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Sample records for prrsv nonstructural protein

  1. Immune Response of Multiparous Hyper-Immunized Sows against Peptides from Non-Structural and Structural Proteins of PRRSV

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    Edgar Rascón-Castelo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the humoral and cellular responses of commercial multiparous and hyper-immunized sows against peptides from non-structural (nsp and structural proteins of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV. We selected sows with different numbers of parities from a commercial farm. Management practices on this farm include the use of the MLV commercial vaccine four times per year, plus two vaccinations during the acclimation period. The humoral response was evaluated via the antibody recognition of peptides from nsp and structural proteins, and the cellular response was assessed by measuring the frequency of peptide and PRRSV-specific IFN-gamma-secreting cells (IFNγ-SC. Our results show that sows with six parities have more antibodies against peptides from structural proteins than against peptides from nsp. The analysis of the cellular response revealed that the number of immunizations did not affect the frequency of IFNγ-SC and that the response was stronger against peptides from structural proteins (M protein than against nsp (nsp2. In summary, these results demonstrate that multiparous, hyper-immunized sows have a stronger immune humoral response to PRRSV structural peptides than nsp, but no differences in IFNγ-SC against the same peptides were observed.

  2. Semen from boars infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) contains antibodies against structural as well as nonstructural viral proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M. B.; Bøtner, Anette; Normann, Preben

    2001-01-01

    antigen, we were able to separately and specifically assay antibody responses against structural and nonstructural viral proteins. Antibodies against structural as well as nonstructural viral proteins were consistently found in the semen of all boars, beginning from 1-4 weeks postinfection...

  3. Interactome profile of the host cellular proteins and the nonstructural protein 2 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

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    Wang, Li; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Han; Li, Yan; Ge, Xinna; Guo, Xin; Yu, Kangzhen; Yang, Hanchun

    2014-01-01

    The nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) is considered to be one of crucial viral proteins in the replication and pathogenesis of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). In the present study, the host cellular proteins that interact with the NSP2 of PRRSV were immunoprecipitated with anti-Myc antibody from the MARC-145 cells infected by a recombinant PRRSV with 3xMyc tag insertion in its NSP2-coding region, and then 285 cellular proteins interacting with NSP2 were identified by LC-MS/MS. The Gene Ontology and enriched KEGG Pathway bioinformatics analyses indicated that the identified proteins could be assigned to different subcellular locations and functional classes. Functional analysis of the interactome profile highlighted cellular pathways associated with infectious disease, translation, immune system, nervous system and signal transduction. Two interested cellular proteins-BCL2-associated athanogene 6 (BAG6) and apoptosis-inducing factor 1 (AIF1) which may involve in transporting of NSP2 to Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or PRRSV-driven apoptosis were validated by Western blot. The interactome data between PRRSV NSP2 and cellular proteins contribute to the understanding of the roles of NSP2 in the replication and pathogenesis of PRRSV, and also provide novel cellular target proteins for elucidating the associated molecular mechanisms of the interaction of host cellular proteins with viral proteins in regulating the viral replication.

  4. Interactome profile of the host cellular proteins and the nonstructural protein 2 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

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    Li Wang

    Full Text Available The nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2 is considered to be one of crucial viral proteins in the replication and pathogenesis of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV. In the present study, the host cellular proteins that interact with the NSP2 of PRRSV were immunoprecipitated with anti-Myc antibody from the MARC-145 cells infected by a recombinant PRRSV with 3xMyc tag insertion in its NSP2-coding region, and then 285 cellular proteins interacting with NSP2 were identified by LC-MS/MS. The Gene Ontology and enriched KEGG Pathway bioinformatics analyses indicated that the identified proteins could be assigned to different subcellular locations and functional classes. Functional analysis of the interactome profile highlighted cellular pathways associated with infectious disease, translation, immune system, nervous system and signal transduction. Two interested cellular proteins-BCL2-associated athanogene 6 (BAG6 and apoptosis-inducing factor 1 (AIF1 which may involve in transporting of NSP2 to Endoplasmic reticulum (ER or PRRSV-driven apoptosis were validated by Western blot. The interactome data between PRRSV NSP2 and cellular proteins contribute to the understanding of the roles of NSP2 in the replication and pathogenesis of PRRSV, and also provide novel cellular target proteins for elucidating the associated molecular mechanisms of the interaction of host cellular proteins with viral proteins in regulating the viral replication.

  5. Induction of Apoptosis by the Nonstructural Protein 4 and 10 of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus.

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    Shuaizhen Yuan

    Full Text Available Infection by most viruses triggers apoptosis in host cells, and viruses manipulate this cell response to promote viral replication, virus spread, and cell killing. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV has been shown to induce apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo, while the regulatory roles of PRRSV-encoded products in apoptosis are not fully understood. In the present study, we first showed a biphasic apoptosis regulation by a highly pathogenic PRRSV strain JXwn06. It was indicated that PRRSV infection delays apoptosis at early infection but activates apoptosis at late infection in MARC-145 cells. In PRRSV-infected MARC-145 cells, procaspase-8, -9 and -12 were activated at late infection, demonstrating the involvements of death receptor pathway, mitochondrial pathway and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress pathway in inducing apoptosis. PRRSV was also shown to induce a similar apoptosis process in pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs with an early initiation. Next, the PRRSV-encoded apoptosis inducers were screened, indicating that the nonstructural protein (Nsp 4 and Nsp10 of PRRSV are pro-apoptotic. In the presence of Nsp4, it was confirmed that procaspase-8, -9 and -12 were cleaved, and Nsp4 facilitates the cleavage of procaspase-9 by activating B-cell lymphoma 2 interacting mediator of cell death (Bim, a pro-apoptotic protein. In addition, Nsp4 was shown to induce the degradation of an anti-apoptotic protein, B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL. Nsp10 was shown to activate procaspase-8 and -9 but procaspase-12 and to upregulate the expression of BH3-only pro-apoptotic protein BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (Bid and its active form, truncated Bid (tBid. Clearly, the participation of both activated caspase-8 and Bid is required for Nsp10-induced apoptosis, indicating a crosstalk between extrinsic- and mitochondria-dependent pathways. Together, our findings suggest that PRRSV infection regulates apoptosis in a two

  6. Induction of Apoptosis by the Nonstructural Protein 4 and 10 of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus.

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    Yuan, Shuaizhen; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Lei; Zhou, Lei; Ge, Xinna; Guo, Xin; Yang, Hanchun

    2016-01-01

    Infection by most viruses triggers apoptosis in host cells, and viruses manipulate this cell response to promote viral replication, virus spread, and cell killing. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been shown to induce apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo, while the regulatory roles of PRRSV-encoded products in apoptosis are not fully understood. In the present study, we first showed a biphasic apoptosis regulation by a highly pathogenic PRRSV strain JXwn06. It was indicated that PRRSV infection delays apoptosis at early infection but activates apoptosis at late infection in MARC-145 cells. In PRRSV-infected MARC-145 cells, procaspase-8, -9 and -12 were activated at late infection, demonstrating the involvements of death receptor pathway, mitochondrial pathway and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway in inducing apoptosis. PRRSV was also shown to induce a similar apoptosis process in pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) with an early initiation. Next, the PRRSV-encoded apoptosis inducers were screened, indicating that the nonstructural protein (Nsp) 4 and Nsp10 of PRRSV are pro-apoptotic. In the presence of Nsp4, it was confirmed that procaspase-8, -9 and -12 were cleaved, and Nsp4 facilitates the cleavage of procaspase-9 by activating B-cell lymphoma 2 interacting mediator of cell death (Bim), a pro-apoptotic protein. In addition, Nsp4 was shown to induce the degradation of an anti-apoptotic protein, B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL). Nsp10 was shown to activate procaspase-8 and -9 but procaspase-12 and to upregulate the expression of BH3-only pro-apoptotic protein BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (Bid) and its active form, truncated Bid (tBid). Clearly, the participation of both activated caspase-8 and Bid is required for Nsp10-induced apoptosis, indicating a crosstalk between extrinsic- and mitochondria-dependent pathways. Together, our findings suggest that PRRSV infection regulates apoptosis in a two-phase manner and

  7. Transdermal delivery of plasmid encoding truncated nucleocapsid protein enhanced PRRSV-specific immune responses.

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    Suradhat, Sanipa; Wongyanin, Piya; Sirisereewan, Chaitawat; Nedumpun, Teerawut; Lumyai, Mongkol; Triyarach, Sittikorn; Chaturavittawong, Damnoen; Paphavasit, Termsit; Panyatong, Raphee; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje

    2016-01-27

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSV) induces several immunomodulatory mechanisms that resulted in delayed and ineffective anti-viral immune responses. Recently, it has been shown that intradermal immunization of plasmid encoding truncated nucleocapsid protein (pORF7t) could reduce PRRSV-induced immunomodulatory activities and enhances anti-PRRSV immunity in vaccinated pigs. However, intradermal immunization may not be practical for farm setting. Currently, there are several transdermal delivery systems available in the market, although they were not originally designed for plasmid delivery. To investigate the potential use of a transdermal delivery system for delivering of pORF7t and its immunological outcomes. The immunomodulatory effects induced by transdermal delivery of pORF7t were compared with intradermal immunization in an experimental pig model. In addition, immunomodulatory effects of the DNA vaccine were determined in the fattening pigs kept in a PRRSV-positive farm environment, and in the experimental pigs receiving heterologous prime-boost, pORF7t-modified live vaccine (MLV) immunization. The patterns of PRRSV-specific cellular responses induced by transdermal and intradermal immunizations of pORF7t were similar. Interestingly, the pigs transdermally immunized with pORF7t exhibited higher number of PRRSV-specific CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) cells. Pigs immunized with pORF7t and kept at PRRSV-positive environment exhibited enhanced PRRSV-specific IFN-γ(+) production, reduced numbers of regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) and lower lung scores at the end of the finishing period. In the heterologous prime-boost experiment, priming with pORF7t prior to MLV vaccination resulted in significantly higher numbers of CD3(+)IFN-γ(+) subpopulations, lower numbers of PRRSV-specific CD3(+)IL-10(+) cells and Tregs, and rapid antibody responses in immunized pigs. Transdermal immunization with pORF7t reduced PRRRSV-induced immunomodulatory effects and enhanced

  8. Identification of epitopes on nonstructural protein 7 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus recognized by monoclonal antibodies using phage-display technology.

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    Wang, Heng; Liu, Rongchang; Zhang, Weidong; Sun, Lingshuang; Ning, Zhangyong; Ji, Fangxiao; Cui, Jin; Zhang, Guihong

    2017-08-01

    Nonstructural protein 7 (nsp7) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is considered to be a suitable reagent for the development of serological diagnostic assays. It can be expressed as a soluble recombinant protein in Escherichia coli, and its antibody response may continue up to 202 days post-infection. Furthermore, the region encoded by nsp7 is highly homologous among various strains within the genotype, and the results of nsp7-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed high agreement with previous Idexx ELISA results. All these evidences suggest the existence of important epitopes on nsp7, though the characteristics of these epitopes remain unclear. In the present study, we prepared three monoclonal antibodies against nsp7 protein and used them to screen the epitope-distribution characteristics of PRRSV nsp7 protein by phage-display technology. We identified a linear epitope NAWGDEDRLN at amino acids 153-162 type II PRRSV nsp7β subunit. This newly defined epitope showed excellent reactivity with PRSSV-positive serum samples. These results further our understanding of the antigenic structure of nsp7 protein, and provide efficient reagents for PRRSV serological tests.

  9. Characterization of the Interactome of the Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Nonstructural Protein 2 Reveals the Hyper Variable Region as a Binding Platform for Association with 14-3-3 Proteins.

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    Xiao, Yihong; Wu, Weining; Gao, Jiming; Smith, Nikki; Burkard, Christine; Xia, Dong; Zhang, Minxia; Wang, Chengbao; Archibald, Alan; Digard, Paul; Zhou, En-Min; Hiscox, Julian A

    2016-05-06

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major threat to the swine industry worldwide and hence global food security, exacerbated by a newly emerged highly pathogenic (HP-PRRSV) strain from China. PRRSV nonstructural protein 2 (nsp2) is a multifunctional polypeptide with strain-dependent influences on pathogenicity. A number of discrete functional regions have been identified on the protein. Quantitative label free proteomics was used to identify cellular binding partners of nsp2 expressed by HP-PRRSV. This allowed the identification of potential cellular interacting partners and the discrimination of nonspecific interactions. The interactome data were further investigated and validated using biological replicates and also compared with nsp2 from a low pathogenic (LP) strain of PRRSV. Validation included both forward and reverse pulldowns and confocal microscopy. The data indicated that nsp2 interacted with a number of cellular proteins including 14-3-3, CD2AP, and other components of cellular aggresomes. The hyper-variable region of nsp2 protein was identified as a binding platform for association with 14-3-3 proteins.

  10. Overall linkage map of the nonstructural proteins of Aichi virus.

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    Ishikawa, Kumiko; Sasaki, Jun; Taniguchi, Koki

    2010-01-01

    Aichi virus (AiV), which is associated with acute gastroenteritis in humans, is a member of the genus Kobuvirus of the family Picornaviridae. Picornavirus genome replication occurs in replication complexes that include viral nonstructural proteins, host proteins and viral RNA. In poliovirus, all nonstructural proteins are found in the replication complexes, suggesting the ability of the viral nonstructural proteins to interact with each other. In this study, we examined the interactions between the AiV nonstructural proteins using a mammalian two-hybrid system. The results showed that all of the tested proteins could interact with more than one protein. We observed homodimerization of five proteins, bidirectional heterodimerization of six protein pairs, and unidirectional heterodimerization of eighteen protein pairs. Among the interactions detected in this study, the 2A-2BC, 2A-2BC, 2A-2C, 2BC-3CD, 2BC-3C, 2C-3C, 2C-3CD and 3AB-3C interactions have not been observed in the previous two-hybrid studies with other picornaviruses. The strongest interaction was observed between 2A and 3CD. AiV 2A has already been shown to be involved in genome replication. Domain mapping of the 2A and 3CD interaction in mammalian two-hybrid analysis revealed that the C-terminal quarter of 2A is not required for the interaction with 3CD.

  11. Predicted Peptides from Non-Structural Proteins of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Are Able to Induce IFN-γ and IL-10

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    Enric Mateu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This work describes peptides from non-structural proteins (nsp of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV predicted as potential T cell epitopes by bioinfornatics and tested for their ability to induce IFN-γ and IL-10 responses. Pigs immunized with either genotype 1 or genotype 2 PRRSV attenuated vaccines (n=5/group and unvaccinated pigs (n = 4 were used to test the peptides. Swine leukocyte antigen haplotype of each pig was also determined. Pigs were initially screened for IFN-γ responses (ELISPOT and three peptides were identified; two of them in non-conserved segments of nsp2 and nsp5 and the other in a conserved region of nsp5 peptide. Then, peptides were screened for IL-10 inducing properties. Six peptides were found to induce IL-10 release in PBMC and some of them were also able to inhibit IFN-γ responses on PHA-stimulated cells. Interestingly, the IFN-γ low responder pigs against PRRSV were mostly homozygous for their SLA haplotypes. In conclusion, these results indicate that nsp of PRRSV contain T-cell epitopes inducing IFN-γ responses as well as IL-10 inducing segments with inhibitory capabilities.

  12. Membrane rearrangements mediated by coronavirus nonstructural proteins 3 and 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagemeijer, M.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483307X; Monastyrska, I.; Griffith, J.; van der Sluijs, P.; Voortman, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304840300; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071919481; Vonk, A.M.; Rottier, P.J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068451954; Reggiori, F.M.; De Haan, C.A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/194204510

    Coronaviruses replicate their genomes in association with rearranged cellular membranes. The coronavirus nonstructural integral membrane proteins (nsps) 3, 4 and 6, are key players in the formation of the rearranged membranes. Previously, we demonstrated that nsp3 and nsp4 interact and that their

  13. Characterization of polyclonal antibodies against nonstructural protein 9 from the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

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    Mengmeng ZHAO,Juanjuan QIAN,Jiexiong XIE,Tiantian CUI,Songling FENG,Guoqiang WANG,Ruining WANG,Guihong ZHANG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS is considered to be one of the most important infectious diseases impacting the swine industry and is characterized by reproductive failure in late term gestation in sows and respiratory disease in pigs of all ages. The nonstructural protein 9 gene, Nsp9, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, is generally regarded as fairly conserved when compared to other viral proteins. Antibodies against Nsp9 will be of great importance for the diagnosis and treatment of the causal agent, PRRS virus. A study was undertaken to generate polyclonal antibodies against the immunodominant Nsp9. For this purpose, the Nsp9 was expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently used as an antigen to immunize New Zealand rabbits. Antiserum was identified via an indirect ELISA, and then verified based on the ability to react with both naturally and artificially expressed Nsp9. Results of virus neutralization test showed that this antiserum could not neutralize the PRRSV. Nevertheless, this antiserum as a diagnostic core reagent should prove invaluable for further investigations into the mechanism of PRRS pathogenesis.

  14. Immunological Features of the Non-Structural Proteins of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

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    Edgar Rascón-Castelo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is currently one of the most important viruses affecting the swine industry worldwide. Despite the large number of papers published each year, the participation of non-structural proteins (nsps in the immune response is not completely clear. nsps have been involved in the host innate immune response, specifically, nsp1α/β, nsp2, nsp4 and nsp11 have been associated with the immunomodulation capability of the virus. To date, only participation by nsp1, nsp2, nsp4 and nsp7 in the humoral immune response has been reported, with the role of other nsps being overlooked. Furthermore, nsp1, nsp2, nsp5, nsp7 nsp9, nsp10, nsp11 have been implicated in the induction of IFN-γ and probably in the development of the cell-mediated immune response. This review discusses recent reports involving the participation of nsps in the modulation of the innate immune response and their role in the induction of both the humoral and cellular immune responses.

  15. Membrane rearrangements mediated by coronavirus nonstructural proteins 3 and 4.

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    Hagemeijer, Marne C; Monastyrska, Iryna; Griffith, Janice; van der Sluijs, Peter; Voortman, Jarno; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M; Vonk, Annelotte M; Rottier, Peter J M; Reggiori, Fulvio; de Haan, Cornelis A M

    2014-06-01

    Coronaviruses replicate their genomes in association with rearranged cellular membranes. The coronavirus nonstructural integral membrane proteins (nsps) 3, 4 and 6, are key players in the formation of the rearranged membranes. Previously, we demonstrated that nsp3 and nsp4 interact and that their co-expression results in the relocalization of these proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) into discrete perinuclear foci. We now show that these foci correspond to areas of rearranged ER-derived membranes, which display increased membrane curvature. These structures, which were able to recruit other nsps, were only detected when nsp3 and nsp4 were derived from the same coronavirus species. We propose, based on the analysis of a large number of nsp3 and nsp4 mutants, that interaction between the large luminal loops of these proteins drives the formation of membrane rearrangements, onto which the coronavirus replication-transcription complexes assemble in infected cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of a fourth orbivirus non-structural protein.

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    Mourad Belhouchet

    Full Text Available The genus Orbivirus includes both insect and tick-borne viruses. The orbivirus genome, composed of 10 segments of dsRNA, encodes 7 structural proteins (VP1-VP7 and 3 non-structural proteins (NS1-NS3. An open reading frame (ORF that spans almost the entire length of genome segment-9 (Seg-9 encodes VP6 (the viral helicase. However, bioinformatic analysis recently identified an overlapping ORF (ORFX in Seg-9. We show that ORFX encodes a new non-structural protein, identified here as NS4. Western blotting and confocal fluorescence microscopy, using antibodies raised against recombinant NS4 from Bluetongue virus (BTV, which is insect-borne, or Great Island virus (GIV, which is tick-borne, demonstrate that these proteins are synthesised in BTV or GIV infected mammalian cells, respectively. BTV NS4 is also expressed in Culicoides insect cells. NS4 forms aggregates throughout the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus, consistent with identification of nuclear localisation signals within the NS4 sequence. Bioinformatic analyses indicate that NS4 contains coiled-coils, is related to proteins that bind nucleic acids, or are associated with membranes and shows similarities to nucleolar protein UTP20 (a processome subunit. Recombinant NS4 of GIV protects dsRNA from degradation by endoribonucleases of the RNAse III family, indicating that it interacts with dsRNA. However, BTV NS4, which is only half the putative size of the GIV NS4, did not protect dsRNA from RNAse III cleavage. NS4 of both GIV and BTV protect DNA from degradation by DNAse. NS4 was found to associate with lipid droplets in cells infected with BTV or GIV or transfected with a plasmid expressing NS4.

  17. The Nonstructural Proteins Directing Coronavirus RNA Synthesis and Processing.

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    Snijder, E J; Decroly, E; Ziebuhr, J

    2016-01-01

    Coronaviruses are animal and human pathogens that can cause lethal zoonotic infections like SARS and MERS. They have polycistronic plus-stranded RNA genomes and belong to the order Nidovirales, a diverse group of viruses for which common ancestry was inferred from the common principles underlying their genome organization and expression, and from the conservation of an array of core replicase domains, including key RNA-synthesizing enzymes. Coronavirus genomes (~26-32 kilobases) are the largest RNA genomes known to date and their expansion was likely enabled by acquiring enzyme functions that counter the commonly high error frequency of viral RNA polymerases. The primary functions that direct coronavirus RNA synthesis and processing reside in nonstructural protein (nsp) 7 to nsp16, which are cleavage products of two large replicase polyproteins translated from the coronavirus genome. Significant progress has now been made regarding their structural and functional characterization, stimulated by technical advances like improved methods for bioinformatics and structural biology, in vitro enzyme characterization, and site-directed mutagenesis of coronavirus genomes. Coronavirus replicase functions include more or less universal activities of plus-stranded RNA viruses, like an RNA polymerase (nsp12) and helicase (nsp13), but also a number of rare or even unique domains involved in mRNA capping (nsp14, nsp16) and fidelity control (nsp14). Several smaller subunits (nsp7-nsp10) act as crucial cofactors of these enzymes and contribute to the emerging "nsp interactome." Understanding the structure, function, and interactions of the RNA-synthesizing machinery of coronaviruses will be key to rationalizing their evolutionary success and the development of improved control strategies. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Membrane alterations induced by nonstructural proteins of human norovirus.

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    Sylvie Y Doerflinger

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Human noroviruses (huNoV are the most frequent cause of non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis worldwide, particularly genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4 variants. The viral nonstructural (NS proteins encoded by the ORF1 polyprotein induce vesical clusters harboring the viral replication sites. Little is known so far about the ultrastructure of these replication organelles or the contribution of individual NS proteins to their biogenesis. We compared the ultrastructural changes induced by expression of norovirus ORF1 polyproteins with those induced upon infection with murine norovirus (MNV. Characteristic membrane alterations induced by ORF1 expression resembled those found in MNV infected cells, consisting of vesicle accumulations likely built from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER which included single membrane vesicles (SMVs, double membrane vesicles (DMVs and multi membrane vesicles (MMVs. In-depth analysis using electron tomography suggested that MMVs originate through the enwrapping of SMVs with tubular structures similar to mechanisms reported for picornaviruses. Expression of GII.4 NS1-2, NS3 and NS4 fused to GFP revealed distinct membrane alterations when analyzed by correlative light and electron microscopy. Expression of NS1-2 induced proliferation of smooth ER membranes forming long tubular structures that were affected by mutations in the active center of the putative NS1-2 hydrolase domain. NS3 was associated with ER membranes around lipid droplets (LDs and induced the formation of convoluted membranes, which were even more pronounced in case of NS4. Interestingly, NS4 was the only GII.4 protein capable of inducing SMV and DMV formation when expressed individually. Our work provides the first ultrastructural analysis of norovirus GII.4 induced vesicle clusters and suggests that their morphology and biogenesis is most similar to picornaviruses. We further identified NS4 as a key factor in the formation of membrane alterations of huNoV and

  19. Non-Structural Proteins of Arthropod-Borne Bunyaviruses: Roles and Functions

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    Alain Kohl

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses within the Bunyaviridae family are tri-segmented, negative-stranded RNA viruses. The family includes several emerging and re-emerging viruses of humans, animals and plants, such as Rift Valley fever virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, La Crosse virus, Schmallenberg virus and tomato spotted wilt virus. Many bunyaviruses are arthropod-borne, so-called arboviruses. Depending on the genus, bunyaviruses encode, in addition to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and the different structural proteins, one or several non-structural proteins. These non-structural proteins are not always essential for virus growth and replication but can play an important role in viral pathogenesis through their interaction with the host innate immune system. In this review, we will summarize current knowledge and understanding of insect-borne bunyavirus non-structural protein function(s in vertebrate, plant and arthropod.

  20. Experimental infection and comparative genomic analysis of a highly pathogenic PRRSV-HBR strain at different passage levels.

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    Wei, Yanwu; Li, Shengbin; Huang, Liping; Tang, Qinghai; Liu, Jianbo; Liu, Dan; Wang, Yiping; Wu, Hongli; Liu, Changming

    2013-10-25

    A highly pathogenic strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV-HBR) was passaged on Marc-145 cells for 125 passages. In order to elucidate the change in virulence of PRRSV-HBR strain during the process of passage in vitro, swine infection experiment was performed with the viruses of low (F5 and F10) and high passage (F125). In addition, to identify the mutations related to the change in virulence of PRRSV-HBR strain, we compared and analyzed the genomic sequences of the F5, F10 and F125 of the strain. The virulence of F125 was significantly lower than that of F5 in the virus-infected pigs. In comparison with F5 and F125, there were 45 amino acids (aa) mutations and a deletion of 2 continuous aa by means of the virus genome sequence analysis. For these mutations, 33 aa (73.3%) occurred in the viral nonstructural proteins and the other 12 aa (26.7%) were contained in the viral structural proteins. Of the mutations, only 15 aa (33.3%) appeared in F10 and 30 aa (66.7%) occurred during passage from F10 to F125. The data showed that the latter 30 aa mutations were probably associated with attenuation of PRRSV-HBR strain, and that the change in virulence of the virus was determined by multiple alterations both in the structural and nonstructural genes. The virulence of PRRSV-HBR strain was remarkably attenuated after serial passages, and it can be used as vaccine candidate for control of the PRRS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Biogenesis of non-structural protein 1 (nsp1) and nsp1-mediated type I interferon modulation in arteriviruses

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    Han, Mingyuan; Kim, Chi Yong [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Rowland, Raymond R.R.; Fang, Ying [Department of Diagnostic Medicine and Pathobiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States); Kim, Daewoo [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States); Yoo, Dongwan, E-mail: dyoo@illinois.edu [Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 South Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61802 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Type I interferons (IFNs-α/β) play a key role for the antiviral state of host, and the porcine arterivirus; porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), has been shown to down-regulate the production of IFNs during infection. Non-structural protein (nsp) 1 of PRRSV has been identified as a viral IFN antagonist, and the nsp1α subunit of nsp1 has been shown to degrade the CREB-binding protein (CBP) and to inhibit the formation of enhanceosome thus resulting in the suppression of IFN production. The study was expanded to other member viruses in the family Arteriviridae: equine arteritis virus (EAV), murine lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV), and simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). While PRRSV–nsp1 and LDV–nsp1 were auto-cleaved to produce the nsp1α and nsp1β subunits, EAV–nsp1 remained uncleaved. SHFV–nsp1 was initially predicted to be cleaved to generate three subunits (nsp1α, nsp1β, and nsp1γ), but only two subunits were generated as SHFV–nsp1αβ and SHFV–nsp1γ. The papain-like cysteine protease (PLP) 1α motif in nsp1α remained inactive for SHFV, and only the PLP1β motif of nsp1β was functional to generate SHFV–nsp1γ subunit. All subunits of arterivirus nsp1 were localized in the both nucleus and cytoplasm, but PRRSV–nsp1β, LDV–nsp1β, EAV–nsp1, and SHFV–nsp1γ were predominantly found in the nucleus. All subunits of arterivirus nsp1 contained the IFN suppressive activity and inhibited both interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and NF-κB mediated IFN promoter activities. Similar to PRRSV–nsp1α, CBP degradation was evident in cells expressing LDV–nsp1α and SHFV–nsp1γ, but no such degradation was observed for EAV–nsp1. Regardless of CBP degradation, all subunits of arterivirus nsp1 suppressed the IFN-sensitive response element (ISRE)-promoter activities. Our data show that the nsp1-mediated IFN modulation is a common strategy for all arteriviruses but their mechanism of action may differ

  2. Recombinant Encephalomyocarditis Viruses Elicit Neutralizing Antibodies against PRRSV and CSFV in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu; Guo, Xin; Keyes, Lisa R; Yang, Hanchun; Ge, Xinna

    2015-01-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is capable of infecting a wide range of species and the infection can cause myocarditis and reproductive failure in pigs as well as febrile illness in human beings. In this study, we introduced the entire ORF5 of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) or the neutralization epitope regions in the E2 gene of the classical swine fever virus (CSFV), into the genome of a stably attenuated EMCV strain, T1100I. The resultant viable recombinant viruses, CvBJC3m/I-ΔGP5 and CvBJC3m/I-E2, respectively expressed partial PRRSV envelope protein GP5 or CSFV neutralization epitope A1A2 along with EMCV proteins. These heterologous proteins fused to the N-terminal of the nonstructural leader protein could be recognized by anti-GP5 or anti-E2 antibody. We also tested the immunogenicity of these fusion proteins by immunizing BALB/c mice with the recombinant viruses. The immunized animals elicited neutralizing antibodies against PRRSV and CSFV. Our results suggest that EMCV can be engineered as an expression vector and serve as a tool in the development of novel live vaccines in various animal species.

  3. Proteome changes of lungs artificially infected with H-PRRSV and N-PRRSV by two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Kongju

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome with PRRS virus (PRRSV infection, which causes significant economic losses annually, is one of the most economically important diseases affecting swine industry worldwide. In 2006 and 2007, a large-scale outbreak of highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS happened in China and Vietnam. However little data is available on global host response to PRRSV infection at the protein level, and similar approaches looking at mRNA is problematic since mRNA levels do not necessarily predict protein levels. In order to improve the knowledge of host response and viral pathogenesis of highly virulent Chinese-type PRRSV (H-PRRSV and Non-high-pathogenic North American-type PRRSV strains (N-PRRSV, we analyzed the protein expression changes of H-PRRSV and N-PRRSV infected lungs compared with those of uninfected negative control, and identified a series of proteins related to host response and viral pathogenesis. Results According to differential proteomes of porcine lungs infected with H-PRRSV, N-PRRSV and uninfected negative control at different time points using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE and mass spectrometry identification, 45 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs were identified. These proteins were mostly related to cytoskeleton, stress response and oxidation reduction or metabolism. In the protein interaction network constructed based on DEPs from lungs infected with H-PRRSV, HSPA8, ARHGAP29 and NDUFS1 belonged to the most central proteins, whereas DDAH2, HSPB1 and FLNA corresponded to the most central proteins in those of N-PRRSV infected. Conclusions Our study is the first attempt to provide the complex picture of pulmonary protein expression during H-PRRSV and N-PRRSV infection under the in vivo environment using 2D-DIGE technology and bioinformatics tools, provides large scale valuable information for better

  4. Proteome changes of lungs artificially infected with H-PRRSV and N-PRRSV by two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shuqi; Wang, Qiwei; Jia, Jianyu; Cong, Peiqing; Mo, Delin; Yu, Xiangchun; Qin, Limei; Li, Anning; Niu, Yuna; Zhu, Kongju; Wang, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiaohong; Chen, Yaosheng

    2010-05-26

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome with PRRS virus (PRRSV) infection, which causes significant economic losses annually, is one of the most economically important diseases affecting swine industry worldwide. In 2006 and 2007, a large-scale outbreak of highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) happened in China and Vietnam. However little data is available on global host response to PRRSV infection at the protein level, and similar approaches looking at mRNA is problematic since mRNA levels do not necessarily predict protein levels. In order to improve the knowledge of host response and viral pathogenesis of highly virulent Chinese-type PRRSV (H-PRRSV) and Non-high-pathogenic North American-type PRRSV strains (N-PRRSV), we analyzed the protein expression changes of H-PRRSV and N-PRRSV infected lungs compared with those of uninfected negative control, and identified a series of proteins related to host response and viral pathogenesis. According to differential proteomes of porcine lungs infected with H-PRRSV, N-PRRSV and uninfected negative control at different time points using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry identification, 45 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were identified. These proteins were mostly related to cytoskeleton, stress response and oxidation reduction or metabolism. In the protein interaction network constructed based on DEPs from lungs infected with H-PRRSV, HSPA8, ARHGAP29 and NDUFS1 belonged to the most central proteins, whereas DDAH2, HSPB1 and FLNA corresponded to the most central proteins in those of N-PRRSV infected. Our study is the first attempt to provide the complex picture of pulmonary protein expression during H-PRRSV and N-PRRSV infection under the in vivo environment using 2D-DIGE technology and bioinformatics tools, provides large scale valuable information for better understanding host proteins-virus interactions of these two

  5. Architects of assembly: roles of Flaviviridae non-structural proteins in virion morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Catherine L; Jones, Christopher T; Rice, Charles M

    2008-09-01

    Viruses of the Flaviviridae family, including hepatitis C, dengue and bovine viral diarrhoea, are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent advances in our understanding of virion assembly have uncovered commonalities among distantly related members of this family. We discuss the emerging hypothesis that physical virion components are not alone in forming the infectious particle, but that non-structural proteins are intimately involved in orchestrating morphogenesis. Pinpointing the roles of Flaviviridae proteins in virion production could reveal new avenues for antiviral therapeutics.

  6. [Nonstructural protein 1 of tick-borne encephalitis virus activates the expression of immunoproteasome subunits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Y V; Starodubova, E S; Karganova, G G; Timofeev, A V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of viral proteins with host cell components plays an important role in antiviral immune response. One of the key steps of antiviral defense is the formation of immunoproteasomes. The effect of nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of tick-borne encephalitis virus on the immunoproteasome formation was studied. It was shown that cell expression of NS1 does not reduce the efficacy of the immunoproteasome generation in response to interferon-γ stimulation and even increases the content of the immunoproteasome subunits without the interferon-γ treatment. Thus, NS1 of tick-borne encephalitis virus activates, rather than blocks the mechanisms of immune defense in the cell.

  7. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Non-Structural Protein of Bluetongue Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratinier, Maxime; Caporale, Marco; Golder, Matthew; Franzoni, Giulia; Allan, Kathryn; Nunes, Sandro Filipe; Armezzani, Alessia; Bayoumy, Amr; Rixon, Frazer; Shaw, Andrew; Palmarini, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent of a major disease of livestock (bluetongue). For over two decades, it has been widely accepted that the 10 segments of the dsRNA genome of BTV encode for 7 structural and 3 non-structural proteins. The non-structural proteins (NS1, NS2, NS3/NS3a) play different key roles during the viral replication cycle. In this study we show that BTV expresses a fourth non-structural protein (that we designated NS4) encoded by an open reading frame in segment 9 overlapping the open reading frame encoding VP6. NS4 is 77–79 amino acid residues in length and highly conserved among several BTV serotypes/strains. NS4 was expressed early post-infection and localized in the nucleoli of BTV infected cells. By reverse genetics, we showed that NS4 is dispensable for BTV replication in vitro, both in mammalian and insect cells, and does not affect viral virulence in murine models of bluetongue infection. Interestingly, NS4 conferred a replication advantage to BTV-8, but not to BTV-1, in cells in an interferon (IFN)-induced antiviral state. However, the BTV-1 NS4 conferred a replication advantage both to a BTV-8 reassortant containing the entire segment 9 of BTV-1 and to a BTV-8 mutant with the NS4 identical to the homologous BTV-1 protein. Collectively, this study suggests that NS4 plays an important role in virus-host interaction and is one of the mechanisms played, at least by BTV-8, to counteract the antiviral response of the host. In addition, the distinct nucleolar localization of NS4, being expressed by a virus that replicates exclusively in the cytoplasm, offers new avenues to investigate the multiple roles played by the nucleolus in the biology of the cell. PMID:22241985

  8. The antiviral protein viperin inhibits hepatitis C virus replication via interaction with nonstructural protein 5A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig, Karla J; Eyre, Nicholas S; Yip, Evelyn; Narayana, Sumudu; Li, Kui; Fiches, Guillaume; McCartney, Erin M; Jangra, Rohit K; Lemon, Stanley M; Beard, Michael R

    2011-11-01

    The interferon-stimulated gene, viperin, has been shown to have antiviral activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the context of the HCV replicon, although the molecular mechanisms responsible are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that viperin plays an integral part in the ability of interferon to limit the replication of cell-culture-derived HCV (JFH-1) that accurately reflects the complete viral life cycle. Using confocal microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis, we demonstrate that viperin localizes and interacts with HCV nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) at the lipid-droplet (LD) interface. In addition, viperin also associates with NS5A and the proviral cellular factor, human vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein subtype A (VAP-A), at the HCV replication complex. The ability of viperin to limit HCV replication was dependent on residues within the C-terminus, as well as an N-terminal amphipathic helix. Removal of the amphipathic helix-redirected viperin from the cytosolic face of the endoplasmic reticulum and the LD to a homogenous cytoplasmic distribution, coinciding with a loss of antiviral effect. C-terminal viperin mutants still localized to the LD interface and replication complexes, but did not interact with NS5A proteins, as determined by FRET analysis. In conclusion, we propose that viperin interacts with NS5A and the host factor, VAP-A, to limit HCV replication at the replication complex. This highlights the complexity of the host control of viral replication by interferon-stimulated gene expression. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  9. Oral Combination Vaccine, Comprising Bifidobacterium Displaying Hepatitis C Virus Nonstructural Protein 3 and Interferon-α, Induces Strong Cellular Immunity Specific to Nonstructural Protein 3 in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Koichi; Omoto, Chika; Oda, Tsugumi; Araki, Ayame; Saito, Hiroki; Shigemura, Katsumi; Katayama, Takane; Hotta, Hak; Shirakawa, Toshiro

    2017-04-01

    We previously generated an oral hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine using Bifidobacterium displaying the HCV nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) polypeptide. NS3-specific cellular immunity is important for viral clearance and recovery from HCV infection. In this study, we enhanced the cellular immune responses induced by our oral HCV vaccine, Bifidobacterium longum 2165 (B. longum 2165), by combining interferon-α (IFN-α) as an adjuvant with the vaccine in a mouse experimental model. IFN-α is a widely used cytokine meeting the standard of care (SOC) for HCV infection and plays various immunoregulatory roles. We treated C57BL/6N mice with B. longum 2165 every other day and/or IFN-α twice a week for a month and then analyzed the immune responses using spleen cells. We determined the induction of NS3-specific cellular immunity by cytokine quantification, intracellular cytokine staining, and a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) assay targeting EL4 tumor cells expressing NS3/4A protein (EL4-NS3/4A). We also treated mice bearing EL4-NS3/4A tumor with the combination therapy in vivo. The results confirmed that the combination therapy of B. longum 2165 and IFN-α induced significantly higher IFN-γ secretion, higher population of CD4(+)T and CD8(+)T cells secreting IFN-γ, and higher CTL activity against EL4-NS3/4A cells compared with the control groups of phosphate-buffered saline, B. longum 2165 alone, and IFN-α alone (p < 0.05). We also confirmed that the combination therapy strongly enhanced tumor growth inhibitory effects in vivo with no serious adverse effects (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the combination of B. longum 2165 and IFN-α could induce a strong cellular immunity specific to NS3 protein as a combination therapy augmenting the current SOC immunotherapy against chronic HCV infection.

  10. Characterising Non-Structural Protein NS4 of African Horse Sickness Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizahn Zwart

    Full Text Available African horse sickness is a serious equid disease caused by the orbivirus African horse sickness virus (AHSV. The virus has ten double-stranded RNA genome segments encoding seven structural and three non-structural proteins. Recently, an additional protein was predicted to be encoded by genome segment 9 (Seg-9, which also encodes VP6, of most orbiviruses. This has since been confirmed in bluetongue virus and Great Island virus, and the non-structural protein was named NS4. In this study, in silico analysis of AHSV Seg-9 sequences revealed the existence of two main types of AHSV NS4, designated NS4-I and NS4-II, with different lengths and amino acid sequences. The AHSV NS4 coding sequences were in the +1 reading frame relative to that of VP6. Both types of AHSV NS4 were expressed in cultured mammalian cells, with sizes close to the predicted 17-20 kDa. Fluorescence microscopy of these cells revealed a dual cytoplasmic and nuclear, but not nucleolar, distribution that was very similar for NS4-I and NS4-II. Immunohistochemistry on heart, spleen, and lung tissues from AHSV-infected horses showed that NS4 occurs in microvascular endothelial cells and mononuclear phagocytes in all of these tissues, localising to the both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Interestingly, NS4 was also detected in stellate-shaped dendritic macrophage-like cells with long cytoplasmic processes in the red pulp of the spleen. Finally, nucleic acid protection assays using bacterially expressed recombinant AHSV NS4 showed that both types of AHSV NS4 bind dsDNA, but not dsRNA. Further studies will be required to determine the exact function of AHSV NS4 during viral replication.

  11. Non-structural protein NS3/NS3a is required for propagation of bluetongue virus in Culicoides sonorensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, Femke; Drolet, B.S.; Boonstra, Jan; Rijn, Van P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes non-contagious haemorrhagic disease in ruminants and is transmitted by Culicoides spp. biting midges. BTV encodes four non-structural proteins of which NS3/NS3a is functional in virus release. NS3/NS3a is not essential for in vitro virus replication.

  12. Non-structural protein NS3/NS3a is required for propagation of bluetongue virus in Culicoides sonorensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes non-contagious haemorrhagic disease in ruminants and is transmitted by Culicoides spp. biting midges. BTV encodes four non-structural proteins of which NS3/NS3a is functional in virus release. NS3/NS3a is not essential for in vitro virus replication. However...

  13. Expression and partial characterisation of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus non-structural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakova, Nadya; Frese, Michael; Hall, Robyn N; Liu, June; Matthaei, Markus; Strive, Tanja

    2015-10-01

    The intracellular replication and molecular virulence mechanisms of Rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) are poorly understood, mainly due to the lack of an effective cell culture system for this virus. To increase our understanding of RHDV molecular biology, the subcellular localisation of recombinant non-structural RHDV proteins was investigated in transiently transfected rabbit kidney (RK-13) cells. We provide evidence for oligomerisation of p23, and an ability of the viral protease to cleave the p16:p23 junction in trans, outside the context of the nascent polyprotein chain. Notably, expression of the viral polymerase alone and in the context of the entire RHDV polyprotein resulted in a redistribution of the Golgi network. This suggests that, similar to other positive-strand RNA viruses, RHDV may recruit membranes of the secretory pathway during replication, and that the viral polymerase may play a critical role during this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential Antagonism of Human Innate Immune Responses by Tick-Borne Phlebovirus Nonstructural Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezelj, Veronica V; Li, Ping; Chaudhary, Vidyanath; Elliott, Richard M; Jin, Dong-Yan; Brennan, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, several newly discovered tick-borne viruses causing a wide spectrum of diseases in humans have been ascribed to the Phlebovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family. The nonstructural protein (NSs) of bunyaviruses is the main virulence factor and interferon (IFN) antagonist. We studied the molecular mechanisms of IFN antagonism employed by the NSs proteins of human apathogenic Uukuniemi virus (UUKV) and those of Heartland virus (HRTV) and severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), both of which cause severe disease. Using reporter assays, we found that UUKV NSs weakly inhibited the activation of the beta interferon (IFN-β) promoter and response elements. UUKV NSs weakly antagonized human IFN-β promoter activation through a novel interaction with mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS), confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. HRTV NSs efficiently antagonized both IFN-β promoter activation and type I IFN signaling pathways through interactions with TBK1, preventing its phosphorylation. HRTV NSs exhibited diffused cytoplasmic localization. This is in comparison to the inclusion bodies formed by SFTSV NSs. HRTV NSs also efficiently interacted with STAT2 and impaired IFN-β-induced phosphorylation but did not affect STAT1 or its translocation to the nucleus. Our results suggest that a weak interaction between STAT1 and HRTV or SFTSV NSs may explain their inability to block type II IFN signaling efficiently, thus enabling the activation of proinflammatory responses that lead to severe disease. Our findings offer insights into how pathogenicity may be linked to the capacity of NSs proteins to block the innate immune system and illustrate the plethora of viral immune evasion strategies utilized by emerging phleboviruses. IMPORTANCE Since 2011, there has been a large expansion in the number of emerging tick-borne viruses that have been assigned to the Phlebovirus genus. Heartland virus (HRTV) and SFTS

  15. 2BC Non-Structural Protein of Enterovirus A71 Interacts with SNARE Proteins to Trigger Autolysosome Formation

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    Jeffrey K. F. Lai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Viruses have evolved unique strategies to evade or subvert autophagy machinery. Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71 induces autophagy during infection in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we report that EV-A71 triggers autolysosome formation during infection in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells to facilitate its replication. Blocking autophagosome-lysosome fusion with chloroquine inhibited virus RNA replication, resulting in lower viral titres, viral RNA copies and viral proteins. Overexpression of the non-structural protein 2BC of EV-A71 induced autolysosome formation. Yeast 2-hybrid and co-affinity purification assays showed that 2BC physically and specifically interacted with a N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor (SNARE protein, syntaxin-17 (STX17. Co-immunoprecipitation assay further showed that 2BC binds to SNARE proteins, STX17 and synaptosome associated protein 29 (SNAP29. Transient knockdown of STX17, SNAP29, and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B, crucial proteins in the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes as well as the lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1 impaired production of infectious EV-A71 in RD cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the generation of autolysosomes triggered by the 2BC non-structural protein is important for EV-A71 replication, revealing a potential molecular pathway targeted by the virus to exploit autophagy. This study opens the possibility for the development of novel antivirals that specifically target 2BC to inhibit formation of autolysosomes during EV-A71 infection.

  16. Elicitation of T-cell responses by structural and non-structural proteins of coxsackievirus B4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengs, Suvi; Marttila, Jane; Susi, Petri; Ilonen, Jorma

    2015-02-01

    Coxsackievirus B4 (CV-B4) belongs to the genus Enterovirus within the family Picornaviridae. To investigate target proteins recognized by T-cells in human enterovirus B infections, virus-encoded structural [VP0 (VP4 and VP2), VP1, VP3] and non-structural (2A, 2B, 2C, 3C and 3D) proteins were expressed and purified in Escherichia coli. Peripheral blood of 19 healthy adult donors was used to create enterovirus-specific T-cell lines by repeated stimulation with CV-B4 cell lysate antigen. T-cell lines responded in individual patterns, and responses to all purified proteins were observed. The most often recognized enteroviral protein was VP0, which is the fusion between the most conserved structural proteins, VP4 and VP2. T-cell responses to VP0 were detected in 15 of the 19 (79 %) donor lines. Non-structural 2C protein was recognized in 11 of the 19 (58 %) lines, and 11 of the 19 (58 %) lines also had a response to 3D protein. Furthermore, responses to other non-structural proteins (2A, 2B and 3C) were also detected. T-cell responses did not correlate clearly to the individual HLA-DR-DQ phenotype or the history of past coxsackie B virus infections of the donors. © 2015 The Authors.

  17. Detection of antibodies against porcine parvovirus nonstructural protein NS1 may distinguish between vaccinated and infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Eva Smedegaard; Madsen, Knud Gert; Nielsen, Jens

    1997-01-01

    The humoral antibody response against the nonstructural protein NS1 and the structural protein VP2 of porcine parvovirus (PPV) was evaluated by immuno-peroxidase test (IPT) and enzyme linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) using recombinant PPV antigens. The coding sequence for NS1 and VP2 was inser......The humoral antibody response against the nonstructural protein NS1 and the structural protein VP2 of porcine parvovirus (PPV) was evaluated by immuno-peroxidase test (IPT) and enzyme linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) using recombinant PPV antigens. The coding sequence for NS1 and VP2...... against rNS1 could only be detected in infected pigs and NS1 may in this way allow the specific detection of infected animals. Analysis of serum samples collected up to 18 days post infection (p.i.) from four pigs experimentally infected with PPV showed that antibodies against rNS1 and rVP2 could in all...

  18. High affinity human antibody fragments to dengue virus non-structural protein 3.

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    Nicole J Moreland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The enzyme activities catalysed by flavivirus non-structural protein 3 (NS3 are essential for virus replication. They are distributed between the N-terminal protease domain in the first one-third and the C-terminal ATPase/helicase and nucleoside 5' triphosphatase domain which forms the remainder of the 618-aa long protein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, dengue full-length NS3 protein with residues 49 to 66 of NS2B covalently attached via a flexible linker, was used as bait in biopanning with a naïve human Fab phage-display library. Using a range of truncated constructs spanning the NS2B cofactor region and the full-length NS3, 10 unique Fab were identified and characterized. Of these, monoclonal Fab 3F8 was shown to bind α3″ (residues 526 through 531 within subdomain III of the helicase domain. The antibody inhibits the ATPase and helicase activites of NS3 in biochemical assays and reduces DENV replication in HEK293 cells that were previously transfected with Fab 3F8 compared with mock transfected cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Antibodies such as 3F8 are valuable tools for studying the molecular mechanisms of flaviviral replication and for the monospecific detection of replicating dengue virus in vivo.

  19. Rotavirus nonstructural protein 1 antagonizes innate immune response by interacting with retinoic acid inducible gene I

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    Qin Lan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1 of rotavirus has been reported to block interferon (IFN signaling by mediating proteasome-dependent degradation of IFN-regulatory factors (IRFs and (or the β-transducin repeat containing protein (β-TrCP. However, in addition to these targets, NSP1 may subvert innate immune responses via other mechanisms. Results The NSP1 of rotavirus OSU strain as well as the IRF3 binding domain truncated NSP1 of rotavirus SA11 strain are unable to degrade IRFs, but can still inhibit host IFN response, indicating that NSP1 may target alternative host factor(s other than IRFs. Overexpression of NSP1 can block IFN-β promoter activation induced by the retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I, but does not inhibit IFN-β activation induced by the mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, indicating that NSP1 may target RIG-I. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that NSP1 interacts with RIG-I independent of IRF3 binding domain. In addition, NSP1 induces down-regulation of RIG-I in a proteasome-independent way. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that inhibition of RIG-I mediated type I IFN responses by NSP1 may contribute to the immune evasion of rotavirus.

  20. Coordination of Hepatitis C Virus Assembly by Distinct Regulatory Regions in Nonstructural Protein 5A.

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    Margarita Zayas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV nonstructural protein (NS5A is a RNA-binding protein composed of a N-terminal membrane anchor, a structured domain I (DI and two intrinsically disordered domains (DII and DIII interacting with viral and cellular proteins. While DI and DII are essential for RNA replication, DIII is required for assembly. How these processes are orchestrated by NS5A is poorly understood. In this study, we identified a highly conserved basic cluster (BC at the N-terminus of DIII that is critical for particle assembly. We generated BC mutants and compared them with mutants that are blocked at different stages of the assembly process: a NS5A serine cluster (SC mutant blocked in NS5A-core interaction and a mutant lacking the envelope glycoproteins (ΔE1E2. We found that BC mutations did not affect core-NS5A interaction, but strongly impaired core-RNA association as well as virus particle envelopment. Moreover, BC mutations impaired RNA-NS5A interaction arguing that the BC might be required for loading of core protein with viral RNA. Interestingly, RNA-core interaction was also reduced with the ΔE1E2 mutant, suggesting that nucleocapsid formation and envelopment are coupled. These findings argue for two NS5A DIII determinants regulating assembly at distinct, but closely linked steps: (i SC-dependent recruitment of replication complexes to core protein and (ii BC-dependent RNA genome delivery to core protein, triggering encapsidation that is tightly coupled to particle envelopment. These results provide a striking example how a single viral protein exerts multiple functions to coordinate the steps from RNA replication to the assembly of infectious virus particles.

  1. Effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) on alveolar lung macrophage survival and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, Martin B.; Nielsen, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) recently emerged as an important cause of reproductive disorders and pneumonia in domestic pigs throughout the world. Acute cytocidal replication of PRRSV in alveolar lung macrophages causes the acute pneumonia; however, it remains largely....... Monitored by flow cytometric detection of intracellular PRRSV nucleocapsid protein, acute (24 h post infection) PRRSV replication did not impede the ability of alveolar macrophages to ingest fluorescently labelled Escherichia coli. At 48 h post infection, PRRSV-induced cytotoxicity (quantitated by flow...... analysis of cell size and membrane integrity) led to 40% reduction in the total number of phagocytozing cells. However, viable/uninfected macrophages in PRRSV-infected cultures exhibited normal phagocytic ability at 48 h, indicating that no soluble phagocytosis-suppressive mediators were induced by PRRSV...

  2. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5B is involved in virus morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouklani, Hamed; Bull, Rowena A; Beyer, Claudia; Coulibaly, Fasséli; Gowans, Eric J; Drummer, Heidi E; Netter, Hans J; White, Peter A; Haqshenas, Gholamreza

    2012-05-01

    The p7 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a viroporin that is dispensable for viral genome replication but plays a critical role in virus morphogenesis. In this study, we generated a JFH1-based intergenotypic chimeric genome that encoded a heterologous genotype 1b (GT1b) p7. The parental intergenotypic chimeric genome was nonviable in human hepatoma cells, and infectious chimeric virions were produced only when cells transfected with the chimeric genomes were passaged several times. Sequence analysis of the entire polyprotein-coding region of the recovered chimeric virus revealed one predominant amino acid substitution in nonstructural protein 2 (NS2), T23N, and one in NS5B, K151R. Forward genetic analysis demonstrated that each of these mutations per se restored the infectivity of the parental chimeric genome, suggesting that interactions between p7, NS2, and NS5B were required for virion assembly/maturation. p7 and NS5B colocalized in cellular compartments, and the NS5B mutation did not affect the colocalization pattern. The NS5B K151R mutation neither increased viral RNA replication in human hepatoma cells nor altered the polymerase activity of NS5B in an in vitro assay. In conclusion, this study suggests that HCV NS5B is involved in virus morphogenesis.

  3. Hepatitis C Virus Nonstructural Protein 5B Is Involved in Virus Morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouklani, Hamed; Bull, Rowena A.; Beyer, Claudia; Coulibaly, Fasséli; Gowans, Eric J.; Drummer, Heidi E.; Netter, Hans J.; White, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    The p7 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a viroporin that is dispensable for viral genome replication but plays a critical role in virus morphogenesis. In this study, we generated a JFH1-based intergenotypic chimeric genome that encoded a heterologous genotype 1b (GT1b) p7. The parental intergenotypic chimeric genome was nonviable in human hepatoma cells, and infectious chimeric virions were produced only when cells transfected with the chimeric genomes were passaged several times. Sequence analysis of the entire polyprotein-coding region of the recovered chimeric virus revealed one predominant amino acid substitution in nonstructural protein 2 (NS2), T23N, and one in NS5B, K151R. Forward genetic analysis demonstrated that each of these mutations per se restored the infectivity of the parental chimeric genome, suggesting that interactions between p7, NS2, and NS5B were required for virion assembly/maturation. p7 and NS5B colocalized in cellular compartments, and the NS5B mutation did not affect the colocalization pattern. The NS5B K151R mutation neither increased viral RNA replication in human hepatoma cells nor altered the polymerase activity of NS5B in an in vitro assay. In conclusion, this study suggests that HCV NS5B is involved in virus morphogenesis. PMID:22345449

  4. Interaction of dengue virus nonstructural protein 5 with Daxx modulates RANTES production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khunchai, Sasiprapa [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Graduate Program in Immunology, Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Junking, Mutita [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Suttitheptumrong, Aroonroong; Yasamut, Umpa [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Graduate Program in Immunology, Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Sawasdee, Nunghathai [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Netsawang, Janjuree [Faculty of Medical Technology, Rangsit University, Bangkok (Thailand); Morchang, Atthapan [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Graduate Program in Immunology, Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Chaowalit, Prapaipit [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Noisakran, Sansanee [Medical Biotechnology Research Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Bangkok (Thailand); Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai, E-mail: grpye@mahidol.ac.th [Division of Molecular Medicine, Department of Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); and others

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the first time how DENV NS5 increases RANTES production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DENV NS5 physically interacts with human Daxx. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of NS5 is required for Daxx interaction and RANTES production. -- Abstract: Dengue fever (DF), dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS), caused by dengue virus (DENV) infection, are important public health problems in the tropical and subtropical regions. Abnormal hemostasis and plasma leakage are the main patho-physiological changes in DHF/DSS. A remarkably increased production of cytokines, the so called 'cytokine storm', is observed in the patients with DHF/DSS. A complex interaction between DENV proteins and the host immune response contributes to cytokine production. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which DENV nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) mediates these responses has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, yeast two-hybrid assay was performed to identify host proteins interacting with DENV NS5 and a death-domain-associate protein (Daxx) was identified. The in vivo relevance of this interaction was suggested by co-immunoprecipitation and nuclear co-localization of these two proteins in HEK293 cells expressing DENV NS5. HEK293 cells expressing DENV NS5-K/A, which were mutated at the nuclear localization sequences (NLS), were created to assess its functional roles in nuclear translocation, Daxx interaction, and cytokine production. In the absence of NLS, DENV NS5 could neither translocate into the nucleus nor interact with Daxx to increase the DHF-associated cytokine, RANTES (CCL5) production. This work demonstrates the interaction between DENV NS5 and Daxx and the role of the interaction on the modulation of RANTES production.

  5. Structure and Function of the Non-Structural Protein of Dengue Virus and its Applications in Antiviral Therapy.

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    Xie, Qian; Zhang, Bao; Yu, JianHai; Wu, Qinghua; Yang, Fangji; Cao, Hong; Zhao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever, a type of global and tropical infectious disease, and its prevention has become a challenging issue worldwide. Antibody-dependent enhancement effects and the virus pathogenic mechanism have not yet been fully elucidated, hindering the development of dengue fever prevention and suitable drug treatment. There is currently no specific prevention and therapy in clinical trials, however, in recent years, studies have focused on the pathogenesis and treatment of dengue. Research focusing on dengue virus nonstructural protein in special drugs for the prevention and control of dengue fever is a new progress leading to improved understanding regarding the prevention and control of dengue fever and suitable drugs for the treatment. The main challenges regarding the structure of dengue virus nonstructural protein and the drugs for antiviral therapy are summarized in this paper.

  6. Nonstructural Protein L* Species Specificity Supports a Mouse Origin for Vilyuisk Human Encephalitis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drappier, Melissa; Opperdoes, Fred R; Michiels, Thomas

    2017-07-15

    Vilyuisk human encephalitis virus (VHEV) is a picornavirus related to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). VHEV was isolated from human material passaged in mice. Whether this VHEV is of human or mouse origin is therefore unclear. We took advantage of the species-specific activity of the nonstructural L* protein of theiloviruses to track the origin of TMEV isolates. TMEV L* inhibits RNase L, the effector enzyme of the interferon pathway. By using coimmunoprecipitation and functional RNase L assays, the species specificity of RNase L antagonism was tested for L* from mouse (DA) and rat (RTV-1) TMEV strains as well as for VHEV. Coimmunoprecipitation and functional assay data confirmed the species specificity of L* activity and showed that L* from rat strain RTV-1 inhibited rat but not mouse or human RNase L. Next, we showed that the VHEV L* protein was phylogenetically related to L* of mouse viruses and that it failed to inhibit human RNase L but readily antagonized mouse RNase L, unambiguously showing the mouse origin of VHEV. IMPORTANCE Defining the natural host of a virus can be a thorny issue, especially when the virus was isolated only once or when the isolation story is complex. The species Theilovirus includes Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV), infecting mice and rats, and Saffold virus (SAFV), infecting humans. One TMEV strain, Vilyuisk human encephalitis virus (VHEV), however, was isolated from mice that were inoculated with cerebrospinal fluid of a patient presenting with chronic encephalitis. It is therefore unclear whether VHEV was derived from the human sample or from the inoculated mouse. The L* protein encoded by TMEV inhibits RNase L, a cellular enzyme involved in innate immunity, in a species-specific manner. Using binding and functional assays, we show that this species specificity even allows discrimination between TMEV strains of mouse and of rat origins. The VHEV L* protein clearly inhibited mouse but not human RNase L

  7. Emergence of fatal PRRSV variants: unparalleled outbreaks of atypical PRRS in China and molecular dissection of the unique hallmark.

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    Kegong Tian

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS is a severe viral disease in pigs, causing great economic losses worldwide each year. The causative agent of the disease, PRRS virus (PRRSV, is a member of the family Arteriviridae. Here we report our investigation of the unparalleled large-scale outbreaks of an originally unknown, but so-called "high fever" disease in China in 2006 with the essence of PRRS, which spread to more than 10 provinces (autonomous cities or regions and affected over 2,000,000 pigs with about 400,000 fatal cases. Different from the typical PRRS, numerous adult sows were also infected by the "high fever" disease. This atypical PRRS pandemic was initially identified as a hog cholera-like disease manifesting neurological symptoms (e.g., shivering, high fever (40-42 degrees C, erythematous blanching rash, etc. Autopsies combined with immunological analyses clearly showed that multiple organs were infected by highly pathogenic PRRSVs with severe pathological changes observed. Whole-genome analysis of the isolated viruses revealed that these PRRSV isolates are grouped into Type II and are highly homologous to HB-1, a Chinese strain of PRRSV (96.5% nucleotide identity. More importantly, we observed a unique molecular hallmark in these viral isolates, namely a discontinuous deletion of 30 amino acids in nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2. Taken together, this is the first comprehensive report documenting the 2006 epidemic of atypical PRRS outbreak in China and identifying the 30 amino-acid deletion in NSP2, a novel determining factor for virulence which may be implicated in the high pathogenicity of PRRSV, and will stimulate further study by using the infectious cDNA clone technique.

  8. The non-structural protein μNS of piscine orthoreovirus (PRV) forms viral factory-like structures

    OpenAIRE

    Haatveit, Hanne Merethe; Nyman, Ingvild Berg; Markussen, Turhan; Wessel, Øystein; Dahle, Maria Krudtaa; Rimstad, Espen

    2016-01-01

    International audience; AbstractPiscine orthoreovirus (PRV) is associated with heart- and skeletal muscle inflammation in farmed Atlantic salmon. The virus is ubiquitous and found in both farmed and wild salmonid fish. It belongs to the family Reoviridae, closely related to the genus Orthoreovirus. The PRV genome comprises ten double-stranded RNA segments encoding at least eight structural and two non-structural proteins. Erythrocytes are the major target cells for PRV. Infected erythrocytes ...

  9. The Role of Interferon Antagonist, Non-Structural Proteins in the Pathogenesis and Emergence of Arboviruses

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    Samantha S. Soldan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A myriad of factors favor the emergence and re-emergence of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses, including migration, climate change, intensified livestock production, an increasing volume of international trade and transportation, and changes to ecosystems (e.g., deforestation and loss of biodiversity. Consequently, arboviruses are distributed worldwide and represent over 30% of all emerging infectious diseases identified in the past decade. Although some arboviral infections go undetected or are associated with mild, flu-like symptoms, many are important human and veterinary pathogens causing serious illnesses such as arthritis, gastroenteritis, encephalitis and hemorrhagic fever and devastating economic loss as a consequence of lost productivity and high mortality rates among livestock. One of the most consistent molecular features of emerging arboviruses, in addition to their near exclusive use of RNA genomes, is the inclusion of viral, non-structural proteins that act as interferon antagonists. In this review, we describe these interferon antagonists and common strategies that arboviruses use to counter the host innate immune response. In addition, we discuss the complex interplay between host factors and viral determinants that are associated with virus emergence and re-emergence, and identify potential targets for vaccine and anti-viral therapies.

  10. Global origin and transmission of hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 3 Q80K polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Rosemary M; Liang, Richard H; Joy, Jeffrey B; Krajden, Mel; Montaner, Julio S G; Harrigan, P Richard; Poon, Art F Y

    2015-04-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has a naturally occurring polymorphism, Q80K, in the nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) gene encoding the viral protease, which has been associated with reduced susceptibility to the direct-acting antiviral inhibitor simeprevir. Q80K is observed predominantly in HCV genotype 1a and seldom in other HCV genotypes; moreover, it has a markedly high prevalence in the United States. Here, we reconstruct the evolutionary history of this polymorphism to investigate why it is so highly localized in prevalence and whether it is stably transmitted between hosts. We found that the majority (96%) of HCV infections carrying Q80K were descended from a single lineage in which a Q80K substitution occurred around the 1940s in the United States, which implies that this polymorphism is likely highly transmissible. Furthermore, we identified 2 other substitutions in NS3 that may interact with Q80K and contribute to its stability. Our results imply that the current distribution and prevalence of Q80K are unlikely to change significantly in the short term. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A perspective on targeting non-structural proteins to combat neglected tropical diseases: Dengue, West Nile and Chikungunya viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakat, Soumendranath; Karubiu, Wilson; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2014-11-24

    Neglected tropical diseases are major causes of fatality in poverty stricken regions across Africa, Asia and some part of America. The combined potential health risk associated with arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses); Dengue virus (DENV), West Nile Virus (WNV) and Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV) is immense. These arboviruses are either emerging or re-emerging in many regions with recent documented outbreaks in the United States. Despite several recent evidences of emergence, currently there are no approved drugs or vaccines available to counter these diseases. Non-structural proteins encoded by these RNA viruses are essential for their replication and maturation and thus may offer ideal targets for developing antiviral drugs. In recent years, several protease inhibitors have been sourced from plant extract, synthesis, computer aided drug design and high throughput screening as well as through drug reposition based approaches to target the non-structural proteins. The protease inhibitors have shown different levels of inhibition and may thus provide template to develop selective and potent drugs against these devastating arboviruses. This review seeks to shed light on the design and development of antiviral drugs against DENV, WNV and CHIKV to date. To the best of our knowledge, this review provides the first comprehensive update on the development of protease inhibitors targeting non-structural proteins of three most devastating arboviruses, DENV, WNV and CHIKV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of hepatitis C virus core protein and nonstructural protein 4B on the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiao-Hua; Xie, Yu-Tao; Cai, Ya-Ping; Ren, Jing; Ma, Tao

    2017-05-25

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein and nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B) are potentially oncogenic. Aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is closely associated with hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated the effects of HCV type 1b core protein and NS4B on Wnt/β-catenin signaling in various liver cells, and explored the molecular mechanism underlying HCV-related hepatocarcinogenesis. Compared with the empty vector control, HCV core protein and NS4B demonstrated the following characteristics in the Huh7 cells: significantly enhanced β-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcriptional activity (F = 40.87, P  0.05), but they did significantly enhance Wnt3a-induced β-catenin/Tcf-dependent transcriptional activity (F = 64.25, P core protein than with NS4B (P core protein and NS4B directly activate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in Huh7 cells and LO2 cells induced by Wnt3a. These data suggest that HCV core protein and NS4B contribute to HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

  13. Dataset of proteins mapped on HepG2 cells and those differentially abundant after expression of the dengue non-structural 1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabelo, Kíssila; Trugilho, Monique R O; Costa, Simone M; Ferreira, André T S; Carvalho, Paulo C; Perales, Jonas; Alves, Ada M B

    2017-02-01

    The data supplied in this article are related to the research article entitled "The effect of the dengue non-structural 1 protein expression over the HepG2 cell proteins in a proteomic approach" (K. Rabelo, M.R. Trugillo, S.M. Costa, B.A. Pereira, O.C. Moreira, A.T. Ferreira et al., 2016) [1]. The present article provides the inventory of peptides and proteins mapped in a hepatocyte cell line (HepG2) by mass spectrometry in the presence of the non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of Dengue 2 virus (DENV2). Cells were transfected with pcENS1 plasmid, which encodes the DENV2 NS1 protein, or the controls pcDNA3 (negative control) or pMAXGFP, encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP), a protein unrelated to dengue. Differentially abundant protein lists were obtained by comparing cells transfected with pcENS1 and controls.

  14. Kobuviral Non-structural 3A Proteins Act as Molecular Harnesses to Hijack the Host ACBD3 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, Martin; Chalupska, Dominika; Różycki, Bartosz; Humpolickova, Jana; Rezabkova, Lenka; Silhan, Jan; Baumlova, Adriana; Dubankova, Anna; Boura, Evzen

    2017-02-07

    Picornaviruses are small positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses that include many important human pathogens. Within the host cell, they replicate at specific replication sites called replication organelles. To create this membrane platform, they hijack several host factors including the acyl-CoA-binding domain-containing protein-3 (ACBD3). Here, we present a structural characterization of the molecular complexes formed by the non-structural 3A proteins from two species of the Kobuvirus genus of the Picornaviridae family and the 3A-binding domain of the host ACBD3 protein. Specifically, we present a series of crystal structures as well as a molecular dynamics simulation of the 3A:ACBD3 complex at the membrane, which reveals that the viral 3A proteins act as molecular harnesses to enslave the ACBD3 protein leading to its stabilization at target membranes. Our data provide a structural rationale for understanding how these viral-host protein complexes assemble at the atomic level and identify new potential targets for antiviral therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibodies against nonstructural protein 1 protect mice from dengue virus-induced mast cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ya-Ting; Wan, Shu-Wen; Chang, Yu-Chang; Lee, Chien-Kuo; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A; Anderson, Robert; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2017-02-27

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). DHF/DSS patients have been reported to have increased levels of urinary histamine, chymase, and tryptase, which are major granule-associated mediators from mast cells. Previous studies also showed that DENV-infected human mast cells induce production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, suggesting a role played by mast cells in vascular perturbation as well as leukocyte recruitment. In this study, we show that DENV but not UV-inactivated DENV enhanced degranulation of mast cells and production of chemokines (MCP-1, RANTES, and IP-10) in a mouse model. We have previously shown that antibodies (Abs) against a modified DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1), designated DJ NS1, provide protection in mice against DENV challenge. In the present study, we investigate the effects of DJ NS1 Abs on mast cell-associated activities. We showed that administration of anti-DJ NS1 Abs into mice resulted in a reduction of mast cell degranulation and macrophage infiltration at local skin DENV infection sites. The production of DENV-induced chemokines (MCP-1, RANTES, and IP-10) and the percentages of tryptase-positive activated mast cells were also reduced by treatment with anti-DJ NS1 Abs. These results indicate that Abs against NS1 protein provide multiple therapeutic benefits, some of which involve modulating DENV-induced mast cell activation.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 27 February 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2017.10.

  16. Protection against dengue virus infection in mice by administration of antibodies against modified nonstructural protein 1.

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    Shu-Wen Wan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection with dengue virus (DENV may cause life-threatening disease with thrombocytopenia and vascular leakage which are related to dysfunction of platelets and endothelial cells. We previously showed that antibodies (Abs against DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 cross-react with human platelets and endothelial cells, leading to functional disturbances. Based on sequence homology analysis, the C-terminal region of DENV NS1 protein contains cross-reactive epitopes. For safety in vaccine development, the cross-reactive epitopes of DENV NS1 protein should be deleted or modified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested the protective effects of Abs against full-length DENV NS1, NS1 lacking the C-terminal amino acids (a.a. 271-352 (designated ΔC NS1, and chimeric DJ NS1 consisting of N-terminal DENV NS1 (a.a. 1-270 and C-terminal Japanese encephalitis virus NS1 (a.a. 271-352. The anti-ΔC NS1 and anti-DJ NS1 Abs showed a lower binding activity to endothelial cells and platelets than that of anti-DENV NS1 Abs. Passive immunization with anti-ΔC NS1 and anti-DJ NS1 Abs reduced DENV-induced prolonged mouse tail bleeding time. Treatment with anti-DENV NS1, anti-ΔC NS1 and anti-DJ NS1 Abs reduced local skin hemorrhage, controlled the viral load of DENV infection in vivo, synergized with complement to inhibit viral replication in vitro, as well as abolished DENV-induced macrophage infiltration to the site of skin inoculation. Moreover, active immunization with modified NS1 protein, but not with unmodified DENV NS1 protein, reduced DENV-induced prolonged bleeding time, local skin hemorrhage, and viral load. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results support the idea that modified NS1 proteins may represent an improved strategy for safe and effective vaccine development against DENV infection.

