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Sample records for provoked venous thromboembolism

  1. Hormonal contraception and venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Milsom, Ian; Geirsson, Reynir Tomas

    2012-01-01

    New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published.......New studies about the influence of hormonal contraception on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been published....

  2. Predictors and Outcomes of Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism in Elderly Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Sandro; Limacher, Andreas; Tritschler, Tobias; Stalder, Odile; Méan, Marie; Righini, Marc; Aschwanden, Markus; Beer, Jürg Hans; Frauchiger, Beat; Osterwalder, Josef; Kucher, Nils; Lämmle, Bernhard; Cornuz, Jacques; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Matter, Christian M; Husmann, Marc; Banyai, Martin; Staub, Daniel; Mazzolai, Lucia; Hugli, Olivier; Rodondi, Nicolas; Aujesky, Drahomir

    2018-01-04

    Little is known about predictors and outcomes of recurrent venous thromboembolism in elderly patients. We prospectively followed up 991 patients aged ≥65 years with acute venous thromboembolism in a multicenter Swiss cohort study. The primary outcome was symptomatic recurrent venous thromboembolism. We explored the association between baseline characteristics and treatments and recurrent venous thromboembolism using competing risk regression, adjusting for periods of anticoagulation as a time-varying co-variate. We also assessed the clinical consequences (case-fatality, localization) of recurrent venous thromboembolism. During a median follow-up period of 30 months, 122 patients developed recurrent venous thromboembolism, corresponding to a 3-year cumulative incidence of 14.8%. The case-fatality of recurrence was high (20.5%), particularly in patients with unprovoked (23%) and cancer-related venous thromboembolism (29%). After adjustment, only unprovoked venous thromboembolism (sub-hazard ratio [SHR] 1.67 compared to provoked venous thromboembolism; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00-2.77) and proximal deep vein thrombosis (SHR 2.41 compared to isolated distal deep vein thrombosis; 95% CI 1.07-5.38) were significantly associated with recurrence. Patients with initial pulmonary embolism were more likely to have another pulmonary embolism as a recurrent event than patients with deep vein thrombosis. Elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism have a substantial long-term risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism and recurrence carries a high case-fatality rate. Only two factors, unprovoked venous thromboembolism and proximal deep vein thrombosis, were independently associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism, indicating that traditional risk factors for venous thromboembolism recurrence (e.g., cancer) may be less relevant in the elderly. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Venous Thromboembolism in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Samková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE during childhood is low with two peaks – neonatal and adolescent age. This retrospective study is focused on clinical characteristics of VTE during adolescence. The main goals are to assess the most frequent inherited and acquired risk factors and to evaluate the benefit of D-dimers in diagnostics of venous thromboemblism. The data of 18 adolescents were analysed – 16 girls (88.9%, 2 boys (11.1%. In 9 patients (50% thrombosis of the lower limb deep veins was diagnosed, six patients (33.3% suffered from symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE and 3 patients (16.7% from thrombosis at unusual sites. One patient had an idiopathic VTE, the mean number of the inherited and acquired risk factors was 2.6. The most frequent inherited risk factor was Leiden mutation of factor V (27.8%. The most frequent acquired risk factor was oral contraception (OC in 12 out of 16 girls (75%. All of our patients on oral contraception had one or more additional risk factors. 10 out of 18 (55.6% patients with VTE had elevated activity of factor VIII. The sensitivity of D-dimers was low (50% in patients with distal lower limb thrombosis, but very high (100% in patients with PE.

  4. Clinical overview of venous thromboembolism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    circulation, causing either partial or complete obstruction of pulmonary blood flow (in 4–13% of ... Keywords:anticoagulants, deep vein thrombosis, DVT, embolus, NOAC, PE, pulmonary embolism, thromboprophylaxis, thrombus, venous thromboembolism ... Cigarette smoking, including passive smoking. Hypercoagulability ...

  5. Neonatal Venous Thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M. Haley

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neonates are the pediatric population at highest risk for development of venous thromboembolism (VTE, and the incidence of VTE in the neonatal population is increasing. This is especially true in the critically ill population. Several large studies indicate that the incidence of neonatal VTE is up almost threefold in the last two decades. Central lines, fluid fluctuations, sepsis, liver dysfunction, and inflammation contribute to the risk profile for VTE development in ill neonates. In addition, the neonatal hemostatic system is different from that of older children and adults. Platelet function, pro- and anticoagulant proteins concentrations, and fibrinolytic pathway protein concentrations are developmentally regulated and generate a hemostatic homeostasis that is unique to the neonatal time period. The clinical picture of a critically ill neonate combined with the physiologically distinct neonatal hemostatic system easily fulfills the criteria for Virchow’s triad with venous stasis, hypercoagulability, and endothelial injury and puts the neonatal patient at risk for VTE development. The presentation of a VTE in a neonate is similar to that of older children or adults and is dependent upon location of the VTE. Ultrasound is the most common diagnostic tool employed in identifying neonatal VTE, but relatively small vessels of the neonate as well as frequent low pulse pressure can make ultrasound less reliable. The diagnosis of a thrombophilic disorder in the neonatal population is unlikely to change management or outcome, and the role of thrombophilia testing in this population requires further study. Treatment of neonatal VTE is aimed at reducing VTE-associated morbidity and mortality. Recommendations for treating, though, cannot be extrapolated from guidelines for older children or adults. Neonates are at risk for bleeding complications, particularly younger neonates with more fragile intracranial vessels. Developmental alterations in the

  6. Hyperhomocysteinemia and venous thromboembolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, A; Mazzola, G; Crippa, L; Fermo, I; Viganò D'Angelo, S

    1997-01-01

    In spite of the large number of reports showing that hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis and arterial occlusive disease, this metabolite of the methionine pathway is measured in relatively few laboratories and its importance is not fully appreciated. Recent data strongly suggest that mild HHcy is also involved in the pathogenesis of venous thromboembolic disease. The aim of this paper is to analyze the most recent advances in this field. The material examined in the present review includes articles and abstracts published in journals covered by the Science Citation Index and Medline. In addition the authors of the present article have been working in the field of mild HHcy as cause of venous thromboembolic disease. The studies examined provide very strong evidence supporting the role of moderate HHcy in the development of premature and/or recurrent venous thromboembolic disease. High plasma homocysteine levels are also a risk factor for deep vein thrombosis in the general population. Folic acid fortification of food has been proposed as a major tool for reducing coronary artery disease mortality in the United States. Vitamin supplementation may also reduce recurrence of venous thromboembolic disease in patients with HHcy. At the present time, however, the clinical efficacy of this approach has not been tested. In addition, the bulk of evidence indicates that fasting total homocysteine determinations can identify up to 50% of the total population of hyperhomocysteinemic subjects. Patients with isolated methionine intolerance may benefit from vitamin B6 supplementation. Homocysteine-lowering vascular disease prevention trials are urgently needed. Such controlled studies, however, should not focus exclusively on fasting homocysteine determinations and folic acid monotherapy.

  7. VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM PROPHYLAXIS – THE OTHER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM PROPHYLAXIS – THE OTHER SIDE OF THE COIN: A REVIEW OF LITERATURE ... Background: There are no local guidelines for prophylaxis against Venous Thrombo-Embolism (VTE). In the absence of any .... of leg ulceration in the age matched general population. (9.6% to 12.6%).

  8. [Venous thromboembolic disease: presentation of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirpuri-Mirpuri, P G; Álvarez-Cordovés, M M; Pérez-Monje, A

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease in its clinical spectrum includes both deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism, which is usually a complication of deep vein thrombosis. It is a relatively common disease with significant morbidity and requires an accurate diagnosis. They are numerous risk factors for venous thromboembolism, and there is evidence that the risk of thromboembolic disease increases proportionally to the number of predisposing risk factors present. The primary care physician should know the risk factors and suspect the presence of venous thromboembolic disease when there is a compatible clnical picture. The treatment for this pathology is anticoagulation. We report a patient with cardiovascular risk factors who was seen with pain in the right leg and shortness of breath and referred to the hospital with suspected venous thromboembolism, atrial fibrillation and pleural effusion. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. Postpartum venous thromboembolism: incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Naomi K; Boulet, Sheree L; Whiteman, Maura K; Monsour, Michael; Marchbanks, Polly A; Hooper, W Craig; Curtis, Kathryn M

    2014-05-01

    To calculate incidence of postpartum venous thromboembolism by week after delivery and to examine potential risk factors for venous thromboembolism overall and at different times during the postpartum period. A deidentified health care claims information database from employers, health plans, hospitals, and Medicaid programs across the United States was used to identify delivery hospitalizations among women aged 15-44 years during the years 2005-2011. International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis and procedure codes were used to identify instances of venous thromboembolism and associated characteristics and conditions among women with recent delivery. Incidence proportions of venous thromboembolism by week postpartum through week 12 were calculated per 10,000 deliveries. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios for selected risk factors among women with postpartum venous thromboembolism and among women with venous thromboembolism during the early or later postpartum periods. The incidence proportion of postpartum venous thromboembolism was highest during the first 3 weeks after delivery, dropping from nine per 10,000 during the first week to one per 10,000 at 4 weeks after delivery and decreasing steadily through the 12th week. Certain obstetric procedures and complications such as cesarean delivery, preeclampsia, hemorrhage, and postpartum infection conferred an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (odds ratios ranging from 1.3 to 6.4), which persisted over the 12-week period compared with women without these risk factors. Risk for postpartum venous thromboembolism is highest during the first 3 weeks after delivery. Women with obstetric complications are at highest risk for postpartum venous thromboembolism, and this risk remains elevated throughout the first 12 weeks after delivery. II.

  10. Familial Clustering of Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindet-Pedersen, Caroline; Oestergaard, Louise Bruun; Gundlund, Anna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) is of utmost importance to improve current prophylactic regimes and treatment guidelines. The extent to which a family history contributes to the risk of VTE needs further exploration. OBJECTIVES: To examine the relative...... rate of VTE in first-degree relatives compared with the general population. METHODS: By crosslinking Danish nationwide registries we identified patients with VTE between 1978 and 2012, and their familial relations. The first member in a family to acquire VTE was defined as the proband. All first...... regression models, with the general population as a fixed reference. RESULTS: We identified 70,767 children of maternal probands, 66,065 children of paternal probands, and 29,183 siblings to sibling probands. Having a maternal proband or a paternal proband were associated with a significantly increased VTE...

  11. Venous Thromboembolism in Patients With Thrombocytopenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jens Kristian; Ellingsen Moe, Espen; Nybo, Mads

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent and potentially lethal condition. Venous thrombi are mainly constituted of fibrin and red blood cells, but platelets also play an important role in VTE formation. Information about VTE in patients with thrombocytopenia is, however, missing. O...

  12. Tuberculosis and Venous Thromboembolism: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Ivone M; Alves, Daniela Costa; Carvalho, Aurora; do Ceu Brito, Maria; Calvario, Fernando; Duarte, Raquel

    2009-12-16

    Tuberculosis remains an infectious disease with a high prevalence worldwide and represents a major public health issue. Although venous thromboembolism is a rare complication of this disease, it may be a potentially life-threatening event. We report two cases of severe pulmonary tuberculosis associated with venous thromboembolism. A 38 year-old caucasian male that had a thromboembolic event as an unsual presentation form of tuberculosis and a 51 year-old caucasian male that developed deep venous thrombosis later in the course of the disease. An association between inflamation induced by tuberculosis and a hypercoagulable state has been described. Therefore, the occurence of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolic episods, should be considered in patients with tuberculosis particulary during the first weeks of treatment. The physician's awarness of these phenomena is important to an early diagnostic suspicion and prompt treatment in order to prevent fatal outcomes.

  13. Apixaban for Extended Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Buller, Harry R.; Cohen, Alexander; Curto, Madelyn; Gallus, Alexander S.; Johnson, Margot; Porcari, Anthony; Raskob, Gary E.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Gallus, Alexander; Raskob, Gary; Weitz, Jeffrey; Prins, Martin; Brandjes, Dees; Kolbach, Dinanda; Limburg, Martinus; Mac Gillavry, Melvin; Otten, Johannes Martinus; Peters, Ron; Roos, Yvo; Segers, Annelise; Slagboom, Ton; Bounameaux, Henry; Hirsh, Jack; Samama, Meyer Michel; Wedel, Hans; Masiukiewicz, Urszula; Pak, Raphael; Sanders, Paul; Sisson, Melanie; Sullivan, Beth; Thompson, John; Auerbach, Jennifer; Cesario, Lynne; Gamero, Miguel; Gordon, Margot; Griffiths, Angela; Noble, Melanie; Ott, Jana; Pennington, Ann; Peffer, Allison; Reinhold, Peggy; Simmons, Melanie; Urwin, Keri; Ceresetto, Jose; McRae, Simon; Pabinger, Ingrid; Pereira, Adamastor Humberto; Spencer, Fred; Gorican, Karel; Husted, Steen Elkiaer; Mottier, Dominique; Harenberg, Job; Pinjala, Ramakrishna; Zeltser, David; Imberti, Davide; Sandset, Morten; Torbicki, Adam; Fijalkowska, Anna; Albino, Jose Pereira; Kirienko, Alexander; Shvarts, Yury; Monreal, Manuel; Jacobson, Barry; Dolan, Gerry; Gudz, Ivan; Ortel, Tom; Spyropoulos, Alex; Torbicki, A.; Fijalkowska, A.; Skupyy, O.; Beryer-Westendorf, J.; de Pellegrin, A.; Prasol, V.; Schellong, S.; Jacobson, B.; Falvo, N.; Abramov, I.; Cizek, V.; Husted, S.; Desai, S.; Gudz, I.; Barillari, G.; Sergeev, O.; Chetter, I.; Inbal, A.; McCollum, C.; Shvalb, P.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Vasylyuk, S.; Kraemmer Nielsen, H.; Pernod, G.; Schmidt, J.; Bova, C.; Gerasymov, V.; Pabinger-Fasching, I.; Skalicka, L.; Zaichuk, A.; Achkar, A.; Bremmelgaard, A.; Chochola, J.; Gould, T.; Khalafallah, A.; Jakobsen, T.; Rose, P.; Zhukov, B.; Dedek, V.; Mirete Ferrer, J.; Pesant, Y.; Repin, A.; Salem, H.; Solis Morales, L.; Spacek, R.; Cannon, K.; Grzelakowski, P.; Jindal, R.; Pereira, A.; Zidkova, E.; Ambrosio, G.; Cardozo, M.; Dunaj, M.; Gallus, A.; Gavish, D.; Ghanima, W.; Harenberg, J.; Leduc, J. J.; Mismetti, P.; Panico, M.; Porreca, E.; Riera, A.; Bareford, D.; Chong, B.; Dvoryashina, I.; Gómez Cerezo, J.; Kobza, I.; Nielsen, T.; Pendleton, R.; Pullman, J.; Schiffman, G.; Stanbro, M.; Zwettler, U.; Aquilanti, S.; Bratsch, H.; Cohen, K.; Elias, D.; Gan, E.; Holaj, R.; Klinke, W.; Liu, H. S. Y.; Sandset, P. M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, E.; Álvarez-Sala, L. A.; Basson, M.; Braester, A.; Bura-Riviere, A.; Calvo Vargas, C.; Cohen, A.; Correa, J.; Elias, M.; Frost, L.; Imberti, D.; Landolfi, R.; Marschang, P.; Moreira, R.; Mottier, D.; Natarajan, S.; Pottier, P.; Tosetto, A.; Tuxen, C.; Vöhringer, H. F.; Alexander, A.; Barbarash, O.; Fajardo Campos, P.; Graham, M.; Gubka, O.; Hudcovic, M.; Hussein, O.; Jackson, D.; Katelnitskiy, I.; Lawall, H.; Monreal, M.; Palareti, G.; Poggio, R.; Roos, J.; Simonneau, G.; Smith, S. W.; Szopinski, P.; Ortel, T.; Zimlichman, R.; Bridgers, D.; Colan, D.; Czekalski, P.; de Jong, D.; Fortinez, J. T.; Garcia Bragado, F.; Harrington, D.; Izbicki, G.; Kadr, H.; Koslow, A.; Loftus, I.; Marais, H.; Neumeister, A.; Oliven, A.; Palla, A.; Pop, C.; Prandoni, P.; Puskas, A.; Sanchez Llamas, F.; Shotan, A.; Shvarts, Y.; Singh, P.; Tveit, A.; Baker, R.; Borja, V.; Brenner, B.; Brown, H.; Ceresetto, J.; Cha, T. J.; Cohen, Y.; D'Angelo, A.; Dhar, A.; Friis, E.; Hueur, H.; Jiménez Rodríguez Madridejos, R.; Karl, J.; Karrasch, J.; Lishner, M.; Manenti, E.; McRae, S.; Meneveau, N.; Nguyen, D.; Sanchez-Escalante, L.; Santoscoy Ibarra, J.; Sokurenko, G.; Staroverov, I.; Stein, R.; Abdullah, I.; Agnelli, G.; Alcocer Gamba, M.; Balanda, J.; Bruckner, I.; Calabuig Alborch, J.; Caraco, Y.; Comerota, A.; Cromer, M.; de Araujo Filho, J.; de los Rios Ibarra, M.; Diaz-Castañon, J.; Doshi, A.; Ebrahim, I.; Fessel, W. J.; Fletcher, E.; Fourie, N.; Fu, C.; Gutowski, P.; Haddad, G.; Hoffman, U.; Jardula, M.; Kvasnicka, T.; Lewczuk, J.; Leyden, M.; Livneh, A.; Lodigiani, C.; Lovell, C.; Miekus, P.; Paloma, M. J.; Parakh, R.; Raval, M.; Schmidt-Lucke, J.; Shtutin, O.; Soroka, V.; Stevens, D.; Sulik, P.; Tay, J. C.; Vejby-Christensen, H.; Vinereanu, D.; Baghestanian, M.; Bono, J.; Cerana, S.; Freire, A.; Gibson, K.; Giumelli, C.; Iastrebner, C.; Karpenko, A.; Kelly, A.; Lacroix, P.; LaFata, J.; Lobo, S.; Macik, B. G.; Marchena Yglesias, P.; Nishinari, K.; Pinjala, R.; Podczeck-Schweighofer, A.; Raby, K.; Sirpal, S.; Solymoss, S.; Spencer, F.; van Zyl, L.; Vargas Núñez, J. A.; von Bilderling, P.; Warr, T.; Wronski, J.; Wurster, M.; Albino, J. A.; Albuquerque, L.; Averill, F.; Baek, S. H.; Bello, F.; Bergoeing, M.; Blanc, F. X.; Bloomberg, R.; Bolster, D.; Brockmyre, A.; Calimano, C.; Checketts, D.; Cieplinski, W.; Chervu, A.; Collado, F.; Denaro, C.; Gaciong, Z.; Game, M.; Iskander, A.; Kaatz, S.; Kim, D. I.; Koura, F.; Laguna, F.; Lanas Zanetti, F.; Lindhoff-Last, E.; Melaniuk, M.; Meade, A.; Murphy, T.; Ng, H. J.; Páramo Fernández, J. A.; Patil, C.; Piovella, F.; Prisco, D.; Pruszczyk, P.; Reimers, G.; Rivera, E.; Rodriguez-Cintron, W.; Rosenthal, S.; Salbach, P.; Salvador, D.; Schuller, D.; Siragusa, S.; Staniszewski, R.; Torp, R.; Vora, K.; Yip, G.; Alfieri, A.; Belaji, V.; Bhagavan, N.; Carnovali, M.; Cobos Segarra, J.; Di Todaro, F.; Dowell, A.; Corder, C.; Crispin, P.; Cuadrado, J.; Flippo, G.; Fraiz, J.; Guillaumon, A.; Gvora, T.; Hakki, S.; Harris, L.; Ison, R.; Htun, P. T.; Jasani, R.; Kates, M.; Kaminski, L.; Kamerkar, D.; Kirienko, A.; Kroger, K.; LaPerna, L.; Leiva, J.; Luber, J.; McCann, A.; McKenzie, W.; Menna Barreto, S.; Moran, J.; Nikulnikov, P.; Paliwal, Y.; Patel, M.; Pilger, E.; Renwick, W.; Shevela, A.; Starosiliz, D.; Stringam, S.; Spyropoulos, A.; To, R.; Updegrove, J.; van Bellen, B.; Waintrub, M.; White, J.; Yeo, E.; Zangroniz, P.; Zeltser, D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Apixaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor that can be administered in a simple, fixed-dose regimen, may be an option for the extended treatment of venous thromboembolism. METHODS In this randomized, double-blind study, we compared two doses of apixaban (2.5 mg and 5 mg, twice daily) with

  14. Venous thromboembolism: Risk profile and management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. This study aims to describe the venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk profile of women undergoing elective gynaecological surgery in a tertiary hospital and to audit the VTE prophylaxis prescribed. Methods. One hundred and nine women who underwent elective gynaecological surgery at Kalafong Provincial ...

  15. Clinical overview of venous thromboembolism | Schellack | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) encompasses two vascular conditions that are of significant importance, namely deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). DVT is also the most common cause of PE. Medical and surgical patients, and individuals who are at increased risk of developing VTE through a ...

  16. Venous thromboembolism: awareness and practice of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the high level of thromboprophylaxis practice appears doubtful because only a few of these physicians carry out VTE risk assessment for their patients as well as follow clinical guidelines on VTE thromboprophylaxis. Key words: Venous thromboembolism, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, risk factor, ...

  17. Association of Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors with Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmoodi, Bakhtawar K; Cushman, Mary; Næss, Inger Anne

    2017-01-01

    Background: Much controversy surrounds the association of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors with venous thromboembolism (VTE). Methods: We performed an individual level random-effect meta-analysis including 9 prospective studies with measured baseline cardiovascular disease risk...... factors and validated VTE events. Definitions were harmonized across studies. Traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors were modeled categorically and continuously using restricted cubic splines. Estimates were obtained for overall VTE, provoked VTE (ie, VTE occurring in the presence of 1 or more...... is potentially mediated through comorbid conditions such as cancer, the modifiable traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors are not associated with increased VTE risk. Higher systolic blood pressure showed an inverse association with VTE....

  18. Pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism and risk of occult cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veres, Katalin; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Ehrenstein, Vera

    2017-01-01

    The cancer risk during the first year after a pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism episode is higher than expected.An aggressive search for cancer in women with pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism is probably not warranted, due to low absolute risk.......The cancer risk during the first year after a pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism episode is higher than expected.An aggressive search for cancer in women with pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism is probably not warranted, due to low absolute risk....

  19. Epidemiology of the contraceptive pill and venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaford, Philip C

    2011-02-01

    Current users of combined oral contraceptives have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. The risk appears to be higher during the first year of use and disappears rapidly once oral contraception is stopped. There is a strong interaction between hereditary defects of coagulation, combined oral contraceptive use and venous thromboembolism. Nevertheless, the routine screening of women before they use combined oral contraception is not recommended. Venous thromboembolism seems to be higher in overweight users, and after air, and possibly other forms of, travel. Both the oestrogen and progestogen content of combined oral contraceptives have been implicated in differences in venous thrombotic risk between products. Even if real, the absolute difference in risk between products is small, because the background incidence of venous thromboembolism in young women is low. All currently available combined oral contraceptives are safe. Progestogen-only oral contraceptives are not associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Direct oral anticoagulants and venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Franchini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate. This narrative review focusses on the characteristics of these direct anticoagulants and the main results of published clinical studies on their use in the prevention and treatment of VTE.

  1. Awareness of Venous thromboembolism among doctors in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Venous thromboembolic (VTE) is a preventable leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and is a cause of sudden death. Awareness of VTE among doctors will reduce the incidence of unexpected deaths in hospitalised patients. Objective: To assess doctors' awareness of venous thromboembolism ...

  2. Edoxaban versus Warfarin for the Treatment of Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büller, Harry R.; Décousus, Hervé; Grosso, Michael A.; Mercuri, Michele; Middeldorp, Saskia; Prins, Martin H.; Raskob, Gary E.; Schellong, Sebastian M.; Schwocho, Lee; Segers, Annelise; Shi, Minggao; Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Phil; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Angchaisuksiri, Pantep; Banyai, Martin; Bauersachs, Rupert; van Bellen, Bonno; Blüguermann, Julio; Boda, Zoltán; Bounameaux, Henri; Brenner, Benjamin; Brighton, Tim; Castañon, Javier Diaz; Chechulov, Pavel; Chlumský, Yaromir; Cohen, Alexander; Davidson, Bruce; Decousus, Hervé; Eriksson, Henry; Gallus, Alexander; Gudz, Ivan; Jacobson, Barry; Heng, Lee Lai; Lyons, Roger; Meijer, Karina; Minar, Erich; Monreal, Manuel; Nakamura, Mashio; Oh, Doyeun; Öngen, Gül; Parakh, Rajiv; Piovella, Franco; Raskob, Gary; Rehm, Jeffery; Sandset, Per Morten; Schellong, Sebastian; Smith, Mark; Sokurenko, German; Tomkowski, Witold; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Wang, Chen; Wang, Yuqi; Weitz, Jeff; Yanushko, Vyacheslav; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Prins, Martin; Beenen, Ludo; Brandjes, Dees; MacGillavry, Melvin; Kaplowitz, Neil; Otten, Hans-Martin; Pessayre, Dominique; Peters, Ron; Roos, Yvo; Slagboom, Ton; Eikelboom, John; Crowther, Mark; Roberts, Robin; Vanassche, Thomas; Vandenbriele, Christophe; Debaveye, Barbara; Dani, Viddhi; van Bergen, Petro; Gerrits, Paul; van Kranen, Robbert; Lanz, Hans; Grosso, Michael; Kappelhoff, John; Franc, John; Zhang, George; Lin, Min; Crerand, William; Giordano, Chris; Skinner, Maureen; Hurley, Steve; Lovelace, Gregg; Barrier, Robert; Betcher, Josh; Alvarez, C.; Amuchastegui, L. M.; Blüguermann, J.; Cassettari, A.; Ceressetto, J.; Hrabar, NN; Macin, S.; Mahuad, C.; Oberti, P.; Santini, F.; Baker, R. I.; Blombery, P.; Brighton, T.; Carroll, P.; Chong, B.; Coughlin, P.; Crispin, P.; Fletcher, J.; Gallus, A.; Serisier, D. J.; Tran, H.; Chan, N.; Stafford, L.; Ward, C.; Baghestanian, M.; Kyrle, P. A.; Eischer, L.; Traby, L.; Marschang, P.; Mathies, R.; Pilger, E.; Brodmann, M.; Roithinger, F.; Weltermann, A.; Adzerikho, I.; Davidovskaya, E.; Gorokhovsky, S.; Maslianski, B.; Kulik, A.; Yanushka, A.; de Vleeschauwer, P.; Debing, E.; Duchateau, J.; Gustin, M.; Hainaut, P.; Vandekerkhof, J.; Verhamme, P.; Peerlinck, K.; Verstraeten, P.; Wautrecht, J. C.; Motte, S.; Annichino-Bizzacchi, J. M.; Mello, T. B. T.; Menezes, F. H.; Burihan, M.; Cavalcanti, M.; Correa, J.; Correa de Carvalho, F.; Cukier, A.; Manenti, E.; Manenti, E. R.; Sacilotto, R.; Timi, J. M.; van Bellen, B.; Kahn, S. R.; Kovacs, M.; Langner, A. Lazo; VanSpronsen, H.; Ritchie, B.; Shafai-Sarshar, R.; Shivakumar, S.; Anderson, D.; Robinson, K.; Gallant, B.; Wells, P.; Karovitch, A.; Scarvelis, D.; Carrier, M.; Bai, C. X.; Chen, R. C.; Cheng, Z. Z.; Du, Y. C.; Hu, X. Y.; Gu, Y. Q.; Hao, Q. L.; Sun, S. B.; Wang, C.; Jiang, L.; Liu, C. J.; Liu, C. W.; Liu, S.; Wang, X. X.; Ye, X. F.; Ma, Z.; Qin, Z. Q.; Qin, X. J.; Tian, H. Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Shi, Z. Y.; Wen, F. Q.; Wu, Q.; Yang, Y. H.; Kuang, T. G.; Yang, H.; Ying, K. J.; Ma, G. F.; Yuan, Y. D.; Yu, J.; Gong, X. W.; Zhang, F. X.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S. X.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, J. C.; Huang, B.; Zhao, J.; Chlumsky, J.; Hola, D.; Hirmerova, J.; Hutyra, M.; Klimsa, Z.; Holub, M.; Kovarova, K.; Lang, P.; Ryba, M.; Podoubský, R.; Matoska, P.; Mayer, O.; Patek, F.; Tupa, M.; Spacek, R.; Urbanova, R.; Blazejova, S.; Vitovec, M.; Andersen, B.; Brønnum-Schou, J.; Dominguez, H.; Egstrup, K.; Auscher, S.; Jeppesen, J.; Asferg, C.; Vishram, J.; Nielsen, H.; Galsgaard, I.; Michaelsen, M.; Haugaard-Nielsen, B.; Ostergaard, O.; Poulsen, S. H.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Masik, S.; Kadarik, M.; Meriste, S.; Paumets, M.; Laheäär, M.; Raidjuk, L.; Accassat, S.; Buchmuller, A.; Mismetti, P.; Achkar, A.; Aquilanti, S.; Rifaï, A.; Breuil, N.; Schmidt, J.; Brisot, D.; Brousse, C.; de la Fuentes, P. Tarodo; Chakra, M.; Crestani, B.; Desormais, I.; Lacroix, P.; Diamand, J. M.; El Kouri, D.; Clairand, R.; Elias, A.; Ferrari, E.; Doyen, D.; Chiche, O.; Grange, C.; Guenneguez, H.; Lacut, K.; Couturaud, F.; Mottier, D.; Leroux, L.; Lorcerie, B.; de Maistre, E.; Berthier, S.; Mahe, I.; Martin, M.; Meneveau, N.; Meyer, G.; Sanchez, O.; Montaclair, K.; Pavic, M.; Pernod, G.; Imbert, B.; Quere, I.; Galanaud, J. P.; Roy, P. M.; Sevestre, M. A.; Simoneau, G.; Stephan, D.; Aleil, B.; Mirea, C.; Trinh-Duc, A.; von Bilderling, P. Baron; Beyer-Westendorf, J.; Werth, S.; Köhler, C.; Halbritter, K.; Diehm, C.; Espinola-Klein, C.; Weisser, G.; Franke, D.; Heuer, H.; Horacek, T.; Kahrmann, G.; Kroening, R.; Lawall, H.; Roecken, M.; Schellong, S. M.; Pomper, L.; Voigts, B.; Bernhard, S.; Frommhold, R.; Stellbrink, C.; Boda, Z.; Ilonczai, P.; Olah, Z.; Razso, K.; Schlammadinger, A.; Farkas, K.; Kolossváry, E.; Szabó, I.; Frankfurter, Z.; Gasztonyi, B.; Gurzó, M.; Klucsik, Z.; Kovacs, A.; Szigeti, S.; Varga, C.; Landi, A.; Nyirati, G.; Pecsvarady, Zs; Riba, M.; Sámson, Z.; Sipos, Gy; Szigyártó, M.; Sebő, N.; Szabó, T. Janossikné; Toth, K.; Agarwal, S.; Arneja, J.; Babhulkar, S.; Balaji, R.; Banker, D.; Bhagavan, N. K.; Bhonagiri, S.; Mehta, A.; Dayasagar Rao, V.; Desai, P.; Desai, S. C.; Chandrashekar, A. R.; Singh, R.; Deshpande, A.; Dharmadhikari, A.; Durairaj, N.; Ghaisas, N.; Gupta, S.; Jain, R.; Jindal, R.; Kamerkar, D.; Kothiwale, V. A.; Kothurkar, A.; Kulkarni, R.; Kumar, S.; Mody, B.; Nagabhushan, K. N.; Pandharpurkar, H. K.; Joshi, S.; Parakh, R.; Grover, T.; Patel, J.; Patel, K.; Dudhagra, N.; Pawar, N.; Penurkar, M.; Pinjala, R.; Rai, K.; Rao, B.; Raval, M.; Raval, A.; Mehta, P.; Ravi Kishore, A. G.; Saravanan, S.; Shetty, P.; Srinivas, A.; Suresh, K. R.; Sumanthraj, K.; Girija, K. R.; Vinod, M. Vijan; Gavish, D.; Ashkenazy, B.; Braester, A.; Caraco, Y.; Elias, M.; Goldstein, L.; Grossman, E.; Lahav, M.; Lishner, M.; Lugassy, G.; Oliven, A.; Rachmilevitz, R.; Tzoran, I.; Brenner, B.; Yeganeh, S.; Zeltser, D.; Zimlichman, R.; Ageno, W.; Barillari, G.; Pasca, S.; Bortoluzzi, C.; Cattaneo, M.; Falanga, A.; Ghirarduzzi, A.; Lodigiani, C.; Picchi, C.; Iosub, D. I.; Porreca, E.; Prandoni, P.; Quintavalla, R.; Siragusa, S.; Akita, T.; Aoyama, T.; Fujimoto, K.; Hanzawa, K.; Ikeda, U.; Iwata, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Kondo, K.; Kurimoto, T.; Maeda, H.; Mo, M.; Munemasa, M.; Murakami, H.; Nishi, Y.; Nishibe, T.; Nishigami, K.; Nunohiro, T.; Obayashi, T.; Satoh, T.; Satokawa, H.; Shimizu, K.; Shiroma, H.; Sonoda, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Taniguchi, S.; Tsujita, K.; Yamada, N.; Yasuda, C.; Yoshida, H.; Chang, H. J.; Choi, W. I.; Kwon, K. Y.; Rho, B. H.; Choi, J. S.; Hong, Y. S.; Joh, J. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, K. U.; Kim, J. Y.; Kwon, T. W.; Lee, T. S.; Lim, S. Y.; Mun, Y. C.; Oh, D. Y.; Park, K. H.; Yun, W. S.; Yoon, H. I.; Diaz-Castañon, J.; Flota, L. F.; Galindo, J.; Gomez Lara, J.; Jerjes-Sanchez, C.; Palomar-Lever, A.; Rodriguez, D.; Higareda, I.; Boersma, W. G.; de Graaff, C. S.; Oudeman, L.; Brans, E.; Bredie, S. J. H.; Dees, A.; Erdkamp, F.; Peters, F.; Fijnheer, R.; Gerdes, V. E. A.; Griffioen, A.; Jie, K.-S. G.; Meijer, K.; Kooistra, H.; Wiewel-Verschueren, S.; Kamphuisen, P. W.; van Es, J.; Eerenberg, E. S.; Swart Heikens, J.; ten Cate, H.; ten Wolde, M.; Hes, R.; Atalay, S.; Harper, P.; Merriman, E.; Ockelford, P.; Hulton, M. H.; Phillips, J.; Royle, G.; Ford, A.; Smith, M.; Ghanima, W.; Amundsen, H.; Sandset, P. M.; Abola, M. T.; Ganzon, M. S.; Germar, A.; Checinski, P.; Kwasniewski, A.; Tomkowski, W.; Zechowicz, T.; Apartsin, K.; Arutyunov, G.; Barbarash, O.; Burov, Y.; Chechulov, P.; Varaksina, E.; Chernyatina, M.; Gladchenko, M.; Belikov, L.; Fokin, A.; Gubenko, A.; Igor, K.; Olga, M.; Kazakov, Y.; Kazakov, A.; Krasavin, V.; Linev, K.; Plechev, V.; Shesternya, P.; Shkurin, V.; Shvalb, P.; Sokurenko, G.; Sonkin, I.; Remizov, A.; Chernykh, K.; Staroverov, I.; Subbotin, Y.; Zeltser, M.; Seletsky, A.; Iliynykh, A.; Zilber, A.; Zubareva, N.; Tkachenko, I.; Pakhomova, A.; Raghuram, J.; Ng, H. J.; Sin, K.; Adler, D.; Weber, F.; van der Jagt, R.; Basson, M.; Becker, J.; Ellis, G.; Isaacs, R.; Jacobson, B.; Louw, S.; van Rensburg, Jansen; Siebert, H.; Skosana, F.; van Marle, J.; van Zyl, L.; le Roux, R.; Williams, P.; Cereto, F.; Garcia-Bragado, F.; Miranda, R. Tirado; Carlsson, A.; Eriksson, H.; Villegas-Scivetti, M.; Ottosson, E.; Sjalander, A.; Torstensson, I.; Banyai, M.; Afarideh, R.; Gallino, A.; Mazzolai, L.; Righini, M.; Staub, D.; Chen, C. J.; Chiang, C. E.; Wang, K. L.; Chiu, K. M.; Huang, J. H.; Lai, W. T.; Pai, P. Y.; Lin, K. H.; Wang, J. H.; Wu, C. C.; Yin, W. H.; Huang, C. L.; Angchaisuksiri, P.; Kulpraneet, M.; Rojnuckarin, P.; Öngen, G.; Duman, B.; Ozkan, S.; Savas, I.; Selçuk, T.; Tuncay, E.; Gerasymov, V.; Gubka, O.; Gudz, I.; Voloshyn, M.; Nikulnikov, P.; Danylets, A.; Prasol, V.; Rusyn, V.; Sergeev, O.; Shtutin, O.; Skupyy, O.; Tatarin, A.; Venger, I.; Cohen, A. T.; Patel, R.; Hunt, B. J.; Kesteven, P.; Robson, L.; MacCallum, P.; Nokes, T.; Rose, P.; Acs, P.; Gordan, L.; Bhatia, A.; Ali, M.; Amin, D.; Masson, J.; Gavi, E.; Ayele, E.; Ayeni, O.; Canosa, R.; Chavous, D.; Chen, D.; Comerota, A.; Concha, M.; Cunanan-Bush, M.; Daboul, N.; Daggubati, S.; Dang, N.; DiBella, N.; Driver, A.; Dulgeroff, A.; Fraiz, J.; Friedlander, A.; Galvez, A.; Jani, C.; Johnson, S.; Khandelwal, P.; Kingsley, E.; Kingsley, J.; Hutchinson, L.; Lavender, R.; Lyons, R.; Guzley, G.; Martinez, R.; Metjian, A.; Moran, J.; Nadar, V.; Pish, R.; Pullman, J.; Quaranta, A. J.; Ravi, C.; Refaai, M.; Rehm, J.; Richards, D.; Richwine, R.; Sachdeva, S.; Seibert, A.; Sharma, A.; Stricklin, D.; Tannenbaum, A.; Tin-U, C.; Vora, K.; Watkins, D.; Willms, D.

