction directions affect the network resilience still lacks a thorough exploration. Here, we study the resilience of directed networks with a generalized k-core pruning process as a simple failure procedure based on both the in- and out-degrees of nodes, in which any node with an in-degree  networks more vulnerable against perturbations based on in- and out-degrees separately.

  19. Associated rare anomalies in prune belly syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Fette

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The triad of deficient abdominal wall musculature, undescended testes and urinary tract anomalies characterizes the Prune Belly Syndrome (PBS. PBS can be associated with other comorbid urological and non urological conditions. But the full pathogenesis and best treatment is still a matter of debate. A term newborn with a classical PBS (Woodhouse Group 2, Smith and Woodard Group 2 plus lung hypoplasia and funnel chest deformity, a megapenis with a tight phimosis and an obturated anterior urethra is presented. Unfortunately, the baby died in urosepsis and renal failure in his 3rd week of life, despite urine drainage surgery and peritoneal dialysis undertaken. According to the best of our knowledge, this is an unique combination of rare anomalies in PBS patients.

  20. Quantifying pruning impacts on olive tree architecture and annual canopy growth by using UAV-based 3D modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Brenes, F M; López-Granados, F; de Castro, A I; Torres-Sánchez, J; Serrano, N; Peña, J M

    2017-01-01

    Tree pruning is a costly practice with important implications for crop harvest and nutrition, pest and disease control, soil protection and irrigation strategies. Investigations on tree pruning usually involve tedious on-ground measurements of the primary tree crown dimensions, which also might generate inconsistent results due to the irregular geometry of the trees. As an alternative to intensive field-work, this study shows a innovative procedure based on combining unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology and advanced object-based image analysis (OBIA) methodology for multi-temporal three-dimensional (3D) monitoring of hundreds of olive trees that were pruned with three different strategies (traditional, adapted and mechanical pruning). The UAV images were collected before pruning, after pruning and a year after pruning, and the impacts of each pruning treatment on the projected canopy area, tree height and crown volume of every tree were quantified and analyzed over time. The full procedure described here automatically identified every olive tree on the orchard and computed their primary 3D dimensions on the three study dates with high accuracy in the most cases. Adapted pruning was generally the most aggressive treatment in terms of the area and volume (the trees decreased by 38.95 and 42.05% on average, respectively), followed by trees under traditional pruning (33.02 and 35.72% on average, respectively). Regarding the tree heights, mechanical pruning produced a greater decrease (12.15%), and these values were minimal for the other two treatments. The tree growth over one year was affected by the pruning severity and by the type of pruning treatment, i.e., the adapted-pruning trees experienced higher growth than the trees from the other two treatments when pruning intensity was low (<10%), similar to the traditionally pruned trees at moderate intensity (10-30%), and lower than the other trees when the pruning intensity was higher than 30% of the crown volume

  1. Supertrees Based on the Subtree Prune-and-Regraft Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whidden, Christopher; Zeh, Norbert; Beiko, Robert G

    2014-07-01

    Supertree methods reconcile a set of phylogenetic trees into a single structure that is often interpreted as a branching history of species. A key challenge is combining conflicting evolutionary histories that are due to artifacts of phylogenetic reconstruction and phenomena such as lateral gene transfer (LGT). Many supertree approaches use optimality criteria that do not reflect underlying processes, have known biases, and may be unduly influenced by LGT. We present the first method to construct supertrees by using the subtree prune-and-regraft (SPR) distance as an optimality criterion. Although calculating the rooted SPR distance between a pair of trees is NP-hard, our new maximum agreement forest-based methods can reconcile trees with hundreds of taxa and>50 transfers in fractions of a second, which enables repeated calculations during the course of an iterative search. Our approach can accommodate trees in which uncertain relationships have been collapsed to multifurcating nodes. Using a series of benchmark datasets simulated under plausible rates of LGT, we show that SPR supertrees are more similar to correct species histories than supertrees based on parsimony or Robinson-Foulds distance criteria. We successfully constructed an SPR supertree from a phylogenomic dataset of 40,631 gene trees that covered 244 genomes representing several major bacterial phyla. Our SPR-based approach also allowed direct inference of highways of gene transfer between bacterial classes and genera. A Small number of these highways connect genera in different phyla and can highlight specific genes implicated in long-distance LGT. [Lateral gene transfer; matrix representation with parsimony; phylogenomics; prokaryotic phylogeny; Robinson-Foulds; subtree prune-and-regraft; supertrees.]. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Society of Systematic Biologists.

  2. New and Emerging Viruses of Blueberry and Cranberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Robert R.; Polashock, James J.; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E.

    2012-01-01

    Blueberry and cranberry are fruit crops native to North America and they are well known for containing bioactive compounds that can benefit human health. Cultivation is expanding within North America and other parts of the world raising concern regarding distribution of existing viruses as well as the appearance of new viruses. Many of the known viruses of these crops are latent or asymptomatic in at least some cultivars. Diagnosis and detection procedures are often non-existent or unreliable. Whereas new viruses can move into cultivated fields from the wild, there is also the threat that devastating viruses can move into native stands of Vaccinium spp. or other native plants from cultivated fields. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of blueberry and cranberry viruses, focusing not only on those that are new but also those that are emerging as serious threats for production in North America and around the world. PMID:23202507

  3. New and Emerging Viruses of Blueberry and Cranberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Polashock

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Blueberry and cranberry are fruit crops native to North America and they are well known for containing bioactive compounds that can benefit human health. Cultivation is expanding within North America and other parts of the world raising concern regarding distribution of existing viruses as well as the appearance of new viruses. Many of the known viruses of these crops are latent or asymptomatic in at least some cultivars. Diagnosis and detection procedures are often non-existent or unreliable. Whereas new viruses can move into cultivated fields from the wild, there is also the threat that devastating viruses can move into native stands of Vaccinium spp. or other native plants from cultivated fields. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of blueberry and cranberry viruses, focusing not only on those that are new but also those that are emerging as serious threats for production in North America and around the world.

  4. Pomegranate seed oil, a rich source of punicic acid, prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroegrijk, I.O.; Diepen, J.A. van; Berg, S.; Westbroek, I.; Keizer, H.; Gambelli, L.; Hontecillas, R.; Bassaganya-Riera, J.; Zondag, G.C.; Romijn, J.A.; Havekes, L.M.; Voshol, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pomegranate seed oil has been shown to protect against diet induced obesity and insulin resistance. OBJECTIVE: To characterize the metabolic effects of punicic acid on high fat diet induced obesity and insulin resistance. DESIGN: High-fat diet or high-fat diet with 1% Pomegranate seed

  5. 75 FR 26707 - Notice of Decision to Issue Permits for the Importation of Fresh Pomegranates and Baby Kiwi from...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... and Baby Kiwi from Chile into the United States AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service... the importation into the continental United States of fresh pomegranates and fresh baby kiwi from... weeds via the importation of fresh pomegranates and fresh baby kiwi from Chile. EFFECTIVE DATE: May 12...

  6. Water stress at the end of the pomegranate fruit ripening permits earlier harvesting and improve fruit quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galindo Egea, Alejandro; Calín-Sánchez,; Griñán, I.; Rodríguez, P.; Cruz, Zulma N; Girón, I.F.; Corell, M.; Martínez-Font, R.; Moriana, A.; Carbonell-Barrachina, A.A.; Torrecillas, A.; Hernández, F.

    2017-01-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is a drought tolerant crop, which thrives in the face of scarce water resources, this fact underlines the importance of determining the optimum harvest time to improve the quality of pomegranate fruits. This research was focused on the crop responses to drought

  7. Effect of pomegranate supplementation and aerobic training on total antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation in overweight men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Rahimifardin

    2014-11-01

    Results: It was found that MDA index decreased in the pomegranate supplementation group compared to placebo group (P=0.016. But, total antioxidant capacity (TAC index in neither of the groups was significant (P=0.72. Conclusion: Results of the study indicate that pomegranate supplementation can reduce MDA derived from lipid peroxidation after 8 week running training in the obese. .

  8. The effect of pomegranate extract on coronary artery atherosclerosis in SR-BI/APOE double knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jarallah, Aishah; Igdoura, Fatima; Zhang, Yi; Tenedero, Christine B; White, Elizabeth J; MacDonald, Melissa E; Igdoura, Suleiman A; Trigatti, Bernardo L

    2013-05-01

    To examine the effects of pomegranate extract on inflammation and oxidative stress and the development of spontaneous occlusive coronary artery atherosclerosis in the SR-BI/apoE double knockout mouse model of coronary heart disease. SR-BI/apoE double KO mice were treated for two weeks with pomegranate extract via drinking water, beginning at three weeks of age. Treatment with pomegranate extract increased cholesterol ester content and reduced the abnormally high unesterified/esterified cholesterol ratio of VLDL-sized lipoproteins. Despite the increase in cholesterol levels associated with VLDL-sized particles, pomegranate extract treatment reduced the size of atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic sinus and reduced the proportion of coronary arteries with occlusive atherosclerotic plaques. Treatment with pomegranate extract resulted in substantial reductions in levels of oxidative stress and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 in atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic sinus and coronary arteries. In addition, treatment with pomegranate extract reduced lipid accumulation, macrophage infiltration, levels of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and fibrosis in the myocardium, attenuated cardiac enlargement and the development of ECG abnormalities in SR-BI/apoE double KO mice. Pomegranate extract reduced aortic sinus and coronary artery atherosclerosis in SR-BI/apoE dKO mice. The atheroprotective effects of pomegranate extract appear to involve reduced oxidative stress and inflammation in the vessel wall despite unaltered systemic markers of inflammation and increased lipoprotein cholesterol in these mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Physicochemical properties and aroma volatile profiles in a diverse collection of California-grown pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are thousands of pomegranate accessions and more than 500 known pomegranate cultivars with around 50 available commercially, exhibiting different growing characteristics and quality attributes; such as fruit size, color, shape, seed hardness, taste and flavor traits which are sometimes not wel...

  10. Effect of Irrigation Regimes on Yield of Two Commercial Varieties of Pomegranate in the Climatic Condition in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ali bafkar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The maximum water efficiency and water productivity of the agricultural sector is one of the most important and effective ways to deal with the water crisis and mitigate the effects of drought. Therefore, scientific and practical agricultural water productivity in terms of planning and development must be followed. Local or drip irrigation systems supply some of the moist around the roots and the plant uses the moisture in the soil. Irrigation systems and irrigation scheduling affect water uptake by plants. Matrials and Methods: In order to evaluate the effect of irrigation on the yield of 4-year-old pomegranate trees with local irrigation system (Bubbler in sandy loam soil with bulk density 1.15 grams per cubic centimeter a research was performed in Agriculture and Natural Resources Research Center of Yazd province with an altitude of 1230 meters . The region has an arid climate with 51 mm average annual rainfall and average annual temperature of 20 ° C, which is located 10 kilometers from the center of the city of Yazd. This project was designed in a factorial experiment with a randomized complete block with three irrigation regimes I1, I2, I3, including irrigation (FC100%, 25% of deficit irrigation (FC75% and 50 percent deficit irrigation (FC50% on two commercial cultivars of pomegranates, which have been growing at 3 × 4 with three replications. To prevent penetration of water per tree, plots adjacent to each block strip (three meters between rows and between plants within one and a half meters without irrigation tape were used as a guard. Trees around the pool shaped a rectangular building with a flow rate of 96 liters per hour for each tree using Bubbler system. The use of such a system with high flow rate, suitability and cost of such a system in orchards and vineyards, water supply reduces energy consumption in a tree in a short time. To prevent clogging of the filter, disc dropper was used at the beginning of the project

  11. [Agrobacterium rubi strains from blueberry plants are highly diverse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamovich, Eliana; López, Ana C; Alippi, Adriana M

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of a collection of Agrobacterium rubi strains isolated from blueberries from different regions of Argentina was studied by conventional microbiological tests and molecular techniques. Results from biochemical and physiological reactions, as well as from rep-PCR and RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified 23S rDNA showed high phenotypic and genotypic intraspecific variation. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of Conserved and Novel MicroRNAs in Blueberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyang Yue

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small endogenous RNAs that play important regulatory roles in cells by negatively affecting gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. There have been extensive studies aiming to identify miRNAs and to elucidate their functions in various plant species. In the present study, we employed the high-throughput sequencing technology to profile miRNAs in blueberry fruits. A total of 9,992,446 small RNA tags with sizes ranged from 18 to 30 nt were obtained, indicating that blueberry fruits have a large and diverse small RNA population. Bioinformatic analysis identified 412 conserved miRNAs belonging to 29 families, and 35 predicted novel miRNAs that are likely to be unique to blueberries. Among them, expression profiles of five conserved miRNAs were validated by stem loop qRT-PCR. Furthermore, the potential target genes of conserved and novel miRNAs were predicted and subjected to Gene Ontology (GO annotation. Enrichment analysis of the GO-represented biological processes and molecular functions revealed that these target genes were potentially involved in a wide range of metabolic pathways and developmental processes. Particularly, anthocyanin biosynthesis has been predicted to be directly or indirectly regulated by diverse miRNA families. This study is the first report on genome-wide miRNA profile analysis in blueberry and it provides a useful resource for further elucidation of the functional roles of miRNAs during fruit development and ripening.

  13. The use of natural blueberry dye producing butter cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. Magomedov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Creamy сream - finishing semi-finished product in the manufacture of pastry products. Tinting cream mass in different shades of color can improve the aesthetic appearance of the product appearance and make it more attractive. Natural blueberry anthocyanin dye has antioxidant, anti-cancer, anti-sclerotic, anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties, P-vitamin activity. The influence of the content of blueberry dye to change the chromaticity characteristics, organoleptic and physico-chemical parameters, shape keeping capacity, antioxidant activity of the samples of butter cream after manufacture and during storage. Based on the analysis of the results to give a butter cream pleasant pink color can be recommended dosage blueberry dye - 2.5 g / kg, with anthocyanin dye in this case is used as an antioxidant and as its use in the recommended amounts increases the antioxidant activity of 12.5 mg / 100 g (62.8% (relative to unstained samples cream. Pastry with a creamy semi-finished product, colored with natural blueberry dye, demand on the food market of confectionery products, and they can be recommended as the first baby food, people with lowered immunity, the elderly and mass consumption, as products contain vitamin E - 30 mg / 100 g of product (satisfaction of the daily requirement for vitamin makes - 75% and a significant amount of antioxidants. The facts make it possible to expand the range of competitive confectionery functionality diversify colors shades of cream, to improve its taste and aroma properties, enhance the nutritional value and shelf life due to the large amount of co-antioxidants.

  14. Síndrome de Prune Belly: Presentación de un caso y revisión de la literatura Prune Belly Syndrome: Case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Franz Guerrero

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: El síndrome de Prune Belly (SPB, también conocido como el síndrome de Eagle Barrett, se caracteriza por una triada de anomalías que incluye grados variables de hipoplasia de la musculatura abdominal, anomalías del tracto urinario y criptorquidia bilateral. Objetivo: Se describe el caso de un paciente masculino con Síndrome de Prune Belly y se realiza una revisión de la literatura sobre esta rara enfermedad. Conclusión: La característica arrugada del abdomen similar a una ciruela pasa, le da el nombre al síndrome. Además, puede estar asociado a alteraciones cardiovasculares, respiratorias, ortopédicas y gastrointestinales. Salud UIS 2010; 42: 78-85Introduction: Prune-belly syndrome, also known as Eagle-Barrett syndrome is characterized by a triad of anomalies that include varying degrees of abdominal musculature hypoplasia, urinary tract anomalies, and bilateral cryptorchidism. Objective: We describe the case of a male patient with Prune Belly Syndrome and we review the literature on this rare disease. Conclusions: The characteristic wrinkled, prune-like abdomen, gives the name to the syndrome. Can also be associated with cardiovascular, respiratory, orthopedic and gastrointestinal anomalies. Salud UIS 2010; 42: 78-85.

  15. A pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) WD40-repeat gene is a functional homologue of Arabidopsis TTG1 and is involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis during pomegranate fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Simhon, Zohar; Judeinstein, Sylvie; Nadler-Hassar, Talia; Trainin, Taly; Bar-Ya'akov, Irit; Borochov-Neori, Hamutal; Holland, Doron

    2011-11-01

    Anthocyanins are the major pigments responsible for the pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruit skin color. The high variability in fruit external color in pomegranate cultivars reflects variations in anthocyanin composition. To identify genes involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway in the pomegranate fruit skin we have isolated, expressed and characterized the pomegranate homologue of the Arabidopsis thaliana TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1), encoding a WD40-repeat protein. The TTG1 protein is a regulator of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (PAs) biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, and acts by the formation of a transcriptional regulatory complex with two other regulatory proteins: bHLH and MYB. Our results reveal that the pomegranate gene, designated PgWD40, recovered the anthocyanin, PAs, trichome and seed coat mucilage phenotype in Arabidopsis ttg1 mutant. PgWD40 expression and anthocyanin composition in the skin were analyzed during pomegranate fruit development, in two accessions that differ in skin color intensity and timing of appearance. The results indicate high positive correlation between the total cyanidin derivatives quantity (red pigments) and the expression level of PgWD40. Furthermore, strong correlation was found between the steady state levels of PgWD40 transcripts and the transcripts of pomegranate homologues of the structural genes PgDFR and PgLDOX. PgWD40, PgDFR and PgLDOX expression also correlated with the expression of pomegranate homologues of the regulatory genes PgAn1 (bHLH) and PgAn2 (MYB). On the basis of our results we propose that PgWD40 is involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis during pomegranate fruit development and that expression of PgWD40, PgAn1 and PgAn2 in the pomegranate fruit skin is required to regulate the expression of downstream structural genes involved in the anthocyanin biosynthesis.

  16. Antioxidant properties of prepared blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Ana; Oliveira, Joana; Neves, Patrícia; Gameiro, Paula; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; de Freitas, Victor; Mateus, Nuno

    2005-08-24

    A blueberry extract (A) and two anthocyanin-derived extracts (B and C) were prepared. The contents of polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, and anthocyanin-derived pigments of the extracts were determined for the first time. The pigment profile of blueberry extract A corresponded to 15 anthocyanins, whereas extract B was mainly composed of anthocyanin-pyruvic acid adducts of the blueberry original anthocyanins and extract C was mainly composed of the respective vinylpyranoanthocyanin-catechins (portisins). The extracts' abilities to inhibit lipid peroxidation, induced by 2,2'-azobis(2-methyl-propanimidamide) dihydrochloride in a liposomal membrane system were examined. The antioxidant capacities of the extracts were evaluated through monitoring oxygen consumption and by measuring the formation of conjugated dienes. All of the extracts provided protection of membranes against peroxyl radicals by increasing the induction time of oxidation. This effect increased with the polyphenol content and with the structural complexity of the anthocyanin-derived pigments of the extracts. The pigments present in extract C seemed to induce a higher protection of the liposome membranes toward oxidation. In addition, the antiradical properties and the reducing power of the extracts were determined by using DPPH and FRAP methods, respectively. The results from these assays were in agreement with those obtained with the liposome membranes.

  17. Anti-Tumor Activity of a Polysaccharide from Blueberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyun Sun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Blueberries (Vaccinium spp. are rich in bioactive compounds. However, the biological activity of polysaccharides from blueberry has not been reported so far. This study evaluated the anti-tumor and immunological activities of a polysaccharide (BBP3-1 from blueberry in S180-bearing mice. The experimental results indicated that BBP3-1 (100 mg·kg−1·d−1 inhibited the tumor growth rate by 73.4%. Moreover, this group, compared with the model control, had shown an effect of increasing both the spleen and thymus indices (p < 0.05, increasing phagocytosis by macrophages (p < 0.05, boosting the proliferation and transformation of lymphocytes (p < 0.01, promoting the secretion of TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-2 (p < 0.05 and improving NK cell activity (p < 0.01. From this study, we could easily conclude that BBP3-1 has the ability to inhibit tumor progression and could act as a good immunomodulator.

  18. Optimization of frozen wild blueberry vacuum drying process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šumić Zdravko M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to optimize the vacuum drying of frozen blueberries in order to preserve health benefits phytochemicals using response surface methodology. The drying was performed in a new design of vacuum dryer equipment. Investigated range of temperature was 46-74°C and of pressure 38-464 mbar. Total solids, total phenolics, vitamin C, anthocyanin content and total color change were used as quality indicators of dried blueberries. Within the experimental range of studied variables, the optimum conditions of 60 °C and 100 mbar were established for vacuum drying of blueberries. Separate validation experiments were conducted at optimum conditions to verify predictions and adequacy of the second-order polynomial models. Under these optimal conditions, the predicted amount of total phenolics was 3.70 mgCAE/100dw, vitamin C 59.79 mg/100gdw, anthocyanin content 2746.33 mg/100gdw, total solids 89.50% and total color change 88.83. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31044

  19. Quality Parameters of Six Cultivars of Blueberry Using Computer Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Matiacevich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Blueberries are considered an important source of health benefits. This work studied six blueberry cultivars: “Duke,” “Brigitta”, “Elliott”, “Centurion”, “Star,” and “Jewel”, measuring quality parameters such as °Brix, pH, moisture content using standard techniques and shape, color, and fungal presence obtained by computer vision. The storage conditions were time (0–21 days, temperature (4 and 15°C, and relative humidity (75 and 90%. Results. Significant differences (P<0.05 were detected between fresh cultivars in pH, °Brix, shape, and color. However, the main parameters which changed depending on storage conditions, increasing at higher temperature, were color (from blue to red and fungal presence (from 0 to 15%, both detected using computer vision, which is important to determine a shelf life of 14 days for all cultivars. Similar behavior during storage was obtained for all cultivars. Conclusion. Computer vision proved to be a reliable and simple method to objectively determine blueberry decay during storage that can be used as an alternative approach to currently used subjective measurements.

  20. Edible Neotropical Blueberries: Antioxidant and Compositional Fingerprint Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DASTMALCHI, KEYVAN; FLORES, GEMA; PETROVA, VANYA; PEDRAZA-PEÑALOSA, PAOLA; KENNELLY, EDWARD J.

    2012-01-01

    Edible blueberry species are well recognized for their potential health benefits. Ericaceae fruits including the North American highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) and five less common edible blueberry relatives from the New World tropics, Anthopterus wardii Ball, Cavendishia grandifolia Hoerld, Macleania coccoloboides A. C. Sm., Sphyrospermum buxifolium Poepp. & Endl., and Sphyrospermum cordifolium Benth, were investigated for their antioxidant properties and phenolic profiles. The Neotropical berries C. grandifolia and A. wardii exhibited significantly higher DPPH• and ABTS•+ scavenging and iron chelation activities than V. corymbosum. Total phenolic content and HPLC-PDA compositional fingerprint analyses were also carried out. Significant correlations were observed among total phenolic contents, DPPH• and ABTS•+ scavenging, and iron chelation activities. Using HPLC-PDA, the phenolic constituents in the berries were identified as chlorogenic acid, p-coumaric acid, hyperoside, quercetin-3-O-glucoside, isoorientin, isovitexin, orientin and vitexin. Principal components analysis reduced the dimensions of antioxidant and total phenolic data to two components, which accounted for 95% of total variation among the six fruits. Each fruit species formed its own cluster, and therefore the antioxidant profile of each species was shown to be distinct. PMID:21391608

  1. Edible neotropical blueberries: antioxidant and compositional fingerprint analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastmalchi, Keyvan; Flores, Gema; Petrova, Vanya; Pedraza-Peñalosa, Paola; Kennelly, Edward J

    2011-04-13

    Edible blueberry species are well recognized for their potential health benefits. Ericaceae fruits including the North American highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) and five less common edible blueberry relatives from the New World tropics, Anthopterus wardii Ball, Cavendishia grandifolia Hoerold, Macleania coccoloboides A. C. Smith, Sphyrospermum buxifolium Poeppig & Endlicher, and Sphyrospermum cordifolium Benth, were investigated for their antioxidant properties and phenolic profiles. The neotropical berries C. grandifolia and A. wardii exhibited significantly higher 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(•)) and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS(• +)) free radical scavenging and iron chelation activities than V. corymbosum. Total phenolic content and high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (HPLC-PDA) compositional fingerprint analyses were also carried out. Significant correlations were observed among total phenolic contents, DPPH(•) and ABTS(• +) scavenging, and iron chelation activities. By use of HPLC-PDA, the phenolic constituents in the berries were identified as chlorogenic acid, p-coumaric acid, hyperoside, quercetin-3-O-glucoside, isoorientin, isovitexin, orientin and vitexin. Principal component analysis reduced the dimensions of antioxidant and total phenolic data to two components, which accounted for 95% of total variation among the six fruits. Each fruit species formed its own cluster, and therefore the antioxidant profile of each species was shown to be distinct.

