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Sample records for proximal amputation level

  1. Distraction lengthening of the proximal phalanx in distal thumb amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansü, Eren; Ünal, Mehmet Bekir; Parmaksızoğlu, Fatih; Gürcan, Serkan

    2015-01-01

    Thumb amputation is a major cause of hand dysfunction, and the treatment for distal thumb amputations remains controversial. Although finger reconstruction methods using distraction lengthening are known to restore finger length and function, we found no reports in the literature regarding phalangeal lengthening in thumb amputations. We aimed to evaluate proximal phalangeal lengthening in thumb amputations at or near the interphalangeal (IP) joint. We retrospectively evaluated patients who had undergone distraction lengthening of the proximal phalanx of the thumb. All patients underwent osteotomy, either during the initial procedure or as a second-stage procedure. Distraction began 10 days after osteotomy with the use of an external fixator that remained in place until ossification of the gap occurred without bone grafting. Patients were evaluated using the QuickDASH score. Fourteen patients with a mean age of 27 years and a mean follow-up period of 7 years were enrolled. The mean phalangeal lengthening achieved was 20 mm. Ossification occurred at all distraction sites, and the fixators were maintained for a mean of 85 days. The mean healing index was 42.5 days/cm. All 14 patients achieved the desired amount of phalangeal lengthening without major complications such as nonunion, premature union, or gross infection. For reconstruction in cases of distal thumb amputations, distraction lengthening of the proximal phalanx can be used to improve absolute length, web space, and grip distance. The technique is safe and effective, improves functionality/cosmesis, and offers a low complication risk.

  2. Proximal femoral focal deficiency: results of rotationplasty and Syme amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alman, B A; Krajbich, J I; Hubbard, S

    1995-12-01

    We reviewed the results of treatment of sixteen patients who had had an isolated unilateral proximal femoral focal deficiency; nine were managed with a rotationplasty and seven, with a Syme amputation combined with an arthrodesis of the knee. We evaluated the perceived physical appearance, gross motor function, and metabolic energy expended in walking. The mean duration of follow-up was 9.9 years (range, four to fourteen years). The mean age of the patients at the time of the study was 13.9 years (range, eight to 18.4 years) in the rotationplasty group and 14.8 years (range, 9.5 to 19.9 years) in the Syme-amputation group. There were three female patients in each group. Roentgenograms showed that the femoral head was in the acetabulum (Aitken class A or B) in four of the seven patients in the Syme-amputation group and in five of the nine patients in the rotationplasty group; the remaining patients did not have this finding (Aitken class C or D). There was no difference in gross motor function or perceived physical appearance between the groups. Rotationplasty was associated with a more energy-efficient gait (mean, 0.153 milliliter of oxygen per kilogram-meter [range, 0.128 to 0.173 milliliter of oxygen per kilogram-meter] than was Syme amputation (mean, 0.169 milliliter of oxygen per kilogram-meter [range, 0.151 to 0.182 milliliter of oxygen per kilogram-meter]). Both types of treatment resulted in a net oxygen utilization per distance (efficiency) that was less than the values reported after amputations performed for non-congenital disorders.

  3. Phalangeal regrowth in rodents: postamputational bone regrowth depends upon the level of amputation.

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    Neufeld, D A; Zhao, W

    1993-01-01

    Conflicting reports of distal phalangeal regrowth prompted a reexamination of bone growth following phalangeal amputation in mammals. Digits of neonatal and adult mice and rats were amputated at various levels. The short-term response was examined on histological sections, and long-term growth was documented by alizarin red-staining of KOH-digested digits. Three patterns of response were seen to correspond to three general levels of amputation. Complete bone regeneration occurred frequently by five weeks following amputation through the distal one-quarter of the distal phalanx. Amputation through the central region of the distal phalanx yielded substantial bone growth, but the form of the regrowth was imperfect even three months after amputation. Amputation through more proximal levels of the digit yielded no significant elongation. To investigate why the response varies in relation to the level of amputation, we are conducting both in vivo and in vitro experiments. We have learned that simple avulsion of the nail plate provokes substantial remodeling of the distal phalanx. We are further exploring the trophic influence of nail organ on bone structure and growth in vivo. We have also recently determined that entire digits may be kept alive in vitro when cultured in DMEM:F-12:BGJb medium supplemented with insulin, EGF and FGF. This system sufficiently replicates in vivo conditions such that osteogenesis occurs both endosteally and distal to the amputation plane in vitro. The effects of growth factors, retinoic acid, and the presence or absence of nail organ components on amputational bone growth at all three levels are currently being studied in vitro. The goal of these studies is to determine why bone fails to grow, undergoes hyperplasia, or regenerates following amputation at different levels in mammals.

  4. Yubitsume: ritualistic self-amputation of proximal digits among the Yakuza.

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    Bosmia, Anand N; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-07-01

    Yubitsume is the ritualistic self-amputation of the proximal digits at the distal interphalangeal joint (DIP) among members of the Japanese Mafia, or Yakuza. This practice of self-mutilation is done as a sign of apology for making a mistake deemed punishable by higher-ranking members or violating the code of the Yakuza. Members of the Yakuza may present to emergency departments seeking medical assistance to stop hemorrhage or treat infection at the site of injury following self-amputation or to have the severed portion of the injured finger reattached. .© 2014 KUMS, All rights reserved.

  5. Estimation of amputation level with a laser Doppler flowmeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Jørgensen, J P; Vollmer-Larsen, B

    1989-01-01

    Leg amputation levels were decided in 24 patients suffering from atherosclerosis, using the conventional techniques of segmental blood pressure and radioisotope skin clearance. The skin microcirculation was measured and recorded before operation with a laser doppler flowmeter. A high correlation...... was found between the successful amputation levels and the maximal blood perfusion of the skin measured in this way....

  6. Indications Level and Outcome of Lower Extremity Amputations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To highlight the indication, level of amputation and the problem associated with lower extremity amputations including rehabilitation in this environment and compare them with results from other centers. The setting is Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, and Holy Cross Hospital Nnewi. Hospital records of ...

  7. Proximal major limb amputations – a retrospective analysis of 45 oncological cases

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    Goertz Ole

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proximal major limb amputations due to malignant tumors have become rare but are still a valuable treatment option in palliation and in some cases can even cure. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse outcome in those patients, including the postoperative course, survival, pain, quality of life, and prosthesis usage. Methods Data of 45 consecutive patients was acquired from patient's charts and contact to patients, and general practitioners. Patients with interscapulothoracic amputation (n = 14, shoulder disarticulation (n = 13, hemipelvectomy (n = 3 or hip disarticulation (n = 15 were included. Results The rate of proximal major limb amputations in patients treated for sarcoma was 2.3% (37 out of 1597. Survival for all patients was 42.9% after one year and 12.7% after five years. Survival was significantly better in patients with complete tumor resections. Postoperative chemotherapy and radiation did not prolong survival. Eighteen percent of the patients with malignant disease developed local recurrence. In 44%, postoperative complications were observed. Different modalities of postoperative pain management and the site of the amputation had no significant influence on long-term pain assessment and quality of life. Eighty-seven percent suffered from phantom pain, 15.6% considered their quality of life worse than before the operation. Thirty-two percent of the patients who received a prosthesis used it regularly. Conclusion Proximal major limb amputations severely interfere with patients' body function and are the last, albeit valuable, option within the treatment concept of extremity malignancies or severe infections. Besides short survival, high complication rates, and postoperative pain, patients' quality of life can be improved for the time they have remaining.

  8. The impact of gender, level of amputation and diabetes on prosthetic fit rates following major lower extremity amputation.

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    Davie-Smith, Fiona; Paul, Lorna; Nicholls, Natalie; Stuart, Wesley P; Kennon, Brian

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a leading cause of major lower extremity amputation. To examine the influence of gender, level of amputation and diabetes mellitus status on being fit with a prosthetic limb following lower extremity amputation for peripheral arterial disease. Retrospective analysis of the Scottish Physiotherapy Amputee Research Group dataset. Within the cohort with peripheral arterial disease ( n = 1735), 64% were men ( n = 1112) and 48% ( n = 834) had diabetes mellitus. Those with diabetes mellitus were younger than those without: mean 67.5 and 71.1 years, respectively ( p amputation:trans-femoral amputation ratio was 2.33 in those with diabetes mellitus, and 0.93 in those without. A total of 41% of those with diabetes mellitus were successfully fit with a prosthetic limb compared to 38% of those without diabetes mellitus. Male gender positively predicted fitting with a prosthetic limb at both trans-tibial amputation ( p = 0.001) and trans-femoral amputation ( p = 0.001) levels. Bilateral amputations and increasing age were negative predictors of fitting with a prosthetic limb ( p amputation level ( p amputation was at trans-femoral amputation level. Of those with lower extremity amputation as a result of peripheral arterial disease, those with diabetes mellitus were younger, and more had trans-tibial amputation. Although both age and amputation level are good predictors of fitting with a prosthetic limb, successful limb fit rates were no better than those without diabetes mellitus. Clinical relevance This is of clinical relevance to those who are involved in the decision-making process of prosthetic fitting following major amputation for dysvascular and diabetes aetiologies.

  9. While Mortality Rates Differ After Dysvascular Partial Foot and Transtibial Amputation, Should They Influence the Choice of Amputation Level?

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    Dillon, Michael; Fatone, Stefania; Quigley, Matthew

    2017-09-01

    Although there is strong evidence to show that the risk of dying after transtibial amputation is higher than partial foot amputation, we are concerned by the implication that amputation level influences mortality, and that such interpretations of the evidence may be used to inform decisions about the choice of amputation level. We argue that the choice of partial foot or transtibial amputation does not influence the risk of mortality. The highest mortality rates are observed in studies with older people with more advanced systemic disease and multiple comorbidities. Studies that control for the confounding influence of these factors have shown no differences in mortality rates by amputation level. These insights have important implications in terms of how we help inform difficult decisions about amputation at either the partial foot or transtibial level, given a more thoughtful interpretation of the published mortality rates. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Estimation of amputation level with a laser Doppler flowmeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Jørgensen, J P; Vollmer-Larsen, B

    1989-01-01

    Leg amputation levels were decided in 24 patients suffering from atherosclerosis, using the conventional techniques of segmental blood pressure and radioisotope skin clearance. The skin microcirculation was measured and recorded before operation with a laser doppler flowmeter. A high correlation...

  11. Level selection in leg amputation for arterial occlusive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P

    1982-01-01

    measurements of the skin perfusion pressure (SPP). Out of 62 BK amputations with an SPP above 30 mmHg wound healing failed in only 2 cases (3 per cent). Out of 13 BK amputations with an SPP between 20 and 30 mmHg 7 cases (54 per cent) failed and out of 9 BK amputations with an SPP below 20 mmHg no less than 8......In 102 leg amputations for arterial occlusion including 84 below-knee (BK), 16 above-knee (AD) and 2 through-knee (TK) amputations, the amputation level was determined by means of clinical criteria. The healing results and the selection of levels were then compared with sealed preoperative...... cases (89 per cent) failed to heal. The difference in failure rate is significant (P less than 0.0001). Out of the 15 failed BK amputations at low pressures (below 30 mmHg) only one case had local signs of ischaemia, which might have warned the surgeons. On the other hand, in 13 out of the 18 cases...

  12. A proximal femur aneurysmal bone cyst resulting in amputation: a rare case report.

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    Khodamorad Jamshidi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC is blood filled expansile cystic lesion that most commonly occurs in patients during the second decade of their lives. Traditionally it has been described as a benign lesion but can be locally aggressive and result in the destruction of the involved bone. Treatment methods include surgical excision and curettage with or without bone grafting. We report a proximal femur aneurysmal bone cyst, which resulted in the amputation of the lower extremity, even though all available classic methods of treatment were applied for it.

  13. Reconstruction of combined thumb amputation at the metacarpal base level and index amputation at the metacarpal level with pollicization and bilateral double toe composite transfer.

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    Chi, Zhenglin; Song, Da Jiang; Tian, Lin; Hu, Fu Hua; Shen, Xiao Fang; Chim, Harvey

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to describe the technique and report our experience with the reconstruction of combined proximal thumb amputations at the metacarpal base level and index finger amputation at the metacarpal level with pollicization and bilateral double toe composite transfer. The technique consists of pollicization of the remnant index ray. Then a contralateral composite medial great toe pulp and vascularized second toe proximal interphalangeal joint flap are harvested to reconstruct the metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb. Subsequently, an ipsilateral composite great toe wrap-around and second toe proximal interphalangeal joint flap are harvested to reconstruct the thumb interphalangeal joint and the distal thumb. A neurotized superthin anterolateral thigh flap is used to reconstruct the ipsilateral toe defect, while the bone defects of the bilateral second toes are reconstructed with corticocancellous iliac crest bone grafts. Between 2010 and 2014, eight patients underwent reconstruction. Four patients could be recalled for follow-up, with a mean duration of 22 months. All flaps survived. The contour and length of the reconstructed thumbs was similar to the contralateral one. The mean Michigan hand outcomes questionnaire score was 80.5. The mean disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand score was 7.5. The mean foot and ankle disability index score was 94.2. Reconstruction of thumb amputations at the metacarpal base level with pollicization and double toe composite transfer results in excellent contour and functional outcome, with a natural-appearing thumb. In addition, all toes are preserved. Therapeutic, Level IV. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reverse Anterolateral Thigh Flap to Revise a Below-knee Amputation Stump at the Mid-tibial Level

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    Parviz Lionel Sadigh, MB ChB

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The reconstruction of defects around the knee often poses a challenge due to the limited availability of local soft tissues. Indeed, this same problem is encountered when attempting to revise a below-knee amputation stump. Moreover, due to a paucity of recipient vessels in those who have undergone previous amputation secondary to trauma, free-flap reconstruction is often challenging and not always successful. We report a case of a reverse anterolateral thigh (ALT flap used to revise a long below-knee amputation stump. Previous reports in the literature attest to the versatility of the reverse ALT to cover defects around the knee and proximal tibia, but to our knowledge, this is the first report of a reverse ALT reaching to the mid-tibial level.

  15. Impact of Amputation Level and Comorbidities on Functional Status of Nursing Home Residents Following Lower Extremity Amputation

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    Vogel, Todd R.; Petroski, Gregory F.; Kruse, Robin L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Nursing home residents’ ability to independently function is associated with their quality of life. The impact of amputations on functional status in this population remains unclear. This analysis evaluated the effect of amputations—Transmetatarsal (TMA), Below-knee (BK), and Above-knee (AK)—on residents’ ability to perform self-care activities. METHODS: Medicare inpatient claims were linked with nursing home assessment data to identify admissions for amputation. The MDS ADL-Long form score (0-28; higher indicating greater impairment), based on seven activities of daily living, was calculated before and after amputation. Hierarchical modeling determined the effect of the surgery on residents’ post-amputation function. Controlling for comorbidity, cognition, and pre-hospital function allowed for evaluation of activities of daily living (ADL) trajectories over time. RESULTS: 4965 residents underwent amputation: 490 TMA, 1596 BK and 2879 AK. Mean age was 81 and 54% of the patients were women. Most were White (67%) or African-American (26.5%). Comorbidities prior to amputation included diabetes (DM, 70.7%), coronary heart disease (57.1%), chronic kidney disease (53.6%), and/or congestive heart failure (CHF, 52.1%). Mortality within 30 days of hospital discharge was 9.0% and hospital readmission was 27.7%. Stroke, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and poor baseline cognitive function were associated with the poorest functional outcome after amputation. Compared with residents who received TMA, those who had BK or AK recovered more slowly and failed to return to baseline function by six months. BK was found to have a superior functional trajectory compared with AK. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly nursing home residents undergoing BK or AK amputation failed to return to their functional baseline within six month. Among frail elderly nursing home residents, higher amputation level, stroke, ESRD, poor baseline cognitive scores, and female gender were associated

  16. Elective proximal lower limb amputation in spinal cord injury patients with chronic pressure ulcers: improve quality of life, function, and shorten hospital stay. Case report.

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    Yusmido, Y A; Hisamud-Din, N; Mazlan, M

    2014-10-01

    Pressure ulcers are common among patients with spinal cord injury and can be very challenging to treat. The treatment involves multidisciplinary approach and ranges from simple pressure relieve and wound dressings to a more radical treatment like proximal lower limb amputations, especially in chronic cases with potential detrimental effects to physical and mental health. To report the outcome of three spinal cord injury patients with a history of chronic pressure ulcers who underwent elective proximal lower limb amputations. We reviewed three patients; patient 1 with bilateral hip disarticulation, patient 2 with left hip disarticulation and right transfemoral amputation and patient 3 with bilateral transfemoral amputation. The clinical impact and functional outcome of the patients were reviewed by comparing the length of hospital stay, the short version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL- BREF) score and the Spinal Cord Independence Measures (SCIM) score before and after amputation. After amputation, all patients have marked reduction in hospital stay (mean reduction of 208 days), improvement in WHOQOL-BREF scores(mean increment of 14.68 scores) and minimal improvement in SCIM scores (mean increment of 3 scores) compared to before amputation. Proximal amputations of the lower limbs are procedures that can be considered as part of the treatment for complicated pressure ulcers. In properly selected patients, it can reduce the number of hospital stay, improve the quality of life and functional outcome.

  17. [Transtibial amputation].

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    Baumgartner, R

    2011-10-01

    To make a transtibial stump as long as possible, free from local and phantom pain with a maximum of terminal load bearing. In order to preserve the knee joint, an ultra-short tibial stump of 5-6 cm may be indicated. A hindfoot amputation level is not possible to achieve. In amputations for peripheral vascular diseases, amputations through the distal third of the tibia are not recommended. If they still heal, the level selection might have been too proximal. According to Verduyn and Burgess, a long posterior muscular flap covering the stump is attached ventrally to a short anterior flap. Modifications: fibular bone bridge (Guedes), resection of the soleus muscle (Baumgartner), Myodesis (Bowker), and Brückner's procedure. Alternative: rotation plasty according to Borggreve-van Nes-Winkelmann. Special diagonal elastic bandaging over the knee that must be changed daily. Early prosthetic fitting (in general after 4-6 weeks) after wound has healed. Physical therapy: gait training with 2 crutches or parallel bars with or without an inflatable "prosthesis". Isometric training of the quadriceps. A stump requires several months until it has achieved its final form. During this time, the prosthesis must be adjusted accordingly. Modifications in the home, workplace, and automobile must be made. Sport for the disabled! In order to preserve a maximum of stump length, wound healing problems are to be taken into consideration, requiring surgery and sometimes even reamputation through or above the knee joint. If it is possible to preserve the knee joint, the rehabilitation results, even with an ultra-short transtibial stump, are far superior to any more proximal amputation level.

  18. Prevalence, Indications, Levels and Outcome Limb amputations at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Amputation is one of the oldest surgical procedures with artificial limbs identified from over 2000 years ago. Amputation is still often viewed as a failure of treatment but can be the treatment of choice and life saving procedure for severe trauma, vascular disease and tumors. The aim of this study was to ...

  19. Association between phantom limb complex and the level of amputation in lower limb amputee.

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    Kelle, Bayram; Kozanoğlu, Erkan; Biçer, Ömer Sunkar; Tan, İsmet

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the natural course of phantom limb complex without any treatment after lower limb amputation. The study design was consisted of a combination of retrospective review and cross-sectional interview. 101 patients with lower limb amputation were included into the study. Patients were divided into three groups according to the amputation level: i) from hip disarticulation to knee disarticulation (including knee disarticulation) (25 patients, mean age: 55.9, 19 males, 6 females) ii) transtibial amputation (below knee to ankle including ankle disarticulation) (41 patients, mean age: 58.6, 33 males, 8 females) iii) below ankle to toe amputation (35 patients, mean age: 58.7, 26 males, 9 females). The patients were evaluated on both early postoperative period (EPP) and sixth months after the surgery (ASM). The data related amputation including amputation date, level, cause, stump pain (SP), phantom limb pain (PLP), components of PLP, phantom sensation (PS) were recorded based on the information obtained from patients' and hospital files. Statistically significant differences were found for pain intensity (VAS) between groups for SP and PLP at EPP (p < 0.001, p = 0.036; respectively). The mean VAS score in Group I for SP and PLP was higher than other groups. This differences for SP and PLP did not continue at ASM assessment (p = 0.242, p = 0.580; respectively). VAS scores for SP in above knee amputations and VAS scores for PLP in above knee amputations and below ankle amputations were higher at EPP. But these high scores had disappeared over time. Management strategies have to be considered particularly in the early postoperative period in patients who had undergone above knee amputation. Level III Prognostic study. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Prognosis of critical limb ischemia: Major vs. minor amputation comparison.

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    Matsuzaki, Kyoichi; Hayashi, Ruka; Okabe, Keisuke; Aramaki-Hattori, Noriko; Kishi, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    Healthcare providers treating wounds have difficulties assessing the prognosis of patients with critical limb ischemia who had been discharged after complete healing of major amputation wounds. The word "major" in "major amputation" gives the impression of "being more severe" than "minor amputation." Therefore, even if wounds are healed after major amputation, they imagine that prognosis after major amputation would be poorer than that after minor amputation. We investigated the prognosis of diabetic nephropathy patients 2 years after amputations. Those patients underwent dialysis as well as amputation following percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for their foot wounds. They were ambulatory prior to these surgeries. Among 56 cases of minor amputation, 45 were males and 11 were females, and mortality was 41.1%. The mortality of cases with and without a coronary intervention history was 53.1% and 25.0%, respectively (p = 0.034). Among 10 cases of major amputation, 9 were males and 1 was female, and mortality was 60%. The mortality of cases with and without a coronary intervention history was 75.0% and 0%, respectively. Although we predicted poor prognosis in cases with major amputation, there was no significant difference in mortality 2 years after amputations (p = 0.267). Thus far poor prognosis has been reported for major amputation. It might be due to inclusion of the following patients: patients with wounds proximal to ankle joints, patients with extensive gangrene spreading to the lower legs, patients with septicemia from wound infection and who died around the time of operation, and patients with malnutrition. The results of our present study showed that the outcomes at 2 years postoperatively were similar between patients with major amputations and those with minor amputations, if surgical wounds were able to heal. We should not estimate the prognosis by the level of amputation, rather we should consider the effect of coronary intervention history on

  1. Proximate composition and levels of some toxicants in four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proximate composition and levels of some toxicants (anti-nutrients) in four commonly consumed spices were investigated. The spices were garlic (Allium sativum), ginger (Zingiber officinale), onion (Allium cepa var. cepa), and Piper guineense seeds (Ashanti pepper). Proximate analyses showed the spices to contain (on ...

  2. Incidence of re-amputation following partial first ray amputation associated with diabetes mellitus and peripheral sensory neuropathy: a systematic review.

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    Sara L. Borkosky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus with peripheral sensory neuropathy frequently results in forefoot ulceration. Ulceration at the first ray level tends to be recalcitrant to local wound care modalities and off-loading techniques. If healing does occur, ulcer recurrence is common. When infection develops, partial first ray amputation in an effort to preserve maximum foot length is often performed. However, the survivorship of partial first ray amputations in this patient population and associated re-amputation rate remain unknown. Therefore, in an effort to determine the actual re-amputation rate following any form of partial first ray amputation in patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy, the authors conducted a systematic review. Only studies involving any form of partial first ray amputation associated with diabetes mellitus and peripheral sensory neuropathy but without critical limb ischemia were included. Our search yielded a total of 24 references with 5 (20.8% meeting our inclusion criteria involving 435 partial first ray amputations. The weighted mean age of patients was 59 years and the weighted mean follow-up was 26 months. The initial amputation level included the proximal phalanx base 167 (38.4% times; first metatarsal head resection 96 (22.1% times; first metatarsal-phalangeal joint disarticulation 53 (12.2% times; first metatarsal mid-shaft 39 (9% times; hallux fillet flap 32 (7.4% times; first metatarsal base 29 (6.7% times; and partial hallux 19 (4.4% times. The incidence of re-amputation was 19.8% (86/435. The end stage, most proximal level, following re-amputation was an additional digit 32 (37.2% times; transmetatarsal 28 (32.6% times; below-knee 25 (29.1% times; and LisFranc 1 (1.2% time. The results of our systematic review reveal that one out of every five patients undergoing any version of a partial first ray amputation will eventually require more proximal re-amputation. These results reveal that partial first ray

  3. Preoperative determination of the level of amputation in chronic arterial occlusion. 2. /sup 133/Xe muscle clearance

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    Geissler, U.; Brueckner, L. (Karl-Marx-Universitaet, Leipzig (German Democratic Republic))

    1985-10-01

    Two quantitative methods of blood flow measuring, venous occlusion plethysmography and /sup 133/Xe muscle clearance, were compared with regard to their suitability in determining the level of amputation preoperatively. The examinations were performed in 38 patients and 20 healthy control subjects. In differentiation between stump healing and distinctive disturbances of wound healing after lower leg amputation the best results could be obtained by the /sup 133/Xe clearance test (p < 0.05), followed by /sup 133/Xe clearance ischemia test and venous occlusion plethysmography. Blood flow measurements are in connection with clinical data auxiliaries in determining the level of amputation. Their application as absolute determinants seems to be not sensible. Considerable scattering of the measured values reduces the usefulness of the two methods.

  4. Successful microsurgical replantation of an amputated penis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchit Garg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile amputation is an uncommon injury for which immediate surgical replantation is warranted. Microsurgical replantation is the “standard” method for penile replantation. Early replantation yields a high success and low complication rate. We report a case of a 34-year-old male who presented with amputation at the proximal penile shaft which was successfully replanted using microsurgical techniques. Minor skin necrosis was noted post-operatively which was debrided and covered with skin graft. Follow-up at 6 months showed satisfactory cosmetic appearance, normal voiding, return of sensations and erectile function. The level of evidence was V.

  5. How Depressive Levels Are Related to the Adults' Experiences of Lower-Limb Amputation: A Mixed Methods Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senra, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    The current pilot study aims to explore whether different adults' experiences of lower-limb amputation could be associated with different levels of depression. To achieve these study objectives, a convergent parallel mixed methods design was used in a convenience sample of 42 adult amputees (mean age of 61 years; SD = 13.5). All of them had…

  6. Amputation - traumatic

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    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000006.htm Amputation - traumatic To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Traumatic amputation is the loss of a body part, usually ...

  7. Levels and proximate determinants of fertility in Butajira District ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    and child health services in Ethiopia were one of the main aims of the health extension program. The impediment of ... Objectives: This study aimed at measuring levels and fertility inhibition effects of proximate determinants in Butajira district. Methods: A ... its link to the success of reproductive health programs and policies ...

  8. Levels and proximate determinants of fertility in Butajira District ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impediment of early marriage was revised in the national family code which claims assessment of fertility situations. Objectives: This study aimed at measuring levels and fertility inhibition effects of proximate determinants in Butajira district. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on resident women of ...

  9. Is hip muscle strength the key to walking as a bilateral amputee, whatever the level of the amputations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Jma; McCarthy, I; Marks, L; Davis, R C

    2011-12-01

    Little data have been reported on the factors that are important in bilateral amputee walking ability especially the role of hip strength. Observational, case-control study where participants were evaluated at a single point in time. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors involved in bilateral amputee walking ability by assessment of walking speed, perceived exertion, exercise intensity, physiological cost index (PCI) and hip muscle strength. For a group of 10 bilateral amputees, with different levels of amputation, and a non-pathological reference group, walking ability was assessed using the two-minute walk test. Hip muscle strength was assessed using isokinetic strength tests. Bilateral amputees were found to have slower walking speeds and increased PCI of walking which were correlated to higher levels of amputation. Peak hip torques were reduced in the amputees, which was only significant for concentric extension torque (p = 0.029), and approaching significance for concentric flexion (p = 0.061) and abduction (p = 0.057). Bilateral amputee peak hip strength suggested a positive trend with increasing walking ability. Bilateral amputee walking ability was reduced and mainly related to level of amputation. The role of hip strength in bilateral amputee walking ability requires further investigation.

  10. Persons with unilateral transfemoral amputation experience larger spinal loads during level-ground walking compared to able-bodied individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, Iman; Hendershot, Brad D.; Wolf, Erik J.; Bazrgari, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Background Persons with lower limb amputation walk with increased and asymmetric trunk motion; a characteristic that is likely to impose distinct demands on trunk muscles to maintain equilibrium and stability of the spine. However, trunk muscle responses to such changes in net mechanical demands, and the resultant effects on spinal loads, have yet to be determined in this population. Methods Building on a prior study, trunk and pelvic kinematics collected during level-ground walking from 40 males (20 with unilateral transfemoral amputation and 20 matched controls) were used as inputs to a kinematics-driven, nonlinear finite element model of the lower back to estimate forces in 10 global (attached to thorax) and 46 local (attached to lumbar vertebrae) trunk muscles, as well as compression, lateral, and antero-posterior shear forces at all spinal levels. Findings Trunk muscle force and spinal load maxima corresponded with heel strike and toe off events, and among persons with amputation, were respectively 10–40% and 17–95% larger during intact vs. prosthetic stance, as well as 6–80% and 26–60% larger during intact stance relative to controls. Interpretation During gait, larger spinal loads with transfemoral amputation appear to be the result of a complex pattern of trunk muscle recruitment, particularly involving co-activation of antagonistic muscles during intact limb stance; a period when these individuals are confident and likely to use the trunk to assist with forward progression. Given the repetitive nature of walking, repeated exposure to such elevated loading likely increases the risk for low back pain in this population. PMID:26682630

  11. Predict the Medicare Functional Classification Level (K-level) using the Amputee Mobility Predictor in people with unilateral transfemoral and transtibial amputation: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Michael P; Major, Matthew J; Kaluf, Brian; Balasanov, Yuri; Fatone, Stefania

    2017-05-01

    While Amputee Mobility Predictor scores differ between Medicare Functional Classification Levels (K-level), this does not demonstrate that the Amputee Mobility Predictor can accurately predict K-level. To determine how accurately K-level could be predicted using the Amputee Mobility Predictor in combination with patient characteristics for persons with transtibial and transfemoral amputation. Prediction. A cumulative odds ordinal logistic regression was built to determine the effect that the Amputee Mobility Predictor, in combination with patient characteristics, had on the odds of being assigned to a particular K-level in 198 people with transtibial or transfemoral amputation. For people assigned to the K2 or K3 level by their clinician, the Amputee Mobility Predictor predicted the clinician-assigned K-level more than 80% of the time. For people assigned to the K1 or K4 level by their clinician, the prediction of clinician-assigned K-level was less accurate. The odds of being in a higher K-level improved with younger age and transfemoral amputation. Ordinal logistic regression can be used to predict the odds of being assigned to a particular K-level using the Amputee Mobility Predictor and patient characteristics. This pilot study highlighted critical method design issues, such as potential predictor variables and sample size requirements for future prospective research. Clinical relevance This pilot study demonstrated that the odds of being assigned a particular K-level could be predicted using the Amputee Mobility Predictor score and patient characteristics. While the model seemed sufficiently accurate to predict clinician assignment to the K2 or K3 level, further work is needed in larger and more representative samples, particularly for people with low (K1) and high (K4) levels of mobility, to be confident in the model's predictive value prior to use in clinical practice.

  12. Lower extremity amputations: factors associated with mortality or contralateral amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Samir K; Bena, James F; Allemang, Matthew T; Kelso, Rebecca; Clair, Daniel G; Vargas, Lina; Kashyap, Vikram S

    2013-11-01

    Tissue loss or gangrene in the setting of lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) may result in amputation. Previous studies have demonstrated elevated mortality rates after major transtibial and transfemoral amputation. Also, amputation of 1 leg may be associated with subsequent major amputation of the contralateral leg. The aim of our study was to identify patient variables associated with mortality and contralateral amputation. We reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent transfemoral or transtibial amputation secondary to PAD from 2004 to 2009. A total of 454 consecutive major amputations were performed on 391 patients, with 63 of these having a subsequent contralateral amputation. Standard demographic information, comorbidities, prior vascular interventions, and relevant procedural information were extracted from patient records. Kaplan-Meier estimates of survival were calculated. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the risk of death and contralateral amputation. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were fit for all variables shown to be marginally associated in the univariate model. In 391 amputees, the mean age was 67.3 years, 63% were male and 62% were caucasian. Patients had high rates of diabetes (63%), hypertension (83%), renal insufficiency (35%), hyperlipidemia (51%), and prior ipsilateral vascular intervention (75%). Seventy percent of patients had below-knee amputations. Perioperative mortality was 9.2% (n = 36). Survival at 12 and 24 months was 70% (95% confidence interval [CI], 65%-74%) and 60% (95% CI, 55%-65%), respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that several independent factors were detrimental to survival including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (hazard ratio [HR] 1.82, P = .002), dialysis dependence (HR 2.50, P amputation (HR 2.49, P = .004). Dialysis (HR 2.42, P = .002) and revision of the index ipsilateral amputation to a higher level (HR 2.02, P = .014) were associated with a

  13. The theoretical simulation on electrostatic distribution of 1st proximity region in proximity focusing low-light-level image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liandong; Bai, Xiaofeng; Song, De; Fu, Shencheng; Li, Ye; Duanmu, Qingduo

    2015-03-01

    Low-light-level night vision technology is magnifying low light level signal large enough to be seen by naked eye, which uses the photons - photoelectron as information carrier. Until the micro-channel plate was invented, it has been possibility for the realization of high performance and miniaturization of low-light-level night vision device. The device is double-proximity focusing low-light-level image intensifier which places a micro-channel plate close to photocathode and phosphor screen. The advantages of proximity focusing low-light-level night vision are small size, light weight, small power consumption, no distortion, fast response speed, wide dynamic range and so on. It is placed parallel to each other for Micro-channel plate (both sides of it with metal electrode), the photocathode and the phosphor screen are placed parallel to each other. The voltage is applied between photocathode and the input of micro-channel plate when image intensifier works. The emission electron excited by photo on the photocathode move towards to micro-channel plate under the electric field in 1st proximity focusing region, and then it is multiplied through the micro-channel. The movement locus of emission electrons can be calculated and simulated when the distributions of electrostatic field equipotential lines are determined in the 1st proximity focusing region. Furthermore the resolution of image tube can be determined. However the distributions of electrostatic fields and equipotential lines are complex due to a lot of micro-channel existing in the micro channel plate. This paper simulates electrostatic distribution of 1st proximity region in double-proximity focusing low-light-level image intensifier with the finite element simulation analysis software Ansoft maxwell 3D. The electrostatic field distributions of 1st proximity region are compared when the micro-channel plates' pore size, spacing and inclination angle ranged. We believe that the electron beam movement

  14. Amputation Osteoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoster, Thomas A; Homedan, Shehada

    2006-01-01

    Amputation osteoplasty is a technique modification promoted by Ertl to enhance rehabilitation after transtibial amputation. Two different techniques for creating sealing of the medullary canal and a distal bone block have been described in the literature. One technique consists of a periosteal sleeve that is sutured over the cut end of the bone. The second technique consists of hinging a segment of fibula into a slot in the cut end of the tibia. The desired goal of amputation osteoplasty is to create an end-bearing limb to enhance rehabilitation. In addition to creation of a bone bridge, Ertl also recommends myoplasty, neuroplasty, individual vessel ligation, and a special skin closure. This report is a small case series of five patients successfully treated with lower extremity amputation osteoplasty, to illustrate the techniques and report initial good results. Two patients had each of the techniques and one patient had both of the techniques. All five patients had good wound healing, accelerated rehabilitation, and the ability to use end-bearing prostheses. PMID:16789450

  15. 38 CFR 4.68 - Amputation rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amputation rule. 4.68... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.68 Amputation rule. The combined rating for disabilities of an extremity shall not exceed the rating for the amputation at the elective level, were...

  16. Spatiotemporal Parameters of 100-m Sprint in Different Levels of Sprinters with Unilateral Transtibial Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobara, Hiroaki; Hashizume, Satoru; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Mochmaru, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate differences of the spatiotemporal parameters in a 100-m sprint among elite, sub-elite, and non-elite sprinters with a unilateral transtibial amputation. Using publicly available Internet broadcasts, we analyzed 125, 19, and 33 records from 30 elite, 12 sub-elite, and 22 non-elite sprinters, respectively. For each sprinter's run, the average velocity, step frequency, and step length were calculated using the number of steps in conjunction with the official race time. Average velocity was greatest in elite sprinters (8.71±0.32 m/s), followed by the sub-elite (8.09±0.06 m/s) and non-elite groups (7.72±0.27 m/s). Although there was a significant difference in average step frequency between the three groups, the effect size was small and the relative difference among the three groups was 3.1%. Statistical analysis also revealed that the average step length was longest in elite sprinters, followed by the sub-elite and non-elite groups. These results suggest that the differences in sprint performance between the three groups is mainly due to the average step length rather than step frequency.

  17. Spatiotemporal Parameters of 100-m Sprint in Different Levels of Sprinters with Unilateral Transtibial Amputation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Hobara

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate differences of the spatiotemporal parameters in a 100-m sprint among elite, sub-elite, and non-elite sprinters with a unilateral transtibial amputation. Using publicly available Internet broadcasts, we analyzed 125, 19, and 33 records from 30 elite, 12 sub-elite, and 22 non-elite sprinters, respectively. For each sprinter's run, the average velocity, step frequency, and step length were calculated using the number of steps in conjunction with the official race time. Average velocity was greatest in elite sprinters (8.71±0.32 m/s, followed by the sub-elite (8.09±0.06 m/s and non-elite groups (7.72±0.27 m/s. Although there was a significant difference in average step frequency between the three groups, the effect size was small and the relative difference among the three groups was 3.1%. Statistical analysis also revealed that the average step length was longest in elite sprinters, followed by the sub-elite and non-elite groups. These results suggest that the differences in sprint performance between the three groups is mainly due to the average step length rather than step frequency.

  18. Influence of advanced prosthetic knee joints on perceived performance and everyday life activity level of low-functional persons with a transfemoral amputation or knee disarticulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theeven, P.J.; Hemmen, B.; Geers, R.P.; Smeets, R.J.P.; Brink, P.R.; Seelen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of two types of microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joints (MPKs) on perceived performance and everyday life activity level. DESIGN: Randomized cross-over trial. SUBJECTS: Thirty persons with a unilateral above-knee amputation or knee disarticulation classified

  19. Amputation of finger by horse bite with complete avulsion of both flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Lior; Stahl, Shalom; Rovitsky, Alexey; Peled, Eli

    2011-08-08

    Amputation of fingers with tendon avulsion occurs through a traction injury, and most occur through a ring avulsion mechanism. Usually the flexor digitorum profundus is torn out with the amputated finger. Replantation usually is recommended only when the amputation is distal to the flexor digitorum superficialis insertion. Animal bites are relatively common, with a decreasing order of frequency of dogs, cats, and humans. Horse bites are relatively infrequent but are associated with crush injuries and tissue loss when they occur. This article describes a 23-year-old man with amputation of his middle finger at the level of the proximal phalanx after being bitten by a horse. The amputated stump was avulsed with the middle finger flexor digitorum profundus and flexor digitorum superficialis torn from the muscle-tendon junction from approximately the middle of the forearm. The patient had no other injuries, and he was able to move his other 4 fingers with only mild pain. As the amputated digit was not suitable for replantation, the wound was irrigated and debrided. The edges of the phalanx were trimmed, and the edges of the wound were sutured. Tetanus toxoid and rabies vaccine were administered, along with intravenous amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. The patient was discharged from the hospital 2 days later, with no sign of infection of the wound or compartment syndrome of the forearm. This case demonstrates the weakest point in the myotendinous junction and emphasizes the importance of a careful physical examination in patients with a traumatic amputation. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Foot amputation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amputation - foot - discharge; Trans-metatarsal amputation - discharge ... You have had a foot amputation. You may have had an accident, or your foot may have had an infection or disease and doctors could ...

  1. Population Exposure Estimates in Proximity to Nuclear Power Plants, Country-Level Aggregates

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Population Exposure Estimates in Proximity to Nuclear Power Plants, Country-Level Aggregates data set consists of country-level estimates of total, urban, and...

  2. Tibial rotational osteotomy for idiopathic torsion. A comparison of the proximal and distal osteotomy levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krengel, W F; Staheli, L T

    1992-10-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of 52 rotational tibial osteotomies (RTOs) performed on 35 patients with severe idiopathic tibial torsion. Thirty-nine osteotomies were performed at the proximal or midtibial level. Thirteen were performed at the distal tibial level with a technique previously described by one of the authors. Serious complications occurred in five (13%) of the proximal and in none of the distal RTOs. For severe and persisting idiopathic tibial torsion, the authors recommend correction by RTO at the distal level. Proximal level osteotomy is indicated only when a varus or valgus deformity required concurrent correction.

  3. Influence of advanced prosthetic knee joints on perceived performance and everyday life activity level of low-functional persons with a transfemoral amputation or knee disarticulation

    OpenAIRE

    Theeven, P.J.; Hemmen, B.; Geers, R.P.; Smeets, R.J.P.; Brink, P.R.; Seelen, H.A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of two types of microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joints (MPKs) on perceived performance and everyday life activity level. DESIGN: Randomized cross-over trial. SUBJECTS: Thirty persons with a unilateral above-knee amputation or knee disarticulation classified as Medicare Functional Classification Level-2. METHODS: Participants were measured in 3 conditions, i.e. using a mechanically controlled prosthesis, an MPK featuring a microprocessor-controlled st...

  4. Risk factors for early failure of surgical amputations: an analysis of 8,878 isolated lower extremity amputation procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Patrick J; Cox, Mitchell W; Shortell, Cynthia K; Scarborough, John E

    2013-04-01

    There are very few data currently published on risk factors for early failure of lower extremity amputation procedures. All patients from the 2005-2010 American College of Surgeons NSQIP database who underwent isolated lower extremity amputation were included for analysis (excluding patients with earlier operation within 30 days, patients undergoing an open amputation, and patients undergoing another procedure during amputation). Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine predictors of early amputation failure (defined as need for reoperation within 30 days postoperatively) after adjustment for a number of preoperative and intraoperative variables. A total of 8,878 patients were included for analysis (4,258 below-knee amputations [BKA]; 3,415 above-knee amputations; and 1,205 transmetatarsal amputations). Overall rate of early amputation failure was 12.7% (12.6% for BKA, 8.1% for above-knee amputations, and 26.4% for transmetatarsal amputations; p amputation failure, including emergency operation, transmetatarsal amputation (reference = BKA), sepsis (reference = no sepsis), septic shock (reference = no sepsis), end-stage renal disease, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (reference = no sepsis), intraoperative surgical trainee participation, body mass index ≥30, and ongoing tobacco use. Characteristics associated with decreased early amputation failure include age 80 years or older (reference = younger than 65 years), locoregional anesthesia, above-knee amputation (reference = BKA), operative time 40 to 59 minutes (reference = amputation failure. In addition, specific clinical situations, such as sepsis or emergency procedures, should prompt vascular surgeons to consider either an open amputation procedure or a more proximal closed amputation. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A developing world experience with distal foot amputations for diabetic limb salvage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Salahuddin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the functional outcome, morbidity, and viability of foot salvage in diabetic patients. Materials and methods: This prospective case series was conducted from March 2007 to December 2012 at the department of surgery Pakistan Ordnance Factories Hospital, Wah Cantt, Pakistan. 123 males and 26 female patients were included in the study. All the patients were treated after getting admitted in the hospital and wounds were managed with daily dressings, nursing care and debridement of necrotic tissue with adequate antibiotic coverage. Results: In total, 149 patients (mean age: 56±7.52 years with 171 amputations were included in the study. The mean duration of diabetes mellitus (DM was 9±4.43 years. Ninety-seven percent of the patients were diagnosed with type 2 DM. Wound debridement was performed under general anesthesia in 48 (33.2% patients, whereas local anesthesia was used for the rest of the patients after having good glycemic control and improvement in general health. The most common pathogen isolated from the infected wounds was Staphylococcus aureus in approximately 46% cases. Regarding the types of amputation, partial toe amputation was performed in 21 (12.2% cases, second-toe amputation in 60 (35% cases, hallux amputation in 41 (24% cases, multiple toe amputations in 29 (17% cases, bilateral feet involvement was observed in 16 (9.3% cases, and transmetatarsal amputation was performed in 4 (2.3% cases. The wounds healed well except in 19 cases where amputation had to be revised to a more proximal level. Thirty-nine patients died during the study period: 3 died of wound-related complications and 36 died of systemic complications. Conclusion: With the ever-increasing epidemic of DM, the number of patients with diabetic foot ulcers has also significantly risen. Early surgical management with good glycemic control and foot care with close monitoring can decrease amputations and thus foot salvage can be successfully

  6. Replantation vs revision amputation in single digit zone II amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Diwany, M; Odobescu, A; Bélanger-Douet, M; Berbiche, D; Arsenault, J; Bou-Merhi, J; Harris, P G; Danino, A M

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the functional outcomes of zone II amputations treated with either replantation or revision amputation at our institution to better aid patients in their decision making process regarding these treatment options. We conducted a comparative retrospective study. All cases of single digit amputations received at our replantation center between 2007 and 2011 were screened for single digit zone II injuries. These patients were stratified based on the treatment received: replantation vs revision amputation. Patients were called and invited to participate in the research project. Those who accepted to enter the study were asked to complete the Quick-DASH, the Beck Depression Inventory-short form, and a custom made questionnaire. There were seventeen patients with single digit zone II replantation and fourteen patients with similar injuries who underwent revision amputation and agreed to take part in the study. Our data revealed that the duration of sick leave, occupation after injury, professional and social reintegration, discontinued activities, and self-confidence were not statistically different between the two groups. The average hospital stay and the follow-up period of replanted individuals were longer. The replantation group did not have higher levels of pain or cold intolerance, and the global functional and esthetic satisfaction levels were similar between the two groups. Also, Beck Depression Inventory and Quick-DASH scores were not statistically different. Yet, significantly more patients in the replantation group would opt to repeat the replantation than revised patients would opt for revision amputation. From a functional viewpoint, our study suggests that revision amputation is not superior to replantation in zone II single digit amputations. This is valuable information that should be given to patients when deciding on the treatment process and to insure a proper informed consent. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  7. Management of Proximal Third Arm Replantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Taş

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding the recent success in major limb replantation achieved through the advancements in microsurgical techniques, the viability of the extremity is still relatively low at the transhumeral level following a replantation. There are no exact guidelines for deciding whether to undertake a stump repair or a replantation in such amputations at the proximal level. However, a highly motivated patient with realistic expectations and protected shoulder function can be a candidate to undergo replantation. The replanted arm may help the uninjured arm in daily activities. In this report we present the case of a 47-year-old man whose arm was amputated at proximal third level by an asphalt machine and successfully replanted together with the encountered problems and their solutions. The roadmap followed in this rare case may be a guide for hand surgeons.

  8. Return to sport following amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, D; Sukeik, M; Haddad, F

    2014-08-01

    Amputation in athletes has a substantial impact on lifestyle and sporting activity, as well as self-perception and quality of life. The impact of limb loss on athletic ability will vary depending on the cause of amputation and the anatomical location of the amputation. The use of sporting activity for rehabilitation of amputees was first introduced in 1944 at Stoke Mandeville Hospital. The first international paralympic games were founded in 1960. Following these events the opportunity to participate in sport following limb loss has increased significantly. Sport participation has been aided by the development of sporting prostheses, however multiple factors will determine the exact prosthesis used. These include the nature of the sporting activity as well as the level of the amputation. The biomechanics involved in walking and running are altered following the loss of a limb or part thereof. This can cause subsequent degenerative changes within the remaining joints on the amputated limb as well as the contralateral limb. Factors affecting return to sporting activity are multivariate and inter-related, including patient factors, surgical factors, nature and level of the sporting activity and prosthetic factors. The authors review current literature, detail predictive factors of return to sport and the physical and psychosocial impact on patients following limb amputation.

  9. Patient-, Treatment-, and Facility-Level Structural Characteristics Associated With the Receipt of Preoperative Lower Extremity Amputation Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Barbara E.; Hallenbeck, Richard; Ferrario, Toni; Kwong, Pui L.; Kurichi, Jibby E.; Stineman, Margaret G.; Xie, Dawei

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine patient, treatment, or facility characteristics that influence decisions to initiate a rehabilitation assessment before transtibial or transfemoral amputation within the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system. Design Retrospective database study. Setting VA medical centers. Participants A total of 4226 veterans with lower extremity amputations discharged from a VA medical center between October 1, 2002, and September 30, 2004. Outcome Evidence of a preoperative rehabilitation assessment after the index surgical stay admission but before the surgical date. Results Evidence was found that 343 of 4226 veterans (8.12%) with lower extremity amputations received preoperative rehabilitation assessments. Veterans receiving preoperative rehabilitation were more likely to be older, admitted from home, or transferred from another hospital. Patients who underwent surgical amputation at smaller-sized hospitals or in the South Central or Mountain Pacific regions were more likely to receive preoperative rehabilitation compared with patients in mid-sized hospitals or in the Northeast, Southeast, or Midwest regions. Patients with evidence of paralysis, patients treated in facilities with programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (P amputation etiology of a previous amputation complication were more likely to receive preoperative consultation rehabilitation services (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.02–2.19) compared with patients who did not have this etiology. Compared with patients treated in the Southeast region of the United States, those treated in the South Central region (OR 2.52, 95% CI 1.82–3.48) or Mountain Pacific region (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.11–2.37) were more likely to receive preoperative consultation rehabilitation services. Patients with evidence of paralysis were less likely to receive preoperative rehabilitative services compared with patients who did not have this condition (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.09–0.93), and

  10. Case study: Correction of angular deformity post-trans-tibial amputation to improve prosthesis fit and comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineham, Beth; Harwood, Paul; Giannoudis, Peter

    2015-04-01

    This case report describes the revision of a trans-tibial amputation complicated by a proximal malunited fracture. It demonstrates the complexity of decisions involved in revisions of this nature. The patient presented has a painful stump due to breakdown of soft tissues. She had been suffering for over a year with pressure sores and inability to use a prosthesis resulting from this, decreasing her quality of life. Malunion of a tibial fracture proximal to the amputation complicated her condition. Initially it was feared that the amputation level would be converted to a through-knee amputation, but wedge osteotomy of the tibia allowed coverage of the stump, increasing functionality for the patient, while still maintaining a below-knee stump. This report highlights the importance of addressing the cause of soft tissue problems in an amputation revision, which must be addressed on a case-by-case basis. This case offers an insight into the decision-making process in limb reconstruction and suggests a solution for similar cases. It is important that all surgical options are considered before amputation length is sacrificed. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  11. Challenges in Replantation of Complex Amputations

    OpenAIRE

    Chim, Harvey; Maricevich, Marco A.; Carlsen, Brian T.; Moran, Steven L.; Christopher J. Salgado; Wei, Fu-Chan; Mardini, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Surgical ingenuity has resulted in continuing microsurgical innovation in replantation. In this article, the authors define complex amputations as those that stretch the boundaries or fall outside traditionally defined indications for replantation. They discuss management of difficult situations involving multiple digit amputations, multiple-level amputations, prolonged ischemia, and multiple trauma. The role of transpositional and ectopic replantation, as well as the requirement for secondar...

  12. Elderly with proximal hip fracture present significantly lower levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Teodoro Ezequiel Guerra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To compare serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D levels, a serum marker of vitamin D3, between patients with and without proximal hip fracture. METHODS: This was a case-control study in which serum samples of 25(OHD were obtained from 110 proximal hip fracture inpatients and 231 control patients without fractures, all over 60 years of age. Levels of 25(OHD lower than or equal to 20 ng/mL were considered deficient; from 21 ng/mL to 29 ng/mL, insufficient; and above 30 ng/mL, sufficient. Sex, age, and ethnicity were considered for association with the study groups and 25(OHD levels. RESULTS: Patients with proximal hip fracture had significantly lower serum 25(OHD levels (21.07 ng/mL than controls (28.59 ng/mL; p = 0.000. Among patients with proximal hip fracture, 54.5% had deficient 25(OHD levels, 27.2% had insufficient levels, and only 18.2% had sufficient levels. In the control group, 30.3% of patients had deficient 25(OHD levels, 30.7% had insufficient levels, and 38.9% had sufficient levels. Female patients had decreased serum 25(OHD levels both in the fracture group and in the control group (19.50 ng/mL vs. 26.94 ng/mL; p = 0.000 when compared with male patients with and without fracture (25.67 ng/mL vs. 33.74 ng/mL; p = 0.017. Regarding age, there was a significant association between 25(OHD levels and risk of fracture only for the age groups 71-75 years and above 80 years. CONCLUSION: Patients with proximal hip fracture had significantly decreased serum 25(OHD levels when compared with the control group. Female patients had significantly lower serum 25(OHD levels in both groups.

  13. Aetiological Factors in Limb Amputation: The Changing Pattern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The data collected and analyzed were the demographic profile, indications for amputation, levels of amputation, traditional bonesetters' (TBS) treatment, complications and method of rehabilitation. Results: A total of sixty (60) patients had major, limb amputation. Four (4) patients with incomplete data were excluded and 56 ...

  14. Impact of a stance phase microprocessor-controlled knee prosthesis on level walking in lower functioning individuals with a transfemoral amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberly, Valerie J; Mulroy, Sara J; Gronley, JoAnne K; Perry, Jacquelin; Yule, William J; Burnfield, Judith M

    2014-12-01

    For individuals with transfemoral amputation, walking with a prosthesis presents challenges to stability and increases the demand on the hip of the prosthetic limb. Increasing age or comorbidities magnify these challenges. Computerized prosthetic knee joints improve stability and efficiency of gait, but are seldom prescribed for less physically capable walkers who may benefit from them. To compare level walking function while wearing a microprocessor-controlled knee (C-Leg Compact) prosthesis to a traditionally prescribed non-microprocessor-controlled knee prosthesis for Medicare Functional Classification Level K-2 walkers. Crossover. Stride characteristics, kinematics, kinetics, and electromyographic activity were recorded in 10 participants while walking with non-microprocessor-controlled knee and Compact prostheses. Walking with the Compact produced significant increase in velocity, cadence, stride length, single-limb support, and heel-rise timing compared to walking with the non-microprocessor-controlled knee prosthesis. Hip and thigh extension during late stance improved bilaterally. Ankle dorsiflexion, knee extension, and hip flexion moments of the prosthetic limb were significantly improved. Improvements in walking function and stability on the prosthetic limb were demonstrated by the K-2 level walkers when using the C-Leg Compact prosthesis. Understanding the impact of new prosthetic designs on gait mechanics is essential to improve prescription guidelines for deconditioned or older persons with transfemoral amputation. Prosthetic designs that improve stability for safety and walking function have the potential to improve community participation and quality of life. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  15. Replantation of ring avulsion amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabapathy R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Replantation of ring avulsion injuries is a challenge because of the long segment damage to the vessels and intrinsic damage caused to soft tissues at the proximal edge of the amputation. Eight patients with total ring avulsion amputations underwent microsurgical replantation in the period 1994 to 2002. Arterial repair was done by direct vessel suture in three patients, interposition vein grafts in two and cross anastomosis of the digital arteries in three patients. Venous anastomosis was carried out by mobilization and direct suture in seven patients and vessel transfer from the adjacent finger in one patient. Seven of the eight replantations were successful, while one patient had a partial failure. At a minimum follow-up of one year, these patients showed good functional and cosmetic recovery. All successful patients were happy with the outcome and none have requested for amputation, even those whose results were not functionally adequate. However, in addition to technical factors, it is important to evaluate the patient's motivation to undergo not only the long surgery, but also multiple secondary procedures and regular supervised physiotherapy. We also describe a simple method which prevents the soft tissues inside the degloved digit from becoming wrapped around the K wire during bony fixation, thus making one step of this technically challenging procedure a little easier.

  16. Ten years at war: comprehensive analysis of amputation trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Chad A; Wenke, Joseph C; Ficke, James R

    2012-12-01

    While multiple studies have examined amputations that have occurred during the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, none of these studies have provided an overarching characterization of all of these injuries. A retrospective study of all major extremity amputations sustained by US Service Members from January 2001 through July 30, 2011, was performed. Data obtained from these amputees included amputation level(s), mechanism of injury, time to amputation, Injury Severity Score (ISS), age, rank, number of trauma admissions, and number of troops deployed. There were 1,221 amputees who met inclusion criteria. These amputees sustained a total of 1,631 amputations. The number of amputations performed each year has increased dramatically in 2010 (196) and the first half of 2011 (160) from 2008 (105) and 2009 (94). The number of amputations performed per every 100 traumatic admissions (3.5-14) and the number of amputations per 100,000 deployed troops (2-14) has also increased in 2010 and the first half of 2011. Most amputations occurred at the transtibial (683, 41.8%) and transfemoral (564, 34.5%) levels. Thirty percent of the amputees (366) sustained multiple amputations, and 14% of all amputations (228) performed involved the upper extremity. There were 127 amputees (10%) who underwent their amputation more than 90 days after the date of injury. The number of amputations occurring during the current Iraqi and Afghanistan conflicts has increased in 2010 and the first half of 2011. Most amputations involve the lower extremities, and there is a much higher percentage of amputees who have sustained multiple amputations during current operations than previous conflicts. Epidemiologic study, level IV.

  17. Physical and social factors determining quality of life for veterans with lower-limb amputation(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan; Ipsen, Thomas; Doherty, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    of the literature to summarize any evidence on the physical and social determinants for HRQoL in veterans with uni- or bilateral lower-limb amputation(s). Method MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, CINAHL, Scopus and Cochrane databases were searched systematically for eligible studies. Inclusion criteria were: traumatic lower......-limb amputation(s), HRQoL outcome and veterans. Physical and social factors that influence HRQoL were extracted. Results The literature search identified 2073 citations, leading to the inclusion of 10 studies in the systematic review. Physical activity level, sport participation, level of amputation, back pain...

  18. A systematic review of outcomes after revision amputation for treatment of traumatic finger amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Frank; McGlinn, Evan P.; Giladi, Aviram M.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Revision amputations are often the treatment for traumatic finger amputation injuries. However, patient outcomes are inadequately reported, and their impact poorly understood. We performed a systematic review to evaluate outcomes of revision amputations and amputation wound coverage techniques. Methods We searched all available English literature in PubMed and EMBASE for articles reporting outcomes of non-replantation treatments for traumatic finger amputation injuries, including revision amputation, local digital flaps, skin grafting, and conservative treatment. Data extracted were study characteristics, patient demographic data, sensory and functional outcomes, patient-reported outcomes (PROs), and complications. Results 1659 articles were screened, yielding 43 studies for review. Mean static 2-point discrimination (2-PD) was 5.0 ± 1.5 mm (n=23 studies) overall. Mean static 2-PD was 6.1 ± 2.4 mm after local flap procedures and 3.8 ± 0.4 mm after revision amputation. Mean total active motion (TAM) was 93 ± 8% of normal (n=6 studies) overall. Mean TAM was 90 ± 9% of normal after local flap procedures and 95% of normal after revision amputation. 77% of patients report cold intolerance after revision amputation. 91% of patients (217/238) report “satisfactory” or “good/excellent” ratings regardless of treatment. Conclusion Revision amputation and conservative treatments result in better static 2-PD outcomes compared to local flaps. All techniques preserve TAM, although arc of motion is slightly better with revision amputation. Revision amputation procedures are frequently associated with cold intolerance. Patients report “satisfactory,” “good,” or “excellent” ratings in appearance and quality of life with all non-replantation techniques. Level of Evidence III PMID:26111316

  19. Informed Decision-Making Regarding Amputation for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodde, Marlies I.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Schrier, Michiel; van den Dungen, Johannes; den Dunnen, Wilfred E.; Geertzen, Joannes

    2014-01-01

    Background: Literature on complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) discussing the decision to amputate or not, the level of amputation, or the timing of the amputation is scarce: We evaluated informed decision-making regarding amputation for CRPS-I. Methods: We describe our findings in a

  20. Osteocutaneous pedicle flap transfer for salvage of transtibial amputation after severe lower-extremity injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallier, Heather A; Fitzgerald, Steven J; Beddow, Meghan E; Sontich, John K; Patterson, Brendan M

    2012-03-07

    A conventional transtibial amputation may not be possible when the zone of injury involves the proximal part of the tibia, or in cases of massive tibial bone and/or soft-tissue loss. The purpose of this study was to examine the outcomes of salvage of a transtibial amputation level with a rotational osteocutaneous pedicle flap from the ipsilateral hindfoot. Fourteen patients who had an osteocutaneous pedicle flap from the ipsilateral foot were included in the study. Twelve patients were followed for more than twenty-four months (mean, 60.2 months) and were evaluated with use of the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP), Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (MFA), and a 100-ft (30.48-m) timed walking test. There were ten men and four women with mean age of 43.2 years. Thirteen patients had a type-IIIB open tibial fracture, and one had extensive soft-tissue loss secondary to a burn. Four patients were treated for infection after the index procedure. There were no nonunions of the tibia to the calcaneus. Three patients underwent late reconstructive procedures to improve prosthetic fit. No patient required subsequent revision to a more proximal amputation level. Mean knee flexion was 139°. A novel technique has been developed to salvage a transtibial amputation level with use of a rotational osteocutaneous flap from the hindfoot. In the absence of adequate tibial length and/or soft-tissue coverage to salvage the entire limb or to perform a conventional-length transtibial amputation, this technique is a highly functional alternative that does not require microvascular free tissue transfer.

  1. Effects of the proximity of groundwater level on short and long normal logging measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Myung Jin; Hwang, Seho

    2010-05-01

    Resistivity logging instruments were designed to measure electrical resistivity of formation, which can be directly interpreted to provide water-saturation profile. Using short and long normal logging, Korea institute of geosciences and mineral resources (KIGAM) has monitored seawater intrusion in a coastal aquifer, Yeonggwang, Jeonnam, Korea, and groundwater distribution in Korea including Jeju Island. Short and long normal logging measurements are made under groundwater level. In some investigation sites, groundwater level reaches to a depth of a few hundred meters. It has come to attention that the proximity of groundwater level might distort short and long normal logging readings, when the measurements are made near groundwater level, owing to the proximity of an insulating air. In this study, to investigate the effects of the proximity of groundwater level (and also the proximity of earth surface) on short and long normal logging measurements, we simulate normal logging measurements near groundwater level. In the simulation, we consider all the details of real logging situation, i.e., the presence of wellbore including casing, the tool mandrel with current and monitoring electrodes, and current return and reference potential electrodes. We also model the air to include the earth's surface in the simulation rather than the customary choice of imposing a boundary condition. To compute the voltage at a monitoring electrode, we subtract the potential at a reference potential electrode from the potential at the monitoring electrode. Note that the actual tool also measures the voltage, i.e., the difference of potential at a monitoring electrode with respect to the potential at the reference potential electrode. The simulation is challenging since we have large contrast in dimension (the large computation domain, which can be several kilometers, and small size of an electrode, which is several centimeters) and in resistivity (the resistivity of conductive electrode

  2. Single Level Proximal Thoracic Pedicle Subtraction Osteotomy for Fixed Hyperkyphotic Deformity: Surgical Technique and Patient Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Ibrahim; Diebo, Bassel G; Boissiere, Louis; Bourghli, Anouar; Cawley, Derek T; Larrieu, Daniel; Pointillart, Vincent; Challier, Vincent; Vital, Jean Marc; Lafage, Virginie

    2017-07-22

    Thoracic hyperkyphosis can display pathological deterioration, resulting in either hyperlordotic cervical compensation or sagittal malalignment. Various techniques have been described to treat fixed malalignment. Pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) is commonly used in the lumbar spine and frequently limited to the distal thoracic spine. This series focuses on the surgical specificities of proximal thoracic PSO, with clinical and radiological outcomes. To report the surgical specificities and assess the clinical and radiological outcomes of proximal thoracic osteotomies for correction of rigid kyphotic deformities. This is a retrospective review of 10 consecutive patients who underwent single level proximal thoracic PSO (T2-T5). Preoperative and postoperative full-body EOS TM radiographs, perioperative data, and complications were recorded. The surgical technique and its nuances were described in detail. Patients had mean age of 41.8 yr and 50% were female. The technique provided correction of segmental and global kyphosis, 26.6° and 29.5°, respectively. Patients reported reciprocal reduction in C2-C7 cervical lordosis (37.6°-18.6°, P  hyperkyphosis (R = 0.840, P  = .002). Mean operative time was 291 min, blood loss 1650 mL, and mean hospital stay was 13.8 d. Three patients reported complications that were resolved, including 1 patient who was revised because of a painful cross link. There were no neurological complications, pseudarthroses, instrumentation breakage, or wound infections at a minimum of 2-yr follow-up. Proximal thoracic PSO can be a safe and effective technique to treat fixed proximal thoracic hyperkyphosis leading to kyphosis reduction and craniocervical relaxation.