  17. Dengue Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Induces Vascular Leakage through Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Autophagy.

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    Hong-Ru Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is the most common mosquito-borne flavivirus; it can either cause mild dengue fever or the more severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and dengue shock syndrome (DSS. One of the characteristic features of DHF/DSS is vascular leakage; although DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 has been proved to induce vascular leakage after binding to Toll-like receptor 4, the down-stream mechanism has not yet been fully understood. In the sera of DENV-infected patients, the concentrations of DENV NS1 and inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF are positively correlated with disease severity, but whether DENV NS1 induces vascular leakage through MIF secretion remains unknown. We demonstrated that recombinant NS1 induced vascular leakage and MIF secretion both in human endothelial cell line HMEC-1 and in mice. Furthermore, these phenomena were inhibited in the presence of anti-NS1 antibodies both in vitro and in vivo. DENV NS1 also induced LC3-I to LC3-II conversion and p62 degradation in endothelial cell line, which indicated the formation of autophagy. To clarify whether MIF or autophagy mediated DENV NS1-induced vascular leakage, various inhibitors were applied. The results showed that DENV NS1-induced vascular leakage and VE-cadherin disarray were blocked in the presence of MIF inhibitors, anti-MIF-antibodies or autophagy inhibitors. An Atg5 knockdown clone further confirmed that autophagy formation of endothelial cells was required in NS1-induced vascular leakage. Furthermore, DENV NS1-induced LC3 puncta were also decreased in the presence of MIF inhibitors, indicating that MIF mediated DENV NS1-induced autophagy. Taken together, the results suggest a potential mechanism of DENV-induced vascular leakage and provide possible therapeutic targets against DHF/DSS.

  18. Pharmacoinformatics approach for investigation of alternative potential hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5B inhibitors

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    Mirza MU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Usman Mirza,1 Noor-Ul-Huda Ghori,2 Nazia Ikram,3 Abdur Rehman Adil,4 Sadia Manzoor3 1Centre for Research in Molecular Medicine (CRiMM, The University of Lahore, Lahore, 2Atta-ur-Rehman School of Applied Biosciences (ASAB, National University of Science and Technology, Islamabad, 3Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan; 4Centre for Excellence in Molecular Biology (CEMB, The University of Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan Abstract: Hepatitis C virus (HCV is one of the major viruses affecting the world today. It is a highly variable virus, having a rapid reproduction and evolution rate. The variability of genomes is due to hasty replication catalyzed by nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B which is also a potential target site for the development of anti-HCV agents. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration approved sofosbuvir as a novel oral NS5B inhibitor for the treatment of HCV. Unfortunately, it is much highlighted for its pricing issues. Hence, there is an urgent need to scrutinize alternate therapies against HCV that are available at affordable price and do not have associated side effects. Such a need is crucial especially in underdeveloped countries. The search for various new bioactive compounds from plants is a key part of pharmaceutical research. In the current study, we applied a pharmacoinformatics-based approach for the identification of active plant-derived compounds against NS5B. The results were compared to docking results of sofosbuvir. The lead compounds with high-binding ligands were further analyzed for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters based on in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET profile. The results showed the potential alternative lead compounds that can be developed into commercial drugs having high binding energy and promising ADMET properties. Keywords: hepatitis C, NS5B inhibitors, molecular docking, Auto

  19. The human respiratory syncytial virus nonstructural protein 1 regulates type I and type II interferon pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Marcus L; Headlam, Madeleine J; Patel, Nirav B; Bukreyev, Alexander A; Buchholz, Ursula J; Dave, Keyur A; Norris, Emma L; Wright, Cassandra L; Spann, Kirsten M; Collins, Peter L; Gorman, Jeffrey J

    2012-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial viruses encode a nonstructural protein (NS1) that interferes with type I and III interferon and other antiviral responses. Proteomic studies were conducted on human A549 type II alveolar epithelial cells and type I interferon-deficient Vero cells (African green monkey kidney cells) infected with wild-type and NS1-deficient clones of human respiratory syncytial virus to identify other potential pathway and molecular targets of NS1 interference. These analyses included two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and quantitative Western blotting. Surprisingly, NS1 was found to suppress the induction of manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) expression in A549 cells and to a much lesser degree Vero cells in response to infection. Because SOD2 is not directly inducible by type I interferons, it served as a marker to probe the impact of NS1 on signaling of other cytokines known to induce SOD2 expression and/or indirect effects of type I interferon signaling. Deductive analysis of results obtained from cell infection and cytokine stimulation studies indicated that interferon-γ signaling was a potential target of NS1, possibly as a result of modulation of STAT1 levels. However, this was not sufficient to explain the magnitude of the impact of NS1 on SOD2 induction in A549 cells. Vero cell infection experiments indicated that NS1 targeted a component of the type I interferon response that does not directly induce SOD2 expression but is required to induce another initiator of SOD2 expression. STAT2 was ruled out as a target of NS1 interference using quantitative Western blot analysis of infected A549 cells, but data were obtained to indicate that STAT1 was one of a number of potential targets of NS1. A label-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative approach is proposed as a means of more definitive identification of NS1 targets.

  20. The non-structural protein μNS of piscine orthoreovirus (PRV) forms viral factory-like structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haatveit, Hanne Merethe; Nyman, Ingvild B; Markussen, Turhan; Wessel, Øystein; Dahle, Maria Krudtaa; Rimstad, Espen

    2016-01-08

    Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV) is associated with heart- and skeletal muscle inflammation in farmed Atlantic salmon. The virus is ubiquitous and found in both farmed and wild salmonid fish. It belongs to the family Reoviridae, closely related to the genus Orthoreovirus. The PRV genome comprises ten double-stranded RNA segments encoding at least eight structural and two non-structural proteins. Erythrocytes are the major target cells for PRV. Infected erythrocytes contain globular inclusions resembling viral factories; the putative site of viral replication. For the mammalian reovirus (MRV), the non-structural protein μNS is the primary organizer in factory formation. The analogous PRV protein was the focus of the present study. The subcellular location of PRV μNS and its co-localization with the PRV σNS, µ2 and λ1 proteins was investigated. We demonstrated that PRV μNS forms dense globular cytoplasmic inclusions in transfected fish cells, resembling the viral factories of MRV. In co-transfection experiments with μNS, the σNS, μ2 and λ1 proteins were recruited to the globular structures. The ability of μNS to recruit other PRV proteins into globular inclusions indicates that it is the main viral protein involved in viral factory formation and pivotal in early steps of viral assembly.

  1. Evaluation of Multiplexed Foot-and-Mouth Disease Nonstructural Protein Antibody Assay Against Standardized Bovine Serum Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, J; Parida, S; Clavijo, A

    2007-05-14

    Liquid array technology has previously been used to show proof-of-principle of a multiplexed non structural protein serological assay to differentiate foot-and-mouth infected and vaccinated animals. The current multiplexed assay consists of synthetically produced peptide signatures 3A, 3B and 3D and recombinant protein signature 3ABC in combination with four controls. To determine diagnostic specificity of each signature in the multiplex, the assay was evaluated against a naive population (n = 104) and a vaccinated population (n = 94). Subsequently, the multiplexed assay was assessed using a panel of bovine sera generated by the World Reference Laboratory for foot-and-mouth disease in Pirbright, UK. This sera panel has been used to assess the performance of other singleplex ELISA-based non-structural protein antibody assays. The 3ABC signature in the multiplexed assay showed comparative performance to a commercially available non-structural protein 3ABC ELISA (Cedi test{reg_sign}) and additional information pertaining to the relative diagnostic sensitivity of each signature in the multiplex is acquired in one experiment. The encouraging results of the evaluation of the multiplexed assay against a panel of diagnostically relevant samples promotes further assay development and optimization to generate an assay for routine use in foot-and-mouth disease surveillance.

  2. Determination of viremia and concentration of circulating nonstructural protein 1 in patients infected with dengue virus in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz-Hernández, Sergio I; Flores-Aguilar, Hilario; González-Mateos, Silvia; López-Martinez, Irma; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ludert, Juan E; del Angel, Rosa M

    2013-03-01

    Higher levels of viremia and circulating nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) have been associated with dengue disease severity. In this study, viremia and circulating NS1 levels were determined in 225 serum samples collected from patients in Mexico infected with dengue virus serotypes 1 and 2 (DENV-1 and DENV-2). Patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) who were infected with DENV-1 showed higher levels of circulating NS1 than patients with dengue fever (DF) (P = 0.0175). Moreover, NS1 levels were higher in patients with primary infections with DENV-1 than in patient infected with DENV-2 (P dengue disease severity.

  3. Influenza virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1 disrupts interferon signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danlin Jia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs function as the first line of defense against viral infections by modulating cell growth, establishing an antiviral state and influencing the activation of various immune cells. Viruses such as influenza have developed mechanisms to evade this defense mechanism and during infection with influenza A viruses, the non-structural protein 1 (NS1 encoded by the virus genome suppresses induction of IFNs-α/β. Here we show that expression of avian H5N1 NS1 in HeLa cells leads to a block in IFN signaling. H5N1 NS1 reduces IFN-inducible tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1, STAT2 and STAT3 and inhibits the nuclear translocation of phospho-STAT2 and the formation of IFN-inducible STAT1:1-, STAT1:3- and STAT3:3- DNA complexes. Inhibition of IFN-inducible STAT signaling by NS1 in HeLa cells is, in part, a consequence of NS1-mediated inhibition of expression of the IFN receptor subunit, IFNAR1. In support of this NS1-mediated inhibition, we observed a reduction in expression of ifnar1 in ex vivo human non-tumor lung tissues infected with H5N1 and H1N1 viruses. Moreover, H1N1 and H5N1 virus infection of human monocyte-derived macrophages led to inhibition of both ifnar1 and ifnar2 expression. In addition, NS1 expression induces up-regulation of the JAK/STAT inhibitors, SOCS1 and SOCS3. By contrast, treatment of ex vivo human lung tissues with IFN-α results in the up-regulation of a number of IFN-stimulated genes and inhibits both H5N1 and H1N1 virus replication. The data suggest that NS1 can directly interfere with IFN signaling to enhance viral replication, but that treatment with IFN can nevertheless override these inhibitory effects to block H5N1 and H1N1 virus infections.

  4. Dengue Virus Non-structural Protein 1 Modulates Infectious Particle Production via Interaction with the Structural Proteins.

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    Pietro Scaturro

    Full Text Available Non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is one of the most enigmatic proteins of the Dengue virus (DENV, playing distinct functions in immune evasion, pathogenesis and viral replication. The recently reported crystal structure of DENV NS1 revealed its peculiar three-dimensional fold; however, detailed information on NS1 function at different steps of the viral replication cycle is still missing. By using the recently reported crystal structure, as well as amino acid sequence conservation, as a guide for a comprehensive site-directed mutagenesis study, we discovered that in addition to being essential for RNA replication, DENV NS1 is also critically required for the production of infectious virus particles. Taking advantage of a trans-complementation approach based on fully functional epitope-tagged NS1 variants, we identified previously unreported interactions between NS1 and the structural proteins Envelope (E and precursor Membrane (prM. Interestingly, coimmunoprecipitation revealed an additional association with capsid, arguing that NS1 interacts via the structural glycoproteins with DENV particles. Results obtained with mutations residing either in the NS1 Wing domain or in the β-ladder domain suggest that NS1 might have two distinct functions in the assembly of DENV particles. By using a trans-complementation approach with a C-terminally KDEL-tagged ER-resident NS1, we demonstrate that the secretion of NS1 is dispensable for both RNA replication and infectious particle production. In conclusion, our results provide an extensive genetic map of NS1 determinants essential for viral RNA replication and identify a novel role of NS1 in virion production that is mediated via interaction with the structural proteins. These studies extend the list of NS1 functions and argue for a central role in coordinating replication and assembly/release of infectious DENV particles.

  5. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Nonstructural Protein 16 Is Necessary for Interferon Resistance and Viral Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menachery, Vineet D.; Gralinski, Lisa E.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Dinnon, Kenneth H.; Leist, Sarah R.; Yount, Boyd L.; Graham, Rachel L.; McAnarney, Eileen T.; Stratton, Kelly G.; Cockrell, Adam S.; Debbink, Kari; Sims, Amy C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Baric, Ralph S.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2017-11-15

    ABSTRACT

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) encode a mixture of highly conserved and novel genes, as well as genetic elements necessary for infection and pathogenesis, raising the possibility of common targets for attenuation and therapeutic design. In this study, we focused on highly conserved nonstructural protein 16 (NSP16), a viral 2'O-methyltransferase (2'O-MTase) that encodes critical functions in immune modulation and infection. Using reverse genetics, we disrupted a key motif in the conserved KDKE motif of Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV) NSP16 (D130A) and evaluated the effect on viral infection and pathogenesis. While the absence of 2'O-MTase activity had only a marginal impact on propagation and replication in Vero cells, dNSP16 mutant MERS-CoV demonstrated significant attenuation relative to the control both in primary human airway cell cultures andin vivo. Further examination indicated that dNSP16 mutant MERS-CoV had a type I interferon (IFN)-based attenuation and was partially restored in the absence of molecules of IFN-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats. Importantly, the robust attenuation permitted the use of dNSP16 mutant MERS-CoV as a live attenuated vaccine platform protecting from a challenge with a mouse-adapted MERS-CoV strain. These studies demonstrate the importance of the conserved 2'O-MTase activity for CoV pathogenesis and highlight NSP16 as a conserved universal target for rapid live attenuated vaccine design in an expanding CoV outbreak setting.

    IMPORTANCECoronavirus (CoV) emergence in both humans and livestock represents a significant threat to global public health, as evidenced by the sudden emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV (SARS-CoV), MERS-CoV, porcine epidemic diarrhea virus, and swine delta CoV in the 21st century. These studies describe an approach that

  6. Cissampelos sympodialis has anti-viral effect inhibiting dengue non-structural viral protein-1 and pro-inflammatory mediators

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    Fagner Carvalho Leite

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Dengue is the most important viral infection transmitted among humans by arthropod-borne. There are currently no vaccines or specific therapeutical treatment. Therefore, immunomodulatory compounds from plants have been widely examined for their antiviral effects. Cissampelos sympodialis Eichler, Menispermaceae, has scientifically proven to present immunomodulatory activities. Here we assessed the antiviral activity of leaf hydroalcoholic extract, warifteine or methylwarifteine from C. sympodialis in an in vitro dengue virus infection model. The results demonstrated that leaf hydroalcoholic extract or warifteine/methylwarifteine treatment did not reduce dengue virus-Ag+ hepatocyte (Huh-7 cell rates in present experimental conditions. However, we assessed the potential antiviral effect of leaf hydroalcoholic extract or warifteine/methylwarifteine on dengue virus-infection by the production of inflammatory molecules, TNF-α, MIF, IL-8 and PGE2. Dengue virus infection enhanced TNF-α, MIF, IL-8 and PGE2 production in infected Huh-7 cells and leaf hydroalcoholic extract but not warifteine/methylwarifteine treatments, significantly reduced these molecules in infected cells. In dengue virus-infected Huh-7 cells, non-structural protein-1 is produced and leaf hydroalcoholic extract significantly inhibited it independently of alkaloids. Our findings imply that leaf hydroalcoholic extract may attenuate dengue virus infection in Huh-7 cells by inhibiting the enhanced of pro-inflammatory mediators and non-structural protein-1 production induce by dengue virus independently of warifteine/methywarifteine its major compound.

  7. Multiplex detection of IgG and IgM to Rift Valley fever virus nucleoprotein, nonstructural proteins, and glycoprotein in ovine and bovine

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multiplex fluorescence microsphere immunoassay (FMIA) was used to detect bovine and ovine IgM and IgG antibodies to several Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) proteins, including the major surface glycoprotein, Gn; the nonstructural proteins, NSs and NSm; and the nucleoprotein, N. Target antigens were...

  8. Roles of viroplasm-like structures formed by nonstructural protein NSs in infection with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaodong; Qi, Xian; Liang, Mifang; Li, Chuan; Cardona, Carol J; Li, Dexin; Xing, Zheng

    2014-06-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus is an emerging bunyavirus that causes a hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality rate. The virus is likely tick-borne and replicates primarily in hemopoietic cells, which may lead to disregulation of proinflammatory cytokine induction and loss of leukocytes and platelets. The viral genome contains L, M, and S segments encoding a viral RNA polymerase, glycoproteins G(n) and G(c), nucleoprotein (NP), and a nonstructural S segment (NSs) protein. NSs protein is involved in the regulation of host innate immune responses and suppression of IFNβ-promoter activities. In this article, we demonstrate that NSs protein can form viroplasm-like structures (VLSs) in infected and transfected cells. NSs protein molecules interact with one another, interact with NP, and were associated with viral RNA in infected cells, suggesting that NSs protein may be involved in viral replication. Furthermore, we observed that NSs-formed VLS colocalized with lipid droplets and that inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis decreased VLS formation or viral replication in transfected and infected cells. Finally, we have demonstrated that viral dsRNAs were also localized in VLS in infected cells, suggesting that NSs-formed VLS may be implicated in the replication of SFTS bunyavirus. These findings identify a novel function of nonstructural NSs in SFTSV-infected cells where it is a scaffolding component in a VLS functioning as a virus replication factory. This function is in addition to the role of NSs protein in modulating host responses that will broaden our understanding of viral pathogenesis of phleboviruses. © FASEB.

  9. Expression of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Non-Structural Protein, 3D in Insect Cells and its Application in Detection of Anti-FMDV Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Rakesh; M Hosamani; Sreenivasa, B. P.; Kotyal, Anil; Venkataramanan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Non-structural proteins (NSPs) based diagnostics are useful for large-scale sero-surveillance of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and to monitor viral activity as a follow up to the vaccination campaign in FMD endemic countries like India which aim at disease control through vaccination. These diagnostics are also handy in the serology of import/export of cloven-footed animals. In the present study, non-structural protein RNA polymerase (3D gene) of FMD virus (FMDV) was expressed using baculoviru...

  10. Genetic and biological characterization of a Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus 2 (PRRSV-2)causing significant clinical disease in the field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine; Larsen, Lars Erik; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane

    2017-01-01

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) is the cause of severe reproductive and respiratory disease in swine worldwide. In Denmark, both PRRSV-1 and PRRSV-2 are circulating and approximately 35% of pig herds are seropositive for PRRSV. In November 2010, a pig herd...... in the Northern part of Denmark experienced an infection with PRRSV-2 with clinical signs that were much more severe than normally reported from current Danish PRRSV-2 affected herds. Due to the clinical observations of reproductive failure in sows and high mortality in piglets, it was speculated that a new, more....... Virus shedding, acute phase protein responses and serological responses were comparable to those seen after experimental challenge with a Danish PRRSV-2 reference strain isolated in 1997. Vaccination with a commercial modified live PRRSV-2 vaccine had a clear reducing effect on virus shedding, magnitude...

  11. Hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 3 interacts with cytosolic 5'(3'-deoxyribonucleotidase and partially inhibits its activity.

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    Chiu-Ping Fang

    Full Text Available Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV is etiologically involved in liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and B-cell lymphomas. It has been demonstrated previously that HCV non-structural protein 3 (NS3 is involved in cell transformation. In this study, a yeast two-hybrid screening experiment was conducted to identify cellular proteins interacting with HCV NS3 protein. Cytosolic 5'(3'-deoxyribonucleotidase (cdN, dNT-1 was found to interact with HCV NS3 protein. Binding domains of HCV NS3 and cellular cdN proteins were also determined using the yeast two-hybrid system. Interactions between HCV NS3 and cdN proteins were further demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal analysis in cultured cells. The cellular cdN activity was partially repressed by NS3 protein in both the transiently-transfected and the stably-transfected systems. Furthermore, HCV partially repressed the cdN activity while had no effect on its protein expression in the systems of HCV sub-genomic replicons and infectious HCV virions. Deoxyribonucleotidases are present in most mammalian cells and involve in the regulation of intracellular deoxyribonucleotides pools by substrate cycles. Control of DNA precursor concentration is essential for the maintenance of genetic stability. Reduction of cdN activity would result in the imbalance of DNA precursor concentrations. Thus, our results suggested that HCV partially reduced the cdN activity via its NS3 protein and this may in turn cause diseases.

  12. Attenuation and Immunogenicity of a Live High Pathogenic PRRSV Vaccine Candidate with a 32-Amino Acid Deletion in the nsp2 Protein

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    Wenhui Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV QY1 was serially passed on Marc-145 cells. Virulence of different intermediate derivatives of QY1 (P5, P60, P80, and P100 were determined. The study found that QY1 had been gradually attenuated during the in vitro process. Pathogenicity study showed that pigs inoculated with QY1 P100 and P80 did not develop any significant PRRS clinic symptoms. However, mild-to-moderate clinical signs and acute HP-PRRSV symptoms of infection were observed in pigs inoculated with QY1 P60 and P5, respectively. Furthermore, we determined the whole genome sequences of these four intermediate viruses. The results showed that after 100 passages, compared to QY1 P5, a total of 32 amino acid mutations were found. Moreover, there were one nucleotide deletion and a unique 34-amino acid deletion found at 5′UTR and in nsp2 gene during the attenuation process, respectively. Such deletions were genetically stable in vivo. Following PRRSV experimental challenge, pigs inoculated with a single dose of QY1 P100 developed no significant clinic symptoms and well tolerated lethal challenge, while QY1 P80 group still developed mild fever in the clinic trial after challenge. Thus, we concluded that QY1 P100 was a promising and highly attenuated PRRSV vaccine candidate.

  13. DNA vaccine expressing the non-structural proteins of hepatitis C virus diminishes the expression of HCV proteins in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takeshi; Kohara, Michinori; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro

    2013-12-05

    Most of the people infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) develop chronic hepatitis, which in some cases progresses to cirrhosis and ultimately to hepatocellular carcinoma. Although various immunotherapies against the progressive disease status of HCV infection have been studied, a preventive or therapeutic vaccine against this pathogen is still not available. In this study, we constructed a DNA vaccine expressing an HCV structural protein (CN2), non-structural protein (N25) or the empty plasmid DNA as a control and evaluated their efficacy as a candidate HCV vaccine in C57BL/6 and novel genetically modified HCV infection model (HCV-Tg) mice. Strong cellular immune responses to several HCV structural and non-structural proteins, characterized by cytotoxicity and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production, were observed in CN2 or N25 DNA vaccine-immunized C57BL/6 mice but not in empty plasmid DNA-administered mice. The therapeutic effects of these DNA vaccines were also examined in HCV-Tg mice that conditionally express HCV proteins in their liver. Though a reduction in cellular immune responses was observed in HCV-Tg mice, there was a significant decrease in the expression of HCV protein in mice administered the N25 DNA vaccine but not in mice administered the empty plasmid DNA. Moreover, both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells were required for the decrease of HCV protein in the liver. We found that the N25 DNA vaccine improved pathological changes in the liver compared to the empty plasmid DNA. Thus, these DNA vaccines, especially that expressing the non-structural protein gene, may be an alternative approach for treatment of individuals chronically infected with HCV. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dependence of Echovirus 9 on the Enterovirus RNA Replication Inhibitor 2-(α-Hydroxybenzyl)-Benzimidazole Maps to Nonstructural Protein 2C

    OpenAIRE

    Hadaschik, Dirk; Klein, Marcus; Zimmermann, Holger; Eggers, Hans J.; Nelsen-Salz, Birgit

    1999-01-01

    HBB [2-(α-hydroxybenzyl)-benzimidazole] selectively inhibits RNA synthesis of most enteroviruses. However, isolation of HBB-dependent variants is possible. Sequence analysis and characterization of recombinant viruses revealed that HBB dependence maps to the nonstructural protein 2C. A single point mutation at position C4782U is sufficient to establish the HBB-dependent phenotype in our echovirus 9 model.

  15. Comparative evaluation of six ELISAs for the detection of antibodies to the non-structural proteins of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brocchi, E.; Bergmann, I.E.; Dekker, A.

    2006-01-01

    To validate the use of serology in substantiating freedom from infection after foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) outbreaks have been controlled by measures that include vaccination, 3551 sera were tested with six assays that detect antibodies to the non-structural proteins of FMD virus. The sera came...

  16. Secretory pathway antagonism by calicivirus homologues of Norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 is restricted to noroviruses

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    Sharp Tyler M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous report that the Norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 is an antagonist of the cellular secretory pathway suggests a new aspect of norovirus/host interaction. To explore conservation of function of this highly divergent calicivirus protein, we examined the effects of p22 homologues from four human and two murine noroviruses, and feline calicivirus on the secretory pathway. Findings All human noroviruses examined induced Golgi disruption and inhibited protein secretion, with the genogroup II.4 Houston virus being the most potent antagonist. Genogroup II.6 viruses have a conserved mutation in the mimic of an Endoplasmic Reticulum export signal (MERES motif that is highly conserved in human norovirus homologues of p22 and is critical for secretory pathway antagonism, and these viruses had reduced levels of Golgi disruption and inhibition of protein secretion. p22 homologues from both persistent and nonpersistent strains of murine norovirus induced Golgi disruption, but only mildly inhibited cellular protein secretion. Feline calicivirus p30 did not induce Golgi disruption or inhibit cellular protein secretion. Conclusions These differences confirm a norovirus-specific effect on host cell secretory pathway antagonism by homologues of p22, which may affect viral replication and/or cellular pathogenesis.

  17. The shift from low to high non-structural protein 1 expression in rotavirus-infected MA-104 cells

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    Laura Martinez-Alvarez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of group/species A rotavirus (RVA replication in MA-104 cells is the logarithmic increase in viral mRNAs that occurs four-12 h post-infection. Viral protein synthesis typically lags closely behind mRNA synthesis but continues after mRNA levels plateau. However, RVA non-structural protein 1 (NSP1 is present at very low levels throughout viral replication despite showing robust protein synthesis. NSP1 has the contrasting properties of being susceptible to proteasomal degradation, but being stabilised against proteasomal degradation by viral proteins and/or viral mRNAs. We aimed to determine the kinetics of the accumulation and intracellular distribution of NSP1 in MA-104 cells infected with rhesus rotavirus (RRV. NSP1 preferentially localises to the perinuclear region of the cytoplasm of infected cells, forming abundant granules that are heterogeneous in size. Late in infection, large NSP1 granules predominate, coincident with a shift from low to high NSP1 expression levels. Our results indicate that rotavirus NSP1 is a late viral protein in MA-104 cells infected with RRV, presumably as a result of altered protein turnover.

  18. The shift from low to high non-structural protein 1 expression in rotavirus-infected MA-104 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Álvarez, Laura; Piña-Vázquez, Carolina; Zarco, Wilbert; Padilla-Noriega, Luis

    2013-06-01

    A hallmark of group/species A rotavirus (RVA) replication in MA-104 cells is the logarithmic increase in viral mRNAs that occurs four-12 h post-infection. Viral protein synthesis typically lags closely behind mRNA synthesis but continues after mRNA levels plateau. However, RVA non-structural protein 1 (NSP1) is present at very low levels throughout viral replication despite showing robust protein synthesis. NSP1 has the contrasting properties of being susceptible to proteasomal degradation, but being stabilised against proteasomal degradation by viral proteins and/or viral mRNAs. We aimed to determine the kinetics of the accumulation and intracellular distribution of NSP1 in MA-104 cells infected with rhesus rotavirus (RRV). NSP1 preferentially localises to the perinuclear region of the cytoplasm of infected cells, forming abundant granules that are heterogeneous in size. Late in infection, large NSP1 granules predominate, coincident with a shift from low to high NSP1 expression levels. Our results indicate that rotavirus NSP1 is a late viral protein in MA-104 cells infected with RRV, presumably as a result of altered protein turnover.

  19. Temporal appearance of structural and nonstructural bluetongue viral proteins in infected cells, as determined by immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whetter, L E; Gebhard, D H; MacLachlan, N J

    1990-08-01

    The temporal appearance of 4 viral proteins was detected in bluetongue virus (BTV)-infected Vero cells by indirect immunofluorescence staining with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) to BTV structural proteins VP2 and VP7 and nonstructural proteins NS1 and NS2. Bluetongue viral proteins were detected at distinct intervals after inoculation of Vero cells; VP7 was first detected 3 hours after inoculation, NS1 and NS2 at 5 hours after inoculation, whereas VP2 was not detected until 8 hours after inoculation. Patterns of fluorescence varied with the fixative used, but each MAb induced a distinct pattern of fluorescence in infected cells. Flow cytometry, which was used with each of the 4 MAb, proved to be an accurate and sensitive method of detecting BTV-infected P3 mouse myeloma cells. The temporal appearance of each viral protein in BTV-infected P3 cells was similar to that detected in BTV-infected Vero cells. Advantages of flow cytometry over conventional immunofluorescence staining to detect BTV-infected cells included: (1) enumeration of the proportion of infected cells in a population; (2) further characterization of infected cells, including estimates of their viability; and (3) computer-assisted storage and analysis of data obtained.

  20. Antigenicity of envelop and non-structural proteins of dengue serotypes and their potentiality to elicit specifi antibody

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    Ramesh Venkatachalam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find out the antigenic nature of envelop (E and non-structural (NS proteins and their ability to induce specific antibodies, and to investigate specific antibody produced by specific dengue virus (DENV serotypes. Methods: Amino acid sequences of E and NS proteins of dengue serotypes were analysed by using VaxiJen antigen predicition server. The transmembrane of topology analyses were conducted by using transmembrane prediction using hidden markov models. The Hex dock server was used for docking. Results: The antigenicity score and exomembrane potentiality of E and NS proteins were calculated. All those proteins were antigenic; these antigens were made to interact with antibodies such as immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M. Higher energy values of immunoglobulin M were found in DENV-1 and DENV-2, and more energy values were found in immunoglobulin G of DENV-3, DENV-4, NS-1, NS-3 and NS-5. Conclusions: In the present study, DENV-1 and DENV-2 are positive to immunoglobulin M and involved in the primary infection. DENV 3, DENV 4 and all the NS proteins (NS-1, NS-3, NS-5 which elicit immunoglobulin G are involved in the secondary infection.

  1. Functional expression, purification, characterization, and membrane reconstitution of non-structural protein 2 from hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogeron, Marie-Laure; Paul, David; Jirasko, Vlastimil; Montserret, Roland; Lacabanne, Denis; Molle, Jennifer; Badillo, Aurélie; Boukadida, Célia; Georgeault, Sonia; Roingeard, Philippe; Martin, Annette; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Penin, François; Böckmann, Anja

    2015-12-01

    Non-structural protein 2 (NS2) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an integral membrane protein that contains a cysteine protease and that plays a central organizing role in assembly of infectious progeny virions. While the crystal structure of the protease domain has been solved, the NS2 full-length form remains biochemically and structurally uncharacterized because recombinant NS2 could not be prepared in sufficient quantities from cell-based systems. We show here that functional NS2 in the context of the NS2-NS3pro precursor protein, ensuring NS2-NS3 cleavage, can be efficiently expressed by using a wheat germ cell-free expression system. In this same system, we subsequently successfully produce and purify milligram amounts of a detergent-solubilized form of full-length NS2 exhibiting the expected secondary structure content. Furthermore, immuno-electron microscopy analyses of reconstituted proteoliposomes demonstrate NS2 association with model membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative analysis of signature genes in PRRSV-infected porcine monocyte-derived cells to different stimuli.

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    Laura C Miller

    Full Text Available Monocyte-derived DCs (mDCs are major target cells in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV pathogenesis; however, the plasticity of mDCs in response to activation stimuli and PRRSV infection remains unstudied. In this study, we polarized mDCs, and applied genome-wide transcriptomic analysis and predicted protein-protein interaction networks to compare signature genes involved in mDCs activation and response to PRRSV infection. Porcine mDCs were polarized with mediators for 30 hours, then mock-infected, infected with PRRSV strain VR2332, or a highly pathogenic PRRSV strain (rJXwn06, for 5 h. Total RNA was extracted and used to construct sequencing libraries for RNA-Seq. Comparisons were made between each polarized and unpolarized group (i.e. mediator vs. PBS, and between PRRSV-infected and uninfected cells stimulated with the same mediator. Differentially expressed genes (DEG from the comparisons were used for prediction of interaction networks affected by the viruses and mediators. The results showed that PRRSV infection inhibited M1-prone immune activity, downregulated genes, predicted network interactions related to cellular integrity, and inflammatory signaling in favor of M2 activity. Additionally, the number of DEG and predicted network interactions stimulated in HP-PRRSV infected mDCs was superior to the VR-2332 infected mDCs and conformed with HP-PRRSV pathogenicity.

  3. Identification of a Highly Conserved Epitope on Avian Influenza Virus Non-Structural Protein 1 Using a Peptide Microarray.

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    Jiashan Sun

    Full Text Available Avian influenza virus (AIV non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is a multifunctional protein. It is present at high levels in infected cells and can be used for AIV detection and diagnosis. In this study, we generated monoclonal antibody (MAb D7 against AIV NS1 protein by immunization of BALB/c mice with purified recombinant NS1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli. Isotype determination revealed that the MAb was IgG1/κ-type subclass. To identify the epitope of the MAb D7, the NS1 protein was truncated into a total of 225 15-mer peptides with 14 amino acid overlaps, which were spotted for a peptide microarray. The results revealed that the MAb D7 recognized the consensus DAPF motif. Furthermore, the AIV NS1 protein with the DAPF motif deletion was transiently expressed in 293T cells and failed to react with MAb D7. Subsequently, the DAPF motif was synthesized with an elongated GSGS linker at both the C- and N-termini. The MAb D7 reacted with the synthesized peptide both in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and dot-blot assays. From these results, we concluded that DAPF motif is the epitope of MAb D7. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a 4-mer epitope on the NS1 protein of AIV that can be recognized by MAb using a peptide microarray, which is able to simplify epitope identification, and that could serve as the basis for immune responses against avian influenza.

  4. Non-structural protein 1 of avian influenza A viruses differentially inhibit NF-κB promoter activation

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    Zohari Siamak

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza virus infection activates NF-κB and is a general prerequisite for a productive influenza virus infection. On the other hand, non-structural protein 1 (NS1 suppresses this viral activated NF-κB, presumably to prevent expression of NF-κB mediated anti-viral response. NS1 proteins of influenza A viruses are divided into two groups, known as allele A and allele B. The possible functional relevance of this NS1 division to viral pathogenicity is lacking. Findings The ability of NS1 protein from two avian influenza subtypes, H6N8 and H4N6, to inhibit NF-κB promoter activation was assessed. Further, efforts were made to characterize the genetic basis of this inhibition. We found that allele A NS1 proteins of H6N8 and H4N6 are significantly better in preventing dsRNA induced NF-κB promoter activation compared to allele B of corresponding subtypes, in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the ability to suppress NF-κB promoter activation was mapped to the effector domain while the RNA binding domain alone was unable to suppress this activation. Chimeric NS1 proteins containing either RNA binding domain of allele A and effector domain of allele B or vice versa, were equally potent in preventing NF-κB promoter activation compared to their wt. NS1 protein of allele A and B from both subtypes expressed efficiently as detected by Western blotting and predominantly localized in the nucleus in both A549 and MiLu cells as shown by in situ PLA. Conclusions Here, we present another aspect of NS1 protein in inhibiting dsRNA induced NF-κB activation in an allele dependent manner. This suggests a possible correlation with the virus's pathogenic potential.

  5. Non-structural protein 1 of avian influenza A viruses differentially inhibit NF-κB promoter activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Muhammad; Zohari, Siamak; Berg, Mikael

    2011-08-02

    Influenza virus infection activates NF-κB and is a general prerequisite for a productive influenza virus infection. On the other hand, non-structural protein 1 (NS1) suppresses this viral activated NF-κB, presumably to prevent expression of NF-κB mediated anti-viral response. NS1 proteins of influenza A viruses are divided into two groups, known as allele A and allele B. The possible functional relevance of this NS1 division to viral pathogenicity is lacking. The ability of NS1 protein from two avian influenza subtypes, H6N8 and H4N6, to inhibit NF-κB promoter activation was assessed. Further, efforts were made to characterize the genetic basis of this inhibition. We found that allele A NS1 proteins of H6N8 and H4N6 are significantly better in preventing dsRNA induced NF-κB promoter activation compared to allele B of corresponding subtypes, in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the ability to suppress NF-κB promoter activation was mapped to the effector domain while the RNA binding domain alone was unable to suppress this activation. Chimeric NS1 proteins containing either RNA binding domain of allele A and effector domain of allele B or vice versa, were equally potent in preventing NF-κB promoter activation compared to their wt. NS1 protein of allele A and B from both subtypes expressed efficiently as detected by Western blotting and predominantly localized in the nucleus in both A549 and MiLu cells as shown by in situ PLA. Here, we present another aspect of NS1 protein in inhibiting dsRNA induced NF-κB activation in an allele dependent manner. This suggests a possible correlation with the virus's pathogenic potential.

  6. Localization of the nonstructural protein NS1 in bluetongue virus-infected cells and its presence in virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, B T; Hyatt, A D; White, J R

    1988-04-01

    Seven monoclonal antibodies to the nonstructural protein NS1 of an Australian isolate of bluetongue virus (BTV) have been used in immunofluoresence and immunogold procedures to locate NS1 in virus-infected cells and cytoskeletons. The antibodies fall into three groups indicating that NS1 contains at least three antigenic sites. One group consists of four antibodies which react solely with cytoskeleton-associated virus-specific tubules. A second group contains one antibody which reacts with cytoskeleton-associated virus particles, released viruses, and purified virus and core particles. Two antibodies constituting a third group react with both tubules and cytoskeleton-associated and released virus particles. NS1 was found in [35S]methionine-labeled, purified virus and core particles. Immunofluorescence tests reveal that those antibodies which react with virus particles also bind to cytoskeleton-associated virus inclusion bodies (VIB). The nature of this association was examined by probing cytoskeletons of BTV-infected cells with antibodies to NS1 and protein A-gold. VIB observed in thin sections were not uniformly labeled. Gold was associated with fibrillar arrays found around virus particles either leaving or in close proximity to the VIB. Fibrillar material was not found in association with all virus particles elsewhere in the cell and this suggests that fibril-virus complexes may be intermediate in virus morphogenesis.

  7. Regulation of hepatitis C virus replication by nuclear translocation of nonstructural 5A protein and transcriptional activation of host genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Imache, Mohamed R; Higgs, Martin R; Carmouse, Sophie; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Lerat, Hervé

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) is involved in regulating viral replication through its direct interaction with the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. NS5A also alters infected cell metabolism through complex interactions with numerous host cell proteins. NS5A has furthermore been suggested to act as a transcriptional activator, although the impact on viral replication is unclear. To study this, HCV NS5A variants were amplified from hepatic tissue from an HCV-infected patient, and their abilities to activate gene transcription were analyzed in a single-hybrid yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) model. Different variants isolated from the same patient displayed different transactivational activities. When these variants were inserted into the HCV subgenomic replicon system, they demonstrated various levels of RNA replication, which correlated with their transactivational activities. We showed that the C-terminal fragment of NS5A was localized to the nucleus and that a functional NS5A nuclear localization signal and cellular caspase activity were required for this process. Furthermore, nuclear localization of NS5A was necessary for viral replication. Finally, we demonstrate that nuclear NS5A binds to host cell promoters of several genes previously identified as important for efficient HCV RNA replication, inducing their transcription. Taken together, these results demonstrate a new mechanism by which HCV modulates its cellular environment, thereby enhancing viral replication.

  8. RNA 3'-end mismatch excision by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nonstructural protein nsp10/nsp14 exoribonuclease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvet, Mickaël; Imbert, Isabelle; Subissi, Lorenzo; Gluais, Laure; Canard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne

    2012-06-12

    The replication/transcription complex of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus is composed of at least 16 nonstructural proteins (nsp1-16) encoded by the ORF-1a/1b. This complex includes replication enzymes commonly found in positive-strand RNA viruses, but also a set of RNA-processing activities unique to some nidoviruses. The nsp14 protein carries both exoribonuclease (ExoN) and (guanine-N7)-methyltransferase (N7-MTase) activities. The nsp14 ExoN activity ensures a yet-uncharacterized function in the virus life cycle and must be regulated to avoid nonspecific RNA degradation. In this work, we show that the association of nsp10 with nsp14 stimulates >35-fold the ExoN activity of the latter while playing no effect on N7-MTase activity. Nsp10 mutants unable to interact with nsp14 are not proficient for ExoN activation. The nsp10/nsp14 complex hydrolyzes double-stranded RNA in a 3' to 5' direction as well as a single mismatched nucleotide at the 3'-end mimicking an erroneous replication product. In contrast, di-, tri-, and longer unpaired ribonucleotide stretches, as well as 3'-modified RNAs, resist nsp10/nsp14-mediated excision. In addition to the activation of nsp16-mediated 2'-O-MTase activity, nsp10 also activates nsp14 in an RNA processing function potentially connected to a replicative mismatch repair mechanism.

  9. Immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus that encodes nonstructural proteins of the hepatitis C virus suppresses viral protein levels in mouse liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Sekiguchi

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C, which is caused by infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV, is a global health problem. Using a mouse model of hepatitis C, we examined the therapeutic effects of a recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV that encodes an HCV protein. We generated immunocompetent mice that each expressed multiple HCV proteins via a Cre/loxP switching system and established several distinct attenuated rVV strains. The HCV core protein was expressed consistently in the liver after polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid injection, and these mice showed chronic hepatitis C-related pathological findings (hepatocyte abnormalities, accumulation of glycogen, steatosis, liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Immunization with one rVV strain (rVV-N25, which encoded nonstructural HCV proteins, suppressed serum inflammatory cytokine levels and alleviated the symptoms of pathological chronic hepatitis C within 7 days after injection. Furthermore, HCV protein levels in liver tissue also decreased in a CD4 and CD8 T-cell-dependent manner. Consistent with these results, we showed that rVV-N25 immunization induced a robust CD8 T-cell immune response that was specific to the HCV nonstructural protein 2. We also demonstrated that the onset of chronic hepatitis in CN2-29((+/-/MxCre((+/- mice was mainly attributable to inflammatory cytokines, (tumor necrosis factor TNF-α and (interleukin IL-6. Thus, our generated mice model should be useful for further investigation of the immunological processes associated with persistent expression of HCV proteins because these mice had not developed immune tolerance to the HCV antigen. In addition, we propose that rVV-N25 could be developed as an effective therapeutic vaccine.

  10. Genetic engineering alveolar macrophages for host resistance to PRRSV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Randall S; Whitworth, Kristin M; Schommer, Susan K; Wells, Kevin D

    2017-09-01

    Standard strategies for control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) have not been effective, as vaccines have not reduced the prevalence of disease and many producers depopulate after an outbreak. Another method of control would be to prevent the virus from infecting the pig. The virus was thought to infect alveolar macrophages by interaction with a variety of cell surface molecules. One popular model had PRRSV first interacting with heparin sulfate followed by binding to sialoadhesin and then being internalized into an endosome. Within the endosome, PRRSV was thought to interact with CD163 to uncoat the virus so the viral genome could be released into the cytosol and infect the cell. Other candidate receptors have included vimentin, CD151 and CD209. By using genetic engineering, it is possible to test the importance of individual entry mediators by knocking them out. Pigs engineered by knockout of sialoadhesin were still susceptible to infection, while CD163 knockout resulted in pigs that were resistant to infection. Genetic engineering is not only a valuable tool to determine the role of specific proteins in infection by PRRSV (in this case), but also provides a means to create animals resistant to disease. Genetic engineering of alveolar macrophages can also illuminate the role of other proteins in response to infection. We suggest that strategies to prevent infection be pursued to reduce the reservoir of virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Human parvovirus B19 nonstructural protein NS1 activates NLRP3 inflammasome signaling in adult‑onset Still's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Der-Yuan; Chen, Yi-Ming; Chen, Hsin-Hua; Hsieh, Chia-Wei; Gung, Ning-Rong; Hung, Wei-Ting; Tzang, Bor-Show; Hsu, Tsai-Ching

    2018-02-01

    Dysregulation of inflammasomes serves a pathogenic role in autoinflammatory diseases (AIDs) and adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) has been categorized as an AID. The present study investigated the expression of NLR family pyrin domain containing proteins (NLRPs) inflammasome in patients with AOSD, the effect of inflammasome inhibitors on NLRP3 signaling and whether human parvovirus B19‑associated antigens can activate NLRP3 in patients with AOSD. mRNA expression levels of NLRPs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 34 patients with AOSD and 14 healthy individuals were determined using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Protein expression of NLRP3 was evaluated by western blotting. Supernatant cytokine levels were measured by ELISA. Among the NLRPs investigated in the present study, NLRP3 transcripts were markedly elevated and expression of NLRP2, NLRP7 and NLRP12 was decreased in patients with AOSD compared with the controls. Treatment with NLRP3 inhibitors significantly reduced downstream NLRP3 signaling in PBMCs form patients with AOSD. B19‑nonstructural protein (NS)1 stimulation of PBMCs from patients with AOSD induced significant upregulation of transcript levels of NLRP3, caspase‑1 and interleukin (IL)‑1β compared with PBMCs from healthy controls. B19‑NS1 stimulation of PBMCs from patients with AOSD induced significant increase in supernatant levels of IL‑1β and protein expression of NLRP3, caspase‑1, IL‑1β, and IL‑18 compared with healthy controls. Elevated expression of NLRP3 and its downstream inflammasome signaling components in patients with AOSD indicated a potential pathogenic role of B19‑NS1. Thus, B19‑NS1 may induce expression of IL‑1β and IL‑18 through activation of caspase‑1‑associated NLRP3‑inflammasome in AOSD.

  12. Truncated recombinant non-structural protein 2C-based indirect ELISA for FMD sero-surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Sonalika; Mohapatra, Jajati Keshari; Pandey, Laxmi Kant; Sharma, Gaurav Kumar; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2013-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a transboundary animal disease caused by foot-and-mouth disease virus. In India, systematic preventive vaccination using inactivated trivalent (O, A and Asia 1) vaccine is the strategy being adopted to control FMD. The use of non-structural protein (NSP)-contaminated inactivated vaccine raises concerns over differentiation of infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) by NSP based immunoassays. However, 2C being a membrane associated protein usually remain absent in vaccine formulations and thus, anti-2C response is one of the most reliable indicator of the FMDV infection. In this study, 34 amino acids from N-terminus of 2C protein were removed to eliminate membrane-binding amphipathic helicase activity for the expression of recombinant protein in soluble form. Truncated 2C (2Ct) was utilized for development of an indirect ELISA (I-ELISA) for bovine and the developed 2Ct I-ELISA was validated using a panel constituting of serum of naïve, vaccinated and infected animals. The assay was compared with the in-house r3AB3 I-ELISA and the overall concordance was 85.31%. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the 2Ct I-ELISA were 92.9% and 94.0%, respectively. The apparent prevalence of anti-2C antibodies for random bovine samples tested by the developed assay was 23.7%. The developed ELISA will help in augmenting the sensitivity of detection if used in combination with r3AB3 I-ELISA for sero-surveillance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of Serum Antibody Responses against the Rotavirus Nonstructural Protein NSP4 in Children after Rhesus Rotavirus Tetravalent Vaccination or Natural Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Vizzi, Esmeralda; Calviño, Eva; González, Rosabel; Pérez-Schael, Irene; Ciarlet, Max; Kang, Gagandeep; Estes, Mary K.; Liprandi, Ferdinando; Ludert, Juan E.

    2005-01-01

    The immune response elicited by the rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP4 and its potential role in protection against rotavirus disease are not well understood. We investigated the serological response to NSP4 and its correlation with disease protection in sera from 110 children suffering acute diarrhea, associated or not with rotavirus, and from 26 children who were recipients of the rhesus rotavirus tetravalent (RRV-TV) vaccine. We used, as antigens in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (...

  14. Alphavirus-based Vaccines Encoding Nonstructural Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus Induce Robust and Protective T-cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Peng Peng; Boerma, Annemarie; Regts, Joke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W; Daemen, Toos

    2014-01-01

    An absolute prerequisite for a therapeutic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the potency to induce HCV-specific vigorous and broad-spectrum T-cell responses. Here, we generated three HCV vaccines based on a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV) vector expressing all- or a part of the conserved nonstructural proteins (nsPs) of HCV. We demonstrated that an rSFV vector was able to encode a transgene as large as 6.1 kb without affecting its vaccine immunogenicity. Prime-boost immunizations of mice with rSFV expressing all nsPs induced strong and long-lasting NS3-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. The strength and functional heterogeneity of the T-cell response was similar to that induced with rSFV expressing only NS3/4A. Furthermore this leads to a significant growth delay and negative selection of HCV-expressing EL4 tumors in an in vivo mouse model. In general, as broad-spectrum T-cell responses are only seen in patients with resolved HCV infection, this rSFV-based vector, which expresses all nsPs, inducing robust T-cell activity has a potential for the treatment of HCV infections. PMID:24370701

  15. Nuclear import inhibitor N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide targets Zika virus (ZIKV) nonstructural protein 5 to inhibit ZIKV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunxiao; Yang, Sundy N Y; Smith, Kate; Forwood, Jade K; Jans, David A

    2017-12-02

    In the absence of approved therapeutics, Zika virus (ZIKV)'s recent prolific outbreaks in the Americas, together with impacts on unborn fetuses of infected mothers, make it a pressing human health concern worldwide. Although a key player in viral replication in the infected host cell cytoplasm, ZIKV non-structural protein 5 (NS5) appears to contribute integrally to pathogenesis by localising in the host cell nucleus, in similar fashion to NS5 from Dengue virus (DENV). We show here for the first time that ZIKV NS5 is recognized with high nanomolar affinity by the host cell importin α/β1 heterodimer, and that this interaction can be blocked by the novel DENV NS5 targeting inhibitor N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) retinamide (4-HPR). Importantly, we show that 4-HPR has potent anti-ZIKV activity at low μM concentrations. With an established safety profile for human use, 4-HPR represents an exciting possibility as an anti-ZIKV agent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Determination of Viremia and Concentration of Circulating Nonstructural Protein 1 in Patients Infected with Dengue Virus in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz-Hernández, Sergio I.; Flores-Aguilar, Hilario; González-Mateos, Silvia; López-Martinez, Irma; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ludert, Juan E.; del Angel, Rosa M.

    2013-01-01

    Higher levels of viremia and circulating nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) have been associated with dengue disease severity. In this study, viremia and circulating NS1 levels were determined in 225 serum samples collected from patients in Mexico infected with dengue virus serotypes 1 and 2 (DENV-1 and DENV-2). Patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) who were infected with DENV-1 showed higher levels of circulating NS1 than patients with dengue fever (DF) (P = 0.0175). Moreover, NS1 levels were higher in patients with primary infections with DENV-1 than in patient infected with DENV-2 (P < 0.0001) and in patients with primary infections with DENV-2 than in patients with secondary infections with DENV-2 (P = 0.0051). Unexpectedly, viremia levels were higher in patients with DF than in those with DHF infected with either DENV-1 or DENV-2 (P = 0.0019 and P = 0.001, respectively) and in patients with primary infections than those with secondary DENV-2 infections (P < 0.0001). Results indicate that levels of circulating NS1 vary according to the infecting serotype, immunologic status (primary or secondary infection), and dengue disease severity. PMID:23339203

  17. Rapid and sensitive homogenous detection of the Ibaraki virus non-structural protein using magnetic modulation biosensing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielli, Amos; Porat, Noga; Arie, Ady; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2010-02-01

    Magnetic modulation biosensing (MMB) system rapidly and homogeneously detected coding sequences of the nonstructural Ibaraki virus protein 3 (NS3) complementary DNA (cDNA). A novel fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based probe discriminated the target DNA from the control. When the target sequence is detected, the FRETbased probe is cleaved using Taq-polymerase activity and upon excitation with a laser beam fluorescent light is produced. The biotinylated probes are attached to streptavidin-coupled superparamagnetic beads and are maneuvered into oscillatory motion by applying an alternating magnetic field gradient. The beads are condensed into the detection area and their movement in and out of an orthogonal laser beam produces a periodic fluorescent signal that is demodulated using synchronous detection. Condensation of the beads from the entire volume increases the signal while modulation separates the signal from the background noise of the non-magnetized solution. 1.9 picomolar of the Ibaraki virus NS3 cDNA was detected in homogeneous solution within 18 minutes without separation or washing steps. In this paper we will review the magnetic modulation system and present its capability in specific DNA sequences detection.

  18. Application of non-structural protein ELISA kits in nationwide FMD surveillance in pigs to demonstrate virus circulation in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S P; Lee, M C; Sun, Y F; Yang, P C

    2011-09-28

    Large scale surveillance of FMD non-structural protein (NSP) antibody in pigs was conducted to monitor for FMD virus circulation in Taiwan using Ceditest and UBI NSP ELISA kits after recurrence of FMD in 2009. A total of 53,759 serum samples were collected from pigs in the auction markets in 2009. There were 43 farms with positive FMD NSP reactors to both NSP ELISA tests in the nationwide surveillance. After tracing back, clinical examination and the NSP ELISA testing using both Ceditest and UBI on 14 follow-up serum samples from all the herds with confirmed NSP reactors in 2009, there were 4 farms classified as positive on follow-up testing criteria. In this surveillance, we have demonstrated that the NSP ELISA tests of outbreak farms followed by clinical and serological investigation could be used to detect FMD circulation in the pig population in Taiwan even while the national compulsory vaccination program is ongoing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Viroporin Activity of the Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Non-Structural 2B Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Ao

    Full Text Available Viroporins are a family of low-molecular-weight hydrophobic transmembrane proteins that are encoded by various animal viruses. Viroporins form transmembrane pores in host cells via oligomerization, thereby destroying cellular homeostasis and inducing cytopathy for virus replication and virion release. Among the Picornaviridae family of viruses, the 2B protein encoded by enteroviruses is well understood, whereas the viroporin activity of the 2B protein encoded by the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV has not yet been described. An analysis of the FMDV 2B protein domains by computer-aided programs conducted in this study revealed that this protein may contain two transmembrane regions. Further biochemical, biophysical and functional studies revealed that the protein possesses a number of features typical of a viroporin when it is overexpressed in bacterial and mammalian cells as well as in FMDV-infected cells. The protein was found to be mainly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, with both the N- and C-terminal domains stretched into the cytosol. It exhibited cytotoxicity in Escherichia coli, which attenuated 2B protein expression. The release of virions from cells infected with FMDV was inhibited by amantadine, a viroporin inhibitor. The 2B protein monomers interacted with each other to form both intracellular and extracellular oligomers. The Ca(2+ concentration in the cells increased, and the integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane was disrupted in cells that expressed the 2B protein. Moreover, the 2B protein induced intense autophagy in host cells. All of the results of this study demonstrate that the FMDV 2B protein has properties that are also found in other viroporins and may be involved in the infection mechanism of FMDV.

  20. Human Enterovirus Nonstructural Protein 2CATPase Functions as Both an RNA Helicase and ATP-Independent RNA Chaperone.

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    Hongjie Xia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available RNA helicases and chaperones are the two major classes of RNA remodeling proteins, which function to remodel RNA structures and/or RNA-protein interactions, and are required for all aspects of RNA metabolism. Although some virus-encoded RNA helicases/chaperones have been predicted or identified, their RNA remodeling activities in vitro and functions in the viral life cycle remain largely elusive. Enteroviruses are a large group of positive-stranded RNA viruses in the Picornaviridae family, which includes numerous important human pathogens. Herein, we report that the nonstructural protein 2CATPase of enterovirus 71 (EV71, which is the major causative pathogen of hand-foot-and-mouth disease and has been regarded as the most important neurotropic enterovirus after poliovirus eradication, functions not only as an RNA helicase that 3'-to-5' unwinds RNA helices in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP-dependent manner, but also as an RNA chaperone that destabilizes helices bidirectionally and facilitates strand annealing and complex RNA structure formation independently of ATP. We also determined that the helicase activity is based on the EV71 2CATPase middle domain, whereas the C-terminus is indispensable for its RNA chaperoning activity. By promoting RNA template recycling, 2CATPase facilitated EV71 RNA synthesis in vitro; when 2CATPase helicase activity was impaired, EV71 RNA replication and virion production were mostly abolished in cells, indicating that 2CATPase-mediated RNA remodeling plays a critical role in the enteroviral life cycle. Furthermore, the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities of 2CATPase are also conserved in coxsackie A virus 16 (CAV16, another important enterovirus. Altogether, our findings are the first to demonstrate the RNA helicase and chaperoning activities associated with enterovirus 2CATPase, and our study provides both in vitro and cellular evidence for their potential roles during viral RNA replication. These findings

  1. Genetic characterization of the non-structural protein-3 gene of bluetongue virus serotype-2 isolate from India

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    Raghavendra Sumanth Pudupakam

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Sequence analysis and phylogenetic studies based on non-structural protein-3 (NS3 gene are important in understanding the evolution and epidemiology of bluetongue virus (BTV. This study was aimed at characterizing the NS3 gene sequence of Indian BTV serotype-2 (BTV2 to elucidate its genetic relationship to global BTV isolates. Materials and Methods: The NS3 gene of BTV2 was amplified from infected BHK-21 cell cultures, cloned and subjected to sequence analysis. The generated NS3 gene sequence was compared with the corresponding sequences of different BTV serotypes across the world, and a phylogenetic relationship was established. Results: The NS3 gene of BTV2 showed moderate levels of variability in comparison to different BTV serotypes, with nucleotide sequence identities ranging from 81% to 98%. The region showed high sequence homology of 93-99% at amino acid level with various BTV serotypes. The PPXY/PTAP late domain motifs, glycosylation sites, hydrophobic domains, and the amino acid residues critical for virus-host interactions were conserved in NS3 protein. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BTV isolates segregate into four topotypes and that the Indian BTV2 in subclade IA is closely related to Asian and Australian origin strains. Conclusion: Analysis of the NS3 gene indicated that Indian BTV2 isolate is closely related to strains from Asia and Australia, suggesting a common origin of infection. Although the pattern of evolution of BTV2 isolate is different from other global isolates, the deduced amino acid sequence of NS3 protein demonstrated high molecular stability.

  2. Interaction between the yellow fever virus nonstructural protein NS3 and the host protein Alix contributes to the release of infectious particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpp, Lindsay N; Galler, Ricardo; Bonaldo, Myrna C

    2011-01-01

    The ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) machinery normally executes cargo sorting and internalization during multivesicular body biogenesis, but is also utilized by several enveloped viruses to facilitate their budding from cellular membranes. Although the mechanisms of flavivirus infectious particle assembly and release are poorly understood, the nonstructural protein NS3 has been reported to have an essential role via an undescribed mechanism. Here, we shed light on the role of NS3 by connecting it to the host factor Alix, a protein intimately connected with the ESCRT machinery. We demonstrate that NS3 and Alix interact and show that dominant negative versions of Alix inhibit YFV release. Furthermore, we show that NS3 supplied in trans rescues this effect. We propose that the interaction between NS3 and Alix contributes to YFV release. Copyright © 2010 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibody Epitopes Identified in Critical Regions of Dengue Virus Nonstructural 1 Protein in Mouse Vaccination and Natural Human Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Tomer; Beatty, P Robert; MacMillen, Zachary; Killingbeck, Sarah S; Wang, Chunling; Harris, Eva

    2017-05-15

    Dengue is a global public health problem and is caused by four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (DENV1-4). A major challenge in dengue vaccine development is that cross-reactive anti-DENV Abs can be protective or potentially increase disease via Ab-dependent enhancement. DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) has long been considered a vaccine candidate as it avoids Ab-dependent enhancement. In this study, we evaluated survival to challenge in a lethal DENV vascular leak model in mice immunized with NS1 combined with aluminum and magnesium hydroxide, monophosphoryl lipid A + AddaVax, or Sigma adjuvant system+CpG DNA, compared with mice infected with a sublethal dose of DENV2 and mice immunized with OVA (negative control). We characterized Ab responses to DENV1, 2, and 3 NS1 using an Ag microarray tiled with 20-mer peptides overlapping by 15 aa and identified five regions of DENV NS1 with significant levels of Ab reactivity in the NS1 + monophosphoryl lipid A + AddaVax group. Additionally, we profiled the Ab responses to NS1 of humans naturally infected with DENV2 or DENV3 in serum samples from Nicaragua collected at acute, convalescent, and 12-mo timepoints. One region in the wing domain of NS1 was immunodominant in both mouse vaccination and human infection studies, and two regions were identified only in NS1-immunized mice; thus, vaccination can generate Abs to regions that are not targeted in natural infection and could provide additional protection against lethal DENV infection. Overall, we identified a small number of immunodominant regions, which were in functionally important locations on the DENV NS1 protein and are potential correlates of protection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Characterization of the Nonstructural Proteins of the Bocavirus Minute Virus of Canines

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhu, Loretta; Fasina, Olufemi; Burger, Lisa; Rai, Ayushi; Qiu, Jianming; Pintel, David J.

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed characterization of a single-cycle infection of the bocavirus minute virus of canines (MVC) in canine WRD cells. This has allowed identification of an additional smaller NS protein that derives from an mRNA spliced within the NS gene that had not been previously reported. In addition, we have identified a role for the viral NP1 protein during infection. NP1 is required for read-through of the MVC internal polyadenylation site and, thus, access of the capsid gene by MVC m...

  5. Analysis of murine B-cell epitopes on bluetongue virus 12 nonstructural protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HaiXiu, Wang; EnCheng, Sun; QingYuan, Xu; Tao, Yang; Qin, Zhang; YuFei, Feng; JunPing, Li; Shuang, Lv; Liang, Sun; Jing, Sun; DongLai, Wu

    2015-02-01

    The bluetongue virus (BTV) NS1 protein is one of the major proteins synthesized during BTV infection and is responsible for the generation of virus-specific tubules. Although some functional and structural studies on the BTV NS1 protein have been reported, there have been no reports describing the linear B-cell epitopes recognized by humoral immune responses published to date. In this study, 25 BTV12 NS1-reactive monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and polyclonal antisera (polyclonal antibodies, PAbs) were generated and analyzed. We identified 14 linear NS1 epitopes recognized by the PAbs and MAbs using NS1-derived peptides in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, we predicted 23 linear B-cell epitopes using the ABCpred online server which employs an artificial neural network. Analysis of the predicted and identified epitopes of NS1 demonstrated the feasibility of B-cell epitope prediction. Sequence alignments indicated that the epitopes recognized by MAbs are highly conserved among BTV serotypes, but not among the other members of the genus Orbivirus, such as the African horse sickness virus (AHSV), epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), and Chuzan disease virus (CV). Importantly, we identified specific MAbs that recognized all BTV serotypes tested as well as MAbs that recognized only BTV12, suggesting that these NS1-specific MAbs could serve as a basis for BTV diagnostic approaches. The generation and identification of NS1 protein epitopes will provide the foundation for further studies about the function and structure of NS1 and novel epitope-based vaccines.

  6. Analysis of the Binding Sites of Porcine Sialoadhesin Receptor with PRRSV

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    Yibo Jiang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV can infect pigs and cause enormous economic losses to the pig industry worldwide. Porcine sialoadhesin (pSN and CD163 have been identified as key viral receptors on porcine alveolar macrophages (PAM, a main target cell infected by PRRSV. In this study, the protein structures of amino acids 1–119 from the pSN and cSN (cattle sialoadhesin N-termini (excluding the 19-amino acid signal peptide were modeled via homology modeling based on mSN (mouse sialoadhesin template structures using bioinformatics tools. Subsequently, pSN and cSN homology structures were superposed onto the mSN protein structure to predict the binding sites of pSN. As a validation experiment, the SN N-terminus (including the wild-type and site-directed-mutant-types of pSN and cSN was cloned and expressed as a SN-GFP chimera protein. The binding activity between SN and PRRSV was confirmed by WB (Western blotting, FAR-WB (far Western blotting, ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence assay. We found that the S107 amino acid residue in the pSN N-terminal played a crucial role in forming a special cavity, as well as a hydrogen bond for enhancing PRRSV binding during PRRSV infection. S107 may be glycosylated during PRRSV infection and may also be involved in forming the cavity for binding PRRSV along with other sites, including W2, Y44, S45, R97, R105, W106 and V109. Additionally, S107 might also be important for pSN binding with PRRSV. However, the function of these binding sites must be confirmed by further studies.

  7. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the West Nile virus nonstructural protein 1 recognized by avian antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encheng Sun

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that primarily infects birds but occasionally infects humans and horses. Certain species of birds, including crows, house sparrows, geese, blue jays and ravens, are considered highly susceptible hosts to WNV. The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 of WNV can elicit protective immune responses, including NS1-reactive antibodies, during infection of animals. The antigenicity of NS1 suggests that NS1-reactive antibodies could provide a basis for serological diagnostic reagents. To further define serological reagents for diagnostic use, the antigenic sites in NS1 that are targeted by host immune responses need to be identified and the potential diagnostic value of individual antigenic sites also needs to be defined. The present study describes comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes in the WNV NS1 using avian WNV NS1 antisera. We screened antisera from chickens, ducks and geese immunized with purified NS1 for reactivity against 35 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire WNV NS1. This study identified twelve, nine and six peptide epitopes recognized by chicken, duck and goose antibody responses, respectively. Three epitopes (NS1-3, 14 and 24 were recognized by antibodies elicited by immunization in all three avian species tested. We also found that NS1-3 and 24 were WNV-specific epitopes, whereas the NS1-14 epitope was conserved among the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV serocomplex viruses based on the reactivity of avian WNV NS1 antisera against polypeptides derived from the NS1 sequences of viruses of the JEV serocomplex. Further analysis showed that the three common polypeptide epitopes were not recognized by antibodies in Avian Influenza Virus (AIV, Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV, Duck Plague Virus (DPV and Goose Parvovirus (GPV antisera. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study have potential applications in differential diagnostic approaches and

  8. In silico mutation analysis of non-structural protein-5 (NS5) dengue virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitasari, R. D.; Tambunan, U. S. F.

    2017-04-01

    Dengue fever is a world disease. It is endemic in more than 100 countries. Information about the effect of mutations in the virus is important in drug design and development. In this research, we studied the effect of mutation on NS5 dengue virus. NS5 is the large protein containing 67% amino acid similarity in DENV 1-4 and has multifunctional enzymatic activities. Dengue virus is an RNA virus that has very high mutation frequency with an average of 100 times higher than DNA mutations, and the accumulation of mutations will be possible to generate the new serotype. In this study, we report that mutation occurs in NS5 of DENV serotype 3, glutamine mutates into methionine at position 10 and threonine mutates into isoleucine at position 55. These residues are part of the domain named S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine-Dependent Methyltransferase (IPR029063).

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of PRRSV from Danish Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Larsen, Lars Erik

    by phylogenetic analysis, in order to asses the applicability of vaccines currently used to control PRRSV infection in Danish pig herds. Materials and methods Lung tissue from samples submitted to the National Veterinary Institute during 2003-2008 for PRRSV diagnosis were screened for PRRSV by real-time RT......-PCR, essentially as described by Egli et al. 2001, on RNA extracted with RNeasy Mini Kit (QIAGEN). Complete open reading frames (ORF) ORF5 and ORF7 were PCR amplified as described (Oleksiewicz et al. 1998) and sequenced. Sequences were aligned and Neighbour-Joining trees were constructed with ClustalX. Trees were...... visualized with NJ-plot software. Genbank entries of Danish PRRSV sequences from the 1990’ties were included in the phylogenetic analysis. Translated sequences were aligned with current vaccine isolates. Results Both PRRSV EU and US type viruses were isolated from material submitted from Danish pigs...

  10. The Non-structural Protein 5 and Matrix Protein Are Antigenic Targets of T Cell Immunity to Genotype 1 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mokhtar, Helen; Pedrera, Miriam; Frossard, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the cause of one of the most economically important diseases affecting swine worldwide. Efforts to develop a next-generation vaccine have largely focused on envelope glycoproteins to target virus-neutralizing antibody responses. H...

  11. Inhibition of cellular protein secretion by norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 requires a mimic of an endoplasmic reticulum export signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler M Sharp

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and Golgi apparatus is central to cellular homeostasis. ER export signals are utilized by a subset of proteins to rapidly exit the ER by direct uptake into COPII vesicles for transport to the Golgi. Norwalk virus nonstructural protein p22 contains a YXΦESDG motif that mimics a di-acidic ER export signal in both sequence and function. However, unlike normal ER export signals, the ER export signal mimic of p22 is necessary for apparent inhibition of normal COPII vesicle trafficking, which leads to Golgi disassembly and antagonism of Golgi-dependent cellular protein secretion. This is the first reported function for p22. Disassembly of the Golgi apparatus was also observed in cells replicating Norwalk virus, which may contribute to pathogenesis by interfering with cellular processes that are dependent on an intact secretory pathway. These results indicate that the ER export signal mimic is critical to the antagonistic function of p22, shown herein to be a novel antagonist of ER/Golgi trafficking. This unique and well-conserved human norovirus motif is therefore an appealing target for antiviral drug development.

  12. Searching for cellular partners of hantaviral nonstructural protein NSs: Y2H screening of mouse cDNA library and analysis of cellular interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomas Rönnberg

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses (Bunyaviridae are negative-strand RNA viruses with a tripartite genome. The small (S segment encodes the nucleocapsid protein and, in some hantaviruses, also the nonstructural protein (NSs. The aim of this study was to find potential cellular partners for the hantaviral NSs protein. Toward this aim, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H screening of mouse cDNA library was performed followed by a search for potential NSs protein counterparts via analyzing a cellular interactome. The resulting interaction network was shown to form logical, clustered structures. Furthermore, several potential binding partners for the NSs protein, for instance ACBD3, were identified and, to prove the principle, interaction between NSs and ACBD3 proteins was demonstrated biochemically.

  13. Expression of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Non-Structural Protein, 3D in Insect Cells and its Application in Detection of Anti-FMDV Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Hosamani, M; Sreenivasa, B P; Kotyal, Anil; Venkataramanan, R

    2012-12-01

    Non-structural proteins (NSPs) based diagnostics are useful for large-scale sero-surveillance of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and to monitor viral activity as a follow up to the vaccination campaign in FMD endemic countries like India which aim at disease control through vaccination. These diagnostics are also handy in the serology of import/export of cloven-footed animals. In the present study, non-structural protein RNA polymerase (3D gene) of FMD virus (FMDV) was expressed using baculovirus expression system. Protein expression was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and confirmed by its immuno-reactivity with serum from a FMDV infected bovine, in the western blot. Recombinant 3D protein was purified and evaluated in the indirect ELISA with 1072 cattle serum samples. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the assay were found to be 92 and 100 %, respectively, when tested with cattle sera of known FMD status. The 3D based ELISA developed here is useful for screening the animals as an adjunct to other NSP based diagnostics available for routine serosurveillance of FMD.