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundWhether the oral factor Xa inhibitor edoxaban can be an alternative to warfarin in patients with venous thromboembolism is unclear. MethodsIn a randomized, double-blind, noninferiority study, we randomly assigned patients with acute venous thromboembolism, who had initially received

  3. [Venous thromboembolism in patients with acute tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Amar, J; Dahri, B; Aouina, H; Bouacha, H

    2015-12-01

    Studies have demonstrated a link between tuberculosis and hypercoagulable state, with reported rates of 0,6%-10% venous thromboembolism (VTE) in all adults with tuberculosis. The present study aimed to evaluate the current incidence and characteristics of VTE in a large sample of patients with acute tuberculosis. We report a retrospective study about 26 patients who have confirmed tuberculosis complicated with VTE disease. Sixteen men and ten women were brought together. The mean age was 42.58 years. The thromboembolic complication revealed tuberculosis among 5 patients, appearing during hospitalization of 21 patients among which 16 of them receiving antituberculosis drug. We have listed 10 cases of immediate pulmonary thromboembolism and 16 cases of deep vein thrombosis complicated with pulmonary embolism in 6 cases. Oral anticoagulation drug were associated with heparin after a mean of 4.57 days. Duration average of achievement of an effective dose was of 21.05 days and we prescribe low molecular weight heparin for 6 months on 2 cases. There was favorable evolution among 14 patients, 4 of them have lost sight and the evolution was fatal by cataclysmic haemoptysis in one case, a patient died hepatocellular insufficiency and 6 died by pulmonary embolism. Immunological and hematological abnormalities are incriminated in the genesis of VTE disease during tuberculosis by creating hypercoagulate state. The accumulation of morbidity of these two affections as well as the difficulty of therapeutic care made by medical interaction ifampicin-anticoagulants aggravate the prognostic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. HIV-ASSOCIATED VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Bibas

    2011-01-01

    ="false" Priority="21" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Intense Emphasis" />

    HIV infection has been recognized as a prothrombotic condition and this association has now been proven by a large number of studies with a reported VTE frequency among HIV-infected patients ranging from 0.19% to 7,63 %/year. HIV infection is associated with a two to tenfold increased risk of venous thrombosis in comparison with a general population of the same age. Some r

  5. Idiopathic versus secondary venous thromboembolism. Findings of the RIETE registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrajas, J M; Garmendia, C; Portillo, J; Gabriel, F; Mainez, C; Yera, C; Monreal, M

    2014-10-01

    The Computerized Registry of Patients with Venous Thromboembolism (RIETE) is a prospective registry that consecutively includes patients diagnosed with venous thromboembolism. We compared the clinical presentation and response to anticoagulant treatment in patients with idiopathic venous thromboembolism (IVT) versus secondary venous thromboembolism (SVT, associated with a risk factor). We analyzed the differences in clinical characteristics, comorbidity, treatment and events during the first 3months after the diagnosis of venous thromboembolism in patients with IVT or SVT and according to their initial clinical presentation. A total of 39,921 patients with IVT (n=18,029; 45.1%) or SVT (n=21,892; 54.9%) were enrolled. The patients with IVT had a greater history of venous thromboembolism than those diagnosed with SVT (pSVT group (pSVT group than in the IVT group. At 90days, bleeding, death and the recurrence of venous thromboembolism were significantly more frequent in the SVT group. The multivariate analysis confirmed that IVT was associated with fewer major (OR, 0.60; 95%CI, 0.50-0.61; pSVT at 90days of the diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Venous thromboembolism: have we made headway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a primary cause of preventable hospital death. The need for effective VTE prophylaxis has been recognized by the Surgical Care Improvement Program (SCIP) and the Joint Commission, which is offering VTE prevention as a core measure set, starting October 1, 2009. The adoption of SCIP VTE measures and mandate to publicly report these rates offers the opportunity to improve the use of prophylaxis in surgical patients and reduce VTE-related morbidity, mortality, and costs. Essential to this reduction is a team approach to implementing real-time interventions. Crucial to the success of the team is early identification of each patient's VTE risk and a mechanism to provide key information to ensure that the physician prescribes appropriate prophylaxis. In addition, it may be the nurse who is responsible for ensuring that a patient receives the appropriate prophylaxis, as well as being the first clinician to observe the clinical signs of a VTE event.

  7. [Oral anticoagulat treatment in venous thromboembolic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontcuberta, Jordi

    2008-11-01

    Coumarin or anti-vitamin K oral anticoagulants have been used in anticoagulation therapy for more than 50 years. Well-designed studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of these drugs in the primary and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolic disease (VTD). Because of greater life expectancy and the increase in the indications for oral anticoagulation therapy (OAT), more and more patients are receiving this type of treatment. In Spain, approximately 1% of the population receives OAT. The mechanism of action of coumarin anticoagulants is based on inhibition of the interconversion of vitamin K and its 2,3-epoxide (vitamin K epoxide, which modulates gamma-carboxylation of the glutamic acid residues in the N-terminal regions of vitamin-K-dependent factors, namely, II, VII, IX, X, protein C, protein S and protein Z). Due to the lack of gamma-carboxylation, these factors lose their procoagulant activity. Major hemorrhagic complications of OAT in VTD after 3-6 months of treatment, with an INR of 2-3, occur in nearly 2% of patients. The hemorrhagic complications of OAT are related to the intensity of anticoagulation, patient characteristics, the concomitant use of drugs that interfere with hemostasis, and treatment duration. The risk of VTD recurrence after 3-6 months of OAT is high and can be more than 10% in patients with idiopathic thromboembolism or irreversible risk factors such as thrombophilia, cancer and other situations conferring permanent risk. The risk of recurrence is more frequent in men, in patients with thrombophilia especially in antithrombin deficiency, and in patients with cancer, residual venous obstruction, or elevated D dimer.

  8. MRA for diagnosis of venous thromboembolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sostman, H. D. [Cornell University, Weill Medical College, Chair of Radiology, New York (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Direct imaging of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) with CT, and potentially with MR, will continue to replace V/Q scintigraphy. Venous imaging with MR far detecting DVT is used in a few centers, and their published accuracy figures are impressive. Recent studies of MR pulmonary angiography for PE reported that sensitivity of MRA was 85-100%, specificity 95-96%, but this data must be confirmed in other centers and patient populations. MR has advantages compared with CT, which make it worthwhile to continue MR development. Ionizing radiation and iodinated contrast material are not used. Imaging the pulmonary arteries and then imaging whichever venous region is of clinical interest is practical in a single examination. Repeated examinations can be performed safely. New contrast materials will facilitate the practically and accuracy of the MR technique and perfusion imaging may increase sensitivity. MR also has disadvantages compared with CT. It does not image effectively the non-vascular compartment of the lungs. It is more expensive, patient monitoring is more cumbersome, and a routine technique, which embodies all of MR's potential advantages, has not been packaged and tested. Accordingly, helical CT is a realistic option in clinical management of patients with suspected PE in most centers, while clinical application of MR is limited to centers with appropriate MR expertise and technology. However, MR has a number of fundamental characteristics that make it potentially ideal modality for evaluating patients with suspected acute venous thromboembolic disease and further clinical research with MRA is warranted.

  9. The pathogenesis of venous thromboembolism : Evidence for multiple interrelated causes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Jan-Leendert P.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; van der Meer, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is thought to result from interactions between multiple genetic and environmental risk factors. Objective: To assess the contribution of multiple thrombophilic defects and exogenous risk factors to the absolute risk for VTE. Design: Retrospective family

  10. The up-to-date management of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Anob M

    2015-08-01

    There have been a number of developments in the management of venous thromboembolism over the past few years. Old questions, such as thrombolysis, have been revisited in recent trials. New initiatives, such as ambulatory care pathways, are being established across the country. This conference brought together doctors from the UK, USA, Spain and Australia to review the up-to-date management of venous thromboembolism. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  11. Descriptive Data of Patients with Venous Thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gul Ilhan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was designed for collecting descriptive data about diagnosis and treatment of patients diagnosed with venous thromboembolism (VTE in an university hospital and for reflecting approach to VTE in such a reference hospital in this way. Material and Methods: We evaluated archive records of patients disgnosed with deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE between 2000 an 2005. Age average of patients was advanced and most of them were women. They had DVT, PTE, DVT and PTE respectively. Most common diagnostic method used for PTE was computed thomogrphy (CT, for DVT was ultrasonography (USG. VTE was diagnosed most frequently in emergency services and policlinics. Most common chronic risk factors for VTE were cancer, heart failure/romathismal cardiac disease, hyperlipidemia/atherosclerosis and obesity. Risk factors spesific to the attacks (or temporary were immobilization, surgery, pregnancy, taking oral contraseptive drugs and trauma. Results: In patients investigated for hemostatic risk factors, Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin 20210 A , and MTHFR mutations were found respectively. Symptoms and findings of patients admitted with PTE were dyspnea-tachipnea, tachycardia, palpitation, pleural pain, caugh, fever, anginal pain, hemopthysis, diaphoresis and wheezing . Echocardiography gave positive results for the most of PTE cases. D-dimer test was found high sensitive. Treatments during accute attacks were low moleculer weight heparin (LMWH, standart heparin, thrombolytic therapy, surgery, aspirine and vena cava inferior filter placement. Acute term complications were death, bleeding and heparin induced thrombocytopenia. Conclusion: This retrospective study reflects the approach of VTE diagnosis and treatment in a reference hospital and it may guide for prospective studies. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 610-616

  12. [Maternal death by venous thromboembolic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, M; Morau, E; Dreyfus, M

    2017-12-01

    Pregnancy and postpartum are very high-risk periods for venous thromboembolism events (TEE), which seems to extend far beyond the classical 6-8 weeks after childbirth. Pulmonary embolism (PE) is one of the 3 main causes of direct maternal death in western countries. Between 2010 an 2012 in France, 24 deaths were related to PE giving a maternal mortality ratio of 1/100,000, which is not different from the former report (2007-2009). PE is responsible of 9% of maternal deaths, in equal position with postpartum hemorrhage and amniotic fluid embolism. Four deaths (16%) occurred after pregnancy interruption (1 abortion, 3 medical interruptions), 7 (30%) during ongoing pregnancy (before 22 weeks of pregnancy) and 13 (54%) in the postpartum period (9 to 60 days after childbirth). Among these deaths, 9 occurred in extra hospital setting (at home or in the street). Fifty percent of these deaths seem to be avoidable, as it was in the former report. Main avoidability criteria were: diagnostic delay; mobilization before effective anticoagulation of proximal deep venous thrombosis; insufficient preventive treatment with low molecular weight heparin [duration and/or dose (obesity)]; unjustified induction of labor. Analyzing those deaths allow to remind that in case of high suspicion of TEE, effective anticoagulation should be started without delay, and that angio-TDM is not contraindicated in pregnant women. Low molecular weight heparin regiment should be adapted to real weight. Monitoring of anti-Xa activity, if not routinely recommended, is probably useful in case of obesity or renal insufficiency. Anticipating birth by induction of labor, in the absence of abnormal fetal heart rhythm, should not delay effective anticoagulation of near-term TEE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlation of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and electronic medical record alerts with incidence among surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Lee, Nathaniel; Duane, Therese M; Gu, Zirui; Nguyen, Natalie; Potter, Teresa; Rensing, Edna; Sampson, Renata; Burrows, Mandy; Banas, Colin; Hartigan, Sarah; Grover, Amelia

    2016-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism events are potentially preventable adverse events. We investigated the effect of interruptions and delays in pharmacologic prophylaxis on venous thromboembolism incidence. Additionally, we evaluated the utility of electronic medical record alerts for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. Venous thromboembolisms were identified in surgical patients retrospectively through Core Measure Venous ThromboEmbolism-6-6 and Patient Safety Indicator 12 between November 2013 and March 2015. Venous thromboembolism pharmacologic prophylaxis and prescriber response to electronic medical record alerts were recorded prospectively. Prophylaxis was categorized as continuous, delayed, interrupted, other, and none. Among 10,318 surgical admissions, there were 131 venous thromboembolisms; 23.7% of the venous thromboembolisms occurred with optimal continuous prophylaxis. Prophylaxis, length of stay, age, and transfer from another hospital were associated with increased venous thromboembolism incidence. Compared with continuous prophylaxis, interruptions were associated with 3 times greater odds of venous thromboembolism. Delays were associated with 2 times greater odds of venous thromboembolism. Electronic medical record alerts occurred in 45.7% of the encounters and were associated with a 2-fold increased venous thromboembolism incidence. Focus groups revealed procedures as the main contributor to interruptions, and workflow disruption as the main limitation of the electronic medical record alerts. Multidisciplinary strategies to decrease delays and interruptions in venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and optimization of electronic medical record tools for prophylaxis may help decrease rates of preventable venous thromboembolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Venous Thromboembolism in Pediatric Vascular Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taizo A. Nakano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a vascular anomaly suggests that capillaries, veins, arteries, and/or lymphatic vessels have demonstrated abnormal development and growth. Often dilated and misshaped, these vessels augment normal flow of blood and lymphatic fluids that increases the overall risk to develop intralesional thrombosis. Abnormal endothelial and lymphoendothelial cells activate hemostasis and hyperfibrinolytic pathways through poorly understood mechanisms, which contribute to the development of localized intravascular coagulopathy. Vascular malformations, tumors, and complex combined syndromes demonstrate varying degrees of prothrombotic activity and consumptive coagulopathy depending on the vessels involved and the pattern and extent of abnormal growth. The clinical impact of venous thromboembolism in pediatric vascular anomalies varies from painful syndromes that disrupt quality of life to life-threatening embolic disease. There remains little literature on the study, evaluation, and treatment of thrombosis in pediatric vascular anomalies. However, there have been great advances in our ability to image complex lesions, to surgically and interventionally augment disease, and to provide enhanced supportive care including patient education, compression therapy, and strategic use of anticoagulation.

  15. New anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J McRae

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Simon J McRae, Jeffrey S GinsbergDepartment of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, CanadaAbstract: Anticoagulant therapy is effective at preventing the development of venous thromboembolism in high-risk patients, and reduces morbidity and mortality in individuals with established thromboembolic disease. Vitamin K antagonists and heparins are currently the most commonly used anticoagulant drugs, but they have practical limitations. Therefore, new antithrombotic agents with predictable dose-responses (thereby decreasing the need for monitoring without compromising efficacy or safety, ideally available in an oral formulation and with a rapidly reversible anticoagulant effect, are needed. New drugs fulfilling some of the above criteria have been developed and have proven to be effective agents for the treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism.Keywords: venous thromboembolism, anticoagulants, antithrombotic

  16. Dabigatran versus warfarin in the treatment of acute venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulman, Sam; Kearon, Clive; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Mismetti, Patrick; Schellong, Sebastian; Eriksson, Henry; Baanstra, David; Schnee, Janet; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.; Schulman, S.; Eriksson, H.; Goldhaber, S.; Kakkar, A.; Kearon, C.; Mismetti, P.; Schellong, S.; Minar, E.; Bergqvist, D.; Tijssen, J.; Prins, M. [=Martin H.; Büller, H.; Otten, J.; Peters, R.; Mac Gillavry, M.; Pol, S.; Burroughs, A.; Gilmore, I.; Bluguermann, J.; Carlevaro, O.; Dipaola, L.; Gitelman, P.; Santos, D.; Schygiel, P.; Baker, R.; Blombery, P.; Gallus, A.; Gan, E.; Gibbs, H.; Salem, H.; Baghestanian, M.; Pilger, E.; Sturm, W.; Debing, E.; Gadisseur, A.; Hainaut, P.; Verhamme, P.; Wautrecht, J.-C.; Zicot, M.; Bizzachi, J. M. Annichino; Araujo, G.; de Araujo, J. Dalmo; Panico, F. M. Duarte Brandão; Nagato, Y.; Pereira, A. H.; Leao, P. Puech; Ramaciotti, E.; Moreira, R. C. Rocha; Timi, J.; Anderson, D.; Crowther, M.; Dolan, S.; Eikelboom, J.; Spencer, F.; Game, M.; Kahn, S.; Kassis, J.; Klinke, P.; Kovacs, M.; Milot, A.; Ritchie, B.; Rodger, M.; Solymoss, S.; Villeneuve, J.; Yeo, E.; Cervinka, P.; Homza, M.; Hrdy, P.; Klimsa, Z.; Lang, P.; Maly, R.; Oral, I.; Reichert, P.; Spinar, J.; Varejka, P.; Vladimir, J.; Brønnum-Schou, J.; Jensen, S.; Jensen, S. E.; Kristensen, K. S.; Nielsen, H.; Wiemann, O.; Bost, V.; Buchmuller, A.; Guillot, K.; Laurent, P.; Lecomte, F.; Mottier, D.; Quere, I.; Wahl, D.; Beyer, J.; Dormann, A.; Hoffmann, U.; Maier, M.; Mietaschk, A.; Katsenis, K.; Klonaris, C.; Liappis, C.; Acsady, G.; Berhes, I.; Boda, Z.; Farkas, K.; Jakucs, J.; Kollar, L.; Matyas, L.; Riba, M.; Sereg, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Banker, D.; Bharani, A.; Gadkari, M.; Hiremath, J.; Jain, A.; Kareem, S.; Lyengar, S.; Parakh, R.; Sekar, N.; Srinivas, A.; Suresh, K.; Vujay, T.; Brenner, B.; Efrati, S.; Elias, M.; Gavish, D.; Grossman, E.; Lahav, M.; Lishner, M.; Zeltser, D.; Agnelli, G.; Cimminiello, C.; Palareti, G.; Prandoni, P.; Santonastaso, M.; Silingardi, M.; Lee, E. Aldrett; Andrade, J. M. Fontes; Valles, J. Jaurrieta; Biesma, D.; Dees, A.; Fijnheer, R.; Hamulyak, K.; Kramer, M. H. H.; Leebeek, F. W. G.; Lieverse, L.; Nurmohamed, M. T.; Chunilal, S.; Jackson, S.; Ockelford, P.; Smith, M.; Njaastad, A. M.; Sandseth, P. M.; Tveit, A.; Waage, A.; Barata, J.; Capitao, M.; Fernandes, F. E.; Leitão, A.; Providência, L.; Alohin, D. I.; Belentsov, S.; Chernyatina, M.; Chernyavsky, A.; Fokin, A.; Gubenko, A.; Guz, V. Alexander V.; Katelnitsky, I.; Khamitov, A. A. A.; Khitaryan, A.; Khubulava, G.; Mikhailov, I.; Shkurin, V.; Staroverov, I.; Tchumakov, A.; Zaporozhsky, A.; Duris, T.; Poliacik, P.; Spisak, V.; Szentivanyi, M.; Zubek, V.; Adler, D.; Kelbe, D.; Le Roux, D.; Pieterse, A.; Routier, R.; Siebert, R.; Sloane, B.; Smith, C.; van Rensburg, H.; del Toro, J.; García-Fuster, M. J.; Mateo, J.; Monreal, M.; Nieto, J. A.; Sánchez-Molini, P.; Sedano, C.; Trujillo, J.; Valle, R.; Villalta, J.; Aagesen, J.; Carlsson, A.; Johansson, L.; Lärfars, G.; Lindmarker, P.; Säfvenberg, U.; Själander, A.; Bengisun, U.; Calkavur, T.; Guney, M. R.; Karahan, S.; Kurtoglu, M.; Sakinci, U.; Gubka, A.; Mishalov, V.; Skupyy, O.; Cohen, A.; Keeling, D.; Kesteven, P.; MacCallum, P.; Maclean, R.; Shah, P.; Watson, H.; Bartkowiak, A.; Bolster, E.; Botnick, W. C.; Burnett, B.; Chervu, A.; Comerota, A. J.; Dy, N. M.; Fulco, F. A.; Gossage, J. R.; Kaatz, S.; Lahiri, B.; Lerner, R. G.; Masson, J. A.; Moll, S.; Morganroth, M.; Patel, K.; Paulson, R.; Powell, R.; Samson, R.; Seibert, A.; Spyropoulos, A.; Vrooman, P. S.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The direct oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran has a predictable anticoagulant effect and may be an alternative therapy to warfarin for patients who have acute venous thromboembolism. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind, noninferiority trial involving patients with acute venous

  17. Rivaroxaban or Aspirin for Extended Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Lensing, Anthonie W. A.; Prins, Martin H.; Bauersachs, Rupert; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A.; Cohen, Alexander T.; Davidson, Bruce L.; Decousus, Hervé; Freitas, Maria C. S.; Holberg, Gerlind; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Haskell, Lloyd; van Bellen, Bonno; Pap, Akos F.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Philip S.; Prandoni, Paolo; Bianchi, Alessandra; Brighton, Tim; Carroll, Patrick; Chong, Beng; Chunilal, Sanjeev; Coughlin, Paul; Curnow, Jennifer; Jackson, David; Tran, Huyen; Ward, Chris; Brodmann, Marianne; Kyrle, Paul; Marschang, Peter; Petkov, Ventzislav; Hainaut, Philippe; Jordens, Paul; Vandekerkhof, Jos; Wautrecht, Jean-Claude; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce; Correa, Joao; Cukier, Alberto; Freire, Antonio; Pereira, Adamastor; Porto, Carmen; Sacilotto, Roberto; Vasconcelos Costa, Agenor; Della Siega, Anthony; Dolan, Sean; Le Gal, Gré goire; Gross, Peter; Kahn, Susan; Kassis, Jeannine; Kovacs, Michael; Pesant, Yves; Ritchie, Bruce; Schulman, Sam; Shivakumar, Sudeep; Solymoss, Susan; Chang, Shu; Chen, Rongchang; Chen, Zhong; Chen, Hong; Dai, Xiangchen; Fang, Baoming; Fu, Weiguo; Gao, Xinglin; Huang, Jinhua; Lai, Yanping; Li, Li; Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Yiqing; Liu, Jinming; Liu, Shuang; Ma, Wenjiang; Ni, Songshi; Qin, Zhiqiang; Shi, Guochao; Tian, Hongyan; Wang, Shenming; Wang, Lie; Xiao, Wei; Ying, Kejing; Yu, Guanfeng; Yuan, Yadong; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Xinri; Zhang, Liyan; Zhu, Lei; Chlumský , Jaromir; Chochola, Jiri; Dunaj, Milna; Kovarova, Katerina; Lang, Pavel; Matoš ka, Petr; Podpera, Ivo; Spacek, Rudolf; Stehlikova, Olga; Brø nnum-Schou, Jens; Egstrup, Kenneth; Gislason, Gunnar; Jeppesen, Jorgen; May, Ole; Nielsen, Henrik; Wiggers, Henrik; Achkar, Antoine; Aquilanti, Sandro; Benhamou, Ygal; Brisot, Dominique; Bura-Riviere, Alessandra; Castella, Nadine; Elias, Antoine; Falvo, Nicolas; Ferrari, Emile; Lacroix, Philippe; Mahe, Isabelle; Meneveau, Nicolas; Messas, Emmanuel; Mismetti, Patrick; Montaclair, Karine; Mottier, Dominique; Moumneh, Thomas; Paleiron, Nicolas; Parent, Florence; Pernod, Gilles; Sanchez, Olivier; Schmidt, Jeannot; Simoneau, Guy; Stephan, Dominique; Amann, Berthold; Blessing, Erwin; Czihal, Michael; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Kahrmann, Gerd; Licka, Manuela; Neumeister, Axel; Schellong, Sebastian; Boda, Zoltan; Farkas, Katalin; Gurzo, Mihaly; Katona, Andras; Riba, Maria; Sipos, Gyula; Tó th, Kalman; Braester, Andrei; Elias, Mazen; Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Gavish, Dov; Hussein, Osamah; Lishner, Michael; Schiff, Elad; Spectre, Galia; Tzoran-Rozenthal, Inna; Zimlichman, Reuven; Ageno, Walter; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Bova, Carlo; Garbelotto, Raffaella; Ghirarduzzi, Angelo; Imberti, Davide; Pesavento, Raffaele; Porreca, Ettore; Visonà , Adriana; Flota Cervera, Luis; Llamas Esperó n, Guillermo; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Daniel; Solis Morales, Lucas; Boersma, Willem; ten Cate, Hugo; Erdkamp, Franciscus; Grifioen-Keijzer, Anita; Marwijk Kooy, Marinus; Meijer, Karina; Middeldorp, Saskia; Swart-Heikens, Janneke; ten Wolde, Marije; Westerweel, Peter; Braithwaite, Irene; Harper, Paul; Merriman, Eileen; Ockelford, Paul; Royle, Gordon; Smith, Mark; Ghanima, Waleed; Sandset, Per Morten; Abola, Maria; Chę ciń ski, Pawel; Grzelakowski, Pawel; Lewczuk, Jerzy; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Tomkowski, Witold; Abramov, Igor; Chechulov, Pavel; Karpenko, Andrey; Katelnitskiy, Ivan; Kazakov, Andrey; Makarova, Olga; Panchenko, Elizaveta; Sergeeva, Elena; Subbotin, Yuriy; Suchkov, Igor; Zeltser, Mikhail; Adler, David; Breedt, Johannes; Fourie, Nyda; Isaacs, Rashid; Jacobson, Barry; Siebert, Heidi; van Zyl, Louis; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kang, Seok-Min; Kim, Kye-Hun; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Kim, Dong-Ik; Min, Seung-Kee; Park, Ki Hyuk; Garcí a-Bragado Dalmau, Fernando; Gó mez Cerezo, Jorge; Mirete, Jose Carlos Ferrer; Riera, Antonio; del Toro, Jorge; Eriksson, Henry; Torstensson, Ingemar; Banyai, Martin; Baumgartner, Iris; Mazzolai, Lucia; Periard, Daniel; Righini, Marc; Staub, Daniel; Chiang, Chern-En; Chiu, Kuan-Ming; Pai, Pei-Ying; Angchaisuksiri, Pantep; Chansung, Kanchana; Ö ngen, Gul; Tuncay, Esin; Alikhan, Raza; Chetter, Ian; Kesteven, Patrick; Nokes, Tim; Bauer, Kenneth; Comerota, Anthony; Elias, Darlene; Garcia, David; Gibson, Kathleen; Ginsberg, Daniel; Jenkins, Jeffrey; Kingsley, Edwin; Lambert, Richard; Lyons, Roger; Pullman, John; Shah, Vinay; Smith, S. Wayne; Stein, Robert; Tapson, Victor; Walsh, John; Wang, Tzu-Fei; Do Loi, Doan; Do Quang, Huan; Pham, Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although many patients with venous thromboembolism require extended treatment, it is uncertain whether it is better to use full- or lower-intensity anticoagulation therapy or aspirin. METHODS In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 study, we assigned 3396 patients with venous

  18. Review of the cost of venous thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Maria M; Hogue, Susan; Preblick, Ronald; Kwong, Winghan Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the second most common medical complication and a cause of excess length of hospital stay. Its incidence and economic burden are expected to increase as the population ages. We reviewed the recent literature to provide updated cost estimates on VTE management. Methods Literature search strategies were performed in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Collaboration, Health Economic Evaluations Database, EconLit, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts from 2003–2014. Additional studies were identified through searching bibliographies of related publications. Results Eighteen studies were identified and are summarized in this review; of these, 13 reported data from the USA, four from Europe, and one from Canada. Three main cost estimations were identified: cost per VTE hospitalization or per VTE readmission; cost for VTE management, usually reported annually or during a specific period; and annual all-cause costs in patients with VTE, which included the treatment of complications and comorbidities. Cost estimates per VTE hospitalization were generally similar across the US studies, with a trend toward an increase over time. Cost per pulmonary embolism hospitalization increased from $5,198–$6,928 in 2000 to $8,764 in 2010. Readmission for recurrent VTE was generally more costly than the initial index event admission. Annual health plan payments for services related to VTE also increased from $10,804–$16,644 during the 1998–2004 period to an estimated average of $15,123 for a VTE event from 2008 to 2011. Lower costs for VTE hospitalizations and annualized all-cause costs were estimated in European countries and Canada. Conclusion Costs for VTE treatment are considerable and increasing faster than general inflation for medical care services, with hospitalization costs being the primary cost driver. Readmissions for VTE are generally more costly than the initial VTE admission. Further studies evaluating the economic impact of new

  19. Epidemiology of venous thromboembolism in the Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puurunen, Marja K; Gona, Philimon N; Larson, Martin G; Murabito, Joanne M; Magnani, Jared W; O'Donnell, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    Reports of the crude incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in Western countries vary widely. Data regarding risk factors, incidence and recurrence of VTE from deeply-phenotyped community-based cohort studies are needed. To study the incidence, associated mortality, and predisposing factors of VTE in the prospective, longitudinal community-based Framingham Heart Study. The study sample consisted of the Framingham Heart Study Original, Offspring, Third Generation, and Omni cohorts (N=9754). Incidence rates (IR) were standardized to the 2000 US population. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to study risk factor associations. During 1995-2014 (total follow-up time 104,091 person-years [median 9.8 (range 0-20) years]), 297 incident VTE events were observed. Age-adjusted IR of VTE was 20.3/10,000 (95% CI 17.9-22.6). Of the events 120 (40%) were pulmonary embolism (PE) and 177 (60%) were deep venous thrombosis (DVT); 29% were unprovoked, 40% provoked, and 31% cancer-related. Cancer-related VTE was associated with high mortality at 30days (24.2%), 1year (66.3%), and 5years (75.6%). In multivariable models, age and obesity, but no other traditional cardiovascular risk factors, were significantly associated with VTE (hazard ratio [HR] per 10-year increase in age 1.69, 95% CI 1.48-1.92; HR for obesity (BMI≥30kg/m(2)) 1.88, 95% CI 1.44-2.45). We provide data on the epidemiology of VTE. VTE is associated with significant mortality, and prognosis after cancer-related VTE is particularly poor. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors beyond age and obesity are not associated with VTE. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. High risk of pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism in women with multiple thrombophilic defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folkeringa, Nienke; Leendert, Jan; Brouwer, P.; Korteweg, Fleurisca J.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Erwich, Jan Jaap H. M.; van der Meer, Jan

    Pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism, which probably varies according to the presence of single or multiple thrombophilic defects. This retrospective family cohort study assessed the risk of venous thromboembolism during pregnancy and puerperium, and the

  1. Oral contraceptives and venous thromboembolism: a five-year national case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Edström, Birgitte; Kreiner, Svend

    2002-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism; Oral contraceptives; Pulmonary embolism; Third-generation; Second-generation; Pill Scare......Venous thromboembolism; Oral contraceptives; Pulmonary embolism; Third-generation; Second-generation; Pill Scare...

  2. Risk of a venous thromboembolic episode due to caesarean section and BMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colmorn, Lotte Berdiin; Ladelund, S; Rasmussen, S

    2014-01-01

    BMI significantly influences the risk of venous thromboembolism after emergency caesarean delivery compared with vaginal delivery.......BMI significantly influences the risk of venous thromboembolism after emergency caesarean delivery compared with vaginal delivery....

  3. Review of the cost of venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez MM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Maria M Fernandez,1 Susan Hogue,1 Ronald Preblick,2 Winghan Jacqueline Kwong2 1RTI-Health Solutions, Market Access and Outcomes Strategy, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2Daiichi Sankyo, Inc., Health Economics & Outcomes Research, Parsippany, NJ, USA Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is the second most common medical complication and a cause of excess length of hospital stay. Its incidence and economic burden are expected to increase as the population ages. We reviewed the recent literature to provide updated cost estimates on VTE management. Methods: Literature search strategies were performed in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Collaboration, Health Economic Evaluations Database, EconLit, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts from 2003–2014. Additional studies were identified through searching bibliographies of related publications. Results: Eighteen studies were identified and are summarized in this review; of these, 13 reported data from the USA, four from Europe, and one from Canada. Three main cost estimations were identified: cost per VTE hospitalization or per VTE readmission; cost for VTE management, usually reported annually or during a specific period; and annual all-cause costs in patients with VTE, which included the treatment of complications and comorbidities. Cost estimates per VTE hospitalization were generally similar across the US studies, with a trend toward an increase over time. Cost per pulmonary embolism hospitalization increased from $5,198–$6,928 in 2000 to $8,764 in 2010. Readmission for recurrent VTE was generally more costly than the initial index event admission. Annual health plan payments for services related to VTE also increased from $10,804–$16,644 during the 1998–2004 period to an estimated average of $15,123 for a VTE event from 2008 to 2011. Lower costs for VTE hospitalizations and annualized all-cause costs were estimated in European countries and Canada. Conclusion: Costs for VTE treatment are

  4. Extended use of dabigatran, warfarin, or placebo in venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulman, Sam; Kearon, Clive; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Schellong, Sebastian; Eriksson, Henry; Baanstra, David; Kvamme, Anne Mathilde; Friedman, Jeffrey; Mismetti, Patrick; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.; Schulman, S.; Eriksson, H.; Goldhaber, S.; Kakkar, A.; Kearon, C.; Mismetti, P.; Schellong, S.; Minar, E.; Bergqvist, D.; Tijssen, J.; Prins, M. [=Martin H.; Büller, H.; Otten, J.; Mac Gillavry, M.; Brandjes, D.; Otten, H.; Peters, R.; Pol, S.; Burroughs, A.; Gilmore, I.; Bluguermann, J.; Bustos, B.; Carlevaro, O.; Cartasegna, L.; Cuello, J.; Gabito, A.; Gitelman, P.; Gutierrez Carrillo, N.; Hrabar, A.; Mackinon, I.; Santos, D.; Schygiel, P.; Sosa Liprandi, M.; Baker, R.; Blombery, P.; Gallus, A.; Gan, E.; McCann, A.; Salem, H.; Koppensteiner, R.; Kyrle, P.; Pilger, E.; Sturm, W.; Hainaut, P.; Verhamme, P.; Wautrecht, J.-C.; Zicot, M.; Bizzachi, J. Annichino; Joyce, M.; Araújo, G.; de Araújo Filho, J. Dalmo; Panico, M. Duarte Brandão; Pereira, A.; Rocha Moreira, R.; Timi, J.; Yamashita, E.; Anastasov, V.; Georgiev, G.; Guirov, K.; Lozev, I.; Milanov, S.; Peneva, M.; Petrov, V.; Yordanov, Y.; Anderson, D.; Crowther, M.; Dolan, S.; Eikelboom, J.; Game, M.; Kahn, S.; Kassis, J.; Klinke, P.; Ritchie, B.; Rodger, M.; Solymoss, S.; Spencer, F.; Yeo, E.; Bai, C.; Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Shen, H.; Wan, H.; Wang, C.; Wang, Y.; Wen, F.; Ying, K.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zheng, Q.; Zhong, N.; Bercikova, J.; Cervinka, P.; Cizek, V.; Jirka, V.; Lang, P.; Maly, R.; Oral, I.; Prochazka, P.; Spinar, J.; Brønnum-Schou, J.; Friis, E.; Jensen, S.; Nielsen, H.; Skødebjerg Kristensen, K.; Wiemann, O.; Husted, S.; Kuusisto, A.; Lassila, R.; Melin, J.; Nikkilä, M.; Nousiainen, T.; Bost, V.; Buchmuller, A.; Guillot, K.; Lecomte, F.; Mottier, D.; Wahl, D.; Beyer-Westendorf, J.; Dormann, A.; Harenberg, J.; Hoffmann, U.; Maier, M.; Mietaschk, A.; Salbach, P.; Cohen, A.; Keeling, D.; Kesteven, P.; Maclean, M. R.; Shah, P.; Katsenis, K.; Klonaris, C.; Liappis, C.; Mihailidis, D.; Acsady, G.; Boda, Z.; Farkas, K.; Jakucs, J.; Kollar, L.; Matyas, L.; Muranyi, A.; Riba, M.; Sereg, M.; Banker, D.; Durairaj, N.; Gadkari, M.; Grant, P.; Hiremath, J.; Kareem, S.; Mahajan, R.; Naik, A.; Parakh, R.; Rai, K.; Santhosh, M.; Sekar, N.; Srinivas, A.; Suresh, K.; Vijayaraghavan, G.; Brenner, B.; Efrati, S.; Mazen, E.; Gavish, D.; Grossman, E.; Lahav, M.; Lishner, M.; Lugassy, G.; Zeltser, D.; Barillari, G.; D' Angelo, A.; Palareti, G.; Santonasto, M.; Schenone, A.; Silingardi, M.; Testa, S.; Aldrett Lee, E.; Fontes Andrade, J.; Jaurrieta Valles, J.; Montaño-González, E.; Sánchez-Escalante, L.-R.; Dees, A.; Hamulyak, K.; Jie, A.; Kamphuisen, P.; Leebeek, F.; Nurmohamed, M.; Pruijt, J.; Wittebol, S.; Hanna, M.; Jackson, S.; Ockelford, P.; Smith, M.; Njaastad, A.; Sandseth, P.; Tveit, A.; Waage, A.; Czarnobilski, K.; Gaciong, Z.; Gluszek, S.; Krolczyk, J.; Zawilska, K.; Barata, J.; Capitao, M.; e Fernandes, F.; Martinez, J.; Providência, L.; Sarmento, P.; Belentsov, S.; Chernyatina, M.; Chernyavsky, A.; Degterev, M.; Fokin, A.; Gubenko, A.; Guz, V.; Katelnitsky, I.; Khamitov, A.; Khitaryan, A.; Khubulava, G.; Koulikovsky, V.; Nelaev, V.; Shkurin, V.; Smirnov, G.; Sokurenko, G.; Soroka, V.; Staroverov, I.; Zaporozhsky, S.; Duris, T.; Poliacik, P.; Spisak, V.; Szentivanyi, M.; Zubek, V.; Adler, D.; Le Roux, D.; Routier, R.; Siebert, R.; Sloane, B.; Smith, C.; del Toro, J.; García-Fuster, M.; Marco, P.; Mateo, J.; Monreal, M.; Nieto J, J.; Sedano, C.; Trujillo, J.; Villalta, J.; Aagesen, J.; Carlsson, A.; Lärfars, G.; Lindmarker, P.; Säfwenberg, U.; Själander, A.; Aslim, E.; Bengisun, U.; Calkavur, T.; Eren, E.; Karahan, S.; Karatepe, O.; Kurtoglu, M.; Sakinci, U.; Gubka, O.; Karpovych, D.; Mishalov, V.; Skupyy, O.; Bartkowiak, A.; Bolster, E.; Burnett, B.; Comerota, A.; Fulco, F.; Gleeson, J.; Gossage, J.; Kaatz, S.; Kuehl, S.; Lahiri, B.; Masson, J.; Moll, S.; Nathanson, A.; Paulson, R.; Powell, R.; Seibert, A.; Vrooman, P.; Sandgren, G.; Wallin, J.; Kälebo, P.; Angerås, U.; Falk, A.; Eriksson, B.; Dellborg, M.; Eriksson, P.; Johansson, P.; Hansson, P. O.; Nicol, A.; Jeffries, B.; Benson, M.; Kyrle, P. A.; Hirschl, M.; Böhler, K.; de Vleeschauwer, P.; Haerens, M.; Duchateau, J.; Verstraeten, P.; Milot, A.; Kotik, L.; Roztocil, K.; Joerg, I.; Holy, M.; Cernosek, B.; Kasalova, Z.; Mandakova, E.; Povolny, J.; Matoska, P.; Hulinsky, V.; Podoubsky, R.; Votocek, S.; Zarubova, D.; Ellervee, T.; Lind, J.; Sukles, K.; Uebel, P.; Bauersachs, R.; Kemkes-Matthes, B.; Beyer, J.; Siragusa, S.; Bova, C.; Cortellaro, M.; Falanga, A.; Palla, A.; Pini, M.; Poggio, R.; Porro, F.; Prisco, D.; Tiraferri, E.; Villalta, S.; Visona, A.; Zanatta, N.; Mazzucconi, M. G.; Porreca, E.; Cattaneo, M.; Di Minno, G.; Oh, D.; Kim, C. S.; Kwon, T. W.; Lee, T. S.; Park, J. S.; Hong, Y. S.; Yoon, S. S.; Kim, Y. K.; Laucevicius, A.; Miliauskas, S.; Novikovs, N.; Zvirgzdins, V.; Meijer, K.; Nijziel, M. R.; van Guldener, C.; van Essen, G. G.; Ouwehand, M. E.; Jie, K. S. G.; Swart-Heikens, J.; Viergever, P. P.; Dullemond, A. C.; Tomkowski, W.; Torbicki, A.; Psuja, P.; Staszkiewicz, W.; Szopinski, P.; Pruszczyk, P.; Ciostek, P.; Windyga, J.; Stepien, J.; Khamitov, A. A.; Ng, H. J.; Elf, J.; Engquist, L.; Sharo, S.; Holmström, M.; Lapidus, L.; Cederin, B.; Brack, T.; Binkert, M.; Canova, C.; Franzeck, U.; Allmann, J. K.; Zehnder, T.; Jeanneret, C.; Jäger, K.; Erni, D.; Banyai, M.; Rödel, C.; Engelbrecht, J.; Bruning, A.; van Rensburg, H.; Vermooten, I. H.; Norasetthada, L.; Thungthong, P.; Angchaisuksiri, P.; Numbenjapon, T.; Cook, R.; Deck, K.; Evans, B.; Hearne, S.; Kaelin, T.; Kuno, R.; Pendelton, R.; Speer, J.; Yood, R.; Kahn, R.; Sheehan, K.; Feldman, G.; Chen, Y. C. J.; Fanning, J.; Hartley, P.; Kulback, S.; McIvor, M. E.; LaPerna, L.; Gibson, K.; Vaid, B. R.; Changlani, M.