  3. Association between Functional Severity and Amputation Type with Rehabilitation Outcomes in Patients with Lower Limb Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol M. Karmarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine independent influences of functional level and lower limb amputation type on inpatient rehabilitation outcomes. We conducted a secondary data analysis for patients with lower limb amputation who received inpatient medical rehabilitation (N = 26,501. The study outcomes included length of stay, discharge functional status, and community discharge. Predictors included the 3-level case mix group variable and a 4-category amputation variable. Age of the sample was 64.5 years (13.4 and 64% were male. More than 75% of patients had a dysvascular-related amputation. Patients with bilateral transfemoral amputations and higher functional severity experienced longest lengths of stay (average 13.7 days and lowest functional rating at discharge (average 79.4. Likelihood of community discharge was significantly lower for those in more functionally severe patients but did not differ between amputation categories. Functional levels and amputation type are associated with rehabilitation outcomes in inpatient rehabilitation settings. Patients with transfemoral amputations and those in case mix group 1003 (admission motor score less than 36.25 generally experience poorer outcomes than those in other case mix groups. These relationships may be associated with other demographic and/or health factors, which should be explored in future research.

  4. Comorbidities in amputation: a systematic review of hemiplegia and lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Jacqueline S; Payne, Michael W C; Wolfe, Dalton L; Deathe, A Barry; Devlin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review of the scientific literature was to investigate the incidence and prevalence of hemiplegia with lower limb amputation, and to identify outcomes following the dual disability of hemiplegia and amputation. Electronic searching of the literature identified major studies examining the effects of hemiplegia on rehabilitation following amputation. Data were extracted and levels of evidence assigned for each subtopic area. The summary conclusions are Level 4 evidence. The prevalence of amputation and hemiplegia is 8-18% and amputation and hemiplegia occur most often in the same leg. Once individuals with hemiplegia and lower limb amputation are selected for prosthetic rehabilitation, rate of successful functional ambulation is greater than 58%. In general there is a lower rate of prosthetic success and independence with hemiplegia than without. Predictive factors associated with success include less severe hemiplegia, laterality of hemiplegia (ipsilateral and right side), transtibial level of amputation and absence of impaired mental function. There is wide variation in length of hospital stay, but a specialty multidisciplinary team reduces length of stay. Patients with dual disability of hemiplegia and amputation generally benefit from a prosthetic rehabilitation program. Further study on predictive factors for outcome would be beneficial. • The prevalence of hemiplegia with lower limb amputation ranges from 8 to 18%, most frequently affecting the same leg. • The majority of patients attain successful functional levels of ambulation with prosthetic rehabilitation, although lower rates than nonhemiplegic patients. • Predictive factors associated with greater success include less severe hemiplegia, ipsilateral hemiplegia, transtibial level of amputation and absence of impaired mental function.

  5. Defining trauma: How level of exposure and proximity affect risk for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Casey L; Wisco, Blair E

    2016-03-01

    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) includes significant changes to Criterion A for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the criterion that defines which events qualify as "traumatic." This systematic review explores the fundamental question of how to define a trauma by reviewing the difference between direct and indirect trauma exposure and the risk for PTSD associated with both exposure types. Direct exposure includes experiencing a trauma firsthand or witnessing a trauma as it occurs to others. In contrast, indirect exposure may occur by learning about the violent or accidental death of a close associate, through secondary narrative accounts (e.g., in service-related professions), or through work-related media reports. This review examines whether indirect trauma exposure can lead to PTSD and the role of proximity in symptom development. We conducted a systematic review of the research assessing changes to PTSD Criterion A in DSM-5, various levels of traumatic exposure, and proximity as a risk factor for PTSD. Our review indicates that indirect exposure can lead to PTSD, although the probability of developing the disorder from indirect exposure is lower than that from direct exposure. Proximity to a trauma also increases risk, but this may be limited to direct exposure. Knowledge of the impact of level of exposure (direct vs. indirect) and proximity will help to better define what events meet PTSD Criterion A. Future research is needed to examine DSM-5's requirement that exposure through media must be related to one's work. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. INCIDENCE OF AMPUTATION IN EMERGENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rojaramani Kumbha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Advanced Technology and early detection of disease by recent improvements in investigation modalities lead to decreased incidents of amputations while Road Traffic Accidents (RTA increase. Furthermore, it leads to variation and decreased morbidity, mortality and accidents (crush injuries, and better equipped and trained staff, specialist services, diabetic food, rehabilitation centres, and giving good support physically and psychologically for Amputated patients. OBJECTIVE To know incidence rates of Emergency Amputation who attended causality with advanced disease and severe Trauma. METHODOLOGY The study is done over a period of one year i.e. between June 2015 to June 2016 who attended causality with advanced and severe disease affecting the limbs either due to diabetes, trauma or vascular diseases. RESULTS During one-year period, total 6,371 patients attended for general surgery OP. In those, 187 patients needed emergency surgery which included both major and minor operations. Among those, 81 patients were amputated. CONCLUSION As per our available records and observation, even though there is increased literacy and access to advanced technology, there is still increased incidence of patients undergoing amputations due to diseases. Therefore, there is a need to improve awareness and importance of early detection of diabetes, hazards of smoking, and regular general health checkups for patients at root level. With that we can treat diabetes and/or any disease in time. So there must be awareness in peripheral health staff i.e. PHC, subcentres, and community health centres about early detection of disease which in turn improves the quality of life of the patient. Due to diabetes slight injury to the glucose laden tissue may cause chronic infection and ulcer formation.(1 The tumours are seen commonly in the age group of 20-40 years after bone fusion, bones affected commonly are those around the knee (lower end of knee, upper end of tibia. A lytic

  7. Pedicled on-top plasty for thumb reconstruction: utilization of proximal phalanx of an injured ring finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, Saeed Ashraf

    2015-04-01

    Thumb has a critical role in the hand function. It is the most important digit for pinching and grasping. Therefore, thumb amputation demands its replantation or reconstruction to restore the hand functions. A case of hand injury which involved multiple digits along with amputation of thumb is reported. The thumb had amputation level just distal to Metacarpophalangeal joint (MPj) along with amputation of other 3 fingers at different levels. Proximal phalanx of ring finger based on palmar vessels was utilized for on-top plasty to build thumb post and restore hand function. On-top plasty for thumb is quite useful, dependable, easier, time saving option which does not increase the morbidity associated with other options of thumb reconstruction. It may especially be a very useful option for the centres lacking the facility and equipment for micro-vascular surgeries and expertise of the trained micro-vascular surgeons.

  8. Influence of advanced prosthetic knee joints on perceived performance and everyday life activity level of low-functional persons with a transfemoral amputation or knee disarticulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeven, Patrick J; Hemmen, Bea; Geers, Richard P J; Smeets, Rob J E M; Brink, Peter R G; Seelen, Henk A M

    2012-05-01

    To assess the effects of two types of microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joints (MPKs) on perceived performance and everyday life activity level. Randomized cross-over trial. Thirty persons with a unilateral above-knee amputation or knee disarticulation classified as Medicare Functional Classification Level-2. Participants were measured in 3 conditions, i.e. using a mechanically controlled prosthesis, an MPK featuring a microprocessor-controlled stance and swing phase (MPKA), and an MPK featuring a microprocessor-controlled stance phase (MPKB). Subjects' perceived performance regarding prosthesis use was measured with the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire. Subjects' activity level was quantified using accelerometry. As high within-group variability regarding subjects' functional performance was expected to impede detection of possible effects of an MPK, data were analysed for the total group and for 3 subgroups of participants. Participants' perception regarding ambulation, residual limb health, utility, and satisfaction with walking were significantly higher in the MPKA condition compared with the mechanical knee joint condition. Participants' activity level was similar in all knee joint conditions. Although Medicare Functional Classification Level-2 amputees report benefitting in terms of their performance from using an MPK, this is not reflected in their actual daily activity level after one week of using an MPK.

  9. [Risk factors for lower extremity amputation in patients with diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, B; Yang, C Z; Wu, S B; Zhang, D; Wang, L N; Xiao, L; Chen, Y; Wang, C R; Tong, A; Zhou, X F; Li, X H; Guan, X H

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To explore the risk factors for lower extremity amputation in patients with diabetic foot. Methods: The clinical data of 1 771 patients with diabetic foot at the Air Force General Hospital of PLA from November 2001 to April 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into the non-amputation and amputation groups. Within the amputation group, subjects were further divided into the minor and major amputation subgroups. Binary logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between risk factors and lower extremity amputation. Results: Among 1 771 patients with diabetic foot, 323 of them (18.24%) were in the amputation group (major amputation: 41; minor amputation: 282) and 1 448 (81.76%) in the non-amputation group. Compared with non-amputation patients, those in the amputation group had a longer hospital stay and higher estimated glomerular filtration rate(eGFR)levels. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C-reaction protein (CRP), ESR, ferritin, fibrinogen and WBC levels of the amputation group were higher, while hemoglobin albumin, transferrin, TC, TG, HDL-C and LDL-C were lower than those of the non-amputation group (all P diabetic foot. Conclusion: Wagner's grade, ischemia of lower limbs and infection are closely associated with amputation of diabetic foot patients.

  10. Spina bifida and lower limb amputation in Northern Ireland: A retrospective study of demographics and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Lorraine

    2017-10-01

    Spina bifida is an uncommon cause for lower limb amputation. The causes and level of amputation and mobility outcome for these patients have not been reported previously. To identify the causes and level of amputation and the mobility outcome for amputee patients with spina bifida. Retrospective case series. Chart review of patients identified by computer as having an amputation secondary to neurological or congenital cause. Additional patients identified from the Regional Spina Bifida Medical Clinic. Demographics, cause and level of mobility pre- and post-amputation recorded from the prosthetic notes. In total, 16 patients were identified who had a diagnosis of spina bifida and a lower limb amputation. Mean age at the time of amputation was 28.5 years. In total, 15 patients had a transtibial amputation. In total, 14 patients post-amputation were able to maintain their mobility, wheelchair or walking, without any change in type of aid needed. Patients with spina bifida appear to require lower limb amputation at a younger age than patients with peripheral vascular disease. Almost all patients had prior chronic skin infection/osteomyelitis as precursors for amputation. The most common level for amputation was transtibial. Mobility was maintained for all patients, albeit for two in a more supported way. Clinical relevance Spina bifida is an uncommon reason for amputation. Patients, are often younger and medically complicated. Chronic skin ulceration, was the most common indication for amputation. Wheelchair or walking ambulance was maintained at the same level for most patients.

  11. Proximal and Distal Predictors of the Spider Monkey's Stress Levels in Fragmented Landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José D Ordóñez-Gómez

    Full Text Available The rapid loss, fragmentation and degradation of tropical forests threaten the survival of many animal species. However, the way in which these phenomena affect animal health has been poorly explored, thus limiting the design of appropriate conservation strategies. To address this, here we identified using linear mixed models the effect of proximal (diet, activity pattern, hunting and logging and distal (sum of the basal areas of fruiting-tree species [SBAFS], landscape forest cover and degree of forest fragmentation variables over fecal glucocorticoid metabolite (fGCM levels-hormones associated with animal health and fitness-of six groups of spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi inhabiting six landscapes with different spatial structures in Mexico. Proximal variables showed a stronger predictive power over fGCMs than distal. In this sense, increases in travel time, the occurrence of hunting, and reductions in rest time and fruit consumption resulted in higher fGCM levels. Regarding distal variables, increases in SBAFS were negatively related to fGCM levels, thus suggesting that food scarcity increases stress hormone levels. Nevertheless, contrary to theoretical expectations, spider monkeys living in smaller tracts of forest spent less time travelling, but the same time feeding on fruit as those in more forested areas. The lower net energy return associated with this combination of factors would explain why, contrary to theoretical expectations, increased forest cover was associated with increased levels of fGCMs in these groups. Our study shows that, at least in the short term, spider monkeys in fragmented landscapes do not always present higher levels of stress hormones compared to those inhabiting continuous forest, and the importance of preserving fruit sources and controlling hunting for reducing the levels of stress hormones in free ranging spider monkeys.

  12. Leg amputation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do your daily activities, such as bathing and cooking. You should try to do as much as ... Elsevier Mosby; 2013:chap 16. Toy PC. General principles of amputations. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. ...

  13. Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy Plate Contouring and Proximal Load Screw Angulation Affect Osteotomy Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Karl R; Roe, Simon C; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of contouring a tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) plate, the associated angulation of the dynamic compression plate (DCP) hole relative to the long axis of the tibia, and angulation of the screw relative to the DCP hole on the osteotomy compression generated by load screws in a TPLO model. In vitro biomechanical study. Polyoxymethylene (POM) rod and synthetic cortical bone substitute model (n = 9). The distal portion of a Slocum TPLO plate was attached to a horizontally positioned POM rod that was connected to a load cell. A segment of synthetic cortical bone substitute was attached to the end mount of the testing frame and adjusted to conform to the angle of the proximal portion of the TPLO plate. A 3.5 mm cortical bone screw was inserted in the proximal DCP hole and tightened to 1.5 Nm. The peak longitudinal load (N) was recorded. Screw insertion and data collection were repeated for proximal plate angles of 0-40° at 5° increments. A significant increase in the compression generated was observed as the plate angle was increased from 0° to 10°. The compression ceased to significantly increase until the plate was bent more than 20°, after which a significant decrease in compression was noted. A marked reduction in the compression generated occurred at plate angles greater than 30°. Angulation of the DCP hole and screw insertion angle can have deleterious effects on the magnitude of osteotomy compression. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  14. Predicting Functional Status Following Amputation After Lower Extremity Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckow, Bjoern D.; Goodney, Philip P.; Cambria, Robert A.; Bertges, Daniel J.; Eldrup-Jorgensen, Jens; Indes, Jeffrey E.; Schanzer, Andres; Stone, David H.; Kraiss, Larry W.; Cronenwett, Jack L.

    2012-01-01

    differ compared with no amputation (BK amputation 87%, p = 0.14, AK amputation 89%, p = 0.27); however, this part of the analysis was limited by its sample size (n = 212). In multivariable analysis, we found that the patients most likely to remain ambulatory and live independently despite undergoing a lower extremity amputation were those living at home preoperatively (hazard ratio [HR]: 6.8, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.94–49, p = 0.058) and those with preoperative statin use (HR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.2–2.1, p = 0.003), whereas the presence of several comorbidities identified patients less likely to achieve a good functional outcome: coronary disease (HR: 0.6, 95% CI: 0.5–0.9, p = 0.003), dialysis (HR: 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3–0.9, p = 0.02), and congestive heart failure (HR: 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3–0.8, p = 0.005). Conclusions A postoperative amputation at any level impacts functional outcomes following LEB surgery, and the extent of amputation is directly related to the effect on functional outcome. It is possible, based on preoperative patient characteristics, to identify patients undergoing LEB who are most or least likely to achieve good functional outcomes even if a major amputation is ultimately required. These findings may assist in patient education and surgical decision making in patients who are poor candidates for lower extremity bypass. PMID:22176876

  15. Transmetatarsal Amputation: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan McCallum; Mark Tagoe

    2012-01-01

    Foot ulceration is a major cause of morbidity amongst patients with diabetes. In severe cases of ulceration, osteomyelitis and amputation can ensue. A distinct lack of agreement exists on the most appropriate level of amputation in cases of severe foot ulceration/infection to provide predictable healing rates. This paper provides an overview of the transmetatarsal amputation (TMA) as a limb salvage procedure and is written with the perspective and experiences of the Department of Podiatric Su...

  16. From Wheelchair to Cane: Elective Transtibial Amputations in a Patient with Spina Bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Amanda; Berbrayer, David

    2015-11-01

    Spina bifida is associated with foot deformities, which may lead to foot ulcers, osteomyelitis, and limb amputation. Calcanectomy and Symes amputations have been reported successful in spina bifida. There is lack of evidence for transtibial amputations. This case describes a 27-yr-old woman with L4 level spina bifida who underwent bilateral transtibial amputations. She ambulated with bilateral ankle foot orthoses and canes until age 22. At age 22, she had bilateral foot reconstructive surgeries complicated by nonunion, ulcerations, and osteomyelitis. She was using a wheelchair by age 25. She had elective bilateral transtibial amputations at age 27 for progressive osteomyelitis. Four weeks after amputations, she was fit with bilateral prostheses. On completion of 2 mos of rehabilitation, she ambulated with a cane. This case demonstrates good functional outcomes after transtibial amputations in a young spina bifida patient. Prosthetic fitting should be considered for similar, previously high functioning spina bifida patients with transtibial amputation(s).

  17. Predicting prosthetic prescription after major lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Borgia, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We describe prosthetic limb prescription in the first year following lower-limb amputation and examine the relationship between amputation level, geographic region, and prosthetic prescription. We analyzed 2005 to 2010 Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Inpatient and Medical Encounters SAS data sets, Vital Status death data, and National Prosthetic Patient Database data for 9,994 Veterans who underwent lower-limb amputation at a VA hospital. Descriptive statistics and bivariates were examined. Cox proportional hazard models identified factors associated with prosthetic prescription. Analyses showed that amputation level was associated with prosthetic prescription. The hazard ratios (HRs) were 1.41 for ankle amputation and 0.46 for transfemoral amputation compared with transtibial amputation. HRs for geographic region were Northeast = 1.49, Upper Midwest = 1.26, and West = 1.39 compared with the South (p prosthetic prescription. Being married was positively associated. After adjusting for patient characteristics, people with ankle amputation were most likely to be prescribed a prosthesis and people with transfemoral amputation were least likely. Geographic variation in prosthetic prescription exists in the VA and further research is needed to explain why.

  18. Amputation of extremity in patients with atherosclerotic gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsareva Yu.O.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of investigation — to analyze the results of treatment of patients with atherosclerotic gangrene of a limb, to identify the causes of adverse outcomes amputation. Materials and methods: We analyzed the results of examination and treatment of 218 patients with atherosclerotic gangrene of the limb. Good outcome of amputation was considered the primary surgical wound healing of the stump. Suppuration, secondary healing, re-amputation and death we attributed to the adverse results of amputation. Results: The adverse outcomes of amputation due to technical errors in surgery, properly chosen level, inadequate drainage of the wound stump, an unsuccessful operation on the arteries of a limb, inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy, patient's age, functional capabilities of myocardium, the duration of critical ischemia, as well as the lack of psychological adaptation of patients before amputation. Conclusion: To decide the need for amputation in patients with atherosclerotic gangrene follows the assessment of possible vascular reconstructive surgery. In determining the level of amputation is necessary to objectively assess the degree of disruption of regional blood flow using multilevel manometry and laser Dopplerflowmetry. In preparation for amputation should be paid special attention to the correction of rheological and coagulation properties of blood, normalization of the functional state of the myocardium, as well as specialized psychotherapeutic training for timely and adequate psychological adaptation of the patient

  19. A modified transmetatarsal amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashi, Hiroto; Kitano, Ikuro; Tsuji, Yoriko; Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Tahara, Shinya

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of the diabetic foot is increasing worldwide. Because evidence has shown that transmetatarsal amputation is associated with fewer failures in amputations of the diabetic foot with or without peripheral arterial disease, improving its management and surgical technique is a mission for the surgeon. Conventional transmetatarsal amputation has held firm, however, for more than 150 years. With a new concept for the transmetatarsal amputation method aimed at a better outcome, we propose a modified procedure for preserving the soft tissue between the metatarsal bones (the vasculature complex with the muscles, periostea, and vessels) and applying it to the distal bone stumps. The purpose of this method is to secure a functional foot by preserving the longitudinal arch. The new method was applied to 11 patients with diabetes mellitus or peripheral arterial disease, or both. All wounds closed successfully. Of the 11 patients, 8 were still alive with no complications. Of these 8 patients, 6 were able to ambulate with a custom-made shoe and 2 used a wheelchair, just as preoperatively. Of the 3 patients who died, 1 died a natural death, 1 died of sepsis, and 1 of cerebral infarction. We believe that the modified transmetatarsal amputation that we have described in this report is a potential breakthrough in the care of patients with forefoot gangrene and may gain acceptance over time. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The patient's experience of amputation due to peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbjörnsson, Eva; Ottosson, Carin; Blomgren, Lena; Boström, Lennart; Fagerdahl, Ann-Mari

    2017-06-01

    It is not uncommon that patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) need to undergo a lower limb amputation, with or without previous revascularization attempts. Despite that, the patient's experience of the amputation has been scarcely studied. The aim of this qualitative study was to describe the patient's experience of amputation due to PAD. Thirteen interviews were conducted with vascular patients who had undergone a lower limb amputation at tibia, knee, or femoral level. Data were analyzed with content analysis. Our findings of the patient's experiences during the amputation process resulted in three themes with additional time sequences: the decision phase "From irreversible problem to amputation decision", the surgical phase "A feeling of being in a vacuum," and the rehabilitation phase "Adaptation to the new life". One main finding was that the patients felt abandoned during the surgical period. Despite that, most of the participants were satisfied with the decision, some of them even regretted that they had not undergone an amputation earlier in the process. It is important for the patient's well-being to develop a partnership with the surgeon to increase a feeling of being participating in the care. Vascular patients need better information on lower limb amputation, and its consequences so as to be better prepared for the whole process. To increase the patient's quality of life and reduce unnecessary suffering, amputation may be presented earlier in the process as a valuable treatment option. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Man or machine? An experimental study of prehospital emergency amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, Caroline; Porter, Keith

    2016-09-01

    Prehospital emergency amputation is a rare procedure, which may be necessary to free a time-critical patient from entrapment. This study aimed to evaluate four techniques of cadaveric lower limb prehospital emergency amputation. A guillotine amputation of the distal femur was undertaken in fresh frozen self-donated cadavers. A prehospital doctor conducted a surgical amputation with Gigli saw or hacksaw for bone cuts and firefighters carried out the procedure using the reciprocating saw and Holmatro device. The primary outcome measures were time to full amputation and the number of attempts required. The secondary outcomes were observed quality of skin cut, soft tissue cut and CT assessment of the proximal bone. Observers also noted the potential risks to the rescuer or patient during the procedure. All techniques completed amputation within 91 s. The reciprocating saw was the quickest technique (22 s) but there was significant blood spattering and continuation of the cut to the surface under the leg. The Holmatro device took less than a minute. The quality of the proximal femur was acceptable with all methods, but 5 cm more proximal soft tissue damage was made by the Holmatro device. Emergency prehospital guillotine amputation of the distal femur can effectively be performed using scalpel and paramedic shears with bone cuts by the Gigli saw or fire service hacksaw. The reciprocating saw could be used to cut bone if no other equipment was available but carried some risks. The Holmatro cutting device is a viable option for a life-threatening entrapment where only firefighters can safely access the patient, but would not be a recommended primary technique for medical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Life after lower extremity amputation in diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, P St L; Williams, S K P; Weaver, S R

    2011-10-01

    Lower limb amputees typically have reduced mobility which affects their ability to perform daily tasks and to successfully reintegrate into community life. A major goal of rehabilitation for amputees is to improve quality of life (QOL). This study therefore focussed on QOL and functional independence for persons with lower limb amputations secondary to diabetes. To determine the QOL and functional independence of lower limb diabetic amputees one to three years post amputation, using variables such as age, gender and amputation level. A total of 87 participants were selected from the 2006-2009 physiotherapy records at the St Ann's Bay Hospital. These participants completed the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale (WHO QOL-BREF) and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Data were analysed using SPSS (version 12) and the mean values for QOL and functional independence were calculated. Relationships between the variables: age, gender and level of amputation with QOL and functional independence were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. Among the 35 males and 52 females participating in the study, below knee amputees recorded higher scores for QOL (p quality of life of all participants. The results showed that below knee amputees functioned better than those with above knee amputations and that females were more likely to cope and function with the disability than males.

  3. Impact of Chronic Kidney Disease on Survival After Amputation in Individuals With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Lawrence A.; Hunt, Nathan A.; Ndip, Agbor; Lavery, David C.; Van Houtum, William; Boulton, Andrew J.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify factors that influence survival after diabetes-related amputations. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We abstracted medical records of 1,043 hospitalized subjects with diabetes and a lower-extremity amputation from 1 January to 31 December 1993 in six metropolitan statistical areas in south Texas. We identified mortality in the 10-year period after amputation from death certificate data. Diabetes was verified using World Health Organization criteria. Amputations were identified by ICD-9-CM codes 84.11–84.18 and categorized as foot, below-knee amputation, and above-knee amputation and verified by reviewing medical records. We evaluated three levels of renal function: chronic kidney disease (CKD), hemodialysis, and no renal disease. We defined CKD based on a glomerular filtration rate Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes (90921, 90925, 90935, and 90937). We used χ2 for trend and Cox regression analysis to evaluate risk factors for survival after amputation. RESULTS Patients with CKD and dialysis had more below-knee amputations and above-knee amputations than patients with no renal disease (P amputation had a 167% increase in hazard (HR 2.67, 95% CI 2.14–3.34), and below-knee amputation patients had a 67% increase in hazard for death. CONCLUSIONS Survival after amputation is lower in diabetic patients with CKD, dialysis, and high-level amputations. PMID:20739688

  4. The potential benefit of pre-operative assessment of amputation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential benefit of pre-operative assessment of amputation wound healing potential in peripheral vascular disease. M. Mars, R. P. Mills, J. V. Robbs. Abstract. Choosing the most distal amputation level that will heal is difficult in patients with peripheral vascular disease. From 1984 to 1988,965 patients underwent 1 563 ...

  5. Physical proximity in anticipation of meeting someone with schizophrenia: the role of explicit evaluations, implicit evaluations and cortisol levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ross M G; Gawronski, Bertram; Hampson, Elizabeth; Sorrentino, Richard M; Szeto, Andrew; Ye, Yang

    2010-12-01

    It has been suggested that the study of the stigma of mental illness should include more behavioral measures and further investigation of the possible importance of implicit evaluations in predicting responses to those with such illness. In the current paper, we report a study testing the relationship of implicit and explicit evaluations to physical proximity and cortisol levels in anticipation of meeting someone with schizophrenia. The results showed that both explicit evaluations and cortisol levels independently predicted physical proximity. Implicit evaluations were not related to either physical proximity or cortisol levels. The findings suggest that there are aspects of emotional response to those with mental illness that are not reflected in explicit measures of evaluation and that these, as well as explicit responses, can contribute to the prediction of behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of finger amputation on grip strength and objectively measured hand function: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuret, Zala; Burger, Helena; Vidmar, Gaj

    2015-06-01

    Finger amputations are common and hands are essential for functioning, but studies on factors influencing functioning after finger amputation are lacking. Therefore, we aimed to explore the influence of the number and level of amputated fingers on hand function and grip strength. A prospective descriptive cross-sectional study involving 69 patients with partial or complete amputation of one or more fingers of one hand was carried out. The function of both hands was assessed using the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure test; grip strength was measured in 42 patients. We confirmed that finger amputation worsens hand function (especially tripod and tip pinch) and reduces grip strength, whereby the extent of the worsening depends on amputation type - it is the smallest after thumb amputation and the largest after amputation of the index finger and fingers III-V. However, because of the variety of amputation types, we recommend that future studies either involve very large samples or focus on specific amputations.

  7. Substantial reduction in the number of amputations among patients with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin S B; Yderstraede, Knud B; Carstensen, Bendix

    2016-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to describe the trends in rates of amputation among individuals with and without diabetes. METHODS: We studied amputation rates in the County of Funen (approximately 0.5 million residents) during the period 1996-2011. Amputations were identified from...... the hospital administrative system, diabetes status by linkage with the Danish National Diabetes Register, and mortality and population data by extraction from Statistics Denmark. Amputation rates were analysed using proportional hazard models. We analysed the incidence of the first amputation at each level...... as well as the incidence of further amputations, subdivided by level of amputation. RESULTS: During the period 1996-2011, a total of 2,832 amputations were performed, of which 1,285 were among patients with diabetes and 1,547 among individuals without diabetes. Relative to persons without diabetes...

  8. Lower limb amputation for diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, S; Inamori, Y; Fukuda, K; Hirotuji, M

    2001-01-01

    We amputated 35 limbs of 27 patients with diabetic foot from March 1988 to March 1998. The mean age of the patients at the time of operation was 67 years, and the mean follow-up period was 27 months. Thirteen patients died in the period from 1 day to 39 months after the operation. All patients suffering from diabetic foot were referred to our department for surgical procedures after failure of conservative treatment conducted elsewhere. Their feet were classified into grade 2-3 in 18 limbs, grade 4-5 in 11 limbs, and gangrene of the lower leg and entire foot in 2 limbs, as classified by the Wagner system. Two patients had cellulitis of the foot and two other limbs had infectious gonarthritis. All patients had type 2 diabetes with poor blood sugar control, and 90% were treated by insulin. All patients suffered from diabetic neuropathy. Half of the patients were put on hemodialysis because of diabetic nephropathy. More than 60% of the patients suffered from arteriosclerosis obliterans. The amputation level of the limb was determined by skin thermography, but the patient's will was critical. The initial amputation levels were: débridement and synovectomy in 4 limbs, toe and digital ray in 15 limbs, transmetatarsal in 3 limbs, transtibial in 9 limbs, transfemoral amputations in 4 limbs. Upper level reamputation was conducted on 15 limbs. Logistic regression analysis revealed that lower temperature of the amputation site, being female, and being elderly were significant risk factors in reamputation. Skin thermography was one of the effective determinants of amputation level, in order to avoid reamputation.

  9. Epidemiology of leg amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebskov, L B; Schroeder, T V; Holstein, P E

    1994-01-01

    The number of amputations performed for vascular disease in Denmark has decreased from 1777 (34.5 per 100,000 population) in 1983 to 1288 (25.0 per 100,000) in 1990, a reduction of 28 per cent. This decline coincided with an increase in vascular surgical activity of up to 100 per cent, including ...

  10. Leg or foot amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 119. Toy PC. General principles of amputations. In: Azar FM, Beaty JH, Canale ST, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 14. ...

  11. Preventable amputations in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Table 1 : Causes of mGor iirnb amputations at Tkur Anbessa Hospital. Yo). % ). --- es of amputathns. --. -. Table 2: Distribution of amputees by sex and specific causes of trauma. -. : accide ury. / ~otar. Causes of trauma. I Se. I R l r. Table 3: Distribution of amputees by sex and causes of gangrene. I raur uangrene. I urnor.

  12. The modified Pirogoff's amputation in treating diabetic foot infections: surgical technique and case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Nather

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This paper describes the surgical technique of a modified Pirogoff's amputation performed by the senior author and reports the results of this operation in a single surgeon case series for patients with diabetic foot infections. Methods: Six patients with diabetic foot infections were operated on by the National University Hospital (NUH diabetic foot team in Singapore between November 2011 and January 2012. All patients underwent a modified Pirogoff's amputation for diabetic foot infections. Inclusion criteria included the presence of a palpable posterior tibial pulse, ankle brachial index (ABI of more than 0.7, and distal infections not extending proximally beyond the midfoot level. Clinical parameters such as presence of pulses and ABI were recorded. Preoperative blood tests performed included a glycated hemoglobin level, hemoglobin, total white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, albumin, and creatinine levels. All patients were subjected to 14 sessions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy postoperatively and were followed up for a minimum of 10 months. Results: All six patients had good wound healing. Tibio-calcaneal arthrodesis of the stump was achieved in all cases by 6 months postoperatively. All patients were able to walk with the prosthesis. Conclusions: The modified Pirogoff's amputation has been found to show good results in carefully selected patients with diabetic foot infections. The selection criteria included a palpable posterior tibial pulse, distal infections not extending proximally beyond the midfoot level, ABI of more than 0.7, hemoglobin level of more than 10 g/dL, and serum albumin level of more than 30 g/L.

  13. Long-term Outcomes Following Syme's Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkler, Elissa S; Marchwiany, Daniel A; Schiff, Adam P; Pinzur, Michael S

    2017-07-01

    The metabolic cost of walking after Syme's ankle disarticulation amputation is minimally more than that for nonamputation. The ability to end weightbearing makes prosthetic fitting relatively simple, and very few patients require extensive rehabilitation or placement in a skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility. In spite of these potential benefits, there is a paucity of objective information on the actual long-term outcomes. Fifty-one patients were identified who underwent single-stage Syme's ankle disarticulation amputation with excision of the lateral and medial malleoli by a single surgeon during a 23-year period. None of these patients had sufficient tissue to allow amputation at the transmetatarsal or tarsometatarsal levels. Thirty-three underwent amputation due to a diabetic forefoot infection, 11 secondary to a crush injury, 3 for a nondiabetic infection, 3 for a noncorrectable acquired deformity, and 1 for neoplasm. The average age at surgery for the diabetic patients was 62.1 years (range, 36-81 years), with an average follow-up of 6.8 years (range, 4.0-11.6 years). The nondiabetic patients had an average age of 37.8 years (range, 21-65 years), with an average follow-up of 9.3 years (range, 2.2-25.0 years). Patients who were alive and could be contacted were invited to complete the Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) questionnaire that was scored for functional, mobility, and bothersome indices. Seventeen of the 33 diabetic patients died. Four (12.1%) were converted to transtibial amputation. One of the nondiabetic patients died, and 1 (5.5%) was converted to transtibial amputation. Eleven of the 33 patients who were contacted completed the SMFA. All of these patients demonstrated favorable outcome scores in the mobility, functional, and bothersome indices (average mobility index of 17.2, functional index of 14.7, and bothersome index of 16.7 for nondiabetic patients compared to 34.7, 29.9, and 30.6 for diabetic patients, respectively

  14. Functional and Clinical Outcomes of Upper Extremity Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbons, Peter; Medvedev, Gleb

    2015-12-01

    Upper extremity amputation is an uncommon but often necessary procedure. It can be required as a result of trauma, infection, or malignancy. Amputation is a life-changing procedure. Careful planning for it must not only include the level of amputation and assurance of durable soft-tissue coverage of the amputation site, but it must also consider patients' goals and occupations, as well as social factors affecting amputees. The choice of prosthesis is an individual matter, but new technology permits lighter and more multifunctional prostheses. Targeted muscle reinnervation can be used to achieve improved myoelectric signaling and possibly decrease limb pain following amputation. Rehabilitation is crucial to achieving favorable results. Copyright 2015 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  15. Calcanectomy, an alternative amputation? Two case reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Jutte, Paul; Rompen, Christiaan; Salvans, Merse

    2009-01-01

    A limb amputation is a traumatic experience for the amputee but it is also a challenge for the recipient to get used to a new situation and reach her/his greatest level of independence. Two patients are presented who had undergone a total calcanectomy. In the first case, a woman with spina bifida

  16. Rehabilitation for bilateral amputation of fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Stapanian, Adrienne M.P.; Staley, Keith E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe reconstructive surgeries, therapy, prostheses, and adaptations for a patient who experienced bilateral amputation of all five fingers of both hands through the proximal phalanges in January 1992. The patient made considerable progress in the use of his hands in the 10 mo after amputation, including nearly a 120% increase in the active range of flexion of metacarpophalangeal joints. In late 1992 and early 1993, the patient had "on-top plasty" surgeries, in which the index finger remnants were transferred onto the thumb stumps, performed on both hands. The increased web space and functional pinch resulting from these procedures made many tasks much easier. The patient and occupational therapists set challenging goals at all times. Moreover, the patient was actively involved in the design and fabrication of all prostheses and adaptations or he developed them himself. Although he was discharged from occupational therapy in 1997, the patient continues to actively find new solutions for prehension and grip strength 18 yr after amputation.

  17. Rates and predictors of readmission after minor lower extremity amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Robert J; Grimm, Joshua C; Lyu, Heather; Abularrage, Christopher J; Perler, Bruce A

    2015-07-01

    One goal of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is to reduce hospital readmissions, with financial penalties applied for excessive rates of unplanned readmissions within 30 days among Medicare beneficiaries. Recent data indicate that as many as 24% of Medicare patients require readmission after vascular surgery, although the rate of readmission after limited digital amputations has not been specifically examined. The present study was therefore undertaken to define the rate of unplanned readmission among patients after digital amputations and to identify the factors associated with these readmissions to allow the clinician to implement strategies to reduce readmission rates in the future. The electronic medical and billing records of all patients undergoing minor amputations (defined as toe or transmetatarsal amputations using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes) from January 2000 through July 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected for procedure- and hospital-related variables, level of amputation, length of stay, time to readmission, and level of reamputation. Patient demographics included hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, smoking history, and history of myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, peripheral arterial disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cerebrovascular accident. Minor amputations were performed in 717 patients (62.2% male), including toe amputations in 565 (72.8%) and transmetatarsal amputations in 152 (19.5%). Readmission occurred in 100 patients (13.9%), including 28 (3.9%) within 30 days, 28 (3.9%) between 30 and 60 days, and 44 (6.1%) >60 days after the index amputation. Multivariable analysis revealed that elective admission (P amputation in 64 (64%) of the patients (below knee in 58, through knee in 2, and above knee in 4). Readmission after minor amputation was associated with limb amputation in the majority of cases. This study identified a number of

  18. Tourniquets do not increase the total blood loss or re-amputation risk in transtibial amputations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wied, Christian; Tengberg, Peter T; Holm, Gitte

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the total blood loss (TBL) and the safety with respect to the re-amputation rate after transtibial amputation (TTA) conducted with and without a tourniquet. METHODS: The study was a single-centre retrospective cohort study of patients with a primary TTA admitted between January...... 2013 and April 2015. All patients with a primary TTA were assessed for inclusion if the amputation was performed because of arteriosclerosis or diabetic complications. All patients underwent a standardized TTA procedure that was performed approximately 10 cm below the knee joint and performed...... the two-year study period were included in the analysis. Of these, 38 were operated on using a tourniquet and 36 were operated on without using a tourniquet. There were no significant preoperative differences between the groups. The patients in both groups had a postoperative decrease in their Hgb level...

  19. Hel igen efter amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Elisabeth Bomholt

    2007-01-01

    aldersgrupper (Dansk Sygeplejeråd 2006) med amputation som mulig konsekvens. Formål Opnå indsigt i • hvad der kan medvirke til, at mennesker kan føle sig hele igen efter en benamputation, føle sig reintegreret i samfundet og opnå et tilfreds-stillende hverdagsliv • kropsforandringers indflydelse på identiteten...... • rehabilitering i rituel belysning med fokus på kroppens rolle Metode og materiale To måneders feltarbejde i 2006 i Danmark blandt ni mennesker, som havde fået amputeret en del af et ben, og som havde fået protese; samt blandt seks sundhedsprofessionelle. Metoderne har været deltagerobservation (passiv, moderat...... frigives plads til at kunne rette opmærksomheden andre steder hen; meget tidligt at oplyse om muligheden for og helst opfordre til at få besøg af en person, der selv har oplevet amputation på egen krop; tilrettelægge tilbud til grupper, så der skabes mulighed for at møde andre i ’samme’ situation; tage...

  20. ASSESSMENT OF QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS AFTER LOWER LIMB AMPUTATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knežević, Aleksandar; Salamon, Tatjana; Milankov, Miroslav; Ninković, Srđan; Jeremić Knežević, Milica; Tomašević Todorović, Snežana

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremity amputation is a surgical procedure resulting in important anatomical, functional, psychological, and social consequences that can influence the quality of life of these patients. The aim of this research was to compare the quality of life of patients with lower extremity amputation and people without amputation taking into account gender differences as well as the amputation level. The study was designed as a cross-sectional study which included 56 subjects. The patients from the experimental group underwent prosthetic rehabilitation treatment at the Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Clinical Centre of Vojvodina. The experimental group included 28 patients (21 male, 7 female) with lower extremity amputation, their average age being 65.36±13.64. The control group consisted of 28 age and gender matching subjects without amputation. Research ANd Development (RAND) 36--Item Health Survey 1.0 (SF-36) was used to measure the quality of life. The results showed that patients with lower extremity amputation scored lower than the control group on all SF-36 variables (p0.05). Seventeen (61%) patients were with transfemoral, and 11 (39%) with transtibial level of amputation. The patients with transtibial amputations scored higher on physical functioning and general health status variables (pamputations have numerous limitations compared to the control group, regardless of gender, while the patients with lower level of amputation have a higher level of physical functioning.

  1. Salvage of a Below Knee Amputation Utilizing Rotationplasty Principles in a Patient with Chronic Tibial Osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralle, Matthew R; Stekas, Nicholas D; Reilly, Mark C; Sirkin, Michael S; Adams, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Chronic osteomyelitis is a disease that requires fastidious treatment to eliminate. However, when eradication is unable to be achieved through exhaustive modalities of antibiotic therapy and multiple debridements, significant resection of the infected bone and soft tissue must be considered, including amputation. Here we report of a salvage procedure for chronic osteomyelitis of the left tibia by employing a rotationplasty to avoid an above knee amputation and instead provide the patient with a below knee amputation. A 51-year-old male presented to the emergency department after noticing dehiscence of an operative wound with exposure of an implant in the left lower extremity. Two years prior to presentation, the patient was involved in a motorcycle accident and underwent four surgeries in the Dominican Republic for an open fracture of the left tibia and fibula, including a procedure that involved the placement of an implant in the left proximal tibia. Tissue biopsies from the wound confirmed that the patient had osteomyelitis of the left proximal tibia. After extensive surgical and antibiotic intervention to eradicate the patient's osteomyeltis, it was eventually determined that an amputation would be necessary. In order to avoid an above knee amputation, a salvage procedure was conducted by employing a rotationplasty to provide the patient with a below knee amputation. When amputation is deemed necessary, sparing the knee joint is associated with decreased energy expenditures, increased patient satisfaction and overall better postoperative outcomes. As part of a multi-disciplinary team, orthopaedics, plastic surgery, infectious disease, and medical services successfully treated this case of chronic osteomyelitis of the left proximal tibia by employing a rotationplasty to avoid an above knee amputation and achieve a below knee amputation.

  2. Pediatric Traumatic Amputations in the United States: A 5-Year Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borne, Allen; Porter, Austin; Recicar, John; Maxson, Todd; Montgomery, Corey

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric traumatic amputations are devastating injuries capable of causing permanent physical and psychological sequelae. Few epidemiologic reports exist for guidance of prevention strategies. The objective of this study is to review the recent trends in pediatric traumatic amputations using a national databank. A review of all pediatric (age, 0 to 17 y) amputee patients was performed using the National Trauma Data Bank from 2007 to 2011. Data including demographics, location of amputation, and mechanism of injury were analyzed. In the analysis 2238 patients were identified. The majority of amputations occurred in the youngest (0 to 5 y) and oldest (15 to 17 y) age groups with a 3:1 male to female ratio. The most common amputation locations were finger (54%) and toe (20%). A caught between mechanism (16.3%) was most common overall followed by machinery, powered lawn mowers, motor vehicle collisions, firearms, and off-road vehicles. Males were statistically more likely to have an amputation and lawnmower injuries were statistically associated with lower extremity amputations in children 5 years old and below. Motor vehicle injuries were the most common cause of adolescent amputations. Firearm-related amputations occurred predominantly in adolescents, whereas off-road vehicle amputations occurred in all ages. Common trends in pediatric amputations are relatively unchanged over the last decade. Young children sustain more finger amputations from a caught between objects mechanism, whereas adolescents sustain serious amputations from higher energy mechanisms such as firearms-related and motor vehicle-related injuries. Lawnmower-related amputations continue to most significantly affect younger children despite increased public awareness. Improved prevention strategies targeting age and mechanism-related trends are necessary to prevent these costly and debilitating injuries. Level IV.

  3. Comparison of quality of life in people with partial foot and transtibial amputation: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Matthew; Dillon, Michael P; Duke, Emily J

    2016-08-01

    Quality of life is often cited as a key influence in decisions about partial foot and transtibial amputations despite there being no studies comparing quality of life in these groups. To compare quality of life in people with partial foot amputation or transtibial amputation secondary to peripheral vascular disease and determine factors influencing quality of life in these cohorts. Cross-sectional. Mail-out, mail-back version of the SF-36v2 Health Survey and an adapted version of the demographic section of the Trinity Amputation and Prosthesis Experience Scales-Revised were sent to people recruited through a large metropolitan hospital. Both the SF-36v2 mental health component summary and physical component summary scores were comparable in the partial foot amputation (n = 10) and transtibial amputation (n = 23) cohorts. A multivariate linear regression showed that age, time with diabetes and the presence of retinopathy significantly influenced either the SF-36v2 mental health component summary or physical component summary whereas amputation level did not. Results support existing descriptive data that indicate quality of life is comparable in cohorts with partial foot and transtibial amputation. Our results suggest that quality of life need not to be a consideration when deciding between partial foot and transtibial amputation for persons with vascular disease. Surgeons and patients may wish to focus on other considerations, such as the relative risk of ulceration and subsequent amputation, when choosing between partial foot and transtibial amputation. The similarity in quality of life between people with partial foot and transtibial amputation helps inform difficult decisions about amputation surgery by focusing on surgery that will reduce the risk of complications and secondary amputation without fear of compromising quality of life. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  4. Performance of scintillation proximity assay (SPA) to measure the level of VEGFR 1 protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEE, So-Young; LIM, Jae-Cheong; KIM, Jin-Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Scintillation proximity assay is a one of radioimmunoassay and can be assayed without the washing or filtration procedures normally used to separate bound from free fractions. Due to its simplicity and high-throughput protocol, it is broadly applicable to immunology, receptor binding, monitoring receptor-ligand interactions and enzyme reactions. Briefly, an antibody or receptor is coated on SPA beads. When a radiolabeled antigen or ligand binds to the beads, the SPA beads stimulate to emit short range electrons. The {sup 3}H and {sup 125}I are commonly used for radiolabeling and the produced photons are detectable with a liquid scintillation counter (LSC). A binding affinity of unlabeled ligands can be determined by competitive reaction of the radiolabeled ligands. Bevacizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody, and can stop or delay growth of tumors by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Bevacizumab was approved by FDA for metastatic cancer such as colorectal cancers, ovarian cancers, breast cancers and glioblastoma multiform of the brain. Recently, Dan G. duda et al. was reported that the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) in plasma may potentially be used as a negative selection biomarker. In this study, we describe a method using scintillation proximity assay to detect the amounts of VEGFR-1 protein. This method is successfully used to measure the concentration of VEGFR-1 protein in human cell extracts. In summary, a simple and sensitive assay is developed for measuring the amount of VEGFR 1 protein in cancer cell lysate using SPA beads. The antibody coating on the beads and antigen binding are achieved in one mixing step.

  5. Quality of Life of Nigerians with Unilateral Lower Limb Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Olusanjo Akosile

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the QoL of Nigerians with lower limb amputation and to investigate the influence of some clinical and socio-demographic variables on it. Method: Forty-seven individuals with lower limb amputation participated in this study. Participants’ age, gender, marital status, occupation, time since amputation, level of amputation, affected limb and use of prosthesis were recorded. Quality of life was then measured using the WHO QOL-BREF. Data were analysed using mean and standard deviation, Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test at 0.05 alpha levels. Results: Participants’ overall health and QoL scores were 3.6(SD 0.9 and 3.9(SD 0.7 respectively. Male subjects had significantly higher scores than females in the domains of physical health (p = 0.007, social relationships (p = 0.024 and overall health (p = 0.012. Prosthesis-wearing subjects scored significantly higher in the domains of physical health (p = 0.015, psychological health (p = 0.008 and environment (p = 0.011 and overall health (0.033, than those not wearing prosthesis. Level of amputation, leg dominance and pre-amputation occupational category had no significant influence on participants’ QoL. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that the QoL of individuals with lower limb amputation in Nigeria is moderate. The only factors which have significant influence on some QoL domains are gender and use of prosthesis.Implications: Individuals with lower limb amputation, particularly females and those not wearing prosthesis, require special attention. Clinicians should identify barriers to the use of prosthesis so as to enhance their quality of life.

  6. Regional intensity of vascular care and lower extremity amputation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodney, Philip P.; Holman, Kerianne; Henke, Peter K.; Travis, Lori L.; Dimick, Justin B.; Stukel, Therese A.; Fisher, Elliott. S.; Birkmeyer, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between the intensity of vascular care and population-based rate of major lower extremity amputation (above-or below-knee) from vascular disease. Background Because patient-level differences do not fully explain the variation in amputation rate across the United States, we hypothesized that variation in intensity of vascular care may also affect regional rates of amputation. Methods Intensity of vascular care was defined as the proportion of Medicare patients who underwent any vascular procedure in the year prior to amputation, calculated at the regional level (2003–2006), using the 306 hospital referral regions in the Dartmouth Atlas of Healthcare. We examined relationship between intensity of vascular care and major amputation rate, at the regional level, between 2007–2009. Results Amputation rates varied widely by region, from 1 to 27 per 10,000 Medicare patients. Compared to regions in the lowest quintile of amputation rate, patients in the highest quintile were commonly African American (50% versus 13%) and diabetic (38% versus 31%). Intensity of vascular care also varied across regions: fewer than 35% of patients underwent revascularization in the lowest quintile of intensity, while nearly 60% of patients underwent revascularization in the highest quintile. Overall, there was an inverse correlation between intensity of vascular care and amputation rate ranging from R= −0.36 for outpatient diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, to R= −0.87 for inpatient surgical revascularizations. In analyses adjusting for patient characteristics and socioeconomic status, patients in high vascular care regions were significantly less likely to undergo amputation without an antecedent attempt at revascularization (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.34–0.37, pamputation varies, and regions with the most intensive vascular care have the lowest amputation rate, although the observational nature of associations do not impart causality. High

  7. Elective amputation of a "healthy limb".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Rianne M; Guglielmi, Valeria; Denys, Damiaan

    2016-10-01

    Patients with body integrity identity disorder (BIID) experience a strong desire for amputation from very early on. BIID patients are often dismissed when they share their wish for amputation with surgeons. Consequently, patients resort to self-amputation, including complications and sometimes death. BIID patients are not psychotic and are mentally competent to oversee the consequences of an elective amputation. The authors offer arguments in favor of elective amputation.

  8. Tourniquets do not increase the total blood loss or re-amputation risk in transtibial amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wied, Christian; Tengberg, Peter T; Holm, Gitte; Kallemose, Thomas; Foss, Nicolai B; Troelsen, Anders; Kristensen, Morten T

    2017-01-18

    To investigate the total blood loss (TBL) and the safety with respect to the re-amputation rate after transtibial amputation (TTA) conducted with and without a tourniquet. The study was a single-centre retrospective cohort study of patients with a primary TTA admitted between January 2013 and April 2015. All patients with a primary TTA were assessed for inclusion if the amputation was performed because of arteriosclerosis or diabetic complications. All patients underwent a standardized TTA procedure that was performed approximately 10 cm below the knee joint and performed with sagittal flaps. The pneumatic tourniquet, when used, was inflated around the femur to a pressure of 100 mmHg above the systolic blood pressure. The number of blood transfusions within the first four postoperative days was recorded. The intraoperative blood loss (OBL), which is defined as the volume of blood lost during surgery, was determined from the suction volume and by the weight difference of the surgical dressings. The trigger for a blood transfusion was set at a decrease in the Hgb level amputation rate was evaluated within 30 d. Seventy-four out of 86 consecutive patients who underwent TTA within the two-year study period were included in the analysis. Of these, 38 were operated on using a tourniquet and 36 were operated on without using a tourniquet. There were no significant preoperative differences between the groups. The patients in both groups had a postoperative decrease in their Hgb level compared with preoperative baseline values. The patients operated on using a tourniquet received approximately three millilitres less blood transfusion per kilogram body weight compared with patients operated on without a tourniquet. The duration of surgery was shorter and the OBL was less for the tourniquet group than the non-tourniquet group, whereas no significant difference was observed for the TBL. The TBL median was 859 mL (IQR: 383-1315) in the non-tourniquet group vs 737 mL (IQR: 331

  9. Short term exposure to elevated levels of leptin reduces proximal tubule cell metabolic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briffa, Jessica F; Grinfeld, Esther; McAinch, Andrew J; Poronnik, Philip; Hryciw, Deanne H

    2014-01-25

    Leptin plays a pathophysiological role in the kidney, however, its acute effects on the proximal tubule cells (PTCs) are unknown. In opossum kidney (OK) cells in vitro, Western blot analysis identified that exposure to leptin increases the phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p44/42 and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Importantly leptin (0.05, 0.10, 0.25 and 0.50 μg/ml) significantly reduced the metabolic activity of PTCs, and significantly decreased protein content per cell. Investigation of the role of p44/42 and mTOR on metabolic activity and protein content per cell, demonstrated that in the presence of MAPK inhibitor U0126 and mTOR inhibitor Ku-63794, that the mTOR pathway is responsible for the reduction in PTC metabolic activity in response to leptin. However, p44/42 and mTOR play no role the reduced protein content per cell in OKs exposed to leptin. Therefore, leptin modulates metabolic activity in PTCs via an mTOR regulated pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fate of individuals with ischemic amputations in the REACH Registry: three-year cardiovascular and limb-related outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abola, Maria Teresa B; Bhatt, Deepak L; Duval, Sue; Cacoub, Patrice P; Baumgartner, Iris; Keo, Hong; Creager, Mark A; Brennan, Danielle M; Steg, Ph Gabriel; Hirsch, Alan T

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate systemic and limb ischemic event rates of PAD patients with prior leg amputation and determine predictors of adverse outcomes. The REduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health (REACH) Registry provided a prospective multinational cohort of 7996 outpatients with PAD enrolled from primary medical clinics in 44 countries in 2003-2004. 1160 patients (14.5%) had a prior leg amputation at any level. Systemic (myocardial infarction [MI], stroke, cardiovascular death) and limb (angioplasty, surgery, amputation) ischemic event rates were determined in a 3-year follow-up. PAD patients with leg amputations on entry had a 5-fold higher rate of a subsequent amputation (12.4% vs. 2.4%, Pprocedures compared with PAD patients without amputation. A nearly 2-fold increase in rates of cardiovascular death (14.5% vs. 7.7%, Pamputation was associated with higher rates of worsening PAD, subsequent lower extremity surgical revascularization procedures, re-amputation, non-fatal MI, and the composite outcome, including hospitalization. Adverse systemic and limb ischemic outcomes were similar regardless of amputation level. Individuals with a history of leg amputations have markedly elevated rates of systemic and limb-related outcomes. PAD patients with recent ischemic amputation have the highest risk of adverse events. A history of "minor" ischemic amputation may confer an identical systemic risk as "major" leg amputation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Difficult to predict early failure after major lower-extremity amputations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Holm, Gitte; Gebuhr, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The successful outcome of a major amputation depends on several factors, including stump wound healing. The purpose of this study was to examine the criteria upon which the index amputation was based and to identify factors associated with early amputation failure after major non...... rating above two. Patient characteristics and other factors potentially influencing early amputation failure within 30 days were evaluated. RESULTS: Eleven patients died (16%) and 11 (16%) had a re-amputation at a higher level, whereas four (6%) had a major revision at the same level within 30 days....... Amputations were performed by a house officer (n = 29), a specialist registrar (n = 27) or a consultant (n = 14). A total of 28 surgeons performed the included operations. Neither a preoperative skin perfusion test (only measured for 25 patients), nor any of the many other factors evaluated predicted early...

  12. Major limb amputation in Ibadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunlade, S O; Alonge, T O; Omololu, A B O; Gana, J Y; Salawu, S A

    2002-12-01

    A prospective study of patients who had major limb amputation at the University College Hospital Ibadan over a 5-year period is presented. One hundred and one major limb amputations were performed within this period (71 Males, 30 Females, M:F = 2.3:1). Trauma accounted for 48% of the cases followed by diabetes in 26%, soft tissue infection in 13% and tumours also in 13%. The major post-op complication was wound infection. In accordance with the findings in other centers, a higher proportion of the amputations (69%) were carried out in the lower limbs. Patient's refusal to accept amputation resulted in a delay in amputation in 49 patients. This delay (before surgery) ranged from 1 day to 150 days, with a mean of 15.49 (SD 9.V). From this study, we found that a reduction in vehicular accidents and increasing emphasis on efficient foot care (and glycaemic control) in the diabetic may significantly reduce the rate of amputations in our environment.

  13. Delayed amputation following trauma increases residual lower limb infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Abhilash; Glass, Graeme E; Ahmadi, Hootan; Mackey, Simon; Simmons, Jon; Hettiaratchy, Shehan; Pearse, Michael; Nanchahal, Jagdeep

    2013-04-01

    Residual limb infection following amputation is a devastating complication, resulting in delayed rehabilitation, repeat surgery, prolonged hospitalisation and poor functional outcome. The aim of this study was to identify variables predicting residual limb infection following non-salvageable lower limb trauma. All cases of non-salvageable lower limb trauma presenting to a specialist centre over 5 years were evaluated from a prospective database and clinical and management variables correlated with the development of deep infection. Forty patients requiring 42 amputations were identified with a mean age of 49 years (±19.9, 1SD). Amputations were performed for 21 Gustilo IIIB injuries, 12 multi-planar degloving injuries, seven IIIC injuries and one open Schatzker 6 fracture. One limb was traumatically amputated at the scene and surgically revised. Amputation level was transtibial in 32, through-knee in one and transfemoral in nine. Median time from injury to amputation was 4 days (range 0-30 days). Amputation following only one debridement and within 5 days resulted in significantly fewer stump infections (p = 0.026 and p = 0.03, respectively, Fisher's exact test). The cumulative probability of infection-free residual limb closure declined steadily from day 5. Multivariate analyses revealed that neither the nature of the injury nor pre-injury patient morbidity independently influenced residual limb infection. Avoiding residual limb infection is critically dependent on prompt amputation of non-salvageable limbs. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Racial Variation in Treatment of Traumatic Finger/Thumb Amputation: A National Comparative Study of Replantation and Revision Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Elham; Swiatek, Peter R; Chung, Kevin C; Ayanian, John Z

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic finger/thumb amputations are some of the most prevalent traumatic injuries affecting Americans each year. Rates of replantation after traumatic finger/thumb amputation, however, have been declining steadily across U.S. hospitals, which may make these procedures less accessible to minorities and vulnerable populations. The specific aim of this study was to examine racial variation in finger replantation after traumatic finger/thumb amputation. Using a two-level hierarchical model, the authors retrospectively compared replantation rates for African American patients with those of whites, adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics. Patients younger than 65 years with traumatic finger/thumb amputation injuries who sought care at a U.S. trauma center between 2007 and 2012 were included in the study sample. The authors analyzed 13,129 patients younger than 65 years with traumatic finger/thumb amputation. Replantation rates declined over time from 19 percent to 14 percent (p = 0.004). Adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics, African Americans (OR, 0.81; 95 percent CI, 0.66 to 0.99; p = 0.049) were less likely to undergo replantation procedures than whites, and uninsured patients (OR, 0.73; 95 percent CI, 0.62 to 0.84; p thumb replantation rates are declining in the United States and vulnerable populations are less likely to undergo replantation after amputation injuries. Regionalization of care for these injuries may not only provide a higher quality care but also reduce variations in treatment. Risk, III.

  15. Educational level as a contextual and proximate determinant of all cause mortality in Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, M; Prescott, E

    2003-01-01

    , exercise, alcohol use, and body mass index) and contextual factors (local area unemployment, income share, and household composition) were included in the Cox model. CONCLUSION: In this study the educational level of an area influenced subject's mortality, but first after adjustment for behavioural......): 0.87 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.98) and individual level (HR: 0.76 (95% CI 0.64 to 0.88) were inversely associated with mortality, when comparing the higest educated groups with the least educated. However, at parish level the effect was only present, when information on subject's income, behaviour (smoking...

  16. Is the T9, T11, or L1 the more reliable proximal level after adult lumbar or lumbosacral instrumented fusion to L5 or S1?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongjung J; Bridwell, Keith H; Lenke, Lawrence G; Rhim, Seungchul; Kim, Young-Woo

    2007-11-15

    A retrospective comparison study. To compare the postoperative proximal junctional change and revision prevalence as influenced by 3 different proximal levels after adult lumbar deformity instrumented fusion from the distal thoracic/upper lumbar spine (T9-L2) to L5 or S1. Few comparative studies on postoperative sagittal plane change and revision prevalence as influenced by 3 different proximal levels after adult lumbar deformity instrumented fusion from the distal thoracic/upper lumbar spine (T9-L2) to L5 or S1 have been published. Many surgeons have hypothesized that stopping proximally in the upper lumbar spine (L1 or L2) or the thoracolumbar junction (T11 or T12) would lead to a high percentage of rapid proximal degeneration, kyphosis, and decompensation because of the concentration of stress on these relatively mobile segments. Therein, many surgeons have felt it is unsafe to stop at these regions of the spine and it is better to always stop proximally at T9 or T10. A clinical and radiographic assessment in addition to revision prevalence of 125 adult lumbar deformity patients (average age 57.1 year) who underwent long (average 7.1 vertebrae) segmental posterior spinal instrumented fusion from the distal thoracic/upper lumbar spine (T9-L2) to L5 or S1 with a minimum 2-year follow-up (2-19.8 year follow-up) were compared as influenced by T9-T10 (group 1, n = 37), T11-T12 (group 2, n = 49), and L1-L2 (group 3, n = 39) proximal fusion levels. The revision prevalence and sagittal Cobb angle change at the proximal junction after surgery were compared. Three groups demonstrated nonsignificant differences in the prevalence of proximal junctional kyphosis (group 1 51% vs. group 2 55% vs. group 3 36%, P = 0.20) and revision (group 1 24% vs. group 2 24% vs. group 3 26%, P = 0.99) at the ultimate follow-up. Subsequent proximal junctional angle and sagittal vertical axis changes between the ultimate follow-up and preoperative (P = 0.10 and 0.46 respectively) were not

  17. A prospective randomized comparison of healing in Gritti-Stokes and through-knee amputations.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, W. B.; Morris, P J

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with a median age of 79 years had 24 amputations about knee joint level. The patients were randomised to undergo either Gritti-Stokes or through-knee amputations. In two-thirds of limbs transcutaneous oxygen was less than 4.65 KPa (35 mmHg) or there were no audible Doppler signals at the ankle, indicating that a below-knee amputation would have been at risk of failing to heal, and in the remainder an amputation at the knee joint was considered the preferable site for a var...