  2. Antioxidant and neuroprotective properties of blueberry polyphenols: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacalone, Marilù; Di Sacco, Filippo; Traupe, Ippolito; Topini, Roberto; Forfori, Francesco; Giunta, Francesco

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this work was to highlight the effects and the possible mechanisms of the action of blueberry polyphenols on the central nervous system (CNS). An analysis was carried out, in a temporal order, of the most important literature about this topic and the results have been correlated with the beneficial and protective effects, mainly concerning the CNS. Over the last 10 years an increasing scientific interest has developed about polyphenols, which are very abundant in blueberries, as they have been seen to produce favourable effects related to neuroprotection and linked to a possible decrease of age-related cognitive and motor decline, as shown by the improvement of such functions in animal models with a supplemented diet. Such effects could not only be explained through a purely antioxidant action but also through more complex mechanisms related to inflammation, genic expression, and regulation of cell survival. Despite the wealth of data from animal studies, there is a relative lack of data concerning human beings, even if some positive results are beginning to emerge. Therefore, blueberry polyphenols could become useful pharmacological agents for various conditions including neurological diseases, but further studies are still necessary to attain this objective.

  3. Effects of Pomegranate Juice Supplementation on Oxidative Stress Biomarkers Following Weightlifting Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achraf Ammar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that pomegranate juice supplementation would blunt acute and delayed oxidative stress responses after a weightlifting training session. Nine elite weightlifters (21.0 ± 1 years performed two Olympic-Weightlifting sessions after ingesting either the placebo or pomegranate juice supplements. Venous blood samples were collected at rest and 3 min and 48 h after each session. Compared to the placebo condition, pomegranate juice supplementation attenuated the increase in malondialdehyde (−12.5%; p < 0.01 and enhanced the enzymatic (+8.6% for catalase and +6.8% for glutathione peroxidase; p < 0.05 and non-enzymatic (+12.6% for uric acid and +5.7% for total bilirubin; p < 0.01 antioxidant responses shortly (3 min after completion of the training session. Additionally, during the 48 h recovery period, pomegranate juice supplementation accelerated (p < 0.05 the recovery kinetics of the malondialdehyde (5.6% and the enzymatic antioxidant defenses compared to the placebo condition (9 to 10%. In conclusion, supplementation with pomegranate juice has the potential to attenuate oxidative stress by enhancing antioxidant responses assessed acutely and up to 48 h following an intensive weightlifting training session. Therefore, elite weightlifters might benefit from blunted oxidative stress responses following intensive weightlifting sessions, which could have implications for recovery between training sessions.

  4. The pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) genome and the genomics of punicalagin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Gaihua; Xu, Chunyan; Ming, Ray; Tang, Haibao; Guyot, Romain; Kramer, Elena M; Hu, Yudong; Yi, Xingkai; Qi, Yongjie; Xu, Xiangyang; Gao, Zhenghui; Pan, Haifa; Jian, Jianbo; Tian, Yinping; Yue, Zhen; Xu, Yiliu

    2017-09-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is a perennial fruit crop grown since ancient times that has been planted worldwide and is known for its functional metabolites, particularly punicalagins. We have sequenced and assembled the pomegranate genome with 328 Mb anchored into nine pseudo-chromosomes and annotated 29 229 gene models. A Myrtales lineage-specific whole-genome duplication event was detected that occurred in the common ancestor before the divergence of pomegranate and Eucalyptus. Repetitive sequences accounted for 46.1% of the assembled genome. We found that the integument development gene INNER NO OUTER (INO) was under positive selection and potentially contributed to the development of the fleshy outer layer of the seed coat, an edible part of pomegranate fruit. The genes encoding the enzymes for synthesis and degradation of lignin, hemicelluloses and cellulose were also differentially expressed between soft- and hard-seeded varieties, reflecting differences in their accumulation in cultivars differing in seed hardness. Candidate genes for punicalagin biosynthesis were identified and their expression patterns indicated that gallic acid synthesis in tissues could follow different biochemical pathways. The genome sequence of pomegranate provides a valuable resource for the dissection of many biological and biochemical traits and also provides important insights for the acceleration of breeding. Elucidation of the biochemical pathway(s) involved in punicalagin biosynthesis could assist breeding efforts to increase production of this bioactive compound. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Analytical standards production for the analysis of pomegranate anthocyanins by HPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Cristina Pessanha de Araújo Santiago

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. is a fruit with a long medicinal history, especially due to its phenolic compounds content, such as the anthocyanins, which are reported as one of the most important natural antioxidants. The analysis of the anthocyanins by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC can be considered as an important tool to evaluate the quality of pomegranate juice. For research laboratories the major challenge in using HPLC for quantitative analyses is the acquisition of high purity analytical standards, since these are expensive and in some cases not even commercially available. The aim of this study was to obtain analytical standards for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the anthocyanins from pomegranate. Five vegetable matrices (pomegranate flower, jambolan, jabuticaba, blackberry and strawberry fruits were used to isolate each of the six anthocyanins present in pomegranate fruit, using an analytical HPLC scale with non-destructive detection, it being possible to subsequently use them as analytical standards. Furthermore, their identities were confirmed by high resolution mass spectrometry. The proposed procedure showed that it is possible to obtain analytical standards of anthocyanins with a high purity grade (98.0 to 99.9% from natural sources, which was proved to be an economic strategy for the production of standards by laboratories according to their research requirements.

  6. Inhibition of melanin production by a combination of Siberian larch and pomegranate fruit extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwakar, Ganesh; Rana, Jatinder; Scholten, Jeffrey D

    2012-09-01

    In an effort to find botanicals containing polyphenolic compounds with the capacity to inhibit melanin biosynthesis, we identified a novel combination of Siberian larch (Larix sibirica) extract, standardized to 80% taxifolin, and pomegranate fruit (Punica granatum) extract, containing 20% punicalagins, that demonstrates a synergistic reduction of melanin biosynthesis in Melan-a cells. The combination of Siberian larch and pomegranate extracts (1:1) produced a 2-fold reduction in melanin content compared to Siberian larch or pomegranate extracts alone with no corresponding effect on cell viability. Siberian larch and pomegranate fruit extracts inhibited expression of melanocyte specific genes, tyrosinase (Tyr), microphthalmia transcription factor (Mitf), and melanosome structural proteins (Pmel17 and Mart1) but did not inhibit tyrosinase enzyme activity. These results suggest that the mechanism of inhibition of melanin biosynthesis by Siberian larch and pomegranate extracts, alone and in combination, is through downregulation of melanocyte specific genes and not due to inhibition of tyrosinase enzyme activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Potential of Spanish sour-sweet pomegranates (cultivar C25) for the juice industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell-Barrachina, A A; Calín-Sánchez, A; Bagatar, B; Hernández, F; Legua, P; Martínez-Font, R; Melgarejo, P

    2012-04-01

    Commercial juices of sweet pomegranates and fresh juices of sour-sweet pomegranates were analysed for organic acids, sugars, antioxidant activity, volatile composition, sensory profile and consumer liking. Organic acids and sugars were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography, while volatiles were extracted using hydrodistillation and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector. Malic acid was predominant in sweet juices while citric acid in sour-sweet samples. Fructose and glucose were found as the predominant sugars in all juices. A total of 18 compounds were found in pomegranate aroma profile, including monoterpenes, aldehydes, alcohols, monoterpenoids and linear hydrocarbons; the most abundant compounds were 3-carene, α-terpinene and α-terpineol. The total concentration of volatiles ranged from 2.0 up to 5.1 mg/L, with commercial samples presenting higher total concentrations due to the presence of peel volatiles. The high potential of sour-sweet pomegranate fruits for the juice industry was supported by (a) the high values of positive attributes, such as colour and fresh pomegranate flavour and (b) the high overall liking of consumers.

  8. Studies on Juice Quality Obtained from Pomegranate and Various Vegetables Additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamaria Pop

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the interest in antioxidants, mainly present in fruits and vegetables, has prompted research in the field of commercial beverages. Taking into account new requirements to improve the quality of feeding behaviour by getting juices without added sugar, the consumer health benefits and high organoleptics properties, it was decided to study the correlation quality of raw pomegranates with other vegetables such as celery, carrot and sharon fruit in order to obtain pomegranate juice with vegetable additions. The vegetable raw materials were chosen in order to improve the quality and organoleptic properties of the pomegranate juice with vegetable additions by optimizing the “in-house” method, to obtaining a stable formulation. The main objectives of the study were characterization of raw and addition materials, studied by psycho-chemical analysis, evaluating of the antioxidant capacity of 4 types of pomegranate juice with additions in different proportions,  establish the best type of mixture juice. Consumer preference was established in sensory analysis  based on hedonic test with 9 point scale, the type of juice with additions with the following concentrations: pomegranate 50%, Sharon 10%, celery 30%, carrot 10%. Positive correlations were performed between antioxidant capacity and type of juice preferred by consumers.

  9. Effects of Pomegranate Extract Supplementation on Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Physical Function in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei-Tzu; Fitschen, Peter J; Kistler, Brandon M; Jeong, Jin Hee; Chung, Hae Ryong; Aviram, Michael; Phillips, Shane A; Fernhall, Bo; Wilund, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of oral supplementation with pomegranate extract on cardiovascular risk, physical function, oxidative stress, and inflammation in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Thirty-three HD subjects were randomized to the pomegranate (POM) or placebo (CON) group. Patients in POM ingested a 1000 mg capsule of a purified pomegranate polyphenol extract 7 days/week for 6 months. Individuals in CON ingested a noncaloric placebo capsule using the same protocol. Measurements were conducted at baseline and repeated 6 months following the start of the intervention. Brachial blood pressure (BP) was obtained using an automatic digital BP monitor. Cardiovascular risk was assessed using ultrasound and arterial tonometry. Blood samples were collected for the measurements of circulating markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and antioxidant capacity. Muscle strength and physical function were assessed by isokinetic dynamometry, a validated shuttle walk test, and a battery of tests to assess functional fitness. Systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were reduced by 24 ± 13.7 and 10 ± 5.3 mmHg, respectively, in POM (P pomegranate supplementation had no effect on other markers of cardiovascular disease risk, inflammation and oxidative stress, or measures of physical function and muscle strength. While pomegranate extract supplementation may reduce BP and increase the antioxidant activity in HD patients, it does not improve other markers of cardiovascular risk, physical function, or muscle strength.

  10. Inhibitory effects of pomegranate extracts on recombinant human maltase-glucoamylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kayoko; Li, Peng; Uraji, Misugi; Hatanaka, Tadashi; Ito, Hideyuki

    2014-09-01

    α-Glucosidase inhibitors are currently used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory activities of aril and pericarp extracts from pomegranates obtained various regions against recombinant human maltase-glucoamylase (MGAM). The inhibitory activities of the aril extracts tended to be stronger than those of the pericarp extracts. The Iranian aril extract was the most effective inhibitor. We investigated the polyphenol content of the pomegranate extracts using the Folin-Ciocalteu method. Among the aril extracts, the Iranian aril extract showed the highest polyphenol content. We further evaluated inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase from the rat small intestine. Pomegranate extract used in this study showed slightly different inhibitory activities according to α-glucosidase origin. Iranian aril extract was the most effective inhibitor of α-glucosidases, especially recombinant human MGAM. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the pomegranate arils led to identification of punicalagin and oenothein B as potent inhibitors of α-glucosidase. Oenothein B showed inhibitory activity with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value of 174 μM. Its potency was comparable to that of the α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose with an IC(50) value of 170 μM. Dixon plot kinetic analysis of oenothein B showed a noncompetitive inhibition with a K(i) value of 102 μM. These results suggest that pomegranate arils would be useful for suppressing postprandial hyperglycemia. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  11. Pomegranate Supplementation Protects against Memory Dysfunction after Heart Surgery: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan A. Ropacki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory dysfunction is a common complaint following heart surgery and may be related to a diffuse ischemic state induced by microemboli dislodged during the procedure. Ischemia can induce damage by a number of mechanisms, including oxidative stress. Because pomegranates contain a variety of polyphenols with antioxidant and other potentially beneficial effects, we tested whether supplementation with a pomegranate extract before and after heart surgery could protect against postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft and/or valve surgery were given either 2 g of pomegranate extract (in 2 POMx pills or placebo (pills containing no pomegranate ingredients per day from one week before surgery to 6 weeks after surgery. The patients were also administered a battery of neuropsychological tests to assess memory function at 1 week before surgery (baseline, 2 weeks after surgery, and 6 weeks after surgery. The placebo group had significant deficits in postsurgery memory retention, and the pomegranate treatment not only protected against this effect, but also actually improved memory retention performance for up to 6 weeks after surgery as compared to presurgery baseline performance.

  12. Effect of Infusion Method and Parameters on Mass Transfer in Blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to obtain optimal processing conditions for producing infused blueberries with high solid gain, we investigated the infusion characteristics of blueberries under various processing parameters in sugar solutions with 1:1 ratio of solution and berries. Static batch constant concentration inf...

  13. Effects of spray drying on antioxidant capacity and anthocyanidin content of blueberry by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kar; Ma, Mitzi; Dolan, Kirk D

    2011-09-01

    The effect of spray drying on degradation of nutraceutical components in cull blueberry extract was investigated. Samples collected before and after spray drying were tested for antioxidant capacity using oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC(FL) ) and total phenolics; and for individual anthocyanidins. In Study 1, four different levels of maltodextrin (blueberry solids to maltodextrin ratios of 5: 95, 10: 90, 30: 70, and 50: 50) were spray dried a pilot-scale spray dryer. There was significantly higher retention of nutraceutical components with increased levels of maltodextrin indicating a protective effect of maltodextrin on the nutraceutical components during spray drying. In Study 2, the air inlet temperature of the spray dryer was kept constant for all runs at 150 °C, with 2 different outlet temperatures of 80 and 90 °C. The degradation of nutraceutical components was not significantly different at the 2 selected outlet temperatures. ORAC(FL) reduction for blueberry samples after spray drying was 66.3% to 69.6%. After spray drying, total phenolics reduction for blueberry was 8.2% to 17.5%. Individual anthocyanidin reduction for blueberry was 50% to 70%. The experimental spray dried powders compared favorably to commercial blueberry powders. Results of the study show that use of blueberry by-products is feasible to make a value-added powder. Results can be used by producers to estimate final nutraceutical content of spray-dried blueberry by-products. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Field Evidence for Lateral Transfer of Water and Nutrients in Highbush Blueberry: Debunking a Myth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Split-root studies done in the 1980’s on potted blueberry plants revealed that applying irrigation or fertilizer on only one side of the plant reduced growth and production on the other side, suggesting blueberry has little ability to transport water and nutrients laterally within the plant. Howeve...

  15. Phylogenetic, morphological and pathogenic characterization of Alternaria species associated with fruit rots of blueberry in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit rot caused by Alternaria spp. is one of the most important factors affecting the postharvest quality and shelf life of blueberry fruits. Alternaria spp. isolates were collected from decayed fruits of blueberry in the Central Valley of California during 2012 and 2013. The aims of this study wer...

  16. Blueberry Cultivars Differ in Susceptibility to the Elephant Weevil, Orthorhinus cylindrirostris (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Gregory; Clift, Alan D; Mansfield, Sarah

    2017-10-01

    The accumulated damage from elephant weevil larvae, Orthorhinus cylindrirostris (F.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), reduces blueberry yield and shortens the productive lifespan of blueberry plants by several years. Selective breeding to develop pest-resistant blueberry cultivars is a possible control option, but the relationship between O. cylindrirostris populations, plant damage, and blueberry yield has not been described. A field survey of 17 blueberry cultivars was conducted on a commercial farm to measure O. cylindrirostris populations (emergence holes and adult numbers) and yield from plants of different ages (2-12 yr). Blueberry plants accumulated damage over time, that is, older plants tended to have more O. cylindrirostris emergence holes than younger plants. All cultivars received some level of O. cylindrirostris attack but this did not always lead to yield losses. Newer cultivars that have been in production since 2000 were less susceptible to O. cylindrirostris than older cultivars. Removal of highly susceptible cultivars from commercial blueberry farms may reduce O. cylindrirostris populations. There is potential for selective breeding to increase plant resistance to O. cylindrirostris if the specific resistance mechanisms can be identified in blueberry. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Impact of processing on the bioavailability and vascular effects of blueberry (poly)phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Del Pino-García, Raquel; George, Trevor W; Vidal-Diez, Alberto; Heiss, Christian; Spencer, Jeremy P E

    2014-10-01

    Blueberries are a rich source of flavonoids and phenolic acids. Currently, little information is available regarding the impact of processing on the bioavailability and the bioactivity of blueberry (poly)phenols. In a randomized, controlled crossover trial, ten healthy volunteers consumed (a) blueberry-containing baked products, (b) an unprocessed blueberry drink containing the same amount of freeze-dried blueberry powder as used in the baked products, and (c) matched control baked products. Endothelial function was measured as flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and plasma samples taken at baseline and at 1, 2, 4, and 6 h postconsumption. Although processing did not significantly change the total (poly)phenolic amount, the processed products contained significantly less anthocyanins (-42%), more chlorogenic acid (23%), no flavanol nonamers or decamers, and significantly more flavanol dimers and trimers (36% and 28%, respectively). FMD increased after 1, 2, and 6 h consumption of the baked products to a similar degree as the unprocessed blueberries, despite significant differences in the levels of individual plasma metabolites. No changes were observed after the consumption of the control product. Careful processing can preserve important biological activities of blueberries despite changing the blueberry (poly)phenol composition and plasma metabolite profile. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Evaluation of 405 nm monochromatic light for inactivation of tulane virus on blueberry surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of 405 nm light as an intervention for virus contaminated blueberries. Tulane virus-contaminated-blueberries were treated with 4.2 mW/sq cm of 405 nm light for 5 to 30 min. To mitigate thermal heating due to the intense light, a dry ice-chilled ni...

  19. Processes of Origin and Duration of Growth of Blueberries at Meridiani Planum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M.

    2007-07-01

    The process behind blueberries needs to be understood. The questions why did they form, and why are they round, can be answered by: chemical energy and radial diffusion. Blueberry growth energy is olivine serpentinization for two possible precursors, FeS or FeO.OH with modeled 830 yrs to grow.

  20. Toward a semi-mechanical harvesting platform system for harvesting blueberries with fresh-market quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major concerns related to harvesting blueberries for fresh market with over-the-row (OTR) harvesters are that the quality of the fruit harvested with OTR machines is generally low and ground loss is excessive. Machine-harvested blueberries have more internal bruise and usually soften rapidly in col...

  1. Grow tubes reduce root and crown growth but not early production during establishment of highbush blueberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    In blueberry, grow tubes have been used by some growers to establish new plantings and to replace plants within older plantings. We conducted two experiments at a commercial northern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) farm over three years using four cultivars (Aurora, Elliott, Liberty, Oz...

  2. Root production, distribution, and turnover in conventional and organic northern highbush blueberry systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) is a shallow-rooted crop with very fine, fibrous roots. Recently, we installed minirhizotrons (root observation tubes) in a conventional and an organic blueberry planting in western Oregon. We wanted to know exactly when and where new roots were ...

  3. Evaluation of critical temperatures for heat damage in northern highbush blueberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overhead sprinklers are often used to cool blueberry fields in the Pacific Northwest, but more information is needed to determine exactly when cooling is needed. The objective of this study was to identify the critical temperatures for heat damage in northern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum...

  4. RNA-Seq Analysis of blueberry fruit identifies candidate genes involved in ripening and secondary metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Loraine, Ann

    2014-01-01

    I presented this talk at the Plant Metabolic Network workshop held at the Plant Animal Genome Conference (PAG) XXII, January, 2014. The main goals of the talk were to describe RNA-Seq based annotation of a blueberry genome assembly and explain how we used PlantCyc enzyme data to associate blueberry genes with metabolic pathways.

  5. Quantitative evaluation of a rotary blueberry mechanical harvester using a miniature instrumental sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highbush blueberries are predominantly for the fresh market and, with a few exceptions, are exclusively hand harvested if destined for fresh market. Mechanical harvesting systems for processed blueberries are available but low harvest efficiency and high fruit damage have limited the use of mechani...

  6. Changes in energy metabolism accompanying pitting in blueberries stored at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Zhang, Chunlei; Cheng, Shunchang; Wei, Baodong; Liu, Xiuying; Ji, Shujuan

    2014-12-01

    Low-temperature storage and transport of blueberries is widely practiced in commercial blueberry production. In this research, the storage life of blueberries was extended at low temperature, but fruit stored for 30 d at 0°C pitted after 2d at room-temperature. Fruit cellular structure and physiological parameters accompanying pitting in blueberries were changed. The objective of this research was to characterise properties of energy metabolism accompanying pitting in blueberries during storage, including adenosine phosphates and mitochondrial enzymes involved in stress responses. Physiological and metabolic disorders, changes in cell ultrastructure, energy content and ATPase enzyme activity were observed in pitting blueberries. Energy shortages and increased activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX) were observed in fruit kept at shelf life. The results suggested that sufficient available energy status and a stable enzymatic system in blueberries collectively contribute to improve chilling tolerance, thereby alleviating pitting and maintaining quality of blueberry fruit in long-term cold storage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Purified blueberry anthocyanins and blueberry juice alter development of obesity in mice fed an obesogenic high fat diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male C57BL/6J mice (25 days of age) were fed a control low-fat diet (10% kcal from fat)(C-LF) or a high-fat diet (45% kcal from fat)(HF45) for a period of 72 days. Dietary treatments included: 1) C-LF; 2) C-LF + blueberry juice in place of drinking water; 3) C-LF + anthocyanins in the drinking water...

  8. EVALUATION OF TEMPORALVARIATIONS IN MOISTURE AND CALORIFIC VALUE OF VINE AND OLIVE PRUNING

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Porceddu, Pier Riccardo; Rosati, Laura; Dionigi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    .... The calorific value is significantly influenced by the moisture content of wood. This work has evaluated the changes in moisture content and calorific value with time for different harvesting and storage systems of vine and olive pruning...

  9. [On breeding burst-resistant self-pruning tomatoes : Preliminary communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, M; Schwanitz, F

    1968-01-01

    From crossings of a self-pruning German commercial tomato variety with medium sized round fruits, relative resistance against bursting in rain with a self-pruning Central American form with medium sized pruneshaped and never bursting fruits a selfpruning F1 was obtained whose round fruits of medium size never burst. In the F2 a greater number of self-pruning types with round fruits completely burst-resistant and of medium size was found. One self-pruning and burst-resistant plant had remarkably large fruits. Furthermore, two dwarfs and a great number of "cherry"-tomatoes were found. The value of these findings for plant breeding and evolution is discussed.

  10. Influence of harvest season on antioxidant activity and constituents of rabbiteye blueberry ( Vaccinium ashei ) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liancai; Liu, Xi; Tan, Jun; Wang, Bochu

    2013-11-27

    To select rabbiteye blueberry leaves from an appropriate harvest season to develop functional foods, this paper studied the bioactive secondary metabolites and the antioxidant capacity of rabbiteye blueberry leaves from May, September, and November. The results showed the leaves from May had the highest content of total flavonoids (114.21 mg/g) and the leaves from November had the highest content of total polyphenols and proanthocyanidins (425.24 and 243.29 mg/g, respectively). It was further found that blueberry leaves from different seasons have similar bioactive constituents, but their contents are obviously different by HPLC. The rabbiteye blueberry leaves from November had the highest antioxidant capacity, which was well correlated with their highest proanthocyanidin content. The results clarify that the blueberry leaves from different seasons have different contents of bioactive secondary metabolites and different antioxidant activities, which implied that leaves from November should be selected first for utilization in functional foods.

  11. Vaccinium corymbosum L. (blueberry) extracts exhibit protective action against cadmium toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprea, Eliza; Ruta, Lavinia L; Nicolau, Ioana; Popa, Claudia V; Neagoe, Aurora D; Farcasanu, Ileana C

    2014-01-01

    Blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) are a rich source of antioxidants and their consumption is believed to contribute to food-related protection against oxidative stress. In the present study, the chemoprotective action of blueberry extracts against cadmium toxicity was investigated using a cadmium-hypersensitive strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Four varieties of blueberries were used in the study, and it was found that the extracts with high content of total anthocyanidins exhibited significant protective effect against the toxicity of cadmium and H2O2. Both the blueberry extracts and pure cyanidin exhibited protective effects against cadmium in a dose-dependent manner, but without significantly interfering with the cadmium accumulation by the yeast cells. The results imply that the blueberry extracts might be a potentially valuable food supplement for individuals exposed to high cadmium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence for anti-cancer properties of blueberries: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah A; Arjmandi, Bahram H

    2013-10-01

    Blueberries are amongst the most commonly consumed berries in the United States. Berries in general are rich in phenolic compounds, which are known for their high antioxidant capacity. Specifically, evidence from in vitro, in vivo and a few clinical studies suggest that blueberries and their active constituents show promise as effective anti-cancer agents, both in the form of functional foods and as nutritional supplements. Some of the mechanisms by which blueberries have been shown to prevent carcinogenesis include inhibition of the production of pro-inflammatory molecules, oxidative stress and products of oxidative stress such as DNA damage, inhibition of cancer cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. This review will focus on the preclinical and clinical evidence that supports blueberries as an anti-cancer fruit, as well as expressing the need for more preclinical studies and the conduction of clinical studies with respect to the cancer preventive ability of blueberries.