    2013-01-01

    Dabigatran, which is administered in a fixed dose and does not require laboratory monitoring, may be suitable for extended treatment of venous thromboembolism. In two double-blind, randomized trials, we compared dabigatran at a dose of 150 mg twice daily with warfarin (active-control study) or with

  5. Is extensive screening for cancer in idiopathic venous thromboembolism warranted?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doormaal, F. F.; Terpstra, W.; van der Griend, R.; Prins, M. H.; Nijziel, M. R.; van de Ree, M. A.; Büller, H. R.; Dutilh, J. C.; ten Cate-Hoek, A.; van den Heiligenberg, S. M.; van der Meer, J.; Otten, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients with a first episode of idiopathic venous thromboembolism (IVTE) have an estimated 10% incidence of cancer within 12 months after diagnosis. However, the utility of screening for cancer in this population is controversial. Methods: In this prospective concurrently controlled

  6. Venous thromboembolism associated with protein S deficiency due ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 6. Venous thromboembolism associated with protein S deficiency due to Arg451∗ mutation in PROS1 gene: a case report and a literature review. EWA WYPASEK MAREK KARPINSKI MARTINE ALHENC-GELAS ANETTA UNDAS. REVIEW ARTICLE Volume 96 Issue ...

  7. Venous thromboembolism: What pharmacists know? What do they need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Jean-Baptiste; Jovenin, Nicolas; Kreit, Pierre; Sicard, Jérôme; Parent, Damien; Hettler, Dominique; Nguyen, Philippe; Ducrocq, Jean-Luc

    2016-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism is common in cancer. Low-molecular weight heparins are recommended for prolonged treatment (3-6 months or more if the cancer is active) and prevention of recurrence of venous thromboembolism in cancer. Community pharmacists are often faced with questions from patients. The main objective of this study was to describe the organization, practices and knowledge of pharmacists in care of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients. A descriptive survey was conducted electronically in October and November 2013 with pharmacists in the Champagne-Ardenne region. The questionnaire collected data on the general organization of the pharmacy, management of outpatients with cancer and thrombosis, and the level of knowledge regarding recommendations on the management of thrombosis in patients with cancer. The participation rate was 31.6%. In 93% of cases, pharmacists had no particular expertise in oncology and/or supportive care. In addition, 96% did not know the existence of recommendations for "thrombosis in cancer." Finally, 49% gave the correct answer to the case report (low-molecular weight heparins). Training sessions on the management of venous thromboembolism in cancer are currently available to pharmacists in the region. A new assessment of knowledge will be performed at the end of the year 2014. This regional experience is now extended to a national level (all French regions). © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Nadroparin therapy in pediatric patients with venous thromboembolic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ommen, C. Heleen; van den Dool, Erik-Jan; Peters, Marjolein

    2008-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight heparins are increasingly used for treatment of pediatric venous thromboembolic disease (VTE). Pediatric data about therapeutic doses of nadroparin are not available. To evaluate pharmacodynamics and safety of therapeutic doses of nadroparin, consecutive patients (age 0 to 18 y)

  9. Statin treatment and risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Cu Dinh; Andersson, Charlotte; Jensen, Thomas Bo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Statins may decrease the risk of primary venous thromboembolism (VTE), that is, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) but the effect of statins in preventing recurrent VTE is less clear. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the association between statin...

  10. Oral Apixaban for the Treatment of Acute Venous Thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agnelli, Giancarlo; Buller, Harry R.; Cohen, Alexander; Curto, Madelyn; Gallus, Alexander S.; Johnson, Margot; Masiukiewicz, Urszula; Pak, Raphael; Thompson, John; Raskob, Gary E.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Gallus, Alexander; Raskob, Gary; Weitz, Jeffrey; Prins, Martin; Brandjes, Dees; Kolbach, Dinanda; Limburg, Martinus; Mac Gillavry, Melvin; Otten, Johannes Martinus; Peters, Ron; Roos, Yvo; Segers, Annelise; Slagboom, Ton; Bounameaux, Henry; Hirsh, Jack; Samama, Meyer Michel; Wedel, Hans; Porcari, Anthony; Sanders, Paul; Sisson, Melanie; Sullivan, Beth; Auerbach, Jennifer; Cesario, Lynne; Crawford, Jennifer; Gordon, Margot; Noble, Melanie; Pennington, Ann; Reinhold, Peggy; Simmons, Melanie; Urwin, Keri; Ceresetto, Jose; McRae, Simon; Pabinger, Ingrid; Pereira, Adamastor Humberto; Spencer, Fred; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Jiwei; Gorican, Karel; Husted, Steen Elkiaer; Mottier, Dominique; Harenberg, Job; Vértes, András; Pinjala, Ramakrishna; Zeltser, David; Prandoni, Pablo; Sandset, Morten; Torbicki, Adam; Fijalkowska, Anna; Alvares, Jose Pereira; Kirienko, Alexander; Shvarts, Yury; Sala, Luis Alvarez; Jacobson, Barry; Gudz, Ivan; Ortel, Tom; Spyropoulos, Alex; Beyer-Westendorf, J.; Sipos, G.; Bredikhin, R.; Della Siega, A.; Klinke, W.; Lawall, H.; Zwettler, U.; Prasol, V.; Cannon, K.; Vasylyuk, S.; Jin, B.; Prandoni, P.; Desai, S.; Zaichuk, A.; Katelnitskiy, I.; de Pellegrin, A.; Santonastaso, M.; Skupyy, O.; Pesant, Y.; Shvalb, P.; Spacek, R.; Visonà, A.; Alvarez Sala, L.; Borja, V.; Gudz, I.; Noori, E.; Sereg, M.; Ortel, T.; Braester, A.; Falvo, N.; Mottier, D.; Jacobson, B.; Vöhringer, H.; LaPerna, L.; Oliven, A.; Skalicka, L.; Bolster, D.; Haidar, A.; Schellong, S.; Vértes, A.; Smith, S.; Sergeev, O.; Pullman, J.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Zimlichman, R.; Elias, M.; Fourie, N.; Pernod, G.; Panchenko, E.; Pendleton, R.; van Nieuwenhuizen, E.; Vinereanu, D.; Agnelli, G.; Becattini, C.; Manina, G.; Leduc, J.; Dunaj, M.; Frost, L.; Gavish, D.; Jakobsen, T.; Lishner, M.; Morales, L. Solis; Chochola, J.; Gubka, O.; Holaj, R.; Hussein, O.; Katona, A.; Sergeeva, E.; Bova, C.; Cepeda, J.; Cohen, K.; Sobkowicz, B.; Grzelakowski, P.; Husted, S.; Lupkovics, G.; Spencer, F.; Dedek, V.; Liu, C.; Puskas, A.; Ritchie, B.; Ambrosio, G.; Parisi, R.; Heuer, H.; Livneh, A.; Podpera, I.; Stanbro, M.; Caraco, Y.; Fulmer, J.; Ghirarduzzi, A.; Schmidt-Lucke, J.; Bergmann, J.; Cizek, V.; Leyden, M.; Stein, R.; Abramov, I.; Chong, B.; Colan, D.; Jindal, R.; Liu, S.; Pereira, A.; Porreca, E.; Salem, H.; Welker, J.; Yusen, R.; Dhar, A.; Gallus, A.; Podczeck-Schweighofer, A.; Shtutin, O.; Vital Durand, D.; Zeltser, D.; Zhang, J.; Balaji, V.; Correa, J.; Harenberg, J.; Kline, J.; Runyon, M.; Laszlo, Z.; Martelet, M.; Parakh, R.; Sandset, P. M.; Schmidt, J.; Yeo, E.; Bhagavan, N.; Bura-Riviere, A.; Ferrer, J. Mirete; Lacroix, P.; Lewczuk, J.; Pilger, E.; Sokurenko, G.; Yu, H.; Nikulnikov, P.; Pabinger-Fasching, I.; Sanchez-Diaz, C.; Schuller, D.; Shvarts, Y.; Suresh, K.; Wang, C.; Lobo, S.; Lyons, R.; Marschang, P.; Palla, A.; Schulman, S.; Spyropoulous, A.; Fraiz, J.; Gerasymov, V.; Lerner, R.; Llamas Esperón, G.; Manenti, E.; Masson, J.; Moreira, R.; Poy, C.; Rodoman, G.; Bruckner, I.; Gurghean, A.; Carrier, M.; Freire, A.; Gan, E.; Gibson, K.; Herold, M.; Hudcovic, M.; Kamath, G.; Koslow, A.; Meneveau, N.; Roos, J.; Zahn, R.; Balanda, J.; Bratsch, H.; Dolan, S.; Gould, T.; Hirschl, M.; Hoffmann, U.; Kaatz, S.; Shah, V.; Kadapatti, K.; Kræmmer Nielsen, H.; Lahav, M.; Natarajan, S.; Tuxen, C.; Tveit, A.; Alves, C.; Formiga, A.; Brudevold, R.; Cardozo, M.; Gorican, K.; Lorch, D.; Marais, H.; Mismetti, P.; Panico, M.; Pop, C.; Quist-Paulsen, P.; Stevens, D.; Tarleton, G.; Yoshida, W.; Cox, M.; Crispin, P.; Czekalski, P.; Ebrahim, I.; Game, M.; Ghanima, W.; Harrington, D.; Jackson, D.; Lee, A.; Matoska, P.; Meade, A.; Camargo, A. C.; Nishinari, K.; Sanchez Llamas, F.; Tosetto, A.; Vejby-Christensen, H.; Basson, M.; Blombery, P.; Fu, G.; Jha, V.; Keltai, K.; Le Jeunne, C.; Lodigiani, C.; Ma, Y.; Nagy, A.; Neumeister, A.; Pinjala, R.; Shotan, A.; Wong, T.; Ying, K.; Anderson, S.; Brenner, B.; Carnovali, M.; Cerana, S.; Cunha, C.; Diaz-Castañon, J.; Graham, M.; Kirenko, A.; Palareti, G.; Rodriguez-Cintron, W.; Nathanson, A.; Rosenthal, S.; Sanders, D.; Scheinberg, P.; Schjesvold, F.; Torp, R.; van Zyl, L.; Venher, I.; Xia, G.; Brockmyre, A.; Chen, Z.; Hakki, S.; Hanefield, C.; Mügge, A.; Janczak, D.; Karpovych, D.; Lancaster, G.; Lavigne, C.; Lugassy, G.; Melaniuk, M.; Moran, J.; Oliver, M.; Schattner, A.; Staroverov, I.; Timi, J.; Vöhringer, F.; von Bilderling, P.; Warr, T.; White, R.; Wronski, J.; Wu, C.; Almeida, C.; Blum, A.; Bono, J.; Durán, M.; Erzinger, F.; Fu, W.; Jagadesan, R.; Jurecka, W.; Korban, E.; Nguyen, D.; Raval, M.; Willms, D.; Zevin, S.; Zhu, H.; Abdullah, I.; Achkar, A.; Albuquerque, L.; Ali, M.; Bai, C.; Bloomfield, D.; Chen, J.; Fajardo Campos, P.; Garcia Bragado, F.; Kobza, I.; Lindhoff-Last, E.; Lourenço, A.; Marchena Yglesias, P.; Marshall, P.; Siegel, M.; Mikhailova, O.; Oliva, M.; Pottier, P.; Pruszczyk, P.; Sauer, M.; Baloira, A.; Cromer, M.; D'Angelo, A.; Faucher, J.; Gutowski, P.; Hong, S.; Lissauer, M.; Lopes, A.; Lopes, R.; Maholtz, M.; Mesquita, E.; Miekus, P.; Mohan, B.; Ng, H.; Peterson, M.; Piovella, F.; Siragusa, S.; Srinivas, R.; Tiberio, G.; van Bellen, B.; Arutyunov, G.; Assi, N.; Baker, R.; Blanc, F.; Curnow, J.; Fu, C.; Gonzalez-Porras, J.; Guijarro Merino, R.; Gunasingam, S.; Gupta, P.; Laule, M.; Liu, Z.; Luber, J.; Serifilippi, G.; Paulson, R.; Shevela, A.; Simonneau, G.; Siu, D.; Sosa Liprandi, M.; Takács, J.; Tay, J.; Vora, K.; Witkiewicz, W.; Zhao, L.; Aquilanti, S.; Dabbagh, O.; Dellas, C.; Denaro, C.; Doshi, A.; Fijalkowska, A.; Flippo, G.; Giumelli, C.; Gomez Cerezo, J.; Han, D.; Harris, L.; Hofmann, L.; Kamerkar, D.; Kaminski, L.; Kazimir, M.; Kloczko, J.; Ko, Y.; Koura, F.; Lavender, R.; Maly, J.; Margolis, B.; McRae, S.; Mos, L.; Sanchez-Escalante, L.; Solvang, A.; Soroka, V.; Szopinski, P.; Thawani, H.; Vickars, L.; Yip, G.; Zangroniz, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Apixaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor administered in fixed doses, may simplify the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Methods In this randomized, double-blind study, we compared apixaban (at a dose of 10 mg twice daily for 7 days, followed by 5 mg twice daily for 6 months) with

  11. Venous thromboembolism incidence in upper limb orthopedic surgery: do these procedures increase venous thromboembolism risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Graham R; Pederson, Amanda; Redfern, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    In 2005, the House of Commons (HoC) Health Committee stated deaths attributed to preventable, hospital-acquired venous thromboembolism (VTE) numbered upwards of 25,000 per annum. Nationwide prevention of VTE became the topic of a major health campaign. The HoC Health Committee stated there was an unstratified VTE risk of between 45% and 51% associated with orthopedic surgery. VTE research in orthopedic surgery has been concentrated on lower limb procedures. Experience suggests that this kind of relation does not hold true for upper limb orthopedic procedures. This project aimed to estimate the incidence of postoperative VTE in upper limb orthopedic surgery. The incidence of postoperative VTE was assessed in 3357 consecutive upper limb orthopedic operations performed by 4 surgeons in Lancashire Teaching Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Trust (LTHTR) between July 1, 2009, and July 31, 2012. Four pulmonary embolisms and 2 deep vein thromboses occurred. Incidence of postoperative VTE was 0.0018%, significantly lower than rates reported in the literature. Five of 6 patients who developed a VTE reported a personal or family history of VTE. Three patients would not have been identified as at risk under the current VTE screening guidelines. Three of these patients received appropriate anticoagulation according to present guidelines, yet VTE events still occurred. These results indicate VTE risk in orthopedic upper limb surgery is much lower than reported in the literature. The necessity for screening for VTE in upper limb surgery is contested. The efficacy of VTE screening and current VTE prophylaxis is discussed, and an alternative and much simplified method of screening is suggested. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rivaroxaban or Aspirin for Extended Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitz, Jeffrey I; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Prins, Martin H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although many patients with venous thromboembolism require extended treatment, it is uncertain whether it is better to use full- or lower-intensity anticoagulation therapy or aspirin. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 study, we assigned 3396 patients with venous...... thromboembolism to receive either once-daily rivaroxaban (at doses of 20 mg or 10 mg) or 100 mg of aspirin. All the study patients had completed 6 to 12 months of anticoagulation therapy and were in equipoise regarding the need for continued anticoagulation. Study drugs were administered for up to 12 months...... in 17 of 1107 patients (1.5%) receiving 20 mg of rivaroxaban and in 13 of 1127 patients (1.2%) receiving 10 mg of rivaroxaban, as compared with 50 of 1131 patients (4.4%) receiving aspirin (hazard ratio for 20 mg of rivaroxaban vs. aspirin, 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20 to 0.59; hazard ratio...

  13. Epidemiological study of venous thromboembolism in a big Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Marianne Tang; Kristensen, Søren Risom; Overvad, Kim

    Introduction: Epidemiological data on venous thromboembolism (VT), i.e. pulmonary emboli (PE) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) are sparse. We have examined VT-diagnoses registered in a big Danish Cohort study.  Methods: All first-time VT diagnoses in The Danish National Patient Register were...... identified among participants in the Danish cohort study "Diet, Cancer and Health" in which 57,053 50-64 years old persons were included 1993-7. Medical records were retrieved and reviewed by an experienced physician using a detailed standardized form, and information on the diagnostic work-up and presence...

  14. The role of factor Xa inhibitors in venous thromboembolism treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Katherine P; Ansell, Jack E

    2015-01-01

    Three factor Xa inhibitors have been studied in the treatment of venous thromboembolism, both for acute therapy and as extended therapy to prevent recurrent events. Rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban have all proven to be effective in Phase III clinical trials for this indication when compared to current standard of therapy with similar or less bleeding. Nevertheless, the agents all offer different pharmacological profiles, which have an impact on patient selection and potential advantages in clinical practice. PMID:25673997

  15. VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY AND THROMBOEMBOLIC DISEASE IN BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonno van BELLEN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Morbid obesity is associated with various co-morbidities, including chronic venous insufficiency. Bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for morbid obesity, but with potential risks and possible complications, including venous thromboembolism. Objective To determine the prevalence of clinical and ultrasonographic signs of chronic venous insufficiency in morbid obese patients in preparation for bariatric surgery and the incidence of post-operative venous thromboembolic disease. Methods Patients on work-up for bariatric surgery of Centro Terapêutico Especializado em Fígado (CETEFI and Pro-Gastro surgical teams of the Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo were included. The analysed data were pre-operative findings for venous insufficiency (CEAP - clinical, etiological, anatomical, physiopathologic - classification and venous ultrassonographic findings, type of surgery (open or laparoscopic, abdominal circumference, body mass index (BMI and post-operative ultrassonography search for venous insufficiency and deep venous thrombosis. Results Between March 2007 and December 2009, 95 patients candidates for bariatric surgery had clinical and duplex scan evaluation of the lower limbs venous system. Of the 95 patients, 53 were submitted to the surgical procedure. There was a predominance of women (77.9%, the average age was 38.5 years, average preoperative weight 124.6 kg and average BMI of 45.5 kg/m2. Regarding obesity, 16.8% were obese, and 83.1% were morbidly obese. In relation to the venous findings, 86.3% of the patients did fit CEAP classification less than 3 and 13.7% greater than or equal to 3. Among the post-operative complications, there were four cases of wound infection. Three patients developed post-operative distal venous thrombosis (7.5%, but no one had clinically manifested pulmonary embolism. Conclusion No relation between BMI, CEAP classification and venous ultrassonographic findings were found. Although

  16. Prospective study of sickle cell trait and venous thromboembolism incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, A R; Tang, W; Roetker, N S; Kshirsagar, A V; Derebail, V K; Lutsey, P L; Naik, R; Pankow, J S; Grove, M L; Basu, S; Key, N S; Cushman, M

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell trait may increase risk of venous thromboembolism, but this is not fully established. We sought to determine the association of sickle cell trait with deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Middle-aged African Americans participating in a prospective, population-based cohort investigation, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, were followed from 1987 through 2011 for incident hospitalized pulmonary embolism (n = 111) or isolated deep vein thrombosis (n = 138), verified by physician review of medical records. Sickle cell trait (heterozygosity for hemoglobin S, n = 268) was compared with no sickle cell trait (n = 3748). Over a median of 22 years of follow-up, 249 participants had an incident venous thromboembolism. The hazard ratio of venous thromboembolism was 1.50 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.96-2.36) for participants with vs. without sickle cell trait, after adjustment for age, sex, ancestry, hormone replacement therapy (women), body mass index, diabetes, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. This hazard ratio was 2.05 (95% CI 1.12-3.76) for pulmonary embolism and 1.15 (95% CI 0.58-2.27) for deep vein thrombosis without pulmonary embolism. Sickle cell trait in African Americans carries a 2-fold increased risk of pulmonary embolism but does not elevate deep vein thrombosis risk. Because neonatal screening for sickle hemoglobin is being conducted in the United States, consideration should be paid to the increased pulmonary embolism risk of individuals with sickle cell trait. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  17. "Pathophysiologic mapping" of venous thromboembolism: opportunities for radiolabeled peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernarducci, M P

    2003-12-01

    The serious clinical and economic impact of venous thromboembolic (VTE) disease is undisputed. What concerns practitioners and researchers alike is the seeming inability to truly mitigate the ramifications of VTE. Ironically, the current approaches to the diagnostic evaluation of suspected VTE patients tends to favor the application of anatomic modalities, which by virtue of their principles of detection, seemingly ignore the extensive knowledge base of VTE pathophysiology and natural history. In other words, are we seeking the appropriate types of information in patients with suspected VTE? Research in nuclear medicine techniques for detecting VTE began approximately 25 years ago. Recently, the emergence of the radiolabeled peptides as a clinically applicable technology platform has encouraged a different way of evaluating VTE. Many radiolabeled peptide candidates are undergoing preclinical and clinical research. Currently, only one, (99m)Tc-apcitide (AcuTect), has been approved (since 1998) for clinical use, specifically in the United States. Its availability this time has fueled ongoing clinical research to further elucidate the benefits of this unique peptide technology. Consequently, significant insight has been gained from large prospective clinical trials. Furthermore, this insight has kindled increasing interest in (99m)Tc-apcitide and potential new entrants into this special "diagnostic class". Unlike the more popular modalities, radiolabeled peptides circumvent many of the clinical and anatomic challenges to objectively and accurately diagnosing VTE. The importance of an objective and accurate diagnosis is understood, because it is paramount to a cost-effective treatment strategy. In addition to describing the current activities concerning the development for and use of radiolabeled peptides for clinical practice, this manuscript is intended to promulgate a thought-provoking argument for changing our current approach to the diagnostic evaluation of VTE

  18. Venous thromboembolism and subsequent hospitalisation due to acute arterial cardiovascular events: a 20-year cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Horvath-Puho, Erzsebet; Pedersen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    of myocardial infarction and stroke in 25,199 patients with deep venous thrombosis, 16,925 patients with pulmonary embolism, and 163,566 population controls. FINDINGS: For patients with deep venous thrombosis, the relative risks varied from 1.60 for myocardial infarction (95% CI 1.35-1.91) to 2.19 (1.......85-2.60) for stroke in the first year after the thrombotic event. For patients with pulmonary embolism, the relative risks in that year were 2.60 (2.14-3.14) for myocardial infarction and 2.93 (2.34-3.66) for stroke. The relative risks were also raised, though less markedly, during the subsequent 20 years of follow......-up, with 20-40% increases in risk for arterial cardiovascular events. Relative risks were similar for those with provoked and unprovoked deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. INTERPRETATION: Patients with venous thromboembolism have a substantially increased long-term risk of subsequent arterial...

  19. Hormone Therapy and Venous Thromboembolism in a Transgender Adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Kaitlin; Cooper, James

    2018-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism can be precipitated by both genetic and acquired factors, but the role of testosterone therapy is less clear. Here, we present a 17-year-old transgender adolescent, transitioning from female to male, receiving both estrogen and testosterone therapy, who developed a pulmonary embolism without an underlying genetic thrombophilic condition. As transgender medical care evolves, the use of testosterone as cross-sex hormone therapy in adolescents is likely to increase. Our review suggests that care must be taken when initiating treatment with testosterone, and modification of other thrombophilic risks should be explored before starting therapy in this population.

  20. The risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peeters, P J H L; Bazelier, M T; Uitdehaag, B M J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), disability and autoinflammatory processes may result in an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of VTE associated with MS. METHODS: We conducted an observational-cohort study within the Clinical Practice...... to be associated with an increased risk of VTE within the MS population. Moreover, the risk of VTE was increased in MS patients with recent records indicating immobility, spasticity, glucocorticoid use, or disability. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with MS had an increased risk of VTE. Furthermore, our results provide...

  1. Venous thromboembolism in HIV-positive women during puerperium : a case series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.M.; Lijfering, W.M.; Sprenger, H.G.; van der Meer, J.; van Pampus, M.G.

    Several studies in the past few years suggested that HIV-infection is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. No data have been reported, however, on pregnancy and the postpartum period as possible additional risk factors for venous thromboembolism in HIV-infected women. We

  2. [Actual questions about the prevention of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losonczy, Hajna; Nagy, Ágnes; Tar, Attila

    2016-02-07

    Cancer patients have a 2-7 fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism compared with the general population and, since 1990, this is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This review summarizes the current knowledge on venous thromboembolism and cancer. Notably, the risk of venous thromboembolism varies depending on the type and stage of cancer. For instance, pancreatic and brain cancer patients have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism than breast and prostate cancer patients. Moreover, patients with metastatic disease have a higher risk than those with localized tumors. Tumor-derived procoagulant factors, cytokines and growth factors may directly and indirectly enhance venous thromboembolism. Chemotherapy produces ~6,5 fold increase in venous thromboembolism incidence in cancer patients compared to the general population. Prevention of this complication is challenging. The authors review the development of guidelines concerning venous thromboembolism prevention in hospitalized and also in ambulatory cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Current guidelines recommend the use of low-molecular-weight heparin. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may allow the development of new therapies to safely prevent venous thromboembolism in cancer patients.

  3. Venous thromboembolism in pregnancy and the puerperal period: a study of 1210 events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virkus, Rie Adser; Løkkegaard, Ellen Cl; Lidegaard, Ojvind

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pregnancy and the puerperal period and to validate diagnoses of VTE.......The aim of this study was to describe venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pregnancy and the puerperal period and to validate diagnoses of VTE....

  4. Stratifying the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism in Otolaryngology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Andrew G.; Hu, Hsou Mei; Pannucci, Christopher J.; Jackson, Christopher R.; Bradford, Carol R.; Bahl, Vinita

    2015-01-01

    Objective The consequences of perioperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) are devastating; identifying patients at risk is an essential step in reducing morbidity and mortality. The utility of perioperative VTE risk assessment in otolaryngology is unknown. This study was designed to risk-stratify a diverse population of otolaryngology patients for VTE events. Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Single-institution academic tertiary care medical center. Subjects and Methods Adult patients presenting for otolaryngologic surgery requiring hospital admission from 2003 to 2010 who did not receive VTE chemoprophylaxis were included. The Caprini risk assessment was retrospectively scored via a validated method of electronic chart abstraction. Primary study variables were Caprini risk scores and the incidence of perioperative venous thromboembolic outcomes. Results A total of 2016 patients were identified. The overall 30-day rate of VTE was 1.3%. The incidence of VTE in patients with a Caprini risk score of 6 or less was 0.5%. For patients with scores of 7 or 8, the incidence was 2.4%. Patients with a Caprini risk score greater than 8 had an 18.3% incidence of VTE and were significantly more likely to develop a VTE when compared to patients with a Caprini risk score less than 8 (P otolaryngology patients for 30-day VTE events and allows otolaryngologists to identify patient subgroups who have a higher risk of VTE in the absence of chemoprophylaxis. PMID:22261490

  5. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcora Mandreoli

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the high morbidity and mortality associated with venous thromboembolism in hospitalized medical patients with a number of risk factors, and large evidence that prophylaxis is effective, prophylaxis rates remain elusive in medically ill patients. Furthermore, in patients with renal failure, prophylaxis often is omitted or sub-optimal, due to fear of provoking hemorrhage. Patients with end-stage renal disease often have platelet deficits. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH therapy may also be difficult to manage in these cases because LMWH clearance is largely dependent on the kidneys. Administration of LMWH to patients with some degree of renal failure may lead to bioaccumulation of anti-Xa activity with an increased risk of bleeding. In recent years, LMWH has largely replaced unfractionated heparin (UFH for the treatment and prophylaxis of thromboembolic disease. LMWHs have been shown to be superior to UFH in the prevention of venous thromboembolism. They are also easier to administer and do not require laboratory monitoring. However, several case reports and a metaanalysis indicate that the use of LMWHs at therapeutic doses in patients with advanced renal failure can be associated with major bleeding with serious adverse effects. In this paper, we review recent evidence supporting the safety of LMWHs at prophylactic doses in patients with mild or moderate renal disease. Current evidence suggests that bioaccumulation of enoxaparin (the most widely used LMWH can occur when the drug is used at standard therapeutic doses in patients with severely impaired renal function. This risk can be reduced by empiric dose reduction or monitoring of anti-Xa heparin levels.

  6. Feasibility and safety of rehabilitation after venous thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noack F

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Frank Noack,1,2 Bernd Schmidt,1 Mroawan Amoury,2 Dietrich Stoevesandt,3 Stephan Gielen,4 Birgit Pflaumbaum,5 Christiane Girschick,5 Heinz Völler,6 Axel Schlitt5,7 1Department of Medicine I, 2Department of Emergency Medicine, 3Department of Diagnostic Radiology, 4Department of Medicine III, University Clinic Halle (Saale, Halle, Germany; 5Department of Cardiology and Pulmology, Paracelsus-Harz-Clinic Bad Suderode, Quedlinburg, Germany; 6Klinik am See, Rüdersdorf, Germany; 7Medical Faculty, Martin Luther University Halle, Wittenberg, Germany Background: Venous thromboembolism is a life-threatening disease. In survivors, different degrees of functional complaints need to be restored or prevented (eg, post-thrombotic syndrome, pulmonary hypertension. Therefore, rehabilitation after venous thromboembolism is recommended in Germany. However, a structured rehabilitation program has not been defined for this indication. Here, we present the experience of a single rehabilitation center. Methods: Data from consecutive pulmonary embolism (PE patients who were referred for a 3-week inpatient rehabilitation program from 2006 to 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Results: In all, 422 patients were identified. The mean age was 63.9±13.5 years, the mean body mass index (BMI was 30.6±6.2 kg/m2, and 51.9% were female. Deep vein thrombosis according to PE was known for 55.5% of all patients. We applied a wide range of therapeutic interventions such as bicycle training with monitored heart rate in 86.7%, respiratory training in 82.5%, aquatic therapy/swimming in 40.1%, and medical training therapy in 14.9% of all patients. Adverse events (AEs occurred in 57 patients during the 3-week rehabilitation period. The most common AEs were cold (n=6, diarrhea (n=5, and infection of the upper or lower respiratory tract that was treated with antibiotics (n=5. However, three patients under anticoagulation therapy suffered from bleeding, which was clinically relevant in

  7. Prevalence of venous thromboembolism in patients with secondary polycythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Omar; Gui, Jiang; Ornstein, Deborah L

    2013-01-01

    To investigate an association between secondary polycythemia and venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk, we performed a case-control study to compare the prevalence of VTE in participants with secondary polycythemia due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; N = 86) to that in age- and sex-matched controls with COPD without secondary polycythemia (N = 86). Although there was a significant difference in mean hematocrit between cases and controls (53.5% vs 43.6%, respectively; P polycythemia alone may not be a significant risk factor for VTE but that VTE risk in this population may be related to known risk factors such as obesity. The role of phlebotomy for VTE risk reduction secondary polycythemia is therefore questionable.

  8. Oral contraception and menstrual bleeding during treatment of venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klok, F A; Schreiber, K; Stach, K

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The optimal management of oral contraception and menstrual bleeding during treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is largely unknown. We aimed to elicit expert opinion and compare that to current practice as assessed by a world-wide international web-based survey among physicians....... METHODS: 10 international thrombosis experts and 10 abnormal uterine bleeding experts independently completed a questionnaire containing three hypothetical patient cases each with four different scenarios, and additional queries covering different severities of VTE, patient circumstances, hormonal...... contraceptives and both thrombotic and bleeding complications. The consensus percentage was set a priori at ≥70%. The same questionnaire with randomized case scenarios was presented to international physicians via newsletters of the ISTH and national scientific communities. Differences between the expert groups...

  9. Venous thromboembolism associated with pregnancy and hormonal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Anne Flem; Sandset, Per Morten

    2012-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality during or early after pregnancy and in women taking hormonal therapy for contraception or for replacement therapy. Post-thrombotic syndrome, including leg oedema and leg pain, is an unrecognized burden after pregnancy-related VTE, which will affect more than two of five women. Women with a prior VTE, a family history of VTE, certain clinical risk factors and thrombophilia are at considerably increased risk both for pregnancy-related VTE and for VTE on hormonal therapy. This review critically assesses the epidemiology and risk factors for pregnancy-related VTE and current guidelines for prophylaxis and treatment. We also provide information on the risk of VTE related to hormonal contraception and replacement therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Different Finite Durations of Anticoagulation and Outcomes following Idiopathic Venous Thromboembolism: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron B. Holley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Controversy remains over the optimal length of anticoagulation following idiopathic venous thromboembolism. We sought to determine if a longer, finite course of anticoagulation offered additional benefit over a short course in the initial treatment of the first episode of idiopathic venous thromboembolism. Data Extraction. Rates of deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, combined venous thromboembolism, major bleeding, and mortality were extracted from prospective trials enrolling patients with first time, idiopathic venous thromboembolism. Data was pooled using random effects meta-regression. Results. Ten trials, with a total of 3225 patients, met inclusion criteria. For each additional month of initial anticoagulation, once therapy was stopped, recurrent venous thromboembolism (0.03 (95% CI: −0.28 to 0.35; =.24, mortality (−0.10 (95% CI: −0.24 to 0.04; =.15, and major bleeding (−0.01 (95% CI: −0.05 to 0.02; =.44 rates measured in percent per patient years, did not significantly change. Conclusions: Patients with an initial idiopathic venous thromboembolism should be treated with 3 to 6 months of secondary prophylaxis with vitamin K antagonists. At that time, a decision between continuing with indefinite therapy can be made, but there is no benefit to a longer (but finite course of therapy.

  11. Initial strides for invent-VTE: Towards global collaboration to accelerate clinical research in venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodger, Marc; Langlois, Nicole; Middeldorp, Saskia; Kahn, Susan; Sandset, Per Morten; Brighton, Timothy; Huisman, Menno; Meyer, Guy; Konstantinides, Stavros; Ageno, Walter; Morange, Pierre; Garcia, David; Kreuziger, Lisa Baumann; Young, Laura; Key, Nigel; Monreal, Manuel; Jiménez, David

    2018-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) represents a major global burden of disease and requires collaborative efforts to conduct large, high-quality investigator-initiated and academically sponsored studies addressing the most relevant clinical questions. Owing to increasing regulatory requirements, the

  12. Endogenous sex hormones and risk of venous thromboembolism in women and men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegard, Haya N; Nordestgaard, B G; Schnohr, P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Use of oral contraceptives with estrogen and hormone replacement therapy with estrogen or testosterone are associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, whether endogenous estradiol and testosterone concentrations are also associated with risk of VTE...

  13. Risk factors of arterial cardiovascular complications in patients with prior venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roshani, S.; Lijfering, W. M.; Coppens, M.; Hamulyák, K.; Prins, M. H.; Büller, H. R.; Middeldorp, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The effect of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRs) and thrombophilic defects on the risk of arterial cardiovascular complications in patients with prior venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unclear. Objective. We investigated whether the risk of arterial cardiovascular complications is

  14. Risk factors of arterial cardiovascular complications in patients with prior venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roshani, S.; Lijfering, W. M.; Coppens, M.; Hamulyak, K.; Prins, M. H.; Buller, H. R.; Middeldorp, S.

    Background. The effect of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRs) and thrombophilic defects on the risk of arterial cardiovascular complications in patients with prior venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unclear. Objective. We investigated whether the risk of arterial cardiovascular complications is

  15. Increased risk of venous thromboembolism and arterial cardiovascular events in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Søren Lund; Ahlehoff, Ole; Lindhardsen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    This focused review describes the current knowledge of the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, and as well as venous thromboembolism this disease shares inflammatory mechanisms with IBD. Patients...

  16. Use of bisphosphonates and raloxifene and risk of deep venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, P; Schwartz, K; Pinholt, E M

    2010-01-01

    Prior studies have associated raloxifene and strontium ranelate with deep venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism. In a cohort study, we observed an increased risk also with the bisphosphonates. However, the increase was present already before the start of bisphosphonates pointing...

  17. International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment and prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farge, D.; Debourdeau, P.; Beckers, M.; Baglin, C.; Bauersachs, R. M.; Brenner, B.; Brilhante, D.; Falanga, A.; Gerotzafias, G. T.; Haim, N.; Kakkar, A. K.; Khorana, A. A.; Lecumberri, R.; Mandala, M.; Marty, M.; Monreal, M.; Mousa, S. A.; Noble, S.; Pabinger, I.; Prandoni, P.; Prins, M. H.; Qari, M. H.; Streiff, M. B.; Syrigos, K.; Bounameaux, H.; Buller, H. R.

    . Background: Guidelines addressing the management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients are heterogeneous and their implementation has been suboptimal worldwide. Objectives: To establish a common international consensus addressing practical, clinically relevant questions in this

  18. International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment and prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farge, D.; Debourdeau, P.; Beckers, M.; Baglin, C.; Bauersachs, R. M.; Brenner, B.; Brilhante, D.; Falanga, A.; Gerotzafias, G. T.; Haim, N.; Kakkar, A. K.; Khorana, A. A.; Lecumberri, R.; Mandala, M.; Marty, M.; Monreal, M.; Mousa, S. A.; Noble, S.; Pabinger, I.; Prandoni, P.; Prins, M. H.; Qari, M. H.; Streiff, M. B.; Syrigos, K.; Bounameaux, H.; Büller, H. R.