  14. Non-structural proteins P17 and P33 are involved in the assembly of the internal membrane-containing virus PRD1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karttunen, Jenni; Mäntynen, Sari [Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions, Department of Biological and Environmental Science and Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Ihalainen, Teemu O. [Stem Cells in Neurological Applications Group, BioMediTech, University of Tampere, Tampere (Finland); Bamford, Jaana K.H. [Centre of Excellence in Biological Interactions, Department of Biological and Environmental Science and Nanoscience Center, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, 40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Oksanen, Hanna M., E-mail: hanna.oksanen@helsinki.fi [Institute of Biotechnology and Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki, Biocenter 2, P.O. Box 56 (Viikinkaari 5), FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-08-15

    Bacteriophage PRD1, which has been studied intensively at the structural and functional levels, still has some gene products with unknown functions and certain aspects of the PRD1 assembly process have remained unsolved. In this study, we demonstrate that the phage-encoded non-structural proteins P17 and P33, either individually or together, complement the defect in a temperature-sensitive GroES mutant of Escherichia coli for host growth and PRD1 propagation. Confocal microscopy of fluorescent fusion proteins revealed co-localisation between P33 and P17 as well as between P33 and the host chaperonin GroEL. A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assay demonstrated that the diffusion of the P33 fluorescent fusion protein was substantially slower in E. coli than theoretically calculated, presumably resulting from intermolecular interactions. Our results indicate that P33 and P17 function in procapsid assembly, possibly in association with the host chaperonin complex GroEL/GroES. - Highlights: • Two non-structural proteins of PRD1 are involved in the virus assembly. • P17 and P33 complement the defect in GroES of Escherichia coli. • P33 co-localises with GroEL and P17 in the bacterium. • Slow motion of P33 in the bacterium suggests association with cellular components.

  15. Hepatitis C virus RNA replication depends on specific cis- and trans-acting activities of viral nonstructural proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teymur Kazakov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many positive-strand RNA viruses encode genes that can function in trans, whereas other genes are required in cis for genome replication. The mechanisms underlying trans- and cis-preferences are not fully understood. Here, we evaluate this concept for hepatitis C virus (HCV, an important cause of chronic liver disease and member of the Flaviviridae family. HCV encodes five nonstructural (NS genes that are required for RNA replication. To date, only two of these genes, NS4B and NS5A, have been trans-complemented, leading to suggestions that other replicase genes work only in cis. We describe a new quantitative system to measure the cis- and trans-requirements for HCV NS gene function in RNA replication and identify several lethal mutations in the NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5A, and NS5B genes that can be complemented in trans, alone or in combination, by expressing the NS3-5B polyprotein from a synthetic mRNA. Although NS5B RNA binding and polymerase activities can be supplied in trans, NS5B protein expression was required in cis, indicating that NS5B has a cis-acting role in replicase assembly distinct from its known enzymatic activity. Furthermore, the RNA binding and NTPase activities of the NS3 helicase domain were required in cis, suggesting that these activities play an essential role in RNA template selection. A comprehensive complementation group analysis revealed functional linkages between NS3-4A and NS4B and between NS5B and the upstream NS3-5A genes. Finally, NS5B polymerase activity segregated with a daclatasvir-sensitive NS5A activity, which could explain the synergy of this antiviral compound with nucleoside analogs in patients. Together, these studies define several new aspects of HCV replicase structure-function, help to explain the potency of HCV-specific combination therapies, and provide an experimental framework for the study of cis- and trans-acting activities in positive-strand RNA virus replication more generally.

  16. Coronavirus Nonstructural Protein 16 Is a Cap-0 Binding Enzyme Possessing (Nucleoside-2′O)-Methyltransferase Activity▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decroly, Etienne; Imbert, Isabelle; Coutard, Bruno; Bouvet, Mickaël; Selisko, Barbara; Alvarez, Karine; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Snijder, Eric J.; Canard, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    The coronavirus family of positive-strand RNA viruses includes important pathogens of livestock, companion animals, and humans, including the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus that was responsible for a worldwide outbreak in 2003. The unusually complex coronavirus replicase/transcriptase is comprised of 15 or 16 virus-specific subunits that are autoproteolytically derived from two large polyproteins. In line with bioinformatics predictions, we now show that feline coronavirus (FCoV) nonstructural protein 16 (nsp16) possesses an S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet)-dependent RNA (nucleoside-2′O)-methyltransferase (2′O-MTase) activity that is capable of cap-1 formation. Purified recombinant FCoV nsp16 selectively binds to short capped RNAs. Remarkably, an N7-methyl guanosine cap (7MeGpppAC3-6) is a prerequisite for binding. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated that nsp16 mediates methyl transfer from AdoMet to the 2′O position of the first transcribed nucleotide, thus converting 7MeGpppAC3-6 into 7MeGpppA2′OMeC3-6. The characterization of 11 nsp16 mutants supported the previous identification of residues K45, D129, K169, and E202 as the putative K-D-K-E catalytic tetrad of the enzyme. Furthermore, residues Y29 and F173 of FCoV nsp16, which may be the functional counterparts of aromatic residues involved in substrate recognition by the vaccinia virus MTase VP39, were found to be essential for both substrate binding and 2′O-MTase activity. Finally, the weak inhibition profile of different AdoMet analogues indicates that nsp16 has evolved an atypical AdoMet binding site. Our results suggest that coronavirus mRNA carries a cap-1, onto which 2′O methylation follows an order of events in which 2′O-methyl transfer must be preceded by guanine N7 methylation, with the latter step being performed by a yet-unknown N7-specific MTase. PMID:18417574

  17. Coronavirus nonstructural protein 16 is a cap-0 binding enzyme possessing (nucleoside-2'O)-methyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decroly, Etienne; Imbert, Isabelle; Coutard, Bruno; Bouvet, Mickaël; Selisko, Barbara; Alvarez, Karine; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Snijder, Eric J; Canard, Bruno

    2008-08-01

    The coronavirus family of positive-strand RNA viruses includes important pathogens of livestock, companion animals, and humans, including the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus that was responsible for a worldwide outbreak in 2003. The unusually complex coronavirus replicase/transcriptase is comprised of 15 or 16 virus-specific subunits that are autoproteolytically derived from two large polyproteins. In line with bioinformatics predictions, we now show that feline coronavirus (FCoV) nonstructural protein 16 (nsp16) possesses an S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet)-dependent RNA (nucleoside-2'O)-methyltransferase (2'O-MTase) activity that is capable of cap-1 formation. Purified recombinant FCoV nsp16 selectively binds to short capped RNAs. Remarkably, an N7-methyl guanosine cap ((7Me)GpppAC(3-6)) is a prerequisite for binding. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated that nsp16 mediates methyl transfer from AdoMet to the 2'O position of the first transcribed nucleotide, thus converting (7Me)GpppAC(3-6) into (7Me)GpppA(2')(O)(Me)C(3-6). The characterization of 11 nsp16 mutants supported the previous identification of residues K45, D129, K169, and E202 as the putative K-D-K-E catalytic tetrad of the enzyme. Furthermore, residues Y29 and F173 of FCoV nsp16, which may be the functional counterparts of aromatic residues involved in substrate recognition by the vaccinia virus MTase VP39, were found to be essential for both substrate binding and 2'O-MTase activity. Finally, the weak inhibition profile of different AdoMet analogues indicates that nsp16 has evolved an atypical AdoMet binding site. Our results suggest that coronavirus mRNA carries a cap-1, onto which 2'O methylation follows an order of events in which 2'O-methyl transfer must be preceded by guanine N7 methylation, with the latter step being performed by a yet-unknown N7-specific MTase.

  18. Characterization of a Critical Interaction between the Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Protein and Nonstructural Protein 3 of the Viral Replicase-Transcriptase Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Kelley R.; Koetzner, Cheri A.

    2013-01-01

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid protein (N) plays an essential structural role in virions through a network of interactions with positive-strand viral genomic RNA, the envelope membrane protein (M), and other N molecules. Additionally, N protein participates in at least one stage of the complex mechanism of coronavirus RNA synthesis. We previously uncovered an unanticipated interaction between N and the largest subunit of the viral replicase-transcriptase complex, nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3). This was found through analysis of revertants of a severely defective mutant of murine hepatitis virus (MHV) in which the N gene was replaced with that of its close relative, bovine coronavirus (BCoV). In the work reported here, we constructed BCoV chimeras and other mutants of MHV nsp3 and obtained complementary genetic evidence for its association with N protein. We found that the N-nsp3 interaction maps to the amino-terminal ubiquitin-like domain of nsp3, which is essential for the virus. The interaction does not require the adjacent acidic domain of nsp3, which is dispensable. In addition, we demonstrated a complete correspondence between N-nsp3 genetic interactions and the ability of N protein to enhance the infectivity of transfected coronavirus genomic RNA. The latter function of N was shown to depend on both of the RNA-binding domains of N, as well as on the serine- and arginine-rich central region of N, which binds nsp3. Our results support a model in which the N-nsp3 interaction serves to tether the genome to the newly translated replicase-transcriptase complex at a very early stage of infection. PMID:23760243

  19. Adaptation of yellow fever virus 17D to Vero cells is associated with mutations in structural and non-structural protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, David W C; Morin, Merribeth; Lamb, Ashley R; Hayman, Edward; Watts, Douglas M; Lee, Cynthia K; Trent, Dennis W; Monath, Thomas P

    2013-09-01

    Serial passaging of yellow fever virus 17D in Vero cells was employed to derive seed material for a novel inactivated vaccine, XRX-001. Two independent passaging series identified a novel lysine to arginine mutation at amino acid 160 of the envelope protein, a surface-exposed residue in structural domain I. A third passage series resulted in an isoleucine to methionine mutation at residue 113 of the NS4B protein, a central membrane spanning region of the protein which has previously been associated with Vero cell adaptation of other mosquito-borne flaviviruses. These studies confirm that flavivirus adaptation to growth in Vero cells can be mediated by structural or non-structural protein mutations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cell-free expression, purification, and membrane reconstitution for NMR studies of the nonstructural protein 4B from hepatitis C virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogeron, Marie-Laure [Université de Lyon, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Protéines, Bases Moléculaires et Structurales des Systèmes Infectieux, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Jirasko, Vlastimil; Penzel, Susanne [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Paul, David [Heidelberg University, Department of Infectious Diseases, Molecular Virology (Germany); Montserret, Roland; Danis, Clément; Lacabanne, Denis; Badillo, Aurélie [Université de Lyon, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Protéines, Bases Moléculaires et Structurales des Systèmes Infectieux, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Gouttenoire, Jérôme; Moradpour, Darius [University of Lausanne, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois (Switzerland); Bartenschlager, Ralf [Heidelberg University, Department of Infectious Diseases, Molecular Virology (Germany); Penin, François [Université de Lyon, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Protéines, Bases Moléculaires et Structurales des Systèmes Infectieux, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS (France); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); and others

    2016-06-15

    We describe the expression of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B), which is an integral membrane protein, in a wheat germ cell-free system, the subsequent purification and characterization of NS4B and its insertion into proteoliposomes in amounts sufficient for multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy. First spectra of the isotopically [{sup 2}H,{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N]-labeled protein are shown to yield narrow {sup 13}C resonance lines and a proper, predominantly α-helical fold. Clean residue-selective leucine, isoleucine and threonine-labeling is demonstrated. These results evidence the suitability of the wheat germ-produced integral membrane protein NS4B for solid-state NMR. Still, the proton linewidth under fast magic angle spinning is broader than expected for a perfect sample and possible causes are discussed.

  1. The effect of the dengue non-structural 1 protein expression over the HepG2 cell proteins in a proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabelo, Kíssila; Trugilho, Monique R O; Costa, Simone M; Pereira, Bernardo A S; Moreira, Otacílio C; Ferreira, André T S; Carvalho, Paulo C; Perales, Jonas; Alves, Ada M B

    2017-01-30

    Dengue is an important mosquito borne viral disease in the world. Dengue virus (DENV) encodes a polyprotein, which is cleaved in ten proteins, including the non-structural protein 1 (NS1). In this work, we analyzed the effect of NS1 expression in one hepatic cell line, HepG2, through a shotgun proteomic approach. Cells were transfected with pcENS1 plasmid, which encodes the DENV2 NS1 protein, or the controls pcDNA3 (negative control) and pMAXGFP (GFP, a protein unrelated to dengue). Expression of NS1 was detected by immunofluorescence, western blot and flow cytometry. We identified 14,138 peptides that mapped to 4,756 proteins in all analyzed conditions. We found 41 and 81 differentially abundant proteins when compared to cells transfected with plasmids pcDNA3 and pMAXGFP, respectively. Besides, 107 proteins were detected only in the presence of NS1. We identified clusters of proteins involved mainly in mRNA process and viral RNA replication. Down regulation expression of one protein (MARCKS), identified by the proteomic analysis, was also confirmed by real time PCR in HepG2 cells infected with DENV2. Identification of proteins modulated by the presence of NS1 may improve our understanding of its role in virus infection and pathogenesis, contributing to development of new therapies and vaccines. Dengue is an important viral disease, with epidemics in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The disease is complex, with different manifestations, in which the liver is normally affected. The NS1 is found in infected cells associated with plasma membrane and secreted into the circulation as a soluble multimer. This protein is essential for virus viability, although its function is not elucidated. Some reports indicate that the NS1 can be used as a protective antigen for the development of a dengue vaccine, while others suggest its involvement in viral pathogenesis. In this work, we report an in-depth comprehensive proteomic profiling resulting from the presence

  2. Expression of surface-bound nonstructural 1 (NS1) protein of influenza virus A H5N1 on Lactobacillus casei strain C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, T S; Syed Hassan, S; Yap, W B

    2017-06-01

    The study aimed to construct a recombinant Lactobacillus casei expressing the nonstructural (NS) 1 protein of influenza A virus H5N1 on its cell wall. The NS1 gene was first amplified and fused to the pSGANC332 expression plasmid. The NS1 protein expression was carried out by Lact. casei strain C1. PCR screening and DNA sequencing confirmed the presence of recombinant pSG-NS1-ANC332 plasmid in Lact. casei. The plasmid was stably maintained (98·94 ± 1·65%) by the bacterium within the first 20 generations without selective pressure. The NS1 was expressed as a 49-kDa protein in association with the anchoring peptide. The yield was 1·325 ± 0·065 μg mg(-1) of bacterial cells. Lactobacillus casei expressing the NS1 on its cell wall was red-fluorescently stained, but the staining was not observed on Lact. casei carrying the empty pSGANC332. The results implied that Lact. casei strain C1 is a promising host for the expression of surface-bound NS1 protein using the pSGANC332 expression plasmid. The study has demonstrated, for the first time, the expression of nonstructural 1 (NS1) protein of influenza A virus H5N1 on the cell wall of Lactobacillus casei using the pSGANC332 expression plasmid. Display of NS1 protein on the bacterial cell wall was evident under an immunofluorescence microscopic observation. Lactobacillus casei carrying the NS1 protein could be developed into a universal oral influenza vaccine since the NS1 is highly conserved among influenza viruses. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Improved Vaccine against PRRSV: Current Progress and Future Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchen Nan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV, one of the most economically significant pathogens worldwide, has caused numerous outbreaks during the past 30 years. PRRSV infection causes reproductive failure in sows and respiratory disease in growing and finishing pigs, leading to huge economic losses for the swine industry. This impact has become even more significant with the recent emergence of highly pathogenic PRRSV strains from China, further exacerbating global food security. Since new PRRSV variants are constantly emerging from outbreaks, current strategies for controlling PRRSV have been largely inadequate, even though our understanding of PRRSV virology, evolution and host immune response has been rapidly expanding. Meanwhile, practical experience has revealed numerous safety and efficacy concerns for currently licensed vaccines, such as shedding of modified live virus (MLV, reversion to virulence, recombination between field strains and MLV and failure to elicit protective immunity against heterogeneous virus. Therefore, an effective vaccine against PRRSV infection is urgently needed. Here, we systematically review recent advances in PRRSV vaccine development. Antigenic variations resulting from PRRSV evolution, identification of neutralizing epitopes for heterogeneous isolates, broad neutralizing antibodies against PRRSV, chimeric virus generated by reverse genetics, and novel PRRSV strains with interferon-inducing phenotype will be discussed in detail. Moreover, techniques that could potentially transform current MLV vaccines into a superior vaccine will receive special emphasis, as will new insights for future PRRSV vaccine development. Ultimately, improved PRRSV vaccines may overcome the disadvantages of current vaccines and minimize the PRRS impact to the swine industry.

  4. Application of non-structural protein antibody tests in substantiating freedom from foot-and-mouth disease virus infection after emergency vaccination of cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paton, D.J.; de Clercq, K.; Greiner, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    There has been much debate about the use of the so-called "vaccinate-to-live" policy for the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Europe, according to which, spread of the FMD virus (FMDV) from future outbreaks could be controlled by a short period of "emergency" vaccination of surrounding...... herds, reducing the need for large-scale pre-emptive culling of at-risk animals. Since vaccinated animals may become subclinically infected with FMDV following challenge exposure, it is necessary to either remove all vaccinates (vaccinate-to-kill) or to detect and remove vaccinates in which virus...... is circulating or has established persistent infections (vaccinate-to-live), in order to rapidly regain the most favoured trading status of FMD-free without vaccination. The latter approach can be supported by testing vaccinated animals for the presence of antibodies to certain non-structural proteins (NSP...

  5. Mutations in the 5' NTR and the Non-Structural Protein 3A of the Coxsackievirus B3 Selectively Attenuate Myocarditogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandirasegaran Massilamany

    Full Text Available The 5' non-translated region (NTR is an important molecular determinant that controls replication and virulence of coxsackievirus B (CVB3. Previous studies have reported many nucleotide (nt sequence differences in the Nancy strain of the virus, including changes in the 5' NTR with varying degrees of disease severity. In our studies of CVB3-induced myocarditis, we sought to generate an infectious clone of the virus for routine in vivo experimentation. By determining the viral nt sequence, we identified three new nt substitutions in the clone that differed from the parental virus strain: C97U in the 5' NTR; a silent mutation, A4327G, in non-structural protein 2C; and C5088U (resulting in P1449L amino acid change in non-structural protein 3A of the virus leading us to evaluate the role of these changes in the virulence properties of the virus. We noted that the disease-inducing ability of the infectious clone-derived virus in three mouse strains was restricted to pancreatitis alone, and the incidence and severity of myocarditis were significantly reduced. We then reversed the mutations by creating three new clones, representing 1 U97C; 2 G4327A and U5088C; and 3 their combination together in the third clone. The viral titers obtained from all the clones were comparable, but the virions derived from the third clone induced myocarditis comparable to that induced by wild type virus; however, the pancreatitis-inducing ability remained unaltered, suggesting that the mutations described above selectively influence myocarditogenicity. Because the accumulation of mutations during passages is a continuous process in RNA viruses, it is possible that CVB3 viruses containing such altered nts may evolve naturally, thus favoring their survival in the environment.

  6. A multi-species indirect ELISA for detection of non-structural protein 3ABC specific antibodies to foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosamani, M; Basagoudanavar, S H; Tamil Selvan, R P; Das, Varsha; Ngangom, Pravina; Sreenivasa, B P; Hegde, Raveendra; Venkataramanan, R

    2015-04-01

    Reliable diagnostic tests that are able to distinguish infected from vaccinated animals are a critical component of regional control programs for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in the affected countries. Non-structural protein (NSP) serology based on the 3ABC protein has been widely used for this purpose, and several kits are commercially available worldwide. This report presents the development of a 3ABC-antigen-based indirect ELISA, employing a peroxidase-conjugated protein G secondary antibody that can detect antibodies from multiple species. Recombinant 3ABC protein was expressed in insect cells and purified using affinity column chromatography. Using this protein, an indirect ELISA was developed and validated for the detection of NSP antibodies in serum samples collected from animals with different status of FMD. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were found to be 95.8 (95 % CI: 92.8-97.8) and 97.45 % (95 % CI: 94.8-99.0), respectively. The in-house ELISA compared well with the commercially available prioCHECK FMDV NS-FMD kit, with a high agreement between the tests, as determined by the kappa coefficient, which was 0.87. The in-house ELISA showed higher sensitivity for detecting vaccinated and subsequently infected animals, when compared to the reference test. Both of the tests were able to detect NSP antibodies as early as 7-8 days after experimental infection.

  7. eEF1G interaction with foot-and-mouth disease virus nonstructural protein 2B: Identification by yeast two-hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongwang; Pan, Li; Ding, Yaozhong; Lv, Jianliang; Zhou, Peng; Fang, Yuzhen; Liu, Xinsheng; Zhang, Yongguang; Wang, Yonglu

    2017-11-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a picornavirus that causes an economically significant disease in cattle and swine. Replication of FMDV is dependent on both viral proteins and cellular factors. Nonstructural protein 2B of FMDV plays multiple roles during viral infection and replication. We investigated the roles of 2B in virus-host interactions by constructing a cDNA library obtained from FMDV-infected swine tissues, and used a split-ubiquitin-based yeast two-hybrid system to identify host proteins that interacted with 2B. We found that 2B interacted with amino acids 208-437 in the C-terminal region of the eEF1G subunit of eukaryotic elongation factor 1, which is essential for protein synthesis. The 2B-eEF1G interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation of 2B and eEF1G in HEK293T cells. Collectively, our results suggest that eEF1G interacts with the 2B protein of FMDV. The identified 2B interaction partner may help to elucidate the mechanisms of FMDV infection and replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. PRRSV outbreak with high mortality in northern part of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Rathkjen, P. H.

    , respectively, due to their geographical origin. In Denmark the type 1 virus was first recognized in 1992, and since 1996 both types of PRRSV are widely spread. Approximately 50 % of the herds are seropositive for PRRSV antibodies against either or both types of PRRSV. In November 2010, a severe case of PRRSV...... with high mortality rate in piglets occurred in Northern Jutland. PRRSV type 2 was detected by real-time RT-PCR in lung tissue from 10 days old piglets. The outbreak was treated by extensive vaccination with Ingelvac® PRRS MLV and strict management procedures. 6 weeks later, the mortality of liveborn...

  9. Epitope-tagging approach to determine the stoichiometry of the structural and nonstructural proteins in the virus particles: amount of Vpr in relation to Gag in HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S P; Lai, D; Cartas, M; Serio, D; Murali, R; Kalyanaraman, V S; Srinivasan, A

    2000-03-15

    We used an epitope-tagging approach to determine the ratio of Gag (structural) to Vpr (nonstructural) in the virus particles directed by human immunodeficiency virus type 1. For this purpose, chimeric Gag and Vpr expression plasmids were constructed with the Flag epitope (DYKDDDDK), and the sequences corresponding to the chimeric protein were introduced into human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proviral DNA (NL4-3) to determine the ratio in the virus particles when these proteins are expressed in cis. In addition, NL4-3 DNA was modified to disrupt Vpr synthesis to determine the extent of incorporation of Vpr-FL when it is expressed in trans through a heterologous promoter. The analysis of virus particles generated by transfection of proviral DNA into RD cells indicated that (1) the ratio of Gag to Vpr in virus particles, when Vpr-FL is expressed in cis (in the context of proviral DNA), is in the range of 150-200:1 (14-18 molecules of Vpr per virion) and (2) the expression of Vpr-FL in trans showed efficient incorporation with a Gag to Vpr ratio of 5-7:1 (392-550 molecules of Vpr). These results suggest that the presence of the same epitope on different viral proteins may provide an accurate comparison of these proteins in the virus particles. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  10. Interaction Research on the Antiviral Molecule Dufulin Targeting on Southern Rice Black Streaked Dwarf Virus P9-1 Nonstructural Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenchao Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV causes severe harm to rice production. Unfortunately, studies on effective antiviral drugs against SRBSDV and interaction mechanism of antiviral molecule targeting on SRBSDV have not been reported. This study found dufulin (DFL, an ideal anti-SRBSDV molecule, and investigated the interactions of DFL targeting on the nonstructural protein P9-1. The biological sequence information and bonding characterization of DFL to four kinds of P9-1 protein were described with fluorescence titration (FT and microscale thermophoresis (MST assays. The sequence analysis indicated that P9-1 had highly-conserved C- and N-terminal amino acid residues and a hypervariable region that differed from 131 aa to 160 aa. Consequently, wild-type (WT-His-P9-1, 23 C-terminal residues truncated (TR-ΔC23-His-P9-1, 6 N-terminal residues truncated (TR-ΔN6-His-P9-1, and Ser138 site-directed (MU-138-His-P9-1 mutant proteins were expressed. The FT and MST assay results indicated that DFL bounded to WT-His-P9-1 with micromole affinity and the 23 C-terminal amino acids were the potential targeting site. This system, which combines a complete sequence analysis, mutant protein expression, and binding action evaluating system, could further advance the understanding of the interaction abilities between antiviral drugs and their targets.

  11. Nonstructural Protein 1 of Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Induces Oxidative Stress and Activates Antioxidant Defense by the Nrf2/ARE Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Yulia V; Smirnova, Olga A; Ivanov, Alexander V; Starodubova, Elizaveta S; Karpov, Vadim L

    2016-01-01

    Infection with tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) causes pathological changes in the central nervous system. However, the possible redox alterations in the infected cells that can contribute to the virus pathogenicity remain unknown. In the current study we explored the ability of TBEV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) to induce oxidative stress and activate antioxidant defense via the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived-2)-like 2/antioxidant response element (Nrf2/ARE) pathway. HEK 293T cells were transfected with plasmid encoding NS1 protein, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured using oxidation-sensitive dyes, the activation of the ARE promoter was estimated using a reporter plasmid, and the expression of phase II detoxifying enzymes was quantified by measuring their mRNA levels using RT-qPCR. A high level of ROS production was detected in cells transfected with NS1-expressing plasmid. In addition, this protein activated the promoter with an ARE and upregulated the transcription of ARE-dependent genes that encode phase II enzymes. TBEV NS1 protein both triggers ROS production and activates a defense Nrf2/ARE pathway. These data suggest that a role of redox-mediated processes in TBEV-induced damage of the central nervous system should also be explored. These data can contribute to a better understanding of TBEV pathogenicity, further improvement of TBE treatment, and the development of vaccine candidates against this infection. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Formation of the factory matrix is an important, though not a sufficient function of nonstructural protein mu NS during reovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Michelle M; Murray, Kenneth E; Nibert, Max L

    2008-06-05

    Genome replication of mammalian orthoreovirus (MRV) occurs in cytoplasmic inclusion bodies called viral factories. Nonstructural protein microNS, encoded by genome segment M3, is a major constituent of these structures. When expressed without other viral proteins, microNS forms cytoplasmic inclusions morphologically similar to factories, suggesting a role for microNS as the factory framework or matrix. In addition, most other MRV proteins, including all five core proteins (lambda1, lambda2, lambda3, micro2, and sigma2) and nonstructural protein sigmaNS, can associate with microNS in these structures. In the current study, small interfering RNA targeting M3 was transfected in association with MRV infection and shown to cause a substantial reduction in microNS expression as well as, among other effects, a reduction in infectious yields by as much as 4 log(10) values. By also transfecting in vitro-transcribed M3 plus-strand RNA containing silent mutations that render it resistant to the small interfering RNA, we were able to complement microNS expression and to rescue infectious yields by ~100-fold. We next used microNS mutants specifically defective at forming factory-matrix structures to show that this function of microNS is important for MRV growth; point mutations in a C-proximal, putative zinc-hook motif as well as small deletions at the extreme C terminus of microNS prevented rescue of viral growth while causing microNS to be diffusely distributed in cells. We furthermore confirmed that an N-terminally truncated form of microNS, designed to represent microNSC and still able to form factory-matrix structures, is unable to rescue MRV growth, localizing one or more other important functions to an N-terminal region of microNS known to be involved in both micro2 and sigmaNS association. Thus, factory-matrix formation is an important, though not a sufficient function of microNS during MRV infection; microNS is multifunctional in the course of viral growth.

  13. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine

    This PhD thesis presents the diversity of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome viruses (PRRSV) circulating in the Danish pig population. PRRS is a disease in pigs caused by the PRRS virus resulting in reproductive failures in sows and gilts and respiratory diseases in pigs . Due to genetic...

  14. Alleles A and B of non-structural protein 1 of avian influenza A viruses differentially inhibit beta interferon production in human and mink lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Muhammad; Zohari, Siamak; Metreveli, Giorgi; Baule, Claudia; Belák, Sándor; Berg, Mikael

    2011-09-01

    Non-structural protein 1 (NS1) counteracts the production of host type I interferons (IFN-α/β) for the efficient replication and pathogenicity of influenza A viruses. Here, we reveal another dimension of the NS1 protein of avian influenza A viruses in suppressing IFN-β production in cultured cell lines. We found that allele A NS1 proteins of H6N8 and H4N6 have a strong capacity to inhibit the activation of IFN-β production, compared with allele B from corresponding subtypes, as measured by IFN stimulatory response element (ISRE) promoter activation, IFN-β mRNA transcription and IFN-β protein expression. Furthermore, the ability to suppress IFN-β promoter activation was mapped to the C-terminal effector domain (ED), while the RNA-binding domain (RBD) alone was unable to suppress IFN-β promoter activation. Chimeric studies indicated that when the RBD of allele A was fused to the ED of allele B, it was a strong inhibitor of IFN-β promoter activity. This shows that well-matched ED and RBD are crucial for the function of the NS1 protein and that the RBD could be one possible cause for this differential IFN-β inhibition. Notably, mutagenesis studies indicated that the F103Y and Y103F substitutions in alleles A and B, respectively, do not influence the ISRE promoter activation. Apart from dsRNA signalling, differences were observed in the expression pattern of NS1 in transfected human and mink lung cells. This study therefore expands the versatile nature of the NS1 protein in inhibiting IFN responses at multiple levels, by demonstrating for the first time that it occurs in a manner dependent on allele type.

  15. In vivo subcellular localization of Mal de Rio Cuarto virus (MRCV) non-structural proteins in insect cells reveals their putative functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroniche, Guillermo A.; Mongelli, Vanesa C.; Llauger, Gabriela; Alfonso, Victoria; Taboga, Oscar [Instituto de Biotecnologia, CICVyA, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria (IB-INTA), Las cabanas y Los Reseros s/n. Hurlingham Cp 1686, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Vas, Mariana del, E-mail: mdelvas@cnia.inta.gov.ar [Instituto de Biotecnologia, CICVyA, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria (IB-INTA), Las cabanas y Los Reseros s/n. Hurlingham Cp 1686, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-09-01

    The in vivo subcellular localization of Mal de Rio Cuarto virus (MRCV, Fijivirus, Reoviridae) non-structural proteins fused to GFP was analyzed by confocal microscopy. P5-1 showed a cytoplasmic vesicular-like distribution that was lost upon deleting its PDZ binding TKF motif, suggesting that P5-1 interacts with cellular PDZ proteins. P5-2 located at the nucleus and its nuclear import was affected by the deletion of its basic C-termini. P7-1 and P7-2 also entered the nucleus and therefore, along with P5-2, could function as regulators of host gene expression. P6 located in the cytoplasm and in perinuclear cloud-like inclusions, was driven to P9-1 viroplasm-like structures and co-localized with P7-2, P10 and {alpha}-tubulin, suggesting its involvement in viroplasm formation and viral intracellular movement. Finally, P9-2 was N-glycosylated and located at the plasma membrane in association with filopodia-like protrusions containing actin, suggesting a possible role in virus cell-to-cell movement and spread.

  16. Evaluation of serum antibody responses against the rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP4 in children after rhesus rotavirus tetravalent vaccination or natural infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizzi, Esmeralda; Calviño, Eva; González, Rosabel; Pérez-Schael, Irene; Ciarlet, Max; Kang, Gagandeep; Estes, Mary K; Liprandi, Ferdinando; Ludert, Juan E

    2005-10-01

    The immune response elicited by the rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP4 and its potential role in protection against rotavirus disease are not well understood. We investigated the serological response to NSP4 and its correlation with disease protection in sera from 110 children suffering acute diarrhea, associated or not with rotavirus, and from 26 children who were recipients of the rhesus rotavirus tetravalent (RRV-TV) vaccine. We used, as antigens in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), affinity-purified recombinant NSP4 (residues 85 to 175) from strains SA11, Wa, and RRV (genotypes A, B, and C, respectively) fused to glutathione S-transferase. Seroconversion to NSP4 was observed in 54% (42/78) of the children who suffered from natural rotavirus infection and in 8% (2/26) of the RRV-TV vaccine recipients. Our findings indicate that NSP4 evokes significantly (P rotavirus-infected children with a detectable response to NSP4. Following natural infection or RRV-TV vaccination, NSP4 was significantly less immunogenic than the VP6 protein when these responses were independently measured by ELISA. A significant (P rotavirus had antibodies to NSP4 in acute-phase serum, suggesting that serum antibodies against NSP4 might correlate with protection from rotavirus diarrhea. In addition, previous exposures to rotavirus did not affect the NSP4 seroconversion rate.

  17. Short peptides derived from the interaction domain of SARS coronavirus nonstructural protein nsp10 can suppress the 2'-O-methyltransferase activity of nsp10/nsp16 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Min; Chen, Yu; Wu, Andong; Sun, Ying; Su, Ceyang; Wu, Hao; Jin, Xu; Tao, Jiali; Wang, Yi; Ma, Xiao; Pan, Ji-An; Guo, Deyin

    2012-08-01

    Coronaviruses are the etiological agents of respiratory and enteric diseases in humans and livestock, exemplified by the life-threatening severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). However, effective means for combating coronaviruses are still lacking. The interaction between nonstructural protein (nsp) 10 and nsp16 has been demonstrated and the crystal structure of SARS-CoV nsp16/10 complex has been revealed. As nsp10 acts as an essential trigger to activate the 2'-O-methyltransferase activity of nsp16, short peptides derived from nsp10 may have inhibitory effect on viral 2'-O-methyltransferase activity. In this study, we revealed that the domain of aa 65-107 of nsp10 was sufficient for its interaction with nsp16 and the region of aa 42-120 in nsp10, which is larger than the interaction domain, was needed for stimulating the nsp16 2'-O-methyltransferase activity. We further showed that two short peptides derived from the interaction domain of nsp10 could inhibit the 2'-O-methyltransferase activity of SARS-CoV nsp16/10 complex, thus providing a novel strategy and proof-of-principle study for developing peptide inhibitors against SARS-CoV. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Small-molecule inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural protein 5A (NS5A): a patent review (2010-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanenkov, Yan A; Aladinskiy, Vladimir A; Bushkov, Nikolay A; Ayginin, Andrey A; Majouga, Alexander G; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V

    2017-04-01

    Non-structural 5A (NS5A) protein has achieved a considerable attention as an attractive target for the treatment of hepatitis C (HCV). A number of novel NS5A inhibitors have been reported to date. Several drugs having favorable ADME properties and mild side effects were launched into the pharmaceutical market. For instance, daclatasvir was launched in 2014, elbasvir is currently undergoing registration, ledipasvir was launched in 2014 as a fixed-dose combination with sofosbuvir (NS5B inhibitor). Areas covered: Thomson integrity database and SciFinder database were used as a valuable source to collect the patents on small-molecule NS5A inhibitors. All the structures were ranked by the date of priority. Patent holder and antiviral activity for each scaffold claimed were summarized and presented in a convenient manner. A particular focus was placed on the best-in-class bis-pyrrolidine-containing NS5A inhibitors. Expert opinion: Several first generation NS5A inhibitors have recently progressed into advanced clinical trials and showed superior efficacy in reducing viral load in infected subjects. Therapy schemes of using these agents in combination with other established antiviral drugs with complementary mechanisms of action can address the emergence of resistance and poor therapeutic outcome frequently attributed to antiviral drugs.

  19. Downregulation of viral RNA translation by hepatitis C virus non-structural protein NS5A requires the poly(U/UC) sequence in the 3' UTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Brett; Li, Zhubing; Liu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) is essential for viral replication; however, its effect on HCV RNA translation remains controversial partially due to the use of reporters lacking the 3' UTR, where NS5A binds to the poly(U/UC) sequence. We investigated the role of NS5A in HCV translation using a monocistronic RNA containing a Renilla luciferase gene flanked by the HCV UTRs. We found that NS5A downregulated viral RNA translation in a dose-dependent manner. This downregulation required both the 5' and 3' UTRs of HCV because substitution of either sequence with the 5' and 3' UTRs of enterovirus 71 or a cap structure at the 5' end eliminated the effects of NS5A on translation. Translation of the HCV genomic RNA was also downregulated by NS5A. The inhibition of HCV translation by NS5A required the poly(U/UC) sequence in the 3' UTR as NS5A did not affect translation when it was deleted. In addition, we showed that, whilst the amphipathic α-helix of NS5A has no effect on viral translation, the three domains of NS5A can inhibit translation independently, also dependent on the presence of the poly(U/UC) sequence in the 3' UTR. These results suggested that NS5A downregulated HCV RNA translation through a mechanism involving the poly(U/UC) sequence in the 3' UTR.

  20. Nonstructural 5A Protein of Hepatitis C Virus Interferes with Toll-Like Receptor Signaling and Suppresses the Interferon Response in Mouse Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeya Tsutsumi

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein NS5A is involved in resistance to the host immune response, as well as the viral lifecycle such as replication and maturation. Here, we established transgenic mice expressing NS5A protein in the liver and examined innate immune responses against lipopolysaccharide (LPS in vivo. Intrahepatic gene expression levels of cytokines such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ were significantly suppressed after LPS injection in the transgenic mouse liver. Induction of the C-C motif chemokine ligand 2, 4, and 5 was also suppressed. Phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which is activated by cytokines, was also reduced, and expression levels of interferon-stimulated genes, 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthase, interferon-inducible double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, and myxovirus resistance 1 were similarly suppressed. Since LPS binds to toll-like receptor 4 and stimulates the downstream pathway leading to induction of these genes, we examined the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and IκB-α. The phosphorylation levels of these molecules were reduced in transgenic mouse liver, indicating that the pathway upstream of the molecules was disrupted by NS5A. Further analyses revealed that the interaction between interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor-6 was dispersed in transgenic mice, suggesting that NS5A may interfere with this interaction via myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, which was shown to interact with NS5A. Since the gut microbiota, a source of LPS, is known to be associated with pathological conditions in liver diseases, our results suggest the involvement of NS5A in the pathogenesis of HCV infected-liver via the suppression of innate immunity.

  1. Chemiluminescence Immunoassay for the Detection of Antibodies against the 2C and 3ABC Nonstructural Proteins Induced by Infecting Pigs with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zezhong; Shao, Junjun; Zhao, Furong; Zhou, Guangqing; Gao, Shandian; Liu, Wei; Lv, Jianliang; Li, Xiumei; Li, Yangfan; Chang, Huiyun; Zhang, Yongguang

    2017-08-01

    The potential diagnostic value of chemiluminescence immunoassays (CLIAs) has been accepted in recent years, although their use for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) diagnostics has not been reported. Full-length 3ABC and 2C proteins were expressed in bacteria and purified by affinity chromatography to develop a rapid and accurate approach to distinguish pigs infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from vaccinated pigs. The recombinant proteins were then used as antigens to develop two CLIAs for the detection of antibodies against nonstructural viral proteins. The diagnostic performance of the two assays was compared by analyzing serum from pigs (naive pigs, n = 63; vaccinated, uninfected pigs, n = 532; naive, infected pigs, n = 117) with a known infection status. The 3ABC-2C CLIA had a higher accuracy rate, with a diagnostic sensitivity of 100% and a diagnostic specificity of 96.5%, than the 3ABC CLIA, which had a diagnostic sensitivity of 95.7% and a diagnostic specificity of 96.0%. The results of the 3ABC-2C CLIA also had a high rate of concordance with those of two commercial FMDV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits used to assess serum collected from 962 pigs in the field (96.2% and 97.8%, respectively). The 3ABC-2C CLIA detected infection in serum samples from infected pigs earlier than the commercial ELISA kits. In addition, the 3ABC-2C CLIA produced results within 15 min. On the basis of these findings, the 3ABC-2C CLIA could serve as the foundation for the development of penside FMD diagnostics and offers an alternative method to detect FMDV infections. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Systematic analysis of non-structural protein features for the prediction of PTM function potential by artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Henry M; Torres, Matthew P

    2017-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) provide an extensible framework for regulation of protein behavior beyond the diversity represented within the genome alone. While the rate of identification of PTMs has rapidly increased in recent years, our knowledge of PTM functionality encompasses less than 5% of this data. We previously developed SAPH-ire (Structural Analysis of PTM Hotspots) for the prioritization of eukaryotic PTMs based on function potential of discrete modified alignment positions (MAPs) in a set of 8 protein families. A proteome-wide expansion of the dataset to all families of PTM-bearing, eukaryotic proteins with a representational crystal structure and the application of artificial neural network (ANN) models demonstrated the broader applicability of this approach. Although structural features of proteins have been repeatedly demonstrated to be predictive of PTM functionality, the availability of adequately resolved 3D structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) limits the scope of these methods. In order to bridge this gap and capture the larger set of PTM-bearing proteins without an available, homologous structure, we explored all available MAP features as ANN inputs to identify predictive models that do not rely on 3D protein structural data. This systematic, algorithmic approach explores 8 available input features in exhaustive combinations (247 models; size 2-8). To control for potential bias in random sampling for holdback in training sets, we iterated each model across 100 randomized, sample training and testing sets-yielding 24,700 individual ANNs. The size of the analyzed dataset and iterative generation of ANNs represents the largest and most thorough investigation of predictive models for PTM functionality to date. Comparison of input layer combinations allows us to quantify ANN performance with a high degree of confidence and subsequently select a top-ranked, robust fit model which highlights 3,687 MAPs, including 10,933 PTMs with a high

  3. Novel Strategy to Control Transgene Expression Mediated by a Sendai Virus-Based Vector Using a Nonstructural C Protein and Endogenous MicroRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Sano

    Full Text Available Tissue-specific control of gene expression is an invaluable tool for studying various biological processes and medical applications. Efficient regulatory systems have been utilized to control transgene expression in various types of DNA viral or integrating viral vectors. However, existing regulatory systems are difficult to transfer into negative-strand RNA virus vector platforms because of significant differences in their transcriptional machineries. In this study, we developed a novel strategy for regulating transgene expression mediated by a cytoplasmic RNA vector based on a replication-defective and persistent Sendai virus (SeVdp. Because of the capacity of Sendai virus (SeV nonstructural C proteins to specifically inhibit viral RNA synthesis, overexpression of C protein significantly reduced transgene expression mediated by SeVdp vectors. We found that SeV C overexpression concomitantly reduced SeVdp mRNA levels and genomic RNA synthesis. To control C expression, target sequences for an endogenous microRNA were incorporated into the 3' untranslated region of the C genes. Incorporation of target sequences for miR-21 into the SeVdp vector restored transgene expression in HeLa cells by decreasing C expression. Furthermore, the SeVdp vector containing target sequences for let-7a enabled cell-specific control of transgene expression in human fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells. Our findings demonstrate that SeV C can be used as an effective regulator for controlling transgene expression. This strategy will contribute to efficient and less toxic SeVdp-mediated gene transfer in various biological applications.

  4. Diagnostic application of recombinant non-structural protein 3A to detect antibodies induced by foot-and-mouth disease virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswal, Jitendra K; Ranjan, Rajeev; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2016-05-01

    Detection of antibodies to the non-structural proteins (NSPs) of FMD virus (FMDV) is the preferred differential diagnostic method for identification of FMD-infected animals in the vaccinated population. Nevertheless, due to the observed variability in the antibody response to NSPs, the likelihood of screening or confirming the FMD infection status in animals is increased if an antibody profile to multiple NSPs is considered for diagnosis. In order to develop and evaluate an additional NSP-based diagnostic assay, in this study, the recombinant 3A protein of FMDV was expressed in Escherichia coli and used as an antigen for detection of FMD infection specific antibodies. At the fixed cut-off value of 45 percentage of positivity, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 3A indirect-ELISA (I-ELISA) were found to be 95.7% and 96.3%, respectively. In FMD naturally infected cattle, about 85% of clinically infected and 75% of asymptomatic in-contact populations were found positive at 13 months post-outbreak. The 3A I-ELISA was further evaluated with the bovine serum samples collected randomly from different parts of the country. Furthermore, the performance of newly developed 3A I-ELISA was compared with the extensively used in-house r3AB3 I-ELISA, and the overall concordance in test results was found to be 93.62%. The r3A I-ELISA could be useful as a screening or confirmatory assay in the sero-surveillance of FMD in India irrespective of extensive bi-annual vaccination. Copyright © 2016 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The C Terminus of the Core β-Ladder Domain in Japanese Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Is Flexible for Accommodation of Heterologous Epitope Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Li-Chen; Liao, Jia-Teh; Lee, Hwei-Jen; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lin, Yi-Ling; Liao, Ching-Len

    2015-11-11

    NS1 is the only nonstructural protein that enters the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where NS1 is glycosylated, forms a dimer, and is subsequently secreted during flavivirus replication as dimers or hexamers, which appear to be highly immunogenic to the infected host, as protective immunity can be elicited against homologous flavivirus infections. Here, by using a trans-complementation assay, we identified the C-terminal end of NS1 derived from Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which was more flexible than other regions in terms of housing foreign epitopes without a significant impact on virus replication. This mapped flexible region is located in the conserved tip of the core β-ladder domain of the multimeric NS1 structure and is also known to contain certain linear epitopes, readily triggering specific antibody responses from the host. Despite becoming attenuated, recombinant JEV with insertion of a neutralizing epitope derived from enterovirus 71 (EV71) into the C-terminal end of NS1 not only could be normally released from infected cells, but also induced dual protective immunity for the host to counteract lethal challenge with either JEV or EV71 in neonatal mice. These results indicated that the secreted multimeric NS1 of flaviviruses may serve as a natural protein carrier to render epitopes of interest more immunogenic in the C terminus of the core β-ladder domain. The positive-sense RNA genomes of mosquito-borne flaviviruses appear to be flexible in terms of accommodating extra insertions of short heterologous antigens into their virus genes. Here, we illustrate that the newly identified C terminus of the core β-ladder domain in NS1 could be readily inserted into entities such as EV71 epitopes, and the resulting NS1-epitope fusion proteins appeared to maintain normal virus replication, secretion ability, and multimeric formation from infected cells. Nonetheless, such an insertion attenuated the recombinant JEV in mice, despite having retained

  6. The nonstructural protein NP1 of human bocavirus 1 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Hela cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Bin; Cai, Yingyue; Li, Yongshu [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Li, Jingjing [College of Life Science, Hubei Normal University, Huangshi 435002, Hubei (China); Liu, Kaiyu [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Li, Yi, E-mail: johnli2668@hotmail.com [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China); Bioengineering Department, Wuhan Bioengineering Institute, Wuhan 430415, Hubei (China); Yang, Yongbo, E-mail: yongboyang@mail.ccnu.edu.cn [College of Life Science, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, Hubei (China)

    2013-05-25

    Human bocavirus type 1 (HBoV1) is a newly identified pathogen associated with human respiratory tract illnesses. Previous studies demonstrated that proteins of HBoV1 failed to cause cell death, which is considered as a possible common feature of bocaviruses. However, our work showed that the NP1 of HBoV1 induced apoptotic cell death in Hela cells in the absence of viral genome replication and expression of other viral proteins. Mitochondria apoptotic pathway was involved in the NP1-induced apoptosis that was confirmed by apoptotic characteristics including morphological changes, DNA fragmentation and caspase activation. We also demonstrated that the cell cycle of NP1-transfected Hela cells was transiently arrested at G2/M phase followed by rapid appearance of apoptosis and that the N terminal domain of NP1 was critical to its nuclear localization and function in apoptosis induction in Hela cells. These findings might provide alternative information for further study of mechanism of HBoV1 pathogenesis. - Highlights: ► NP1 protein of HBoV1 induced apoptosis in Hela cells was first reported. ► NP1 induced-apoptosis followed the cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. ► The NP1 induced-apoptosis was mediated by mitochondrion apoptotic pathway. ► N terminal of NP1 was critical for apoptosis induction and nuclear localization.

  7. Expression of the rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV) non-structural protein 3 (NS3) in Escherichia coli and its in situ localization in RHBV-infected rice tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Miguel; Bolaños, Isela; Arrieta-Espinoza, Griselda; Espinoza, Ana M

    2004-09-01

    The non-structural NS3 protein gene from the rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV) was fused to the glutathione-S-transferase carboxilic end and expressed in Escherichia coli strain JM83. Large quantities of fusion protein were produced in insoluble form. The fusion protein was fractionated in SDS-PAGE and purified by electroelution, polyclonal antibodies were raised in rabbit and the antiserum was absorbed with bacterial crude extract. A band of similar size as that of NS3 protein was observed in Western blots using extracts from RHBV-infected rice plants. Immunoelectron microscopy with colloidal gold-labeled antibodies against NS3 protein and the viral nucleocapsid protein revealed in situ accumulation of NS3 protein in the cytoplasm but not in the viral inclusion bodies, vacuoles or chloroplasts of RHBV-infected plants, following the same pattern of distribution as the RHBV nucleocapsid protein.

  8. Isolation of serotype-specific antibodies against dengue virus non-structural protein 1 using phage display and application in a multiplexed serotyping assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kebaneilwe Lebani

    Full Text Available The multidimensional nature of dengue virus (DENV infections, which can be caused by four distinct serotypes of the virus, complicates the sensitivity of assays designed for the diagnosis of infection. Different viral markers can be optimally detected at different stages of infection. Of particular clinical importance is the early identification of infection, which is pivotal for disease management and the development of blood screening assays. Non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is an early surrogate marker of infection and its detection in serum coincides with detectable viraemia. The aim of this work was to isolate and characterise serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies that bind to NS1 for each of the four DENV serotypes. This was achieved using phage display and a subtractive biopanning strategy to direct the antibody selection towards serotype-specific epitopes. This antibody isolation strategy has advantages over immunisation techniques where it is difficult to avoid antibody responses to cross-reactive, immunodominant epitopes. Serotype specificity to recombinant antigen for each of the antibodies was confirmed by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA and Surface Plasmon Resonance. Confirmation of binding to native DENV NS1 was achieved using ELISA and immunofluorescence assay on DENV infected Vero cells. No cross-reactivity with Zika or Kunjin viruses was observed. A previously isolated pan-reactive antibody that binds to an immunodominant epitope was able to pair with each of the serotype-specific antibodies in a sandwich ELISA, indicating that the serotype specific antibodies bind to epitopes which are all spatially distinct from the immunodominant epitope. These antibodies were suitable for use in a multiplexed assay for simultaneous detection and serotyping of DENV NS1 in human serum. This work demonstrates that phage display coupled with novel biopanning strategies is a valuable in vitro methodology for isolation of binders that can

  9. Modification of S-Adenosyl-l-Homocysteine as Inhibitor of Nonstructural Protein 5 Methyltransferase Dengue Virus Through Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Nasution, Mochammad Arfin Fardiansyah; Azhima, Fauziah; Parikesit, Arli Aditya; Toepak, Erwin Prasetya; Idrus, Syarifuddin; Kerami, Djati

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever is still a major threat worldwide, approximately threatening two-fifths of the world’s population in tropical and subtropical countries. Nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) methyltransferase enzyme plays a vital role in the process of messenger RNA capping of dengue by transferring methyl groups from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to N7 atom of the guanine bases of RNA and the RNA ribose group of 2′OH, resulting in S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (SAH). The modification of SAH compound was screened using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation, along with computational ADME-Tox (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity) test. The 2 simulations were performed using Molecular Operating Environment (MOE) 2008.10 software, whereas the ADME-Tox test was performed using various software. The modification of SAH compound was done using several functional groups that possess different polarities and properties, resulting in 3460 ligands to be docked. After conducting docking simulation, we earned 3 best ligands (SAH-M331, SAH-M2696, and SAH-M1356) based on ΔGbinding and molecular interactions, which show better results than the standard ligands. Moreover, the results of molecular dynamics simulation show that the best ligands are still able to maintain the active site residue interaction with the binding site until the end of the simulation. After a series of molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation were performed, we concluded that SAH-M1356 ligand is the most potential SAH-based compound to inhibit NS5 methyltransferase enzyme for treating dengue fever. PMID:28469408

  10. Modification of S-Adenosyl-l-Homocysteine as Inhibitor of Nonstructural Protein 5 Methyltransferase Dengue Virus Through Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Nasution, Mochammad Arfin Fardiansyah; Azhima, Fauziah; Parikesit, Arli Aditya; Toepak, Erwin Prasetya; Idrus, Syarifuddin; Kerami, Djati

    2017-01-01

    Dengue fever is still a major threat worldwide, approximately threatening two-fifths of the world's population in tropical and subtropical countries. Nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) methyltransferase enzyme plays a vital role in the process of messenger RNA capping of dengue by transferring methyl groups from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to N7 atom of the guanine bases of RNA and the RNA ribose group of 2'OH, resulting in S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (SAH). The modification of SAH compound was screened using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation, along with computational ADME-Tox (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity) test. The 2 simulations were performed using Molecular Operating Environment (MOE) 2008.10 software, whereas the ADME-Tox test was performed using various software. The modification of SAH compound was done using several functional groups that possess different polarities and properties, resulting in 3460 ligands to be docked. After conducting docking simulation, we earned 3 best ligands (SAH-M331, SAH-M2696, and SAH-M1356) based on ΔGbinding and molecular interactions, which show better results than the standard ligands. Moreover, the results of molecular dynamics simulation show that the best ligands are still able to maintain the active site residue interaction with the binding site until the end of the simulation. After a series of molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation were performed, we concluded that SAH-M1356 ligand is the most potential SAH-based compound to inhibit NS5 methyltransferase enzyme for treating dengue fever.

  11. Hepatitis C Virus Nonstructural 3/4A Protein Dampens Inflammation and Contributes to Slow Fibrosis Progression during Chronic Fibrosis In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Bansal

    Full Text Available HCV infection typically induces liver injury and inflammation, which appears to be responsible for the associated fibrogenesis. To date, the mechanism underlying the different rates of disease progression remains unclear. The aim of the study is to understand the possible role of the HCV non-structural (NS 3/4A protein in the fibrosis progression. We used NS3/4A-expressing transgenic mice (NS3/4A-Tg to accomplish the goals of the study. Different stages of liver fibrosis were induced in wild-type and NS3/4A-Tg mice by single carbon tetrachloride (acute or multiple injections for 4 (intermediate or 8 (chronic weeks. Fibrotic parameters, inflammatory responses and hepatocyte turnover were extensively examined. Hepatic expression of HCV NS3/4A did not induce spontaneous liver damage. However, NS3/4A expression exerted contrasting effects during acute and chronic liver damage. During early fibrogenesis and intermediate fibrosis (4 weeks, NS3/4A-Tg mice exhibited enhanced liver damage whereas reduced fibrosis was observed in NS3/4A-Tg during chronic liver fibrosis (8 weeks. Furthermore, attenuated inflammation was observed in NS3/4A-Tg during chronic fibrosis with increase in M2 macrophages, hepatocyte proliferation, decreased hepatocyte apoptosis and decreased ductular reaction. In conclusion, during early fibrogenesis, HCV NS3/4A contributes to liver damage. While, during chronic liver fibrosis, NS3/4A dampens inflammation and induces hepatocyte regeneration thereby contributing to slow fibrosis progression to promote its survival or persistence.

  12. Modification of -Adenosyl--Homocysteine as Inhibitor of Nonstructural Protein 5 Methyltransferase Dengue Virus Through Molecular Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Sumo Friend Tambunan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is still a major threat worldwide, approximately threatening two-fifths of the world’s population in tropical and subtropical countries. Nonstructural protein 5 (NS5 methyltransferase enzyme plays a vital role in the process of messenger RNA capping of dengue by transferring methyl groups from S -adenosyl- l -methionine to N7 atom of the guanine bases of RNA and the RNA ribose group of 2′OH, resulting in S -adenosyl- l -homocysteine (SAH. The modification of SAH compound was screened using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation, along with computational ADME-Tox (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity test. The 2 simulations were performed using Molecular Operating Environment (MOE 2008.10 software, whereas the ADME-Tox test was performed using various software. The modification of SAH compound was done using several functional groups that possess different polarities and properties, resulting in 3460 ligands to be docked. After conducting docking simulation, we earned 3 best ligands (SAH-M331, SAH-M2696, and SAH-M1356 based on ΔG binding and molecular interactions, which show better results than the standard ligands. Moreover, the results of molecular dynamics simulation show that the best ligands are still able to maintain the active site residue interaction with the binding site until the end of the simulation. After a series of molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation were performed, we concluded that SAH-M1356 ligand is the most potential SAH-based compound to inhibit NS5 methyltransferase enzyme for treating dengue fever.

  13. Multiple ascending dose study of BMS-790052, a nonstructural protein 5A replication complex inhibitor, in patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Richard E; Gao, Min; Bifano, Marc; Chung, Ellen; Persson, Anna; Marbury, Thomas C; Goldwater, Ronald; DeMicco, Michael P; Rodriguez-Torres, Maribel; Vutikullird, Apinya; Fuentes, Ernesto; Lawitz, Eric; Lopez-Talavera, Juan Carlos; Grasela, Dennis M

    2011-12-01

    The antiviral activity, resistance profile, pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and tolerability of BMS-790052, a nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) replication complex inhibitor, were evaluated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, sequential panel, multiple ascending dose study. Thirty patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection were randomized to receive a 14-day course of BMS-790052 (1, 10, 30, 60, or 100 mg once daily or 30 mg twice daily) or placebo in a ratio of 4:1. The mean maximum decline from baseline in HCV RNA ranged from 2.8 to 4.1 log(10) IU/mL; the placebo group showed no evidence of antiviral activity. Most patients experienced viral rebound on or before day 7 of treatment with BMS-790052 monotherapy; viral rebound was associated with viral variants that had been previously implicated in resistance development in the in vitro replicon system. The PK profile was supportive of once-daily dosing with median peak plasma concentrations at 1-2 hours postdose and mean terminal half-life of 12-15 hours. Steady state was achieved following 3-4 days of daily dosing. BMS-790052 was well tolerated in all dose groups, with adverse events occurring with a similar frequency in BMS-790052- and placebo-treated groups. There were no clinically relevant changes in vital signs, laboratory, or electrocardiogram parameters. BMS-7590052 is the first NS5A replication complex inhibitor with multiple dose proof-of-concept in clinic. At doses of 1-100 mg daily, BMS-790052 was well tolerated, had a PK profile supportive of once-daily dosing, and produced a rapid and substantial decrease in HCV-RNA levels in patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1. Copyright © 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  14. Statistical linkage analysis of substitutions in patient-derived sequences of genotype 1a hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 3 exposes targets for immunogen design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadeer, Ahmed A; Louie, Raymond H Y; Shekhar, Karthik; Chakraborty, Arup K; Hsing, I-Ming; McKay, Matthew R

    2014-07-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the leading causes of liver failure and liver cancer, affecting around 3% of the world's population. The extreme sequence variability of the virus resulting from error-prone replication has thwarted the discovery of a universal prophylactic vaccine. It is known that vigorous and multispecific cellular immune responses, involving both helper CD4(+) and cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, are associated with the spontaneous clearance of acute HCV infection. Escape mutations in viral epitopes can, however, abrogate protective T-cell responses, leading to viral persistence and associated pathologies. Despite the propensity of the virus to mutate, there might still exist substitutions that incur a fitness cost. In this paper, we identify groups of coevolving residues within HCV nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) by analyzing diverse sequences of this protein using ideas from random matrix theory and associated methods. Our analyses indicate that one of these groups comprises a large percentage of residues for which HCV appears to resist multiple simultaneous substitutions. Targeting multiple residues in this group through vaccine-induced immune responses should either lead to viral recognition or elicit escape substitutions that compromise viral fitness. Our predictions are supported by published clinical data, which suggested that immune genotypes associated with spontaneous clearance of HCV preferentially recognized and targeted this vulnerable group of residues. Moreover, mapping the sites of this group onto the available protein structure provided insight into its functional significance. An epitope-based immunogen is proposed as an alternative to the NS3 epitopes in the peptide-based vaccine IC41. Despite much experimental work on HCV, a thorough statistical study of the HCV sequences for the purpose of immunogen design was missing in the literature. Such a study is vital to identify epistatic couplings among residues that can

  15. Hepatitis C virus non-structural 5B protein interacts with cyclin A2 and regulates viral propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Long; Ngo, HT; Lim, YS

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Hepatitis C virus (HCV) requires host cellular proteins for its own propagation. To identify the cellular factors necessary for HCV propagation, we have recently screened the small interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting cell cycle genes using cell culture grown HCV (HCVcc......)-infected cells. In the current study, we have selected and characterized the gene encoding Cyclin A2 (CycA2). Deregulation of CycA2 has been implicated in many types of cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods The effects of CycA2 on HCV propagation were investigated by siRNA-mediated knockdown assay...

  16. Discovery of a novel compound with anti-venezuelan equine encephalitis virus activity that targets the nonstructural protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoon Chung

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses present serious health threats as emerging and re-emerging viruses. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV, a New World alphavirus, can cause encephalitis in humans and horses, but there are no therapeutics for treatment. To date, compounds reported as anti-VEEV or anti-alphavirus inhibitors have shown moderate activity. To discover new classes of anti-VEEV inhibitors with novel viral targets, we used a high-throughput screen based on the measurement of cell protection from live VEEV TC-83-induced cytopathic effect to screen a 340,000 compound library. Of those, we identified five novel anti-VEEV compounds and chose a quinazolinone compound, CID15997213 (IC50 = 0.84 µM, for further characterization. The antiviral effect of CID15997213 was alphavirus-specific, inhibiting VEEV and Western equine encephalitis virus, but not Eastern equine encephalitis virus. In vitro assays confirmed inhibition of viral RNA, protein, and progeny synthesis. No antiviral activity was detected against a select group of RNA viruses. We found mutations conferring the resistance to the compound in the N-terminal domain of nsP2 and confirmed the target residues using a reverse genetic approach. Time of addition studies showed that the compound inhibits the middle stage of replication when viral genome replication is most active. In mice, the compound showed complete protection from lethal VEEV disease at 50 mg/kg/day. Collectively, these results reveal a potent anti-VEEV compound that uniquely targets the viral nsP2 N-terminal domain. While the function of nsP2 has yet to be characterized, our studies suggest that the protein might play a critical role in viral replication, and further, may represent an innovative opportunity to develop therapeutic interventions for alphavirus infection.

  17. Discovery of a novel compound with anti-venezuelan equine encephalitis virus activity that targets the nonstructural protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dong-Hoon; Jonsson, Colleen B; Tower, Nichole A; Chu, Yong-Kyu; Sahin, Ergin; Golden, Jennifer E; Noah, James W; Schroeder, Chad E; Sotsky, Julie B; Sosa, Melinda I; Cramer, Daniel E; McKellip, Sara N; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Schmaljohn, Connie S; Julander, Justin G; Smith, Jeffrey M; Filone, Claire Marie; Connor, John H; Sakurai, Yasuteru; Davey, Robert A

    2014-06-01

    Alphaviruses present serious health threats as emerging and re-emerging viruses. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), a New World alphavirus, can cause encephalitis in humans and horses, but there are no therapeutics for treatment. To date, compounds reported as anti-VEEV or anti-alphavirus inhibitors have shown moderate activity. To discover new classes of anti-VEEV inhibitors with novel viral targets, we used a high-throughput screen based on the measurement of cell protection from live VEEV TC-83-induced cytopathic effect to screen a 340,000 compound library. Of those, we identified five novel anti-VEEV compounds and chose a quinazolinone compound, CID15997213 (IC50 = 0.84 µM), for further characterization. The antiviral effect of CID15997213 was alphavirus-specific, inhibiting VEEV and Western equine encephalitis virus, but not Eastern equine encephalitis virus. In vitro assays confirmed inhibition of viral RNA, protein, and progeny synthesis. No antiviral activity was detected against a select group of RNA viruses. We found mutations conferring the resistance to the compound in the N-terminal domain of nsP2 and confirmed the target residues using a reverse genetic approach. Time of addition studies showed that the compound inhibits the middle stage of replication when viral genome replication is most active. In mice, the compound showed complete protection from lethal VEEV disease at 50 mg/kg/day. Collectively, these results reveal a potent anti-VEEV compound that uniquely targets the viral nsP2 N-terminal domain. While the function of nsP2 has yet to be characterized, our studies suggest that the protein might play a critical role in viral replication, and further, may represent an innovative opportunity to develop therapeutic interventions for alphavirus infection.

  18. Yellow fever vaccination elicits broad functional CD4+ T cell responses that recognize structural and nonstructural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Eddie A; LaFond, Rebecca E; Gates, Theresa J; Mai, Duy T; Malhotra, Uma; Kwok, William W

    2013-12-01

    Yellow fever virus (YFV) can induce acute, life-threatening disease that is a significant health burden in areas where yellow fever is endemic, but it is preventable through vaccination. The live attenuated 17D YFV strain induces responses characterized by neutralizing antibodies and strong T cell responses. This vaccine provides an excellent model for studying human immunity. While several studies have characterized YFV-specific antibody and CD8(+) T cell responses, less is known about YFV-specific CD4(+) T cells. Here we characterize the epitope specificity, functional attributes, and dynamics of YFV-specific T cell responses in vaccinated subjects by investigating peripheral blood mononuclear cells by using HLA-DR tetramers. A total of 112 epitopes restricted by seven common HLA-DRB1 alleles were identified. Epitopes were present within all YFV proteins, but the capsid, envelope, NS2a, and NS3 proteins had the highest epitope density. Antibody blocking demonstrated that the majority of YFV-specific T cells were HLA-DR restricted. Therefore, CD4(+) T cell responses could be effectively characterized with HLA-DR tetramers. Ex vivo tetramer analysis revealed that YFV-specific T cells persisted at frequencies ranging from 0 to 100 cells per million that are detectable years after vaccination. Longitudinal analysis indicated that YFV-specific CD4(+) T cells reached peak frequencies, often exceeding 250 cells per million, approximately 2 weeks after vaccination. As frequencies subsequently declined, YFV-specific cells regained CCR7 expression, indicating a shift from effector to central memory. Cells were typically CXCR3 positive, suggesting Th1 polarization, and produced gamma interferon and other cytokines after reactivation in vitro. Therefore, YFV elicits robust early effector CD4(+) T cell responses that contract, forming a detectable memory population.

  19. Expression and stability of foreign epitopes introduced into 3A nonstructural protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinghua Li

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV is an aphthovirus that belongs to the Picornaviridae family and causes one of the most important animal diseases worldwide. The capacity of other picornaviruses to express foreign antigens has been extensively reported, however, little is known about FMDV. To explore the potential of FMDV as a viral vector, an 11-amino-acid (aa HSV epitope and an 8 aa FLAG epitope were introduced into the C-terminal different regions of 3A protein of FMDV full-length infectious cDNA clone. Recombinant viruses expressing the HSV or FLAG epitope were successfully rescued after transfection of both modified constructs. Immunofluorescence assay, Western blot and sequence analysis showed that the recombinant viruses stably maintained the foreign epitopes even after 11 serial passages in BHK-21 cells. The 3A-tagged viruses shared similar plaque phenotypes and replication kinetics to those of the parental virus. In addition, mice experimentally infected with the epitope-tagged viruses could induce tag-specific antibodies. Our results demonstrate that FMDV can be used effectively as a viral vector for the delivery of foreign tags.

  20. Development of a multiplex Luminex assay for detecting swine antibodies to structural and nonstructural proteins of foot-and-mouth disease virus in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsu-Han; Lee, Fan; Lin, Yeou-Liang; Pan, Chu-Hsiang; Shih, Chia-Ni; Tseng, Chun-Hsien; Tsai, Hsiang-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and swine vesicular disease (SVD) are serious vesicular diseases that have devastated swine populations throughout the world. The aim of this study was to develop a multianalyte profiling (xMAP) Luminex assay for the differential detection of antibodies to the FMD virus of structural proteins (SP) and nonstructural proteins (NSP). After the xMAP was optimized, it detected antibodies to SP-VP1 and NSP-3ABC of the FMD virus in a single serum sample. These tests were also compared with 3ABC polypeptide blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and virus neutralization test (VNT) methods for the differential diagnosis and assessment of immune status, respectively. To detect SP antibodies in 661 sera from infected naïve pigs and vaccinated pigs, the diagnostic sensitivity (DSn) and diagnostic specificity (DSp) of the xMAP were 90.0-98.7% and 93.0-96.5%, respectively. To detect NSP antibodies, the DSn was 90% and the DSp ranged from 93.3% to 99.1%. The xMAP can detect the immune response to SP and NSP as early as 4 days postinfection and 8 days postinfection, respectively. Furthermore, the SP and NSP antibodies in all 15 vaccinated but unprotected pigs were detected by xMAP. A comparison of SP and NSP antibodies detected in the sera of the infected samples indicated that the results from the xMAP had a high positive correlation with results from the VNT and a 3ABC polypeptide blocking ELISA assay. However, simultaneous quantitation detected that xMAP had no relationship with the VNT. Furthermore, the specificity was 93.3-94.9% with 3ABC polypeptide blocking ELISA for the FMDV-NSP antibody. The results indicated that xMAP has the potential to detect antibodies to FMDV-SP-VP1 and NSP-3ABC and to distinguish FMDV-infected pigs from pigs infected with the swine vesicular disease virus. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Comparison of time to PRRSv-stability and production losses between two exposure programs to control PRRSv in sow herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhares, D C L; Cano, J P; Torremorell, M; Morrison, R B

    2014-09-01

    To control and eliminate porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) from breeding herds, some veterinarians adopt a strategy called load-close-expose which consists of interrupting replacement pig introduction for several months and exposing the pigs to a replicating PRRSv. This was a prospective quasi-experiment that followed 61 breeding herds acutely infected with PRRSv that adopted one of two exposure programs: modified-live virus (MLV) vaccine or live-resident virus inoculation (LVI). Treatment groups (load-close-expose with MLV or LVI) were compared for: (a) time-to-PRRSv stability (TTS), defined as time in weeks it took to produce PRRSv negative pigs at weaning; (b) the time-to-baseline production (TTBP), defined using statistical process control methods to represent time to recover to the number of pigs weaned per week that herds had prior to PRRSv-detection; and (c) the total production loss in terms of number of pigs weaned per week. TTS and TTBP were compared between treatments using survival analysis. Day 1 of the program was considered to be the day that treatment was administered. Sampling at herds consisted of bleeding 30 due-to-wean piglets on a monthly basis. Serum was tested for PRRSv RNA by RT-PCR. Herds in which PRRSv was not detected over a 90-day period were classified as reaching stability. Multivariate analysis using proportional hazards regression was performed adjusting the effect of treatment on TTBP and TTS to 'severity of PRRSv infection', 'number of whole-herd exposures', 'days from PRRSv-detection to intervention', 'prior PRRSv-infection status' and 'veterinary clinic associated with the herd'. Total loss was compared between groups using multivariate regression analysis adjusted by selected covariates. The median TTS among participating herds was 26.6 weeks (25th to 75th percentile, 21.6-33.0 weeks). The overall TTBP was 16.5 weeks (range 0-29 weeks). The magnitude of production losses following whole-herd exposure

  2. Differentiation of foot-and-mouth disease virus-infected from vaccinated pigs by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using nonstructural protein 3AB as the antigen and application to an eradication program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Wen Bin; Sørensen, Karl Johan; Liao, Pei Chih

    2002-01-01

    Baculovirus-expressed foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) nonstructural protein 3AB was used as the antigen in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This assay allowed the differentiation of vaccinated from infected pigs. Serial studies were performed using sera collected from pigs in the field....... Positive reactions were found in sera from fattening pigs and sows 16 weeks and 3.5 years postoutbreak, respectively. There was, however, no positive reaction in sows with at least 10 vaccinations. Maternally derived antibodies to the 3AB antigen persisted in piglets up to 13 weeks of age. A high...