  18. Physiologic amputation: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeri; Hall, Virginia

    2014-03-01

    Acute limb ischemia is a complication of severe peripheral arterial disease that can be a threatening limb as well as life. Multiple procedures exist today to help revascularize extremities; however, even with the latest technologies, surgical amputation of the limb may still be necessary. Cryoamputation, or physiologic amputation, is a method used to treat patients who are hemodynamically unstable for the operating room and who are in need of urgent amputation owing to arterial ischemia. This procedure is used in the rare instance where not only a persons' limb is threatened, but also their life. This is a case study regarding one patient who presented to the hospital with limb-threatening ischemia who became hemodynamically unstable owing to the rhabdomyolysis associated with the ischemia of his lower extremity. Cryoamputation was used to stabilize the patient and prevent further deterioration, so that he could safely undergo surgical amputation of the limb without an increase in mortality risk. Cryoamputation must be followed by formal surgical amputation when the patient is hemodynamically stabilized. It is not a limb salvaging, procedure but it is a life-saving procedure. This case study demonstrates the usefulness of the procedure and discusses the technique used for cryoamputation. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. What Sport Activity Levels Are Achieved in Patients After Resection and Endoprosthetic Reconstruction for a Proximal Femur Bone Sarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobusch, Gerhard M; Bollmann, Jakob; Puchner, Stephan E; Lang, Nikolaus W; Hofstaetter, Jochen G; Funovics, Philipp T; Windhager, Reinhard

    2017-03-01

    Limited information is available about sports activities of survivors after resection and reconstruction of primary malignant bone tumors with megaprostheses. Because patients often ask what activities are possible after treatment, objective knowledge about sports activities is needed to help assess the risks of sports participation and to help guide patients' expectations. The aims of this study were to evaluate (1) what proportion of patients with proximal-femoral megaprostheses placed as part of tumor reconstructions can perform sports; (2) what activity levels they achieved; and (3) whether sports activity levels are associated with an increased likelihood of revision. This retrospective study considered all 27 living patients in our institutional tumor registry with enduring proximal-femoral reconstructions performed more than 5 years ago who were between the ages of 11 and 49 years at the time of the reconstruction; seven were lost to followup and one was excluded because of paraplegia as a result of a car accident and another because of senile dementia; another two were excluded from statistics because of growing prostheses and skeletal immaturity at the time of followup, leaving 16 (11 male, five female) for analysis. Their mean age was 26 ± 12 years (range, 11-49 years) at surgery, and the mean followup was 18 ± 7 years (range, 5-27 years). Types of sports, frequency per week, duration of each sports session as well as the UCLA and modified Weighted Activity Score were assessed retrospectively by an independent assessor a median of 18 years (range, 5.3-27 years) after surgery. Patients recalled that preoperatively 14 were practicing sports 5 (± 4) hours/week. At followup, 11 of the patients were practicing one or more sports activities 2 (± 3) hours/week on a regular basis. The preoperative UCLA and modified Weighted Activity Score levels of 9 and 6 fell to levels of 6 (p = 0.005) and 3 (p = 0.025), respectively, at followup. With the numbers of

  20. The role of elective amputation in patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Andrés A; Kircher, Michelle F; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2016-03-01

    Despite undergoing complex brachial plexus, surgical reconstructions, and rehabilitation, some patients request an elective amputation. This study evaluates the role of elective amputation after brachial plexus injury. A retrospective chart review was performed for all the 2140 patients with brachial plexus injuries treated with elective amputation between 1999 and 2012 at a single institution. Analysis was conducted on the potential predisposing factors for amputation, amputation level, and postamputation complications. Patients were evaluated using pre- and postamputation Disabilities of the Shoulder, Arm, and hand scores in addition to visual analog pain scores. The following three conditions were observed in all nine patients who requested an elective amputation: (1) Pan-plexus injury; (2) non-recovery (mid-humeral amputation) or elbow flexion recovery only (forearm amputation) 1 year after all other surgical options were performed; and (3) at least one chronic complication (chronic infection, nonunion fractures, full-thickness burns, chronic neck pain with arm weight, etc.). Pain improvement was found in five patients. Subjective patient assessments and visual analog pain scores before and after amputation did not show a statistically significant improvement in Disabilities of the Shoulder, Arm, and Hand Scores. However, four patients reported that their shoulder pain felt "better" than it did before the amputation, and two patients indicated they were completely cured of chronic pain after surgery. Elective amputation after brachial plexus injury should be considered as an option in the above circumstances. When the informed and educated decision is made, patients can have satisfactory outcomes regarding amputation. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Leg or foot amputation - dressing change

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000018.htm Leg or foot amputation - dressing change To use the sharing features ... chap 14. Read More Compartment syndrome Leg or foot amputation Peripheral artery disease - legs Type 1 diabetes ...

  2. Body Image, Relationships and Sexuality After Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Body Image, Relationships and Sexuality after Amputation Original article by Sandra Houston, PhD First Step - Volume 4, 2005 ... Amputations affect our lives in many ways – our body image, relationships, and even sexuality. Here is information about ...

  3. The changing pattern of amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kate V; Clasper, J C

    2013-12-01

    Conflict in the Middle East over the past 10 years has seen a change in warfare tactics from the use of ballistic missiles to blast weapons, which has resulted in a well-documented change in wounding patterns. Due to the severity of these injuries, there have been large numbers of amputations, both as life and limb saving procedures. The purpose of this paper is to retrospectively review all UK service personnel who have undergone limb amputation in the last 8 years of conflict and compare those from the early years with the more recent. All UK service personnel scoring more than 1 on the extremity score of the Abbreviated Injury Score were identified from the UK Joint Theatre Trauma Registry and separated into two temporal cohorts (August 2003-February 2008 and August 2008-July 2010). Intheatre medical facility and Role 4 hospital notes from the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham were examined for details of mechanisms of injury, number of limbs injured, associated injuries, method of amputation, microbiology of contaminating organisms and outcome. There were significant differences in the nature of the amputations, the number of multiple amputations and soft tissue perineal wounds, as well as a significantly higher Injury Severity Score in the later time period. There were also significant differences in the surgical techniques, with more guillotine amputations in the early group, and mechanism of injury, with more blast injuries in the late group. This study has confirmed the clinical impression that there has been a significant change in the limb trauma from the Iraq conflict to Afghanistan. These injury patterns have significantly different logistic implications and this must be considered when planning the required medical assets in future conflicts.

  4. The mangled extremity score and amputation: Time for a revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loja, Melissa N; Sammann, Amanda; DuBose, Joseph; Li, Chin-Shang; Liu, Yu; Savage, Stephanie; Scalea, Thomas; Holcomb, John B; Rasmussen, Todd E; Knudson, M Margaret

    2017-03-01

    The Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) was developed 25 years ago in an attempt to use the extent of skeletal and soft tissue injury, limb ischemia, shock, and age to predict the need for amputation after extremity injury. Subsequently, there have been mixed reviews as to the use of this score. We hypothesized that the MESS, when applied to a data set collected prospectively in modern times, would not correlate with the need for amputation. We applied the MESS to patient data collected in the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma PROspective Vascular Injury Treatment registry. This registry contains prospectively collected demographic, diagnostic, treatment, and outcome data. Between 2013 and 2015, 230 patients with lower extremity arterial injuries were entered into the PROspective Vascular Injury Treatment registry. Most were male with a mean age of 34 years (range, 4-92 years) and a blunt mechanism of injury at a rate of 47.4%. A MESS of 8 or greater was associated with a longer stay in the hospital (median, 22.5 (15, 29) vs 12 (6, 21); p = 0.006) and intensive care unit (median, 6 (2, 13) vs 3 (1, 6); p = 0.03). Of the patients' limbs, 81.3% were ultimately salvaged (median MESS, 4 (3, 5)), and 18.7% required primary or secondary amputation (median MESS, 6 (4, 8); p amputated limbs was no longer significantly different. Importantly, a MESS of 8 predicted in-hospital amputation in only 43.2% of patients. Therapeutic advances in the treatment of vascular, orthopedic, neurologic, and soft tissue injuries have reduced the diagnostic accuracy of the MESS in predicting the need for amputation. There remains a significant need to examine additional predictors of amputation following severe extremity injury. Prospective, prognostic study, level III.

  5. Diabetes Management and Its Association with Transtibial Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kun; Pogoda, Terri K

    2015-05-01

    Transtibial (TTA) and transfemoral (TFA) amputations are rarely considered as distinct events when examining major lower-limb amputation outcomes. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships among type 2 diabetes, diabetes management strategies, hemoglobin A1c levels, and other health factors related to TTA and TFA. The retrospective medical record review included abstracting demographic and health-related data from the electronic medical records of 92 patients who received amputation-related services in a Department of Veterans Affairs hospital. Patients who controlled their diabetes with insulin (with or without other oral agents) were significantly more likely to undergo TTA (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 7.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-49.97; P = .03) compared with patients who controlled their diabetes through noninsulin medications or by diet. Patients who underwent no previous surgery (aOR = 6.66; 95% CI, 0.89-49.72; P = .06) or partial amputation only (aOR = 15.44; 95% CI, 1.04-228.29; P = .05) compared with a combination of partial amputation and bypass, thrombolectomy, or stent procedures were marginally to statistically significantly more likely to undergo TTA than TFA. The preferential association between TTA with insulin-dependent diabetes and higher hemoglobin A1c levels versus TFA with previous lower-limb bypasses, stent placement, and thrombolytic interventions distinguishes TTA and TFA as two distinct entities, and awareness of this difference may help clinicians design preventive strategies accordingly.

  6. Osteomyoplastic transtibial amputation: technique and tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poka Attila

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Treatment of severe lower extremity trauma, diabetic complications, infections, dysvascular limbs, neoplasia, developmental pathology, or other conditions often involves amputation of the involved extremity. However, techniques of lower extremity amputation have largely remained stagnant over decades. This article reports a reproducible technique for transtibial osteomyoplastic amputation.

  7. Osteomyoplastic transtibial amputation: technique and tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Benjamin C; Poka, Attila

    2011-03-07

    Treatment of severe lower extremity trauma, diabetic complications, infections, dysvascular limbs, neoplasia, developmental pathology, or other conditions often involves amputation of the involved extremity. However, techniques of lower extremity amputation have largely remained stagnant over decades. This article reports a reproducible technique for transtibial osteomyoplastic amputation.

  8. Elective amputation of a "healthy limb"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Rianne M; Guglielmi, Valeria; Denys, D.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with body integrity identity disorder (BIID) experience a strong desire for amputation from very early on. BIID patients are often dismissed when they share their wish for amputation with surgeons. Consequently, patients resort to self-amputation, including complications and sometimes

  9. Peak Oxygen Consumption in Older Adults With a Lower Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, Daphne; de Haan, Arnold; Faber, Willemijn X.; Slootman, Hans J.; van der Woude, Lucas H.; Houdijk, Han

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether the aerobic capacity of older adults who underwent a lower limb amputation is associated with the presence, cause (traumatic or vascular), and level of amputation (transtibial or transfemoral). Design: Cross-sectional descriptive. Setting: Human motion laboratory at

  10. Pathophysiology of Post Amputation Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    standard ( afferent ) regional nerve/neuroma and (efferent) sympathetic nerve blocks, in the final results, we will report descriptive statistics and pain...psychophysical and biometric testing correlated with standard ( afferent ) regional nerve/neuroma and (efferent) sympathetic nerve blocks, in the final...amputation pain, pathophysiology, peripheral nervous system, afferent nervous system, central nervous system, sympathetic nervous system 3

  11. Phantom pain after eye amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Prause, Jan U; Toft, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the quality of phantom pain, its intensity and frequency following eye amputation. Possible triggers and relievers of phantom pain are investigated. Methods: The hospital database was searched using surgery codes for patients who received ocular evisceration, enucleation,...... appears to be similar to the phantom pain suffered by limb amputees. Patients should be informed about this potential complication before surgery....

  12. AMPUTATION AND REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GEERTZEN, JHB; EISMA, WH

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by chronic burning pain, restricted range of motion, oedema and vasolability. Patients are difficult to treat and the prognosis is very often poor. This report emphasizes that an amputation in case of a reflex sympathetic

  13. Replantation versus Prosthetic Fitting in Traumatic Arm Amputations: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris A Otto

    Full Text Available Traumatic arm amputations can be treated with replantation or surgical formalization of the stump with or without subsequent prosthetic fitting. In the literature, many authors suggest the superiority of replantation. This systematic review compared available literature to analyze whether replantation is functionally and psychologically more profitable than formalization and prosthetic fitting in patients with traumatic arm amputation.Functional outcome and satisfaction levels were recorded of patients with amputation levels below elbow, through elbow, and above elbow.Functional outcomes of 301 replantation patients and 172 prosthesis patients were obtained. In the replantation group, good or excellent functional scores were reported in 39% of above elbow, 55% of through elbow, and 50% of below elbow amputation cases. Nearly 100% of patients were satisfied with the replanted limb. In the prosthesis group, full use of the prosthesis was attained in 48% of above elbow and in 89% of below elbow amputation patients. Here, 29% of patients elected not to use the prosthesis for reasons including pain and functional superfluity. In both replantation patients and prosthesis wearers, a below elbow amputation yielded better functional results than higher amputation levels.Replantation of a traumatically amputated arm leads to good function and higher satisfaction rates than a prosthesis, regardless of the objective functional outcome. Sensation and psychological well-being seem the two major advantages of replantation over a prosthesis. The current review of the available literature shows that in carefully selected cases replantation could be the preferred option of treatment.

  14. Replantation versus Prosthetic Fitting in Traumatic Arm Amputations: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Iris A; Kon, Moshe; Schuurman, Arnold H; van Minnen, L Paul

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic arm amputations can be treated with replantation or surgical formalization of the stump with or without subsequent prosthetic fitting. In the literature, many authors suggest the superiority of replantation. This systematic review compared available literature to analyze whether replantation is functionally and psychologically more profitable than formalization and prosthetic fitting in patients with traumatic arm amputation. Functional outcome and satisfaction levels were recorded of patients with amputation levels below elbow, through elbow, and above elbow. Functional outcomes of 301 replantation patients and 172 prosthesis patients were obtained. In the replantation group, good or excellent functional scores were reported in 39% of above elbow, 55% of through elbow, and 50% of below elbow amputation cases. Nearly 100% of patients were satisfied with the replanted limb. In the prosthesis group, full use of the prosthesis was attained in 48% of above elbow and in 89% of below elbow amputation patients. Here, 29% of patients elected not to use the prosthesis for reasons including pain and functional superfluity. In both replantation patients and prosthesis wearers, a below elbow amputation yielded better functional results than higher amputation levels. Replantation of a traumatically amputated arm leads to good function and higher satisfaction rates than a prosthesis, regardless of the objective functional outcome. Sensation and psychological well-being seem the two major advantages of replantation over a prosthesis. The current review of the available literature shows that in carefully selected cases replantation could be the preferred option of treatment.

  15. Reoperation after combat-related major lower extremity amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintle, Scott M; Shawen, Scott B; Forsberg, Jonathan A; Gajewski, Donald A; Keeling, John J; Andersen, Romney C; Potter, Benjamin K

    2014-04-01

    Complication rates leading to reoperation after trauma-related amputations remain ill defined in the literature. We sought to identify and quantify the indications for reoperation in our combat-injured patients. Retrospective review of a consecutive series of patients. Tertiary Military Medical Center. Combat-wounded personnel sustaining 300 major lower extremity amputations from Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom from 2005 to 2009. We performed a retrospective analysis of injury and treatment-related data, complications, and revision of amputation data. Prerevision and postrevision outcome measures were identified for all patients. The primary outcome measure was the reoperation on an amputation after a previous definitive closure. Secondary outcome measures included ambulatory status, prosthesis use, medication use, and return to duty status. At a mean follow-up of 23 months (interquartile range: 16-32), 156 limbs required reoperation leading to a 53% overall reoperation rate. Ninety-one limbs had 1 indication for reoperation, whereas 65 limbs had more than 1 indication for reoperation. There were a total of 261 distinct indications for reoperation leading to a total of 465 additional surgical procedures. Repeat surgery was performed semiurgently for postoperative wound infection (27%) and sterile wound dehiscence/wound breakdown (4%). Revision amputation surgery was also performed electively for persistently symptomatic residual limbs due to the following indications: symptomatic heterotopic ossification (24%), neuromas (11%), scar revision (8%), and myodesis failure (6%). Transtibial amputations were more likely than transfemoral amputations to be revised due to symptomatic neuromata (P = 0.004; odds ratio [OR] = 3.7; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.45-9.22). Knee disarticulations were less likely to require reoperation when compared with all other amputation levels (P = 0.0002; OR = 7.6; 95% CI = 2.2-21.4). In our patient population, reoperation to

  16. A reliable surgical approach for the two-staged amputation in unsalvageable limb and life threatening acute progressive diabetic foot infections: tibiotalar disarticulation with vertical crural incisions and secondary transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altindas, Muzaffer; Kilic, Ali; Cinar, Can

    2011-03-01

    If all efforts to treat acute progressive diabetic foot infection remain insufficient, the decision of major amputation should be undertaken. For this purpose, guillotine amputation is usually performed first. However, guillotine amputation below the knee level may cause the corresponding infection to spread to preserved anatomical spaces. First stage of our procedure consists of tibiotalar disarticulation and vertical incisions performed throughout the lower leg to remove the septic foot and drain the compartments. During the interval period, appropriate antibiotherapy and wound care are applied. After the interval period, definitive transtibial amputation is performed in the second stage. Fifty-nine percent of the 62 transtibial amputations were healed completely. Failure developed in 3 cases which required opening of the amputation stump. In one patient, revision amputation at a higher transtibial level was done. Infection and necrosis reached to the knee joint in the other two patients and transfemoral amputation became the only treatment option for these 2 cases. Tibiotalar disarticulation with vertical lower leg incisions as a first stage of two-stage transtibial amputation is a safe and reliable method. It reduces the risk of unnecessary tissue sacrifice and failure rate of the secondary transtibial amputation. Copyright © 2009 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Transfemoral Amputation After Failure of Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfriedsen, Tinne B; Schrøder, Henrik M; Odgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfemoral amputation is considered the last treatment option for failed knee arthroplasty. The extent to which this procedure is performed is not well known. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and causes of amputation following failure of knee arthroplasty...... were followed by amputation. Hospital records of all identified cases were reviewed. A competing-risk model was used to estimate the cumulative incidence of amputation. Differences in cumulative incidences were analyzed with use of the Gray test. RESULTS: A total of 115 amputations were performed...... for causes related to failed knee arthroplasty. The 15-year cumulative incidence of amputation was 0.32% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23% to 0.48%). The annual incidence of amputation following arthroplasties performed from 1997 to 2002 was 0.025% compared with 0.018% following arthroplasties performed...

  18. The utilization of a suture bridge construct for tibiofibular instability during transtibial amputation without distal bridge synostosis creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Louis R; Tintle, Scott M; D'Alleyrand, Jean-Claude G; Potter, Benjamin K

    2013-10-01

    Symptomatic distal tibiofibular instability is a known complication of trauma-related transtibial amputations. Overt proximal tibiofibular dislocations, which are easily recognized on routine radiographs, may occur concurrently with the traumatic injury or amputation. More commonly, however, the proximal tibiofibular joint remains structurally intact in the presence of distal instability due to the loss of the distal syndesmotic structures and damage to the interosseous membrane, resulting in fibular angulation and distal tibiofibular diastasis. Some authors have espoused treating this instability with the creation of a distal tibiofibular bridge synostosis (the so-called Ertl procedure or modifications there of) to prevent potentially painful discordant motion and to minimize the prominence of the residual distal fibula. Recent studies, however, have suggested an increase in complication and reoperation rates in transtibial amputations that received a bridge synostosis compared with standard transtibial amputations. Additionally, although there are several described techniques for bridge synostosis creation, most are dependent on having sufficient remaining fibula to construct the bone bridge without unnecessary shortening of the tibia; however, sufficient residual fibula is not always available after traumatic and trauma-related amputations. We propose a technique utilizing a suture bridge to restore tibiofibular stability when performing transtibial amputations in patients with proximal tibiofibular dislocations or distal diastasis, avoiding the potential need for a distal bridge synostosis.

  19. Transmetatarsal Amputation: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan McCallum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Foot ulceration is a major cause of morbidity amongst patients with diabetes. In severe cases of ulceration, osteomyelitis and amputation can ensue. A distinct lack of agreement exists on the most appropriate level of amputation in cases of severe foot ulceration/infection to provide predictable healing rates. This paper provides an overview of the transmetatarsal amputation (TMA as a limb salvage procedure and is written with the perspective and experiences of the Department of Podiatric Surgery at West Middlesex University Hospital (WMUH. We have reflected on the cases of 11 patients (12 feet and have found the TMA to be an effective procedure in the management of cases of severe forefoot ulceration and infection.

  20. INCORRECT PRESERVATION OF AMPUTATED DIGITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uroš Ahčan

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. A decision to replant is critically dependent on the condition of the amputated digit and the way it was preserved during transport. The most common error is exposing the amputated digit to very low temperatures. Preservation directly on ice, on cooling devices in portable refrigerators, or on top of packets of frozen meat often result in a frozen and therefore unusable body digit.Methods. An inquiry questionnaire on correct methods of preservation of amputated digits was conducted on a sample of 30 lay persons, 30 medical students, and 15 physicians.Three simulations of most frequently used methods of preservation of amputated digit were conducted (the correct method; directly on ice; on cooling devices of portable refrigerators. Environment temperature of the (simulated amputated digits stored was measured.In a retrospective study, hospital records of patients treated at the Clinical department of plastic surgery and burns in Ljubljana between 1998 and 2002 were examined. We determined the number of replantations performed, gender of the patients, their age, the mechanism of the injury, the success rate of the replantation, and the duration of hospitalisation. In five case described in detail, we present an inadequate treatment of the amputated digits.Results. The results of the questionnaire survey show that no less than 86.7% of lay person respondents would have treated the injuries in an incorrect way; same holds for 43.4% students of medicine, and 33.3% of practicing physicians.The temperature of the simulated amputated digit remained above 5°C throughout the simulated correct treatment. When preserved directly on ice on or coolant bodies, the temperature dropped below the freezing point and never climbed above 0°C throughout the duration of the simulation (150 minutes.Between years 1998 and 2002, Clinical department of plastic surgery and burns at the University clinical centre Ljubljana admitted 124 injured persons with

  1. Quality of life in persons with partial foot or transtibial amputation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Matthew; Dillon, Michael P

    2016-02-01

    Systematic review. Common beliefs about quality of life in people with partial foot and transtibial amputation are often described as passing comments in the literature with seeming little research evidence. A clear understanding of the research evidence is important to inform decisions about amputation level from a quality of life perspective. To systematically gather and appraise research evidence comparing quality of life between persons with partial foot and transtibial amputation. A comprehensive suite of databases (e.g. Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and Web of Science) were searched using terms relating to amputation level and quality of life. Reference lists of articles that met the inclusion criteria were hand searched. Included studies reported quantitative data for persons with partial foot and transtibial amputation secondary to peripheral vascular disease and diabetes. Studies were appraised using the McMaster University Critical Review form. There is insufficient evidence comparing quality of life in people with partial foot and transtibial amputation. The available evidence suggests that quality of life may be very similar in people with partial foot and transtibial amputation and the small differences are not likely to be clinically meaningful. Without adequate evidence comparing quality of life in people with partial foot and transtibial amputation, it is difficult to inform decisions about amputation level from a quality of life perspective. There is insufficient evidence about differences in QoL between persons with PFA or TTA. Contrary to common belief, the available evidence suggests that QoL may be similar in persons with PFA and TTA. Further research is needed to inform decisions about amputation level from a QoL perspective. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  2. Elevated Levels of SOX10 in Serum from Vitiligo and Melanoma Patients, Analyzed by Proximity Ligation Assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andries Blokzijl

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of malignant melanoma currently relies on clinical inspection of the skin surface and on the histopathological status of the excised tumor. The serum marker S100B is used for prognostic estimates at later stages of the disease, but analyses are marred by false positives and inadequate sensitivity in predicting relapsing disorder.To investigate SOX10 as a potential biomarker for melanoma and vitiligo.In this study we have applied proximity ligation assay (PLA to detect the transcription factor SOX10 as a possible serum marker for melanoma. We studied a cohort of 110 melanoma patients. We further investigated a second cohort of 85 patients with vitiligo, which is a disease that also affects melanocytes.The specificity of the SOX10 assay in serum was high, with only 1% of healthy blood donors being positive. In contrast, elevated serum SOX10 was found with high frequency among vitiligo and melanoma patients. In patients with metastases, lack of SOX10 detection was associated with treatment benefit. In two responding patients, a change from SOX10 positivity to undetectable levels was seen before the response was evident clinically.We show for the first time that SOX10 represents a promising new serum melanoma marker for detection of early stage disease, complementing the established S100B marker. Our findings imply that SOX10 can be used to monitor responses to treatment and to assess if the treatment is of benefit at stages earlier than what is possible radiologically.

  3. [Incidence of major lower limb amputation in Geneva: twenty-one years of observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, G A; Lacraz, A; Hoffmeyer, P; Assal, M

    2014-10-22

    Between 1990 and 2010 the incidence of major lowerlimb amputations (by definition any level of amputation above the foot) in the canton of Geneva was 10.02 per 100,000 inhabitants/ year. The analysis of various population groups revealed that the presence of diabetes increased the relative risk of amputation by a factor of 20, and age 65 years or older by a factor of 9. During this 21 years period we observed a gradual decline in the incidence of amputation and an increased age at the time of amputation, despite the increasing prevalence of diabetes and an aging population. This was a reflection on the efforts of primary and secon- dary prevention, initiated in the 1980s in which Geneva was a pioneer.

  4. An Epidemiological and Etiological Report on Lower Extremity Amputation in Northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Rouhani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lower extremity amputation has different etiologies and the purpose of the study was to describe the demographics and etiologies of amputations. This study was designed to evaluate amputations performed in the province of Eastern Azerbaijan (north-west of Iran and to       determine specific causes of amputations associated with geographical and cultural characteristics of the region.   Methods: We have done this retrospective and descriptive study from June 1st, 2005 to June 1st, 2010 in Tabriz Shohada Hospital (Tabriz, Iran. The patients were evaluated with respect to age, sex, etiology, side and level of amputations, prevalence of amputations among the sexes at different ages and surgical interventions performed. Results: One-hundred-sixty files were identified with a diagnosis of lower limb amputation. Trauma was the most frequent cause in 67 cases (46%, followed by vascular disease in 61 cases (42%, and then infection in 18 cases (12%. Eighty percent of patients were male and 20% were female. Conclusion: This investigation shows that trauma (especially due to car accidents is the most common cause of amputations in our region, followed by vascular problems.

  5. The Boyd amputation in children: indications and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberry, David E; Davids, Jon R; Pugh, Linda I

    2014-01-01

    The level of amputation in the pediatric population requires appropriate planning to provide an optimal residual limb for prosthetic fitting and must include long-term strategies to accommodate future growth of the extremity. A retrospective review over a 15-year period was performed of all Boyd procedures (calcaneotibial fusion) in the pediatric limb deficiency population at a single institution. A chart review and radiographic analysis was performed to identify the indications, surgical outcomes, complications, need for additional surgical intervention, and nature of the postoperative prosthetic management. Optimal positioning of the calcaneotibial fusion and the growth-dependent changes in the morphology of the fusion site were determined by radiographic analysis. A total of 109 children (117 limbs) were identified for inclusion in the study. The average age at the time of the Boyd procedure was 2.8 years. The most common indication for the Boyd procedure was a diagnosis of postaxial limb bud deficiency, which accounted for 66% of cases. Concomitant procedures were performed in 24% of cases and included proximal tibial epiphyseodesis, tibial osteotomy, or knee fusion in the majority of cases. Additional procedures were required in 33% of cases either for treatment of complication (9%) or optimization of the residual limb (24%). For the entire cohort, the complication rate was 14%. Complications were most common when the Boyd procedure was used as a treatment strategy for congenital pseudoarthrosis of the tibia. Prosthetic management utilizing supramalleolar suspension with complete end-bearing through the residual limb was possible for the majority of cases. The Boyd procedure is an effective treatment for various conditions of the lower extremity. Concomitant or additional procedures after the initial intervention may be required for complete optimization of the residual limb. Level IV.

  6. Factors affecting healing and survival after finger amputations in patients with digital artery occlusive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Gregory J; McClary, Ashley; Liem, Timothy K; Mitchell, Erica L; Azarbal, Amir F; Moneta, Gregory L

    2013-05-01

    Finger amputations are typically performed as distal as possible to preserve maximum finger length. Failure of primary amputation leads to additional procedures, which could potentially be avoided if a more proximal amputation was initially performed. The effect of single versus multiple procedures on morbidity and mortality is not known. We evaluated factors that predicted primary healing and the effects of secondary procedures on survival. Patients undergoing finger amputations from 1995 to 2011 were evaluated for survival with uni- and multivariate analysis of demographic data and preoperative vascular laboratory studies to assess factors influencing primary healing. Seventy-six patients underwent 175 finger amputations (range 1 to 6 fingers per patient). Forty-one percent had diabetes, 33% had nonatherosclerotic digital artery disease, and 29% were on dialysis. Sex distribution was equal. Primary healing occurred in 78.9%, with the remainder requiring revisions. By logistic regression analysis, nonatherosclerotic digital artery disease was associated with failure of primary healing (odds ratio = 7.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 54; P = .047). Digital photoplethysmography did not predict primary healing. The overall healing of primary and secondary finger amputations was 96.0%. The mean survival after the initial finger amputation was 34.3 months and did not differ between patients undergoing single (35.6 months) versus multiple procedures (33.6 months). Dialysis dependence was associated with decreased survival (hazard ratio = 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.13 to 7.25; P = .026). Failure of primary healing is associated with the presence of nonatherosclerotic digital artery disease and is not predicted by digital photoplethysmographic studies. Dialysis dependence is associated with decreased survival in patients with finger amputations, but failure of primary healing does not adversely affect survival. A strategy of aggressive preservation of finger

  7. Transfemoral Amputation After Failure of Knee Arthroplasty: A Nationwide Register-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfriedsen, Tinne B; Schrøder, Henrik M; Odgaard, Anders

    2016-12-07

    Transfemoral amputation is considered the last treatment option for failed knee arthroplasty. The extent to which this procedure is performed is not well known. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and causes of amputation following failure of knee arthroplasty in a nationwide population. Data were extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register. With use of individual data linkage, 92,785 primary knee arthroplasties performed from 1997 to 2013 were identified. Of these, 258 were followed by amputation. Hospital records of all identified cases were reviewed. A competing-risk model was used to estimate the cumulative incidence of amputation. Differences in cumulative incidences were analyzed with use of the Gray test. A total of 115 amputations were performed for causes related to failed knee arthroplasty. The 15-year cumulative incidence of amputation was 0.32% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23% to 0.48%). The annual incidence of amputation following arthroplasties performed from 1997 to 2002 was 0.025% compared with 0.018% following arthroplasties performed from 2008 to 2013 (p = 0.06). The causes of the amputation were periprosthetic infection in 95 cases (83%), soft-tissue deficiency in 26 (23%), severe bone loss in 21 (18%), extensor mechanism disruption in 11 (10%), intractable pain in 11 (10%), periprosthetic fracture in 10 (9%), and vascular complications in 9 (8%). In 92 (80%) of the cases, there were ≥2 indications for amputation. The cumulative incidence of amputation within 15 years after primary knee arthroplasty was 0.32%, with a tendency toward a decreasing incidence in the last part of the study period. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  8. Phantom pain in bilateral upper limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modirian, Ehsan; Shojaei, Hadi; Soroush, Mohammad Reza; Masoumi, Mahdi

    2009-01-01

    To alert health professionals on presence and extent of phantom pain and sensation following bilateral upper limb amputation. Of a total of 140 war-related bilateral upper limb amputees in Iran, 103 subjects were thoroughly examined in this cross-sectional study by a physical medicine specialist. The patients were questioned for the presence of phantom pain and sensations, and frequency and intensity of the feeling were recorded. At 17.1 +/- 6.1 years after injury, 82.0% of the 103 amputees suffered from phantom sensation, including varying degrees of phantom limb pain in 53.9% of stumps. Phantom phenomena had a higher frequency in the right extremities, but this was not statistically significant (p > 0.01). Of those amputees who had phantom pain or sensation, 51.2% reported that they 'always' had phantom limb sensation; and approximately one-fourth of the subjects (24.6%) 'always' had phantom pain. Among the stumps who reported phantom pain (N=112), the pain was excruciating (38.5%), distressing (34.9%) or discomforting (25.6%). A significant statistical relation between phantom limb sensation and level of amputation was observed (p phantom pain; medical and surgical modalities only bring temporary relief, and less than 1% of the respondents achieve permanent relief through different treatment methods.

  9. The importance of orthoses on activities of daily living in patients with unilateral lower limb amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onat, Sule Sahin; Ünsal-Delialioğlu, Sibel; Özel, Sumru

    2017-01-01

    The role of the selected prothesis on activities of daily living (ADL). To evaluate the impact of prothesis on ADL in patients with lower-limb amputations. The data of 500 patients with unilateral lower limb amputation were recorded. The activity level was defined based on the Medicare Functional Classification Level. Old and new prescribed prosthesis were recorded. Nottingham Extended Activities of daily living activities Daily Living Scale was used to evaluate ADL. Amputation levels were transfemoral (TF) in 268 (53.6%), transtibial (TT) in 178 (35.6%), knee disarticulation (KD) in 54 (10.8%). In patients with TF and KD amputation active vacuum system, pin modular system, hydraulic system and mechanical modular prosthesis were replaced with the swing stance phase microprocessor-controlled prostheses. In patients with TT amputation pin modular system, hydraulic system and mechanical modular prosthesis were converted to active vacuum system prostheses. Prescribed new prosthesis has caused a statistically significant increase in all amputation levels in ADL of patients (p≤ 0.05). We observed that there was significant improvement in ADL when conventional prostheses replaced with advanced technology prostheses in unilateral lower extremity amputation patients.

  10. Adult outcomes following amputation or lengthening for fibular deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Janet L; Knapp, Dwana; Minter, Christin; Boakes, Jennette L; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Sanders, James O; Lubicky, John P; Drvaric, David M; Davids, Jon R

    2009-04-01

    health-related quality of life or physical function. The patients who were treated with lengthening had started out with more residual foot rays and more fibular preservation than the amputees. They also required more surgical intervention than did those with an amputation. While patients with an amputation spent less of their childhood undergoing treatment, they were found to have a better outcome in terms of only one of seventeen quality-of-life parameters. Both groups of patients who had had treatment of fibular deficiency were functioning at high levels, with an average to above-average quality of life compared with that of the normal adult population.

  11. Long-term mortality after lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajiv Kumar; Prasad, Guru

    2016-10-01

    Mortality after amputation is known to be extremely high and is associated with a number of patient features. We wished to calculate this mortality after first-time lower-limb amputation and investigate whether any population or treatment factors are associated with worse mortality. To follow up individuals after lower limb amputation and ascertain the mortality rate as well as population or treatment features associated with mortality. A prospective cohort study. Prospective lower-limb amputations over 1 year (N = 105) at a Regional Rehabilitation Centre were followed up for 3 years. After 3 years, 35 individuals in the cohort had died, representing a mortality of 33%. On initial univariate analysis, those who died were more likely to have diabetes mellitus (χ(2) = 7.16, df = 1, p = 0.007) and less likely to have been fitted with a prosthesis (χ(2) = 5.84, df = 1, p = 0.016). There was no association with age, gender, level of amputation, social isolation, significant medical co-morbidity other than diabetes or presence of mood disorders. A multi-variable logistic regression (backward step) confirmed that diabetes (odds ratio = 3.04, confidence intervals = 1.25-7.40, p = 0.014) and absence of prosthesis-fitting (odds ratio = 2.60, confidence interval = 1.16-6.25, p = 0.028) were independent predictors of mortality. Mortality after amputation is extremely high and is increased in individuals with diabetes or in those who are not fitted with a prosthesis after amputation. The link between diabetes and mortality after amputation has been noted by others, but this is the first study to find an effect from prosthetic limb-wearing. This requires further investigation to ascertain why the wearing of a prosthetic limb, confers an independent survival benefit that is not related to the presence of medical co-morbidity. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  12. Prevalence of phantom limb pain, stump pain, and phantom limb sensation among the amputated cancer patients in India: A prospective, observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The phantom limb pain (PLP and phantom limb sensation (PLS are very common among amputated cancer patients, and they lead to considerable morbidity. In spite of this, there is a lack of epidemiological data of this phenomenon among the Asian population. This study was done to provide the data from Indian population. Methods: The prevalence of PLP, stump pain (SP, and PLS was prospectively analyzed from the amputated cancer patients over a period of 2 years in Dr. B.R.A. Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. The risk factors and the impact of phantom phenomenon on patients were also noted. Results: The prevalence of PLP was 41% at 3 and 12 months and 45.3% at 6 months, whereas that of SP and PLS was 14.4% and 71.2% at 3 months, 18.75% and 37.1% at 6 months, 15.8% and 32.4% at 12 months, respectively. There was higher prevalence of PLP and PLS among the patients with history of preamputation pain, smoking with proximal level of amputation, receiving general anesthesia, receiving intravenous (IV opioid postoperative analgesia, and developing neuroma or infection. Conclusion: The prevalence of PLP and PLS was higher among the cancer amputees as compared to SP, and a few risk factors responsible for their higher prevalence were found in our study. The PLP and PLS lead to considerable morbidity in terms of sleep disturbance and depression.

  13. Prevalence of Phantom Limb Pain, Stump Pain, and Phantom Limb Sensation among the Amputated Cancer Patients in India: A Prospective, Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Arif; Bhatnagar, Sushma; Mishra, Seema; Khurana, Deepa; Joshi, Saurabh; Ahmad, Syed Mehmood

    2017-01-01

    The phantom limb pain (PLP) and phantom limb sensation (PLS) are very common among amputated cancer patients, and they lead to considerable morbidity. In spite of this, there is a lack of epidemiological data of this phenomenon among the Asian population. This study was done to provide the data from Indian population. The prevalence of PLP, stump pain (SP), and PLS was prospectively analyzed from the amputated cancer patients over a period of 2 years in Dr. B.R.A. Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. The risk factors and the impact of phantom phenomenon on patients were also noted. The prevalence of PLP was 41% at 3 and 12 months and 45.3% at 6 months, whereas that of SP and PLS was 14.4% and 71.2% at 3 months, 18.75% and 37.1% at 6 months, 15.8% and 32.4% at 12 months, respectively. There was higher prevalence of PLP and PLS among the patients with history of preamputation pain, smoking with proximal level of amputation, receiving general anesthesia, receiving intravenous (IV) opioid postoperative analgesia, and developing neuroma or infection. The prevalence of PLP and PLS was higher among the cancer amputees as compared to SP, and a few risk factors responsible for their higher prevalence were found in our study. The PLP and PLS lead to considerable morbidity in terms of sleep disturbance and depression.

  14. Proximal Hypospadias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Kate H.; Shukla, Aseem R.; Canning, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Hypospadias results from abnormal development of the penis that leaves the urethral meatus proximal to its normal glanular position. Meatal position may be located anywhere along the penile shaft, but more severe forms of hypospadias may have a urethral meatus located at the scrotum or perineum. The spectrum of abnormalities may also include ventral curvature of the penis, a dorsally redundant prepuce, and atrophic corpus spongiosum. Due to the severity of these abnormalities, proximal hypospadias often requires more extensive reconstruction in order to achieve an anatomically and functionally successful result. We review the spectrum of proximal hypospadias etiology, presentation, correction, and possible associated complications. PMID:21516286

  15. Primary motor cortex changes after amputation correlate with phantom limb pain and the ability to move the phantom limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffin, Estelle; Richard, Nathalie; Giraux, Pascal; Reilly, Karen T

    2016-04-15

    A substantial body of evidence documents massive reorganization of primary sensory and motor cortices following hand amputation, the extent of which is correlated with phantom limb pain. Many therapies for phantom limb pain are based upon the idea that plastic changes after amputation are maladaptive and attempt to normalize representations of cortical areas adjacent to the hand area. Recent data suggest, however, that higher levels of phantom pain are associated with stronger local activity and more structural integrity in the missing hand area rather than with reorganization of neighbouring body parts. While these models appear to be mutually exclusive they could co-exist, and one reason for the apparent discrepancy between them might be that no single study has examined the organisation of lip, elbow, and hand movements in the same participants. In this study we thoroughly examined the 3D anatomy of the central sulcus and BOLD responses during movements of the hand, elbow, and lips using MRI techniques in 11 upper-limb amputees and 17 healthy control subjects. We observed different reorganizational patterns for all three body parts as the former hand area showed few signs of reorganization, but the lip and elbow representations reorganized and shifted towards the hand area. We also found that poorer voluntary control and higher levels of pain in the phantom limb were powerful drivers of the lip and elbow topological changes. In addition to providing further support for the maladaptative plasticity model, we demonstrate for the first time that motor capacities of the phantom limb correlate with post-amputation reorganization, and that this reorganization is not limited to the face and hand representations but also includes the proximal upper-limb. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Soft Tissue Balancing After Partial Foot Amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwood, Caitlin S; Steinberg, John S

    2016-01-01

    Partial foot amputations have become common procedures for the foot and ankle surgeon as part of a limb salvage practice. These procedures are highly technique driven and there are many complex factors that affect the outcome and longevity. Appropriate surgical planning must be used with every partial foot amputation to ensure a plantigrade foot with the least potential for future breakdown. When performed appropriately, these amputations have great success with lower energy expenditure and decreased mortality compared with below-knee or above-knee amputations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Features of surgical tactics in traumatic amputations of limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Ponomarenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of traumatic amputations is constantly growing, which is associated with the development of transport and modern technology, military conflicts. Aim: To improve the results of treatment of patients with wound and functional defects after injury by developing a comprehensive program of surgical treatment to restore the shape and function of the trunk and limbs. Materials and methods. From 2010 to 2016 52 patients were observed in the clinic. Traumatic amputations at the hip level were observed in 14 patients, at the level of the upper third of the tibia – in 7 patients, at the level of the lower third of the tibia – 3, foot – 6. Simultaneous amputation of two lower limbs was observed in 2 patients. Amputation of upper limbs at shoulder level was observed in 3 patients, hand – 2, fingers – 15 patients. Among the reasons of limb amputations road traffic injuries occupied the leading position – 77.8 %. Combined injury (mechanical and thermal was observed in 1 case – there was a burn of amputated limb. In 31 cases (59.6 % there was complete amputation of a limb, incomplete – in 21 cases (40.4 %. Results. As a result of these tactics, only in 3 cases we had to do limb reamputation due to the inconsistency of the stump. In 22 patients for the conservation of sufficient length and the optimum shape of the stump the imposition of primary sutures was not made. At the stage of recovery of tissue covering the stump in 16 cases the closure of wound defects with simple split skin graft was fulfilled, 3 – with plastic by local tissues, 4 – islet flap on the peripheral stalk, 1 – plastic flat bridging flap, 20 operations were performed with tubular migratory classic flap. There were no complications in the postoperative period. Conclusions. The main principles in establishing the indications for reconstruction of large limb segments should be both critical attitude to the operation and strict individual approach to each

  18. An enhanced treatment program with markedly reduced mortality after a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten T; Holm, Gitte; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose - Historically, high 30-day and 1-year mortality post-amputation rates (> 30% and 50%, respectively) have been reported in patients with a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation (LEA). We evaluated whether allocating experienced staff and implementing...... adjusted for age, sex, residential and health status, the disease that caused the amputation, and the index amputation level showed that 30-day and 1-year mortality risk was reduced by 52% (HR =0.48, 95% CI: 0.25-0.91) and by 46% (HR =0.54, 95% CI: 0.35-0.86), respectively, in the intervention group...

  19. Sex after amputation: the relationships between sexual functioning, body image, mood and anxiety in persons with a lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Lorraine; Hevey, David; Ryall, Nicola; O'Keeffe, Fiadhnait

    2017-03-30

    The study examined the relationships between psychological variables and sexual functioning in persons with lower limb amputations. Sixty-five participants (n = 49 males, n = 16 females) with lower limb amputations completed a battery of self-report questionnaires regarding their current psychological well-being and their current sexual activity. Measures included the anxiety items on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory - Second Edition, Body Image Quality of Life Inventory, Body Exposure Self-Consciousness during Intimate Situations and the Golombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction. Half of all participants with lower limb amputations were not currently sexually active. Approximately 60% of those who were sexually active scored within the clinical range for overall sexual dysfunction. Overall levels of sexual dysfunction were associated with significantly higher levels of anxiety (r = 0.40, p depression (r = 0.41, p body exposure self-consciousness during sexual activities (r = 0.56, p Body image self-consciousness during sexual activities was the strongest predictor of sexual dysfunction. Psychological challenges following limb loss are strongly associated with levels of sexual dysfunction. The study highlights the need for psychological and psychosexual assessment and intervention following limb loss to enhance sexual functioning and overall quality of life. Implications for Rehabilitation Only half of the participants with a lower limb amputation were sexually active. Over 60% of those who were sexually active reported clinical levels of sexual dysfunction. One third of the entire sample scored within the clinical range for depression and for anxiety. Depression, anxiety and body image issues were significantly associated with sexual dysfunction in the current sample of individuals with lower limb amputation. There is a need for psychosexual assessment following limb loss to ensure that

  20. Association between Caveolin-1 expression and pathophysiological progression of femoral nerves in diabetic foot amputation patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Min

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the pathological changes of femoral nerves and the levels of caveolin-1 in diabetic foot amputation patients with neuropathy, and evaluate the association between caveolin-1 and neuropathy development.

  1. Does amputation side influence sprint performances in athletes using running-specific prostheses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobara, Hiroaki; Potthast, Wolfgang; Sano, Yoko; Müller, Ralf; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Heldoorn, Thijs A; Mochimaru, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    For athletes using running-specific prostheses (RSPs), current Paralympic guidelines for track events are generally based on level of amputation, not side of amputation. Although 200- and 400-m sprint races are performed in a counterclockwise direction, little is known about the effects of amputation side on race performance in athletes with unilateral lower limb amputation. The study aim was to test whether athletes using RSPs on their left side have slower race times than those using RSPs on their right side. Athletes with unilateral lower limb amputation (N = 59 in total) participating in elite-level 200-m races were analyzed from publicly available Internet broadcasts. These races included the 2008 Beijing and 2012 London Paralympics, and the International Paralympic Committee Athletics World Championships in 2011 and 2013. For each athlete the official race time and amputation side were determined. There was no significant difference in number of participants and race time between left and right side amputees in T42 men, T44 men, and T44 women. The results of the present study suggest that sprint performance of athletes using RSPs is not affected by amputation side on a standard 400-m track.

  2. [Phantom limb after amputation--overview and new knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, H J

    2000-01-13

    Almost all patients who have an extremity amputated will experience a phantom limb. Amputations of other parts of the body can also cause phantom sensations. One fourth of all women who undergo mastectomy relates phantom breast sensations. Phantoms are common following rectum amputation and may be significant as indicators of rectal tumor relapse. Visual phantoms can appear in patients who undergo eye amputation. Phantom phenomena occur after tooth extraction, ureterocystectomy, penectomy, plexus avulsion or spinal cord injury. The causes underlying phantom sensations are unknown. Sensory deprivation in animals causes reorganization of the cortical and subcortical maps: the areas representing the deprived input shrink and the neighbouring areas expand. The mapping allocates areas to represent the most used peripheral inputs. Every level of the nervous system seems to exhibit plasticity. The primary site seems to be the cortex. The cellular basis of plasticity is unclear. Significant sensory and motor reorganization was found in humans suffering phantom pain. There was a strong relationship between the amount of cortical reorganization and the intensity of phantom pain. These findings may influence the rehabilitation of the amputee. It was shown that pain and cortical reorganization can be reduced or even prevented by the active use of prostheses.

  3. Natural control capabilities of robotic hands by hand amputated subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Manfredo; Gijsberts, Arjan; Caputo, Barbara; Muller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    People with transradial hand amputations who own a myoelectric prosthesis currently have some control capabilities via sEMG. However, the control systems are still limited and not natural. The Ninapro project is aiming at helping the scientific community to overcome these limits through the creation of publicly available electromyography data sources to develop and test machine learning algorithms. In this paper we describe the movement classification results gained from three subjects with an homogeneous level of amputation, and we compare them with the results of 40 intact subjects. The number of considered subjects can seem small at first sight, but it is not considering the literature of the field (which has to face the difficulty of recruiting trans-radial hand amputated subjects). The classification is performed with four different classifiers and the obtained balanced classification rates are up to 58.6% on 50 movements, which is an excellent result compared to the current literature. Successively, for each subject we find a subset of up to 9 highly independent movements, (defined as movements that can be distinguished with more than 90% accuracy), which is a deeply innovative step in literature. The natural control of a robotic hand in so many movements could lead to an immediate progress in robotic hand prosthetics and it could deeply change the quality of life of amputated subjects.

  4. Reduction of residual limb volume in people with transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantua, Audrey T; Geertzen, Jan H B; van den Dungen, Jan J A M; Breek, Jan-Kees C; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2014-01-01

    The early postoperative phase after transtibial amputation is characterized by rapid residual limb volume reduction. Accurate measurement of residual limb volume is important for the timing of fitting a prosthesis. The aim of this study is to analyze the reduction of residual limb volume in people with transtibial amputation and to correlate residual limb volume with residual limb circumference. In a longitudinal cohort study of 21 people who had a transtibial amputation, residual limb volume was measured using a laser scanner and circumference was measured using a tape measure 1 wk postamputation and every 3 wk thereafter until 24 wk postamputation. A linear mixed model analysis was performed with weeks postamputation transformed according to the natural logarithm as predictor. Residual limb volume decreased significantly over time, with a large variation between patients. Residual limb volume does not correlate well with circumference. On average, residual limb volume decreased 200.5 mL (9.7% of the initial volume) per natural logarithm of the weeks postamputation. The decrease in residual limb volume following a transtibial amputation is substantial in the early postamputation phase, followed by a leveling off. It was not possible to determine a specific moment when the residual limb volume had stabilized.

  5. Are inflammatory parameters predictors of amputation in acute arterial occlusions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saskin, Huseyin; Ozcan, Kazim S; Duzyol, Cagri; Baris, Ozgur; Koçoğulları, Uğur C

    2017-04-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of inflammatory markers to predict amputation following embolectomy in acute arterial occlusion. Methods A total of 123 patients operated for arterial thromboembolectomy due to acute embolism were included in the study. The patients without an extremity amputation following thromboembolectomy were classified as Group 1 ( n = 91) and the rest were classified as Group 2 ( n = 32). These groups were compared in terms of clinical and demographic characteristics, C-reactive protein, complete blood count parameters, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, platelet-lymphocyte ratio and red cell distribution width. Results The average age was 68.0 ± 11.7 years. The most common thromboembolism localization was femoral artery. When preoperative mean C-reactive protein ( p = 0.0001), mean platelet volume ( p = 0.0001), platelet-lymphocyte ratio ( p = 0.0001), neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio ( p = 0.0001) and red cell distribution width ( p = 0.0001) were compared, a statistically significant difference was observed between groups. In univariate and multivariate regression analysis, higher levels of preoperative C-reactive protein ( p = 0.009) and mean platelet volume ( p = 0.04) were detected as independent risk factors of early extremity amputation. Conclusion We observed that preoperative mean platelet volume and C-reactive protein were predictors of amputation after thromboembolectomy in acute arterial occlusion.

  6. Arteriosclerosis, amputation and peptic ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhoutsos, J.; Barabas, A. P.; Martin, Peter

    1972-01-01

    In a series of 400 consecutive patients with arteriosclerosis seen in two peripheral vascular clinics, we confirm the previously reported association with peptic ulcer. The incidence was almost 25% both in patients with occlusive disease (300) and with aneurysm (100). The accepted expectation of peptic ulcer in the same age-group is 6 or 7% (Jones, Kirk & Bloor, 1970; McManus, 1966). Patients with peptic ulcer, or the history of one, had a significantly higher amputation rate than those without a peptic ulcer. PMID:4650780

  7. Proximal Tibia Reconstruction After Bone Tumor Resection: Are Survivorship and Outcomes of Endoprosthetic Replacement and Osteoarticular Allograft Similar?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Albergo, Jose I; Gaston, Czar L; Aponte-Tinao, Luis A; Ayerza, Miguel A; Muscolo, D Luis; Farfalli, Germán L; Jeys, Lee M; Carter, Simon R; Tillman, Roger M; Abudu, Adesegun T; Grimer, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    ...) limb salvage reconstruction failures and risk of amputation of the limb; (2) causes of failure; and (3) functional results.Between 1990 and 2012, two oncologic centers treated 385 patients with proximal tibial resections and reconstruction...

  8. "Limb Salvage With Intrepid Dynamic Exoskeleton Orthosis Versus Transtibial Amputation: A Comparison of Functional Gait Outcomes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katharine I; Kingsbury, Trevor D; Mazzone, Brittney N; Wyatt, Marilynn P; Kuhn, Kevin M

    2016-08-23

    To determine if there is a difference in functional gait outcomes between patients with limb injuries treated with either transtibial amputation or limb preservation with Intrepid Dynamic Exoskeletal Orthosis (IDEO). Retrospective prognostic study. Tertiary referral military hospital. This study included 10 transtibial amputees and ten limb preservation patients using the IDEO who were matched by body mass index after excluding for non-traumatic, proximal ipsilateral, contralateral, spine or traumatic brain injuries. Transtibial amputation patients were also excluded if they did not have a gait study between 6 and 12 months after independent ambulation and limb preservation were excluded if they did not complete the "Return to Run" program. An observational study of functional outcomes utilizing instrumented gait analysis. Spatiotemporal, kinetic (vertical ground reaction force), unified deformable (UD) power, work, and efficiency. Limb preservation patients walked with a significantly slower cadence (p=0.036) and spent less time on their affected limb in stance (p=0.045), and longer in swing (p=0.019). Amputees had significantly increased maximum positive power in both limbs (p=0.004 and p= 0.029) and increased maximum negative power on the unaffected limb (p= 0.035). Amputees had significantly increased positive and negative work in the affected limb (p=0.0009 and p=0.014) and positive work in the unaffected limb (p=0.042).There was no significant difference in the kinetic data or efficiency. Limb preservation patients spend less time on their affected limb as a percentage of the gait cycle. The UD power demonstrated more dynamic gait in amputees, with peak values closer to normative data. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  9. Limb Salvage With Intrepid Dynamic Exoskeletal Orthosis Versus Transtibial Amputation: A Comparison of Functional Gait Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katharine I; Kingsbury, Trevor D; Mazzone, Brittney N; Wyatt, Marilynn P; Kuhn, Kevin M

    2016-12-01

    To determine if there is a difference in functional gait outcomes between patients with limb injuries treated with either transtibial amputation or limb preservation with the Intrepid Dynamic Exoskeletal Orthosis. Retrospective prognostic study. Tertiary referral military hospital. This study included 10 transtibial amputees and 10 limb preservation patients using the Intrepid Dynamic Exoskeletal Orthosis who were matched by body mass index after excluding for nontraumatic, proximal ipsilateral, contralateral, spine, or traumatic brain injuries. Transtibial amputation patients were also excluded if they did not have a gait study between 6 and 12 months after independent ambulation. Limb preservation were excluded if they did not complete the "Return to Run" program. An observational study of functional outcomes using instrumented gait analysis. Spatiotemporal, kinetic (vertical ground reaction force), unified deformable power, work, and efficiency. Limb preservation patients walked with a significantly slower cadence (P = 0.036) and spent less time on their affected limb in stance (P = 0.045), and longer in swing (P = 0.019). Amputees had significantly increased maximum positive power in both limbs (P = 0.004 and P = 0.029) and increased maximum negative power on the unaffected limb (P = 0.035). Amputees had significantly increased positive and negative work in the affected limb (P = 0.0009 and P = 0.014) and positive work in the unaffected limb (P = 0.042). There was no significant difference in the kinetic data or efficiency. Limb preservation patients spend less time on their affected limb as a percentage of the gait cycle. The unified deformable power demonstrated more dynamic gait in amputees, with peak values closer to normative data. Therapeutic level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  10. Proximal focal femoral deficiency in Ibadan a developing country's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2011-06-09

    Jun 9, 2011 ... The major problems are limb length inequality and variable inadequacy of the proximal femoral musculature and hip joint. Treatment is indicated and ranges from amputation and prosthetic rehabilitation to limb salvage, lengthening, and hip re- construction. Until the early 1960s, treatment for PFFD at the St.

  11. [Amputation and exarticulation of the lesser toes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, C; Forray, M; Kinner, B

    2016-10-01

    Amputations and exarticulations of the toes may be necessary due to several reasons. The goal is to remove necrosis or infection prior to its spread to the midfoot region. From a functional or cosmetic point of view, amputation/exarticulation of a single toe plays no major role. However, this can be different with exarticulation of several toes. Necrosis, trauma, infection, tumor, deformity. Conditions where amputation/exarticulation of a toe is insufficient, e. g., in progressing peripheral arterial disease. The toe can either be amputated through the distal phalanx or exarticulated in the metatarsophalangeal joint. Orthopedic shoes or orthotic devices are rarely necessary when a single toe is amputated/exarticulated. However, concomitant deformities of the foot have to be thoroughly addressed. If more than one toe is amputated, silicone spacers may be necessary to prevent the remaining toes from deviating. Amputations and exarticulations of the toes are frequent and the procedure is technically simple. However, the complication rate is high due to typical indications making amputation necessary.

  12. Physiotherapy after amputation of the limb

    OpenAIRE

    Pospíšil, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In this bachelor thesis the author considers physiotherapy after amputation of the lower limb. The theoretical section describes the anatomy of the lower limb, a procedure for amputation of the lower limb, occupational theraoy and prosthesis. The author then goes on to discuss physiotherapy in relation to two case studies of patients who have had their lower limbs removed.

  13. [Minor foot amputations in diabetic foot syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, C; Eckhard, M; Szalay, G; Heiss, C

    2016-10-01

    The treatment strategy for diabetic foot syndrome must take into account protective sensibility of the foot, open wounds, infection status, and the rules of septic bone surgery. Interventions are classified as elective, prophylactic, curative, or emergency. Amputations in the forefoot and midfoot region are performed as ray amputations (including metatarsal), which can often be carried out as "inner" amputations. Gentle tissue treatment mandatory because of greater risk of revision with re-amputation compared to classical amputation. Good demarcation of infection, acute osteomyelitis, osteolytic lesions, neurotropic ulcer, arterial and venous blood flow to the other toes, gangrene of other toes with metatarsal affection. Arterial occlusive disease, infection of neighboring areas, avoidable amputations, poorly healing ulcers on the lower leg. Primary dorsal approach; minimal incisional distance (5 cm) to minimize skin necrosis risk. Atraumatic preparation, minimize hemostasis to not compromise the borderline perfusion situation. In amputations, plantar skin preparation and longer seams placed as dorsal as possible, either disarticulated and maintain cartilage, or round the cortical metatarsal bone after resection. Diabetes control. Braun splint, mobilization in a shoe with forefoot decompression and hindfoot support, physiotherapy. Antibiotics based on resistance testing. If no complications, dressing change on postoperative day 1. Optimal wound drainage by lowering foot several times a day; drainage removal after 12-24 h. Insoles and footwear optimization. Amputations require continued attention and if necessary treatment to avoid sequelae. Insufficient treatment associated with recurrent ulceration and altered anatomy.

  14. Amputations De Membres Inferieurs : Aspects Epidemiologiques ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was a male prevalence of the patients amputees (69%). The Middle Age was 47 years (extended, 22 days- 94 years). Vascular pathology constituted the first cause of amputation (51.9%). The gangrenes after open fractures or traditionally treated fractures accounted for 37.8% of the traumatic amputations.

  15. Forequarter Amputation at Muhimbili Orthopaedic Institute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amputation through the scapulo-thoracic articulations is a radical surgical procedure.Although it is rarely performed, it remains a valuable surgical option for malignancy and severe injuries around the shoulder joint. In this review we present five cases of Fore Quarter Amputation done at Muhimbili Orthopaedic Institute ...

  16. Assessment of anxiety and depression after lower limb amputation in Jordanian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad M Hawamdeh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Ziad M Hawamdeh1, Yasmin S Othman2, Alaa I Ibrahim31Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan; 2Department of Orthotics and Prosthetics, Faculty of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan; 3Lecturer, Department of Physical Therapy for Pediatrics and Pediatric surgery, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, EgyptObjective: This study aimed to assess the prevalence of anxiety and depression among Jordanian lower limb amputees with different clinical characteristics and sociodemographic data (gender, marital status, social support, income, type and level of amputation, and occupation.Methods: Participants were 56 patients with unilateral lower limb amputation with mean duration (8.4 ± 5.75 years. They were recruited from inpatient and outpatient clinics of Jordan University hospital, Royal Farah Rehabilitation Center, and Al-basheer hospital in Amman, Jordan. Participants responded to a questionnaire that included a battery of questions requesting brief information about sociodemographic variables and characteristics of amputation. The level of depression and anxiety in each participating patient was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS.Results: The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms were 37% and 20%, respectively. Factors associated with high prevalence of psychological symptoms included female gender, lack of social support, unemployment, traumatic amputation, shorter time since amputation, and amputation below the knee. These findings were confirmed by a significant reduction of anxiety and depression scores in patients who received social support, patients with amputation due to disease, and patients with amputation above the knee. Presence of pain and use of prosthesis had no effect on the prevalence.Conclusions: The findings of the present study highlight the high incidence of psychiatric disability and

  17. A retrospective analysis of amputation rates in diabetic patients: can lower extremity amputations be further prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Lower extremity amputations are costly and debilitating complications in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Our aim was to investigate changes in the amputation rate in patients with DM at the Karolinska University Hospital in Solna (KS) following the introduction of consensus guidelines for treatment and prevention of diabetic foot complications, and to identify risk groups of lower extremity amputations that should be targeted for preventive treatment. Methods 150 diabetic and 191 nondiabetic patients were amputated at KS between 2000 and 2006; of these 102 diabetic and 99 nondiabetic patients belonged to the catchment area of KS. 21 diabetic patients who belonged to KS catchment area were amputated at Danderyd University Hospital. All patients' case reports were searched for diagnoses of diabetes, vascular disorders, kidney disorders, and ulcer infections of the foot. Results There was a 60% reduction in the rate of amputations performed above the ankle in patients with DM during the study period. Patients with DM who underwent amputations were more commonly affected by foot infections and kidney disorders compared to the nondiabetic control group. Women with DM were 10 years older than the men when amputated, whereas men with DM underwent more multiple amputations and had more foot infections compared to the women. 88% of all diabetes-related amputations were preceded by foot ulcers. Only 30% of the patients had been referred to the multidisciplinary foot team prior to the decision of amputation. Conclusions These findings indicate a reduced rate of major amputations in diabetic patients, which suggests an implementation of the consensus guidelines of foot care. We also propose further reduced amputation rates if patients with an increased risk of future amputation (i.e. male sex, kidney disease) are identified and offered preventive treatment early. PMID:22385577

  18. Pain and pain-related interference in adults with lower-limb amputation: comparison of knee-disarticulation, transtibial, and transfemoral surgical sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, James; Friedly, Janna; Molton, Ivan; Morgenroth, David; Jensen, Mark P; Smith, Douglas G

    2009-01-01

    Pain and pain-related interference with physical function have not been thoroughly studied in individuals who have undergone knee-disarticulation amputations. The principal aim of this study was to determine whether individuals with knee-disarticulation amputations have worse pain and pain-related interference with physical function than do individuals with transtibial or transfemoral amputations. We analyzed cross-sectional survey data provided by 42 adults with lower-limb amputations. These individuals consisted of 14 adults reporting knee-disarticulation amputation in one limb and best-matched cases (14 reporting transfemoral amputation and 14 reporting transtibial amputation) from a larger cross-sectional sample of 472 individuals. Participants were rigorously matched based on time since amputation, reason for amputation, age, sex, diabetes diagnosis, and pain before amputation. Continuous outcome variables were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance. Categorical outcomes were analyzed by Pearson chi-square statistic. Given the relatively small sample size and power concerns, mean differences were also described by estimated effect size (Cohen's d). Of the 42 participants, 83% were male. They ranged in age from 36 to 85 (median = 55.1, standard deviation = 11.0). Most amputations were of traumatic origin (74%), and participants were on average 12.4 years from their amputations at the time of the survey. Individuals with transtibial amputation reported significantly more prosthesis use than did individuals with knee-disarticulation amputation. Amputation levels did not significantly differ in phantom limb pain, residual limb pain, back pain, and pain-related interference with physical function. Estimates of effect size, however, indicated that participants with knee-disarticulation amputation reported less phantom limb pain, phantom limb pain-related interference with physical function, residual limb pain, residual limb pain-related interference with physical

  19. Complete amputation of the palm and replantation: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Shafaee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Even though replantation surgery has now become a routine procedure, it remains delicate and demanding surgery, requiring adequate training and expertise in microsurgical techniques. Functional outcomes following replantation vary with the level of injury. Replants of the fingers distal to the flexor superficial are insertion, the hand at the wrist, and the upper extremity at the distal forearm can achieve good function. With the advent of refined microscopes, sutures, and needles, along with specialized surgical training, replantation has become a routine part of hand-surgery practice in centers all over the world. Clearly, survival does not equate with function. Amputations constitute multisystem injury, with disruption of skeletal support (bone, motor function (muscle, sensibility (nerve, circulation (blood vessel, and soft-tissue coverage (skin. A lot of News work-related accidents published daily. Complete amputation of the palm with sharp objects electric disrupts quality of life and irreversible effects on their life. Replantation or repair the damaged organ can improve their quality of life, functional body. Case presentation: The case is a man with complete amputation of the palm while working with an electrical machine, at the same time as damage and severe crush was also the distal phalanx of the first finger of the right hand. Patient was admitted to the emergency unit at Fatemi Hospital of Ardabil city in January 2014, Iran, and underwent to surgery for replantation. Conclusion: Complete amputation of palm and its successful replantation are among rarely occurred and reportable cases. Complete amputation of palm and successful replantation and the 10-month follow-up indicated that the patient had a successful operation. No abnormalities were found in the blood circulation, and finger grasping was acceptable. Nerve development was acceptable.