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines addressing the management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients are heterogeneous and their implementation has been suboptimal worldwide. To establish a common international consensus addressing practical, clinically relevant questions in this setting. An international

  19. C-reactive protein and risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Jeppe; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2010-01-01

    To examine the robustness of the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and to examine whether genetically elevated CRP levels cause VTE....

  20. Symptomatic venous thromboembolism in orthognathic surgery and distraction osteogenesis: a retrospective cohort study of 4127 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlinden, C.R.A.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a common postoperative complication, and orthopaedic procedures are particularly at risk. We designed a retrospective, single centre, observational, cohort study of 4127 patients (mean (SD) age 27 (11) years) who had elective orthognathic operations or distraction

  1. Postprandial lipemia is not increased in patients with previous unprovoked venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hald, Erin M; Brækkan, Sigrid K; Vik, Anders; Brodin, Ellen E; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    Patients with arterial cardiovascular disease have increased postprandial lipemia, and plasma levels of postprandial remnants are related to the progression of atherosclerosis. Studies have shown that patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism have increased risk of arterial cardiovascular disease. To investigate whether patients with a history of unprovoked venous thromboembolism have increased postprandial lipemia. A population-based case-control study was performed in 20 patients with a history of unprovoked venous thromboembolism and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Participants were subjected to a standard fat tolerance test (1 g/kilo body weight) with subsequent blood sampling every second hour for 8 hours. Lipids were measured by traditional methods and lipoprotein subclasses by proton nuclear magnetic resonance. Fasting lipids and lipoprotein subclasses did not differ between groups. The postprandial lipemia, assessed by the incremental area under the triglyceride curve, was not different in venous thromboembolism patients and healthy controls (5.0 ± 3.6 mmol/L∗h vs 5.3 ± 4.4 mmol/L∗h, P = .81). Similarly, the distribution and size of the lipoprotein subclasses obtained 4 hours postprandially did not differ between groups. Patients with a history of unprovoked venous thromboembolism had similar lipoprotein subclasses size, distribution, and postprandial lipemia as healthy controls. Our findings indicate that postprandial lipemia is not a link between unprovoked venous thromboembolism and arterial cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2013 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Feasibility and safety of rehabilitation after venous thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Frank; Schmidt, Bernd; Amoury, Mroawan; Stoevesandt, Dietrich; Gielen, Stephan; Pflaumbaum, Birgit; Girschick, Christiane; Völler, Heinz; Schlitt, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism is a life-threatening disease. In survivors, different degrees of functional complaints need to be restored or prevented (eg, post-thrombotic syndrome, pulmonary hypertension). Therefore, rehabilitation after venous thromboembolism is recommended in Germany. However, a structured rehabilitation program has not been defined for this indication. Here, we present the experience of a single rehabilitation center. Methods Data from consecutive pulmonary embolism (PE) patients who were referred for a 3-week inpatient rehabilitation program from 2006 to 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. Results In all, 422 patients were identified. The mean age was 63.9±13.5 years, the mean body mass index (BMI) was 30.6±6.2 kg/m2, and 51.9% were female. Deep vein thrombosis according to PE was known for 55.5% of all patients. We applied a wide range of therapeutic interventions such as bicycle training with monitored heart rate in 86.7%, respiratory training in 82.5%, aquatic therapy/swimming in 40.1%, and medical training therapy in 14.9% of all patients. Adverse events (AEs) occurred in 57 patients during the 3-week rehabilitation period. The most common AEs were cold (n=6), diarrhea (n=5), and infection of the upper or lower respiratory tract that was treated with antibiotics (n=5). However, three patients under anticoagulation therapy suffered from bleeding, which was clinically relevant in one. Four patients (0.9%) had to be transferred to a primary care hospital for non-PE-associated reasons (acute coronary syndrome, pharyngeal abscess, and acute abdominal problems). No influence of any of the physical activity interventions on the incidence of any AE was found. Conclusion Since PE is a life-threatening disease, it seems reasonable to recommend rehabilitation at least in PE patients with an intermediate or high risk. It is shown for the first time in this study that a standard rehabilitation program after PE is safe. However, efficacy and

  3. Cancer-associated venous thromboembolism: Burden, mechanisms, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ay, Cihan; Pabinger, Ingrid; Cohen, Alexander T

    2017-01-26

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant health problem in the general population but especially in cancer patients. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology and burden of the disease, the pathophysiology of cancer-associated VTE, and the clinical treatment options for both primary prevention and acute treatment. Overall, the development of VTE in cancer patients is related to increases in morbidity, mortality, and medical costs. However, the incidence of cancer-associated VTE varies due to patient-related factors (e.g. thrombophilia, comorbidities, performance status, history of venous diseases), tumour-related factors (e.g. cancer site, stage, grade), and treatment-related factors (e.g. surgery, chemotherapy, anti-angiogenesis treatment, hormonal and supportive treatment). Furthermore, blood count parameters (e.g. platelets and leukocytes) and biomarkers (e.g. soluble P-selectin and D-dimer) are predictive markers for the risk of VTE in cancer patients and have been used to enhance risk stratification. Evidence suggests that cancer itself is associated with a state of hypercoagulability, driven in part by the release of procoagulant factors, such as tissue factor, from malignant tissue as well as by inflammation-driven activation of endothelial cells, platelets, and leukocytes. In general, low-molecular-weight heparin (LWMH) monotherapy is the standard of care for the management of cancer-associated VTE, as vitamin K antagonists are less effective in cancer patients. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) offer a potentially promising treatment option for cancer patients with VTE, but recommendations concerning the routine use of DOACs should await head-to-head studies with LMWH.

  4. Pharmacotherapy with oral Xa inhibitors for venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanassche, Thomas; Vandenbriele, Christophe; Peerlinck, Kathelijne; Verhamme, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. The traditional treatment of VTE, with an initial therapy with (low molecular weight) heparin or fondaparinux and a continued treatment with vitamin K antagonists, is effective but has limitations. The current review summarizes the results of the Phase III trials with the new oral direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban and provides a meta-analysis of these trials in the subgroups of elderly patients (> 75 years) and patients with impaired renal function. The practical use of direct Xa inhibitors in the treatment of VTE in general and in specific subgroups is discussed. For elderly patients, patients with extremes of body weight, cancer patients or patients with moderate renal impairment, pooled data suggest that the direct oral Xa inhibitors are a reasonable alternative to standard therapy. For other indications, such as treatment of VTE in children, during pregnancy or in the context of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, further data from clinical trials are needed.

  5. Does thromboprophylaxis prevent venous thromboembolism after major orthopedic surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Eylem Akpinar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary embolism (PE is an important complication of major orthopedic surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE and factors influencing the development of VTE in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery in a university hospital. METHODS: Patients who underwent major orthopedic surgery (hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty, or femur fracture repair between February of 2006 and June of 2012 were retrospectively included in the study. The incidences of PE and deep vein thrombosis (DVT were evaluated, as were the factors influencing their development, such as type of operation, age, and comorbidities. RESULTS: We reviewed the medical records of 1,306 patients. The proportions of knee arthroplasty, hip arthroplasty, and femur fracture repair were 63.4%, 29.9%, and 6.7%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of PE and DVT in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery was 1.99% and 2.22%, respectively. Most of the patients presented with PE and DVT (61.5% and 72.4%, respectively within the first 72 h after surgery. Patients undergoing femur fracture repair, those aged ≥ 65 years, and bedridden patients were at a higher risk for developing VTE. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that VTE was a significant complication of major orthopedic surgery, despite the use of thromboprophylaxis. Clinicians should be aware of VTE, especially during the perioperative period and in bedridden, elderly patients (≥ 65 years of age.

  6. European guidelines on perioperative venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: Aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Jean-Yves; Pabinger, Ingrid; Samama, Charles Marc

    2018-02-01

    : There is a good rationale for the use of aspirin in venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in some orthopaedic procedures, as already proposed by the 9th American College of Chest Physicians' guidelines (Grade 1C). We recommend using aspirin, considering that it may be less effective than or as effective as low molecular weight heparin for prevention of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism after total hip arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty and hip fracture surgery (Grade 1C). Aspirin may be less effective than or as effective as low molecular weight heparins for prevention of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism after other orthopaedic procedures (Grade 2C). Aspirin may be associated with a low rate of bleeding after total hip arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty and hip fracture surgery (Grade 1B). Aspirin may be associated with less bleeding after total hip arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty and hip fracture surgery than other pharmacological agents (Grade 1B). No data are available for other orthopaedic procedures. We do not recommend aspirin as thromboprophylaxis in general surgery (Grade 1C). However, this type of prophylaxis could be interesting especially in low-income countries (Grade 2C) and adequate large-scale trials with proper study designs should be carried out (Grade 1C).

  7. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Matthew A; Mauck, Karen F; Daniels, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgical procedures are now a common method of obesity treatment with established effectiveness. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) events, which include deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, are an important source of postoperative morbidity and mortality among bariatric surgery patients. Due to an understanding of the frequency and seriousness of these complications, bariatric surgery patients typically receive some method of VTE prophylaxis with lower extremity compression, pharmacologic prophylaxis, or both. However, the optimal approach in these patients is unclear, with multiple open questions. In particular, strategies of adjusted-dose heparins, postdischarge anticoagulant prophylaxis, and the role of vena cava filters have been evaluated, but only to a limited extent. In contrast to other types of operations, the literature regarding VTE prophylaxis in bariatric surgery is notable for a dearth of prospective, randomized clinical trials, and current professional guidelines reflect the uncertainties in this literature. Herein, we summarize the available evidence after systematic review of the literature regarding approaches to VTE prevention in bariatric surgery. Identification of risk factors for VTE in the bariatric surgery population, analysis of the effectiveness of methods used for prophylaxis, and an overview of published guidelines are presented. PMID:26316771

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids predict recurrent venous thromboembolism or total mortality in elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, M F; Stivala, S; Limacher, A; Bonetti, N R; Méan, M; Egloff, M; Rodondi, N; Aujesky, D; von Schacky, C; Lüscher, T F; Camici, G G; Beer, J H

    2017-01-01

    Essentials The role of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) in recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) is unknown. Association of n-3 FAs with recurrent VTE or total mortality was investigated in 826 patients. Whole blood n-3 FAs were inversely correlated with recurrent VTE or total mortality. Major and non-major bleeding was not increased in patients with higher levels of n-3 FAs. Background The role of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) in recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) remains unknown. Objectives To investigate the association of n-3 FAs with recurrent VTE or total mortality at 6 months and 3 years. Methods N-3 FAs were assessed in 826 patients aged ≥ 65 years, categorized into low, medium and high based on the 25th and 75th percentile. Mean follow-up was 29 months. Results At 6 months, subjects with medium (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.22-0.62) and high n-3 FA levels (adjusted HR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.20-0.67) were less likely to develop recurrent VTE or total mortality, compared with those with low n-3 FAs. At 3 years, medium levels (adjusted HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.47-0.96) were associated with lower risk of recurrent VTE or total mortality. As compared with low n-3 FAs, the adjusted sub-hazard ratio [SHR] of recurrent VTE was 0.39 (95% CI, 0.15-0.99) in patients with medium and 0.17 (95% CI, 0.03-0.82) in patients with high n-3 FAs. The cumulative incidence of recurrent VTE was lower in the medium and high n-3 FA groups as compared with the low n-3 FA groups, but seems to have worn off after 3 years. The incidence of major and non-major bleeding was not greater in the high n-3 FA group. Conclusion Higher levels of n-3 FAs were associated with a lower risk of recurrent VTE or total mortality in elderly patients with VTE, but not with greater bleeding risk. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  9. Analysis of Postoperative Venous Thromboembolism in Patients With Chronic Ulcerative Colitis: Is It the Disease or the Operation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Nicholas P; Behm, Kevin T; Ubl, Daniel S; Glasgow, Amy E; Mathis, Kellie L; Pemberton, John H; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Cima, Robert R

    2017-07-01

    Patients with IBD have a higher baseline risk of venous thromboembolism, which further increases with surgery. Therefore, extended venous thromboembolism chemoprophylaxis has been suggested in certain high-risk cohorts. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the underlying diagnosis, operative procedure, or both influence the incidence of postoperative venous thromboembolism. This was a retrospective review. The American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database was analyzed. The NSQIP database was queried for patients with chronic ulcerative colitis and non-IBD undergoing colorectal resections using surgical Current Procedural Terminology codes modeled after the 3 stages used for the surgical management of chronic ulcerative colitis from 2005 to 2013. We measured 30-day postoperative venous thromboembolism risk in patients with chronic ulcerative colitis based on operative stage and risk factors for development of venous thromboembolism. A total of 18,833 patients met inclusion criteria, with an overall rate of venous thromboembolism of 3.8. Among procedure risk groups, venous thromboembolism rates were high risk, 4.4%; intermediate risk, 1.6%; and low risk, 0.7% (across risk groups, p operative procedure are the 2 highest risk factors for postoperative venous thromboembolism. Extended venous thromboembolism prophylaxis might be appropriate for patients undergoing these high-risk procedures or any emergent colorectal procedures. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A339.

  10. Relationship between neighborhood socioeconomic status and venous thromboembolism: results from a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort, D; van Rein, N; van der Meer, F J M; Vermaas, H W; Wiersma, N; Cannegieter, S C; Lijfering, W M

    2017-12-01

    Essentials Literature on socioeconomic status (SES) and incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is scarce. We assessed neighborhood SES with VTE risk in a population of over 1.4 million inhabitants. Higher neighborhood SES was associated with lower incidence of VTE. These findings are helpful to inform policy and resource allocation in health systems. Background The association between socioeconomic status and arterial cardiovascular disease is well established. However, despite its high burden of disability-adjusted life years, little research has been carried out to determine whether socioeconomic status is associated with venous thromboembolism. Objective To determine if neighborhood socioeconomic status is associated with venous thromboembolism in a population-based study from the Netherlands. Methods We identified all patients aged 15 years and older with a first event of venous thromboembolism from inhabitants who lived in the urban districts of The Hague, Leiden and Utrecht in the Netherlands in 2008-2012. Neighborhood socioeconomic status was based on the status score, which combines educational level, income and unemployment on a four-digit postal code level. Incidence rate ratios of venous thromboembolism were calculated for different levels of neighborhood socioeconomic status, with adjustments for age and sex. Results A total of 7373 patients with a first venous thromboembolism (median age 61 years; 50% deep vein thrombosis) were identified among more than 1.4 million inhabitants. Higher neighborhood SES was associated with lower incidence of VTE. In the two highest status score groups (i.e. the 95-99th and > 99th percentile), the adjusted incidence rate ratios were 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.00) and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.69-0.93), respectively, compared with the reference status score group (i.e. 30-70th percentile). Conclusions High neighborhood socioeconomic status is associated with a lower risk of first venous thromboembolism. © 2017

  11. Aspirin for Prophylaxis Against Venous Thromboembolism After Orthopaedic Oncologic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Gregory M; Patel, Yash M; Ricketti, Daniel A; Gaughan, John P; Lackman, Richard D; Kim, Tae Won B

    2017-12-06

    Patients who undergo orthopaedic oncologic surgical procedures are at increased risk of developing a venous thromboembolism (VTE). Guidelines from surgical societies are shifting to include aspirin as a postoperative VTE prophylactic agent. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using aspirin as postoperative VTE prophylaxis for orthopaedic oncologic surgical procedures. This study was a retrospective review of patients diagnosed with a primary malignant soft-tissue or bone tumor or metastatic carcinoma. Demographic information, histopathologic diagnosis, VTE history, surgical procedure, and VTE prophylaxis were analyzed. VTE rates in the overall and prophylactic-specific cohorts were recorded and compared. A total of 142 distinct surgical procedures in 130 patients were included. VTE prophylaxis with aspirin was used after 103 procedures, and non-aspirin prophylaxis was used after 39. In 33 cases, imaging was used to investigate for VTE because of clinical signs and symptoms. VTE developed after 7 (4.9%) of the 142 procedures. There were 6 deep venous thromboses (DVTs) and 1 pulmonary embolism, and 2 of the VTEs presented in patients with a VTE history. VTE developed in 2.9% (3) of the 103 aspirin cases and 10.3% (4) of the 39 non-aspirin cases. No patient in the aspirin group who had been diagnosed with metastatic carcinoma, malignant soft-tissue sarcoma, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma developed a VTE. Risk factors for VTE development included diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 10.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.61 to 67.30), a history of VTE (OR = 7.26, 95% CI = 1.19 to 44.25), postoperative transfusion (OR = 34.50, 95% CI = 3.94 to 302.01), and estimated blood losses of 250 mL (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.11 to 2.03), 500 mL (OR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.23 to 4.13), and 1,000 mL (OR = 5.10, 95% CI = 1.52 to 17.04). Aspirin may be a suitable and effective option for VTE chemoprophylaxis in patients treated with orthopaedic oncologic surgery, especially

  12. Diet as prophylaxis and treatment for venous thromboembolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cundiff David K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE: deep venous thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary emboli (PE with anticoagulants are associated with significant risks of major and fatal hemorrhage. Anticoagulation treatment of VTE has been the standard of care in the USA since before 1962 when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began requiring randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs showing efficacy, so efficacy trials were never required for FDA approval. In clinical trials of 'high VTE risk' surgical patients before the 1980s, anticoagulant prophylaxis was clearly beneficial (fatal pulmonary emboli (FPE without anticoagulants = 0.99%, FPE with anticoagulants = 0.31%. However, observational studies and RCTs of 'high VTE risk' surgical patients from the 1980s until 2010 show that FPE deaths without anticoagulants are about one-fourth the rate that occurs during prophylaxis with anticoagulants (FPE without anticoagulants = 0.023%, FPE while receiving anticoagulant prophylaxis = 0.10%. Additionally, an FPE rate of about 0.012% (35/28,400 in patients receiving prophylactic anticoagulants can be attributed to 'rebound hypercoagulation' in the two months after stopping anticoagulants. Alternatives to anticoagulant prophylaxis should be explored. Methods and Findings The literature concerning dietary influences on VTE incidence was reviewed. Hypotheses concerning the etiology of VTE were critiqued in relationship to the rationale for dietary versus anticoagulant approaches to prophylaxis and treatment. Epidemiological evidence suggests that a diet with ample fruits and vegetables and little meat may substantially reduce the risk of VTE; vegetarian, vegan, or Mediterranean diets favorably affect serum markers of hemostasis and inflammation. The valve cusp hypoxia hypothesis of DVT/VTE etiology is consistent with the development of VTE being affected directly or indirectly by diet. However, it is less consistent with

  13. The postoperative venous thromboembolism (TREVO) study - risk and case mortality by surgical specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Cristina; Guimarães Pereira, Luís; Moreto, Ana; Sá, Ana Carolina; Azevedo, Ana

    2017-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism, risk of which is increased in surgical patients, is a preventable cause of morbidity and death. The primary objective of this study was to estimate the incidence of symptomatic postoperative venous thromboembolism in adults at a tertiary university hospital, overall and by surgical specialty. The secondary objective was to analyze severity of and mortality from thromboembolic events. We performed a retrospective study to identify cases of in-hospital postoperative venous thromboembolism, encoded by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, according to the Joint Commission International criteria. Adult patients admitted for surgery in 2008-2012 were included. Among 67 635 hospitalizations, 90 cases of postoperative symptomatic venous thromboembolism were identified, corresponding to an incidence of 1.33/1000 admissions (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-1.6/1000). Neurosurgery had the highest risk (4.07/1000), followed by urological surgery and general surgery (p<0.001). There were 50 cases of pulmonary embolism, 11 of which were fatal. Of the 90 cases, 12.2% occurred under neuraxial anesthesia and 55.1% in patients with American Society of Anesthesiology III physical status. At least 37.7% of patients with events received a prophylactic dose of injectable anticoagulant postoperatively. The overall risk decreased from 2008 to 2012. Venous thromboembolism-associated mortality during hospitalization was 21.1% (95% CI 13.6-30.4). The incidence of postoperative symptomatic venous thromboembolism was 1.33/1000. Neurosurgery showed the greatest risk. Mortality was 21.1%. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Elevated risk of venous thromboembolic events in patients with inflammatory myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Michał Nowak, Katarzyna Królak-Nowak, Aleksandra Sobolewska-Włodarczyk, Jakub Fichna, Marcin Włodarczyk Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland Abstract: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a multifactorial disease manifesting as either deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Its prevalence makes VTE a significant issue for both the individual – as a negative factor influencing the quality of life and prognosis – and the society due to economic burden. VTE is the third most common vascular disorder in Western countries, after myocardial infarction and stroke, making it a major cause of in-hospital mortality, responsible for 5%–10% of hospital deaths. Despite many studies conducted, only 50%–60% provoking factors have been identified, while the remaining 40%–50% have been classified as idiopathic or unprovoked. Chronic inflammatory disorders, with their underlying prothrombotic state, reveal an increased risk of VTE (six to eight times compared with the general population. Among the inflammatory disorders, we can identify inflammatory myopathies – a group of rare, chronic diseases featuring weakness and inflammation of muscles with periods of exacerbation and remission; their main classes are polymyositis and dermatomyositis. The objective of this review is to emphasize the need of VTE prophylaxis in individuals with inflammatory myopathies in order to reduce morbidity and mortality rates among those patients and improve their quality of life and prognosis. Keywords: deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, inflammation, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, prothrombotic state

  15. Venous thromboembolic events in isolated severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Mohseni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of prophylactic anticoagulation on the incidence of venous thromboembolic events (VTE in patients suffering from isolated severe traumatic brain injury (TBI. Materials and Methods: Retrospective matched case-control study in adult patients sustaining isolated severe TBI (head AIS ≥3, with extracranial AIS ≤2 receiving VTE prophylaxis while in the surgical intensive care unit from 1/2007 through 12/2009. Patients subjected to VTE prophylaxis were matched 1:1 by age, gender, glasgow coma scale (GCS score at admission, presence of hypotension on admission, injury severity score, and head abbreviated injury scale (AIS score, with patients who did not receive chemical VTE prophylaxis. The primary outcome measure was VTE. Secondary outcomes were SICU and hospital length of stay (HLOS, adverse effects of anticoagulation, and mortality. Results: After propensity matching, 37 matched pairs were analysed. Cases and controls had similar demographics, injury characteristics, rate of craniotomies/craniectomies, SICU LOS, and HLOS. The median time of commencement of VTE prophylaxis was 10 days. The incidence of VTE was increased 3.5-fold in the controls compared to the cases (95% CI 1.0-12.1, P=0.002. The mortality was higher in patients who did not receive anticoagulation (19% vs. 5%, P=0.001. No adverse outcomes were detected in the anticoagulated patients. Conclusion: Prophylactic anticoagulation decreases the overall risk for clinically significant VTE in patients with severe isolated TBI. Prospective validation of the timing and safety of chemical VTE prophylaxis in these instances is warranted.

  16. Venous thromboembolic events in isolated severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Shahin; Talving, Peep; Lam, Lydia; Chan, Linda S; Ives, Crystal; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of prophylactic anticoagulation on the incidence of venous thromboembolic events (VTE) in patients suffering from isolated severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Retrospective matched case-control study in adult patients sustaining isolated severe TBI (head AIS ≥3, with extracranial AIS ≤2) receiving VTE prophylaxis while in the surgical intensive care unit from 1/2007 through 12/2009. Patients subjected to VTE prophylaxis were matched 1:1 by age, gender, glasgow coma scale (GCS) score at admission, presence of hypotension on admission, injury severity score, and head abbreviated injury scale (AIS) score, with patients who did not receive chemical VTE prophylaxis. The primary outcome measure was VTE. Secondary outcomes were SICU and hospital length of stay (HLOS), adverse effects of anticoagulation, and mortality. After propensity matching, 37 matched pairs were analysed. Cases and controls had similar demographics, injury characteristics, rate of craniotomies/craniectomies, SICU LOS, and HLOS. The median time of commencement of VTE prophylaxis was 10 days. The incidence of VTE was increased 3.5-fold in the controls compared to the cases (95% CI 1.0-12.1, P=0.002). The mortality was higher in patients who did not receive anticoagulation (19% vs. 5%, P=0.001). No adverse outcomes were detected in the anticoagulated patients. Prophylactic anticoagulation decreases the overall risk for clinically significant VTE in patients with severe isolated TBI. Prospective validation of the timing and safety of chemical VTE prophylaxis in these instances is warranted.

  17. Evaluation of an institutional project to improve venous thromboembolism prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Christina A; Yang, Anthony D; Ju, Mila; Culver, Eckford; Seifert, Kathryn; Kreutzer, Lindsey; Halverson, Terri; O'Leary, Kevin J; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2016-12-01

    Northwestern Memorial Hospital (NMH) was historically a poor performer on the venous thromboembolism (VTE) outcome measure. As this measure has been shown to be flawed by surveillance bias, NMH embraced process-of-care measures to ensure appropriate VTE prophylaxis to assess healthcare-associated VTE prevention efforts. To evaluate the impact of an institution-wide project aimed at improving hospital performance on VTE prophylaxis measures. A retrospective observational study. NMH, an 885-bed academic medical center in Chicago, Illinois PATIENTS: Inpatients admitted to NMH from January 1, 2013 to May 1, 2013 and from October 1, 2014 to April 1, 2015 were eligible for evaluation. Using the define-measure-analyze-improve-control (DMAIC) process-improvement methodology, a multidisciplinary team implemented and iteratively improved 15 data-driven interventions in 4 broad areas: (1) electronic medical record (EMR) alerts, (2) education initiatives, (3) new EMR order sets, and (4) other EMR changes. The Joint Commission's 6 core measures and the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) SCIP-VTE-2 measure. Based on 3103 observations (1679 from January 1, 2013 to May 1, 2013, and 1424 from October 1, 2014 to April 1, 2015), performance on the core measures improved. Performance on measure 1 (chemoprophylaxis) improved from 82.5% to 90.2% on medicine services, and from 94.4% to 97.6% on surgical services. The largest improvements were seen in measure 4 (platelet monitoring), with a performance increase from 76.7% adherence to 100%, and measure 5 (warfarin discharge instructions), with a performance increase from 27.4% to 88.8%. A systematic hospital-wide DMAIC project improved VTE prophylaxis measure performance. Sustained performance has been observed, and novel control mechanisms for continued performance surveillance have been embedded in the hospital system. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:S29-S37. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. © 2016 Society of Hospital

  18. Predicting perioperative venous thromboembolism in Japanese gynecological patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masae Ikeda

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To develop a convenient screening method that can predict perioperative venous thromboembolism (VTE and identify patients at risk of fatal perioperative pulmonary embolism (PE. METHODS: Patients hospitalized for gynecological abdominal surgery (n = 183 underwent hematology tests and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT to detect VTE. All statistical analyses were carried out using the SPSS software program (PASWV19.0J. RESULTS: The following risk factors for VTE were identified by univariate analysis: plasmin-alpha2-plasmin inhibitor complex (PIC, thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT, and prolonged immobility (all p<0.001; age, neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC, malignancy, hypertension, past history of VTE, and hormone therapy (all p<0.01; and hemoglobin, transverse tumor diameter, ovarian disease, and menopause (all p<0.05. Multivariate analysis using these factors revealed that PIC, age, and transverse tumor diameter were significant independent determinants of the risk of VTE. We then calculated the incidence rate of perioperative VTE using PIC and transverse tumor diameter in patient groups stratified by age. In patients aged ≤40 years, PIC ≥1.3 µg/mL and a transverse tumor diameter ≥10 cm identified the high-risk group for VTE with an accuracy of 93.6%. For patients in their 50 s, PIC ≥1.3 µg/mL identified a high risk of VTE with an accuracy of 78.2%. In patients aged ≥60 years, a transverse tumor diameter ≥15 cm (irrespective of PIC or PIC ≥1.3 µg/mL identified the high-risk group with an accuracy of 82.4%. CONCLUSIONS: We propose new screening criteria for VTE risk that are based on PIC, transverse tumor diameter, and age. Our findings suggest the usefulness of these criteria for predicting the risk of perioperative VTE and for identifying patients with a high risk of fatal perioperative PE.

  19. Individualized Risk Model for Venous Thromboembolism After Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Javad; Huang, Ronald; Rezapoor, Maryam; Bagheri, Behrad; Maltenfort, Mitchell G

    2016-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is a potentially fatal complication. Currently, a standard protocol for postoperative VTE prophylaxis is used that makes little distinction between patients at varying risks of VTE. We sought to develop a simple scoring system identifying patients at higher risk for VTE in whom more potent anticoagulation may need to be administered. Utilizing the National Inpatient Sample data, 1,721,806 patients undergoing TJA were identified, among whom 15,775 (0.9%) developed VTE after index arthroplasty. Among the cohort, all known potential risk factors for VTE were assessed. An initial logistic regression model using potential predictors for VTE was performed. Predictors with little contribution or poor predictive power were pruned from the data, and the model was refit. After pruning of variables that had little to no contribution to VTE risk, using the logistic regression, all independent predictors of VTE after TJA were identified in the data. Relative weights for each factor were determined. Hypercoagulability, metastatic cancer, stroke, sepsis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease had some of the highest points. Patients with any of these conditions had risk for postoperative VTE that exceeded the 3% rate. Based on the model, an iOS (iPhone operating system) application was developed (VTEstimator) that could be used to assign patients into low or high risk for VTE after TJA. We believe individualization of VTE prophylaxis after TJA can improve the efficacy of preventing VTE while minimizing untoward risks associated with the administration of anticoagulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Venous thromboembolism in centenarians: Findings from the RIETE registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Beatriz; Tiberio, Gregorio; Núñez, Manuel Jesús; López-Jiménez, Luciano; Riera-Mestre, Antoni; Tiraferri, Eros; Verhamme, Peter; Mazzolai, Lucia; González, José; Monreal, Manuel

    2016-12-01

    The balance between the efficacy and safety of anticoagulant therapy in patients aged ≥100years receiving anticoagulant therapy for venous thromboembolism (VTE) is uncertain. We used data from the RIETE (Registro Informatizado Enfermedad TromboEmbólica) database to assess the rate of VTE recurrences, bleeding events, and mortality appearing during the course of anticoagulant therapy in VTE patients aged ≥100years. Of 61,173 patients enrolled in RIETE as of January 2016, 47 (0.08%) were aged ≥100years. Of these, 10 (21%) were men, 21 (45%) presented with pulmonary embolism (PE), and 26 with deep vein thrombosis alone. Overall, 35 patients (74%) had severe renal insufficiency, 14 (30%) chronic heart failure, 30 (64%) anemia, 16 (34%) were taking antiplatelets, and 6 (13%) corticosteroids or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Most patients (95%) were treated initially with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (mean daily dose, 168±42IU/kg). Then, 14 (30%) switched to vitamin K antagonists and 29 (62%) kept receiving long-term LMWH therapy (mean, 148±51IU/kg/day). During the course of anticoagulant therapy (mean duration, 139days), mortality was high (15/47; 32%). Two patients died of PE (initial PE one, recurrent PE one) and 5 (11%) had minor bleeding, but no major bleeding was reported. Among patients with acute VTE aged ≥100years, the risk of VTE recurrences during the course of anticoagulation outweighed the risk of bleeding. Our data suggest the use of standard anticoagulant therapy in this patient population, even if they have severe renal insufficiency. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mandatory Risk Assessment Reduces Venous Thromboembolism in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimeri, Abdelrahman A; Bautista, Jejomar; Ibrahim, Maha; Philip, Ruby; Al Shaban, Talat; Maasher, Ahmed; Altinoz, Ajda

    2018-02-01

    Bariatric surgery patients are at high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE), and chemoprophylaxis is recommended. Sheikh Khalifa Medical City (SKMC) is an American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) member since 2009. We report the rates of VTE in bariatric surgery patients from 2010 to 2016 compared to ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery programs before and after switching from heparin to low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), initiating mandatory risk assessment using Caprini scoring for VTE and adopting an aggressive strategy for high-risk patients regarding dosage of LMWH and chemoprophylaxis after discharge. During the study period, there were 1152 cases (laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) 625 and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) 527) at Bariatric & Metabolic Institute (BMI) Abu Dhabi compared to 65,693 cases (LRYGB 32,130 and LSG 33,563) at ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery programs. VTE rates remained stable at ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery programs from 2010 to 2016 (0.45, 0.45, 0.45, 0.25, 0.35, 0.3, and 0.3%). In contrast, VTE rates at BMI Abu Dhabi decreased from 2.2% in 2011 to 0.35% after we adopted an aggressive strategy to VTE without an increase in bleeding complications. LRYGB patients with VTE had higher OR time, leak, collection, and mortality at ACS NSQIP hospitals compared to those at BMI Abu Dhabi. In contrast, rates were similar in LSG patients with VTE. Changing our approach to VTE management led our VTE rates to decrease and become like those of ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery patients in LSG and LRYGB.

  2. Incidence of pulmonary and venous thromboembolism in pregnancies after in vitro fertilisation: cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Peter; Westerlund, Eli; Wallén, Håkan; Brandt, Lena; Hovatta, Outi; Ekbom, Anders

    2013-01-15

    To estimate the risk of pulmonary embolism and venous thromboembolism in pregnant women after in vitro fertilisation. Cross sectional study. Sweden. 23,498 women who had given birth after in vitro fertilisation between 1990 and 2008 and 116,960 individually matched women with natural pregnancies. Risk of pulmonary embolism and venous thromboembolism (identified by linkage to the Swedish national patient register) during the whole pregnancy and by trimester. Venous thromboembolism occurred in 4.2/1000 women (n=99) after in vitro fertilisation compared with 2.5/1000 (n=291) in women with natural pregnancies (hazard ratio 1.77, 95% confidence interval 1.41 to 2.23). The risk of venous thromboembolism was increased during the whole pregnancy (Pfertilisation versus 0.3/1000 (hazard ratio 4.22, 2.46 to 7.26). The proportion of women experiencing pulmonary embolism during the first trimester was 3.0/10,000 after in vitro fertilisation versus 0.4/10,000 (hazard ratio 6.97, 2.21 to 21.96). In vitro fertilisation is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary embolism and venous thromboembolism during the first trimester. The risk of pulmonary embolism is low in absolute terms but because the condition is a leading cause of maternal mortality and clinical suspicion is critical for diagnosis, an awareness of this risk is important. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01524393.

  3. The Clinical Course of Venous Thromboembolism May Differ According to Cancer Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahé, Isabelle; Chidiac, Jean; Bertoletti, Laurent; Font, Carme; Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Peris, Marisa; Pérez Ductor, Cristina; Nieto, Santiago; Grandone, Elvira; Monreal, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    We hypothesized that the clinical course of venous thromboembolism in patients with active cancer may differ according to the specificities of primary tumor site. We used data from RIETE (international registry of patients with venous thromboembolism) to compare the clinical venous thromboembolism-related outcomes during the course of anticoagulation in patients with one of the 4 more frequent cancers (breast, prostate, colorectal, or lung cancer). As of September 2014, 3947 cancer patients were recruited, of whom 938 had breast, 629 prostate, 1189 colorectal, and 1191 lung cancer. Overall, 55% had metastatic disease (42%, 36%, 53%, and 72%, respectively). During the course of anticoagulant therapy (mean duration, 139 days), the rate of thromboembolic recurrences was similar to the rate of major bleeding in patients with breast (5.6 [95% confidence interval (CI), 3.8-8.1] vs 4.1 [95% CI, 2.7-5.9] events per 100 patient-years) or colorectal cancer (10 [95% CI, 7.6-13] vs 12 [95% CI, 9.4-15] per 100 patient-years). In contrast, in patients with prostate cancer, the rate of venous thromboembolic recurrences was half the rate of major bleeding (6.9 [95% CI, 4.4-10] vs 13 [95% CI, 9.2-17] events per 100 patient-years), whereas in those with lung cancer, the rate of thromboembolic recurrences was twofold higher than the rate of major bleeding (27 [95% CI, 22-23] vs 11 [95% CI, 8.6-15] per 100 patient-years). Significant differences in the clinical profile of venous thromboembolic-related outcomes were observed according to the site of cancer. These findings suggest the development of cancer-specific anticoagulant strategies as an area for further research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk Factors for Venous Thromboembolism in 1.3 Million Pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virkus, Rie Adser; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify risk factors for venous thromboembolism during pregnancy and the puerperal period. DESIGN: In a nationwide prospective cohort study we followed pregnant and puerperal women in Denmark from 1995 to 2009 for venous thromboembolism. Information on risk factors and confounders...... was retrieved from national registries. The diagnosis of venous thromboembolism was confirmed through medical charts. We calculated adjusted incidence rates per 10,000 women years and used Poisson regression to estimate effects during pregnancy and the puerperal period. RESULTS: We studied 1,297,037 pregnancies.......4-4.5)). The incidence rate among women with multiple pregnancies was 18.2/10,000 yr and 6.3/10,000 yr in singletons (adjusted rate ratio: 2.8 (1.9-4.2)). Increased risk was found with hospitalization during pregnancy or the puerperal period with incidence rates of 42.1/10.000 and 54.7/10.000, respectively, (rate ratios...