  3. Antibody response and maternal immunity upon boosting PRRSV-immune sows with experimental farm-specific and commercial PRRSV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldhof, Marc F; Van Breedam, Wander; De Jong, Ellen; Lopez Rodriguez, Alfonso; Karniychuk, Uladzimir U; Vanhee, Merijn; Van Doorsselaere, Jan; Maes, Dominiek; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2013-12-27

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes reproductive failure in sows and respiratory disease in pigs of all ages. Despite the frequent use of vaccines to maintain PRRSV immunity in sows, little is known on how the currently used vaccines affect the immunity against currently circulating and genetically divergent PRRSV variants in PRRSV-immune sows, i.e. sows that have a pre-existing PRRSV-specific immunity due to previous infection with or vaccination against the virus. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the capacity of commercially available attenuated/inactivated PRRSV vaccines and autogenous inactivated PRRSV vaccines - prepared according to a previously optimized in-house protocol - to boost the antibody immunity against currently circulating PRRSV variants in PRRSV-immune sows. PRRSV isolates were obtained from 3 different swine herds experiencing PRRSV-related problems, despite regular vaccination of gilts and sows against the virus. In a first part of the study, the PRRSV-specific antibody response upon booster vaccination with commercial PRRSV vaccines and inactivated farm-specific PRRSV vaccines was evaluated in PRRSV-immune, non-pregnant replacement sows from the 3 herds. A boost in virus-neutralizing antibodies against the farm-specific isolate was observed in all sow groups vaccinated with the corresponding farm-specific inactivated vaccines. Use of the commercial attenuated EU type vaccine boosted neutralizing antibodies against the farm-specific isolate in sows derived from 2 farms, while use of the commercial attenuated NA type vaccine did not boost farm-specific virus-neutralizing antibodies in any of the sow groups. Interestingly, the commercial inactivated EU type vaccine boosted farm-specific virus-neutralizing antibodies in sows from 1 farm. In the second part of the study, a field trial was performed at one of the farms to evaluate the booster effect of an inactivated farm-specific vaccine and a commercial

  4. Noroviruses Co-opt the Function of Host Proteins VAPA and VAPB for Replication via a Phenylalanine–Phenylalanine-Acidic-Tract-Motif Mimic in Nonstructural Viral Protein NS1/2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broc T. McCune

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Norovirus genus contains important human pathogens, but the role of host pathways in norovirus replication is largely unknown. Murine noroviruses provide the opportunity to study norovirus replication in cell culture and in small animals. The human norovirus nonstructural protein NS1/2 interacts with the host protein VAMP-associated protein A (VAPA, but the significance of the NS1/2-VAPA interaction is unexplored. Here we report decreased murine norovirus replication in VAPA- and VAPB-deficient cells. We characterized the role of VAPA in detail. VAPA was required for the efficiency of a step(s in the viral replication cycle after entry of viral RNA into the cytoplasm but before the synthesis of viral minus-sense RNA. The interaction of VAPA with viral NS1/2 proteins is conserved between murine and human noroviruses. Murine norovirus NS1/2 directly bound the major sperm protein (MSP domain of VAPA through its NS1 domain. Mutations within NS1 that disrupted interaction with VAPA inhibited viral replication. Structural analysis revealed that the viral NS1 domain contains a mimic of the phenylalanine–phenylalanine-acidic-tract (FFAT motif that enables host proteins to bind to the VAPA MSP domain. The NS1/2-FFAT mimic region interacted with the VAPA-MSP domain in a manner similar to that seen with bona fide host FFAT motifs. Amino acids in the FFAT mimic region of the NS1 domain that are important for viral replication are highly conserved across murine norovirus strains. Thus, VAPA interaction with a norovirus protein that functionally mimics host FFAT motifs is important for murine norovirus replication.

  5. Production of recombinant non-structural protein-3 hydrophobic domain deletion (NS3ΔHD) protein of bluetongue virus from prokaryotic expression system as an efficient diagnostic reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Nihar Nalini; Chacko, Nirmal; Biswas, Sanchay Kumar; Chand, Karam; Pandey, Awadh Bihari; Mondal, Bimalendu; Hemadri, Divakar; Shivachandra, Sathish Bhadravati

    2016-09-01

    Serological diagnostics for bluetongue (BT), which is an infectious, non-contagious and arthropod-borne virus disease of ruminants, are primarily dependent on availability of high quality native or recombinant antigen(s) based on either structural/non-structural proteins in sufficient quantity. Non-structural proteins (NS1-NS4) of BT virus are presumed candidate antigens in development of DIVA diagnostics. In the present study, NS3 fusion gene encoding for NS3 protein containing the N- and C-termini with a deletion of two hydrophobic domains (118A to S141 aa and 162S to A182 aa) and intervening variable central domain (142D to K161 aa) of bluetongue virus 23 was constructed, cloned and over-expressed using prokaryotic expression system. The recombinant NS3ΔHD fusion protein (∼38 kDa) including hexa-histidine tag on its both termini was found to be non-cytotoxic to recombinant Escherichia coli cells and purified by affinity chromatography. The purified rNS3ΔHD fusion protein was found to efficiently detect BTV-NS3 specific antibodies in indirect-ELISA format with diagnostic sensitivity (DSn = 94.4%) and specificity (DSp = 93.9%). The study indicated the potential utility of rNS3ΔHD fusion protein as candidate diagnostic reagent in developing an indirect-ELISA for sero-surveillance of animals for BTV antibodies under DIVA strategy, wherever monovalent/polyvalent killed BT vaccine formulations devoid of NS proteins are being practiced for immunization. Copyright © 2016 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Immunity raised by recent European subtype 1 PRRSV strains allows better replication of East European subtype 3 PRRSV strain Lena than that raised by an older strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trus, Ivan; Frydas, Ilias S.; Reddy, Vishwanatha R. A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Stable spatial distribution of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRSV)-1 subtypes in Europe is accompanied by a strong population immunity induced by local PRRSV strains. In the present study, it was examined if the immunity induced by three West European subtype 1 PRRSV strains (20...

  7. Elevated Dengue Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Serum Levels and Altered Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression, Nitric Oxide, and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Production in Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Maciel Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. During dengue virus (DV infection, monocytes produce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and nitric oxide (NO which might be critical to immunopathogenesis. Since intensity of DV replication may determine clinical outcomes, it is important to know the effects of viral nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 on innate immune parameters of infected patients. The present study investigates the relationships between dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 serum levels and innate immune response (TLR4 expression and TNF-α/NO production of DV infected patients presenting different clinical outcomes. Methodology/Principal Findings. We evaluated NO, NS1 serum levels (ELISA, TNF-α production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, and TLR4 expression on CD14+ cells from 37 dengue patients and 20 healthy controls. Early in infection, increased expression of TLR4 in monocytes of patients with dengue fever (DF was detected compared to patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. Moreover, PBMCs of DHF patients showed higher NS1 and lower NO serum levels during the acute febrile phase and a reduced response to TLR4 stimulation by LPS (with a reduced TNF-α production when compared to DF patients. Conclusions/Significance. During DV infection in humans, some innate immune parameters change, depending on the NS1 serum levels, and phase and severity of the disease which may contribute to development of different clinical outcomes.

  8. Udvikling af antistoffer efter vaccination mod og podning med PRRSV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne Kristensen, Charlotte; Qvist Pawlowski, Mia; Thoning, Henrik

    SEGES Videncenter for Svineproduktion har undersøgt, om det er muligt at opnå den samme udvikling i antistoffer i grise, der var dobbelt-vaccineret med MLV-vaccine mod både PRRSV Type 1 og Type 2 samtidig, sammenlignet med grise, der kun havde fået den ene af vaccinerne. Ud fra forsøget kan vi...... konkludere, at det er muligt at vaccinere med begge PRRS vacciner på samme tid og opnå antistofsvar for begge typer PRRSV. Husk dog altid at give forskellige vacciner i hver sin side af nakken. Blodprøver fra grisene viste, at de havde dannet antistoffer og blev positive i ELISA-testen for PRRSV Type 1 21......-35 dage og PRRSV Type 2 6-14 dage efter vaccination. I IPT-testen testede grisene positive 6-14 dage efter vaccination. Den østeuropæiske PRRSV Type 1 subtype 2 (PRRSV Type Øst), som 1/3 af grisene blev podet med, gav ligeledes anledning til antistofudvikling, der kunne måles i både ELISA-EU og ELISA...

  9. Recombinant foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) non-structural protein 3A fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as a candidate probe to identify FMDV-infected cattle in serosurveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotufo, Cecilia M; Bergmann, Ingrid E; Mattion, Nora M; Wilda, Maximiliano; Grigera, Pablo R

    2017-08-01

    Recombinant protein 3A-EGFP, a fusion construct between foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) non-structural protein 3A and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was expressed in BL21-DE3 cells. The identity of the partially purified protein 3A-EGFP was confirmed by its reactivity with sera from cattle infected with FMDV and with a monoclonal antibody specific for FMDV-3ABC (MAb3H7) in Western blot assays. No reactivity was observed with sera from uninfected vaccinated animals. The performance of 3A-EGFP as an antigen in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was assessed and compared with that of a previously developed and validated capture ELISA that uses a 3ABC recombinant antigen (3ABC ELISA) and has been widely applied for serological surveys in Argentina. Parallel analysis of strongly and weakly positive reference sera from infected animals and 329 serum samples from uninfected vaccinated cattle showed that the 3A-EGFP antigen unequivocally identifies sera from FMDV-infected cattle with similar performance to its 3ABC counterpart. The 3A-EGFP ELISA is simpler and faster to perform than the 3ABC ELISA, since it does not require a capture step with a specific antibody. Moreover, the expression and storage of the recombinant 3A-EGFP is simplified by the absence of residual autoproteolytic activity associated to the 3C sequence. We conclude that the 3A-EGFP ELISA constitutes a promising screening method in serosurveys to determine whether or not animals are infected with FMDV.

  10. Precision engineering for PRRSV resistance in pigs: Macrophages from genome edited pigs lacking CD163 SRCR5 domain are fully resistant to both PRRSV genotypes while maintaining biological function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Burkard

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS is a panzootic infectious disease of pigs, causing major economic losses to the world-wide pig industry. PRRS manifests differently in pigs of all ages but primarily causes late-term abortions and stillbirths in sows and respiratory disease in piglets. The causative agent of the disease is the positive-strand RNA PRRS virus (PRRSV. PRRSV has a narrow host cell tropism, limited to cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. CD163 has been described as a fusion receptor for PRRSV, whereby the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain 5 (SRCR5 region was shown to be an interaction site for the virus in vitro. CD163 is expressed at high levels on the surface of macrophages, particularly in the respiratory system. Here we describe the application of CRISPR/Cas9 to pig zygotes, resulting in the generation of pigs with a deletion of Exon 7 of the CD163 gene, encoding SRCR5. Deletion of SRCR5 showed no adverse effects in pigs maintained under standard husbandry conditions with normal growth rates and complete blood counts observed. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs and peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs were isolated from the animals and assessed in vitro. Both PAMs and macrophages obtained from PBMCs by CSF1 stimulation (PMMs show the characteristic differentiation and cell surface marker expression of macrophages of the respective origin. Expression and correct folding of the SRCR5 deletion CD163 on the surface of macrophages and biological activity of the protein as hemoglobin-haptoglobin scavenger was confirmed. Challenge of both PAMs and PMMs with PRRSV genotype 1, subtypes 1, 2, and 3 and PMMs with PRRSV genotype 2 showed complete resistance to viral infections assessed by replication. Confocal microscopy revealed the absence of replication structures in the SRCR5 CD163 deletion macrophages, indicating an inhibition of infection prior to gene expression, i.e. at entry/fusion or unpacking stages.

  11. Pathogenesis of European subtype3 and subtype 1 PRRSV strains in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weesendorp, E.; Stockhofe, N.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) results often in limited protection. Understanding host immune responses and pathogenesis elicited by different PRRSV strains could help to develop more efficacious vaccines. Differences in host response between the

  12. Tula hantavirus isolate with the full-length ORF for nonstructural protein NSs survives for more consequent passages in interferon-competent cells than the isolate having truncated NSs ORF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundkvist Åke

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The competitiveness of two Tula hantavirus (TULV isolates, TULV/Lodz and TULV/Moravia, was evaluated in interferon (IFN -competent and IFN-deficient cells. The two isolates differ in the length of the open reading frame (ORF encoding the nonstructural protein NSs, which has previously been shown to inhibit IFN response in infected cells. Results In IFN-deficient Vero E6 cells both TULV isolates survived equally well. In contrast, in IFN-competent MRC5 cells TULV/Lodz isolate, that possesses the NSs ORF for the full-length protein of 90 aa, survived for more consequent passages than TULV/Moravia isolate, which contains the ORF for truncated NSs protein (66–67 aa. Conclusion Our data show that expression of a full-length NSs protein is beneficial for the virus survival and competitiveness in IFN-competent cells and not essential in IFN-deficient cells. These results suggest that the N-terminal aa residues are important for the full activity of the NSs protein.

  13. Tula hantavirus isolate with the full-length ORF for nonstructural protein NSs survives for more consequent passages in interferon-competent cells than the isolate having truncated NSs ORF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Kirsi M; Plyusnina, Angelina; Lundkvist, Åke; Vaheri, Antti; Plyusnin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Background The competitiveness of two Tula hantavirus (TULV) isolates, TULV/Lodz and TULV/Moravia, was evaluated in interferon (IFN) -competent and IFN-deficient cells. The two isolates differ in the length of the open reading frame (ORF) encoding the nonstructural protein NSs, which has previously been shown to inhibit IFN response in infected cells. Results In IFN-deficient Vero E6 cells both TULV isolates survived equally well. In contrast, in IFN-competent MRC5 cells TULV/Lodz isolate, that possesses the NSs ORF for the full-length protein of 90 aa, survived for more consequent passages than TULV/Moravia isolate, which contains the ORF for truncated NSs protein (66–67 aa). Conclusion Our data show that expression of a full-length NSs protein is beneficial for the virus survival and competitiveness in IFN-competent cells and not essential in IFN-deficient cells. These results suggest that the N-terminal aa residues are important for the full activity of the NSs protein. PMID:18190677

  14. Challenges for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccinology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimman, T.G.; Cornelissen, A.H.M.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Rebel, J.M.J.; Stockhofe, N.

    2009-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) continues to be a threat for the pig industry. Vaccines have been developed, but these failed to provide sustainable disease control, in particular against genetically unrelated strains. Here we give an overview of current knowledge and

  15. Differentiation of infection from vaccination in foot-and-mouth disease by the detection of antibodies to the non-structural proteins 3D, 3AB and 3ABC in ELISA using antigens expressed in baculovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.J.; Madsen, K.G.; Madsen, E.S.

    1998-01-01

    a positive result in both the 3AB and the 3ABC ELISA's. Two cattle that had been both vaccinated and infected also gave, positive results in both tests, suggesting that the 3AB and 3ABC ELISA's, but not the 3D ELISA might represent a reliable means of detecting infection in a vaccinated population.......The baculovirus expression system was found to be efficient at expressing the 3D, the 3AB and the 3ABC non-structural proteins (NSP) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) as antigens recognised by immune sera in ELISA. ELISA's using 3D, 3AB and 3ABC detected antibodies from day 8 and 10 after...... experimental infection of susceptible cattle and sheep and cattle remained seropositive for more than 395 days. The ELISA's detected antibodies against any of the seven serotypes of FMDV. The 3D ELISA was specific and precise and as sensitive as established ELISA's which measure antibody to structural proteins...

  16. Development of a Blocking ELISA Using a Monoclonal Antibody to a Dominant Epitope in Non-Structural Protein 3A of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus, as a Matching Test for a Negative-Marker Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuanfang; Li, Pinghua; Cao, Yimei; Wang, Na; Sun, Pu; Shi, Qian; Ji, Xincheng; Bao, Huifang; Li, Dong; Chen, Yingli; Bai, Xingwen; Ma, Xueqing; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Zengjun; Liu, Zaixin

    2017-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a devastating animal disease. Strategies for differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) remain very important for controlling disease. Development of an epitope-deleted marker vaccine and accompanying diagnostic method will improve the efficiency of DIVA. Here, a monoclonal antibody (Mab) was found to recognize a conserved "AEKNPLE" epitope spanning amino acids 109-115 of non-structural protein (NSP) 3A of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV; O/Tibet/CHA/99 strain), which could be deleted by a reverse-genetic procedure. In addition, a blocking ELISA was developed based on this Mab against NSP 3A, which could serve as a matching test for a negative-marker vaccine. The criterion of this blocking ELISA was determined by detecting panels of sera from different origins. The serum samples with a percentage inhibition (PI) equal or greater than 50% were considered to be from infected animals, and those with <50% PI were considered to be from non-infected animals. This test showed similar performance when compared with other 2 blocking ELISAs based on an anti-NSP 3B Mab. This is the first report of the DIVA test for an NSP antibody based on an Mab against the conserved and predominant "AEKNPLE" epitope in NSP 3A of FMDV.

  17. Detection of PRRSV in 218 field samples using six molecular methods: What we are looking for?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toplak, Ivan; Štukelj, Marina; Gracieux, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and the specificity of six molecular methods used for the detection of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Methods 218 field samples (serum, tissues) were collected between 2009 and 2011 from 50 PRRSV p......-time) Continuesly follow the genetic evaluation of especially Type I PRRSV subtype viruses and regularly update their primer sequences....

  18. Engineering a CTL-Tailored Replicon RNA Vaccine against PRRSV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Simon; Werder, Simea; Nielsen, Morten

    The development of vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been hampered by the high mutation rate and the multiple immunoevasive strategies of the virus. With the overall aim of designing a broad coverage vaccine that induces an effective CTL response...... detection in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor. Finally, a vaccination-challenge experiment using 18 SLA-matched pigs is currently being conducted until July 2016 in which a test group and a control group are being vaccinated twice with VRPs expressing PRRSV epitopes and non-sense control epitopes...... will be available for IVIS. This study exemplifies how bioinformatics epitope prediction, recombinant SLA molecules and RNA virus replicon design can be used to engineer a replicating non-propagating vaccine tailored to deliver conserved and immunogenic CTL epitopes....

  19. Construction and prokaryotic expression of the fusion gene PRRSV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl4

    2013-07-24

    Jul 24, 2013 ... pathology mechanisms of autoimmune diseases (Koets et al., 1999; Wong, 1999; Atay et al., 2009; ... Amplification of target gene PRRSV GP5 and construction of. pMD18-GP5 plasmid. Virus RNA was ... Construction of fusion expressed plasmid pET32-GP5-Hsp70. pMD18-GP5 and pET-32(α+) plasmids ...

  20. A brief review of microRNA and its role in PRRSV infection and replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuekun GUO,Wenhai FENG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV, a single-stranded RNA virus, mainly infects cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Recently, host microRNAs were shown to be capable of modulating PRRSV infection and replication by multiple ways such as targeting viral genomic RNA, targeting viral receptor and inducing antiviral response. MicroRNAs are small RNAs and have emerged as important regulators of virus-host cell interactions. In this review, we discuss the identified functions of host microRNAs in relation to PRRSV infection and propose that cellular microRNAs may have a substantial effect on cell or tissue tropism of PRRSV.

  1. Expression of the rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV non-structural protein 3 (NS3 in Escherichia coli and its in situ localization in RHBV-infected rice tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Muñoz

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The non-structural NS3 protein gene from the rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV was fused to the glutathione- S-transferase carboxilic end and expressed in Escherichia coli strain JM83. Large quantities of fusion protein were produced in insoluble form. The fusion protein was fractionated in SDS-PAGE and purified by electroelution, polyclonal antibodies were raised in rabbit and the antiserum was absorbed with bacterial crude extract. A band of similar size as that of NS3 protein was observed in Western blots using extracts from RHBV-infected rice plants. Immunoelectron microscopy with colloidal gold-labeled antibodies against NS3 protein and the viral nucleocapsid protein revealed in situ accumulation of NS3 protein in the cytoplasm but not in the viral inclusion bodies, vacuoles or chloroplasts of RHBV-infected plants, following the same pattern of distribution as the RHBV nucleocapsid protein. Rev. Biol. Trop. 52(3: 765-775. Epub 2004 Dic 15.El gen que codifica por la proteína no estructural NS3 del virus de la hoja blanca de arroz (RHBV se fusionó al extremo carboxilo del gen de la glutationa-S-transferasa y se expresó en la cepa JM83 de Escherichia coli. Se obtuvieron altas concentraciones de la proteína de fusion (GST-NS3 en forma insoluble. La proteína de fusión se fraccionó en geles de SDS-PAGE, se purificó por electroelución, y se utilizó para producir anticuerpos policlonales en conejo . El antisuero producido se absorbió con extractos crudos de E. coli. Extractos crudos de plantas de arroz sanas e infectadas con el RHBV se evaluaron por Western blots detectándose una banda de peso molecular similar al estimado para la proteína NS3 (23KDa en las plantas infectadas con el virus. Los tejidos provenientes de plantas infectadas con el RHBV se analizaron por medio de microscopia inmunoelectrónica con oro colloidal marcado con anticuerpos contra la proteína NS3 y la nucleoproteína viral N. Se observó una acumulación in situ de la

  2. Cross-protection of a new type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) modified live vaccine (Fostera PRRS) against heterologous type 1 PRRSV challenge in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changhoon; Choi, Kyuhyung; Jeong, Jiwoon; Chae, Chanhee

    2015-05-15

    The objective of the present study was to determine the cross-protection of a new type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) modified live vaccine against heterologous type 1 PRRSV challenge in growing pigs. The mean rectal temperature and respiratory score was significantly (Pprotection of a new type 2 PRRSV modified live vaccine against heterologous type 1 PRRSV challenge in growing pigs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nonstructural carbon in woody plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Michael C; Sala, Anna; Carbone, Mariah S; Czimczik, Claudia I; Mantooth, Joshua A; Richardson, Andrew D; Vargas, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Nonstructural carbon (NSC) provides the carbon and energy for plant growth and survival. In woody plants, fundamental questions about NSC remain unresolved: Is NSC storage an active or passive process? Do older NSC reserves remain accessible to the plant? How is NSC depletion related to mortality risk? Herein we review conceptual and mathematical models of NSC dynamics, recent observations and experiments at the organismal scale, and advances in plant physiology that have provided a better understanding of the dynamics of woody plant NSC. Plants preferentially use new carbon but can access decade-old carbon when the plant is stressed or physically damaged. In addition to serving as a carbon and energy source, NSC plays important roles in phloem transport, osmoregulation, and cold tolerance, but how plants regulate these competing roles and NSC depletion remains elusive. Moving forward requires greater synthesis of models and data and integration across scales from -omics to ecology.

  4. The C-terminal region of the non-structural protein 2B from Hepatitis A Virus demonstrates lipid-specific viroporin-like activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Ashutosh; Dey, Debajit; Banerjee, Kamalika; Nain, Anshu; Banerjee, Manidipa

    2015-10-01

    Viroporins are virally encoded, membrane-active proteins, which enhance viral replication and assist in egress of viruses from host cells. The 2B proteins in the picornaviridae family are known to have viroporin-like properties, and play critical roles during virus replication. The 2B protein of Hepatitis A Virus (2B), an unusual picornavirus, is somewhat dissimilar from its analogues in several respects. HAV 2B is approximately 2.5 times the length of other 2B proteins, and does not disrupt calcium homeostasis or glycoprotein trafficking. Additionally, its membrane penetrating properties are not yet clearly established. Here we show that the membrane interacting activity of HAV 2B is localized in its C-terminal region, which contains an alpha-helical hairpin motif. We show that this region is capable of forming small pores in membranes and demonstrates lipid specific activity, which partially rationalizes the intracellular localization of full-length 2B. Using a combination of biochemical assays and molecular dynamics simulation studies, we also show that HAV 2B demonstrates a marked propensity to dimerize in a crowded environment, and probably interacts with membranes in a multimeric form, a hallmark of other picornavirus viroporins. In sum, our study clearly establishes HAV 2B as a bona fide viroporin in the picornaviridae family.

  5. Pathogenicity of three genetically diverse strains of PRRSV Type 1 in specific pathogen free pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadejek, Tomasz; Larsen, Lars E; Podgórska, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Studies from Eastern European countries proved that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus Type 1 (PRRSV-1) harbours high genetic diversity and that genetically divergent subtypes 2-4 circulate in this area. In the present study, we compared the pathogenicity of two different PRRSV-1...

  6. Envelope protein requirements for the assembly of infectious virions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissink, E.H.J.; Kroese, M.V.; Wijk, van H.A.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Meulenberg, J.J.; Rottier, P.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Virions of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) contain six membrane proteins: the major proteins GP5 and M and the minor proteins GP2a, E, GP3, and GP4. Here, we studied the envelope protein requirements for PRRSV particle formation and infectivity using full-length cDNA

  7. Anti-dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 antibodies cause NO-mediated endothelial cell apoptosis via ceramide-regulated glycogen synthase kinase-3β and NF-κB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Chiou-Feng; Wan, Shu-Wen; Wei, Li-Shiung; Chen, Mei-Chun; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Anderson, Robert; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2013-08-15

    Immunopathogenetic mechanisms of dengue virus (DENV) infection are involved in hemorrhagic syndrome resulting from thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, and vasculopathy. We have proposed a mechanism of molecular mimicry in which Abs against DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) cross-react with human endothelial cells and cause NF-κB-regulated immune activation and NO-mediated apoptosis. However, the signaling pathway leading to NF-κB activation after the binding of anti-DENV NS1 Abs to endothelial cells is unresolved. In this study, we found that anti-DENV NS1 Abs caused the formation of lipid raftlike structures, and that disrupting lipid raft formation by methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased NO production and apoptosis. Treatment with anti-DENV NS1 Abs elevated ceramide generation in lipid rafts. Pharmacological inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) decreased anti-DENV NS1 Ab-mediated ceramide and NO production, as well as apoptosis. Exogenous ceramide treatment induced biogenesis of inducible NO synthase (iNOS)/NO and apoptosis through an NF-κB-regulated manner. Furthermore, activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) was required for ceramide-induced NF-κB activation and iNOS expression. Notably, anti-DENV NS1 Abs caused GSK-3β-mediated NF-κB activation and iNOS expression, which were regulated by aSMase. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3β reduced hepatic endothelial cell apoptosis in mice passively administered anti-DENV NS1 Abs. These results suggest that anti-DENV NS1 Abs bind to the endothelial cell membrane and cause NO production and apoptosis via a mechanism involving the aSMase/ceramide/GSK-3β/NF-κB/iNOS/NO signaling pathway.

  8. Shortening the unstructured, interdomain region of the non-structural protein NS1 of an avian H1N1 influenza virus increases its replication and pathogenicity in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Sascha; Soubieux, Denis; Marty, Hélène; Esnault, Evelyne; Hoffmann, Thomas W; Chandenier, Margaux; Lion, Adrien; Kut, Emmanuel; Quéré, Pascale; Larcher, Thibaut; Ledevin, Mireille; Munier, Sandie; Naffakh, Nadia; Marc, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Currently circulating H5N1 influenza viruses have undergone a complex evolution since the appearance of their progenitor A/Goose/Guangdong/1/96 in 1996. After the eradication of the H5N1 viruses that emerged in Hong Kong in 1997 (HK/97 viruses), new genotypes of H5N1 viruses emerged in the same region in 2000 that were more pathogenic for both chickens and mice than HK/97 viruses. These, as well as virtually all highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses since 2000, harbour a deletion of aa 80-84 in the unstructured region of the non-structural (NS) protein NS1 linking its RNA-binding domain to its effector domain. NS segments harbouring this mutation have since been found in non-H5N1 viruses and we asked whether this 5 aa deletion could have a general effect not limited to the NS1 of H5N1 viruses. We genetically engineered this deletion in the NS segment of a duck-origin avian H1N1 virus, and compared the in vivo and in vitro properties of the WT and NSdel8084 viruses. In experimentally infected chickens, the NSdel8084 virus showed both an increased replication potential and an increased pathogenicity. This in vivo phenotype was correlated with a higher replicative efficiency in vitro, both in embryonated eggs and in a chicken lung epithelial cell line. Our data demonstrated that the increased replicative potential conferred by this small deletion was a general feature not restricted to NS1 from H5N1 viruses and suggested that viruses acquiring this mutation may be selected positively in the future. © 2014 The Authors.

  9. Equine Arteritis Virus Does Not Induce Interferon Production in Equine Endothelial Cells: Identification of Nonstructural Protein 1 as a Main Interferon Antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Young Go

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of equine arteritis virus (EAV on type I interferon (IFN production. Equine endothelial cells (EECs were infected with the virulent Bucyrus strain (VBS of EAV and expression of IFN-β was measured at mRNA and protein levels by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and IFN bioassay using vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the green fluorescence protein (VSV-GFP, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that IFN-β mRNA levels in EECs infected with EAV VBS were not increased compared to those in mock-infected cells. Consistent with quantitative RT-PCR, Sendai virus- (SeV- induced type I IFN production was inhibited by EAV infection. Using an IFN-β promoter-luciferase reporter assay, we subsequently demonstrated that EAV nsps 1, 2, and 11 had the capability to inhibit type I IFN activation. Of these three nsps, nsp1 exhibited the strongest inhibitory effect. Taken together, these data demonstrate that EAV has the ability to suppress the type I IFN production in EECs and nsp1 may play a critical role to subvert the equine innate immune response.

  10. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus neutralizing antibodies provide in vivo cross-protection to PRRSV1 and PRRSV2 viral challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sally R; Rahe, Michael C; Gray, Diem K; Martins, Kyra V; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2018-02-03

    Vaccine control and prevention of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), the most important disease of swine, is difficult to achieve. However, the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibody activity against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) under typical field conditions opens the door to new immunologic approaches for robust protection. We show here that passive administration of purified immunoglobulins with neutralizing antibodies reduced PRRSV2 infection by up to 96%, and PRRSV1 infection by up to 87%, whereas immune immunoglobulins lacking neutralizing activity had no effect on viral infection. Hence, immune competence of passive immunoglobulin transfer was associated specifically with antibody neutralizing activity. Current models of PRRSV infection implicate a minor envelope glycoprotein (GP) complex including GP2, GP3, and GP4, as critical to permissive cell infection. However, conserved peptides comprising the putative cell attachment structure did not attenuate neutralization or viral infection. The results show that immunological approaches aimed at induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies may substantially enhance immune protection against PRRSV. The findings further show that naturally occurring viral isolates are able to induce protective humoral immunity against unrelated PRRSV challenge, thus removing a major conceptual barrier to vaccine development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Carbon Monoxide Inhibits Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Replication by the Cyclic GMP/Protein Kinase G and NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Angke; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Na; Duan, Hong; Liu, Hongliang; Pu, Fengxing; Zhang, Gaiping; Zhou, En-Min; Xiao, Shuqi

    2017-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes significant economic losses to the pork industry worldwide each year. Our previous research demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) can suppress PRRSV replication via an unknown molecular mechanism. In this study, inhibition of PRRSV replication was demonstrated to be mediated by carbon monoxide (CO), a downstream metabolite of HO-1. Using several approaches, we demonstrate that CO significantly inhibited PRRSV replication in both a PRRSV permissive cell line, MARC-145, and the predominant cell type targeted during in vivo PRRSV infection, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Our results showed that CO inhibited intercellular spread of PRRSV; however, it did not affect PRRSV entry into host cells. Furthermore, CO was found to suppress PRRSV replication via the activation of the cyclic GMP/protein kinase G (cGMP/PKG) signaling pathway. CO significantly inhibits PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation, a required step for PRRSV replication. Moreover, CO significantly reduced PRRSV-induced proinflammatory cytokine mRNA levels. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that CO exerts its anti-PRRSV effect by activating the cellular cGMP/PKG signaling pathway and by negatively regulating cellular NF-κB signaling. These findings not only provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of HO-1 inhibition of PRRSV replication but also suggest potential new control measures for future PRRSV outbreaks. PRRSV causes great economic losses each year to the swine industry worldwide. Carbon monoxide (CO), a metabolite of HO-1, has been shown to have antimicrobial and antiviral activities in infected cells. Our previous research demonstrated that HO-1 can suppress PRRSV replication. Here we show that endogenous CO produced through HO-1 catalysis mediates the antiviral effect of HO-1. CO inhibits PRRSV replication by activating the cellular cGMP/PKG signaling pathway and by negatively regulating cellular NF

  12. [The PRRSV-serumneutralization test detects gaps in herd immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Jens; Alex, Michaela; Janowetz, Britta; Müller, Silvia; Schuh, Christina; Niemeyer, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) appears in two genotypes (EU and US), for both genotypes attenuated live-vaccines are available. A cross-sectional study in 38 Bavarian sow herds was performed to assess the level of neutralizing antibodies. Per herd 38 blood samples were collected (10 weaned piglets, 10 gilts and 6 sows of 1./2., 3J4. and 5/6. parity, respectively). Sera were tested by ELISA, serumneutralization test (SNT) against EU- and US-vaccine virus, and pooled sera were tested by real-time RT-PCR. Herds were classified by the last vaccination of sows as "Vacc EU" "Vacc US"and "nv (non-vaccinated) and by detection of PRRSV-US and vaccination of piglets were not included as variables. Sows of group (2) Vacc EU/EU- showed the highest EU-SNT-titers irrespective of parity. Groups (5) Vacc US/EU+ and (1) Vacc EU/EU+ followed in descending order. Significantly lower SNT-titers in (1) Vacc EU/EU+ were especially observed in sows of 1/2. Parity (Kruskal-Wallis, p immunity at least against vaccine virus; it indicates gaps in herd immunity.

  13. Synergism between porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and Salmonella choleraesuis in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, R W; Gray, J T; Fedorka-Cray, P J; Yoon, K J; Ladely, S; Zimmerman, J J

    2000-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and Salmonella choleraesuis are two leading causes of economic loss in the swine industry. While respiratory disease is common in both S. choleraesuis and PRRSV infections, the factors that contribute to its development remain largely undefined. We investigated the interaction of PRRSV, S. choleraesuis, and stress in 5-week-old swine. All combinations of three factors (inoculation with S. choleraesuis on Day 0, PRRSV on Day 3, and treatment with dexamethasone on Days 3-7) were used to produce eight treatment groups in two independent trials. Fecal samples, tonsil and nasal swabs, serum samples and postmortem tissues were collected for bacteriologic and virologic examinations. No clinical signs were observed in pigs inoculated with only PRRSV or only S. choleraesuis. In contrast, pigs which were dually infected with S. choleraesuis and PRRSV exhibited unthriftiness, rough hair coats, dyspnea, and diarrhea. The pigs which received all three treatment factors were the most severely affected and 43% (three of seven) of the animals in this group died. Individuals in this group shed significantly higher quantities of S. choleraesuis in feces and had significantly higher serum PRRSV titers compared to other treatments (p syndrome similar to that observed in the field.

  14. Evaluation of protective immunity in gilts inoculated with the NADC-8 isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and challenge-exposed with an antigenically distinct PRRSV isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lager, K M; Mengeling, W L; Brockmeier, S L

    1999-08-01

    To determine whether intrauterine inoculation of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) interferes with conception and whether exposure to one strain of PRRSV provides protection against challenge-exposure (CE) with homologous or heterologous strains of PRRSV. 40 gilts. Gilts were inoculated by intrauterine administration of a PRRSV isolate (NADC-8) at breeding. Inoculated and noninoculated gilts were exposed oronasally to homologous (NADC-8) or heterologous (European isolate) PRRSV during late gestation. Specimens from gilts and fetuses were tested against CE virus. Lack of virus in gilts indicated protective immunity for the dam, in fetuses indicated protection of gilt from reproductive losses, and in both groups indicated complete protection. In the homologous CE group, interval from inoculation to CE ranged from 90 to 205 days, and protection was complete. In the heterologous CE group, interval from inoculation to CE ranged from 90 to 170 days, and protection was incomplete. The CE virus was detected in gilts necropsied 134 to 170 days after CE and in a litter necropsied 170 days after CE. Homologous protection can be induced in gilts by exposure to live PRRSV. Heterologous protection from reproductive losses can be induced in gilts by exposure to live PRRSV; however, this protection is incomplete and may have a shorter duration than homologous protection. Exposure of swine to enzootic PRRSV will provide protection against homologous PRRSV-induced reproductive losses. Extent and duration of protection against heterologous PRRSV may be variable and dependent on antigenic relatedness of the virus strains used for inoculation and CE.

  15. Hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) can enhance the immune responses of swine immunized with killed PRRSV vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Zhihong [State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); China Institute of Veterinary Drug Control, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Quan [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Wang, Zaishi [China Institute of Veterinary Drug Control, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Zhongqiu [State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Veterinary Bureau, Ministry of Agriculture of the People' s Republic of China, Beijing 100125 (China); Guo, Pengju [Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangdong 510640 (China); Zhao, Deming, E-mail: zhaodm@cau.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the immunoadjuvant effects of HVJ-E on killed PRRSV vaccine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HVJ-E enhanced the humoral and cellular responses of the piglets to PRRSV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is suggested that HVJ-E could be developed as a new-type adjuvant for mammals. -- Abstract: Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an economically detrimental pig pathogen that causes significant losses for the pig industry. The immunostimulatory effects of hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) in cancer therapy and the adjuvant efficacy of HVJ-E have been previously evaluated. The objective of this study was to investigate the adjuvant effects of HVJ-E on immunization with killed PRRSV vaccine, and to evaluate the protective effects of this immunization strategy against virulent PRRSV infection in piglets. Next, the PRRSV-specific antibody response, lymphocyte proliferation, PRRSV-specific IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-{gamma} production, and the overall protection efficacy were evaluated to assess the immune responses of the piglets. The results showed that the piglets inoculated simultaneously with killed PRRSV vaccine and HVJ-E had a significantly stronger immune response than those inoculated with killed PRRSV vaccine alone. Our results suggest that HVJ-E could be employed as an effective adjuvant to enhance the humoral and cellular responses of piglets to PRRSV.

  16. A quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of PRRSV vaccination in pigs under experimental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nodelijk, G.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Leengoed, van L.A.M.G.; Wensvoort, G.; Pol, J.M.A.; Steverink, P.J.G.M.; Verheijden, J.H.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a quantitative approach to evaluate effectiveness of vaccination under experimental conditions. We used two consecutive experimental designs to investigate whether PRRSV transmission among vaccinated pigs was reduced compared to control pigs and to estimate the reproduction

  17. Epidemiological study of air filtration systems for preventing PRRSV infection in large sow herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Carmen; Murtaugh, Michael P; Dee, Scott A; Davies, Peter R

    2013-10-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the most economically significant pathogen in the US swine industry. Aerosol transmission among herds is a major concern in pig dense regions and filtration of incoming air, in combination with standard biosecurity procedures, has been demonstrated to prevent transmission of PRRSV into susceptible herds. To quantify the impact of air filtration on reducing risk of PRRSV outbreaks, we compared the incidence rate of new PRRSV introductions in 20 filtered and 17 non-filtered control sow herds in a swine dense region of North America during a 7 year study period. Events of novel virus introduction were ascertained by phylogenetic analysis of PRRSV ORF5 gene sequences. Putative new viruses were defined as exogenous (introduced) based on ORF5 nucleotide sequence differences compared to previous farm isolates. The influence of sequence difference cut-off values ranging from 2 to 10% on case definition and relative risk were evaluated. Non-filtered farms incurred about 0.5 outbreaks per year, with a seasonal increase in risk in cooler periods. Baseline risk, prior to filtration, in treatment farms was approximately 0.75 per year, approximately 50% higher than in control farms. Air filtration significantly reduced risk of PRRSV introduction events to 0.06-0.22 outbreaks per year, depending on the cut-off values used to classify a virus isolate as new to the herd. Overall, air filtration led to an approximately 80% reduction in risk of introduction of novel PRRSV, indicating that on large sow farms with good biosecurity in swine-dense regions, approximately four-fifths of PRRSV outbreaks may be attributable to aerosol transmission. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Accumulation pattern of total nonstructural carbohydrate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pattern of total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) accumulation in strawberry (Fragaria ananassa Duch.) nursery runner plants, cv. eCamarosaf, was determined for three growing seasons. Plant growth and fruit production patterns were also evaluated. The experiments were carried out on plants propagated in high ...

  19. Accumulation pattern of total nonstructural carbohydrate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Umukoro

    1977-09-09

    Sep 9, 1977 ... predominant soluble nonstructural carbohydrates in roots and crowns of strawberry plants (Bringhurst et al., 1960;. Macias-Rodriguez et al., 2002). Starch accumulation in roots is influenced by temperature; moreover, total non- structural carbohydrate (TNC) concentration in strawberry roots increases with ...

  20. Recognition of Highly Diverse Type-1 and -2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Viruses (PRRSVs by T-Lymphocytes Induced in Pigs after Experimental Infection with a Type-2 PRRSV Strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chungwon J Chung

    Full Text Available Live attenuated vaccines confer partial protection in pigs before the appearance of neutralizing antibodies, suggesting the contribution of cell-mediated immunity (CMI. However, PRRSV-specific T-lymphocyte responses and protective mechanisms need to be further defined. To this end, the hypothesis was tested that PRRSV-specific T-lymphocytes induced by exposure to type-2 PRRSV can recognize diverse isolates.An IFN-gamma ELISpot assay was used to enumerate PRRSV-specific T-lymphocytes from PRRSVSD23983-infected gilts and piglets born after in utero infection against 12 serologically and genetically distinct type-1 and -2 PRRSV isolates. The IFN-gamma ELISpot assay using synthetic peptides spanning all open reading frames of PRRSVSD23983 was utilized to localize epitopes recognized by T-lymphocytes. Virus neutralization tests were carried out using the challenge strain (type-2 PRRSVSD23983 and another strain (type-2 PRRSVVR2332 with high genetic similarity to evaluate cross-reactivity of neutralizing antibodies in gilts after PRRSVSD23983 infection.At 72 days post infection, T-lymphocytes from one of three PRRSVSD23983-infected gilts recognized all 12 diverse PRRSV isolates, while T-lymphocytes from the other two gilts recognized all but one isolate. Furthermore, five of nine 14-day-old piglets infected in utero with PRRSVSD23983 had broadly reactive T-lymphocytes, including one piglet that recognized all 12 isolates. Overlapping peptides encompassing all open reading frames of PRRSVSD23983 were used to identify ≥28 peptides with T-lymphocyte epitopes from 10 viral proteins. This included one peptide from the M protein that was recognized by T-lymphocytes from all three gilts representing two completely mismatched MHC haplotypes. In contrast to the broadly reactive T-lymphocytes, neutralizing antibody responses were specific to the infecting PRRSVSD23983 isolate.These results demonstrated that T-lymphocytes recognizing antigenically and

  1. Recognition of Highly Diverse Type-1 and -2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Viruses (PRRSVs) by T-Lymphocytes Induced in Pigs after Experimental Infection with a Type-2 PRRSV Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chungwon J; Cha, Sang-Ho; Grimm, Amanda L; Chung, Grace; Gibson, Kathleen A; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Parish, Steven M; Ho, Chak-Sum; Lee, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccines confer partial protection in pigs before the appearance of neutralizing antibodies, suggesting the contribution of cell-mediated immunity (CMI). However, PRRSV-specific T-lymphocyte responses and protective mechanisms need to be further defined. To this end, the hypothesis was tested that PRRSV-specific T-lymphocytes induced by exposure to type-2 PRRSV can recognize diverse isolates. An IFN-gamma ELISpot assay was used to enumerate PRRSV-specific T-lymphocytes from PRRSVSD23983-infected gilts and piglets born after in utero infection against 12 serologically and genetically distinct type-1 and -2 PRRSV isolates. The IFN-gamma ELISpot assay using synthetic peptides spanning all open reading frames of PRRSVSD23983 was utilized to localize epitopes recognized by T-lymphocytes. Virus neutralization tests were carried out using the challenge strain (type-2 PRRSVSD23983) and another strain (type-2 PRRSVVR2332) with high genetic similarity to evaluate cross-reactivity of neutralizing antibodies in gilts after PRRSVSD23983 infection. At 72 days post infection, T-lymphocytes from one of three PRRSVSD23983-infected gilts recognized all 12 diverse PRRSV isolates, while T-lymphocytes from the other two gilts recognized all but one isolate. Furthermore, five of nine 14-day-old piglets infected in utero with PRRSVSD23983 had broadly reactive T-lymphocytes, including one piglet that recognized all 12 isolates. Overlapping peptides encompassing all open reading frames of PRRSVSD23983 were used to identify ≥28 peptides with T-lymphocyte epitopes from 10 viral proteins. This included one peptide from the M protein that was recognized by T-lymphocytes from all three gilts representing two completely mismatched MHC haplotypes. In contrast to the broadly reactive T-lymphocytes, neutralizing antibody responses were specific to the infecting PRRSVSD23983 isolate. These results demonstrated that T-lymphocytes recognizing antigenically and genetically diverse

  2. Recognition of Highly Diverse Type-1 and -2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Viruses (PRRSVs) by T-Lymphocytes Induced in Pigs after Experimental Infection with a Type-2 PRRSV Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Sang-Ho; Grimm, Amanda L.; Chung, Grace; Gibson, Kathleen A.; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Parish, Steven M.; Ho, Chak-Sum; Lee, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim Live attenuated vaccines confer partial protection in pigs before the appearance of neutralizing antibodies, suggesting the contribution of cell-mediated immunity (CMI). However, PRRSV-specific T-lymphocyte responses and protective mechanisms need to be further defined. To this end, the hypothesis was tested that PRRSV-specific T-lymphocytes induced by exposure to type-2 PRRSV can recognize diverse isolates. Methods An IFN-gamma ELISpot assay was used to enumerate PRRSV-specific T-lymphocytes from PRRSVSD23983-infected gilts and piglets born after in utero infection against 12 serologically and genetically distinct type-1 and -2 PRRSV isolates. The IFN-gamma ELISpot assay using synthetic peptides spanning all open reading frames of PRRSVSD23983 was utilized to localize epitopes recognized by T-lymphocytes. Virus neutralization tests were carried out using the challenge strain (type-2 PRRSVSD23983) and another strain (type-2 PRRSVVR2332) with high genetic similarity to evaluate cross-reactivity of neutralizing antibodies in gilts after PRRSVSD23983 infection. Results At 72 days post infection, T-lymphocytes from one of three PRRSVSD23983-infected gilts recognized all 12 diverse PRRSV isolates, while T-lymphocytes from the other two gilts recognized all but one isolate. Furthermore, five of nine 14-day-old piglets infected in utero with PRRSVSD23983 had broadly reactive T-lymphocytes, including one piglet that recognized all 12 isolates. Overlapping peptides encompassing all open reading frames of PRRSVSD23983 were used to identify ≥28 peptides with T-lymphocyte epitopes from 10 viral proteins. This included one peptide from the M protein that was recognized by T-lymphocytes from all three gilts representing two completely mismatched MHC haplotypes. In contrast to the broadly reactive T-lymphocytes, neutralizing antibody responses were specific to the infecting PRRSVSD23983 isolate. Conclusion These results demonstrated that T-lymphocytes recognizing

  3. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infection Induces Stress Granule Formation Depending on Protein Kinase R-like Endoplasmic Reticulum Kinase (PERK) in MARC-145 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yanrong; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2017-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are sites of mRNA storage that are formed in response to various conditions of stress, including viral infections. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an Arterivirus that has been devastating the swine industry worldwide since the late 1980s. In this study, we found that infection of PRRSV strain WUH3 (genotype 2 PRRSV) induced stable formation of robust SGs in MARC-145 cells, as demonstrated by the recruitment of marker proteins of SGs, includ...

  4. Live virus immunization (LVI) with a recent 1-7-4 PRRSV isolate elicits broad protection against PRRSV challenge in finishing age swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    PRRSV infection is the most economically important disease affecting domestic swine herds in the United States and in many countries. Commercially available vaccines are often based on older viral strains and offer limited efficacy against heterologous challenge. Live virus immunization (LVI), a for...

  5. Differences in Whole Blood Gene Expression Associated with Infection Time-Course and Extent of Fetal Mortality in a Reproductive Model of Type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jamie M.; Ladinig, Andrea; Bao, Hua; Kommadath, Arun; Stothard, Paul; Lunney, Joan K.; Harding, John C. S.; Plastow, Graham S.

    2016-01-01

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) infection of pregnant females causes fetal death and increased piglet mortality, but there is substantial variation in the extent of reproductive pathology between individual dams. This study used RNA-sequencing to characterize the whole blood transcriptional response to type 2 PRRSV in pregnant gilts during the first week of infection (at 0, 2, and 6 days post-inoculation), and attempted to identify gene expression signatures associated with a low or high level of fetal mortality rates (LFM and HFM; n = 8/group) at necropsy, 21 days post-inoculation. The initial response to infection measured at 2 days post-inoculation saw an upregulation of genes involved in innate immunity, such as interferon-stimulated antiviral genes and inflammatory markers, and apoptosis. A concomitant decrease in expression of protein synthesis and T lymphocyte markers was observed. By day 6 the pattern had reversed, with a drop in innate immune signaling and an increase in the expression of genes involved in cell division and T cell signaling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with extremes of litter mortality rate were identified at all three time-points. Among the 15 DEGs upregulated in LFM gilts on all three days were several genes involved in platelet function, including integrins ITGA2B and ITGB3, and the chemokine PF4 (CXCL4). LFM gilts exhibited a higher baseline expression of interferon-stimulated and pro-inflammatory genes prior to infection, and of T cell markers two days post-infection, indicative of a more rapid progression of the immune response to PRRSV. This study has increased our knowledge of the early response to PRRSV in the blood of pregnant gilts, and could ultimately lead to the development of a biomarker panel that can be used to predict PRRSV-associated reproductive pathology. PMID:27093427

  6. Differences in Whole Blood Gene Expression Associated with Infection Time-Course and Extent of Fetal Mortality in a Reproductive Model of Type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie M Wilkinson

    Full Text Available Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV infection of pregnant females causes fetal death and increased piglet mortality, but there is substantial variation in the extent of reproductive pathology between individual dams. This study used RNA-sequencing to characterize the whole blood transcriptional response to type 2 PRRSV in pregnant gilts during the first week of infection (at 0, 2, and 6 days post-inoculation, and attempted to identify gene expression signatures associated with a low or high level of fetal mortality rates (LFM and HFM; n = 8/group at necropsy, 21 days post-inoculation. The initial response to infection measured at 2 days post-inoculation saw an upregulation of genes involved in innate immunity, such as interferon-stimulated antiviral genes and inflammatory markers, and apoptosis. A concomitant decrease in expression of protein synthesis and T lymphocyte markers was observed. By day 6 the pattern had reversed, with a drop in innate immune signaling and an increase in the expression of genes involved in cell division and T cell signaling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs associated with extremes of litter mortality rate were identified at all three time-points. Among the 15 DEGs upregulated in LFM gilts on all three days were several genes involved in platelet function, including integrins ITGA2B and ITGB3, and the chemokine PF4 (CXCL4. LFM gilts exhibited a higher baseline expression of interferon-stimulated and pro-inflammatory genes prior to infection, and of T cell markers two days post-infection, indicative of a more rapid progression of the immune response to PRRSV. This study has increased our knowledge of the early response to PRRSV in the blood of pregnant gilts, and could ultimately lead to the development of a biomarker panel that can be used to predict PRRSV-associated reproductive pathology.

  7. Differences in Whole Blood Gene Expression Associated with Infection Time-Course and Extent of Fetal Mortality in a Reproductive Model of Type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jamie M; Ladinig, Andrea; Bao, Hua; Kommadath, Arun; Stothard, Paul; Lunney, Joan K; Harding, John C S; Plastow, Graham S

    2016-01-01

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) infection of pregnant females causes fetal death and increased piglet mortality, but there is substantial variation in the extent of reproductive pathology between individual dams. This study used RNA-sequencing to characterize the whole blood transcriptional response to type 2 PRRSV in pregnant gilts during the first week of infection (at 0, 2, and 6 days post-inoculation), and attempted to identify gene expression signatures associated with a low or high level of fetal mortality rates (LFM and HFM; n = 8/group) at necropsy, 21 days post-inoculation. The initial response to infection measured at 2 days post-inoculation saw an upregulation of genes involved in innate immunity, such as interferon-stimulated antiviral genes and inflammatory markers, and apoptosis. A concomitant decrease in expression of protein synthesis and T lymphocyte markers was observed. By day 6 the pattern had reversed, with a drop in innate immune signaling and an increase in the expression of genes involved in cell division and T cell signaling. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with extremes of litter mortality rate were identified at all three time-points. Among the 15 DEGs upregulated in LFM gilts on all three days were several genes involved in platelet function, including integrins ITGA2B and ITGB3, and the chemokine PF4 (CXCL4). LFM gilts exhibited a higher baseline expression of interferon-stimulated and pro-inflammatory genes prior to infection, and of T cell markers two days post-infection, indicative of a more rapid progression of the immune response to PRRSV. This study has increased our knowledge of the early response to PRRSV in the blood of pregnant gilts, and could ultimately lead to the development of a biomarker panel that can be used to predict PRRSV-associated reproductive pathology.

  8. Deciphering transcriptome profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to PRRSV vaccination in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Aminul; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Pröll, Maren Julia; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Rony, Sharmin Aqter; Tesfaye, Dawit; Tholen, Ernst; Hölker, Michael; Schellander, Karl; Neuhoff, Christiane

    2016-08-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is one of the most economically important viral diseases affecting swine industry worldwide. Despite routine farm vaccination, effective control strategies for PRRS remained elusive which underscores the need for in-depth studies to gain insight into the host immune response to vaccines. The current study aimed to investigate transcriptional responses to PRRS Virus (PRRSV) vaccine in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) within 3 days following vaccination in German Landrace pigs. Transcriptome profiling of PBMCs from PRRSV vaccinated and age-matched unvaccinated pigs at right before (0 h), and at 6, 24 and 72 h after PRRSV vaccination was performed using the Affymetrix gene chip porcine gene 1.0 st array. Comparison of PBMCs transcriptome profiles between vaccinated and unvaccinated pigs revealed a distinct host innate immune transcriptional response to PRRSV vaccine. There was a significant temporal variation in transcriptional responses of PRRSV vaccine in PBMCs accounting 542, 2,263 and 357 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) at 6, 24 and 72 h post vaccination, respectively compared to the time point before vaccination (controls). Gene ontology analysis revealed the involvement of these DEGs in various biological process including innate immune response, signal transduction, positive regulation of MAP kinase activity, TRIF-dependent toll-like receptor signaling pathway, T cell differentiation and apoptosis. Immune response specific pathways such as cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, chemokine signaling pathway, signal transduction, JAK-STAT pathway and regulation, TRAF6 mediated induction of NF-kB and MAPK, the NLRP3 inflammasome, endocytosis and interferon signaling were under regulation during the early stage of PRRSV vaccination. Network enrichment analysis revealed APP, TRAF6, PIN1, FOS, CTNNB1, TNFAIP3, TIP1, CDKN1, SIRT1, ESR1 and HDAC5 as the highly interconnected hubs of the

  9. A fast and robust method for full genome sequencing of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) Type 1 and Type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    PRRSV is a positive-sense RNA virus with a high degree of genetic variability among isolates. For diagnostic sensitivity and vaccine design it is essential to monitor PRRSV genetic diversity. However, to date only a few full genome sequences of PRRSV isolates have been made publicly available. In...

  10. Hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) can enhance the immune responses of swine immunized with killed PRRSV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhihong; Zhang, Quan; Wang, Zaishi; Zhang, Zhongqiu; Guo, Pengju; Zhao, Deming

    2011-11-11

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an economically detrimental pig pathogen that causes significant losses for the pig industry. The immunostimulatory effects of hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) in cancer therapy and the adjuvant efficacy of HVJ-E have been previously evaluated. The objective of this study was to investigate the adjuvant effects of HVJ-E on immunization with killed PRRSV vaccine, and to evaluate the protective effects of this immunization strategy against virulent PRRSV infection in piglets. Next, the PRRSV-specific antibody response, lymphocyte proliferation, PRRSV-specific IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-γ production, and the overall protection efficacy were evaluated to assess the immune responses of the piglets. The results showed that the piglets inoculated simultaneously with killed PRRSV vaccine and HVJ-E had a significantly stronger immune response than those inoculated with killed PRRSV vaccine alone. Our results suggest that HVJ-E could be employed as an effective adjuvant to enhance the humoral and cellular responses of piglets to PRRSV. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Commercial and in-house RT-PCR methods for detection of PRRSV. Design, performance and pitfalls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane

    2012-01-01

    RT-PCR is a widely used method for detection of PRRSV, because it is a rapid, sensitive and highly specific detection tool. However, the profound diversity and rapid evolution of PRRSV genomes complicates the development of highly sensitive and robust assays. Several factors need to be taken...

  12. Demonstration of microchimerism in pregnant sows and effects of congenital PRRSV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karniychuk Uladzimir U

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The presence of foreign cells within the tissue/circulation of an individual is described as microchimerism. The main purpose of the present investigation was to study if microchimerism occurs in healthy sows/fetuses and if porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV infection influences this phenomenon. Six dams were inoculated intranasally with PRRSV and three non-inoculated dams served as controls. Male DNA was detected in female fetal sera of all dams via PCR. Male DNA was also detected in the maternal circulation. Sex-typing FISH showed the presence of male cells in the female fetal organs and vice versa. PRRSV infection did not influence microchimerism, but might misuse maternal and sibling microchimeric cells to enter fetuses.

  13. Identification of host cellular proteins that interact with the M protein of a highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Li, Yanwei; Dong, Hong; Wang, Li; Peng, Jinmei; An, Tongqing; Yang, Xufu; Tian, Zhijun; Cai, Xuehui

    2017-02-22

    The highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) continues to pose one of the greatest threats to the swine industry. M protein is the most conserved and important structural protein of PRRSV. However, information about the host cellular proteins that interact with M protein remains limited. Host cellular proteins that interact with the M protein of HP-PRRSV were immunoprecipitated from MARC-145 cells infected with PRRSV HuN4-F112 using the M monoclonal antibody (mAb). The differentially expressed proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS. The screened proteins were used for bioinformatics analysis including Gene Ontology, the interaction network, and the enriched KEGG pathways. Some interested cellular proteins were validated to interact with M protein by CO-IP. The PRRSV HuN4-F112 infection group had 10 bands compared with the control group. The bands included 219 non-redundant cellular proteins that interact with M protein, which were identified by LC-MS/MS with high confidence. The gene ontology and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway bioinformatic analyses indicated that the identified proteins could be assigned to several different subcellular locations and functional classes. Functional analysis of the interactome profile highlighted cellular pathways associated with protein translation, infectious disease, and signal transduction. Two interested cellular proteins-nuclear factor of activated T cells 45 kDa (NF45) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-that could interact with M protein were validated by Co-IP and confocal analyses. The interactome data between PRRSV M protein and cellular proteins were identified and contribute to the understanding of the roles of M protein in the replication and pathogenesis of PRRSV. The interactome of M protein will aid studies of virus/host interactions and provide means to decrease the threat of PRRSV to the swine industry in the future.

  14. Evaluation of a DNA vaccine candidate co-expressing GP3 and GP5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) with interferon α/γ in immediate and long-lasting protection against HP-PRRSV challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yijun; Qi, Jing; Lu, Yu; Wu, Jiaqiang; Yoo, Dongwan; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Xiumei; Li, Jun; Sun, Wenbo; Cong, Xiaoyan; Shi, Jianli; Wang, Jinbao

    2012-12-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has become one of the most economically important diseases to the global pork industry. Current vaccination strategies only provide a limited protective efficacy. In this study, a DNA vaccine, pVAX1(©)-α-γ-GP35, co-expressing GP3 and GP5 of PRRSV with interferon α/γ was constructed, and its immediate and long-lasting protection against highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) challenge were examined in pigs. For immediate protection, the results showed that pVAX1(©)-α-γ-GP35 could provide partially protective efficacy, which was similar to the pVAX1(©)-α-γ (expressing interferon α/γ). For long-lasting protection, pigs inoculated with pVAX1(©)-α-γ-GP35 developed significantly higher PRRSV-specific antibody response, T cell proliferation, IFN-γ, and IL-4, than those vaccinated with pVAX1(©)-GP35 (expressing GP3 and GP5 of PRRSV). Following homologous challenge with HP-PRRSV strain SD-JN, pigs inoculated with pVAX1(©)-α-γ-GP35 showed almost no clinical signs, no lung lesions, and significantly lower viremia, as compared to those in pVAX1(©)-GP35 group. It indicated that pVAX1(©)-α-γ-GP35 could induce enhanced immune responses and provide both immediate and long-lasting protection against HP-PRRSV challenge in pigs. The DNA vaccine pVAX1(©)-α-γ-GP35 might be an attractive candidate vaccine for the prevention and control of HP-PRRSV infections.

  15. Fulminant sepsis is a cardinal sign of HP-PRRSV in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2006 a unique syndrome with high morbidity and mortality was recognized in growing pigs in China that became known as porcine high fever disease (PHFD). One consistent finding in affected pigs was the detection of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) that had unique nsp2 ge...

  16. Genetic control of host resistance to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manuscript focuses on the advances made using genomic approaches to identify biomarkers that define genes and pathways that are correlated with swine resistance to infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), the most economically important swine viral pathogen wo...

  17. Understanding PRRSV infection in porcine lung based on genome-wide transcriptome response identified by deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqi Xiao

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS has been one of the most economically important diseases affecting swine industry worldwide and causes great economic losses each year. PRRS virus (PRRSV replicates mainly in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs and dendritic cells (DCs and develops persistent infections, antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE, interstitial pneumonia and immunosuppression. But the molecular mechanisms of PRRSV infection still are poorly understood. Here we report on the first genome-wide host transcriptional responses to classical North American type PRRSV (N-PRRSV strain CH 1a infection using Solexa/Illumina's digital gene expression (DGE system, a tag-based high-throughput transcriptome sequencing method, and analyse systematically the relationship between pulmonary gene expression profiles after N-PRRSV infection and infection pathology. Our results suggest that N-PRRSV appeared to utilize multiple strategies for its replication and spread in infected pigs, including subverting host innate immune response, inducing an anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory state as well as developing ADE. Upregulation expression of virus-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules and inflammatory enzymes and inflammatory cells, antibodies, complement activation were likely to result in the development of inflammatory responses during N-PRRSV infection processes. N-PRRSV-induced immunosuppression might be mediated by apoptosis of infected cells, which caused depletion of immune cells and induced an anti-inflammatory cytokine response in which they were unable to eradicate the primary infection. Our systems analysis will benefit for better understanding the molecular pathogenesis of N-PRRSV infection, developing novel antiviral therapies and identifying genetic components for swine resistance/susceptibility to PRRS.

  18. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infection Induces Stress Granule Formation Depending on Protein Kinase R-like Endoplasmic Reticulum Kinase (PERK) in MARC-145 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanrong; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2017-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are sites of mRNA storage that are formed in response to various conditions of stress, including viral infections. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an Arterivirus that has been devastating the swine industry worldwide since the late 1980s. In this study, we found that infection of PRRSV strain WUH3 (genotype 2 PRRSV) induced stable formation of robust SGs in MARC-145 cells, as demonstrated by the recruitment of marker proteins of SGs, including TIA1, G3BP1, and eIF3η. Treatment with specific inhibitors or siRNAs against the stress kinases that are involved in SG formation revealed that PRRSV induced SG formation through a PERK (protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase)-dependent mechanism. Impairment of SG assembly by concomitant knockdown of the SG marker proteins (TIA1, G3BP1, and TIAR) did not affect PRRSV growth, while significantly enhanced PRRSV-induced NF-κB subunit p65 phosphorylation and inflammatory cytokine production. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PRRSV induces SG formation via a PERK-dependent pathway and that SGs are involved in the signaling pathway of the PRRSV-induced inflammatory response in MARC-145 cells.

  19. Changes in the cellular proteins of pulmonary alveolar macrophage infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by proteomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiming; Guo, Xin; Ge, Xinna; Chen, Yanhong; Sun, Qixin; Yang, Hanchun

    2009-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is known to infect and replicate preferentially in pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). We applied proteomic approaches to investigate the change in cellular proteins of PAMs infected with PRRSV in vitro. A total of 23 cellular proteins with significant alteration in different courses postinfection were identified. These proteins could be classified into the functions associated with morphogenesis, protein synthesis, metabolism, and stress response and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Of the altered proteins, two proteins, heat shock 27 kDa protein (HSP27) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), involved in stress response or ubiquitin-proteasome pathway were observed to be up-regulated. Our study is the first attempt to analyze the cellular protein profile of PRRSV-infected PAMs by proteomics and provide valuable information for better understanding the function alterations of PAMs induced by PRRSV infection.

  20. Porcine B-cells recognize epitopes that are conserved between the structural proteins of American- and European-type porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, Martin B.; Bøtner, Anette; Normann, Preben

    2002-01-01

    By selecting phage display libraries with immune sera from experimentally infected pigs, porcine B-cell epitopes in the open reading frame (ORF) 2, 3, 5 and 6 proteins of European-type porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were identified. The sequences of all the epitopes...... were well conserved in European-type PRRSV and even between European- and American-type PRRSV. Accordingly, sera from pigs infected with American-type PRRSV cross-reacted with the European-type epitopes. Thus, this study showed, for the first time, the presence of highly conserved epitopes...... epitopes was subjected to closer scrutiny. A heptad motif, VSRRIYQ, which is present in a single copy in ORF2 and 3 proteins, was identified; this arrangement is completely conserved in all European-type PRRSV sequences available. The VSRRIYQ repeat motif colocalized closely with one of the ORF2 epitopes...

  1. Financial implications of installing air filtration systems to prevent PRRSV infection in large sow herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Carmen; Davies, Peter R; Polson, Dale D; Dee, Scott A; Lazarus, William F

    2013-09-01

    Air filtration systems implemented in large sow herds have been demonstrated to decrease the probability of having a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) outbreak. However, implementation of air filtration represents a considerable capital investment, and does not eliminate the risk of new virus introductions. The specific objectives of the study were: 1) to determine productivity differences between a cohort of filtered and non-filtered sow farms; and 2) to employ those productivity differences to model the profitability of filtration system investments in a hypothetical 3000 sow farm. Variables included in the study were production variables (quarterly) from respective herds; air filtration status; number of pig sites within 4.7 km of the farm; occurrence of a PRRSV outbreak in a quarter, and season. For the investment analyses, three Scenarios were compared in a deterministic spreadsheet model of weaned pig cost: (1) control, (2) filtered conventional attic, and (3) filtered tunnel ventilation. Model outputs indicated that a filtered farm produced 5927 more pigs than unfiltered farms. The payback periods for the investments, were estimated to be 5.35 years for Scenario 2 and 7.13 years for Scenario 3 based solely on sow herd productivity. Payback period sensitivity analyses were performed for both biological and financial inputs. The payback period was most influenced by the premium for weaned pig sales price for PRRSV-negative pigs, and the relative proportions of time that filtered vs. unfiltered farms produced PRRSV-negative pigs. A premium of $5 per pig for PRRS-negative weaned pigs reduced the estimated payback periods to 2.1 years for Scenario 2 and 2.8 years for Scenario 3. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Virus replicon particles expressing porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus proteins elicit immune priming but do not confer protection from viremia in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Melanie; Durán, Margarita García; Ricklin, Meret E; Locher, Samira; Sarraseca, Javier; Rodríguez, María José; McCullough, Kenneth C; Summerfield, Artur; Zimmer, Gert; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2016-02-19

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the causative agent of one of the most devastating and economically significant viral disease of pigs worldwide. The vaccines currently available on the market elicit only limited protection. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replicon particles (VRP) have been used successfully to induce protection against influenza A virus (IAV) in chickens and bluetongue virus in sheep. In this study, VSV VRP expressing the PRRSV envelope proteins GP5, M, GP4, GP3, GP2 and the nucleocapsid protein N, individually or in combination, were generated and evaluated as a potential vector vaccine against PRRSV infection. High level expression of the recombinant PRRSV proteins was demonstrated in cell culture. However, none of the PRRSV antigens expressed from VRP, with the exception of the N protein, did induce any detectable antibody response in pigs before challenge infection with PRRSV. After challenge however, the antibody responses against GP5, GP4 and GP3 appeared in average 2 weeks earlier than in pigs vaccinated with the empty control VRP. No reduction of viremia was observed in the vaccinated group compared with the control group. When pigs were co-vaccinated with VRP expressing IAV antigens and VRP expressing PRRSV glycoproteins, only antibody responses to the IAV antigens were detectable. These data show that the VSV replicon vector can induce immune responses to heterologous proteins in pigs, but that the PRRSV envelope proteins expressed from VSV VRP are poorly immunogenic. Nevertheless, they prime the immune system for significantly earlier B-cell responses following PRRSV challenge infection.

  3. Recognition of Highly Diverse Type-1 and -2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Viruses (PRRSVs) by T-Lymphocytes Induced in Pigs after Experimental Infection with a Type-2 PRRSV Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Chungwon J.; Cha, Sang-Ho; Grimm, Amanda L.; Chung, Grace; Gibson, Kathleen A.; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Parish, Steven M.; Ho, Chak-Sum; Lee, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim Live attenuated vaccines confer partial protection in pigs before the appearance of neutralizing antibodies, suggesting the contribution of cell-mediated immunity (CMI). However, PRRSV-specific T-lymphocyte responses and protective mechanisms need to be further defined. To this end, the hypothesis was tested that PRRSV-specific T-lymphocytes induced by exposure to type-2 PRRSV can recognize diverse isolates. Methods An IFN-gamma ELISpot assay was used to enumerate PRRSV-specifi...

  4. Cellular transcriptional profiling in influenza A virus-infected lung epithelial cells: The role of the nonstructural NS1 protein in the evasion of the host innate defense and its potential contribution to pandemic influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, Gary K.; Salvatore, Mirella; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Carter, Victoria S.; Wang, Xiuyan; Basler, Christopher F.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Palese, Peter; Katze, Michael G.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2002-08-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza A virus contributes to viral pathogenesis, primarily by enabling the virus to disarm the host cell type IFN defense system. We examined the downstream effects of NS1 protein expression during influenza A virus infection on global cellular mRNA levels by measuring expression of over 13,000 cellular genes in response to infection with wild-type and mutant viruses in human lung epithelial cells. Influenza A/PR/8/34 virus infection resulted in a significant induction of genes involved in the IFN pathway. Deletion of the viral NS1 gene increased the number and magnitude of expression of cellular genes implicated in the IFN, NF-B, and other antiviral pathways. Interestingly, different IFN-induced genes showed different sensitivities to NS1-mediated inhibition of their expression. A recombinant virus with a C-terminal deletion in its NS1 gene induced an intermediate cellular mRNA expression pattern between wild-type and NS1 knockout viruses. Most significantly, a virus containing the 1918 pandemic NS1 gene was more efficient at blocking the expression of IFN-regulated genes than its parental influenza A/WSN/33 virus. Taken together, our results suggest that the cellular response to influenza A virus infection in human lung cells is significantly influenced by the sequence of the NS1 gene, demonstrating the importance of the NS1 protein in regulating the host cell response triggered by virus infection.

  5. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) up-regulates IL-15 through PKCβ1-TAK1-NF-κB signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li; Liu, Yihao; Du, Yinping; Wang, Honglei; Zhang, Meijie; Du, Yijun; Feng, Wen-Hai

    2016-09-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) caused by PRRS virus (PRRSV) is one of the most important infectious diseases in swine industry. IL-15 is a pleiotropic cytokine and has been shown to be essential to transform NKs, CD8 T cells, and other cells of the immune systems into functional effectors. Here, we demonstrated that the broad-spectrum or conventional PKC inhibitors repressed PRRSV-induced IL-15 expression and NF-κB activation. Subsequently, we found that the PKCβ specific inhibitor inhibited PRRSV-induced IL-15 production, which was also confirmed by knock-down of PKCβ1, suggesting that PKCβ1 is involved in the PRRSV-induced IL-15 expression. In addition, we demonstrated that PRRSV activated NF-κB through PKCβ1-induced TAK1 activation. Finally, we demonstrated that PRRSV activated PKCβ1 dependent on the participation of TRIF and MAVS. These data indicate that PRRSV up-regulates IL-15 through TRIF/MAVS-PKCβ1-TAK1-NF-κB signaling pathway. These findings will provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of IL-15 production induced by PRRSV. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Real-time onestep RT-PCR for the detection and differentiation of European and North American types of PRRSV in boar semen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Lars Erik

    Porcine Reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRRSV) is a single-stranded RNA virus and a worldwide cause of significant respiratory disease and reproductive failure in swine. Two different types of PRRSV, the European (EU) and North American (US) type exist. Boar semen can harbor PRRSV (1...