  13. Antioxidant activity of blueberry fruit is impaired by association with milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Mauro; Testa, Maria Francesca; Villaño, Debora; Pecorari, Monia; van Wieren, Karin; Azzini, Elena; Brambilla, Ada; Maiani, Giuseppe

    2009-03-15

    The antioxidant properties of dietary phenolics are believed to be reduced in vivo because of their affinity for proteins. In this study we assessed the bioavailability of phenolics and the in vivo plasma antioxidant capacity after the consumption of blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) with and without milk. In a crossover design, 11 healthy human volunteers consumed either (a) 200 g of blueberries plus 200 ml of water or (b) 200 g of blueberries plus 200 ml of whole milk. Venous samples were collected at baseline and at 1, 2, and 5 h postconsumption. Ingestion of blueberries increased plasma levels of reducing and chain-breaking potential (+6.1%, pblueberries and milk were ingested there was no increase in plasma antioxidant capacity. There was a reduction in the peak plasma concentrations of caffeic and ferulic acid (-49.7%, pblueberries in association with milk, thus, impairs the in vivo antioxidant properties of blueberries and reduces the absorption of caffeic acid.

  14. Regulating mineralization rates of Tithonia diversifolia and Lantana camara prunings to improve phosphorus availability in calcareous soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Nuraini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of mixing of Tithonia diversifolia and Lantana camara prunings to improve synchronization between P released from the prunings with crop demand for P was studied in a laboratory and in a glasshouse. Tithonia diversifolia prunings (Td, Lantana camara prunings (Lc, and farmyard manure (Pk were thoroughly mixed with the proportion (% of dry weight of; 25Td +75 Lc ; 50Td +50 Lc ; 75Td +25 Lc ; 90Lc +10 Pk ; 45Td +45 +10 Lc Pk ; 100Td and 100Lc, and then mixed with 100 g of air-dried soil with a rate equivalent to 100 kg P / ha. Results of the study showed that the pruning mixtures decomposed and mineralized faster than that of Lantana camara pruning only, but slower than that of Tithonia diversifolia pruning only. The amount of P released from the pruning mixtures increased with increasing proportion of Tithonia diversifolia pruning in the mixtures. Increasing proportion of Tithonia diversifolia pruning in the mixture applied to the soil increased the amount of P taken up by maize.

  15. Factors affecting branch wound occlusion and associated decay following pruning – a case study with wild cherry (Prunus avium L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Sheppard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pruning wild cherry (Prunus avium L. is a common silvicultural practice carried out to produce valuable timber at a veneer wood quality. Sub-optimal pruning treatments can permit un-occluded pruning wounds to develop devaluing decay. The aim of this study is to determine relevant branch, tree and pruning characteristics affecting the occlusion process of pruning wounds. Important factors influencing occlusion time for an optimised pruning treatment for valuable timber production utilising wild cherry are derived. 85 artificially pruned branches originating from ten wild cherry trees were retrospectively analysed. Branch stub length, branch diameter and radial stem increment during occlusion were found to be significant predictors for occlusion time. From the results it could be concluded that for the long term success of artificial pruning of wild cherry it is crucial to (i keep branch stubs short (while avoiding damage to the branch collar, (ii to enable the tree to maintain significant radial growth after pruning, (iii to avoid large pruning wounds (>2.5 cm by removing steeply angled and fast growing branches at an early stage.

  16. Congenital megalourethra in 2 weeks old boy associated with Prune-Belly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawal Barau Abdullahi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The megalourethra is a rare congenital anomaly of the penile urethra. It is characterized by the congenital absence of the corpus spongiosum and/or corpus cavernosum. It is especially common associated with Prune-Belly syndrome, and with upper tract abnormalities. We present a 2 weeks old boy with congenital megalourethra because of its association with the Prune-Belly syndrome.

  17. Pseudo Prune Belly Syndrome: Diagnosis Revealed by Imaging ? A Case Report and Brief Review

    OpenAIRE

    Grover, Hemal; Sethi, Sanjay; Garg, Jatin; Ahluwalia, Amrit Pal

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Prune Belly Syndrome (PBS) is a rare entity, usually found in male neonates. It comprises complex urinary tract anomalies, bilateral undescended testis and absence of anterior abdominal wall muscles. Patients with unilateral abdominal wall deficiency, unilateral undescended testis and female neonates with abdominal wall laxity are classified as Pseudo Prune Belly syndrome (PPBS). Reports on PPBS do not highlight the radiological and imaging characteristics of this syndrome ...

  18. Prune belly syndrome in an Egyptian infant with Down syndrome: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Metwalley Kotb A; Farghalley Hekma S; Abd-Elsayed Alaa A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly of uncertain aetiology almost exclusive to males. The association between prune belly syndrome and Down syndrome is very rare. Case presentation A 4-month-old Egyptian boy was admitted to our institute for management of acute bronchiolitis. He was born at full term by normal vaginal delivery. His mother, a 42-year-Egyptian villager with six other children, had no antenatal or prenatal care. On examination, the boy was fou...

  19. Response surface optimization of ultrasound-assisted polysaccharides extraction from pomegranate peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cai-Ping; Zhai, Xi-Chuan; Li, Lin-Qiang; Wu, Xiao-Xia; Li, Bing

    2015-06-15

    Ultrasonic technique was employed to extract polysaccharides from pomegranate peel. The optimal conditions for ultrasonic extraction of pomegranate peel polysaccharide (PPP) were determined by response surface methodology. Box-Behnken design was applied to evaluate the effects of four independent variables (ratio of water to raw material, extraction time, extraction temperature, ultrasonic power) on the yield of PPP. The correlation analysis of mathematical-regression models indicated that quadratic polynomial model could be employed to optimize the ultrasonic extraction of PPP. The optimum extraction parameters were as follows: ratio of water to raw material, 24 ml/g; extraction time, 63 min; extraction temperature, 55°C; and ultrasonic power, 148 W. Under these conditions, the polysaccharide yield was 13.658 ± 0.133% for the pomegranate peel, which well matches with the predicted value. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Alginate-pomegranate peels' polyphenols beads: effects of formulation parameters on loading efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wissam Zam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium alginate beads containing pomegranate peels' polyphenol extract were encapsulated by ionic gelation method. The effects of various formulation factors (sodium alginate concentration, calcium chloride concentration, calcium chloride exposure time, gelling bath time maintaining, and extract concentration on the efficiency of extract loading were investigated. The formulation containing an extract of 1 g pomegranate peels in 100 mL distilled water encapsulated with 3 % of sodium alginate cured in 0.05 M calcium chloride for 20 minutes and kept in a gelling bath for 15 minutes was chosen as the best formula regarding the loading efficiency. These optimized conditions allowed the encapsulation of 43.90% of total extracted polyphenols and 46.34 % of total extracted proanthocyanidins. Microencapsulation of pomegranate peels' extract in calcium alginate beads is a promising technique for pharmaceutical and food supplementation with natural antioxidants.

  1. PRUNE is crucial for normal brain development and mutated in microcephaly with neurodevelopmental impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollo, Massimo; Ahmed, Mustafa; Ferrucci, Veronica; Salpietro, Vincenzo; Asadzadeh, Fatemeh; Carotenuto, Marianeve; Maroofian, Reza; Al-Amri, Ahmed; Singh, Royana; Scognamiglio, Iolanda; Mojarrad, Majid; Musella, Luca; Duilio, Angela; Di Somma, Angela; Karaca, Ender; Rajab, Anna; Al-Khayat, Aisha; Mohan Mohapatra, Tribhuvan; Eslahi, Atieh; Ashrafzadeh, Farah; Rawlins, Lettie E; Prasad, Rajniti; Gupta, Rashmi; Kumari, Preeti; Srivastava, Mona; Cozzolino, Flora; Kumar Rai, Sunil; Monti, Maria; Harlalka, Gaurav V; Simpson, Michael A; Rich, Philip; Al-Salmi, Fatema; Patton, Michael A; Chioza, Barry A; Efthymiou, Stephanie; Granata, Francesca; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Wiethoff, Sarah; Borgione, Eugenia; Scuderi, Carmela; Mankad, Kshitij; Hanna, Michael G; Pucci, Piero; Houlden, Henry; Lupski, James R; Crosby, Andrew H; Baple, Emma L

    2017-04-01

    PRUNE is a member of the DHH (Asp-His-His) phosphoesterase protein superfamily of molecules important for cell motility, and implicated in cancer progression. Here we investigated multiple families from Oman, India, Iran and Italy with individuals affected by a new autosomal recessive neurodevelopmental and degenerative disorder in which the cardinal features include primary microcephaly and profound global developmental delay. Our genetic studies identified biallelic mutations of PRUNE1 as responsible. Our functional assays of disease-associated variant alleles revealed impaired microtubule polymerization, as well as cell migration and proliferation properties, of mutant PRUNE. Additionally, our studies also highlight a potential new role for PRUNE during microtubule polymerization, which is essential for the cytoskeletal rearrangements that occur during cellular division and proliferation. Together these studies define PRUNE as a molecule fundamental for normal human cortical development and define cellular and clinical consequences associated with PRUNE mutation. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  2. Síndrome de Prune Belly: Presentación de un caso y revisión de la literatura Prune Belly Syndrome: Case report and review

    OpenAIRE

    Albert Franz Guerrero; Carlos Augusto Cuadros; Diana Carolina Archila; Sandra Milena Beltrán; Gustavo Adolfo Cuadros

    2010-01-01

    Introducción: El síndrome de Prune Belly (SPB), también conocido como el síndrome de Eagle Barrett, se caracteriza por una triada de anomalías que incluye grados variables de hipoplasia de la musculatura abdominal, anomalías del tracto urinario y criptorquidia bilateral. Objetivo: Se describe el caso de un paciente masculino con Síndrome de Prune Belly y se realiza una revisión de la literatura sobre esta rara enfermedad. Conclusión: La característica arrugada del abdomen similar a una ciruel...

  3. Exobasidium maculosum, a new species causing leaf and fruit spots on blueberry in the southeastern USA and its relationship with other Exobasidium spp. parasitic to blueberry and cranberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Marin Talbot; Turner, Ashley N; Brannen, Phillip M; Cline, William O; Richardson, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot of blueberry (Vaccinium section Cyanococcus) is an emerging disease that has rapidly increased in prevalence throughout the southeastern USA. To determine whether this disease is caused by a new species of Exobasidium, we studied the morphology and phylogenetic relationship of the causal fungus compared with other members of the genus, including the type species E. vaccinii and other species that parasitize blueberry and cranberry (V. macrocarpon). Both scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy were used for morphological characterization. For phylogenetic analyses, we sequenced the large subunit of the rDNA (LSU) from 10 isolates collected from leaf or fruit spots of rabbiteye blueberry (V. virgatum), highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum) and southern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium interspecific hybrid) from Georgia and North Carolina and six isolates from leaf spots of lowbush blueberry (V. angustifolium) from Maine and Nova Scotia, Canada. LSU was sequenced from isolates causing red leaf disease of lowbush blueberry and red leaf spot (E. rostrupii) and red shoot (E. perenne) of cranberry. In addition, LSU sequences from GenBank, including sequences with high similarity to the emerging parasite and from Exobasidium spp. parasitizing other Vaccinium spp. and related hosts, were obtained. All sequences were aligned and subjected to phylogenetic analyses. Results indicated that the emerging parasite in the southeastern USA differs morphologically and phylogenetically from other described species and is described herein as Exobasidium maculosum. Within the southeastern USA, clustering based on host species, host tissue type (leaf or fruit) or geographic region was not detected; however, leaf spot isolates from lowbush blueberry were genetically different and likely represent a unique species. © 2014 by The Mycological Society of America.

  4. Lipid composition of seed oils of different pomegranate (Punica granatum L. cultivars from Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Fernandes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. is an ancient fruit tree traditionally cultivated in the Near and Middle East. Presently, its most important growing regions include Afghanistan, Iran, Israel, USA, Italy and Spain, the latter country the largest European exporter. The pomegranate fruit can be divided into several anatomical compartments: outside peel, inside peel, and arils (pulp and seeds, the last part being usually used for consumption as is or for juice, jams and jellies production. Even though pomegranate seeds are an industrial by-product, recent reports have highlighted their potential use as a source of oil with beneficial chemical attributes. Therefore, the main objective of the present work was to characterize the seed oil of nine European pomegranate varieties, collected in Spain, for their fatty acid and vitamin E compositions. All seed lipid fractions consisted mainly of punicic acid (c9,t11,c13 C-18:3, ranging between 77.3% and 83.6% of total fatty acids, followed by small amounts of linoleic acid (C18:2n6, oleic acid (C18:1n9 and palmitic acid (C16:0. Regarding vitamin E composition, α-, γ-, δ-tocopherols were found in all pomegranate seed oils, but mainly γ-tocopherol, with total tocopherols ranging from 174.5 to 627.3 mg/100g oil.The richness of these pomegranate varieties seed oils in punicic acid, a conjugated linolenic acid with interesting anti-carcinogenic activity, and the elevated amount of tocopherols on the extracted lipids, of technological and nutritional relevance, make this by-product interesting for further exploitation.

  5. Pomegranate peel as a natural antioxidant boosts bucks' fertility under Egyptian summer conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Zeweil, Hassan S.; Samar Elnagar; Zahran, Soliman M.; Ahmed, Mohamed H.; Yassmine El-Gindy

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of male rabbits to heat stress during summer adversely affects their fertility, leading to major production losses. A total of 16 male rabbits were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups exposed to temperatures ranging from a high of 30.3 to a low of 27.3 °C. Animals from first to fourth groups were fed diets containing 0, 1.5, 3.0, or 4.5% pomegranate peel (PP) to evaluate the ability of PP feeding to enhance bucks¿ reproductive status. Pomegranate peel treatments significantly...

  6. Pomegranate peel and peel extracts: chemistry and food features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Saeed; Ismail, Tariq; Fraternale, Daniele; Sestili, Piero

    2015-05-01

    The present review focuses on the nutritional, functional and anti-infective properties of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) peel (PoP) and peel extract (PoPx) and on their applications as food additives, functional food ingredients or biologically active components in nutraceutical preparations. Due to their well-known ethnomedical relevance and chemical features, the biomolecules available in PoP and PoPx have been proposed, for instance, as substitutes of synthetic food additives, as nutraceuticals and chemopreventive agents. However, because of their astringency and anti-nutritional properties, PoP and PoPx are not yet considered as ingredients of choice in food systems. Indeed, considering the prospects related to both their health promoting activity and chemical features, the nutritional and nutraceutical potential of PoP and PoPx seems to be still underestimated. The present review meticulously covers the wide range of actual and possible applications (food preservatives, stabilizers, supplements, prebiotics and quality enhancers) of PoP and PoPx components in various food products. Given the overall properties of PoP and PoPx, further investigations in toxicological and sensory aspects of PoP and PoPx should be encouraged to fully exploit the health promoting and technical/economic potential of these waste materials as food supplements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pomegranate ellagitannins stimulate growth of gut bacteria in vitro: Implications for prebiotic and metabolic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoping; Summanen, Paula H; Komoriya, Tomoe; Henning, Susanne M; Lee, Ru-Po; Carlson, Eliisa; Heber, David; Finegold, Sydney M

    2015-08-01

    The present study investigated the effect of pomegranate extract (POMx) and pomegranate juice (POM juice) on the growth of major groups of intestinal bacteria: Enterobacteriaceae, Bacteroides fragilis group, clostridia, bifidobacteria, and lactobacilli, and the utilization of pomegranate polyphenols by Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus. The total phenolic content of the pomegranate extract and juice was determined using the Folin-Ciocalteau colorimetric method and reported as gallic acid equivalent (GAE). The polyphenol composition was determined by HPLC. Stool specimens were incubated with 400, 100, and 25 μg/ml GAE POMx and POM juice and subjected to selective culture. Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus strains were incubated with 400 μg/ml GAE POMx and POM juice and metabolites were analyzed. POMx and POM juice increased the mean counts of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus and significantly inhibited the growth of B. fragilis group, clostridia, and Enterobacteriaceae in a dose-response manner. Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus utilized ellagic acid and glycosyl ellagic acid but little or no punicalin was utilized. Neither POMx nor POM juice was converted to urolithins by the test bacteria or the in vitro stool cultures. The effect of pomegranate on the gut bacteria considered to be beneficial (Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus) suggests that pomegranate may potentially work as a prebiotic. The concept that polyphenols such as those in pomegranate impact gut microbiota populations may establish a new role for polyphenols in human health. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Pomegranate peel extract attenuates oxidative stress by decreasing coronary angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity in hypertensive female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Roger L; Dellacqua, Lais O; Delgado, Nathalie T B; Rouver, Wender N; Podratz, Priscila L; Lima, Leandro C F; Piccin, Mariela P C; Meyrelles, Silvana S; Mauad, Helder; Graceli, Jones B; Moyses, Margareth R

    2016-01-01

    Based on the antioxidant properties of pomegranate, this study was designed to investigate the effects of pomegranate peel extract on damage associated with hypertension and aging in a spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) model. The influence of pomegranate consumption was examined on systolic blood pressure (SBP), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) coronary activity, oxidative stress, and vascular morphology. Four- or 28-wk-old SHR model rats were treated for 30 d, with terminal experimental animal age being 8 and 32 wk, respectively, with either pomegranate extract (SHR-PG) or filtered water (SHR). Data showed significant reduction in SBP and coronary ACE activity in both age groups. The levels of superoxide anion, a measure of oxidative stress, were significantly lower in animals in the SHR-PG group compared to SHR alone. Coronary morphology demonstrated total increases in vascular wall areas were in the SHR group, and pomegranate peel extract diminished this effect. Pomegranate peel extract consumption conferred protection against hypertension in the SHR model. This finding was demonstrated by marked reduction in coronary ACE activity, oxidative stress, and vascular remodelling. In addition, treatment was able to reduce SBP in both groups. Evidence indicates that the use of pomegranate peel extract may prove beneficial in alleviating coronary heart disease.

  9. Dictionary Pruning with Visual Word Significance for Medical Image Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Song, Yang; Cai, Weidong; Hauptmann, Alexander G.; Liu, Sidong; Pujol, Sonia; Kikinis, Ron; Fulham, Michael J; Feng, David Dagan; Chen, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Content-based medical image retrieval (CBMIR) is an active research area for disease diagnosis and treatment but it can be problematic given the small visual variations between anatomical structures. We propose a retrieval method based on a bag-of-visual-words (BoVW) to identify discriminative characteristics between different medical images with Pruned Dictionary based on Latent Semantic Topic description. We refer to this as the PD-LST retrieval. Our method has two main components. First, we calculate a topic-word significance value for each visual word given a certain latent topic to evaluate how the word is connected to this latent topic. The latent topics are learnt, based on the relationship between the images and words, and are employed to bridge the gap between low-level visual features and high-level semantics. These latent topics describe the images and words semantically and can thus facilitate more meaningful comparisons between the words. Second, we compute an overall-word significance value to evaluate the significance of a visual word within the entire dictionary. We designed an iterative ranking method to measure overall-word significance by considering the relationship between all latent topics and words. The words with higher values are considered meaningful with more significant discriminative power in differentiating medical images. We evaluated our method on two public medical imaging datasets and it showed improved retrieval accuracy and efficiency. PMID:27688597

  10. Randomised clinical trial: dried plums (prunes) vs. psyllium for constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaluri, A; Donahoe, R; Valestin, J; Brown, K; Rao, S S C

    2011-04-01

    Treatment of chronic constipation remains challenging with 50% of patients dissatisfied with current therapy. There is an unmet need for natural and safe alternatives. Dried plums (prunes) have been used traditionally for constipation but their efficacy is not known. Aim To assess and compare the effects of dried plums and psyllium in patients with chronic constipation. Subjects were enrolled in an 8-week, single-blind, randomised cross-over study. Subjects received either dried plums (50 g b.d., fibre=6 gm/day) or psyllium (11 g b.d., fibre=6 gm/day) for 3 weeks each, in a crossover trial with a 1-week washout period. Subjects maintained a daily symptom and stool diary. Assessments included number of complete spontaneous bowel movements per week, global relief of constipation, stool consistency, straining, tolerability and taste. Forty constipated subjects (m/f=3/37, mean age=38 years) participated. The number of complete spontaneous bowel movements per week (primary outcome measure) and stool consistency scores improved significantly (Ppsyllium. Straining and global constipation symptoms did not differ significantly between treatments (P=N.S.). Dried plums and psyllium were rated as equally palatable and both were safe and well tolerated. Dried plums are safe, palatable and more effective than psyllium for the treatment of mild to moderate constipation, and should be considered as a first line therapy. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Prune belly syndrome, splenic torsion, and malrotation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Sifrance; Grossman, Eric; Barsness, Katherine A

    2013-02-01

    An 18 year old male with a history of prune belly syndrome (PBS) presented with acute abdominal pain and palpable left upper quadrant mass. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed a medialized spleen with a "whirl sign" in the splenic vessels, consistent with splenic torsion. Coincidentally, the small bowel was also noted to be on the right side of the abdomen, while the colon was located on the left, indicative of malrotation. Emergent diagnostic laparoscopy confirmed splenic torsion and intestinal malrotation. Successful laparoscopic reduction of the splenic torsion was achieved, however, conversion to an open procedure by a vertical midline incision was necessary owing to the patient's unique anatomy. Open splenopexy with a mesh sling and Ladd's procedure were subsequently performed. Malrotation and wandering spleen are known, rare associated anomalies in PBS; however, both have not been reported concurrently in a patient with PBS in the literature. In patients with PBS, acute abdominal pain, and an abdominal mass, high clinical suspicion for gastrointestinal malformations and prompt attention can result in spleen preservation and appropriate malrotation management. We present a case of a teenager who presented with a history of PBS, acute abdominal pain, and a palpable abdominal mass. The patient was found to have splenic torsion and intestinal malrotation. The clinical findings, diagnostic imaging, and surgical treatment options of splenic torsion are reviewed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pomegranate juice and punicalagin attenuate oxidative stress and apoptosis in human placenta and in human placental trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baosheng; Tuuli, Methodius G; Longtine, Mark S; Shin, Joong Sik; Lawrence, Russell; Inder, Terrie; Michael Nelson, D

    2012-05-15

    The human placenta is key to pregnancy outcome, and the elevated oxidative stress present in many complicated pregnancies contributes to placental dysfunction and suboptimal pregnancy outcomes. We tested the hypothesis that pomegranate juice, which is rich in polyphenolic antioxidants, limits placental trophoblast injury in vivo and in vitro. Pregnant women with singleton pregnancies were randomized at 35∼38 wk gestation to 8 oz/day of pomegranate juice or apple juice (placebo) until the time of delivery. Placental tissues from 12 patients (4 in the pomegranate group and 8 in the control group) were collected for analysis of oxidative stress. The preliminary in vivo results were extended to oxidative stress and cell death assays in vitro. Placental explants and cultured primary human trophoblasts were exposed to pomegranate juice or glucose (control) under defined oxygen tensions and chemical stimuli. We found decreased oxidative stress in term human placentas from women who labored after prenatal ingestion of pomegranate juice compared with apple juice as control. Moreover, pomegranate juice reduced in vitro oxidative stress, apoptosis, and global cell death in term villous explants and primary trophoblast cultures exposed to hypoxia, the hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride, and the kinase inhibitor staurosporine. Punicalagin, but not ellagic acid, both prominent polyphenols in pomegranate juice, reduced oxidative stress and stimulus-induced apoptosis in cultured syncytiotrophoblasts. We conclude that pomegranate juice reduces placental oxidative stress in vivo and in vitro while limiting stimulus-induced death of human trophoblasts in culture. The polyphenol punicalagin mimics this protective effect. We speculate that antenatal intake of pomegranate may limit placental injury and thereby may confer protection to the exposed fetus.

  13. Pomegranate juice and punicalagin attenuate oxidative stress and apoptosis in human placenta and in human placental trophoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuuli, Methodius G.; Longtine, Mark S.; Shin, Joong Sik; Lawrence, Russell; Inder, Terrie; Michael Nelson, D.