  20. Amputations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... performs work on material. s Power-transmission apparatuses — flywheels, pulleys, belts, chains, couplings, spindles, cams, and gears in ... circular motion that gears, rollers, belt drives, and pulleys generate—the following are the most common types ...

  1. Clinimetric properties of hip abduction strength measurements obtained using a handheld dynamometer in individuals with a lower extremity amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijendekkers, R.A.; Hinte, G.J. van; Sman, A.D.; Staal, J.B.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Hoogeboom, T.J.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Suitable handheld dynamometer (HHD)-techniques to test hip abduction strength in individuals with a lower extremity amputation, irrespective of their amputation level are absent. The aim of this study was to optimise a HHD-technique and to test its reproducibility and validity.

  2. Effect of locking plate internal fixation system treatment on the levels of bone turnover biomarkers and inflammatory factors in patients with proximal humeral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Cong Huang1,

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of locking plate internal fixation system treatment on the levels of bone turnover biomarkers and inflammatory factors in patients with proximal humeral fractures. Methods: 62 patients with proximal humeral fractures who received surgical treatment in the hospital between May 2013 and February 2016 were selected and divided into the control group (n=34 who received traditional common anatomical bone plate internal fixation treatment and the observation group (n=28 who received locking plate internal fixation system treatment. 4 weeks after operation, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to detect the serum levels of bone formation indexes, bone resorption indexes, pro-inflammatory factors and anti-inflammatory factors of two groups of patients. Results: 4 weeks after operation, serum bone formation indexes osteocalcin (OC, N-terminal propeptide of procollagen type I (P1NP, bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP and bone gla protein (BGP levels of observation group were higher than those of control group while bone resorption indexes pyridinoline (PYD, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, cross-linked C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX and deoxypyridinoline crosslink (D-pyr levels were lower than those of control group (P<0.05; serum pro-inflammatory factors interleukin 1β (IL-1β, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-22 (IL-22 levels of observation group were lower than those of control group while anti-inflammatory factors soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor I (sTNF-RI, interleukin-4 (IL-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13 levels were higher than those of control group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Locking plate internal fixation system treatment of proximal humeral fractures can promote the fracture end healing and improve the bone metabolism without causing strong systemic inflammatory reaction.

  3. A Review of Amputation of 106 Hand Digits | Olaitan | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Finger amputation is an uncommon injury. Fingers and thumbs sometimes are amputated either due to severe crushing or as a result of gangrene or malignant lesions. A review of finger amputation in our environment is rare. Objective: This paper sets to review amputation of the hand digits of the upper limbs ...

  4. Major upper limb amputation after Snake Bite Gangrene | Ajibade ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major lower limb amputations following snake bite gangrene have been reported from the savannah belt of Nigeria. In bites delivered to the upper limb, amputations are often of the digits (minor amputations). We report the case of a male farmer who had an above elbow amputation after a snake bite to the hand. Explanation ...

  5. Osteomyoplastic Transtibial Amputation: The Ertl Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Benjamin C; Poka, Attila

    2016-04-01

    Amputation may be required for management of lower extremity trauma and medical conditions, such as neoplasm, infection, and vascular compromise. The Ertl technique, an osteomyoplastic procedure for transtibial amputation, can be used to create a highly functional residual limb. Creation of a tibiofibular bone bridge provides a stable, broad tibiofibular articulation that may be capable of some distal weight bearing. Several different modified techniques and fibular bridge fixation methods have been used; however, no current evidence exists regarding comparison of the different techniques. Additional research is needed to elucidate the optimal patient population, technique, and postoperative protocol for the Ertl osteomyoplastic transtibial amputation technique.

  6. [Minor amputations - a maxi task. Part 1: From the principles to transmetatarsal amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros, R; Riepe, G; Drees, P

    2012-10-01

    A threatening major amputation represents a fateful turning point for diabetics. This occurs in 50% of cases of amputations in diabetics. This increases the demand for another therapeutic route not only because of the limitations in quality of life but also due to substantially higher mortality. Even if an osteomyelitic ischemic situation is often present specialized centers have succeeded in substantially reducing the rate of major amputations in such patients. The term "minor amputation" commonly used in vascular surgery is not uniformly understood. Following the "vascular surgery working model" developed by Rümenapf, the significance of "minor amputations" for retention of extremities and the associated controversies have been shown. "Minor amputations" therefore represent a maxi-task if patients undergoing such a procedure are to be timely and competently treated. The necessary interdisciplinary cooperation with other specialists should in the future also include orthopedic surgeons.

  7. Transfemoral Amputation After Failure of Knee Arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfriedsen, Tinne B; Schrøder, Henrik M; Odgaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfemoral amputation is considered the last treatment option for failed knee arthroplasty. The extent to which this procedure is performed is not well known. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence and causes of amputation following failure of knee arthroplasty...... in a nationwide population. METHODS: Data were extracted from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Patient Register, and the Danish Knee Arthroplasty Register. With use of individual data linkage, 92,785 primary knee arthroplasties performed from 1997 to 2013 were identified. Of these, 258...... for causes related to failed knee arthroplasty. The 15-year cumulative incidence of amputation was 0.32% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23% to 0.48%). The annual incidence of amputation following arthroplasties performed from 1997 to 2002 was 0.025% compared with 0.018% following arthroplasties performed...

  8. Referral patterns and proximity to palliative care inpatient services by level of socio-economic disadvantage. A national study using spatial analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Currow David C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A range of health outcomes at a population level are related to differences in levels of social disadvantage. Understanding the impact of any such differences in palliative care is important. The aim of this study was to assess, by level of socio-economic disadvantage, referral patterns to specialist palliative care and proximity to inpatient services. Methods All inpatient and community palliative care services nationally were geocoded (using postcode to one nationally standardised measure of socio-economic deprivation – Socio-Economic Index for Areas (SEIFA; 2006 census data. Referral to palliative care services and characteristics of referrals were described through data collected routinely at clinical encounters. Inpatient location was measured from each person’s home postcode, and stratified by socio-economic disadvantage. Results This study covered July – December 2009 with data from 10,064 patients. People from the highest SEIFA group (least disadvantaged were significantly less likely to be referred to a specialist palliative care service, likely to be referred closer to death and to have more episodes of inpatient care for longer time. Physical proximity of a person’s home to inpatient care showed a gradient with increasing distance by decreasing levels of socio-economic advantage. Conclusion These data suggest that a simple relationship of low socioeconomic status and poor access to a referral-based specialty such as palliative care does not exist. Different patterns of referral and hence different patterns of care emerge.

  9. Referral patterns and proximity to palliative care inpatient services by level of socio-economic disadvantage. A national study using spatial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currow, David C; Allingham, Samuel; Bird, Sonia; Yates, Patsy; Lewis, Joanne; Dawber, James; Eagar, Kathy

    2012-11-23

    A range of health outcomes at a population level are related to differences in levels of social disadvantage. Understanding the impact of any such differences in palliative care is important. The aim of this study was to assess, by level of socio-economic disadvantage, referral patterns to specialist palliative care and proximity to inpatient services. All inpatient and community palliative care services nationally were geocoded (using postcode) to one nationally standardised measure of socio-economic deprivation - Socio-Economic Index for Areas (SEIFA; 2006 census data). Referral to palliative care services and characteristics of referrals were described through data collected routinely at clinical encounters. Inpatient location was measured from each person's home postcode, and stratified by socio-economic disadvantage. This study covered July - December 2009 with data from 10,064 patients. People from the highest SEIFA group (least disadvantaged) were significantly less likely to be referred to a specialist palliative care service, likely to be referred closer to death and to have more episodes of inpatient care for longer time. Physical proximity of a person's home to inpatient care showed a gradient with increasing distance by decreasing levels of socio-economic advantage. These data suggest that a simple relationship of low socioeconomic status and poor access to a referral-based specialty such as palliative care does not exist. Different patterns of referral and hence different patterns of care emerge.

  10. Biomechanical analysis of postural control of persons with transtibial or transfemoral amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougier, P R; Bergeau, J

    2009-11-01

    In human subjects, leg amputation impairs upright quiet-stance control. The inability to exert appropriate force reactions under the amputated leg and a slight weight-bearing asymmetry cause the amputee to develop compensatory mechanisms through the sound leg. This study is aimed at assessing these mechanisms and the influence of the level of amputation. The postural strategies of transtibial and transfemoral amputees for maintaining quiet stance were investigated using a dual-force platform. With this device, mean body weight distribution and plantar and resultant center of pressure trajectories can be measured and used to assess the likely compensatory mechanisms. Compensatory strategies were found in both transtibial and transfemoral groups, with a forward shift of the mean positions of the center of pressure under the amputated leg and greater resultant center of pressure displacements appearing along the anteroposterior axis, respectively. The transfemoral group presents a larger center of pressure displacements under the amputated leg than the transtibial group. These data emphasize the role played by the differences between the center-of-pressure magnitudes intervening under the sound and amputated legs and the size of the prosthesis-stump contact area in these postural strategies.

  11. Daily physical activity and heart rate response in people with a unilateral traumatic transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Johannes B; Schrauwen, Hannelore J; Stam, Henk J

    2008-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that people with a unilateral traumatic transtibial amputation are less active than people without an amputation, and to explore whether both groups have a similar heart rate response while walking. A case-comparison study. General community. Nine subjects with a unilateral traumatic transtibial amputation and 9 matched subjects without known impairments. Not applicable. Percentage of dynamic activities in 48 hours (expressing activity level). Additionally, we examined heart rate and percentage heart rate reserve during walking (expressing heart rate response) and body motility during walking (expressing walking speed). These parameters were objectively measured at participants' homes on 2 consecutive days. Subjects with an amputation showed a lower percentage of dynamic activities (6.0% vs 11.7% in a 48-h period, P=.02). No significant differences were found between the 2 groups in heart rate (91.1 bpm vs 89.5 bpm, P=.86) and percentage heart rate reserve during walking (28.2% vs 27.5%, P=1.0). Body motility during walking was lower in the amputation group (.14 g vs .18 g, Ptranstibial amputation are considerably less active than persons without known impairments. The results indicate that heart rate response during walking is similar in both groups, and is probably regulated by adapting one's walking speed.

  12. PROXIMITY MANAGEMENT IN CRISIS CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Dorin BUMBENECI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate the level of assimilation for the terms "Proximity Management" and "Proximity Manager", both in the specialized literature and in practice. The study has two parts: the theoretical research of the two terms, and an evaluation of the use of Proximity management in 32 companies in Gorj, Romania. The object of the evaluation resides in 27 companies with less than 50 employees and 5 companies with more than 50 employees.

  13. Dermatological changes of amputation stump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora P

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatological changes of stumps of 174 amputees are presented. The commonest dermatological change recorded at the site of amputation stump was hyperpigmentation in 46 (26.4% followed by callosities in 32 (18.3%, scaling in 29 (16.7%, cutaneous atrophy in 20 (11.5%, lichenification in 19(10.9%, traumatic ulcer and bacterial infections in 18 (10.3% each, hypertrophic scar in 14 (8.1%, hypopigmentation and corns in 13 (7.4% each, verrucous hypertrophy of stump in 12 (6.9%, dermatophytic infection in 5(2.9%, stump oedema and phantom limb in 4 (2.3% each, intertriginous dermatitis in 3( 1.7%, allergic contact dermatitis (resin and frictional eczema in 2(1.1% each. Epidermoid cyst, keloid formation, anaesthesia, gangrene and cutaneous horn were recorded in 1 (0.6% each. Atrophy (epidermal and derma, anaesthesia, alopecia and elephantiasis of the stump have not been documented in the literature earlier.

  14. Tourniquets do not increase the total blood loss or re-amputation risk in transtibial amputations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wied, Christian; Tengberg, Peter T; Holm, Gitte

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the total blood loss (TBL) and the safety with respect to the re-amputation rate after transtibial amputation (TTA) conducted with and without a tourniquet. METHODS: The study was a single-centre retrospective cohort study of patients with a primary TTA admitted between Januar...

  15. Transfer of the Fifth Finger to Replace an Amputated Thumb: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Bilsev; Gundeslioglu, Ayse Ozlem; Cicekcibasi, Aynur Emine; Dadaci, Mehmet; Inan, Irfan; Buyukmumcu, Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    Amputation of the thumb causes not only loss of significant functional use of the hand but also psychological and social problems. The procedures of toe-to-thumb transfer, pollicization, or metacarpal extension are recognized and well-documented options in thumb reconstruction. Although these techniques have been successfully applied, they have some disadvantages. This study aims to test the feasibility of the fifth finger for thumb reconstruction. The fifth finger was released following exploration of the digital artery, vein, nerve, and flexor and extensor tendons, including the flexor retinaculum. The digital vein and the extensor tendon of the fifth finger were separated at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint. The proximal phalanx of the fifth finger was cut smoothly at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint with a saw. The deep flexor tendons, digital arteries, and nerves were preserved. The proximal phalanx of the released fifth finger was fixed to the first metacarpal bone. The digital vein of the first finger was anastomosed to the digital vein of the fifth finger by microsurgery. Angiography was done after the transfer. Exploration till the flexor retinaculum enabled thumb transfer without any restriction of movement in all 10 cadaver fingers. The average total surgical time was 135 ± 12 minutes. Flow from both radial and ulnar arteries was demonstrated in the transferred fifth finger by angiography. The technique appears to be feasible for thumb reconstruction by preserving digital arteries and nerves in a relatively short time, but further important aspects have to be assessed in further clinical studies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Predictors of major lower limb amputation among type II diabetic patients admitted for diabetic foot problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Nazri Mohd; Rahman, Jamalludin Ab; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Che-Ahmad, Aminudin; Khalid, Kamarul Ariffin; Sulong, Ahmad Fadzli; Vijayasingham, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of amputations in Malaysia. This study aimed to identify the predictive factors for major lower limb amputation among patients with type 2 DM (T2DM) who were admitted to a hospital, in order to reduce its likelihood. METHODS This cross-sectional study involved 218 patients with T2DM who were admitted to Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan, Kuantan, Malaysia, for diabetic foot problems from June 2011 to July 2012. A form was developed to document the patients’ profiles, comorbidities, complications, investigations, treatment and clinical outcomes. The predictors for major lower limb amputations were determined using univariate and stepwise logistic regression analysis. RESULTS A total of 31 patients underwent major lower limb amputations (25 transtibial, 6 transfemoral). The following factors were found to be associated with the incidence of major lower limb amputations: T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, presentation with gangrene, diabetic foot conditions of Wagner grade 4 or 5, and necrotising fasciitis. Patients who underwent major amputations had significantly lower haemoglobin and albumin levels, and higher total white blood cell counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and C-reactive protein, urea and creatinine levels. However, only T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, positive bacterial culture and albumin levels were significant on stepwise logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSION T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, positive bacterial culture and low albumin levels were found to be significant predictive factors for major lower limb amputation among patients with T2DM admitted for diabetic foot problems. PMID:26668408

  17. Capacitive proximity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change.

  18. Describe the outcomes of dysvascular partial foot amputation and how these compare to transtibial amputation: a systematic review protocol for the development of shared decision-making resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Michael P; Fatone, Stefania; Quigley, Matthew

    2015-12-04

    Helping people make well-informed decisions about dysvascular partial foot amputation is becoming increasingly important as improvements in diabetes care and vascular surgery make more distal amputations increasingly possible. The high rates of complications and reamputations associated with partial foot amputation are of concern, particularly given that transtibial amputation seems to result in similar outcomes (e.g., mobility and quality of life) with comparatively few complications and reamputations. The aim of this review is to describe the outcomes of dysvascular partial foot amputation and compare these to transtibial amputation. Results from the review are intended for use in the development of shared decision-making resources. A comprehensive range of databases-MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, AMED, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), ProQuest Nursing and Allied Health, and Web of Science-will be searched using National Library of Medicine, Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms as well as title, abstract, and keywords relating to different amputation levels and outcomes of interest; specifically: incidence, prevalence, and rate of amputation; rate of mortality, wound failure, dehiscence, and time between index and ipsilateral reamputations; and mobility, functional ability, activity and participation, quality of life, pain, and psychosocial outcomes including depression and anxiety. Articles that meet the inclusion criteria will be hand-searched for relevant citations. A forward citation search using Google Scholar will be used to identify articles not yet indexed. Original research published in the English language after 1 January 2000 will be included. The McMaster Critical Review Forms will be used to assess methodological quality and identify sources of bias. Included articles will be independently appraised by two reviewers. Data will be extracted using a spreadsheet based on the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review

  19. Combination tibial plateau leveling osteotomy and transverse corrective osteotomy of the proximal tibia for the treatment of complex tibial deformities in 12 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weh, Jennifer L; Kowaleski, Michael P; Boudrieau, Randy J

    2011-08-01

    To describe a surgical technique, and outcome, for treatment of proximal tibial deformity (varus, valgus, excessive tibial plateau angle [eTPA], tibial torsion and patellar luxation) by combined tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) and transverse corrective osteotomy. Cases series. Dogs (n=12; 19 stifle joints). Medical records of dogs that had combination TPLO and transverse corrective osteotomy, were reviewed. Pre- and postoperative tibial angulation, tibial torsion, tibial plateau angle (TPA), corrective osteotomy technique, method of fixation, and complications were recorded. In hospital re-evaluation of limb function and alignment and length of time to radiographic healing were reviewed. Long-term outcome was assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) questionnaire and owner telephone interview. Proximal tibial varus or valgus was present in 68.4%; 73.7% had eTPA; and 47.4% had both. Medial patellar luxation (MPL) was present in 57.9%, of which 47.4% had tibial tuberosity displacement. Severe tibial torsion was present in 68.4%. Mean pre- and postoperative TPA was 37.5° and 5.7°, respectively. The mean postoperative mechanical medial proximal tibial angle (mMPTA) and mechanical medial distal tibial angle (mMDTA) were 92.2° (range, 88-96°) and 96.1° (range, 94-101°), respectively. Postoperative surgical complications were documented in 21.0%, which included implant loosening or breakage (5.3%), seroma (5.3%), septic arthritis (5.3%), and infection of the proximal tibia (5.3%). All complications were considered major because they required additional surgery. Mean time to document radiographic healing was 10.4 weeks. In-hospital re-evaluation of lameness was obtained at the same time; 82.4% were not lame or had a mild lameness, 17.6% had severe lameness (2/3 with infection). The VAS evaluation revealed excellent results and owner satisfaction in all ten dogs in which long-term follow-up was obtained. Long-term clinical outcome of combination TPLO and

  20. Genitourinary injuries and extremity amputation in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom: Early findings from the Trauma Outcomes and Urogenital Health (TOUGH) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnamani, Nina S; Janak, Judson C; Hudak, Steven J; Rivera, Jessica C; Lewis, Eluned A; Soderdahl, Douglas W; Orman, Jean A

    2016-11-01

    In Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF), genitourinary (GU) wounds have occurred in unprecedented numbers. Severe concomitant injuries, including extremity amputations, are common. The epidemiology of GU injury and extremity amputation in OEF/OIF has not been described. The Department of Defense Trauma Registry was queried from October 2001 through August 2013 to identify all surviving US male service members with GU injuries sustained in OEF/OIF. Genitourinary injury was defined as sustaining one or more injuries to any organ or structure within the genitourinary and/or reproductive system(s) based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes. Injury severity was quantified based on Abbreviated Injury Scale scores and overall Injury Severity Scores. The incidence, nature, and severity of GU injuries and extremity amputations are described. Of the 1,367 service members with GU injury included in this analysis, 433 (31.7%) had one or more extremity amputations. Most GU injuries were to the external genitalia [scrotum (55.6%), testes (33.0%), penis (31.0%), and urethra (9.1%)] vs. the kidneys (21.1%). Those with amputation(s) had greater GU injury severity (Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥ 3) than those without amputations (50.1% vs. 30.5%, respectively; p < 0.0001). Approximately 3.4% of male service members with GU injury had an upper extremity amputation only, 8.9% had both lower and upper extremity amputation(s), and 19.4% had lower extremity amputation(s) only. Of the 387 patients with GU injury and lower extremity amputations, 87 (22.5%) had amputations below the knee and 300 (77.5%) had amputation(s) at/above the knee. In OEF/OIF, concomitant GU injury and extremity amputation are common and have serious implications for health and quality of life. This wounding pattern presents new challenges to the military medical and research and development communities to prevent, mitigate

  1. AB136. Successful penile replantation following penile self-amputation: case report and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chan Jung; Ou, Chien Hui; Lin, Yung Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective Penile amputation is an uncommon injury resulting from self-mutilation, felonious assault, or accidental trauma. Although it is uncommon and rarely fatal, penile amputation is a challenging injury for Urologist to treat. Many factors should be taken into consideration of proper treatment. In this kind of patients, the mental and physical conditions are usually complicated. Rapid stabilization is very important to afford the appropriate time and specialization for surgical success. Currently, many reconstructive techniques provide an excellent outcome for penile replantation. We reported a case of soft palate squamous cell carcinoma under palliative chemotherapy who amputated his penis at the base with a sharp blade due to severe depression. Methods A 66-year-old man with soft palate squamous cell carcinoma, pT2N0M0, post surgery and local recurrence, was under palliative chemotherapy now. Two days before this emergent episode, he was just admitted due to dyspnea and electrolytes imbalance. He decided to discharge against advice before completing the treatment. After lunch, he locked himself in the bathroom and used kitchen knife to mutilate his penis. He was brought to our emergency department by his family. A clinical examination found a bloody and destroyed penis. One small piece of penile appendage was connected with actively bleeding penile stump by one side of prepuce. The exploratory surgery showed a complete transection of corpus cavernosum, corpus spongiosum, and urethra. A 14-French silicon catheter was threaded through the glans and aligned with the proximal urethra. We began with interrupted 4-0 Vicryl sutures in a 360-degree fashion to connect urethra. Interrupted 4-0 Vicryl sutures were placed from ventral side of the tunica albuginea of the corpus spongiosum. Till the dorsal aspect of amputated penis, we carefully applied tension-free, interrupted 4-0 Vicryl sutures to reapproximate the tunica albuginea of the corpus cavernosum. A pressure

  2. Successful Second Microsurgical Replantation for Amputated Penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, Masahide; Ozaki, Mine; Kai, Akiko; Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori

    2017-09-01

    Penile amputation is a rare emergency, but the best method for its repair is required due to the organ's functional and societal role. Since the first successful microsurgical replantation of the amputated penis, microsurgical techniques have matured and become the standard treatment for the penile replantation. However, the successful second microsurgical replantation for amputated penis has been rarely reported. We present the case of a 40-year-old man with schizophrenia who had a past history of penile self-mutilation and successful replantation at another hospital 2 years ago. After stopping oral medication for schizophrenia, he again cut his penis with a kitchen knife. We successfully replanted the amputated penis by anastomosing both circumflex arteries, the superficial dorsal vein, and the deep dorsal vein using microsurgical techniques. Postoperatively, the foreskin of the replanted penis gradually developed partial necrosis, requiring surgical debridement. The aesthetic and functional results were satisfactory and retrograde urethrography showed no evidence of leakage and stricture of the urethra. Although skin necrosis after penile replantation has been reported as an unavoidable process owing to the nature of injury, the rate would be higher after secondary replantation because of scar formation due to the previous operation. Therefore, our case of successful secondary replantation suggests that skin necrosis would be a predictable postoperative complication and the debridement timing of the devitalized foreskin should be closely monitored, and also secondary amputation is not a contraindication of replantation.

  3. Factors associated with diabetic foot amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Ramos Vieira Santos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetes and the problem of the diabetic foot specifically are a severe burden on the public healthcare system. Amputations caused by this condition are still common in our setting (Brazil, although the true magnitude of the problem is not known with certainty. Lower limb amputation rates have come to be seen as an indicator of the quality of preventative care of the diabetic foot. OBJECTIVE: To identify associations between amputations and factors related to people, to morbidities and to primary care received. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of a sample of 137 patients with diabetic feet admitted to a large hospital in the city of Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. Logistic regression analysis was conducted. RESULTS: Associations with amputation were detected for the following variables: age over 60; resident of the Metro zone; income of three minimum salaries or less; presence of gangrene on admission; glycemia ≥ 126 mg/dL; smoking; not receiving information about results of glycemia testing; not having feet examined, and not being given guidance on caring for feet at consultations during the previous year. CONCLUSIONS: Factors related to Primary Care, such as time since onset of ulcers, information about results of glycemia testing and lack of guidance on how to care for their feet, were associated with occurrence of lower limb amputations.

  4. Successful Second Microsurgical Replantation for Amputated Penis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahide Fujiki, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Penile amputation is a rare emergency, but the best method for its repair is required due to the organ’s functional and societal role. Since the first successful microsurgical replantation of the amputated penis, microsurgical techniques have matured and become the standard treatment for the penile replantation. However, the successful second microsurgical replantation for amputated penis has been rarely reported. We present the case of a 40-year-old man with schizophrenia who had a past history of penile self-mutilation and successful replantation at another hospital 2 years ago. After stopping oral medication for schizophrenia, he again cut his penis with a kitchen knife. We successfully replanted the amputated penis by anastomosing both circumflex arteries, the superficial dorsal vein, and the deep dorsal vein using microsurgical techniques. Postoperatively, the foreskin of the replanted penis gradually developed partial necrosis, requiring surgical debridement. The aesthetic and functional results were satisfactory and retrograde urethrography showed no evidence of leakage and stricture of the urethra. Although skin necrosis after penile replantation has been reported as an unavoidable process owing to the nature of injury, the rate would be higher after secondary replantation because of scar formation due to the previous operation. Therefore, our case of successful secondary replantation suggests that skin necrosis would be a predictable postoperative complication and the debridement timing of the devitalized foreskin should be closely monitored, and also secondary amputation is not a contraindication of replantation.

  5. Effect of Dietary Protein and Energy Level on Proximate Composition of Breast and Thigh Meat in White Leghorn Layers at Molt and Post Molt Production Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Javaid*, M. I. Anjum1 and M. Akram2

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to explore the effects of varying protein and energy levels in molt diets on meat composition of White Leghorn layers. One hundred and fifty four, 70 weeks old, layers were randomly divided into 18 experimental units of 8 hens each in addition to 10 birds that were slaughtered at pre molt and post fast stages. After 10 days of fasting during molting, 6 experimental diets having 3 levels of crude protein (CP i.e. 14, 16 and 18% and 2 levels of metabolizable energy (ME i.e. 2700 and 2900 kcal/kg were given to the birds at the rate of 45 g/bird for 25 day. There after the birds were offered ad-libitum layer ration during production phase. Two birds per replicate at post molt, at 50% egg production and at the end of experiment were slaughtered and then breast and thigh meat samples were analyzed for proximate composition. Moisture (71.7 and 70.0% content was significantly (P<0.05 higher while, ether extract (2.13 and 3.49% was significantly (P<0.05 lower in both breast and thigh meat, respectively, with 18% CP diet as compared to 14 and 16% CP diets. Medium Protein-High Energy (MPHE molt diet having 16% CP with 2900 kcal/kg ME produced more dry matter and protein content in meat at the expense of ether extract. Results regarding proximate composition of layer meat determined at different stages of molting and post molt production revealed that moisture and protein contents of both breast and thigh meat were significantly increased where as, ether extract and ash contents were significantly decreased at post fast stage with respect to other stages.

  6. Quality of life of eye amputated patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Ekholm, Ola; Prause, Jan U

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate eye-amputated patients’ health-related quality of life, perceived stress, self-rated health, job separation because of illness or disability and socioeconomic position. Methods: Patients were recruited from a tertiary referral centre situated in Copenhagen. Inclusion criteria......-administered questionnaire containing health-related quality of life (SF-36), the perceived stress scale and answered questions about self-rated health, job changes because of illness or disability and socioeconomic status. These results were compared with findings from the Danish Health Interview Survey 2005. Results...... and self-rated health of many eye-amputated patients are drastically changed. Eye amputation has a marked negative influence on job separation because of illness or disability and on socioeconomic position....

  7. Mortality and reoperations following lower limb amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Noam; Gigi, Roy; Haim, Amir; Salai, Moshe; Chechik, Ofir

    2014-02-01

    Above-the-knee amputations (AKA) and below-the-knee amputations (BKA) are commonly indicated in patients with ischemia, extensive tissue loss, or infection. AKA were previously reported to have better wound-healing rates but poorer rehabilitation rates than BKA. To compare the outcomes of AKA and BKA and to identify risk factors for poor outcome following leg amputation. This retrospective cohort study comprised 188 consecutive patients (mean age 72 years, range 25-103, 71 males) who underwent 198 amputations (91 AKA, 107 BK 10 bilateral procedures) between February 2007 and May 2010. Included were male and female adults who underwent amputations for ischemic, infected or gangrenotic foot. Excluded were patients whose surgery was performed for other indications (trauma, tumors). Mortality and reoperations (wound debridement or need for conversion to a higher levelof amputation) were evaluated as outcomes. Patient- and surgery-related risk factors were studied in relation to these primary outcomes. The risk factors for mortality were dementia [hazard ratio (HR) 2.769], non-ambulatory status preoperatively (HR 2.281), heart failure (HR 2.013) and renal failure (HR 1.87). Resistant bacterial infection (HR 3.083) emerged as a risk factor for reoperation. Neither AKA nor BKA was found to be an independent predictor of mortality or reoperation. Both AKA and BKA are associated with very high mortality rates. Mortality is most probably related to serious comorbidities (renal and heart disease) and to reduced functional status and dementia. Resistant bacterial infections are associated with high rates of reoperation. The risk factors identified can aid surgeons and patients to better anticipate and possibly prevent severe complications.

  8. Lower limb amputations in Trondheim, Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Wits?, Eivind; Lium, Arne; Lydersen, Stian

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose In the city of Trondheim, Norway, diabetic lower-limb amputations accounted for one-third of all lower-limb amputations (LLAs). In an attempt to reduce this rate, a diabetic foot team was established in 1996. We present the incidence of LLA in Trondheim as measured 10 years later. Patients and methods In 2004?07, we registered all LLAs performed in Trondheim and then compared the data with previously published data from 1994?1997. From 1996 through 2006, we registered t...

  9. Outcomes of individuals with transfemoral and contralateral transtibial amputation due to dysvascular etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhangu, Sukhinder; Devlin, Michael; Pauley, Tim

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the functional outcome of individuals with transfemoral and contralateral transtibial amputations secondary to peripheral vascular disease. A retrospective chart review followed by phone interview. The primary outcome measures were the discharge 2-minute walk test, Frenchay Activities Index, and the Houghton Scale. There were 31 dysvascular individuals identified to have a combination of transfemoral/transtibial (TF/TT) amputation admitted to our institution for rehabilitation from February 1998 to June 2007. The mortality at follow up was 68%. There were eight surviving amputees. The average 2-minute walk test score was 31.9 m at the time of discharge from our inpatient program. Of these, the average Frenchay Activities Index was 15.3. The average Houghton Scale score for use of the transtibial prosthesis alone was 2.1. The average Houghton Scale score for use of both prostheses was 1.5. Comparisons between groups based on initial amputation level revealed a significant difference of being fitted with a transfemoral prosthesis. Those whom initially had a TT amputation were less likely to ultimately be fitted with a TF prosthesis (X(2) (1,n=31) = 4.76, p amputation due to dysvascular causes is poor. These individuals have a low level of ambulation, activity, and prosthetic use.

  10. Consensus-based distributed optimisation of multi-agent networks via a two level subgradient-proximal algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Liao, Rui-Quan; Zhang, Ding-Xue; Zheng, Gui-Lin

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a consensus-based stochastic subgradient algorithm for multi-agent networks to minimise multiple convex but not necessarily differential objective functions, subject to an intersection set of multiple closed convex constraint sets. Compared with the existing results an alternative subgradient algorithm is first introduced based on two level subgradient iterations, where the first level is to minimise the component functions, and the second to enforce the iterates not oscillate from the constraint set wildly. In addition, a distributed consensus-based type of the proposed subgradient algorithm is constructed within the framework of multi-agent networks for the case when the iteration index of local objective functions and local constraint sets is not homologous. Detailed convergence analysis of the proposed algorithms is established using matrix theories and super-martingale convergence theorem. In addition, a pre-step convergence factor is obtained in this study to characterise the distance between the iterations and the optimal set, while some existing literatures only present a convergence work. Simulation results are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed theoretical results.

  11. Free fillet flap application to cover forequarter or traumatic amputation of an upper extremity: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglioni, Mario F; Lindenblatt, Nicole; Barth, André A; Fuchs, Bruno; Weder, Walter; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2016-11-01

    Reusing tissue of amputated or unsalvageable limbs to reconstruct soft tissue defects is one aspect of the "spare parts concept." Using a free fillet flap in such situations enables the successful formation of a proximal stump with the length needed to cover a large defect from forequarter amputation without risking additional donor-site morbidity. The use of free fillet flaps for reconstruction after forequarter and traumatic upper extremity amputations is illustrated here in a case report. A 41-year old patient required a forequarter amputation to resect a desmoid tumor, resulting in an extensive soft-tissue defect of the upper extremity. A free fillet flap of the amputated arm and an additional local epaulette flap were used to reconstruct the defect. At 9 months after the procedure, a satisfactory result with a very well healed flap was attained. Free fillet flaps can be used successfully for reconstruction of large upper extremity defects, without risking additional donor-site morbidity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 36:700-704, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Successful Replantation of Amputated Penile Shaft following Industrial Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Salehipour

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Penile amputation is an uncommon urological emergency. Although rare, traumatic amputation of penis is a challenging injury to treat. However, modern microsurgical reconstruction techniques have improved success rate of penile replantation and become the procedure of choice for managing these patients. Herein, we report on a case of penile amputation following an industrial accident.

  13. Successful Replantation of Amputated Penile Shaft following Industrial Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Salehipour, M.; A Ariafar

    2010-01-01

    Penile amputation is an uncommon urological emergency. Although rare, traumatic amputation of penis is a challenging injury to treat. However, modern microsurgical reconstruction techniques have improved success rate of penile replantation and become the procedure of choice for managing these patients. Herein, we report on a case of penile amputation following an industrial accident.

  14. Lower limb amputation for ischaemia with special reference to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patient must be left with an amputation stump that can bear weight and, when necessary, to which a prosthesis can be fitted. The scope of what follows is not intended to be a detailed text on amputation, but to provide some insight for the clinician, based on general experience with amputation over a number of years.

  15. Primary and Revision Amputation Surgery in a Tertiary Institution in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An increasing trend in the prevalence of revision amputation was found. There was a statistically significant association between diabetic amputees and their having a revision amputation done with p =0.002. Conclusion: Diabetic amputees are at a higher risk of a revision amputation. Counseling and appropriate diagnostic ...

  16. Preventable amputations in Ethiopia | Dessie | East and Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine how many amputations might be avoidable in Ethiopia. Patients and methods: A retrospective study was made of 110 amputations (Male 83, Female 27) performed at the Tikur Anbessa Hospital during the 12 months between May 1 - April 3 1,200 1- 02. Results: Upper limb amputations (ULA) were ...

  17. Diabetes Drug Gets FDA Warning Due to Amputation Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Diabetes Drug Gets FDA Warning Due to Amputation Risk Canagliflozin tied to a doubling of amputations of legs, feet, agency says To use the ... to increase the risk of leg and foot amputations, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. The ...

  18. Three-dimensional micro-level computational study of Wolff's law via trabecular bone remodeling in the human proximal femur using design space topology optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Christopher; Kim, Il Yong

    2011-03-15

    The law of bone remodeling, commonly referred to as Wolff's Law, asserts that the internal trabecular bone adapts to external loadings, reorienting with the principal stress trajectories to maximize mechanical efficiency creating a naturally optimum structure. The goal of the current study was to utilize an advanced structural optimization algorithm, called design space optimization (DSO), to perform a micro-level three-dimensional finite element bone remodeling simulation on the human proximal femur and analyse the results to determine the validity of Wolff's hypothesis. DSO optimizes the layout of material by iteratively distributing it into the areas of highest loading, while simultaneously changing the design domain to increase computational efficiency. The result is a "fully stressed" structure with minimized compliance and increased stiffness. The large-scale computational simulation utilized a 175 μm mesh resolution and the routine daily loading activities of walking and stair climbing. The resulting anisotropic trabecular architecture was compared to both Wolff's trajectory hypothesis and natural femur samples from literature using a variety of visualization techniques, including radiography and computed tomography (CT). The results qualitatively revealed several anisotropic trabecular regions, that were comparable to the natural human femurs. Quantitatively, the various regional bone volume fractions from the computational results were consistent with quantitative CT analyses. The global strain energy proceeded to become more uniform during optimization; implying increased mechanical efficiency was achieved. The realistic simulated trabecular geometry suggests that the DSO method can accurately predict bone adaptation due to mechanical loading and that the proximal femur is an optimum structure as the Wolff hypothesized. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Proximal Priority Theory: An Updated Technique in Low Level Laser Therapy with an 830 nm GaAlAs Laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshiro, Toshio

    2012-12-26

    The 830 nm GaAlAs diode laser has played an extremely active role in low level laser therapy (LLLT) since the early 1980's. Recently, the author modified his original proximal priority laser technique (PPLT), and the current article set out to explain the improved approach and show scientific evidence for its efficacy. Laser Therapy System: The laser therapy system used was based on the GaAlAs diode (OhLase-3D1, JMLL, Japan), delivering 60 mW in continuous wave at a wavelength of 830 nm in the near infrared with a power density at the tip of the probe head of approximately 1.2 W/cm(2). Proximal Priority Laser Technique: Under the author's PPLT concept, the brain is the control center for the body so every other part of the body is distal to the head. The main blood supply to the head is through the carotid arteries, and the deep penetration of the 830 nm beam applied to the side of the neck can involve and photoactivate the external and internal carotids, increasing the blood supply to the brain and creating a systemic parasympathetic system-mediated whole-body effect. The author has added gentle neck-stretching, trunk-stretching and his distal tissue softening approaches concomitant with the irradiation which enhance treatment efficacy. Real-time fine-plate thermography has revealed whole-body warming as a result of the PPLT, with applications including chronic pain attenuation, female infertility and functional training of paraplegic cerebral palsy patients. The warming effect had a latency from hours to days, increasing in intensity and latency with subsequent PPLT sessions. Both Doppler flowmetry and SPECT have shown increased cerebral and systemic blood flow following PPLT. PPLT is easy to deliver and offers tangible results in a large range of conditions, enhancing the efficacy of diode laser LLLT.

  20. Contralateral Total Hip Arthroplasty After Hindquarter Amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. M. Sommerville

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the management and outcome of a 62-year old lady who developed severe osteoarthritis of the hip, nine years after a hindquarter amputation for radiation-induced sarcoma of the contralateral pelvis. The difficulties of stabilising the pelvis intraoperatively and the problems of postoperative rehabilitation are outlined. The operation successfully relieved her pain and restored limited mobility.

  1. The Functions of an Amputation Clinic*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-08-28

    Aug 28, 1971 ... (b) The Orthopaedic Department. (c) The Physiotherapy Department. 'Date received: 19 April 1971. (d) The Occupational Therapy Department. (e) The Medical Social Workers. (t) The Limb Fitters. . Eve:y amputation performed at Groote Schuur Hospital. IS notified to the Medical Superintendent's office by ...

  2. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renal tubular acidosis - proximal; Type II RTA; RTA - proximal; Renal tubular acidosis type II ... by alkaline substances, mainly bicarbonate. Proximal renal tubular acidosis (Type II RTA) occurs when bicarbonate is not ...

  3. Effects of prosthetic limb prescription on 3-year mortality among Veterans with lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurichi, Jibby E; Kwong, Pui; Vogel, W Bruce; Xie, Dawei; Cowper Ripley, Diane; Bates, Barbara E

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the relationship between receipt of a prescription for a prosthetic limb and 3 yr mortality postsurgery among Veterans with lower-limb amputation (LLA). We conducted a retrospective observational study that included 4,578 Veterans hospitalized for LLA and discharged in fiscal years 2003 and 2004. The outcome was time to all-cause mortality from the amputation surgical date up to the 3 yr anniversary of the surgical date. Of the Veterans with LLA, 1,300 (28.4%) received a prescription for a prosthetic limb within 1 yr after the surgical amputation. About 46% (n = 2,086) died within 3 yr of the surgical anniversary. Among those who received a prescription for a prosthetic limb, only 25.2% died within 3 yr of the surgical anniversary. After adjustment, Veterans who received a prescription for a prosthetic limb were less likely to die after the surgery than Veterans without a prescription, with a hazard ratio of 0.68 (95% confidence interval: 0.60-0.77). Findings demonstrated that Veterans with LLA who received a prescription for a prosthetic limb within 1 yr after the surgical amputation were less likely to die within 3 yr of the surgical amputation after controlling for patient-, treatment-, and facility-level characteristics.

  4. Phantom limb related phenomena and their rehabilitation after lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, R; Alaa, L; Mallick, M; Ring, H

    2009-12-01

    This paper reviewed the various hypotheses on phantom limb and phantom limb pain as well as all the related rehabilitation techniques to control these symptoms. The uncertainty in their pathophysiology strongly affects all the rehabilitation approaches so far used, as no single parameter has been found to predict or control phantom limb pain as well as no single factor can be quoted as an indicator of rehabilitation success for lower limb amputation. Within a comprehensive rehabilitation plan, behavioral interventions, stimulation techniques, feedback, physical therapies designed to possibly reverse the maladaptive memory traces and enhance its extinction have been described. Although substantially not clinically useful, pharmacological and surgical interventions also have been briefly considered. A reassessment of the actual strategies used is suggested with a role for rehabilitation not only after the amputation but also in the pre-emptive control of the pre-existing painful condition. In this process, rehabilitation should take into account many parameters, not always related to the traditional role of rehabilitation. Pain assessment before and after amputation, its natural history and clinical picture such as its quality, variations, level of the amputation, dominance, time interval between amputation and rehabilitation, as well as all the other phantom limb related phenomena should be considered and treated.

  5. Leg amputation side determines performance in curve sprinting: a case study on a Paralympic medalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funken, Johannes; Heinrich, Kai; Willwacher, Steffen; Müller, Ralf; Böcker, Jonas; Hobara, Hiroaki; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Potthast, Wolfgang

    2017-11-13

    The lower limb kinetics of curve sprinting in amputees are not well described in the literature, particularly with respect to the effect of the side of amputation. This is an issue due to the importance of the knowledge for prosthetic design and classification of athletes. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of side of amputation on curve sprinting performance in athletes with a unilateral leg amputation. A three-dimensional motion analysis system (Vicon), four force plates (Kistler) and a modified mathematical human model (ALASKA) were used to compare clockwise and counter clockwise curve sprinting lower limb kinematics and kinetics of a Paralympic medalist with a left-sided knee exarticular amputation. Results reveal that vertical ground reaction force application and total vertical impulse were lower when the affected limb was at the inside of the curve. The unaffected limb showed joint mechanics different to those established for non-amputee athletes and might contribute better to propulsion when being the inside limb. Curve sprinting biomechanics and the ability to attain high radial velocities are directly dependent on the side of amputation relative to the curve direction in a unilateral amputee athlete of highest performance level.

  6. Very low survival rates after non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a consecutive series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Holm, Gitte; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate factors potentially influencing short- and long-term mortality in patients who had a non-traumatic lower limb amputation in a university hospital. A consecutive series of 93 amputations (16% toe/foot, 33% trans-tibial, 9% through knee and 42......% trans-femoral) were studied. Their mean age was 75.8 years; 21 (23%) were admitted from a nursing home and 87 (92%) were amputated due to a vascular disease and/or diabetes. Thirty days and 1-year mortality were 30 and 54%, respectively. Cox regression analysis demonstrated that the 30-day mortality...... was associated with older age (P = 0.01), and the number of co-morbidities (P = 0.04), when adjusted for gender, previous amputations, cause of and amputation level, and residential status. Thus, a patient with 4 or 5 co-morbidities (n = 20) was seven times more likely to die within 30 days, compared...

  7. Comparison of Transtibial Amputations in Diabetic Patients With and Without End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukich, Dane K; Ahn, Junho; Raspovic, Katherine M; Gottschalk, Frank A; La Fontaine, Javier; Lavery, Larry A

    2017-04-01

    The primary purpose of this retrospective study was to report on a consecutive series of 102 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) who underwent transtibial amputation (TTA) for chronic infections and nonreconstructable lower extremity deformities. A secondary aim was to compare the outcomes of TTA patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis (ESRD) to patients without ESRD, and to identify risk factors for mortality after TTA. This cohort involved a consecutive series of patients who were treated by a single surgeon. The TTA patients were divided into 2 groups for analysis. The study group included those patients with ESRD who underwent TTA, and the control group included those patients who did not have ESRD. At the time of final follow-up, 64 of 102 patients were ambulatory with a prosthesis. There was a significant improvement in ambulatory status after amputation (preoperatively 45.1%, postoperatively 62.7%, P = .02). Wound healing complications (infection and/or dehiscence) occurred in 31 of 102 patients and led to a transfemoral amputation in 4 patients. After TTA patients with ESRD were significantly more likely to die (52.4% vs. 23.5%, p transtibial amputation. Excluding patients with bilateral amputations (5 prior to and 10 after the index amputation), 64 of 87 patients with successful unilateral transtibial amputations were able to ambulate with a prosthesis. Thirty of 102 patients (29.4%) died during the follow-up period, and 6 of these deaths occurred during the perioperative period (within 30 days of surgery). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups with regard to the use of staged TTA, need for transfemoral amputation, or wound healing problems at the amputation site. Patients who were unable to walk postoperatively had a calculated 5-year survival rate of 30.1%, whereas those who were ambulatory had a 5-year survival rate of 68.8%. Cox proportional hazards model demonstrated a 62% reduced risk of mortality in patients who were

  8. Preoperative blood glucose and prognosis in diabetic patients undergoing lower extremity amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayak, Raj Kumar; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous work has shown that uncontrolled diabetes mellitus is associated with adverse surgical outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to establish if a high peri-operative random blood sugar (RBS) concentration among patients with diabetes with non-traumatic lower......: A total of 270 patients underwent non-traumatic LEA of whom 105 had diabetes, whereas 81 patients were included for this study. The mean age was 71 years (standard deviation: ± 11.8). Mortality was 27% and 16% were re-amputated within three months after their first amputation.The median pre-operative RBS.......50-7.22), with the Q1 tertile as the reference group. CONCLUSIONS: This study does not confirm that a high peri-operative RBS level can predict increased mortality or re-amputation among patients with diabetes who undergo non-traumatic LEA. Furthermore, based on our results, we cannot inform clinical decision...

  9. [Cross-hand replantation in bilateral upper limb amputation: An anatomical emergency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, A; Rongieres, M; Laffosse, J-M; Pailhe, R; Lauwers, F; Grolleau, J-L

    2015-08-01

    Bilateral amputations of upper limbs are excessively rare clinical situations. We report an exceptional clinical case of bilateral amputation of upper limbs at different levels: destruction of the right hand and left transhumeral amputation in a patient after an attempted suicide on train lines. This special situation led us to perform a cross-hand replantation of the left hand to the right forearm. Only 4 other similar cases have been published in the literature. Once the surgical indication had been formulated collectively, and taking into account all the ethical issues surrounding such a decision, we had to solve the issue of inverting anatomical structures in emergency. We have provided a detailed description of our surgical technique. The aim was to save at least one organ used for grasping. The result obtained is presented and reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationship between regional spending on vascular care and amputation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodney, Philip P.; Travis, Lori L.; Brooke, Benjamin S.; DeMartino, Randall R.; Goodman, David C.; Fisher, Elliott S.; Birkmeyer, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Importance While lower extremity revascularization is effective in preventing amputation, the relationship between spending on vascular care and regional amputation rates remains unclear. Objective To test the hypothesis that higher regional spending on vascular care is associated with lower amputation rates in patients with severe peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting United States Medicare patients, 2003-2010 Participants 18,463 patients who underwent major PAD-related amputation. Exposures Price-adjusted Medicare spending on revascularization procedures and related vascular care in the year before lower extremity amputation, across hospital referral regions. Main Outcome Measure(s) Correlation coefficient between regional spending on vascular care and regional rates of PAD-related amputation. Results Among patients ultimately subject to amputation, 64% were admitted to the hospital in the year prior to amputation for revascularization, wound-related care, or both; 36% were admitted only for their amputation. The mean cost of inpatient care in the year before amputation, including the amputation itself, was $22,405, but varied from $11,077 (Bismarck, North Dakota) to $42,613 (Salinas, California) (pamputation rates (R=0.10, p=0.06). Regions most aggressive in the use of endovascular interventions which most likely to have high spending (R=0.42, p=0.002) and high amputation rates (R=0.40, p=0.004). Conclusions Regions that spend the most on vascular care is highest perform the most procedures, especially endovascular interventions, in the year before amputation. However, there is little evidence that higher regional spending is associated with lower amputation rates. This suggests an opportunity to limit costs in vascular care without compromising quality. PMID:24258010

  11. Rehabilitation outcome following war-related transtibial amputation in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmani-Vllasolli, Teuta; Hundozi, Hajrije; Orovcanec, Nikola; Krasniqi, Blerim; Murtezani, Ardiana

    2014-06-01

    Previous literature has suggested that age, level of amputation, residual limb length, comorbidities, mental disorders, and cause of amputation can affect the ability to successfully ambulate with prosthesis. The objective of this study was to analyze the predictors that affect the rehabilitation outcome of war-related transtibial amputees and the relationship of these factors with ambulation ability after prosthetic fitting. Retrospective observational study. We reviewed the records of 69 war-related transtibial amputees. The rehabilitation outcome was analyzed according to the grade of rehabilitation summarized in three grades. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the odds of achieving the first rehabilitation grade. The majority of patients with transtibial amputations achieved the first grade of rehabilitation (59.4%). The factors that significantly influenced the achievement of the first grade of rehabilitation were age and absence of posttraumatic stress disorder. For every 1-year increase in patient age, the odds of achieving first grade of rehabilitation decreased by a factor of 0.9. Patients without posttraumatic stress disorder had 12.9 greater odds of achieving the first rehabilitation grade compared to patients with posttraumatic stress disorder. Achievement of the first grade of rehabilitation among war-related transtibial amputees is dependent on patient age and the absence of posttraumatic stress disorder. Understanding the factors that may affect the rehabilitation outcome of war-related amputees could lead to a more specific organization of the rehabilitation, especially in a country that has recently been involved in war. This is the first study to focus on determinants of prosthetic rehabilitation in these patients. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2013.

  12. Fate of the contralateral limb after lower extremity amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Julia D.; Bensley, Rodney P.; Hurks, Rob; Dahlberg, Suzanne; Hamdan, Allen D.; Wyers, Mark C.; Chaikof, Elliot L.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Lower extremity amputation is often performed in patients where both lower extremities are at risk due to peripheral arterial disease or diabetes, yet the proportion of patients who progress to amputation of their contralateral limb is not well defined. We sought to determine the rate of subsequent amputation on both the ipsilateral and contralateral lower extremities following initial amputation. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of all patients undergoing lower extremity amputation (exclusive of trauma or tumor) at our institution from 1998 to 2010. We used International Classification of Diseases-Ninth Revision codes to identify patients and procedures as well as comorbidities. Outcomes included the proportion of patients at 1 and 5 years undergoing contralateral and ipsilateral major and minor amputation stratified by initial major vs minor amputation. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to determine predictors of major contralateral amputation. Results We identified 1715 patients. Mean age was 67.2 years, 63% were male, 77% were diabetic, and 34% underwent an initial major amputation. After major amputation, 5.7% and 11.5% have a contralateral major amputation at 1 and 5 years, respectively. After minor amputation, 3.2% and 8.4% have a contralateral major amputation at 1 and 5 years while 10.5% and 14.2% have an ipsilateral major amputation at 1 and 5 years, respectively. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis revealed end-stage renal disease (hazard ratio [HR], 3.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3–6.5), chronic renal insufficiency (HR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.5–3.3), atherosclerosis without diabetic neuropathy (HR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.5–5.7), atherosclerosis with diabetic neuropathy (HR, 9.1; 95% CI, 3.7–22.5), and initial major amputation (HR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.3–2.6) were independently predictive of subsequent contralateral major amputation. Conclusions Rates of contralateral limb amputation are high and predicted

  13. Attitude and perception of patients towards amputation as a form of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A survey of the attitude and perception of a cross- section of residents of Calabar to therapeutic limb amputation was done to determine the level of knowledge and understanding of the indications, advantages as well as the prospects for the amputees in our environment. Patients and Methods: Structured ...

  14. Syme amputation for the treatment of fibular deficiency. An evaluation of long-term physical and psychological functional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, J G; Walsh, S J; Small, J M; Morton, A; Koch, K D; Smith, C; Cummings, D; Buchanan, R

    1999-11-01

    Syme amputation is an accepted treatment for fibular deficiency. With improvement in limb-lengthening procedures, there has been renewed interest in limb salvage for these patients. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the physical and psychological results in ten young adults who had had a Syme amputation for the treatment of fibular deficiency when they were children. The evaluation consisted of physical examination, prosthetic assessment, psychological testing, and physical performance testing of knee extension and flexion with use of a Cybex-II dynamometer. Five patients reported no difficulty with the involved limb since the Syme amputation, four had had minor secondary procedures (three medial distal femoral or proximal tibial hemiepiphyseodeses, one reconstruction with an autologous patellar ligament graft, one revision of the stump, and one tibial osteotomy) on the affected extremity, and one had mild instability of the knee that had been treated nonoperatively. All ten patients had an appropriate, functional Syme prosthesis, and none reported difficulty with walking or running. On psychological testing, this group generally did not differ from the norm with regard to occupational satisfaction, personal growth, relationships with family members and peers, and recreational behavior. The patients' overall assessment of self-reported quality of life and self-esteem was similar to that of normative adult samples. In general, these patients were leading active, productive lives and had always done so. On the basis of the results of this study, we concluded that young adults who have had a Syme amputation apparently are not limited in their ability to pursue and achieve personal goals. In order to justify recommending limb salvage rather than early Syme amputation for the treatment of fibular deficiency, the results of multistaged lengthening and reconstruction would have to match the functional, psychological, and cost-effective results for the

  15. Dynamic Stability of Superior vs. Inferior Body Segments in Individuals with Transtibial Amputation Walking in Destabilizing Environments✰

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurskens, Rainer; Wilken, Jason M.; Dingwell, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    Interestingly, young and highly active people with lower limb amputation appear to maintain a similar trunk and upper body stability during walking as able bodied individuals. Understanding the mechanisms underlying how this stability is achieved after lower leg amputation is important to improve training regimens for improving walking function in these patients. This study quantified how superior (i.e., head, trunk, and pelvis) and inferior (i.e., thigh, shank, and feet) segments of the body respond to continuous visual or mechanical perturbations during walking. Nine persons with transtibial amputation (TTA) and 12 able bodied controls (AB) walked on a 2m × 3m treadmill in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN). Subjects were perturbed by continuous pseudo random mediolateral movements of either the treadmill platform or the visual scene. TTA maintained a similar local and orbital stability in their superior body segments as AB throughout both perturbation types. However, for their inferior body segments, TTA subjects exhibited greater dynamic instability during perturbed walking. In TTA subjects, these increases in instability were even more pronounced in their prosthetic limb compared to their intact leg. These findings demonstrate that persons with unilateral lower leg amputation maintain upper body stability in spite of increased dynamic instability in their impaired lower leg. Thus, transtibial amputation does significantly impair sensorimotor function, leading to substantially altered dynamic movements of their lower limb segments. However, otherwise relatively healthy patients with unilateral transtibial amputation appear to retain sufficient remaining sensorimotor function in their proximal and contralateral limbs to adequately compensate for their impairment. PMID:25064425

  16. Dynamic stability of superior vs. inferior body segments in individuals with transtibial amputation walking in destabilizing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurskens, Rainer; Wilken, Jason M; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2014-09-22

    Interestingly, young and highly active people with lower limb amputation appear to maintain a similar trunk and upper body stability during walking as able-bodied individuals. Understanding the mechanisms underlying how this stability is achieved after lower-leg amputation is important to improve training regimens for improving walking function in these patients. This study quantified how superior (i.e., head, trunk, and pelvis) and inferior (i.e., thigh, shank, and feet) segments of the body respond to continuous visual or mechanical perturbations during walking. Nine persons with transtibial amputation (TTA) and 12 able-bodied controls (AB) walked on a 2 m × 3 m treadmill in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN). Subjects were perturbed by continuous pseudo-random mediolateral movements of either the treadmill platform or the visual scene. TTA maintained a similar local and orbital stability in their superior body segments as AB throughout both perturbation types. However, for their inferior body segments, TTA subjects exhibited greater dynamic instability during perturbed walking. In TTA subjects, these increases in instability were even more pronounced in their prosthetic limb compared to their intact leg. These findings demonstrate that persons with unilateral lower leg amputation maintain upper body stability in spite of increased dynamic instability in their impaired lower leg. Thus, transtibial amputation does significantly impair sensorimotor function, leading to substantially altered dynamic movements of their lower limb segments. However, otherwise relatively healthy patients with unilateral transtibial amputation appear to retain sufficient remaining sensorimotor function in their proximal and contralateral limbs to adequately compensate for their impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [The nursing role in field amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aït-Mohammed, Farid; Waroux, Stanislas; Lefort, Hugues

    2015-03-01

    Field amputation is a surgical procedure which consists in removing one or several limbs of a victim to extricate them from rubble and evacuate them to a hospital. A last resort, it is a rarely-performed procedure, carried out primarily in disaster medicine. A team which worked in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake reports on one such clinical situation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors influencing quality of life following lower limb amputation for peripheral arterial occlusive disease: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davie-Smith, Fiona; Coulter, Elaine; Kennon, Brian; Wyke, Sally; Paul, Lorna

    2017-12-01

    The majority of lower limb amputations are undertaken in people with peripheral arterial occlusive disease, and approximately 50% have diabetes. Quality of life is an important outcome in lower limb amputations; little is known about what influences it, and therefore how to improve it. The aim of this systematic review was to identify the factors that influence quality of life after lower limb amputation for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science and Cochrane databases were searched to identify articles that quantitatively measured quality of life in those with a lower limb amputation for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Articles were quality assessed by two assessors, evidence tables summarised each article and a narrative synthesis was performed. Systematic review. Twelve articles were included. Study designs and outcome measures used varied. Quality assessment scores ranged from 36% to 92%. The ability to walk successfully with a prosthesis had the greatest positive impact on quality of life. A trans-femoral amputation was negatively associated with quality of life due to increased difficulty in walking with a prosthesis. Other factors such as older age, being male, longer time since amputation, level of social support and presence of diabetes also negatively affected quality of life. Being able to walk with a prosthesis is of primary importance to improve quality of life for people with lower limb amputation due to peripheral arterial occlusive disease. To further understand and improve the quality of life of this population, there is a need for more prospective longitudinal studies, with a standardised outcome measure. Clinical relevance This is of clinical relevance to those who are involved in the rehabilitation of persons with lower limb amputations. Improved quality of life is associated with successful prosthetic use and focus should be directed toward achieving this.

  19. A Salvage Operation for Total Penis Amputation Due to Circumcision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilsev Ince

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Circumcision is one of the most common rituals in Jewish and Islamic cultures. It may also be performed for phimosis correction or the treatment of recurrent balanitis. Although circumcision is considered to be a technically easy and safe surgical procedure with no significant risk, it may lead to severe complications such as necrotizing fasciitis or total penis amputation. In this report, we present a case of penis amputation at two levels occurring with third-degree burns due to electrocautery during circumcision. Although penile replantation was attempted, it was unsuccessful due to burn damage to the veins. After restoration of the functional structures, the penis was buried in the inguinal area by reepithelization to maintain blood circulation. The recovery of the penis was successful. This case is presented as a novel example of groin flap surgery to achieve a functionally and aesthetically acceptable outcome in a salvage operation for a penis with significant traumatic injury, which has not been previously reported in the literature.

  20. Amputation Totale de La Verge: A Propos de Trois Observations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: qu'elle soit d'origine criminelle ou psychogène, l'amputation totale du pénis est rarissime. Les conséquences sont urinaires, sexuelles et psychogènes. La prise en charge doit être multidisciplinaire. Mots Clés: Verge; amputation; méat; sténose. English Title: Total penile amputation: a report on three cases.

  1. Treatment of the diabetic foot – to amputate or not?

    OpenAIRE

    Weledji, Elroy P.; Fokam, Pius

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot infections are a frequent clinical problem. About 50% of patients with diabetic foot infections who have foot amputations die within five years. Properly managed most can be cured, but many patients needlessly undergo amputations because of improper diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Discussion The article debates the pros and cons of amputation of the diabetic foot. The thesis is that if the guidelines on the management of the diabetic foot are followed primary a...

  2. [Transtibial amputation: sagittal flaps in patients with diabetic foot syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalůvka, F; Ostruszka, P; Sitek, P; Foltys, A; Vávra, P; Jelínek, P; Zonča, P

    2014-03-01

    Diabetic foot syndrome is defined by ulcer or destruction of leg tissues in patients with diabetes (diabetics) associated with infection, neuropathy and various degree of ischaemia (peripheral vascular disease). In Czech Republic in 2010 were registrated over 45 000 patients with diabetic foot syndrome. 8500 (diabetics) patients with diabetes undergone the surgery (any type of amputation). In retrospective non randomized trial we evaluated the population of patients with lower limb amputation admitted to Clinic of Surgery FNO between 2010-1012. We introduce current (present) view to possibilities of lower limb amputations, historical problems and development of surgical methods. Special aspect is dedicated to sagital shank amputation. Detail description of operative (surgical) technique itself and crural region (area) anatomy. In 2010-2012 we achieved 146 lower limb amputations in shank, from that 27 sagital shank amputations( sagital operative method). We observed ( followed up) the number of reoperations, reasons that led to amputation, wounds healing by secondary intention, itęs sources and necessity of revision due to postoperative hemorrhage. Effects of amputations on patientęs quality of life. Social and socioeconomical impacts. Provably lower number of complications in sagital shank amputations compared to (in comparison with) conventional methods. Authors would like to point out and introduce interesting operation method to the general public.