  7. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not mitigate disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is responsible for one of the most economically important diseases in swine worldwide. It causes reproductive failure in sows and pneumonia in pigs that predisposes them to secondary bacterial infections. Methods to control PRRSV and/or lim...

  8. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not prevent disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinese highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) strain JXwn06 has been shown to produce high fevers, loss of body condition, respiratory distress and death in pigs. Necropsy reveals extensive interstitial pneumonia, multi-systemic pathology and a high occurrence of secondary bacterial infections. The ful...

  9. Differential cellular protein expression in continuous porcine alveolar macrophages regulated by the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagong, Mingeun; Lee, Changhee

    2010-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a leading cause of significant economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. PRRSV infects preferentially porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) and subsequently utilizes the host cell biosynthetic machinery for its own replication. To date, a number of studies have been conducted to investigate compensatory changes of cellular gene expression of PAMs upon PRRSV infection. However, very little information exists about differential cellular protein expression of the natural target cells regulated by each viral protein. This study was therefore designed to examine the dynamics of host protein expression of continuous PAM cells by the PRRSV nucleocapsid (N) protein that is the most abundant and multifunctional viral component. We first established sublines of PAM cells to stably express the PRRSV N protein and assessed alterations in cellular protein productions of N-expressing PAM (PAM-pCD163-N) cells at different time courses by the use of proteomic analysis. A total of 23 protein spots were initially found to be differentially expressed in PAM-pCD163-N cells compared with normal PAM cells by high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). Of these spots, 15 protein spots with statistically significant alteration, including 4 up-regulated and 11 down-regulated protein spots, were picked out for subsequent protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting after matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). The altered cellular proteins identified in this study were classified into the functions involved in a variety of cellular processes such as cell division, metabolism, inflammation response, stress response, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, protein folding and synthesis, and transportation. Notably, heat shock 27kDa protein (HSP27) was found to be up-regulated in PAM-pCD163-N cells. The proteomics data will provide insights into the specific

  10. Inhibition of influenza A virus matrix and nonstructural gene expression using RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Cynthia M; Beezhold, Donald H; Blachere, Francoise M; Othumpangat, Sreekumar; Kashon, Michael L; Noti, John D

    2016-10-01

    Influenza antiviral drugs that use protein inhibitors can lose their efficacy as resistant strains emerge. As an alternative strategy, we investigated the use of small interfering RNA molecules (siRNAs) by characterizing three siRNAs (M747, M776 and M832) targeting the influenza matrix 2 gene and three (NS570, NS595 and NS615) targeting the nonstructural protein 1 and 2 genes. We also re-examined two previously reported siRNAs, M331 and M950, which target the matrix 1 and 2 genes. Treatment with M331-, M776-, M832-, and M950-siRNAs attenuated influenza titer. M776-siRNA treated cells had 29.8% less infectious virus than cells treated with the previously characterized siRNA, M950. NS570-, NS595- and NS615-siRNAs reduced nonstructural protein 1 and 2 expression and enhanced type I interferon expression by 50%. Combination siRNA treatment attenuated 20.9% more infectious virus than single siRNA treatment. Our results suggest a potential use for these siRNAs as an effective anti-influenza virus therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Combined prime-boost vaccination against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE using a recombinant vaccinia virus and a bacterial plasmid both expressing TBE virus non-structural NS1 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharova LG

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heterologous prime-boost immunization protocols using different gene expression systems have proven to be successful tools in protecting against various diseases in experimental animal models. The main reason for using this approach is to exploit the ability of expression cassettes to prime or boost the immune system in different ways during vaccination procedures. The purpose of the project was to study the ability of recombinant vaccinia virus (VV and bacterial plasmid, both carrying the NS1 gene from tick-borne encephalitis (TBE virus under the control of different promoters, to protect mice against lethal challenge using a heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocol. Results The heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocol, using a VV recombinant and bacterial plasmid, both containing the NS1 TBE virus protein gene under the control of different promoters, achieved a high level of protection in mice against lethal challenge with a highly pathogenic TBE virus strain. No signs of pronounced TBE infection were detected in the surviving animals. Conclusion Heterologous prime-boost vaccination protocols using recombinant VV and bacterial plasmids could be used for the development of flavivirus vaccines.

  12. NONSTRUCTURAL AND STATISTICAL NONPARAMETRIC MARKET POWER TESTS: AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION

    OpenAIRE

    Noelke, Corinna M.; Raper, Kellie Curry

    1999-01-01

    We use Monte Carlo experiments to assess the accuracy of two nonstructural and two statistical nonparametric market power tests. We implement these monopoly and monopsony market power tests using data from ten known market structures. The objective is to determine which test is most able to distinguish between market structures. The statistical nonparametric market power tests appear to be promising.

  13. Non-structural carbohydrates in woody plants compared among laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audrey G. Quentin; Elizabeth A. Pinkard; Michael G. Ryan; David T. Tissue; L. Scott Baggett; Henry D. Adams; Pascale Maillard; Jacqueline Marchand; Simon M. Landhausser; Andre Lacointe; Yves Gibon; William R. L. Anderegg; Shinichi Asao; Owen K. Atkin; Marc Bonhomme; Caroline Claye; Pak S. Chow; Anne Clement-Vidal; Noel W. Davies; L. Turin Dickman; Rita Dumbur; David S. Ellsworth; Kristen Falk; Lucía Galiano; Jose M. Grunzweig; Henrik Hartmann; Gunter Hoch; Sharon Hood; Joanna E. Jones; Takayoshi Koike; Iris Kuhlmann; Francisco Lloret; Melchor Maestro; Shawn D. Mansfield; Jordi Martinez-Vilalta; Mickael Maucourt; Nathan G. McDowell; Annick Moing; Bertrand Muller; Sergio G. Nebauer; Ulo Niinemets; Sara Palacio; Frida Piper; Eran Raveh; Andreas Richter; Gaelle Rolland; Teresa Rosas; Brigitte Saint Joanis; Anna Sala; Renee A. Smith; Frank Sterck; Joseph R. Stinziano; Mari Tobias; Faride Unda; Makoto Watanabe; Danielle A. Way; Lasantha K. Weerasinghe; Birgit Wild; Erin Wiley; David R. Woodruff

    2016-01-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in plant tissue are frequently quantified to make inferences about plant responses to environmental conditions. Laboratories publishing estimates of NSC of woody plants use many different methods to evaluate NSC. We asked whether NSC estimates in the recent literature could be quantitatively compared among studies. We also...

  14. Radial distribution of non-structural carbohydrates in Malaysian teak ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-structural carbohydrates are primary compounds whose distribution in the wood affects its properties. During the two last decades, a high variability of natural durability of plantation teak wood properties has been found with consequences for industry and consumers. In order to further investigate chemical traits for ...

  15. Dry matter and nonstructural carbohydrate content as quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Lolium multiflorum cv. Midmar pasture and ninety individual plants (both Italian and Westerwolds types), from 15 different Lolium multiflorum cultivars in a spaced-plant trial, were assessed for total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) content, TNC yield, dry matter (DM) content, DM yield and nitrogen (N) content. Maximum ...

  16. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV in GB pig herds: farm characteristics associated with heterogeneity in seroprevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medley Graham F

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The between- and within-herd variability of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV antibodies were investigated in a cross-sectional study of 103 British pig herds conducted 2003–2004. Fifty pigs from each farm were tested for anti-PRRSV antibodies using ELISA. A binomial logistic model was used to investigate management risks for farms with and without pigs with PRRSV antibodies and multilevel statistical models were used to investigate variability in pigs' log ELISA IRPC (relative index × 100 in positive herds. Results Thirty-five herds (34.0% were seronegative, 41 (39.8% were seropositive and 27 (26.2% were vaccinated. Herds were more likely to be seronegative if they had Conclusion These patterns are consistent with PRRSV failing to persist indefinitely on some infected farms, with fadeout more likely in smaller herds with little/no reintroduction of infectious stock. Persistence of infection may be associated with large herds in pig-dense regions with repeated reintroduction.

  17. Dietary prescription adherence and non-structured physical activity following weight loss with and without aerobic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, M C; Treuth, M S; Ryan, A S

    2014-12-01

    To compare the effects of weight loss with and without exercise on 1) dietary prescription adherence and 2) non-structured activity in postmenopausal women. Longitudinal study. Clinical research setting with facility based exercise and nutrition education. Overweight and obese women, 45-76 years old. 6 months of weight loss alone (WL; N=38) or with aerobic exercise (AEX+WL; N=41). Cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max), resting metabolic rate (RMR), seven day food intake, and physical activity (by Actical accelerometers worn in a subset subgroup: WL: N=10; AEX+WL: N=15) were assessed before and after the interventions. Both interventions resulted in similar weight loss (~9%) and no significant changes in RMR, while only the AEX+WL group improved VO2max (~10%). At baseline, the AEX+WL group consumed slightly more protein than the WL group (Pexercise to prevent the decline in non-structured activity observed following weight loss alone.

  18. Nonstructural Proteins of Alphavirus—Potential Targets for Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana Abu Bakar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are enveloped, positive single-stranded RNA viruses, typically transmitted by arthropods. They often cause arthralgia or encephalitic diseases in infected humans and there is currently no targeted antiviral treatment available. The re-emergence of alphaviruses in Asia, Europe, and the Americas over the last decade, including chikungunya and o’nyong’nyong viruses, have intensified the search for selective inhibitors. In this review, we highlight key molecular determinants within the alphavirus replication complex that have been identified as viral targets, focusing on their structure and functionality in viral dissemination. We also summarize recent structural data of these viral targets and discuss how these could serve as templates to facilitate structure-based drug design and development of small molecule inhibitors.

  19. Transcriptome profile of lung dendritic cells after in vitro porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pröll, Maren Julia; Neuhoff, Christiane; Schellander, Karl; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Cinar, Mehmet Ulas; Sahadevan, Sudeep; Qu, Xueqi; Islam, Md Aminul; Poirier, Mikhael; Müller, Marcel A; Drosten, Christian; Tesfaye, Dawit; Tholen, Ernst; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine

    2017-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an infectious disease that leads to high financial and production losses in the global swine industry. The pathogenesis of this disease is dependent on a multitude of factors, and its control remains problematic. The immune system generally defends against infectious diseases, especially dendritic cells (DCs), which play a crucial role in the activation of the immune response after viral infections. However, the understanding of the immune response and the genetic impact on the immune response to PRRS virus (PRRSV) remains incomplete. In light of this, we investigated the regulation of the host immune response to PRRSV in porcine lung DCs using RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq). Lung DCs from two different pig breeds (Pietrain and Duroc) were collected before (0 hours) and during various periods of infection (3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 hours post infection (hpi)). RNA-Seq analysis revealed a total of 20,396 predicted porcine genes, which included breed-specific differentially expressed immune genes. Pietrain and Duroc infected lung DCs showed opposite gene expression courses during the first time points post infection. Duroc lung DCs reacted more strongly and distinctly than Pietrain lung DCs during these periods (3, 6, 9, 12 hpi). Additionally, cluster analysis revealed time-dependent co-expressed groups of genes that were involved in immune-relevant pathways. Key clusters and pathways were identified, which help to explain the biological and functional background of lung DCs post PRRSV infection and suggest IL-1β1 as an important candidate gene. RNA-Seq was also used to characterize the viral replication of PRRSV for each breed. PRRSV was able to infect and to replicate differently in lung DCs between the two mentioned breeds. These results could be useful in investigations on immunity traits in pig breeding and enhancing the health of pigs.

  20. Evaluation of the long-term effect of air filtration on the occurrence of new PRRSV infections in large breeding herds in swine-dense regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Scott; Cano, Jean Paul; Spronk, Gordon; Reicks, Darwin; Ruen, Paul; Pitkin, Andrea; Polson, Dale

    2012-05-01

    Airborne transmission of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a risk factor for the infection of susceptible populations. Therefore, a long‑term sustainability study of air filtration as a means to reduce this risk was conducted. Participating herds (n = 38) were organized into 4 independent cohorts and the effect of air filtration on the occurrence of new PRRSV infections was analyzed at 3 different levels from September 2008 to January 2012 including the likelihood of infection in contemporary filtered and non-filtered herds, the likelihood of infection before and after implementation of filtration and the time to failure in filtered and non-filtered herds. Results indicated that new PRRSV infections in filtered breeding herds were significantly lower than in contemporary non-filtered control herds (P filtration was 7.97 times higher than the odds after filtration was initiated (P filtration on reducing the occurrence of new PRRSV infections in the study population was demonstrated.

  1. GP4-specific neutralizing antibodies might be a driving force in PRRSV evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costers, Sarah; Vanhee, Merijn; Van Breedam, Wander; Van Doorsselaere, Jan; Geldhof, Marc; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2010-12-01

    The structural envelope glycoprotein GP4 of European porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strains contains a highly variable neutralizing epitope that is susceptible to neutralizing antibody-mediated selective pressure in vitro. In this study, it was analyzed what happens with this neutralizing epitope during infection in vivo in the presence of neutralizing antibodies. A neutralizing antibody-mediated selective pressure was created in 30 pigs by vaccination prior to inoculation with infectious Lelystad virus (LV). Nine viable neutralizing antibody-escape variants were isolated from 9 of these pigs and their neutralizing antibody-escape mutant-identity was confirmed by the acquired resistance to neutralization by autologous neutralizing sera. Six out of 9 neutralizing antibody-escape variants contained aa substitutions in the GP4 neutralizing epitope and had become resistant to neutralization by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against this epitope. In addition, in all 6 corresponding pigs, antibodies against this epitope were detected early in infection. In contrast to these 6 virus variants, the 3 other antibody-escape variants did not contain aa substitutions in the GP4 neutralizing epitope and were still sensitive to neutralization by the GP4-specific mAb. These antibody-escape variants were isolated from pigs that did not contain antibodies against this epitope early in infection. All these findings together strongly indicate that aa substitutions in the GP4 neutralizing epitope can abrogate antibody recognition, and that neutralizing antibodies might be responsible for the selection of neutralizing antibody-resistant variants with aa substitutions in the neutralizing epitope on GP4. In conclusion, this study indicates that neutralizing antibodies in pigs might be a driving force in the rapid evolution of the neutralizing epitope on GP4 of European PRRSV strains. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Experimental inoculation of swine at various stages of gestation with a Danish isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kranker, Søren; Nielsen, Jens; Bille-Hansen, Vivi

    1998-01-01

    Following intranasal inoculation of three groups of pregnant swine (in total 11 dams) with a Danish isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) on or about day 85, 70 and 45 of gestation, respectively, reproductive disturbances were observed in the first two groups...... inflammatory conditions, especially in the lung and heart. In conclusion, the present results support the hypothesis, that PRRSV infection of dams late in pregnancy has the greatest likelihood of transplacental infection of fetuses....

  3. Transcriptome Differences in Porcine Alveolar Macrophages from Tongcheng and Large White Pigs in Response to Highly Pathogenic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Liang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is a single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus that can cause devastating reproductive failure and respiratory tract lesions, which has led to serious damage to the swine industry worldwide. Our previous studies have indicated that Tongcheng (TC pigs, a Chinese local breed, have stronger resistance or tolerance to PRRSV infection than Large White (LW pigs. This study aims to investigate their host transcriptome differences in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs at 7 days post challenge. Transcriptome profiling of PAMs from PRRSV infected and control pigs of these two breeds were performed using RNA-sequencing. For both breeds, there were 1257 common differentially expressed genes (DEGs in response to PRRSV infection, involving hepatic fibrosis/hepatic stellate cell activation, phospholipase C, and granulocyte adhesion and diapedesis pathways. For TC pig, 549 specific DEGs were identified, including VAV2, BCL2 and BAX, which were enriched in activation of leukocyte extravasation and suppression of apoptosis. While, 898 specific DEGs were identified in LW pigs, including GNAQ, GNB5, GNG2, CALM4 and RHOQ, which were involved in suppression of Gαq and PI3K-AKT signaling. This study provides an insight into the transcriptomic comparison of resistant and susceptible pigs to PRRSV infection. TC pigs may promote the extravasation and migration of leukocytes to defend against PRRSV infections and suppress apoptosis of the infected macrophages to increase antigen presentation, thereby reducing the lung lesions.

  4. Long-term administration of a commercial porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-inactivated vaccine in PRRSV-endemically infected sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatsiros, V G; Alexopoulos, C; Kritas, S K; Koptopoulos, G; Nauwynck, H J; Pensaert, M B; Kyriakis, S C

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of a commercial European porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-inactivated vaccine after 18-month use in gilts/sows at a farm with high seroprevalence. In a farrow-to-finish farm with 1100 sows, all sows and gilts were systematically vaccinated with the PRRS-inactivated PROGRESSIS vaccine for a period of 18 months. Farm's reproductive and litter characteristics were longitudinally recorded for this period and historically compared with those of the year prior to vaccination. Serology, employing immunoperoxidase monolayer assay, had confirmed a high prevalence of PRRS-specific antibodies in most age groups within the farm prior to vaccination. Seroprevalence during the experiment ranged between 0% and 100% in weaners and growers, but remained at stable high levels (> 93%) in finishing pigs and gilts throughout all 2-year period of serology measurements. No local or systemic vaccine side effects were noted throughout the trial period. Vaccinations had resulted over time in a significant improvement of sow reproductive performance (e.g. reduction of premature farrowings, abortions and increase of farrowing rate) and litter characteristics (e.g. increase of the number of live born and weaned pigs and decrease of stillborn, mummified, weak and splay-legged piglets). It has also been observed that the higher the degree of immunization of a sow, the better the improvement of her reproductive parameters. Sows after vaccination have shown improved characteristics compared to homoparous sows prior to the application of vaccinations in the farm.

  5. Transcriptome profile of lung dendritic cells after in vitro porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pröll, Maren Julia; Neuhoff, Christiane; Schellander, Karl

    2017-01-01

    generally defends against infectious diseases, especially dendritic cells (DCs), which play a crucial role in the activation of the immune response after viral infections. However, the understanding of the immune response and the genetic impact on the immune response to PRRS virus (PRRSV) remains incomplete....... In light of this, we investigated the regulation of the host immune response to PRRSV in porcine lung DCs using RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq). Lung DCs from two different pig breeds (Pietrain and Duroc) were collected before (0 hours) and during various periods of infection (3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 hours post...... could be useful in investigations on immunity traits in pig breeding and enhancing the health of pigs....

  6. Seasonal dynamics and age of stemwood nonstructural carbohydrates in temperate forest trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. Richardson; Mariah S. Carbone; Trevor F. Keenan; Claudia I. Czimczik; David Y. Hollinger; Paula Murakami; Paul G. Schaberg; Xiaomei. Xu

    2013-01-01

    Nonstructural carbohydrate reserves support tree metabolism and growth when current photosynthates are insufficient, offering resilience in times of stress. We monitored stemwood nonstructural carbohydrate (starch and sugars) concentrations of the dominant tree species at three sites in the northeastern United States. We estimated the mean age of the starch and sugars...

  7. The KnowRISK project: Tools and strategies to reduce non-structural damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa Oliveira, Carlos; Lopes, Mário; Mota de Sá, Francisco; Amaral Ferreia, Mónica; Candeias, Paulo; Campos Costa, Alfredo; Rupakhety, Rajesh; Meroni, Fabrizio; Azzaro, Raffaele; D'Amico, Salvatore; Langer, Horst; Musacchio, Gemma; Sousa Silva, Delta; Falsaperla, Susanna; Scarfì, Luciano; Tusa, Giuseppina; Tuvé, Tiziana

    2016-04-01

    The project KnowRISK (Know your city, Reduce seISmic risK through non-structural elements) is financed by the European Commission to develop prevention measures that may reduce non-structural damage in urban areas. Pilot areas of the project are within the three European participating countries, namely Portugal, Iceland and Italy. Non-structural components of a building include all those components that are not part of the structural system, more specifically the architectural, mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems, as well as furniture, fixtures, equipment, and contents. Windows, partitions, granite veneer, piping, ceilings, air conditioning ducts and equipment, elevators, computer and hospital equipment, file cabinets, and retail merchandise are all examples of non-structural components that are vulnerable to earthquake damage. We will use the experience gained during past earthquakes, which struck in particular Iceland, Italy and Portugal (Azores). Securing the non-structural elements improves the safety during an earthquake and saves lives. This paper aims at identifying non-structural seismic protection measures in the pilot areas and to develop a portfolio of good practices for the most common and serious non-structural vulnerabilities. This systematic identification and the portfolio will be achieved through a "cross-knowledge" strategy based on previous researches, evidence of non-structural damage in past earthquakes. Shake table tests of a group of non-structural elements will be performed. These tests will be filmed and, jointly with portfolio, will serve as didactic supporting tools to be used in workshops with building construction stakeholders and in risk communication activities. A Practical Guide for non-structural risk reduction will be specifically prepared for citizens on the basis of the outputs of the project, taking into account the local culture and needs of each participating country.

  8. Stress-activated protein kinases are involved in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection and modulate virus-induced cytokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Lee, Changhee

    2012-06-05

    The present study examined the role of the p38 MAPK and JNK pathways during PRRSV infection in immortalized porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM) cells. Infection with PRRSV was found to progressively activate p38 and JNK1/2 up to 36 h postinfection and then their phosphorylation levels dramatically decreased to baseline at 48 h postinfection. In contrast, UV-inactivated PRRSV failed to trigger phosphorylation of these SAPKs, indicating that the post-entry process is responsible for their activation. Independent treatment of cells with a selective p38 or JNK inhibitor markedly impaired PRRSV infection, resulting in significant reduction in synthesis of viral genomic and subgenomic RNAs, viral protein expression, and progeny virus production. Notably, cytokine production in PAM cells infected with PRRSV was shown to be altered by inhibiting these SAPKs. Altogether, our data suggest that the p38 and JNK signaling pathways play pivotal roles in PRRSV replication and may regulate immune responses during virus infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Influence of the amino acid residues at 70 in M protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus on viral neutralization susceptibility to the serum antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Baochao; Liu, Xing; Bai, Juan; Zhang, Tingjie; Zhang, Qiaoya; Jiang, Ping

    2016-03-22

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is mainly responsible for the significant economic losses in pig industry in the world. The adaptive immune responses of the host act as an important source of selective pressure in the evolutionary process of the virus. In the previous study, we confirmed that the amino acid (aa) residues at 102 and 104 sites in GP5 played an important role in escaping from the neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV). In this study, we further analyzed the aa mutants affecting neutralization susceptibility of NAbs in other structure proteins in NAbs resistant variants. Based on the different aa residues of the structural proteins between the resistant virus BB20s and the parent virus BB, 12 recombinant PRRSV strains containing these aa residue substitutions were constructed using reverse genetic techniques. The neutralizing antibody (NA) titers of the recombinant strains were tested on MARC-145 and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). And the NAbs binding abilities of parent and rescued viruses were tested by using ELISA method. By using the neutralization assay, it was revealed that the NA titer of N4 serum with rBB/Ms was significantly lower than that with rBB. Meanwhile, NA titer of the serum with rBB20s/M was significantly higher than that with rBB20s. The ELISA binding results showed that rBB/Ms had higher binding inability to N4 than did rBB. And alignment of M protein revealed that the variant aa residue lysine (K) at 70 was also existed in field type 2 and vaccine PRRSV strains. The aa residue at 70 in M protein of PRRSV played an important role in regulating neutralization susceptibility to the porcine serum NAbs. It may be helpful for monitoring the antigen variant strains in the field and developing new vaccine against PRRSV in the future.

  10. Comparison of PRRSV Nucleic Acid and Antibody Detection in Pen-Based Oral Fluid and Individual Serum Samples in Three Different Age Categories of Post-Weaning Pigs from Endemically Infected Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Regge, Nick; Cay, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Background Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the causative agent of an economically important disease in swine. Since it has been shown that PRRSV and PRRSV specific antibodies can be detected in oral fluid, many different aspects have been studied to show that oral fluid could be a worthy alternative diagnostic sample to serum for monitoring and surveillance of this disease. Thorough field evaluations are however missing to convincingly show its usefulness under representative field conditions. Methodology Pen-based oral fluid samples and serum samples from all individual pigs in the corresponding pens were collected from post-weaning pigs of three different age categories in eight endemically PRRSV infected farms and one PRRSV free farm in Belgium. All samples were tested by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and ELISA to detect PRRSV RNA and PRRSV specific antibodies, respectively. Results While the relative specificity of PRRSV detection by qRT-PCR in pen-based oral fluid compared to serum collected from individual pigs was high in all age categories (>90%), the relative sensitivity decreased with the age of the pigs (89, 93 and 10% in 8-12w, 16-20w and 24-28w old pigs, respectively). The latter correlated with a lower percentage of PRRSV positive pigs in serum/pen in the different age categories (55, 29 and 6%, respectively). Irrespective of the age category, pen-based oral fluid samples were always found PCR positive when at least 30% of the individual pigs were positive in serum. PRRSV specific antibody detection in oral fluid by ELISA showed a 100% relative sensitivity to detection in serum since oral fluid samples were always positive as soon as one pig in the pen was positive in serum. On the other hand, two false positive oral fluid samples in 11 pens without serum positive pigs were found, resulting in a relative specificity of 82%. Indications are however present that the oral fluid

  11. Seismic Behaviour of Post-Installed Anchors: Non-Structural Components and Art Objects Fastening

    OpenAIRE

    Abate, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The damage observation in recent seismic events (L’Aquila 2009, Chile 2010, Christchurch 2011, Tohoku 2011, Emilia 2012) helps in the identification of the critical aspects related to the response to earthquake of non-structural components (Miranda et al. 2012). Generally these elements are included in buildings and may belong to the architectural system, to the utility system or to the building content. The failure of the non-structural components can represent a significant danger for life ...

  12. Temporary CD8(+) T-cell depletion in pigs does not exacerbate infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Eriksen, Lis

    2004-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated a consistent increase in the CD8(+) T-cell subset of pigs following infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory virus (PRRSV). Consequently, it has been suggested that CD8(+) T-cells may play an important role in protection against this infection. In order...

  13. The genetic diversity of European type PRRSV is similar to that of the North American type but is geographically skewed within Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, R.; Storgaard, Torben; Nielsen, Henriette S.

    2002-01-01

    nucleotide diversity in the European genotype. Here, we analyzed the ORF5 and ORF7 genes for a large number of new European type PRRSV isolates in conjunction with existing database sequences. This new analysis showed that contrary to previous assumptions, genetic diversity is at least as high...

  14. Genetic and antigenic characterization of complete genomes of Type 1 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome viruses (PRRSV) isolated in Denmark over a period of 10 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Kristensen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) caused by the PRRS virus (PRRSV) is considered one of the most devastating swine diseases worldwide. PRRS viruses are divided into two major genotypes, Type 1 and Type 2, with pronounced diversity between and within the genotypes. In Denmark more...

  15. Use of recycled tires in non-structural concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Rawahi Zamzam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research addresses the issue of tire waste management and natural aggregate resource depletion. It investigates use of commercially produced recycled tire rubber as replacement for fine and coarse aggregate in non-structural concrete. Two replacement levels of 10% and 20% were considered for fine aggregate with 0% or 10% of coarse aggregate. The study employed a mix proportion of 1:5:4 (cement: fine aggregate: coarse aggregate with a water-to-cement ratio of 0.25, which is normally utilized in concrete block manufacturing in Oman. The mixes were tested for their thermal conductivity, water absorption and compressive strength. The behavior of mixes exposed to 100 and 200°C was also studied and the samples were later tested for compressive strength. The results showed improvements in compressive strength after exposure to heat. Thermal conductivity was reduced as the percentage replacement increased for both fine and coarse aggregate. During heat exposure, the temperature rise was faster in rubberized mixes, and the compressive strength of all mixes improved after the exposure to heat. Water absorption and void content increased with increase in replacement percentage. The compressive strength did not show a clear trend with the replacement and this is due to the sensitivity of the stiff mix used in the study and its inherent lean nature. The results indicate that the lean nature of the mix makes it insensitive to small replacement investigated in this research.

  16. Recombination in circulating Human enterovirus B: independent evolution of structural and non-structural genome regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashev, Alexander N; Lashkevich, Vasilii A; Ivanova, Olga E; Koroleva, Galina A; Hinkkanen, Ari E; Ilonen, Jorma

    2005-12-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of eight Human enterovirus B (HEV-B) strains were determined, representing five serotypes, E6, E7, E11, CVB3 and CVB5, which were isolated in the former Soviet Union between 1998 and 2002. All strains were mosaic recombinants and only the VP2-VP3-VP1 genome region was similar to that of the corresponding prototype HEV-B strains. In seven of the eight strains studied, the 2C-3D genome region was most similar to the prototype E30, EV74 and EV75 strains, whilst the remaining strain was most similar to the prototype E1 and E9 strains in the non-structural protein genome region. Most viruses also bore marks of additional recombination events in this part of the genome. In the 5' non-translated region, all strains were more similar to the prototype E9 than to other enteroviruses. In most cases, recombination mapped to the VP4 and 2ABC genome regions. This, together with the star-like topology of the phylogenetic trees for these genome regions, identified these genome parts as recombination hot spots. These findings further support the concept of independent evolution of enterovirus genome fragments and indicate a requirement for more advanced typing approaches. A range of available phylogenetic methods was also compared for efficient detection of recombination in enteroviruses.

  17. Influence of pig age on virus titer and bactericidal activity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanawongnuwech, R; Thacker, E L; Halbur, P G

    1998-10-01

    Twelve pigs (six 4-week-old and six 4-month-old cross-bred, specific pathogen free pigs) were used as donors for both pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) and pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs). The PIMs and PAMs were infected in vitro with low (ISU-55) or high (VR-2385) virulence strains of PRRSV at 1 multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) for comparisons of virus titers at 48 h post infection (PI). PIMs were as permissive as PAMs to infection with both PRRSV isolates yielding similar progeny titers (10(4.81) vs. 10(5.22) TCID50/ml, respectively). Both ISU-55 and VR-2385 were able to infect PIMs and no significant difference in virus replication as measured by virus titers between isolates was found (10(5.33) vs. 10(4.69) TCID50/ml, respectively). PIMs from 4-weak-old pigs yielded a higher virus titer following PRRSV infection than PIMs from 4-month-old pigs (10(5.43) vs. 10(4.59) TCID50/ml, respectively; p PIMs had significantly decreased bactericidal (Staphylococcus aureus) activity compared with uninfected PIMS at 48 h PI (p PIMs and VR-2385 (high virulence)-infected PIMs. Both ISU-55 and VR-2385 infection significantly decreased the production of superoxide anion (SOA) at 24 and 48 h PI (p PIMs, (2) PIMs from younger pigs were more permissive to PRRSV infection, and (3) the selected PRRSV strains, which differ in their abilities to induce pneumonia in vivo were not different when tested in vitro by measuring virus titer and bactericidal functions.

  18. Tree Nonstructural Carbohydrate Reserves Across Eastern US Temperate Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantooth, J.; Dietze, M.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the roles, importance, and dynamics of tree non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) is currently an active area of research. The question of how the relationships between NSCs, growth, and mortality can be used to develop more accurate projections of forest dynamics is central to this research. To begin to address this question, we have asked an even more fundamental question: How much are trees allocating carbon to storage, in the form of NSCs, versus new growth? Ecological theory predicts that there should be trade-offs between different plant life history strategies provided that there are the carbon mass-balance constraints to enforce these trade-offs. Current data on tree NSCs lack the spatial and taxonomic extent required to properly address this question. Therefore, we established a network of forest inventory plots at ten sites across the eastern US and measured growth in adult trees using increment cores and repeat measures of diameter at breast height (DBH). Increment cores were also used to measure sapwood NSCs. We hypothesized that across the eastern US, shade tolerant species, e.g. Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum) have the largest NSC reserves and that shade intolerant species have the lowest reserves. We also hypothesized that NSC reserves increase with temperature and precipitation, as with growth, and that within species NSC reserves increase with growth rate. Initial analyses of tree NSCs indicates that trees of intermediate shade tolerance, e.g. Red Oak (Quercus rubra) have the highest concentrations of sapwood NSCs, and among the highest growth rates. Across the entire study region, NSC concentrations are positively correlated with tree size and growth rate. Within species, NSC concentrations are also positively correlated with growth rate. Across functional groups healthy individuals have significantly higher sapwood NSC concentrations than visibly stressed individuals. There are also significantly lower NSC concentrations in sapwood of

  19. Evaluation of the effectiveness of an antimicrobial air filter to avoid porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) aerosol transmission, after 16 months of exposure to a commercial swine environmental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, L. [Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica Inc., St. Joseph, MO (United States); Pouliot, F.; Urizar, L. [Centre de developpement du porc du Quebec Inc., Quebec City, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The effectiveness of Noveko's antimicrobial filter was evaluated after 16 months of exposure to commercial swine production. The experiment involved the use of a scaled model of a commercial swine facility consisting of 2 small chambers connected by a duct containing the filters. A 5 kg naive pig was placed in the reception chamber for a period of 6 hours after aerosolization with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Blood samples from pigs were collected before and after aerosolization to test for the presence of PRRSV RNA. Only blood samples were tested for PRRSV antibodies by IDEXX 2XR ELISA. None of the 9 pigs tested were found to be infected. The study showed that the technology used to integrate the antimicrobial agent into the filter fibers allows the filter combination to withstand extreme weather and endure commercial swine production for at least 16 months, and can maintain its effectiveness to avoid airborne transmission of PRRSV.

  20. Effect of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) (isolate ATCC VR-2385) infection on bactericidal activity of porcine pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs): in vitro comparisons with pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanawongnuwech, R; Thacker, E L; Halbur, P G

    1997-11-01

    Porcine pulmonary intravascular macrophages (PIMs) were recovered by in situ pulmonary vascular perfusion with 0.025% collagenase in saline from six 8-week old, crossbred pigs. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs) were recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage from the same pigs for comparisons in each assay. The macrophages were exposed to PRRSV (ATCC VR-2385) in vitro for 24 h and infection was confirmed by an indirect immunofluorescence test or transmission electron microscopy. Viral particles tended to accumulate in the vesicles of the Golgi apparatus or endoplasmic reticulum. Bactericidal function assays were performed on the recovered macrophages to determine the effects of the virus on macrophage functions. In vitro PRRSV infection reduced the bactericidal ability of PIMs from 68.3% to 56.4% (P 0.1) at 24 h post-infection. The mean percentage of bacteria killed by macrophages after PRRSV infection was not significantly different among the treatment groups or between the treatment groups and non-infected controls based on colorimetric MTT bactericidal (Staphylococcus aureus) assay. PRRSV did not affect the ability of PIMs or PAMs to internalize opsonized 125I-iododeoxyuridine-labeled S. aureus (P > 0.05). PRRSV infection significantly decreased the production of superoxide anion (P PIMs and by 69.4% in PAMs. PRRSV reduced the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-halide product (P PIMs and by 48.1% for PAMs. The results suggest: (1) PIMs should be considered as an important replication site of PRRSV; (2) PRRSV may have a detrimental effect on both PIMs and PAMs; (3) loss of bactericidal function in PIMs may facilitate hematogenous bacterial infections.

  1. Non-structural carbohydrates in woody plants compared among laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentin, Audrey G; Pinkard, Elizabeth A; Ryan, Michael G; Tissue, David T; Baggett, L Scott; Adams, Henry D; Maillard, Pascale; Marchand, Jacqueline; Landhäusser, Simon M; Lacointe, André; Gibon, Yves; Anderegg, William R L; Asao, Shinichi; Atkin, Owen K; Bonhomme, Marc; Claye, Caroline; Chow, Pak S; Clément-Vidal, Anne; Davies, Noel W; Dickman, L Turin; Dumbur, Rita; Ellsworth, David S; Falk, Kristen; Galiano, Lucía; Grünzweig, José M; Hartmann, Henrik; Hoch, Günter; Hood, Sharon; Jones, Joanna E; Koike, Takayoshi; Kuhlmann, Iris; Lloret, Francisco; Maestro, Melchor; Mansfield, Shawn D; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Maucourt, Mickael; McDowell, Nathan G; Moing, Annick; Muller, Bertrand; Nebauer, Sergio G; Niinemets, Ülo; Palacio, Sara; Piper, Frida; Raveh, Eran; Richter, Andreas; Rolland, Gaëlle; Rosas, Teresa; Saint Joanis, Brigitte; Sala, Anna; Smith, Renee A; Sterck, Frank; Stinziano, Joseph R; Tobias, Mari; Unda, Faride; Watanabe, Makoto; Way, Danielle A; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Wild, Birgit; Wiley, Erin; Woodruff, David R

    2015-11-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in plant tissue are frequently quantified to make inferences about plant responses to environmental conditions. Laboratories publishing estimates of NSC of woody plants use many different methods to evaluate NSC. We asked whether NSC estimates in the recent literature could be quantitatively compared among studies. We also asked whether any differences among laboratories were related to the extraction and quantification methods used to determine starch and sugar concentrations. These questions were addressed by sending sub-samples collected from five woody plant tissues, which varied in NSC content and chemical composition, to 29 laboratories. Each laboratory analyzed the samples with their laboratory-specific protocols, based on recent publications, to determine concentrations of soluble sugars, starch and their sum, total NSC. Laboratory estimates differed substantially for all samples. For example, estimates for Eucalyptus globulus leaves (EGL) varied from 23 to 116 (mean = 56) mg g(-1) for soluble sugars, 6-533 (mean = 94) mg g(-1) for starch and 53-649 (mean = 153) mg g(-1) for total NSC. Mixed model analysis of variance showed that much of the variability among laboratories was unrelated to the categories we used for extraction and quantification methods (method category R(2) = 0.05-0.12 for soluble sugars, 0.10-0.33 for starch and 0.01-0.09 for total NSC). For EGL, the difference between the highest and lowest least squares means for categories in the mixed model analysis was 33 mg g(-1) for total NSC, compared with the range of laboratory estimates of 596 mg g(-1). Laboratories were reasonably consistent in their ranks of estimates among tissues for starch (r = 0.41-0.91), but less so for total NSC (r = 0.45-0.84) and soluble sugars (r = 0.11-0.83). Our results show that NSC estimates for woody plant tissues cannot be compared among laboratories. The relative changes in NSC between treatments measured within a laboratory

  2. Seismic assessment and performance of nonstructural components affected by structural modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Jieun; Althoff, Eric; Sezen, Halil; Denning, Richard; Aldemir, Tunc [Ohio State University, Columbus (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) requires a large number of simulations to evaluate the seismic vulnerability of structural and nonstructural components in nuclear power plants. The effect of structural modeling and analysis assumptions on dynamic analysis of 3D and simplified 2D stick models of auxiliary buildings and the attached nonstructural components is investigated. Dynamic characteristics and seismic performance of building models are also evaluated, as well as the computational accuracy of the models. The presented results provide a better understanding of the dynamic behavior and seismic performance of auxiliary buildings. The results also help to quantify the impact of uncertainties associated with modeling and analysis of simplified numerical models of structural and nonstructural components subjected to seismic shaking on the predicted seismic failure probabilities of these systems.

  3. A user exposure based approach for non-structural road network vulnerability analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jin

    Full Text Available Aiming at the dense urban road network vulnerability without structural negative consequences, this paper proposes a novel non-structural road network vulnerability analysis framework. Three aspects of the framework are mainly described: (i the rationality of non-structural road network vulnerability, (ii the metrics for negative consequences accounting for variant road conditions, and (iii the introduction of a new vulnerability index based on user exposure. Based on the proposed methodology, a case study in the Sioux Falls network which was usually threatened by regular heavy snow during wintertime is detailedly discussed. The vulnerability ranking of links of Sioux Falls network with respect to heavy snow scenario is identified. As a result of non-structural consequences accompanied by conceivable degeneration of network, there are significant increases in generalized travel time costs which are measurements for "emotionally hurt" of topological road network.

  4. Seismic Assessment and Performance of Nonstructural Components Affected by Structural Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Hur

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA requires a large number of simulations to evaluate the seismic vulnerability of structural and nonstructural components in nuclear power plants. The effect of structural modeling and analysis assumptions on dynamic analysis of 3D and simplified 2D stick models of auxiliary buildings and the attached nonstructural components is investigated. Dynamic characteristics and seismic performance of building models are also evaluated, as well as the computational accuracy of the models. The presented results provide a better understanding of the dynamic behavior and seismic performance of auxiliary buildings. The results also help to quantify the impact of uncertainties associated with modeling and analysis of simplified numerical models of structural and nonstructural components subjected to seismic shaking on the predicted seismic failure probabilities of these systems.

  5. Occurrence of swine salmonellosis in postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) affected pigs concurrently infected with porcine reproduction and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Satoshi; Ogawa, Akihiro; Kinoshita, Tomohide; Matsumoto, Atsuko; Ito, Noriko; Nakane, Takashi

    2006-04-01

    Fourteen diseased pigs from four farms in which there had been an outbreak of salmonellosis were investigated. Granulomatous inflammation with depletion of lymphocytes was observed in the swollen lymph nodes in these pigs. Antigens to porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) were immunolabeled in the lesions along with detection of viral DNA as PCV2 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In addition, antigens to porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were immunodetected in the lungs and Salmonella Choleraesuis was isolated from the affected pigs. The nine salmonellosis affected pigs, five (55.6%) with salmonellosis and PMWS concurrently infected with PRRSV were much higher than those infected with salmonellosis and PMWS (22.2%) or with salmonellosis and PPPRV (22.2%).

  6. Avaluació de l'eficiència de l'ús dels fluids orals en el diagnòstic del PRRSV /

    OpenAIRE

    Gibert Rebull, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Departament responsable de la tesi: Departament de Sanitat i d'Anatomia Animals En els darrers anys, l'ús dels fluids orals (FO) com a mostra diagnòstica en el control i monitoratge del Virus de la síndrome reproductiva i respiratòria porcina (PRRSV) s'ha estès en gran mesura per l'Amèrica del Nord i de manera més discreta per Europa. Tanmateix, no existeixen gaires estudis sobre els límits de detecció de la tècnica en el monitoratge de la malaltia en granges infectades amb el PRRSV1. Per ...

  7. PBMC transcriptome profiles identifies potential candidate genes and functional networks controlling the innate and the adaptive immune response to PRRSV vaccine in Pietrain pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Aminul; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Pröll, Maren Julia; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Aqter Rony, Sharmin; Tesfaye, Dawit; Tholen, Ernst; Hoelker, Michael; Schellander, Karl; Neuhoff, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a devastating viral disease affecting swine production, health and welfare throughout the world. A synergistic action of the innate and the adaptive immune system of the host is essential for mounting a durable protective immunity through vaccination. Therefore, the current study aimed to investigate the transcriptome profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to characterize the innate and the adaptive immune response to PRRS Virus (PRRSV) vaccination in Pietrain pigs. The Affymetrix gene chip porcine gene 1.0 ST array was used for the transcriptome profiling of PBMCs collected at immediately before (D0), at one (D1) and 28 days (D28) post PRRSV vaccination with three biological replications. With FDR activation, cytokine activity and inflammatory response were enriched during the innate immunity; cytolysis, T cell mediated cytotoxicity, immunoglobulin production were enriched during adaptive immunity to PRRSV vaccination. Significant enrichment of cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, signaling by interleukins, signaling by the B cell receptor (BCR), viral mRNA translation, IFN-gamma pathway and AP-1 transcription factor network pathways were indicating the involvement of altered genes in the antiviral defense. Network analysis revealed that four network modules were functionally involved with the transcriptional network of innate immunity, and five modules were linked to adaptive immunity in PBMCs. The innate immune transcriptional network was found to be regulated by LCK, STAT3, ATP5B, UBB and RSP17. While TGFß1, IL7R, RAD21, SP1 and GZMB are likely to be predictive for the adaptive immune transcriptional response to PRRSV vaccine in PBMCs. Results of the current immunogenomics study advances our understanding of PRRS in term of host-vaccine interaction, and thereby contribute to design a rationale for disease control strategy. PMID:28278192

  8. Fast and robust methods for full genome sequencing of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) Type 1 and Type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    followed by cycle sequencing of clones. The genome lengths were determined to be 14,876-15,098 and 15,342-15,408 nucleotides long for the Type 1 and Type 2 strains, respectively. These methods will greatly facilitate the generation of more complete genome PRRSV sequences globally which in turn may lead....... In the present study, fast and robust methods for long range RT-PCR amplification and subsequent next generation sequencing (NGS) of PRRSV Type 1 and Type 2 viruses were developed and validated on nine Type 1 and nine Type 2 PRRSV viruses. The methods were shown to generate robust and reliable sequences both...... on primary material and cell culture adapted viruses and the protocols were shown to perform well on all three NGS platforms tested (Roche 454 FLX, Illumina HiSeq 2000, and Ion Torrent PGM™ Sequencer). To complete the sequences at the 5’ end, 5’ Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (5’ RACE) was conducted...

  9. Age, allocation and availability of nonstructural carbon in mature red maple trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariah S. Carbone; Claudia I. Czimczik; Trevor F. Keenan; Paula F. Murakami; Neil Pederson; Paul G. Schaberg; Xiaomei Xu; Andrew D. Richardson

    2013-01-01

    The allocation of nonstructural carbon (NSC) to growth, metabolism and storage remains poorly understood, but is critical for the prediction of stress tolerance and mortality.We used the radiocarbon (14C) ‘bomb spike’ as a tracer of substrate and age of carbon in stemwood NSC, CO2 emitted by stems, tree...

  10. Distribution and mixing of old and new nonstructural carbon in two temperate trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. Richardson; Mariah S. Carbone; Brett A. Huggett; Morgan E. Furze; Claudia I. Czimczik; Jennifer C. Walker; Xiaomei Xu; Paul G. Schaberg; Paula. Murakami

    2015-01-01

    We know surprisingly little about whole-tree nonstructural carbon (NSC; primarily sugars and starch) budgets. Even less well understood is the mixing between recent photosynthetic assimilates (new NSC) and previously stored reserves. And, NSC turnover times are poorly constrained. We characterized the distribution of NSC in the stemwood, branches, and roots of two...

  11. Antibiotic-Mediated Inhibition of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV Infection: A Novel Quinolone Function Which Potentiates the Antiviral Cytokine Response in MARC-145 Cells and Pig Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Cafruny

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is an economically significant agent for which there currently are no effective treatments. Development of antiviral agents for PRRSV as well as many other viruses has been limited by toxicity of known antiviral compounds. In contrast, antibiotics for non-virus microbial infections have been widely useful, in part because of their acceptable toxicity in animals. We report here the discovery that the quinolonecontaining compound Plasmocin™, as well as the quinolones nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin, have potent anti-PRRSV activity in vitro. PRRSV replication was inhibited by these antibiotics in both cultured MARC-145 cells and cultured primary alveolar porcine macrophages (PAMs. Furthermore, sub-optimal concentrations of nalidixic acid synergized with antiviral cytokines (AK-2 or IFN-γ to quantitatively and qualitatively inhibit PRRSV replication in MARC-145 cells or PAMs. The antiviral activity of Plasmocin and nalidixic acid correlated with reduced actin expression in MARC-145 cells. Replication of the related lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV was also inhibited in primary mouse macrophages by Plasmocin. These results are significant to the development of antiviral strategies with potentially reduced toxicity, and provide a model system to better understand regulation of arterivirus replication.

  12. The major envelope protein, GP(5), of a European porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus contains a neutralization epitope in its N-terminal ectodomain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissink, E.H.J.; Wijk, van H.A.R.; Kroese, M.V.; Weiland, E.; Meulenberg, J.J.M.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Rijn, van P.A.

    2003-01-01

    A set of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the GP5 protein of European type porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been produced previously (Weiland et al., 1999). This set reacted with a plaque-purified virus (PPV) subpopulation of Dutch isolate

  13. Experimental infection of pigs with two East European variants of Type 1 PRRSV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Lars Erik; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    , 7, 10, 14, 17, 21 and 24 days post infection (dpi). The pigs infected with the “Bor59” virus developed higher body temperature and more severe clinical symptoms compared to the other three groups, although the clinical signs in general were mild. The acute phase response was measured in serum...... samples as an objective indicator of infection. Acute phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) showed an increase in levels in pigs infected with the Eastern European viruses with an earlier rise for Bor59 than for Ili6, both peaking at 10 dpi. In contrast, the CRP level did not increase significantly...... in neither the subtype 1 virus inoculated pigs nor the sham-inoculated controls. Acute phase protein haptoglobin showed a very early increase in Bor59 infected pigs, peaking at 3 dpi, while no increase was observed in Ili6 infected pigs. All of the virus inoculated pigs seroconverted, as measured by IPMA...

  14. Non-Structured Materials Science Data Sharing Based on Semantic Annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjun Hu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The explosion of non-structured materials science data makes it urgent for materials researchers to resolve the problem of how to effectively share this information. Materials science image data is an important class of non-structured data. This paper proposes a semantic annotation method to resolve the problem of materials science image data sharing. This method is implemented by a four-layer architecture, which includes ontology building, semantic annotation, reasoning service, and application. We take metallographic image data as an example and build a metallographic image OWL-ontology. Users can accomplish semantic annotation of metallographic image according to the ontology. Reasoning service is provided in a data sharing application to demonstrate the effective sharing of materials science image data through adding semantic annotation.

  15. Upscaling the Use of Mixed Recycled Aggregates in Non-Structural Low Cement Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio López-Uceda; Jesús Ayuso; José Ramón Jiménez; Francisco Agrela; Auxiliadora Barbudo; Jorge De Brito

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to produce non-structural concrete with mixed recycled aggregates (MRA) in upscaled applications with low-cement content. Four slabs were executed with concrete made with different ratios of coarse MRA (0%, 20%, 40% and 100%), using the mix design, the mixing procedures and the facilities from a nearby concrete production plant. The analysis of the long-term compressive and splitting tensile strengths in concrete cores, extracted from the slabs, allowed the highlighting of ...

  16. Spectroscopic Remote Sensing of Non-Structural Carbohydrates in Forest Canopies

    OpenAIRE

    Asner, Gregory P.; Martin, Roberta E.

    2015-01-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) are products of photosynthesis, and leaf NSC concentration may be a prognostic indicator of climate-change tolerance in woody plants. However, measurement of leaf NSC is prohibitively labor intensive, especially in tropical forests, where foliage is difficult to access and where NSC concentrations vary enormously by species and across environments. Imaging spectroscopy may allow quantitative mapping of leaf NSC, but this possibility remains unproven. We test...

  17. PBMC transcriptome profiles identifies potential candidate genes and functional networks controlling the innate and the adaptive immune response to PRRSV vaccine in Pietrain pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Aminul; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Pröll, Maren Julia; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Aqter Rony, Sharmin; Tesfaye, Dawit; Tholen, Ernst; Hoelker, Michael; Schellander, Karl; Neuhoff, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a devastating viral disease affecting swine production, health and welfare throughout the world. A synergistic action of the innate and the adaptive immune system of the host is essential for mounting a durable protective immunity through vaccination. Therefore, the current study aimed to investigate the transcriptome profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to characterize the innate and the adaptive immune response to PRRS Virus (PRRSV) vaccination in Pietrain pigs. The Affymetrix gene chip porcine gene 1.0 ST array was used for the transcriptome profiling of PBMCs collected at immediately before (D0), at one (D1) and 28 days (D28) post PRRSV vaccination with three biological replications. With FDR <0.05 and log2 fold change ±1.5 as cutoff criteria, 295 and 115 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed in PBMCs during the stage of innate and adaptive response, respectively. The microarray expression results were technically validated by qRT-PCR. The gene ontology terms such as viral life cycle, regulation of lymphocyte activation, cytokine activity and inflammatory response were enriched during the innate immunity; cytolysis, T cell mediated cytotoxicity, immunoglobulin production were enriched during adaptive immunity to PRRSV vaccination. Significant enrichment of cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, signaling by interleukins, signaling by the B cell receptor (BCR), viral mRNA translation, IFN-gamma pathway and AP-1 transcription factor network pathways were indicating the involvement of altered genes in the antiviral defense. Network analysis revealed that four network modules were functionally involved with the transcriptional network of innate immunity, and five modules were linked to adaptive immunity in PBMCs. The innate immune transcriptional network was found to be regulated by LCK, STAT3, ATP5B, UBB and RSP17. While TGFß1, IL7R, RAD21, SP1 and GZMB are likely to

  18. Unraveling the contact patterns and network structure of pig shipments in the United States and its association with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyuyoung; Polson, Dale; Lowe, Erin; Main, Rodger; Holtkamp, Derald; Martínez-López, Beatriz

    2017-03-01

    The analysis of the pork value chain is becoming key to understanding the risk of infectious disease dissemination in the swine industry. In this study, we used social network analysis to characterize the swine shipment network structure and properties in a typical multisite swine production system in the US. We also aimed to evaluate the association between network properties and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus (PRRSV) transmission between production sites. We analyzed the 109,868 swine shipments transporting over 93 million swine between more than 500 production sites from 2012 to 2014. A total of 248 PRRSV positive occurrences were reported from 79 production sites during those 3 years. The temporal dynamics of swine shipments was evaluated by computing network properties in one-month and three-month networks. The association of PRRS occurrence in sow farms with centrality properties from one-month and three-month networks was assessed by using the multilevel logistic regression. All monthly networks showed a scale-free network topology with positive degree assortativity. The regression model revealed that out-degree centrality had a negative association with PRRS occurrence in sow farms in both one-month and three-month networks [OR=0.79 (95% CI, 0.63-0.99) in one-month network and 0.56 (95% CI, 0.36, 0.88) in three-month network] and in-closeness centrality model was positively associated with PRRS occurrence in sow farms in the three-month network [OR=2.45 (95% CI, 1.14-5.26)]. We also describe how the occurrence of porcine epidemic diarrheac (PED) outbreaks severely affected the network structure as well as the PRRS occurrence reports and its association with centrality measures in sow farms. The structure of the swine shipment network and the connectivity between production sites influenced on the PRRSV transmission. The use of network topology and characteristics combining with spatial analysis based on fine scale geographical location

  19. Real-time onestep RT-PCR for the detection and differentiation of European and North American types of PRRSV in boar semen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Lars Erik

    ) and the virus can be transmitted by this route, creating a need for diagnostic tests to ensure a PRRSV-free semen supply. PCR is an obvious method for such testing, and especially nested and TwoStep RT-PCR methods have been extensively used for this purpose. However, OneStep RT-PCR offers a more convenient...... and safe diagnostic procedure, since cDNA synthesis and PCR is performed sequentially without inbetween opening of the PCR-tubes, thus eliminating a substantial contamination risk. The aim of the present study was to validate a real-time OneStep RT-PCR assay for the simultaneous detection...

  20. Ensiling characteristics, structural and nonstructural carbohydrate composition and enzymatic digestibility of Napier grass ensiled with additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desta, Seare T; Yuan, XianJun; Li, Junfeng; Shao, Tao

    2016-12-01

    Ensiling characteristics, structural and nonstructural carbohydrate composition and enzymatic digestibility (ED) of Napier grass silage was examined. Napier grass ensiled with no additive control, 0.2% formic acid, 0.4% molasses, and 0.3% fibrolytic enzyme for, 7, 30, 60 and 90days. Additives increased lactic acid, soluble carbohydrate and decreased all of lignocellulosic contents except acid detergent lignin and pH than control. The highest value of nonstructural carbohydrate and large reduction in lignocellulosic contents was observed in formic acid and fibrolytic enzyme silage respectively. The content of glucose and fructose showed rapid drop in the first 7days of ensilage. Ensilage decreased lignocellulosic contents and increased ED compared to fresh material. The ED of formic acid and molasses silage was significantly higher than control and fibrolytic enzyme silages in all tested days. In summery the ensiling quality structural and nonstructural carbohydrate and ED value of mature Napier grass silage improved through additives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nonstructural damages of reinforced concrete buildings due to 2015 Ranau earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiyanto, Mohd Irwan; Majid, Taksiah A.; Nazri, Fadzli Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    On 15th June 2016 a moderate earthquake with magnitude Mw5.9 was occurred in Sabah, Malaysia. Specifically, the epicentre was located at 16 km northwest of Ranau. Less than two days after the first event, a reconnaissance mission took action to investigate the damages on buildings. Since the reinforced concrete buildings in Ranau were designed based on gravity and wind load only, a lot of minor to severe damages was occurred. This paper presents the damages on the nonstructural elements of reinforced concrete buildings due to Ranau earthquake. The assessment was conducted via in-situ field investigation covering the visual observation, taking photo, and interview with local resident. Based on in-situ field investigation, there was a lot of damages occurred on the nonstructural elements like the brick walls. Such damages cannot be neglected since it can cause injury and fatality to the victims. Therefore, it can be concluded that the installation of nonstructural elements should be reviewed for the sake of safety.

  2. Examining non-structural retrofitting status of teaching hospitals in Kerman against disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Mahmood Nekooi; Moradi, Seyed Mobin; Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza

    2017-05-01

    Continuous services provision of a hospital before and after a disaster is one of the most prominent issues that all people, especially the authorities must take into huge consideration. Concerning the experiences of previous earthquakes, the role and importance of nonstructural components becomes increasingly clear in the uninterrupted services of hospitals. In this study, non-structural retrofitting status of Kerman teaching hospitals was evaluated against natural disasters. This cross-sectional study was carried out in the second half of 2014 on the teaching hospitals in Kerman (Iran). The study population consisted of all Kerman teaching hospitals. The research instrument was World Health Organization/Pan American Health Organization (WHO/PAHO) standard checklist. Data analysis was carried out using descriptive statistics through SPSS 19. One hospital had a low retrofitting level, two hospitals had an average level and one had a high level. In the examined hospitals in this study, the medical gas section had the lowest preparedness against natural disasters, while the office, warehouse and furniture section had the highest resistance. Generally, the non-structural retrofitting status was 50% in one hospital and was between 65% and 85% in other hospitals. Generally, the retrofitting status of hospitals was not at the ideal condition, most hospitals were in average condition. Concerning the high risk of hospitals in disasters, it is necessary that senior executives and managers of Kerman Province and Kerman University of Medical Sciences take some measures to retrofit these buildings and to reduce the risk of vulnerability.

  3. Recombinant non-structural polyprotein 3AB-based serodiagnostic strategy for FMD surveillance in bovines irrespective of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Jajati K; Pandey, Laxmi K; Sanyal, Aniket; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2011-11-01

    In India, the proportion of bovines vaccinated against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is increasing since the implementation of the Government supported 'FMD Control Programme', and non-structural protein (NSP)-based serological assays for discriminating between antibodies induced by infection or vaccination (DIVA) could be useful. The FMD virus NSP 3AB was expressed in a prokaryotic system and an indirect ELISA (r3AB(3) I-ELISA) was developed and validated as a screening assay for detecting virus in vaccinated bovines. The diagnostic sensitivity of the assay was estimated to be 96%, while the diagnostic specificity varied between the naïve and vaccinates as 99.1% and 96.4%, respectively. This assay could detect antibodies to 3AB (3AB-Ab) from 10 to as late as 900 days post-infection in cattle infected experimentally. The "in-house" assay demonstrated higher sensitivity than a commercial 3ABC ELISA kit particularly with samples obtained from the late stages of infection. Transient post-vaccinal 3AB-Ab response could be detected in one of the three commercial vaccines during the six-month vaccination regimen, which emphasizes the fact that for a DIVA-compatible diagnostic strategy to be a realistic option, all vaccines need to be quality checked for the NSP content. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of a swine specific 9-plex Luminex cytokine assay and assessment of immunity after porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccination: Elevated serum IL-12 levels are not predictive of protect

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Luminex multiplex swine cytokine assay was developed to measure 9 cytokines simultaneously in pig serum and tested in a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine/challenge study. This assay detects innate (IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, IFNa, TNFa); regulatory (IL-10), Th1 (IL-12, I...

  5. The KnowRISK project - Know your city, Reduce seISmic risK through non-structural elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa Oliveria, Carlos; Amaral Ferreira, Mónica; Lopez, Mário; Sousa Silva, Delta; Musacchio, Gemma; Rupakhety, Rajesh; Falsaperla, Susanna; Meroni, Fabrizio; Langer, Horst

    2016-04-01

    Historically, there is a tendency to focus on seismic structural performance of buildings, neglecting the potential for damage of non-structural elements. In particular, non-structural elements of buildings are their architectural parts (i.e. partitions, ceilings, cladding), electrical and mechanical components (i.e., distribution panels, piping, plumbing), and contents (e.g., furniture, bookcases, computers and desktop equipment). Damage of these elements often contributes significantly to earthquake impacts. In the 1999 Izmit Earthquake, Turkey, 50% of the injuries and 3% of human losses were caused by non-structural failures. In the 2010-2011 Christchurch Earthquakes (New Zealand), 40% of building damage was induced by non-structural malfunctions. Around 70%-85% of construction cost goes into these elements, and their damage can strongly influence the ability of communities to cope with and recover from earthquakes. The project Know your city, Reduce seISmic risK through non-structural elements (KnowRISK) aims at facilitating local communities' access to expert knowledge on non-structural seismic protection solutions. The project will study seismic scenarios critical for non-structural damage, produce a portfolio of non-structural protection measures and investigate the level of awareness in specific communities. We will implement risk communication strategies that will take into account the social and cultural background and a participatory approach to raise awareness in local communities. The paradox between the progress of scientific knowledge and the ongoing increase of losses from natural disasters worldwide is a well-identified gap in the UN Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015, in which one of the main priorities is the investment on "knowledge use, innovation and education to build a culture of safety and resilience". The KnowRISK is well aligned with these priorities and will contribute to participatory action aimed at: i) transferring expert knowledge

  6. Reducing New Orleans Residential Flood Risk in an Uncertain Future Using Non-Structural Risk Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, J. R.; Groves, D.; Johnson, D.

    2010-12-01

    Five years after Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast, the long-term future of the City of New Orleans remains uncertain. This paper addresses one of New Orleans' most critical challenges: how to make the city more resilient and less vulnerable to future flood damages. Despite recent upgrades to the protection system surrounding the city designed to protect against floods with a 1-in-100 (1%) annual chance of occurrence, New Orleans remains vulnerable to lower-frequency, high-damage events. In addition, uncertain factors that influence flood risk, including coastal land loss and subsidence, rising sea levels, and population recovery and growth, may lead to increasing risk over time. Current proposals for risk reduction in New Orleans and South Louisiana, however, have not fully accounted for these key uncertain drivers. Rather than focus on additional large-scale structural infrastructure investments, this paper considers proposals to augment the existing protection system with ``non-structural" risk mitigation programs. Non-structural risk mitigation includes incentives for elevating existing or new structures, revised building codes, incentives for relocation to lower risk areas, and land use restrictions designed to curtail future growth in the floodplain. This research estimates the risk reduction benefits and implementation costs of non-structural risk mitigation strategies focused on single-family or small multi-family homes in New Orleans. We draw from existing risk models to develop a low-resolution scenario generator, NOLArisk, designed to produce first-order estimates of property risk from 2011-2060 across a range of uncertain future scenarios. We then apply exploratory modeling and Robust Decision Making (RDM) methods to a) suggest strategies that balance risk reduction and implementation costs across many or most plausible futures, and b) identify scenarios in which current alternatives yield negative net economic benefits or excessive levels of

  7. Novel Moraxella catarrhalis prophages display hyperconserved non-structural genes despite their genomic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariff, Amir; Wise, Michael J; Kahler, Charlene M; Tay, Chin Yen; Peters, Fanny; Perkins, Timothy T; Chang, Barbara J

    2015-10-24

    Moraxella catarrhalis is an important pathogen that often causes otitis media in children, a disease that is not currently vaccine preventable. Asymptomatic colonisation of the human upper respiratory tract is common and lack of clearance by the immune system is likely due to the emergence of seroresistant genetic lineages. No active bacteriophages or prophages have been described in this species. This study was undertaken to identify and categorise prophages in M. catarrhalis, their genetic diversity and the relationship of such diversity with the host-species phylogeny. This study presents a comparative analysis of 32 putative prophages identified in 95 phylogenetically variable, newly sequenced M. catarrhalis genomes. The prophages were genotypically classified into four diverse clades. The genetic synteny of each clade is similar to the group 1 phage family Siphoviridae, however, they form genotypic clusters that are distinct from other members of this family. No core genetic sequences exist across the 32 prophages despite clades 2, 3, and 4 sharing the most sequence identity. The analysis of non-structural prophage genes (coding the integrase, and terminase), and portal gene showed that the respective genes were identical for clades 2, 3, and 4, but unique for clade 1. Empirical analysis calculated that these genes are unexpectedly hyperconserved, under purifying selection, suggesting a tightly regulated functional role. As such, it is improbable that the prophages are decaying remnants but stable components of a fluctuating, flexible and unpredictable system ultimately maintained by functional constraints on non-structural and packaging genes. Additionally, the plate encoding genes were well conserved across all four prophage clades, and the tail fibre genes, commonly responsible for receptor recognition, were clustered into three major groups distributed across the prophage clades. A pan-genome of 283,622 bp was identified, and the prophages were mapped

  8. The role of non-structural carbohydrate reserves in trees under climatic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, G.; Koerner, C.

    2012-12-01

    The storage of non-structural carbon (C) reserves is an indispensable process for all plants. Diverting parts of their photoassimilates into storage pools (e.g. starch and storage lipids) ensures plants to survive periods when the requirement for C (i.e. the sum of all C-sink activities) exceeds their photosynthetic capacity (C-source activity). Over the last decade, research delivered clear evidence that under the current atmospheric CO2 concentrations, tree growth is generally limited by the availability of resources other than C (e.g. soil nutrients) under most conditions. Whether climatic stresses, like cold temperature or drought, can induce C-limitation in trees is currently vividly debated. We will thus address the following questions: 1) do low temperatures at alpine treelines or drought lead to situations where photosynthesis is limiting growth, and 2) what is the role of non-structural C reserves under such conditions? Trees at the alpine treeline as well as under hydraulic constraints accumulate, rather than use up their non-structural carbohydrate reserves with increasing stress. We propose that this observed increase of C stores results from a stress related decline in growth (C-sink activity) relative to C-supply. Hence, the higher C reserve concentrations found in trees under cold and dry conditions are very likely a direct physiological response to the environmental stress (diversion to storage), reflecting relatively higher availability of photoassimilates compared to sink demand. Previous experiments with trees and crops showed that in cold and dry environments, meristematic growth is generally limited more severely and at an earlier stage than photosynthesis. While cell division and differentiation are close to zero at about 5 °C even in cold adapted species, rates of photosynthesis are still reaching up to 80 % of maximum rates. Similarly, structural growth generally ceases at much less negative water potentials than does photosynthesis, which

  9. Bluetongue virus nonstructural protein NS3/NS3a is not essential for virus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gennip, van H.G.P.; Water, van de S.G.P.; Rijn, van P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Orbiviruses form the largest genus of the family Reoviridae consisting of at least 23 different virus species. One of these is the bluetongue virus (BTV) and causes severe hemorrhagic disease in ruminants, and is transmitted by bites of Culicoides midges. BTV is a non-enveloped virus which is

  10. Upscaling the Use of Mixed Recycled Aggregates in Non-Structural Low Cement Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio López-Uceda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to produce non-structural concrete with mixed recycled aggregates (MRA in upscaled applications with low-cement content. Four slabs were executed with concrete made with different ratios of coarse MRA (0%, 20%, 40% and 100%, using the mix design, the mixing procedures and the facilities from a nearby concrete production plant. The analysis of the long-term compressive and splitting tensile strengths in concrete cores, extracted from the slabs, allowed the highlighting of the long-term high strength development potential of MRA incorporation. The study of cast specimens produced in situ under the same conditions as the slabs showed, firstly, that the use of MRA has a great influence on the properties related to durability, secondly, that the loss of compressive strength for total MRA incorporation relative to control concrete increases proportionally with the class strength, and, thirdly, that the mechanical properties (including Schmidt hammer results from the concrete slabs showed no significant differences relative to the control concrete for coarse aggregates replacements up to 40%. Therefore, this upscaled experimental study supports the application of concrete with 100% coarse MRA incorporation and low cement content in non-structural civil works such as bike lanes, gutters, ground slabs, leveling surfaces, and subgrades for foundations. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there have not been any upscaled applications of concrete with MRA and low cement content.

  11. Upscaling the Use of Mixed Recycled Aggregates in Non-Structural Low Cement Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Uceda, Antonio; Ayuso, Jesús; Jiménez, José Ramón; Agrela, Francisco; Barbudo, Auxiliadora; De Brito, Jorge

    2016-02-02

    This research aims to produce non-structural concrete with mixed recycled aggregates (MRA) in upscaled applications with low-cement content. Four slabs were executed with concrete made with different ratios of coarse MRA (0%, 20%, 40% and 100%), using the mix design, the mixing procedures and the facilities from a nearby concrete production plant. The analysis of the long-term compressive and splitting tensile strengths in concrete cores, extracted from the slabs, allowed the highlighting of the long-term high strength development potential of MRA incorporation. The study of cast specimens produced in situ under the same conditions as the slabs showed, firstly, that the use of MRA has a great influence on the properties related to durability, secondly, that the loss of compressive strength for total MRA incorporation relative to control concrete increases proportionally with the class strength, and, thirdly, that the mechanical properties (including Schmidt hammer results) from the concrete slabs showed no significant differences relative to the control concrete for coarse aggregates replacements up to 40%. Therefore, this upscaled experimental study supports the application of concrete with 100% coarse MRA incorporation and low cement content in non-structural civil works such as bike lanes, gutters, ground slabs, leveling surfaces, and subgrades for foundations. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there have not been any upscaled applications of concrete with MRA and low cement content.

  12. Genetic and antigenic drift of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) in a closed population evaluated by full genome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Lars Erik

    of circulating PRRS viruses in Danish pigs and to investigate the genetic drift of the virus in a closed population with very limited introductions of new animals. The study included phylogenetic analysis of full genome sequences of eight Type 1 and nine Type 2 PRRS viruses, including the very first Danish......Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) viruses are divided into two major genotypes (Type 1 and Type 2) based on their genetic diversity. Type 1 PRRSV is further divided into at least 3 subtypes, but until now only subtype 1 has been detected in Western Europe and North America. Both...... isolated Type 1 virus and the very first Danish Type 2 PRRS virus isolated from a non-vaccinated pig herd. Furthermore, by sequencing ORF5 and ORF7 of 43 Type 1 and 57 Type 2 viruses isolated between 2003 and 2013, the level of genetic diversity was assessed. The results showed a very high genetic...