  5. [Venous thromboembolism's risk assessment: rationale, objectives, and methodology--the ARTE study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Ana; De Sousa, Joaquim Abreu; Felicíssimo, Paulo; Ferreira, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Venous thromboembolism is a frequent clinical condition with high impact on both morbidity and mortality. Venous thromboembolism risk is particularly high in hospitalized patients as well as in oncologic patients, being a factor of poor prognosis for the oncologic disease. Several clinical studies have shown the need to develop effective hospital strategies using a systematic and individualized assessment of venous thromboembolism risk, and additionally to optimize the institution of prophylaxis treatment and its proper use in the context of in-hospital and outpatient management. The ARTE national study is a non-interventional, multicentre, prospective study which is divided in two phases. In the first phase patients are followed in the hospital; in the second phase patients are followed in ambulatory context for a period of 6 months after discharge. Four thousand patients will be included, equally distributed over medical, surgical, oncologic and orthopaedic patients. Data will be collected from the patient's clinical files and through direct clinical evaluation of risk factors for venous thromboembolism, in the departments of medicine, oncology, surgery, and orthopaedics of the participating centres. The main objectives of the study are to assess the risk profile of venous thromboembolism of the study population using a risk assessment model adapted from the Caprini and Khorana et al models, and the validation of the score for the Portuguese population. Simultaneously, the secondary objectives are as follows: to determine the proportion of patients with venous thromboembolism risk, according to the risk assessment model, that are doing prophylaxis; to determine the duration of prophylaxis during the hospitalization; to determine the proportion of patients doing long-term prophylaxis, at the moment of the discharge; to determine the incidence of thromboembolic events (deep venous thrombosis; stroke; pulmonary thromboembolism; transient ischemic attack

  6. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism in 1.3 million pregnancies: a nationwide prospective cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Adser Virkus

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify risk factors for venous thromboembolism during pregnancy and the puerperal period. DESIGN: In a nationwide prospective cohort study we followed pregnant and puerperal women in Denmark from 1995 to 2009 for venous thromboembolism. Information on risk factors and confounders was retrieved from national registries. The diagnosis of venous thromboembolism was confirmed through medical charts. We calculated adjusted incidence rates per 10,000 women years and used Poisson regression to estimate effects during pregnancy and the puerperal period. RESULTS: We studied 1,297,037 pregnancies and related puerperal periods, during which there were 748 venous thromboembolisms. The incidence rate for venous thromboembolism during a pregnancy with and without hospitalization for hyperemesis was 15.2/10,000 yr and 6.3/10,000 yr, respectively, (adjusted rate ratio: 2.5 (95%-confidence interval; 1.4-4.5. The incidence rate among women with multiple pregnancies was 18.2/10,000 yr and 6.3/10,000 yr in singletons (adjusted rate ratio: 2.8 (1.9-4.2. Increased risk was found with hospitalization during pregnancy or the puerperal period with incidence rates of 42.1/10.000 and 54.7/10.000, respectively, (rate ratios: 12.2 (8.7-17 and 5.9 (4.0-8.8. Women hospitalized with infections during pregnancy had incidence rates of 25.9/10,000 yr and 29.3/10,000 yr during pregnancy and the puerperal period, respectively, and of 62.7/10,000 yr if hospitalized with infection in the puerperal period. Puerperal venous thromboembolism was associated with hospitalization for preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction/fetal death with incidence rates of 45.8/10,000 yr and 18.3/10,000 yr, respectively (rate ratio: 5.0 (3.1-7.8 and 1.9 (0.9-4.4. Additionally puerperal venous thromboembolism was associated with obesity, elective and acute caesarean sections and major postpartum bleeding with incidence rates of 25.5/10,000 yr, 23.2/10,000 yr, 34.0/10,000 yr and 20

  7. Apolipoprotein(a) Kringle-IV Type 2 Copy Number Variation Is Associated with Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sticchi, Elena; Magi, Alberto; Kamstrup, Pia R

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the established association between high lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] concentrations and coronary artery disease, an association between Lp(a) and venous thromboembolism (VTE) has also been described. Lp(a) is controlled by genetic variants in LPA gene, coding for apolipoprotein(a), incl......In addition to the established association between high lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] concentrations and coronary artery disease, an association between Lp(a) and venous thromboembolism (VTE) has also been described. Lp(a) is controlled by genetic variants in LPA gene, coding for apolipoprotein...

  8. Venous thromboembolic prophylaxis after simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty: aspirinversuswarfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, R; Fleischman, A N; Tan, T; Sterbis, E; Huang, R; Higuera, C; Parvizi, J; Rothman, R H

    2018-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the efficacy of two agents, aspirin and warfarin, for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty (SBTKA), and to elucidate the risk of VTE conferred by this procedure compared with unilateral TKA (UTKA). A retrospective, multi-institutional study was conducted on 18 951 patients, 3685 who underwent SBTKA and 15 266 who underwent UTKA, using aspirin or warfarin as VTE prophylaxis. Each patient was assigned an individualised baseline VTE risk score based on a system using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Symptomatic VTE, including pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT), were identified in the first 90 days post-operatively. Statistical analyses were performed with logistic regression accounting for baseline VTE risk. The adjusted incidence of PE following SBTKA was 1.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.86 to 1.2) with aspirin and 2.2% (95% CI 2.0 to 2.4) with warfarin. Similarly, the adjusted incidence of VTE following SBTKA was 1.6% (95% CI 1.1 to 2.3) with aspirin and 2.5% (95% CI 1.9 to 3.3) with warfarin. The risk of PE and VTE were reduced by 66% (odds ratio (OR) 0.44, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.78) and 38% (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.38 to 1.0), respectively, using aspirin. In addition, the risk of PE was 204% higher for patients undergoing SBTKA relative to those undergoing UTKA. For each ten-point increase in baseline VTE risk, the risk of PE increased by 25.5% for patients undergoing SBTKA compared with 10.5% for those undergoing UTKA. Patients with a history of myocardial infarction or peripheral vascular disease had the greatest increase in risk from undergoing SBTKA instead of UTKA. Aspirin is more effective than warfarin for the prevention of VTE following SBTKA, and serves as the more appropriate agent for VTE prophylaxis for patients in all risk categories. Furthermore, patients undergoing SBTKA are at a substantially increased risk of VTE, even more so for

  9. Treatment of acute venous thromboembolism with dabigatran or warfarin and pooled analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulman, Sam; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.; Schellong, Sebastian; Eriksson, Henry; Mismetti, Patrick; Christiansen, Anita Vedel; Friedman, Jeffrey; Le Maulf, Florence; Peter, Nuala; Kearon, Clive; Schulman, S.; Eriksson, H.; Goldhaber, S.; Kakkar, A.; Kearon, C.; Mismetti, P.; Schellong, S.; Bergqvist, D.; Tijssen, J.; Prins, M. [=Martin H.; Robben, S.; Büller, H.; Otten, H. M.; Brandjes, D.; Peters, R.; Mac Gillavry, M. R.; Gan, E.; Salem, H.; Baker, R.; Blomberry, P.; Curnow, J.; Annichino-Bizzacch, J. M.; Brandao Panico, M. D.; Timi Ribas, J. R.; Fernandes Manenti, E. R.; Miranda, F.; Moraes, J.; Raev, D.; Mollov, M.; Peneva, M.; Milanov, S.; Anderson, D.; Crowther, M.; Dolan, S.; Eikelboom, J.; Game, M.; Kahn, S.; Kassis, J.; Ritchie, B.; Solymoss, S.; Rodger, M.; Yeo, E.; Milot, A.; Klinke, P.; Chen, W.; Zhihong, L.; Chunxue, B.; Jinming, L.; Jiwei, Z.; Jie, C.; Jina, K.; Yuqi, W.; Zhongqi, Y.; Hua, W.; Kejing, Y.; Bonan, L.; Yadong, Y.; Changwei, L.; Jin, Z.; Yongcheng, D.; Spinar, J.; Maly, R.; Cizek, V.; Bercikova, J.; Cervinka, P.; Lang, P.; Jirka, V.; Oral, I.; Reichert, P.; Kotik, L.; Pojsl, S.; Klimovic, T.; Husted, S.; Nielsen, H.; Friis, E.; Skødebjerg Kristensen, K.; Mottier, D.; El Kouri, D.; Bleher, Y.; Leroux, L.; Boda, Z.; Sereg, M.; Riba, M.; Hiremath, J. S.; Kareem, S.; Banker, D. N.; Gadkari, M.; Parakh, R.; Suresh, K. R.; Natarajan, S.; Jain, A.; Aggarwal, P. K.; Patil, C. B.; Durairaj, N.; Seshadri, R.; Thakore, V. M.; Rai, K. M.; Efrati, S.; Elias, M.; Gavish, D.; Grossman, M.; Lishner, M.; Lahavr, M.; Lugassy, G.; Nseir, W.; Zeltser, D.; Brenner, B.; Yeganeh, S.; Zanatta, N.; Pizzini, A. M.; Di Salvo, M.; Novo, S.; Arosio, E.; Campanini, M.; Castellani, S.; Oh, D. Y.; Cho, D. K.; Kim, D. I.; Kwon, T. W.; Yoon, S. S.; Kim, M. H.; Kwon, S. Y.; Cheong, J. W.; Lee, T. S.; Shokri, A. A.; Looi, T. S.; Chon, Y.; Chunn, K. Y.; Salleh, R.; Fijnheer, R.; Veth, G.; Dees, A.; Pruijt, H.; Lieverse, A. G.; Jie, G. K. S.; van Marwijk-Kooij, M.; Simsek, S.; Hanna, M.; Jackson, S.; Ockelford, P.; Smith, M.; Sandset, P. M.; Waage, A.; Fernandez, L.; Ma, A.; de Guia, T.; Ong-Garcia, H.; Lach, L.; Zawilska, K.; Gluszek, S.; Czarnobilski, K.; Gaciong, Z.; Chernyatina, M.; Tchumakov, A.; Staroverov, I.; Belentsov, S.; Katelnitsky, I.; Khamitov, A.; Zaporozhsky, A.; Degterev, M.; Khitaryan, A.; Heng, L. L.; Robless, P. A.; Kenny, S. Y. K.; Poliacik, P.; Duris, T.; Szentivanyi, M.; Zubek, V.; Adler, D.; Smith, C.; Roux, D. Le; van Rensburg, J.; Miller, D.; Ismail, S.; Roodt, A.; Vermooten, I. H.; Villalta, J.; Nieto, J. A.; Trujillo, J.; del Toro, J.; García Fuster, M. J.; Giménez, A.; Lozano, P.; Holmström, M.; Edmark, M.; Carlsson, A.; Torstensson, I.; Huang, C. H.; Shyu, K. G.; Chiang, C. E.; Shen, M. C.; Tsai, C. S.; Wang, S. S.; Sirijerachai, C.; Saetang, S.; Kanitsap, N.; Polprasert, C.; Mutirangura, P.; Boonbaichaiyapruck, S.; Leelasiri, A.; Kurtoglu, M.; Eren, E.; Bengisun, U.; Sakinci, U.; Karahan, S.; Islamoglu, F.; Kurt, N.; Aygun, E.; Skupyy, O.; Keeling, D.; Kesteven, P.; Cohen, A.; Maclean, R.; Thomas, W.; Masson, J. A.; Bolster, E.; Beard, T.; Gasparis, A.; LaPerna, L. M.; Gibson, K.; Curtis, B.; Chu, C. O.; Bass, P.; Lavende, R.

    2014-01-01

    Dabigatran and warfarin have been compared for the treatment of acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) in a previous trial. We undertook this study to extend those findings. In a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy trial of 2589 patients with acute VTE treated with low-molecular-weight or

  10. Diagnostic and prognostic risk stratification of venous thromboembolism in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, J.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) play an important role in the diagnosis and management of venous thromboembolic disease (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). With an incidence of approximately 2-3 cases per 1000 persons annually, GPs are encountered with this

  11. An audit of pressure sores caused by intermittent compression devices used to prevent venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Joanna; Thomas, Sunil

    2011-12-01

    When intermittent compression devices (ICDs) are used to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) they can cause pressure sores in a selected group of women, undergoing long operations. A prospective audit pre and post intervention showed a reduced risk with an alternative device, without increasing the risk of VTE.

  12. Pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism: Risk and the effect of thromboprophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lussana, Federico; Coppens, Michiel; Cattaneo, Marco; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity during pregnancy in developed countries. The incidence of VTE per pregnancy-year increases about 4-fold during pregnancy and at least 14-fold during the puerperium. Risk factors include a personal history of VTE,

  13. Efficacy of FDG PET/CT Imaging for Venous Thromboembolic Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Madsen, Poul Henning; Iversen, Else Dalsgaard

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: In recent years, several case reports have described venous thromboembolism (VTE) on FDG PET/CT. In this short communication, we present results from a proof-of-concept pilot study aimed at providing some preliminary data on the efficacy of FDG PET/CT in prospective patients with suspected...

  14. Use of a heparin nomogram for treatment of patients with venous thromboembolism in a community hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, M. R.; Büller, H. R.; ten Cate, J. W.; van Marwijk Kooy, M.

    1998-01-01

    The application of a heparin dosing nomogram in the treatment of patients with venous thromboembolism resulted in improvement of heparin therapy in clinical research settings. In 1992 a heparin nomogram was introduced in our hospital, which is a community hospital where anticoagulant therapy is

  15. Statin treatment and risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism: a nationwide cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Cu Dinh; Andersson, Charlotte; Jensen, Thomas Bo; Gjesing, Anne; Schjerning Olsen, Anne-Marie; Malta Hansen, Carolina; Büller, Harry; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2013-01-01

    Statins may decrease the risk of primary venous thromboembolism (VTE), that is, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) but the effect of statins in preventing recurrent VTE is less clear. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the association between statin therapy and

  16. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in commercial airline pilots: a cohort study of 2630 pilots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, S.; Venemans-Jellema, A.; Cannegieter, S. C.; van Haften, M.; Middeldorp, S.; Büller, H. R.; Rosendaal, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Airline pilots may be at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) because air travel has recently been established as a risk factor for VTE. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of VTE in a cohort of Dutch airline pilots. Airline pilots who had been active members of the Dutch aviation

  17. Comparative safety and effectiveness of rivaroxaban versus VKAs in patients with venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindet-Pedersen, Caroline; Langtved Pallisgaard, Jannik; Staerk, Laila

    2017-01-01

    The approval of rivaroxaban has changed the landscape of treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Little is known about the effect of rivaroxaban compared with vitamin K antagonists (VKA), when used in the everyday clinical practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and effec...

  18. Venous thromboembolism in ANCA-associated vasculitis - incidence and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stassen, P. M.; Derks, R. P. H.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.; Stegeman, C. A.

    Objectives. In patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV), an increased incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE), mainly during active disease, has been described. In a large cohort of AAV patients, live assessed the incidence of VTE and its relation with disease activity and classic risk

  19. 77 FR 10748 - Scientific Information Request on Mechanical Prophylaxis of Venous Thromboembolism (VTE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ....ahrq.gov/index.cfm/search-for-guides-reviews-andreports/?pageaction=displayproduct&productid=928#4370... prohibited by law. The draft of this review will be posted on AHRQ's EHC program Web site and available for... Pharmacologic and Mechanical Prophylaxis of Venous Thromboembolism Among Special Populations Review, which is...

  20. Venous thromboembolism in ovarian cancer: incidence, risk factors and impact on survival.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abu Saadeh, Feras

    2013-09-01

    Ovarian cancer has a higher incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) than other cancers. Clear cell cancers carry the highest risk at 11-27%. The aim of this study was to identify the predisposing factors for VTE in a population of ovarian cancer patients and to determine the influence of VTE on overall survival.

  1. Low molecular weight heparin versus unfractionated heparin in the initial treatment of venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettiarachchi, R. J.; Prins, M. H.; Lensing, A. W.; Buller, H. R.

    1998-01-01

    In this review, we analyze data from randomized trials in which low molecular weight heparin was compared with unfractionated heparin, both to estimate the treatment effect of low molecular weight heparin in the initial treatment of venous thromboembolism and to evaluate the effect of the varied

  2. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in patients with overt hyperthyroidism A retrospective multicentre cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootte, Ruud S.; Stuijver, Danka J. F.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; van Zaane, Bregje; Fliers, Eric; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; Gerdes, Victor E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is associated with several changes in the haemostatic system resulting in a hypercoagulable state. It is uncertain at this stage whether this leads to an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VIE). The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to determine the risk of VTE in all

  3. Observationally and Genetically High YKL-40 and Risk of Venous Thromboembolism in the General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Alisa D; Johansen, Julia S; Bojesen, Stig E

    2016-01-01

    =94 579). From 1977 to 2013, 1489 individuals developed pulmonary embolism, 2647 developed deep vein thrombosis, and 3750 developed venous thromboembolism (pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis). For the 91% to 100% versus 0% to 33% YKL-40 percentile category, the multifactorially adjusted...... hazard ratio was 2.38 (95% confidence interval, 1.25-4.55) for pulmonary embolism, 1.98 (1.09-3.59) for deep vein thrombosis, and 2.13 (1.35-3.35) for venous thromboembolism. Compared with rs4950928 GG homozygosity, presence of C-allele was associated with a doubling (CG) or tripling (CC) in YKL-40...... and 1.11 (0.91-1.35) genetically for deep vein thrombosis and 1.23 (1.10-1.38) observationally and 1.08 (0.92-1.27) genetically for venous thromboembolism. CONCLUSIONS: High YKL-40 levels were associated with a 2-fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism, but the association was not causal....

  4. Jobs encompassing prolonged sitting in cramped positions and risk of venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suadicani, Poul; Hannerz, Harald; Bach, Elsa

    2012-01-01

    There is mounting evidence that prolonged cramped sitting in connection with long-lasting air travel increases the risk of deep vein thrombosis of the legs and pulmonary embolism, i.e. venous thromboembolism (VTE). Prolonged cramped sitting may occur even in various jobs unrelated to air travel...

  5. Abnormal vaginal bleeding in women with venous thromboembolism treated with apixaban or warfarin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brekelmans, Marjolein P. A.; Scheres, Luuk J. J.; Bleker, Suzanne M.; Hutten, Barbara A.; Timmermans, Anne; Büller, Harry R.; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal vaginal bleeding can complicate direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) treatment. We aimed to investigate the characteristics of abnormal vaginal bleeding in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) receiving apixaban or enoxaparin/warfarin. Data were derived from the AMPLIFY trial. We compared

  6. ADAMTS-13 and von Willebrand factor predict venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pepin, M.; Kleinjan, A.; Hajage, D.; Buller, H. R.; Di Nisio, M.; Kamphuisen, P. W.; Salomon, L.; Veyradier, A.; Stepanian, A.; Mahe, I.

    Essentials Cancer patients are at high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). In this study, cases and controls were cancer patients who did or did not develop VTE. von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels were higher if compared with controls and correlated with cancer stage. VWF and ADAMTS-13 are

  7. Oral rivaroxaban for the prevention of symptomatic venous thromboembolism after elective hip and knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, B I; Kakkar, A K; Turpie, A G G

    2009-01-01

    A once-daily dose of rivaroxaban 10 mg, an oral, direct Factor Xa inhibitor, was compared with enoxaparin 40 mg subcutaneously once daily for prevention of venous thromboembolism in three studies of patients undergoing elective hip and knee replacement (RECORD programme). A pooled analysis of data...

  8. Risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with mycosis fungoides and parapsoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl, Lise M; Schmidt, Morten; Farkas, Dora K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mycosis fungoides (MF) and parapsoriasis are characterized by malignant proliferation and chronic inflammation, which may impact the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). OBJECTIVES: To examine the risk of VTE in patients with MF and parapsoriasis. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide p...

  9. Long-term quality of life and postthrombotic syndrome in women after an episode of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungqvist, Maria; Holmström, Margareta; Kieler, Helle; Lärfars, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate health-related quality of life after venous thromboembolism. Methods We conducted a cohort study, TEHS follow-up, including 1040 women with a first episode of venous thromboembolism and 994 women unexposed to venous thromboembolism. Patients were recruited from the "Thrombo Embolism Hormonal Study" (TEHS), a Swedish nation-wide case-control study on risk factors for venous thromboembolism in women 18-64 years of age. Quality of life was measured using SF-36 and VEINES-QoL/VEINES-Sym. Results On average there were no difference in mean SF-36 summary scales scores between exposed and unexposed women. Twenty percent of exposed women developed postthrombotic syndrome during follow-up. Women with postthrombotic syndrome had severely impaired quality of life with lower scores on all scales. Other predictors of low quality of life after venous thromboembolism were age, obesity, physical inactivity, and recurrent venous thromboembolism. Conclusion Long-term quality of life after venous thromboembolism in women was severely impaired among those developing postthrombotic syndrome, while quality of life in women not developing postthrombotic syndrome was similar to a control population.

  10. Markers of endothelial dysfunction, coagulation and tissue fibrosis independently predict venous thromboembolism in HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselwhite, Laura W; Sheikh, Virginia; Norton, Thomas D; Rupert, Adam; Porter, Brian O; Penzak, Scott R; Skinner, Jeff; Mican, JoAnn M; Hadigan, Colleen; Sereti, Irini

    2011-03-27

    HIV infection is associated with coagulation abnormalities and significantly increased risk of venous thrombosis. It has been shown that higher plasma levels of coagulation and inflammatory biomarkers predicted mortality in HIV. We investigated the relationship between venous thrombosis and HIV-related characteristics, traditional risk factors of hypercoagulability, and pre-event levels of biomarkers. A retrospective case-control study of 23 HIV-infected individuals who experienced an incident venous thromboembolic event while enrolled in National Institutes of Health studies from 1995 to 2010 and 69 age-matched and sex-matched HIV-infected individuals without known venous thromboembolism (VTE). Biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, coagulation, tissue fibrosis, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation were assessed by ELISA-based assays and PCR using plasma obtained prior to the event. VTE events were related to nadir CD4 cell count, lifetime history of multiple opportunistic infections, CMV disease, CMV viremia, immunological AIDS, active infection, and provocation (i.e., recent hospitalization, surgery, or trauma). VTE events were independently associated with increased plasma levels of P-selectin (P = 0.002), D-dimer (P = 0.01), and hyaluronic acid (P = 0.009) in a multivariate analysis. No significant differences in antiretroviral or interleukin-2 exposures, plasma HIV viremia, or other traditional risk factors were observed. Severe immunodeficiency, active infection, and provocation are associated with venous thromboembolic disease in HIV. Biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction, coagulation, and tissue fibrosis may help identify HIV-infected patients at elevated risk of VTE.

  11. Elevated plasma vitamin B12 levels and risk of venous thromboembolism among cancer patients: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Johan Frederik Håkonsen; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Pedersen, Lars; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2017-08-01

    Both venous thromboembolism (VTE) and high plasma vitamin B12 levels (cobalamin, Cbl) are markers of occult cancer and aggressive cancer with a poor prognosis. In this population-based cohort study, we assessed VTE risk among cancer patients with high plasma Cbl levels. We used Danish health registries to identify a Cb1 cohort of 25,310 cancer patients with a plasma Cbl measurement prior to cancer diagnosis. The cohort was subdivided according to Cbl levels (pmol/L): 200-600 (population reference range), 601-800 and >800. All VTE events were considered provoked and categorised as either cancer-associated if no other provoking factors were present before VTE or provoked by other risk factors (surgery, trauma, or pregnancy). We calculated cumulative incidence proportions and adjusted hazard ratios computed from Cox regression analysis (reference: plasma Cbl of 200-600pmol/L) for the risk of VTE before and after the cancer diagnosis date (index date). The risk of cancer-associated VTE 30days after index date increased with higher Cbl levels. The cumulative incidence (95% CI) by Cbl levels was: 200-600pmol/L: 0.24 (0.18-0.31); 601-800pmol/L: 0.63 (0.34-1.09); >800pmol/L: 0.86 (0.49-1.40). Adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) were: 601-800 vs. 200-600: 2.55 (1.32-4.92); >800 vs. 200-600: 2.36 (1.19-4.71). We found similar results for VTE provoked by other risk factors and for VTE occurring before index date, but scarcity of events produced uncertain risk estimates. We demonstrated an association between high plasma Cbl levels and risk of VTE in cancer patients. Any clinical implications warrant further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In the absence of a central venous catheter, risk of venous thromboembolism is low in critically injured children, adolescents, and young adults: evidence from the National Trauma Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Sarah H; Candrilli, Sean D

    2011-05-01

    To describe the incidence and risk factors of venous thromboembolism in a large sample of critical care pediatric, adolescent, and young adult trauma patients. The National Trauma Data Bank-the largest and most complete aggregation of trauma registry data in the United States. Seven hundred eighty-four level I to level IV trauma centers. Patients ≤ 21 yrs of age who spent at least 1 day in a critical care unit during a trauma admission between 2001 and 2005. To characterize differences between patients with and without venous thromboembolism, we extracted variables regarding patient demographics, injury pattern and severity, procedures, total length of stay, and intensive care unit and ventilator days. Odds ratios for predictors of venous thromboembolism were estimated with a logistic regression model. Among the 135,032 critical care patients analyzed, venous thromboembolism was uncommon (6 per 1,000 discharges). Placement of a central venous catheter was a significant predictor of venous thromboembolism (odds ratio = 2.24; p risk of venous thromboembolism in critical care patients without a central venous catheter was risk of venous thromboembolism in pediatric critical care patients and the efficacy and safety of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis preclude the ability to make definitive recommendations for the use of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in this setting. Our results, however, suggest that venous thromboembolism prophylaxis may need to be considered only in critically injured adolescents and young adults with a continuing need for central venous access.

  13. Periodontal disease as a risk factor of recurrence of venous thromboembolic disease: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Siles, Mariano; Rosa-Salazar, Vladimir; Salazar-Sánchez, Noemi; Camacho-Alonso, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, periodontal disease has been related to a large number of systemic disorders. To study the possible relationship between periodontal disease and high levels of D-dimer in a group of patients with venous thromboembolic disease. A study was made of 142 patients diagnosed with unprovoked venous thromboembolic disease. All patients underwent oral examination consecutively and randomly. Finally, two groups were obtained: (a) patients with periodontal disease (n = 71); and (b) patients without periodontal disease (n = 71). All patients were subjected to periodontal study, with evaluation of the number of teeth, bleeding index, gingival index, simplified oral hygiene index, community periodontal index of treatment needs, clinical attachment level, probe depth, number of pockets ≥4 mm, number of pockets ≥6 mm. The D-dimer values were evaluated in both groups. D-dimer values were higher in the study group than the control group, with statistically significant differences (p = 0.010). A relationship is observed between the presence of periodontal disease and high D-dimer levels. Patients with venous thromboembolic disease and periodontal disease could have more risk of a new thromboembolism episode.

  14. New anticoagulants for venous thromboembolism and atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitropoulos, Gerasimos; Rahim, S M Zubair; Moss, Alexandra Sophie

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The field of anticoagulation has seen impressive progress over the last decade. The introduction of the Non Vitamin K Oral Anticoagulants (NOACs) has revolutionized practice surrounding thromboprophylaxis, treatment of thromboembolic disease and stroke prevention in atrial fibrillat...... on well-established targets such factor Xa and thrombin remains the mainstay, attention has also shifted to other factors in the coagulation cascade. The evidence emerging from clinical research is growing, generating exciting possibilities in the field of anticoagulation....

  15. Venous Thromboembolism: A Comparison of Chronic Spinal Cord Injury and General Surgery Patients in a Metropolitan Veterans Affairs Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ryan M; Rimler, Jonathan; Smith, Brian R; Wirth, Garrett A; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z

    2016-11-01

    Venous thromboembolic events result in significant morbidity, mortality, and costly therapeutic interventions. As medical resource allocation strategies are becoming more pervasive, appropriate risk stratification and prophylactic regimens are essential. Previous studies have shown a decreased incidence of perioperative venous thromboembolism in the chronic spinal cord injury population. The question remains of whether chronic spinal cord injury is protective against venous thromboembolism. A retrospective review of all cases involving chronic spinal cord injury patients who underwent plastic and reconstructive surgery operations (n = 424) and general surgery patients (n = 777) with a primary outcome of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism within 90 days of surgery was performed. The incidence of postoperative deep venous thrombosis in the control and spinal cord injury groups was 1.7 percent and 0.2 percent, respectively (p = 0.027). However, such significance was not observed with regard to postoperative pulmonary embolism incidence (p = 0.070). Collectively, the incidence of postoperative venous thromboembolism-specifically, deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism-was significantly greater in the general surgery population (p = 0.014). A nearly 10-fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism was seen among the control group (1.9 percent versus 0.2 percent) despite administration of optimal prophylaxis. This study demonstrates a profoundly low incidence of venous thromboembolism among chronic spinal cord injury patients compared with general surgery patients. Future efforts to elucidate how chronic spinal cord injury confers a protective mechanism may potentially influence the evolution of venous thromboembolism prevention guidelines, and spark the development of alternative prophylactic agents or customized application of prevention efforts.

  16. Do Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin G20210A Mutations Predict Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism in Older Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méan, Marie; Limacher, Andreas; Stalder, Odile; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Alberio, Lorenzo; Fontana, Pierre; Beer, Hans-Jürg; Rodondi, Nicolas; Lämmle, Bernhard; Aujesky, Drahomir

    2017-10-01

    The value of genetic thrombophilia testing in elderly patients with an unprovoked venous thromboembolism is unclear. We assessed whether the Factor V Leiden and the prothrombin G20210A mutation are associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism in elderly patients in a prospective multicenter cohort study. We genotyped the Factor V Leiden and the prothrombin G20210A mutation in 354 consecutive in- and outpatients aged ≥65 years with a first unprovoked venous thromboembolism from 9 Swiss hospitals. Patients and managing physicians were blinded to testing results. The outcome was recurrent symptomatic venous thromboembolism during follow-up. We examined the association between the Factor V Leiden and the prothrombin G20210A mutation and venous thromboembolism recurrence using competing risk regression, adjusting for age, sex, and periods of anticoagulation as a time-varying covariate. Overall, 9.0% of patients had a Factor V Leiden and 3.7% had a prothrombin G20210A mutation. At 36 months of follow-up, patients with a Factor V Leiden and a prothrombin G20210A mutation had a cumulative incidence of recurrent venous thromboembolism of 12.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.1%-30.8%) and 18.5% (95% CI, 4.9%-56.5%), respectively, compared with 16.7% (95% CI, 12.5%-22.1%) of patients without mutation (P = .91 by the log-rank test). After adjustment, neither the Factor V Leiden (sub-hazard ratio 0.98; 95% CI, 0.35-2.77) nor the prothrombin G20210A mutation (sub-hazard ratio 1.15; 95% CI, 0.25-5.19) was associated with recurrent venous thromboembolism. Our results suggest that testing for genetic thrombophilia may not be beneficial in elderly patients with a first unprovoked venous thromboembolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hormonal contraception and risk of venous thromboembolism: national follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Svendsen, Anne Louise

    2009-01-01

    .22), with gestodene 1.86 (1.59 to 2.18), with drospirenone 1.64 (1.27 to 2.10), and with cyproterone 1.88 (1.47 to 2.42). Compared with non-users of oral contraceptives, the rate ratio for venous thromboembolism in users of progestogen only oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel or norethisterone was 0.59 (0.33 to 1...... and the same length of use, oral contraceptives with desogestrel, gestodene, or drospirenone were associated with a significantly higher risk of venous thrombosis than oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel. Progestogen only pills and hormone releasing intrauterine devices were not associated with any...

  18. Venous Thromboembolism in Patients With Thrombocytopenia: Risk Factors, Treatment, and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baelum, Jens Kristian; Moe, Espen Ellingsen; Nybo, Mads; Vinholt, Pernille Just

    2017-05-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent and potentially lethal condition. Venous thrombi are mainly constituted of fibrin and red blood cells, but platelets also play an important role in VTE formation. Information about VTE in patients with thrombocytopenia is, however, missing. To identify VTE risk factors and describe treatment and outcome (bleeding episodes and mortality) in patients with thrombocytopenia. Patients with thrombocytopenia (platelet count thrombocytopenia. Also, patients with thrombocytopenia may be VTE risk stratified based on platelet count and comorbidities. Finally, patients having thrombocytopenia with VTE seem to be safely treated with anticoagulants without increased occurrence of bleeding.

  19. Venous thromboembolism in chronic kidney disease: epidemiology, the role of proteinuria, CKD severity and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, Chrisanna; Clark, Edward G; Sood, Manish M

    2017-02-01

    The worldwide prevalence of chronic kidney disease is 10-15 % of the adult population, is rising and increases susceptibility to venous thromboembolism (VTE). In this narrative review we discuss the underlying evidence behind the association of VTE/CKD and examine the role of worsening CKD stage, proteinuria, and the risk of recurrent VTE. As CKD may alter therapeutic options we discuss the role of emerging therapies, the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOAC), in the treatment of VTE.

  20. Evidence-base for aspirin as venous thromboembolic prophylaxis following joint replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Jameson, S. S.; Baker, P. N.; Deehan, D. J.; Port, A.; Reed, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has thus far relied on historical data and predominantly industry-sponsored trials to provide evidence for venous thromboembolic (VTE) prophylaxis in joint replacement patients. We argue that the NICE guidelines may be reliant on assumptions that are in need of revision. Following the publication of large scale, independent observational studies showing little difference between low-molecular-weight heparins and aspirin, and rec...

  1. The Importance of Homozygous Polymorphisms of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Gene in Romanian Patients with Idiopathic Venous Thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Hotoleanu, Cristina; Trifa, Adrian; Popp, Radu; Fodor, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Background: Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphisms have recently raised the interest as a possible thrombophilic factors. Aims: We aimed to assess the frequency of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1298C polymorphisms in idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE) in a Romanian population and the associated risk of VTE. Study Design: We performed a case-control transversal study including 90 patients diagnosed with VTE and 75 sex- an...

  2. Psoriasis carries an increased risk of venous thromboembolism: a danish nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Lindhardsen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    . The present study investigated the potential association between psoriasis and VTE. Methods and Findings Information from nationwide prospectively recorded registers of hospitalization, drug dispensing from pharmacies, socio-economic data, and causes of death was linked on an individual level......Background Psoriasis is an immunoinflammatory disease associated with cardiovascular risk factors, atherothrombotic events, and hypercoagulability. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is potentially lethal and shares risk factors with psoriasis, but the risk of VTE associated with psoriasis is unknown...

  3. Quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination in boys and risk of autoimmune diseases, neurological diseases and venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisch, Morten; Besson, Andréa; Clemmensen, Kim Katrine Bjerring

    2018-01-01

    following HPV vaccination in this group. We investigated if quadrivalent HPV (qHPV) vaccination of 10-17-year-old boys is associated with any unusual risk of autoimmune diseases, neurological diseases or venous thromboembolism. Methods: We conducted a national cohort study of 568 410 boys born in Denmark...... 1988-2006 and followed for 4 million person-years during 2006-16, using nationwide registers to obtain individual-level information about received doses of the qHPV vaccine and hospital records for 39 autoimmune diseases, 12 neurological diseases and venous thromboembolism. For each outcome, we......: 0.71-1.28, n = 46 cases in qHPV-vaccinated boys) and neurological diseases (RR = 0.67; 0.41-1.10, n = 16), as well as for venous thromboembolism (RR = 0.88; 0.33-2.35, n = 4). After taking multiple testing into account, none of the 52 individual outcomes studied appeared to occur in excess among q...

  4. The use of aspirin for primary and secondary prevention in venous thromboembolism and other cardiovascular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, A T; Imfeld, S; Markham, J; Granziera, S

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes a number of conditions such as myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease, stroke, and venous thromboembolism. CVD is a leading health problem worldwide and a major cause of mortality, morbidity, and disability; it is also associated with high healthcare costs. The incidence of CVD is predicted to increase in the forthcoming years, and thus it is crucial that physicians are aware of the benefits and limitations of the available therapies to ensure patients receive optimized treatment. Current clinical practice guidelines provide recommendations on the use of anticoagulants and antiplatelets for both the prevention and treatment of CVD. Aspirin is the most studied antiplatelet agent in this context. The benefits of aspirin are well documented and supported by data from robust clinical trials for CVD conditions, such as acute coronary syndrome and stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, the clinical benefits of aspirin are less clear for other conditions, namely for primary prevention of venous thromboembolism after major orthopaedic surgery, particularly in comparison with newer drugs such as the direct oral anticoagulants. This article provides an outline of the current guidelines and a critical assessment of the efficacy and safety data supporting the recommendations for the use of aspirin in the treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism and other cardiovascular disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparing Direct Oral Anticoagulants and Warfarin for Atrial Fibrillation, Venous Thromboembolism, and Mechanical Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, Todd R; Truong, Teresa; Rai, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    To summarize available data for use of direct oral anticoagulants in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, and mechanical heart valves including dose-response consistency to offer considerations for pharmacotherapeutic decision-making for oral anticoagulants. A Medline search of English-language studies published between 2000 and March 2015 was conducted to identify pertinent papers using combinations of the following words: apixaban, atrial fibrillation, dabigatran, direct oral anticoagulant, edoxaban, factor IIa inhibitors, factor Xa inhibitors, mechanical heart valves, novel oral anticoagulant, rivaroxaban, venous thromboembolism, and warfarin. Original studies, guidelines, and approved prescribing information were evaluated and included if contributing new or complementary data toward the objective. References for all identified studies were reviewed and entries included if contributory. Randomized controlled trials have established the safety and efficacy of direct oral anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism for most patient groups. Direct oral anticoagulants should not be used in patients with mechanical heart valves until proven safe and effective. There are groups for which questions remain regarding inter-patient dose-response consistency for direct oral anticoagulants. There are postmarketing data suggesting poorer real-world performance of dabigatran relative to clinical trial data. Direct oral anticoagulants offer several advantages over warfarin, and large clinical trial data establish the appropriateness of their use in broad populations. There remain groups for whom the relative benefit and risk of these agents relative to warfarin are uncertain. A patient-specific approach in pharmacotherapeutic decision-making is appropriate.