    2012-01-01

    The human placenta is key to pregnancy outcome, and the elevated oxidative stress present in many complicated pregnancies contributes to placental dysfunction and suboptimal pregnancy outcomes. We tested the hypothesis that pomegranate juice, which is rich in polyphenolic antioxidants, limits placental trophoblast injury in vivo and in vitro. Pregnant women with singleton pregnancies were randomized at 35∼38 wk gestation to 8 oz/day of pomegranate juice or apple juice (placebo) until the time of delivery. Placental tissues from 12 patients (4 in the pomegranate group and 8 in the control group) were collected for analysis of oxidative stress. The preliminary in vivo results were extended to oxidative stress and cell death assays in vitro. Placental explants and cultured primary human trophoblasts were exposed to pomegranate juice or glucose (control) under defined oxygen tensions and chemical stimuli. We found decreased oxidative stress in term human placentas from women who labored after prenatal ingestion of pomegranate juice compared with apple juice as control. Moreover, pomegranate juice reduced in vitro oxidative stress, apoptosis, and global cell death in term villous explants and primary trophoblast cultures exposed to hypoxia, the hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride, and the kinase inhibitor staurosporine. Punicalagin, but not ellagic acid, both prominent polyphenols in pomegranate juice, reduced oxidative stress and stimulus-induced apoptosis in cultured syncytiotrophoblasts. We conclude that pomegranate juice reduces placental oxidative stress in vivo and in vitro while limiting stimulus-induced death of human trophoblasts in culture. The polyphenol punicalagin mimics this protective effect. We speculate that antenatal intake of pomegranate may limit placental injury and thereby may confer protection to the exposed fetus. PMID:22374759

  14. Bioactive Compounds of Blueberries: Post-Harvest Factors Influencing the Nutritional Value of Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Anna; Łysiak, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Blueberries, besides having commonly-recognized taste properties, are also a valuable source of health-promoting bioactive compounds. For several decades, blueberries have gained in popularity all over the world, and recent years have seen not only an increase in fresh consumption, but also in the importance of blueberries for the processing industry. Blueberry processing mostly consists of freezing and juicing. Recently, more attention has been drawn to dewatering and drying, which are promising areas for developing novel blueberry products. Processing affects each biologically-active compound in a different way, and it is still unknown what changes those compounds undergo at the molecular level after the application of different processing technologies. This work presents the most recent state of knowledge about the pre-treatment and processing methods applied to blueberries and their influence on the content of biologically-active compounds. The presentation of methods is preceded by a brief overview of the characteristics of the blueberry species, a description of the chemical composition of the fruit and a short note about the main growing areas, production volumes and the management of fruit crops. PMID:26266408

  15. Storage effects on anthocyanins, phenolics and antioxidant activity of thermally processed conventional and organic blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamaladevi, Roopesh M; Andrews, Preston K; Davies, Neal M; Walters, Thomas; Sablani, Shyam S

    2012-03-15

    Consumer demand for products rich in phytochemicals is increasing as a result of greater awareness of their potential health benefits. However, processed products are stored for long-term and the phytochemicals are susceptible to degradation during storage. The objective of this study was to assess the storage effects on phytochemicals in thermally processed blueberries. Thermally processed canned berries and juice/puree were analysed for phytochemicals during their long-term storage. The phytochemical retention of thermally processed blueberries during storage was not influenced by production system (conventional versus organic). During 13 months of storage, total anthocyanins, total phenolics and total antioxidant activity in canned blueberry solids decreased by up to 86, 69 and 52% respectively. In canned blueberry syrup, total anthocyanins and total antioxidant activity decreased by up to 68 and 15% respectively, while total phenolic content increased by up to 117%. Similar trends in phytochemical content were observed in juice/puree stored for 4 months. The extent of changes in phytochemicals of thermally processed blueberries during storage was significantly influenced by blanching. Long-term storage of thermally processed blueberries had varying degrees of influence on degradation of total anthocyanins, total phenolics and total antioxidant activity. Blanching before thermal processing helped to preserve the phytochemicals during storage of blueberries. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. BBGD454: A database for transcriptome analysis of blueberry using 454 sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Omar; Rowland, L Jeannine; Alkharouf, Nadim W

    2013-01-01

    Blueberry is an economically and nutritionally important small fruit crop, native to North America. As with many crops, extreme low temperature can affect blueberry crop yield negatively and cause major losses to growers. For this reason, blueberry breeding programs have focused on developing improved cultivars with broader climatic adaptation. To help achieve this goal, the blueberry genomic database (BBGD454) was developed to provide the research community with valuable resources to identify genes that play an important role in flower bud and fruit development, cold acclimation and chilling accumulation in blueberry. The database was developed using SQLServer2008 to house 454 transcript sequences, annotations and gene expression profiles of blueberry genes. BBGD454 can be accessed publically from a web-based interface; this website provides search and browse functionalities to allow scientists to access and search the data in order to correlate gene expression with gene function in different stages of blueberry fruit ripening, at different stages of cold acclimation of flower buds, and in leaves. It can be accessed from http://bioinformatics.towson.edu/BBGD454/

  17. Phenology of Dasineura oxycoccana (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) on cranberry and blueberry indicates potential for gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Melissa A; Fitzpatrick, Sheila M; Roitberg, Bernard D

    2012-08-01

    Dasineura oxycoccana (Johnson) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) is a pest of cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon (Aiton) (Ericales: Ericaceae), and highbush blueberry, Vaccinium corymbosum (L.) (Ericales: Ericaceae), in North America. In British Columbia, Canada, D. oxycoccana was first found on highbush blueberry in 1991 and then on cranberry seven years later. Because many cranberry and highbush blueberry farms are adjacent to one another, we hypothesized that D. oxycoccana was moving from highbush blueberry onto cranberry. Cranberry and highbush blueberry differ in phenology, and adaptation to these different phenologies may result in host races or cryptic species on these two crops. We recognized the alternative hypothesis that D. oxycoccana had arrived as immature stages with cranberry vines imported from another region of North America. During spring and summer, we recorded the phenology of D. oxycoccana and the development of plant shoots from three cranberry and three highbush blueberry farms to determine whether the opportunity exists for successful movement of D. oxycoccana between the two crops. Our results show that D. oxycoccana from cranberry and highbush blueberry overlap in phenology for much of the season, indicating a high potential for movement and gene flow. However, differences were seen in number of larvae per shoot, location of pupae, and heat unit accumulation during larval development suggesting that instead there may be the potential for host race or cryptic species formation.

  18. Differential iridoid production as revealed by a diversity panel of 84 cultivated and wild blueberry species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, Courtney P; Kamileen, Mohamed O; Conway, Megan E; O'Connor, Sarah E; Buell, C Robin

    2017-01-01

    Cultivated blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum, Vaccinium angustifolium, Vaccinium darrowii, and Vaccinium virgatum) is an economically important fruit crop native to North America and a member of the Ericaceae family. Several species in the Ericaceae family including cranberry, lignonberry, bilberry, and neotropical blueberry species have been shown to produce iridoids, a class of pharmacologically important compounds present in over 15 plant families demonstrated to have a wide range of biological activities in humans including anti-cancer, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory. While the antioxidant capacity of cultivated blueberry has been well studied, surveys of iridoid production in blueberry have been restricted to fruit of a very limited number of accessions of V. corymbosum, V. angustifolium and V. virgatum; none of these analyses have detected iridoids. To provide a broader survey of iridoid biosynthesis in cultivated blueberry, we constructed a panel of 84 accessions representing a wide range of cultivated market classes, as well as wild blueberry species, and surveyed these for the presence of iridoids. We identified the iridoid glycoside monotropein in fruits and leaves of all 13 wild Vaccinium species, yet only five of the 71 cultivars. Monotropein positive cultivars all had recent introgressions from wild species, suggesting that iridoid production can be targeted through breeding efforts that incorporate wild germplasm. A series of diverse developmental tissues was also surveyed in the diversity panel, demonstrating a wide range in iridoid content across tissues. Taken together, this data provides the foundation to dissect the molecular and genetic basis of iridoid production in blueberry.

  19. Incidence of viruses in highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevremović Darko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A large-scale survey for highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. viruses in Serbia was performed from 2011 to 2015. A total of 81 leaf samples from 15 locations were collected and analyzed for the presence of 8 viruses. Serological ELISA assay was performed to determine the presence of: Blueberry scorch virus (BlScV, Blueberry shock virus (BlShV, Blueberry shoestring virus (BSSV, Blueberry leaf mottle virus (BLMoV, Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV and Tomato ringspot virus (ToRSV. All samples were tested for the presence of Blueberry red ringspot virus (BRRV by PCR and for Blueberry mosaic-associated virus (BlMaV by RT-PCR test. The analyses confirmed the presence of BlMaV in 8 (9.9% samples and BRRV in 1 (1.2% sample. No BlScV, BlShV, BLMoV, BSSV, TRSV or ToRSV viruses were detected in any of the analyzed samples.

  20. Bioactive Compounds of Blueberries: Post-Harvest Factors Influencing the Nutritional Value of Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Anna; Łysiak, Grzegorz

    2015-08-10

    Blueberries, besides having commonly-recognized taste properties, are also a valuable source of health-promoting bioactive compounds. For several decades, blueberries have gained in popularity all over the world, and recent years have seen not only an increase in fresh consumption, but also in the importance of blueberries for the processing industry. Blueberry processing mostly consists of freezing and juicing. Recently, more attention has been drawn to dewatering and drying, which are promising areas for developing novel blueberry products. Processing affects each biologically-active compound in a different way, and it is still unknown what changes those compounds undergo at the molecular level after the application of different processing technologies. This work presents the most recent state of knowledge about the pre-treatment and processing methods applied to blueberries and their influence on the content of biologically-active compounds. The presentation of methods is preceded by a brief overview of the characteristics of the blueberry species, a description of the chemical composition of the fruit and a short note about the main growing areas, production volumes and the management of fruit crops.

  1. Bioactive Compounds of Blueberries: Post-Harvest Factors Influencing the Nutritional Value of Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Michalska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Blueberries, besides having commonly-recognized taste properties, are also a valuable source of health-promoting bioactive compounds. For several decades, blueberries have gained in popularity all over the world, and recent years have seen not only an increase in fresh consumption, but also in the importance of blueberries for the processing industry. Blueberry processing mostly consists of freezing and juicing. Recently, more attention has been drawn to dewatering and drying, which are promising areas for developing novel blueberry products. Processing affects each biologically-active compound in a different way, and it is still unknown what changes those compounds undergo at the molecular level after the application of different processing technologies. This work presents the most recent state of knowledge about the pre-treatment and processing methods applied to blueberries and their influence on the content of biologically-active compounds. The presentation of methods is preceded by a brief overview of the characteristics of the blueberry species, a description of the chemical composition of the fruit and a short note about the main growing areas, production volumes and the management of fruit crops.

  2. Formation of acrylamide at temperatures lower than 100°C: the case of prunes and a model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becalski, A.; Brady, B.; Feng, S.; Gauthier, B.R.; Zhao, T.

    2011-01-01

    Acrylamide concentrations in prune products – baby strained prunes (range = 75–265 μg kg−−1), baby apple/prune juice (33–61 μg kg−−1), prune juice (186–916 μg kg−−1) and prunes (58–332 μg kg−−1) – on the Canadian market were determined. The formation of acrylamide in a simulated plum juice was also investigated under ‘drying conditions’ in an open vessel at temperatures Acrylamide was produced in a simulated plum juice under ‘drying conditions’ in amounts comparable with those found in prunes and prune juices. Acrylamide was not produced in simulated plum juice under ‘wet conditions’ in a closed vessel at temperature of 120°C for 1 h, but under the same condition an authentic prune juice doubled its acrylamide concentration. Formation of acrylamide in prune products was attributed to the presence of asparagine and sugars in the starting materials. PMID:21623495

  3. Yield and crop cycle time of peaches cultivated in subtropical climates and subjected to different pruning times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Augusto Ferraz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation of peaches in regions of subtropical and tropical climate is currently achieved through a set of practices such as using less demanding cultivars in cold conditions, applying plant growth regulators to break dormancy, and performing specific pruning, like production and renewal pruning. Research on the climate adaptation of cultivars is of great importance in establishing a crop in a given region. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the agronomic performance of three cultivars subjected to different production pruning times in Botucatu/SP, where 2-year old peach trees were evaluated, grown at a spacing of 6.0 x 4.0 meters. The experimental design was a split plot design with four blocks, using the cultivars Douradão, BRS Kampai and BRS Rubimel, and the subplots corresponded to pruning times in May, June, July and August. Ten plants were used per plot, with the four central plants considered useful and the remaining considered as margins. Pruning in June and July showed the best results in terms of percentage of fruit set and production. The cultivar BRS Rubimel showed the best percentage of fruit set when pruned in June (44.96%, and best fruit production when pruned in July (18.7 kg plant-1. Pruning in May anticipated the harvest of cultivar BRS Rubimel by 13 days whereas pruning carried out in July and August provided late harvests for cultivars Douradão and BRS Kampai.

  4. Cover crops and pruning in Bobal and Tempranillo vineyards have little influence on grapevine nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pérez-Bermúdez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cover crops may improve vineyard soil properties, grapevine nutrient status and berry composition, however, factors such as cover crop type, annual rainfall, climate and irrigation may change their effects on vineyards. From 2008 to 2011, the effects of a non-permanent cover crop and two pruning techniques on soil as well as vine nutrients and grapevine performance of two vineyards (cv. Tempranillo and cv. Bobal were evaluated. For that purpose, two legumes were sown in inter-rows of hand-pruned vines in February and were tilled at flowering. Soil tillage, or cover cropping, was combined with either light pruning or severe pruning to study foliar nutrient variations. Soil N, P, K and total organic carbon (TOC were determined in samples taken from the Ap1 horizon in January prior to vine pruning. Foliar N, P, K contents were measured in leaves sampled upon grape veraison. The differences between vineyards with cover cropping and bare soils suggest that legumes positively affected soil N (1.55 vs. 1.68 g kg−1 and 1.49 vs. 1.76 g kg−1 in Bobal and Tempranillo vineyards, respectively and soil organic matter (SOM (12.5 vs. 15.5 g kg−1 and 12.9 vs. 17.2 g kg−1 in Bobal and Tempranillo vineyards, respectively. The use of cover crops did not affect grapevine yields nor quality of Bobal and Tempranillo berry . Cover crops, or light pruning, did not alter the foliar N, P, K contents of both cultivars since their concentrations were similar to those found in the leaves from vineyards with soil tillage or severe pruning.

  5. EVALUATION OF TEMPORALVARIATIONS IN MOISTURE AND CALORIFIC VALUE OF VINE AND OLIVE PRUNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Riccardo Porceddu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In Italy arboreal crops, in particular vine and olive, cover a surface area of around 19.6×109 m2 from which about 4.6×109 kg of pruning are cut. These by-products are currently ploughed into the soil or else harvested and burned in open fields. On the other hand such materials would be more useful as an energy source. If these materials are to be used as fuel, it is important to know their calorific value. The calorific value is significantly influenced by the moisture content of wood. This work has evaluated the changes in moisture content and calorific value with time for different harvesting and storage systems of vine and olive pruning. The observed decrease in the moisture content of the vine and olive pruning depended on the storage system utilized, in particular on the product compression ratio and air circulation. Some differences were observed between the results obtained for vine and olive pruning. The time required for these materials to obtain their best energetic performance was identified at 32 weeks from their harvesting. Harvesting with balers and forwarding costs are about 6.21×10-2 €/kg for vine pruning and 4.64×10-2 €/kg for olive pruning. They are very similar to the price currently offered for energy biomass in Italy (5.00×10-2 €/kg. While the cost actually paid to plough pruning into the soil amounts to about 2.50×10-2 €/kg. Therefore the energy chain encourages a cost-and-benefit analysis.

  6. Blueberry-enriched diet protects rat heart from ischemic damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismayil Ahmet

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available to assess the cardioprotective properties of a blueberry enriched diet (BD.Reactive oxygen species (ROS play a major role in ischemia-related myocardial injury. The attempts to use synthetic antioxidants to block the detrimental effects of ROS have produced mixed or negative results precipitating the interest in natural products. Blueberries are readily available product with the highest antioxidant capacity among fruits and vegetables.Following 3-mo of BD or a regular control diet (CD, the threshold for mitochondrial permeability transition (t(MPT was measured in isolated cardiomyocytes obtained from young male Fischer-344 rats. Compared to CD, BD resulted in a 24% increase (p<0.001 of ROS indexed t(MPT. The remaining animals were subjected to a permanent ligation of the left descending coronary artery. 24 hrs later resulting myocardial infarction (MI in rats on BD was 22% less than in CD rats (p<0.01. Significantly less TUNEL(+ cardiomyocytes (2% vs 9% and 40% less inflammation cells were observed in the myocardial area at risk of BD compared to CD rats (p<0.01. In the subgroup of rats, after coronary ligation the original diet was either continued or switched to the opposite one, and cardiac remodeling and MI expansion were followed by serial echocardiography for 10 weeks. Measurements suggested that continuation of BD or its withdrawal after MI attenuated or accelerated rates of post MI cardiac remodeling and MI expansion.A blueberry-enriched diet protected the myocardium from induced ischemic damage and demonstrated the potential to attenuate the development of post MI chronic heart failure.

  7. Blueberry-enriched diet protects rat heart from ischemic damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmet, Ismayil; Spangler, Edward; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Sollott, Steven J; Joseph, James A; Ingram, Donald K; Talan, Mark

    2009-06-18

    to assess the cardioprotective properties of a blueberry enriched diet (BD). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a major role in ischemia-related myocardial injury. The attempts to use synthetic antioxidants to block the detrimental effects of ROS have produced mixed or negative results precipitating the interest in natural products. Blueberries are readily available product with the highest antioxidant capacity among fruits and vegetables. Following 3-mo of BD or a regular control diet (CD), the threshold for mitochondrial permeability transition (t(MPT)) was measured in isolated cardiomyocytes obtained from young male Fischer-344 rats. Compared to CD, BD resulted in a 24% increase (p<0.001) of ROS indexed t(MPT). The remaining animals were subjected to a permanent ligation of the left descending coronary artery. 24 hrs later resulting myocardial infarction (MI) in rats on BD was 22% less than in CD rats (p<0.01). Significantly less TUNEL(+) cardiomyocytes (2% vs 9%) and 40% less inflammation cells were observed in the myocardial area at risk of BD compared to CD rats (p<0.01). In the subgroup of rats, after coronary ligation the original diet was either continued or switched to the opposite one, and cardiac remodeling and MI expansion were followed by serial echocardiography for 10 weeks. Measurements suggested that continuation of BD or its withdrawal after MI attenuated or accelerated rates of post MI cardiac remodeling and MI expansion. A blueberry-enriched diet protected the myocardium from induced ischemic damage and demonstrated the potential to attenuate the development of post MI chronic heart failure.

  8. Blueberry muffin syndrome | Benmiloud | Pan African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le Blueberry Muffin Baby est un syndrome cutané rare observé en période néonatale. Il est caractérisé par des papulo-nodules disséminés inflammatoires traduisant des réactions d'hématopoïèse dermique. Plusieurs causes doivent être recherchées, notamment les infections congénitales, une hémolyse sévère et les ...

  9. Segmentation of pomegranate MR images using spatial fuzzy c-means (SFCM) algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Ghobad; Shamsi, Mousa; Sedaaghi, M. H.; Alsharif, M. R.

    2011-10-01

    Segmentation is one of the fundamental issues of image processing and machine vision. It plays a prominent role in a variety of image processing applications. In this paper, one of the most important applications of image processing in MRI segmentation of pomegranate is explored. Pomegranate is a fruit with pharmacological properties such as being anti-viral and anti-cancer. Having a high quality product in hand would be critical factor in its marketing. The internal quality of the product is comprehensively important in the sorting process. The determination of qualitative features cannot be manually made. Therefore, the segmentation of the internal structures of the fruit needs to be performed as accurately as possible in presence of noise. Fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm is noise-sensitive and pixels with noise are classified inversely. As a solution, in this paper, the spatial FCM algorithm in pomegranate MR images' segmentation is proposed. The algorithm is performed with setting the spatial neighborhood information in FCM and modification of fuzzy membership function for each class. The segmentation algorithm results on the original and the corrupted Pomegranate MR images by Gaussian, Salt Pepper and Speckle noises show that the SFCM algorithm operates much more significantly than FCM algorithm. Also, after diverse steps of qualitative and quantitative analysis, we have concluded that the SFCM algorithm with 5×5 window size is better than the other windows.

  10. Pomegranate juice (punica granatum: a new storage medium for avulsed teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Tavassoli-Hojjati

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence indicating that pomegranate juice contains many of the essential properties necessary to retain cell viability and cell proliferation. These properties indicate that pomegranate juice is a suitable storage medium for avulsed teeth. However, this idea has not yet been tested. In this study, the capacity of pomegranate juice (PJ as a storage medium for retaining avulsed teeth was evaluated.PDL fibroblasts were obtained from healthy human premolars and cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM. Cultured cells were subjected to different concentrations of pomegranate juice (PJ, 1% Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS and tap water for 1, 3, 6 and 24 hours. PDL cell viability was assessed by the neutral red uptake assay.The results indicated that 7.5% PJ was the most effective solution for maintaining PDL cell viability amongst all the experimental solution's and time intervals (P<0.05. The results also showed that 1% PJ was as effective as HBSS for maintaining PDL cell viability. The amount of cell viability increased with increasing concentration of PJ at all time intervals (P<0.001. This effect is suggestive of the proliferative potential of PJ solution.In conclusion, PJ can be recommended as a suitable transport medium for avulsed teeth.

  11. Pomegranate Juice (Punica Granatum): A New Storage Medium for Avulsed Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli-Hojjati, Sara; Aliasghar, Elham; Babaki, Fatemeh Ahmadian; Emadi, Fatemeh; Parsa, Maliheh; Tavajohi, Shohreh; Ahmadyar, Maryam; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is evidence indicating that pomegranate juice contains many of the essential properties necessary to retain cell viability and cell proliferation. These properties indicate that pomegranate juice is a suitable storage medium for avulsed teeth. However, this idea has not yet been tested. In this study, the capacity of pomegranate juice (PJ) as a storage medium for retaining avulsed teeth was evaluated. Materials and Methods: PDL fibroblasts were obtained from healthy human premolars and cultured in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM). Cultured cells were subjected to different concentrations of pomegranate juice (PJ), 1% Hank’s balanced salt solution (HBSS) and tap water for 1, 3, 6 and 24 hours. PDL cell viability was assessed by the neutral red uptake assay. Results: The results indicated that 7.5% PJ was the most effective solution for maintaining PDL cell viability amongst all the experimental solution’s and time intervals (P<0.05). The results also showed that 1% PJ was as effective as HBSS for maintaining PDL cell viability. The amount of cell viability increased with increasing concentration of PJ at all time intervals (P<0.001). This effect is suggestive of the proliferative potential of PJ solution. Conclusion: In conclusion, PJ can be recommended as a suitable transport medium for avulsed teeth. PMID:24910699

  12. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Pomegranate Juice and Peel Extracts on Cariogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmaria Fabrizio Ferrazzano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of hydroalcoholic extracts of pomegranate (Punica granatum L. peel and juice, against the microorganisms considered the main etiologic agents of dental caries. Methods. The values of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC were determined against Streptococcus mutans Clarke ATCC® 25175™ strain and Rothia dentocariosa clinical isolate. Results. Peel extracts inhibit effectively the growth and survival of S. mutans ATCC 25175 strain and R. dentocariosa clinical isolate with MIC and MBC values of 10 μg/μl and 15 μg/μl, respectively. Furthermore, the pomegranate juice extract showed high inhibitory activity against S. mutans ATCC 25175 strain with a MIC value of 25 μg/μl and a MBC value of 40 μg/μl, whereas, against R. dentocariosa, it has displayed a moderate inhibitory activity, with MIC and MBC values of 20 μg/μl and 140 μg/μl, respectively. Conclusions. In vitro microbiological tests demonstrate that the hydroalcoholic extracts of pomegranate juice and peel are able to contrast the main cariogenic bacteria involved in tooth decay. Although being preliminary data, our results suggest that pomegranate polyphenolic compounds could represent a good adjuvant for the prevention and treatment of dental caries.

  13. Urolithins, Intestinal Microbial Metabolites of Pomegranate Ellagitannins, Exhibit Potent Antioxidant Activity in Cell-Based Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many health benefits of pomegranate products have been attributed to the potent antioxidant action of their tannin components, mainly punicalagins and ellagic acid. While moving through the intestines, ellagitannins are metabolized by gut bacteria into urolithins that readily enter systemic circulat...

  14. Biological Activity of Conventional and Organic Pomegranate Juices: Antioxidant and Antimutagenic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Lamadrid, M; Marhuenda-Egea, F C; Hernández, F; Rosas-Burgos, E C; Burgos-Hernández, A; Carbonell-Barrachina, A A

    2016-12-01

    None of the health claims about pomegranate juices has been approved yet by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). There is a general perception among consumers that organic foods are healthier, tastier, and more nutritive than the conventional products. The aim of this research was to study the differences in the biological activity between ready-for-consumption juices obtained from pomegranates fruits grown under conventional and organic agricultural practices. Antioxidant activity has been evaluated by three methods (DPPH • , ABTS + , and FRAP), together with the total contents of phenolics and punicalagin (HPLC-DAD); besides, the Ames test was used to evaluate the antimutagenic potential of the juices. Pomegranate juice, either from conventionally or organically grown fruits, was antimutagenic (mean of 51 and 90 % for Salmonella typhimurium TA100 and TA98, respectively) and it was capable of protecting DNA from both, base-pair or frame-shift type of mutations. In fact, the antimutagenicity of conventional pomegranate juice was higher than that achieved by the organic sample; this finding was linked to a higher punicalagin content (201 and 104 mg L -1 for conventional and organic juices, respectively).