  13. Biliverdin inhibits hepatitis C virus nonstructural 3/4A protease activity: mechanism for the antiviral effects of heme oxygenase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhaowen; Wilson, Anne T; Luxon, Bruce A; Brown, Kyle E; Mathahs, M Meleah; Bandyopadhyay, Sarmistha; McCaffrey, Anton P; Schmidt, Warren N

    2010-12-01

    Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Of the products of the reaction catalyzed by HO-1, iron has been shown to inhibit HCV ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymerase, but little is known about the antiviral activity of biliverdin (BV). Herein, we report that BV inhibits viral replication and viral protein expression in a dose-dependent manner in replicons and cells harboring the infectious J6/JFH construct. Using the SensoLyte 620 HCV Protease Assay with a wide wavelength excitation/emission (591 nm/622 nm) fluorescence energy transfer peptide, we found that both recombinant and endogenous nonstructural 3/4A (NS3/4A) protease from replicon microsomes are potently inhibited by BV. Of the tetrapyrroles tested, BV was the strongest inhibitor of NS3/4A activity, with a median inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 9 μM, similar to that of the commercial inhibitor, AnaSpec (Fremont, CA) #25346 (IC(50) 5 μM). Lineweaver-Burk plots indicated mixed competitive and noncompetitive inhibition of the protease by BV. In contrast, the effects of bilirubin (BR) on HCV replication and NS3/4A were much less potent. Because BV is rapidly converted to BR by biliverdin reductase (BVR) intracellularly, the effect of BVR knockdown on BV antiviral activity was assessed. After greater than 80% silencing of BVR, inhibition of viral replication by BV was enhanced. BV also increased the antiviral activity of α-interferon in replicons. BV is a potent inhibitor of HCV NS3/4A protease, which likely contributes to the antiviral activity of HO-1. These findings suggest that BV or its derivatives may be useful in future drug therapies targeting the NS3/4A protease. Copyright © 2010 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  14. Genetic analysis of nonstructural genes (NS1 and NS2) of H9N2 and H5N1 viruses recently isolated in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banet-Noach, Caroline; Panshin, Alexander; Golender, Natalia; Simanov, Lubov; Rozenblut, Ezra; Pokamunski, Shimon; Pirak, Michael; Tendler, Yevgenii; García, Maricarmen; Gelman, Boris; Pasternak, Ruslan; Perk, Shimon

    2007-04-01

    The avian influenza virus subtype H9N2 affects wild birds, domestic poultry, swine, and humans; it has circulated amongst domestic poultry in Israel during the last 6 years. The H5N1 virus was recorded in Israel for the first time in March 2006. Nonstructural (NS) genes and NS proteins are important in the life cycle of the avian influenza viruses. In the present study, NS genes of 21 examples of H9N2 and of two examples of H5N1 avian influenza viruses, isolated in Israel during 2000-2006, were completely sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. All the H9N2 isolates fell into a single group that, in turn, was subdivided into three subgroups in accordance with the time of isolation; their NS1 and NS2 proteins possessed 230 and 121 amino acids, respectively. The NS1 protein of the H5N1 isolates had five amino acid deletions, which was typical of highly pathogenic H5N1 viruses isolated in various countries during 2005-2006. Comparative analysis showed that the NS proteins of the H9N2 Israeli isolates contained few amino acid sequences associated with high pathogenicity or human host specificity.

  15. Water stress, shoot growth and storage of non-structural carbohydrates along a tree height gradient in a tall conifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Woodruff; Frederick C. Meinzer

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed concentrations of starch, sucrose, glucose and fructose in upper branch wood, foliage and trunk sapwood of Douglas-fir trees in height classes ranging from ~2 to ~57 m. Mean concentrations of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) for all tissues were highest in the tallest height class and lowest in the lowest height class, and height-related trends in NSC...

  16. Highly Insulating Glazing Systems using Non-Structural Center Glazing Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, Christian; Arasteh, Dariush; Goudey, Howdy; Kohler, Christian

    2008-04-09

    Three layer insulating glass units with two low-e coatings and an effective gas fill are known to be highly insulating, with center-of-glass U-factors as low as 0.57 W/m{sup 2}-K (0.10 Btu/h-ft{sup 2}- F). Such units have historically been built with center layers of glass or plastic which extend all the way through the spacer system. This paper shows that triple glazing systems with non-structural center layers which do not create a hermetic seal at the edge have the potential to be as thermally efficient as standard designs, while potentially removing some of the production and product integration issues that have discouraged the use of triples.

  17. Quantitative characterization of nonstructural carbohydrates of mezcal Agave (Agave salmiana Otto ex Salm-Dick).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel-Cuello, Christian; Juárez-Flores, Bertha Irene; Aguirre-Rivera, Juan Rogelio; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan Manuel

    2008-07-23

    Fructans are the reserve carbohydrates in Agave spp. plants. In mezcal factories, fructans undergoes thermal hydrolysis to release fructose and glucose, which are the basis to produce this spirit. Carbohydrate content determines the yield of the final product, which depends on plant organ, ripeness stage, and thermal hydrolysis. Thus, a qualitative and quantitative characterization of nonstructural carbohydrates was conducted in raw and hydrolyzed juices extracted from Agave salmiana stems and leaves under three ripeness stages. By high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), fructose, glucose, sucrose, xylose, and maltose were identified in agave juice. Only the plant fraction with hydrolysis interaction was found to be significant in the glucose concentration plant. Interactions of the fraction with hydrolysis and ripeness with hydrolysis were statistically significant in fructose concentration. Fructose concentration rose considerably with hydrolysis, but only in juice extracted from ripe agave stems (early mature and castrated). This increase was statistically significant only with acid hydrolysis.

  18. Hospital Workers Disaster Management and Hospital Nonstructural: A Study in Bandar Abbas, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakbala, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A devastating earthquake is inevitable in the long term and likely in the near future in Iran. The objective of the study was to assess the knowledge of hospital staff to disaster management system in hospital and to determine nonstructural safety assessment in Shahid Mohammadi hospital in Bandar Abbas city of Iran. This hospital is the main referral hospital in Hormozgan province with a capacity of about 450 beds and the highest patient admissions. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 on 200 healthcare workers at Shahid Mohammadi hospital, in the city of Bandar Abbas, Iran. This hospital is the main referral hospital in Hormozgan province and has a capacity of about 450 beds with highest numbers of patient admissions. Questionnaire and checklist used for assessing health workers knowledge and awareness towards disaster management and nonstructural safety this hospital. Results: This study found that knowledge, awareness, and disaster preparedness of hospital staff need continual reinforcement to improve self efficacy for disaster management. Equipping health care facilities at the time of natural disasters, especially earthquakes are of great importance all over the world, especially in Iran. This requires the national strategies and planning for all health facilities. Conclusion: It seems due to limitations of hospital beds, insufficient of personnel, and medical equipment, health care providers paid greater attention to this issue. Since this hospital is the only educational public hospital in the province, it is essential to pay much attention to the risk management not only to this hospital but at the national level to health facilities. PMID:26573039

  19. Properties of Non-Structural Concrete Made with Mixed Recycled Aggregates and Low Cement Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Uceda, Antonio; Ayuso, Jesús; López, Martin; Jimenez, José Ramón; Agrela, Francisco; Sierra, María José

    2016-01-26

    In spite of not being legally accepted in most countries, mixed recycled aggregates (MRA) could be a suitable raw material for concrete manufacturing. The aims of this research were as follows: (i) to analyze the effect of the replacement ratio of natural coarse aggregates with MRA, the amount of ceramic particles in MRA, and the amount of cement, on the mechanical and physical properties of a non-structural concrete made with a low cement content; and (ii) to verify if it is possible to achieve a low-strength concrete that replaces a greater amount of natural aggregate with MRA and that has a low cement content. Two series of concrete mixes were manufactured using 180 and 200 kg/m³ of CEM II/A-V 42.5 R type Portland cement. Each series included seven concrete mixes: one with natural aggregates; two MRA with different ceramic particle contents; and one for each coarse aggregate replacement ratio (20%, 40%, and 100%). To study their properties, compressive and splitting tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, density, porosity, water penetration, and sorptivity, tests were performed. The results confirmed that the main factors affecting the properties analyzed in this research are the amount of cement and the replacement ratio; the two MRAs used in this work presented a similar influence on the properties. A non-structural, low-strength concrete (15 MPa) with an MRA replacement ratio of up to 100% for 200 kg/m³ of cement was obtained. This type of concrete could be applied in the construction of ditches, sidewalks, and other similar civil works.

  20. Perinatal transmission of hepatitis C antigens: envelope 1, envelope 2 and non-structural 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attallah, Abdelfattah M; Abdallah, Sanaa O; El-Far, Mohamed; Omran, Mohamed M; Tabll, Ashraf A; Ghaly, Mohamed F; Ezzat, Said M; Elhamshary, Manal O; El-Gohary, Zeinab M; Mohamedin, Attiya H; El-Morsi, Adel A; Askora, Ahmed A; Abdelrazek, Mohamed A; El-Kafrawy, Hala M; Keneber, Mohamed H; Khalil, Mohamed R; Aggag, Mostafa M; Elbendary, Mohamed S; El-Deeb, Menatallah M; Abuzaid, Mahmoud S; Mansour, Ahmed T; Attallah, Ahmed A

    2015-08-01

    Perinatal exposure to hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens during pregnancy may affect the developing immune system in the fetus. We aimed to study the perinatal transmission of HCV structural and non-structural antigens. Sera from 402 pregnant mothers were tested for anti-HCV antibody and HCV RNA. HCV antigens were determined in sera from 101 HCV-infected mothers and their cord blood. In both serum and cord blood samples, HCV NS4 (non-structural 4) at 27 kDa, E1 (envelope 1) at 38 kDa and E2 (envelope 2) at 40 kDa were identified, purified and quantified using western blotting, electroelution and ELISA. Maternal sera and neonate cord blood samples had similar detection rates for NS4 (94.1%), E1 (90.1%) and E2 (90.1%). The mean maternal serum levels (optical density, OD) of HCV NS4 (0.87 ± 0.01), E1 (0.86 ± 0.01) and E2 (0.85 ± 0.01) did not differ significantly (p > 0.05) from those of neonatal cord blood (0.83 ± 0.01, 0.87 ± 0.01 and 0.85 ± 0.01, respectively). Also, strong correlations (p 0.05) from those in caesarean section. These findings indicate that vertical transmission of HCV NS4, E1 and E2 antigens was very high. Thus, exposure to these antigens may influence the developing immune responses to natural infection or future vaccination.

  1. Properties of Non-Structural Concrete Made with Mixed Recycled Aggregates and Low Cement Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Uceda, Antonio; Ayuso, Jesús; López, Martin; Jimenez, José Ramón; Agrela, Francisco; Sierra, María José

    2016-01-01

    In spite of not being legally accepted in most countries, mixed recycled aggregates (MRA) could be a suitable raw material for concrete manufacturing. The aims of this research were as follows: (i) to analyze the effect of the replacement ratio of natural coarse aggregates with MRA, the amount of ceramic particles in MRA, and the amount of cement, on the mechanical and physical properties of a non-structural concrete made with a low cement content; and (ii) to verify if it is possible to achieve a low-strength concrete that replaces a greater amount of natural aggregate with MRA and that has a low cement content. Two series of concrete mixes were manufactured using 180 and 200 kg/m3 of CEM II/A-V 42.5 R type Portland cement. Each series included seven concrete mixes: one with natural aggregates; two MRA with different ceramic particle contents; and one for each coarse aggregate replacement ratio (20%, 40%, and 100%). To study their properties, compressive and splitting tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, density, porosity, water penetration, and sorptivity, tests were performed. The results confirmed that the main factors affecting the properties analyzed in this research are the amount of cement and the replacement ratio; the two MRAs used in this work presented a similar influence on the properties. A non-structural, low-strength concrete (15 MPa) with an MRA replacement ratio of up to 100% for 200 kg/m3 of cement was obtained. This type of concrete could be applied in the construction of ditches, sidewalks, and other similar civil works. PMID:28787874

  2. Evaluation of three 3ABC ELISAs for foot-and-mouth disease non-structural antibodies using latent class analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malirat Viviane

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is a highly contagious viral disease of even-toed ungulates. Serological diagnosis/surveillance of FMD presents several problems as there are seven serotypes worldwide and in the event of vaccination it may be necessary to be able to identify FMD infected/exposed animals irrespective of their vaccination status. The recent development of non-structural 3ABC protein (NSP ELISA tests has greatly advanced sero-diagnosis/surveillance as these tests detect exposure to live virus for any of the seven serotypes of FMD, even in vaccinated populations. This paper analyses the performance of three NSP tests using a Bayesian formulation of the Hui-Walter latent class model to estimate test sensitivity and specificity in the absence of a "gold-standard" test, using sera from a well described cattle population in Cameroon with endemic FMD. Results The analysis found a high sensitivity and specificity for both the Danish C-ELISA and the World Organisation for Animal Health (O.I.E. recommended South American I-ELISA. However, the commercial CHEKIT kit, though having high specificity, has very low sensitivity. The results of the study suggests that for NSP ELISAs, latent class models are a useful alternative to the traditional approach of evaluating diagnostic tests against a known "gold-standard" test as imperfections in the "gold-standard" may give biased test characteristics. Conclusion This study demonstrates that when applied to naturally infected zebu cattle managed under extensive rangeland conditions, the FMD ELISAs may not give the same parameter estimates as those generated from experimental studies. The Bayesian approach allows for full posterior probabilities and capture of the uncertainty in the estimates. The implications of an imperfect specificity are important for the design and interpretation of sero-surveillance data and may result in excessive numbers of false positives in low prevalence

  3. Non-structural carbohydrate metabolism and postharvest conservation of gerbera flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Oliveira Souza Alves

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The species Gerbera jamesonii Adlam has great economic importance in the ornamental sector, due to exuberance of floral stems. However, florists face some challenges such as postharvest handling and difficulty of conservation. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize the non-structural carbohydrate content in different floral stages of G. jamesonii var. Dawn and evaluate the effect of preservative solutions during the postharvest storage of this species. For this purpose, it was quantified TSS, RS and NRS from the seven stages of gerbera stems ontogeny (E1, E2, E3, E4, E5, E6 and E7. The preservative solutions used were: T1 distilled water; T2 citric acid (100 mg L-1; T3 glucose (20 g L-1; T4 gibberellic acid (GA3 , 5 mg L-1; T5 calcium chloride (CaCl2 , 20g L-1 and T6 Sodium Thiosulphate (STS, 20 mM. The effect of preservative solutions were assessed daily, considering the longevity of flowers, variation in the absorption of preservative solution, pH of the solution and fresh mass variation. The experimental design was completely randomized with four replicates. There was a difference in carbohydrate metabolism during floral opening and senescence. In the orange bracts there was a lower TSS content, while in the inflorescences it was observed a reduction in the yellowish, greenish-green and greenish stages. The content of RS increased in the bracts, whereas in the inflorescence there was no difference. The NRS content was higher in the orange bracts, showing lower rates in the inflorescences in yellowish and yellowish greenish stages. The preservative solutions had an impact, on the floral stem longevity, varying according to the solutions used, i.e. CaCl2 and STS reduced the durability of gerbera flower in 9.25 and 11.5 days, respectively, compared to stems kept in distilled water. The glucose solution did not promote a significant difference compared to water. Therefore, we conclude that there is variation in the metabolism of non-structural

  4. Whole-tree distribution and temporal variation of non-structural carbohydrates in broadleaf evergreen trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Merryn G; Miller, Rebecca E; Arndt, Stefan K; Kasel, Sabine; Bennett, Lauren T

    2017-11-03

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) form a fundamental yet poorly quantified carbon pool in trees. Studies of NSC seasonality in forest trees have seldom measured whole-tree NSC stocks and allocation among organs, and are not representative of all tree functional types. Non-structural carbohydrate research has primarily focussed on broadleaf deciduous and coniferous evergreen trees with distinct growing seasons, while broadleaf evergreen trees remain under-studied despite their different growth phenology. We measured whole-tree NSC allocation and temporal variation in Eucalyptus obliqua L'Hér., a broadleaf evergreen tree species typically occurring in mixed-age temperate forests, which has year-round growth and the capacity to resprout after fire. Our overarching objective was to improve the empirical basis for understanding the functional importance of NSC allocation and stock changes at the tree- and organ-level in this tree functional type. Starch was the principal storage carbohydrate and was primarily stored in the stem and roots of young (14-year-old) trees rather than the lignotuber, which did not appear to be a specialized starch storage organ. Whole-tree NSC stocks were depleted during spring and summer due to significant decreases in starch mass in the roots and stem, seemingly to support root and crown growth but potentially exacerbated by water stress in summer. Seasonality of stem NSCs differed between young and mature trees, and was not synchronized with stem basal area increments in mature trees. Our results suggest that the relative magnitude of seasonal NSC stock changes could vary with tree growth stage, and that the main drivers of NSC fluctuations in broadleaf evergreen trees in temperate biomes could be periodic disturbances such as summer drought and fire, rather than growth phenology. These results have implications for understanding post-fire tree recovery via resprouting, and for incorporating NSC pools into carbon models of mixed

  5. Simulating past severe flood events to evaluate the effectiveness of nonstructural flood countermeasures in the upper Chao Phraya River Basin, Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Jamrussri, Sarawut; Toda, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Floods devastate communities and result in large economic losses in the lower reaches of the Chao Phraya River Basin, Thailand. The aim of this study was to determine whether nonstructural flood countermeasures would help prevent flash floods in the upstream area of the Upper Chao Phraya River Basin, and control the volume of floodwaters reaching the downstream area. Numerical models were used to quantify the effects of nonstructural measures, namely land use regulation, reforestation, and...

  6. Simulating past severe flood events to evaluate the effectiveness of nonstructural flood countermeasures in the upper Chao Phraya River Basin, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarawut Jamrussri

    2017-04-01

    Their effectiveness in the Upper Chao Phraya River Basin was quantitatively assessed by comparing the model results for the actual conditions with the scenario results. Results showed that the proposed nonstructural measures had considerable potential to reduce peak discharges and flood volumes in the Upper Chao Phraya River Basin. Integration of these proposed nonstructural flood countermeasures with the existing countermeasures in the Chao Phraya River Basin may be the most practical way to cope with the challenges of future flood disasters.

  7. Effects of non-structural components and soil-structure interaction on the seismic response of framed structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditommaso, Rocco; Auletta, Gianluca; Iacovino, Chiara; Nigro, Antonella; Carlo Ponzo, Felice

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, several nonlinear numerical models of reinforced concrete framed structures have been defined in order to evaluate the effects of non-structural elements and soil-structure interaction on the elastic dynamic behaviour of buildings. In the last few years, many and various studies have highlighted the significant effects derived from the interaction between structural and non-structural components on the main dynamic characteristics of a building. Usually, structural and non-structural elements act together, adding both masses and stiffness. The presence of infill panels is generally neglected in the design process of structural elements, although these elements can significantly increase the lateral stiffness of a structure leading to a modification in the dynamic properties. Particularly, at the Damage Limit State (where an elastic behaviour is expected), soil-structure interaction effects and non-structural elements may further affect the elastic natural period of buildings, changing the spectral accelerations compared with those provided by seismic codes in case of static analyses. In this work, a parametric study has been performed in order to evaluate the elastic fundamental period of vibration of buildings as a function of structural morphology (height, plan area, ratio between plan dimensions), infills presence and distribution and soil characteristics. Acknowledgements This study was partially funded by the Italian Department of Civil Protection within the project DPC-RELUIS 2016 - RS4 ''Seismic observatory of structures and health monitoring'' and by the "Centre of Integrated Geomorphology for the Mediterranean Area - CGIAM" within the Framework Agreement with the University of Basilicata "Study, Research and Experimentation in the Field of Analysis and Monitoring of Seismic Vulnerability of Strategic and Relevant Buildings for the purposes of Civil Protection and Development of Innovative Strategies of Seismic Reinforcement".

  8. Therapeutic efficacy of pedicle screw-rod internal fixation after one-stage posterior transforaminal lesion debridement and non-structural bone grafting for tuberculosis of lumbar vertebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-ming LIU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of pedicle screw-rod internal fixation after one-stage posterior transforaminal lesion debridement and non-structural bone grafting in the treatment of tuberculosis of mono-segmental lumbar vertebra. Methods From January 2010 to April 2013, 21 patients (9 males and 12 females with an average age of 49.1 years with mono-segmental tuberculosis of lumbar vertebra underwent surgery in our hospital were included. Eight patients had neurological deficit. The focus of tuberculosis was located on one side of the vertebral body, and all the patients had obvious signs of bone destruction on CT and MRI. All the patients were given anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy for 2-3 weeks before surgery. The local bone chips and autologous iliac cancellous bone were used as the intervertebral bone graft. Postoperative plain radiographs and CT were obtained to evaluate the fusion rate and degree of lumbar lordosis. The visual analogue scale score (VAS, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, and C-reactive protein (CRP before and after operation, and at final follow-up date were recorded. Results All the patients were followed up for 25.3±4.2 months. The mean operation time was 157±39 minutes, and the average blood loss was 470±143ml. The fusion rate of the interbody bone graft was 95.2%, with an average fusion period of 6.1±2.5 months. The neurological function was improved by 100%, and no severe complication or neurological injury occured. The preoperative and postoperative lordosis angles of the lumbar spine were 21.4°±5.7° and 33.6°±3.1°, respectively, and it was 31.3°±2.7° at the final follow up. The preoperative and postoperative VAS scores were 7.8±2.6 and 2.4±1.7 respectively, and it was 0.9±0.7 at the final follow up. The ESR and CRP were significantly decreased 3 months after surgery, and they became normal at 6 months. Conclusion Pedicle screw-rod internal fixation after one-stage posterior

  9. Distinctive Structural and Non-Structural Building Defects and Failures in Educational Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Sin Wen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the maintenance-free building may be a theoretical possibility, all buildings are subject to the vagaries of defects, failures, deterioration and variation. The examples of these problems are fungus growth, peeling paint, termite attack, dampness, defective rainwater goods, roof defects, harmful growth, settlement, foundation failure, roof collapse and others. There are a great number of building defects and failures arose and being reported officially by mass media, especially problems with educational buildings. Theoretically, all buildings tend to deteriorate over period of time due to aging or other factors, regardless the types of buildings. There are several main factors can be taken into account such as design fault, poor maintenance, poor workmanship, building age and location of building. This paper will discuss on distinctive structural and non-structural building defects and failures than frequently happened in educational buildings. This paper is noteworthy to render varies of problems generally faced by Malaysian educational buildings to the public. As such, the awareness among them can be raised or improved. Furthermore, the public will concern, especially the government authorities should emphasize the laws and regulations to enforce the safety of construction work as well as the procedure in giving approval to the occupation of educational buildings.

  10. The evolution of codon usage in structural and non-structural viral genes: the case of Avian coronavirus and its natural host Gallus gallus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Paulo Eduardo

    2013-12-26

    To assess the codon evolution in virus-host systems, Avian coronavirus and its natural host Gallus gallus were used as a model. Codon usage (CU) was measured for the viral spike (S), nucleocapsid (N), nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) and papain-like protease (PL(pro)) genes from a diverse set of A. coronavirus lineages and for G. gallus genes (lung surfactant protein A, intestinal cholecystokinin, oviduct ovomucin alpha subunit, kidney vitamin D receptor and the ubiquitary beta-actin) for different A. coronavirus replicating sites. Relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) trees accommodating all virus and host genes in a single topology showed a higher proximity of A. coronavirus CU to the respiratory tract for all genes. The codon adaptation index (CAI) showed a lower adaptation of S to G. gallus compared to NSP2, PL(pro) and N. The effective number of codons (Nc) and GC3% revealed that natural selection and genetic drift are the evolutionary forces driving the codon usage evolution of both A. coronavirus and G. gallus regardless of the gene being considered. The spike gene showed only one 100% conserved amino acid position coded by an A. coronavirus preferred codon, a significantly low number when compared to the three other genes (p<0.0001). Virus CU evolves independently for each gene in a manner predicted by the protein function, with a balance between natural selection and mutation pressure, giving further molecular basis for the viruses' ability to exploit the host's cellular environment in a concerted virus-host molecular evolution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Preparation for emergence of an Eastern European porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strain in Western Europe: Immunization with modified live virus vaccines or a field strain confers partial protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renson, P; Fablet, C; Le Dimna, M; Mahé, S; Touzain, F; Blanchard, Y; Paboeuf, F; Rose, N; Bourry, O

    2017-05-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes huge economic losses for the swine industry worldwide. In the past several years, highly pathogenic strains that lead to even greater losses have emerged. For the Western European swine industry, one threat is the possible introduction of Eastern European PRRSV strains (example Lena genotype 1.3) which were shown to be more virulent than common Western resident strains under experimental conditions. To prepare for the possible emergence of this strain in Western Europe, we immunized piglets with a Western European PRRSV field strain (Finistere: Fini, genotype 1.1), a new genotype 1 commercial modified live virus (MLV) vaccine (MLV1) or a genotype 2 commercial MLV vaccine (MLV2) to evaluate and compare the level of protection that these strains conferred upon challenge with the Lena strain 4 weeks later. Results show that immunization with Fini, MLV1 or MLV2 strains shortened the Lena-induced hyperthermia. In the Fini group, a positive effect was also demonstrated in growth performance. The level of Lena viremia was reduced for all immunized groups (significantly so for Fini and MLV2). This reduction in Lena viremia was correlated with the level of Lena-specific IFNγ-secreting cells. In conclusion, we showed that a commercial MLV vaccine of genotype 1 or 2, as well as a field strain of genotype 1.1 may provide partial clinical and virological protection upon challenge with the Lena strain. The cross-protection induced by these immunizing strains was not related with the level of genetic similarity to the Lena strain. The slightly higher level of protection established with the field strain is attributed to a better cell-mediated immune response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Can gas exchange dynamics predict non-structural carbohydrate use under drought stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannenberg, S.; Phillips, R.

    2016-12-01

    A recent conceptual framework for understanding tree drought responses characterizes species along a continuum from isohydry to anisohydry, with theory predicting that isohydric and anisohydric trees should display different carbon (C) allocation patterns under drought conditions. We tested the hypothesis that the trade-offs inherent in the isohydry-anisohydry framework (i.e., C starvation vs. hydraulic failure) necessitate different allocation patterns to non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs), growth, and respiration. Specifically, we hypothesized that isohydric trees would decrease NSC stores and growth in the face of reduced incoming photoassimilate, whereas anisohydric trees would maintain assimilation, growth, and NSC pools due to decreased demand for stored metabolic C and enhanced osmoregulatory needs. To test this, we subjected saplings of Liriodendron tulipifera (an isohydric tree) and Quercus alba (an anisohydric tree) to a six week drought in the greenhouse, and measured assimilation, leaf water potential (midday and predawn), growth, leaf dark respiration and NSCs (both sugars and starch in aboveground and belowground tissues) in control and droughted plants. Overall, we confirmed that the isohydric and anisohydric species used NSCs differently during drought. In most tissues, both species had similar responses of NSCs to drought: starch NSCs were maintained or decreased while sugar NSCs tended to increase. Stem NSCs were a notable exception, as L. tulipifera decreased total NSC to almost zero while NSCs in Q. alba remained constant. This depletion of stem NSC in L. tulipifera was offset by increases in other tissues, however, resulting in no net change to total NSC during the drought. In contrast, Q. alba increased total NSC. Interestingly, Q. alba also decreased assimilation and growth, indicating a potential trade-off between NSC and biomass allocation. Our results show that NSCs in different tissues may have contrasting uses as storage or

  13. Drought stress, growth, and nonstructural carbohydrate dynamics of pine trees in a semi-arid forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tamir; Yakir, Dan; Hoch, Günter

    2014-05-01

    • In trees under prolonged drought, both carbon uptake (C source) and growth (C sink) typically decrease. This correlation raises two important questions: (1) to what degree is tree growth limited by C availability; and (2) Is growth limited by concurrent C storage (e.g. as nonstructural carbohydrates, NSC). • To test the relationships between drought, growth, and C reserves, we monitored the changes in NSC levels and constructed stem growth chronologies of Pinus halepensis trees of three drought stress levels growing in Yatir forest, Israel, at the dry limit of forest existence. • Moderately stressed and stressed trees showed 37% and 21% of the stem growth of healthy trees in 2012; 71% and 31% of the sap flux density; and 79% and 66% of the final needle length. In spite of these large reductions, both starch and soluble sugars concentrations in branches of these trees were similar in all trees throughout the dry season (2-4% dry mass). At the same time the root starch concentrations of moderately stressed and stressed trees were 47% and 58% of that of healthy trees, but never below 2% d.m. • Our results suggest that the drought-induced growth reduction is associated with a general C shortage, rather than competition with concurrent C storage. The relatively small effect of drought stress level on NSC dynamics, the maintenance of a 2% d.m. starch, and the continued sap flow indicate that a whole-tree C starvation is not likely to occur in these trees growing at the edge of the desert. Special request: If the abstract is not accepted for presentation in this session, please consider for presentation in session BG2.11 Plant traits and biogeochemical cycles. Thank you.

  14. Concentrations and 14C age of nonstructural carbon in California oaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czimczik, C. I.; Druffel-Rodriguez, K.; Trumbore, S. E.

    2008-12-01

    Plants store photosynthetic assimilates as nonstructural carbon (NSC), mainly glucose, fructose, sucrose, and starch. NSC fuels processes such as respiration and growth. Research suggests that NSC represents a significant fraction of a plant's annual C budget, but temporal dynamics of NSC are poorly understood. We used concentration and radiocarbon (14C) measurements of NSC to investigate how temporal dynamics of NSC vary with life strategy and throughout a species' range. In Mediterranean environments, oaks have developed two strategies (evergreen and deciduous) to cope with drought. Within California, the uncertainty of annual winter rain increases from north to south. We compared two evergreen and deciduous species: Coastal and Interior live oak (Quercus agrifolia and wislizenii) and Valley and Blue oak (Q. lobata and douglasii). Samples (4 mm cores to 20 cm depth at dbh) were taken in 2008 before leaf-out and fall at five sites which represent an inland to coast temperature gradient from high to low summer temperatures as well as a north- south precipitation gradient. Sugars were isolated by shaking in methanol-water and quantified using a spectrometric micro-plate technique. Starch was isolated by boiling in ethanol followed by HCl digestion and quantified manometrically. 14C contents were measured by AMS. Preliminary findings indicate that in live oaks, winter sugar concentrations are constant throughout the tree and across sites, while 14C concentrations increase towards a tree's center. This suggests that the NSC pool oaks is not well mixed. Future work will elucidate whether plants can access these older NSC stores.

  15. Nonstructural carbohydrate remobilization and suckering of aspen roots following severe disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, E.; King, C.; Richardson, A. D.; Landhäusser, S.

    2016-12-01

    Nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) storage and remobilization are important processes that allow trees to temporarily maintain a negative carbon balance and recover from disturbances that kill aboveground tissue and/or limit carbon uptake. However, our knowledge of carbohydrate remobilization in trees remains very limited. Recent isotopic work suggests that trees can store carbohydrates that are relatively old, but it is not known how much of this carbon can be remobilized and used for growth. To determine the extent and the spatial/temporal pattern in which carbohydrates are remobilized following a severe disturbance, we collected root segments (1-3 cm diameter; 10-30 years old) from mature trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) in northern Alberta. These roots were incubated in a dark growth chamber to ensure that root reserves were the sole supply of carbon for root suckering. Roots were harvested periodically to measure sucker growth and NSC concentrations of the phloem and inner and outer xylem. In addition, at two stages of suckering, the carbon in the newest sucker tissues was aged using the radiocarbon `bomb spike'. Initially, roots contained 5-6 times more NSC mass in the phloem than in the xylem, and the decrease in NSC mass during suckering was 3-4 times greater in the phloem. Root sucker mass was more strongly correlated with initial phloem NSC than xylem NSC concentration. Early sucker growth was composed of relatively young carbon, averaging 1-3 years old. Later sucker growth was significantly, but only slightly older ( 1 yr). At sucker death, xylem still contained 2-3% NSC and phloem contained 11-13.5% NSC; NSC pools were reduced to a greater degree in xylem than in phloem. These results suggest that the phloem—an often overlooked carbohydrate pool—contains a large and important carbon reserve pool for regrowth following disturbance. The high levels of carbohydrates remaining in the root suggest that a large portion of NSC may be unavailable

  16. Spectroscopic Remote Sensing of Non-Structural Carbohydrates in Forest Canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory P. Asner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC are products of photosynthesis, and leaf NSC concentration may be a prognostic indicator of climate-change tolerance in woody plants. However, measurement of leaf NSC is prohibitively labor intensive, especially in tropical forests, where foliage is difficult to access and where NSC concentrations vary enormously by species and across environments. Imaging spectroscopy may allow quantitative mapping of leaf NSC, but this possibility remains unproven. We tested the accuracy of NSC remote sensing at leaf, canopy and stand levels using visible-to-shortwave infrared (VSWIR spectroscopy with partial least squares regression (PLSR techniques. Leaf-level analyses demonstrated the high precision (R2 = 0.69–0.73 and accuracy (%RMSE = 13%–14% of NSC estimates in 6136 live samples taken from 4222 forest canopy species worldwide. The leaf spectral data were combined with a radiative transfer model to simulate the role of canopy structural variability, which led to a reduction in the precision and accuracy of leaf NSC estimation (R2 = 0.56; %RMSE = 16%. Application of the approach to 79 one-hectare plots in Amazonia using the Carnegie Airborne Observatory VSWIR spectrometer indicated the good precision and accuracy of leaf NSC estimates at the forest stand level (R2 = 0.49; %RMSE = 9.1%. Spectral analyses indicated strong contributions of the shortwave-IR (1300–2500 nm region to leaf NSC determination at all scales. We conclude that leaf NSC can be remotely sensed, opening doors to monitoring forest canopy physiological responses to environmental stress and climate change.

  17. Efficacy of double-stranded RNA against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV non-structural (orf89, wsv191 and structural (vp28, vp26 genes in the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César M. Escobedo-Bonilla

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV is a major pathogen in shrimp aquaculture. RNA interference (RNAi is a promising tool against viral infections. Previous works with RNAi showed different antiviral efficacies depending on the silenced gene. This work evaluated the antiviral efficacy of double-stranded (ds RNA against two non-structural (orf89, wsv191 WSSV genes compared to structural (vp26, vp28 genes to inhibit an experimental WSSV infection. Gene orf89 encodes a putative regulatory protein and gene white spot virus (wsv191 encodes a nonspecific nuclease; whereas genes vp26 and vp28 encode envelope proteins, respectively. Molecules of dsRNA against each of the WSSV genes were intramuscularly injected (4 μg per shrimp into a group of shrimp 48 h before a WSSV challenge. The highest antiviral activity occurred with dsRNA against orf89, vp28 and vp26 (cumulative mortalities 10%, 10% and 21%, respectively. In contrast, the least effective treatment was wsv191 dsRNA (cumulative mortality 83%. All dead animals were WSSV-positive by one-step PCR, whereas reverse-transcription PCR of all surviving shrimp confirmed inhibition of virus replication. This study showed that dsRNA against WSSV genes orf89, vp28 and vp26 were highly effective to inhibit virus replication and suggest an essential role in WSSV infection. Non-structural WSSV genes such as orf89 can be used as novel targets to design therapeutic RNAi molecules against WSSV infection.

  18. Genotype 2 strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus dysregulate alveolar macrophage cytokine production via the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Schniztlein, William M; Calzada-Nova, Gabriela; Zuckermann, Federico A

    2017-10-25

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infects alveolar macrophages (AMΦ) causing dysregulated interferon (IFN)-α and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production through a mechanism(s) yet to be resolved. Here, we show that AMΦ infected with PRRSV secreted a reduced quantity of IFN-α following the cell exposure to synthetic dsRNA. This reduction did not correlate with reduced IFNA1 gene transcription. Rather, it coincided with two events that occurred late during infection and were indicative of translational attenuation, specifically, the activation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), and the appearance of stress granules. Notably, the typical rapid production of TNF-α by AMΦ exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was suppressed or enhanced by PRRSV depending on when the LPS exposure occurred after virus infection. If exposure was delayed until 6 h post-infection (hpi) so that the development of the cytokine response coincided with the time in which phosphorylation of eIF2α by the stress sensor PERK (protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase) occurred, inhibition of TNF-α production was observed. However, if LPS exposure occurred at 2 hpi, prior to a detectable onset of eIF2α phosphorylation, a synergistic response was observed due to the earlier NF-κB activation via the stress sensor IRE1α (inositol-requiring kinase 1α). These results suggest that the asynchronous actions of two branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR), namely IRE1α, and PERK, activated by ER stress resulting from the virus infection, are associated with enhancement or suppression of TNF-α production, respectively.IMPORTANCE The activation of AMΦ is controlled by its microenvironment to deter excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine responses to microbes that could impair lung function. However, viral pneumonias frequently become complicated by secondary bacterial infections triggering severe inflammation, lung dysfunction, and death. Although

  19. Accumulation of the 126 kDa protein of tobacco mosaic virus during systemic infection analysed by immunocytochemistry and ELISA.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijdeveld, M.M.G.; Goldbach, R.W.; Meurs, C.; Loon, van L.C.

    1992-01-01

    Systemic infection of tobacco with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) strain WU1, is accompanied by massive accumulation of the virus-coded non-structural 126 kDa protein in X-bodies. The development of X-bodies and the time course of the increase in 126 kDa protein in systemically infected leaves were

  20. Variation in the concentration and age of nonstructural carbon stored in different tree tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Andrew; Carbone, Mariah; Huggett, Brett; Furze, Morgan; Czimczik, Claudia I.; Xu, Xiaomei

    2014-05-01

    Trees store nonstructural carbon (NSC), in the form of sugars and starch, in the ray parenchyma cells of woody tissues. These reserves provide a carbon buffer when demand (growth, protection, or metabolism) exceeds supply (photosynthesis). This is particularly important in the context of resilience to stress and disturbance, such as might be associated with various global change factors. However, storage allocation processes and the availability of stored reserves remain poorly understood in woody plants. To better understand how NSC reserves are distributed throughout the tree, and the degree to which NSC reserves mix across ring boundaries and tissue types, we destructively sampled two 30-year-old trees (one red oak, Quercus rubra L., and one white pine, Pinus strobus L.) growing at Harvard Forest, an oak-dominated temperate forest in the northeastern United States. We analyzed stemwood samples (divided into individual rings, bark, and phloem), coarse and fine branches, and coarse (separated into three depths) and fine roots for concentrations of total sugars and starch. For a subset of samples we used the radiocarbon (14C) "bomb spike" method to estimate the mean age of extracted sugars and starch. In oak, stemwood sugar and starch concentrations were highest (50 mg/g) in the youngest (most recently-formed) rings, and dropped off rapidly (to 10 mg/g or less) across the 10 most recent rings. In oak phloem tissue, sugar concentrations were high (90 mg/g) compared to starch (10 mg/g). In pine, sugar concentrations dropped off rapidly across the three most recent rings (from 30 mg/g to 10 mg/g) whereas starch concentrations were low even for the youngest rings (10 mg/g or less). In pine, phloem concentrations of both sugar (190 mg/g) and starch (20 mg/g) were both substantially higher than in oak. Such strong radial trends must be accounted for when scaling up to whole-tree budgets, as whole increment cores cannot properly integrate (on a ring-area basis) across the

  1. Alphavirus-based Vaccines Encoding Nonstructural Proteins of Hepatitis C Virus Induce Robust and Protective T-cell Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ip, Peng; Boerma, Annemarie; Regts, Joke; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Wilschut, Jan; Nijman, Hans W.; Daemen, Toos

    An absolute prerequisite for a therapeutic vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the potency to induce HCV-specific vigorous and broad-spectrum T-cell responses. Here, we generated three HCV vaccines based on a recombinant Semliki Forest virus (rSFV) vector expressing all-or a part of

  2. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nonstructural protein 2 (nsp2) topology and selective isoform integration in artificial membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membrane modification of host subcellular compartments is critical to the replication of many RNA viruses. Enveloped viruses additionally require the ability to requisition cellular membranes during egress for the development of infectious progeny. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus...

  3. SARS-CoV ORF1b-encoded nonstructural proteins 12-16: replicative enzymes as antiviral targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subissi, Lorenzo; Imbert, Isabelle; Ferron, François; Collet, Axelle; Coutard, Bruno; Decroly, Etienne; Canard, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) pandemic caused ten years ago by the SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has stimulated a number of studies on the molecular biology of coronaviruses. This research has provided significant new insight into many mechanisms used by the coronavirus replication-transcription complex (RTC). The RTC directs and coordinates processes in order to replicate and transcribe the coronavirus genome, a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA of outstanding length (∼27-32kilobases). Here, we review the up-to-date knowledge on SARS-CoV replicative enzymes encoded in the ORF1b, i.e., the main RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (nsp12), the helicase/triphosphatase (nsp13), two unusual ribonucleases (nsp14, nsp15) and RNA-cap methyltransferases (nsp14, nsp16). We also review how these enzymes co-operate with other viral co-factors (nsp7, nsp8, and nsp10) to regulate their activity. These last ten years of research on SARS-CoV have considerably contributed to unravel structural and functional details of one of the most fascinating replication/transcription machineries of the RNA virus world. This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on "From SARS to MERS: 10years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses". Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of structured versus non-structured learning on achievement and attitudes of fifth graders in a public aquarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Merryl Audrey

    The investigator analyzed the main effect of a structured-learning experience in an informal setting, as well as interactions between the students' learning-style variations toward the element of structure and the imposed instructional conditions. The subjects consisted of 170 students enrolled in two public schools located in Brooklyn, New York. The students were predominantly a White multi-ethnic population consisting of 118 Caucasians, 25 Hispanics, 24 Asians, and 3 African-Americans. Three randomly assigned classes (n = 81) were provided trip sheets, which directed students on how to learn new information with written questions and directives. Three randomly assigned non-structured classes (n = 89) experienced the same exhibit in a free-form manner. Science-based criterion-referenced pre- and posttests were administered, in addition to Learning Style Inventories (Dunn, Dunn, & Price, 1996) and a modified Semantic Differential Scale (Pizzo, 1981), which was used to measure attitudinal levels. The non-structured group had access to similar content information in the form of exhibit graphics, but apparently they chose not to read it as carefully or engage in the information-seeking process as intensely as the students equipped with trip sheets. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) indicated that a structured-learning experience produced significantly higher science-achievement test scores than in a non-structured-learning experience (p = .0001). In addition, there was no single learning-style variation (preference, aversion, or no preference) to structure that produced significantly higher gains than another. Furthermore, attitudinal scores were not significantly different between structured and non-structured groups, as well as among homogeneous subsets of students with learning-style variations that matched, mismatched, or indicated no-preferenced positions on the element of structure. Hence, a moderate amount of structure resulted in academic gains without

  5. Long range chromosome organization in Escherichia coli: The position of the replication origin defines the non-structured regions and the Right and Left macrodomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Escherichia coli chromosome is organized into four macrodomains (Ori, Ter, Right and Left) and two non-structured regions. This organization influences the segregation of sister chromatids, the mobility of chromosomal DNA, and the cellular localization of the chromosome. The organization of the Ter and Ori macrodomains relies on two specific systems, MatP/matS for the Ter domain and MaoP/maoS for the Ori domain, respectively. Here by constructing strains with chromosome rearrangements to reshuffle the distribution of chromosomal segments, we reveal that the difference between the non-structured regions and the Right and Left lateral macrodomains relies on their position on the chromosome. A change in the genetic location of oriC generated either by an inversion within the Ori macrodomain or by the insertion of a second oriC modifies the position of Right and Left macrodomains, as the chromosome region the closest to oriC are always non-structured while the regions further away behave as macrodomain regardless of their DNA sequence. Using fluorescent microscopy we estimated that loci belonging to a non-structured region are significantly closer to the Ori MD than loci belonging to a lateral MD. Altogether, our results suggest that the origin of replication plays a prominent role in chromosome organization in E. coli, as it determines structuring and localization of macrodomains in growing cell. PMID:28486476

  6. Production performance and milk fatty acids profile in grazing dairy cows offered ground corn or liquid molasses as the sole supplemental nonstructural carbohydrate source

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of corn meal or liquid molasses fed as the sole supplemental nonstructural carbohydrate source on milk yield and composition, milk fatty acids, and N use efficiency in grazing dairy cows. Ten multiparous organically-certified Jersey cows averagi...

  7. Development of NIR calibration models to assess year-to-year variation in total non-structural carbohydrates in grasses using PLSR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shetty, Nisha; Gislum, René; Jensen, Anne Mette Dahl

    2012-01-01

    Near- infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was used in combination with chemometrics to quantify total non-structural carbohydrates (TNC) in grass samples in order to overcome year-to-year variation. A total of 1103 above-ground plant and root samples were collected from different field and pot experiments...

  8. [Responses of non-structural carbohydrate metabolism of cucumber seedlings to drought stress and doubled CO2 concentration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan-hong; Liu, Bin-bin; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Xue-na; Ai, Xi-zhen; Li, Qing-ming

    2015-01-01

    The effects of doubled CO2 concentration on non-structural carbohydrate metabolism of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. 'Jinyou No.1') seedlings under drought stress were investigated. Split plot design was deployed, with two levels of CO2 concentrations (ambient CO2 concentration, 380 µmol . mol-1, and doubled CO2 concentration, 760±20 µmol . mol-1) in the main plots, and three levels of water treatments (control, moderate drought stress, and severe drought stress) simulated by PEG 6000 in the split-plots. The results showed that non-structural carbohydrates of cucumber leaves, including glucose, fructose, sucrose, and stachyose, increased with the doubling of CO2 concentration, which resulted in the decreased osmotic potential, improving the drought stress in cucumber seedlings. During the drought stress, sucrose synthase, soluble acid invertase and al- kaline invertase started with an increase, and followed with a decline in the leaves. In the root system, however, soluble acid invertase and alkaline invertase increased gradually throughout the whole process, whereas sucrose phosphate synthase firstly increased and then decreased. The treatment of doubled CO2 enhanced the activity of sucrose synthase, but decreased the activity of sucrose phosphate synthase. The synergistic action of the two enzymes and invertase accelerated the decomposition of sucrose and inhibited the synthesis of sucrose, leading to the accumulation of hexose, which lowered the cellular osmotic potential and enhanced the water uptake capacity. In conclusion, doubled CO2 concentration could alleviate the adverse effects of drought stress and improve the drought tolerance of cucumber seedlings. Such mitigating effect on cucumber was more significant under severe drought stress.

  9. [Non-structural abnormalities of CNS function resulting in coincidence of endocrinopathies, epilepsy and psychoneurologic disorders in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzyk, Jerzy; Pituch-Noworolska, Anna; Pietrzyk, Jacek A; Urbanik, Andrzej; Kroczka, Sławomir; Drozdz, Ryszard; Wójcik, Małgorzata

    2010-01-01

    In the population of children and adolescents, epilepsy affects approximately 1% of cases, nonepileptic seizures are seen in approximately 3%, and endocrine disorders are several times more common. For this reason, coincidence of endocrine disorders and epilepsy and psychoneurologic disorders is frequent. Much less common are structural abnormalities (tumors, developmental abnormalities), and especially non-structural CNS abnormalities, resulting in coincidence of both disorders. There are no reports available in the literature that would address the problem. 1) Assessment of the frequency of coincidental epilepsy and endocrine disorders in patients without structural CSN abnormalities treated as outpatients and inpatients of Department of Endocrinology University Children's Hospital of Krakow. 2) Presentation of diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties in these patients, and 3) An attempt at defining the common etiology of both disorders. On the basis of ICD code patients with coincidance of endocrine disorders, epilepsy and psychoneurologic disorders were selected from several thousands of children treated between 2000 and 2009 in Pediatric Endocrinology Department. The neurologic disorders were diagnosed and treated in Chair and Department of Children's and Adolescents Neurology or in another pediatric neurology center. Various forms of epilepsy (symptomatic or idiopathic) and other psychoneurological disorders (disorders of behavior and emotions, obsession-compulsion syndromes, stereotypias, aggression, autoaggression, or hypothalamic obesity) coincident with one or more endocrine disorders, such as growth disorders, disorders of pubertal development, obesity, thyroid diseases, adrenal diseases, hyperprolactinemia, hypoparathyroidism and ion metabolism disorders were diagnosed in 49 patients. The group included: i) children after cranial irradiation and chemotherapy due to medulloblastoma (3 patients), oligodenroglioma (1 patient), ependymoma (1 patient), optic

  10. Anterior release and nonstructural bone grafting and posterior fixation for old lower cervical dislocations with locked facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chen; Wu, Ting-Kui; Gong, Quan; Li, Tao; Ma, Li-Tai; Wang, Bei-Yu; Deng, Yu-Xiao; Liu, Hao

    2017-11-01

    Lower cervical dislocations are often missed at the time of initial injury for several reasons. The treatment of old facet dislocations of the lower cervical spine is difficult, and the optimal method has not been established. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of a surgical technique, anterior release, and nonstructural bone grafting combined with posterior fixation, for the treatment of old lower cervical dislocations with locked facets.This was a retrospective study of 17 patients (13 men and 4 women) with old facet dislocations, who underwent the same surgical treatment at our hospital between April 2010 and January 2016. The anterior procedure was conducted to remove the fusion mass and to achieve discectomy and morselized bone grafting. Subsequent posterior procedure included release, reduction, and posterior fusion. The neurologic status, clinical data (Japanese Orthopedic Association [JOA], Neck Disability Index [NDI], and Visual Analog Scale [VAS] scores), and radiographic information (local sagittal alignment and bone graft fusion) were recorded and evaluated pre and postoperatively.All patients achieved a nearly complete reduction intraoperatively. The mean operative time was 178 ± 49 minutes. The mean blood loss was 174 ± 73 mL. Each patient completed at least 12 months of follow-up. The mean follow-up duration was 32.6 ± 18.5 months. The neurologic status according to the Frankel grade was significantly improved at the last follow-up. The JOA, NDI, and VAS scores all demonstrated significant improvements compared with the preoperative values (P dislocated segments was 10.5 ± 5.9° at preoperation, and was corrected to 5.9 ± 4.3° lordosis postoperatively. Anterior and posterior solid fusion was observed in all patients within 12 months of follow-up. Fat liquefaction and delayed healing of the posterior wound occurred in 1 patient. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in another

  11. Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Type 5 Rep Protein Cleaves a Unique Terminal Resolution Site Compared with Other AAV Serotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Chiorini, John A.; Afione, Sandra; Kotin, Robert M

    1999-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) replication depends on two viral components for replication: the AAV nonstructural proteins (Rep) in trans, and inverted terminal repeat (ITR) sequences in cis. AAV type 5 (AAV5) is a distinct virus compared to the other cloned AAV serotypes. Whereas the Rep proteins and ITRs of other serotypes are interchangeable and can be used to produce recombinant viral particles of a different serotype, AAV5 Rep proteins cannot cross-complement in the packaging of a genome w...

  12. THE EFFECT OF GROWTH REGULATOR ON STRUCTURAL AND NON-STRUCTURAL CARBOHYDRATES AND LIGNIN CONTENT IN SELECTED GRASS SPECIES AND CULTIVARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Anna Ciepiela

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The research was undertaken to determine the effect of the biostimulant Kelpak SL, derived from brown seaweed species Ecklonia maxima (kelp, on structural and non-structural carbohydrates, as well as lignin content in orchard grass and Braun’s festulolium. The experiment was a split-plot arrangement with three replicates. It was set up at the experimental facility of the University of Natural Sciences and Humanities, Siedlce, in late April 2009. The following factors were examined: an application of the plant growth regulator Kelpak SL applied at the rate of 2 dm3· ha-1 vs an untreated control (0 dm3· ha-1, pure sown grass species and cultivars grown in monoculture: Dactylis glomerata, cv. Amila and Tukan, as well as Festulolium braunii cv. Felopa and Agula. This study revealed that an application of Kelpak significantly reduced cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin contents of the grasses but significantly increased non-structural carbohydrates, regardless of the remaining factors. Non-structural carbohydrates were the highest in Kelpak-treated Festulolium braunii (on average, 232.7 g · kg-1.

  13. Radio-metabolite analysis of carbon-11 biochemical partitioning to non-structural carbohydrates for integrated metabolism and transport studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babst, Benjamin A; Karve, Abhijit A; Judt, Tatjana

    2013-06-01

    Metabolism and phloem transport of carbohydrates are interactive processes, yet each is often studied in isolation from the other. Carbon-11 ((11)C) has been successfully used to study transport and allocation processes dynamically over time. There is a need for techniques to determine metabolic partitioning of newly fixed carbon that are compatible with existing non-invasive (11)C-based methodologies for the study of phloem transport. In this report, we present methods using (11)C-labeled CO2 to trace carbon partitioning to the major non-structural carbohydrates in leaves-sucrose, glucose, fructose and starch. High-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) was adapted to provide multisample throughput, raising the possibility of measuring different tissues of the same individual plant, or for screening multiple plants. An additional advantage of HPTLC was that phosphor plate imaging of radioactivity had a much higher sensitivity and broader range of sensitivity than radio-HPLC detection, allowing measurement of (11)C partitioning to starch, which was previously not possible. Because of the high specific activity of (11)C and high sensitivity of detection, our method may have additional applications in the study of rapid metabolic responses to environmental changes that occur on a time scale of minutes. The use of this method in tandem with other (11)C assays for transport dynamics and whole-plant partitioning makes a powerful combination of tools to study carbohydrate metabolism and whole-plant transport as integrated processes.

  14. Understanding the roles of nonstructural carbohydrates in forest trees - from what we can measure to what we want to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Henrik; Trumbore, Susan

    2016-07-01

    Contents 386 I. 386 II. 388 III. 392 IV. 392 V. 396 VI. 399 399 References 399 SUMMARY: Carbohydrates provide the building blocks for plant structures as well as versatile resources for metabolic processes. The nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC), mainly sugars and starch, fulfil distinct functional roles, including transport, energy metabolism and osmoregulation, and provide substrates for the synthesis of defence compounds or exchange with symbionts involved in nutrient acquisition or defence. At the whole-plant level, NSC storage buffers the asynchrony of supply and demand on diel, seasonal or decadal temporal scales and across plant organs. Despite its central role in plant function and in stand-level carbon cycling, our understanding of storage dynamics, its controls and response to environmental stresses is very limited, even after a century of research. This reflects the fact that often storage is defined by what we can measure, that is, NSC concentrations, and the interpretation of these as a proxy for a single function, storage, rather than the outcome of a range of NSC source and sink functions. New isotopic tools allow direct quantification of timescales involved in NSC dynamics, and show that NSC-C fixed years to decades previously is used to support tree functions. Here we review recent advances, with emphasis on the context of the interactions between NSC, drought and tree mortality. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Intra-annual dynamics of non-structural carbohydrates in the cambium of mature conifer trees reflects radial growth demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Sonia; Giovannelli, Alessio; Treydte, Kerstin; Traversi, Maria Laura; King, Gregory M; Frank, David; Fonti, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    The presence of soluble carbohydrates in the cambial zone, either from sugars recently produced during photosynthesis or from starch remobilized from storage organs, is necessary for radial tree growth. However, considerable uncertainties on carbohydrate dynamics and the consequences on tree productivity exist. This study aims to better understand the variation in different carbon pools at intra-annual resolution by quantifying how cambial zone sugar and starch concentrations fluctuate over the season and in relation to cambial phenology. A comparison between two physiologically different species growing at the same site, i.e., the evergreen Picea abies Karst. and the deciduous Larix decidua Mill., and between L. decidua from two contrasting elevations, is presented to identify mechanisms of growth limitation. Results indicate that the annual cycle of sugar concentration within the cambial zone is coupled to the process of wood formation. The highest sugar concentration is observed when the number of cells in secondary wall formation and lignification stages is at a maximum, subsequent to most radial growth. Starch disappears in winter, while other freeze-resistant non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) increase. Slight differences in NSC concentration between species are consistent with the differing climate sensitivity of the evergreen and deciduous species investigated. The general absence of differences between elevations suggests that the cambial activity of trees growing at the treeline was not limited by the availability of carbohydrates at the cambial zone but instead by environmental controls on the growing season duration.

  16. Sweets for the foe - effects of nonstructural carbohydrates on the susceptibility of Quercus robur against Phytophthora quercina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angay, Oguzhan; Fleischmann, Frank; Recht, Sabine; Herrmann, Sylvie; Matyssek, Rainer; Oßwald, Wolfgang; Buscot, François; Grams, Thorsten E E

    2014-09-01

    The root-rot pathogen Phytophthora quercina is a key determinant of oak decline in Europe. The susceptibility of pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) to this pathogen has been hypothesized to depend on the carbon availability in roots as an essential resource for defense. Microcuttings of Q. robur undergo an alternating rhythm of root and shoot growth. Inoculation of mycorrhizal (Piloderma croceum) and nonmycorrhizal oak roots with P. quercina was performed during both growth phases, that is, root flush (RF) and shoot flush (SF). Photosynthetic and morphological responses as well as concentrations of nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC) were analyzed. Infection success was quantified by the presence of pathogen DNA in roots. Concentrations of NSC in roots depended on the alternating root/shoot growth rhythm, being high and low during RF and SF, respectively. Infection success was high during RF and low during SF, resulting in a significantly positive correlation between pathogen DNA and NSC concentration in roots, contrary to the hypothesis. The alternating growth of roots and shoots plays a crucial role for the susceptibility of lateral roots to the pathogen. NSC availability in oak roots has to be considered as a benchmark for susceptibility rather than resistance against P. quercina. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of Influenza A Virus Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses transcribe and replicate their genomes in the nuclei of infected host cells. The viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP complex of influenza virus is the essential genetic unit of the virus. The viral proteins play important roles in multiple processes, including virus structural maintenance, mediating nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the vRNP complex, virus particle assembly, and budding. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of viral proteins occurs throughout the entire virus life cycle. This review mainly focuses on matrix protein (M1, nucleoprotein (NP, nonstructural protein (NS1, and nuclear export protein (NEP, summarizing the mechanisms of their nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and the regulation of virus replication through their phosphorylation to further understand the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in host adaptation of the viruses.

  18. Feedbacks between earlywood anatomy and non-structural carbohydrates affect spring phenology and wood production in ring-porous oaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-de-Lis, Gonzalo; García-González, Ignacio; Rozas, Vicente; Olano, José Miguel

    2016-10-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) play a central role in the construction and maintenance of a tree's vascular system, but feedbacks between the NSC status of trees and wood formation are not fully understood. We aimed to evaluate multiple dependencies among wood anatomy, winter NSC, and phenology for coexisting temperate (Quercus robur) and sub-Mediterranean (Q. pyrenaica) oaks along a water-availability gradient in the NW Iberian Peninsula. Sapwood NSC concentrations were quantified at three sites in December 2012 (N = 240). Leaf phenology and wood anatomy were surveyed in 2013. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse the interplay among hydraulic diameter (Dh), winter NSC, budburst date, and earlywood vessel production (EVP), while the effect of Dh and EVP on latewood width was assessed by using a mixed-effects model. NSC and wood production increased under drier conditions for both species. Q. robur showed a narrower Dh and lower soluble sugar (SS) concentration (3.88-5.08 % dry matter) than Q. pyrenaica (4.06-5.57 % dry matter), but Q. robur exhibited larger EVP and wider latewood (1403 µm) than Q. pyrenaica (667 µm). Stem diameter and Dh had a positive effect on SS concentrations, which were related to an earlier leaf flushing in both species. Sapwood sugar content appeared to limit EVP exclusively in Q. pyrenaica. In turn, Dh and EVP were found to be key predictors of latewood growth. Our results confirm that sapwood SS concentrations are involved in modulating growth resumption and xylem production in spring. Q. pyrenaica exhibited a tighter control of carbohydrate allocation to wood formation than Q. robur, which would play a role in protecting against environmental stress in the sub-Mediterranean area.

  19. Human rhinovirus 16 causes Golgi apparatus fragmentation without blocking protein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousnier, Aurelie; Swieboda, Dawid; Pinto, Anaïs; Guedán, Anabel; Rogers, Andrew V; Walton, Ross; Johnston, Sebastian L; Solari, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    The replication of picornaviruses has been described to cause fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus that blocks the secretory pathway. The inhibition of major histocompatibility complex class I upregulation and cytokine, chemokine and interferon secretion may have important implications for host defense. Previous studies have shown that disruption of the secretory pathway can be replicated by expression of individual nonstructural proteins; however the situation with different serotypes of human rhinovirus (HRV) is unclear. The expression of 3A protein from HRV14 or HRV2 did not cause Golgi apparatus disruption or a block in secretion, whereas other studies showed that infection of cells with HRV1A did cause Golgi apparatus disruption which was replicated by the expression of 3A. HRV16 is the serotype most widely used in clinical HRV challenge studies; consequently, to address the issue of Golgi apparatus disruption for HRV16, we have systematically and quantitatively examined the effect of HRV16 on both Golgi apparatus fragmentation and protein secretion in HeLa cells. First, we expressed each individual nonstructural protein and examined their cellular localization and their disruption of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus architecture. We quantified their effects on the secretory pathway by measuring secretion of the reporter protein Gaussia luciferase. Finally, we examined the same outcomes following infection of cells with live virus. We demonstrate that expression of HRV16 3A and 3AB and, to a lesser extent, 2B caused dispersal of the Golgi structure, and these three nonstructural proteins also inhibited protein secretion. The infection of cells with HRV16 also caused significant Golgi apparatus dispersal; however, this did not result in the inhibition of protein secretion. Importance: The ability of replicating picornaviruses to influence the function of the secretory pathway has important implications for host defense. However, there appear to be

  20. Hepatitis B Virus HBx Protein Localizes to Mitochondria in Primary Rat Hepatocytes and Modulates Mitochondrial Membrane Potential ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Clippinger, Amy J.; Bouchard, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Over 350 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), and a significant number of chronically infected individuals develop primary liver cancer. HBV encodes seven viral proteins, including the nonstructural X (HBx) protein. The results of studies with immortalized or transformed cells and with HBx-transgenic mice demonstrated that HBx can interact with mitochondria. However, no studies with normal hepatocytes have characterized the precise mitochondrial localization o...

  1. Single-provenance mature conifers show higher non-structural carbohydrate storage and reduced growth in a drier location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Frida I; Fajardo, Alex; Hoch, Günter

    2017-08-01

    Since growth is more sensitive to drought than photosynthesis, trees inhabiting dry regions are expected to exhibit higher carbohydrate storage and less growth than their conspecifics from more humid regions. However, the same pattern can be the result of different genotypes inhabiting contrasting humidity conditions. To test if reduced growth and high carbohydrate storage are environmentally driven by drought, we examined the growth and non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations in single-provenance stands of mature trees of Pinus contorta Douglas and Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex C. Lawson planted at contrasting humidity conditions (900 versus 300 mm of annual precipitation) in Patagonia, Chile. Individual tree growth was measured for each species and at each location as mean basal area increment of the last 10 years (BAI10), annual shoot elongation for the period 2011-14, and needle length for 2013 and 2014 cohorts. Additionally, needle, branch, stem sapwood and roots were collected from each sampled tree to determine soluble sugars, starch and total NSC concentrations. The two species showed lower mean BAI10 and 2013 needle length in the dry site; P. ponderosa also had lower annual shoot extension for 2011 and 2014, and lower 2014 needle length, in the dry than in the mesic site. By contrast, NSC concentrations of all woody tissues for both species were either similar or higher in the dry site when compared with the mesic site. Patterns of starch and sugars were substantially different: starch concentrations were similar between sites except for roots of P. ponderosa, which were higher in the dry site, while sugar concentrations of all woody tissues in both species were higher in the dry site. Overall, our study provides evidence that reduced growth along with carbon (C) accumulation is an environmentally driven response to drought. Furthermore, the significant accumulation of low-molecular weight sugars in the dry site is compatible with a prioritized C

  2. Osmolality and non-structural carbohydrate composition in the secondary phloem of trees across a latitudinal gradient in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eLintunen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Phloem osmolality and its components are involved in basic cell metabolism, cell growth, and in various physiological processes including the ability of living cells to withstand drought and frost. Osmolality and sugar composition responses to environmental stresses have been extensively studied for leaves, but less for the secondary phloem of plant stems and branches. Leaf osmotic concentration and the share of pinitol and raffinose among soluble sugars increase with increasing drought or cold stress, and osmotic concentration is adjusted with osmoregulation. We hypothesize that similar responses occur in the secondary phloem of branches. We collected living bark samples from branches of adult Pinus sylvestris, Picea abies, Betula pendula and Populus tremula trees across Europe, from boreal Northern Finland to Mediterranean Portugal. In all studied species, the observed variation in phloem osmolality was mainly driven by variation in phloem water content, while tissue solute content was rather constant across regions. Osmoregulation, in which osmolality is controlled by variable tissue solute content, was stronger for Betula and Populus in comparison to the evergreen conifers. Osmolality was lowest in mid-latitude region, and from there increased by 37% towards northern Europe and 38% towards southern Europe due to low phloem water content in these regions. The ratio of raffinose to all soluble sugars was negligible at mid-latitudes and increased towards north and south, reflecting its role in cold and drought tolerance. For pinitol, another sugar known for contributing to stress tolerance, no such latitudinal pattern was observed. The proportion of sucrose was remarkably low and that of hexoses (i.e. glucose and fructose high at mid-latitudes. The ratio of starch to all non-structural carbohydrates increased towards the northern latitudes in agreement with the build-up of osmotically inactive C reservoir that can be converted into soluble

  3. Sub-tropical urban environment affecting content and composition of non-structural carbohydrates of Lolium multiflorum ssp. italicum cv. Lema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandrin, Carla Zuliani; Figueiredo-Ribeiro, Rita de Cassia Leone; Carvalho, Maria Angela Machado de [Instituto de Botanica, Caixa Postal 3005, 01061-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carvalho Delitti, Welington Braz [Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Ecologia, Caixa Postal 11461, 05422-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Domingos, Marisa [Instituto de Botanica, Caixa Postal 3005, 01061-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: mmingos@superig.com.br

    2008-12-15

    This study analyzed the relationship between environmental factors, especially air pollution and climatic conditions, and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in plants of Lolium multiflorum exposed during 10 consecutive periods of 28 days at a polluted site (Congonhas) and at a reference site in Sao Paulo city (Brazil). After exposure, NSC composition and leaf concentrations of Al, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd were measured. The seasonal pattern of NSC accumulation was quite similar in both sites, but plants at Congonhas showed higher concentrations of these compounds, especially fructans of low and medium degree of polymerization. Regression analysis showed that NSC in plants growing at the polluted site were explained by variations on temperature and leaf concentration of Fe (positive effect), as well as relative humidity and particulate material (negative effect). NSC in the standardized grass culture, in addition to heavy metal accumulation, may indicate stressing conditions in a sub-tropical polluted environment. - Particulate matter and air temperature increased non-structural carbohydrates in the standardized biomonitor grass in Sao Paulo.

  4. SAT: a late NS protein of porcine parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zádori, Zoltán; Szelei, József; Tijssen, Peter

    2005-10-01

    The genomes of all members of the Parvovirus genus were found to contain a small open reading frame (ORF), designated SAT, with a start codon four or seven nucleotides downstream of the VP2 initiation codon. Green fluorescent protein or FLAG fusion constructs of SAT demonstrated that these ORFs were expressed. Although the SAT proteins of the different parvoviruses are not particularly conserved, they were all predicted to contain a membrane-spanning helix, and mutations in this hydrophobic stretch affected the localization of the SAT protein. SAT colocalized with calreticulin in the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and the nucleus. A knockout mutant (SAT(-)), with an unmodified VP sequence, showed a "slow-spreading" phenotype. These knockout mutants could be complemented with VP2(-) SAT(+) mutant. The SAT protein is a late nonstructural (NS) protein, in contrast to previously identified NS proteins, since it is expressed from the same mRNA as VP2.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of protein-protein interactions and involvement of viral proteins in SARS-CoV replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji'an Pan

    Full Text Available Analyses of viral protein-protein interactions are an important step to understand viral protein functions and their underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we adopted a mammalian two-hybrid system to screen the genome-wide intraviral protein-protein interactions of SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV and therefrom revealed a number of novel interactions which could be partly confirmed by in vitro biochemical assays. Three pairs of the interactions identified were detected in both directions: non-structural protein (nsp 10 and nsp14, nsp10 and nsp16, and nsp7 and nsp8. The interactions between the multifunctional nsp10 and nsp14 or nsp16, which are the unique proteins found in the members of Nidovirales with large RNA genomes including coronaviruses and toroviruses, may have important implication for the mechanisms of replication/transcription complex assembly and functions of these viruses. Using a SARS-CoV replicon expressing a luciferase reporter under the control of a transcription regulating sequence, it has been shown that several viral proteins (N, X and SUD domains of nsp3, and nsp12 provided in trans stimulated the replicon reporter activity, indicating that these proteins may regulate coronavirus replication and transcription. Collectively, our findings provide a basis and platform for further characterization of the functions and mechanisms of coronavirus proteins.

  6. Characterization of cytopathic factors through genome-wide analysis of the Zika viral proteins in fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ge; Poulsen, Melissa; Fenyvuesvolgyi, Csaba; Yashiroda, Yoko; Yoshida, Minoru; Simard, J. Marc; Gallo, Robert C.; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2017-01-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) causes microcephaly and the Guillain-Barré syndrome. Little is known about how ZIKV causes these conditions or which ZIKV viral protein(s) is responsible for the associated ZIKV-induced cytopathic effects, including cell hypertrophy, growth restriction, cell-cycle dysregulation, and cell death. We used fission yeast for the rapid, global functional analysis of the ZIKV genome. All 14 proteins or small peptides were produced under an inducible promoter, and we measured the intracellular localization and the specific effects on ZIKV-associated cytopathic activities of each protein. The subcellular localization of each ZIKV protein was in overall agreement with its predicted protein structure. Five structural and two nonstructural ZIKV proteins showed various levels of cytopathic effects. The expression of these ZIKV proteins restricted cell proliferation, induced hypertrophy, or triggered cellular oxidative stress leading to cell death. The expression of premembrane protein (prM) resulted in cell-cycle G1 accumulation, whereas membrane-anchored capsid (anaC), membrane protein (M), envelope protein (E), and nonstructural protein 4A (NS4A) caused cell-cycle G2/M accumulation. A mechanistic study revealed that NS4A-induced cellular hypertrophy and growth restriction were mediated specifically through the target of rapamycin (TOR) cellular stress pathway involving Tor1 and type 2A phosphatase activator Tip41. These findings should provide a reference for future research on the prevention and treatment of ZIKV diseases. PMID:28049830

  7. The Rift Valley Fever virus protein NSm and putative cellular protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engdahl Cecilia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rift Valley Fever is an infectious viral disease and an emerging problem in many countries of Africa and on the Arabian Peninsula. The causative virus is predominantly transmitted by mosquitoes and high mortality and abortion rates characterize outbreaks in animals while symptoms ranging from mild to life-threatening encephalitis and hemorrhagic fever are noticed among infected humans. For a better prevention and treatment of the infection, an increased knowledge of the infectious process of the virus is required. The focus of this work was to identify protein-protein interactions between the non-structural protein (NSm, encoded by the M-segment of the virus, and host cell proteins. This study was initiated by screening approximately 26 million cDNA clones of a mouse embryonic cDNA library for interactions with the NSm protein using a yeast two-hybrid system. We have identified nine murine proteins that interact with NSm protein of Rift Valley Fever virus, and the putative protein-protein interactions were confirmed by growth selection procedures and β-gal activity measurements. Our results suggest that the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor subunit 2 (Cpsf2, the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (cyclophilin-like 2 protein (Ppil2, and the synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25 are the most promising targets for the NSm protein of the virus during an infection.

  8. Application of non-structural protein antibody tests in substantiating freedom from foot-and-mouth disease virus infection after emergency vaccination of cattle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paton, D.J.; Clerq, De K.; Greiner, M.; Dekker, A.; Brocchi, E.; Bergmann, I.E.; Sammin, D.J.; Gubbins, S.; Parida, S.