  6. Prospective study of γ′ fibrinogen and incident venous thromboembolism: the Longitudinal Investigation of Thromboembolism Etiology (LITE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folsom, Aaron R.; Tang, Weihong; George, Kristen M.; Heckbert, Susan R.; MacLehose, Richard F.; Cushman, Mary; Pankow, James S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiological studies generally have not found plasma total fibrinogen to be a risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE), but several have reported associations between variants in the fibrinogen gamma gene (FGG) and VTE. A case-control study in whites suggested plasma γ′ fibrinogen concentration may be associated inversely with VTE, but this was not replicated in African Americans. Objective To examine the prospective association between γ′ fibrinogen concentrations and occurrence of VTE. Methods We used the Longitudinal Investigation of Thromboembolism Etiology (LITE), involving two pooled population-based cohorts in the United States including 16,234 participants. The cohorts comprised white and African American men and women, aged 50 years and older at study onset in the early 1990s. We identified VTEs during follow-up and documented they met standardized diagnostic criteria. Results During two decades of follow-up, neither γ′ fibrinogen nor total fibrinogen nor their ratio was associated with VTE overall (n = 521 VTEs), in subgroups defined by race, or in other subgroups. In both race groups, the minor allele of FGG rs2066865 was associated with lower γ′ fibrinogen concentrations, but this allele was not associated with VTE. Conclusions A lower plasma concentration of γ′ fibrinogen in healthy adults does not appear to increase VTE risk. PMID:26916295

  7. Radiolabeled peptides: overcoming the challenges of post-surgical patient management of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernarducci, Marc P

    2004-01-01

    The serious clinical and economic impact of venous thromboembolic (VTE) disease is undisputed. What concerns practitioners and researchers alike is the seeming inability to truly mitigate the ramification of VTE, especially in the post-surgical or postoperative subpopulation, in whom the risk of VTE is disproportionately high and often asymptomatic. Ironically, current approaches to the diagnostic evaluation of suspected VTE patients tend to favor the application of anatomic modalities, either invasive or technically challenging (eg, venography) or the performance of which is clinically inadequate (eg, ultrasonography) for post-surgical/postoperative patients. These modalities' primary principle of detection rely on the effects or results of an intricate pathophysiologic process, seemingly ignoring the critical role and potentially better prognostic value of endogenous hemostatic mechanisms. In other words, are we using the correct tools to seek the appropriate types of information in patients with suspected VTE? Research in nuclear medicine techniques for detecting VTE began approximately 25 years ago. Recently, the emergence of radiolabeled peptides as a clinically applicable technology platform has encouraged a different approach to evaluating VTE. Many radiolabeled peptide candidates are undergoing preclinical and clinical research. Currently,only one, 99'Tc-apcitide (AcuTect), has been approved (since 1998) for clinical use in the United States. The growing numbers of physicians with experience using 9mTc-apcitide (including those who remember using "'In-fibrinogen) has fueled ongoing clinical research to further elucidate the benefits of this unique peptide technology. Consequently, significant insight has been gained from large prospective clinical tri-als, of which one was conducted to support the approval of 99mTc-apcitide in Europe. Furthermore, this insight has kindled increasing interest in 99'Tc-apcitide and potential new entrants into this special

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease and venous thromboembolism during pregnancy and the postpartum period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, A T; Erichsen, R; Horváth-Puhó, E; Sørensen, H T

    2017-04-01

    Essentials Risk of pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism may be increased in inflammatory bowel disease. We performed a study on inflammatory bowel disease and pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism. Inflammatory bowel disease is a risk factor for pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism. Proper disease control before conception is pivotal to avoid venous thromboembolism. Background The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) increases, and thus is more common, in pregnant women. IBD is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE) but it is not clear whether IBD predisposes women to an excess risk of VTE during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Methods This was a nationwide population-based cohort study of all deliveries during 1980-2013 in Denmark, using data from two nationwide health registries: the Danish National Patient Registry and the Medical Birth Registry. We computed incidence rates (IRs) per 1000 person-years, and crude and adjusted relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for VTE during pregnancy and the first 12 postpartum weeks in women with and without IBD. Results We included 1 046 754 women with 1 978 701 deliveries. We identified 3465 VTE events during pregnancy and 1302 VTE events postpartum. The IR for VTE during pregnancy was 4.20 (95% CI, 2.83-5.58) in IBD patients and 2.41 (95% CI, 2.33-2.50) in women without IBD, corresponding to an RR of 1.72 (95% CI, 1.22-2.43). Adjustment for maternal age and smoking (pregnancies during 1991-2013) yielded an adjusted RR of 1.67 (95% CI, 1.15-2.41). IBD flare was associated with an RR of 2.64 (95% CI, 1.69-4.14) for VTE during pregnancy. The IR for postpartum VTE was 7.03 (95% CI, 3.87-10.20) among IBD patients and 2.88 (95% CI, 2.72-3.04) in women without IBD, corresponding to an adjusted RR of 2.10 (95% CI, 1.33-3.30). Conclusions IBD is a risk factor for VTE during pregnancy and postpartum. © 2017 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  9. Economic analyses of venous thromboembolism prevention strategies in hospitalized patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirugnanam, Subarna; Pinto, Ruxandra; Cook, Deborah J; Geerts, William H; Fowler, Robert A

    2012-03-09

    Despite evidence-based guidelines for venous thromboembolism prevention, substantial variability is found in practice. Many economic evaluations of new drugs for thromboembolism prevention do not occur prospectively with efficacy studies and are sponsored by the manufacturers, raising the possibility of bias. We performed a systematic review of economic analyses of venous thromboembolism prevention in hospitalized patients to inform clinicians and policy makers about cost-effectiveness and the potential influence of sponsorship. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Databases, ACP Journal Club, and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, from 1946 to September 2011. We extracted data on study characteristics, quality, costs, and efficacy. From 5,180 identified studies, 39 met eligibility and quality criteria. Each addressed pharmacologic prevention: low-molecular-weight heparins versus placebo (five), unfractionated heparin (12), warfarin (eight), one or another agents (five); fondaparinux versus enoxaparin (11); and rivaroxaban and dabigatran versus enoxaparin (two). Low-molecular-weight heparins were most economically attractive among most medical and surgical patients, whereas fondaparinux was favored for orthopedic patients. Fondaparinux was associated with increased bleeding events. Newer agents rivaroxaban and dabigatran may offer additional value. Of all economic evaluations, 64% were supported by manufacturers of a "new" agent. The new agent had a favorable outcome in 38 (97.4%) of 39 evaluations [95% confidence interval [CI] (86.5 to 99.9)]. Among studies supported by a pharmaceutical company, the sponsored medication was economically attractive in 24 (96.0%) of 25 [95% CI, 80.0 to 99.9)]. We could not detect a consistent bias in outcome based on sponsorship; however, only a minority of studies were unsponsored. Low-molecular-weight heparins and fondaparinux are the most economically attractive drugs for venous thromboembolism prevention in

  10. Observationally and Genetically High YKL-40 and Risk of Venous Thromboembolism in the General Population: Cohort and Mendelian Randomization Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaergaard, Alisa D; Johansen, Julia S; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-05-01

    High baseline YKL-40 is associated with later development of ischemic stroke, but not with myocardial infarction. Whether high YKL-40 levels are associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism is presently unknown. We tested the hypothesis that observationally and genetically high YKL-40 is associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population. Cohort and Mendelian randomization studies in 96 110 individuals from the Danish general population, with measured plasma levels of YKL-40 (N=21 647) and CHI3L1 rs4950928 genotype (N=94 579). From 1977 to 2013, 1489 individuals developed pulmonary embolism, 2647 developed deep vein thrombosis, and 3750 developed venous thromboembolism (pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis). For the 91% to 100% versus 0% to 33% YKL-40 percentile category, the multifactorially adjusted hazard ratio was 2.38 (95% confidence interval, 1.25-4.55) for pulmonary embolism, 1.98 (1.09-3.59) for deep vein thrombosis, and 2.13 (1.35-3.35) for venous thromboembolism. Compared with rs4950928 GG homozygosity, presence of C-allele was associated with a doubling (CG) or tripling (CC) in YKL-40 levels, but not with risk of venous thromboembolism. A doubling in YKL-40 was associated with a multifactorially adjusted observational hazard ratio for pulmonary embolism of 1.17 (1.00-1.38) and a genetic odds ratio of 0.97 (0.76-1.23). Corresponding risk estimates were 1.28 (1.12-1.47) observationally and 1.11 (0.91-1.35) genetically for deep vein thrombosis and 1.23 (1.10-1.38) observationally and 1.08 (0.92-1.27) genetically for venous thromboembolism. High YKL-40 levels were associated with a 2-fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism, but the association was not causal. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Prediction of Venous Thromboembolism after Total Knee Arthroplasty Using Blood Coagulation-Fibrinolysis Markers: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Watanabe

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To account for changes in blood coagulation-fibrinolysis using blood markers after total knee arthroplasty with and without venous thromboembolism, and to determine the etiology of postoperative venous thromboembolism after total knee arthroplasty. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted during November and December 2014. The electronic databases searched were PubMed, MEDLINE®, and Cochrane Library. English only and no data restriction were used. The search keywords were total knee arthroplasty AND venous thromboembolism, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism AND D-dimer, SFMC, PAI-1 appearing in the title, abstract, or keyword fields. Eight articles were identified, and the full texts of these articles were read and analyzed for validity in blood coagulation-fibrinolysis markers with vs. without venous thromboembolism after total knee arthroplasty. RESULTS: Only D-dimer level has been a useful blood coagulationfibrinolysis marker in the detection of venous thromboembolism after total knee arthroplasty since the 1990s. However, the D-dimer cutoff value varies from 3 to 10μg/mL and sensitivity and specificity vary from 68% to 54.5% and from 94.4% to 90%, respectively. A recent study reported that the level of fibrin degradation products of leukocyte elastase released from activated leukocytes, e-XDP, was significantly elevated in patients with venous thromboembolism and noted that the sensitivity and specificity, both 75%, might be clinically important for a cutoff value of 8.2U/mL. CONCLUSION: D-dimer and e-XDP levels are significantly elevated in patients with venous thromboembolism after total knee arthroplasty. However, their clinical importance remains low.

  12. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in the Portuguese hospital care setting: The ARTE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Daniel; de Sousa, Joaquim Abreu; Felicíssimo, Paulo; França, Ana

    2017-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a relatively common complication during hospital stay and determination of VTE risk is critical to choosing the best prophylactic strategy for each patient. In the present study we studied the risk profile for VTE in hospitalized patients in a group of hospitals in Portugal. Based on an open cohort of 4248 patients hospitalized in surgical, internal medicine, orthopedic or oncology departments, we determined thromboembolic risk at admission by applying a new score, modified from the Caprini and Khorana scores. Thrombotic, embolic and bleeding events and death were assessed during hospital stay and at three and six months after discharge. The median duration of hospital stay was five days and thromboembolic prophylaxis was implemented in 67.2% (n=2747) of the patients. A low molecular weight heparin was used as prophylaxis in the majority of cases (88.3%). Most patients were classified as high (68%) or intermediate risk (27%). The overall incidence of thromboembolic events was 1.5%. Major bleeding events were recorded in 3.89% of patients and all-cause mortality was 3.4%. In this study, we propose a modified VTE risk score that effectively risk-stratifies a mixed inpatient population during hospital stay. The use of this score may result in improvement of thromboprophylaxis practices in hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Splenectomy and the incidence of venous thromboembolism and sepsis in patients with immune thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Soames; White, Richard H.; Brunson, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) who relapse after an initial trial of corticosteroid treatment present a therapeutic challenge. Current guidelines recommend consideration of splenectomy, despite the known risks associated with surgery and the postsplenectomy state. To better define these risks, we identified a cohort of 9976 patients with ITP, 1762 of whom underwent splenectomy. The cumulative incidence of abdominal venous thromboembolism (AbVTE) was 1.6% compared with 1% in patients who did not undergo splenectomy; venous thromboembolism (VTE) (deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolus) after splenectomy was 4.3% compared with 1.7% in patients who did not undergo splenectomy. There was increased risk of AbVTE early (splenectomy. There was increased risk of VTE both early (HR 5.2 [CI, 3.2-8.5]) and late (HR 2.7 [CI, 1.9-3.8]) after splenectomy. The cumulative incidence of sepsis was 11.1% among the ITP patients who underwent splenectomy and 10.1% among the patients who did not. Splenectomy was associated with a higher adjusted risk of sepsis, both early (HR 3.3 [CI, 2.4-4.6]) and late (HR 1.6 or 3.1, depending on comorbidities). We conclude that ITP patients post splenectomy are at increased risk for AbVTE, VTE, and sepsis. PMID:23637127

  14. Decisions to withhold diagnostic investigations in nursing home patients with a clinical suspicion of venous thromboembolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike J Schouten

    Full Text Available This study aimed to gather insights in physicians' considerations for decisions to either refer for- or to withhold additional diagnostic investigations in nursing home patients with a suspicion of venous thromboembolism.Our study was nested in an observational study on diagnostic strategies for suspected venous thromboembolism in nursing home patients. Patient characteristics, bleeding-complications and mortality were related to the decision to withhold investigations. For a better understanding of the physicians' decisions, 21 individual face-to-face in-depth interviews were performed and analysed using the grounded theory approach.Referal for additional diagnostic investigations was forgone in 126/322 (39.1% patients with an indication for diagnostic work-up. 'Blind' anticoagulant treatment was initiated in 95 (75.4% of these patients. The 3 month mortality rates were higher for patients in whom investigations were withheld than in the referred patients, irrespective of anticoagulant treatment (odds ratio 2.45; 95% confidence interval 1.40 to 4.29 but when adjusted for the probability of being referred (i.e. the propensity score, there was no relation of non-diagnosis decisions to mortality (odds ratio 1.75; 0.98 to 3.11. In their decisions to forgo diagnostic investigations, physicians incorporated the estimated relative impact of the potential disease; the potential net-benefits of diagnostic investigations and whether performing investigations agreed with established management goals in advance care planning.Referral for additional diagnostic investigations is withheld in almost 40% of Dutch nursing home patients with suspected venous thromboembolism and an indication for diagnostic work-up. We propose that, given the complexity of these decisions and the uncertainty regarding their indirect effects on patient outcome, more attention should be focused on the decision to either use or withhold additional diagnostic tests.

  15. Venous thromboembolic disease in systemic autoimmune diseases: an association to keep in mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvariño, Ricardo; Danza, Álvaro; Mérola, Valentina; Bérez, Adriana; Méndez, Enrique; Espinosa, Gerard; Cervera, Ricard

    2012-12-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are conditions of unknown etiology, characterized by the simultaneous or successive involvement of most organs and systems, as well as the presence of autoantibodies as biological markers. Venous thromboembolic disease has a higher incidence in this population when compared to healthy individuals. This responds to the increase in congenital and acquired risk factors in this group. One of the main risk factors is linked to the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies, whose prevalence is increased among patients with such conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evidence-base for aspirin as venous thromboembolic prophylaxis following joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, S S; Baker, P N; Deehan, D J; Port, A; Reed, M R

    2014-05-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has thus far relied on historical data and predominantly industry-sponsored trials to provide evidence for venous thromboembolic (VTE) prophylaxis in joint replacement patients. We argue that the NICE guidelines may be reliant on assumptions that are in need of revision. Following the publication of large scale, independent observational studies showing little difference between low-molecular-weight heparins and aspirin, and recent changes to the guidance provided by other international bodies, should NICE reconsider their recommendations? Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:146-9. ©2014 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  17. OPTIMAL PREVENTION OF HOSPITAL VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISM WITH THE HELP OF MEDICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Nazarenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are an important medical and social problem, contributing to the structure of morbidity and mortality in the developed countries. Despite the availability of clinical guidelines for the prevention of venous thromboembolic complications there is a gap between scientific knowledge and clinical practice. Clinical decision support systems (CDSS are confirmed to be effective tool for the implementation of clinical guidelines in daily practice. CDSS should be based on national and international clinical guidelines; their effectiveness depends upon successful integration with other health information systems and care flow processes.

  18. Edoxaban in Atrial Fibrillation and Venous Thromboembolism-Ten Key Questions and Answers: A Practical Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Caterina, Raffaele; Ageno, Walter; Boriani, Giuseppe; Colonna, Paolo; Ghirarduzzi, Angelo; Patti, Giuseppe; Rossini, Roberta; Rubboli, Andrea; Schinco, Piercarla; Agnelli, Giancarlo

    2017-03-01

    Edoxaban is the fourth non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant now available for clinical use in the prevention of stroke/systemic embolism in atrial fibrillation (AF) and in the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE), after the completion of large-scale randomized comparative clinical trials with the vitamin K antagonist warfarin. Edoxaban has some peculiar pharmacological properties and outcome data. Here a group of experts in AF and VTE answers a set of questions on its practical use, trying to define the profile of patients that would be most appropriate for its use.

  19. Pulmonary tuberculosis - An emerging risk factor for venous thromboembolism: A case series and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amitesh; Mrigpuri, Parul; Faye, Abhishek; Bandyopadhyay, Debdutta; Singla, Rupak

    2017-01-01

    One-third of patients with symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) manifest pulmonary embolism, whereas two-thirds manifest deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Overall, 25%–50% of patients with first-time VTE have an idiopathic condition, without a readily identifiable risk factor, and its association with tuberculosis (TB) is a rare occurrence. Deep venous thrombosis has been associated with 1.5%–3.4% cases of TB. Early initiation of anti-TB treatment along with anticoagulant therapy decreases the overall morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. We report three cases of DVT associated with pulmonary TB who were diagnosed due to high index of suspicion as the risk factors for the development of DVT were present in these cases. PMID:28144063

  20. Pulmonary tuberculosis - An emerging risk factor for venous thromboembolism: A case series and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitesh Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One-third of patients with symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE manifest pulmonary embolism, whereas two-thirds manifest deep vein thrombosis (DVT. Overall, 25%–50% of patients with first-time VTE have an idiopathic condition, without a readily identifiable risk factor, and its association with tuberculosis (TB is a rare occurrence. Deep venous thrombosis has been associated with 1.5%–3.4% cases of TB. Early initiation of anti-TB treatment along with anticoagulant therapy decreases the overall morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. We report three cases of DVT associated with pulmonary TB who were diagnosed due to high index of suspicion as the risk factors for the development of DVT were present in these cases.

  1. Current Status of New Anticoagulants in the Management of Venous Thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto C. Montoya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous Thromboembolism, manifested as deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a common problem associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and resource expenditure. Unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin, and vitamin K antagonists are the most common treatment and prophylaxis, and have demonstrated their efficacy in a vast number of previous studies. Despite their broad use, these agents have important limitations that have led to the development of new drugs in a bid to overcome the disadvantages of the old ones without decreasing their therapeutic effect. These novel medications, some approved and others in different stages of development, include direct thrombin inhibitors like dabigatran etexilate, and direct activated factor X inhibitors like rivaroxaban. The current paper will review the characteristics, clinical trial results, and current and potential therapeutic uses of these new agents with a focus on the categories of direct thrombin inhibitors and activated factor X inhibitors.

  2. Risk of venous thromboembolism from use of oral contraceptives containing different progestogens and oestrogen doses: Danish cohort study, 2001-9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Nielsen, Lars Hougaard; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel

    2011-01-01

    To assess the risk of venous thromboembolism from use of combined oral contraceptives according to progestogen type and oestrogen dose.......To assess the risk of venous thromboembolism from use of combined oral contraceptives according to progestogen type and oestrogen dose....

  3. Outcome of Patients with Venous Thromboembolism and Factor V Leiden or Prothrombin 20210 Carrier Mutations During the Course of Anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoran, Inna; Papadakis, Manolis; Brenner, Benjamin; Fidalgo, Ángeles; Rivas, Agustina; Wells, Philip S; Gavín, Olga; Adarraga, María Dolores; Moustafa, Farès; Monreal, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Individuals with factor V Leiden or prothrombin G20210A mutations are at a higher risk to develop venous thromboembolism. However, the influence of these polymorphisms on patient outcome during anticoagulant therapy has not been consistently explored. We used the Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad TromboEmbólica database to compare rates of venous thromboembolism recurrence and bleeding events occurring during the anticoagulation course in factor V Leiden carriers, prothrombin mutation carriers, and noncarriers. Between March 2001 and December 2015, 10,139 patients underwent thrombophilia testing. Of these, 1384 were factor V Leiden carriers, 1115 were prothrombin mutation carriers, and 7640 were noncarriers. During the anticoagulation course, 160 patients developed recurrent deep vein thrombosis and 94 patients developed pulmonary embolism (16 died); 154 patients had major bleeding (10 died), and 291 patients had nonmajor bleeding. On multivariable analysis, factor V Leiden carriers had a similar rate of venous thromboembolism recurrence (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82-1.64), half the rate of major bleeding (adjusted HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.25-0.99) and a nonsignificantly lower rate of nonmajor bleeding (adjusted HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.43-1.01) than noncarriers. Prothrombin mutation carriers and noncarriers had a comparable rate of venous thromboembolism recurrence (adjusted HR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.68-1.48), major bleeding (adjusted HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.42-1.34), and nonmajor bleeding events (adjusted HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.77-1.57). During the anticoagulation course, factor V Leiden carriers had a similar risk for venous thromboembolism recurrence and half the risk for major bleeding compared with noncarriers. This finding may contribute to decision-making regarding anticoagulation duration in selected factor V Leiden carriers with venous thromboembolism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Clinical and safety outcomes associated with treatment of acute venous thromboembolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, Lana A; Cameron, Chris; Le Gal, Grégoire; Rodger, Marc A; Coyle, Doug; Wells, Philip S; Clifford, Tammy; Gandara, Esteban; Wells, George; Carrier, Marc

    2014-09-17

    Many anticoagulant strategies are available for the treatment of acute venous thromboembolism, yet little guidance exists regarding which drug is most effective and safe. To summarize and compare the efficacy and safety outcomes associated with 8 anticoagulation options (unfractionated heparin [UFH], low-molecular-weight heparin [LMWH], or fondaparinux in combination with vitamin K antagonists); LMWH with dabigatran or edoxaban; rivaroxaban; apixaban; and LMWH alone) for treatment of venous thromboembolism. A systematic literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the evidence-based medicine reviews from inception through February 28, 2014. Eligible studies were randomized trials reporting rates of recurrent venous thromboembolism and major bleeding in patients with acute venous thromboembolism. Of the 1197 studies identified, 45 trials including 44,989 patients were included in the analyses. Two reviewers independently extracted trial-level data including number of patients, duration of follow-up, and outcomes. The data were pooled using network meta-analysis. The primary clinical and safety outcomes were recurrent venous thromboembolism and major bleeding, respectively. Compared with the LMWH-vitamin K antagonist combination, a treatment strategy using the UFH-vitamin K antagonist combination was associated with an increased risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (hazard ratio [HR], 1.42; 95% credible interval [CrI], 1.15-1.79). The proportion of patients experiencing recurrent venous thromboembolism during 3 months of treatment were 1.84% (95% CrI, 1.33%-2.51%) for the UFH-vitamin K antagonist combination and 1.30% (95% CrI, 1.02%-1.62%) for the LMWH-vitamin K antagonist combination. Rivaroxaban (HR, 0.55; 95% CrI, 0.35-0.89) and apixaban (HR, 0.31; 95% CrI, 0.15-0.62) were associated with a lower risk of bleeding than was the LMWH-vitamin K antagonist combination, with a lower proportion of patients experiencing a major bleeding event during 3

  5. Neutrophil extracellular traps form predominantly during the organizing stage of human venous thromboembolism development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, A S; Martinod, K; Seidman, M A; Wong, S L; Borissoff, J I; Piazza, G; Libby, P; Goldhaber, S Z; Mitchell, R N; Wagner, D D

    2014-06-01

    A growing health problem, venous thromboembolism (VTE), including pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT), requires refined diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Neutrophils contribute to thrombus initiation and development in experimental DVT. Recent animal studies recognized neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) as an important scaffold supporting thrombus stability. However, the hypothesis that human venous thrombi involve NETs has not undergone rigorous testing. To explore the cellular composition and the presence of NETs within human venous thrombi at different stages of development. We examined 16 thrombi obtained from 11 patients during surgery or at autopsy using histomorphological, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analyses. We classified thrombus regions as unorganized, organizing and organized according to their morphological characteristics. We then evaluated them, focusing on neutrophil and platelet deposition as well as micro-vascularization of the thrombus body. We observed evidence of NET accumulation, including the presence of citrullinated histone H3 (H3Cit)-positive cells. NETs, defined as extracellular diffuse H3Cit areas associated with myeloperoxidase and DNA, localized predominantly during the phase of organization in human venous thrombi. NETs are present in organizing thrombi in patients with VTE. They are associated with thrombus maturation in humans. Dissolution of NETs might thus facilitate thrombolysis. This finding provides new insights into the clinical development and pathology of thrombosis and provides new perspectives for therapeutic advances. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  6. Clinical utility of apixaban in the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalpour A

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ali Zalpour,1 Thein Hlaing Oo21Division of Pharmacy – Clinical Programs, 2Section of Thrombosis and Benign Hematology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Anticoagulation with heparin and vitamin K antagonist has been the mainstay of prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE for many years. In recent years, novel oral anticoagulants such as dabigatran etexilate (a direct thrombin inhibitor and rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban (a direct factor Xa inhibitor have emerged for the prevention and treatment of VTE. Novel oral anticoagulants have been shown to be noninferior to vitamin K antagonist or heparin in the prevention and treatment of VTE. This review specifically examines the role of apixaban in the prevention and treatment of VTE based on the available literature. The management of apixaban in the perioperative setting is also explored because some patients on apixaban may require surgical intervention. Finally, we discuss the management of apixaban-induced major bleeding complications, the relevance of drug–drug interactions, and patient education.Keywords: new oral anticoagulants, apixaban, venous thromboembolism, thromboprophylaxis

  7. Statistical Process Control: A Quality Tool for a Venous Thromboembolic Disease Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadas-Martinez, Maria Lourdes; Rojas, Liliana Paloma; Vazquez, Fernando Javier; De Quiros, Fernan Bernaldo; Waisman, Gabriel Dario; Giunta, Diego Hernan

    2016-01-01

    We aim to describe Statistical Control Process as a quality tool for the Institutional Registry of Venous Thromboembolic Disease (IRTD), a registry developed in a community-care tertiary hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The IRTD is a prospective cohort. The process of data acquisition began with the creation of a computerized alert generated whenever physicians requested imaging or laboratory study to diagnose venous thromboembolism, which defined eligible patients. The process then followed a structured methodology for patient's inclusion, evaluation, and posterior data entry. To control this process, process performance indicators were designed to be measured monthly. These included the number of eligible patients, the number of included patients, median time to patient's evaluation, and percentage of patients lost to evaluation. Control charts were graphed for each indicator. The registry was evaluated in 93 months, where 25,757 patients were reported and 6,798 patients met inclusion criteria. The median time to evaluation was 20 hours (SD, 12) and 7.7% of the total was lost to evaluation. Each indicator presented trends over time, caused by structural changes and improvement cycles, and therefore the central limit suffered inflexions. Statistical process control through process performance indicators allowed us to control the performance of the registry over time to detect systematic problems. We postulate that this approach could be reproduced for other clinical registries.

  8. Efficacy and safety of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis with apixaban in major orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werth S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Werth, Kai Halbritter, Jan Beyer-WestendorfCenter for Vascular Medicine and Department of Medicine III, Division of Angiology, University Hospital “Carl Gustav Carus” Dresden, Dresden, GermanyAbstract: Over the last 15 years, low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs have been accepted as the “gold standard” for pharmaceutical thromboprophylaxis in patients at high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE in most countries around the world. Patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery (MOS represent a population with high risk of VTE, which may remain asymptomatic or become symptomatic as deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Numerous trials have investigated LMWH thromboprophylaxis in this population and demonstrated high efficacy and safety of these substances. However, LMWHs have a number of disadvantages, which limit the acceptance of patients and physicians, especially in prolonged prophylaxis up to 35 days after MOS. Consequently, new oral anticoagulants (NOACs were developed that are of synthetic origin and act as direct and very specific inhibitors of different factors in the coagulation cascade. The most developed NOACs are dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban, all of which are approved for thromboprophylaxis in MOS in a number of countries around the world. This review is focused on the pharmacological characteristics of apixaban in comparison with other NOACs, on the impact of NOAC on VTE prophylaxis in daily care, and on the management of specific situations such as bleeding complications during NOAC therapy.Keywords: major orthopedic surgery, apixaban, dabigatran, edoxaban, rivaroxaban, deep vein thrombosis, venous thromboembolism, VTE prophylaxis

  9. Barriers to the diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism in advanced cancer patients: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, Laura; Prout, Hayley; Dowding, Dawn; Noble, Simon; Watt, Ian; Maraveyas, Anthony; Johnson, Miriam

    2013-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism is common in patients with cancer and the risk increases with advanced disease. Evidence-based treatment is administration of low-molecular-weight heparin daily by subcutaneous injection. Clinical uncertainty exists as to whether treating venous thromboembolism in advanced disease is in the patient's best interests. To explore the barriers faced by doctors when diagnosing and treating patients with cancer-associated thrombosis. Qualitative, in-depth interview study using framework analysis. Forty-five UK doctors across urban and rural settings, from three specialties, oncology, palliative medicine and general practice, with a mixture of senior and junior staff. Organisational constraints served to act as barriers to the diagnosis and treatment of this patient group. Issues were identified around access to diagnostic testing. A cancer-associated thrombosis patient having to wait for a scan as an inpatient was sometimes deemed unnecessary. Patient ambulance transport (especially transportation of hospice patients) was often viewed as inflexible and bureaucratic. Low-molecular-weight heparin prescribing had sometimes led to tension between the acute, community and hospice sectors about whose prescribing responsibility this was, with different areas having divergent 'rules' and practices. Finally, the doctors interviewed discussed the role of nurses. Multiple logistical barriers are hindering best patient care for people with cancer-associated thrombosis. There is scope for some of these barriers to be reduced to improve service delivery and ultimately patient care. The research team proposes practical recommendations, which could yield direct benefit for patients and the health services.

  10. Optimal management of venous thromboembolism in adolescent and young adult oncology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKillop S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarah McKillop,1 Cynthia Wu,2 Aisha Bruce,1 Joseph Brandwein2 1Division of Immunology, Hematology, Oncology, Palliative Care and Environmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, 2Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a serious complication experienced by adolescents and young adults (AYAs diagnosed with cancer. Data exist in the adult literature to guide the management of cancer-associated thrombosis. Unfortunately, little is known regarding the epidemiology of cancer-associated thrombosis in AYAs. As a result, evidence on the treatment and prevention of thrombosis in this vulnerable population is lacking, posing a great challenge to physicians caring for AYAs with cancer. It is clear that the basic principles of VTE likely apply to AYAs and that low-molecular-weight heparin is the drug of choice for the treatment of VTE regardless of age. We review the available data on the epidemiology, diagnostic methods, and management of AYAs with cancer and VTE. Recognizing the lack of accepted guidelines for the prevention or management of VTE in this population, we offer expert opinion recommendations to serve as guidance to improve management of thrombosis in AYA cancer patients. Keywords: adolescents, young adults, thrombosis, cancer, venous thromboembolism, anticoagulation

  11. Incidence of venous thromboembolism among patients who underwent major surgery in a public hospital in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya P. Susanto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a fatal yet potentially preventable complication of surgery. Routine thromboprophylaxis is still unequivocal prescription is problematic due to perception of low VTE incidence among Asian population. This study aims to investigate the incidence of VTE and thromboprophylaxis prescription among patients undergoing major surgery in a Singapore hospital.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from medical record of 1,103 patients who had underwent major orthopaedic or abdominal surgery in 2011-2012 at Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore. Incidence of VTE events either in the same admission or re-admission in less than one month time were noted as study parameters.Results: Incidence of VTE was 2.1% (95% CI: 1.67 - 2.53 of which 1.3% and 0.8% were DVT and PE cases respectively. Age, gender, history of VTE, ischemic heart disease, and mechanical prophylaxis were associated with VTE incidence based on bivariate analysis. The prescription of pharmacological thromboprophylaxis was associated with prior anticoagulant medication, type of surgery, and incidence of new bleeding. Conclusion: Subsequent to major surgeries, VTE is as common in Asian patients as published data in other populations. Pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis should be considered as recommended in non-Asian guidelines.Keywords: thromboprophylaxis, venous thromboembolism

  12. Inflammation – a common pathogenic factor of arterial atherosclerotic and venous thromboembolic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Kaja Ježovnik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is among the basic mechanisms of arterial atherosclerotc diseases and is most likely also involved in the onset of venous thromboembolic disease. Various risk factors for atherosclerosis cause damage to the vascular wall and trigger inflammatory changes, which may lead to the development of atherosclerosis. Therefore, people with advanced atherosclerosis, and particularly those with unstable atherosclerotic plaques as a result of intense inflammatory changes, are found to have elevated levels of inflammatory markers in the blood. The most frequent findings include elevated levels of highly specific C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, which is a non-specific systemic indicator of inflammation, and certain interleukins (interleukin–6, interleukin–8 that are considered to be more specific markers of vascular wall inflammation. Therefore, studies are underway to improve the prognostic value for cardiovascular events by the determination of inflammatory markers in the blood. However, due to the unspecifcity of individual inflammatory markers, different methods of their determination and close relation between marker levels and the established risk factors, these have failed to contribute significantly to the evaluation of the role of inflammation in the occurrence of cardiovascular events. Currently, the determination of hs-CRP as one of the most prominent risk factors is recommended only in persons at high risk for cardiovascular events, in those that do not have classical risk factors and are at risk due to other causes, such as e.g. familial predisposition.Recently, it has also been found that inflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of venous thrombosis. In the case of a damaged venous wall inflammation occurs as a response to injury, while in idiopathic venous thrombosis without the presence of risk factors the vascular wall inflammation is probably a primary event that is followed by coagulation activation. Namely

  13. Hormonal contraception and risk of venous thromboembolism: national follow-up study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Løkkegaard, Ellen; Svendsen, Anne Louise; Agger, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the risk of venous thrombosis in current users of different types of hormonal contraception, focusing on regimen, oestrogen dose, type of progestogen, and route of administration. Design National cohort study. Setting Denmark, 1995-2005. Participants Danish women aged 15-49 with no history of cardiovascular or malignant disease. Main outcome measures Adjusted rate ratios for all first time deep venous thrombosis, portal thrombosis, thrombosis of caval vein, thrombosis of renal vein, unspecified deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism during the study period. Results 10.4 million woman years were recorded, 3.3 million woman years in receipt of oral contraceptives. In total, 4213 venous thrombotic events were observed, 2045 in current users of oral contraceptives. The overall absolute risk of venous thrombosis per 10 000 woman years in non-users of oral contraceptives was 3.01 and in current users was 6.29. Compared with non-users of combined oral contraceptives the rate ratio of venous thrombembolism in current users decreased with duration of use (4 years 2.76, 2.53 to 3.02; Pgestodene 1.86 (1.59 to 2.18), with drospirenone 1.64 (1.27 to 2.10), and with cyproterone 1.88 (1.47 to 2.42). Compared with non-users of oral contraceptives, the rate ratio for venous thromboembolism in users of progestogen only oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel or norethisterone was 0.59 (0.33 to 1.03) or with 75 μg desogestrel was 1.12 (0.36 to 3.49), and for hormone releasing intrauterine devices was 0.90 (0.64 to 1.26). Conclusion The risk of venous thrombosis in current users of combined oral contraceptives decreases with duration of use and decreasing oestrogen dose. For the same dose of oestrogen and the same length of use, oral contraceptives with desogestrel, gestodene, or drospirenone were associated with a significantly higher risk of venous thrombosis than oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel. Progestogen only pills and hormone releasing

  14. Thromboembolism in pregnancy: challenges and controversies in the prevention of pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism and management of anticoagulation in women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLintock, Claire

    2014-05-01

    Thromboembolism in pregnancy is an important clinical issue. Despite identification of maternal and pregnancy-specific risk factors for development of pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism, limited data are available to inform on optimal approaches for prevention. The relatively low overall prevalence of pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism has prompted debate about the validity of recommendations, which are mainly based on expert opinion, and have resulted in an increased use of pharmacological thromboprophylaxis in pregnancy and postpartum. A pragmatic approach is required in the absence of more robust data. Anticoagulation management of pregnant women with mechanical prosthetic heart valves is particularly challenging. Continuation of therapeutic anticoagulation during pregnancy is essential to prevent valve thrombosis. Warfarin, the most effective anticoagulant, is associated with adverse fetal outcomes, including embryopathy and stillbirth. Fetal outcome is improved with therapeutic-dose low-molecular-weight heparin, but there may be more thromboembolic complications. More intensive anticoagulation, targeting higher trough anti-Xa levels, may reduce the risk of valve thrombosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Incidence of Venous Thromboembolism in cancer patients treated with Cisplatin based chemotherapy - a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahir, Muhammad Nauman; Shaikh, Quratulain; Shabbir-Moosajee, Munira; Jabbar, Adnan Abdul

    2017-01-16

    Cancer related thrombosis not only increases morbidity and mortality but also poses a significant financial burden on health care system. Risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in these patients substantially increases with the addition of chemotherapy. Lately, cisplatin has been implicated as an independent factor. There is little data estimating the risk of venous thromboembolism in patients receiving cisplatin based chemotherapy when compared to other chemotherapeutic agents. Patients who had received chemotherapy between November 2010 and October 2012 were retrospectively identified from a single institute cancer registry. 200 patients who had received cisplatin based chemotherapy were identified as the exposed group while 200 patients who had received non-Cisplatin based regimens were identified as the non-exposed group. Patients were followed for development of VTE throughout the entire duration of therapy and one month thereafter. Cox proportional hazard model was used to compute relative risks with 95% confidence intervals. The baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. Mean age for the entire cohort was 55.4 ± 10.7 years and male to female ratio was almost 1:1. On univariate analysis, cisplatin based chemotherapy, presence of central venous catheter, female gender, poor performance status, high risk stratification according to the Khorana model and use of granulocyte colony stimulating factor were all significantly associated with the development of VTE. The crude relative risk for the incidence of VTE in cisplatin group was 2.8 (95% CI, 1.4 - 4.2) times compared to the non-Cisplatin group. When the relative risk was adjusted for the above variables in multivariable analysis, it increased to 3.3 (95% CI, 1.6 - 6.8) compared to the control group. A high incidence of VTE in patients receiving cisplatin based chemotherapy was demonstrated in this study. Prospective studies are warranted to establish this observation with certainty and to

  16. Absolute annual incidences of first events of venous thromboembolism and arterial vascular events in individuals with elevated FVIII : c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bank, Ivan; van de Poel, Marlene H. W.; Coppens, Michiel; Hamulyak, Karly; Prins, Martin H.; van der Meer, Jan; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Bueller, Harry R.; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2007-01-01

    Elevated levels of factor VIII:c (elevated FVIII:c) are associated with an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and arterial vascular events, and are at least in part determined genetically. We prospectively followed 192 asymptomatic individuals with elevated FVIII:c (> 150%) and 340 with

  17. Association of Mild to Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease With Venous Thromboembolism Pooled Analysis of Five Prospective General Population Cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoodi, Bakhtawar K.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Naess, Inger Anne; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Braekkan, Sigrid K.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Brodin, Ellen E.; Meijer, Karina; Sang, Yingying; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Hallan, Stein I.; Hammerstrom, Jens; Cannegieter, Suzanne C.; Astor, Brad C.; Coresh, Josef; Folsom, Aaron R.; Hansen, John-Bjarne; Cushman, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Background-Recent findings suggest that chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Given the high prevalence of mild-to-moderate CKD in the general population, in depth analysis of this association is warranted. Methods and Results-We

  18. A worldwide survey to assess the current approach to the treatment of patients with cancer and venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, Ankie; Aggarwal, Anita; van de Geer, Annemarie; Faselis, Charles; Büller, Harry R.; Di Nisio, Marcello; Rickles, Frederick R.; Kamphuisen, Pieter Willem

    2013-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight heparin (LWMH) is recommended as the preferred anticoagulant treatment over vitamin K antagonists (VKA) for venous thromboembolism (VIE) in patients with cancer. However, there is uncertainty about the duration and dose of LMWH treatment. Therefore, we designed this

  19. A worldwide survey to assess the current approach to the treatment of patients with cancer and venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, A.; Aggarwal, A.; van de Geer, A.; Faselis, C.; Büller, H. R.; Di Nisio, M.; Rickles, F. R.; Kamphuisen, P. W.

    2013-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight heparin (LWMH) is recommended as the preferred anticoagulant treatment over vitamin K antagonists (VKA) for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cancer. However, there is uncertainty about the duration and dose of LMWH treatment. Therefore, we designed this

  20. A worldwide survey to assess the current approach to the treatment of patients with cancer and venous thromboembolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, A.; Aggerwal, A.; Van Der Geer, A.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Rickles, F.R.; Faselis, C.; Büller, H.R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Since the results of the CLOT trial were published in 2003, low-molecular-weight heparin (LWMH) has been recommended as the preferred anticoagulant treatment over vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cancer. However, there is uncertainty about

  1. Prediction of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients by tissue factor dependent microparticle coagulant activity, biomarkers and a clinical score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, A.; Bossuyt, P.; Cesarman-Maus, G.; Di Nisio, M.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Kramer, M.; Mahé, I.; Nanayakkara, P.; Nieuwland, R.; Otten, H.M.; Stephanian, A.; Büller, H.R.