  15. Swarm motility inhibitory and antioxidant activities of pomegranate peel processed under three drying conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contaminated fruits and vegetables cause global health problems and reduced economic productivity resulting in significant loss to food industry. Pomegranate (Punica granatum) peels provides a rich source of bioactive phytochemicals namely, punicalins (PC: a and ß) punicalagins (PG: a and ß) and ell...

  16. Mixed Pro- and Anti-Oxidative Effects of Pomegranate Polyphenols in Cultured Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Danesi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the number of scientific papers concerning pomegranate (Punica granatum L. and its health properties has increased greatly, and there is great potential for the use of bioactive-rich pomegranate extracts as ingredients in functional foods and nutraceuticals. To translate this potential into effective strategies it is essential to further elucidate the mechanisms of the reported bioactivity. In this study HepG2 cells were supplemented with a pomegranate fruit extract or with the corresponding amount of pure punicalagin, and then subjected to an exogenous oxidative stress. Overall, upon the oxidative stress the gene expression and activity of the main antioxidant enzymes appeared reduced in supplemented cells, which were more prone to the detrimental effects than unsupplemented ones. No differences were detected between cells supplemented with the pomegranate juice or the pure punicalagin. Although further studies are needed due to the gaps existing between in vitro and in vivo studies, our results suggest caution in the administration of high concentrations of nutraceutical molecules, particularly when they are administered in concentrated form.

  17. Antifungal activity of pomegranate peel extract and isolated compound punicalagin against dermatophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Simone R; Nakamura, Celso V; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Cortez, Diógenes A G; Endo, Eliana H; Dias Filho, Benedito P

    2014-09-05

    Dermatophyte species infect the epidermis and appendages, often with serious social and health-economic consequences. The hydroalcoholic extract of pomegranate fruit peel showed activity against the dermatophyte fungi Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. rubrum, Microsporum canis and M. gypseum. Hydroalcoholic extract was prepared with pomegranate peels. This crude extract was fractionated and submitted to liquid-liquid partition, resulting in an active fraction which was fractionated in a Sephadex LH-20 column, followed by a Lobar column. The structure of the active compound was established with the use of spectroscopic methods. The crude extract of pomegranate fruit peel showed activity against the dermatophytes Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. rubrum, Microsporum canis, and M. gypseum, with MICs values of 125 μg/ml and 250 μg/ml, respectively for each genus. Punicalagin was isolated and identified by spectroscopic analysis. The crude extract and punicalagin showed activity against the conidial and hyphal stages of the fungi. The cytotoxicity assay showed selectivity for fungal cells than for mammalian cells. These results indicated that the crude extract and punicalagin had a greater antifungal activity against T. rubrum, indicating that the pomegranate is a good target for study to obtain a new antidermatophyte medicine.

  18. Antibacterial activity of fresh pomegranate juice against clinical strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Betanzos-Cabrera

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polyphenols have received a great deal of attention due to their biological functions. Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. is a polyphenol-rich fruit. In the past decade, studies testing the antimicrobial activity of pomegranates almost exclusively used solvent extracts instead of fresh pomegranate juice (FPJ. The use of FPJ instead of solvent extracts would reduce toxicity issues while increasing patient acceptance. We established a model to test FPJ as a natural antimicrobial agent. Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of FPJ on clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis strains. Design: Sixty strains of S. epidermidis isolated from ocular infections were grown in the presence of FPJ, and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined by broth and agar dilution methods. Results: FPJ at 20% had a MIC equal to 100% (MIC100% on all 60 strains tested. This inhibition of FPJ was confirmed by the growth kinetics of a multidrug-resistant strain exposed to different concentrations of FPJ. Additionally, the antimicrobial activity of FPJ was compared against commercial beverages containing pomegranate: Ocean Spray® had a MIC100% at 20%, followed by Del Valle® with a MIC15% at 20% concentration only. The beverages Jumex® and Sonrisa® did not have any antimicrobial activity. FPJ had the highest polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity. Conclusions: Overall, FPJ had antimicrobial activity, which might be attributed to its high polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity.

  19. Pomegranate Supplementation Improves Affective and Motor Behavior in Mice after Radiation Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S. Dulcich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, NASA has plans for extended space travel, and previous research indicates that space radiation can have negative effects on cognitive skills as well as physical and mental health. With long-term space travel, astronauts will be exposed to greater radiation levels. Research shows that an antioxidant-enriched diet may offer some protection against the cellular effects of radiation and may provide significant neuroprotection from the effects of radiation-induced cognitive and behavioral skill deficits. Ninety-six C57BL/6 mice (48 pomegranate fed and 48 control were irradiated with proton radiation (2 Gy, and two-month postradiation behaviors were assessed using a battery of behavioral tests to measure cognitive and motor functions. Proton irradiation was associated with depression-like behaviors in the tail suspension test, but this effect was ameliorated by the pomegranate diet. Males, in general, displayed worse coordination and balance than females on the rotarod task, and the pomegranate diet ameliorated this effect. Overall, it appears that proton irradiation, which may be encountered in space, may induce a different pattern of behavioral deficits in males than females and that a pomegranate diet may confer protection against some of those effects.

  20. Phenolics of pomegranate peels: extraction optimization by central composite design and alpha glucosidase inhibition potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çam, Mustafa; İçyer, Necattin Cihat

    2015-03-01

    Optimum water extraction conditions for phenolics of pomegranate peels were investigated by fractional factorial and face-centered central composite designs. Five potential factors were selected for the fractional factorial design: extraction technique, extraction temperature, extraction time, particle size and solvent to solid ratio. After eliminating statistically unimportant factors, a face-centered central composite design was set up with two controllable factors and with two responses: total phenolics and α-glucosidase inhibition activity. Optimum conditions were found as 100 °C for extraction temperature and 1 min for extraction time. There were no statistically significant differences (p > 0.05) between water extracts at optimized conditions and classical methanol extracts. Total phenolic content by HPLC was192.0 mg/g of pomegranate peels on dry matter basis. Phenolics of pomegranate peels showed α-glucosidase inhibition activity with an IC50 (concentration of phenolics required to inhibit 50 % of the enzyme activity) value of 5.56 ± 2.23 μg/ml. Pomegranate peel phenolics with its antioxidant and α-glucosidase inhibition properties might be a suitable ingredient for functional food applications.

  1. Phenolic composition of pomegranate peel extracts using an LC-MS approach with silica hydride columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    The peels of different pomegranate cultivars (Molla Nepes, Parfianka, Purple Heart, Wonderful and Vkunsyi) were compared in terms of phenolic composition and total phenolics. Analyses were performed on two silica hydride-based stationary phases: phenyl and undecenoic acid columns. Quantitation was ...

  2. Seasonal pattern of infestation by the carob moth Ectomyelois ceratoniae in pomegranate cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosseini, S.A.; Goldansaz, S.H.; Fotoukkiaii, S.M.; Menken, S.B.J.; Groot, A.T.

    2017-01-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) orchards in the Middle East are typically composed of a mix of different cultivars in which variation in fruit infestation by carob moth Ectomyelois ceratoniae (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) has been observed. However, seasonal variation in infestation and

  3. Anti-oxidant effects of pomegranate juice on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Abdullah; Can, Muhammed İsmail; Boydak, Didem

    2014-01-01

    Pomegranate juice has a number of positive effects on both human and animal subjects. Four groups were used in this study. i: Control group, ii: H2O2 group, iii: Pomegranate juice (PJ) group and iv: PJ + H2O2 group. Following the sterilization method for pomegranate juice (10%) and H2O2 (6% v/v), Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures were added and the cultivation incubated at 35°C for 72 hours. Fatty acids and vitamin concentrations were measured using HPLC and GC and the total protein bands profile were determined by SDS-PAGE. According to our results statistically significant differences have been determined among the study groups in terms of fatty acids and vitamin (pSaccharomyces cerevisiae in comparison with the control. Pomegranate juice has a positive effect on fatty acid, vitamin and protein synthesis by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Accordingly, we believe that it has significantly decreased oxidative damage thereby making a positive impact on yeast development.

  4. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of a Pomegranate Leaf Extract in LPS-Induced Peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Lucia C F; Pinheiro, Aruanã J M C R; Araújo, João G G; de Oliveira, Raimundo A G; Silva, Selma N; Abreu, Iracelle C; de Sousa, Eduardo M; Fernandes, Elizabeth S; Luchessi, André D; Silbiger, Vivian N; Nicolete, Roberto; Lima-Neto, Lidio G

    2016-11-01

    Folk medicine suggests that pomegranate (peels, seeds and leaves) has anti-inflammatory properties; however, the precise mechanisms by which this plant affects the inflammatory process remain unclear. Herein, we analyzed the anti-inflammatory properties of a hydroalcoholic extract prepared from pomegranate leaves using a rat model of lipopolysaccharide-induced acute peritonitis. Male Wistar rats were treated with either the hydroalcoholic extract, sodium diclofenac, or saline, and 1 h later received an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharides. Saline-injected animals (i. p.) were used as controls. Animals were culled 4 h after peritonitis induction, and peritoneal lavage and peripheral blood samples were collected. Serum and peritoneal lavage levels of TNF-α as well as TNF-α mRNA expression in peritoneal lavage leukocytes were quantified. Total and differential leukocyte populations were analyzed in peritoneal lavage samples. Lipopolysaccharide-induced increases of both TNF-α mRNA and protein levels were diminished by treatment with either pomegranate leaf hydroalcoholic extract (57 % and 48 % mean reduction, respectively) or sodium diclofenac (41 % and 33 % reduction, respectively). Additionally, the numbers of peritoneal leukocytes, especially neutrophils, were markedly reduced in hydroalcoholic extract-treated rats with acute peritonitis. These results demonstrate that pomegranate leaf extract may be used as an anti-inflammatory drug which suppresses the levels of TNF-α in acute inflammation. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Cloning and expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in red and white pomegranate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueqing; Yuan, Zhaohe; Feng, Lijuan; Fang, Yanming

    2015-07-01

    Exterior fruit color is an important trait for the evaluation of pomegranate fruit quality, but the molecular mechanism underlying the variation in color between red- and white-fruited pomegranate is poorly understood. In this study, full-length cDNA clones encoding enzymes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis-such as chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, flavanone 3-hydoxylase, dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), UDP-glucose-flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase, and the R2R3 MYB transcription factor PgMYB-were isolated from fruit peels. In addition, transcript levels of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes were quantitatively measured by real-time PCR in red and white fruits. In both cultivars, two expression peaks for structural genes were detected during fruit development, whereas only one peak was observed-during early development-for PgMYB. While PgMYB is important for flavonoid biosynthesis, other transcription factors appear to also be necessary for the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis. No anthocyanins were detected in the white cultivar. Peels of white fruits contained transcripts of all identified genes except for PgANS, suggesting that the lack of PgANS expression may be the main factor responsible for the absence of anthocyanins in white pomegranate. PgANS may be the key gene involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis in pomegranate fruit.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Anthelmintic Activity of Edible and Ornamental Pomegranate Ethanolic Extracts against Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa A. Yones

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the development of praziquantel (PZQ schistosomes resistant strains, the discovery of new antischistosomal agents is of high priority in research. This work reported the in vitro and in vivo effects of the edible and ornamental pomegranate extracts against Schistosoma mansoni. Leaves and stem bark ethanolic extracts of both dried pomegranates were prepared at 100, 300, and 500 μg/mL for in vitro and 600 and 800 mg/kg for in vivo. Adult worms Schistosoma mansoni in RPMI-1640 medium for in vitro and S. mansoni infected mice for in vivo tests were obtained from Theodor Bilharz Research Institute, Cairo, Egypt. In vitro activity was manifested by significant coupled worms separation, reduction of motor activity, lethality, and ultrastructural tegumental alterations in adult worms. In vivo activity was manifested revealed by significant reduction of hepatic granulomas number and diameter, decreased number of bilharzial eggs in liver tissues, lowered liver inflammatory infiltration, decreased hepatic fibrosis, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression. Ethanolic stem bark extract of edible pomegranate exhibited highest antischistosomal activities both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, pomegranate showed a good potential to be used as a promising new candidate for the development of new schistosomicidal agents.

  7. Antibacterial activity of fresh pomegranate juice against clinical strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betanzos-Cabrera, Gabriel; Montes-Rubio, Perla Y.; Fabela-Illescas, Héctor E.; Belefant-Miller, Helen; Cancino-Diaz, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Polyphenols have received a great deal of attention due to their biological functions. Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is a polyphenol-rich fruit. In the past decade, studies testing the antimicrobial activity of pomegranates almost exclusively used solvent extracts instead of fresh pomegranate juice (FPJ). The use of FPJ instead of solvent extracts would reduce toxicity issues while increasing patient acceptance. We established a model to test FPJ as a natural antimicrobial agent. Objective To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of FPJ on clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis strains. Design Sixty strains of S. epidermidis isolated from ocular infections were grown in the presence of FPJ, and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by broth and agar dilution methods. Results FPJ at 20% had a MIC equal to 100% (MIC100%) on all 60 strains tested. This inhibition of FPJ was confirmed by the growth kinetics of a multidrug-resistant strain exposed to different concentrations of FPJ. Additionally, the antimicrobial activity of FPJ was compared against commercial beverages containing pomegranate: Ocean Spray® had a MIC100% at 20%, followed by Del Valle® with a MIC15% at 20% concentration only. The beverages Jumex® and Sonrisa® did not have any antimicrobial activity. FPJ had the highest polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity. Conclusions Overall, FPJ had antimicrobial activity, which might be attributed to its high polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity. PMID:25999265

  8. Mixed Pro- and Anti-Oxidative Effects of Pomegranate Polyphenols in Cultured Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesi, Francesca; Kroon, Paul A.; Saha, Shikha; de Biase, Dario; D’Antuono, Luigi Filippo; Bordoni, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the number of scientific papers concerning pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) and its health properties has increased greatly, and there is great potential for the use of bioactive-rich pomegranate extracts as ingredients in functional foods and nutraceuticals. To translate this potential into effective strategies it is essential to further elucidate the mechanisms of the reported bioactivity. In this study HepG2 cells were supplemented with a pomegranate fruit extract or with the corresponding amount of pure punicalagin, and then subjected to an exogenous oxidative stress. Overall, upon the oxidative stress the gene expression and activity of the main antioxidant enzymes appeared reduced in supplemented cells, which were more prone to the detrimental effects than unsupplemented ones. No differences were detected between cells supplemented with the pomegranate juice or the pure punicalagin. Although further studies are needed due to the gaps existing between in vitro and in vivo studies, our results suggest caution in the administration of high concentrations of nutraceutical molecules, particularly when they are administered in concentrated form. PMID:25350111

  9. Characterization of pectins extracted from pomegranate peel and their gelling properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Mouna; Cheikhrouhou, S; Renard, Catherine M G C; Bureau, Sylvie; Cuvelier, Gérard; Attia, Hamadi; Ayadi, M A

    2017-01-15

    The composition of pomegranate peel, the main by-product during pomegranate processing, and some of the characteristics of the water-soluble pectins were investigated. Four tunisian pomegranate peels were subjected to hot aqueous extractions (86°C, 80min, 20mM nitric acid). Pomegranate peels yielded between 6.8% and 10.1% pectins. The extracted pectins were low methylated and were characterized by the predominance of homogalacturonan regions. Principal component analysis applied on FT-IR spectral data in the region between 4000 and 650cm(-1) differentiated the samples according to their degree of methylation. At pH 3, in the presence of 0.7% pectin, all solutions showed a rapid gel formation with G'>G″. With decreasing temperature from 90°C to 10°C, G' increased to reach a plateau at 10°C. The variation in the pectin gel formation between varieties was attributed to difference in pectin characteristics particularly the hydrodynamic volume and the neutral sugar content. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Physico-chemical properties and fatty acid composition of pomegranate, cherry and pumpkin seed oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siano, Francesco; Straccia, Maria C; Paolucci, Marina; Fasulo, Gabriella; Boscaino, Floriana; Volpe, Maria G

    2016-03-30

    Nut and seed oils are often considered waste products but in recent years they have been receiving growing interest due to their high concentration of hydrophilic and lipophilic bioactive components, which have important pharmacological properties on human health. The aim of this work was to compare the physico-chemical and biochemical properties of pomegranate (Punicagranatum), sweet cherry (Prunusavium) and pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) seed oils obtained by solvent extraction. High amount of linoleic acid was found in the cherry and pumpkin seed oils, while pomegranate seed oil showed relevant content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) along to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and nervonic acid. Pumpkin seed oil had high concentration of carotenoids, while pomegranate oil was the best absorber in the UV-A and UV-B ranges. Pomegranate, cherry and pumpkin seed oils can be an excellent source of bioactive molecules and antioxidant compounds such as polyphenols, carotenoids and unsaturated fatty acids. These seed oils can be included both as preservatives and functional ingredients in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic fields and can contribute to disease prevention and health promotion. Moreover, high absorbance of UV light indicates a potential use of these oils as filters from radiations in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic fields. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Pomegranate inhibits neuroinflammation and amyloidogenesis in IL-1β-stimulated SK-N-SH cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Ravikanth; Baco, Gina; Khela, Sunjeet; Okorji, Uchechukwu; Olajide, Olumayokun

    2016-06-01

    Pomegranate fruit, Punica granatum L. (Punicaceae), and its constituents have been shown to inhibit inflammation. In this study, we aimed to assess the effects of freeze-dried pomegranate (PWE) on PGE2 production in IL-1β-stimulated SK-N-SH cells. An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was used to measure prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production from supernatants of IL-1β-stimulated SK-N-SH cells. Expression of COX-2, phospho-IκB, and phospho-IKK proteins was evaluated, while NF-κB reporter gene assay was carried out in TNFα-stimulated HEK293 cells to determine the effect of PWE on NF-κB transactivation. Levels of BACE-1 and Aβ in SK-N-SH cells stimulated with IL-1β were measured with an in cell ELISA. PWE (25-200 μg/ml) dose dependently reduced COX-2-dependent PGE2 production in SK-N-SH cells stimulated with IL-1β. Phosphorylation of IκB and IKK was significantly (p pomegranate inhibits inflammation, as well as amyloidogenesis in IL-1β-stimulated SK-N-SH cells. We propose that pomegranate is a potential nutritional strategy in slowing the progression of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Inhibition growth of pomegranate seeds extract against streptococcus sanguis: the cause of recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riani Setiadhi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. seeds contain high of phytonutrients and phytochemicals, rich in polyphenol antioxidants namely tannins and flavonoids which also have antibacterial activity. Streptococcus sanguis is a bacterium known as one of the factors causing Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis (RAS. To examine the potential antibacterial of Pomegranate seeds against Streptococcus sanguis. Material anda Methods : In vitro study of Pomegranate seed were extracted with maceration method using 70% ethanol as the solvent to obtain stable extract, continued with phytochemical screening against phenolic, flavonoids, alkaloids, steroids, triterpenoid, saponins and tannins.  The extract was evaluated for Minimum Inhibitory Concentration and Minimum Bactericide Concentration against Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10556, using microdiluted method through 96 wells microplate. Results : Chlorhexidine was used as positive control while 70% ethanol was used as solvent as well as negative control. Phytochemical screening gave positive results for phenolics, flavonoids, steroids, saponins and tannins. Microdilution test showed the concentration of 500 ppm as MIC and MBC value at 2,000 ppm. Conclusion : Pomegranate seeds extract have a growth inhibitory against Streptococcus sanguis with MIC value of 500 ppm and 2,000 ppm as MBC.

  13. Olive Crown Porosity Measurement Based on Radiation Transmittance: An Assessment of Pruning Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Castillo-Ruiz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Crown porosity influences radiation interception, air movement through the fruit orchard, spray penetration, and harvesting operation in fruit crops. The aim of the present study was to develop an accurate and reliable methodology based on transmitted radiation measurements to assess the porosity of traditional olive trees under different pruning treatments. Transmitted radiation was employed as an indirect method to measure crown porosity in two olive orchards of the Picual and Hojiblanca cultivars. Additionally, three different pruning treatments were considered to determine if the pruning system influences crown porosity. This study evaluated the accuracy and repeatability of four algorithms in measuring crown porosity under different solar zenith angles. From a 14° to 30° solar zenith angle, the selected algorithm produced an absolute error of less than 5% and a repeatability higher than 0.9. The described method and selected algorithm proved satisfactory in field results, making it possible to measure crown porosity at different solar zenith angles. However, pruning fresh weight did not show any relationship with crown porosity due to the great differences between removed branches. A robust and accurate algorithm was selected for crown porosity measurements in traditional olive trees, making it possible to discern between different pruning treatments.

  14. Density based pruning for identification of differentially expressed genes from microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motivation Identification of differentially expressed genes from microarray datasets is one of the most important analyses for microarray data mining. Popular algorithms such as statistical t-test rank genes based on a single statistics. The false positive rate of these methods can be improved by considering other features of differentially expressed genes. Results We proposed a pattern recognition strategy for identifying differentially expressed genes. Genes are mapped to a two dimension feature space composed of average difference of gene expression and average expression levels. A density based pruning algorithm (DB Pruning is developed to screen out potential differentially expressed genes usually located in the sparse boundary region. Biases of popular algorithms for identifying differentially expressed genes are visually characterized. Experiments on 17 datasets from Gene Omnibus Database (GEO with experimentally verified differentially expressed genes showed that DB pruning can significantly improve the prediction accuracy of popular identification algorithms such as t-test, rank product, and fold change. Conclusions Density based pruning of non-differentially expressed genes is an effective method for enhancing statistical testing based algorithms for identifying differentially expressed genes. It improves t-test, rank product, and fold change by 11% to 50% in the numbers of identified true differentially expressed genes. The source code of DB pruning is freely available on our website http://mleg.cse.sc.edu/degprune

  15. Pruning management of Chardonnay grapevines at high altitude in Brazilian southeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania dos Reis Mendonça

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The agronomical responses of Chardonnay, a variety indicated for sparkling wine production, is influenced by the vineyard management and the edaphoclimatic conditions of the region. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of two pruning types (Royat and double Guyot on vegetative and reproductive development of Chardonnay vine growing at high altitude in the Brazilian southeastern region. The experiment was carried out in a commercial vineyard located at 1,280 m of altitude in Divinolândia, São Paulo State, Brazil. The Chardonnay vines (clone 96, grafted onto 1103 Paulsen rootstock and trained in a vertical shoot positioning trellis system, were assessed. Vegetative vigor, bud fruitfulness, production and physicochemical composition of grapes were evaluated during 2014 and 2015 growing seasons. The Royat pruning induced higher vegetative vigor and increased the bud fruitfulness, the cluster number and the productivity of Chardonnay vine when compared to Guyot pruning. Even though the increase on yield was observed, there was no effect of pruning type on grape final quality. Therefore, the choice of pruning method in function of variety genetic characteristics and their interaction with environment can optimize the vineyard profitability. In the Brazilian southeast, the Royat system is the most suitable one to grow Chardonnay for sparkling wines production.