  3. Amputation predictors in diabetic foot ulcers treated with hyperbaric oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, S T; Hemsinli, D; Kaplan, S; Arslan, A

    2017-07-02

    Although hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has long been used for diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), its effectiveness is still controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of HBOT in the management of DFUs and identify amputation predictors. Patients with chronic DFUs (Wanger grade 2-5) were included in the study, which took place between January 2010 and December 2012. HBOT, 100% oxygen, 2.4 atmosphere absolute (ATA) for 120 minutes, was administered to all patients in addition to standard treatment. DFUs were monitored for at least 3 years, or until healing or amputation occurred. Patients with a total of 146 chronic DFUswere recruited. Complete healing (69.6%) and significant improvement (17.9%) was observed in 87.5% of the patients. The cases with no improvement resulted in amputation (minor amputation: 15.0%; major amputation: 8.2%). The duration of diabetes (p=0.037), new wound formation (p=0.045), C-reactive protein (p=0.001) and Wagner grade (p=0.0001) were correlated with amputation in multiple regression analysis. Mortality was higher in the amputation group than in the non-amputation group (47.1 % versus 21.4 %, p=0.007). The inclusion of HBOT with standard treatment and a multidisciplinary approach may be useful in the treatment of DFUs. We found the most important predictors of amputation to be Wagner grade and wound infection. Multicentre, prospective, randomised studies are needed to provide more evidence.

  4. Rotational flap closure of first and fifth metatarsal head plantar ulcers: adjunctive procedure when performing first or fifth ray amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffeli, Troy J; Peterson, Matthew C

    2013-01-01

    Partial ray amputation is a common treatment of diabetes-related neuropathic ulcers located beneath the metatarsal heads. The standard incision for partial first or fifth ray amputation involves a tennis racket incision, with the proximal arm made mid-line along the respective medial or lateral side of the metatarsal head and neck, creating equal dorsal and plantar flaps. This incision works well when the ulcer is located within the excised soft tissue distal to the incision or when the plantar ulcer is superficial and will heal secondarily once the underlying bone has been removed. This standard first or fifth ray amputation incision does not, however, allow excision and closure of plantar ulcers located beneath the first or fifth metatarsal head. Two cases are presented to demonstrate our surgical protocol for partial first or fifth ray amputation using a local rotational flap to cover plantar metatarsal head ulcers. These cases highlight our patient selection criteria, staging protocol when cellulitis or abscess is present, rotational flap design, surgical technique pearls, and the typical postoperative healing progress. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tibia-hindfoot osteomusculocutaneous rotationplasty with calcaneopelvic arthrodesis for extensive loss of bone from the proximal part of the femur. A report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, C A; Koch, L D; Wood, M B

    1997-10-01

    We report a new technique to create an effective lower extremity weight-bearing stump for two patients who had extensive segmental loss of femoral bone proximal to the distal femoral condyles. One patient had previously had complete resection of the proximal part of the femur because of an infection following the insertion of a custom femoral replacement and hip arthroplasty prosthesis. The other patient had had débridement of the femur from the subcapital line to the femoral condyles because of post-traumatic osteomyelitis after failure of a reconstruction with a massive allograft. Both patients were managed with a tibia-hindfoot osteomusculocutaneous rotationplasty after transtarsal (Chopart) amputation, with calcaneopelvic arthrodesis to create stable fixation of the extremity to the pelvis; this fixation allowed flexion, extension, abduction, and adduction of the hip by means of the retained tibiotalar and subtalar joints. At the time of the latest follow-up (at thirty-three and forty-four months), both patients were bearing full weight, without pain, with the use of a standard above-the-knee-amputation prosthesis. We report this procedure as a useful alternative to disarticulation at the level of the hip in patients who have massive loss of femoral bone and destruction of the hip joint in association with scarred and previously infected soft tissues and are not considered to be candidates for other forms of limb-preservation reconstruction. The patient must be willing to accept the equivalent of a low above-the-knee amputation and recognize the potential value of a weight-bearing stump.

  6. A late unusual complication after an open cholecystectomy: Amputation neuroma of the CBD causing obstructive jaundice

    OpenAIRE

    Youssef A. Sleiman; Hassoun, Ziad A.; Nasser, Haydar A.; Abs, Leila; Allouch, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Highlights ? Amputation Neuromas are benign lesions of the CBD that occur months to years following surgery. ? Almost all patients with amputation have had a history of open cholecystectomy. ? Surgery is the best treatment option for amputation neuroma of the CBD.

  7. Type of incision for below knee amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisi, Paul V; Than, Mary M

    2014-04-08

    Below knee amputation (BKA) may be necessary in patients with advanced critical limb ischaemia or diabetic foot sepsis in whom no other treatment option is available. There is no consensus as to which surgical technique achieves the maximum rehabilitation potential. This is the third update of the review first published in 2004. To assess the effects of different types of incision on the outcome of BKA in people with lower limb ischaemia or diabetic foot sepsis, or both. The main focus of the review was to assess the relative merits of skew flap amputation versus the long posterior flap technique. For this update the Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator (TSC) searched the Specialised Register (last searched 28 March 2013) and CENTRAL (2013, Issue 2). Randomised controlled trials comparing two or more types of skin incision for BKA were identified. People with lower limb ischaemia (acute or chronic) or diabetic foot sepsis, or both, were considered for inclusion. People undergoing below knee amputation for other conditions were excluded. One review author identified potential trials. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted the data. Additional information, if required, was sought from study authors. Three studies with a combined total of 309 participants were included in the review. One study compared two-stage versus one-stage BKA; one study compared skew flaps BKA versus long posterior flap BKA; and one study compared sagittal flaps BKA versus long posterior flap BKA. Overall the quality of the evidence from these studies was moderate. BKA using skew flaps or sagittal flaps conferred no advantage over the well established long posterior flap technique (primary stump healing was 60% for both skew flaps and long posterior flap (risk ratio (RR) 1.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.71 to 1.42) and primary stump healing was 58% for sagittal flaps and 55% for long posterior flap (Peto odds ratio (OR) 1

  8. Internal Pedal Amputation in Diabetic Forefoot Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Altındaş

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Approximately 80% of diabetic foot wounds occur in the front foot. Most of these wounds are associated with bone and joint involvement. Toe amputations and ray amputations are the most frequently performed surgical interventions for lesions limited to the front foot. Many diabetic patients refuse surgery despite having advanced deformities that may cause serious injuries. In regard of such patients, we devised a new alternative surgical procedure that maintains the appearance of the toe and is not perceived by patients as amputation. Material and Methods: Seventy-six toe lesions of 66 diabetic patients were treated with the new surgical approach between 01-0-2004 and 08-11-2012. Of these patients 50 were male and 16 were female. Their mean age was 60.4 years, and mean duration of diabetes was 16.6 years. Results: The mean follow-up period was 26.4 (range, 12.0–71.4 months. In 47 patients, the surgical closure healed by primary intention (81%. Dehiscence occurred in 11 patients (19%. Infection of the surgical wound developed in four patients (6.9%. Ulcer relapse occurred in three patients (5.1%. In six patients (10.3%, an ulcer developed in the contralateral foot. In the long-term follow-up, 66 toes of 58 patients were seen to recover in the same or almost same length and width as the other non-deformed toes. Conclusion: Removal of the involved bone and other involved tissues while preserving the skin and other healthy tissues to reconstruct an acceptable new toe is possible using this new technique.

  9. Handling stairs in the seated position for people with unilateral lower-limb amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, R Lee; Brown, Barbara A; Connolly, Christina M; McRae, Sarah; Phillips, Pamela L

    2009-07-01

    Handling stairs in the seated position for people with unilateral lower-limb amputations. The objective of this uncontrolled pilot study was to test the hypotheses that the seated stair-handling method enables people with unilateral lower-limb amputations to ascend and descend stairs effectively and safely, and with an acceptable level of perceived exertion. Eight people with unilateral lower-limb amputations each received a single 20-minute education session on climbing stairs in the seated position. The main outcome measures, assessed 3 days after training, were success in ascending and descending a flight of 11 stairs, safety, and rating of perceived exertion (Borg CR-10 scale, range 0-10). Before training, 3 participants (37.5%) were successful in using a variety of methods. After training, all 8 (100%) were successful, but only 7 (87.5%) were successful when required to use the seated stair-handling method. Two participants had difficulty with this method, one as a result of arm weakness and the other as a result of aggravation of knee pain. There were no adverse events. Ratings of perceived exertion for the seated method (n=7) ranged from 3 to 7.5 for stair ascent and 1 to 5.5 for descent. The seated stair-handling method is a generally effective, safe, and well-tolerated method for people with unilateral lower-limb amputations to ascend and descend stairs.

  10. [Incidence of amputations among patients with diabetes mellitus in the Czech Republic from 2010 to 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piťhová, Pavlína; Honěk, Petr; Dušek, Ladislav; Pavlík, Tomáš; Kvapil, Milan

    2015-11-01

    Information about the incidence of organ-affecting complications of diabetes, including the diabetic foot syndrome, can be obtained from the documents of the Institute of Health Information in the Czech Republic. Assessment of the development of high amputations and minor surgical procedures on the lower limb from 2010 to 2014 in a representative sample of the population of patients with DM kept in the General Health Insurance Company of the Czech Republic database. We identified all individuals in the VZP database who had a record of DM diagnosis (E10-E16 based on ICD 10) or any antidiabetic therapy prescribed (ATC group A10) in the period of 2010-2014. A set of patients who had an agent from A10 group prescribed at least once in the given year was extracted for analysis. In the next step we identified individuals, who in the period of 2010-2014 also underwent a surgical procedure on the lower limb due to diabetic foot. An absolute number of lower limb amputations remains at a stationary level. The submitted analysis presents the first assessment of the development of surgical treatment of diabetic foot in the Czech Republic. The amount of surgical procedures on the diabetic foot remains stable, regarding both high amputations and lower limb minor surgical procedures. In the context of an absolute increase of patients treated for diabetes mellitus, the stationary state is an indication of a relative decrease, which is favourable in particular with regard to the amputation of long bones.

  11. Influence of osteomyelitis location in the foot of diabetic patients with transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faglia, Ezio; Clerici, Giacomo; Caminiti, Maurizio; Curci, Vincenzo; Somalvico, Francesco

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of osteomyelitis in different areas of the foot and the possible correlation between localization and outcome of major amputation. From January 2008 to December 2010, a total of 350 diabetic patients were admitted to our diabetic foot unit for the surgical treatment of osteomyelitis. Osteomyelitis was diagnosed when both the probe-to-bone maneuver and plain radiography were positive. In all of these patients, osteomyelitis was confirmed by histological examination. Osteomyelitis was localized to the forefoot in 300 (85.7%) patients, to the midfoot in 27 (7.7%) patients, and to the hindfoot in the remaining 23 (6.75) patients. On average, foot lesions had developed 6.6 ± 5.6 months before admission to our unit. Transtibial amputation was performed in 1 (0.33%) patient with forefoot osteomyelitis, in 5 (18.5%) patients with midfoot osteomyelitis, and in 12 (52.2%) patients with osteomyelitis of the heel (χ(2) = 128.4, P amputation outcome (odds ratio 15.3; P transtibial amputation when osteomyelitis involved the heel instead of the midfoot or forefoot in diabetic patients. Level III, retrospective comparative series.

  12. Influence of physical capacities of males with transtibial amputation on gait adjustments on sloped surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Karine; Villa, Coralie; Bonnet, Xavier; Lavaste, François; Fodé, Pascale; Martinet, Noel; Pillet, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how kinematic and kinetic adjustments between level and slope locomotion of persons with transtibial amputation are related to their individual muscular and functional capacities. A quantified gait analysis was conducted on flat and slope surfaces for seven patients with transtibial amputation and a control group of eight subjects to obtain biomechanical parameters. In addition, maximal isometric muscular strength (knee and hip extensors) and functional scores were measured. The results of this study showed that most of the persons with transtibial amputation could adapt to ramp ascent either by increasing ankle, knee, and hip flexion angles of the residual limb and/or by recruiting their hip extensors to guarantee enough hip extension power during early stance. Besides, 6-minute walk test score was shown to be a good predictor of adaptation capacities to slope ascent. In ramp descent, the increase of knee flexion moment was correlated with knee extensor strength and residual-limb length. However, no correlation was observed with functional parameters. Results show that the walking strategy adopted by persons with transtibial amputation to negotiate ramp locomotion mainly depends on their muscular capacities. Therefore, muscular strengthening should be a priority during rehabilitation.

  13. Multiset proximity spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kandil

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A multiset is a collection of objects in which repetition of elements is essential. This paper is an attempt to explore the theoretical aspects of multiset by extending the notions of compact, proximity relation and proximal neighborhood to the multiset context. Examples of new multiset topologies, open multiset cover, compact multiset and many identities involving the concept of multiset have been introduced. Further, an integral examples of multiset proximity relations are obtained. A multiset topology induced by a multiset proximity relation on a multiset M has been presented. Also the concept of multiset δ- neighborhood in the multiset proximity space which furnishes an alternative approach to the study of multiset proximity spaces has been mentioned. Finally, some results on this new approach have been obtained and one of the most important results is: every T4- multiset space is semi-compatible with multiset proximity relation δ on M (Theorem 5.10.

  14. Cosmetic amputation of the fourth ray as possible outcome of the traumatic amputation of the ring finger injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrazzini, Alessio; Calderazzi, Filippo; Bertoni, Nicola; Ceccarelli, Francesco

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this work is to describe a case of traumatic amputation of the fourth finger of the left hand. In its first phase, a treatment which consisted in a disarticulation at the level of the metacarpo-phalangeal joint was carried out; in the second phase, three months after this emergency treatment, a cosmetic amputation of the fourth metacarpal ray was required. Surgery was performed in accordance with the technique described by Bunnell, which consisted in the disarticulation of the fourth metacarpal, together with radial traslation of the fifth ray. Eighteen months after the operation The patient reported the absence of any subjective problems, with complete functional recovery of the hand that had been operated on. By that time she was back at her job; she also was satisfied with the cosmetic results that had been achieved.

  15. Differences in minor amputation rate in diabetic foot disease throughout Europe are in part explained by differences in disease severity at presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Battum, P; Schaper, N; Prompers, L

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of minor amputation may vary significantly, and determinants of minor amputation have not been studied systematically. We evaluated minor amputation rate, the determinants of minor amputation and differences in amputation rate between European centres....

  16. Effects of high levels of dietary zinc oxide on ex vivo epithelial histamine response and investigations on histamine receptor action in the proximal colon of weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, S; Pieper, R; Aschenbach, J R; Martin, L; Liu, P; Rieger, J; Schwelberger, H G; Neumann, K; Zentek, J

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the effect of high dietary zinc oxide (ZnO) levels on the histamine-induced secretory-type response and histamine metabolism in the porcine proximal colon. After weaning at d 26, 3 diets with low (LZn), normal (NZn), and high (HZn) concentrations of zinc (57, 164, or 2,425 mg/kg) were fed to a total of 120 piglets. Digesta and tissue samples were taken from the ascending colon after 7 ± 1, 14 ± 1, 21 ± 1, and 28 ± 1 d. Partially stripped tissue was mounted in Ussing chambers, and histamine was applied either to the serosal or mucosal compartments. Tissue was pretreated with or without aminoguanidine and amodiaquine to block the histamine-degrading enzymes diamine oxidase (DAO) and histamine -methyltransferase (HMT), respectively. Gene expression and catalytic activity of DAO and HMT in the tissue were analyzed. The numbers of mast cells were determined in tissue samples, and histamine concentration was measured in the colon digesta. Colon tissue from another 12 piglets was used for functional studies on histamine H and H receptors by using the neuronal conduction blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) and the H and H receptor blocker chloropyramine and famotidine, respectively. After serosal histamine application to colonic tissue in Ussing chambers, the change of short-circuit current (Δ) was not affected by pretreatment and was not different between Zn feeding groups. The Δ after mucosal histamine application was numerically lower ( = 0.168) in HZn compared to LZn and NZn pigs. Mast cell numbers increased from 32 to 46 d of life ( < 0.05). Further studies elucidated that the serosal histamine response was partly inhibited by chloropyramine or famotidine ( < 0.01). The response to mucosal histamine tended to be decreased when chloropyramine but not famotidine was applied from either the serosal or the mucosal side ( = 0.055). Tetrodotoxin alone or in combination with chloropyramine resulted in a similar reduction in the mucosal

  17. Amputation des quatre members | Feruzi | Pan African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Mireille Kakinga Zabibu, Jules Panda Mulefu, Francois Tshilombo Katombe. Abstract. Les auteurs présentent les cas d'amputation des quatre membres réalisée chez trois patients différents. Ce sont des amputations réalisées pour chaque ...

  18. Pattern Of Lower Limb Amputations In Eku | Akhator | Ebonyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amputation is a psychological, social and economic tragedy for the patient and his/her family. The lack of rehabilitation facilities in our environment makes the operation a dreaded procedure. This study aims to ascertain the pattern of lower limb amputation in Baptist Medical Center, Eku, with regards to socio biological ...

  19. The eventual outcome of patients who had lower limb amputations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C De Klerk

    The cumulative mortality showed that 16.1% died within a month and 48.4% within one year post-amputation. Among the 18 living amputees, 50.0% became unemployed, 77.8% used wheelchairs, 11.1% used crutches and 11.1% a prosthesis. Conclusion: Lower limb amputation due to PVD is indicative of a poor prognosis ...

  20. Lower limb amputation for ischaemia with special reference to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mars M, Elson KI, Salisbury RT, Robbs JV. Do pre-operative antibiotics reach the operative field in amputation surgery for peripheral vascular disease? A pilot study. S Afr J Surg. 1990; 28: 58-61. 7. Huizinga WKJ, Robbs JV, Bhamjee A. Wound infection after major lower limb amputation – the role of antibiotic prophylaxis.

  1. Surgical Limb Amputation: A Five-Year Experience At Hilltop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Limb amputation is one of the oldest and commonest surgical procedures known to man. It is performed by the orthopedic, general, vascular and trauma surgeons. At Hilltop Orthopedic Hospital, Enugu, limb amputation is found prevalent, yet most times it is objectionable to the patient. METHOD: A ...

  2. Fibular deficiency and the indications for Syme's amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, W L

    1991-08-01

    Recent literature on the subject is reviewed, and the role of Syme's amputation, reconstructive surgery and prosthetic management is discussed in relation to the severity of the condition. Amputation, which should be performed between 18 months and two years old is specifically recommended for total fibula absence with ankle instability. The operative technique is detailed.

  3. Amputation Surgery in a Secondary Healthcare Facility in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... year period in a secondary healthcare facility in sub- Saharan Africa. A retrospective study of 117 patients that underwent amputation in the facility between January 1998 and December 2007. Trauma remains the commonest indication for amputation in our environment. Only very few of the amputees were known to have ...

  4. Amputations Following Traumatic Limb Injuries In Jos, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... setters is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Appropriate legislation to check the excesses of traditional bone setters should reduce the number of amputations following limb trauma. Key words: Amputation, Trauma, Traditional bone setters, Younger age. Highland Medical Research Journal Vol.2(1) 2004: 56-60 ...

  5. Major limb amputations in El Obeid Hospital, Western Sudan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To study the causes and pattern of major limb amputations in El Obeid Hospital, Western Sudan. Patients and methods: The records of 50 major limb amputations performed in patients admitted to the University Surgical Unit at El Obeid Teaching Hospital, Western Sudan in two years were retrospectively studied.

  6. Beak Amputation Effects on Performance and Egg Quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of beak amputation on performance and egg quality characteristics of egg-type chickens. A total of 132 native layers (Yacon) chickens were obtained from a commercial hatchery for the study. There were four treatments in which upper and lower beaks were amputated at ...

  7. Limb amputations in adults in an Ivorian Teaching Hospital | Essoh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the pattern of limb amputations and preventable indications. Design: A retrospective study. Setting: Department of orthopaedic surgery, Yopougon Teaching Hospital, Abidjan, Côte d\\'Ivoire. Patients and methods: One hundred fifty-six patients with amputations over an 11-year period from January ...

  8. Congenital Amputation Involving the Hands and Feet: A Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Congenital amputation of the limbs is not uncommon. However, it is very rare when this involves both the upper and lower limbs. Method: This is a case report of a child who presented with congenital amputation involving both the upper and lower limbs. Results: The patient was a 10 day old baby girl that was ...

  9. [Amputation and prosthesis attachment of the lower extremities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, I; Beirau, M; Ekkernkamp, A; Matthes, G

    2015-06-01

    Approximately 61,000 amputations are performed in Germany per year. In most cases the lower limbs are affected. The reasons for amputations are arteriosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, severe infections, tumors and complex trauma to the extremities. A decision must be made concerning whether a salvage procedure or amputation is appropriate, specially after trauma. In cases where the need for amputation is clear, the site of amputation needs to be planned in advance with the aim of creating a stump which allows sufficient prosthetic attachment. Adjuvant pain therapy is mandatory, especially in order to avoid subsequent phantom pain. The type of prosthetic restoration is influenced by the grade of mobility and personal requirements of patients. Moreover, aftercare and adjusted rehabilitation are recommended.

  10. Outcomes after 294 transtibial amputations with the posterior myocutaneous flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin J; Iorio, Matthew L; Klement, Mitchell; Conti Mica, Michael R; El-Amraoui, Amine; O'Halloran, Peter; Attinger, Christopher E

    2014-03-01

    The transtibial amputation is a common operation for which there is little agreement regarding which technique provides the most reliable and resilient outcomes. We performed a retrospective chart review of all transtibial amputations performed by a single surgeon between 2004 and 2011 using the posterior myocutaneous flap with triceps surae myodesis technique. A stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association between independent variables and dependent outcome variables. A total of 270 patients with 294 transtibial amputations were identified. Ambulation data were available for 192 patients with a mean follow-up 18.4 months. This cohort had an overall ambulation rate of 75%, a 12% incidence of stump wounds, 24% operative revision rate and only 2% required conversion to a transfemoral amputation. The posterior myocutaneous flap provides durable and reliable soft tissue coverage in the setting of a transtibial amputation.

  11. Progression of disease preceding lower extremity amputation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia Søe; Petersen, Janne; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with non-traumatic lower extremity amputation are characterised by high age, multi-morbidity and polypharmacy and long-term complications of atherosclerosis and diabetes. To ensure early identification of patients at risk of amputation, we need to gain knowledge about...... the progression of diseases related to lower extremity amputations during the years preceding the amputation. DESIGN: A retrospective population-based national registry study. SETTING: The study includes data on demographics, diagnoses, surgery, medications and healthcare services from five national registries....... Data were retrieved from 14 years before until 1 year after the amputation. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the progression of diseases and use of medication and healthcare services. PARTICIPANTS: An unselected cohort of patients (≥50 years; n=2883) subjected to a primary non...

  12. Hel igen efter amputation - og vejen dertil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Elisabeth Bomholt

    Hel igen efter amputation – og vejen dertil Elisabeth Bomholt Østergaard, PT, Master i sundhedsantropologi, Dip.pæd. Baggrund Sundhedsprofessionelle bør udvikle større opmærksomhed på og forståelse for, hvilke måder mennesker oplever ’inkorporation’ af diverse proteser, som fx pacemaker, benprotese.......000 og 300.000 mennesker type 2- diabetes og forekomsten er kraftigt stigende og forekommer i stadig yngre aldersgrupper (Dansk Sygeplejeråd 2006) med amputation som mulig konsekvens. Formål Opnå indsigt i hvad der kan medvirke til, at mennesker kan føle sig hele igen efter en benamputation, føle sig...... reintegreret i samfundet og opnå et tilfreds-stillende hverdagsliv, kropsforandringers indflydelse på identiteten , rehabilitering i rituel belysning med fokus på kroppens rolle. Metode og materiale To måneders feltarbejde i 2006 i Danmark blandt ni mennesker, som havde fået amputeret en del af et ben, og som...

  13. Possible consequences of regionally based bundled payments for diabetic amputations for safety net hospitals in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhall, Karina; Stone, David; Svoboda, Ryan; Goodney, Philip

    2016-12-01

    Ongoing health reform in the United States encourages quality-based reimbursement methods such as bundled payments for surgery. The effect of such changes on high-risk procedures is unknown, especially at safety net hospitals. This study quantified the burden of diabetes-related amputation and the potential financial effect of bundled payments at safety net hospitals in Texas. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of diabetic amputation burden and charges using publically available data from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid and the Texas Department of Health from 2008 to 2012. Using hospital referral region (HRR)-level analysis, we categorized the proportion of safety net hospitals within each region as very low (0%-9%), low (10%-20%), average (20%-33%), and high (>33%) and compared amputation rates across regions using nonparametric tests of trend. We then used charge data to create reimbursement rates based on HRR to estimate financial losses. We identified 51 adult hospitals as safety nets in Texas. Regions varied in the proportion of safety net hospitals from 0% in Victoria to 65% in Harlingen. Among beneficiaries aged >65, amputation rates correlated to the proportion of safety net hospitals in each region; for example, patients in the lowest quartile of safety net had a yearly rate of 300 amputations per 100,000 beneficiaries, whereas those in the highest quartile had a yearly rate of 472 per 100,000 (P = .007). Charges for diabetic amputation-related admissions varied almost 200-fold, from $5000 to $1.4 million. Using reimbursement based on HRR to estimate a bundled payment, we noted net losses would be higher at safety net vs nonsafety net hospitals ($180 million vs $163 million), representing a per-hospital loss of $1.6 million at safety nets vs $700,000 at nonsafety nets (P amputations in Texas. Changes to traditional payment models should account for the disproportionate burden of high-risk procedures performed by these hospitals. Copyright © 2016

  14. Medial and Lateral Plantar Artery Angiosome Rotational Flaps for Transmetatarsal and Lisfranc Amputation in Patients With Compromised Plantar Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffeli, Troy J; Waverly, Brett J

    2016-01-01

    Traditional incision techniques for midfoot amputation might not provide immediate soft tissue coverage of the underlying metatarsal and tarsal bones in the presence of a large plantar soft tissue defect. Patients undergoing transmetatarsal and Lisfranc amputation frequently have compromised plantar tissue in association with neuropathic ulcers, forefoot gangrene, and infection, necessitating wide resection as a part of the amputation procedure. Open amputation will routinely be performed under these circumstances, although secondary healing could be compromised owing to residual bone exposure. Alternatively, the surgeon might elect to perform a more proximal lower extremity amputation, which will allow better soft tissue coverage but compromises function of the lower extremity. A third option for this challenging situation is to modify the plantar flap incision design to incorporate a medial or lateral plantar artery angiosome-based rotational flap, which will provide immediate coverage of the forefoot and midfoot soft tissue defects without excessive shortening of the bone structure. A plantar medial soft tissue defect is treated with the lateral plantar artery angiosome flap, and a plantar lateral defect is treated with the medial plantar artery angiosome flap. Medial and lateral flaps can be combined to cover a central plantar wound defect. Incorporating large rotational flaps requires knowledge of the applicable angiosome anatomy and specific modifications to incision planning and dissection techniques to ensure adequate soft tissue coverage and preservation of the blood supply to the flap. A series of 4 cases with an average follow-up duration of 5.75 years is presented to demonstrate our patient selection criteria, flap design principles, dissection pearls, and surgical staging protocol. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Toe amputation: a predictor of future limb loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Kathryn J; Rashid, Tawqeer S; Bailey, Marc A; Bird, Sarah A; Bridge, Katherine; Scott, Julian D A

    2012-01-01

    Digital toe amputation is a relatively minor surgical procedure but there is a historical view that it is the "first stage in a predictable clinical course" leading to eventual limb loss. There is a paucity of contemporaneous data on the long-term outcomes of patients undergoing toe amputation. We aim to study the experience from our institution, focussing on the risk factors for progression to future limb loss, by conducting a retrospective review of our practice. Sixty-three patients undergoing toe amputation within our institution were identified and the clinical notes retrospectively reviewed. A database of vascular risk factors and co-morbidity was constructed and correlation with future limb loss was analysed with Chi-squared testing and a logistic regression model. Sixty-three patients with a mean age of 69 (IQR 62-76.5) years were identified. Thirty-five (55.6%) of these patients went on to have a further surgical amputation; 22 major amputations (16 below-knee and 6 above-knee amputations) and 23 minor amputations were performed in total. Forty three (68.3%) patients had diabetes and 31 (49.2%) patients had one or more revascularisation procedures undertaken. There was a significant correlation between patients who did not have diabetes and future limb loss (Chi-squared=4.31, p=0.038), however no other identified risk factor predicted the need for major amputation. Toe amputation is a significant predictor of future limb loss. Our study identified that patients with diabetes are significantly less likely to progress to further limb loss than those with the disease. We hypothesise that this difference is due to the more intensive, multi-disciplinary foot care follow-up that diabetic patients receive. These results highlight the significance of toe amputation and contribute to the evidence for a more intensive out-patient service for these high risk patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of adjustments to amputation and artificial limb on quality of life in patients following lower limb amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, Richa; van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    The objectives of this study are to investigate the relationship between adjustments to amputation and artificial limb, and quality of life (QoL), and to analyse the influence of sociodemographic, medical and amputation-related factors on this relationship. Patients with unilateral and noncongenital

  17. Transtibial Amputation Outcomes Study (TAOS): Comparing Transtibial Amputation With and Without a Tibiofibular Synostosis (Ertl) Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Michael J; Morshed, Saam; Reider, Lisa; Ertl, William; Toledano, James; Firoozabadi, Reeza; Seymour, Rachel B; Carroll, Eben; Scharfstein, Daniel O; Steverson, Barbara; MacKenzie, Ellen J

    2017-04-01

    The optimal technique for a transtibial amputation in a young, active, and healthy patient is controversial. Proponents of the Ertl procedure (in which the cut ends of the tibia and fibula are joined with a bone bridge synostosis) argue that the residual limb is more stable which confers better prosthetic fit and improved function especially among high-performing individuals. At the same time, the Ertl procedure is associated with longer operative and healing time and may be associated with a higher complication rate compared with the standard Burgess procedure. The TAOS is a prospective, multicenter randomized trial comparing 18-month outcomes after transtibial amputation using the Ertl versus Burgess approach among adults aged 18 to 60. The primary outcomes include surgical treatment for a complication and patient-reported function. Secondary outcomes include physical impairment, pain, and treatment cost.

  18. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  19. The persistence of gender and racial disparities in vascular lower extremity amputation: an examination of HCUP-NIS data (2002-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Kristin M; Chevan, Julia

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine trends in racial and gender disparities in the severity of lower extremity amputation among individuals with peripheral artery disease (PAD) over the period of a decade (2002-2011). This is a longitudinal secondary analysis of data from the Healthcare Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Survey (HCUP-NIS) for the years 2002-2011. Level of amputation was determined from ICD-9-CM procedure and coded as either transfemoral (TF) or transtibial (TT). The main predictors were gender and race; covariates including age, race, income, insurance status and presence of vascular disease were incorporated as control variables in regression analysis. A total 121,587 cases of non-traumatic dysvascular amputations were identified. Female gender (odds ratio (OR) 1.35; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32, 1.39) and black race (OR 1.17; 95% CI 1.12, 1.23) are both significantly associated with increased odds for receiving TF amputation with no change in these odds over the decade of study. Other covariates with significant associations with TF amputation level include increased age (OR 1.03; 95% CI 0.99, 1.09), low income (OR 1.21; 95% CI 1.15, 1.27), Medicaid insurance (OR 1.36; 95% CI 1.29, 1.44), Medicare insurance (OR 1.27; 95% CI 1.21, 1.32), and cerebrovascular disease (OR 2.12; 95% CI 2.03, 2.23). In conclusion, although overall rates of amputation have decreased, disparities in level of amputation related to female gender and black race have not significantly changed over time. Higher-level amputation has significant consequences from a quality-of-life, medical and economic perspective. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. A Population-Based Study of Replantation After Traumatic Thumb Amputation, 2007-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Elham; Huetteman, Helen E; Chung, Kevin C

    2017-01-01

    The recommended surgical treatment after thumb amputation is replantation. In the United States, fewer than 40% of thumb amputation injuries are replanted, and little is known about factors associated with the probability of replantation. We aimed to investigate recent trends and examine patient and hospital characteristics that are associated with increased probability of attempted thumb replantation. We hypothesized that higher-volume teaching hospitals and level-I trauma centers attempted more replantations. We used 2007-2012 data from the National Trauma Data Bank. Our final sample included 2,206 traumatic thumb amputation patients treated in 1 of 365 centers during the study period. First, we used a 2-level hierarchical logistic model to estimate the odds of replantation. In addition, we used a treatment effect estimation method, with the inverse propensity score weighting to examine the difference in thumb replantation if the only variation among patients was their presumptive payer. There was a higher probability of attempted replantation at teaching hospitals than nonteaching hospitals (odds ratio [OR], 1.40). Patients were less likely to undergo replantation at a level II (OR, 0.53) or a level III (OR, 0.33) trauma center. The uninsured were less likely to undergo replantation (OR, 0.61) than those with private insurance. Having insurance coverage and being treated in a high-volume, teaching, level-I trauma hospital increased the odds of replantation after traumatic thumb amputation. Regionalization may lead to a higher number of indicated cases of replantation actually being attempted. Therapeutic II. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vascular surgery reduces the frequency of lower limb major amputations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Bøvling, Søren; Fasting, H

    1994-01-01

    In June 1988 a Department of Vascular Surgery was established in the county of Viborg, Denmark. In this retrospective study of the periods 1986-87 and 1989-90, we have observed a significant rise in the number of patients evaluated by a vascular surgeon before amputation, from 19 to 49%. At the s......In June 1988 a Department of Vascular Surgery was established in the county of Viborg, Denmark. In this retrospective study of the periods 1986-87 and 1989-90, we have observed a significant rise in the number of patients evaluated by a vascular surgeon before amputation, from 19 to 49......%. At the same time the number of major lower limb amputations significantly decreased. This reduction was most marked in 1990 probably due to a rise of 43% in the number of distal reconstructions. The distribution between below knee, through knee and mid-thigh amputation was unaffected by the increased vascular...... surgical activity. The frequency of major amputations in the county in 1986-87 of 40.9 per 100,000 per year declined by 25% to 30.9 per 100,000 per year in 1989-90. We conclude that vascular surgery reduces the number of major lower limb amputations and consequently all patients threatened with amputation...

  2. Field amputation: response planning and legal considerations inspired by three separate amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Alexander; Lees, Jason; Fry, William; Parks, Aaron; Tuggle, David

    2014-01-01

    Surgical procedures in the field are occasionally required as life-saving measures. Few centers have a planned infrastructure for field physician support. Focused efforts are needed to create teams that can meet such needs. Additionally, certain legal issues surrounding these efforts should be considered. Three cases of field dismemberment inspired this call for preparation. In one case, an earthquake caused the collapse of a bridge, entrapping a child within a car. A through-knee amputation was required to free the patient with local anesthetic only. The second case was the result of a truck bomb causing the collapse of a building whereby a victim was trapped by a pillar. After retrieval of supplies from a local hospital, a through-knee amputation was performed. The third case involved a young man whose arm became entangled in an oil derrick. This patient was sedated and intubated in an erect position and the arm was amputated. Fortunately, each of these victims survived. However, the care these patients received was unplanned and had the potential for failure. The authors feel that disaster teams, including a surgeon, should be identified in advance as responders to a disaster on short notice. Legal issues including statespecific Good Samaritan laws and financial support systems must also be considered. As hospitals and trauma systems prepare for disaster situations, they should consider the eventuality of field dismemberment. This involves identifying a team, including a surgeon, and devising an infrastructure allowing rapid response capabilities, including surgical procedures in the field.

  3. FROM CULTURAL IMPOTENCE TO CULTURAL AMPUTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Вячеслав Владимирович Суханов

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cultural space of any state is formed by a population that is within its borders. In this article, the author introduces a new cultural definitions «cultural impotence» and «cultural amputation», justifying their use, both in terms of population of the Russian Federation and the European Union and America. The article analyzes the state of society and the cultural factors that influence the development of society in Russia, there are options to bring the country out of a deep cultural crisis. Also established a close relationship between the domestic policy of the state and development of culture.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-2-1

  4. Variation in clinical decision making is a partial explanation for geographical variation in lower extremity amputation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, J; Airey, M; Chell, S

    2001-04-01

    Rates of lower extremity amputation vary significantly both between and within countries. The variation does not appear to support differences in need as an explanation. This study set out to see if variations in clinical decision making might contribute to the explanation. Based on an extensive audit database of lower extremity amputations and revascularization operations, a decision model was produced. Drawing on items in this model allowed the selection of six clinical cases that differed in their probability of having amputation as the outcome. Two cases had 80 per cent or more, two cases had 45--55 per cent and two cases had 20 per cent or less probability of amputation. Each of ten consultant vascular surgeons looked at these cases without knowledge of their probability of outcome and decided on amputation or revascularization. Overall the chance-adjusted level of agreement (kappa coefficient) between the decisions made by ten surgeons on the six clinical cases and the actual outcome was 0.46, indicating a moderate level of agreement. The kappa coefficient for individual surgeons showed complete agreement (kappa = 1) for four, substantial agreement (kappa = 0.66) for four, fair agreement (kappa = 0.32) for one and no agreement other than at a chance level (kappa = 0) for one surgeon. Variations in the clinical decisions made by vascular surgeons given the same patient are likely to explain at least a part of the observed geographical variation in rates of lower extremity amputation. Consensus guidelines may enable more consistent decision making for this problem.

  5. Depression and incident lower limb amputations in veterans with diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lisa H.; Miller, Donald R.; Fincke, Graeme; Lafrance, Jean-Philippe; Etzioni, Ruth; Maynard, Charles; Raugi, Gregory J.; Reiber, Gayle E.

    2010-01-01

    Problem Depression is associated with a higher risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications and mortality in diabetes, but whether depression is linked to an increased risk of incident amputations is unknown. We examined the association between diagnosed depression and incident non-traumatic lower limb amputations in veterans with diabetes. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study from 2000-2004 that included 531,973 veterans from the Diabetes Epidemiology Cohorts, a national Veterans Affairs (VA) registry with VA and Medicare data. Depression was defined by diagnostic codes or antidepressant prescriptions. Amputations were defined by diagnostic and procedural codes. We determined the HR and 95% CI for incident non-traumatic lower limb amputation by major (transtibial and above) and minor (ankle and below) subtypes, comparing veterans with and without diagnosed depression and adjusting for demographics, health care utilization, diabetes severity, and comorbid medical and mental health conditions. Results Over a mean 4.1 years of follow up, there were 1,289 major and 2,541 minor amputations. Diagnosed depression was associated with an adjusted HR of 1.33 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.55) for major amputations. There was no statistically significant association between depression and minor amputations (adjusted HR 1.01, 95% CI: 0.90, 1.13). Conclusions Diagnosed depression is associated with a 33% higher risk of incident major lower limb amputation in veterans with diabetes. Further study is needed to understand this relationship and to determine whether depression screening and treatment in patients with diabetes could decrease amputation rates. PMID:20801060

  6. Lower limb amputations in Trondheim, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose In the city of Trondheim, Norway, diabetic lower-limb amputations accounted for one-third of all lower-limb amputations (LLAs). In an attempt to reduce this rate, a diabetic foot team was established in 1996. We present the incidence of LLA in Trondheim as measured 10 years later. Patients and methods In 2004–07, we registered all LLAs performed in Trondheim and then compared the data with previously published data from 1994–1997. From 1996 through 2006, we registered the activity of the diabetic foot team and we also registered the number of vascular procedures performed on citizens of Trondheim from 1998 through 2006. Results Comparing the two 3-year periods 1994–97 and 2004–07, we observed a decrease in all non-traumatic LLAs. The incidence of diabetic major LLAs per 103 diabetics per year decreased from 4.0 to 2.4, and in patients with peripheral vascular disease we observed a decrease in LLAs from 18 to 12 per 105 inhabitants per year. 5,915 consultations on diabetic subjects were conducted by the diabetic foot team during the period 1996–2006. From 1998 to 2006, the rate of vascular procedures decreased in the non-diabetic population, and was unchanged in diabetic subjects. Interpretation In the population of Trondheim city there appears to have been a reduction in the rate of vascular obstructive lower-limb disease between the two 3-year periods 1994–97 and 2004–07. In our judgment, the decline in diabetic LLA also reflects better care of the diabetic foot. PMID:20860446

  7. Remote dose-dependent effects of dry needling at distant myofascial trigger spots of rabbit skeletal muscles on reduction of substance P levels of proximal muscle and spinal cords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yueh-Ling; Yang, Chen-Chia; Liu, Szu-Yu; Chou, Li-Wei; Hong, Chang-Zern

    2014-01-01

    Dry needling at distant myofascial trigger points is an effective pain management in patients with myofascial pain. However, the biochemical effects of remote dry needling are not well understood. This study evaluates the remote effects of dry needling with different dosages on the expressions of substance P (SP) in the proximal muscle, spinal dorsal horns of rabbits. Male New Zealand rabbits (2.5-3.0 kg) received dry needling at myofascial trigger spots of a gastrocnemius (distant muscle) in one (1D) or five sessions (5D). Bilateral biceps femoris (proximal muscles) and superficial laminaes of L5-S2, T2-T5, and C2-C5 were sampled immediately and 5 days after dry needling to determine the levels of SP using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Immediately after dry needling for 1D and 5D, the expressions of SP were significantly decreased in ipsilateral biceps femoris and bilateral spinal superficial laminaes (P dry needling, these reduced immunoactivities of SP were found only in animals receiving 5D dry needling (P dry needling involves the reduction of SP levels in proximal muscle and spinal superficial laminaes, which may be closely associated with the control of myofascial pain.

  8. Remote Dose-Dependent Effects of Dry Needling at Distant Myofascial Trigger Spots of Rabbit Skeletal Muscles on Reduction of Substance P Levels of Proximal Muscle and Spinal Cords

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueh-Ling Hsieh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dry needling at distant myofascial trigger points is an effective pain management in patients with myofascial pain. However, the biochemical effects of remote dry needling are not well understood. This study evaluates the remote effects of dry needling with different dosages on the expressions of substance P (SP in the proximal muscle, spinal dorsal horns of rabbits. Methods. Male New Zealand rabbits (2.5–3.0 kg received dry needling at myofascial trigger spots of a gastrocnemius (distant muscle in one (1D or five sessions (5D. Bilateral biceps femoris (proximal muscles and superficial laminaes of L5-S2, T2-T5, and C2-C5 were sampled immediately and 5 days after dry needling to determine the levels of SP using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Results. Immediately after dry needling for 1D and 5D, the expressions of SP were significantly decreased in ipsilateral biceps femoris and bilateral spinal superficial laminaes (P<.05. Five days after dry needling, these reduced immunoactivities of SP were found only in animals receiving 5D dry needling (P<.05. Conclusions. This remote effect of dry needling involves the reduction of SP levels in proximal muscle and spinal superficial laminaes, which may be closely associated with the control of myofascial pain.

  9. Amputations in natural disasters and mass casualties: staged approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Nikolaj

    2012-10-01

    Amputation is a commonly performed procedure during natural disasters and mass casualties related to industrial accidents and military conflicts where large civilian populations are subjected to severe musculoskeletal trauma. Crush injuries and crush syndrome, an often-overwhelming number of casualties, delayed presentations, regional cultural and other factors, all can mandate a surgical approach to amputation that is different than that typically used under non-disaster conditions. The following article will review the subject of amputation during natural disasters and mass casualties with emphasis on a staged approach to minimise post-surgical complications, especially infection.

  10. Goal pursuit, goal adjustment, and affective well-being following lower limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Laura; Gallagher, Pamela; Desmond, Deirdre; Ryall, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the relationships between tenacious goal pursuit (TGP), flexible goal adjustment (FGA), and affective well-being in a sample of individuals with lower limb amputations. Cross-sectional, quantitative. Ninety-eight patients recently admitted to a primary prosthetic rehabilitation programme completed measures of TGP, FGA, positive affect, and negative affect. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that TGP and FGA accounted for a significant proportion of the variance in both positive and negative affect, controlling for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. TGP was significantly positively associated with positive affect, while FGA was significantly negatively associated with negative affect. Moderated regression analyses indicated that the beneficial effect of FGA on negative affect was strongest at high levels of amputation-related pain intensity and low levels of TGP. TGP and FGA appear to influence subjective well-being in different ways, with TGP promoting the experience of positive affect and FGA buffering against negative affect. TGP and FGA may prove useful in identifying individuals at risk of poor affective outcomes following lower limb amputation and represent important targets for intervention in this patient group. What is already known on this subject? The loss of a limb has a significant impact on several important life domains. Although some individuals experience emotional distress following amputation, the majority adjust well to their limb loss, with some achieving positive change or growth as a result of their experiences. Theories of self-regulation propose that disruptions in goal attainment have negative affective consequences. The physical, social, and psychological upheaval caused by limb loss is likely to threaten the attainment of valued goals, which may leave individuals vulnerable to negative psychosocial outcomes if they do not regulate their goals in response to these challenges. According to the dual

  11. Does the OTA Open Fracture Classification Predict the Need for Limb Amputation? A Retrospective Observational Cohort Study on 512 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jiandong; Cuellar, Derly O; Herbert, Benoit; Kim, Ji Wan; Chadayammuri, Vivek; Casemyr, Natalie; Hammerberg, Mark E; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J; Mauffrey, Cyril

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have examined the utility of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association Open Fracture Classification (OTA-OFC) compared to the traditional Gustilo-Anderson classification for prediction of treatment outcomes in patients with open fractures. QUESTIONS/OBJECTIVES:: (1) How do the Gustilo-Anderson classification and OTA-OFC systems compare in accuracy of predicting limb amputation, infection, and need for soft tissue coverage? (2) Is there an OTA-OFC summative threshold score that may guide the discussion and decision-making with regard to limb salvage or amputation? Retrospective observational cohort study; Level IV evidence. Level I trauma center and urban safety-net institution. Consecutive adult patients with open long bone fractures who underwent operative treatment between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012. Postoperative complications of infection, early limb amputation, and requirement for soft-tissue procedures. The study cohort comprised 512 patients with mean age 49.6 ± 14.9 years. Nineteen patients (3.7%) underwent amputation. The Gustilo-Anderson classification demonstrated no correlations with any of the primary outcome measures, while OTA-OFC summative scores significantly varied between all outcome comparison groups. The skin injury component of the OTA-OFC was an independent predictor of limb amputation (OR, 5.44; 95% CI, 2.37-12.47), and an OTA-OFC summative score of ≥10 best correlated with need for amputation (P Gustilo-Anderson classification system for prediction of postoperative complications and treatment outcomes in patients with open long bone fractures. A summative threshold score of 10 seems to identify increased odds of successful limb salvage.

  12. The use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health to classify the factors influencing mobility reported by persons with an amputation: An international study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Seema; Kohler, Friedbert; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Jayaraman, Arun; Li, Jianin; Pieber, Karin; Schiappacasse, Carolina

    2017-08-01

    Amputation of lower limb results in limitations in mobility which are amenable to multiple rehabilitation interventions. The challenges faced by the persons with lower limb amputation vary internationally. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health provides a common language to describe the function of persons with lower limb amputation across various countries. This article reports the concepts in mobility important to persons with lower limb amputation across six countries using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Qualitative study using focus groups and individual interviews. Focus groups and individual interviews of persons with lower limb amputation were organised across six countries to identify the issues faced by patients with an amputation during and after their amputation, subsequent rehabilitation and on an ongoing basis in their daily life. Meaningful concepts were extracted from the responses and linked to suitable second-level and where applicable third-level International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categorical frequencies were analysed to represent the prevalence and spread of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories by location. A total of 133 patients were interviewed. A large percentage (93%) of the identified concepts could be matched to International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories for quantitative analysis. The important concepts in mobility were similar across different countries. The comprehensiveness of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a classification system for human function and its universality across the globe is demonstrated by the large proportion of the concepts contained in the interviews from across the study centres that could be matched to International

  13. Management of fibular hemimelia: amputation or limb lengthening

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naudie, D; Hamdy, R C; Fassier, F; Morin, B; Duhaime, M

    1997-01-01

    .... There were 12 boys and 10 girls, all with associated anomalies in the lower limbs. Twelve patients (13 limb segments) had early amputation and prosthetic fitting and ten had tibial lengthening using the Ilizarov technique...

  14. Major limb amputations: a tertiary hospital experience in northwestern Tanzania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chalya, Phillipo L; Mabula, Joseph B; Dass, Ramesh M; Ngayomela, Isdori H; Chandika, Alphonce B; Mbelenge, Nkinda; Gilyoma, Japhet M

    2012-01-01

    Major limb amputation is reported to be a major but preventable public health problem that is associated with profound economic, social and psychological effects on the patient and family especially...

  15. Root amputation: a new look into an old procedure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Livada, Rania; Fine, Norman; Shiloah, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    A treatment option for managing furcation invasions is root amputation. Long-term survival of resected molars requires a complete harmony of sequential endodontic, periodontic, restorative and maintenance procedures...

  16. Bilateral transtibial amputation with concomitant thoracolumbar vertebral collapse in a Sichuan earthquake survivor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Herman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The devastating earthquake in Sichuan, China on 12 May 2008 left thousands of survivors requiring medical care and intensive rehabilitation. In view of this great demand, the Chinese Speaking Orthopaedic Society established the "Stand Tall" project to provide voluntary services to aid amputee victims in achieving total rehabilitation and social integration. This case report highlights the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of a girl who suffered thoracolumbar vertebral collapse and underwent bilateral transtibial amputation. The rehabilitation team was involved in all stages of the care process from the pre-operative phase, through amputation, into prosthetic training, and during her life thereafter. Despite this catastrophic event, early rehabilitation and specially designed bilateral prostheses allowed her a high level of functional ability. The joint efforts of the multidisciplinary team and the advancement of new technology have revolutionized the care process for amputees.

  17. Crossover replantation after bilateral traumatic lower limb amputations: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Jun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Replantation of a limb to the contralateral stump after bilateral traumatic amputations is rare. To the best of our knowledge, there are only a few reports of crossover lower limb replantation in the literature. Case presentation We treated a 37-year-old Chinese woman with bilateral lower limb crush injuries sustained in a traffic accident. Her lower limb injuries were at different anatomic levels. We performed emergency bilateral amputations followed by crossover replantation. Five years later, the woman had recovered well, and had perfect movement and stability in her replanted leg. After reviewing the literature, we thought that presentation of our patient’s case might provide useful information for clinicians. Conclusions Crossover replantation should be considered when evaluating a patient with bilateral lower limb injuries, thus allowing the patient to touch the ground and stand using their own foot.

  18. Bilateral transtibial amputation with concomitant thoracolumbar vertebral collapse in a Sichuan earthquake survivor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The devastating earthquake in Sichuan, China on 12 May 2008 left thousands of survivors requiring medical care and intensive rehabilitation. In view of this great demand, the Chinese Speaking Orthopaedic Society established the "Stand Tall" project to provide voluntary services to aid amputee victims in achieving total rehabilitation and social integration. This case report highlights the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of a girl who suffered thoracolumbar vertebral collapse and underwent bilateral transtibial amputation. The rehabilitation team was involved in all stages of the care process from the pre-operative phase, through amputation, into prosthetic training, and during her life thereafter. Despite this catastrophic event, early rehabilitation and specially designed bilateral prostheses allowed her a high level of functional ability. The joint efforts of the multidisciplinary team and the advancement of new technology have revolutionized the care process for amputees. PMID:20630054

  19. Energy expenditure during walking in subjects with tibial rotationplasty, above-knee amputation, or hip disarticulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Windt, D A; Pieterson, I; van der Eijken, J W; Hollander, A P; Dahmen, R; de Jong, B A

    1992-12-01

    The surgical treatment of osteosarcoma with a tibial rotationplasty seems to offer functional advantages in comparison with an above-knee amputation. It has not been established whether the functional advantages are accompanied by a lower rate of energy expenditure during walking. In children with a tibial rotationplasty (n = 15), an above-knee amputation (n = 6), or a hip disarticulation (n = 5), energy expenditure was measured during treadmill walking at various walking velocities. The subjects with a tibial rotationplasty were able to walk faster, but there were no differences between the groups in energy expenditure per unit time or per unit distance. Correction for confounding variables including age, sex, height, time since operation, level of activity, and support during walking in a multiple linear regression model did not reveal any significant differences in energy expenditure during walking between groups. 1992 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

  20. [Open digit amputation in cattle: Surgery, wound healing and follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaux, D; Steiner, A; Pipoz, F; Nuss, K

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to document secondary wound healing and outcome in 20 cattle that had undergone digit amputation at the level of the distal metaphysis of the first phalanx between April 2009 and June 2015. The surgical technique for amputation was simple and fast, and granulation tissue covered the stump of the first phalanx 9 to 30 days postoperatively. Complications associated with wound healing were seen in 7 animals and in 3, a second surgery was required; all 20 cattle were discharged from the clinic. Epithelial closure was complete after a mean of 3 months (range, 2 to 7 months). The mean postoperative survival time was 15 months (range, 1 to 34 months), and 6 animals were still alive at the time of follow-up inquiry. Wound healing and long-term outcome did not differ between cattle that had undergone a more intensive aftercare regime than those with a less intensive postoperative treatment.

  1. Distribution and abundance of host-seeking Culex species at three proximate locations with different levels of West Nile virus activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlin, I.; Ginsberg, H.S.; Campbell, S.R.

    2009-01-01

    Culex species were monitored at three proximate sites with historically different West Nile virus (WNV) activities. The site with human WNV transmission (epidemic) had the lowest abundance of the putative bridge vectors, Culex pipiens and Cx. salinarius. The site with horse cases but not human cases (epizootic) had the highest percent composition of Cx. salinarius, whereas the site with WNV-positive birds only (enzootic) had the highest Cx. pipiens abundance and percent composition. A total of 29 WNV-positive Culex pools were collected at the enzootic site, 17 at the epidemic site, and 14 at the epizootic site. Published models of human risk using Cx. pipiens and Cx. salinarius as the primary bridge vectors did not explain WNV activity at our sites. Other variables, such as additional vector species, environmental components, and socioeconomic factors, need to be examined to explain the observed patterns of WNV epidemic activity.

  2. Causes of successful medico-legal claims following amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolan, Caroline C; Cartwright-Terry, Matthew; Scurr, James R H; Smout, Jonathan D

    2014-10-01

    The causes of successful medico-legal claims following amputation were reviewed. A retrospective analysis of claims handled by the National Health Service Litigation Authority, from 2005 to August 2010, was performed. Under the Freedom of Information Act, the National Health Service Litigation Authority provided limited details on closed claims, settled with damages, following a search of their database with the term "amputation." No demographic data were provided. During this period, 174 claims were settled by the National Health Service Litigation Authority, who paid out more than £36.3 million. The causes of the claims were the need for a lower limb amputation due to a delay in the diagnosis and or treatment of arterial ischaemia (56), an iatrogenic injury (15), the development of preventable pressure sores (15), the delay and or failure to diagnose a limb malignancy (6) and the delay in the management of an infected pseudo-aneurysm (1). Complications following orthopaedic surgery resulted in 25 successful claims as did the delayed diagnosis or mismanagement of 10 lower limb fractures. Additional claims followed the amputation of the wrong toe (1), a retained foreign body (2), an unnecessary amputation (4), inadequate consent (4), failure to provide thrombo-prophylaxis following amputation resulting in death (2) and a diathermy burn injury during an amputation (1). Delay in the diagnosis of and/or failure to manage an injury or infection resulted in 21 upper limb amputations. There was insufficient information provided in the remaining 11 claims to determine how the claim related to an amputation procedure. The largest single payout for damages (£1.9 million) resulted from the failure to diagnose and treat a femoral artery injury following a road traffic accident leading to an eventual below knee amputation. Delays in the diagnosis and or treatment of arterial ischaemia were the commonest reasons for a settled claim. Lessons can be learnt from potentially

  3. Systemic vasculitis is associated with a higher risk of lower extremity amputation in patients with severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease: a secondary analysis of a nationwide, population-based health claims database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Chi; Hsu, Honda; Lin, Ching-Hsing; Koo, Malcolm

    2017-11-01

    Previous research has shown that diabetes mellitus increases the risk of lower extremity amputation in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease. However, to our knowledge, no studies have investigated whether systemic autoimmune disease, in particular systemic vasculitis is associated with a higher risk of lower extremity amputation in these patients. To investigate the association between systemic autoimmune disease and lower extremity amputation in patients with severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease based on a secondary analysis of a nationwide, population-based health claims database. Using the inpatient datafile of the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD), we identified 432 patients with severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease that required hospitalization between 2000 and 2012. We also identified patients who had undergone lower extremity amputation and their comorbidities using the same datafile. The risk of lower extremity amputation was assessed using multiple logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age, sex, insured amount, the urbanization level of residence, and the presence of comorbidities. Among patients with severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease, those with systemic vasculitis exhibited a significant higher risk of lower extremity amputation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 6.82, p obstructive pulmonary disease (aOR = 2.87, p = 0.007) were also significantly associated with a higher risk of lower extremity amputation. Among patients with severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease, a significantly higher risk of lower extremity amputation was observed in those with systemic vasculitis.

  4. Amputations in natural disasters and mass casualties: staged approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfson, Nikolaj

    2012-01-01

    Amputation is a commonly performed procedure during natural disasters and mass casualties related to industrial accidents and military conflicts where large civilian populations are subjected to severe musculoskeletal trauma. Crush injuries and crush syndrome, an often-overwhelming number of casualties, delayed presentations, regional cultural and other factors, all can mandate a surgical approach to amputation that is different than that typically used under non-disaster conditions. The foll...

  5. Gender differences in diabetes-related lower extremity amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Monica E

    2011-07-01

    Diabetes is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, with much of the economic and social costs related to macrovascular and microvascular complications, such as myocardial infarctions, renal failure, and lower extremity amputations. While racial/ethnic differences in diabetes are well documented, less attention has been given to differences in diabetes outcomes by gender. Does gender influence the rate of diabetes-related lower extremity amputations and/or the rate of mortality after amputation? I reviewed the literature utilizing peer-reviewed publications found through MEDLINE searches. WHERE ARE WE NOW?: Major complex gender differences exist in diabetes-related lower extremity amputations: men are more likely to undergo lower extremity amputations, but women apparently have higher mortality related to these procedures. The reasons for such differences are not entirely clear, but it appears biologic factors may play important roles (increased rates of peripheral vascular disease and peripheral neuropathy in men, interaction between gender and cardiac mortality in women). WHERE DO WE NEED TO GO?: More research is warranted to confirm gender differences in diabetes-related lower extremity amputation mortality and explore underlying mechanisms for the gender differences in lower extremity amputations and its associated mortality. HOW DO WE GET THERE?: Exploring gender disparities in diabetes-related outcomes, such as lower extremity amputations, will need to become a national priority from a research (eg, National Institutes of Health) and policy (eg, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) perspective. Only when we have a better understanding of the causes of such differences can we begin to make strides in addressing them.

  6. The successful use of peripheral nerve blocks for femoral amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Birgitte Louise; Melchiors, J; Børglum, J

    2009-01-01

    We present a case report of four patients with severe cardiac insufficiency where peripheral nerve blocks guided by either nerve stimulation or ultrasonography were the sole anaesthetic for above-knee amputation. The patients were breathing spontaneously and remained haemodynamically stable during...... surgery. Thus, use of peripheral nerve blocks for femoral amputation in high-risk patients seems to be the technique of choice that can lower perioperative risk....

  7. Quality of life and functionality after lower limb amputations: comparison between uni- vs. bilateral amputee patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akarsu, Selim; Tekin, Levent; Safaz, Ismail; Göktepe, Ahmet Salim; Yazicioğlu, Kamil

    2013-02-01

    It is difficult for the lower limb amputee patients to adapt to their new lifestyles. To compare the life quality and functionality of patients with bilateral vs. unilateral lower extremity amputations. Cross-sectional study. Fifteen bilateral and 15 unilateral lower extremity amputee patients were enrolled. Demographics, cause and level of amputations, frequency and duration of prosthesis use were evaluated. SF-36, Satisfaction with Prosthesis Questionnaire (SAT-PRO), Amputee Body Image Scale. (ABIS), Houghton Scale (HS), six-minute walk test (6MWT), and 10-metre walk test (10 MWT) were performed. Physical function, physical and emotional role scores of SF-36 were significantly lower in the bilateral amputee group in comparison with the unilateral group. SAT-PRO and ABIS total scores were similar between the groups. There was a positive correlation between the frequency of prosthetic use and SF-36 subgroups (except pain). The unilateral amputee group had significantly better scores than the bilateral amputee group in terms of HS, 6MWT and 10 MWT. Physical capacity of bilateral lower extremity amputee patients is lower than the unilateral amputee patients; satisfaction with prosthesis and body image are not related with the amputation level; and the life quality and satisfaction with prostheses are increased in parallel with the use of the prostheses. Clinical relevance Although differences exist between the groups, in terms of quality of life and functionality, patients can reach an acceptable life standard with good rehabilitation and a suitable prosthesis.

  8. Bionic ankle-foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh M; Grabowski, Alena M

    2012-02-07

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75-1.75 m s(-1) and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation.

  9. Bionic ankle–foot prosthesis normalizes walking gait for persons with leg amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh M.; Grabowski, Alena M.

    2012-01-01

    Over time, leg prostheses have improved in design, but have been incapable of actively adapting to different walking velocities in a manner comparable to a biological limb. People with a leg amputation using such commercially available passive-elastic prostheses require significantly more metabolic energy to walk at the same velocities, prefer to walk slower and have abnormal biomechanics compared with non-amputees. A bionic prosthesis has been developed that emulates the function of a biological ankle during level-ground walking, specifically providing the net positive work required for a range of walking velocities. We compared metabolic energy costs, preferred velocities and biomechanical patterns of seven people with a unilateral transtibial amputation using the bionic prosthesis and using their own passive-elastic prosthesis to those of seven non-amputees during level-ground walking. Compared with using a passive-elastic prosthesis, using the bionic prosthesis decreased metabolic cost by 8 per cent, increased trailing prosthetic leg mechanical work by 57 per cent and decreased the leading biological leg mechanical work by 10 per cent, on average, across walking velocities of 0.75–1.75 m s−1 and increased preferred walking velocity by 23 per cent. Using the bionic prosthesis resulted in metabolic energy costs, preferred walking velocities and biomechanical patterns that were not significantly different from people without an amputation. PMID:21752817

  10. Synostosis of proximal phalangeal bases for loss of distal metacarpal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Jindal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A finger rendered unstable due to loss of metacarpal head can be stabilized by creating a synostosis at the base of the proximal phalanx of the affected finger with the adjacent normal finger. A cortico cancellous graft bridges the two adjacent proximal phalanges at their bases which are temporarily stabilized with an external fixator. The procedure can be done for, recurrence of giant cell tumor of metacarpal and for traumatic metacarpal loss. The procedure and long term follow up of one patient is presented who had giant cell tumor. This option should be considered before offering ray amputation. There is no micro vascular surgery involved, nor is there any donor site morbidity. The graft heals well without any absorption. The affected finger shows excellent function in the long term followup.