    Background: Cancer patients receiving chemotherapy in an ambulatory setting are at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Randomized controlled trials have shown that thromboprophylaxis with lowmolecular- weight-heparin reduces the occurrence of VTE in cancer patients but the overall incidence of 4%

  2. Combined arterial and venous whole-body MR angiography with cardiac MR imaging in patients with thromboembolic disease - initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Florian M.; Hunold, Peter; Barkhausen, Joerg [University Hospital Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Herborn, Christoph U. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Medical Prevention Center Hamburg (MPCH) at University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Ruehm, Stefan G. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kroger, Knut [University Hospital Essen, Department of Angiology, Essen (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to assess the feasibility of a combined arterial and venous whole-body three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, together with a cardiac MR examination, in patients with arterial thromboembolism. Ten patients with arterial thromboembolism underwent a contrast-enhanced whole-body MR examination of the arterial and venous vessels, followed by a cardiac MR examination on a separate occasion within 24 h. All examinations were performed on a 1.5-T MR scanner. For both arterial and venous MR angiography only one injection of contrast agent was necessary. The cardiac imaging protocol included dark-blood-prepared half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequences, fast steady-state free precession cine sequences, T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequences and inversion recovery gradient-echo fast low-angle-shot sequences after injection of contrast agent. MR imaging revealed additional clinically unknown arterial thromboembolisms in four patients. The thoracic aorta was depicted as embolic source in four patients, while deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was found in one patient as the underlying disease. Unsuspected infarction of parenchymal organs was detected by MRI in two patients. An unknown additional DVT was found in one patient. Four patients were considered to have arterial emboli of cardiac origin. In conclusion, acquisition of arterial and venous MR angiograms of the entire vascular system combined with cardiac MR imaging is a most comprehensive and valuable strategy in patients with arterial thromboembolism. (orig.)

  3. Combined oral contraceptives, thrombophilia and the risk of venous thromboembolism : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vlijmen, E. F. W.; Wiewel-Verschueren, S.; Monster, T. B. M.; Meijer, K.

    Background Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which is shown to be more pronounced in women with hereditary thrombophilia. Currently, WHO recommendations state that COC-use in women with hereditary thrombophilias (antithrombin

  4. Rivaroxaban for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after hip or knee arthroplasty. Pooled analysis of four studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turpie, A G G; Lassen, M R; Eriksson, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Four phase III studies compared oral rivaroxaban with subcutaneous enoxaparin for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA). A pooled analysis of these studies compared the effect of rivaroxaban with enoxaparin on symptomatic VTE plus all...

  5. Family history of venous thromboembolism and risk of hospitalized thromboembolism in cancer patients: A nationwide family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöller, Bengt; Palmer, Karolina; Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-09-01

    The importance of family history of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients is unclear. We conducted a nationwide study to determine whether family history of VTE is a risk factor for hospitalized VTE in cancer patients. The Swedish Multi-Generation Register was linked to the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register and the Swedish Cancer Registry. Familial (sibling/parent history of VTE) hazard ratios (HRs) for VTE in 20 cancer types were determined by cause-specific Cox regression for 258877 cancer patients in 1987-2010 without previous VTE. Familial HRs were also determined in 7644203 individuals without cancer or VTE before 1987, with follow-up in 1987-2010. Significant familial HRs for VTE in cancer patients were observed for the following cancer types: cancers of the breast (HR=1.79), lung (HR=1.21), colon (HR=1.30), prostate (HR=1.46), testis (HR=2.02), nervous system (HR=1.31), stomach (HR=1.73), and rectum (HR=1.77), as well as melanoma (HR=1.71), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (HR=1.32), myeloma (HR=1.69), and leukemia (HR=1.44). In a time-dependent analysis the familial HRs for VTE were significant before diagnosis of cancer (p-values cancer the familial HRs VTE were weaker, with significant HRs for 12 cancer types. On an additive scale, the joint effect of cancer and family history was significantly increased compared to separate effects in four cancer types. However, for certain cancers the familial VTE cases were limited. Family history of VTE is a risk factor for VTE in several cancer types. However, familial factors are relatively more important in non-cancer than in cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Red meat, processed meat and the risk of venous thromboembolism: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Mattiuzzi, Camilla

    2015-08-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a highly prevalent condition worldwide, which can be triggered by a combination of inherited and acquired risk factors, including diet. Several lines of evidence suggest that consumption of red and processed meat is associated with a significant risk of colorectal cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Therefore, an electronic search was conducted to identify clinical studies investigating the potential association between the risk of venous thrombosis and consumption of red or processed meat. Seven articles were finally included in this review, 6 prospective studies and 1 case-control investigation. Taken together, the evidence of the current scientific literature suggests that whether or not a pathophysiological link may exist between red or processed meat consumption and venous thrombosis, the association is definitely weak, since it was found to be non-statistically significant in four prospective cohort studies, marginally significant in one prospective cohort study and highly significant in the remaining prospective cohort study. In the single case-control study, the risk was also found to be non-statistically significant. Although further studies will be needed to definitely establish the existence of a thrombotic risk associated with different subtypes of red or processed meat, it seems premature to conclude that a reduced consumption of red and processed meat lowers the risk of VTE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative safety of direct oral anticoagulants and warfarin in venous thromboembolism: multicentre, population based, observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Min; Lix, Lisa M; Durand, Madeleine; Dahl, Matt; Paterson, J Michael; Dormuth, Colin R; Ernst, Pierre; Yao, Shenzhen; Renoux, Christel; Tamim, Hala; Wu, Cynthia; Mahmud, Salaheddin M

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the safety of direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) use compared with warfarin use for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Design Retrospective matched cohort study conducted between 1 January 2009 and 31 March 2016. Setting Community based, using healthcare data from six jurisdictions in Canada and the United States. Participants 59 525 adults (12 489 DOAC users; 47 036 warfarin users) with a new diagnosis of venous thromboembolism and a prescription for a DOAC or warfarin within 30 days of diagnosis. Main outcome measures Outcomes included hospital admission or emergency department visit for major bleeding and all cause mortality within 90 days after starting treatment. Propensity score matching and shared frailty models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios of the outcomes comparing DOACs with warfarin. Analyses were conducted independently at each site, with meta-analytical methods used to estimate pooled hazard ratios across sites. Results Of the 59 525 participants, 1967 (3.3%) had a major bleed and 1029 (1.7%) died over a mean follow-up of 85.2 days. The risk of major bleeding was similar for DOAC compared with warfarin use (pooled hazard ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1.03), with the overall direction of the association favouring DOAC use. No difference was found in the risk of death (pooled hazard ratio 0.99, 0.84 to 1.16) for DOACs compared with warfarin use. There was no evidence of heterogeneity across centres, between patients with and without chronic kidney disease, across age groups, or between male and female patients. Conclusions In this analysis of adults with incident venous thromboembolism, treatment with DOACs, compared with warfarin, was not associated with an increased risk of major bleeding or all cause mortality in the first 90 days of treatment. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT02833987. PMID:29042362

  8. Lower extremity deep venous thrombosis with fatal pulmonary thromboembolism caused by benign pelvic space-occupying lesions--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Hannah; Byard, Roger W

    2012-05-01

    Venous stasis predisposes to thrombosis. One hundred and sixty cases of fatal pulmonary thromboembolism were reviewed to determine how many cases had deep venous thromboses associated with venous blood flow reduction caused by external pressure from benign pelvic masses. Three cases were identified, representing 2% of cases overall (3/160): a 44-year-old woman with a large uterine leiomyoma (1048 g); a 74-year-old man with prostatomegaly and bladder distension (containing 1 L of urine); and a 70-year-old man with prostatomegaly and bladder distension (containing 3 L of urine). Although a rare cause of fatal deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism, space-occupying pelvic lesions can lead to extrinsic pressure on adjacent veins reducing blood flow and causing stasis and thrombosis. Individuals with large pelvic masses may, therefore, be at increased risk of pulmonary thromboembolism from deep venous thrombosis, particularly in the presence of concurrent risk factors such as immobility, thrombophilias, malignancy, and significant cardiopulmonary disease. © 2012 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. Predictors of Interventional Treatment Use for Venous Thromboembolism in Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Lara; Hillyer, Grace Clarke; Chen, Ling; Hu, Jim C.; Neugut, Alfred I.; Hershman, Dawn L.; Wright, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a major cause of morbidity in cancer patients. The Perspective database was used to identify patients with solid tumors and a diagnosis of VTE from 2006–2012. We examined use of IVC filters, thrombolysis, and thrombectomy. Among 32,545 patients, 23.1% received an IVC filter, 1.9% thrombolytic therapy and 0.4% underwent thrombectomy. Use of IVC filters decreased between 2006 and 2012 (23.4% to 21.2%, P=0.012). Older patients, uninsured patients, Hispanics and those with more comorbidities were more likely to undergo filter placement while patients at rural hospitals were less likely to receive an IVC filter (P<0.05 for all). PMID:27624740

  10. Adipsic diabetes insipidus and venous thromboembolism (VTE): recommendations for addressing its hypercoagulability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljic, Dragana; Miljic, Predrag; Doknic, Mirjana; Pekic, Sandra; Stojanovic, Marko; Petakov, Milan; Popovic, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Adipsic diabetes insipidus (ADI) is a rare disorder. It can occur after transcranial surgery for craniopharyngeoma, suprasellar pituitary adenoma and anterior communicating artery aneurysm but also with head injury, toluene exposure and developmental disorders. It is often associated with significant hypothalamic dysfunction and complications like obesity, sleep apnea, thermoregulatory disorders, seizures and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Morbidity and mortality data have been reported as single case reports with only one large series suggesting increased risk for VTE in patients with ADI. Here we report a mini-series of four patients with ADI and VTE. Post-surgery immobilization, obesity, infection, with prolonged hospitalization, hemoconcentration and changes in coagulation which might be induced by inadequate hormone treatment in the postoperative period (high doses of glucocorticoids, sex steroids and DDAVP replacement) may all contribute to the pathogenesis of VTE. Thromboprophylactic treatment after pituitary surgery and during episodes of hypernatremia is therefore warranted.

  11. Long-term mental well-being of adolescents and young adults diagnosed with venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højen, Anette Arbjerg; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard; Dreyer, Pia Sander

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Critical and chronic illness in youth can lead to impaired mental well-being. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potentially traumatic and life-threatening condition. Nonetheless, the long-term mental well-being of adolescents and young adults (AYAS) with VTE is unclear. OBJECTIVES...... compared with sex and age matched population controls and AYAS with fist-time diagnosis of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Impaired mental well-being was largely connected to fear of recurrence and concomitant uncertainty. Therefore, it was important for the long-term mental well-being to navigate...... uncertainty. Perceived health threat played a more profound role for the long-term mental well-being than disease severity, as the potential life-threat was the pivot which pointed back to the initial VTE and forward to the perception of future health-threat and the potential risk of dying of a recurrent...

  12. [Venous thromboembolism prevention in pregnancy and the postpartum period in Primary and Specialized Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo-Vallejo, J L; Naveiro-Fuentes, M; Puertas-Prieto, A; Gallo-Vallejo, F J

    2017-09-01

    After noting that there are a number of risk factors for venous thromboembolism disease during pregnancy, it emphasizes primary prevention and treatment of this serious condition during pregnancy and the postpartum period are essential to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality. Low molecular-weight heparins are under the anticoagulant of choice in pregnancy. Your prescription may make both the primary care physician, as the hematologist and obstetrician. As for prescribing terms, an application protocol in both primary and specialized, multidisciplinary care, based on the existing literature on the subject is presented, which indicated that the hypercoagulable disorders associated with some of the risk factors, forced to do thromboprophylaxis with low molecular-weight heparins throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period presented. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Low-molecular-weight or unfractionated heparin in venous thromboembolism: the influence of renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Schellong, Sebastian; Falga, Conxita; Zorrilla, Vanessa; Gallego, Pedro; Barrón, Manuel; Monreal, Manuel

    2013-05-01

    In patients with acute venous thromboembolism and renal insufficiency, initial therapy with unfractionated heparin may have some advantages over low-molecular-weight heparin. We used the Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad TromboEmbólica (RIETE) Registry data to evaluate the 15-day outcome in 38,531 recruited patients. We used propensity score matching to compare patients treated with unfractionated heparin with those treated with low-molecular-weight heparin in 3 groups stratified by creatinine clearance levels at baseline: >60 mL/min, 30 to 60 mL/min, or 60 mL/min (n = 1598 matched pairs), 30 to 60 mL/min (n = 277 matched pairs), and 60 mL/min or <30 mL/min, but not in those with levels between 30 and 60 mL/min. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Incidence of venous thromboembolic events in enhanced recovery after surgery for colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendler, M M I; Haidari, T A; Waage, J E

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Both the Danish and the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines recommend prolonged thromboprophylaxis (PT) with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for 28 days postoperatively after elective surgery for colon cancer. The evidence relies on data from two randomized clinical...... trials (RCTs) that included not only colon cancers but also other abdominal cancers or benign colorectal diseases. Neither of those studies investigated the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) under enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS). We aim to describe the risk of VTE and estimate the cost...... of preventing one case of VTE by PT under ERAS. METHOD: This was a retrospective study of 2230 patients undergoing elective surgery for colon cancer Stage I-III in the Capital Region of Denmark, 1 June 2008 to 31 December 2013. Patients who were discharged on postoperative day 28 or later, died during admission...

  15. [Vena cava filters and treatment of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mismetti, P; Rivron-Guillot, K; Moulin, N

    2008-06-01

    Despite numerous publications, there is still only one randomised clinical trial with vena cava filter in the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE). This study has shown a potential and early benefit on the risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) (the first three months) but a late negative effect on the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) recurrences (beyond the sixth month) especially on the risk of filter thrombosis. Consequently, the international recommendations are against a systematic use of vena cava filter to treat VTE (grade 1A) and they suggest to use them in case of a recurrence despite adequate treatment or in case of a contra-indication to anticoagulants (grade 2C). But these two conditions are frequent with VTE associated with cancer since, the risk of VTE recurrences is about 5 to 10% despite prolonged low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) treatment and the major bleeding risk is also about 5 to 10% in this case. These VTE recurrences are frequently early (first month of treatment) and contra-indications to anticoagulants due to major bleeding are mostly temporary. In this way, retrievable vena cava filters (possible retrieval until six months after placement) could be useful in order, to prevent recurrences during the thromboembolic risk period without any prolonged increasing risk of vena cava thrombosis. However, vena cava filters could be associated with some complications (tilt, migration sepsis...). So without any strong validation, they have still to be considered as a therapeutic strategy needing to be evaluated especially in cancer patient.

  16. [Risk and prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in the material of 2nd Chair of Surgery JUMC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kózka, Mariusz; Natkaniec, Michał; Hankus, Jerzy; Budziaszek, Łukasz

    2009-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is one of the most dangerous complication that could occur in patiens treated in surgical ward. Threat is increased due to presence of additional, apart from surgical procedures, risk factors. It is assesed, that approximately 50 000 patients are at risk of VTE yearly in Poland, 20 000 of them develop pulmonary thromboembolism during hospitalisation, which is fatal in 10% of cases. Aim of the study was to asses presence of VTE risk factors in the group of patients treated in the 2nd Chair of Surgery Jagiellonian University Medical College and to analyse applied prophylaxis. The study enrolled 170 patients, 89 (52%) females and 81 (48%) males. Average age of the studied group was 57.9. Medical history of all patients was taken with an emphasis on presence of VTE risk factors. It had a form of questionnaire and enclosed questions. Apart from the anamnesis, physical examination was performed. Type of applied prophylaxis was assesed on the basis of medical records. Each patient was charged with 4 risk factors on average. The most common risk factors were: age, surgical procedure lasting longer than 45 minutes, ischaemic heart disease and hipertension. Clinical probability of deep venous thrombosis was assesed according to Wells scale; low: 59% of studied group, intermediate: 41%, high: 0%. Applied prophylaxis included pharmacotherapy, physiotherapy, and mechanical methods (compression). The most common risk factor that could be changed was duration of the surgery lasting longer than 45 minutes. Pharmacological prophylaxis should be more often complemented by mechanical methods and physiotherapy, especially in group burdened with high risk of VTE.

  17. Venous Thromboembolism Risk and Adequacy of Prophylaxis in High Risk Pregnancy in the Arabian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsayegh, Faisal; Al-Jassar, Waleed; Wani, Salima; Tahlak, Muna; Albahar, Awatef; Al Kharusi, Lamya; Al-Tamimi, Halima; El-Taher, Faten; Mahmood, Naeema; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk factors in pregnancy and the proportion of pregnancies at risk of VTE that received the recommended prophylaxis according to the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) 2012 published guidelines in antenatal clinics in the Arabian Gulf. The evaluation of venous thromboembolism (EVE)-Risk project was a non-interventional, cross-sectional, multi-centre, multi-national study of all eligible pregnant women (≥17 years) screened during antenatal clinics from 7 centres in the Arabian Gulf countries (United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar and Oman). Pregnant women were recruited during a 3-month period between September and December 2012. Of 4,131 screened pregnant women, 32% (n=1,337) had ≥1 risk factors for VTE. Common VTE risk factors included obesity (76%), multiparity (33%), recurrent miscarriages (9.1%), varicose veins (6.9%), thrombophilia (2.6%), immobilization (2.0%), sickle cell disease (2.8%) and previous VTE (1.6%). Only 8.3% (n=111) of the high risk patients were on the recommended VTE prophylaxis. Enoxaparin was used in 80% (n=89) of the cases followed by tinzaparin (4%; n=4). Antiplatelet agents were prescribed in 11% (n=149) of pregnant women. Of those on anticoagulants (n=111), 59% (n=66) were also co-prescribed antiplatelet agents. Side effects (mainly local bruising at the injection site) were reported in 12% (n=13) of the cases. A large proportion of pregnant women in the Arabian Gulf countries have ≥1 VTE risk factor with even a smaller fraction on prophylaxis. VTE risk assessment must be adopted to identify those at risk who would need VTE prophylaxis.

  18. Benchmark for time in therapeutic range in venous thromboembolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra M G Erkens

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The percentage of time within the target INR range 2.0 to 3.0 (TTR in patients treated with vitamin K antagonists varies considerably among efficacy-studies of novel anticoagulants. In order to properly asses the quality of anticoagulant control in upcoming cost-effectiveness studies and real life registries this systematic review reports a benchmark of TTR for different treatment durations in patients with venous thromboembolism and discusses ways to calculate TTR. METHODS: Medline and Embase were searched for studies published between January 1990 and May 2012. Randomized controlled trials and cohort studies reporting the TTR in patients with objectively confirmed venous thromboembolism treated with vitamin K antagonists (VKA were eligible. Duplicate reports, studies only reporting INR during initial treatment or with VKA treatment less than 3 months were excluded. Three authors assessed trials for inclusion and extracted data independently. Discrepancies were resolved by discussion between the reviewers. A meta-analysis was performed by calculating a weighted mean, based on the number of participants in each included study, for each time-period in which the TTR was measured since the confirmation of the diagnosis of VTE. RESULTS: Forty studies were included (26064 patients. The weighted means of TTR were 54.0% in the first month since the start of treatment, 55.6% in months 1 to 3, 60.0% in months 2 to 3, 60.0% in the months 1 to 6+ and 75.2% in months 4 to 12+. Five studies reported TTR in classes. The INR in these studies was ≥ 67% of time in therapeutic range in 72.0% of the patients. CONCLUSION: Reported quality of VKA treatment is highly dependent on the time-period since the start of treatment, with TTR ranging from approximately 56% in studies including the 1(st month to 75% in studies excluding the first 3 months.

  19. Spinal anesthesia increases the risk of venous thromboembolism in total arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Mashio; Kamei, Masataka; Bito, Seiji; Migita, Kiyoshi; Miyata, Shigeki; Kumagai, Kenji; Abe, Isao; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Nakayama, Yuichiro; Saito, Masanobu; Tanaka, Takaaki; Motokawa, Satoru

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Clinical guidance on the choice of anesthetic modality vis-à-vis the risk of perioperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) is largely lacking because of a paucity of recent evidence. A comparative effect of general anesthesia and neuraxial blockade on the perioperative incidence of VTE has not been well-investigated. We compared the effects of different types of anesthetic modalities on the risk of VTE after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This is a secondary analysis of the Japanese Study of Prevention and Actual Situation of Venous Thromboembolism after Total Arthroplasty (J-PSVT). Data pertaining to a total of 2162 patients who underwent THA and TKA at 34 hospitals were included in this analysis. We compared the different anesthetic modalities with respect to the incidence of VTE. The composite end-point was asymptomatic/symptomatic deep vein thrombosis detected using scheduled bilateral ultrasonography up to postoperative day (POD) 10 and fatal/non-fatal pulmonary embolism up to POD 10. The study groups were as follows: general anesthesia (n = 646), combined epidural/general anesthesia (n = 1004), epidural anesthesia (n = 87), and spinal anesthesia (n = 425). On multivariate analysis, only spinal anesthesia was associated with a significant increase in the risk of VTE as compared with that associated with general anesthesia. Propensity score-matched analysis for “combined epidural/general anesthesia group” versus “spinal anesthesia group” demonstrated a 48% higher incidence of VTE (relative risk = 1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18–1.85) in the latter. Spinal anesthesia was associated with a higher risk of postoperative VTE, as compared with that associated with combined epidural/general anesthesia, in patients undergoing total arthroplasty. PMID:28471968

  20. Effective management of venous thromboembolism in the community: non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Raj Patel Department of Haematological Medicine, King's Thrombosis Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Anticoagulation therapy is essential for the effective treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE. For many years, anticoagulation for acute VTE was limited to the use of initial parenteral heparin, overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist. Although highly effective, this regimen has several limitations and is particularly challenging when given in an ambulatory setting. Current treatment pathways for most patients with deep-vein thrombosis typically involve initial hospital or community-based ambulatory care with subsequent follow-up in a secondary care setting. With the introduction of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs into routine clinical practice, it is now possible for the initial acute management of patients with deep-vein thrombosis to be undertaken by primary care. As hospital admissions associated with VTE become shorter, primary care will play an increasingly important role in the long-term management of these patients. Although the NOACs can potentially simplify patient management and improve clinical outcomes, primary care physicians may be less familiar with these new treatments compared with traditional therapy. To assist primary care physicians in further understanding the role of the NOACs, this article outlines the main differences between NOACs and traditional anticoagulation therapy and discusses the benefit–risk profile of the different NOACs in the treatment and secondary prevention of recurrent VTE. Key considerations for the use of NOACs in the primary care setting are highlighted, including dose transition, risk assessment and follow-up, duration of anticoagulant therapy, how to minimize bleeding risks, and the importance of patient education and counseling. Keywords: venous thromboembolism, oral anticoagulant, prevention, treatment, primary

  1. 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population with 18,791 participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Jacobsen, Peter; Benn, Marianne; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A

    2013-01-01

    thromboembolism. Corresponding risk increases in an age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and cancer adjusted model was 26%(5%-51%), and in a multivariable adjusted model further including physical activity, hormone replacement therapy, menopausal status, oral contraception use, and lipid lowering therapy 28....... OBJECTIVES: We tested the hypothesis that reduced plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations associate with increased risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population. METHODS: We prospectively studied 18,791 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study and the Copenhagen General Population Study...

  2. The Use of Surgical Care Improvement Projects in Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erem, Hasan Hakan; Aytac, Erman

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a potentially mortal complication in patients undergoing surgery. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism can be seen up to 40 % of patients who have no or inappropriate VTE prophylaxis during perioperative period.In addition to the preoperative and intraoperative preventive measures, the standardization of postoperative care and follow-up are essential to reduce VTE risk. Modern healthcare prioritizes patient's safety and aims to reduce postoperative morbidity by using standardized protocols. Use of quality improvement projects with well-organized surgical care has an important role to prevent VTE during hospital stay. Present surgical care improvement projects have provided us the opportunity to identify patients who are vulnerable to VTE. Description and introduction of the quality standards for VTE prevention in the educational materials, meetings and at the medical schools will increase the VTE awareness among the health care providers. You are going to find the characteristics of the major surgical quality improvement projects and their relations with VTE in the chapter.

  3. Venous Thromboembolism after Allogeneic Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Single-Center Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Azık

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Venous thromboembolism (VTE in children who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT has high morbidity. The aim of this study is to assess the incidence of VTE in allogeneic pediatric HSCT recipients and the contribution of pretransplant prothrombotic risk factors to thrombosis. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 92 patients between April 2010 and November 2012 undergoing allogeneic HSCT who had completed 100 days post-HSCT. Before HSCT, coagulation profiles; acquired and inherited prothrombotic risk factors including FV G1691A (factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T, and MTHFR A1298C mutations; and serum homocysteine and lipoprotein (a, plasma antithrombin III, protein C, and protein S levels were obtained from all patients. Results: In the screening of thrombophilia, 8 patients (9% were heterozygous for factor V Leiden, 5 (6% were homozygous for MTHFR 677TT, 12 (14% were homozygous for MTHFR 1298CC, and 2 (2% were heterozygous for prothrombin G20210A mutation. We observed VTE in 5 patients (5.4%; a prothrombotic risk factor was found in 3 out of these 5 patients, while 4 out of 5 patients had central venous catheters. It was determined there was no significant relationship between VTE and inherited prothrombotic risk factors. Conclusion: VTE after HSCT seems to be a low-frequency event that may be due to low-dose, low-molecular-weight heparin prophylaxis, and the role of inherited prothrombotic risk factors cannot be entirely excluded without a prospective study.

  4. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in commercial airline pilots: a cohort study of 2630 pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, S; Venemans-Jellema, A; Cannegieter, S C; van Haften, M; Middeldorp, S; Büller, H R; Rosendaal, F R

    2014-08-01

    Airline pilots may be at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) because air travel has recently been established as a risk factor for VTE. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of VTE in a cohort of Dutch airline pilots. Airline pilots who had been active members of the Dutch aviation society (VNV) were questioned for the occurrence of VTE, presence of risk factors for VTE and number of flight hours per year and rank. Incidence rates among pilots were compared with those of the general Dutch population and with a population of frequently flying employees of multinational organizations. A total of 2630 male pilots were followed-up for a total of 20420 person-years (py). Six venous thromboses were reported, yielding an incidence rate of 0.3 per 1000 py. The standardized morbidity ratio, comparing these pilots with the general Dutch population adjusted for age, was 0.8. Compared with the international employee cohort, the standardized morbidity ratio was 0.7 when all employees were included and 0.6 when only the frequently travelling employees were included. The incidence rate did not increase with number of flight hours per year and did not clearly vary by rank. We conclude that the risk of VTE is not increased amongst airline pilots. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  5. Low molecular weight heparin for prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients with lower-leg immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testroote, Mark; Stigter, Willem; de Visser, Dianne C; Janzing, Heinrich

    2008-10-08

    Immobilization of the lower leg is associated with venous thromboembolism. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is an anticoagulant treatment which might be used in adult patients with lower-leg immobilization to prevent deep venous thrombosis and its complications. To investigate the current literature on thromboprophylactic practice for patients with lower-limb injuries who are immobilized in plaster casts or braces, to assess the need for concrete guidelines, and to assess whether it is possible to come to an evidence-based conclusion. The Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Disease Group searched their Specialized Register (last searched 20 May 2008) and the Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (last searched The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 2). We searched MEDLINE (until May 2008) and EMBASE (until May 2008) and reference lists of articles. We contacted pharmaceutical companies of LMWHs for relevant studies. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) that described thromboprophylaxis by means of LMWH compared with no prophylaxis or placebo in adult patients with lower-leg immobilization. Immobilization was by means of a plaster cast or brace. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. The review authors contacted the trial authors for additional information if required. Statistical analysis was carried out using Review Manager (RevMan 5). We included six RCTs fulfilling the above criteria with a total of 1490 patients. We found an incidence of venous thromboembolism ranging from 4.3% to 40%, in patients who had a leg injury that had been immobilized in a plaster cast or a brace for at least one week and who received no prophylaxis, or placebo. This number was significantly lower in patients who received daily subcutaneous injections of LMWH during immobilization (event rates ranging from 0% to 37%; odds ratio (OR) 0.49; fixed 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34 to 0.72; with minimal evidence of

  6. A Clinical Tool for the Prediction of Venous Thromboembolism in Pediatric Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Christopher R; Laird, Amy; Barton, Jeffrey S; Fischer, Peter E; Krishnaswami, Sanjay; Schreiber, Martin A; Zonies, David H; Watters, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    Although rare, the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pediatric trauma patients is increasing, and the consequences of VTE in children are significant. Studies have demonstrated increasing VTE risk in older pediatric trauma patients and improved VTE rates with institutional interventions. While national evidence-based guidelines for VTE screening and prevention are in place for adults, none exist for pediatric patients, to our knowledge. To develop a risk prediction calculator for VTE in children admitted to the hospital after traumatic injury to assist efforts in developing screening and prophylaxis guidelines for this population. Retrospective review of 536,423 pediatric patients 0 to 17 years old using the National Trauma Data Bank from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2012. Five mixed-effects logistic regression models of varying complexity were fit on a training data set. Model validity was determined by comparison of the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) for the training and validation data sets from the original model fit. A clinical tool to predict the risk of VTE based on individual patient clinical characteristics was developed from the optimal model. Diagnosis of VTE during hospital admission. Venous thromboembolism was diagnosed in 1141 of 536,423 children (overall rate, 0.2%). The AUROCs in the training data set were high (range, 0.873-0.946) for each model, with minimal AUROC attenuation in the validation data set. A prediction tool was developed from a model that achieved a balance of high performance (AUROCs, 0.945 and 0.932 in the training and validation data sets, respectively; P = .048) and parsimony. Points are assigned to each variable considered (Glasgow Coma Scale score, age, sex, intensive care unit admission, intubation, transfusion of blood products, central venous catheter placement, presence of pelvic or lower extremity fractures, and major surgery), and the points total is converted to a VTE

  7. Increased risk of venous thromboembolism associated with polymyositis and dermatomyositis: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Yanqing Li,1 Peihong Wang,2 Lei Li,3 Fei Wang,4 Yuxiu Liu5 1Department of Pharmacy Intravenous Admixture Services, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, 2Department of Interventional Oncology, Weifang Tumor Hospital, Weifang, 3Department of Gastroenterology, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, 4Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, 5School of Nursing, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, People’s Republic of China Objective: Polymyositis and dermatomyositis (PM/DM have been implicated in the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE. Previous studies investigating the association between PM/DM and VTE risk had yielded inconsistent findings. The aim of this study was to precisely estimate this association by meta-analysis of all available publications.Methods: Two investigators independently performed a comprehensive literature search in databases of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library for eligible studies. The strength for the association was weighed by pooled odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs. Stratified analysis and sensitivity analysis were performed for further analysis.Results: Six studies including 9,045 patients with PM/DM were analyzed. The pooled OR suggested that inflammatory myositis was associated with increased risk of VTE (OR =4.31, 95% CI: 2.55–7.29, P<0.001. Besides, significantly elevated risk of VTE was related with PM and DM, respectively (for PM: OR =6.87, 95% CI: 4.12–11.46, P<0.001; for DM: OR =11.59, 95% CI: 6.54–20.55, P<0.001. In addition, inflammatory myositis could increase the risk of DVT (OR =4.85, 95% CI: 1.38–17.12, P<0.05 and PE (OR =4.74, 95% CI: 2.18–10.30, P<0.05. Sensitivity analysis did not materially alter the pooled results.Conclusion: Our study shows strong evidence that patients with inflammatory myositis have an increased risk of VTE. Keywords: polymyositis

  8. Potential role of new anticoagulants for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Outes A

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Gómez-Outes,1 M Luisa Suárez-Gea,1 Ramón Lecumberri,2 Ana Isabel Terleira-Fernández,3,4 Emilio Vargas-Castrillón,3,4 Eduardo Rocha51Division of Pharmacology and Clinical Evaluation, Medicines for Human Use, Spanish Agency for Medicines and Medical Devices, Madrid, 2Department of Hematology, University Clinic of Navarra, Pamplona, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Hospital Clínico, Madrid, 4Department of Pharmacology, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, 5Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Pamplona, SpainAbstract: Venous thromboembolism (VTE, encompassing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. Low molecular weight heparins are the preferred option for anticoagulation in cancer patients according to current clinical practice guidelines. Fondaparinux may also have a place in prevention of VTE in hospitalized cancer patients with additional risk factors and for initial treatment of VTE. Although low molecular weight heparins and fondaparinux are effective and safe, they require daily subcutaneous administration, which may be problematic for many patients, particularly if long-term treatment is needed. Studying anticoagulant therapy in oncology patients is challenging because this patient group has an increased risk of VTE and bleeding during anticoagulant therapy compared with the population without cancer. Risk factors for increased VTE and bleeding risk in these patients include concomitant treatments (surgery, chemotherapy, placement of central venous catheters, radiotherapy, hormonal therapy, angiogenesis inhibitors, antiplatelet drugs, supportive therapies (ie, steroids, blood transfusion, white blood cell growth factors, and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and tumor-related factors (local vessel damage and invasion, abnormalities in platelet function, and number. New anticoagulants in development for prophylaxis

  9. Role of Physical Therapists in the Management of Individuals at Risk for or Diagnosed With Venous Thromboembolism: Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hillegass, Ellen; Puthoff, Michael; Frese, Ethel M; Thigpen, Mary; Sobush, Dennis C; Auten, Beth

    2016-01-01

    ... & Pulmonary and Acute Care sections of APTA, have developed this clinical practice guideline to assist physical therapists in their decision-making process when treating patients at risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE...

  10. Dose reduction of edoxaban preserves efficacy and safety for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. An analysis of the randomised, double-blind HOKUSAI VTE trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Philip S.; Segers, Annelise; Ageno, Walter; Brekelmans, Marjolein P. A.; Cohen, Alexander T.; Meyer, Guy; Grosso, Michael A.; Raskob, Gary; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Zhang, George; Buller, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Direct oral anticoagulants simplify venous thromboembolism (VTE) treatment by obviating the need for coagulation monitoring. Nonetheless, renal function, body weight and P-glycoprotein inhibitors influence drug levels. The objective of this analysis was to determine whether reduction in edoxaban

  11. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in the acute hospital care setting: the Irish results of the ENDORSE study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, O

    2012-05-01

    ENDORSE (Epidemiologic International Day for the Evaluation of Patients at Risk for Venous Thromboembolism in the Acute Hospital Care Setting), is a multinational, cross-sectional survey of venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk prevalence and effective prophylaxis in the acute hospital care setting. Three Irish hospitals enrolled in the study. The American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines were employed to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis. Of 552 patients, 297 (53.8%) and 255 (46.2%) were categorised as surgical or medical, respectively, with 175 (59%) surgical and 109 (43%) medical patients deemed to be at risk for VTE. Of these, only 112 (64%) and 51 (47%) received recommended VTE prophylaxis, respectively. The results are consistent with those observed in other countries and demonstrate a high prevalence of risk for VTE and a low rate of prophylaxis use, particularly in medical patients. Awareness of VTE guidelines should be an integral component of health policy.

  12. Has incentive payment improved venous thrombo-embolism risk assessment and treatment of hospital in-patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Child, Sue; Sheaff, Rod; Boiko, Olga; Bateman, Alice; Gericke, Christian A

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on financial incentives rewarding successful implementation of guidelines in the UK National Health Service (NHS). In particular, it assesses the implementation of National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) venous thrombo-embolism (VTE) guidance in 2010 on the risk assessment and secondary prevention of VTE in hospital in-patients and the financial incentives driving successful implementation introduced by the Commissioning for Quality and Innovation for P...