    2006-01-01

    There has been much debate about the use of the so-called ¿vaccinate-to-live¿ policy for the control of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) in Europe, according to which, spread of the FMD virus (FMDV) from future outbreaks could be controlled by a short period of ¿emergency¿ vaccination of surrounding

  9. Highly efficient infectious cell culture of three hepatitis C virus genotype 2b strains and sensitivity to lead protease, nonstructural protein 5A, and polymerase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, Santseharay; Li, Yi-Ping; Jensen, Sanne B

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a genetically diverse virus with multiple genotypes exhibiting remarkable differences, particularly in drug susceptibility. Drug and vaccine development will benefit from high-titer HCV cultures mimicking the complete viral life cycle, but such systems only...... exist for genotypes 1a and 2a. We developed efficient culture systems for the epidemiologically important genotype 2b. Full-length molecular clones of patient strains DH8 and DH10 were adapted to efficient growth in Huh7.5 cells by using F1468L/A1676S/D3001G (LSG) mutations. The previously developed J8......cc prototype 2b recombinant was further adapted. DH8 and J8 achieved infectivity titers >4.5 log10 Focus-Forming Units/mL. A defined set of DH8 mutations had cross-isolate adapting potential. A chimeric genome with the DH10 polyprotein coding sequence inserted into a vector with J8 untranslated...

  10. The thiazolobenzimidazole TBZE-029 inhibits enterovirus replication by targeting a short region immediately downstream from motif C in the nonstructural protein 2C.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palma, A.M. de; Heggermont, W.; Lanke, K.H.W.; Coutard, B.; Bergmann, M.; Monforte, A.M.; Canard, B.; Clercq, E. de; Chimirri, A.; Purstinger, G.; Rohayem, J.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Neyts, J.

    2008-01-01

    TBZE-029 {1-(2,6-difluorophenyl)-6-trifluoromethyl-1H,3H-thiazolo[3,4-a]benzimidazole} is a novel selective inhibitor of the replication of several enteroviruses. We show that TBZE-029 exerts its antiviral activity through inhibition of viral RNA replication, without affecting polyprotein

  11. Foot-and-mouth disease virus, but not bovine enterovirus, targets the host cell cytoskeleton, via the non-structural protein 3Cpro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armer, Hannah; Moffat, Katy; Wileman, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), a member of the Picornaviridae, is a pathogen of cloven-hoofed animals and causes a disease of major economic importance. Picornavirus-infected cells show changes in cell morphology and rearrangement of cytoplasmic membranes, which are a consequence of virus...

  12. Antibody to parvovirus B19 nonstructural protein is associated with chronic arthralgia in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jonathan R; Gough, John; Richards, Selwyn C M; Main, Janice; Enlander, Derek; McCreary, Michelle; Komaroff, Anthony L; Chia, John K

    2010-04-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a neuro-immune disease of uncertain pathogenesis. Human parvovirus B19 infection has been shown to occur just prior to development of the onset of CFS/ME in several cases, although B19 seroprevalence studies do not show any significant differences between CFS/ME and controls. In this study, we analysed parvovirus B19 markers in CFS/ME patients (n=200), diagnosed according to Fukuda CDC criteria, and normal blood donors (n=200). Serum from each subject was tested for anti-B19 VP2 IgM and IgG (by Biotrin ELISA), anti-B19 NS1 IgM and IgG (by immunofluorescence), and B19 DNA (by real-time PCR). CFS/ME patients and normal blood donors had a similar B19 seroprevalence (75 % versus 78 %, respectively). Eighty-three CFS patients (41.5 %) as compared with fourteen (7 %) normal blood donors tested positive for anti-B19 NS1 IgG (chi(2)=64.8; Pchronic joint pain, while 22 did not. Parvovirus B19 DNA was detected in serum of 11 CFS patients and none of the controls by Taqman real-time PCR (chi(2)=9.35, Pgenes NHLH1 and GABPA. As NS1 antibodies are thought to indicate chronic or severe courses of B19 infection, these findings suggest that although the seroprevalence of B19 in CFS patients is similar to controls, the immune control of the virus in these patients may not be efficient.

  13. Serotype-specific interactions among functional domains of dengue virus 2 nonstructural proteins (NS) 5 and NS3 are crucial for viral RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Tadahisa; Balasubramanian, Anuradha; Choi, Kyung H; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan

    2017-06-09

    Four serotypes of mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV), evolved from a common ancestor, are human pathogens of global significance for which there is no vaccine or antiviral drug available. The N-terminal domain of DENV NS5 has guanylyltransferase and methyltransferase (MTase), and the C-terminal region has the polymerase (POL), all of which are important for 5'-capping and RNA replication. The crystal structure of NS5 shows it as a dimer, but the functional evidence for NS5 dimer is lacking. Our studies showed that the substitution of DENV2 NS5 MTase or POL for DENV4 NS5 within DENV2 RNA resulted in a severe attenuation of replication in the transfected BHK-21 cells. A replication-competent species was evolved with the acquired mutations in the DENV2 and DENV4 NS5 MTase or POL domain or in the DENV2 NS3 helicase domain in the DENV2 chimera RNAs by repeated passaging of infected BHK-21 or mosquito cells. The linker region of seven residues in NS5, rich in serotype-specific residues, is important for the recovery of replication fitness in the chimera RNA. Our results, taken together, provide genetic evidence for a serotype-specific interaction between NS3 and NS5 as well as specific interdomain interaction within NS5 required for RNA replication. Genome-wide RNAseq analysis revealed the distribution of adaptive mutations in RNA quasispecies. Those within NS3 and NS5 are located at the surface and/or within the NS5 dimer interface, providing a functional significance to the crystal structure NS5 dimer. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Adhesive strength of pilot-scale washed cottonseed meal in comparison with a synthetic adhesive for non-structural application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Great progress has been made on developing bio-based wood adhesives from renewable natural resources over last couple of decades . Water-washed cottonseed meal (WCSM) showed the adhesive performance comparable to cottonseed protein isolate. To promote WCSM as an industrial wood adhesive for non-stru...

  15. Recombinant capripoxviruses expressing proteins of bluetongue virus: evaluation of immune responses and protection in small ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Aurélie; Albina, Emmanuel; Bréard, Emmanuel; Sailleau, Corinne; Promé, Sylvie; Grillet, Colette; Kwiatek, Olivier; Russo, Pierre; Thiéry, Richard; Zientara, Stephan; Cêtre-Sossah, Catherine

    2007-09-17

    The development of recombinant capripoxviruses for protective immunization of ruminants against bluetongue virus (BTV) infection is described. Sheep (n=11) and goats (n=4) were immunized with BTV recombinant capripoxviruses (BTV-Cpox) individually expressing four different genes encoding two capsid proteins (VP2 and VP7) and two non-structural proteins (NS1, NS3) of BTV serotype 2 (BTV-2). Seroconversion was observed against NS3, VP7 and VP2 in both species and a lymphoproliferation specific to BTV antigens was also demonstrated in goats. Finally, partial protection of sheep challenged 3 weeks after BTV-Cpox administration with a virulent strain of BTV-2, was observed.

  16. Rooting depth, water relations and non-structural carbohydrate dynamics in three woody angiosperms differentially affected by an extreme summer drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Andrea; Casolo, Valentino; Dal Borgo, Anna; Savi, Tadeja; Stenni, Barbara; Bertoncin, Paolo; Zini, Luca; McDowell, Nathan G

    2016-03-01

    In 2012, an extreme summer drought induced species-specific die-back in woody species in Northeastern Italy. Quercus pubescens and Ostrya carpinifolia were heavily impacted, while Prunus mahaleb was largely unaffected. By comparing seasonal changes in isotopic composition of xylem sap, rainfall and deep soil samples, we show that P. mahaleb has a deeper root system than the other two species. This morphological trait allowed P  mahaleb to maintain higher water potential (Ψ), gas exchange rates and non-structural carbohydrates content (NSC) throughout the summer, when compared with the other species. More favourable water and carbon states allowed relatively stable maintenance of stem hydraulic conductivity (k) throughout the growing season. In contrast, in Quercus pubescens and Ostrya carpinifolia, decreasing Ψ and NSC were associated with significant hydraulic failure, with spring-to-summer k loss averaging 60%. Our data support the hypothesis that drought-induced tree decline is a complex phenomenon that cannot be modelled on the basis of single predictors of tree status like hydraulic efficiency, vulnerability and carbohydrate content. Our data highlight the role of rooting depth in seasonal progression of water status, gas exchange and NSC, with possible consequences for energy-demanding mechanisms involved in the maintenance of vascular integrity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Measurement of the distribution of non-structural carbohydrate composition in onion populations by a high-throughput microplate enzymatic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revanna, Roopashree; Turnbull, Matthew H; Shaw, Martin L; Wright, Kathryn M; Butler, Ruth C; Jameson, Paula E; McCallum, John A

    2013-08-15

    Non-structural carbohydrate (NSC; glucose, fructose, sucrose and fructan) composition of onions (Allium cepa L.) varies widely and is a key determinant of market usage. To analyse the physiology and genetics of onion carbohydrate metabolism and to enable selective breeding, an inexpensive, reliable and practicable sugar assay is required to phenotype large numbers of samples. A rapid, reliable and cost-effective microplate-based assay was developed for NSC analysis in onions and used to characterise variation in tissue hexose, sucrose and fructan content in open-pollinated breeding populations and in mapping populations developed from a wide onion cross. Sucrose measured in microplates employing maltase as a hydrolytic enzyme was in agreement with HPLC-PAD results. The method revealed significant variation in bulb fructan content within open-pollinated 'Pukekohe Longkeeper' breeding populations over a threefold range. Very wide segregation from 80 to 600 g kg(-1) in fructan content was observed in bulbs of F2 genetic mapping populations from the wide onion cross 'Nasik Red × CUDH2150'. The microplate enzymatic assay is a reliable and practicable method for onion sugar analysis for genetics, breeding and food technology. Open-pollinated onion populations may harbour extensive within-population variability in carbohydrate content, which may be quantified and exploited using this method. The phenotypic data obtained from genetic mapping populations show that the method is well suited to detailed genetic and physiological analysis. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Prospective evaluation of nonstructural 1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and rapid immunochromatographic tests to detect dengue virus in patients with acute febrile illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najioullah, Fatiha; Combet, Emilie; Paturel, Laure; Martial, Jenny; Koulmann, Laurence; Thomas, Laurent; Hatchuel, Yves; Cabié, André; Cesaire, Raymond

    2011-02-01

    We prospectively evaluated the Bio-Rad nonstructural 1 (NS1) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunochromatographic assay (LFIA) in comparison to an in-place reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction for dengue diagnosis. Among 537 consecutive samples from patients with acute febrile disease, 264 (49.2%) tested positive in reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), 156 (29.1%) in NS1-antigen (Ag) ELISA, and 125 (23.3%) in NS1-Ag LFIA. Compared to the RT-PCR status, the specificity was 100% for the NS1-Ag ELISA and LFIA, but their respective sensitivities were 61.2% [95% confidence interval (CI), 55.2-67.2] and 49.4% (95% CI, 43.2-55.6), with nadirs of 37.9% and 24.1% on day 6 of illness. The NS1-Ag ELISA and LFIA were positive, respectively, for 48.0% and 40.7% of the secondary infections versus 85.0% and 66.7% of the primary infections. For patients LFIA reached respective sensitivities of 100% and 90.5%. Reports of results of dengue NS1-Ag assays should specify that negativity does not preclude DENV infection, and require further investigations in the case of severe disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of the nonstructural and structural polyprotein regions, and complete genome sequences of Israel acute paralysis viruses identified from honeybees (Apis mellifera) in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Kondreddy Eswar; Noh, Jin Hyeong; Kim, Young-Ha; Yoo, Mi Sun; Doan, Huong Thi Thanh; Ramya, Mummadireddy; Jung, Suk-Chan; Quyen, Dong Van; Kang, Seung-Won

    2013-09-01

    Phylogenetic trees were constructed for 24 partial nucleotide sequences of the nonstructural polyprotein (ORF1) and structural polyprotein regions (ORF2) of Korean IAPV genotypes, as well as eight previously reported IAPV sequences from various countries. Most of the Korean genotypes formed a distinct cluster, separate from other country genotypes. To investigate this phenomenon in more detail, three complete IAPV genome sequences were identified from different regions in Korea, i.e., Korea1, Korea2, and Korea3. These sequences were aligned with eight previously reported complete genome sequences and various genome regions were compared. The Korean IAPVs were very similar to those from China and Israel, but highly diverged from USA and Australian genotypes. Interestingly, they showed greater variability than the USA and Australian genotypes in ORF1, but highly similar to the Australian genotype in the ORF2 region. Thus, genetic recombination may account for the spatial distance between the Korean IAPV genotypes and those from other countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Localization of mammalian orthoreovirus proteins to cytoplasmic factory-like structures via nonoverlapping regions of microNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cathy L; Arnold, Michelle M; Broering, Teresa J; Hastings, Craig E; Nibert, Max L

    2010-01-01

    Virally induced structures called viral factories form throughout the cytoplasm of cells infected with mammalian orthoreoviruses (MRV). When expressed alone in cells, MRV nonstructural protein microNS forms factory-like structures very similar in appearance to viral factories, suggesting that it is involved in forming the structural matrix of these structures. microNS also associates with MRV core particles; the core proteins mu2, lambda1, lambda2, lambda3, and sigma2; and the RNA-binding nonstructural protein sigmaNS. These multiple associations result in the recruitment or retention of these viral proteins or particles at factory-like structures. In this study, we identified the regions of microNS necessary and sufficient for these associations and additionally examined the localization of viral RNA synthesis in infected cells. We found that short regions within the amino-terminal 220 residues of microNS are necessary for associations with core particles and necessary and sufficient for associations with the proteins mu2, lambda1, lambda2, sigma2, and sigmaNS. We also found that only the lambda3 protein associates with the carboxyl-terminal one-third of microNS and that viral RNA is synthesized within viral factories. These results suggest that microNS may act as a cytoplasmic scaffolding protein involved in localizing and coordinating viral replication or assembly intermediates for the efficient production of progeny core particles during MRV infection.

  1. The influence of short-term cold stress on the metabolism of non-structural carbohydrates in polar grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łopieńska-Biernat Elżbieta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants adapt to extremely low temperatures in polar regions by maximizing their photosynthetic efficiency and accumulating cryoprotective and osmoprotective compounds. Flowering plants of the family Poaceae growing in the Arctic and in the Antarctic were investigated. Their responses to cold stress were analyzed under laboratory conditions. Samples were collected after 24 h and 48 h of cold treatment. Quantitative and qualitative changes of sugars are found among different species, but they can differ within a genus of the family Poaceae. The values of the investigated parameters in Poa annua differed considerably depending to the biogeographic origin of plants. At the beginning of the experiment, Antarctic plants were acclimatized in greenhouse characterized by significantly higher content of sugars, including storage reserves, sucrose and starch, but lower total protein content. After 24 h of exposure to cold stress, much smaller changes in the examined parameters were noted in Antarctic plants than in locally grown specimens. Total sugar content and sucrose, starch and glucose levels were nearly constant in P. annua, but they varied significantly. Those changes are responsible for the high adaptability of P. annua to survive and develop in highly unsupportive environments and colonize new regions.

  2. The role of matricellular proteins in glaucoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wallace, Deborah M

    2014-07-01

    Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy affecting approximately 60million people worldwide and is the second most common cause of irreversible blindness. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the main risk factor for developing glaucoma and is caused by impaired aqueous humor drainage through the trabecular meshwork (TM) and Schlemm\\'s canal (SC). In primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), this elevation in IOP in turn leads to deformation at the optic nerve head (ONH) specifically at the lamina cribrosa (LC) region where there is also a deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules such as collagen and fibronectin. Matricellular proteins are non-structural secreted glycoproteins that help cells communicate with their surrounding ECM. This family of proteins includes connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), also known as CCN2, thrombospondins (TSPs), secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), periostin, osteonectin, and Tenascin-C and -X and other ECM proteins. All members appear to play a role in fibrosis and increased ECM deposition. Most are widely expressed in tissues particularly in the TM and ONH and deficiency of TSP1 and SPARC have been shown to lower IOP in mouse models of glaucoma through enhanced outflow facility. The role of these proteins in glaucoma is emerging as some have an association with the pathophysiology of the TM and LC regions and might therefore be potential targets for therapeutic intervention in glaucoma.

  3. Potential of semi-structural and non-structural adaptation strategies to reduce future flood risk: case study for the Meuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Poussin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Flood risk throughout Europe has increased in the last few decades, and is projected to increase further owing to continued development in flood-prone areas and climate change. In recent years, studies have shown that adequate undertaking of semi-structural and non-structural measures can considerably decrease the costs of floods for households. However, there is little insight into how such measures can decrease the risk beyond the local level, now and in the future. To gain such insights, a modelling framework using the Damagescanner model with land-use and inundation maps for 2000 and 2030 was developed and applied to the Meuse river basin, in the region of Limburg, in the southeast of the Netherlands. The research suggests that annual flood risk may increase by up to 185% by 2030 compared with 2000, as a result of combined land-use and climate changes. The independent contributions of climate change and land-use change to the simulated increase are 108% and 37%, respectively. The risk-reduction capacity of the implementation of spatial zoning measures, which are meant to limit and regulate developments in flood-prone areas, is between 25% and 45%. Mitigation factors applied to assess the potential impact of three mitigation strategies (dry-proofing, wet-proofing, and the combination of dry- and wet-proofing in residential areas show that these strategies have a risk-reduction capacity of between 21% and 40%, depending on their rate of implementation. Combining spatial zoning and mitigation measures could reduce the total increase in risk by up to 60%. Policy implications of these results are discussed. They focus on the undertaking of effective mitigation measures, and possible ways to increase their implementation by households.

  4. Modulation of carbon and nitrogen allocation in Urtica dioica and Plantago major by elevated CO{sub 2}. Impact of accumulation of nonstructural carbohydrates and ontogenetic drift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertog, J. den; Stulen, I.; Fonseca, F.; Delea, P.

    1996-10-01

    Doubling the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration from 350 to 700 {mu} l{sup -1} increased the relative growth rate (RGR) of hydroponically grown Urtica dioica L. and Plantagomajor ssp. pleiospherma Pilger only for the first 10-14 days. Previous experiments with P. major indicated that RGR did not respond i proportion to the rate of photosynthesis. The impact of changes in leaf morphology, dry matter partitioning, dry matter chemical composition and ontogenetic drift on this discrepancy is analysed. Soon after the start of the treatment, carbohydrate concentrations were higher at elevated CO{sub 2}; largely due to starch accumulation. An increase in the percentage of leaf dry matter and decreases in the specific leaf area (SLA) and the shoot nitrogen concentration were correlated with an increase in the total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration (TNC). A combination of accumulation of soluble sugars and starch and ontogenetic drift explains the decrease in SLA at the elevated CO{sub 2} level. A similar ontogenetic effect of elevated CO{sub 2} was observed on the specific root length (SRL). Shoot nitrogen concentration and percentage leaf dry matter were not affected. The net diurnal fluctuation of the carbohydrate pool in P. major was equal for both CO{sub 2} concentrations, indicating that the growth response to elevated CO{sub 2} may be ruled by other variables such as sink strength. Elevated CO{sub 2} did not greatly influence the partitioning of nitrogen between soluble and insoluble, reduced N and nitrate, nor the allocation of dry matter between leaf, stem and root. That the root to shoot ratio (F/S) was not affected by elevated CO{sub 2} implies that, to maintain a balanced activity between roots and shoot, no shift in partitioning of dry matter upon doubling of the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration is required. (AB)

  5. Seasonal and inter-annual dynamics of growth, non-structural carbohydrates and C stable isotopes in a Mediterranean beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scartazza, Andrea; Moscatello, Stefano; Matteucci, Giorgio; Battistelli, Alberto; Brugnoli, Enrico

    2013-07-01

    Seasonal and inter-annual dynamics of growth, non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) and carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of NSC were studied in a beech forest of Central Italy over a 2-year period characterized by different environmental conditions. The net C assimilated by forest trees was mainly used to sustain growth early in the season and to accumulate storage carbohydrates in trunk and root wood in the later part of the season, before leaf shedding. Growth and NSC concentration dynamics were only slightly affected by the reduced soil water content (SWC) during the drier year. Conversely, the carbon isotope analysis on NSC revealed seasonal and inter-annual variations of photosynthetic and post-carboxylation fractionation processes, with a significant increase in δ(13)C of wood and leaf soluble sugars in the drier summer year than in the wetter one. The highly significant correlation between δ(13)C of leaf soluble sugars and SWC suggests a decrease of the canopy C isotope discrimination and, hence, an increased water-use efficiency with decreasing soil water availability. This may be a relevant trait for maintaining an acceptable plant water status and a relatively high C sink capacity during dry seasonal periods. Our results suggest a short- to medium-term homeostatic response of the Collelongo beech stand to variations in water availability and solar radiation, indicating that this Mediterranean forest was able to adjust carbon-water balance in order to prevent C depletion and to sustain plant growth and reserve accumulation during relatively dry seasons.

  6. Higher Flexibility and Better Immediate Spontaneous Correction May Not Gain Better Results for Nonstructural Thoracic Curve in Lenke 5C AIS Patients: Risk Factors for Its Correction Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanbin; Lin, Guanfeng; Wang, Shengru; Zhang, Jianguo; Shen, Jianxiong; Wang, Yipeng; Guo, Jianwei; Yang, Xinyu; Zhao, Lijuan

    2016-11-15

    Retrospective study. To study the behavior of the unfused thoracic curve in Lenke type 5C during the follow-up and to identify risk factors for its correction loss. Few studies have focused on the spontaneous behaviors of the unfused thoracic curve after selective thoracolumbar or lumbar fusion during the follow-up and the risk factors for spontaneous correction loss. We retrospectively reviewed 45 patients (41 females and 4 males) with AIS who underwent selective TL/L fusion from 2006 to 2012 in a single institution. The follow-up averaged 36 months (range, 24-105 months). Patients were divided into two groups. Thoracic curves in group A improved or maintained their curve magnitude after spontaneous correction, with a negative or no correction loss during the follow-up. Thoracic curves in group B deteriorated after spontaneous correction with a positive correction loss. Univariate analysis and multivariate analysis were built to identify the risk factors for correction loss of the unfused thoracic curves. The minor thoracic curve was 26° preoperatively. It was corrected to 13° immediately with a spontaneous correction of 48.5%. At final follow-up it was 14° with a correction loss of 1°. Thoracic curves did not deteriorate after spontaneous correction in 23 cases in group A, while 22 cases were identified with thoracic curve progressing in group B. In multivariate analysis, two risk factors were independently associated with thoracic correction loss: higher flexibility and better immediate spontaneous correction rate of thoracic curve. Posterior selective TL/L fusion with pedicle screw constructs is an effective treatment for Lenke 5C AIS patients. Nonstructural thoracic curves with higher flexibility or better immediate correction are more likely to progress during the follow-up and close attentions must be paid to these patients in case of decompensation. 4.

  7. Morbillivirus v proteins exhibit multiple mechanisms to block type 1 and type 2 interferon signalling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil K Chinnakannan

    Full Text Available Morbilliviruses form a closely related group of pathogenic viruses which encode three non-structural proteins V, W and C in their P gene. Previous studies with rinderpest virus (RPV and measles virus (MeV have demonstrated that these non-structural proteins play a crucial role in blocking type I (IFNα/β and type II (IFNγ interferon action, and various mechanisms have been proposed for these effects. We have directly compared four important morbilliviruses, rinderpest (RPV, measles virus (MeV, peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV and canine distemper virus (CDV. These viruses and their V proteins could all block type I IFN action. However, the viruses and their V proteins had varying abilities to block type II IFN action. The ability to block type II IFN-induced gene transcription correlated with co-precipitation of STAT1 with the respective V protein, but there was no correlation between co-precipitation of either STAT1 or STAT2 and the abilities of the V proteins to block type I IFN-induced gene transcription or the creation of the antiviral state. Further study revealed that the V proteins of RPV, MeV, PPRV and CDV could all interfere with phosphorylation of the interferon-receptor-associated kinase Tyk2, and the V protein of highly virulent RPV could also block the phosphorylation of another such kinase, Jak1. Co-precipitation studies showed that morbillivirus V proteins all form a complex containing Tyk2 and Jak1. This study highlights the ability of morbillivirus V proteins to target multiple components of the IFN signalling pathways to control both type I and type II IFN action.

  8. The discrete ordinate method in association with the finite-volume method in non-structured mesh; Methode des ordonnees discretes associee a la methode des volumes finis en maillage non structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Dez, V.; Lallemand, M. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Mecanique et d`Aerotechnique (ENSMA), 86 - Poitiers (France); Sakami, M.; Charette, A. [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada). Dept. des Sciences Appliquees

    1996-12-31

    The description of an efficient method of radiant heat transfer field determination in a grey semi-transparent environment included in a 2-D polygonal cavity with surface boundaries that reflect the radiation in a purely diffusive manner is proposed, at the equilibrium and in radiation-conduction coupling situation. The technique uses simultaneously the finite-volume method in non-structured triangular mesh, the discrete ordinate method and the ray shooting method. The main mathematical developments and comparative results with the discrete ordinate method in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates are included. (J.S.) 10 refs.

  9. Interannual and seasonal dynamics, and the age, of nonstructural carbohydrate pools in the stemwood of temperate trees across a climatic gradient in the Northeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A. D.; Carbone, M. S.; Czimczik, C. I.; Keenan, T. F.; Schaberg, P.; Murakami, P.; Xu, X.

    2012-04-01

    Like all plants, forest trees accumulate and store non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) as resources to be used in the future. This can be viewed as a bet-hedging strategy, providing reserves that the tree can draw on in times of stress—e.g., following disturbance, disease, or extreme climatic events. In the context of climate change, understanding factors influencing the availability of these stored NSC compounds to support growth and metabolism is essential for predicting the resilience of forests to environmental stress factors. We conducted this study to investigate the role of these stored NSC pools in the context of ecosystem C balance at time scales from days to years. At quarterly intervals over a three-year period, we monitored stemwood total NSC concentrations of the dominant tree species of New England. Work was conducted at three sites along a climatic gradient: an oak-dominated transition hardwood forest (Harvard Forest), a maple-beech-birch northern hardwood forest (Bartlett Experimental Forest), and a spruce-fir forest (Howland Forest). We observed large differences among species both in NSC concentrations, and in how the NSC pool is partitioned to different compounds (starch, sucrose, glucose, fructose, raffinose, and stachyose). Within a species, however, seasonal dynamics were remarkably similar across sites. We used the bomb radiocarbon (14C) spike to estimate the average age of the sugars and starches in the NSC pool in a subset of nine maple trees from each site. We found that the age of sugars ranged from 1-24 y and starches from 1-31 y. The ages of sugar and starch pools were highly correlated across all sites, and there was no significant difference in the mean age of the two pools, which was ~11 y. Using a one-pool representation of NSC reserves (similar to the standard approach used in several existing forest C models) our model FöBAAR (FOrest Biomass, Allocation, Assimilation and Respiration) failed to reproduce the seasonal NSC dynamics

  10. Interannual and seasonal dynamics, and the age, of nonstructural carbohydrate pools in the stemwood of temperate trees across a climatic gradient in New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A. D.; Carbone, M. S.; Czimczik, C. I.; Keenan, T. F.; Schaberg, P.; Xu, X.

    2011-12-01

    Like all plants, forest trees accumulate and store surplus mobile carbon (C) compounds as resources to be used to support future growth. This can be viewed as a bet-hedging strategy, providing reserves that the tree can draw on in times of stress-e.g., following disturbance, disease, or extreme climatic events. In the context of climate change, understanding factors influencing the availability of these stored C compounds to support growth and metabolism is essential for predicting the resilience of forests to environmental stress factors. We conducted this study to investigate the role of these stored C pools in the context ecosystem C balance at time scales from days to years. At quarterly intervals over a three year period, we monitored stemwood total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) concentrations of the dominant tree species of New England. Work was conducted at three sites along a climatic gradient: an oak-dominated transition hardwood forest (Harvard Forest), a maple-beech-birch northern hardwood forest (Bartlett Experimental Forest), and a spruce-fir forest (Howland Forest). We observed large differences among species both in TNC concentrations, and in how the TNC pool is partitioned to different compounds (starch, sucrose, glucose, fructose, raffinose, xylose and stachyose). Within a species, however, seasonal dynamics were remarkably similar across sites. The interannual variability in maximum TNC concentrations appears to be smaller than interannual variability in annual net ecosystem exchange of CO2. With an additional set of samples, we are using the bomb radiocarbon (14C) spike to estimate the average age of the sugars and starches in the TNC pool, and relating this to factors such as size, age, and recent growth rates of each tree. Initial results suggest that these TNC pools range in age from several years to several decades old. The average ages of starch and sugar pools are related, with the starches generally being older than sugars

  11. Nonstructural carbon dynamics are best predicted by the combination of photosynthesis and plant hydraulics during both bark beetle induced mortality and herbaceous plant response to drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, B. E.; Mackay, D. S.; Guadagno, C.; Peckham, S. D.; Pendall, E.; Borkhuu, B.; Aston, T.; Frank, J. M.; Massman, W. J.; Reed, D. E.; Yarkhunova, Y.; Weinig, C.

    2012-12-01

    Recent work has shown that nonstructural carbon (NSC) provides both a signal and consequence of water stress in plants. The dynamics of NSC are likely not solely a result of the balance of photosynthesis and respiration (carbon starvation hypothesis) but also the availability of NSC for plant functions due to hydraulic condition. Further, plant hydraulics regulates photosynthesis both directly through stomatal conductance and indirectly through leaf water status control over leaf biochemistry. To test these hypotheses concerning NSC in response to a wide variety of plant perturbations, we used a model that combines leaf biochemical controls over photosynthesis (Farquhar model) with dynamic plant hydraulic conductance (Sperry model). This model (Terrestrial Regional Ecosystem Exchange Simulator; TREES) simulates the dynamics of NSC through a carbon budget approach that responds to plant hydraulic status. We tested TREES on two dramatically different datasets. The first dataset is from lodgepole pine and Engelmann spruce trees dying from bark beetles that carry blue-stain fungi which block xylem and cause hydraulic failure. The second data set is from Brassica rapa, a small herbaceous plant whose accessions are used in a variety of crops. The Brassica rapa plants include two parents whose circadian clock periods are different; NSC is known to provide inputs to the circadian clock likely modified by drought. Thus, drought may interact with clock control to constrain how NSC changes over the day. The Brassica rapa plants were grown in growth chamber conditions where drought was precisely controlled. The connection between these datasets is that both provide rigorous tests of our understanding of plant NSC dynamics and use similar leaf and whole plant gas exchange and NSC laboratory methods. Our results show that NSC decline (<10% in the whole plant) is less precipitous than expected from carbon starvation alone because both C uptake and use are impacted by water stress

  12. Dual infections of PRRSV / influenza or PRRSV / Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in the respiratory tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, J.M.A.; Leengoed, van L.A.M.G.; Stockhofe, N.; Kok, G.; Wensvoort, G.

    1997-01-01

    To study the effect of a previous porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome-infection (PRRS) of the respiratory tract on influenza virus and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (App) infections, 3-week-old specific-pathogen-free (spf) piglets were intranasally infected with PRRS virus. One week

  13. A systematic review of structured versus non-structured breastfeeding programmes to support the initiation and duration of exclusive breastfeeding in acute and primary healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beake, Sarah; Pellowe, Carol; Dykes, Fiona; Schmied, Virginia; Bick, Debra

    2011-01-01

    Background: Breastfeeding has many important health benefits for the woman and her baby. Despite evidence of benefit from a large number of well conducted studies, breastfeeding uptake and the duration of exclusive breastfeeding remain low in many countries. In order to improve breastfeeding rates, policy and guidelines at global, individual country level and in local healthcare settings have recommended that structured programmes to support breastfeeding should be introduced. The objective of this review was to consider the evidence of outcomes of structured compared with non-structured breastfeeding programmes in acute maternity care settings to support initiation and duration of exclusive breastfeeding. The definition of structured programme used included a multi-faceted or single intervention approach to support breastfeeding; definition of non-structured included support offered within standard care. The review considered quantitative and qualitative studies which addressed outcomes following the introduction of a structured programme in acute healthcare settings to support breastfeeding compared with no programme. The primary outcomes of interest were uptake of breastfeeding and duration of exclusive breastfeeding (only breast milk, including milk expressed). Studies which only considered community based interventions were not included. A search of the literature published between 1992 and 2010 was conducted, which followed a four step process. After a limited search of MEDLINE and CINAHL to identify key words contained in the title or abstract and index terms to describe relevant interventions, a second extensive search was undertaken using identified key words and index terms. The third step included a search of reference lists and bibliographies of relevant articles and the fourth step included a search of grey and unpublished literature and national databasesMethodological quality: Methodological quality was assessed using checklists developed by the

  14. Protein Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Protein Foods Foods high in protein such as fish, ... for the vegetarian proteins, whether they have carbohydrate. Protein Choices Plant-Based Proteins Plant-based protein foods ...

  15. A global analysis of the concentration and dynamics of non-structural carbohydrates in plants: does it matter under global change? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, A.; Martínez-Vilalta, J.; Asencio, M.; Lloret, F.; Palacio, S.; Galiano, L.; Hoch, G.; Piper, F.

    2013-12-01

    Forests store significant amounts of C globally and recent reports of forest mortality world-wide have generated strong concern. Evidence suggests that increasing drought associated with climate change is a primary cause of tree stress and subsequent mortality. This has generated an urgent need to predict how forests will cope with increasing stress. Storage of non-structural C compounds (NSC, compounds not permanently invested in structural biomass that can later be used to support diverse plant functions) is critical for survival during periods when C assimilation does not meet demand. However, remarkable knowledge gaps exist to accurately predict plant growth and survival under climate change. Although trees accumulate relatively large pools of NSC, there is a strong debate on how these pools build up over time. On the one hand, it is frequently assumed that the build- up of NSC in trees occurs when supply via photosynthesis exceeds overall demands. If so, the abundant NSC pools in trees reflect an overabundance of C in the long term. An alternative explanation is that trees regulate NSC storage to maintain sufficient pools to cope with asynchronies between demand and supply and with stresses that long lived plants inevitably experience during their life time. However, our understanding of whether and how trees regulate storage in the long term is minimal. Here, we assembled a new global database to examine broad patterns of seasonal NSC variation across organs, life forms and biomes, and the degree to which NSC storage is depleted in plants under a wide range of natural conditions. We compiled seasonal data (at least three measurements over a minimum of four months) for ca. 200 wild species under natural conditions. On average, NSC account for ca. 8-10% of dry plant biomass. NSC and starch concentrations do not vary significantly with biome, but soluble sugars (SS) in plants from Mediterranean biomes are higher than in temperate or tropical biomes. On average

  16. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection triggers HMGB1 release to promote inflammatory cytokine production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Erzhen; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Luo, Jingyi; Gao, Li; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong, E-mail: fanglr@mail.hzau.edu.cn; Xiao, Shaobo, E-mail: vet@mail.hzau.edu.cn

    2014-11-15

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious agents. Based on meta-analysis of all publicly available microarray datasets, HMGB1 has recently been proposed as the most significant immune modulator during the porcine response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. However, the function of HMGB1 in PRRSV pathogenesis is unclear. In this study, we found that PRRSV infection triggers the translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the extracellular milieu in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Although HMGB1 has no effect on PRRSV replication, HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and subsequent expression of inflammatory cytokines through receptors RAGE, TLR2 and TLR4. Our findings show that HMGB1 release, triggered by PRRSV infection, enhances the efficiency of virus-induced inflammatory responses, thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection. - Highlights: • PRRSV infection triggers HMGB1 release from MARC-145 cells and PAMs. • HMGB1 does not significantly affect PRRSV proliferation. • HMGB1 is involved in PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory responses. • HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced inflammatory responses through TLR2/4 and RAGE.

  17. Development and application of hepatitis C reporter viruses with genotype 1 to 7 core-nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) expressing fluorescent proteins or luciferase in modified JFH1 NS5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith M; Jensen, Tanja B; Mathiesen, Christian K

    2011-01-01

    of these reporter viruses for high-throughput fluorescence- and luminescence-based studies of HCV-receptor interactions and serum-neutralizing antibodies was demonstrated. Finally, using RLuc viruses, we showed that the genotype-specific core-NS2 sequence did not influence the response to alfa-2b interferon (IFN-alfa...

  18. Post-translational modifications of hepatitis C viral proteins and their biological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundt, Jana; Li, Zhubing; Liu, Qiang

    2013-12-21

    Replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV) depends on the interaction of viral proteins with various host cellular proteins and signalling pathways. Similar to cellular proteins, post-translational modifications (PTMs) of HCV proteins are essential for proper protein function and regulation, thus, directly affecting viral life cycle and the generation of infectious virus particles. Cleavage of the HCV polyprotein by cellular and viral proteases into more than 10 proteins represents an early protein modification step after translation of the HCV positive-stranded RNA genome. The key modifications include the regulated intramembranous proteolytic cleavage of core protein, disulfide bond formation of core, glycosylation of HCV envelope proteins E1 and E2, methylation of nonstructural protein 3 (NS3), biotinylation of NS4A, ubiquitination of NS5B and phosphorylation of core and NS5B. Other modifications like ubiquitination of core and palmitoylation of core and NS4B proteins have been reported as well. For some modifications such as phosphorylation of NS3 and NS5A and acetylation of NS3, we have limited understanding of their effects on HCV replication and pathogenesis while the impact of other modifications is far from clear. In this review, we summarize the available information on PTMs of HCV proteins and discuss their relevance to HCV replication and pathogenesis.

  19. Monkey Viperin Restricts Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyu Fang

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is an important pathogen which causes huge economic damage globally in the swine industry. Current vaccination strategies provide only limited protection against PRRSV infection. Viperin is an interferon (IFN stimulated protein that inhibits some virus infections via IFN-dependent or IFN-independent pathways. However, the role of viperin in PRRSV infection is not well understood. In this study, we cloned the full-length monkey viperin (mViperin complementary DNA (cDNA from IFN-α-treated African green monkey Marc-145 cells. It was found that the mViperin is up-regulated following PRRSV infection in Marc-145 cells along with elevated IRF-1 gene levels. IFN-α induced mViperin expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner and strongly inhibits PRRSV replication in Marc-145 cells. Overexpression of mViperin suppresses PRRSV replication by blocking the early steps of PRRSV entry and genome replication and translation but not inhibiting assembly and release. And mViperin co-localized with PRRSV GP5 and N protein, but only interacted with N protein in distinct cytoplasmic loci. Furthermore, it was found that the 13-16 amino acids of mViperin were essential for inhibiting PRRSV replication, by disrupting the distribution of mViperin protein from the granular distribution to a homogeneous distribution in the cytoplasm. These results could be helpful in the future development of novel antiviral therapies against PRRSV infection.

  20. Analysis of intraviral protein-protein interactions of the SARS coronavirus ORFeome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht von Brunn

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV genome is predicted to encode 14 functional open reading frames, leading to the expression of up to 30 structural and non-structural protein products. The functions of a large number of viral ORFs are poorly understood or unknown. In order to gain more insight into functions and modes of action and interaction of the different proteins, we cloned the viral ORFeome and performed a genome-wide analysis for intraviral protein interactions and for intracellular localization. 900 pairwise interactions were tested by yeast-two-hybrid matrix analysis, and more than 65 positive non-redundant interactions, including six self interactions, were identified. About 38% of interactions were subsequently confirmed by CoIP in mammalian cells. Nsp2, nsp8 and ORF9b showed a wide range of interactions with other viral proteins. Nsp8 interacts with replicase proteins nsp2, nsp5, nsp6, nsp7, nsp8, nsp9, nsp12, nsp13 and nsp14, indicating a crucial role as a major player within the replication complex machinery. It was shown by others that nsp8 is essential for viral replication in vitro, whereas nsp2 is not. We show that also accessory protein ORF9b does not play a pivotal role for viral replication, as it can be deleted from the virus displaying normal plaque sizes and growth characteristics in Vero cells. However, it can be expected to be important for the virus-host interplay and for pathogenicity, due to its large number of interactions, by enhancing the global stability of the SARS proteome network, or play some unrealized role in regulating protein-protein interactions. The interactions identified provide valuable material for future studies.

  1. Detecting molecular features of spectra mainly associated with structural and non-structural carbohydrates in co-products from bioEthanol production using DRIFT with uni- and multivariate molecular spectral analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peiqiang; Damiran, Daalkhaijav; Azarfar, Arash; Niu, Zhiyuan

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use DRIFT spectroscopy with uni- and multivariate molecular spectral analyses as a novel approach to detect molecular features of spectra mainly associated with carbohydrate in the co-products (wheat DDGS, corn DDGS, blend DDGS) from bioethanol processing in comparison with original feedstock (wheat (Triticum), corn (Zea mays)). The carbohydrates related molecular spectral bands included: A_Cell (structural carbohydrates, peaks area region and baseline: ca. 1485-1188 cm(-1)), A_1240 (structural carbohydrates, peak area centered at ca. 1240 cm(-1) with region and baseline: ca. 1292-1198 cm(-1)), A_CHO (total carbohydrates, peaks region and baseline: ca. 1187-950 cm(-1)), A_928 (non-structural carbohydrates, peak area centered at ca. 928 cm(-1) with region and baseline: ca. 952-910 cm(-1)), A_860 (non-structural carbohydrates, peak area centered at ca. 860 cm(-1) with region and baseline: ca. 880-827 cm(-1)), H_1415 (structural carbohydrate, peak height centered at ca. 1415 cm(-1) with baseline: ca. 1485-1188 cm(-1)), H_1370 (structural carbohydrate, peak height at ca. 1370 cm(-1) with a baseline: ca. 1485-1188 cm(-1)). The study shows that the grains had lower spectral intensity (KM Unit) of the cellulosic compounds of A_1240 (8.5 vs. 36.6, P carbohydrate of A_928 (17.3 vs. 2.0) and A_860 (20.7 vs. 7.6) than their co-products from bioethanol processing. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in the peak area intensities of A_Cell (structural CHO) at 1292-1198 cm(-1) and A_CHO (total CHO) at 1187-950 cm(-1) with average molecular infrared intensity KM unit of 226.8 and 508.1, respectively. There were no differences (P > 0.05) in the peak height intensities of H_1415 and H_1370 (structural CHOs) with average intensities 1.35 and 1.15, respectively. The multivariate molecular spectral analyses were able to discriminate and classify between the corn and corn DDGS molecular spectra, but not wheat and wheat DDGS. This study indicated that

  2. Systematic analysis of protein identity between Zika virus and other arthropod-borne viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsiao-Han; Huber, Roland G; Bond, Peter J; Grad, Yonatan H; Camerini, David; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Lipsitch, Marc

    2017-07-01

    To analyse the proportions of protein identity between Zika virus and dengue, Japanese encephalitis, yellow fever, West Nile and chikungunya viruses as well as polymorphism between different Zika virus strains. We used published protein sequences for the Zika virus and obtained protein sequences for the other viruses from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) protein database or the NCBI virus variation resource. We used BLASTP to find regions of identity between viruses. We quantified the identity between the Zika virus and each of the other viruses, as well as within-Zika virus polymorphism for all amino acid k-mers across the proteome, with k ranging from 6 to 100. We assessed accessibility of protein fragments by calculating the solvent accessible surface area for the envelope and nonstructural-1 (NS1) proteins. In total, we identified 294 Zika virus protein fragments with both low proportion of identity with other viruses and low levels of polymorphisms among Zika virus strains. The list includes protein fragments from all Zika virus proteins, except NS3. NS4A has the highest number (190 k-mers) of protein fragments on the list. We provide a candidate list of protein fragments that could be used when developing a sensitive and specific serological test to detect previous Zika virus infections.

  3. Mutational analysis of Rift Valley fever phlebovirus nucleocapsid protein indicates novel conserved, functional amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottram, Timothy J; Li, Ping; Dietrich, Isabelle; Shi, Xiaohong; Brennan, Benjamin; Varjak, Margus; Kohl, Alain

    2017-12-21

    Rift Valley fever phlebovirus (RVFV; Phenuiviridae, Phlebovirus) is an important mosquito-borne pathogen of both humans and ruminants. The RVFV genome is composed of tripartite, single stranded, negative or ambisense RNAs. The small (S) segment encodes both the nucleocapsid protein (N) and the non-structural protein (NSs). The N protein is responsible for the formation of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes, which are essential in the virus life cycle and for the transcription and replication of the viral genome. There is currently limited knowledge surrounding the roles of the RVFV nucleocapsid protein in viral infection other than its key functions: N protein multimerisation, encapsidation of the RNA genome and interactions with the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, L. By bioinformatic comparison of the N sequences of fourteen phleboviruses, mutational analysis, minigenome assays and packaging assays, we have further characterised the RVFV N protein. Amino acids P11 and F149 in RVFV N play an essential role in the function of RNPs and are neither associated with N protein multimerisation nor known nucleocapsid protein functions and may have additional roles in the virus life cycle. Amino acid Y30 exhibited increased minigenome activity despite reduced RNA binding capacity. Additionally, we have determined that the N-terminal arm of N protein is not involved in N-L interactions. Elucidating the fundamental processes that involve the nucleocapsid protein will add to our understanding of this important viral protein and may influence future studies in the development of novel antiviral strategies.

  4. Detecting Molecular Features of Spectra Mainly Associated with Structural and Non-Structural Carbohydrates in Co-Products from BioEthanol Production Using DRIFT with Uni- and Multivariate Molecular Spectral Analyses

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    Zhiyuan Niu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to use DRIFT spectroscopy with uni- and multivariate molecular spectral analyses as a novel approach to detect molecular features of spectra mainly associated with carbohydrate in the co-products (wheat DDGS, corn DDGS, blend DDGS from bioethanol processing in comparison with original feedstock (wheat (Triticum, corn (Zea mays. The carbohydrates related molecular spectral bands included: A_Cell (structural carbohydrates, peaks area region and baseline: ca. 1485–1188 cm−1, A_1240 (structural carbohydrates, peak area centered at ca. 1240 cm−1 with region and baseline: ca. 1292–1198 cm−1, A_CHO (total carbohydrates, peaks region and baseline: ca. 1187–950 cm-1, A_928 (non-structural carbohydrates, peak area centered at ca. 928 cm−1 with region and baseline: ca. 952–910 cm−1, A_860 (non-structural carbohydrates, peak area centered at ca. 860 cm−1 with region and baseline: ca. 880–827 cm-1, H_1415 (structural carbohydrate, peak height centered at ca. 1415 cm−1 with baseline: ca. 1485–1188 cm−1, H_1370 (structural carbohydrate, peak height at ca. 1370 cm−1 with a baseline: ca. 1485–1188 cm−1. The study shows that the grains had lower spectral intensity (KM Unit of the cellulosic compounds of A_1240 (8.5 vs. 36.6, P < 0.05, higher (P < 0.05 intensities of the non-structural carbohydrate of A_928 (17.3 vs. 2.0 and A_860 (20.7 vs. 7.6 than their co-products from bioethanol processing. There were no differences (P > 0.05 in the peak area intensities of A_Cell (structural CHO at 1292–1198 cm−1 and A_CHO (total CHO at 1187–950 cm−1 with average molecular infrared intensity KM unit of 226.8 and 508.1, respectively. There were no differences (P > 0.05 in the peak height intensities of H_1415 and H_1370 (structural CHOs with average intensities 1.35 and 1.15, respectively. The multivariate molecular spectral analyses were able to discriminate and classify between the corn and corn DDGS

  5. Protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byron, Olwyn; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Responsive formation of protein:protein interaction (PPI) upon diverse stimuli is a fundament of cellular function. As a consequence, PPIs are complex, adaptive entities, and exist in structurally heterogeneous interplays defined by the energetic states of the free and complexed protomers. The bi...

  6. A versatile molecular tagging method for targeting proteins to avian reovirus muNS inclusions. Use in protein immobilization and purification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Brandariz-Nuñez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Avian reoviruses replicate in viral factories, which are dense cytoplasmic compartments established by protein-protein interactions. The non-structural protein muNS forms the factory scaffold that attracts other viral components in a controlled fashion. To create such a three-dimensional network, muNS uses several different self-interacting domains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we have devised a strategy to identify muNS regions containing self-interacting domains, based on the capacity of muNS-derived inclusions to recruit muNS fragments. The results revealed that the muNS region consisting of residues 477-542 was recruited with the best efficiency, and this raised the idea of using this fragment as a molecular tag for delivering foreign proteins to muNS inclusions. By combining such tagging system with our previously established method for purifying muNS inclusions from baculovirus-infected insect cells, we have developed a novel protein purification protocol. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that our tagging and inclusion-targeting system can be a simple, versatile and efficient method for immobilizing and purifying active proteins expressed in baculovirus-infected cells. We also demonstrate that muNS inclusions can simultaneously recruit several tagged proteins, a finding which may be used to generate protein complexes and create multiepitope particulate material for immunization purposes.

  7. A versatile molecular tagging method for targeting proteins to avian reovirus muNS inclusions. Use in protein immobilization and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Menaya-Vargas, Rebeca; Benavente, Javier; Martinez-Costas, Jose

    2010-11-12

    Avian reoviruses replicate in viral factories, which are dense cytoplasmic compartments established by protein-protein interactions. The non-structural protein muNS forms the factory scaffold that attracts other viral components in a controlled fashion. To create such a three-dimensional network, muNS uses several different self-interacting domains. In this study we have devised a strategy to identify muNS regions containing self-interacting domains, based on the capacity of muNS-derived inclusions to recruit muNS fragments. The results revealed that the muNS region consisting of residues 477-542 was recruited with the best efficiency, and this raised the idea of using this fragment as a molecular tag for delivering foreign proteins to muNS inclusions. By combining such tagging system with our previously established method for purifying muNS inclusions from baculovirus-infected insect cells, we have developed a novel protein purification protocol. We show that our tagging and inclusion-targeting system can be a simple, versatile and efficient method for immobilizing and purifying active proteins expressed in baculovirus-infected cells. We also demonstrate that muNS inclusions can simultaneously recruit several tagged proteins, a finding which may be used to generate protein complexes and create multiepitope particulate material for immunization purposes.

  8. Viral RNA Silencing Suppression: The Enigma of Bunyavirus NSs Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedil, Marcio; Kormelink, Richard

    2016-07-23

    The Bunyaviridae is a family of arboviruses including both plant- and vertebrate-infecting representatives. The Tospovirus genus accommodates plant-infecting bunyaviruses, which not only replicate in their plant host, but also in their insect thrips vector during persistent propagative transmission. For this reason, they are generally assumed to encounter antiviral RNA silencing in plants and insects. Here we present an overview on how tospovirus nonstructural NSs protein counteracts antiviral RNA silencing in plants and what is known so far in insects. Like tospoviruses, members of the related vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses classified in the genera Orthobunyavirus, Hantavirus and Phlebovirus also code for a NSs protein. However, for none of them RNA silencing suppressor activity has been unambiguously demonstrated in neither vertebrate host nor arthropod vector. The second part of this review will briefly describe the role of these NSs proteins in modulation of innate immune responses in mammals and elaborate on a hypothetical scenario to explain if and how NSs proteins from vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses affect RNA silencing. If so, why this discovery has been hampered so far.

  9. Viral RNA Silencing Suppression: The Enigma of Bunyavirus NSs Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Hedil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae is a family of arboviruses including both plant- and vertebrate-infecting representatives. The Tospovirus genus accommodates plant-infecting bunyaviruses, which not only replicate in their plant host, but also in their insect thrips vector during persistent propagative transmission. For this reason, they are generally assumed to encounter antiviral RNA silencing in plants and insects. Here we present an overview on how tospovirus nonstructural NSs protein counteracts antiviral RNA silencing in plants and what is known so far in insects. Like tospoviruses, members of the related vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses classified in the genera Orthobunyavirus, Hantavirus and Phlebovirus also code for a NSs protein. However, for none of them RNA silencing suppressor activity has been unambiguously demonstrated in neither vertebrate host nor arthropod vector. The second part of this review will briefly describe the role of these NSs proteins in modulation of innate immune responses in mammals and elaborate on a hypothetical scenario to explain if and how NSs proteins from vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses affect RNA silencing. If so, why this discovery has been hampered so far.

  10. Full genome comparison and characterization of avian H10 viruses with different pathogenicity in Mink (Mustela vison reveals genetic and functional differences in the non-structural gene

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    Belák Sándor

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unique property of some avian H10 viruses, particularly the ability to cause severe disease in mink without prior adaptation, enabled our study. Coupled with previous experimental data and genetic characterization here we tried to investigate the possible influence of different genes on the virulence of these H10 avian influenza viruses in mink. Results Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship between the viruses studied. Our study also showed that there are no genetic differences in receptor specificity or the cleavability of the haemagglutinin proteins of these viruses regardless of whether they are of low or high pathogenicity in mink. In poly I:C stimulated mink lung cells the NS1 protein of influenza A virus showing high pathogenicity in mink down regulated the type I interferon promoter activity to a greater extent than the NS1 protein of the virus showing low pathogenicity in mink. Conclusions Differences in pathogenicity and virulence in mink between these strains could be related to clear amino acid differences in the non structural 1 (NS1 protein. The NS gene of mink/84 appears to have contributed to the virulence of the virus in mink by helping the virus evade the innate immune responses.

  11. Limited cross-reactivity of mouse monoclonal antibodies against Dengue virus capsid protein among four serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noda M

    2012-11-01

    envelope and nonstructural 1 proteins. Phylogenetic distances between the four serotypes of DENV were as different as those of other flaviviruses, such as Japanese encephalitis virus and West Nile virus. Large variations in the DENV serotypes were comparable with the differences between species of flavivirus. Furthermore, the diversity of flavivirus capsid protein was much greater than that of envelope and nonstructural 1 proteins.Conclusion: In this study, we produced specific monoclonal antibodies that can be used to detect DENV-2 capsid protein, but not a cross-reactive one with all serotypes of DENV capsid protein. The high diversity of the DENV capsid protein sequence by phylogenetic analysis supported the low cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies against DENV capsid protein.Keywords: Dengue virus, capsid protein, monoclonal antibody, cross-reactivity

  12. Analysis of the PDZ binding specificities of Influenza A Virus NS1 proteins

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    Nagasaka Kazunori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is a multifunctional virulence factor with several protein-protein interaction domains, involved in preventing apoptosis of the infected cell and in evading the interferon response. In addition, the majority of influenza A virus NS1 proteins have a class I PDZ-binding motif at the C-terminus, and this itself has been shown to be a virulence determinant. In the majority of human influenza NS1 proteins the consensus motif is RSxV: in avian NS1 it is ESxV. Of the few human strains that have the avian motif, all were from very high mortality outbreaks of the disease. Previous work has shown that minor differences in PDZ-binding motifs can have major effects on the spectrum of cellular proteins targeted. In this study we analyse the effect of these differences upon the binding of Influenza A virus NS1 protein to a range of cellular proteins involved in polarity and signal transduction.

  13. Insights into Bacteriophage T5 Structure from Analysis of Its Morphogenesis Genes and Protein Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivanovic, Yvan; Confalonieri, Fabrice; Ponchon, Luc; Lurz, Rudi; Chami, Mohamed; Flayhan, Ali; Renouard, Madalena; Huet, Alexis; Decottignies, Paulette; Davidson, Alan R.; Breyton, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophage T5 represents a large family of lytic Siphoviridae infecting Gram-negative bacteria. The low-resolution structure of T5 showed the T=13 geometry of the capsid and the unusual trimeric organization of the tail tube, and the assembly pathway of the capsid was established. Although major structural proteins of T5 have been identified in these studies, most of the genes encoding the morphogenesis proteins remained to be identified. Here, we combine a proteomic analysis of T5 particles with a bioinformatic study and electron microscopic immunolocalization to assign function to the genes encoding the structural proteins, the packaging proteins, and other nonstructural components required for T5 assembly. A head maturation protease that likely accounts for the cleavage of the different capsid proteins is identified. Two other proteins involved in capsid maturation add originality to the T5 capsid assembly mechanism: the single head-to-tail joining protein, which closes the T5 capsid after DNA packaging, and the nicking endonuclease responsible for the single-strand interruptions in the T5 genome. We localize most of the tail proteins that were hitherto uncharacterized and provide a detailed description of the tail tip composition. Our findings highlight novel variations of viral assembly strategies and of virion particle architecture. They further recommend T5 for exploring phage structure and assembly and for deciphering conformational rearrangements that accompany DNA transfer from the capsid to the host cytoplasm. PMID:24198424

  14. Foot-and-mouth disease virus induces lysosomal degradation of host protein kinase PKR by 3C proteinase to facilitate virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuntian; Zhu, Zixiang; Du, Xiaoli; Cao, Weijun; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Xiangle; Feng, Huanhuan; Li, Dan; Zhang, Keshan; Liu, Xiangtao; Zheng, Haixue

    2017-09-01

    The interferon-induced double-strand RNA activated protein kinase (PKR) plays important roles in host defense against viral infection. Here we demonstrate the significant antiviral role of PKR against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and report that FMDV infection inhibits PKR expression and activation in porcine kidney (PK-15) cells. The viral nonstructural protein 3C proteinase (3Cpro) is identified to be responsible for this inhibition. However, it is independent of the well-known proteinase activity of 3Cpro or 3Cpro-induced shutoff of host protein synthesis. We show that 3Cpro induces PKR degradation by lysosomal pathway and no interaction is determined between 3Cpro and PKR. Together, our results indicate that PKR acts an important antiviral factor during FMDV infection, and FMDV has evolved a strategy to overcome PKR-mediated antiviral role by downregulation of PKR protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Suppression of type I interferon production by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and degradation of CREB-binding protein by nsp1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qingzhan; Shi, Kaichuang; Yoo, Dongwan, E-mail: dyoo@illinois.edu

    2016-02-15

    Type I interferons (IFN-α/β) are the major components of the innate immune response of hosts, and in turn many viruses have evolved to modulate the host response during infection. We found that the IFN-β production was significantly suppressed during PEDV infection in cells. To identify viral IFN antagonists and to study their suppressive function, viral coding sequences for the entire structural and nonstructural proteins were cloned and expressed. Of 16 PEDV nonstructural proteins (nsps), nsp1, nsp3, nsp7, nsp14, nsp15 and nsp16 were found to inhibit the IFN-β and IRF3 promoter activities. The sole accessory protein ORF3, structure protein envelope (E), membrane (M), and nucleocapsid (N) protein were also shown to inhibit such activities. PEDV nsp1 did not interfere the IRF3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation but interrupted the enhanceosome assembly of IRF3 and CREB-binding protein (CBP) by degrading CBP. A further study showed that the CBP degradation by nsp1 was proteasome-dependent. Our data demonstrate that PEDV modulates the host innate immune responses by degrading CBP and suppressing ISGs expression. - Highlights: • PEDV modulates the host innate immune system by suppressing the type I interferon production and ISGs expression. • Ten viral proteins were identified as IFN antagonists, and nsp1 was the most potent viral IFN antagonist. • PEDV nsp1 did not interfere the IRF3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation but interrupted the enhanceosome assembly of IRF3 and CREB-binding protein (CBP). • PEDV nsp1 caused the CBP degradation in the nucleus, which may be the key mechanism for PEDV-mediated IFN downregulation.

  16. Role of CD151, A tetraspanin, in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection

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    Kapil Sanjay

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is a RNA virus causing respiratory and reproductive diseases in swine. The susceptibility for PRRSV varies between the different breeds of swine. In cell culture, PRRSV virus can be propagated in primary porcine alveolar macrophages and some African green monkey kidney cell lines, such as MARC-145 cells. Previous studies have shown that 3' untranslated region (UTR RNAs of the arteriviruses play an important role in the replication of the virus through interactions with cellular proteins. To better understand the differences in the replication capability of PRRSV in different cell lines, we sought to identify the host cellular proteins interacting with PRRSV 3' UTR RNA. We constructed a cDNA library of MARC-145 cell line in lambda ZAP Express vector and screened the library with the positive sense 3' UTR RNA of PRRSV. Results We found that CD151, a host cellular protein, interacting with PRRSV 3' UTR RNA. The specificity of the interaction between CD151 and PRRSV 3' UTR RNA was examined by gel shift assay as well as North-Western hybridization. The transfection of CD151 expression clone into BHK-21 rendered these cells susceptible to PRRSV infection, and the transfection of siRNA against CD151 into MARC-145 significantly reduced the level of PRRSV infection. Also, anti-CD151 antibody treatment to MARC-145 completely blocked PRRSV infection. Conclusion Based on our results, we suggest that CD151 should cooperate in PRRSV infection in vitro in MARC-145 and BHK-21 cells.

  17. Identification of adaptive mutations in the influenza A virus non-structural 1 gene that increase cytoplasmic localization and differentially regulate host gene expression.

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    Nicole Forbes

    Full Text Available The NS1 protein of influenza A virus (IAV is a multifunctional virulence factor. We have previously characterized gain-of-function mutations in the NS1 protein arising from the experimental adaptation of the human isolate A/Hong Kong/1/1968(H3N2 (HK to the mouse. The majority of these mouse adapted NS1 mutations were demonstrated to increase virulence, viral fitness, and interferon antagonism, but differ in binding to the post-transcriptional processing factor cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30. Because nuclear trafficking is a major genetic determinant of influenza virus host adaptation, we assessed subcellular localization and host gene expression of NS1 adaptive mutations. Recombinant HK viruses with adaptive mutations in the NS1 gene were assessed for NS1 protein subcellular localization in mouse and human cells using confocal microscopy and cellular fractionation. In human cells the HK wild-type (HK-wt virus NS1 protein partitioned equivalently between the cytoplasm and nucleus but was defective in cytoplasmic localization in mouse cells. Several adaptive mutations increased the proportion of NS1 in the cytoplasm of mouse cells with the greatest effects for mutations M106I and D125G. The host gene expression profile of the adaptive mutants was determined by microarray analysis of infected mouse cells to show either high or low extents of host-gene regulation (HGR or LGR phenotypes. While host genes were predominantly down regulated for the HGR group of mutants (D2N, V23A, F103L, M106I+L98S, L98S, M106V, and M106V+M124I, the LGR phenotype mutants (D125G, M106I, V180A, V226I, and R227K were characterized by a predominant up regulation of host genes. CPSF30 binding affinity of NS1 mutants did not predict effects on host gene expression. To our knowledge this is the first report of roles of adaptive NS1 mutations that impact intracellular localization and regulation of host gene expression.

  18. Effects of prolonged drought on stem non-structural carbohydrates content and post-drought hydraulic recovery in Laurus nobilis L.: The possible link between carbon starvation and hydraulic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifilò, Patrizia; Casolo, Valentino; Raimondo, Fabio; Petrussa, Elisa; Boscutti, Francesco; Lo Gullo, Maria Assunta; Nardini, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    Drought-induced tree decline is a complex event, and recent hypotheses suggest that hydraulic failure and carbon starvation are co-responsible for this process. We tested the possible role of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) content on post-drought hydraulic recovery, to verify the hypothesis that embolism reversal represents a mechanistic link between carbon starvation and stem hydraulics. Measurements were performed in laurel plants subjected to similar water stress levels either over short or long term, to induce comparable embolism levels. Plants subjected to mild and prolonged water shortage (S) showed reduced growth, adjustment of turgor loss point driven by changes in both osmotic potential at full turgor and bulk modulus of elasticity, a lower content of soluble NSC and a higher content of starch with respect to control (C) plants. Moreover, S plants showed a lower ability to recover from xylem embolism than C plants, even after irrigation. Our data suggest that plant carbon status might indirectly influence plant performance during and after drought via effects on xylem hydraulic functioning, supporting the view of a possible mechanistic link between the two processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The 3a Protein of SARS-coronavirus Induces Apoptosis in Vero E6 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Waye, Mary; W Law, Patrick; Wong, Chi-Hang; C Au, Thomas; Chuck, Chi-Pang; Kong, Siu-Kai; S Chan, Paul; To, Ka-Fai; I Lo, Anthony; W Chan, Judy; Suen, Yick-Keung; Edwin Chan, H Y; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Y Sung, Joseph; Lo, Y M; W Tsui, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    An outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred in China and the first case emerged in mid November 2002. The etiologic agent of this disease was found to be a previously unknown coronavirus, SARS-CoV. The detailed pathology of SARS-CoV infection and the host response to the viral infection are still not known. The 3a gene encodes a non-structural viral protein which is predicted to be a transmembrane protein. In this study, we showed that the 3a protein was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in 3a-transfected monkey kidney Vero E6 cells. In vitro experiments of chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation suggest that the 3a protein may trigger apoptosis. Our data show that over-expression of a single SARS-CoV protein can induce apoptosis in vitro. Thus GFP-3a fusion protein could also be used as a biosensor for monitoring the cytopathic features of SARS infection, e.g. lymphopenia, in animal model systems, similar to nucleocapsid and 7a proteins.

  20. The nucleocapsid proteins of mouse hepatitis virus and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus share the same IFN-β antagonizing mechanism: attenuation of PACT-mediated RIG-I/ MDA5 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhen; Fang, Liurong; Yuan, Shuangling; Zhao, Ling; Wang, Xunlei; Long, Siwen; Wang, Mohan; Wang, Dang; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Xiao, Shaobo

    2017-07-25

    Coronaviruses (CoVs) are a huge threat to both humans and animals and have evolved elaborate mechanisms to antagonize interferons (IFNs). Nucleocapsid (N) protein is the most abundant viral protein in CoV-infected cells, and has been identified as an innate immunity antagonist in several CoVs, including mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain unclear. In this study, we found that MHV N protein inhibited Sendai virus and poly(I:C)-induced IFN-β production by targeting a molecule upstream of retinoic acid-induced gene I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation gene 5 (MDA5). Further studies showed that both MHV and SARS-CoV N proteins directly interacted with protein activator of protein kinase R (PACT), a cellular dsRNA-binding protein that can bind to RIG-I and MDA5 to activate IFN production. The N-PACT interaction sequestered the association of PACT and RIG-I/MDA5, which in turn inhibited IFN-β production. However, the N proteins from porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), which are also classified in the order Nidovirales, did not interact and counteract with PACT. Taken together, our present study confirms that both MHV and SARS-CoV N proteins can perturb the function of cellular PACT to circumvent the innate antiviral response. However, this strategy does not appear to be used by all CoVs N proteins.

  1. HCV-specific T-cell responses in injecting drug users : evidence for previous exposure to HCV and a role for CD4+ T cells focussing on nonstructural proteins in viral clearance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruys, T A; Nanlohy, N M; van den Berg, C H S B; Hassink, E; Beld, M; van de Laar, T; Bruisten, S; Wit, F; Krol, A; Prins, M; Lange, J; van Baarle, D

    In order to understand the parameters associated with resolved hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection, we analysed the HCV-specific T-cell responses longitudinally in 13 injecting drug-users (IDUs) with a prospectively identified acute HCV infection. Seven IDUs cleared HCV and six IDUs remained

  2. Identification of cross-reacting T-cell epitopes in structural and non-structural proteins of swine and pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus strains in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baratelli, Massimiliano; Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Trebbien, Ramona

    2017-01-01

    , reverse vaccinology was applied to identify cross-reacting MHC class I T-cell epitopes from two different SwIV H1 lineages in pigs. In silico prediction followed by in vitro and in vivo testing was used to identify SLA-1*0702 T-cell epitopes in heterologous SwIV-infected pigs. Following viral infection......, tetramer specific T-cell populations were identified. The majority of the identified T-cell epitopes were conserved between the examined lineages, suggesting that targeting cross-reactive T-cell epitopes could be used to improve vaccines against SwIV in SLA-1*0702-positive pigs....

  3. Influenza A virus protein PB1-F2 exacerbates IFN-beta expression of human respiratory epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goffic, Ronan; Bouguyon, Edwige; Chevalier, Christophe; Vidic, Jasmina; Da Costa, Bruno; Leymarie, Olivier; Bourdieu, Christiane; Decamps, Laure; Dhorne-Pollet, Sophie; Delmas, Bernard

    2010-10-15

    The PB1-F2 protein of the influenza A virus (IAV) contributes to viral pathogenesis by a mechanism that is not well understood. PB1-F2 was shown to modulate apoptosis and to be targeted by the CD8(+) T cell response. In this study, we examined the downstream effects of PB1-F2 protein during IAV infection by measuring expression of the cellular genes in response to infection with wild-type WSN/33 and PB1-F2 knockout viruses in human lung epithelial cells. Wild-type virus infection resulted in a significant induction of genes involved in innate immunity. Knocking out the PB1-F2 gene strongly decreased the magnitude of expression of cellular genes implicated in antiviral response and MHC class I Ag presentation, suggesting that PB1-F2 exacerbates innate immune response. Biological network analysis revealed the IFN pathway as a link between PB1-F2 and deregulated genes. Using quantitative RT-PCR and IFN-β gene reporter assay, we determined that PB1-F2 mediates an upregulation of IFN-β expression that is dependent on NF-κB but not on AP-1 and IFN regulatory factor-3 transcription factors. Recombinant viruses knocked out for the PB1-F2 and/or the nonstructural viral protein 1 (the viral antagonist of the IFN response) genes provide further evidence that PB1-F2 increases IFN-β expression and that nonstructural viral protein 1 strongly antagonizes the effect of PB1-F2 on the innate response. Finally, we compared the effect of PB1-F2 variants taken from several IAV strains on IFN-β expression and found that PB1-F2-mediated IFN-β induction is significantly influenced by its amino acid sequence, demonstrating its importance in the host cell response triggered by IAV infection.

  4. Structural basis for concerted recruitment and activation of IRF-3 by innate immune adaptor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Shu, Chang; Gao, Xinsheng; Sankaran, Banumathi; Du, Fenglei; Shelton, Catherine L; Herr, Andrew B; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Li, Pingwei

    2016-06-14

    Type I IFNs are key cytokines mediating innate antiviral immunity. cGMP-AMP synthase, ritinoic acid-inducible protein 1 (RIG-I)-like receptors, and Toll-like receptors recognize microbial double-stranded (ds)DNA, dsRNA, and LPS to induce the expression of type I IFNs. These signaling pathways converge at the recruitment and activation of the transcription factor IRF-3 (IFN regulatory factor 3). The adaptor proteins STING (stimulator of IFN genes), MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling), and TRIF (TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing IFN-β) mediate the recruitment of IRF-3 through a conserved pLxIS motif. Here we show that the pLxIS motif of phosphorylated STING, MAVS, and TRIF binds to IRF-3 in a similar manner, whereas residues upstream of the motif confer specificity. The structure of the IRF-3 phosphomimetic mutant S386/396E bound to the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein reveals that the pLxIS motif also mediates IRF-3 dimerization and activation. Moreover, rotavirus NSP1 (nonstructural protein 1) employs a pLxIS motif to target IRF-3 for degradation, but phosphorylation of NSP1 is not required for its activity. These results suggest a concerted mechanism for the recruitment and activation of IRF-3 that can be subverted by viral proteins to evade innate immune responses.

  5. Oral and parenteral immunization of chickens (Gallus gallus) against West Nile virus with recombinant envelope protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbinder-Orth, C. A.; Hofmeister, Erik K.; Weeks-Levy, C.; Karasov, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes morbidity and mortality in humans, horses, and in more than 315 bird species in North America. Currently approved WNV vaccines are designed for parenteral administration and, as yet, no effective oral WNV vaccines have been developed. WNV envelope (E) protein is a highly antigenic protein that elicits the majority of virus-neutralizing antibodies during a WNV immune response. Leghorn chickens were given three vaccinations (each 2 wk apart) of E protein orally (20 ??g or 100 ??g/dose), of E protein intramuscularly (IM, 20 ??g/dose), or of adjuvant only (control group) followed by a WNV challenge. Viremias were measured post-WNV infection, and three new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were developed for quantifying IgM, IgY, and IgA-mediated immune response of birds following WNV infection. WNV viremia levels were significantly lower in the IM group than in both oral groups and the control group. Total WNV E protein-specific IgY production was significantly greater, and WNV nonstructural 1-specific IgY was significantly less, in the IM group compared to all other treatment groups. The results of this study indicate that IM vaccination of chickens with E protein is protective against WNV infection and results in a significantly different antibody production profile as compared to both orally vaccinated and nonvaccinated birds. ?? 2009 American Association of Avian Pathologists.