  11. Early Post-operative Mortality After Major Lower Limb Amputation: A Systematic Review of Population and Regional Based Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, J J; Fortington, L V; Hinchliffe, R J; Hijmans, J M

    2016-02-01

    Lower limb amputation is often associated with a high risk of early post-operative mortality. Mortality rates are also increasingly being put forward as a possible benchmark for surgical performance. The primary aim of this systematic review is to investigate early post-operative mortality following a major lower limb amputation in population/regional based studies, and reported factors that might influence these mortality outcomes. Embase, PubMed, Cinahl and Psycinfo were searched for publications in any language on 30 day or in hospital mortality after major lower limb amputation in population/regional based studies. PRISMA guidelines were followed. A self developed checklist was used to assess quality and susceptibility to bias. Summary data were extracted for the percentage of the population who died; pooling of quantitative results was not possible because of methodological differences between studies. Of the 9,082 publications identified, results were included from 21. The percentage of the population undergoing amputation who died within 30 days ranged from 7% to 22%, the in hospital equivalent was 4-20%. Transfemoral amputation and older age were found to have a higher proportion of early post-operative mortality, compared with transtibial and younger age, respectively. Other patient factors or surgical treatment choices related to increased early post-operative mortality varied between studies. Early post-operative mortality rates vary from 4% to 22%. There are very limited data presented for patient related factors (age, comorbidities) that influence mortality. Even less is known about factors related to surgical treatment choices, being limited to amputation level. More information is needed to allow comparison across studies or for any benchmarking of acceptable mortality rates. Agreement is needed on key factors to be reported. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. HDL cholesterol as a predictor for the incidence of lower extremity amputation and wound-related death in patients with diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikura, Kazuki; Hanai, Ko; Shinjyo, Takamichi; Uchigata, Yasuko

    2015-04-01

    We examined whether HDL cholesterol levels are a predictor for an incidence of lower-extremity amputation (LEA) and wound-related death in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). This was a single-center, observational, longitudinal historical cohort study of 163 Japanese ambulatory patients with DFUs, 45 woman and 118 men, with a mean (standard deviation) age of 62 (14) years. The primary composite endpoint was defined as the worst of the following outcomes for each individual; (1) minor amputation, defined as amputation below the ankle, (2) major amputation, defined as amputation above the ankle, and (3) wound-related death. During the median follow-up period of 5.1 months, 67 patients (41.1%) reached the endpoint (43 minor amputations, 16 major amputations, and 8 wound-related deaths). In the univariate Cox proportional hazard model analysis, lower HDL cholesterol levels (mmol/L) were significantly associated with the incidence of the primary composite endpoint (hazard ratio 0.16 [95% CI 0.08-0.32], p procedure, HDL cholesterol levels in addition to the presence of ankle brachial index <0.9 or ≥1.4 and serum albumin levels were selected as independent risk factors for the incidence of the endpoint (hazard ratio 0.30 [95% CI 0.14-0.63], p = 0.002). Similar results were obtained when HDL cholesterol levels were treated as a categorical variable (≥1.03 mmol/L or less). HDL cholesterol levels might be a novel clinical predictor for the incidence of LEA and wound-related death in patients with DFUs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Amputation risk after the revascularization procedures in sarcoma resections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Moreira Teixeira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of vascular reconstructive surgery after resection of bone and soft tissue tumors in extremities and the risk of progression to amputation. METHODS: This is a retrospective, observational data collection from medical records of patients who underwent resection of bone and soft tissue tumors in the period of 2002-2015. Thirteen patients met the inclusion criteria, which evaluated the correlations between certain factors (gender, tumor type, location, reconstruction, revascularization and patency, infection with amputation in the postoperative period. RESULTS: In this study, of the 13 patients undergoing reconstruction, five (38.46% evolved to amputation. All patients who progressed to amputation had the following in common: presence of bone sarcoma (p = 0.005, having undergone reconstruction with an orthopedic prosthesis (p = 0.005, lack of vascular patency in the revascularization site in the postoperative period (p = 0.032, and surgical site infection (p = 0.001. None of the patients with soft tissue sarcoma underwent amputation, and the only patient with bone sarcoma who did not undergo amputation had no infection and maintained vascular patency of the graft. CONCLUSION: The occurrence of infection appears to be one of the main risk factors for failure of revascularization, especially in cases of bone sarcoma in which vascular reconstruction is performed with placement of a non-conventional joint prosthesis.

  14. Rehabilitation for patients with paraplegia and lower extremity amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangyong; Hong, Yi

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] To study the characteristics and treatment strategy for patients with paraplegia and lower extremity amputation. [Subjects] Six cases were selected from among the patients admitted to the China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1991 to 2014. The criteria for the six cases were spinal cord injury with amputation immediately or in a short time (1 week) after the trauma. [Methods] General information, clinical diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and other data were analyzed. [Results] All the six cases were injured by high energy or complex energy accidents: two cases by falls after high voltage electric shock, one by an oil pipeline explosion, one by the impact of a falling tower crane and received high energy traffic accident injuries (one was hit by a train, and the other was hit by a truck at high speed). All the six cases had thoracic and lumbar vertebral injuries and complete paraplegia. Amputation stump infection occurred in four cases. After comprehensive rehabilitation treatment, patients' functional independence measure (FIM) scores improved significantly, but American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scores and ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) grades showed no significant improvement. [Conclusion] When formulating the clinical treatment and rehabilitation for spinal cord injury with amputation patients, simultaneous consideration of the characteristics of the spinal cord injury and amputation is needed to develop an individualized strategy. For spinal cord injury with limb amputation patients, prostheses should allow the improvement of patients' self-care ability.

  15. Perioperative Pain Management Strategies for Amputation: A Topical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Michael L; Hsia, Hung-Lun John; Van de Ven, Thomas J; Buchheit, Thomas E

    2017-03-01

    To review acute pain management strategies in patients undergoing amputation with consideration of preoperative patient factors, pharmacologic/interventional modalities, and multidisciplinary care models to alleviate suffering in the immediate post-amputation setting. Regardless of surgical indication, patients undergoing amputation suffer from significant residual limb pain and phantom limb pain in the acute postoperative phase. Most studies have primarily focused on strategies to prevent persistent pain with inclusion of immediate postoperative outcomes as secondary measures. Pharmacologic agents, including gabapentin, ketamine, and calcitonin, and interventional modalities such as neuraxial and perineural catheters, have been examined in the perioperative period. Focused Literature Review. Pharmacologic agents (gabapentin, ketamine, calcitonin) have not shown consistent efficacy. Neuraxial analgesia has demonstrated both an opioid sparing and analgesic benefit while results have been mixed regarding perineural catheters in the immediate post-amputation setting. However, several early studies of perineural catheters employed sub-optimal techniques (distal surgical placement), and prolonged use of perineural catheters may provide a sustained benefit. Regardless of analgesic technique, a multidisciplinary approach is necessary for optimal care. Patient-tailored analgesic regimens utilizing catheter-based techniques are essential in the acute post-amputation phase and should be implemented in all patients undergoing amputation. Future research should focus on improved measurement of acute pain and comparisons of effective analgesic regimens instead of single techniques.

  16. [The influence of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of the muscles of the lumbosacral region of the spine on the manifestations of the flexion contracture in the hip joint in the men at the age of 50-60 years following amputation of the lower limb at the hip level in the course of the rehabilitation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaev, M S; Malchevskiy, V A; Prokopev, N Y; Khrupa, D A

    2017-12-28

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the outcome the application of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of the muscles of the lumbosacral region of the spine and of the lumbosacral junction as a component of the combined rehabilitation on the manifestations of the flexion contracture in the hip joint in the men at the age of 50-60 years following amputation of the lower limb at the hip level throughout the course of the rehabilitative process. A total of 243 patients who had undergone ablation of a femur available for the examination. 153 of them were treatment with the use of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of the muscles of the lumbosacral region of the spine and of the lumbosacral junction. The control group was comprised of the remaining 90 patients treated without the application of the technique for post-isometric relaxation. The analysis of the degree of flexion contracture of the hip joint on the side of ablation was carried out by means of the Thomas test. The results of the study give evidence that that use of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of muscles of the lumbar spine and sacroiliac joint makes it possible to reduce the time needed to decrease the severity of contracture of the hip joint during the rehabilitation process. The data obtained provide a basis for recommending the inclusion of the technique for the post-isometric relaxation of muscles of the lumbar spine and the lumbosacral junction into the program of the combined rehabilitation of the patients who had undergone ablation of a femur.

  17. Dutch evidence-based guidelines for amputation and prosthetics of the lower extremity : Amputation surgery and postoperative management. Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, Jan; van der Linde, Harmen; Rosenbrand, Kitty; Conradi, Marcel; Deckers, Jos; Koning, Jan; Rietman, Hans S.; van der Schaaf, Dick; van der Ploeg, Rein; Schapendonk, Johannes; Schrier, Ernst; Duijzentkunst, Rob Smit; Spruit-van Eijk, Monica; Versteegen, Gerbrig; Voesten, Harrie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgeons still use a range of criteria to determine whether amputation is indicated. In addition, there is considerable debate regarding immediate postoperative management, especially concerning the use of immediate/delayed fitting' versus conservative elastic bandaging. Objectives: To

  18. Amputation: A Rare Surgical Indication in Melorheostosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Masood

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Melorheostosis is a rare and progressive mesenchymal dysplasia characterized by thickening (hyperostosis of the cortical bone. It is a developmental error that has been described to occur due to a mutation in LEMD3 gene. It affects bone and soft tissue development resulting in severe functional limitation; chronic pain, malformed or immobilized muscles, tendons or ligaments limb deformities and leg length discrepancies. X-ray imaging is the preferred diagnostic tool for melorheostosis, which often reveals a pattern of thickened bone resembling dripping candle wax. Treatment of melorheostosis is limited and generally conservative that includes physical and occupational therapy, and in severe cases, surgery may be considered. We report a case of 68-year-old female with melorheostosis of the middle finger, with her chief complaint being gross swelling, complete restriction of movement of all joints of the middle finger and limitations in movements of joints of index and ring finger, making the hand almost non-functional. It was treated with amputation, a rare surgical indication.

  19. Limb salvage treatment vs. amputation in sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motamedi M

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available Many years ago the treatment of sarcoma was radiotherapy up to 2000-4000 rad. This treatment was very complicated, due to producing neoplasm after radiotherapy. By this method of treatment of osteosarcoma, the rate of survival became about 20% (two years. The second method of treatment was chemotherapy for a period of 2-5 weeks that amputation was performed afterwards. By chemotherapy, the rate of being alive reached up to 25-27% (five years. Right now, the best treatment for sarcoma is limb salvage. In our report, the chance of being alive in chondrosarcoma was about four years. This was nearly the same as that of the other institutes in the world especially in America, Europe, and Japan. The rate of recurrence was also more than that from different parts of the world. The survival rate in osteosarcomatic patients was about two years less for males the females, and it was more in tall people than short ones. The survival rate of the patients with giant cell tumor was more than osteosarcoma up to five years, and it has no recurrence or metastasis

  20. Female American Kestrel survives double amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, Ben R.; Boal, Clint W.

    2011-01-01

    Free-ranging raptors are susceptible to a variety of injuries, many of which are sustained while pursuing and/or capturing live prey. Injuries hindering an individual’s ability to capture prey, such as partial blindness, damage to the bill, and foot or leg injuries, are debilitating and potentially life-threatening. However, there are ample observations in the literature of free-ranging raptors with eye (Bedrosian and St.Pierre 2007), bill (Strobel and Haralson-Strobel 2009) and foot and leg injuries (Blodget et al. 1990, Murza et al. 2000, Dwyer 2006, Bedrosian and St.Pierre 2007), suggesting that some individuals are able to compensate for their injuries if only partial functionality is lost (e.g., loss of only one eye). Reports of injuries resulting in the complete loss of functionality (e.g., loss of both eyes) are rare as individuals suffering such severe trauma presumably do not survive long. Here we report the capture on a bal-chatri trap of an American Kestrel (Falco sparverius; hereafter kestrel) with previous amputation of both legs

  1. Gray matter changes following limb amputation with high and low intensities of phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissler, Sandra; Feiler, Johanna; Dietrich, Caroline; Hofmann, Gunther O; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Limb amputation and chronic phantom limb pain (PLP) are both associated with neural alterations at all levels of the neuraxis. We investigated gray matter volume of 21 upper limb amputees and 14 healthy control subjects. Results demonstrate that amputation is associated with reduced gray matter in areas in the motor cortex representing the amputated limb. Additionally, patients show an increase in gray matter in brain regions that belong to the dorsal and ventral visual stream. We subdivided the patient group into patients with medium to high PLP (HPLP; N = 11) and those with slight PLP (SPLP; N = 10). HPLP patients showed reduced gray matter in brain areas involved in pain processing. SPLP patients showed a significant gray matter increase in regions of the visual stream. Results indicate that all patients may have an enhanced need for visual control to compensate the lack of sensory feedback of the missing limb. As we found these alterations primarily in the SPLP patient group, successful compensation may have an impact on PLP development. Therefore, we hypothesize that visual adaptation mechanisms may compensate for the lack of sensorimotor feedback and may therefore function as a protection mechanism against high PLP development.

  2. Treatment of Fingertip Amputation in Adults by Palmar Pocketing of the Amputated Part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Sun Jung

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background First suggested by Brent in 1979, the pocket principle is an alternative methodfor patients for whom a microsurgical replantation is not feasible. We report the successfulresults of a modified palmar pocket method in adults.Methods Between 2004 and 2008, we treated 10 patients by nonmicrosurgical replantationusing palmar pocketing. All patients were adults who sustained a complete fingertip amputationfrom the tip to lunula in a digits. In all of these patients, the amputation occurred due to a crushor avulsion-type injury, and a microsurgical replantation was not feasible. We used the palmarpocketing method following a composite graft in these patients and prepared the pocket in thesubcutaneous layer of the ipsilateral palm.Results Of a total of 10 cases, nine had complete survival of the replantation and one had20% partial necrosis. All of the cases were managed to conserve the fingernails, which led toacceptable cosmetic results.Conclusions A composite graft and palmar pocketing in adult cases of fingertip injuryconstitute a simple, reliable operation for digital amputation extending from the tip to thelunula. These methods had satisfactory results.

  3. Weight Change Trajectories After Incident Lower-Limb Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouldin, Erin D; Thompson, Mary Lou; Boyko, Edward J; Morgenroth, David C; Littman, Alyson J

    2016-01-01

    To characterize weight change after amputation by identifying typical weight trajectories in men with incident lower-limb amputation (LLA) and describing characteristics associated with each trajectory. Retrospective cohort study and analyzed using group-based trajectory modeling. Administrative data. Veterans who were men (N=759), living in the Northwest United States, and who had an incident toe, foot, or leg amputation between 1997 and 2008 and at least 18 months of amputation-free survival thereafter. Not applicable. Postamputation weight and body mass index change. The mean weight at baseline was 91.6±24 kg (202±53 lb), and average follow-up was 2.4 years. We identified 4 trajectory groups for weight change: weight loss (13%), stable weight (47%), slow weight gain (33%), and rapid weight gain (7%). Men with a toe or foot amputation most frequently were assigned to the stable weight group (58%), whereas men with transtibial or transfemoral amputations were most commonly assigned to the slow weight gain group (42% each). Men who died during follow-up were more likely to be assigned to the weight loss group (24%) than men who did not die (11%). We identified distinct weight change trajectories that represent heterogeneity in weight change after LLA. An improved understanding of factors predictive of weight gain or loss in people with LLA may help better target rehabilitation and prosthetic prescription. Additional research is needed to fully understand the relation between weight change and health status after amputation. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Locomotor adaptability in persons with unilateral transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darter, Benjamin J; Bastian, Amy J; Wolf, Erik J; Husson, Elizabeth M; Labrecque, Bethany A; Hendershot, Brad D

    2017-01-01

    Locomotor adaptation enables walkers to modify strategies when faced with challenging walking conditions. While a variety of neurological injuries can impair locomotor adaptability, the effect of a lower extremity amputation on adaptability is poorly understood. Determine if locomotor adaptability is impaired in persons with unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA). The locomotor adaptability of 10 persons with a TTA and 8 persons without an amputation was tested while walking on a split-belt treadmill with the parallel belts running at the same (tied) or different (split) speeds. In the split condition, participants walked for 15 minutes with the respective belts moving at 0.5 m/s and 1.5 m/s. Temporal spatial symmetry measures were used to evaluate reactive accommodations to the perturbation, and the adaptive/de-adaptive response. Persons with TTA and the reference group of persons without amputation both demonstrated highly symmetric walking at baseline. During the split adaptation and tied post-adaptation walking both groups responded with the expected reactive accommodations. Likewise, adaptive and de-adaptive responses were observed. The magnitude and rate of change in the adaptive and de-adaptive responses were similar for persons with TTA and those without an amputation. Furthermore, adaptability was no different based on belt assignment for the prosthetic limb during split adaptation walking. Reactive changes and locomotor adaptation in response to a challenging and novel walking condition were similar in persons with TTA to those without an amputation. Results suggest persons with TTA have the capacity to modify locomotor strategies to meet the demands of most walking conditions despite challenges imposed by an amputation and use of a prosthetic limb.

  5. Axillary Artery Injury Associated with Proximal Humerus Fracture: A Report of 6 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinne M. Peters

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal humerus fractures are common, but associated injury of the axillary artery is uncommon. The majority of published blunt traumatic axillary artery injuries are associated with anterior glenohumeral dislocation; a few are associated with isolated proximal humerus fractures or fracture-dislocation. Experience within our institution demonstrates that axillary artery injury is often unrecognized on initial presentation owing to palpable peripheral pulses and the absence of ischemia and places the hand at risk of necrosis and amputation if there is prolonged ischemia and the forearm at risk of compartment syndrome after revascularization. Accurate physical examination in combination with a low threshold for Doppler examination or angiography can establish the diagnosis of axillary artery injury. We present 6 cases of axillary artery injury associated with proximal humerus fractures in order to highlight the potential for this vascular injury in the setting of a proximal humerus fracture.

  6. Major limb amputations: A tertiary hospital experience in northwestern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalya Phillipo L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major limb amputation is reported to be a major but preventable public health problem that is associated with profound economic, social and psychological effects on the patient and family especially in developing countries where the prosthetic services are poor. The purpose of this study was to outline the patterns, indications and short term complications of major limb amputations and to compare our experience with that of other published data. Methods This was a descriptive cross-sectional study that was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre between March 2008 and February 2010. All patients who underwent major limb amputation were, after informed consent for the study, enrolled into the study. Data were collected using a pre-tested, coded questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 11.5 computer software. Results A total of 162 patients were entered into the study. Their ages ranged between 2–78 years (mean 28.30 ± 13.72 days. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 2:1. The majority of patients (76.5% had primary or no formal education. One hundred and twelve (69.1% patients were unemployed. The most common indication for major limb amputation was diabetic foot complications in 41.9%, followed by trauma in 38.4% and vascular disease in 8.6% respectively. Lower limbs were involved in 86.4% of cases and upper limbs in 13.6% of cases giving a lower limb to upper limb ratio of 6.4:1 Below knee amputation was the most common procedure performed in 46.3%. There was no bilateral limb amputation. The most common additional procedures performed were wound debridement, secondary suture and skin grafting in 42.3%, 34.5% and 23.2% respectively. Two-stage operation was required in 45.4% of patients. Revision amputation rate was 29.6%. Post-operative complication rate was 33.3% and surgical site infection was the most common complication accounting for 21.0%. The mean length of hospital stay was 22.4 days and mortality

  7. Major limb amputations: a tertiary hospital experience in northwestern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalya, Phillipo L; Mabula, Joseph B; Dass, Ramesh M; Ngayomela, Isdori H; Chandika, Alphonce B; Mbelenge, Nkinda; Gilyoma, Japhet M

    2012-05-11

    Major limb amputation is reported to be a major but preventable public health problem that is associated with profound economic, social and psychological effects on the patient and family especially in developing countries where the prosthetic services are poor. The purpose of this study was to outline the patterns, indications and short term complications of major limb amputations and to compare our experience with that of other published data. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study that was conducted at Bugando Medical Centre between March 2008 and February 2010. All patients who underwent major limb amputation were, after informed consent for the study, enrolled into the study. Data were collected using a pre-tested, coded questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 11.5 computer software. A total of 162 patients were entered into the study. Their ages ranged between 2-78 years (mean 28.30 ± 13.72 days). Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 2:1. The majority of patients (76.5%) had primary or no formal education. One hundred and twelve (69.1%) patients were unemployed. The most common indication for major limb amputation was diabetic foot complications in 41.9%, followed by trauma in 38.4% and vascular disease in 8.6% respectively. Lower limbs were involved in 86.4% of cases and upper limbs in 13.6% of cases giving a lower limb to upper limb ratio of 6.4:1 Below knee amputation was the most common procedure performed in 46.3%. There was no bilateral limb amputation. The most common additional procedures performed were wound debridement, secondary suture and skin grafting in 42.3%, 34.5% and 23.2% respectively. Two-stage operation was required in 45.4% of patients. Revision amputation rate was 29.6%. Post-operative complication rate was 33.3% and surgical site infection was the most common complication accounting for 21.0%. The mean length of hospital stay was 22.4 days and mortality rate was 16.7%. Complications of diabetic foot ulcers and trauma

  8. Factors predicting resource utilization and survival after major amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Antonia J; Hevelone, Nathanael D; Hawkins, Alexander T; Watkins, Michael T; Belkin, Michael; Nguyen, Louis L

    2013-03-01

    Major amputation is associated with increased short-term healthcare resource utilization (RU), early mortality, and socioeconomic status (SES) disparities. Our objective is to study patient-specific and SES-related predictors of long-term RU and survival after amputation. This retrospective analysis identified 364 adult patients who underwent index major amputation for critical limb ischemia from January 1995 through December 2000 at two tertiary centers with outcomes through December 2010. Age, gender, SES (race, income, insurance, and marital status), comorbidities (congestive heart failure [CHF], diabetes, diabetes with complications, and renal failure [RF]), subsequent procedures, cumulative length of stay (cLOS), and mortality were analyzed. Bivariate and multivariate Poisson regression for subsequent procedures and cLOS and Cox proportional hazard modeling for all-cause mortality were undertaken. During a mean follow-up of 3.25 years, amputation patients had mean cLOS of 71.2 days per person-year (median, 17.6), 19.5 readmissions per person-year (median, 2.1), 0.57 amputation-related procedures (median, 0), and 0.31 cardiovascular procedures (median, 0). Below-knee amputation as the index procedure was performed in 70% of patients, and 25% had additional amputation procedures. Of readmissions at ≤ 30 days, 52% were amputation-related. Overall mortality during follow-up was 86.9%; 37 patients (10.2%) died within 30 days. Among patients surviving >30 days, multivariate Poisson regression demonstrated that younger age (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.98), public insurance (IRR, 1.63), CHF (IRR, 1.60), and RF (IRR, 2.12) were associated with increased cLOS. Diabetes with complications (IRR, 1.90) and RF (IRR, 2.47) affected subsequent amputation procedures. CHF (IRR, 1.83) and RF (IRR, 3.67) were associated with a greater number of cardiovascular procedures. Cox proportional hazard modeling indicated older age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.04), CHF (HR, 2.26), and RF (HR

  9. Decrease of thalamic gray matter following limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draganski, B; Moser, T; Lummel, N; Gänssbauer, S; Bogdahn, U; Haas, F; May, A

    2006-07-01

    Modern neuroscience has elucidated general mechanisms underlying the functional plasticity of the adult mammalian brain after limb deafferentation. However, little is known about possible structural alterations following amputation and chronic loss of afferent input in humans. Using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), based on high-resolution magnetic resonance images, we investigated the brain structure of 28 volunteers with unilateral limb amputation and compared them to healthy controls. Subjects with limb amputation exhibited a decrease in gray matter of the posterolateral thalamus contralateral to the side of the amputation. The thalamic gray matter differences were positively correlated with the time span after the amputation but not with the frequency or magnitude of coexisting phantom pain. Phantom limb pain was unrelated to thalamic structural variations, but was positively correlated to a decrease in brain areas related to the processing of pain. No gray matter increase was detected. The unilateral thalamic differences may reflect a structural correlate of the loss of afferent input as a secondary change following deafferentation.

  10. Neighborhoods and manageable proximity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros Stavrides

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The theatricality of urban encounters is above all a theatricality of distances which allow for the encounter. The absolute “strangeness” of the crowd (Simmel 1997: 74 expressed, in its purest form, in the absolute proximity of a crowded subway train, does not generally allow for any movements of approach, but only for nervous hostile reactions and submissive hypnotic gestures. Neither forced intersections in the course of pedestrians or vehicles, nor the instantaneous crossing of distances by the technology of live broadcasting and remote control give birth to places of encounter. In the forced proximity of the metropolitan crowd which haunted the city of the 19th and 20th century, as well as in the forced proximity of the tele-presence which haunts the dystopic prospect of the future “omnipolis” (Virilio 1997: 74, the necessary distance, which is the stage of an encounter between different instances of otherness, is dissipated.

  11. Primary motor cortex changes after amputation correlate with phantom limb pain and the ability to move the phantom limb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffin, Estelle; Richard, Nathalie; Giraux, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence documents massive reorganization of primary sensory and motor cortices following hand amputation, the extent of which is correlated with phantom limb pain. Many therapies for phantom limb pain are based upon the idea that plastic changes after amputation are maladap......A substantial body of evidence documents massive reorganization of primary sensory and motor cortices following hand amputation, the extent of which is correlated with phantom limb pain. Many therapies for phantom limb pain are based upon the idea that plastic changes after amputation...... are maladaptive and attempt to normalize representations of cortical areas adjacent to the hand area. Recent data suggest, however, that higher levels of phantom pain are associated with stronger local activity and more structural integrity in the missing hand area rather than with reorganization of neighbouring...... body parts. While these models appear to be mutually exclusive they could co-exist, and one reason for the apparent discrepancy between them might be that no single study has examined the organisation of lip, elbow, and hand movements in the same participants. In this study we thoroughly examined the 3...

  12. Atrofia muscular proximal familiar

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    José Antonio Levy

    1962-09-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam dois casos de atrofia muscular proximal familiar, moléstia caracterizada por déficit motor e atrofias musculares de distribuição proximal, secundárias a lesão de neurônios periféricos. Assim, como em outros casos descritos na literatura, foi feito inicialmente o diagnóstico de distrofia muscular progressiva. O diagnóstico correto foi conseguido com auxílio da eletromiografia e da biopsia muscular.

  13. Microneurovascular reimplantation in a case of total penile amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatt Yogesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Amputation of the penis is a rare condition reported from various parts of the world as isolated cases or small series of patients; the common aetiology is self-mutilating sharp amputation or an avulsion or crush injury in an industrial accident. A complete reconstruction of all penile structures should be attempted in one stage which provides the best chance for full rehabilitation of the patient. We report here a single case of total amputation of the penis, which was successfully reattached by using a microsurgical technique. After surgery, near-normal appearance and function including a good urine flow and absence of urethral stricture, capabilities of erection and near normal sensitivity were observed.

  14. Amputation and prosthesis implantation shape body and peripersonal space representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canzoneri, Elisa; Marzolla, Marilena; Amoresano, Amedeo; Verni, Gennaro; Serino, Andrea

    2013-10-03

    Little is known about whether and how multimodal representations of the body (BRs) and of the space around the body (Peripersonal Space, PPS) adapt to amputation and prosthesis implantation. In order to investigate this issue, we tested BR in a group of upper limb amputees by means of a tactile distance perception task and PPS by means of an audio-tactile interaction task. Subjects performed the tasks with stimulation either on the healthy limb or the stump of the amputated limb, while wearing or not wearing their prosthesis. When patients performed the tasks on the amputated limb, without the prosthesis, the perception of arm length shrank, with a concurrent shift of PPS boundaries towards the stump. Conversely, wearing the prosthesis increased the perceived length of the stump and extended the PPS boundaries so as to include the prosthetic hand, such that the prosthesis partially replaced the missing limb.

  15. Preventing amputation in adults with diabetes: identifying the risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Eleanor

    2015-06-03

    Good management of diabetes can reduce the risk of complications of the disease. When not well managed, diabetes is associated with the complications of heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputations. Diabetes can reduce the blood supply to the feet and cause a loss of feeling. As a result, foot injuries do not heal well and the person may not realise that their foot is sore or injured. Damage to the foot may lead to the development of foot ulcers, which if left untreated may result in amputation of the limb. Preventive care is a priority, but when complications occur the next step is to halt progression. Therefore, effective foot care and timely treatment of foot ulcers are important in preserving foot function and mobility, and preventing amputation in adults with diabetes.

  16. Does amputation side influence sprint performances in athletes using running-specific prostheses?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hobara, Hiroaki; Potthast, Wolfgang; Sano, Yoko; Müller, Ralf; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Heldoorn, Thijs A; Mochimaru, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    .... Although 200- and 400-m sprint races are performed in a counterclockwise direction, little is known about the effects of amputation side on race performance in athletes with unilateral lower limb amputation...

  17. Factors related to successful job reintegration of people with a lower limb amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoppen, Tanneke; Boonstra, Antje; Groothoff, JW; van Sonderen, E; Goeken, LN; Eisma, Willem

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study demographically, amputation-, and employment-related factors that show a relationship to successful job reintegration of patients after lower limb amputation. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University hospital. Patients: Subjects had an acquired unilateral major

  18. Remote Dose-Dependent Effects of Dry Needling at Distant Myofascial Trigger Spots of Rabbit Skeletal Muscles on Reduction of Substance P Levels of Proximal Muscle and Spinal Cords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yueh-Ling; Liu, Szu-Yu; Hong, Chang-Zern

    2014-01-01

    Background. Dry needling at distant myofascial trigger points is an effective pain management in patients with myofascial pain. However, the biochemical effects of remote dry needling are not well understood. This study evaluates the remote effects of dry needling with different dosages on the expressions of substance P (SP) in the proximal muscle, spinal dorsal horns of rabbits. Methods. Male New Zealand rabbits (2.5–3.0 kg) received dry needling at myofascial trigger spots of a gastrocnemius (distant muscle) in one (1D) or five sessions (5D). Bilateral biceps femoris (proximal muscles) and superficial laminaes of L5-S2, T2-T5, and C2-C5 were sampled immediately and 5 days after dry needling to determine the levels of SP using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Results. Immediately after dry needling for 1D and 5D, the expressions of SP were significantly decreased in ipsilateral biceps femoris and bilateral spinal superficial laminaes (P myofascial pain. PMID:25276839

  19. The use of bone bridges in transtibial amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto Auro Mitsuo

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to describe the bone bridge technique in adults, and present a variation for use in children, as well as to present its applicability as an option in elective transtibial amputations. This paper presents a prospective study of 15 transtibial amputations performed between 1992 and 1995 in which the bone bridge technique was employed. The patients' ages ranged from 8 to 48 years, with an average of 22.5 years. This technique consisted of the preparation of a cylinder of periosteum extracted from the tibia and with cortical bone fragments attached to it to promote a tibiofibular synostosis on the distal extremity of the amputation stump. We noted that the cortical bone fragments were dispensable when the technique was employed in children, due to the increased osteogenic capacity of the periosteum. This led to a variation of the original technique, a bone bridge without the use of the cortical bone fragments. RESULTS: The average time spent with this procedure, without any significant variation between adults and children, was 171 minutes. The adaptation to the definitive prosthesis was accomplished between 20 and 576 days, with an average of 180 days. Revision of the procedure was necessary in 3 amputations. CONCLUSIONS: This technique may be employed in transtibial amputations in which the final length of the stump lies next to the musculotendinous transition of the gastrocnemius muscle, as well as in the revision of amputation stumps in children, where the procedure has been shown to be effective in the prevention of lesions due to excessive bone growth.

  20. Factors Associated with Amputation after Popliteal Vascular Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jessica; Koopmann, Matthew; Yan, Huan; DeVirgilio, Christian; Putnam, Brant; Y Kim, Dennis; Plurad, David

    2016-05-01

    Popliteal artery trauma has the highest rate of limb loss of all peripheral vascular injuries. The objectives of this study were to evaluate outcomes after popliteal vascular injury and to identify predictors of amputation. Retrospective data over a 14-year period were collected for patients with popliteal artery with or without vein injuries. Patient demographics, mechanism of injury, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS), and physiologic parameters were extracted. Time to operative intervention, operative time, type of vascular repair, need for concomitant orthopedic procedures, and outcomes including amputation rate, and in-hospital mortality were recorded. Fifty-one patients were found to have popliteal artery injuries, with a median age of 25 (range 10-70 years). The median ISS was 9, and the mean extremity Abbreviated Injury Severity score was 3. The mechanism of injury was blunt for 43% and penetrating for 57%. Fasciotomies were performed in 74% of patients and 64% of patients underwent combined orthopedic and vascular procedures. Overall, 66% of these patients had their vascular procedure performed first. Ten patients required amputation: 1 immediate and 9 after attempted limb salvage (20%). We found that those patients requiring amputation had a higher incidence of blunt trauma (80% vs. 35%, P = 0.014) and higher MESS score (7.1 vs. 4.7, P = 0.02). There was no difference in the incidence of amputation for those who underwent orthopedic fixation before vascular repair (P = 0.68). Popliteal vascular injuries continue to be associated with a high risk of amputation. Those patients undergoing attempted limb salvage should be revascularized expediently, but selected patients may undergo orthopedic stabilization before vascular repair without increased risk of limb loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Through Knee Amputation: Technique Modifications and Surgical Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank P Albino

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundKnee disarticulations (KD are most commonly employed following trauma or tumor resection but represent less than 2% of all lower extremity amputations performed in the United States annually. KDs provide enhanced proprioception, a long lever arm, preservation of adductor muscle insertion, decreased metabolic cost of ambulation, and an end weight-bearing stump. The role for KDs in the setting of arterial insufficiency or overwhelming infection is less clear. The purpose of this study is to describe technique modifications and report surgical outcomes following KDs at a high-volume Limb Salvage Center.MethodsA retrospective study of medical records for all patients who underwent a through-knee amputation performed by the senior author (C.E.A. between 2004 and 2012 was completed. Medical records were reviewed to collect demographic, operative, and postoperative information for each of the patients identified.ResultsBetween 2004 and 2012, 46 through-knee amputations for 41 patients were performed. The mean patient age was 68 and indications for surgery included infection (56%, arterial thrombosis (35%, and trauma (9%. Postoperative complications included superficial cellulitis (13%, soft tissue infection (4%, and flap ischemia (4% necessitating one case of surgical debridement (4% and four trans-femoral amputations (9%. 9 (22% patients went on to ambulate. Postoperative ambulation was greatest in the traumatic cohort and for patients less than 50 years of age, P<0.05. Alternatively, diabetes mellitus and infection reduced the likelihood of postoperative ambulation, P<0.01.ConclusionsKnee disarticulations are a safe and effective alternative to other lower extremity amputations when clinically feasible. For patient unlikely to ambulate, a through-knee amputation maximizes ease of transfers, promotes mobility by providing a counterbalance, and eliminates the potential for knee flexion contracture with subsequent skin breakdown.

  2. Gait biomechanics following lower extremity trauma: Amputation vs. reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell Esposito, Elizabeth; Stinner, Daniel J; Fergason, John R; Wilken, Jason M

    2017-05-01

    Surgical advances have substantially improved outcomes for individuals sustaining traumatic lower extremity injury. Injuries once requiring lower limb amputation are now routinely managed with limb reconstruction surgery. However, comparisons of functional outcomes between the procedures are inconclusive. To compare gait biomechanics after lower limb reconstruction and transtibial amputation. Twenty-four individuals with unilateral lower limb reconstruction wearing a custom ankle-foot orthosis (Intrepid Dynamic Exoskeletal Orthosis), 24 with unilateral, transtibial amputation, and 24 able-bodied control subjects underwent gait analysis at a standardized Froude speed based on leg length. Lower extremity joint angles, moments, and powers, and ground reaction forces were analyzed on the affected limb of patients and right limb of able-bodied individuals. ANOVA with Tukeys post-hoc tests determined differences among groups and post-hoc paired t-tests with Bonferroni-Holm corrections determined differences between limbs. The ankle, knee, and hip exhibited significant kinematic differences between amputated, reconstructed and able-bodied limbs. The reconstruction group exhibited less ankle power and range of motion while the amputee group exhibited lower knee flexor and extensor moments and power generation. Gait deficiencies were more pronounced at the ankle following limb reconstruction with orthosis use and at the knee following transtibial amputation with prosthesis use. Although both groups in the cohorts tested can replicate many key aspects of normative gait mechanics, some deficiencies still persist. These results add to the growing body of literature comparing amputation and limb reconstruction and provide information to inform the patient on functional expectations should either procedure be considered. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. [Experimental proximal carpectomy. Biodynamics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, J N

    1992-01-01

    Proximal carpectomy was performed in 10 fresh cadavre wrists. Dynamic x-rays were taken and the forces necessary to obtain different movements before and after the operation were measured. Comparison of these parameters clearly defines the advantages and limitations of carpectomy and indicates the reasons.

  4. Proximate Analysis of Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Craig J.; Rais, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    This lab experiment illustrates the use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to perform proximate analysis on a series of coal samples of different rank. Peat and coke are also examined. A total of four exercises are described. These are dry exercises as students interpret previously recorded scans. The weight percent moisture, volatile matter,…

  5. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Big Toe Ailments of the Smaller Toes Diabetic Foot Treatments Currently selected Injections and other Procedures Treatments ... from which the bone was taken if the foot/ankle surgeries done at the same time allow for it. ... problems after a PTBG include infection, fracture of the proximal tibia and pain related ...

  6. Traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waxman, J.; Belman, A.B.; Kass, E.J.

    1985-07-01

    Four children between 5 and 10 years old suffered traumatic amputation of the left lower renal pole following flank trauma. All patients were evaluated with excretory urography and isotope renography. The renal scan clearly demonstrated failure of perfusion of the lower renal pole and urinary extravasation, and was believed to be more valuable than the standard excretory urogram as a diagnostic tool. All children were managed similarly: delayed (72 to 96 hours) exploration, simple removal of the amputated segment and insertion of a Penrose drain. They all have done well. The patients were normotensive at followup and had excellent function of the remaining portion of the kidney.

  7. [Antibiotic treatment in patients amputated for ischemic diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Montequín, J I; McCook Martínez, J; Lima Santana, B; Velasco Armas, N; Montalvo Diago, J; Mahía Vilas, M

    1991-01-01

    Thirty diabetic patients submitted to a major amputation were tested by humo-celullar assays (retarded hypersensibility assays). Reactive patients were subdivided into two groups: one group was treated postoperatively with antibiotics, and the other group was not treated. Both groups were homogeneous in age, hemoglobin concentrations, hematocrit, total proteins, glucemy and history of sepsis or leukocytosis. Five patients treated with antibiotics (33.3%) presented sepsis, one patient was reamputated and one patient died. Between the not treated patients, only three presented sepsis (20%) without any other complications. Authors conclude that the development of sepsis in reactive, diabetic, amputated patients is independent of antibiotic treatment.

  8. Amputation and prosthesis implantation shape body and peripersonal space representations

    OpenAIRE

    Canzoneri, Elisa; Marzolla, Marilena; Amoresano, Amedeo; Verni, Gennaro; Serino, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about whether and how multimodal representations of the body (BRs) and of the space around the body (Peripersonal Space, PPS) adapt to amputation and prosthesis implantation. In order to investigate this issue, we tested BR in a group of upper limb amputees by means of a tactile distance perception task and PPS by means of an audio-tactile interaction task. Subjects performed the tasks with stimulation either on the healthy limb or the stump of the amputated limb, while wearin...

  9. Outcomes of dogs undergoing limb amputation, owner satisfaction with limb amputation procedures, and owner perceptions regarding postsurgical adaptation: 64 cases (2005-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Vanna M; Coleman, Kevin D; Ogawa, Morika; Saba, Corey F; Cornell, Karen K; Radlinsky, MaryAnn G; Schmiedt, Chad W

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate outcomes of dogs and owner satisfaction and perception of their dogs' adaptation following amputation of a thoracic or pelvic limb. Retrospective case series. 64 client-owned dogs. Procedures-Medical records of dogs that underwent limb amputation at a veterinary teaching hospital between 2005 and 2012 were reviewed. Signalment, body weight, and body condition scores at the time of amputation, dates of amputation and discharge from the hospital, whether a thoracic or pelvic limb was amputated, and reason for amputation were recorded. Histologic diagnosis and date of death were recorded if applicable. Owners were interviewed by telephone about their experience and interpretation of the dog's adaptation after surgery. Associations between perioperative variables and postoperative quality of life scores were investigated. 58 of 64 (91%) owners perceived no change in their dog's attitude after amputation; 56 (88%) reported complete or nearly complete return to preamputation quality of life, 50 (78%) indicated the dog's recovery and adaptation were better than expected, and 47 (73%) reported no change in the dog's recreational activities. Body condition scores and body weight at the time of amputation were negatively correlated with quality of life scores after surgery. Taking all factors into account, most (55/64 [86%]) respondents reported they would make the same decision regarding amputation again, and 4 (6%) indicated they would not; 5 (8%) were unsure. This information may aid veterinarians in educating clients about adaptation potential of dogs following limb amputation and the need for postoperative weight control in such patients.

  10. What Risk Factors Predict Recurrence of Heterotopic Ossification After Excision in Combat-related Amputations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavey, Gabriel J; Polfer, Elizabeth M; Nappo, Kyle E; Tintle, Scott M; Forsberg, Jonathan A; Potter, Benjamin K

    2015-09-01

    excision was performed as a partial excision (p = 0.03; odds ratio [OR], 5.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-29.6) or when the initial excision was performed within 180 days of injury (p = 0.047; OR, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.02-16.6). There was no association between symptomatic recurrence and HO grade, central nervous system injury, experience of the attending surgeon, or postoperative prophylaxis. Radiographic recurrence was observed when partial excisions (eight of 30 [27%]) were done compared with complete excisions (five of 77 [7%]; p = 0.008). HO is common after combat-related amputations, and patients undergoing surgical excision of HO for this indication often have complications that result in repeat surgical procedures. Partial excisions of immature lesions more often resulted in both symptomatic and radiographic recurrence. The likelihood of a patient undergoing reexcision can be minimized by performing a complete excision at least 180 days from injury to surgery with no evidence of a reduced risk of reexcision by waiting longer than 270 days. Level III, therapeutic study.

  11. Risk factors for foot ulceration and lower extremity amputation in adults with end-stage renal disease on dialysis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Michelle R; Raspovic, Anita; McMahon, Lawrence P; Strippoli, Giovanni F M; Palmer, Suetonia C; Ruospo, Marinella; Dallimore, Sarah; Landorf, Karl B

    2015-10-01

    Adults with end-stage renal disease are at increased risk of foot ulceration and lower extremity amputation. However, the central determinants of lower limb injury and loss are incompletely understood. We conducted a systematic review of non-randomized studies that quantified the major risk factors for foot ulceration and amputation in adults treated with dialysis and analysed patient populations in which risks were greatest. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to generate summary estimates. Thirty studies (48 566 participants) were identified. Risk factors for foot ulceration and amputation included previous foot ulceration (odds ratios, OR, 17.56 and 70.13), peripheral arterial disease (OR, 7.52 and 9.12), diabetes (OR, 3.76 and 7.48), peripheral neuropathy (OR, 3.24 and 3.36) and coronary artery disease (OR, 3.92 and 2.49). Participants with foot ulceration or amputation had experienced a longer duration of diabetes (mean difference, MD, 4.04 and 6.07 years) and had lower serum albumin levels (MD, -0.23 and -0.13 g/dL). Risk factors for foot ulceration also included retinopathy (OR, 3.03), previous amputation (OR, 15.50) and higher serum phosphorus levels (MD, 0.40 mg/dL), while risk factors for amputation also included male sex (OR, 1.50), current smoking (OR, 2.26) and higher glycated haemoglobin levels (MD, 0.75%). Dialysis patients who have markedly higher risks of ulceration or amputation include those with previous foot ulceration or amputation, peripheral neuropathy, diabetes or macrovascular disease. The temporal relationship between these risk factors and the development of foot ulceration and/or limb loss is uncertain and requires further study. Stable estimates of the key risk factors for ulceration and amputation can inform the design of future trials investigating clinical interventions to reduce the burden of lower limb disease in the dialysis population. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights

  12. THE FEASIBILITY OF HIND FOOT AMPUTATION IN SELECTED SARCOMAS OF THE FOOT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAM, SJ; HOEKSTRA, HJ; EISMA, WH; OLDHOFF, J; KOOPS, HS

    The treatment of foot sarcomas is generally a below knee amputation. In selected sarcomas of the forefoot, however, a transtarsal amputation according to Chopart, a calcaneotibial arthrodesis according to Pirogoff, or a supramalleolar amputation according to Syme can be considered the treatment of

  13. Epidemiological and Clinical Characteristics of Traumatic Hand and Finger Amputations in North Western Iran; A Single Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehri, Nasrin; Sadeghi-Bazergani, Homayoun; Safaiean, Abdolrasoul

    2017-01-01

    To determine the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of hand and finger amputations in patients referring to a single center in northern Iran. This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 200 traumatic hand amputees hospitalized in Shohada Hospital in Tabriz, Northwestern Iran during a 1-year period in 2014. Data were collected through prospective interviews for variables such as demographic characteristics, accident time; exact anatomical site of amputation; reasons for amputation; amputation mechanism; and having attention deficit symptoms as well as activities causing attention deficit prior to the accident. The vast majority of cases were men and women accounted for only 7.5% of injured cases. In 60.5% of cases, the accident occurred on the fingers of their active hand and fingers accounted for almost 95% of accidents. 85.8% of accidents occurred at work . 63.7% of accidents occurred in the evening. 63.67% of accidents occurred in the evening. Among hazardous occupations, agricultural occupations ranked the first followed by sugar cut and pressing jobs. It was found that 10% of the victims were injured while responding a mobile phone call and 3% of the victims reported that they were listening to music through headphones before the accident.  Five percent of the participants reported a quarrel with a colleague and 11.5 % of them reported a quarrel with their employer prior to the accident. Amputations are of much importance in men working in given jobs such as agricultural and pressing. Distraction caused by mobiles, music and personal relations with others is considered of importance to be prevented during job. Risk levels for potential risk indicators need to be assessed through controlled studies.

  14. Delivery of cosmetic covers to persons with transtibial and transfemoral amputations in an outpatient prosthetic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highsmith, M Jason; Kahle, Jason T; Knight, Molly; Olk-Szost, Ayla; Boyd, Melinda; Miro, Rebecca M

    2016-06-01

    Limb loss negatively impacts body image to the extent that functional activity and societal participation are affected. Scientific literature is lacking on the subject of cosmetic covering for prostheses and the rate of cosmetic cover utilization by cover type, gender, amputation level, and type of healthcare reimbursement. To describe the delivery of cosmetic covers in lower limb prostheses in a sample of people with lower extremity amputation. Cross-sectional design Patient records from an outpatient practice were reviewed for people who received a transtibial or transfemoral prosthesis within a selected 2-year period. A total of 294 records were reviewed. Regardless of the amputation level, females were significantly (p ≤ 0.05) more likely to receive a cover. Type of insurance did not affect whether or not a cover was used, but Medicare reimbursed more pull-up skin covers. There were differences regarding cosmetic cover delivery based on gender, and Medicare reimbursed for more pull-up skin covers at the transtibial level than other reimbursors did. This analysis was conducted in a warm, tropical geographic region of the United States. Results may differ in other parts of the world based on many factors including climate and local views of body image and disability. Cosmetic covering rates are clinically relevant because they provide insight into which gender is utilizing more cosmetic covers. Furthermore, it can be determined which type of covers are being utilized with greater frequency and which insurance type is providing more coverage for them. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  15. Use of a Temporary Shunt as a Salvage Technique for Distal Extremity Amputations Requiring Repair by Vessel Grafting during Critical Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilsev Ince

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlthough the use of temporary shunts in proximal extremity amputations has been reported, no study has described the use of temporary shunts in distal extremity amputations that require vein grafting. Moreover, the total volume of blood loss when temporary shunts are used has not been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of a temporary shunt for distal extremity amputations requiring repair by vessel grafting with an ischemia time of >6 hours. This study also aimed to determine the total volume of blood loss when temporary shunts were used.MethodsPatients who underwent distal major extremity replantation and/or revascularization with a vessel graft and who experienced ischemia for 6–8 hours between 2013 and 2014 were included in the study. A 6-Fr suction catheter was cut to 5 cm in length after the infusion of heparin, and secured with a 5-0 silk suture between the distal and the proximal ends of the artery. While bleeding continued, the bones were shortened and fixed. After the complete restoration of circulation, the arterial shunt created using the catheter was also repaired with a vein graft.ResultsSix patients were included in this study. The mean duration of ischemia was 7.25 hours. The mean duration of suction catheter use during limb revascularization was 7 minutes. The mean transfusion volume was 7.5 units. No losses of the extremity were observed.ConclusionsThis procedure should be considered in distal extremity amputations requiring repair by vessel grafting during critical ischemia.

  16. [The psychosocial characteristics of the patient who has undergone amputation for vascular reasons. The work, family and sex life aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Viniegras, C R; Rial Blanco, N; Molina Martínez, O; Salazar Fernández, N; Almeida Hernández, L; Herrera Rodríguez, G

    1991-01-01

    Forty-one amputee patients because vascular disease, 20 of them diabetics and 21 non-diabetics, with a mean of 68 years, were studied--from psychosocial aspect--by interviewing them 3 or 4 years after their amputation. Different factors were evaluated, like prosthesis usage, personal cares that patient could do by him self, home activities made by the patients, sexual life quality and labor status. For this evaluation different variables were considered, like age, sex, scholar level, familial economic level, original pathology, amputation level, stump status and phantom [correction of fantasm] limb perception. The most important variables correlated with good psychosocial conditions of amputee patients are noted, and considerations and recommendations for a rehabilitation program are established.

  17. Amputation with median nerve redirection (Targeted Reinnervation) reactivates forepaw barrel subfield in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Paul D.; Kuiken, Todd A.

    2010-01-01

    Prosthetic limbs are difficult to control and do not provide sensory feedback. Targeted Reinnervation was developed as a neural-machine-interface for amputees to address these issues. In Targeted Reinnervation, amputated nerves are redirected to proximal muscles and skin creating nerve interfaces for prosthesis control and sensory feedback. Touching the reinnervated skin causes sensation to be projected to the missing limb. Here we use electrophysiological brain recording in the Sprague-Dawley rat to investigate the changes to somatosensory cortex (S1) following amputation and nerve redirection with the intent to provide insight into the sensory phenomena observed in human Targeted Reinnervation amputees. Recordings revealed that redirected nerves established an expanded representation in S1 which may help to explain the projected sensations that encompass large areas of the hand in Targeted Reinnervation amputees. These results also provide evidence that the reinnervated target skin could serve as a line of communication from a prosthesis to cortical hand processing regions. S1 border regions were simultaneously responsive to reinnervated input and also vibrissae, lower lip and hind-foot, suggesting competition for deactivated cortical territory. Electrically evoked potential latencies from reinnervated skin to cortex suggest direct connection of the redirected afferents to the forepaw processing region of S1. Latencies also provide evidence that the wide-spread reactivation of S1 cortex may arise from central anatomical interconnectivity. Targeted Reinnervation offers the opportunity to examine the cortical plasticity effects when behaviorally important sensory afferents are redirected from their original location to a new skin surface on a different part of the body. PMID:21106839

  18. Proximal femoral fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palm, Henrik; Teixidor, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    -displaced femoral neck fractures and prosthesis for displaced among the elderly; and sliding hip screw for stabile- and intramedullary nails for unstable- and sub-trochanteric fractures) but they are based on a variety of criteria and definitions - and often leave wide space for the individual surgeons' subjective...... guidelines for hip fracture surgery and discuss a method for future pathway/guideline implementation and evaluation. METHODS: By a PubMed search in March 2015 six studies of surgical treatment pathways covering all types of proximal femoral fractures with publication after 1995 were identified. Also we...... searched the homepages of the national heath authorities and national orthopedic societies in West Europe and found 11 national or regional (in case of no national) guidelines including any type of proximal femoral fracture surgery. RESULTS: Pathway consensus is outspread (internal fixation for un...

  19. Mortality after major amputation in elderly patients with critical limb ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaphake, Sanne; de Leur, Kevin; Mulder, Paul GH; Ho, Gwan H; de Groot, Hans G; Veen, Eelco J; Verhagen, Hence JM; van der Laan, Lijckle

    2017-01-01

    Background Owing to the aging population, the number of elderly patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) has increased. The consequence of amputation is immense. However, at the moment, information about the mortality after amputation in the elderly vascular patients is unknown. For this reason, this study evaluated mortality rates and patient-related factors associated with mortality after a major amputation in elderly patients with CLI. Methods From 2006 to 2013, we included patients aged >70 years who were treated for chronic CLI by primary or secondary major amputation within or after 3 months of initial therapy (revascularization or conservative management). Outcome measurements were mortality after major amputation and factors associated with mortality (age, comorbidity and timing of amputation). Results In total, 168/651 patients (178 legs; 26%) underwent a major amputation. Patients were stratified by age: 70–80 years (n=86) and >80 years (n=82). Overall mortality after major amputation was 44%, 66% and 85% after 1, 3 and 5 years, respectively. The 6-month and 1-year mortality in patients aged 80 years or older was, respectively, 59% or 63% after a secondary amputation amputation >3 months. Per year of age, the mortality rate increased by 4% (P=0.005). No significant difference in mortality after major amputation was found in the presence of comorbidity or according to Rutherford classification. Conclusion Despite developments in the treatment of CLI by revascularization, amputation rates remain high and are associated with tremendous mortality rates. Secondary amputation after a failed attempt of revascularization causes a higher mortality. Further research concerning timing of amputation and patient-related outcome is needed to evaluate if selected patients might benefit from primary amputation. PMID:29200838

  20. Proximal humeral fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Mauro, Craig S.

    2011-01-01

    Proximal humeral fractures may present with many different configurations in patients with varying co-morbities and expectations. As a result, the treating physician must understand the fracture pattern, the quality of the bone, other patient-related factors, and the expanding range of reconstructive options to achieve the best functional outcome and to minimize complications. Current treatment options range from non-operative treatment with physical therapy to fracture fixation using percuta...

  1. Near total penile amputation caused by hair tourniquet, managed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    V.K. Dikshit

    2015-12-02

    ees.elsevier.com/afju · www.sciencedirect.com. Case report. Near total penile amputation caused by hair tourniquet, managed with the URAGPI procedure. V.K. Dikshit. ∗. , R.K. Gupta, P.R. Kothari, A.R. Gupta, R.S. Kamble,.

  2. Notes to Parents - When Your Child Has Undergone Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Margaret Hauser

    Designed to provide parents with basic information about the physical and emotional aspects of amputation, the booklet gives information about the grief response, body image, phantom limb sensation, stump care, and the prosthesis. The section on the grief process describes normal reactions to loss: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and…

  3. Amputation Totale de La Verge: A Propos de Trois Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimassoum Rimtebaye

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: qu’elle soit d’origine criminelle ou psychogène, l’amputation totale du pénis est rarissime. Les conséquences sont urinaires, sexuelles et psychogènes. La prise en charge doit être multidisciplinaire.

  4. Prevention of wound sepsis in amputations by peri-operative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    as regards development of sepsis in wounds closed primarily or left open while under A-CA cover. In a series of 44 patients with lower limb ischaemia requiring amputation for major limb sepsis, the per- formance of a new antibiotic combination with B- lactamase-inhibiting properties, amoxycillin plus . c1avulanic acid ...

  5. Amputation of the limbs: 10 years' experience at Enugu State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Limb amputation is a veritable means of saving lives in the West African sub-region where patients present late to hospitals with severe injuries; often in the presence of previously undiagnosed co-morbidities. In this region, many amputees are left permanently without prosthetic fittings for variable reasons, and ...

  6. Psychological effects of amputation: A review of studies from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika Sahu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amputation is a major health burden on the families, society, and on medical services as well. Traumatic limb amputation is a catastrophic injury and an irreversible act which is sudden and emotionally devastating for the victims. In addition, it causes inability to support self and the family and driving many patients toward various psychiatric disorders. Extensive information regarding the effects of amputation has not been ascertained and therefore it was decided to do a systematic review. The goal of this review was to provide comprehensive information of peer-reviewed papers examining the psychological distress among amputees in India. A search of the literature resulted in a total of 12 articles with varied sample size from 16 to 190. The sample has been largely comprised males with lower limb amputation caused by primarily traumatic ones, i.e., motor vehicle accident, railway track accidents, machinery injury, blasts, etc., The prevalence of psychiatric disorders among amputees has been found to be in the range of 32% to 84% including depression rates 10.4%–63%, posttraumatic stress disorder 3.3%–56.3%, and phantom limb phenomenon 14%–92%. Although the studies reported that symptoms of anxiety and depression become better over the course of time, however surgical treatment providers need to liaise with psychiatrists and psychologists to support and deal with the psychological disturbances.

  7. Prevention of wound sepsis in amputations by peri-operative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cellulitis. + cellulitis Toes foot Leg. 15. 1. 15. 6. 19. 6. 7. 1. 5. 8. 5. - -. 22. 2. 20. 6. 27. 11. Total. Group. A-CA combination of amoxycillin and clavulanic acid (A-CA) (Aug- mentin; Beecham), was studied and its efficacy in preventing amputation wound sepsis determined. In this combination the amoxycillin is supplemented by ...

  8. Vocational reintegration after a lower limb amputation : a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, M.; Geertzen, J.H.; Groothoff, J.W.; Schoppen, T.

    The objectives of this study were to describe the process of job reintegration, to obtain more detailed information about workplace adjustments, and to assess the positive and negative experiences of amputees (in the Netherlands) who returned to paid work after their lower limb amputation. The study

  9. Early outcome of vascular lower limb amputations at a National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Majority of lower limb amputations performed in the African setting have been reported to be mainly due to trauma and neoplasms. These affect mainly young and therefore, fit individuals with lower risks of complications. Recent local studies show an increase in the incidence of cardiovascular diseases ...

  10. Lower Limb Amputation at the 34 Military Hospital in Freetown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , poverty and social stigma attached to “amputation” all prevent people from seeking early medical treatment for diabetic foot. The purpose of this study was to document the causes and indications of lower limb amputations and to make ...

  11. Satisfaction and adherence of patients with amputations to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Individuals who have undergone a lower limb amputation require comprehensive rehabilitation from the multidisciplinary team to ensure optimal treatment outcomes and social integration. Physiotherapists play a pivotal role within the multidisciplinary team and offer patients physical and psychosocial ...

  12. The Functions of an Amputation Clinic | Birkenstock | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In an effort towards a more positive approach to the treatment and rehabilitation of the amputee, an Amputation Clinic was commenced at Groote Schuur Hospital in 1968. During this period 301 new amputees were seen and assisted in rehabilitation. The importance of psychological trauma and readjustment is emphasized ...

  13. External Auditory Canal Stenosis After Traumatic Auricular Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong Chung, J.E.; Chussi, D.C; Heerbeek, N. van

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The auricles are easily injured or amputated in case of head trauma. Inadequate treatment of the external auditory canal (EAC) after auricular injury is often seen and can lead to significant complications of the EAC. CASE REPORT: The authors report 4 cases of auricular injury or

  14. Take Care of Yourself After an Amputation or Other Surgery

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-02-18

    This podcast provides health information for amputees on how to take care of yourself after an amputation or other surgery.  Created: 2/18/2010 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disability, Disability and Health Program.   Date Released: 2/18/2010.

  15. Reduction of residual limb volume in people with transtibial amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tantua, Audrey T.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Breek, Jan-Kees C.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2014-01-01

    The early postoperative phase after transtibial amputation is characterized by rapid residual limb volume reduction. Accurate measurement of residual limb volume is important for the timing of fitting a prosthesis. The aim of this study was to analyze the reduction of residual limb volume in people

  16. Preparing youth with cancer for amputation: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucas, Caitlyn A; Brand, Sarah R; Bedoya, Sima Zadeh; Muriel, Anna C; Wiener, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Children and adolescents who require limb amputation as part of cancer treatment face many physical and emotional challenges. Preparatory interventions may serve to facilitate positive coping and improve long-term adjustment during pediatric cancer treatment, including decreasing anxiety and postoperative distress. This review aimed to examine and identify the type and degree of psychosocial preparation provided to the child with cancer and family prior to amputation. Electronic databases including Embase, PubMed, and PsycINFO were searched for relevant research articles. Five studies were identified that satisfied inclusion criteria and revealed common themes for preparatory interventions, but results were limited by a lack of empirical approaches and revealed little consensus on pre-operative support prior to amputation. These findings demonstrate that there is a lack of studies to date that have adequately addressed psychosocial preparation prior to amputation for pediatric oncology patients. Future research on preparatory interventions is needed using prospective and quantitative research to establish evidence-based recommendations for interventions to support this vulnerable population.

  17. Pain Management in Four-Limb Amputation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Nafisseh S; Warner, Matthew A; Moeschler, Susan M; Hoelzer, Bryan C

    2015-09-01

    Acute pain following amputation can be challenging to treat due to multiple underlying mechanisms and variable clinical responses to treatment. Furthermore, poorly controlled preoperative pain is a risk factor for developing chronic pain. Evidence suggests that epidural analgesia and peripheral nerve blockade may decrease the severity of residual limb pain and the prevalence of phantom pain after lower extremity amputation. We present the perioperative analgesic management of a patient with gangrene of the bilateral upper and lower extremities as a result of septic shock and prolonged vasopressor administration who underwent four-limb amputation in a single procedure. A multimodal analgesic regimen was utilized, including titration of preoperative opioid and neuropathic pain agents, perioperative intravenous, epidural and peripheral nerve catheter infusions, and postoperative oral medication titration. More than 8 months postoperatively, the patient has satisfactory pain control with no evidence for phantom limb pain. To our knowledge, there have been no publications to date concerning analgesic regimens in four-limb amputation. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  18. The eventual outcome of patients who had lower limb amputations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) presenting with irreversible lower limb pathology has a high morbidity and mortality rate. This study aimed to determine the outcome of patients who underwent lower limb amputations (LLAs) because of PVD at Pelonomi Hospital, Bloemfontein, 2008–2011. Methods: ...

  19. Mangled lower extremity: can we trust the amputation scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, Lucian; Sobec, Raluca; Sita-Alb, Laura; Fodor, Marius; Ciuce, Constantin

    2012-01-01

    Limb injuries represent a constant and severe problem. Several lower limb injuries are more frequent than upper limb injuries. Over time, in an attempt to quantify the severity of traumas and to establish guidelines for the decision whether to save or amputate a mangled extremity, several scoring systems have been reported. Most refer to bone fractures, soft tissue damage, vascular, nerves and tendon lesions. Articles dealing with mangled lower extremities published in the last 15 years were analyzed. Other inclusion criteriaincluded:articles reporting MESS, PSI, LSI, and Gustillo-Anderson scores, studies based on groups of more than 25 patients, and English language articles. We tried to determine if there was good correlation between amputation recommendations and various scores of injury, with regard to combat wounds and civilian injuries, in adult and pediatric groups. Thirty-two papers fulfilled our criteria; in 17 of these, correlation between mangled extremity scores and the decision to amputate or salvage the limb was well-defined. Good correlation between MESS and amputation was found in 25% of the papers. The highest correlation was found for pediatric injuries and combined adult and pediatric combat injuries. The mangled extremity is a long-lasting, unsolved problem, with much debate and a large number of protocols and scoring systems, but with no unanimously-accepted solution. Many mangled extremities are borderline cases, and the decision to amputate or to salvage a limb must be carefully assessed. With advances in the medical field over the last 15 years, more mangled lower extremities are salvaged, especially in civilian injuries.