  16. Modified abdominoplasty for patients with the Prune Belly syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dénes, Francisco Tibor; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; Oliveira, Lorena Marçalo; Tavares, Alessandro; Srougi, Miguel

    2014-02-01

    To present the results of a new technique for abdominoplasty in patients with the Prune Belly syndrome (PBS). Since 1985, 46 children with PBS underwent surgical treatment that included urinary tract reconstruction (UTR), orchidopexy, and abdominoplasty. In 41 patients, we performed the abdominoplasty as follows: (1) fusiform longitudinal resection of the mid-abdominal skin and subcutaneous tissue, with preservation of the musculo-aponeurotic fascia (MAF) and umbilicus, (2) ellipsoid unilateral longitudinal incision of the MAF in the most weakened side of the abdomen, producing 2 flaps, with the umbilicus being kept intact in the widest flap, (3) after UTR and bilateral orchiopexy, suture fixation of the widest MAF layer to the inner side of the contralateral abdominal wall, creating an inner MAF layer, (4) lateral suture fixation of the other flap over the inner layer, creating an outer MAF layer with a buttonhole exposing the umbilicus, that is sutured to the outer layer, and (5) approximation of the skin edges with incorporation of the umbilicus in the suture. Skin coaptation was excellent in all patients, and no trimming was necessary in incision extremities. There was no dehiscence or skin necrosis and all patients presented immediate improvement of the abdominal tonus and appearance. Further improvement with growth was observed in all except 4 patients, 2 requiring secondary abdominoplasties. We conclude that this technique is applicable in all forms of weakened abdomen typical of PBS, even in asymmetrical cases, requiring only 1 MAF incision, with good cosmetic and functional results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. An ergonomic assessment of the long handle blueberry harvesting rake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Elizabeth; Scribani, Melissa; Wyckoff, Sherry; Bauer, Robert; May, John; Wyckoff, Lynae; Jenkins, Paul

    2012-11-01

    Previous work shows the superiority of the long-handled blueberry harvesting rake (LHR) for worker preference and productivity compared to the short-handle rake (SHR). Post-shift interviews on occurrence, location, and severity of pain, and video-based observation of body postures enabled ergonomic assessment of Maine workers harvesting blueberries. Workers randomly crossed between LHR and SHR on consecutive work days. Wilcoxon tests compared proportions of specific body postures between LHR and SHR. Subjects used SHR for shorter work periods than LHR. Thirty workers provided interviews for both one LHR and one SHR shift. Assessment of these matched pairs suggested a trend toward less frequent overall pain (P = 0.07) and back pain (P = 0.11) with the LHR versus the SHR. Video tape analysis included 17 sets of observations (8 SHR and 9 LHR) on 12 individuals. Posture assessment showed more severe forward bend and squatting with the SHR and more moderate/neutral postures with the LHR. Harvesting with the traditional SHR is likely to be associated with increased frequency of pain in general, and mid-low back pain in particular, when compared to the newer LHR. This may well relate to the work postures associated with each rake. Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Occurrence and biology of Tolype innocens (Burmeister on blueberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Salvador Louzada

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tolype innocens (Burmeister, 1878 is reported for the first time damaging blueberry (Vaccinium ashei plants in Brazil having the caterpillars feeding on leaves and new shoots. T. innocens biology was studied on blueberry leaves in laboratory conditions and then a fertility life table was elaborated. Developmental time and viability of egg, larval and pupal stages and egg-adult period were 15.0 and 35.3, 33.3 and 84.5, 20.6 and 100, and 69.2 days and 45%, respectively. Average pupal weight was 0.840g for the females and 0.580g for the males. The sex ratio was 0.5. Pre-oviposition and oviposition time lasted 6.34 and 12.1 days, respectively. Mean fecundity was 251 eggs per female. Eggs were laid either individually or in masses. Longevity was 19.0 and 20.0 days for males and females, respectively. T. innocens population increased 47 times per generation, with a mean generation time of 77 days, and a finite rate of increase of 1.02. This data on biological parameters will be useful for establishing control strategies.

  19. Exploring Perceptions of Raspberries and Blueberries by Italian Consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Girgenti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Consumers can be important active contributors to a sustainable society by selecting foods that are produced respecting environmental and socially ethical standards. In the fruit sector, sustainability issues are often associated with imprecisely defined concepts such as “locally grown”, “freshness” and “local product”. This study has investigated raspberries (Rubus idaeus L. and blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L. purchases in order to identify how berry fruits choice attributes are ranked by consumers in two Italian Regions, using a choice experiment (best-worst methodology. Twelve attributes—that indirectly refer to the concept of environmental sustainability—have been investigated. According to the preferences expressed by our sample of retail purchasers (n = 669, the results show that the reasons for the purchase of berries are associated with numerous parameters among which freshness and product origin are the most important and price was not ranked as so relevant. These findings indirectly testify the consumer attention towards the sustainability of local production and the link between sustainability and territory. Therefore, we can presume that the improvement of consumer familiarity with attributes such as “locally grown” and “local product” could support more eco-friendly consumption of raspberries and blueberries.

  20. The ex vitro rooting of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. microcuttings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacholczak Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A growing demand for blueberry fruit has necessitated the development of an efficient propagation method of this species that would provide large quantities of planting material. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of auxin indole-3-butyric acid (IBA 50 mg dm−3, the commercial rooting powder Rhizopon containing 1% IBA, and salicylic acid (50 mg dm−3 on the in vivo rooting of microcuttings of Vaccinium corymbosum ‘Bluecrop’ and ‘Duke’. The contents of chlorophyll a + b, soluble proteins, free amino acids, as well as total soluble and reducing sugars were determined in rooted cuttings. All of the treatments increased the degree and percentage of rooting in the cuttings of both cultivars. While improving rhizogenesis in blueberry, salicylic acid did not perform as a cofactor of the auxin IBA. Foliar applications of IBA or salicylic acid (SA increased the contents of soluble proteins, free amino acids and sugars, but no effects on chlorophyll levels were observed.

  1. Thermal and high pressure inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Delon, Antoine; Versteeg, Cornelis

    2017-10-01

    This study for the first time investigated the stability and inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase in model systems (McIlvaine buffer, pH=3.6, the typical pH of blueberry juice) during thermal (40-80°C) and combined high pressure-thermal processing (0.1-690MPa, 30-90°C). At 70-80°C, the thermal inactivation kinetics was best described by a biphasic model with ∼61% labile and ∼39% stable fractions at temperature between 70 and 75°C. High pressure inhibited the inactivation of the enzyme with no inactivation at pressures as high as 690MPa and temperatures less than 50°C. The inactivation kinetics of the enzyme at 60-70°C, and pressures higher than 500MPa was best described by a first order biphasic model with ∼25% labile fraction and 75% stable fraction. The activation energy values at atmospheric pressure were 548.6kJ/mol and 324.5kJ/mol respectively for the stable and the labile fractions. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of polyphenol oxidase from blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiq, M; Dolan, K D

    2017-03-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was extracted and characterized from high-bush blueberries. PPO showed an optimum activity at pH 6.1-6.3 and 35°C, with the enzyme showing significant activity over a wide temperature range (25-60°C). Catechol was the most readily oxidized substrate followed by 4-methylcatechol, DL-DOPA, and dopamine. Blueberry PPO showed a Km of 15mM and Vmax of 2.57 ΔA420nm/min×10-1, determined with catechol. PPO was completely inactivated in 20min at 85°C, however, after 30minat 75°C it showed about 10% residual activity. Thermal treatment at 55 and 65°C for 30min resulted in the partial inactivation of PPO. Ascorbic acid, sodium diethyldithiocarbamic acid, L-cysteine, and sodium metabisulfite were effective inhibitors of PPO at 1.0mM. Benzoic acid and cinnamic acid series inhibitors showed relatively weak inhibition of PPO (21.8-27.6%), even at as high as 2.0mM concentration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) leaf and pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit rind for activity against Meloidogyne incognita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit and roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) leaves have been used in traditional medicine, including as anthelmintics. Methanolic extracts from these plants were investigated for activity against the southern root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita. Dried, ground p...

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Two Varieties of Tunisian Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Extracts on Gastrointestinal Transit in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souli, Abdelaziz; Sebai, Hichem; Rtibi, Kais; Chehimi, Latifa; Sakly, Mohsen; Amri, Mohamed; El-Benna, Jamel; Marzouki, Lamjed

    2015-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether total and methanol juice extracts of two Tunisian Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) varieties (Garsi and Gabsi) protect against diarrhea as well as their effects on gastrointestinal transit (GIT) in healthy rats. In this respect, male Wistar rats were used and divided into control- and pomegranate-treated groups. The antidiarrheal activity was evaluated using the castor oil-induced diarrhea method and the GIT was assessed using charcoal meal. Our results showed that total and methanol P. granatum juice extracts produced a significant dose-dependent protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea. Pomegranate extracts and juice also decreased the GIT significantly and dose dependently. Importantly, the Garsi variety appeared to be more effective than the Gabsi variety on these two parameters. These findings suggest that pomegranate extracts have a potent antidiarrheal property in rats confirming their efficiency in the Tunisian traditional medicine.

  5. Variation of anthocyanins and other major phenolic compounds throughout the ripening of four Portuguese blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sara; Costa, Eduardo M; Coelho, Marta C; Morais, Rui M; Pintado, Manuela E

    2017-01-01

    Blueberries are widely recognised as one of the richest sources of bioactive compounds, among which are anthocyanins, though the ripeness of berries has been reported as affecting the phytochemical composition of fruits. Therefore, the present work aimed to evaluate the variation of anthocyanins, and other major phenolics, throughout five ripening stages in four blueberry cultivars. The results showed that the antioxidant capacity and anthocyanin content increased during ripening, reaching the highest values when the blueberries are collected from bunches comprised of 75% ripe blueberries. Antagonistically, the amount of phenolic acid decreases, while the quercetin-3-glucoside levels remain stable. Furthermore, Goldtraube blueberries appear to possess, systematically, higher amounts of phenolic compounds than the other cultivars studied. Thus, when seeking the highest yield of anthocyanins, the preferred harvest should occur in bunches that contain ca 75% of ripe blueberries and, considering the cultivars assayed, the Goldtraube cultivar appears to be the richest in phenolic compounds.

  6. Organ-specific distribution of phenolic compounds in bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) and 'northblue' blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum x V. angustifolium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihinen, Kaisu; Jaakola, Laura; Kärenlampi, Sirpa; Hohtola, Anja

    2008-09-01

    Blueberries and bilberries are recognized as some of the best sources of flavonoids, especially anthocyanins. The contents of flavonoids (anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins, flavonols) and hydroxycinnamic acids in the flower, fruit skin and pulp, leaf and rhizome of bilberry and the blueberry cultivar 'Northblue' were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography combined with diode-array detection. The most striking difference in the fruits was the predominance of hydroxycinnamic acids in blueberry, whereas in bilberry the anthocyanin content was much higher, particularly in the pulp. Differences in flavonoid contents of fruits were already apparent at the flower stage. Bilberry and blueberry leaves both contained high amounts of proanthocyanidins, flavonols and hydroxycinnamic acids. Blueberry rhizomes accumulated high amounts of hydroxycinnamic acids. All plant parts of bilberry and blueberry are potential sources of phenolic compounds for use either as dietary botanicals or by the pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 76 FR 11939 - Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Section 610 Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-04

    ... the market for fresh and processed cultivated blueberries in the United States and abroad. The Council... comply with the independent evaluation provision of the Federal Agricultural Improvement and Reform Act...

  8. 75 FR 22551 - United States Standards for Grades of Frozen Blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service United States Standards for Grades of Frozen Blueberries AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice; withdrawal. SUMMARY: The Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS), of...

  9. Transformation of 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid in blueberries during high-temperature processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Typek, Rafal

    2014-11-12

    Chlorogenic acid (CQA), an ester of caffeic with quinic acid, is a natural compound found in a wide array of plants. Although coffee beans are most frequently mentioned as plant products remarkably rich in CQAs, their significant amounts can also be found in many berries, for example, blueberries. This paper shows and discusses the thermal stability of the main CQA representative, that is, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), during high-temperature processing of blueberries (as in the production of blueberry foods) in systems containing sucrose in low and high concentration. It has been found that up to 11 components (5-CQA derivatives and its reaction product with water) can be formed from 5-CQA during the processing of blueberries. Their formation speed depends on the sucrose concentration in the processed system, which has been confirmed in the artificial system composed of 5-CQA water solution containing different amounts of the sugar.

  10. Utah Marbles and Mars Blueberries: Comparitive Terrestrial Analogs for Hematite Concretions on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, M. A.; Beitler, B.; Parry, W. T.; Ormö, J.; Komatsu, G.

    2005-03-01

    Compelling comparisons show why Utah iron oxide-cemented "marbles" are a good analog for Mars hematite "blueberries". Terrestrial examples offer valuable models for interpreting the diagenetic history and importance of water on Mars.

  11. Do Martian Blueberries Have Pits? -- Artifacts of an Early Wet Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, L.

    2005-03-01

    Early Martian weather cycles would have supported organic chemical self-organization, the assumed predecessor to an independent "origin" of Martian life. Artifacts of these processes are discussed, including the possibility that Martian blueberries nucleated around organic cores.

  12. Composition and morphology of cuticular wax in blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wenjing; Gao, Haiyan; Cao, Shifeng; Fang, Xiangjun; Chen, Hangjun; Xiao, Shangyue

    2017-03-15

    The chemical composition and morphology of cuticular wax in mature fruit of nine blueberry cultivars were investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Triterpenoids and β-diketones were the most prominent compounds, accounting for on average 64.2% and 16.4% of the total wax, respectively. Ursolic or oleanolic acid was identified as the most abundant triterpenoids differing in cultivars. Two β-diketones, hentriacontan-10,12-dione and tritriacontan-12,14-dione, were detected in cuticular wax of blueberry fruits for the first time. Notably, hentriacontan-10,12-dione and tritriacontan-12,14-dione were only detected in highbush (V. corymbosum) and rabbiteye (V. ashei) blueberries, respectively. The results of SEM showed that a large amount of tubular wax deposited on the surface of blueberry fruits. There was no apparent difference in wax morphology among the nine cultivars. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Blueberry and mulberry juice prevent obesity development in C57BL/6 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wu

    Full Text Available To establish whether blueberry (Vaccinium ashei and mulberry (Morus australis Poir juice, anthocyanin rich fruit juice, may help counteract obesity.And Methods: Four-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD with or without blueberry and mulberry juice for 12 weeks. Body weight, serum and hepatic lipids, liver and adipose tissues morphology, insulin and leptin were assessed.Mice fed HFD exhibited increased body weight, insulin resistance, serum and hepatic lipids. In comparison, blueberry and mulberry juice inhibited body weight gain, decreased the serum cholesterol, reduced the resistance to insulin, attenuated lipid accumulation and decreased the leptin secretin.These results indicate that blueberry and mulberry juice may help counteract obesity.

  14. Blueberry and mulberry juice prevent obesity development in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Tang, Qiong; Gao, Zichun; Yu, Zhuoping; Song, Haizhao; Zheng, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    To establish whether blueberry (Vaccinium ashei) and mulberry (Morus australis Poir) juice, anthocyanin rich fruit juice, may help counteract obesity. And Methods: Four-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) with or without blueberry and mulberry juice for 12 weeks. Body weight, serum and hepatic lipids, liver and adipose tissues morphology, insulin and leptin were assessed. Mice fed HFD exhibited increased body weight, insulin resistance, serum and hepatic lipids. In comparison, blueberry and mulberry juice inhibited body weight gain, decreased the serum cholesterol, reduced the resistance to insulin, attenuated lipid accumulation and decreased the leptin secretin. These results indicate that blueberry and mulberry juice may help counteract obesity.

  15. Effect of the Addition of Blueberries on Selected Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Yoghurts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuman Cinbas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, physicochemical and sensory properties of blueberries and sugar added to yoghurts have been investigated on the first, 10th and 20th day of storage in refrigerator. Samples were analyzed for pH, total solids, protein, fat, ash, viscosity, syneresis, Hunter's L, a, and b values, flavour, body, texture, appearance and colour. Blueberry and sugar mass fractions and storage time had a significant effect on the physicochemical and sensory properties of yoghurts. The addition of blueberries to yoghurt formula resulted in an increase in the syneresis and a decrease in the pH, fat, protein, ash, viscosity and whiteness values. The addition of sugar improved only the flavour of yoghurts. Panelists favoured samples with 25 % blueberries and 4 % sugar in terms of flavour, body, texture, appearance and colour.

  16. Urethral obstruction malformation complex: a cause of abdominal muscle deficiency and the "prune belly".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagon, R A; Smith, D W; Shepard, T H

    1979-06-01

    Abdominal muscle deficiency with a "prune belly" abdomen as been a major feature of the so-called prune belly syndrome, which has been regarded as a specific entity, although the etiology and developmental pathology are not understood. We present evidence that abdominal muscle deficiency is an etiologically nonspecific anatomic defect which is secondary to fetal abdominal distention of various causes. One of the more common causes is urethral obstruction with consequent early bladder distention, causing abdominal distention and other anomalies, a constellation of findings which we have termed the urethral obstruction malformation complex. This interpretation of the etiology of most cases of prune belly syndrome accounts for the male predominance, the observed variability in severity, and the lack of a defined mode of inheritance. Recurrence risk figures need to be redefined for each specific obstructing lesion of the urethra. The possibility of early prenatal diagnosis and management of fetuses with urethral obstruction needs further study.

  17. An Artificial Neural Network Modeling for Force Control System of a Robotic Pruning Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hashemi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there has been an increasing application of pruning robots for planted forests due to the growing concern on the efficiency and safety issues. Power consumption and working time of agricultural machines have become important issues due to the high value of energy in modern world. In this study, different multi-layer back-propagation networks were utilized for mapping the complex and highly interactive of pruning process parameters and to predict power consumption and cutting time of a force control equipped robotic pruning machine by knowing input parameters such as: rotation speed, stalk diameter, and sensitivity coefficient. Results showed significant effects of all input parameters on output parameters except rotational speed on cutting time. Therefore, for reducing the wear of cutting system, a less rotational speed in every sensitivity coefficient should be selected.

  18. Punicalagin, a polyphenol in pomegranate juice, downregulates p53 and attenuates hypoxia-induced apoptosis in cultured human placental syncytiotrophoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Baosheng; Longtine, Mark S.; Nelson, D. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with placental dysfunction and suboptimal pregnancy outcomes. Therapeutic interventions to limit placental injury from oxidative stress are lacking. Punicalagin is an ellagitannin and a potent antioxidant in pomegranate juice. We showed that both pomegranate juice and punicalagin decrease oxidative stress and apoptosis in cultured syncytiotrophoblasts. p53 is involved in the oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in trophoblasts. We now test the hypothesis that puni...

  19. A pilot randomized crossover trial assessing the safety and short-term effects of pomegranate supplementation in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivara, Matthew B; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Linke, Lori; Ruzinski, John; Ikizler, T Alp; Himmelfarb, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and systemic inflammation are highly prevalent in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) and are linked to excess cardiovascular risk. This study examined whether short-term supplementation with pomegranate juice and extract is safe and well tolerated by MHD patients. The secondary aim was to assess the effect of pomegranate supplementation on oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, monocyte function, and blood pressure. Prospective, randomized, crossover, pilot clinical trial (NCT01562340). The study was conducted from March to October 2012 in outpatient dialysis facilities in the Seattle metropolitan area. Twenty-four patients undergoing MHD (men, 64%; mean age, 61 ± 14 years) were randomly assigned to receive pomegranate juice or extract during a 4-week intervention period. After a washout period, all patients received the alternative treatment during a second 4-week intervention period. Patients assigned to receive pomegranate juice received 100 mL of juice before each dialysis session. Patients assigned to receive pomegranate extract were given 1,050 mg of extract daily. The main outcome measures were safety and tolerability of pomegranate juice and extract. Additional secondary outcomes assessed included serum lipids, laboratory biomarkers of inflammation (C-reactive protein and interleukin 6) and oxidative stress (plasma F2 isoprostanes and isofurans), monocyte cytokine production, and predialysis blood pressure. Both pomegranate juice and extract were safe and well tolerated by study participants. Over the study period, neither treatment had a significant effect on lipid profiles, plasma C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, F2-isoprostane or isofuran concentrations, predialysis systolic or diastolic blood pressure nor changed the levels of monocyte cytokine production. Both pomegranate juice and extract are safe and well tolerated by patients undergoing MHD but do not influence markers of inflammation or oxidative stress

  20. Longleaf Pine Root System Development and Seedling Quality in Response to Copper Root Pruning and Cavity Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Anne Sword Sayer; Shi-Jean Susana Sung; James D. Haywood

    2011-01-01

    Cultural practices that modify root system structure in the plug of container-grown seedlings have the potential to improve root system function after planting. Our objective was to assess how copper root pruning affects the quality and root system development of longleaf pine seedlings grown in three cavity sizes in a greenhouse. Copper root pruning increased seedling...

  1. Effects of leader topping and branch pruning on efficiency of Douglas-fir cone harvesting with a tree shaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.L. Copes

    1985-01-01

    In 1983, a study was conducted to evaluate the effects of leader topping and branch pruning on the efficiency to tree shaking to remove Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) cones. Removal efficiency for three topping and pruning treatments averaged 69 percent, whereas for the uncut control treatment it was 62 percent. The treatment...

  2. Pruning for crop regulation in high density guava (Psidium guajava L.) plantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakre, M.; Lal, S.; Uniyal, S.; Goswami, A.K. Prakash. P.

    2016-11-01

    High density management and crop regulation are two important aspects in guava (Psidium guajava L.) production. Therefore, to find out the economic way of managing high density planting and crop regulation, the present work was carried out on 6-year-old guava trees of cv. Pant Prabhat under double-hedge row system of planting during 2009-10 and 2010-11. Seven different forms of pruning [FBT: flower bud thinning by hand, FBTT: flower bud thinning by hand followed by removal of terminal one leaf pair, RLFO: removal of leaves and flower buds by hand, retaining one leaf pair at the top, RLF: removal of all leaves and flowers by hand, OLPS: one leaf pair shoot pruning, FSP: full shoot pruning, OLPF: one leaf pair pruning of fruited shoots only] were studied along with control (C).Minimum annual increase in tree volume (6.764 m3) was recorded with the treatment OLPF, which was 2.31 times less than the control (15.682 m3). Highest yield during winter season (55.30 kg/tree) and total yield (59.87 kg/tree) was obtained from treatment OLPF. One leaf pair pruning of fruited shoots only (OLPF) was also found profitable among other treatments by recording cost:benefit ratio of 1:2.96. This treatment also recorded the highest return distributed in rainy as well as in winter season. On the basis of findings it can be concluded that one leaf pair pruning of fruited shoots only is suitable for profitable high density management as well as crop regulation of guava in farmer friendly manner. (Author)

  3. Optimization of hot water treatment for removing microbial colonies on fresh blueberry surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Jo; Corbitt, Melody P; Silva, Juan L; Wang, Dja Shin; Jung, Yean-Sung; Spencer, Barbara

    2011-08-01

    Blueberries for the frozen market are washed but this process sometimes is not effective or further contaminates the berries. This study was designed to optimize conditions for hot water treatment (temperature, time, and antimicrobial concentration) to remove biofilm and decrease microbial load on blueberries. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image showed a well-developed microbial biofilm on blueberries dipped in room temperature water. The biofilm consisted of yeast and bacterial cells attached to the berry surface in the form of microcolonies, which produced exopolymer substances between or upon the cells. Berry exposure to 75 and 90 °C showed little to no microorganisms on the blueberry surface; however, the sensory quality (wax/bloom) of berries at those temperatures was unacceptable. Response surface plots showed that increasing temperature was a significant factor on reduction of aerobic plate counts (APCs) and yeast/mold counts (YMCs) while adding Boxyl® did not have significant effect on APC. Overlaid contour plots showed that treatments of 65 to 70 °C for 10 to 15 s showed maximum reductions of 1.5 and 2.0 log CFU/g on APCs and YMCs, respectively; with acceptable level of bloom/wax score on fresh blueberries. This study showed that SEM, response surface, and overlaid contour plots proved successful in arriving at optima to reduce microbial counts while maintaining bloom/wax on the surface of the blueberries. Since chemical sanitizing treatments such as chlorine showed ineffectiveness to reduce microorganisms loaded on berry surface (Beuchat and others 2001, Sapers 2001), hot water treatment on fresh blueberries could maximize microbial reduction with acceptable quality of fresh blueberries. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  4. Phylogenetic, Morphological, and Pathogenic Characterization of Alternaria Species Associated with Fruit Rot of Blueberry in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X Q; Xiao, C L

    2015-12-01

    Fruit rot caused by Alternaria spp. is one of the most important factors affecting the postharvest quality and shelf life of blueberry fruit. The aims of this study were to characterize Alternaria isolates using morphological and molecular approaches and test their pathogenicity to blueberry fruit. Alternaria spp. isolates were collected from decayed blueberry fruit in the Central Valley of California during 2012 and 2013. In total, 283 isolates were obtained and five species of Alternaria, including Alternaria alternata, A. tenuissima, A. arborescens, A. infectoria, and A. rosae, were identified based on DNA sequences of the plasma membrane ATPase, Alt a1 and Calmodulin gene regions in combination with morphological characters of the culture and sporulation. Of the 283 isolates, 61.5% were identified as A. alternata, 32.9% were A. arborescens, 5.0% were A. tenuissima, and only one isolate of A. infectoria and one isolate of A. rosae were found. These fungi were able to grow at temperatures from 0 to 35°C, and mycelial growth was arrested at 40°C. Optimal radial growth occurred between 20 to 30°C. Pathogenicity tests showed that all five Alternaria spp. were pathogenic on blueberry fruit at 0, 4, and 20°C, with A. alternata, A. arborescens, and A. tenuissima being the most virulent species, followed by A. infectoria and A. rosae. Previously A. tenuissima has been reported to be the primary cause of Alternaria fruit rot of blueberry worldwide. Our results indicated that the species composition of Alternaria responsible for Alternaria fruit rot in blueberry can be dependent on geographical region. A. alternata, A. arborescens, A. infectoria, and A. rosae are reported for the first time on blueberry in California. This is also the first report of A. infectoria and A. rosae infecting blueberry fruit.