  6. Differential reactivity of putative genotype 2 hepatitis C virus F protein between chronic and recovered infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Wing Chia-Ming; Allain, Jean-Pierre

    2008-08-01

    To date, all studies regarding hepatitis C virus (HCV) F protein have been based on expression in vitro/in vivo of recombinant protein or monoclonal antibodies derived from genotype 1a or 1b sequences, but not from other genotypes. The objective of this study was to prepare a putative genotype 2 recombinant F protein and evaluate its reactivity in plasma from individuals with chronic HCV infection or who had recovered from infection. One genotype 2 strain was selected for F protein (F-2) and core expression in bacterial culture. An ELISA was developed and applied to samples from patients with chronic infection or recovered infection of various genotypes. The anti-F-2 response in 117 samples showed a significantly higher reactivity in chronic than in recovered HCV-infected blood donors (PF and anti-core was more significant in genotypes 1 and 2 than in genotype 3. Anti-F-2 titres were also significantly higher in chronic than in recovered individuals (PF-2 end-point antibody titre. This study thus demonstrated the antigenicity of genotype 2 HCV F protein, although the exact location of the natural frameshift position remains unknown. The difference in anti-F-2 response between chronic and recovered infection, the cross-reactivity irrespective of genotype and the correlation of antibody response with structural and non-structural antigens suggest that the immune response to F protein is an integral part of the natural HCV infection.

  7. Liposome destabilization induced by synthetic lipopeptides corresponding to envelope and non-structural domains of GBV-C/HGV virus. Conformational requirements for leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Vidal, Mónica; Rojo, Núria; Herrera, Elena; Gómara, María José; Haro, Isabel

    2008-01-01

    Liposomes have been used primarily as a model system for studying biological membranes. Numerous chemical, biochemical and biophysical methods have been used to elucidate the various aspects of the interaction between proteins or peptides and phospholipids. Having in mind the potential use of synthetic lipopeptides as antiviral therapies and aiming for a better understanding of the molecular interaction of the GBV-C/HGV with liposomes as model membranes, epitopes of GBV-C/HGV located at the E2 (99-118) and NS3(440-460) regions were selected. Peptides were modified at the N-terminus with acyl chains of different length (C(14) and C(16)) yielding the corresponding myristoil and palmytoil lipopeptides. The main aim of the present study was to get insight into the membrane-interacting properties of the above-described synthetic lipopeptides and to study their inhibition of the capacity of perturbing model membranes of fusion peptide of HIV-1 using fluorescence spectroscopy. In an attempt to establish a relationship between peptide membrane activity and structure, we use Circular Dichroism (CD) and Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR).

  8. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  9. MAVS-mediated apoptosis and its inhibition by viral proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Host responses to viral infection include both immune activation and programmed cell death. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling adaptor, MAVS (IPS-1, VISA or Cardif is critical for host defenses to viral infection by inducing type-1 interferons (IFN-I, however its role in virus-induced apoptotic responses has not been elucidated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that MAVS causes apoptosis independent of its function in initiating IFN-I production. MAVS-induced cell death requires mitochondrial localization, is caspase dependent, and displays hallmarks of apoptosis. Furthermore, MAVS(-/- fibroblasts are resistant to Sendai virus-induced apoptosis. A functional screen identifies the hepatitis C virus NS3/4A and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV nonstructural protein (NSP15 as inhibitors of MAVS-induced apoptosis, possibly as a method of immune evasion. SIGNIFICANCE: This study describes a novel role for MAVS in controlling viral infections through the induction of apoptosis, and identifies viral proteins which inhibit this host response.

  10. The rotaviral NSP3 protein stimulates translation of polyadenylated target mRNAs independently of its RNA-binding domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keryer-Bibens, Cecile, E-mail: cecile.keryer-bibens@univ-rennes1.fr [Universite de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes, 35000 Rennes (France); CNRS, UMR 6061, equipe Expression Genetique et Developpement, 35000 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France); Legagneux, Vincent; Namanda-Vanderbeken, Allen [Universite de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes, 35000 Rennes (France); CNRS, UMR 6061, equipe Expression Genetique et Developpement, 35000 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France); Cosson, Bertrand [UPMC Universite de Paris 06, UMR 7150, Equipe Traduction Cycle Cellulaire et Developpement, Station Biologique de Roscoff, 29682 Roscoff (France); CNRS, UMR 7150, Station Biologique de Roscoff, 29682 Roscoff (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France); Paillard, Luc [Universite de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes, 35000 Rennes (France); CNRS, UMR 6061, equipe Expression Genetique et Developpement, 35000 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France); Poncet, Didier [Virologie Moleculaire et Structurale, UMR CNRS, 2472, INRA, 1157, 91198 Gif sur Yvette (France); Osborne, H. Beverley, E-mail: beverley.osborne@univ-rennes1.fr [Universite de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes, 35000 Rennes (France); CNRS, UMR 6061, equipe Expression Genetique et Developpement, 35000 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France)

    2009-12-11

    The non-structural protein 3 (NSP3) of rotaviruses is an RNA-binding protein that specifically recognises a 4 nucleotide sequence at the 3' extremity of the non-polyadenylated viral mRNAs. NSP3 also has a high affinity for eIF4G. These two functions are clearly delimited in separate domains the structures of which have been determined. They are joined by a central domain implicated in the dimerisation of the full length protein. The bridging function of NSP3 between the 3' end of the viral mRNA and eIF4G has been proposed to enhance the synthesis of viral proteins. However, this role has been questioned as knock-down of NSP3 did not impair viral protein synthesis. We show here using a MS2/MS2-CP tethering assay that a C-terminal fragment of NSP3 containing the eIF4G binding domain and the dimerisation domain can increase the expression of a protein encoded by a target reporter mRNA in HEK 293 cells. The amount of reporter mRNA in the cells is not significantly affected by the presence of the NSP3 derived fusion protein showing that the enhanced protein expression is due to increased translation. These results show that NSP3 can act as a translational enhancer even on a polyadenylated mRNA that should be a substrate for PABP1.

  11. Interaction of Tomato Spotted Wilt Tospovirus (TSWV) Glycoproteins with a Thrips Midgut Protein, a Potential Cellular Receptor for TSWV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandla, M D; Campbell, L R; Ullman, D E; Sherwood, J L

    1998-02-01

    ABSTRACT Interactions between viral and cellular membrane fusion proteins mediate virus penetration of cells for many arthropod-borne viruses. Electron microscope observations and circumstantial evidence indicate insect acquisition of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) (genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae) is receptor mediated, and TSWV membrane glycoproteins (GP1 and GP2) serve as virus attachment proteins. The tospoviruses are plant-infecting members of the family Bunyaviridae and are transmitted by several thrips species, including Frankliniella occidentalis. Gel overlay assays and immunolabeling were used to investigate the putative role of TSWV GPs as viral attachment proteins and deter mine whether a corresponding cellular receptor may be present in F. occidentalis. A single band in the 50-kDa region was detected with murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the TSWV-GPs when isolated TSWV or TSWV-GPs were used to overlay separated thrips proteins. This band was not detected when blots were probed with antibody to the non-structural protein encoded by the small RNA of TSWV or the TSWV nucleocapsid protein, nor were proteins from nonvector insects labeled. Anti-idiotype antibodies prepared to murine MAbs against GP1 or GP2 specifically labeled a single band at 50 kDa in Western blots and the plasmalemma of larval thrips midguts. These results support the putative role of the TSWV GPs as viral attachment proteins and identified potential cellular receptor(s) in thrips.

  12. Protein Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  13. The Norovirus NS3 Protein Is a Dynamic Lipid- and Microtubule-Associated Protein Involved in Viral RNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Ben T; Hyde, Jennifer L; Sarvestani, Soroush T; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Green, Kim Y; White, Peter A; Mackenzie, Jason M

    2017-02-01

    Norovirus (NoV) infections are a significant health burden to society, yet the lack of reliable tissue culture systems has hampered the development of appropriate antiviral therapies. Here we show that the NoV NS3 protein, derived from murine NoV (MNV), is intimately associated with the MNV replication complex and the viral replication intermediate double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). We observed that when expressed individually, MNV NS3 and NS3 encoded by human Norwalk virus (NV) induced the formation of distinct vesicle-like structures that did not colocalize with any particular protein markers to cellular organelles but localized to cellular membranes, in particular those with a high cholesterol content. Both proteins also showed some degree of colocalization with the cytoskeleton marker β-tubulin. Although the distribution of MNV and NV NS3s were similar, NV NS3 displayed a higher level of colocalization with the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, we observed that although both proteins colocalized in membranes counterstained with filipin, an indicator of cholesterol content, MNV NS3 displayed a greater association with flotillin and stomatin, proteins known to associate with sphingolipid- and cholesterol-rich microdomains. Utilizing time-lapse epifluorescence microscopy, we observed that the membrane-derived vesicular structures induced by MNV NS3 were highly motile and dynamic in nature, and their movement was dependent on intact microtubules. These results begin to interrogate the functions of NoV proteins during virus replication and highlight the conserved properties of the NoV NS3 proteins among the seven Norovirus genogroups. Many mechanisms involved in the replication of norovirus still remain unclear, including the role for the NS3 protein, one of seven nonstructural viral proteins, which remains to be elucidated. This study reveals that murine norovirus (MNV) NS3 is intimately associated with the viral replication complex and ds

  14. Construction and prokaryotic expression of the fusion gene PRRSV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an economically important swine disease that has devastated the swine industry worldwide. Vaccination with live attenuated vaccine or inactivated vaccine is the main treatment to control PRRS. However, the disadvantages such as virulence resumption of the ...

  15. ABA and GA3 increase carbon allocation in different organs of grapevine plants by inducing accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates in leaves, enhancement of phloem area and expression of sugar transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcia, Germán; Pontin, Mariela; Reinoso, Herminda; Baraldi, Rita; Bertazza, Gianpaolo; Gómez-Talquenca, Sebastián; Bottini, Rubén; Piccoli, Patricia N

    2016-03-01

    Grape quality for winemaking depends on sugar accumulation and metabolism in berries. Abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellins (GAs) have been reported to control sugar allocation in economically important crops, although the mechanisms involved are still unknown. The present study tested if ABA and gibberellin A3 (GA3) enhance carbon allocation in fruits of grapevines by modifying phloem loading, phloem area and expression of sugar transporters in leaves and berries. Pot-grown Vitis vinifera cv. Malbec plants were sprayed with ABA and GA3 solutions. The amount of soluble sugars in leaves and berries related to photosynthesis were examined at three points of berry growth: pre-veraison, full veraison and post-veraison. Starch levels and amylase activity in leaves, gene expression of sugar transporters in leaves and berries and phloem anatomy were examined at full veraison. Accumulation of glucose and fructose in berries was hastened in ABA-treated plants at the stage of full veraison, which was correlated with enhancement of Vitis vinifera HEXOSE TRANSPORTER 2 (VvHT2) and Vitis vinifera HEXOSE TRANSPORTER 6 (VvHT6) gene expression, increases of phloem area and sucrose content in leaves. On the other hand, GA3 increased the quantity of photoassimilates delivered to the stem thus increasing xylem growth. In conclusion, stimulation of sugar transport by ABA and GA3 to berries and stems, respectively, was due to build-up of non-structural carbohydrates in leaves, modifications in phloem tissue and modulation in gene expression of sugar transporters. © 2015 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  16. Survey of Epstein Barr virus (EBV) immunogenic proteins and their epitopes: implications for vaccine preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajcani, Julius; Szenthe, Kalman; Banati, Ferenc; Szathmary, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (Human herpesvirus 4) encodes approximately 80 proteins, from which 15 possess at least 90 antigenic epitopes. Many of them stimulate the T cell receptors (TCR), but a few interact with the B cell receptors (BCR). Activation of B-cells and subsequent antibody production has not only been related to at least 3 envelope glycoproteins (mostly gp350) but also to latency associated membrane proteins (LMPs). The majority of EBV epitopes (over 80) inducing either cytotoxic and/or helper T lymphocytes were located on non-structural and/or latency associated polypeptides. The former interaction mediated by CD8plus/T cells is restricted by the HLA I molecules, predominantly of HLA-A subclass. In acute infectious mononucleosis (IM) patients (about 40 %) a considerable proportion of HLA B8 restricted CTL reactivity is directed against a single peptide (RAKFKQLL) of transactivator protein BZLF1/Zta. The EBV vaccines designed so far fall into two categories: those preventing any kind of infection (including prophylaxis of EBVassociated malignancies) and those designed for therapeutic purposes (to be used in subjects already infected). Preventive vaccines protecting against acute disease (such as IM) contain, as a rule, the gp350 polypeptide(s) encoded by the BLLF1 gene. Vaccines destined for tumor prevention rather consist of peptides derived from latency associated nuclear proteins (EBNA 2, 3 and 6) and/or from oncogenic latent membrane proteins (LMP1/LMP2a). Whereas the former generates antibodies preventing virus entry, the latter would potentiate the cell mediated response. In addition to recently described and purified individual recombinant immunogenic EBV polypeptides and/or their mixes, new perspectives were opened by construction of random overlapping strongly immunogenic scrambled polypeptide(s). Further novel approaches are based on carefully selected antigenic peptides (oligopeptides) coming from both, structural as well as non-structural or

  17. Significance of the oligosaccharides of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus glycoproteins GP2a and GP5 for infectious virus production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissink, E.H.J.; Kroese, M.V.; Maneschijn-Bonsing, J.G.; Meulenberg, J.J.; Rijn, van P.A.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Rottier, P.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The arterivirus porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) contains four glycoproteins, GP2a, GP3, GP4 and GP5, the functions of which are still largely unresolved. In this study, the significance of the N-glycosylation of the GP2a and GP5 proteins of PRRSV strain LV was

  18. West Nile virus infection induces depletion of IFNAR1 protein levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jared D; Crown, Rachel A; Sohn, Ji A; Seeger, Christoph

    2011-08-01

    Productive virus infection requires evasion, inhibition, or subversion of innate immune responses. West Nile virus (WNV), a human pathogen that can cause symptomatic infections associated with meningitis and encephalitis, inhibits the interferon (IFN) signal transduction pathway by preventing phosphorylation of Janus kinases and STAT transcription factors. Inhibition of the IFN signal cascade abrogates activation of IFN-induced genes, thus attenuating an antiviral response. We investigated the mechanism responsible for this inhibition and found that WNV infection prevents accumulation of the IFN-α receptor subunit 1 (IFNAR1). The WNV-induced depletion of IFNAR1 was conserved across multiple cell types. Our results indicated that expression of WNV nonstructural proteins resulted in activated lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation pathways independent of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Furthermore, WNV infection did not induce serine phosphorylation, a modification on IFNAR1 that precedes its natural turnover. These data demonstrate that WNV infection results in a reduction of IFNAR1 protein through a non-canonical protein degradation pathway, and may participate in the inhibition of the IFN response.

  19. Recognition of the Different Structural Forms of the Capsid Protein Determines the Outcome following Infection with Porcine Circovirus Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trible, Benjamin R.; Suddith, Andrew W.; Kerrigan, Maureen A.; Cino-Ozuna, Ada G.; Hesse, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) capsid protein (CP) is the only protein necessary for the formation of the virion capsid, and recombinant CP spontaneously forms virus-like particles (VLPs). Located within a single CP subunit is an immunodominant epitope consisting of residues 169 to 180 [CP(169–180)], which is exposed on the surface of the subunit, but, in the structural context of the VLP, the epitope is buried and inaccessible to antibody. High levels of anti-CP(169–180) activity are associated with porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the immune response to monomer CP in the development of PCVAD. The approach was to immunize pigs with CP monomer, followed by challenge with PCV2 and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). To maintain the CP immunogen as a stable monomer, CP(43–233) was fused to ubiquitin (Ub-CP). Size exclusion chromatography showed that Ub-CP was present as a single 33-kDa protein. Pigs immunized with Ub-CP developed a strong antibody response to PCV2, including antibodies against CP(169–180). However, only low levels of virus neutralizing activity were detected, and viremia levels were similar to those of nonimmunized pigs. As a positive control, immunization with baculovirus-expressed CP (Bac-CP) resulted in high levels of virus neutralizing activity, small amounts of anti-CP(169–180) activity, and the absence of viremia in pigs following virus challenge. The data support the role of CP(169–180) as an immunological decoy and illustrate the importance of the structural form of the CP immunogen in determining the outcome following infection. PMID:23035215

  20. DExD/H-Box Helicase 36 Signaling via Myeloid Differentiation Primary Response Gene 88 Contributes to NF-κB Activation to Type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyuan Jing

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available DExD/H-box helicase 36 (DHX36 is known to be an ATP-dependent RNA helicase that unwinds the guanine-quadruplexes DNA or RNA, but emerging data suggest that it also functions as pattern recognition receptor in innate immunity. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is an Arterivirus that has been devastating the swine industry worldwide. Interstitial pneumonia is considered to be one of the most obvious clinical signs of PRRSV infection, suggesting that the inflammatory response plays an important role in PRRSV pathogenesis. However, whether DHX36 is involved in PRRSV-induced inflammatory cytokine expression remains unclear. In this study, we found that PRRSV infection increased the expression of DHX36. Knockdown of DHX36 and its adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88 by small-interfering RNA in MARC-145 cells significantly reduced NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression after PRRSV infection. Further investigation revealed that PRRSV nucleocapsid protein interacted with the N-terminal quadruplex binding domain of DHX36, which in turn augmented nucleocapsid protein-induced NF-κB activation. Taken together, our results suggest that DHX36–MyD88 has a relevant role in the recognition of PRRSV nucleocapsid protein and in the subsequent activation of pro-inflammatory NF-κB pathway.

  1. Alternate reading frame protein (F protein) of hepatitis C virus: paradoxical effects of activation and apoptosis on human dendritic cells lead to stimulation of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Li, Wen; Singh, Shakti; Kumar, Rakesh; Agrawal, Babita

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to chronic infection in the majority of infected individuals due to lack, failure, or inefficiency of generated adaptive immune responses. In a minority of patients, acute infection is followed by viral clearance. The immune correlates of viral clearance are not clear yet but have been extensively investigated, suggesting that multispecific and multifunctional cellular immunity is involved. The generation of cellular immunity is highly dependent upon how antigen presenting cells (APCs) process and present various viral antigens. Various structural and non-structural HCV proteins derived from the open reading frame (ORF) have been implicated in modulation of dendritic cells (DCs) and APCs. Besides the major ORF proteins, the HCV core region also encodes an alternate reading frame protein (ARFP or F), whose function in viral pathogenesis is not clear. In the current studies, we sought to determine the role of HCV-derived ARFP in modulating dendritic cells and stimulation of T cell responses. Recombinant adenovirus vectors containing F or core protein derived from HCV (genotype 1a) were prepared and used to endogenously express these proteins in dendritic cells. We made an intriguing observation that endogenous expression of F protein in human DCs leads to contrasting effects on activation and apoptosis of DCs, allowing activated DCs to efficiently internalize apoptotic DCs. These in turn result in efficient ability of DCs to process and present antigen and to prime and stimulate F protein derived peptide-specific T cells from HCV-naive individuals. Taken together, our findings suggest important aspects of F protein in modulating DC function and stimulating T cell responses in humans.

  2. Alternate reading frame protein (F protein of hepatitis C virus: paradoxical effects of activation and apoptosis on human dendritic cells lead to stimulation of T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh Kumar Samrat

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV leads to chronic infection in the majority of infected individuals due to lack, failure, or inefficiency of generated adaptive immune responses. In a minority of patients, acute infection is followed by viral clearance. The immune correlates of viral clearance are not clear yet but have been extensively investigated, suggesting that multispecific and multifunctional cellular immunity is involved. The generation of cellular immunity is highly dependent upon how antigen presenting cells (APCs process and present various viral antigens. Various structural and non-structural HCV proteins derived from the open reading frame (ORF have been implicated in modulation of dendritic cells (DCs and APCs. Besides the major ORF proteins, the HCV core region also encodes an alternate reading frame protein (ARFP or F, whose function in viral pathogenesis is not clear. In the current studies, we sought to determine the role of HCV-derived ARFP in modulating dendritic cells and stimulation of T cell responses. Recombinant adenovirus vectors containing F or core protein derived from HCV (genotype 1a were prepared and used to endogenously express these proteins in dendritic cells. We made an intriguing observation that endogenous expression of F protein in human DCs leads to contrasting effects on activation and apoptosis of DCs, allowing activated DCs to efficiently internalize apoptotic DCs. These in turn result in efficient ability of DCs to process and present antigen and to prime and stimulate F protein derived peptide-specific T cells from HCV-naive individuals. Taken together, our findings suggest important aspects of F protein in modulating DC function and stimulating T cell responses in humans.

  3. Identification of naturally occurring amino acid variations that affect the ability of the measles virus C protein to regulate genome replication and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankamp, Bettina; Wilson, Jenna; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2005-05-25

    The C protein of measles virus (MV C) is a basic protein of 186 amino acids (aa) that plays at least two roles in infected cells, interference with the innate immune response and modulation of viral polymerase activity. In this study, Northern blots were used to demonstrate that C proteins from three vaccine strains and three wild-type isolates of MV downregulated both mRNA transcription and genome replication in a plasmid-based mini-genome assay. The effect on transcription always paralleled the effect on replication; however, the six MV C proteins varied considerably in their ability to inhibit polymerase activity. Though the amino-terminal 45 aa of the C protein are more variable among different MV strains than the remaining 75% of the protein, the ability of the MV C proteins to inhibit polymerase activity was not regulated by substitutions in the amino terminus, but rather by the more conserved region containing aa 46-167. Naturally occurring substitutions at positions 147 and 166, but not 88 and 186, were found to regulate MV C protein activity. Deletion of the carboxyl-terminal 19 aa did not affect the polymerase-modulating activity. Though we did not find a link between the aa changes in MV C and attenuation, these data provide new information regarding the functions of this non-structural protein.

  4. Whey Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protein daily for 2 years does not improve bone density in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Weight loss. Most research suggests that taking whey protein alone, along with diet modifications, or while following an exercise plan does not seem to reduce weight for ...

  5. Protein Extractability

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    limited to high oleic acid oil and water purification property (Katayon et al., 2006; Foid et al., 2001 and. Folkard et al., 1993), whereas it contains up to. 332.5 g of crude protein per kg of sample (Jose et al., 1999). Studies to characterize the interaction effects of pH and salts on the extraction of. PROTEIN EXTRACTABILITY ...

  6. Tau protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini; Kristensen, Kim; Bahl, Jmc

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tau protein has been proposed as biomarker of axonal damage leading to irreversible neurological impairment in MS. CSF concentrations may be useful when determining risk of progression from ON to MS. Objective: To investigate the association between tau protein concentration and 14......-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) versus patients with monosymptomatic onset who progressed to multiple sclerosis (MS). To evaluate results against data found in a complete literature review. Methods: A total of 66 patients with MS and/or ON from...... the Department of Neurology of Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, were included. CSF samples were analysed for tau protein and 14-3-3 protein, and clinical and paraclinical information was obtained from medical records. Results: The study shows a significantly increased concentration of tau...

  7. Comparing the intra-annual wood formation of three European species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea and Pinus sylvestris) as related to leaf phenology and non-structural carbohydrate dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelot, Alice; Simard, Sonia; Rathgeber, Cyrille; Dufrêne, Eric; Damesin, Claire

    2012-08-01

    Monitoring cambial phenology and intra-annual growth dynamics is a useful approach for characterizing the tree growth response to climate change. However, there have been few reports concerning intra-annual wood formation in lowland temperate forests with high time resolution, especially for the comparison between deciduous and coniferous species. The main objective of this study was to determine how the timing, duration and rate of radial growth change between species as related to leaf phenology and the dynamics of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) under the same climatic conditions. We studied two deciduous species, Fagus sylvatica L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., and an evergreen conifer, Pinus sylvestris L. During the 2009 growing season, we weekly monitored (i) the stem radial increment using dendrometers, (ii) the xylem growth using microcoring and (iii) the leaf phenology from direct observations of the tree crowns. The NSC content was also measured in the eight last rings of the stem cores in April, June and August 2009. The leaf phenology, NSC storage and intra-annual growth were clearly different between species, highlighting their contrasting carbon allocation. Beech growth began just after budburst, with a maximal growth rate when the leaves were mature and variations in the NSC content were low. Thus, beech radial growth seemed highly dependent on leaf photosynthesis. For oak, earlywood quickly developed before budburst, which probably led to the starch decrease quantified in the stem from April to June. For pine, growth began before the needles unfolding and the lack of NSC decrease during the growing season suggested that the substrates for radial growth were new assimilates of the needles from the previous year. Only for oak, the pattern determined from the intra-annual growth measured using microcoring differed from the pattern determined from dendrometer data. For all species, the ring width was significantly influenced by growth duration

  8. Characterisation of Structural Proteins from Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV Using Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Chevin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV is the etiological agent of chronic paralysis, an infectious and contagious disease in adult honeybees. CBPV is a positive single-stranded RNA virus which contains two major viral RNA fragments. RNA 1 (3674 nt and RNA 2 (2305 nt encode three and four putative open reading frames (ORFs, respectively. RNA 1 is thought to encode the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp since the amino acid sequence derived from ORF 3 shares similarities with the RdRP of families Nodaviridae and Tombusviridae. The genomic organization of CBPV and in silico analyses have suggested that RNA 1 encodes non-structural proteins, while RNA 2 encodes structural proteins, which are probably encoded by ORFs 2 and 3. In this study, purified CBPV particles were used to characterize virion proteins by mass spectrometry. Several polypeptides corresponding to proteins encoded by ORF 2 and 3 on RNA 2 were detected. Their role in the formation of the viral capsid is discussed.

  9. New Tags for Recombinant Protein Detection and O-Glycosylation Reporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldi, Francesca; Burrone, Oscar R.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), because of their unique specificity, are irreplaceable tools for scientific research. Precise mapping of the antigenic determinants allows the development of epitope tagging approaches to be used with recombinant proteins for several purposes. Here we describe a new family of tags derived from the epitope recognized by a single highly specific mAb (anti-roTag mAb), which was obtained from a pool of mAbs reacting with the rotavirus nonstructural protein 5 (NSP5). The variable regions of the anti-roTag mAb were identified and their binding capacity verified upon expression as a single-chain/miniAb. The minimal epitope, termed roTag, was identified as a 10 amino acid sequence (SISSSIFKNE). The affinity of the anti-roTag/roTag interaction was found to be comparable to that of the anti-SV5/SV5 tag interaction. roTag was successfully used for detection of several recombinant cytosolic, secretory and membrane proteins. Two additional variants of roTag of 10 and 13 amino acids containing O-glycosylation susceptible sites (termed OG-tag and roTagO) were constructed and characterised. These tags were useful to detect proteins passing through the Golgi apparatus, the site of O-glycosylation. PMID:24802141

  10. New tags for recombinant protein detection and O-glycosylation reporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Petris

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, because of their unique specificity, are irreplaceable tools for scientific research. Precise mapping of the antigenic determinants allows the development of epitope tagging approaches to be used with recombinant proteins for several purposes. Here we describe a new family of tags derived from the epitope recognized by a single highly specific mAb (anti-roTag mAb, which was obtained from a pool of mAbs reacting with the rotavirus nonstructural protein 5 (NSP5. The variable regions of the anti-roTag mAb were identified and their binding capacity verified upon expression as a single-chain/miniAb. The minimal epitope, termed roTag, was identified as a 10 amino acid sequence (SISSSIFKNE. The affinity of the anti-roTag/roTag interaction was found to be comparable to that of the anti-SV5/SV5 tag interaction. roTag was successfully used for detection of several recombinant cytosolic, secretory and membrane proteins. Two additional variants of roTag of 10 and 13 amino acids containing O-glycosylation susceptible sites (termed OG-tag and roTagO were constructed and characterised. These tags were useful to detect proteins passing through the Golgi apparatus, the site of O-glycosylation.

  11. Porcine arterivirus activates the NF-kappaB pathway through IkappaB degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Myeong; Kleiboeker, Steven B

    2005-11-10

    Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) is a critical regulator of innate and adaptive immune function as well as cell proliferation and survival. The present study demonstrated for the first time that a virus belonging to the Arteriviridae family activates NF-kappaB in MARC-145 cells and alveolar macrophages. In porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected cells, NF-kappaB activation was characterized by translocation of NF-kappaB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, increased DNA binding activity, and NF-kappaB-regulated gene expression. NF-kappaB activation was increased as PRRSV infection progressed and in a viral dose-dependent manner. UV-inactivation of PRRSV significantly reduced the level of NF-kappaB activation. Degradation of IkappaB protein was detected late in PRRSV infection, and overexpression of the dominant negative form of IkappaBalpha (IkappaBalphaDN) significantly suppressed NF-kappaB activation induced by PRRSV. However, IkappaBalphaDN did not affect viral replication and viral cytopathic effect. PRRSV infection induced oxidative stress in cells by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidants inhibited NF-kappaB DNA binding activity in PRRSV-infected cells, suggesting ROS as a mechanism by which NF-kappaB was activated by PRRSV infection. Moreover, NF-kappaB-dependent expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 was observed in PRRSV-infected cells, an observation which implies that NF-kappaB activation is a biologically significant aspect of PRRSV pathogenesis. The results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular pathways of pathology and immune evasion associated with disease caused by PRRSV.

  12. Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szklarczyk, Damian; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    of research are explored. Here we present an overview of the most widely used protein-protein interaction databases and the methods they employ to gather, combine, and predict interactions. We also point out the trade-off between comprehensiveness and accuracy and the main pitfall scientists have to be aware...

  13. The chaperone like function of the nonhistone protein HMGB1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmanov, Taner; Ugrinova, Iva [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria); Pasheva, Evdokia, E-mail: eva@bio21.bas.bg [Institute of Molecular Biology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (Bulgaria)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► The HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of nucleosome particles. ► The target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA not the histone octamer. ► The acetylation of HMGB1 decreases the stimulating effect of the protein. -- Abstract: Almost all essential nuclear processes as replication, repair, transcription and recombination require the chromatin template to be correctly unwound and than repackaged. The major strategy that the cell uses to overcome the nucleosome barrier is the proper removal of the histone octamer and subsequent deposition onto DNA. Important factors in this multi step phenomenon are the histone chaperones that can assemble nucleosome arrays in vitro in the absence of ATP. The nonhistone protein HMGB1 is a good candidate for a chaperone as its molecule consists of two DNA binding motives, Box’s A and B, and a long nonstructured C tail highly negatively charged. HMGB1 protein is known as a nuclear “architectural” factor for its property to bind preferentially to distorted DNA structures and was reported to kink the double helix. Our experiments show that in the classical stepwise dialysis method for nucleosome assembly the addition of HMGB1 protein stimulates more than two times the formation of middle-positioned nucleosomes. The stimulation effect persists in dialysis free experiment when the reconstitution is possible only in the presence of a chaperone. The addition of HMGB1 protein strongly enhanced the formation of a nucleosome in a dose dependant manner. Our results show that the target of HMGB1 action as a chaperone is the DNA fragment not the histone octamer. One possible explanation for the stimulating effect of HMGB1 is the “architectural” property of the protein to associate with the middle of the DNA fragment and to kink it. The acquired V shaped DNA structure is probably conformationals more favorable to wrap around the prefolded histone octamer. We tested also the role of the post

  14. A Synthetic Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Strain Confers Unprecedented Levels of Heterologous Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Hiep L X; Ma, Fangrui; Laegreid, William W; Pattnaik, Asit K; Steffen, David; Doster, Alan R; Osorio, Fernando A

    2015-12-01

    Current vaccines do not provide sufficient levels of protection against divergent porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strains circulating in the field, mainly due to the substantial variation of the viral genome. We describe here a novel approach to generate a PRRSV vaccine candidate that could confer unprecedented levels of heterologous protection against divergent PRRSV isolates. By using a set of 59 nonredundant, full-genome sequences of type 2 PRRSVs, a consensus genome (designated PRRSV-CON) was generated by aligning these 59 PRRSV full-genome sequences, followed by selecting the most common nucleotide found at each position of the alignment. Next, the synthetic PRRSV-CON strain was generated through the use of reverse genetics. PRRSV-CON replicates as efficiently as our prototype PRRSV strain FL12, both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, when inoculated into pigs, PRRSV-CON confers significantly broader levels of heterologous protection than does wild-type PRRSV. Collectively, our data demonstrate that PRRSV-CON can serve as an excellent candidate for the development of a broadly protective PRRSV vaccine. The extraordinary genetic variation of RNA viruses poses a monumental challenge for the development of broadly protective vaccines against these viruses. To minimize the genetic dissimilarity between vaccine immunogens and contemporary circulating viruses, computational strategies have been developed for the generation of artificial immunogen sequences (so-called "centralized" sequences) that have equal genetic distances to the circulating viruses. Thus far, the generation of centralized vaccine immunogens has been carried out at the level of individual viral proteins. We expand this concept to PRRSV, a highly variable RNA virus, by creating a synthetic PRRSV strain based on a centralized PRRSV genome sequence. This study provides the first example of centralizing the whole genome of an RNA virus to improve vaccine coverage. This

  15. Dietary Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because your body doesn't store it the way it stores fats or carbohydrates. How much you need depends on your age, sex, health, and level of physical activity. Most Americans eat enough protein in their diet.

  16. Analysis of Tospovirus NSs Proteins in Suppression of Systemic Silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Hedil

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is a sequence-specific gene regulation mechanism that in plants also acts antiviral. In order to counteract antiviral RNA silencing, viruses have evolved RNA silencing suppressors (RSS. In the case of tospoviruses, the non-structural NSs protein has been identified as the RSS. Although the tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV tospovirus NSs protein has been shown to exhibit affinity to long and small dsRNA molecules, its ability to suppress the non-cell autonomous part of RNA silencing has only been studied to a limited extent. Here, the NSs proteins of TSWV, groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV and tomato yellow ring virus (TYRV, representatives for three distinct tospovirus species, have been studied on their ability and strength to suppress local and systemic silencing. A system has been developed to quantify suppression of GFP silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana 16C lines, to allow a comparison of relative RNA silencing suppressor strength. It is shown that NSs of all three tospoviruses are suppressors of local and systemic silencing. Unexpectedly, suppression of systemic RNA silencing by NSsTYRV was just as strong as those by NSsTSWV and NSsGRSV, even though NSsTYRV was expressed in lower amounts. Using the system established, a set of selected NSsTSWV gene constructs mutated in predicted RNA binding domains, as well as NSs from TSWV isolates 160 and 171 (resistance breakers of the Tsw resistance gene, were analyzed for their ability to suppress systemic GFP silencing. The results indicate another mode of RNA silencing suppression by NSs that acts further downstream the biogenesis of siRNAs and their sequestration. The findings are discussed in light of the affinity of NSs for small and long dsRNA, and recent mutant screen of NSsTSWV to map domains required for RSS activity and triggering of Tsw-governed resistance.

  17. Generation of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus-like-particles (VLPs) with different protein composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Durán, Marga; Costa, Sofia; Sarraseca, Javier; de la Roja, Nuria; García, Julia; García, Isabel; Rodríguez, Maria José

    2016-10-01

    The causative agent of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) is an enveloped ssRNA (+) virus belonging to the Arteriviridae family. Gp5 and M proteins form disulfide-linked heterodimers that constitute the major components of PRRSV envelope. Gp2, Gp3, Gp4 and E are the minor structural proteins, being the first three incorporated as multimeric complexes in the virus surface. The disease has become one of the most important causes of economic losses in the swine industry. Despite efforts to design an effective vaccine, the available ones allow only partial protection. In the last years, VLPs have become good vaccine alternatives because of safety issues and their potential to activate both branches of the immunological response. The characteristics of recombinant baculoviruses as heterologous expression system have been exploited for the production of VLPs of a wide variety of viruses. In this work, two multiple baculovirus expression vectors (BEVs) with PRRS virus envelope proteins were engineered in order to generate PRRS VLPs: on the one hand, Gp5 and M cDNAs were cloned to generate the pBAC-Gp5M vector; on the other hand, Gp2, Gp3, Gp4 and E cDNAs have been cloned to generate the pBAC-Gp234E vector. The corresponding recombinant baculoviruses BAC-Gp5M and BAC-Gp234E were employed to produce two types of VLPs: basic Gp5M VLPs, by the simultaneous expression of Gp5 and M proteins; and complete VLPs, by the co-expression of the six PRRS proteins after co-infection. The characterization of VLPs by Western blot confirmed the presence of the recombinant proteins using the available specific antibodies (Abs). The analysis by Electron microscopy showed that the two types of VLPs were indistinguishable between them, being similar in shape and size to the native PRRS virus. This system represents a potential alternative for vaccine development and a useful tool to study the implication of specific PRRS proteins in the response against the virus. Copyright

  18. A tree-based conservation scoring method for short linear motifs in multiple alignments of protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Rodrigo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structure of many eukaryotic cell regulatory proteins is highly modular. They are assembled from globular domains, segments of natively disordered polypeptides and short linear motifs. The latter are involved in protein interactions and formation of regulatory complexes. The function of such proteins, which may be difficult to define, is the aggregate of the subfunctions of the modules. It is therefore desirable to efficiently predict linear motifs with some degree of accuracy, yet sequence database searches return results that are not significant. Results We have developed a method for scoring the conservation of linear motif instances. It requires only primary sequence-derived information (e.g. multiple alignment and sequence tree and takes into account the degenerate nature of linear motif patterns. On our benchmarking, the method accurately scores 86% of the known positive instances, while distinguishing them from random matches in 78% of the cases. The conservation score is implemented as a real time application designed to be integrated into other tools. It is currently accessible via a Web Service or through a graphical interface. Conclusion The conservation score improves the prediction of linear motifs, by discarding those matches that are unlikely to be functional because they have not been conserved during the evolution of the protein sequences. It is especially useful for instances in non-structured regions of the proteins, where a domain masking filtering strategy is not applicable.

  19. Role of transcription regulatory sequence in regulation of gene expression and replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengbao; Meng, Han; Gao, Yujin; Gao, Hui; Guo, Kangkang; Almazan, Fernando; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zhang, Yanming; Abrahamyan, Levon

    2017-08-10

    In order to gain insight into the role of the transcription regulatory sequences (TRSs) in the regulation of gene expression and replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene, under the control of the different structural gene TRSs, was inserted between the N gene and 3'-UTR of the PRRSV genome and EGFP expression was analyzed for each TRS. TRSs of all the studied structural genes of PRRSV positively modulated EGFP expression at different levels. Among the TRSs analyzed, those of GP2, GP5, M, and N genes highly enhanced EGFP expression without altering replication of PRRSV. These data indicated that structural gene TRSs could be an extremely useful tool for foreign gene expression using PRRSV as a vector.

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 metabolite biliverdin, not iron, inhibits porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Angke; Duan, Hong; Li, Na; Zhao, Lijuan; Pu, Fengxing; Huang, Baicheng; Wu, Chunyan; Nan, Yuchen; Du, Taofeng; Mu, Yang; Zhao, Qin; Sun, Yani; Zhang, Gaiping; Hiscox, Julian A; Zhou, En-Min; Xiao, Shuqi

    2017-01-01

    Porcinereproductiveandrespiratorysyndromevirus (PRRSV) causes significant economic losses to the pork industry worldwide. Previously, we demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) interferes with PRRSV replication. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, here we assess whether the HO-1 downstream metabolites biliverdin (BV) and/or iron mediate the HO-1 antiviral effect. We demonstrate a BV concentration-dependent suppression of PRRSV replication and show that virions are not directly inactivated by BV. Additionally, BV or N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) significantly reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in PRRSV-infected MARC-145 cells; however, because NAC did not reduce viral load, the BV antiviral effect is independent of decreased ROS levels. Moreover, a secondary metabolite of BV, bilirubin (BR), specifically mediates this anti-PRRSV activity via a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent cGMP/PKG signaling pathway. While increased iron via addition of FeCl3 did not interfere with PRRSV replication, iron depletion by deferoxamine (DFO) after cobalt-protoporphyrin IX induction of HO-1 did not restore PRRSV replication. Collectively, our findings identify a HO-1-BV/BR-NO-cGMP/PKG cascade as a novel pathway underlying the host cell antiviral effect. These results provide a unique insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the antiviral effects of the stress-responsive protein HO-1 during PRRSV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Epitope Sequences in Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Identified by Monoclonal Antibodies

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    Leticia Barboza Rocha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 is a multi-functional glycoprotein with essential functions both in viral replication and modulation of host innate immune responses. NS1 has been established as a good surrogate marker for infection. In the present study, we generated four anti-NS1 monoclonal antibodies against recombinant NS1 protein from dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV2, which were used to map three NS1 epitopes. The sequence 193AVHADMGYWIESALNDT209 was recognized by monoclonal antibodies 2H5 and 4H1BC, which also cross-reacted with Zika virus (ZIKV protein. On the other hand, the sequence 25VHTWTEQYKFQPES38 was recognized by mAb 4F6 that did not cross react with ZIKV. Lastly, a previously unidentified DENV2 NS1-specific epitope, represented by the sequence 127ELHNQTFLIDGPETAEC143, is described in the present study after reaction with mAb 4H2, which also did not cross react with ZIKV. The selection and characterization of the epitope, specificity of anti-NS1 mAbs, may contribute to the development of diagnostic tools able to differentiate DENV and ZIKV infections.

  2. Stable human lymphoblastoid cell lines constitutively expressing hepatitis C virus proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölk, Benno; Gremion, Christel; Ivashkina, Natalia; Engler, Olivier B; Grabscheid, Benno; Bieck, Elke; Blum, Hubert E; Cerny, Andreas; Moradpour, Darius

    2005-06-01

    The cellular immune response plays a central role in virus clearance and pathogenesis of liver disease in hepatitis C. The study of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific immune responses is limited by currently available cell-culture systems. Here, the establishment and characterization of stable human HLA-A2-positive B-lymphoblastoid x T hybrid cell lines constitutively expressing either the NS3-4A complex or the entire HCV polyprotein are reported. These cell lines, termed T1/NS3-4A and T1/HCVcon, respectively, were maintained in continuous culture for more than 1 year with stable characteristics. HCV structural and non-structural proteins were processed accurately, indicating that the cellular and viral proteolytic machineries are functional in these cell lines. Viral proteins were found in the cytoplasm in dot-like structures when expressed in the context of the HCV polyprotein or in a perinuclear fringe when the NS3-4A complex was expressed alone. T1/NS3-4A and T1/HCVcon cells were lysed efficiently by HCV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes from patients with hepatitis C and from human HLA-A2.1 transgenic mice immunized with a liposomal HCV vaccine, indicating that viral proteins are processed endogenously and presented efficiently via the major histocompatibility complex class I pathway. In conclusion, these cell lines represent a unique tool to study the cellular immune response, as well as to evaluate novel vaccine and immunotherapeutic strategies against HCV.

  3. Protein Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation, growth and perfection of protein crystals will be overviewed along with crystal mechanical properties. The knowledge is based on experiments using optical and force crystals behave similar to inorganic crystals, though with a difference in orders of magnitude in growing parameters. For example, the low incorporation rate of large biomolecules requires up to 100 times larger supersaturation to grow protein, rather than inorganic crystals. Nucleation is often poorly reproducible, partly because of turbulence accompanying the mixing of precipitant with protein solution. Light scattering reveals fluctuations of molecular cluster size, its growth, surface energies and increased clustering as protein ages. Growth most often occurs layer-by-layer resulting in faceted crystals. New molecular layer on crystal face is terminated by a step where molecular incorporation occurs. Quantitative data on the incorporation rate will be discussed. Rounded crystals with molecularly disordered interfaces will be explained. Defects in crystals compromise the x-ray diffraction resolution crucially needed to find the 3D atomic structure of biomolecules. The defects are immobile so that birth defects stay forever. All lattice defects known for inorganics are revealed in protein crystals. Contribution of molecular conformations to lattice disorder is important, but not studied. This contribution may be enhanced by stress field from other defects. Homologous impurities (e.g., dimers, acetylated molecules) are trapped more willingly by a growing crystal than foreign protein impurities. The trapped impurities induce internal stress eliminated in crystals exceeding a critical size (part of mni for ferritin, lysozyme). Lesser impurities are trapped from stagnant, as compared to the flowing, solution. Freezing may induce much more defects unless quickly amorphysizing intracrystalline water.

  4. The core protein of classical Swine Fever virus is dispensable for virus propagation in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Riedel

    Full Text Available Core protein of Flaviviridae is regarded as essential factor for nucleocapsid formation. Yet, core protein is not encoded by all isolates (GBV- A and GBV- C. Pestiviruses are a genus within the family Flaviviridae that affect cloven-hoofed animals, causing economically important diseases like classical swine fever (CSF and bovine viral diarrhea (BVD. Recent findings describe the ability of NS3 of classical swine fever virus (CSFV to compensate for disabling size increase of core protein (Riedel et al., 2010. NS3 is a nonstructural protein possessing protease, helicase and NTPase activity and a key player in virus replication. A role of NS3 in particle morphogenesis has also been described for other members of the Flaviviridae (Patkar et al., 2008; Ma et al., 2008. These findings raise questions about the necessity and function of core protein and the role of NS3 in particle assembly. A reverse genetic system for CSFV was employed to generate poorly growing CSFVs by modification of the core gene. After passaging, rescued viruses had acquired single amino acid substitutions (SAAS within NS3 helicase subdomain 3. Upon introduction of these SAAS in a nonviable CSFV with deletion of almost the entire core gene (Vp447(Δc, virus could be rescued. Further characterization of this virus with regard to its physical properties, morphology and behavior in cell culture did not reveal major differences between wildtype (Vp447 and Vp447(Δc. Upon infection of the natural host, Vp447(Δc was attenuated. Hence we conclude that core protein is not essential for particle assembly of a core-encoding member of the Flaviviridae, but important for its virulence. This raises questions about capsid structure and necessity, the role of NS3 in particle assembly and the function of core protein in general.

  5. The C protein of measles virus inhibits the type I interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Jessica A; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2003-10-25

    Type I interferons (IFNalpha/beta) are an important part of innate immunity to viral infections because they induce an antiviral response and limit viral replication until the adaptive response clears the infection. Since the nonstructural proteins of several paramyxoviruses inhibit the IFNalpha/beta response, we chose to explore the role of the C protein of measles virus (MV) in such inhibition. Previous studies have suggested that the MV C protein may serve as a virulence factor, but its role in the pathogenesis of MV remains undefined. In the present study, a recombinant MV strain that does not express the C protein (MV C-) and its parental strain (Ed Tag) were used. Growth of MV C- was restricted in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and HeLa cells, but in the presence of neutralizing antibodies to IFNalpha/beta, MV C- produced titers that were equivalent to those of Ed Tag. In addition, expression of the MV C protein from plasmid DNA inhibited the production of an IFNalpha/beta responsive reporter gene and, to a lesser extent, inhibited an IFNgamma responsive reporter gene. The ability of the MV C protein to suppress the IFNalpha/beta response was confirmed using a biologic assay. After IFNbeta stimulation, HeLa cells infected with Ed Tag produced five-fold less IFNalpha/beta than cells infected with MV C-. While the mechanism of inhibition remains unclear, these data suggest that the MV C protein plays an important role in the pathogenesis of MV by inhibiting IFNalpha/beta signaling.

  6. Bluetongue Virus NS4 Protein Is an Interferon Antagonist and a Determinant of Virus Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratinier, Maxime; Shaw, Andrew E; Barry, Gerald; Gu, Quan; Di Gialleonardo, Luigina; Janowicz, Anna; Varela, Mariana; Randall, Richard E; Caporale, Marco; Palmarini, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent of bluetongue, a major infectious disease of ruminants with serious consequences to both animal health and the economy. The clinical outcome of BTV infection is highly variable and dependent on a variety of factors related to both the virus and the host. In this study, we show that the BTV nonstructural protein NS4 favors viral replication in sheep, the animal species most affected by bluetongue. In addition, NS4 confers a replication advantage on the virus in interferon (IFN)-competent primary sheep endothelial cells and immortalized cell lines. We determined that in cells infected with an NS4 deletion mutant (BTV8ΔNS4), there is increased synthesis of type I IFN compared to cells infected with wild-type BTV-8. In addition, using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we show that NS4 modulates the host IFN response and downregulates mRNA levels of type I IFN and interferon-stimulated genes. Moreover, using reporter assays and protein synthesis assays, we show that NS4 downregulates the activities of a variety of promoters, such as the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter, the IFN-β promoter, and a promoter containing interferon-stimulated response elements (ISRE). We also show that the NS4 inhibitory activity on gene expression is related to its nucleolar localization. Furthermore, NS4 does not affect mRNA splicing or cellular translation. The data obtained in this study strongly suggest that BTV NS4 is an IFN antagonist and a key determinant of viral virulence. Bluetongue is one of the main infectious diseases of ruminants and is caused by bluetongue virus (BTV), an arthropod-borne virus transmitted from infected to susceptible animals by Culicoides biting midges. Bluetongue has a variable clinical outcome that can be related to both virus and host factors. It is therefore critical to understand the interplay between BTV and the host immune responses. In this study, we show that a nonstructural protein of BTV (NS4) is

  7. Hepatitis C virus core protein induces apoptosis-like caspase independent cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Michael

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV associated liver diseases may be related to apoptotic processes. Thus, we investigated the role of different HCV proteins in apoptosis induction as well as their potency to interact with different apoptosis inducing agents. Methods and Results The use of a tightly adjustable tetracycline (Tet-dependent HCV protein expression cell system with the founder osteosarcoma cell line U-2 OS allowed switch-off and on of the endogenous production of HCV proteins. Analyzed were cell lines expressing the HCV polyprotein, the core protein, protein complexes of the core, envelope proteins E1, E2 and p7, and non-structural proteins NS3 and NS4A, NS4B or NS5A and NS5B. Apoptosis was measured mainly by the detection of hypodiploid apoptotic nuclei in the absence or presence of mitomycin C, etoposide, TRAIL and an agonistic anti-CD95 antibody. To further characterize cell death induction, a variety of different methods like fluorescence microscopy, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT-catalyzed deoxyuridinephosphate (dUTP-nick end labeling assay, Annexin V staining, Western blot and caspase activation assays were included into our analysis. Two cell lines expressing the core protein but not the total polyprotein exerted a strong apoptotic effect, while the other cell lines did not induce any or only a slight effect by measuring the hypodiploid nuclei. Cell death induction was caspase-independent since it could not be blocked by zVAD-fmk. Moreover, caspase activity was absent in Western blot analysis and fluorometric assays while typical apoptosis-associated morphological features like the membrane blebbing and nuclei condensation and fragmentation could be clearly observed by microscopy. None of the HCV proteins influenced the apoptotic effect mediated via the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway while only the core protein enhanced death-receptor-mediated apoptosis. Conclusion Our data showed a caspase

  8. Determination of 5 '-leader sequences from radically disparate strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus reveals the presence of highly conserved sequence motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Bøtner, Anette; Nielsen, Jens

    1999-01-01

    We determined the untranslated 5'-leader sequence for three different isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV): pathogenic European- and American-types, as well as an American-type vaccine strain. 5'-leader from European- and American-type PRRSV differed in length...... (220 and 190 nt, respectively), and exhibited only approximately 50% nucleotide homology. Nevertheless, highly conserved areas were identified in the leader of all 3 PRRSV isolates, which constitute candidate motifs for binding of protein(s) involved in viral replication. These comparative data provide...

  9. Structural Basis for dsRNA Recognition by NS1 Protein of Influenza A Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, A.; Wong, S; Yuan, Y

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important human pathogens causing periodic pandemic threats. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) protein of influenza A virus (NS1A) shields the virus against host defense. Here, we report the crystal structure of NS1A RNA-binding domain (RBD) bound to a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) at 1.7A. NS1A RBD forms a homodimer to recognize the major groove of A-form dsRNA in a length-independent mode by its conserved concave surface formed by dimeric anti-parallel alpha-helices. dsRNA is anchored by a pair of invariable arginines (Arg38) from both monomers by extensive hydrogen bonds. In accordance with the structural observation, isothermal titration calorimetry assay shows that the unique Arg38-Arg38 pair and two Arg35-Arg46 pairs are crucial for dsRNA binding, and that Ser42 and Thr49 are also important for dsRNA binding. Agrobacterium co-infiltration assay further supports that the unique Arg38 pair plays important roles in dsRNA binding in vivo.

  10. Effect of the Protein Corona on Antibody-Antigen Binding in Nanoparticle Sandwich Immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Puig, Helena; Bosch, Irene; Carré-Camps, Marc; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2017-01-18

    We investigated the effect of the protein corona on the function of nanoparticle (NP) antibody (Ab) conjugates in dipstick sandwich immunoassays. Ab specific for Zika virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) were conjugated to gold NPs, and another anti-NS1 Ab was immobilized onto the nitrocellulose membrane. Sandwich immunoassay formation was influenced by whether the strip was run in corona forming conditions, i.e., in human serum. Strips run in buffer or pure solutions of bovine serum albumin exhibited false positives, but those run in human serum did not. Serum pretreatment of the nitrocellulose also eliminated false positives. Corona formation around the NP-Ab in serum was faster than the immunoassay time scale. Langmuir binding analysis determined how the immobilized Ab affinity for the NP-Ab/NS1 was impacted by corona formation conditions, quantified as an effective dissociation constant, K D eff . Results show that corona formation mediates the specificity and sensitivity of the antibody-antigen interaction of Zika biomarkers in immunoassays, and plays a critical but beneficial role.

  11. Aquaporin Protein-Protein Interactions

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    Jennifer Virginia Roche

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are tetrameric membrane-bound channels that facilitate transport of water and other small solutes across cell membranes. In eukaryotes, they are frequently regulated by gating or trafficking, allowing for the cell to control membrane permeability in a specific manner. Protein–protein interactions play crucial roles in both regulatory processes and also mediate alternative functions such as cell adhesion. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge about aquaporin protein–protein interactions; dividing the interactions into three types: (1 interactions between aquaporin tetramers; (2 interactions between aquaporin monomers within a tetramer (hetero-tetramerization; and (3 transient interactions with regulatory proteins. We particularly focus on the structural aspects of the interactions, discussing the small differences within a conserved overall fold that allow for aquaporins to be differentially regulated in an organism-, tissue- and trigger-specific manner. A deep knowledge about these differences is needed to fully understand aquaporin function and regulation in many physiological processes, and may enable design of compounds targeting specific aquaporins for treatment of human disease.

  12. A crystal structure of the Dengue virus NS5 protein reveals a novel inter-domain interface essential for protein flexibility and virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqian Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Flavivirus RNA replication occurs within a replication complex (RC that assembles on ER membranes and comprises both non-structural (NS viral proteins and host cofactors. As the largest protein component within the flavivirus RC, NS5 plays key enzymatic roles through its N-terminal methyltransferase (MTase and C-terminal RNA-dependent-RNA polymerase (RdRp domains, and constitutes a major target for antivirals. We determined a crystal structure of the full-length NS5 protein from Dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV3 at a resolution of 2.3 Å in the presence of bound SAH and GTP. Although the overall molecular shape of NS5 from DENV3 resembles that of NS5 from Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV, the relative orientation between the MTase and RdRp domains differs between the two structures, providing direct evidence for the existence of a set of discrete stable molecular conformations that may be required for its function. While the inter-domain region is mostly disordered in NS5 from JEV, the NS5 structure from DENV3 reveals a well-ordered linker region comprising a short 310 helix that may act as a swivel. Solution Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS analysis reveals an increased mobility of the thumb subdomain of RdRp in the context of the full length NS5 protein which correlates well with the analysis of the crystallographic temperature factors. Site-directed mutagenesis targeting the mostly polar interface between the MTase and RdRp domains identified several evolutionarily conserved residues that are important for viral replication, suggesting that inter-domain cross-talk in NS5 regulates virus replication. Collectively, a picture for the molecular origin of NS5 flexibility is emerging with profound implications for flavivirus replication and for the development of therapeutics targeting NS5.

  13. Protein immobilization strategies for protein biochips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusmini, F.; Rusmini, Federica; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Feijen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In the past few years, protein biochips have emerged as promising proteomic and diagnostic tools for obtaining information about protein functions and interactions. Important technological innovations have been made. However, considerable development is still required, especially regarding protein

  14. A Recombinant Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine Candidate Attenuated by a Low-Fusion F Protein Is Immunogenic and Protective against Challenge in Cotton Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, Christina A; Stobart, Christopher C; Gilbert, Brian E; Pickles, Ray J; Hotard, Anne L; Meng, Jia; Blanco, Jorge C G; Moin, Syed M; Graham, Barney S; Piedra, Pedro A; Moore, Martin L

    2016-08-15

    Although respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants, a safe and effective vaccine is not yet available. Live-attenuated vaccines (LAVs) are the most advanced vaccine candidates in RSV-naive infants. However, designing an LAV with appropriate attenuation yet sufficient immunogenicity has proven challenging. In this study, we implemented reverse genetics to address these obstacles with a multifaceted LAV design that combined the codon deoptimization of genes for nonstructural proteins NS1 and NS2 (dNS), deletion of the small hydrophobic protein (ΔSH) gene, and replacement of the wild-type fusion (F) protein gene with a low-fusion RSV subgroup B F consensus sequence of the Buenos Aires clade (BAF). This vaccine candidate, RSV-A2-dNS-ΔSH-BAF (DB1), was attenuated in two models of primary human airway epithelial cells and in the upper and lower airways of cotton rats. DB1 was also highly immunogenic in cotton rats and elicited broadly neutralizing antibodies against a diverse panel of recombinant RSV strains. When vaccinated cotton rats were challenged with wild-type RSV A, DB1 reduced viral titers in the upper and lower airways by 3.8 log10 total PFU and 2.7 log10 PFU/g of tissue, respectively, compared to those in unvaccinated animals (P < 0.0001). DB1 was thus attenuated, highly immunogenic, and protective against RSV challenge in cotton rats. DB1 is the first RSV LAV to incorporate a low-fusion F protein as a strategy to attenuate viral replication and preserve immunogenicity. RSV is a leading cause of infant hospitalizations and deaths. The development of an effective vaccine for this high-risk population is therefore a public health priority. Although live-attenuated vaccines have been safely administered to RSV-naive infants, strategies to balance vaccine attenuation with immunogenicity have been elusive. In this study, we introduced a novel strategy to attenuate a recombinant RSV vaccine by

  15. Interaction entropy for protein-protein binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaoxi; Yan, Yu N.; Yang, Maoyou; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are at the heart of signal transduction and are central to the function of protein machine in biology. The highly specific protein-protein binding is quantitatively characterized by the binding free energy whose accurate calculation from the first principle is a grand challenge in computational biology. In this paper, we show how the interaction entropy approach, which was recently proposed for protein-ligand binding free energy calculation, can be applied to computing the entropic contribution to the protein-protein binding free energy. Explicit theoretical derivation of the interaction entropy approach for protein-protein interaction system is given in detail from the basic definition. Extensive computational studies for a dozen realistic protein-protein interaction systems are carried out using the present approach and comparisons of the results for these protein-protein systems with those from the standard normal mode method are presented. Analysis of the present method for application in protein-protein binding as well as the limitation of the method in numerical computation is discussed. Our study and analysis of the results provided useful information for extracting correct entropic contribution in protein-protein binding from molecular dynamics simulations.

  16. Artificial neural network for prediction of antigenic activity for a major conformational epitope in the hepatitis C virus NS3 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, James; Wohlhueter, Robert M; Dimitrova, Zoya; Khudyakov, Yury E

    2008-09-01

    Insufficient knowledge of general principles for accurate quantitative inference of biological properties from sequences is a major obstacle in the rationale design of proteins with predetermined activities. Due to this deficiency, protein engineering frequently relies on the use of computational approaches focused on the identification of quantitative structure-activity relationship (SAR) for each specific task. In the current article, a computational model was developed to define SAR for a major conformational antigenic epitope of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural protein 3 (NS3) in order to facilitate a rationale design of HCV antigens with improved diagnostically relevant properties. We present an artificial neural network (ANN) model that connects changes in the antigenic properties and structure of HCV NS3 recombinant proteins representing all 6 HCV genotypes. The ANN performed quantitative predictions of the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) Signal/Cutoff (S/Co) profiles from sequence information alone with 89.8% accuracy. Amino acid positions and physicochemical factors strongly associated with the HCV NS3 antigenic properties were identified. The positions most significantly contributing to the model were mapped on the NS3 3D structure. The location of these positions validates the major associations found by the ANN model between antigenicity and structure of the HCV NS3 proteins. Matlab code is available at the following URL address: http://bio-ai.myeweb.net/box_widget.html

  17. Generation and Characterization of Antinonstructural Protein 1 Monoclonal Antibodies and Development of Diagnostics for Dengue Virus Serotype 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yin-Liang; Liu, I-Ju; Li, Pi-Chun; Chiu, Chien-Yu; Lin, Chun-Yu; Huang, Chung-Hao; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Fu, Chi-Yu; Chao, Day-Yu; King, Chwan-Chuen; Wu, Han-Chung

    2017-10-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) circulates in tropical and subtropical areas around the world, where it causes high morbidity and mortality. There is no effective treatment of infection, with supportive care being the only option. Furthermore, early detection and diagnosis are important to facilitate clinical decisions. In this study, seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of DENV were generated by hybridoma techniques. These antibodies can be divided into two groups: serotype-specific (DB6-1, DB12-3, and DB38-1) and nonspecific (consisting of antibodies DB16-1, DB20-6, DB29-1, and DB41-2). The B-cell epitopes of DB20-6 and DB29-1 were identified by phage display and site-directed mutagenesis, and its binding motif, WXXWGK, was revealed to correspond to amino acid residues 115-120 of the DENV-2 NS1 protein. A diagnostic platform, consisting of a serotype-specific capture antibody and a complex detection antibody, exhibited a detection limit of about 1 ng/mL, which is sufficient to detect NS1 in clinical serum samples from dengue patients. This diagnostic platform displayed better specificity and sensitivity than two examined commercial NS1 diagnostic platforms. In summary, our results indicate that these newly generated mAbs are suitable for detection of NS1 protein of DENV-2 in clinical samples.

  18. The NS1 Protein from Influenza Virus Stimulates Translation Initiation by Enhancing Ribosome Recruitment to mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthu, Baptiste; Terrier, Olivier; Carron, Coralie; Traversier, Aurélien; Corbin, Antoine; Balvay, Laurent; Lina, Bruno; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2017-10-27

    The non-structural protein NS1 of influenza A viruses exerts pleiotropic functions during infection. Among these functions, NS1 was shown to be involved in the control of both viral and cellular translation; however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be determined. Thus, we have revisited the role of NS1 in translation by using a combination of influenza infection, mRNA reporter transfection, and in vitro functional and biochemical assays. Our data show that the NS1 protein is able to enhance the translation of virtually all tested mRNAs with the exception of constructs bearing the Dicistroviruses Internal ribosome entry segment (IRESes) (DCV and CrPV), suggesting a role at the level of translation initiation. The domain of NS1 required for translation stimulation was mapped to the RNA binding amino-terminal motif of the protein with residues R38 and K41 being critical for activity. Although we show that NS1 can bind directly to mRNAs, it does not correlate with its ability to stimulate translation. This activity rather relies on the property of NS1 to associate with ribosomes and to recruit them to target mRNAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mutation of candidate immunosuppressive domains of viral envelope proteins in order to generate hyperimmunogenic vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    , respiratorisk udbrud af monocyter og moduleringen af udtryk af cytokiner og chemokiner. Siden opdagelsen af retrovirale ISD’er er der blevet foreslået og bevist adskillige ISD’er i vira tilhørende andre virusfamilier, som f.eks. Ebola virus, influenza virus og severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS...... nosokomiel transmission. Den manglende effekt af især type 1 PRRSV vaccinen indikerer et behov for at forberede vacciner mod PRRSV og der er endnu ingen vaccine imod MERS coronavirus. Dog er der fornyeligt blevet rapporteret, at en Ebola vaccine har udvist 100% effektivitet, men i kapløbet mod de evigt...... udviklende patogener er vaccine forbedringer altid nødvendige. I denne afhandling bliver det demonstreret, at enkelte punkt mutationer af specifikke aminosyrer i de formodede ISD’er ikke ødelægger proteinernes funktion i cellekultur. Proteinernes funktion blev testet ved transduktion af vildtypevirus...

  20. Learning about Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Learning About Proteins KidsHealth / For Kids / Learning About Proteins What's in ... from the foods you eat. Different Kinds of Protein Protein from animal sources, such as meat and ...

  1. Modulation of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells by Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Through Interaction with the Porcine Intercellular-Adhesion-Molecule-3-Grabbing Nonintegrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeyro, Pablo E; Subramaniam, Sakthivel; Kenney, Scott P; Heffron, C Lynn; Giménez-Lirola, Luis G; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-12-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an economically important global swine pathogen. PRRSV infects porcine dendritic cells (DCs), but the effects of the interactions with DCs are largely unknown. Current research focuses on the production and regulation of interferons and selected inflammatory cytokines in DCs, which may play key roles in immune modulation. In addition, PRRSV also downregulates swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I), SLA-II, and CD80/86 costimulatory molecules in DCs. In this study, we aim to evaluate the PRRSV immunomodulatory effects on monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) through interactions with porcine DC-SIGN (pDC-SIGN) receptor. We demonstrated that blocking the PRRSV and pDC-SIGN interactions in MoDCs with recombinant hICAM-3 did not affect the regulatory effects of PRRSV on SLA-I, SLA-II, or CD80/86 molecules. The hICAM-3 did not affect the morphological changes on MoDCs associated with their activation and maturation after PRRSV infection, and did not impair the virus infectivity in these cells either. The mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-12p35, IL-1β, and IL-6 were upregulated after hICAM-3 treatment or PRRSV infection, but in the presence of the blockage of pDC-SIGN in MoDCs with hICAM-3, PRRSV did not modulate the expression of these genes. However, in the presence of an anti-pDC-SIGN monoclonal antibody (mAb), we showed that PRRSV infection significantly reduced the mRNA expression levels of TNF-α and IL-1α, but enhanced the expression of IL-12p35 in MoDCs. Both hICAM-3-Fc and pDC-SIGN mAb treatments did not modulate proinflammatory cytokine protein levels in the culture supernatants of PRRSV-infected MoDCs. The results indicate that blocking the PRRSV-pDC-SIGN interactions by recombinant hICAM-3-Fc did not significantly affect virus infectivity, DC maturation, and proinflammatory cytokine gene expression in infected MoDCs. However, blocking the PRRSV-pDC-SIGN interactions on MoDCs with

  2. INVESTIGATION OF IMMUNE PATHWAYS INVOLVED IN REGULATING RESPONSES TO PORCINE REPRODUCTIVE AND RESPIRATORY SYNDROME USING SWINE PROTEIN-ANNOTATED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) costs U.S. swine producers around $560 million annually. PRRS virus (PRRSV)-infected pigs are susceptible to pneumonia and reproductive losses; infected sows have increased rates of abortions, stillbirths, mummifications, and give birth to weak pi...

  3. Hepatitis C virus induces E6AP-dependent degradation of the retinoblastoma protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Munakata

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a positive-strand RNA virus that frequently causes persistent infections and is uniquely associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. While the mechanism(s by which the virus promotes cancer are poorly defined, previous studies indicate that the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B, forms a complex with the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb, targeting it for degradation, activating E2F-responsive promoters, and stimulating cellular proliferation. Here, we describe the mechanism underlying pRb regulation by HCV and its relevance to HCV infection. We show that the abundance of pRb is strongly downregulated, and its normal nuclear localization altered to include a major cytoplasmic component, following infection of cultured hepatoma cells with either genotype 1a or 2a HCV. We further demonstrate that this is due to NS5B-dependent ubiquitination of pRb and its subsequent degradation via the proteasome. The NS5B-dependent ubiquitination of pRb requires the ubiquitin ligase activity of E6-associated protein (E6AP, as pRb abundance was restored by siRNA knockdown of E6AP or overexpression of a dominant-negative E6AP mutant in cells containing HCV RNA replicons. E6AP also forms a complex with pRb in an NS5B-dependent manner. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for the regulation of pRb in which the HCV NS5B protein traps pRb in the cytoplasm, and subsequently recruits E6AP to this complex in a process that leads to the ubiquitination of pRb. The disruption of pRb/E2F regulatory pathways in cells infected with HCV is likely to promote hepatocellular proliferation and chromosomal instability, factors important for the development of liver cancer.

  4. Silencing of the rotavirus NSP4 protein decreases the incidence of biliary atresia in murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiexiong Feng

    Full Text Available Biliary atresia is a common disease in neonates which causes obstructive jaundice and progressive hepatic fibrosis. Our previous studies indicate that rotavirus infection is an initiator in the pathogenesis of experimental biliary atresia (BA through the induction of increased nuclear factor-kappaB and abnormal activation of the osteopontin inflammation pathway. In the setting of rotavirus infection, rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4 serves as an important immunogen, viral protein 7 (VP7 is necessary in rotavirus maturity and viral protein 4 (VP4 is a virulence determiner. The purpose of the current study is to clarify the roles of NSP4, VP7 and VP4 in the pathogenesis of experimental BA. Primary cultured extrahepatic biliary epithelia were infected with Rotavirus (mmu18006. Small interfering RNA targeting NSP4, VP7 or VP4 was transfected before rotavirus infection both in vitro and in vivo. We analyzed the incidence of BA, morphological change, morphogenesis of viral particles and viral mRNA and protein expression. The in vitro experiments showed NSP4 silencing decreased the levels of VP7 and VP4, reduced viral particles and decreased cytopathic effect. NSP4-positive cells had strongly positive expression of integrin subunit α2. Silencing of VP7 or VP4 partially decreased epithelial injury. Animal experiments indicated after NSP4 silencing, mouse pups had lower incidence of BA than after VP7 or VP4 silencing. However, 33.3% of VP4-silenced pups (N = 6 suffered BA and 50% of pups (N = 6 suffered biliary injury after VP7 silencing. Hepatic injury was decreased after NSP4 or VP4 silencing. Neither VP4 nor VP7 were detected in the biliary ducts after NSP4. All together, NSP4 silencing down-regulates VP7 and VP4, resulting in decreased incidence of BA.

  5. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine is a matrix scavenger chaperone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Chlenski

    Full Text Available Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC is one of the major non-structural proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM in remodeling tissues. The functional significance of SPARC is emphasized by its origin in the first multicellular organisms and its high degree of evolutionary conservation. Although SPARC has been shown to act as a critical modulator of ECM remodeling with profound effects on tissue physiology and architecture, no plausible molecular mechanism of its action has been proposed. In the present study, we demonstrate that SPARC mediates the disassembly and degradation of ECM networks by functioning as a matricellular chaperone. While it has low affinity to its targets inside the cells where the Ca(2+ concentrations are low, high extracellular concentrations of Ca(2+ activate binding to multiple ECM proteins, including collagens. We demonstrated that in vitro, this leads to the inhibition of collagen I fibrillogenesis and disassembly of pre-formed collagen I fibrils by SPARC at high Ca(2+ concentrations. In cell culture, exogenous SPARC was internalized by the fibroblast cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pulse-chase assay further revealed that internalized SPARC is quickly released outside the cell, demonstrating that SPARC shuttles between the cell and EC