  20. Distal tibiofibular bone-bridging in transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzur, Michael S; Beck, Jennifer; Himes, Ryan; Callaci, John

    2008-12-01

    The creation of a bone bridge between the residual tibia and fibula is a controversial surgical technique used in the performance of transtibial amputation. Twenty consecutive patients who underwent a unilateral transtibial amputation, as a consequence of traumatic injury, had distal tibiofibular bone-bridging performed by a single surgeon. Eight completed the Prosthesis Evaluation Questionnaire (PEQ), a validated outcomes instrument designed to measure patient self-reported health-related quality of life after a lower-extremity amputation. Their responses were compared with those of a previously reported control group of nondiabetic patients who had undergone transtibial amputation with the use of a traditional technique and with those of a previously reported consecutive group of Brazilian patients, including twelve who were diabetic, who had undergone a similar bone-bridge procedure. The scores in the American bone-bridge group were similar to those in the control group and not as good as those in the Brazilian bone-bridge group. The American bone-bridge and control groups scored lower in the Social Burden, Ambulation, Frustration, Sounds, Utility, and Well-Being domains of the PEQ. While many experts in the care of amputees believe that the distal tibiofibular bone-bridge technique improves patient functional outcomes, our small group of patients treated with this procedure did not appear to have better outcomes than a group of patients treated successfully with a standard surgical technique. More information is needed before the bone-bridge technique can be recommended as an important component of standard transtibial amputation surgery.

  1. Amputation and rotationplasty in children with limb deficiencies: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkers, Ralph; van Wijk, Iris

    2016-12-01

    Amputations and fitting surgery have a long history in children with limb deficiencies. With the current developments in limb reconstruction and new techniques in prosthetics, the indications for amputation and fitting surgery might have shifted, but still have a very important role in creating high functional performance, optimal participation and quality of life. The purpose of this current concepts article is to give an overview of the indications, dilemmas and technical considerations in the decision-making for amputation and fitting surgery. A special part of this overview is dedicated to the indications, variations and outcomes in rotationplasties. The article is based on the experience of a multidisciplinary reconstruction team for children with complex limb deficiencies, as well as research of the literature on the various aspects that cover this multidisciplinary topic. For those children with a more severe limb deficiency, reconstruction is not always feasible for every patient. In those cases, amputation with prosthetic fitting can lead to a good result. Outcomes in quality of life and function do not significantly differ from the children that had reconstruction. For children with a postaxial deficiency with a femur that is too short for lengthening, and with a stable ankle and foot with good function, rotationplasty offers the best functional outcome. However, the decision-making between the different options will depend on different individual factors. Amputations and rotationplasties combined with optimal prosthesis fitting in children with more severe limb deficiencies may lead to excellent short- and long-term results. An experienced multidisciplinary team for children with complex limb deficiencies should guide the patient and parents in the decision-making between the different options without or with prosthesis.

  2. Single centre experience of combat-related vascular injury in victims of Syrian conflict: Retrospective evaluation of risk factors associated with amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şişli, Emrah; Kavala, Ali Aycan; Mavi, Mustafa; Sarıosmanoğlu, Osman Nejat; Oto, Öztekin

    2016-09-01

    To elucidate the risk factors associated with amputation in cases with combat-related vascular injury (CRVI). This retrospective study included 90 cases with CRVI treated between May 2011 and July 2013. The patients were divided into group I (n=69), in which the limb was salvaged and group II (n=21), in which the patients received amputation. The overall and the secondary amputation rates were 23% and 18%, respectively. There were no amputations with the MESS of nine or less, increasing proportions of amputations at 10 and 11, with a level of 12 leading to 100% amputation rate. The mortality rate was 2%. Among the 52 (58%) cases with the mangled extremity severity score (MESS) ≥7, the limb salvage rate was 60%. The patients in group II were more likely to have a combined artery and vein injury (p=0.042). They were also more likely to be injured as a result of an explosion (p=0.004). Along with the MESS (pamputation, the odds ratio of the bony fracture (OR: 61.39, p=0.011), nerve injury (OR: 136.23, p=0.004), DoI (OR: 2.03, p=0.003), vascular ligation (OR: 8.65, p=0.040) and explosive device injury (OR: 10.8, p=0.041) were significant. Although the DoI (pamputation rate (p=1.0). The DoI and the variables indicating the extent of tissue disruption were the major determinants of amputation. While statistically non-significant, the benefit of the application of a TVS is non-negligible. MESS is a valid scoring system but should not be the sole foundation for deciding on amputation. Extremities which were doomed to amputation with the MESS>7 seem to benefit from revascularisation with initiation of reperfusion at once. The validity of MESS merits further investigation with regard to the determination of a new cut-off value under ever developing medical management strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Endovascular revascularization is associated with a lower risk of above knee amputation than surgical or combined modalities. Analysis of English hospital admissions over a six year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Naseer; Thomas, Neil; Gill, Paramjit; Torella, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to determine whether revascularization modality affected risk of an above knee amputation (AKA) in patients with peripheral arterial disease. We used English hospital data and began by determining the number of major amputations and revascularization procedures performed between 1st April 2003- 31st March 2009. We then extracted demographic (age, sex, level of deprivation, treatment location), comorbidity (diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, coronary heart disease, ischemic cerebrovascular disease and smoking) and revascularization modality (endovascular/surgical) data. Multi-variate analysis determined the odds ratios of an AKA in relation to previous revascularization attempts (if any). Over the six year period, there were 25,312 major amputations of which 7544 (29.4%) were linked to a revascularization attempt. Level of amputation was significantly influenced by previous revascularization. Compared to patients not linked to revascularization, those requiring endovascular treatment were less likely to undergo an AKA (OR 0.82; 95% CI 0.75-0.90). Surgical (OR 1.16; 1.07-1.25) and combined endovascular/surgical treatment (OR 1.24; 1.09-1.40) had the opposite effect. Men (0.64; 0.55-0.74) and diabetics (0.44; 0.55-0.74) were less likely to undergo an AKA whereas patients with coronary (1.28; 1.10-1.47) or cerebrovascular (1.90; 1.33-2.71) disease were more likely to have the procedure. Age, deprivation, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, smoking and geographical location did not influence the level of amputation. When a major leg amputation is necessary, the risk of this being carried out above the knee may be lowest after endovascular revascularization attempts and highest after combined endovascular and surgical treatment.

  4. A Comparison of Four-Year Health Outcomes following Combat Amputation and Limb Salvage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcer, Ted; Walker, Jay; Bhatnagar, Vibha; Richard, Erin; Sechriest, V Franklin; Galarneau, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Little research has described the long-term health outcomes of patients who had combat-related amputations or leg-threatening injuries. We conducted retrospective analysis of Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs health data for lower extremity combat-injured patients with (1) unilateral amputation within 90 days postinjury (early amputation, n = 440), (2) unilateral amputation more than 90 days postinjury (late amputation, n = 78), or (3) leg-threatening injuries without amputation (limb salvage, n = 107). Patient medical records were analyzed for four years postinjury. After adjusting for group differences, early amputation was generally associated with a lower or similar prevalence for adverse physical and psychological diagnoses (e.g., pain, osteoarthritis, posttraumatic stress disorder) versus late amputation and/or limb salvage. By contrast, early amputation was associated with an increased likelihood of osteoporosis during the first year postinjury. The prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder increased for all patient groups over four years postinjury, particularly in the second year. The different clinical outcomes among combat extremity injured patients treated with early amputation, late amputation, or limb salvage highlight their different healthcare requirements. These findings can inform and optimize the specific treatment pathways that address the physical and psychological healthcare needs of such patients over time.

  5. Amputation-induced reactive oxygen species are required for successful Xenopus tadpole tail regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Nick R; Chen, Yaoyao; Ishibashi, Shoko; Kritsiligkou, Paraskevi; Lea, Robert; Koh, Yvette; Gallop, Jennifer L; Dorey, Karel; Amaya, Enrique

    2013-02-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms that promote successful tissue regeneration is critical for continued advancements in regenerative medicine. Vertebrate amphibian tadpoles of the species Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis have remarkable abilities to regenerate their tails following amputation, through the coordinated activity of numerous growth factor signalling pathways, including the Wnt, Fgf, Bmp, Notch and TGF-β pathways. Little is known, however, about the events that act upstream of these signalling pathways following injury. Here, we show that Xenopus tadpole tail amputation induces a sustained production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during tail regeneration. Lowering ROS levels, using pharmacological or genetic approaches, reduces the level of cell proliferation and impairs tail regeneration. Genetic rescue experiments restored both ROS production and the initiation of the regenerative response. Sustained increased ROS levels are required for Wnt/β-catenin signalling and the activation of one of its main downstream targets, fgf20 (ref. 7), which, in turn, is essential for proper tail regeneration. These findings demonstrate that injury-induced ROS production is an important regulator of tissue regeneration.

  6. Comparison of gait after Syme and transtibial amputation in children: factors that may play a role in function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeans, Kelly A; Karol, Lori A; Cummings, Donald; Singhal, Kunal

    2014-10-01

    Preservation of maximal limb length during amputation is often recommended to maximize the efficiency and symmetry of gait. The goals of this study were to determine (1) whether there are gait differences between children with a Syme (or Boyd) amputation and those with a transtibial-level amputation, and (2) whether the type of prosthetic foot affects gait and PODCI (Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument) outcomes. Sixty-four patients (age range, 4.7 to 19.2 years) with unilateral below-the-knee prosthesis use (forty-one in the Syme group and twenty-three in the transtibial group) underwent gait analysis and review of data for the involved limb. The twelve prosthetic foot types were categorized as designed for a high, medium, or low activity level (e.g., Flex foot, dynamic response foot, or SACH). Statistical analyses were conducted. Kinematic differences of transtibial groups. Ankle power was greater in the transtibial group, whereas the Syme group had greater coronal-plane hip power (p transtibial amputations. Ankle motion was greater in patients using high-performance feet (9% of the total cohort) compared with medium-performance (59%) and low-performance (31%) feet. Despite the increased ankle motion achieved with high-performance dynamic feet, this advantage was not reflected in peak power of the prosthetic ankle or the PODCI sports/physical functioning subscale. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  7. Reduced Incidence of Foot-Related Hospitalisation and Amputation amongst Persons with Diabetes in Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarini, Peter A.; O’Rourke, Sharon R.; Russell, Anthony W.; Derhy, Patrick H.; Kamp, Maarten C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine trends in the incidence of foot-related hospitalisation and amputation amongst persons with diabetes in Queensland (Australia) between 2005 and 2010 that coincided with changes in state-wide ambulatory diabetic foot-related complication management. Methods All data from cases admitted for the principal reason of diabetes foot-related hospitalisation or amputation in Queensland from 2005–2010 were obtained from the Queensland Hospital Admitted Patient Data Collection dataset. Incidence rates for foot-related hospitalisation (admissions, bed days used) and amputation (total, minor, major) cases amongst persons with diabetes were calculated per 1,000 person-years with diabetes (diabetes population) and per 100,000 person-years (general population). Age-sex standardised incidence and age-sex adjusted Poisson regression models were also calculated for the general population. Results There were 4,443 amputations, 24,917 hospital admissions and 260,085 bed days used for diabetes foot-related complications in Queensland. Incidence per 1,000 person-years with diabetes decreased from 2005 to 2010: 43.0% for hospital admissions (36.6 to 20.9), 40.1% bed days (391 to 234), 40.0% total amputations (6.47 to 3.88), 45.0% major amputations (2.18 to 1.20), 37.5% minor amputations (4.29 to 2.68) (p amputations (18.57 to 14.99), 26.4% major amputations (6.26 to 4.61), 15.7% minor amputations (12.32 to 10.38) (p amputations 0.962 (0.946–0.979), major amputations 0.945 (0.917–0.974), minor amputations 0.970 (0.950–0.991) (p amputation amongst persons with diabetes in the population of Queensland over a recent six-year period. PMID:26098890

  8. Modified Van Nes rotationplasty for osteosarcoma of the proximal tibia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bari, A; Krajbich, J I; Langer, F; Hamilton, E L; Hubbard, S

    1990-11-01

    Above-knee amputation has been the traditional treatment for osteosarcoma of the proximal tibia. Recent advances in chemotherapy have encouraged the development of limb-salvage techniques. Van Nes rotationplasty for malignant lesions of the distal femur has increased in popularity as a reconstructive technique, but no similar procedure has been described for lesions of the proximal tibia. We have developed a modified rotationplasty for this lesion and have performed it in four children. The surgical technique, postoperative management and results of the procedure are described. Two patients had delayed wound healing. No other complications have developed and our patients were disease-free at follow-up, while the appearance of the leg was well accepted by the patients and their parents. This procedure is a useful addition to the armamentarium of the tumour surgeon for the treatment of malignant lesions of the proximal tibia.

  9. The Impact of the Immediate Postoperative Prosthesis on Patient Mobility and Quality of Life after Transtibial Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, Brian T; Andrews, Karen L; Houdek, Matthew T; Terry, Marisa; Shives, Thomas C; Sim, Franklin H

    2017-02-01

    The immediate postoperative prosthesis has been purported to allow early mobilization with potential physical and psychologic benefits to patients. This study used accelerometers and validated questionnaires to prospectively examine activity level and quality of life data for patients receiving an immediate postoperative prosthesis after transtibial amputation. A total of 10 patients were included in the study. Mean age was 58 yrs (range, 22-69 yrs), there were 9 men and 1 woman, and reason for amputation was nonhealing gangrenous ulcer in 9 patients and ischemic limb in 1 patient. Patients were followed for 6 wks. Activity data were collected on ActiGraph GT3X accelerometers and analyzed using ActiLife 6 Data Analysis Software. At the 6-wk postoperative visit, an Amputee Mobility Predictor clinician-rated performance evaluation was conducted and a Short Form-36 questionnaire was completed. Patients in the cohort spent an average of 88% (range, 83%-92%) of their time sedentary, 11.5% (range, 7.6%-16.9%) of their time in light physical activity, and 0.3% (range, 0.12%-1.36%) of their time in moderate to vigorous physical activity. No statistically significant relationships were observed between expected level of function and recorded activity level. Patients had low physical and emotional Short Form-36 component scores. Patients with transtibial amputations were extremely sedentary in the early postoperative period despite their immediate postoperative prosthesis dressings.

  10. Progression of disease preceding lower extremity amputation in Denmark: a longitudinal registry study of diagnoses, use of medication and healthcare services 14 years prior to amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Janne; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus; Poulsen, Ingrid; Andersen, Ove

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Patients with non-traumatic lower extremity amputation are characterised by high age, multi-morbidity and polypharmacy and long-term complications of atherosclerosis and diabetes. To ensure early identification of patients at risk of amputation, we need to gain knowledge about the progression of diseases related to lower extremity amputations during the years preceding the amputation. Design A retrospective population-based national registry study. Setting The study includes data on demographics, diagnoses, surgery, medications and healthcare services from five national registries. Data were retrieved from 14 years before until 1 year after the amputation. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the progression of diseases and use of medication and healthcare services. Participants An unselected cohort of patients (≥50 years; n=2883) subjected to a primary non-traumatic lower extremity amputation in 2010 or 2011 in Denmark. Results The prevalence of atherosclerosis, hypertension and diabetes was 70%, 53% and 49%, respectively. Among patients with atherosclerosis, 42% had not received cholesterol-lowering treatment even though 87% had visited their general practitioner within the last year prior to amputation. Further, 16% were diagnosed with diabetes at the time of the amputation. The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases increased from 22% to 70%, atherosclerosis from 5% to 53% and diabetes from 17% to 35% over the 14 years preceding major amputation. Of all patients, 64% had been in contact with the hospital or outpatient clinics within the last 3 years, and 29% received a prescription of opioids 3 years prior to the amputation. Conclusion Among patients with non-traumatic lower extremity amputation, one-third live with undiagnosed and untreated atherosclerosis and one-sixth suffer from undiagnosed diabetes despite continuous contacts to general practitioner and the hospital. This study emphasises a need for enhanced focus, among both

  11. Is Limb Salvage With Microwave-induced Hyperthermia Better Than Amputation for Osteosarcoma of the Distal Tibia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kang; Dang, Peiye; Bian, Na; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Tongtao; Fan, QingYu; Zhou, Yong; Zhao, Tingbao; Wang, Pingshan

    2017-06-01

    considered statistically significant. Survival to death was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Complications were recorded from the patients' files and graded using the classification of surgical complications described by Dindo et al. In the limb-salvage group, Kaplan Meier survival at 6 years was 80% (95% CI, 63%-90%), and this was not different with the numbers available from survivorship in the amputation group at 6 years (70%; 95% CI, 37%-90%; p = 0.301).With the numbers available, we found no difference in local recurrence (six versus 0; p = 0.066). However mean ± SD MSTS functional scores were higher in patients who had microwave-induced hyperthermia compared with those who had amputations (85% ± 6% versus 66% ± 5%; p = 0.008).With the numbers available, we found no difference in the proportion of patients experiencing complications between the two groups (six of 52 [12%] versus three of 27 [11%]; p = 0.954). We were encouraged to find no early differences in survival, local recurrence, or serious complications between microwave-induced hyperthermia and amputation, and a functional advantage in favor of microwave-induced hyperthermia. However, these findings should be replicated in larger studies with longer mean duration of followup, and in studies that compare microwave-induced hyperthermia with conventional limb-sparing approaches. Level III, therapeutic study.

  12. Balance confidence and activity of community-dwelling patients with transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Alena; Paul, Kailan; Paner, Ruby; Devlin, Michael; Dilkas, Steve; Pauley, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between balance confidence and community-based physical activity. Twenty-two community-dwelling patients with right or left unilateral transtibial amputation who reported no falls in the past 6 mo completed the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) and wore a StepWatch Activity Monitor for 7 consecutive d in the community. Subjects were subsequently stratified as low ( /=3,000) steps/d) activity groups. Balance confidence was significantly lower among the low activity weekday group (LAG, 70.8 +/- 12.0 versus 88.9 +/- 8.7, t(20) = 3.97, p = 0.001). Further, correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation between ABC score and step total (r = 0.55, p amputation, the results of this study emphasize the importance of contextualizing recent fall history relative to activity level. Clinicians can use this contextual information when considering the inclusion of appropriate fall-risk mediation strategies relative to activity levels and counseling patients of the benefits of physical exercise for maintaining functional capacity and general health.

  13. Quantitative functional evaluation of a 3D-printed silicone-embedded prosthesis for partial hand amputation: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvial, Pilar; Bravo, Gabriela; Bustos, María Paz; Moreno, Gabriel; Alfaro, Roberto; Cancino, Renata; Zagal, Juan Cristóbal

    A male patient with partial hand amputation of his nondominant hand, with only stumps of the proximal phalanx of the first and fifth finger, was evaluated. The performance of using two alternative 3D printed silicone-embedded personalized prostheses was evaluated using the quantitative Jebsen Hand Function Test. Custom design and fabrication of 3D printed prostheses appears to be a good technique for improving the clinical treatment of patients with partial hand amputations. Despite its importance the literature shows an absence of studies reporting on quantitative functional evaluations of 3D printed hand prostheses. We aim at producing the first quantitative assessment of the impact of using 3D printed silicone-embedded prostheses that can be fabricated and customized within the clinical environment. Alginate molds and computed tomographic scans were taken from the patient's hand. Each candidate prosthesis was modeled in Computer Aided Design software and then fabricated using a combination of 3D printed parts and silicone-embedded components. Incorporating the patient's feedback during the design loop was very important for obtaining a good aid on his work activities. Although the explored patient-centered design process still requires a multidisciplinary team, functional benefits are large. Quantitative data demonstrates better hand performance when using 3D printed silicone-embedded prosthesis vs not using any aid. The patient accomplished complex tasks such as driving a nail and opening plastic bags. This was impossible without the aid of produced prosthesis. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of Immediate and Delayed Lower-Limb Amputation Compared with Lower-Limb Salvage on Functional and Mental Health Outcomes Post-Rehabilitation in the U.K. Military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladlow, Peter; Phillip, Rhodri; Coppack, Russell; Etherington, John; Bilzon, James; McGuigan, M Polly; Bennett, Alexander N

    2016-12-07

    amputation groups. We found that patients electing for delayed amputation below the knee after attempted limb salvage achieved superior functional gains in mobility compared with patients who underwent limb salvage below the knee and experienced no functional disadvantage compared with patients who underwent immediate amputation. The mental health outcomes were comparable with general population norms, optimizing the prospect of full integration back into society. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  15. Satisfaction and adherence of patients with amputations to physiotherapy service at public hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verusia, Chetty; Tanuja, Dunpath; Simira, Meghnath; Sarisha, Mothalal; Varuna, Sewmungal; Ursula, Kunene; Thalente, Ntshakala

    2015-06-01

    Individuals who have undergone a lower limb amputation require comprehensive rehabilitation from the multidisciplinary team to ensure optimal treatment outcomes and social integration. Physiotherapists play a pivotal role within the multidisciplinary team and offer patients physical and psychosocial rehabilitative care. Determining patients' satisfaction levels and exploring factors affecting adherence to physiotherapy interventions can inform practice and improve service delivery of rehabilitation within resource poor settings such as South Africa. To determine the level of satisfaction with physiotherapy services rendered to acute and sub-acute in-patients with lower limb amputations and to explore factors affecting adherence to physiotherapy intervention. A prospective survey of 35 patients with lower limb amputations from four public hospitals in South Africa was undertaken. A modified version of the Hampstead rehabilitation centre patient satisfaction questionnaire was utilised. Majority of participants were satisfied with the physiotherapy services whilst a few reported dissatisfaction. Three themes emerged whilst exploring the patients' experience relating to adherence to physiotherapy programmes. Themes included service delivery, patient-therapist interaction and participation barriers and facilitators. Recommendations aimed to improve quality of care and healthcare outcomes thereby enhancing the participants' adherence to the physiotherapy programme.

  16. Traumatic fifth finger amputation due to pontoon boat railing design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, John C; Buckner, Billy; Pigott, David C

    2012-12-01

    Boating is a common recreational activity that may subject its participants to specific patterns of injury. We describe two unrelated cases of fifth-finger amputation associated with a specific pontoon boat guardrail design. The individuals in these cases sustained an avulsion-type amputation injury to the fifth finger when their fingers became entrapped in a narrowed portion of the boat railing before jumping into the water. Given the widespread use of this type of recreational boat, this apparent design flaw may place additional individuals at risk of significant hand injury with cosmetic and functional loss. Methods to reduce the public health impact of this type of injury are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulating bodily integrity: cosmetic surgery and voluntary limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Aileen

    2012-12-01

    Cosmetic surgery and voluntary limb amputation share a number of features. Both procedures are patient-driven forms of body shaping that can only be performed by surgeons, and therefore the procedures require the imprimatur of the medical profession to be lawful. Both invoke identity construction as a central legitimating factor that renders the procedures therapeutic. The legal regulation of surgery is subsumed within general principles regulating medical practice, where autonomy and consent are constituted as fundamental authorising principles. The legitimacy of consent to surgical intervention operates unevenly in relation to these two forms of surgery. Amputation of healthy limbs is presumed to be non-therapeutic. Capacity is closely interrogated and minutely scrutinised. Consent to cosmetic surgery, by contrast, is presumed to be a valid expression of autonomy and self-determination.

  18. Feasibility of the Nintendo WiiFit™ for improving walking in individuals with a lower limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Imam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of the Nintendo WiiFit™ as an adjunct to usual therapy in individuals with a lower limb amputation. Methods: The study was a Multiple Baseline (AB Single Subject Research Design. Subjects were ≥19 years old, had their first unilateral transtibial or transfemoral amputation  ≤12 months ago, and were participating in prosthetic training. WiiFit training was provided for 30 min, 5 times a week, for a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 6 weeks in addition to usual therapy. Feasibility indicators were safety, post-intervention fatigue and pain levels, adherence, and subject’s acceptability of the program as measured by the Short Feedback Questionnaire–modified (SFQ-M. The primary clinical outcome was walking capacity assessed by the 2 Minute Walk Test (2MWT. The secondary clinical outcomes were the Short Physical Performance Battery, L-test, and Activities-Specific Balance Confidence. Results: Subjects (4 transtibial; 2 transfemoral had a median age of 48.5 years (range = 45–59 years. No adverse events associated with the intervention occurred. Median pain and fatigue levels were 1.3 (range = 0.5–3.5 and 3.1 (range = 1.4–4.1, respectively. Median adherence was 80%. Subjects found the WiiFit enjoyable and acceptable (median SFQ-M = 35. Five subjects showed statistical improvement on the 2MWT and four on the secondary outcomes (p < 0.05. Conclusion: The WiiFit intervention was found to be feasible in individuals with unilateral lower limb amputation. This research provides the foundation for future clinical research investigating the use of the WiiFit as a viable adjunctive therapy to improve outcomes in individuals with unilateral lower limb amputation who are participating in prosthetic training.

  19. Proximate composition, bread characteristics and sensory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate proximate composition, bread characteristics and sensory evaluation of cocoyam-wheat composite breads at different levels of cocoyam flour substitution for human consumption.A whole wheat bread (WWB) and cocoyam-composite breads (CCB1,CCB 2 and CCB 3) were prepared ...

  20. Bilateral V-Y rotation advancement flap for fingertip amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungur, Nezih; Kankaya, Yüksel; Yıldız, Kaya; Dölen, Utku Can; Koçer, Uğur

    2012-03-01

    Fingertip amputation is the most common type of injury in the upper limb. Goals in fingertip amputation reconstruction are covering the defect, establishing maximum tactile gnosis, keeping the length of the finger, protecting the joint function, acquiring a well-padded pulp tissue, providing a bed for growing nail, obtaining a satisfactory cosmetic appearance and allowing the patient to return to work as soon as possible. Adjacent skin and soft tissue are the best covers for fingertip injuries. However, local homodigital flaps lack enough tissue to cover the defect. To solve this problem, we used V-Y rotation advancement flap bilaterally in fingertip amputations which meets all the reconstruction goals. Rotation besides advancement makes this flap more mobile and easier to cover larger defects in all amputation planes. Between 2007 and 2009, we performed bilateral V-Y rotation advancement flap on seven male patients' pulpa (average age, 37.6 years) whose fingertips were not replantable. Fourteen flaps were made on 7 fingers. There was neither total nor partial flap loss. Patients had neither cold intolerance nor scar hypersensitivity. Stiffness of the PIP joint did not occur. No obvious hooked nail occurred in patients who have remaining nail matrix. Because flaps contain neurovascular bundle, there was no difference in sensation and perfusion between the finger's pre-operative and post-operative status. The result was satisfactory with painless pinching. In addition to the various and versatile fingertip reconstruction methods, we want to present V-Y rotation advancement flap as a quick, reliable and aesthetic method.

  1. Iatrogenic Penile Glans Amputation: Major Novel Reconstructive Procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Rami Nasr; Samer L. Traboulsi; Rami R. Abou Ghaida; Joseph Bakhach

    2013-01-01

    Circumcision is a very common urological practice. Even though it is relatively safe, it is not a complication-free procedure. We describe a patient that underwent a neonatal circumcision complicated by iatrogenic complete glans amputation. Reconstructive repair of a neoglans using a modified traditional method was used. Postoperative followup to 90 days is illustrated. Despite being a simple procedure, circumcision in unprofessional hands can have major complication impacting the emotional a...

  2. Les amputations et autres traumatismes de la verge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahima Diabaté

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Dans notre institutions, les TrV sont rares, potentiellement graves, survenant électivement chez des enfants et adolescents à la suite d’accidents domestique et de sport. Leur prise en charge thérapeutique ne pose pas de grandes difficultés dans les cas simples, en revanche le traitement des formes graves (amputations, fistules demeure un défi.

  3. Exploring ethical justification for self-demand amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasini, Floris

    2006-01-01

    Self-demand amputees are persons who need to have one or more healthy limbs or digits amputated to fit the way they see themselves. They want to rid themselves of a limb that they believe does not belong to their body-identity. The obsessive desire to have appendages surgically removed to fit an alternative body-image is medically and ethically controversial. My purpose in this paper is to provide a number of normative and professional ethical perspectives on whether or not it is possible to justify surgery for self-demand amputees. In doing so I proceed dialogically, moving between empirical context and normative theory, revealing the taken for granted normative assumptions (what I call the natural attitude--a technical term borrowed from phenomenology) that provide ethical limits to justifying the treatment of self-demand amputees. While I critically examine both Kantian responses against as well as Utilitarian responses for amputation on demand, I conclude that neither normative tradition can fully incorporate an understanding of what it is like to be a self-demand amputee. Since neither theory can justify the apparent non-rational desire of amputation on demand, ethical justification, I argue, falls short of the recognition that there may be a problem. To end, I introduce a meta-ethical idea, "the struggle for recognition," opening up the theoretical possibility of a hermeneutics of recognition before ethical justification that may be more sensitive to the problem of radical embodied difference exemplified by self-demand amputees.

  4. The social and economic outcome after upper limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejlaa, G H

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports a study of 66 upper limb amputees in County Funen, Denmark who were visited in their homes by the author. The purpose of this study was to evaluate for the same period of time the social and economic outcome for a population of upper limb amputees compared with the normal population. The number of amputees investigated corresponds to the annual number of persons becoming upper limb amputees in Denmark. The aetiology of registered amputees also corresponds to the Danish Amputation Register. The amputees had become "better placed" in the social system after amputation independent of prosthetic use. The mean age of the amputees corresponded with the age where people reach their best social grouping. Their social migration quotient was higher than the background population and reflected the amputees better income and housing conditions. The reasons for these surprising results must be the high grade social system in a sophisticated industrial county. None of the amputees were required to pay for rehabilitation or prosthetic supply. A lower divorce rate for the amputees was explained by a symbiosis between the amputees and their partners to protect their future existence. Only 14% lived alone. Those who had their sexual debut after amputation were 3 years later in sexual experience than the rest of the amputees because of difficulties during the maturing process.

  5. Six-minute walk test in persons with transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Suh-Jen; Bose, Nisha Hathi

    2008-12-01

    This study was to report the within-day test-retest reliability and the measurement properties of the six-minute walk test (6MWT) in persons with lower-limb (transtibial) amputation. Test-retest study design. University research laboratory. Subjects (N=13) with transtibial amputation (9 men and 4 women; mean age, 46 y). Three trials of the 6MWT were conducted within 1 day with 20 to 30 minutes of rest between consecutive trials. Timed Up & Go (TUG) test and timed one-leg balance tests were conducted on another day. (1) Distance, heart rate, symptoms and signs of exercise intolerance during the walk test, (2) times of the TUG test and the one-leg balance test. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC3,1) value was .94. Bland and Altman graphs showed no systemic variations between trials and a small learning effect. The peak heart rate approximated 72% to 78% of the age-predicted maximal heart rate. Moderate degrees of correlation were observed in: (1) the 6MWT versus the TUG test (r=-.76, Ptranstibial amputation.

  6. Correlation between social proximity and mobility similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chao; Liu, Yiding; Huang, Junming; Rong, Zhihai; Zhou, Tao

    2017-09-20

    Human behaviors exhibit ubiquitous correlations in many aspects, such as individual and collective levels, temporal and spatial dimensions, content, social and geographical layers. With rich Internet data of online behaviors becoming available, it attracts academic interests to explore human mobility similarity from the perspective of social network proximity. Existent analysis shows a strong correlation between online social proximity and offline mobility similarity, namely, mobile records between friends are significantly more similar than between strangers, and those between friends with common neighbors are even more similar. We argue the importance of the number and diversity of common friends, with a counter intuitive finding that the number of common friends has no positive impact on mobility similarity while the diversity plays a key role, disagreeing with previous studies. Our analysis provides a novel view for better understanding the coupling between human online and offline behaviors, and will help model and predict human behaviors based on social proximity.

  7. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurdeman, Shane R., E-mail: shanewurdeman@gmail.com [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); Advanced Prosthetics Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68134 (United States); Myers, Sara A. [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); Stergiou, Nicholas [Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, Nebraska 68182 (United States); College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed “more appropriate” and the other “less appropriate” based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a “more appropriate” prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a “less appropriate” prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  8. Amputation effects on the underlying complexity within transtibial amputee ankle motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurdeman, Shane R.; Myers, Sara A.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    The presence of chaos in walking is considered to provide a stable, yet adaptable means for locomotion. This study examined whether lower limb amputation and subsequent prosthetic rehabilitation resulted in a loss of complexity in amputee gait. Twenty-eight individuals with transtibial amputation participated in a 6 week, randomized cross-over design study in which they underwent a 3 week adaptation period to two separate prostheses. One prosthesis was deemed "more appropriate" and the other "less appropriate" based on matching/mismatching activity levels of the person and the prosthesis. Subjects performed a treadmill walking trial at self-selected walking speed at multiple points of the adaptation period, while kinematics of the ankle were recorded. Bilateral sagittal plane ankle motion was analyzed for underlying complexity through the pseudoperiodic surrogation analysis technique. Results revealed the presence of underlying deterministic structure in both prostheses and both the prosthetic and sound leg ankle (discriminant measure largest Lyapunov exponent). Results also revealed that the prosthetic ankle may be more likely to suffer loss of complexity than the sound ankle, and a "more appropriate" prosthesis may be better suited to help restore a healthy complexity of movement within the prosthetic ankle motion compared to a "less appropriate" prosthesis (discriminant measure sample entropy). Results from sample entropy results are less likely to be affected by the intracycle periodic dynamics as compared to the largest Lyapunov exponent. Adaptation does not seem to influence complexity in the system for experienced prosthesis users.

  9. Some Properties of Fuzzy Soft Proximity Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, İzzettin; Özbakır, Oya Bedre

    2015-01-01

    We study the fuzzy soft proximity spaces in Katsaras's sense. First, we show how a fuzzy soft topology is derived from a fuzzy soft proximity. Also, we define the notion of fuzzy soft δ-neighborhood in the fuzzy soft proximity space which offers an alternative approach to the study of fuzzy soft proximity spaces. Later, we obtain the initial fuzzy soft proximity determined by a family of fuzzy soft proximities. Finally, we investigate relationship between fuzzy soft proximities and proximities. PMID:25793224

  10. Amputation Risk in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus and Peripheral Artery Disease Using Statewide Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Misty D; Brunson, Ann; Hedayati, Nasim; Romano, Patrick; Melnkow, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Conflicting data exist regarding changes in amputation rates in patients with ulcers because of diabetes mellitus (DM) and peripheral artery disease (PAD). This study focuses on how population-based amputation rates are changing in the current treatment era. Using the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Patient Discharge database, all patients who underwent major nontraumatic lower extremity (LE) amputation in 2005 through 2011 were identified. Age-adjusted population-based amputation risk was determined by year. Gender and age trends in amputation risk were estimated separately for diabetes-related amputations and PAD-related amputations, treating all California residents as the population at risk. From 2005 to 2011, 32,025 qualifying amputations were performed in California. Of these, 11,896 were DM-associated (n = 1,095), PAD-associated (n = 4,335), or associated with both conditions (n = 6,466). PAD-associated amputation rates and combined PAD/DM-associated amputation rates have changed little since 2009 after decreasing substantially over the prior 5 years, but DM-associated amputation rates have continuously increased since 2005. California residents older than the age of 80 years had the most dramatic decrease in PAD-associated amputation rates from 2005 to 2011 (i.e., from 317 to 175 per million Californians). Men with PAD/DM had amputation rate 1.5 times higher than those of patients with PAD alone and 5 times higher than rates of DM patients. In women the difference between patient with PAD and PAD/DM was not seen; however, these rates were 2.5 times higher than patients with DM alone. Preventable amputations associated with high-risk diseases are no longer decreasing despite continuing advances in care and education. Octogenarians with PAD represent the highest risk group for amputation, but DM-associated amputations have increased since 2005. Further research to understand treatment pathways for patient with LE wounds may shed

  11. Ectopic banking of amputated great toe for delayed thumb reconstruction: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Ian L; Hui-Chou, Helen G; Zelken, Jonathan; Basile, Patrick L; Ipsen, Derek; Higgins, James P

    2014-07-01

    Ectopic banking of amputated parts is a recognized technique for delayed replantation of an amputated part when the amputation stump will not permit immediate replantation. This is conventionally performed with the intent of transferring the injured part back to its anatomic position when the amputation stump is more appropriate for replantation. Current warfare conditions have led to a commonly encountered military trauma injury pattern of multiple extremity amputations with protected trunk and core structures. This pattern poses many challenges, including the limit or absence of donor sites for immediate or delayed flap reconstructive procedures. We describe a case in which we ectopically banked the great toe of an amputated lower extremity for delayed thumb reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Review of 345 eye amputations carried out in the period 1996-2003, at Rigshospitalet, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie Louise Roed; Prause, Jan Ulrik; Johnson, Martin

    2008-01-01

    was screened using surgery codes for patients who had undergone bulbar evisceration, enucleation or orbital exenteration in the period 1996-2003. Patient records were reviewed for gender, age, time since surgery, causative diagnosis (the disease process leading to the indication for amputation), indication...... for eye amputation, type of surgery and whether an implant was applied. RESULTS: A total of 345 patients were identified as having undergone eye amputation during the 8-year period. Indications for eye amputation were: painful blind eye (127); neoplasm (119); infection (42); recent injury (25...... frequent indications for eye amputation were painful blind eye (37%) and neoplasm (34%). During the study period, the annual number of eye amputations was stable, but an increase in bulbar eviscerations was noticed. Orbital implants were used in 33% of patients in 1996 and 67% in 2003....

  13. Cross-sectional study of alteration of phantom limb pain with visceral stimulation in military personnel with amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Michael; Bennett Britton, Thomas M; Drew, Benjamin T; Phillip, Rhodri D

    2015-01-01

    While phantom limb pain is a well-recognized phenomenon, clinical experience has suggested that the augmentation of phantom limb pain with visceral stimulation is an issue for many military personnel with amputation (visceral stimulation being the sensation of the bowel or bladder either filling or evacuating). However, the prevalence of this phenomenon is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the alteration in phantom limb pain and the effect that visceral stimulation has on phantom limb pain intensity. A cross-sectional study of 75 military personnel who have lost one or both lower limbs completed a questionnaire to assess the prevalence of the alteration of phantom limb pain with visceral stimulation. Included in the questionnaire was a pain visual analog scale (VAS) graded from 0 to 10. Patients recorded the presence and intensity of phantom limb pain. They also recorded whether and how this pain altered with a need to micturate or micturition, and/or a need to defecate or defecation, again using a pain VAS. Time since amputation, level of amputation, and medications were also recorded. Patients reported a phantom limb pain prevalence of 85% with a mean VAS of 3.6. In all, 56% of patients reported a change in the severity of phantom limb pain with visceral stimuli. The mean increase in VAS for visceral stimulation was 2.5 +/- 1.6 for bladder stimulation and 2.9 +/- 2.0 for bowel stimulation. Of the patients questioned, 65% reported an improvement in symptoms over time. VAS scores were highest in the subgroup less than 6 mo postamputation. An increase in phantom limb pain with visceral stimulation is a common problem for military personnel with amputation.

  14. An enhanced treatment program with markedly reduced mortality after a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Morten T; Holm, Gitte; Krasheninnikoff, Michael; Jensen, Pia S; Gebuhr, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Historically, high 30-day and 1-year mortality post-amputation rates (> 30% and 50%, respectively) have been reported in patients with a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation (LEA). We evaluated whether allocating experienced staff and implementing an enhanced, multidisciplinary recovery program would reduce the mortality rates. We also determined factors that influenced mortality rates. Patients and methods - 129 patients with a LEA were consecutively included over a 2-year period, and followed after admission to an acute orthopedic ward. Mortality was compared with historical and concurrent national controls in Denmark. Results - The 30-day and 1-year mortality rates were 16% and 37%, respectively, in the intervention group, as compared to 35% and 59% in the historical control group treated in the same orthopedic ward. Cox proportional harzards models adjusted for age, sex, residential and health status, the disease that caused the amputation, and the index amputation level showed that 30-day and 1-year mortality risk was reduced by 52% (HR =0.48, 95% CI: 0.25-0.91) and by 46% (HR =0.54, 95% CI: 0.35-0.86), respectively, in the intervention group. The risk of death was increased for patients living in a nursing home, for patients with a bilateral LEA, and for patients with low health status. Interpretation - With similarly frail patient groups and instituting an enhanced program for patients after LEA, the risks of death by 30 days and by 1 year after LEA were markedly reduced after allocating staff with expertise.

  15. Changes in cortical network connectivity with long-term brain-machine interface exposure after chronic amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Karthikeyan; Vaidya, Mukta; Southerland, Joshua; Badreldin, Islam; Eleryan, Ahmed; Takahashi, Kazutaka; Qian, Kai; Slutzky, Marc W; Fagg, Andrew H; Oweiss, Karim; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G

    2017-11-27

    Studies on neural plasticity associated with brain-machine interface (BMI) exposure have primarily documented changes in single neuron activity, and largely in intact subjects. Here, we demonstrate significant changes in ensemble-level functional connectivity among primary motor cortical (MI) neurons of chronically amputated monkeys exposed to control a multiple-degree-of-freedom robot arm. A multi-electrode array was implanted in M1 contralateral or ipsilateral to the amputation in three animals. Two clusters of stably recorded neurons were arbitrarily assigned to control reach and grasp movements, respectively. With exposure, network density increased in a nearly monotonic fashion in the contralateral monkeys, whereas the ipsilateral monkey pruned the existing network before re-forming a denser connectivity. Excitatory connections among neurons within a cluster were denser, whereas inhibitory connections were denser among neurons across the two clusters. These results indicate that cortical network connectivity can be modified with BMI learning, even among neurons that have been chronically de-efferented and de-afferented due to amputation.

  16. Myoelectric Activation Pattern Changes in the Involved Limb of Individuals With Transtibial Amputation During Locomotor State Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Bryson H; Hahn, Michael E

    2017-06-01

    To investigate whether lower extremity muscle activation patterns differ in the strides leading to locomotive state transitions in the involved limb of individuals with transtibial amputation. It is hypothesized that all transitions elicit activation differences between strides as the subjects move toward the transition event. Single-sample, observational study. University research center. Volunteer sample of persons with unilateral transtibial amputation (N=9; mean age, 48.8±12.1y; mean height, 1.74±0.09m; mean weight, 86.1±24.7kg) were recruited by posting flyers in local prosthetics clinics. Not applicable. Surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activation from 7 muscles of the involved limb. Subjects walked across 8 different terrain conditions transitioning from level-ground to ramp/stair locomotion and vice versa. Statistical Parametric Mapping analysis of variance (αtranstibial amputation during stair transitions, suggesting that those patterns may be successfully used in transition detection algorithms. It remains unknown whether ramp transitions can be successfully identified pretransition using electromyography. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Plasticity of Brain Gray Matter and White Matter following Lower Limb Amputation

    OpenAIRE

    Guangyao Jiang; Xuntao Yin; Chuanming Li; Lei Li; Lu Zhao; Evans, Alan C.; Tianzi Jiang; Jixiang Wu; Jian Wang

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that amputation induces functional reorganization in the sensory and motor cortices. However, the extent of structural changes after lower limb amputation in patients without phantom pain remains uncertain. We studied 17 adult patients with right lower limb amputation and 18 healthy control subjects using T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Cortical thickness and fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter (WM) were investiga...

  18. Patients amputated by work accidents: characteristics and years accumulated of potential productive life lost

    OpenAIRE

    Camacho-Conchucos, Herminio Teófilo; Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the accumulated years of potential productive life lost in amputated patients by work accidents. Design: Descriptive, retrospective, cross-sectional study. Setting: Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion, Callao, Peru. Participants: Amputated patients by work accidents. Interventions: Review of 1 290 medical records of amputated patients attended from January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2007, 108 due to work accidents. The accumulated years of potential productive life los...

  19. Clinical characteristics and survival of patients with diabetes mellitus following non-traumatic lower extremity amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiessman, Maya Paryente; Liberty, Idit F; Segev, Renana Wilkof; Katz, Tiberiu; Abu Tailakh, Muhammad; Novack, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus-related lower extremity amputation is a major complication severely affecting patient survival and quality of life. To analyze epidemiological and clinical trends in the incidence and survival of lower extremity amputations among diabetes patients. We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study of 565 consecutive diabetes patients who underwent their first non-traumatic lower extremity amputation between January 2002 and December 2009. Major amputations were performed in 316 (55.9%) patients: 142 above the knee (25.1%) and 174 below (30.8%); 249 (44.1%) had a minor amputation. The incidence rates of amputations decreased from 2.9 to 2.1 per 1000 diabetes patients. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that first year mortality rates were lower among patients with minor amputations (31.7% vs. 39.6%, P = 0.569). First year mortality rates following below-knee amputation were somewhat lower than above-knee amputation (33.1 vs. 45.1%, respectively). Cox regression model of survival at 1 year after the procedure found that age (HR 1.06 per year, 95% CI 1.04-1.07, P amputation (HR 1.36, 95% CI 1.01-1.83, P = 0.045) and ischemic heart disease (HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.26-2.24, P amputations in diabetes patients between January 2002 and December 2009 decreased slightly. However, one year mortality rates after the surgery did not decline and remained high, stressing the need for a multidisciplinary effort to prevent amputations in diabetes patients.

  20. Reducing treatment by means of physical rehabilitation after lower limb amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Dugina

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the main approaches to the assignment of physical rehabilitation restorative treatment after lower limb amputations. Material and Methods: theoretical analysis and synthesis of modern scientific and methodological literature data on methods of comprehensive rehabilitation after lower limb amputations. Results: the features of the application of physical rehabilitation after lower limb amputations, tasks and presents the main approaches to the appointment of medical physical training, therapeutic massage and physical therapy in preparation for prosthetics. Conclusions: demonstrated that therapeutic physical training, therapeutic massage and physical therapy are effective means of physical rehabilitation of patients after lower limb amputations.

  1. Effect of primary and secondary wartime below-knee amputation on length of hospitalization and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandrić Slavica

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of below-knee amputations in 36 war wounded (mean age 35,42 were reviewed. The majority of the patients was wounded by land mines (94.4%. Most of them were between 25 and 35 years old. Bilateral amputation was done in 2.8% of cases. The amputation was performed on the day of wounding (primary below-knee amputation in 30 (83.3% amputees. Secondary amputation after the attempt to save the severely injured lower-limb was performed in 6 patients (16,7% average 4.61 ± 11.67 days after wounding. Reamputation was necessary in 6 cases (16.7%. Time period from the beginning of rehabilitation to the fitting of prosthesis, was 36.25 ± 14.97 days for primary amputations, 32 ± 17.8 days for secondary amputations and 68.66 ± 33.52 days for reamputations. There was no significant correlation between the duration of rehabilitation to prosthetic management and the period between wounding and amputation (r = -0.102. The attempt to save the limb after severe below-knee injuries and the secondary amputation afterwards, did not significantly influence the ensuing rehabilitation and prosthetic works.

  2. A Clinical and Histological Analysis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-08

    Ischemia; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Peripheral Vascular Disease; Vascular Disease; Arterial Occlusive Disease; Arteriosclerosis; Atherosclerosis; Cardiovascular Disease; Pathologic Processes; Orthopedic Procedures; Amputation

  3. Distal phalanx amputation with delayed presentation and successful reconstruction with reposition and flap after 2 weeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Braga-Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic finger amputations are common, causing significant functional and cosmetic deficits. Microsurgical replantation techniques are the mainstay of treatment for most such injuries although they require adequate conservation of the amputated segment for a successful result. In distal finger amputations, replantation is the procedure of choice, as long as the amputated fragment is viable. If replantation is not an option, reposition + flap using a neurovascular flap can be an efficient option, as this offers improved skin coverage. To the best of our knowledge, this case illustrates the longest cold ischaemic time with a successful outcome.

  4. Analysis of 24 Patients Who Were Amputated Due to a Malignant Tumor in the Skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Gocer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of the study was to assess the cases that were amputated in our clinic due to primary malignant and metastatic bone and soft tissue tumor. Material and Method: 24 cases that were amputated due to primary malignant and metastatic bone and soft tissue tumor between January 1987 and January 2012 were examined retrospectively. The cases were assessed in terms of age, gender, pathological diagnosis, localization, type of amputation, survival and characteristics. The data obtained were transferred to SPSS 15.0 program and analyzed. Normality distributions of the data were analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test. Results: Of the 24 cases, 17 (70% were men, while 7 (30% were women and the average age was 42 (between 12 and 68. The most common reasons for amputation were skin cancer (25%, Ewing sarcoma (20.8%, Osteosarcoma (16.6% and others (Malignant mesenchymal tumor, chondrosarcoma, synovial sarcoma, metastatic tumor. 16 of these patients had previously received an intervention in a different centre at least once. The most common type of amputation was above-knee amputation (58.3%, below-knee amputation (25% and others (hip disarticulation, below-elbow amputation. 8 patients were found to have skin problems and debridement was performed on 6. 14 cases died within the postoperative first year. Discussion: Amputation can be performed for the treatment of the patient’s other health problems and fast and local controls of advanced malignant extremity tumors.

  5. Biomechanical compensations of the trunk and lower extremities during stepping tasks after unilateral transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Amanda M; Gaffney, Brecca M; Davidson, Bradley S; Christiansen, Cory L

    2017-11-01

    Lower extremity movement compensations following transtibial amputation are well-documented and are likely influenced by trunk posture and movement. However, the biomechanical compensations of the trunk and lower extremities, especially during high-demand tasks such as step ascent and descent, remain unclear. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected during step ascent and descent tasks for three groups of individuals: diabetic/transtibial amputation, diabetic, and healthy. An ANCOVA was used to compare peak trunk, hip and knee joint angles and moments in the sagittal and frontal planes between groups. Paired t-tests were used to compare peak joint angles and moments between amputated and intact limbs of the diabetic/transtibial amputation group. During step ascent and descent, the transtibial amputation group exhibited greater trunk forward flexion and lateral flexion compared to the other two groups (Pamputation group (Ptranstibial amputation, by identifying low back, hip, and knee joint moment patterns unique to transtibial amputation during stepping tasks. In addition, the results suggest that some movement compensations may be confounded by the presence of diabetes and precede limb amputation. The increased and asymmetrical loading patterns identified may predispose individuals with transtibial amputation to the development of secondary pain conditions, such as low back pain or osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The relationship of regional hemoglobin A1c testing and amputation rate among patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhall, Karina A; Bekelis, Kimon; Suckow, Bjoern D; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Farber, Adrienne E; Goodney, Philip P; Skinner, Jonathan S

    2017-04-01

    Objective The risk of leg amputation among patients with diabetes has declined over the past decade, while use of preventative measures-such as hemoglobin A1c monitoring-has increased. However, the relationship between hemoglobin A1c testing and amputation risk remains unclear. Methods We examined annual rates of hemoglobin A1c testing and major leg amputation among Medicare patients with diabetes from 2003 to 2012 across 306 hospital referral regions. We created linear regression models to study associations between hemoglobin A1c testing and lower extremity amputation. Results From 2003 to 2012, the proportion of patients who received hemoglobin A1c testing increased 10% (74% to 84%), while their rate of lower extremity amputation decreased 50% (430 to 232/100,000 beneficiaries). Regional hemoglobin A1c testing weakly correlated with crude amputation rate in both years (2003 R = -0.20, 2012 R = -0.21), and further weakened with adjustment for age, sex, and disability status (2003 R = -0.11, 2012 R = -0.17). In a multivariable model of 2012 amputation rates, hemoglobin A1c testing was not a significant predictor. Conclusion Lower extremity amputation among patients with diabetes nearly halved over the past decade but only weakly correlated with hemoglobin A1c testing throughout the study period. Better metrics are needed to understand the relationship between preventative care and amputation.

  7. The Progression of Male 100 m Sprinting with a Lower-Limb Amputation 1976–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce Dyer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sprinting with a lower-limb amputation over 100 m has taken place in the Paralympic Games for over three decades. The aim of this paper is to statistically evaluate the performances and participation levels of such athletes during this period. The level of performance improvement over a 36-year period was proposed to be significantly greater than the able-bodied equivalent. Coupled with this, a major spike in amputee running performance improvement was shown to occur from 1984–1988. This supports previously recorded accounts of a major technological change being made at this time. Finally, whilst the average performance of the medallists has increased consistently over the 36-year history, the overall participation in the event fell significantly after 1988 and did not recover until 2012.

  8. Desire for amputation of a limb: paraphilia, psychosis, or a new type of identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    First, Michael B

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe and conceptualize an unusual and probably rare condition: the intense longstanding desire to have an amputation. Structured interviews were conducted by telephone of 52 subjects (mean age: 48.6, range 23-77 years; 47 male, 4 female, 1 intersexed) self-identified as having had a desire to have an amputation. Seventeen per cent (n = 9) had an arm or leg amputated with two-thirds using methods that put the subject at risk of death and one-third enlisting a surgeon to amputate their healthy limb. The most common reported reason for wanting an amputation was the subject's feeling that it would correct a mismatch between the person's anatomy and sense of his or her 'true' self (identity). None were delusional. For all but one subject age at onset was during childhood or early adolescence. For those who had psychotherapy or medication there was no change in the intensity of the desire for amputation. The six subjects who had an amputation at their desired site reported that following the amputation they felt better than they ever had and no longer had a desire for an amputation. These preliminary results suggest the existence of an extremely unusual clinically distinct condition characterized by a lifelong desire to have an amputation of a particular limb. The condition is associated with serious negative consequences: amputation attempts, impairment and marked distress. Reflecting similarities between Gender Identity Disorder and this condition, the author suggests that it may be conceptualized as an unusual dysfunction in the development one's fundamental sense of anatomical (body) identity.

  9. Predictors of lower-extremity amputation in patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickwell, Kristy; Siersma, Volkert; Kars, Marleen; Apelqvist, Jan; Bakker, Karel; Edmonds, Michael; Holstein, Per; Jirkovská, Alexandra; Jude, Edward; Mauricio, Didac; Piaggesi, Alberto; Ragnarson Tennvall, Gunnel; Reike, Heinrich; Spraul, Maximilian; Uccioli, Luigi; Urbancic, Vilma; van Acker, Kristien; van Baal, Jeff; Schaper, Nicolaas

    2015-05-01

    Infection commonly complicates diabetic foot ulcers and is associated with a poor outcome. In a cohort of individuals with an infected diabetic foot ulcer, we aimed to determine independent predictors of lower-extremity amputation and the predictive value for amputation of the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF) classification system and to develop a risk score for predicting amputation. We prospectively studied 575 patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer presenting to 1 of 14 diabetic foot clinics in 10 European countries. Among these patients, 159 (28%) underwent an amputation. Independent risk factors for amputation were as follows: periwound edema, foul smell, (non)purulent exudate, deep ulcer, positive probe-to-bone test, pretibial edema, fever, and elevated C-reactive protein. Increasing IWGDF severity of infection also independently predicted amputation. We developed a risk score for any amputation and for amputations excluding the lesser toes (including the variables sex, pain on palpation, periwound edema, ulcer size, ulcer depth, and peripheral arterial disease) that predicted amputation better than the IWGDF system (area under the ROC curves 0.80, 0.78, and 0.67, respectively). For individuals with an infected diabetic foot ulcer, we identified independent predictors of amputation, validated the prognostic value of the IWGDF classification system, and developed a new risk score for amputation that can be readily used in daily clinical practice. Our risk score may have better prognostic accuracy than the IWGDF system, the only currently available system, but our findings need to be validated in other cohorts. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  10. Sprint kinematics of athletes with lower-limb amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, J G

    1999-05-01

    To determine and compare the kinematics of the sound and prosthetic limb in five of the world's best unilateral amputee sprinters. Five men, all unilateral lower-limb amputee (one transfemoral, four transtibial) athletes. The individual with transfemoral amputation used a Endolite Hi-activity prosthesis incorporating a CaTech hydraulic swing and stance control unit, a Flex-Foot Modular III, and an ischial containment total contact socket. Those with transtibial amputations used prostheses incorporating a Flex-Foot Modular III and patellar tendon-bearing socket, with silicone sheath liner (Iceross) and lanyard suspension. Case series. Subjects were videotaped sprinting through a performance area. Sagittal plane lower-limb kinematics derived from manual digitization (at 50 Hz) of the video were determined for three sprint trials of the prosthetic and sound limb. Hip, knee, and ankle kinematics of each subject's sound and prosthetic limb were compared to highlight kinematic alterations resulting from the use of individual prostheses. Comparisons were also made with mean data from five able-bodied men who had similar sprinting ability. Sound limb hip and knee kinematics in all subjects with amputation were comparable to those in able-bodied subjects. The prosthetic knee of the transfemoral amputee athlete fully extended early in swing and remained so through stance. In the transtibial amputee athletes, as in able-bodied subjects, a pattern of stance flexion-extension was evident for both limbs. During stance, prosthetic ankle angles of the transtibial amputee subjects were similar to those of the sound side and those of able-bodied subjects. Prosthetic limb kinematics in transtibial amputee subjects were similar to those for the sound limb, and individuals achieved an "up-on-the-toes" gait typical of able-bodied sprinting. Kinematics for the prosthetic limb of the transfemoral amputee subject were more typical of those seen for walking. This resulted in a sprinting

  11. [Endo-exo prostheses following limb-amputation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhnke, D-L; Aschoff, H-H

    2015-06-01

    Rehabilitation of patients having undergone limb amputation is difficult due to problems related to poor socket fit, which often deteriorates comfort, gait and the ability to take part in everyday life and work. The endo-exo prosthesis has been an alternative provision for people having undergone lower limb amputation for reasons other than diabetes or peripheral vascular disease for more than 10 years. The system consists of an intramedullar, osseointegrated and skin perforating prosthesis, which is implanted in the remaining bone and has an abutment to allow the attachment of the external prosthetic part including the knee joint in the case of a trans-femoral amputation. The idea originates in findings of modern tooth-implantology and involves a two-step operation. This study focuses on one centre's experience with the endo-exo prostheses in Lübeck, Germany, to describe and discuss the reliability of this alternative treatment method after lower limb amputation. This article presents the results of lower limb amputees operated on in Lübeck, Germany between 1999-2013. It focuses on theoretical aspects of osseointegration and different clinically-based findings using the endo-exo technique over the last decade. 74 lower-limb amputees were treated with an endo-exo prosthesis until December 2013. There were only 4 verified intramedullar infections, yet there were many unplanned surgical revisions secondary to soft-tissue infections in the beginning. They were successfully encountered via clinically-based changes that were made concerning implant design, wound treatment and operative technique. Since 1990 a few groups have developed an innovative method that provides an alternative to traditional socket-type prostheses. This involves a skeletally anchored device that is inserted into the remaining stump and provides osseointegration into the bone. The distal part of the implant protrudes transcutaneously and allows attachment to a prosthetic limb. This creates a

  12. Reconstructive operations at the amputations of the penis of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Fayzulin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article the versions of rendering to surgical aid to children with the iatrogenic and traumatic amputations of penis are represented. Are described the surgical methods, with make it possible to attain lengthening the state of sexual term with the simultaneous elimination of the meatal stenosis. The application of a free skin flap for the imitation of head and closing of the trunk of penis is the method of selection with the deficiency of skin coating and considerably improves cosmetic result of operation.

  13. A case of psychosis who amputated his finger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Cemal Kaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-harm behavior is defined as the person’s intentional,direct injuring of some body tissue or the whole body mostoften done without suicidal intentions. Mild types of selfmutilationis seen frequently however more severe onesare rarely seen. Severe self-mutilation is generally a signof a serious psychiatric disorder and it can result in organand/or organ functionality loss. In this study we aimed topresent a schizophrenic patient with repetitive self-mutilation.As a conclusion, practicing clinicians should takeinto consideration the possibility of self-harm behavior inschizophrenia patients especially if they have high riskproperties.Key words: Schizophrenia, self-mutilation, amputation

  14. Barriers and Facilitators of Participation in Sports : A Qualitative Study on Dutch Individuals with Lower Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragaru, Mihai; van Wilgen, C. P.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Ruijs, Suzette G. J. B.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Dekker, Rienk

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Although individuals with lower limb amputation may benefit from participation in sports, less than 40% do so. Aim: To identify the barriers and facilitators that influence participation in sports for individuals with lower limb amputation. Design: Qualitative study. Participants:

  15. Outcomes of dysvascular partial foot amputation and how these compare to transtibial amputation: a systematic review for the development of shared decision-making resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Michael P; Quigley, Matthew; Fatone, Stefania

    2017-03-14

    Dysvascular partial foot amputation (PFA) is a common sequel to advanced peripheral vascular disease. Helping inform difficult discussions between patients and practitioners about the level of PFA, or the decision to have a transtibial amputation (TTA) as an alternative, requires an understanding of the current research evidence on a wide range of topics including wound healing, reamputation, quality of life, mobility, functional ability, participation, pain and psychosocial outcomes, and mortality. The aim of this review was to describe a comprehensive range of outcomes of dysvascular PFA and compare these between levels of PFA and TTA. The review protocol was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42015029186). A systematic search of the literature was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, psychINFO, AMED, CINAHL, ProQuest Nursing and Allied Health, and Web of Science. These databases were searched using MeSH terms and keywords relating to different amputation levels and outcomes of interest. Peer reviewed studies of original research-irrespective of the study design-were included if published in English between 1 January 2000, and 31 December 2015, and included discrete cohort(s) with dysvascular PFA or PFA and TTA. Outcomes of interest were rate of wound healing and complications, rate of ipsilateral reamputation, quality of life, functional ability, mobility, pain (i.e., residual limb or phantom pain), psychosocial outcomes (i.e., depression, anxiety, body image and self-esteem), participation, and mortality rate. Included studies were independently appraised by two reviewers. The McMaster Critical Review Forms were used to assess methodological quality and identify sources of bias. Data were extracted based on the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group's data extraction template by a primary reviewer and checked for accuracy and clarity by a second reviewer. Findings are reported as narrative summaries given the heterogeneity of the literature, except for mortality

  16. Talocalcaneal coalition in patients who have fibular hemimelia or proximal femoral focal deficiency. A comparison of the radiographic and pathological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, D P; Holt, G R; Ogden, J A

    1994-09-01

    The prevalence of congenital anomalies of the foot was studied in ninety-nine children (105 limbs) who had fibular hemimelia or proximal femoral focal deficiency, or both. Twenty-six of these patients had had a Syme amputation at our institution and the specimens were analyzed anatomically; they were found to include fourteen talocalcaneal coalitions (54 per cent). The preoperative radiographs of these same patients, however, revealed only four such coalitions (15 per cent). Thirty-seven of the ninety-nine patients had had a Syme amputation previously at another facility (with subsequent follow-up at our institution), and ten of them (ten feet) had radiographs that were adequate for analysis of congenital anomalies. Forty-two feet that had not yet been amputated were also analyzed radiographically. Nine of these fifty-two feet included in the radiographic analysis had a talocalcaneal coalition, a radiographic prevalence similar to that found on the preoperative radiographs of the twenty-six patients included in the anatomical analysis. The true prevalence of talocalcaneal coalition remains to be determined; however, this can be done only at the time of skeletal maturity. Examination of the twenty-six amputation specimens revealed only one talocalcaneal coalition in the nine patients who had proximal femoral focal deficiency alone, six such coalitions in the eight patients who had only fibular hemimelia, and seven coalitions in the nine patients who had both proximal femoral focal deficiency and fibular hemimelia. These findings should be useful in the evaluation of the radiographic anatomy of the feet in children who have proximal femoral focal deficiency or fibular hemimelia, or both, particularly if limb-lengthening is considered as a treatment option.