  5. Bioactives in Blueberries Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Obese, Insulin-Resistant Men and Women1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, April J.; Cash, Katherine C.; Johnson, William D.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Cefalu, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Dietary supplementation with whole blueberries in a preclinical study resulted in a reduction in glucose concentrations over time. We sought to evaluate the effect of daily dietary supplementation with bioactives from blueberries on whole-body insulin sensitivity in men and women. A double-blinded, randomized, and placebo-controlled clinical study design was used. After screening to resolve study eligibility, baseline (wk 0) insulin sensitivity was measured on 32 obese, nondiabetic, and insulin-resistant subjects using a high-dose hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (insulin infusion of 120 mU(861 pmol)⋅m−2⋅min−1). Serum inflammatory biomarkers and adiposity were measured at baseline. At the end of the study, insulin sensitivity, inflammatory biomarkers, and adiposity were reassessed. Participants were randomized to consume either a smoothie containing 22.5 g blueberry bioactives (blueberry group, n = 15) or a smoothie of equal nutritional value without added blueberry bioactives (placebo group, n = 17) twice daily for 6 wk. Both groups were instructed to maintain their body weight by reducing ad libitum intake by an amount equal to the energy intake of the smoothies. Participants’ body weights were evaluated weekly and 3-d food records were collected at baseline, the middle, and end of the study. The mean change in insulin sensitivity improved more in the blueberry group (1.7 ± 0.5 mg⋅kg FFM−1⋅min−1) than in the placebo group (0.4 ± 0.4 mg⋅kg FFM−1⋅min−1) (P = 0.04). Insulin sensitivity was enhanced in the blueberry group at the end of the study without significant changes in adiposity, energy intake, and inflammatory biomarkers. In conclusion, daily dietary supplementation with bioactives from whole blueberries improved insulin sensitivity in obese, nondiabetic, and insulin-resistant participants. PMID:20724487

  6. Effects of Media and Hormones on Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L. ) Production from Cuttings

    OpenAIRE

    TURNA, İbrahim; KULAÇ, Şemsettin; GÜNEY, Deniz; SEYİS, Erhan

    2018-01-01

    Three different species of natural blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L., Vaccinium arctostaphylos L., Vaccinium uliginosum L.) are available, in our country. In addition to adaptation experiments were successfully conducted on some varieties (Brigitta, Bluecrop, Bluejay, Duke, Nelson, Earliblue, Patriot and Spartan) of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) from some province of Eastern Black Sea Region (Rize, Trabzon and Artvin). Şimşirli village of İkizdere district of Rize province was ...

  7. Effect of New Zealand blueberry consumption on recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage

    OpenAIRE

    McLeay, Yanita; Barnes, Matthew J; Mundel, Toby; Hurst, Suzanne M; Hurst, Roger D; Stannard, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) is accompanied by localized oxidative stress / inflammation which, in the short-term at least, is associated with impaired muscular performance. Dietary antioxidants have been shown to reduce excessive oxidative stress; however, their effectiveness in facilitating recovery following EIMD is not clear. Blueberries demonstrate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study we examine the effect of New Zealand blueberries on ...

  8. Dietary blueberry supplementation affects growth but not vascularization of neural transplants

    OpenAIRE

    Willis, Lauren M; Small, Brent J.; Bickford, Paula C.; Umphlet, Claudia D; Moore, Alfred B.; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte E.

    2008-01-01

    Transplantation of neural tissue has been attempted as a treatment method for neurodegenerative disorders. Grafted neurons survive to a lesser extent into middle-aged or aged hosts, and survival rates of < 10% of grafted neurons is common. Antioxidant diets, such as blueberry, can exert powerful effects on developing neurons and blood vessels in vitro, but studies are lacking that examine the effects of these diets on transplanted tissues. In this study, we examined the effects of a blueberry...

  9. Blueberry and Mulberry Juice Prevent Obesity Development in C57BL/6 Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Wu; Qiong Tang; Zichun Gao; Zhuoping Yu; Haizhao Song; Xiaodong Zheng; Wei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To establish whether blueberry (Vaccinium ashei) and mulberry (Morus australis Poir) juice, anthocyanin rich fruit juice, may help counteract obesity. Design And Methods: Four-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) with or without blueberry and mulberry juice for 12 weeks. Body weight, serum and hepatic lipids, liver and adipose tissues morphology, insulin and leptin were assessed. Results Mice fed HFD exhibited increased body weight, insulin resistance, serum and hep...

  10. Epidemiology of colletotrichum acutatum, cause of anthracnose on highbush blueberry, in British Columbia

    OpenAIRE

    Verma,Nitin

    2005-01-01

    Blueberry anthracnose reduces yield and post-harvest quality of blueberries in British Columbia. Isolates recovered from diseased fruit during 2002-2004 were identified as Colletotrichum acutatum using colony morphology, growth rate, and PCR. Leaf-wetness and temperature data indicated that plants exposed to prevailing environmental field conditions and natural inoculum in 2001-2003 required 10 hr of leaf wetness at 1 1•‹C for successful fruit infection. Three peaks of infection occurred; at ...

  11. Physical-chemical properties of blueberry as influenced by production and conservation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Christophe; Guiné, Raquel; Gonçalves, Fernando; Costa, Danilea

    2015-01-01

    In this study was evaluated the effect of production mode (organic versus conventional) on some physical-chemical properties of three blueberry cultivars (Duke, Bluecrop, Ozarkblue). The properties evaluated were caliber, moisture content, total soluble solids, acidity, color and texture. The effect of storage on these properties was also evaluated. For this, samples were analyzed at harvest and after 7 and 14 days of storage. This work showed that Duke blueberries had a...

  12. Statistical Analysis of the Factors that Influence the Properties of Blueberries from Cultivar Bluecrop

    OpenAIRE

    Guiné, Raquel; Matos, Susana; Costa, Daniela; Gonçalves, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Because blueberries are worldwide recognized as a good source of beneficial components, their consumption has increased in the past decades, and so have the scientific works about their properties. Hence, this work was undertaken to evaluate the effect of some production and conservation factors on the properties of blueberries from cultivar Bluecrop. The physical and chemical analyses were done according to established methodologies and t...

  13. Effect of the Addition of Blueberries on Selected Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Yoghurts

    OpenAIRE

    Asuman Cinbas; Fehmi Yazici

    2008-01-01

    In this research, physicochemical and sensory properties of blueberries and sugar added to yoghurts have been investigated on the first, 10th and 20th day of storage in refrigerator. Samples were analyzed for pH, total solids, protein, fat, ash, viscosity, syneresis, Hunter's L, a, and b values, flavour, body, texture, appearance and colour. Blueberry and sugar mass fractions and storage time had a significant effect on the physicochemical and sensory properties of yoghurts. The addition of b...

  14. In-vitro Evaluation of Bioactive Fractions of Blueberry Extract for Phenolic-mediated Inhibition of Carbohydrate Hydrolyzing Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Bouhee Kang; Kenneth Racicot; Sarah Pilkenton; Emmanouil Apostolidis

    2016-01-01

    Summary. Blueberry is known to have health benefits such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammation, and anti-hyperglycemia effect. In our previous study, blueberry low-molecular weight phenolic compounds were investigated to have potential to prevent type 2 diabetes. To further identify which low molecular weight phenolic compounds were primarily responsible for the observed bioactivity, BAE (Blueberry acetone extract) was fractionated using LH-20 column chromatography with different solvents. For f...

  15. Generation and analysis of blueberry transcriptome sequences from leaves, developing fruit, and flower buds from cold acclimation through deacclimation

    OpenAIRE

    Rowland Lisa J; Alkharouf Nadim; Darwish Omar; Ogden Elizabeth L; Polashock James J; Bassil Nahla V; Main Dorrie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There has been increased consumption of blueberries in recent years fueled in part because of their many recognized health benefits. Blueberry fruit is very high in anthocyanins, which have been linked to improved night vision, prevention of macular degeneration, anti-cancer activity, and reduced risk of heart disease. Very few genomic resources have been available for blueberry, however. Further development of genomic resources like expressed sequence tags (ESTs), molecul...

  16. Incidence and etiology of postharvest fungal diseases of pomegranate (Punica granatum cv. Mollar de Elche in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís PALOU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spain is the largest European Union producer and exporter of pomegranates. More than 85% of Spanish commercial plantings are located in the Elche area (Alicante Province, SE Spain, where cv. Mollar de Elche is the most important cultivar. The incidence and etiology of postharvest pomegranate diseases were determined in local environmental conditions. Commercially-grown pomegranates cv. Mollar de Elche from two orchards were assessed, during two consecutive seasons, for latent and wound pathogens causing postharvest diseases. Healthy pomegranates were either artificially wounded in the rind or surface disinfected and placed in humid chambers at 20ºC for up to 15 weeks. Additionally, decay was periodically assessed on commercially-handled pomegranates stored at 5ºC for up to 27 weeks. The main causal agents of wound and latent infections were Penicillium spp. and Botrytis cinerea, respectively. The same pathogens were also the most frequently isolated from cold-stored fruit, but decay at 5ºC was only significant after 19 weeks. Another relatively frequent pathogen on fruit incubated at 20ºC was Aspergillus niger. Among the fungi isolated, Penicillium expansum, P. sclerotiorum, P. glabrum and Pilidiella granati were pathogenic on inoculated pomegranates, whereas P. minioluteum and Cytospora annulata were not. No decay caused by Alternaria spp. or Colletotrichum gloeosporioides was observed.

  17. Investigation of Antioxidant Activity of Pomegranate Juices by Means of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and UV-Vis Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozik, Violetta; Jarzembek, Krystyna; Jędrzejowska, Agnieszka; Bąk, Andrzej; Polak, Justyna; Bartoszek, Mariola; Pytlakowska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Pomegranate fruit (Punica granatum L.) is a source of numerous phenolic compounds, and it contains flavonoids such as anthocyanins, anthocyanidins, cyanidins, catechins and other complexes of flavonoids, ellagitannins, and hydrolyzed tannins. Pomegranate juice shows antioxidant, antiproliferative, and anti-atherosclerotic properties. The antioxidant capacity (TEAC) of the pomegranate juices was measured using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH•) as a source of free radicals, and the total phenolic (TP) content was measured using UV-Vis spectroscopy. All the examined pomegranate juices exhibited relatively high antioxidant properties. The TEAC values determined by means of EPR spectroscopy using Trolox (TE) as a free radical scavenger were in the range of 463.12 to 1911.91 μmol TE/100 mL juice. The TP content measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu method, using gallic acid (GA) as a free radical scavenger, widely varied in the investigated pomegranate juice samples and ranged from 1673.62 to 5263.87 mg GA/1 L juice. The strongest antioxidant properties were observed with the fresh pomegranate juices obtained from the fruits originating from Israel, Lebanon, and Azerbaijan. Correlation analysis of numerical data obtained by means of EPR spectroscopy (TEAC) and UV-Vis spectroscopy (TP) gave correlation coefficient (r)=0.90 and determination coefficient (r2)=0.81 (P<0.05).

  18. Pomegranate Juice Augments Memory and fMRI Activity in Middle-Aged and Older Adults with Mild Memory Complaints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Y. Bookheimer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing emphasis on the potential of dietary antioxidants in preventing memory loss and on diet as a precursor of neurological health, rigorous studies investigating the cognitive effects of foods and their components are rare. Recent animal studies have reported memory and other cognitive benefits of polyphenols, found abundantly in pomegranate juice. We performed a preliminary, placebo-controlled randomized trial of pomegranate juice in older subjects with age-associated memory complaints using memory testing and functional brain activation (fMRI as outcome measures. Thirty-two subjects (28 completers were randomly assigned to drink 8 ounces of either pomegranate juice or a flavor-matched placebo drink for 4 weeks. Subjects received memory testing, fMRI scans during cognitive tasks, and blood draws for peripheral biomarkers before and after the intervention. Investigators and subjects were all blind to group membership. After 4 weeks, only the pomegranate group showed a significant improvement in the Buschke selective reminding test of verbal memory and a significant increase in plasma trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC and urolithin A-glucuronide. Furthermore, compared to the placebo group, the pomegranate group had increased fMRI activity during verbal and visual memory tasks. While preliminary, these results suggest a role for pomegranate juice in augmenting memory function through task-related increases in functional brain activity.

  19. Specific phenolic compounds and sensory properties of a new dealcoholized red wine with pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárrega, Maria Amparo; Varela, Paula; Fromentin, Emilie; Feuillère, Nicolas; Issaly, Nicolas; Roller, Marc; Sanz-Buenhombre, Marisa; Villanueva, Sonia; Moro, Carlos; Guadarrama, Alberto; Fiszman, Susana

    2014-09-01

    The pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruit has a long history of human consumption and possesses notable antioxidant and cardiovascular properties. This work evaluated the feasibility to provide a new functional beverage based on a dealcoholized red wine matrix supplemented by a pomegranate extract. The potential bioactive compounds in the pomegranate extract, punicalagin A and B and ellagic acid, were analyzed during the downstream process in order to evaluate the functional dose in the final beverage. The addition of pomegranate extract to the dealcoholized red wine resulted in a product with more intense yeast odor, acidity, yeast flavor, and astringency and with a less intense berry flavor. Consumer acceptance of the product was also investigated and the results revealed the existence of a niche of consumers willing to consume dealcoholized wine enriched with pomegranate extract. After tasting, 50% and 40% of those consumers initially interested by this product concept declared to be interested to purchase the control sample and the functional beverage, respectively. The daily consumption of two servings of 250 mL of this new pomegranate-enriched dealcoholized wine provides 82 mg of total ellagitannins, corresponding to the sum of punicalagin A and B and ellagic acid. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Genetic diversity and association mapping of bacterial blight and other horticulturally important traits with microsatellite markers in pomegranate from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nripendra Vikram; Abburi, Venkata Lakshmi; Ramajayam, D; Kumar, Ravinder; Chandra, Ram; Sharma, Kuldeep Kumar; Sharma, Jyotsana; Babu, K Dhinesh; Pal, Ram Krishna; Mundewadikar, Dhananjay M; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Cantrell, Robert; Nimmakayala, Padma; Reddy, Umesh K

    2015-08-01

    This genetic diversity study aimed to estimate the population structure and explore the use of association mapping strategies to identify linked markers for bacterial resistance, growth and fruit quality in pomegranate collections from India. In total, 88 accessions including 37 cultivated types were investigated. A total of 112 alleles were amplified by use of 44 publicly available microsatellites for estimating molecular genetic diversity and population structure. Neighbor-joining analysis, model-based population structure and principal component analysis corroborated the genetic relationships among wild-type and cultivated pomegranate collections from India. Our study placed all 88 germplasm into four clusters. We identified a cultivated clade of pomegranates in close proximity to Daru types of wild-type pomegranates that grow naturally near the foothills of the Himalayas. Admixture analysis sorted various lineages of cultivated pomegranates to their respective ancestral forms. We identified four linked markers for fruit weight, titratable acidity and bacterial blight severity. PGCT001 was found associated with both fruit weight and bacterial blight, and the association with fruit weight during both seasons analyzed was significant after Bonferroni correction. This research demonstrates effectiveness of microsatellites to resolve population structure among the wild and cultivar collection of pomegranates and future use for association mapping studies.

  1. Validated Method for the Characterization and Quantification of Extractable and Nonextractable Ellagitannins after Acid Hydrolysis in Pomegranate Fruits, Juices, and Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Villalba, Rocío; Espín, Juan Carlos; Aaby, Kjersti; Alasalvar, Cesarettin; Heinonen, Marina; Jacobs, Griet; Voorspoels, Stefan; Koivumäki, Tuuli; Kroon, Paul A; Pelvan, Ebru; Saha, Shikha; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2015-07-29

    Pomegranates are one of the main highly valuable sources of ellagitannins. Despite the potential health benefits of these compounds, reliable data on their content in pomegranates and derived extracts and food products is lacking, as it is usually underestimated due to their complexity, diversity, and lack of commercially available standards. This study describes a new method for the analysis of the extractable and nonextractable ellagitannins based on the quantification of the acid hydrolysis products that include ellagic acid, gallic acid, sanguisorbic acid dilactone, valoneic acid dilactone, and gallagic acid dilactone in pomegranate samples. The study also shows the occurrence of ellagitannin C-glycosides in pomegranates. The method was optimized using a pomegranate peel extract. To quantify nonextractable ellagitannins, freeze-dried pomegranate fruit samples were directly hydrolyzed with 4 M HCl in water at 90 °C for 24 h followed by extraction of the pellet with dimethyl sulfoxide/methanol (50:50, v/v). The method was validated and reproducibility was assessed by means of an interlaboratory trial, showing high reproducibility across six laboratories with relative standard deviations below 15%. Their applicability was demonstrated in several pomegranate extracts, different parts of pomegranate fruit (husk, peels, and mesocarp), and commercial juices. A large variability has been found in the ellagitannin content (150-750 mg of hydrolysis products/g) and type (gallagic acid/ellagic acid ratios between 4 and 0.15) of the 11 pomegranate extracts studied.

  2. Pomegranate polyphenols and extract inhibit nuclear factor of activated T-cell activity and microglial activation in vitro and in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Puig, Kendra L; Combs, Colin K

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) brain is characterized by extracellular plaques of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide with reactive microglia. This study aimed to determine whether a dietary intervention could attenuate microgliosis. Memory was assessed in 12-mo-old male amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice via Barnes maze testing followed by division into either a control-fed group provided free access to normal chow and water or a treatment group provided free access to normal chow and drinking water supplemented with pomegranate extract (6.25 mL/L) for 3 mo followed by repeat Barnes maze testing for both groups. Three months of pomegranate feeding decreased the path length to escape of mice compared with their initial 12-mo values (P pomegranate-fed mice had lower tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) concentrations (P pomegranate or control mice were also compared with an additional control group of 12-mo-old mice for histologic analysis. Immunocytochemistry showed that pomegranate- but not control-fed mice had attenuated microgliosis (P pomegranate extract-supplemented drinking water (6.25 mL/L) for 1 mo followed by repeat T-maze testing in both groups. One month of pomegranate feeding increased spontaneous alternations versus control-fed mice (P pomegranate extract, punicalagin and ellagic acid, attenuated NFAT activity in a reporter cell line (P pomegranate produces brain antiinflammatory effects that may attenuate AD progression.

  3. Case Report: Prune perineum syndrome: a rare case with an unfavourable outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Roberto I.; D?nes, Francisco T.; Messi, Gustavo B.; Machado, Marcos G.

    2016-01-01

    Prune perineum syndrome (PPS) is a rare anomaly, with only two previous case reports, both dying in the perinatal period. We report the first case of PPS that reached childhood. The patient presented with a hypoplastic genitalia and bilateral cryptorchidism. There was no evidence of an anal orifice. A significant prune-like mass was observed, extending from the perineum to both gluteal regions and to a cephalic mid-line bony prominence, with a 1cm central orifice that discharged urine. MRI co...

  4. Cane pruning on Chardonnay grapevine in the high-altitude regions of Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filho José Luiz Marcon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude regions of southern Brazil, located above 900 m above sea level, the cordon training with spur pruning is widely used because of easier application. In these regions, Chardonnay wine grape shows potential to produce quality wines, however, in commercial vineyards, the training system used has not provided productivities that makes economically viable the cultivation of this variety. Given this, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of different cane-pruning systems on the vegetative, productive and enological potential of Chardonnay grapevines grown in the high-altitude region of Southern Brazil. The experiment was conducted in a commercial Chardonnay vineyard, located in São Joaquim – Santa Catarina State (28o17 ′39”S and 49∘ 55′56” W, to 1230 m a.s.l during 2015 and 2016 vintages. Chardonnay vines (grafted on 1103 Paulsen were planted in 2010, with a 3.0 m (row × 1.0 m (vine spacing. The treatments consisted of different cane-pruning systems: Cordon spur-pruning (control; Sylvoz; Cazenave; Capovolto; single Guyot and double Guyot. Pruning was performed in August of each year when the buds were in the green tip developmental stage. Data was analyzed by Scott Knott test (p < 0.05 following a randomized block design with four replicates, each consisting of 12 vines per plot. We observed higher yield in the Cazenave and double Guyot training system with three and two more tons of grapes than spur-pruning respectively. The bud fertility was higher in plants trained in double Guyot. Vines spur-pruned showed higher relation of leaf area: production, with values above 100 cm2 g−1 grape at 2016 vintage. Commercial maturity of grapes (soluble solids, acidity and polyphenols did not differ among training systems studied. The results suggest that cane-pruning systems could be an alternative to increase production efficiency of Chardonnay in high-altitude region of southern Brazil.

  5. Grapevine cultivar variation to pruning wound protection by Trichoderma species against trunk pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheusi MUTAWILA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Using Trichoderma species to protect grapevine pruning wounds from trunk disease pathogensis one of the options available for managing grapevine trunk diseases. The growth and persistence of Trichoderma species in the pruning wound and the resulting control effect may depend on intrinsic wound factors and hence may vary between cultivars. Cultivar variability to pruning wound protection by Trichoderma species was evaluated in eight wine grape (Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Chenin blanc, Colombar, Merlot,Pinotage, Sauvignon blanc and Shiraz and four table grape (Prime, Red Globe, Thompson Seedless andVictoria cultivars. Two strains of Trichoderma atroviride (USPP-T1 and USPP-T2 separately or in combinationand Eco 77® a registered pruning wound biocontrol agent based on T. harzianum, were applied to fresh pruning wounds of spur-pruned wine grapevines and cane-pruned table grapevines. Trichoderma spp. and a variety of trunk pathogens, Phaeomoniella chlamydospora and species of Phaeoacremonium, Phomopsis, Botryosphaeriaceae and Diatrypaceae, were isolated from the pruning wounds eight months after treatment. Significant treatment × cultivar interactions (P<0.01 were found in the incidence of Trichoderma spp. in table and wine grapes. Trichoderma incidence varied greatly between cultivars and was less between Trichoderma treatments within the same cultivar. The highest Trichoderma incidence in wine grapes was found in Chenin blanc (71.4–82.5% and in table grapes in Thompson Seedless (43.5–76.7%. In the remaining winegrape cultivars Trichoderma incidence varied between 20–50% while with all treatments in Chardonnay Trichoderma incidence was less than 24%. In table grapes Trichoderma incidence varied from 20-67% in the other cultivars. Trichoderma reduced the pathogen by between 10.3% in Chardonnay to 66.7% in Cheninblanc. Trichoderma incidence and pathogen reduction were significantly correlated in most cultivars (r> 0.50;P<0.05 though not

  6. Changes in the Quality of Black Mulberry and Blueberry Sherbets During Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsen Rayman Ergün

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was evaluated the quality properties of traditional drink sherbets that are prepared from black mulberry and blueberry fruits. After production sherbets were investigated to determine their pH, acidity, °brix and colour values, total sugar, phenolic, anthocyanin and antioxidant contents. Moreover the sherbets stored at 4°C during 2 months and the changes in these quality properties were examined per month. As a result statistically significant changes were observed in the quality properties of these sherbets of black mulberry and blueberry fruits which are known with their rich content of phytochemical compounds. The results show that in blueberry sherbet the degradation of phenolics was faster than black mulberry sherbet. Anthocyanins that are higher in black mulberry sherbets after production were preserved better in blueberry sherbets at the end of 2nd month. L*and a* values decreased for blackberry and blueberry sherbets during storage. b* value decreased from 5.59 to 4.92 for blackberry sherbet while it increased from 0.62 to 0.79 for blueberry sherbet at the end of the storage time.

  7. Survey of antioxidant capacity and phenolic composition of blueberry, blackberry, and strawberry in Nanjing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wu-yang; Zhang, Hong-cheng; Liu, Wen-xu; Li, Chun-yang

    2012-02-01

    Berries are a good source of natural antioxidants. In the present study, the total antioxidant capacity and phenolic composition of three berry fruits (blueberry, blackberry, and strawberry) cultivated in Nanjing were investigated. Blueberry, with a Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) value of 14.98 mmol Trolox/100 g dry weight (DW), exhibited the strongest total antioxidant capacity using both the 2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) and the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) methods. Blueberry also had the highest total phenolic content (TPC, 9.44 mg gallic acid/g DW), total flavonoid content (TFC, 36.08 mg rutin/g DW), and total anthocyanidin content (TAC, 24.38 mg catechin/g DW). A preliminary analysis using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed that the blueberry, blackberry, and strawberry samples tested contained a range of phenolic acids (including gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, ellagic acid, and cinnamic acid) and various types of flavonoids (flavone: luteolin; flavonols: rutin, myricetin, quercetrin, and quercetin; flavanols: gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, catechin, and catechin gallate; anthocyanidins: malvidin-3-galactoside, malvidin-3-glucoside, and cyanidin). In particular, the blueberries had high levels of proanthocyanidins and anthocyanidins, which might be responsible for their strong antioxidant activities. These results indicate a potential market role for berries (especially blueberries) as a functional food ingredient or nutraceutical.