  17. Sexuality in people with a lower limb amputation : a topic too hot to handle?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, J. E. A.; Enzlin, P.; Geertzen, J. H. B.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Dekker, R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze whether, and by whom sexuality is discussed in amputation departments. The focus was on whether professionals received questions about sexuality from their patients with a lower limb amputation and whether they addressed sexuality themselves, as well

  18. Screening of patients for first time prostheses after amputation of lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetra A.

    2016-01-01

    More than 25% of those who followed the recommended treatment and rehabilitation programme to prepare the amputation stump, reduced contracture and enhanced physical working abilities were declared to be appropriate for further prostheses. This indicates serious shortcomings in medical treatments during the early post-amputation period.

  19. Adjustments to amputation and an artificial limb in lower limb amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, Richa; van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam

    Background: Positive adjustments to amputation and an artificial limb play important roles in the rehabilitation process. Objectives: To study the different facets of adjustments to amputation and an artificial limb in lower limb amputees and to assess the possible role of different background and

  20. Lower limb amputation - Part 2 : Rehabilitation - a 10 year literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, JHB; Martina, JD; Rietman, HS

    Ten years after the ISPO consensus conference on amputation surgery, a search of relevant publications in the Rehabilitation-prosthetics-literature over the years 1990-2000 was performed. The main key-words in this research were: "lower limb, amputation, human and rehabilitation". One hundred and

  1. Amputation for Long-Standing, Therapy-Resistant Type-I Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krans-Schreuder, H.K.; Bodde, M.I.; Schrier, E.; Dijkstra, P.U.; van den Dungen, J.A.; den Dunnen, W.F.; Geertzen, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Some patients with long-standing, therapy-resistant typed complex regional pain syndrome consider an amputation. There is a lack of evidence regarding the risk of recurrence of the pain syndrome and patient outcomes after amputation. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the

  2. Direct medical costs of accidental falls for adults with transfemoral amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Benjamin; Maradit Kremers, Hilal; Visscher, Sue; Hoppe, Kurtis; Kaufman, Kenton

    2017-12-01

    Active individuals with transfemoral amputations are provided a microprocessor-controlled knee with the belief that the prosthesis reduces their risk of falling. However, these prostheses are expensive and the cost-effectiveness is unknown with regard to falls in the transfemoral amputation population. The direct medical costs of falls in adults with transfemoral amputations need to be determined in order to assess the incremental costs and benefits of microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees. We describe the direct medical costs of falls in adults with a transfemoral amputation. This is a retrospective, population-based, cohort study of adults who underwent transfemoral amputations between 2000 and 2014. A Bayesian structural time series approach was used to estimate cost differences between fallers and non-fallers. The mean 6-month direct medical costs of falls for six hospitalized adults with transfemoral amputations was US$25,652 (US$10,468, US$38,872). The mean costs for the 10 adults admitted to the emergency department was US$18,091 (US$-7,820, US$57,368). Falls are expensive in adults with transfemoral amputations. The 6-month costs of falls resulting in hospitalization are similar to those reported in the elderly population who are also at an increased risk of falling. Clinical relevance Estimates of fall costs in adults with transfemoral amputations can provide policy makers with additional insight when determining whether or not to cover a prescription for microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees.

  3. Analgesic management of an eight-year-old Springer Spaniel after amputation of a thoracic limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, E; Andreoni, V; Keeley, Bj; Self, Ia; Jones, Br

    2009-02-01

    Analgesic agents were administered perioperatively to an eight-year-old Springer Spaniel undergoing amputation of its right thoracic limb. The amputation was carried out due to a painful, infiltrative and poorly differentiated sarcoma involving the nerves of the brachial plexus. A combination of pre-emptive and multimodal perioperative analgesic strategies was used; including intravenous (IV) infusions of fentanyl, morphine, lidocaine and ketamine.

  4. Pathological fracture in osteosarcoma: is it always an indication for amputation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagelada, Francesc; Tarrago, Laura Trullols; Tibrewal, Saket; Ibanez, Ana Peiro; Jeyaseelan, Luckshmana; Alegria, Isidre Gracia

    2014-01-01

    The presence of a pathological fracture due to osteosarcoma (OS) has been considered a high risk factor for dissemination and an indication for immediate amputation. With current neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens there is a trend towards limb salvage procedures in selected cases. The aim of this study is to assess the outcome of patients treated with amputation versus patients treated with limb salvage surgery focusing on local recurrence, mortality rates and metastatic dissemination. A retrospective study of patients with OS treated at our institution was performed. Fifteen patients with a mean age of 25.6 years (8 to 66) were identified with an average follow up of 7 years (2 to 29). Patients were treated either with amputation (8) or limb salvage procedure (6). One patient was not treated surgically. Four patients developed local recurrence (1 in the amputation group and 3 in the limb salvage group, treated with secondary amputation). Six patients developed pulmonary metastasis (4 in the amputation group and 2 in the limb salvage) and 3 patients died (all of them in the amputation group). 1. A pathologic fracture in an OS is not always a contraindication for limb salvage because the oncologic results are acceptable. 2. In selected cases limb salvage has similar success rates to amputation.

  5. Epidemiology and pattern of limb amputations at a private hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Amputation of either the upper or lower extremities in man presents a special public health challenge due to the problems associated with patients' rehabilitation. Objective: To determine the epidemiology and pattern of limb amputations in a private medical setting in Owerri, Imo State. Methodology: This was a ...

  6. People with lower limb amputation and their sexual functioning and sexual well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuren, Jesse Elisabeth; Geertzen, Jan H.; Enzlin, Paul; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Dekker, Rienk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Following a lower limb amputation, people may experience limitations in performing sexual activities. However, only little research efforts have been devoted to unravel how people experience their sexuality after such an amputation. Therefore, the purpose of the current study is to describe

  7. Therapy-Resistant Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I : To Amputate or Not?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodde, M.I.; Dijkstra, P.U.; den Dunnen, W.F.A.; Geertzen, J.H.B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Amputation for the treatment of long-standing, therapy-resistant complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is controversial. An evidence-based decision regarding whether or not to amputate is not possible on the basis of current guidelines. The aim of the current study was to

  8. Risk Factors for Foot Amputation in Patients Hospitalized for Diabetic Foot Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilici, Maria Teresa Verrone; Del Fiol, Fernando de Sá; Vieira, Alexandre Eduardo Franzin; Toledo, Maria Inês

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and quantify risk factors for amputation in diabetic patients hospitalized for foot infections. This cross-sectional study comprised 100 patients with diabetic infectious complications in the lower limbs. The variables investigated were related to diabetes, infection, and treatment compliance. Multiple Cox regression analysis was performed to identify the variables independently associated with the outcome of amputation. The most prevalent chronic complications were neuropathy and hypertension. Most patients presented with a neuroischemic foot (86%). The Morisky test showed that 72% were not compliant with diabetes treatment. Regarding patient outcome, 61% progressed to amputation, 14% to debridement, and 9% to revascularization. The results showed a 42% higher risk for progression to amputation in patients with previous use of antimicrobials. Also, the amputation risk was 26% higher for those less compliant with diabetes treatment. An increase of one point in the Wagner ulcer classification criteria corresponded to a 65% increase in the risk of amputation. Undergoing conservative, nonsurgical procedures prior to admission provided a 63% reduction in the risk of amputation. Knowledge of these factors is critical to enable multidisciplinary teams to develop treatment plans for these patients so as to prevent the need for amputation.

  9. Diabetes-related amputations create considerable public health burden in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graz, Heather; D'Souza, Vijay K; Alderson, David E C; Graz, Michael

    2018-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to assess the cost of diabetic amputation (both direct and indirect) to the National Health Service from the point of amputation onwards. This systematic review involved searches of published literature between January 2007 and March 2017 mainly using the bibliographic databases, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE via Ovid®, MEDLINE via Ovid®, as well as grey literature, both in print and in electronic formats published through non-commercial publications, which reported the cost of amputation due to diabetic foot ulcers. The studies included in this review varied considerably in estimating the cost including cost elements and how those costs were categorised. The cost estimates for inpatient care associated with amputation involving admissions or procedures on amputation stumps in people with diabetes was £43.8 million. The annual expenditure for post-amputation care involving prosthetic care, physiotherapy, transport and wheelchair use was £20.8 million. There is a considerable public health and economic burden caused by diabetes-related amputations in England. More focussed research is needed with improved methods of estimating costs that would account for direct and indirect costs associated with diabetic amputation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) Independently Predicts Amputation Inchronic Criticallimb Ischemia (CLI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Han; Yang, Hongliu; Huang, Bin; Yuan, Ding; Zhu, Jingqiang; Zhao, Jichun

    2016-01-01

    General malnutrition usually occurs in critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients because of shortness of appetite and sleeplessness leaded by chronic pain. And amputation frequently is end-point of CLI patients. So the aim of this study was to assess the predictive ability of Geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) for predicting amputation in patients with CLI. A retrospective study was designed. Demographics, history, comorbidity, and risk factors for peripheral vascular disease of admitted patients, and laboratory study were documented. Patients' height, weight and BMI were recorded. Amputation was identified as end-point during follow-up. Patients' amputation-free survival (AFS) was recorded. 172 patients were identified, with mean age 71.98±3.12. Geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) = 90 was taken as cutoff value of high risk of amputation for CLI patients via using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Span of follow-up was 12-48 months. During follow-up, 60 patients (36.04%) received amputation surgery. And analyzed by Cox proportional hazards model, it is found that GNRI was the independent predictive factor for amputation in long term. This study revealed that GNRI was a reliable and effective predictive marker for AFS. GNRI could identify patients with high risk for amputation in early time.

  11. Epidemiology of digital amputation and replantation in Taiwan: A population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dun-Hao Chang

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Our study of the National Health Insurance database characterized the epidemiology of digital amputation patients undergoing replantation and the facilities in Taiwan where these procedures are performed. The hospitals treating more digital amputation patients had higher attempt rates and lower thumb failure rates.

  12. Replantation versus Prosthetic Fitting in Traumatic Arm Amputations: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Iris A.; Kon, Moshe; Schuurman, Arnold H.; van Minnen, L. Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traumatic arm amputations can be treated with replantation or surgical formalization of the stump with or without subsequent prosthetic fitting. In the literature, many authors suggest the superiority of replantation. This systematic review compared available literature to analyze whether replantation is functionally and psychologically more profitable than formalization and prosthetic fitting in patients with traumatic arm amputation. Methods: Functional outcome and satisfaction ...

  13. Predicting prosthetic use in elderly patients after major lower limb amputation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, M.S. van; Linde, H. van der; Buijck, B.I.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Zuidema, S.U.; Koopmans, R.T.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The main determinants of prosthetic use known from literature apply to the younger patient with lower limb amputation. Studies aimed at identifying determinants of outcome of lower limb amputation in elderly patients with multimorbidity that rehabilitate in skilled nursing facilities

  14. The effect of limb amputation on standing weight distribution in the remaining three limbs in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Grayson Lee; Millis, Darryl

    2017-01-16

    Despite the fact that limb amputation is a commonly performed procedure in veterinary medicine, quantitative data regarding outcomes are lacking. The intention of this study was to evaluate the effect of limb amputation on weight distribution to the remaining three limbs at a stance in dogs. Ten dogs with a prior forelimb amputation and ten dogs with a prior hindlimb amputation; all of which had no history of orthopaedic or neural disease in the remaining three limbs were included in the study. Standing weight bearing was evaluated with a commercial stance analyzer in all dogs. Five valid trials were obtained and a mean percentage of weight bearing was calculated for each remaining limb. The dogs with a previous forelimb amputation, and also those with a previous hindlimb amputation, had the largest mean increase in weight bearing in the contralateral forelimb. In conclusion, proactive monitoring of orthopaedic disease in the contralateral forelimb may be advisable in dogs with a previous limb amputation. In addition, when determining candidacy for a limb amputation, disease of the contralateral forelimb should be thoroughly evaluated.

  15. Major amputation for intractable extremity melanoma after failure of isolated limb perfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapma, M. R.; Vrouenraets, B. C.; Nieweg, O. E.; van Geel, A. N.; Noorda, E. M.; Eggermont, A. M. M.; Kroon, B. B. R.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to analyse indications and results of amputation for intractable extremity melanoma after failure of isolated limb perfusion (ILP). METHODS: Between 1978 and 2001, 451 patients with loco-regional advanced extremity melanoma underwent 505 ILPs. Amputation of the

  16. Evaluation of quality of life and walking ability among amputated patients and those who refused to undergo amputation following infection of total knee arthroplasty: Small case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; de Brito, Andre Thiago Scandiuzzi; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Tirico, Luis Eduardo P; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-12-01

    Patients who undergo transfemoral amputation after infection of a total knee arthroplasty do not have good functional outcomes and have major difficulty walking. To evaluate the quality of life and walking ability among patients who underwent amputation and among those who refused to undergo amputation following infection of a total knee arthroplasty. Retrospective case series. Patients who received an indication for amputation following an infection of a total knee arthroplasty were evaluated retrospectively. The patients were divided between those who accepted the amputation procedure and those who refused amputation (four amputee vs four non-amputees). Walking ability and quality of life were evaluated using the Short Form-36 questionnaire. The average physical health was 27.4 for the amputees and 31.3 for the non-amputees. The average mental health was 49.9 for the amputees and 47.1 for the non-amputees. In relation to walking ability, only one (25%) of the amputees was able to walk, as opposed to 100% in the non-amputee groups. Twenty-five percent of the amputee patients continued to be able to walk. The functional outcome of non-amputee patients was better, with 100% being able to walk, though with limitations. This is the first study evaluating patients who refused the amputation procedure and remained with the spacer. Despite the fact that this option is not recommended by the medical community, we believe that these data are useful when discussing, with a patient, quality of life after amputation. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  17. Reduced Incidence of Foot-Related Hospitalisation and Amputation amongst Persons with Diabetes in Queensland, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Lazzarini

    Full Text Available To determine trends in the incidence of foot-related hospitalisation and amputation amongst persons with diabetes in Queensland (Australia between 2005 and 2010 that coincided with changes in state-wide ambulatory diabetic foot-related complication management.All data from cases admitted for the principal reason of diabetes foot-related hospitalisation or amputation in Queensland from 2005-2010 were obtained from the Queensland Hospital Admitted Patient Data Collection dataset. Incidence rates for foot-related hospitalisation (admissions, bed days used and amputation (total, minor, major cases amongst persons with diabetes were calculated per 1,000 person-years with diabetes (diabetes population and per 100,000 person-years (general population. Age-sex standardised incidence and age-sex adjusted Poisson regression models were also calculated for the general population.There were 4,443 amputations, 24,917 hospital admissions and 260,085 bed days used for diabetes foot-related complications in Queensland. Incidence per 1,000 person-years with diabetes decreased from 2005 to 2010: 43.0% for hospital admissions (36.6 to 20.9, 40.1% bed days (391 to 234, 40.0% total amputations (6.47 to 3.88, 45.0% major amputations (2.18 to 1.20, 37.5% minor amputations (4.29 to 2.68 (p < 0.01 respectively. Age-sex standardised incidence per 100,000 person-years in the general population also decreased from 2005 to 2010: 23.3% hospital admissions (105.1 to 80.6, 19.5% bed days (1,122 to 903, 19.3% total amputations (18.57 to 14.99, 26.4% major amputations (6.26 to 4.61, 15.7% minor amputations (12.32 to 10.38 (p < 0.01 respectively. The age-sex adjusted incidence rates per calendar year decreased in the general population (rate ratio (95% CI; hospital admissions 0.949 (0.942-0.956, bed days 0.964 (0.962-0.966, total amputations 0.962 (0.946-0.979, major amputations 0.945 (0.917-0.974, minor amputations 0.970 (0.950-0.991 (p < 0.05 respectively.There were significant

  18. Risk of major limb amputation in diabetic foot ulcer and accompanying disease: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jin Yong; Roh, Si-Gyun; Sharaf, Basel; Lee, Nae-Ho

    2017-12-01

    Limb amputation in diabetic patients raises important issues regarding low quality of life and survival rates. This meta-analysis aimed to identify predictive factors accompanying diseases with high major amputation rates in diabetic patients. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases. Eight variables were extracted from the included studies and evaluated according to major amputation rates. The Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS) was utilized to assess the quality of the studies. The search strategy identified 101 publications. After screening, 10 articles were selected for review. Hypertension, ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral vascular disease were identified as predictive variables of higher major amputation rates. Although further investigation of long-term and prospective studies is needed, we identified four variables as predisposing factors for higher major amputation in diabetic patients through meta-analysis. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Portraying the amputation of lower limbs: an approach using ICF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erádio Gonçalves Junior

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Amputation is a trauma that involves important functional, psychological and social sequelae. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF is based on the biopsychosocial model and enables understanding functioning and disability through the interaction of its components. Objective: This study’s aim was to depict functioning and disability using the ICF conceptual interaction model from the perspective of individuals who suffered a lower limb amputation. Methods: The qualitative approach was used and included a semi-structured interview held with six participants. Results: All the participants used assistive devices such as crutches, wheelchairs or walkers: three used prostheses and the other three emphasized their difficulty in acquiring prostheses from the Social Security Service or Public Health System. Social support, especially that provided by family and friends, is a major facilitator. The importance of acquiring and adapting prostheses to enable the rehabilitation of amputees became clear; however, rehabilitation is not restricted to the acquisition of prostheses. A rehabilitation program directed to restoring functionality is needed. Conclusion: The multidirectional approach using the ICF’s conceptual interaction model enabled important insights concerning public health issues, such as obstacles related to the access to rehabilitation services and a lack of preparedness on the part of health professionals in relation to care provided to amputees.

  20. Rehabilitation after Amputation: Psychotherapeutic Intervention Module in Indian Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychological aspects of adjustment to amputation are varied and not addressed in the present treatment regime. There is no research evidence available of psychological intervention and outcome in Indian scenario. One hundred and seventy-three consecutive patients with limb amputations were randomly assigned to psychotherapeutic intervention module (PIM, study group (n=90 and treatment as usual group (TAU, control group (n=83. Patients with psychotic disorder were excluded from the study. Carroll Rating Scale for Depression (CRSD, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Amputees Body Image Scale (ABIS, and Impact of Event Scale (IES along with specially designed information schedule were administered individually. Structured psychotherapeutic module was developed for the intervention. Patients in PIM group were given six therapy sessions, addressing the specific areas of concern. All patients were evaluated on the same tools after two months of therapy. Analysis showed that after treatment a significant reduction in scores was noted on CRSD, STAI, ABIS, and IES in the PIM group. On the TAU group a significant reduction was seen only in the ABIS. The psychological intervention module proposed by authors was efficacious in alleviating the psychological distress, depression, and anxiety and thus was vastly superior to the conventional method of management of amputees.

  1. Early interfaced neural activity from chronic amputated nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshitija Garde

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation, currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8 days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3 months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative on-dependent multi-electrode arrays of open design allow the early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. .

  2. Surgical reimplantation of penile glans amputation in children during circumcision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouassida Khaireddine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circumcision is one of the oldest and most commonly performed surgical procedures. Unfortunately, various complications may occur during circumcision, ranging from trivial to tragic such as penile amputation which is a serious complication and a challenging injury to treat. We describe two cases of non-microsurgical successful reattachment of a distal penile glans which were amputated during circumcision. In the first case, a 5-year-old child underwent circumcision by an urologist under local anesthesia. In the second one, a 3-year-old child underwent circumcision by a general practitioner who used to make circumcision. In this article, the literature is reviewed; results and potential complications of this surgery are also discussed. Glans sensation was present, early morning erection was maintained, and there was an erectile response during penile manipulation in both cases. Although circumcision is not technically difficult, it should be taken seriously. The use of microsurgical reattachment is not always possible, especially in pediatric cases; it also requires special equipment and training.

  3. Functional improvement with digital prosthesis use after multiple digit amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifchez, Scott D; Marchant-Hanson, Judith; Matloub, Hani S; Sanger, James R; Dzwierzynski, William W; Nguyen, Hanh H

    2005-07-01

    Patients who sustain traumatic amputation of multiple fingers suffer both a functional and psychologic loss. Previous studies of prosthesis use for finger amputees have focused primarily on the psychologic benefits. Clinically our group noticed a functional improvement on hand function tests when patients with multiple digit amputations used a prosthesis. Given the expense of multiple finger prostheses we sought to determine if they led to a consistent functional improvement in these patients. Ten consecutive patients performed a battery of hand function tests and rated their ability to perform a variety of activities of daily living both with and without their prosthesis using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire. Our results show a significant improvement in 3-finger-pinch strength and grip strength and a trend of improvement of tip-pinch, lateral-pinch, and grip strength in dynamometer positions 1, 2, 3, and 4 in these patients when tested with and without their prostheses. Function in activities of daily living, as assessed by the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire, was improved globally with prosthesis use. In addition, significant improvement was noted in several specific activities including opening a jar, writing, and turning a key, among others. These results show that prosthesis use provides a functional benefit to these patients in multiple activities.

  4. A Finger Amputation Case Caused by Human Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Hakan Doğan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bite is a type of wound created with animal or human teeth. Bite wounds created by humans are encountered in situations as fighting, rape, murder and child abuse. Bite marks are usually observed on arms, neck, breasts, body, cheeks and legs. The teeth may penetrate to skin on the areas where bone or cartilage tissue lies underneath skin, and tissue loss may occur. Auricles are most frequent regions that occur tissue loss with bites. Finger amputation occurring with human bite is extremely rare. The case presented in this paper is a 28 years old man. In his medical history, the 3rd finger of his left hand was bitten during a fight two months ago. One centimeter shortness at the end point of the distal phalanx of the left 3rd finger because of tissue loss was found in the examination. In his left hand radiograph, bone defect at the middle part of the distal phalanx of 3rd finger was determined. The case has been discussed by comparing similar cases rarely reported in the literature. Keywords: Forensic medicine, human bite, amputation

  5. Kinematic analysis of males with transtibial amputation carrying military loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall, Barri L; Hendershot, Brad D; Bell, Johanna C; Wolf, Erik J

    2014-01-01

    The biomechanical responses to load carriage, a common task for dismounted troops, have been well studied in nondisabled individuals. However, with recent shifts in the rehabilitation and retention process of injured servicemembers, there remains a substantial need for understanding these responses in persons with lower-limb amputations. Temporal-spatial and kinematic gait parameters were analyzed among 10 male servicemembers with unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA) and 10 uninjured male controls. Participants completed six treadmill walking trials in all combinations of two speeds (1.34 and 1.52 m/s) and three loads (none, 21.8, and 32.7 kg). Persons with TTA exhibited biomechanical compensations to carried loads that are comparable to those observed in uninjured individuals. However, several distinct gait changes appear to be unique to those with TTA, notably, increased dorsiflexion (deformation) of the prosthetic foot/ankle, less stance knee flexion on the prosthetic limb, and altered trunk forward lean/excursion. Such evidence supports the need for future work to assess the risk for overuse injuries with carried loads in this population in addition to guiding the development of adaptive prosthetic feet/components to meet the needs of redeployed servicemembers or veterans/civilians in physically demanding occupations.

  6. Fractures of the proximal humerus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Stig

    2013-01-01

    . The bandages were further supported by splints made of wood or coarse grass. Healing was expected in forty days. Different fracture patterns have been discussed and classified since Ancient Greece. Current classification of proximal humeral fractures mainly relies on the classifications proposed by Charles......, classification of proximal humeral fractures remains a challenge for the conduct, reporting, and interpretation of clinical trials. The evidence for the benefits of surgery in complex fractures of the proximal humerus is weak. In three systematic reviews I studied the outcome after locking plate osteosynthesis......Fractures of the proximal humerus have been diagnosed and managed since the earliest known surgical texts. For more than four millennia the preferred treatment was forceful traction, closed reduction, and immobilization with linen soaked in combinations of oil, honey, alum, wine, or cerate...

  7. Global position sensing and step activity as outcome measures of community mobility and social interaction for an individual with a transfemoral amputation due to dysvascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Arun; Deeny, Sean; Eisenberg, Yochai; Mathur, Gayatri; Kuiken, Todd

    2014-03-01

    Community mobility of individuals following lower limb amputation is highly variable and has a great impact on their quality of life. Currently, clinical assessments of ambulatory ability and motivation influence prosthetic prescription. However, these outcome measures do not effectively quantify community mobility (ie, mobility outside of the clinic) of individuals with an amputation. Advances in global positioning systems (GPSs) and other wearable step-monitoring devices allow for objective, quantifiable measurement of community mobility. This case report will examine the combined use of a GPS unit and a step activity monitor to quantify community mobility and social interaction of an individual with transfemoral amputation due to dysvascular disease. A 76-year-old woman with a unilateral transfemoral amputation due to vascular disease carried a commercial GPS unit and step activity monitor to quantify her community mobility and social interaction every day over a period of 1 month. The step activity monitor was affixed to her prosthesis. The patient used a wheelchair as well as her prosthesis for everyday mobility. Information from the GPS unit and step activity monitor provided quantitative details on the patient's steps taken in and out of the home, wheelchair use, prosthesis use, driving trips, and time spent on social and community trips. This case report describes a potential clinical measurement procedure for quantifying community mobility and social interaction of an individual with lower limb amputation. Future efforts are needed to validate this measurement tool on large sample sizes and in individuals with different mobility levels. Additionally, automatization of data analysis and technological approaches to reduce compromised GPS signals may eventually lead to a practical, clinically useful tool.

  8. The infrastructure of psychological proximity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian Mossfeldt

    2015-01-01

    ). The experience of psychological proximity between patient and nurse is provided through confidence, continuity and the practical set-up. This constitutes an important enactment of skillfulness, which may render telemedicine a convincing health service in the future. Methodology: The study draws on a pilot...... (Langstrup & Winthereik 2008). This study contributes by showing the infrastructure of psychological proximity, which is provided by way of device, confidence, continuity and accountability....

  9. The auto-amputated adnexa: a review of findings in a pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focseneanu, Mariel A; Omurtag, Kenan; Ratts, Valerie S; Merritt, Diane F

    2013-12-01

    To quantify our experience and that of the literature with diagnosis and management of the auto-amputated adnexa in a pediatric population. Case series and literature review. Tertiary care medical center. Case series of pediatric patients (auto-amputation collected from our medical center and the literature. None. Auto-amputated adnexa. In addition to the 3 cases discussed from our institution, 91 cases of auto-amputated adnexa were identified in the literature dating back to 1943, for a total of 94 cases. Forty-nine percent (46/94) of the cases involved girls in a pediatric population (auto-amputated adnexa. 34 out of 46 cases were analyzed in detail. The right adnexa were involved in 56% of the cases. The most common presenting complaint verbalized by the older girls was pain; however, 8 cases were identified in asymptomatic girls undergoing unrelated diagnostic testing. The auto-amputated adnexa is a rare finding in the pediatric population, but it must be considered as a possible explanation for the incidental finding of absence of the fallopian tube or ovary in the subgroup of patients who undergo surgery for any reason. Patients with an antecedent history of pelvic pain either chronic or intermittent in nature may be diagnosed with torsion or less frequently auto-amputation of the adnexa. A fetal "pelvic mass" or "ovarian cyst" may predispose the adnexa to torsion and subsequent auto-amputation either in-utero or post-delivery. Many of these antenatally diagnosed cysts and even subsequent auto-amputations are completely asymptomatic, however, and do not compromise fertility assuming the contralateral adnexa are normal. Thus expectant management is appropriate for small (less than 4 cm), asymptomatic simple cysts and even suspected auto-amputated adnexa in an asymptomatic patient. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Proximate composition, bread

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... 0, 10, 20 and 30% levels of cocoyam flours substitution respectively and assessed for proximatecomposition ... decreased significantly with progressive increase in the cocoyam flour substitution. The significant (p<0.05) ... flour from locally grown crops replaces a portion of wheat flour for use in breads,.

  11. Individual Leg and Joint Work during Sloped Walking for People with a Transtibial Amputation Using Passive and Powered Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana R. Jeffers

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available People with a transtibial amputation using passive-elastic prostheses exhibit reduced prosthetic ankle power and push-off work compared to non-amputees and compensate by increasing their affected leg (AL hip joint work and unaffected leg (UL ankle, knee, and hip joint and leg work during level-ground walking. Use of a powered ankle–foot prosthesis normalizes step-to-step transition work during level-ground walking over a range of speeds for people with a transtibial amputation, but the effects on joint work during level-ground, uphill, and downhill walking have not been assessed. We investigated how use of passive-elastic and powered ankle–foot prostheses affect leg joint biomechanics during level-ground and sloped walking. 10 people with a unilateral transtibial amputation walked at 1.25 m/s on a dual-belt force-measuring treadmill at 0°, ±3°, ±6°, and ±9° using their own passive-elastic and a powered prosthesis (BiOM T2, BionX Medical Technologies, Inc., Bedford, MA, USA while we measured kinematic and kinetic data. We calculated AL and UL prosthetic, ankle, knee, hip, and individual leg positive, negative, and net work. Use of a powered compared to passive-elastic ankle–foot prosthesis resulted in greater AL prosthetic and individual leg net work on uphill and downhill slopes. Over a stride, AL prosthetic positive work was 23–30% greater (p < 0.05 during walking on uphill slopes of +6°, and +9°, prosthetic net work was up to 10 times greater (more positive (p ≤ 0.005 on all uphill and downhill slopes and individual leg net work was 146 and 82% more positive (p < 0.05 at uphill slopes of +6° and +9°, respectively, with use of the powered compared to passive-elastic prosthesis. Greater prosthetic positive and net work through use of a powered ankle–foot prosthesis during uphill and downhill walking improves mechanical work symmetry between the legs, which could decrease metabolic cost and improve functional

  12. Asymmetrical loading demands associated with vertical jump landings in people with unilateral transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, Marlene; Diss, Ceri E; Strike, Siobhan C

    2013-01-01

    Loading symmetry during vertical jump landings between a person with amputation's intact and prosthetic limbs was assessed to determine the role of each limb in controlling the downward momentum of the center of mass during landing. Six participants with unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA) and ten nondisabled participants completed 10 maximal vertical jumps, of which the highest jump was analyzed. Contralateral symmetry was assessed through the Symmetry Index (SI), while symmetry at the group level was assessed through a Mann-Whitney U test. Participants with TTA performed quasi-unilateral landings onto the intact limbs, resulting from either the incapability of the prosthetic ankle to plantar flex or increased residual-limb knee and hip flexion. In the loading phase, the participants with TTA displayed reduced prosthetic-side peak vertical forces (p = 0.04) along with reduced prosthetic-side ankle range of motion (p vertical force magnitudes (SI = 51%-140%), duration from touchdown to peak vertical force (SI = 52%-157%), ankle joint angles at touchdown (SI = 100%-538%), ranges of motion (SI = 147%-200%), knee (SI = 66%-179%) and hip (SI = 87%-132%) extensor moments, and work done at the ankle (SI = 155%-199%) and hip (SI = 83%-204%). High peak forces (25.25 +/- 4.89 N·kg(-1) intact limb and 14.61 +/- 8.28 N·kg(-1) prosthetic limb) from significantly lower (p < 0.001) landing heights than the nondisabled participants indicate a potential injury risk associated with landing for people with TTA.

  13. Protein expression profiling in head fragments during planarian regeneration after amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoguang; Xu, Cunshuan

    2015-04-01

    Following amputation, a planarian tail fragment can regrow into a complete organism including a well-organized brain within about 2-3 weeks, thus restoring the structure and function to presurgical levels. Despite the enormous potential of these animals for regenerative medicine, our understanding of the exact mechanism of planarian regeneration is incomplete. To better understand the molecular nature of planarian head regeneration, we applied two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE)/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF)/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS) technique to analyze the dynamic proteomic expression profiles over the course of 6 to 168 h post-decapitation. This approach identified a total of 141 differentially expressed proteins, 47 of which exhibited exceptionally high fold changes (≥3-fold change). Of these, Rx protein, an important regulator of head and brain development, was considered to be closely related to planarian head regeneration because of its exceptional high expression almost throughout the time course of regeneration process. Functional annotation analysis classified the 141 proteins into eight categories: (1) signaling, (2) Ca(2+) binding and translocation, (3) transcription and translation, (4) cytoskeleton, (5) metabolism, (6) cell protection, (7) tissue differentiation, and (8) cell cycle. Signaling pathway analysis indicated that Wnt1/Ca(2+) signaling pathway was activated during head regeneration. Integrating the analyses of proteome expression profiling, functional annotation, and signaling pathway, amputation-induced head reformation requires some mechanisms to promote cell proliferation and differentiation, including differential regulation of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins, and the regulation of proliferation and differentiation-related proteins. Importantly, Wnt1/Ca(2+) signaling pathway upregulates Rx expression, finally facilitating the differentiation of neoblasts into various

  14. Remote Dose-Dependent Effects of Dry Needling at Distant Myofascial Trigger Spots of Rabbit Skeletal Muscles on Reduction of Substance P Levels of Proximal Muscle and Spinal Cords

    OpenAIRE

    Yueh-Ling Hsieh; Chen-Chia Yang; Szu-Yu Liu; Li-Wei Chou; Chang-Zern Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background. Dry needling at distant myofascial trigger points is an effective pain management in patients with myofascial pain. However, the biochemical effects of remote dry needling are not well understood. This study evaluates the remote effects of dry needling with different dosages on the expressions of substance P (SP) in the proximal muscle, spinal dorsal horns of rabbits. Methods. Male New Zealand rabbits (2.5–3.0 kg) received dry needling at myofascial trigger spots of a gastrocnemiu...

  15. Human - Robot Proximity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickelsen, Niels Christian Mossfeldt

    The media and political/managerial levels focus on the opportunities to re-perform Denmark through digitization. Feeding assistive robotics is a welfare technology, relevant to citizens with low or no function in their arms. Despite national dissemination strategies, it proves difficult to recruit...... the study that took place as multi-sited ethnography at different locations in Denmark and Sweden. Based on desk research, observation of meals and interviews I examine socio-technological imaginaries and their practical implications. Human - robotics interaction demands engagement and understanding...

  16. Influence of a concurrent cognitive task on foot pedal reaction time following traumatic, unilateral transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauley, Tim; Devlin, Michael

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the influence of a secondary task on foot pedal reaction time, movement time and total response time in patients with transtibial amputation. Controlled trial without randomization. Ten patients with transtibial amputation and 13 age-matched controls. Foot pedal reaction time and movement time were measured for both legs under simple and dual-task conditions. To evaluate the influence of a secondary task on foot pedal reaction time, movement time and total response time in patients with transtibial amputation. Controlled trial without randomization. Ten patients with transtibial amputation and 13 age-matched controls. Foot pedal reaction time and movement time were measured for both legs under simple and dual-task conditions. While mean simple reaction time was similar for both groups (258 (standard deviation (SD) 53) vs 239 (SD 34) ms), a group by reaction time condition interaction (p transtibial amputation (432 (SD 109)vs 317 (SD 63) ms), apparently affecting the prosthetic and intact legs equally (426 (SD 110) vs 438 (SD 107) ms). Among patients with transtibial amputation faster movement time was achieved with the intact leg (185 (SD 61) vs 232 (SD 58)ms, p transtibial amputation, affecting the prosthetic and intact lower limbs equally.

  17. Mediolateral Angular Momentum Changes in Persons With Amputation During Perturbed Walking✰

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Riley C.; Beltran, Eduardo J.; Dingwell, Jonathan B.; Wilken, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    Over 50% of individuals with lower limb amputation fall at least once each year. These individuals also exhibit reduced ability to effectively respond to challenges to frontal plane stability. The range of whole body angular momentum has been correlated with stability and fall risk. This study determined how lateral walking surface perturbations affected the regulation of whole body and individual leg angular momentum in able-bodied controls and individuals with unilateral transtibial amputation. Participants walked at fixed speed in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation ENvironment with no perturbations and continuous, pseudo-random, mediolateral platform oscillations. Both the ranges and variability of angular momentum for both the whole body and both legs were significantly greater (p amputation than for controls for all segments (p amputation. However, for the prosthetic leg, angular momentum ranges were less for patients than controls. Patients with amputation were significantly more affected by the perturbations. Though patients with amputation were able to maintain similar patterns of whole body angular momentum during unperturbed walking, they were more highly destabilized by the walking surface perturbations. Individuals with transtibial amputation appear to predominantly use altered motion of the intact limb to maintain mediolateral stability. PMID:25797789

  18. Amputation-Free Survival after Crural Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty for Critical Limb Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm, M; Konge, L; Lönn, L; Schroeder, T V; Rørdam, P

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the amputation-free survival after below the knee percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in a consecutive group of patients with critical ischemia of the lower extremity. A total of 70 consecutive patients with critical ischemia were treated with below the knee percutaneous transluminal angioplasty at the vascular center at Rigshospitalet with the purpose of limb salvage. All patients were deemed unfit for major surgery due to anatomical limitations or severe co-morbidity, and no prior attempts of revascularization were performed. Follow-up clinical examinations were performed within 6 weeks and after 1 year. All medical records were crosschecked with the national vascular registry ensuring a valid 1-year status in 97% of the patients. A total of 15 major amputations were performed during follow-up, with 11 amputations performed within the first year. Complications after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty were rare. Cumulative mortality after 1 and 2 years was 22% and 34%, respectively. Amputation-free survival at 1 and 2 years of follow-up was 68% and 58%, respectively. There were no association between known risk factors such as diabetes, ischemic ulcers, cardiac disease, history of smoking, major amputation, or overall amputation. Below the knee percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in patients with end-stage peripheral arterial disease and critical limb ischemia is a safe procedure in relieving critical ischemia, reducing the short-term rate of a major amputation as opposed to best medical treatment alone. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2015.

  19. Survival of diabetes patients with major amputation is comparable to malignant disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Martin; Kujath, Peter; Flemming, Annette; Proß, Moritz; Begum, Nehara; Zimmermann, Markus; Keck, Tobias; Kleemann, Markus; Schloericke, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Almost all studies on diabetic foot syndrome focused on prevention of amputation and did not investigate long-term prognosis and survival of patients as a primary outcome parameter. We did a retrospective cohort study including 314 patients who had diabetic foot syndrome and underwent amputation between December 1995 and January 2001. A total of 48% of patients received minor amputation (group I), 15% only major amputation (group II) and 36% initially underwent a minor amputation that was followed by a major amputation (group III). Statistically significant differences were observed in comparison of the median survival of group I to group II (51 vs. 40 months; p = 0.016) and of group II to group III (40 vs. 55 months; p = 0.003). The prognosis of patients with major amputation due to diabetic foot syndrome is comparable to patients with malignant diseases. Vascular interventions did not improve the individual prognosis of patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. [Tests of hand functionality in upper limb amputation with prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzini, G; Orlandini, D; Moscato, T A; Nicita, D; Panigazzi, M

    2007-01-01

    The need for standardized instruments for clinical measurements has become pressing in the fields of occupational rehabilitation and ergonomics. This is particularly the case for instruments that allow a quantitative evaluation of upper limb function, and especially hand function in patients who have undergone an amputation and then application of an upper limb prosthesis. This study presents a review of the main tests used to evaluate hand function, with a critical analysis of their use in subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. The tests are divided into: tests to evaluate strength, tests to evaluate co-ordination and dexterity, tests of global or overall function, and tests proposed specifically for subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. Of the various tests presented, the authors give their preference to the Bimanual Functional Assessment, Abilhand and/or the ADL Questionnaire, because of the practical usefulness, clinimetric features, simplicity and ease of administration of these tests.

  1. Acute ischemia after revision hallux valgus surgery leading to amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, W David; Kruse, Dustin; Brantigan, Charles O; Stone, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Acute arterial insufficiency after revision hallux valgus surgery is a rare complication. The identification of surgical candidates who are at risk of vascular complications is of utmost importance. The patient-reported symptoms and physical findings combined with noninvasive vascular studies are generally reliable to assess the vascular status but can fail to identify patients with atypical disease patterns. We present the case of a patient with normal pulses who underwent revision hallux valgus surgery, leading to gangrene of the hallux that required transmetatarsal amputation. We reviewed the vascular evaluation methods and causes of acute ischemia after surgery, including vasculitis. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cubesat Proximity Operations Demonstration (CPOD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Marco; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The CubeSat Proximity Operations Demonstration (CPOD) project will demonstrate rendezvous, proximity operations and docking (RPOD) using two 3-unit (3U) CubeSats. Each CubeSat is a satellite with the dimensions 4 inches x 4 inches x 13 inches (10 centimeters x 10 centimeters x 33 centimeters) and weighing approximately 11 pounds (5 kilograms). This flight demonstration will validate and characterize many new miniature low-power proximity operations technologies applicable to future missions. This mission will advance the state of the art in nanosatellite attitude determination,navigation and control systems, in addition to demonstrating relative navigation capabilities.The two CPOD satellites are scheduled to be launched together to low-Earth orbit no earlier than Dec. 1, 2015.

  3. Adaptation to prostheses among patients with major lower-limb amputations and its association with sociodemographic and clinical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Nunes

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Lower-limb amputation compromises patients' independence and autonomy, and therefore they should be referred for rehabilitation in order to adapt to prostheses and regain autonomy. The aim here was to assess adaptation to prostheses among patients with major lower-limb amputations and its association with sociodemographic and clinical data. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a cross-sectional study in the city of Aracaju, Brazil. METHODS: The patients were identified by primary healthcare teams. The inclusion criterion was that these should be patients who underwent major lower-limb amputations of any etiology. Associations between sociodemographic and clinical variables and the adaptation to lower-limb prostheses were assessed. RESULTS: 149 patients were examined. Adaptation to the prosthesis occurred in 40% (60/149 of them, but only 62% (37/60 were using it. Adaptation occurred more often among male patients (P = 0.017 and among those who had a higher educational level (P = 0.013, with a longer time since amputation (P = 0.049 and when the etiology was trauma (P = 0.003. The result from logistic regression analysis showed that only patients with low education (P = 0.031 were significantly associated with a lower frequency of adaptation to prostheses. CONCLUSION: It was found that patients with a low educational level became adapted to the prosthesis less frequently. CONTEXTO E OBJETIVO: A amputação de membros inferiores compromete a independência e a autonomia dos pacientes, por isso, eles devem ser encaminhados para a reabilitação para a adaptação das próteses e assim viabilizar a recuperação da autonomia. O objetivo foi avaliar a adaptação de prótese em pacientes com amputações maiores de membros inferiores e sua associação com dados sócio-demográficos e clínicos.

  4. Assessment of reorganization in the sensorimotor cortex after upper limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenkreis, P; Witscher, K; Janssen, F; Pleger, B; Dertwinkel, R; Zenz, M; Malin, J P; Tegenthoff, M

    2001-04-01

    We wanted to investigate plastic changes occurring in the motor and somatosensory cortex after upper limb amputation, and their possible relationship to phantom pain. To assess these plastic changes, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and source localization of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP). Eleven patients with upper limb amputation were investigated. The phantom pain intensity was assessed by visual analogue scaling (VAS). Using TMS mapping, we found a significant lateralization of the amplitude-weighted centre of gravity (Pphantom pain intensity. We conclude that after limb amputation, the relationship between plastic changes occurring in the sensorimotor cortex and phantom pain seems to be more complex than previously believed.

  5. Wound healing in above-knee amputations in relation to skin perfusion pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein, P; Dovey, H; Lassen, N A

    1979-01-01

    In 59 above-knee amputations healing of the stumps was correlated with the local skin perfusion pressure (SPP) measured preoperatively as the external pressure required to stop isotope washout using 1318-- or 125I--antipyrine mixed with histamine. Out of the 11 cases with an SPP below 30 mm...... on the stumps was on average only slightly and insignificantly higher than the preoperative values, explaining why the preoperative values related so closely to the postoperative clinical course. We conclude that the SPP can be used to predict ischaemic wound complications in above-knee amputations as has...... previously been shown to be the case in below-knee amputations....

  6. [Self-amputation of the penis treated immediately: Case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odzébé, A W S; Bouya, P A; Otiobanda, G F; Banga Mouss, R; Nzaka Moukala, C; Ondongo Atipo, A M; Ondziel Opara, A S

    2015-12-01

    Self-amputation of the penis treated immediately: case report and review of the literature. Self-amputation of the penis is rare in urological practice. It occurs more often in a context psychotic disease. It can also be secondary to alcohol or drugs abuse. Treatment and care vary according on the severity of the injury, the delay of consultation and the patient's mental state. The authors report a case of self-amputation of the penis in an alcoholic context. The authors analyze the etiological and urological aspects of this trauma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Therapy-Resistant Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I: To Amputate or Not?

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    Bodde, M.I.; Dijkstra, P.U.; den Dunnen, W.F.A.; Geertzen, J.H.B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Amputation for the treatment of long-standing, therapy-resistant complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is controversial. An evidence-based decision regarding whether or not to amputate is not possible on the basis of current guidelines. The aim of the current study was to systematically review the literature and summarize the beneficial and adverse effects of an amputation for the treatment of long-standing, therapy-resistant CRPS-I. Methods: A literature search, using Me...

  8. Prior contralateral amputation predicts worse outcomes for lower extremity bypasses performed in the intact limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Donald T.; Goodney, Philip P.; Robinson, William P.; Nolan, Brian W.; Stone, David H.; Li, YouFu; Cronenwett, Jack L.; Schanzer, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To date, history of a contralateral amputation as a potential predictor of outcomes after lower extremity bypass (LEB) for critical limb ischemia (CLI) has not been studied. We sought to determine if a prior contralateral lower extremity amputation predicts worse outcomes in patients undergoing LEB in the remaining intact limb. Methods A retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing infrainguinal LEB for CLI between 2003 and 2010 within hospitals comprising the Vascular Study Group of New England was performed. Patients were stratified according to whether or not they had previously undergone a contralateral major or minor amputation before LEB. Primary end points included major amputation and graft occlusion at 1 year postoperatively. Secondary end points included in-hospital major adverse events, discharge status, and mortality at 1 year. Results Of 2636 LEB procedures, 228 (8.6%) were performed in the setting of a prior contralateral amputation. Patients with a prior amputation compared to those without were younger (66.5 vs 68.7; P = .034), more like to have congestive heart failure (CHF; 25% vs 16%; P = .002), hypertension (94% vs 85%; P = .015), renal insufficiency (26% vs 14%; P = .0002), and hemodialysis-dependent renal failure (14% vs 6%; P = .0002). They were also more likely to be nursing home residents (8.0% vs 3.6%; P = .036), less likely to ambulate without assistance (41% vs 80%; P amputation experienced increased rates of graft occlusion (38% vs 17%; P amputation (16% vs 7%; P amputation was an independent predictor of both major amputation (odds ratio, 1.73; confidence interval, 1.06–2.83; P = .027) and graft occlusion (odds ratio, 1.93; confidence interval, 1.39–2.68; P amputations who present with CLI in the intact limb represent a high-risk population, even among patients with advanced peripheral arterial disease. When considering LEB in this setting, both physicians and patients should expect increased rates of

  9. Sensory cortical re-mapping following upper-limb amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation: A case report

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    Jun Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case study demonstrates the change of sensory cortical representations of the residual parts of the arm in an individual who underwent a trans-humeral amputation and subsequent targeted reinnervation (TR. As a relatively new surgical technique, TR restores a direct neural connection from amputated sensorimotor nerves to specific target muscles. This method has been successfully applied to upper-limb and lower-limb amputees, and has shown effectiveness in regaining control signals via the newly re-innervated muscles. Correspondingly, recent study results have shown that motor representations for the missing limb move closer to their original locations following TR. Besides regaining motor control signals, TR also restores the sensation in the re-innervated skin areas. We therefore hypothesize that TR causes analogous cortical sensory remapping that may return closer to their original locations. In order to test this hypothesis, cortical activity in response to sensory-level electrical stimulation in different parts of the arm was studied longitudinally in one amputated individual before and up to 2 years after TR. Our results showed that 1 before TR, the cortical response to sensory electrical stimulation in the residual limb showed a diffuse bilateral pattern without a clear focus in either the time or spatial domain; and 2 2 years after TR, the sensory map of the reinnervated median nerve reorganized, showing predominant activity over the contralateral S1 hand area as well as moderate activity over the ipsilateral S1. Therefore, this work provides new evidence for long-term sensory cortical plasticity in the human brain after TR.

  10. Transverse Stress Fracture of the Proximal Patella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsumi, Satoru; Arai, Yuji; Kato, Ko; Nishimura, Akinobu; Nakazora, Shigeto; Nakagawa, Shuji; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Sudo, Akihiro; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Among stress fractures associated with sports activities, patellar stress fracture is rare. Regarding patella stress fractures, so far only distal transverse or lateral longitudinal fractures have been reported, but there are no reports of transverse fractures occurring in the proximal patella. We describe an extremely rare case of transverse stress fracture of proximal patella in a 9-year-old athlete. A 9-year old boy, who participated in sports (sprints and Kendo) presented with left knee pain without any external injury. In plain radiographs, a fracture line was observed in the proximal 1/3 of the left patella, and a patella stress fracture was diagnosed. For treatment, because 7 months of conservative therapy showed no improvement, internal fixation was carried out using Acutrak screws, and bone union was thus achieved. Three months after the operation, he was able to return to his previous level of athletic sports activity. Regarding the mechanism of onset, it is believed that the causes are longitudinal traction force and patellofemoral contact pressure. On the other hand, the contact region of the patella with the femur changes with the flexion angle of the knee. In the current case, the fracture occurred at a site where the patella was in contact with the femur at a flexion angle of >90°, so it is believed that it occurred as a clinical condition from being subjected to repeated longitudinal traction force and patellofemoral contact pressure at a flexion angle of >90°, during the sports activities of sprints and Kendo. The nonunion of the transverse stress fracture of his proximal patella was successfully treated with internal fixation using Acutrak screws. PMID:26871789

  11. Perceived self-efficacy and specific self-reported outcomes in persons with lower-limb amputation using a non-microprocessor-controlled versus a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Saffran; Hagberg, Kerstin; Samulesson, Kersti; Ramstrand, Nerrolyn

    2018-04-01

    To measure self-efficacy in a group of individuals who have undergone a lower-limb amputation and investigate the relationship between self-efficacy and prosthetic-specific outcomes including prosthetic use, mobility, amputation-related problems and global health. A second purpose was to examine if differences exist in outcomes based upon the type of prosthetic knee unit being used. Cross-sectional study using the General Self-Efficacy (GSE) Scale and the Questionnaire for Persons with a Transfemoral Amputation (Q-TFA). Forty-two individuals participated in the study. Twenty-three used a non-microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint (non-MPK) and 19 used a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint (MPK). The study sample had quite high GSE scores (32/40). GSE scores were significantly correlated to the Q-TFA prosthetic use, mobility and problem scores. High GSE scores were related to higher levels of prosthetic use, mobility, global scores and negatively related to problem score. No significant difference was observed between individuals using a non-MPK versus MPK joints. Individuals with high self-efficacy used their prosthesis to a higher degree and high self-efficacy was related to higher level of mobility, global scores and fewer problems related to the amputation in individuals who have undergone a lower-limb amputation and were using a non-MPK or MPK knee. Implications for rehabilitation Perceived self-efficacy has has been shown to be related to quality of life, prosthetic mobility and capability as well as social activities in daily life. Prosthetic rehabilitation is primary focusing on physical improvement rather than psychological interventions. More attention should be directed towards the relationship between self-efficacy and prosthetic related outcomes during prosthetic rehabilitation after a lower-limb amputation.

  12. Frontal plane dynamic margins of stability in individuals with and without transtibial amputation walking on a loose rock surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Deanna H; Scott, Shawn J; Wilken, Jason M; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2013-09-01

    Uneven walking surfaces pose challenges to balance, especially in individuals with lower extremity amputation. The purpose of this study was to determine if lateral stability of persons with unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA) is compromised when walking on a loose rock surface. Thirteen TTA and 15 healthy controls walked over level ground and over a loose rock surface at four controlled speeds. Dependent measures, including medial-lateral center of mass (COM) motion, step width variability, lateral arm swing velocity, and mean and variability of the minimum margins of stability (MOSmin), were compared between subject groups and across conditions. TTA had greater average MOSmin than Control subjects (p=0.018). TTA exhibited decreased MOSmin on their prosthetic limbs compared to their intact limbs (p=0.036), while Control subjects did not exhibit side to side differences. Both groups increased MOSmin with increasing walking speed (p≤0.001). There was no difference in the average MOSmin between walking surfaces (p=0.724). However, the variability of MOSmin was greater on the rocks compared to level ground. Both subject groups increased step width, step width variability, COM range of motion and peak COM velocity when walking on the rock surface. TTA exhibited greater variability of both step width and MOSmin, which suggests that they made larger step-to-step corrective responses, more often, to achieve the same average result. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Frontal Plane Dynamic Margins of Stability in Individuals With and Without Transtibial Amputation Walking on a Loose Rock Surface☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Deanna H.; Scott, Shawn J.; Wilken, Jason M.; Dingwell, Jonathan B.

    2013-01-01

    Uneven walking surfaces pose challenges to balance, especially in individuals with lower extremity amputation. The purpose of this study was to determine if lateral stability of persons with unilateral transtibial amputation (TTA) is compromised when walking on a loose rock surface. Thirteen TTA and 15 healthy controls walked over level ground and over a loose rock surface at four controlled speeds. Dependent measures, including medial-lateral center of mass (COM) motion, step width variability, lateral arm swing velocity, and mean and variability of the minimum margins of stability (MOSmin), were compared between subject groups and across conditions. TTA had greater average MOSmin than Control subjects (p = 0.018). TTA exhibited decreased MOSmin on their prosthetic limbs compared to their intact limbs (p = 0.036), while Control subjects did not exhibit side to side differences. Both groups increased MOSmin with increasing walking speed (p ≤ 0.001). There was no difference in the average MOSmin between walking surfaces (p = 0.724). However, the variability of MOSmin was greater on the rocks compared to level ground. Both subject groups increased step width, step width variability, COM range of motion and peak COM velocity when walking on the rock surface. TTA exhibited greater variability of both step width and MOSmin, which suggests that they made larger step-to-step, corrective responses, more often, to achieve the same average result. PMID:23481866

  14. SHORT COMMUNICATION PROXIMATE COMPOSITION, MINERAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    SHORT COMMUNICATION. PROXIMATE COMPOSITION, MINERAL CONTENT AND ANTINUTRITIONAL. FACTORS OF SOME CAPSICUM (Capsicum annum) VARIETIES GROWN IN. ETHIOPIA. Esayas K.1, Shimelis A.2, Ashebir F.3, Negussie R.3, Tilahun B.4 and Gulelat D.4*. 1Hawassa University, Department of Food ...

  15. A comparison of two prosthetic feet on the multi-joint and multi-plane kinetic gait compensations in individuals with a unilateral trans-tibial amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Heather A; Tokuno, Craig D; Eng, Janice J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of two different prosthetic feet on the three-dimensional kinetic patterns of both the prosthetic and sound limbs during unilateral trans-tibial amputee gait. Design Eleven individuals with a unilateral trans-tibial amputation participated in two walking sessions: once while using the conventional SAFE foot, the other while using the dynamic Flex foot. Background Despite the wide variation in the design of prosthetic feet, the benefits of these prostheses remain unclear. Methods During each test session, peak joint moments and powers in the sagittal, transverse and frontal planes were examined, as subjects walked at a comfortable speed. Results The majority of the kinetic differences that occurred due to the changing of prosthetic foot type were limited to ankle joint variables in the sagittal plane with greater peak moments and power during propulsion for the Flex foot compared to the SAFE foot. However, effects were also found at joints proximal to the prosthesis (e.g. knee) and differences were also found in the kinetics of the sound limb. Conclusion The dynamic Flex foot allowed subjects to rely more heavily on the prosthetic foot for propulsion and stability during walking with minimal compensations at the remaining joints. Relevance Determining the biomechanical differences between the conventional and dynamic prosthetic feet may advocate the use of one prosthetic foot type over another. This information, when used in conjunction with subjective preferences, may contribute to higher functioning and greater satisfaction for individuals with a lower limb amputation. PMID:15234485

  16. Rotationplasty (Borggreve/Van Nes and modifications) as an alternative to amputation in failed reconstructions after resection of tumours around the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseier, Leonhard E; Dumont, Charles E; Exner, G Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Failure of reconstructions as a result of infective or aseptic loosening and massive bone loss may make amputation necessary. If neurovascular structures can be preserved to keep a functional foot, rotationplasty may be considered an option. Four patients treated for malignant bone tumours (two osteosarcomas, one Ewing sarcoma, and one malignant fibrous histiocytoma) of the proximal tibia and distal femur (n=2 each) at the ages of 13 to 21 years had reconstructions that failed 3, 4, 5, and 15 years later. In three patients the cause was intractable infection, and in one loosening with shortening and deficiency of the extensor mechanism. The patients had the option to contact patients who had had rotationplasty as the primary procedure for tumours or severe femoral deficiencies. In two patients an AI-type rotationplasty was done, in one a type AII rotationplasty, and in the fourth a modification with shortening of the lower leg but retention of the knee joint. There were no postoperative complications such as persisting infections, fractures, or pseudarthrosis. All patients are active and are able to go alpine skiing or snowboarding. The main advantage of procedures in which a sensory-motor functional foot is retained is to avoid neuroma pain or phantom sensations. The foot allows for active knee movement of the orthoprosthesis and full weight bearing. It is of great psychological help for the patients to have contact during the decision-making with patients who have had similar procedures. It should be considered as an alternative to amputation.

  17. Clinimetric properties of hip abduction strength measurements obtained using a handheld dynamometer in individuals with a lower extremity amputation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruud A Leijendekkers

    Full Text Available Suitable handheld dynamometer (HHD-techniques to test hip abduction strength in individuals with a lower extremity amputation, irrespective of their amputation level are absent. The aim of this study was to optimise a HHD-technique and to test its reproducibility and validity.This study involved three phases, in which two techniques were evaluated. Both HHD-techniques used a lever-arm of 22 centimetre. HHD-technique 1 used a break-technique. After obtaining within-session test-retest reproducibility (phase 1 we optimised the HHD-technique by adding a fixation-belt and using a make-technique (HHD-technique 2. We tested the within-session test-retest and inter-rater reproducibility (phase 2 and the validity (phase 3 of HHD-technique 2 using an isokinetic dynamometer. New cohorts of participants were recruited for each phase.Phase 1: we tested HHD-technique 1 in 26 participants with a lower extremity amputation. It was test-retest reproducible (ICC3.1agreement: 0.80-0.92, standard error of measurement (SEM: 3.1-4.4 Nm and smallest detectable change (SDC: 8.6-12.3 Nm. There were questions regarding the validity of the measurement, because the mean muscle torque of the residual limb and sound limb were similar, which is uncommon. Phase 2: reproducibility of HHD-technique 2 was tested in 44 participants with a lower extremity amputation. It was test-retest reproducible (ICC3.1agreement: 0.96-0.97, SEM: 3.9-4.7 Nm and SDC: 10.9-12.9 Nm but not inter-rater reproducible despite having good reliability (ICC3.1agreement: 0.92, SEM: 6.9-7.6 Nm and SDC: 19.2-21.2 Nm. Systematic bias and bias related to the magnitude of the muscle torque was suspected. Phase 3: the concurrent validity was established in 30 healthy participants (r = 0.84. Systematic bias in measurement error was present, including a consistent overestimation of the muscle torque of 28% using the HHD.HHD-technique 2 is a test-retest reproducible and valid measuring technique The technique may

  18. Clinimetric properties of hip abduction strength measurements obtained using a handheld dynamometer in individuals with a lower extremity amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijendekkers, Ruud A; Hinte, Gerben van; Sman, Amy D; Staal, J Bart; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Hoogeboom, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Suitable handheld dynamometer (HHD)-techniques to test hip abduction strength in individuals with a lower extremity amputation, irrespective of their amputation level are absent. The aim of this study was to optimise a HHD-technique and to test its reproducibility and validity. This study involved three phases, in which two techniques were evaluated. Both HHD-techniques used a lever-arm of 22 centimetre. HHD-technique 1 used a break-technique. After obtaining within-session test-retest reproducibility (phase 1) we optimised the HHD-technique by adding a fixation-belt and using a make-technique (HHD-technique 2). We tested the within-session test-retest and inter-rater reproducibility (phase 2) and the validity (phase 3) of HHD-technique 2 using an isokinetic dynamometer. New cohorts of participants were recruited for each phase. Phase 1: we tested HHD-technique 1 in 26 participants with a lower extremity amputation. It was test-retest reproducible (ICC3.1agreement: 0.80-0.92, standard error of measurement (SEM): 3.1-4.4 Nm and smallest detectable change (SDC): 8.6-12.3 Nm). There were questions regarding the validity of the measurement, because the mean muscle torque of the residual limb and sound limb were similar, which is uncommon. Phase 2: reproducibility of HHD-technique 2 was tested in 44 participants with a lower extremity amputation. It was test-retest reproducible (ICC3.1agreement: 0.96-0.97, SEM: 3.9-4.7 Nm and SDC: 10.9-12.9 Nm) but not inter-rater reproducible despite having good reliability (ICC3.1agreement: 0.92, SEM: 6.9-7.6 Nm and SDC: 19.2-21.2 Nm). Systematic bias and bias related to the magnitude of the muscle torque was suspected. Phase 3: the concurrent validity was established in 30 healthy participants (r = 0.84). Systematic bias in measurement error was present, including a consistent overestimation of the muscle torque of 28% using the HHD. HHD-technique 2 is a test-retest reproducible and valid measuring technique The technique may be

  19. What Are the Frequency, Associated Factors, and Mortality of Amputation and Arthrodesis After a Failed Infected TKA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Min-Sun; Lau, Edmund; Parvizi, Javad; Mont, Michael A; Bozic, Kevin J; Kurtz, Steven

    2017-12-01

    For patients with failed surgical treatment of an infected TKA, salvage operations such as arthrodesis or above-knee amputation (AKA) may be considered. Clinical and institutional factors associated with AKA and arthrodesis after a failed TKA have not been investigated in a large-scale population, and the utilization rate and trend of these measures are not well known. (1) How has the frequency of arthrodesis and AKA after infected TKA changed over the last 10 years? (2) What clinical or institutional factors are associated with patients undergoing arthrodesis or AKA? (3) What is the risk of mortality after arthrodesis or AKA? The Medicare 100% National Inpatient Claims Database was used to identify 44,466 patients 65 years of age or older who were diagnosed with an infected TKA and who underwent revision between 2005 and 2014 based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Overall, 1182 knee arthrodeses and 1864 AKAs were identified among the study population. One year of data before the index infection-related knee revision were used to examine patient demographic, institutional, and clinical factors, including comorbidities, hospital volumes, and surgeon volumes. We developed Cox regression models to investigate the risk of arthrodesis, AKA, and death as outcomes. In addition, the year of the index revision was included as a covariate to determine if the risk of subsequent surgical interventions was changing over time. The risk of mortality was also assessed as the event of interest using a similar multivariate Cox model for each patient group (arthrodesis, AKA) in addition to those who underwent additional revisions but who did not undergo either of the salvage procedures. The number of arthrodesis (hazard ratio [HR], 0.90, p amputation (HR, 0.95, p amputation after adjusting for age, comorbidities, and other factors (HR, 1.28 [1.20-1.37], p amputation (HR, 1.00 [0.91-1.10], p = 0.971). The findings of this study

  20. Points to Know and Consider When Preparing for and Undergoing an Amputation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lifestyle: obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression, loss of bone density, back pain, amputation of another limb, and even some forms of cancer. Rehabilitation of the patient will likely include: Stretching exercises Strengthening exercises Gait (walking) training with or without ...