  8. Survey of antioxidant capacity and phenolic composition of blueberry, blackberry, and strawberry in Nanjing*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wu-yang; Zhang, Hong-cheng; Liu, Wen-xu; Li, Chun-yang

    2012-01-01

    Berries are a good source of natural antioxidants. In the present study, the total antioxidant capacity and phenolic composition of three berry fruits (blueberry, blackberry, and strawberry) cultivated in Nanjing were investigated. Blueberry, with a Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) value of 14.98 mmol Trolox/100 g dry weight (DW), exhibited the strongest total antioxidant capacity using both the 2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) and the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) methods. Blueberry also had the highest total phenolic content (TPC, 9.44 mg gallic acid/g DW), total flavonoid content (TFC, 36.08 mg rutin/g DW), and total anthocyanidin content (TAC, 24.38 mg catechin/g DW). A preliminary analysis using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed that the blueberry, blackberry, and strawberry samples tested contained a range of phenolic acids (including gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, ellagic acid, and cinnamic acid) and various types of flavonoids (flavone: luteolin; flavonols: rutin, myricetin, quercetrin, and quercetin; flavanols: gallocatechin, epigallocatechin, catechin, and catechin gallate; anthocyanidins: malvidin-3-galactoside, malvidin-3-glucoside, and cyanidin). In particular, the blueberries had high levels of proanthocyanidins and anthocyanidins, which might be responsible for their strong antioxidant activities. These results indicate a potential market role for berries (especially blueberries) as a functional food ingredient or nutraceutical. PMID:22302422

  9. Evaluation of the quality and shelf life of gamma irradiated blueberries by quarantine purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lires, Carla M. L.; Docters, Andrea; Horak, Celina I.

    2018-02-01

    Fresh blueberries (Vaccinium spp.) are considered one of the richest sources of phenolic compounds and are appreciated for their high antioxidant capacity. But they are hosts in Argentina of the quarantine pests Ceratitis capitata and Anastrepha fraterculus, and have to be treated to avoid its spreading. Irradiation is being introduced in the Agricultural World trade, increasing exponentially on the last years. In order to guarantee the success of this process, it is required previous to the rutinary treatment, to define the irradiation dose range to be applied. The minimum dose for these pests has been already approved in the IPPC standard 28. The maximum dose depends on the tolerance of the fruit cultivars, maturity, pre-harvest conditions, harvest time, storage conditions, and interactions among these factors. The postharvest quality of Argentina´s blueberry treated with irradiation doses of 150 (generic quarantine dose used for fruit flies) and 300 Gy (to evaluate tolerance) was evaluated. The studies included blueberries from different harvest seasons 2009-2012). Misty, O'Neal and Emeral varieties were chosen, because they represent the biggest volume of exported blueberry from Argentina. The results indicated that irradiation at 150 Gy and 300 Gy did not significantly affect the postharvest quality and slightly improved shelf life of the different blueberries varieties. Therefore, it is possible to use irradiation as an alternative quarantine treatment for Argentina´s blueberries, establishing a dose range appropriate to be applied on a commercial irradiation facility.

  10. Blueberry Supplementation Attenuates Microglial Activation in Hippocampal Intraocular Grafts to aged hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Lauren M.; Freeman, Linnea; Bickford, Paula C.; Quintero, E. Matthew; Umphlet, Claudia D.; Moore, Alfred B.; Goetzl, Laura; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Transplantation of central nervous tissue has been proposed as a therapeutic intervention for age-related neurodegenerative diseases and stroke. However, survival of embryonic neuronal cells is hampered by detrimental factors in the aged host brain such as circulating inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress. We have previously found that supplementation with 2% blueberry in the diet increases graft growth and neuronal survival in intraocular hippocampal grafts to aged hosts. In the present study we explored possible biochemical mechanisms for this increased survival, and we here report decreased microglial activation and astrogliosis in intraocular hippocampal grafts to middle-aged hosts fed a 2% blueberry diet. Markers for astrocytes and for activated microglial cells were both decreased long-term after grafting to blueberry-treated hosts compared to age-matched rats on a control diet. Similar findings were obtained in the host brain, with a reduction in OX-6 immunoreactive microglial cells in the hippocampus of those recipients treated with blueberry. In addition, immunoreactivity for the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was found to be significantly attenuated in intraocular grafts by the 2% blueberry diet. These studies demonstrate direct effects of blueberry upon microglial activation both during isolated conditions and in the aged host brain and suggest that this nutraceutical can attenuate age-induced inflammation. PMID:20014277

  11. Plasma and Urinary Phenolic Profiles after Acute and Repetitive Intake of Wild Blueberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo P. Feliciano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that blueberries may have cardiovascular and cognitive health benefits. In this work, we investigated the profile of plasma and urine (polyphenol metabolites after acute and daily consumption of wild blueberries for 30 days in 18 healthy men. The inter-individual variability in plasma and urinary polyphenol levels was also investigated. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 2 h post-consumption on day 1 and day 30. Twenty-four-hour urine was also collected on both days. A total of 61 phenolic metabolites were quantified in plasma at baseline, of which 43 increased after acute or chronic consumption of blueberries over one month. Benzoic and catechol derivatives represented more than 80% of the changes in phenolic profile after 2 h consumption on day 1, whereas hippuric and benzoic derivatives were the major compounds that increased at 0 and 2 h on day 30, respectively. The total (polyphenol urinary excretion remained unchanged after 30 days of wild blueberry intake. The inter-individual variability ranged between 40%–48% in plasma and 47%–54% in urine. Taken together, our results illustrate that blueberry (polyphenols are absorbed and extensively metabolized by phase II enzymes and by the gut microbiota, leading to a whole array of metabolites that may be responsible for the beneficial effects observed after blueberry consumption.

  12. Assessing the Economic Importance of Dasineura oxycoccana (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) in Northern Highbush Blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Noel G; Isaacs, Rufus

    2015-08-01

    Infestation by blueberry gall midge, Dasineura oxycoccana Johnson, is common in northern highbush blueberries, but its effects on crop productivity are unknown. We examined whether infestation by blueberry gall midge reduces flower bud production when compared with uninfested shoots, and how infestation at different times affects the crop response. From the fall of 2009 to the spring of 2011, the number of flower buds on infested and uninfested shoots of blueberry bushes was counted and compared. Despite causing branching of vegetative growth, there was no significant effect of infestation on flower bud production. During the summer of 2010, damaged shoots were marked throughout the growing season in June, July, or August. The number of flower buds set per shoot declined with later infestation dates, and shoots damaged in August had significantly fewer buds than those damaged in June and July. We discuss the implications of these findings for management of blueberry gall midge in northern highbush blueberry. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Acetobacter strains isolated during the acetification of blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, C; García, D; Romero, J; Mas, A; Torija, M J; Mateo, E

    2013-09-01

    Highbush blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) are known to have positive health benefits. The production of blueberry vinegar is one method to preserve this seasonal fruit and allow extended consumption. In this study, blueberry wine acetification was performed with naturally occurring micro-organisms and with an inoculated Acetobacter cerevisiae strain. Acetifications were carried out in triplicate using the Schützenbach method. The successful spontaneous processes took up to 66% more time than the processes involving inoculation. The isolation of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) and the analysis of these AAB using molecular methods allowed the identification of the main genotypes responsible of the blueberry acetification. Although the Acet. cerevisiae strain was the predominant strain isolated from the inoculated process samples, Acetobacter pasteurianus was isolated from samples for both processes and was the only species present in the spontaneous acetification samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the identification and variability of AAB isolated during blueberry acetification. The isolated Acet. pasteurianus strains could be used for large-scale blueberry vinegar production or as a starter culture in studies of other vinegar production methods. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Dried Plums, Prunes and Bone Health: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor C. Wallace

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans advocate for increasing fruit intake and replacing energy-dense foods with those that are nutrient-dense. Nutrition across the lifespan is pivotal for the healthy development and maintenance of bone. The National Osteoporosis Foundation estimates that over half of Americans age 50+ have either osteoporosis or low bone mass. Dried plums, also commonly referred to as prunes, have a unique nutrient and dietary bioactive profile and are suggested to exert beneficial effects on bone. To further elucidate and summarize the potential mechanisms and effects of dried plums on bone health, a comprehensive review of the scientific literature was conducted. The PubMed database was searched through 24 January 2017 for all cell, animal, population and clinical studies that examined the effects of dried plums and/or extracts of the former on markers of bone health. Twenty-four studies were included in the review and summarized in table form. The beneficial effects of dried plums on bone health may be in part due to the variety of phenolics present in the fruit. Animal and cell studies suggest that dried plums and/or their extracts enhance bone formation and inhibit bone resorption through their actions on cell signaling pathways that influence osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation. These studies are consistent with clinical studies that show that dried plums may exert beneficial effects on bone mineral density (BMD. Long-term prospective cohort studies using fractures and BMD as primary endpoints are needed to confirm the effects of smaller clinical, animal and mechanistic studies. Clinical and prospective cohort studies in men are also needed, since they represent roughly 29% of fractures, and likewise, diverse race and ethnic groups. No adverse effects were noted among any of the studies included in this comprehensive review. While the data are not completely consistent, this review suggests that

  15. Blueberries improve endothelial function, but not blood pressure, in adults with metabolic syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stull, April J; Cash, Katherine C; Champagne, Catherine M; Gupta, Alok K; Boston, Raymond; Beyl, Robbie A; Johnson, William D; Cefalu, William T

    2015-01-01

    Blueberry consumption has been shown to have various health benefits in humans. However, little is known about the effect of blueberry consumption on blood pressure, endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in humans...

  16. Chemopreventive and adjuvant therapeutic potential of pomegranate (Punica granatum) for human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Deuk; Mehta, Rajendra; Yu, Weiping; Neeman, Ishak; Livney, Talia; Amichay, Akiva; Poirier, Donald; Nicholls, Paul; Kirby, Andrew; Jiang, Wenguo; Mansel, Robert; Ramachandran, Cheppail; Rabi, Thangaiyan; Kaplan, Boris; Lansky, Ephraim

    2002-02-01

    Fresh organically grown pomegranates (Punica granatum L.) of the Wonderful cultivar were processed into three components: fermented juice, aqueous pericarp extract and cold-pressed or supercritical CO2-extracted seed oil. Exposure to additional solvents yielded polyphenol-rich fractions ('polyphenols') from each of the three components. Their actions, and of the crude whole oil and crude fermented and unfermented juice concentrate, were assessed in vitro for possible chemopreventive or adjuvant therapeutic potential in human breast cancer. The ability to effect a blockade of endogenous active estrogen biosynthesis was shown by polyphenols from fermented juice, pericarp, and oil, which inhibited aromatase activity by 60-80%. Fermented juice and pericarp polyphenols, and whole seed oil, inhibited 17-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase Type 1 from 34 to 79%, at concentrations ranging from 100 to 1,000 microg/ml according to seed oil > fermented juice polyphenols > pericarp polyphenols. In a yeast estrogen screen (YES) lyophilized fresh pomegranate juice effected a 55% inhibition of the estrogenic activity of 17-beta-estradiol; whereas the lyophilized juice by itself displayed only minimal estrogenic action. Inhibition of cell lines by fermented juice and pericarp polyphenols was according to estrogen-dependent (MCF-7) > estrogen-independent (MB-MDA-231) > normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A). In both MCF-7 and MB-MDA-231 cells, fermented pomegranate juice polyphenols consistently showed about twice the anti-proliferative effect as fresh pomegranate juice polyphenols. Pomegranate seed oil effected 90% inhibition of proliferation of MCF-7 at 100 microg/ml medium, 75% inhibition of invasion of MCF-7 across a Matrigel membrane at 10 microg/ml, and 54% apoptosis in MDA-MB-435 estrogen receptor negative metastatic human breast cancer cells at 50 microg/ml. In a murine mammary gland organ culture, fermented juice polyphenols effected 47% inhibition of cancerous

  17. On-line identification of hybrid systems using an adaptive growing and pruning RBF neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alizadeh, Tohid

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces an adaptive growing and pruning radial basis function (GAP-RBF) neural network for on-line identification of hybrid systems. The main idea is to identify a global nonlinear model that can predict the continuous outputs of hybrid systems. In the proposed approach, GAP-RBF neu...

  18. Fast pairwise structural RNA alignments by pruning of the dynamical programming matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havgaard, Jakob Hull; Torarinsson, Elfar; Gorodkin, Jan

    2007-01-01

    not be present and pre-folding ignores the comparative information. Here, pruning of the dynamical programming matrix is presented as an alternative novel heuristic constraint. All subalignments that do not exceed a length-dependent minimum score are discarded as the matrix is filled out, thus giving...

  19. Pruning affects the vegetative balance of the wine grape (Vitis vinifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro José Almanza-Merchán

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Grape cultivation for wine production at altitudes between 2,200 and 2,600 m a.s.l. started in the department of Boyaca in 1982. Quality wines are produced by the AinKarim Vineyard in Ricaurte High. Wine grapes have to possess suitable organoleptic compounds at harvest in order to guarantee quality grape must that can be converted into wine. Therefore, it is necessary to maintain a suitable ratio the sources and the sinks and to guarantee production, quality and vegetative sustainability over time, conserving the equilibrium and benefiting the productive potential of the vineyard. The aim of this study was to evaluate the productive and vegetative balance effect in the wine grape varieties Cabernet Sauvignon and Sauvignon Blanc in Sutamarchan-Boyaca, considering different pruning types (short, long, and mixed. A bifactorial, completely random statistical design was used. At the time of harvest, the fruit production and pruned wood were evaluated. The long-pruned vines showed the best behavior and the most balanced source/sink relationship,, while Sauvignon Blanc demonstrated a better productive yield. Meanwhile, the short and mixed prunings had the better values for the Ravaz index (balance between fruit production and vegetative growth, indicating that they are more suitable for the conditions of the region, allowing for sustainability during the productive cycles of the wine grapes.

  20. Sensitivity of directed networks to the addition and pruning of edges and vertices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, A. V.; Timár, G.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2017-08-01

    Directed networks have various topologically different extensive components, in contrast to a single giant component in undirected networks. We study the sensitivity (response) of the sizes of these extensive components in directed complex networks to the addition and pruning of edges and vertices. We introduce the susceptibility, which quantifies this sensitivity. We show that topologically different parts of a directed network have different sensitivity to the addition and pruning of edges and vertices and, therefore, they are characterized by different susceptibilities. These susceptibilities diverge at the critical point of the directed percolation transition, signaling the appearance (or disappearance) of the giant strongly connected component in the infinite size limit. We demonstrate this behavior in randomly damaged real and synthetic directed complex networks, such as the World Wide Web, Twitter, the Caenorhabditis elegans neural network, directed Erdős-Rényi graphs, and others. We reveal a nonmonotonic dependence of the sensitivity to random pruning of edges or vertices in the case of C. elegans and Twitter that manifests specific structural peculiarities of these networks. We propose the measurements of the susceptibilities during the addition or pruning of edges and vertices as a new method for studying structural peculiarities of directed networks.

  1. 7 CFR 944.350 - Safeguard procedures for avocados, grapefruit, kiwifruit, olives, oranges, prune variety plums...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables... plums (fresh prunes), and table grapes for processing; (3) Olives for processing into oil; (4) Grapefruit for animal feed; or (5) Avocados for seed shall obtain an “Importer's Exempt Commodity Form” (FV-6...

  2. Pruning dwarf mistletoe brooms reduces stress on Jeffrey pines, Cleveland National Forest, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert F. Scharpf; Richard S. Smith; Detlev Vogler

    1987-01-01

    Western dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium campylopodum) is a damaging parasite of Jeffrey pines (Pinus jeffreyi) in southern California. Infected branches that develop into brooms are believed to reduce tlee vigor and increase mortality. Brooms were pruned from Jeffrey pines with varying levels of dwarf mistletoe infection and live...

  3. Prune belly syndrome in an Egyptian infant with Down syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metwalley, Kotb A; Farghalley, Hekma S; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A

    2008-10-02

    Prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly of uncertain aetiology almost exclusive to males. The association between prune belly syndrome and Down syndrome is very rare. A 4-month-old Egyptian boy was admitted to our institute for management of acute bronchiolitis. He was born at full term by normal vaginal delivery. His mother, a 42-year-Egyptian villager with six other children, had no antenatal or prenatal care. On examination, the boy was found to be hypotonic. In addition to features of Down syndrome, karyotyping confirmed the diagnosis of trisomy 21. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen showed bilateral gross hydronephrosis with megaureter. Micturating cystourethrography showed grade V vesicoureteric reflux bilaterally with no urethral obstruction. Serum creatinine concentration was 90 mumol/litre, serum sodium was 132 mmol/litre and serum potassium was 5.9 mmol/litre. We report an Egyptian infant with Down syndrome and prune belly syndrome. The incidence of this association is unknown. Routine antenatal ultrasonography will help in discovering renal anomalies which can be followed postnatally. Postnatal detection of prune belly syndrome necessitates full radiological investigation to detect any renal anomalies. Early diagnosis of this syndrome and determining its optimal treatment are very important in helping to avoid its fatal course.

  4. Prune belly syndrome in an Egyptian infant with Down syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metwalley Kotb A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Prune belly syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly of uncertain aetiology almost exclusive to males. The association between prune belly syndrome and Down syndrome is very rare. Case presentation A 4-month-old Egyptian boy was admitted to our institute for management of acute bronchiolitis. He was born at full term by normal vaginal delivery. His mother, a 42-year-Egyptian villager with six other children, had no antenatal or prenatal care. On examination, the boy was found to be hypotonic. In addition to features of Down syndrome, karyotyping confirmed the diagnosis of trisomy 21. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen showed bilateral gross hydronephrosis with megaureter. Micturating cystourethrography showed grade V vesicoureteric reflux bilaterally with no urethral obstruction. Serum creatinine concentration was 90 μmol/litre, serum sodium was 132 mmol/litre and serum potassium was 5.9 mmol/litre. Conclusion We report an Egyptian infant with Down syndrome and prune belly syndrome. The incidence of this association is unknown. Routine antenatal ultrasonography will help in discovering renal anomalies which can be followed postnatally. Postnatal detection of prune belly syndrome necessitates full radiological investigation to detect any renal anomalies. Early diagnosis of this syndrome and determining its optimal treatment are very important in helping to avoid its fatal course.

  5. 75 FR 1269 - Dried Prunes Produced in California; Decreased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ..., Regional Manager, California Marketing Field Office, Marketing Order Administration Branch, Fruit and... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 993 Dried Prunes Produced in California; Decreased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Affirmation of interim final rule as final rule...

  6. Growing Up With Prune Belly Syndrome In A Resource Poor Setting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The challenges here are for the care givers as well as the physicians who are confronted with the enormous task of taking care of a child with congenital abnormality against a backdrop of lack of resources and a cultural environment that is almost intolerant of dysmorphology. Keywords : Dysmorphology, Prune belly ...

  7. Decreasing-Rate Pruning Optimizes the Construction of Efficient and Robust Distributed Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saket Navlakha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Robust, efficient, and low-cost networks are advantageous in both biological and engineered systems. During neural network development in the brain, synapses are massively over-produced and then pruned-back over time. This strategy is not commonly used when designing engineered networks, since adding connections that will soon be removed is considered wasteful. Here, we show that for large distributed routing networks, network function is markedly enhanced by hyper-connectivity followed by aggressive pruning and that the global rate of pruning, a developmental parameter not previously studied by experimentalists, plays a critical role in optimizing network structure. We first used high-throughput image analysis techniques to quantify the rate of pruning in the mammalian neocortex across a broad developmental time window and found that the rate is decreasing over time. Based on these results, we analyzed a model of computational routing networks and show using both theoretical analysis and simulations that decreasing rates lead to more robust and efficient networks compared to other rates. We also present an application of this strategy to improve the distributed design of airline networks. Thus, inspiration from neural network formation suggests effective ways to design distributed networks across several domains.

  8. Prune belly syndrome in a set of twins, a family tragedy: Case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report prune belly syndrome, a rare congenital malformation, in a set of twins delivered to a young couple with a history of three previous first trimester spontaneous abortions, discordant HIV seropositivity and antenatal ultrasound report that indicated renal abnormalities in only one of the twins. The challenges of ...

  9. On failure of the pruning technique in "error repair in shift-reduce parsers"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertsch, E; Nederhof, MJ

    A previous article presented a technique to compute the least-cost error repair by incrementally generating configurations that result from inserting and deleting tokens in a syntactically incorrect input. An additional mechanism to improve the run-time efficiency of this algorithm by pruning some

  10. 76 FR 75805 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Prune Crop Insurance Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Federal Crop Insurance Corporation 7 CFR Part 457 RIN 0563-AC36 Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Prune Crop Insurance Provisions AGENCY: Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Federal Crop Insurance Corporation (FCIC) proposes to amend the Common Crop Insurance...

  11. Development of epicormic sprouts in Sitka spruce following thinning and pruning in south-east Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Deal; R. James Barbour; Michael H. McClellan; Dean L. Parry

    2003-01-01

    The frequency and size of epicormic sprouts in Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) were assessed in five 23-29 year-old mixed Sitka spruce-western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) stands that were uniformly thinned and pruned to 2.4, 3.7 and 5.2 m lift heights. Six to nine years after treatment sprouts were...

  12. Can early thinning and pruning lessen the impact of pine plantations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dwelling insects found in pine tree plantations in Patagonia. We compared the abundance, species richness and composition of the beetle and ant assemblages within 16-year-old pine stands (n = 10) subjected to early pruning and thinning (i.e. ...

  13. Competition in apple, as influenced by Alar sprays, fruiting, pruning and tree spacing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, E.W.M.

    1972-01-01

    In the spring of 1965 a trial was planted with Golden Delicious IX and James Grieve 'aimed' VII, in which tree spacing, deblossoming, Alar sprays and pruning were variable factors, Results are presented over the period 1966-1969.

    At the end of 1969, the 5th year from planting, 400

  14. Effect of Staking and Pruning on the Growth and Yield of Cucumber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of pruning and staking on the vegetative growth and yield of cucumber ( Cucumis sativus L.). The experiment was a 3 x 2 factorial laid out in Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with five replications. The results showed that vine length, number of flowers, total ...

  15. Effect of Time and Level of Pruning on Vegetative Growth, Flowering, Yield, and Quality of Guava

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikari, Shiva; Kandel, Tanka Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Poor quality fruit production in the rainy season and failure to manipulate production periods are common problems for guava production in India and Nepal. As a possible management to overcome these problems, a field experiment was conducted to understand the effect of time and level of pruning o...

  16. Evaluation of fungicides as potential grapevine pruning wound protectants against Botryosphaeria species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bester, W.; Crous, P.W.; Fourie, P.H.

    2007-01-01

    Protection of wounds against infection by trunk disease pathogens is the most efficient and cost-effective means to prevent grapevine trunk diseases. Studies done to determine the effectiveness of chemical pruning wound protectants have mostly focused on the control of Eutypa lata. However, other

  17. Effect of electrical conductivity, fruit pruning, and truss position on quality in greenhouse tomato fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fanasca, S.; Martino, A.; Heuvelink, E.; Stanghellini, C.

    2007-01-01

    The combined effects of electrical conductivity (an EC of 2.5 dS m-1 or 8 dS m-1 in the root zone) and fruit pruning (three or six fruit per truss) on tomato fruit quality were studied in a greenhouse experiment, planted in January 2005. Taste-related attributes [dry matter content (DM), total

  18. Effect of edge pruning on structural controllability and observability of complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengiste, Simachew Abebe; Aertsen, Ad; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-12-01

    Controllability and observability of complex systems are vital concepts in many fields of science. The network structure of the system plays a crucial role in determining its controllability and observability. Because most naturally occurring complex systems show dynamic changes in their network connectivity, it is important to understand how perturbations in the connectivity affect the controllability of the system. To this end, we studied the control structure of different types of artificial, social and biological neuronal networks (BNN) as their connections were progressively pruned using four different pruning strategies. We show that the BNNs are more similar to scale-free networks than to small-world networks, when comparing the robustness of their control structure to structural perturbations. We introduce a new graph descriptor, ‘the cardinality curve’, to quantify the robustness of the control structure of a network to progressive edge pruning. Knowing the susceptibility of control structures to different pruning methods could help design strategies to destroy the control structures of dangerous networks such as epidemic networks. On the other hand, it could help make useful networks more resistant to edge attacks.

  19. 78 FR 63128 - Dried Prunes Produced in California; Increased Assessment Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 993 Dried Prunes Produced in California; Increased Assessment Rate AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This... the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7 U.S.C. 601-674), hereinafter referred...

  20. Mineralization and N-use efficiency of tree legume prunings from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatment combinations were laid out as a randomized complete blocks design. Mixtures of tree prunings with 2.5 t ha-1 maize stover increased maize N uptake and grain yield whereas 5 t ha-1 maize stover reduced maize N uptake and grain yield during the wetter season. Mixtures of Pea-R, Stover-1 or Stover-2 with ...