  13. [Prevention of venous thromboembolic disease in the critical patient: an assessment of clinical practice in the Community of Madrid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Olivares, P; Guerrero, J E; Tomey, M J; Hernangómez, A M; Stanescu, D O

    2014-01-01

    To analyze measures referred to venous thromboembolic prophylaxis in critically ill patients. An epidemiological, cross-sectional (prevalence cut), multicenter study was performed using an electronic survey. Comparison of results with quality indexes of the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the American College of Chest Physician guidelines and international studies. Intensive Care Units (ICUs) in the Community of Madrid (Spain). All patients admitted to the ICU on the day of the survey. General aspects of venous thromboembolic prophylaxis and protocols used (risk stratification and ultrasound screening). A descriptive analysis was performed, continuous data being expressed as the mean or median, and categorical data as percentages. A total of 234 patients in 18 ICUs were included. Eighteen percent (42/234) received no prophylaxis, and 55% had no contraindication to pharmacological prophylaxis. Of the 192 patients receiving prophylaxis, 84% received pharmacological prophylaxis, 14% mechanical prophylaxis and 2% combined prophylaxis. Low molecular weight heparin was the only pharmacological prophylaxis used, with a majority use of enoxaparin (17 of 18 ICUs). In patients with mechanical prophylaxis (31/192), antiembolic stockings were the most commonly used option (58%). Pharmacological prophylaxis contraindications were reported in 20% of the patients (46/234), the most frequent cause being thrombocytopenia (28% of the cases). Fifty percent of the ICUs used no specific venous thromboembolic prophylaxis protocol. Pharmacological prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin was the most frequently used venous thromboembolic prophylactic measure. In patients with contraindications to pharmacological prophylaxis, mechanical measures were little used. The use of combined prophylaxis was anecdotal. Many of our ICUs lack specific prophylaxis protocols. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  14. Predictors and Causes of Long-Term Mortality in Elderly Patients with Acute Venous Thromboembolism: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Nicolas; Limacher, Andreas; Méan, Marie; Righini, Marc; Aschwanden, Markus; Beer, Jürg Hans; Frauchiger, Beat; Osterwalder, Josef; Kucher, Nils; Lämmle, Bernhard; Cornuz, Jacques; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Matter, Christian M; Husmann, Marc; Banyai, Martin; Staub, Daniel; Mazzolai, Lucia; Hugli, Olivier; Rodondi, Nicolas; Aujesky, Drahomir

    2017-02-01

    Long-term predictors and causes of death are understudied in elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism. We prospectively followed up 991 patients aged ≥65 years with acute venous thromboembolism in a multicenter Swiss cohort study. The primary outcome was overall mortality. We explored the association between patient baseline characteristics and mortality, adjusting for other baseline variables and periods of anticoagulation as a time-varying covariate. Causes of death over time were adjudicated by a blinded, independent committee. The median age was 75 years. During a median follow-up period of 30 months, 206 patients (21%) died. Independent predictors of overall mortality were age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.65, per decade), active cancer (HR, 5.80; 95% CI, 4.22-7.97), systolic blood pressure low physical activity level (HR, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.38-2.66), polypharmacy (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.01-1.96), anemia (HR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.07-2.05), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein >40 mg/L (HR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.36-2.60), ultra-sensitive troponin >14 pg/mL (HR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.06-2.25), and D-dimer >3000 ng/mL (HR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.04-2.01). Cancer (34%), pulmonary embolism (18%), infection (17%), and bleeding (6%) were the most common causes of death. Elderly patients with acute venous thromboembolism have a substantial long-term mortality, and several factors, including polypharmacy and a low physical activity level, are associated with long-term mortality. Cancer, pulmonary embolism, infections, and bleeding are the most common causes of death in the elderly with venous thromboembolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A decision model to estimate a risk threshold for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in hospitalized medical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, P; Martinez, K A; Pappas, M A; Rothberg, M B

    2017-06-01

    Essentials Low risk patients don't require venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis; low risk is unquantified. We used a Markov model to estimate the risk threshold for VTE prophylaxis in medical inpatients. Prophylaxis was cost-effective for an average medical patient with a VTE risk of ≥ 1.0%. VTE prophylaxis can be personalized based on patient risk and age/life expectancy. Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common preventable condition in medical inpatients. Thromboprophylaxis is recommended for inpatients who are not at low risk of VTE, but no specific risk threshold for prophylaxis has been defined. Objective To determine a threshold for prophylaxis based on risk of VTE. Patients/Methods We constructed a decision model with a decision-tree following patients for 3 months after hospitalization, and a lifetime Markov model with 3-month cycles. The model tracked symptomatic deep vein thromboses and pulmonary emboli, bleeding events and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. Long-term complications included recurrent VTE, post-thrombotic syndrome and pulmonary hypertension. For the base case, we considered medical inpatients aged 66 years, having a life expectancy of 13.5 years, VTE risk of 1.4% and bleeding risk of 2.7%. Patients received enoxaparin 40 mg day-1 for prophylaxis. Results Assuming a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $100 000/ quality-adjusted life year (QALY), prophylaxis was indicated for an average medical inpatient with a VTE risk of ≥ 1.0% up to 3 months after hospitalization. For the average patient, prophylaxis was not indicated when the bleeding risk was > 8.1%, the patient's age was > 73.4 years or the cost of enoxaparin exceeded $60/dose. If VTE risk was 19%, the risks of prophylaxis outweighed benefits. The prophylaxis threshold was relatively insensitive to low-molecular-weight heparin cost and bleeding risk, but very sensitive to patient age and life expectancy. Conclusions The decision to offer prophylaxis should be

  16. "Post-thrombotic panic syndrome": A thematic analysis of the experience of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Rachael; Lewis, Sarah; Noble, Simon; Rance, Jaynie; Bennett, Paul D

    2017-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE, including deep vein thrombosis [DVT] and pulmonary embolism [PE]) is a serious, potentially traumatic, life-threatening condition and a major cause of mortality and morbidity. The aim of this study was to explore the patients' experiences of VTE and its psychosocial impact. Audio-recorded semistructured interviews with a purposive sample of 12 participants who had experienced a first-time DVT or PE within the previous 6 months. Interviews were transcribed and thematically analysed. Four key themes with 10 subthemes were identified. The major themes were as follows: VTE as life-changing and traumatic, living with uncertainty and fear of reoccurrence, feeling let down by health services, and positive changes and outcomes. The content of themes varied according to age at the time of VTE and participants' experiences of diagnosis and treatment. The data demonstrate the psychosocial impact of VTE as life-changing, encompassing a dynamic duality of trauma and growth. The findings highlight a potential role for health care professionals in identifying and supporting individuals at risk of post-traumatic stress, and targeted interventions to enhance psychological well-being and recovery and reduce distress. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is often characterized by sudden onset and may carry a significant threat to life, particularly in the form of pulmonary embolism. Early studies suggest that health-related quality of life is negatively affected by VTE and there is likely to be a high prevalence of trauma. What does this study add? This study explores for the first time the experience of, and reactions to, VTE in the 6 months following its occurrence. It explores the role that psychological well-being can play in recovery after VTE. This study highlights that improvements are needed to support VTE patients to cope with the emotional impact of VTE. A dual process of trauma and post

  17. Risk stratification for venous thromboembolism in patients with testicular germ cell tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika Bezan

    Full Text Available Patients with testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT have an increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE. We identified risk factors for VTE in this patient cohort and developed a clinical risk model.In this retrospective cohort study at the Medical University of Graz we included 657 consecutive TGCT patients across all clinical stages. A predictive model for VTE was developed and externally validated in 349 TGCT patients treated at the University Hospital Zurich.Venous thromboembolic events occurred in 34 (5.2% patients in the Graz cohort. In univariable competing risk analysis, higher clinical stage (cS and a retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy (RPLN were the strongest predictors of VTE (p<0.0001. As the presence of a RPLN with more than 5cm in greatest dimension without coexisting visceral metastases is classified as cS IIC, we constructed an empirical VTE risk model with the following four categories (12-month-cumulative incidence: cS IA-B 8/463 patients (1.7%, cS IS-IIB 5/86 patients (5.9%, cS IIC 3/21 patients (14.3% and cS IIIA-C 15/70 patients (21.4%. This risk model was externally validated in the Zurich cohort (12-month-cumulative incidence: cS IA-B (0.5%, cS IS-IIB (6.0%, cS IIC (11.1% and cS IIIA-C (19.1%. Our model had a significantly higher discriminatory performance than a previously published classifier (RPLN-VTE-risk-classifier which is based on the size of RPLN alone (AUC-ROC: 0.75 vs. 0.63, p = 0.007.According to our risk stratification, TGCT patients with cS IIC and cS III disease have a very high risk of VTE and may benefit from primary thromboprophylaxis for the duration of chemotherapy.

  18. The ABO blood group genotype and factor VIII levels as independent risk factors for venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado, Isabel; Mateo, José; Soria, José Manuel; Oliver, Arturo; Martínez-Sánchez, Elisabeth; Vallvé, Cristina; Borrell, Monserrat; Urrutia, Teresa; Fontcuberta, Jordi

    2005-03-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII), von Willebrand factor (vWF) and the ABO blood groups have been associated with thrombosis. The ABO locus has functional effects on vWF and FVIII levels and is genetically correlated with FVIII, vWF and thrombosis. We carried out a case-control study to assess the role of FVIII, vWF and ABO types on thrombotic risk. We analyzed 250 patients with venous thrombosis and 250 unrelated controls. FVIII, vWF and other factors related to thrombophilia were measured, ABO groups were analyzed by genotyping. FVIII and vWF were higher in non-O individuals. Group O was more frequent in the controls (44.3% v 23.3%; difference 21.1%; 95% CI: 13.0-29.3%) and Group A in patients (59.2% v. 41.5%; difference 17.7%, 95% CI: 9.1-26.4%). Individuals carrying the A1 allele had a higher risk of thrombosis (OR 2.6; 95% CI, 1.8-3.8). The risk attributed to vWF disappeared after adjusting for the ABO group. Patients with FVIII above the 90th percentile had a high thrombotic risk (adjusted OR 3.7; 95% CI, 2.1-6.5), and a high risk of recurrence (OR 2.3; 95% CI: 1.3-4.1). In conclusion, high FVIII levels and non-O blood groups, likely those with the A1 allele, are independent risk factors for venous thromboembolism and should be considered in evaluating of thrombophilia.

  19. Comparing Length of Stay Between Patients Taking Rivaroxaban and Conventional Anticoagulants for Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Anish; Desai, Amishi; Calixte, Rose; Aparnath, Malaygiri; Hindenburg, Alexander; Salzman, Steve; Mathew, Joseph P

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated non-inferiority of rivaroxaban when compared to warfarin for the treatment of pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis. Analysis of data from the EINSTEIN trials has demonstrated that patients who received rivaroxaban had a shorter length of stay (LOS) compared to those who received warfarin. However, these trials had strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, and were designed for a different primary outcome. Also, data from these closely monitored clinical trials may not reflect the daily practice of medicine. To clarify this issue further, we performed a retrospective analysis at our institution, comparing the LOS between patients discharged on rivaroxaban and other conventional anticoagulants (warfarin, enoxaparin, and enoxaparin with warfarin). This was a retrospective study of consecutive patients admitted to our institution from January 2011 to July 2014 with newly diagnosed venous thromboembolism (VTE). Inclusion criteria were age > 18 years and objective confirmation of VTE. Exclusion criteria included diagnosis of VTE 24 h after admission, contraindication to anticoagulation, treatment with fibrinolytic agents, patients already on anticoagulation, and pregnancy. Out of 1553 consecutive patients diagnosed with VTE, a total of 414 patients met the eligibility criteria. These patients were further subdivided into four groups based on their discharge anticoagulant: rivaroxaban, warfarin, enoxaparin, and warfarin with enoxaparin. Patients discharged on rivaroxaban had a significantly shorter LOS compared with patients discharged on warfarin (3.5 vs. 7.0 days; p  0.05). The hospital incidence of bleeding and the 6-month readmission rates were not different among the different anticoagulants. In patients admitted with newly diagnosed VTE, those discharged on rivaroxaban had a significantly shorter LOS compared to those discharged on warfarin. In the appropriate subset of patients with VTE, treatment with rivaroxaban may

  20. Immune function of peripheral T cells in patients with venous thromboembolism or coronary artery atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lin; Song, Haoming; Xu, Wenjun; Xu, Jiahong; Jiang, Jinfa; Gong, Zhu; Liu, Yang; Yan, Wenwen; Wang, Lemin

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that the major risk factors for arterial thrombotic diseases are closely associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE). This study aimed to investigate the expression of CD3, CD4 and CD8 in T lymphocytes, the CD4/CD8 ratio and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in patients with VTE, coronary artery atherosclerosis (CAA) and healthy subjects. A total of 82 healthy subjects, 51 VTE patients and 114 CAA patients were recruited, and the expression of CD3, CD4 and CD8 in T lymphocytes and the CD4/CD8 ratio were determined. Serum hs-CRP was also measured. Compared to healthy subjects, VTE patients had significantly reduced CD3 expression (p=0.019), comparable CD4 expression (p=0.868), significantly reduced CD8 expression (p<0.001) and increased CD4/CD8 ratio (p=0.044). However, VTE patients had comparable expression of CD3, CD4 and CD8 and CD4/CD8 ratio to CAA patients. In addition, among patients with VTE or CAA, the proportion of patients with reduced CD3+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes or increased CD4/CD8 ratio was significantly higher than in healthy subjects. In addition, hs-CRP in both VTE and CAA groups was significantly higher than in healthy subjects. The antigen recognition and signal transduction activation of T cells is significantly reduced in patients with VTE or CAA, and the killing effect of T cells on pathogens, including viruses, is also significantly compromised. In addition, inflammatory and immune mechanisms are involved in the occurrence and development of venous and arterial thrombosis. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk of venous thromboembolism from use of oral contraceptives containing different progestogens and oestrogen doses: Danish cohort study, 2001-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Nielsen, Lars Hougaard; Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel; Skjeldestad, Finn Egil; Løkkegaard, Ellen

    2011-10-25

    To assess the risk of venous thromboembolism from use of combined oral contraceptives according to progestogen type and oestrogen dose. National historical registry based cohort study. Four registries in Denmark. Non-pregnant Danish women aged 15-49 with no history of thrombotic disease and followed from January 2001 to December 2009. Relative and absolute risks of first time venous thromboembolism. Within 8,010,290 women years of observation, 4307 first ever venous thromboembolic events were recorded and 4246 included, among which 2847 (67%) events were confirmed as certain. Compared with non-users of hormonal contraception, the relative risk of confirmed venous thromboembolism in users of oral contraceptives containing 30-40 µg ethinylestradiol with levonorgestrel was 2.9 (95% confidence interval 2.2 to 3.8), with desogestrel was 6.6 (5.6 to 7.8), with gestodene was 6.2 (5.6 to 7.0), and with drospirenone was 6.4 (5.4 to 7.5). With users of oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel as reference and after adjusting for length of use, the rate ratio of confirmed venous thromboembolism for users of oral contraceptives with desogestrel was 2.2 (1.7 to 3.0), with gestodene was 2.1 (1.6 to 2.8), and with drospirenone was 2.1 (1.6 to 2.8). The risk of confirmed venous thromboembolism was not increased with use of progestogen only pills or hormone releasing intrauterine devices. If oral contraceptives with desogestrel, gestodene, or drospirenone are anticipated to increase the risk of venous thromboembolism sixfold and those with levonorgestrel threefold, and the absolute risk of venous thromboembolism in current users of the former group is on average 10 per 10,000 women years, then 2000 women would need to shift from using oral contraceptives with desogestrel, gestodene, or drospirenone to those with levonorgestrel to prevent one event of venous thromboembolism in one year. After adjustment for length of use, users of oral contraceptives with desogestrel, gestodene, or

  2. Thrombin Generation Assay in Hospitalized Nonsurgical Patients: A New Tool to Assess Venous Thromboembolism Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espitia, Olivier; Fouassier, Marc; Hardouin, Jean-Benoît; Pistorius, Marc-Antoine; Agard, Christian; Planchon, Bernard; Trossaert, Marc; Pottier, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk is important to determine optimal primary prophylaxis in hospitalized patients. The Padua score helps to recognize patients with high VTE risk, but quantifying a VTE risk is often challenging in medical patients. Thrombin generation assay (TGA) reflects the pro-/anticoagulant balance and thus could help to better quantify VTE risk in medical hospitalized patients. To analyze the relation between TGA and VTE risk according to Padua score in medical hospitalized patients. Between May and October 2013, 105 patients were included in an unselected cohort group of patients admitted to an internal medicine department in a large, university hospital. Within the 36 hours after admission and before any anticoagulant therapy, Padua score was calculated and sample for TGA was collected for each patient. Thrombin generation assay (velocity, peak, and endogenous thrombin potential [ETP]) was performed with 1 and 5 picomol/l (pM) tissue factor (TF) reagent. In patients with high Padua score (n = 29), velocity, peak, and ETP differed from patients with low Padua score. This difference was present at 1 and 5 pM TF, in ETP (P older age, higher body mass index, myocardial infarction, C-reactive protein >5 mg/L, reduced mobility with bed rest significantly increased velocity 1 pM TF value. Single thrombin generation measurement could help to identify patients at risk of VTE in medical hospitalized patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Venous Thromboembolism – Risk Assessment Tool and Thromboprophylaxis Policy: A National Survey

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, MI

    2017-01-01

    Venous Thromboembolic (VTE) events in hospitalised patients are associated with significant mortality and morbidity and a major economic burden on the health service. It is well established in the literature that active implementation of a mandatory risk assessment tool and thromboprophylaxis policy reduces the incidence of hospital associated thrombosis (HAT). This study examines the utilization of a VTE risk assessment tool and thromboprophylaxis (TP) policy in Irish hospitals that manage acute admissions. A national survey was distributed to forty acute hospitals throughout Ireland. The response rate was 78% (31\\/40). The results showed that only 26% (n=8\\/31) of acute hospitals in Ireland have a local implemented TP policy. Six (75%) of these eight had a risk assessment tool in conjunction with the TP policy. All respondents who did not report to have a TP policy and risk assessment tool agreed that they should implement VTE prevention policy at their hospital. Based on the data from this survey and evidence from the effectiveness of the VTE prevention programme introduced in the United Kingdom, there is a need for a national risk assessment and thromboprophylaxis policy in Ireland. This change in practice would have the potential to prevent or reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with hospital acquired thrombosis

  4. Do pregnant women have a higher risk for venous thromboembolism following air travel?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Izadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available International travel has become increasingly common and accessible, and it is part of everyday life in pregnant women. Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a serious public health disorder that occurs following long-haul travel, especially after air travel. The normal pregnancy is accompanied by a state of hypercoagulability and hypofibrinolysis. Thus, it seems that pregnant women are at a higher risk of VTE following air travel, and, if they have preexisting risk factors, this risk would increase. There is limited data about travel-related VTE in pregnant women; therefore, in the present study, we tried to evaluate the pathogenesis of thrombosis, association of thrombosis and air travel, risk factors and prevention of VTE in pregnant women based on available evidences. Pregnancy is associated with a five- to 10-fold increased risk of VTE compared with nonpregnant women; however, during the postpartum period, this risk would increase to 20-80-fold. Furthermore, the risk of thrombosis is higher in individuals with preexisting risk factors, and the most common risk factor for VTE during pregnancy is a previous history of VTE. Pregnant women are at a higher risk for thrombosis compared with other women. Thus, the prevention of VTE and additional risk factors should be considered for all pregnant women who travel by plane.

  5. [Risk of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients: Reality, actuality and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerotziafas, Grigoris T; Elalamy, Ismail

    2016-09-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and vice versa. Pulmonary embolism is the second cause of death in cancer patients. Tumor progression is associated with coagulation activation. The pathogenesis of thrombosis during cancer is particularly complex stemming from multiple connections of this disease with both systems of inflammation and hemostasis. The risk of VTE depends on cancer type and the stage of the disease, the anticancer treatments and the time since cancer diagnosis as well as on the presence of patient-related risk factors (i.e. age, obesity, previous history of VTE, underlying diseases…). The presence of other precipitating factors and the duration of the exposure to them are also key elements in the assessment of such a thrombotic risk. It is therefore important to identify all the VTE risk factors to identify patients at high vascular risk and to determine the period during which this risk is significantly increased. The integration of biomarkers of hypercoagulability in proposed risk assessment models for VTE will improve their capacity to identify patients eligible for pharmacological thromboprophylaxis. In this review, we report the current status of knowledge on the connection between cancer and hypercoagulability, the numerous risk factors for VTE must be identified in cancer patients and the best methodology to build a more accurate assessment of this vascular risk in such a complex medical context. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. Onset of Coagulation Function Recovery Is Delayed in Severely Injured Trauma Patients with Venous Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, Belinda H; Connelly, Christopher R; Fair, Kelly A; Holcomb, John B; Fox, Erin E; Wade, Charles E; Bulger, Eileen M; Schreiber, Martin A

    2017-07-01

    Altered coagulation function after trauma can contribute to development of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Severe trauma impairs coagulation function, but the trajectory for recovery is not known. We hypothesized that enhanced, early recovery of coagulation function increases VTE risk in severely injured trauma patients. Secondary analysis was performed on data from the Pragmatic Randomized Optimal Platelet and Plasma Ratio (PROPPR) trial, excluding patients who died within 24 hours or were on pre-injury anticoagulants. Patient characteristics, adverse outcomes, and parameters of platelet function and coagulation (thromboelastography) were compared from admission to 72 hours between VTE (n = 83) and non-VTE (n = 475) patients. A p value coagulation recovery (a significant change compared with 2 hours) of K-value (48 vs 24 hours), α-angle (no recovery), maximum amplitude (24 vs 12 hours), and clot lysis at 30 minutes (48 vs 12 hours). Platelet function recovery mediated by arachidonic acid (72 vs 4 hours), ADP (72 vs 12 hours), and collagen (48 vs 12 hours) was delayed in VTE patients. The VTE patients had lower mortality (4% vs 13%; p coagulation that can potentiate VTE formation require additional investigation. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Determinants of the elevated factor VIII activity in patients following venous thromboembolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Monika; Kościelniak, Barbara; Bryk, Agata; Undas, Anetta

    2016-01-01

    Activity of factor VIII (FVIII) increased above 150% of reference range predisposes to venous thromboembolism (VTE). The aim of this study was to identify predictors of increased FVIII activity in patients following VTE. 241 (38% men) patients presented due to objectively documented VTE episode at least 3 months ago were included in this study. FVIII activity was measured using a clotting assay on the analyzer BCS XP. Among 241 patients with VTE, activity of FVIII above 150% (FVIII ≥ 150%) was observed in 96 (40%). These patients were older (p = 0.035) and their concentrations of fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP) were higher by 12% and 88% (p 200%) and this group was also older (p = 0.015), more patients in that group had obesity (p = 0.015), idiopathic VTE (p = 0.043), less of them had positive family history (p = 0.010) and they were characterized by fibrinogen and CRP increased by 28% (p 200% (p = 0.016). The activity of FVIII in patients after VTE episode is influenced by age, concentration of fibrinogen, bilirubin, hemoglobin, glucose, CRP and homocysteine. Our results suggest the role of environmental factors, mainly inflammatory response in maintaining elevated FVIII activity following VTE.

  8. The humanistic and economic burden of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourlaba, Georgia; Relakis, John; Mylonas, Charalambos; Kapaki, Vasiliki; Kontodimas, Stathis; Holm, Majbrit V; Maniadakis, Nikos

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to present evidence on the epidemiology, health outcomes and economic burden of cancer-related venous thromboembolism (VTE). Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Econlit, Science Direct, JSTOR, Oxford Journals and Cambridge Journals were searched. The systematic literature search was limited to manuscripts published from January 2000 to December 2012. On the basis of the literature, cancer patients experience between two-fold and 20-fold higher risk of developing VTE than noncancer patients. They are more likely to experience a VTE event during the first 3-6 months after cancer diagnosis. In addition, an increased risk of VTE in patients with distant metastases and certain types of cancer (i.e. pancreatic or lung) was revealed. VTE was found to be a leading cause of mortality in cancer patients. The annual average total cost for cancer patients with VTE was found to be almost 50% higher than that of cancer patients without VTE. Inpatient care costs accounted for more than 60% of total cost. The existing evidence assessed in the present review demonstrated the significant health and economic consequences of cancer-related VTE, which make a strong case for the importance of its proper and efficient prevention and management.

  9. Venous Thromboembolism - Risk Assessment Tool and Thromboprophylaxis Policy: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M I; O'Leary, C; Silvari, V; O'Brien, A; O'Connor, M; Duggan, C; O'Shea, S

    2017-01-11

    Venous Thromboembolic (VTE) events in hospitalised patients are associated with significant mortality and morbidity and a major economic burden on the health service. It is well established in the literature that active implementation of a mandatory risk assessment tool and thromboprophylaxis policy reduces the incidence of hospital associated thrombosis (HAT). This study examines the utilization of a VTE risk assessment tool and thromboprophylaxis (TP) policy in Irish hospitals that manage acute admissions. A national survey was distributed to forty acute hospitals throughout Ireland. The response rate was 78% (31/40). The results showed that only 26% (n=8/31) of acute hospitals in Ireland have a local implemented TP policy. Six (75%) of these eight had a risk assessment tool in conjunction with the TP policy. All respondents who did not report to have a TP policy and risk assessment tool agreed that they should implement VTE prevention policy at their hospital. Based on the data from this survey and evidence from the effectiveness of the VTE prevention programme introduced in the United Kingdom, there is a need for a national risk assessment and thromboprophylaxis policy in Ireland. This change in practice would have the potential to prevent or reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with hospital acquired thrombosis.

  10. Incidence, Characteristics and Management of Venous Thromboembolism in Japan During 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Satoshi; Matsuda, Akimasa; Ogihara, Yoshito; Yamada, Norikazu; Nakamura, Mashio; Mori, Takuya; Hamada, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Takao; Ito, Masaaki

    2018-01-25

    This study aimed to determine the incidence, characteristics and management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in Japan during 2011.Methods and Results:A retrospective study assessed responses to a questionnaire regarding treating newly diagnosed VTE at all admitting hospitals throughout Japan during 2011. More individuals were diagnosed with VTE than ever before, with 16,096 cases of diagnosed pulmonary embolism (PE) and 24,538 cases of diagnosed deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Almost half (47.2%) of the PE patients had a relatively mild condition with no right ventricular overload. Similarly, almost half (43.8%) of the DVT patients had a relatively mild condition with isolated calf thrombus. Most of PE patients were treated by anticoagulation, and fewer were treated using thrombolytic agent or inferior vena cava (IVC) filter. The present study showed a remarkable increase in the incidence of VTE in Japan during 2011. Relatively mild conditions such as non-massive PE and isolated calf DVT were frequently diagnosed. Among PE patients, thrombolytic therapy or IVC filter implantation decreased compared with previous surveys. The appropriate management of isolated calf DVT requires further investigation.

  11. Expression of Tissue Factor in Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma Is Involved in the Development of Venous Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Manabu; Matsumoto, Koji; Gosho, Masahiko; Sakata, Akiko; Hosokawa, Yoshihiko; Tenjimbayashi, Yuri; Katoh, Takashi; Shikama, Ayumi; Komiya, Haruna; Michikami, Hiroo; Tasaka, Nobutaka; Akiyama-Abe, Azusa; Nakao, Sari; Ochi, Hiroyuki; Onuki, Mamiko; Minaguchi, Takeo; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Satoh, Toyomi

    2017-01-01

    Our 2007 study of 32 patients with ovarian cancer reported the possible involvement of tissue factor (TF) in the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE) before treatment, especially in clear cell carcinoma (CCC). This follow-up study further investigated this possibility in a larger cohort. We investigated the intensity of TF expression (ITFE) and other variables for associations with VTE using univariate and multivariate analyses in 128 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer initially treated between November 2004 and December 2010, none of whom had received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Before starting treatment, all patients were ultrasonographically screened for VTE. The ITFE was graded based on immunostaining of surgical specimens. Histological types were serous carcinoma (n = 42), CCC (n = 12), endometrioid carcinoma (n = 15), mucinous carcinoma (n = 53), and undifferentiated carcinoma (n = 6). The prevalence of VTE was significantly higher in CCC (34%) than in non-CCC (17%, P = 0.03). As ITFE increased, the frequencies of CCC and VTE increased significantly (P epithelial ovarian cancer may involve TF expression in cancer tissues.

  12. Risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with celiac disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungprasert, Patompong; Wijarnpreecha, Karn; Tanratana, Pansakorn

    2016-07-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) might be at an increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) due to chronic inflammation and vitamin deficiency. However, epidemiologic studies attempting to investigate this risk have yielded inconsistent results. We conducted this meta-analysis with the aims to better characterize this possible association. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies that reported odds ratio, relative risk, hazard ratio, or standardized incidence ratio comparing the risk of VTE in patients with CD versus participants without CD. Generic inverse variance method of DerSimonian and Laird was used to calculate the pooled risk ratio. Out of 279 potentially relevant articles, four studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. We found a statistically significant increased risk of VTE among patients with CD with the pooled risk ratio of 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.53). The statistical heterogeneity was moderate with an I(2) of 69%. A significantly increased risk of VTE among patients with CD was demonstrated in this meta-analysis. Further studies are required to clarify how this risk should be addressed in clinical practice. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Improving venous thromboembolic disease prophylaxis in medical inpatients: a role for education and audit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, B D

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolic disease (VTED) prophylaxis is a key strategy in reducing preventable deaths in medical inpatients. We assessed compliance with internationally published guidelines for VTED prophylaxis in at-risk medical patients before and 1 month after an educational intervention to enhance compliance with such guidelines. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty patients were assessed on each occasion. Pre-intervention, VTED prophylaxis was prescribed in only 48% of at-risk cases. Compliance was best among patients under stroke services and worst for those under acute medical teams. Patients within specialist units were more likely to be prescribed prophylaxis than those in general wards (75 vs. 53%; p = 0.0019). Post-intervention, overall compliance improved to 63% (p = 0.041 for comparison). There was a significant improvement among general medical teams (48 vs. 75%; p = 0.001), and in general wards (52 vs. 74%; p = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Thromboprophylaxis is under-prescribed in medical inpatients, but compliance with international guidelines can be significantly enhanced with targeted educational intervention.

  14. Clinical and economic analysis of the use of apixaban for the treatment of venous thromboembolic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Shatalova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Pharmacoeconomic analysis of apixaban use compared to conventional therapy in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE.Material and methods. Economic evaluation was performed from a position of the health care system. The cost analysis, "cost-effectiveness" analysis, "impact on the budget” analysis, and sensitivity analysis were fulfilled.Results. In real clinical practice in hospitals direct medical costs of apixaban treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism make up 2331.67 and 3142.98 rubles, respectively, while the costs of the standard therapy - 6192.15 and 6225.75 rubles. Potential resource savings will reduce 2.65 times the cost of the health system. The share of the costs of treatment of adverse effects (bleeding in the conventional therapy group was 4.8 times higher than the costs in apixaban group. The results of analysis of the effect on the budget show a decrease in the load on the budget when apixaban was included in the treatment regimen of VTE. Potential resource savings of the health system in the treatment of 1,000 patients with apixaban will account 3,911,860 rubles in comparison with conventional therapy.Conclusion. The inclusion of apixaban in the therapy of VTE can significantly reduce the burden on the budget of the health care system.

  15. Splenectomy is associated with a higher risk for venous thromboembolism: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Debora H; Barmparas, Galinos; Fierro, Nicole; Sun, Beatrice J; Ashrafian, Sogol; Li, Tong; Ley, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Thrombocytosis following splenectomy is a common occurrence. Whether this thrombocytosis leads to a higher risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) remains unclear. This investigation aimed to determine if splenectomy increases the risk for VTE. This was a prospective study conducted in the SICU between 1/2011 and 11/2013 investigating the VTE risk in patients undergoing a splenectomy compared with those undergoing any other abdominal procedure. In total 2503 patients were admitted to the SICU: 37 (2%) after a splenectomy and 638 (26%) after any other abdominal surgery. Splenectomy patients had a higher incidence of VTE compared to patients undergoing any other abdominal procedure (29.7% vs. 12.1%, p splenectomy was associated with a higher adjusted risk for VTE compared to the no-splenectomy group (AOR [95% CI]: 2.6 [1.2, 5.9], p = 0.02). Reactive thrombocytosis did not predict the development of VTE. Splenectomy increases the risk for VTE, however reactive thrombocytosis is not associated with this higher incidence. Further investigations are required to characterize the pathophysiologic mechanisms of VTE development following splenectomy. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Venous thromboembolism capture on electronic systems in obstetrics patients at St Thomas' Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aminah Noor; Byrne, Megan Leyla; Imambaccus, Nazia; Hubert, Dawid; Gateley, Anna; Abdullahi Idle, Salwa; Lloyd, Jilly

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality in the UK. Therefore, timely VTE risk assessment is essential in all obstetrics patients. The Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) payment framework set a target for trusts to complete a VTE risk assessment within 24 hours of admission for 95% of patients. A combination of factors, including lack of integration between multiple IT systems, means that this CQUIN target is currently not being met for obstetric patients in the Hospital Birth Centre at Guys and St Thomas' NHS Trust. This project aims to increase staff awareness of this issue and educate them regarding the correct procedure for VTE assessment. Trialled methods included reminders at staff handovers, use of magnets on the patient whiteboard, posters and stickers displayed around the unit and a loyalty card scheme as incentive to complete assessments. Initial average completion rate was 20.7%, which increased to 67.5% after the first plan, do, study, act (PDSA) cycle with a slight drop to 65.7% after the second cycle. Completion rates increased to 92.3% on the last day of the third PDSA cycle. Although we did not reach the 95% target, we have raised awareness of the importance of recording VTE assessment on electronic systems, and hope we have created sustainable change.

  17. Risk of venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokenstad, Erik D; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Glasgow, Amy E; Occhino, John A

    2016-10-01

    We sought to determine the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients undergoing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) based on surgical approach. The American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was used to select all surgeries performed for POP from 2005 to 2013. CPT-4 codes were grouped based on surgical approach: vaginal (VAG), laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy (LSC), or open abdominal sacrocolpopexy (ASC). Patient demographics, preoperative American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification system scores, and 30-day postoperative complications were obtained. Of the 26,103 women who underwent surgery for POP, 21,311 (81.7 %) underwent VAG, 3,346 (12.8 %) LSC, and 1,426 (5.5 %) ASC. VTE occurred in 36 patients (0.17 %) in the VAG group, 8 (0.24 %) in the LSC group, and 9 (0.63 %) in the ASC group. The ASC group had a significantly higher incidence of VTE compared with the VAG group (p surgery for POP. Although differences in VTE rates between procedure groups failed to maintain statistical significance after multivariate analysis, we were able to identify risk factors associated with an increased VTE risk in surgery for POP. Women with obesity, an increased length of stay, or ASA score of 3 or higher are at an increased risk for developing VTE after undergoing surgery for POP.

  18. Venous thromboembolism and subsequent risk of cancer in patients with liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montomoli, Jonathan; Erichsen, Rune; Søgaard, Kirstine Kobberøe

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) may be a marker of occult cancer in the general population. While liver disease is known to increase the risk of VTE and cancer, it is unclear whether VTE in patients with liver disease is also a marker of occult cancer. DESIGN: A population-based cohort...... and patients with liver cirrhosis were followed as two separate cohorts from the date of their VTE. MEASURES: For each cohort, we computed the absolute and relative risk (standardised incidence ratio; SIR) of cancer after VTE. RESULTS: During the study period, 1867 patients with non-cirrhotic liver disease...... and 888 with liver cirrhosis were diagnosed with incident VTE. In the first year following VTE, the absolute risk of cancer was 2.7% among patients with non-cirrhotic liver disease and 4.3% among those with liver cirrhosis. The SIR for the first 90 days of follow-up was 9.96 (95% CI 6.85 to 13.99) among...

  19. Venous thromboembolism in adult elective spinal surgery: a tertiary centre review of 2181 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawi, H M T; Saba, K; Cunningham, A; Masud, S; Lewis, M; Hossain, M; Chopra, I; Ahuja, S

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the incidence of primary venous thromboembolism (VTE), epidural haematoma, surgical site infection (SSI), and 90-day mortality after elective spinal surgery, and the effect of two protocols for prophylaxis. A total of 2181 adults underwent 2366 elective spinal procedures between January 2007 and January 2012. All patients wore anti-embolic stockings, mobilised early and were kept adequately hydrated. In addition, 29% (689) of these were given low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) while in hospital. SSI surveillance was undertaken using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. In patients who only received mechanical prophylaxis, the incidence of VTE was 0.59% and that of SSI 2.1%. In patients who were additionally given LMWH, the incidence of VTE was 0% and that of SSI 0.7%. The unadjusted p-value was 0.04 for VTE and 0.01 for SSI. There were no cases of epidural haematoma or 90-day mortality in either group. When adjusted for case-mix, LMWH remained a significant factor (p = 0.006) for VTE, but not for SSI. A peri-operative protocol involving mechanical anti-embolism stockings, adequate hydration, and early post-operative mobilisation is effective in significantly reducing the incidence of VTE. The addition of LMWH is safe in patients at higher risk of developing VTE. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1204-9. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  20. Venous thromboembolism: the prevailing approach to diagnosis, prevention and treatment among Internal Medicine practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, Arie; Gavish, Israel; Kfir, Hila; Rimbrot, Sofia

    2017-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the third most common cause of death and the leading cause of sudden death in hospitalized medical patients. Despite the existence of guidelines for prevention and treatment of this disorder, their implementation in everyday life is not always accomplished. We performed a survey among directors of Internal Medicine departments in our country in order to evaluate their attitude and approach to this issue. A questionnaire with pertinent questions regarding prevention and treatment of VTE, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) was sent to each one of the directors of Internal Medicine Departments around the country. Sixty-nine out of 97 (71%) of the Internal Medicine departments directors responded the questionnaire. We found that several of the current guidelines were followed in a reasonable way. On the other hand, heterogeneity of responses was also present and the performance of current guidelines was imperfectly followed, and showed to be deficient in several aspects. An effort should be done in order to reemphasize and put in effect current guidelines for the prevention and treatment of VTE among hospitalists and Internal Medicine practitioners.

  1. Accuracy of D-Dimers to Rule Out Venous Thromboembolism Events across Age Categories

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    G. Der Sahakian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Strategies combining pretest clinical assessment and D-dimers measurement efficiently and safely rule out venous thromboembolism events (VTE in low- and intermediate-risk patients. Objectives. As process of ageing is associated with altered concentrations of coagulation markers including an increase in D-dimers levels, we investigated whether D-dimers could reliably rule out VTE across age categories. Method. We prospectively assessed the test performance in 1,004 patients visiting the emergency department during the 6-month period with low or intermediate risk of VTE who also received additional diagnostic procedures. Results. 67 patients had VTE with D-dimers levels above the threshold, and 3 patients displayed D-dimers levels below the threshold. We observed that specificity of D-dimers test decreased in an age-dependent manner. However, sensitivity and negative predictive value remained at very high level in each age category including older patients. Conclusion. We conclude that, even though D-dimers level could provide numerous false positive results in elderly patients, its high sensitivity could reliably help physicians to exclude the diagnosis of VTE in every low- and intermediate-risk patient.

  2. Perioperative complications increase the risk of venous thromboembolism following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Melissa C; Simon, Kathleen; Higgins, Rana; Kindel, Tammy L; Gould, Jon C

    2017-12-01

    Morbidly obese patients are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) following surgery. This study explores the impact of a perioperative complication on the risk of VTE after bariatric surgery. Patients who underwent bariatric surgery were identified from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program dataset (2012-2014). The 17 most common perioperative complications were analyzed by multivariate regression analysis to determine the effect of complications on the risk of VTE. The postoperative incidence of VTE was 0.5% (n = 59,424 bariatric surgeries). The average time to diagnosis of VTE was 11.6 days. 80% of VTE events occurred after discharge. A major complication occurred prior to VTE in 22.6% of patients. The more complications experienced by an individual patient, the more likely they were to experience VTE. Unadjusted thirty-day mortality increased 13.89-fold following VTE (p bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Benchmarking of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis practice with ENT.UK guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qahtani, Ali S

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to benchmark our guidelines of prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in ENT surgical population against ENT.UK guidelines, and also to encourage healthcare providers to utilize benchmarking as an effective method of improving performance. The study design is prospective descriptive analysis. The setting of this study is tertiary referral centre (Assir Central Hospital, Abha, Saudi Arabia). In this study, we are benchmarking our practice guidelines of the prevention of VTE in the ENT surgical population against that of ENT.UK guidelines to mitigate any gaps. ENT guidelines 2010 were downloaded from the ENT.UK Website. Our guidelines were compared with the possibilities that either our performance meets or fall short of ENT.UK guidelines. Immediate corrective actions will take place if there is quality chasm between the two guidelines. ENT.UK guidelines are evidence-based and updated which may serve as role-model for adoption and benchmarking. Our guidelines were accordingly amended to contain all factors required in providing a quality service to ENT surgical patients. While not given appropriate attention, benchmarking is a useful tool in improving quality of health care. It allows learning from others' practices and experiences, and works towards closing any quality gaps. In addition, benchmarking clinical outcomes is critical for quality improvement and informing decisions concerning service provision. It is recommended to be included on the list of quality improvement methods of healthcare services.

  4. Risk of venous thromboembolism in hospitalised cancer patients in England—a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Ratib

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a well-recognised and life-threatening complication in patients with cancer. However, the precise risk of VTE in hospitalised cancer patients in England has not been previously reported. Methods We conducted a cohort study using linked Hospital Episodes Statistics and Office for National Statistics mortality data. We determined the risk of VTE separately for 24 cancer sites following first hospitalisation for cancer (index date and how this varied by age, proximity from hospital admission, administration of chemotherapy and calendar time. Results Between 1998 and 2012, 3,558,660 patients were hospitalised for cancer. The cancer sites with the highest risk of VTE during initial hospitalisation for cancer were pancreatic (4.9 %, ovarian (4 % and liver (3.8 %. The three cancer sites with the highest risk of first VTE event within 6 months from discharge were pancreatic (3.7 %, oesophagus (3 % and stomach (2.8 %. For most cancers, the risk of VTE within 6 months from discharge was higher amongst patients who underwent chemotherapy compared to those who did not. The impact of age on risk of VTE varied considerably between cancer sites. Conclusions The risk of VTE amongst patients hospitalised for cancer varies greatly by cancer site, age, proximity from hospital admission, and chemotherapy administration.

  5. The Risk of Venous Thromboembolism with Different Generation of Oral Contraceptives; a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Baratloo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral contraceptives (OCs are considered as one of the most common risk factor of venous thromboembolism (VTE in child bearing age. Some of the recent researches indicate that the odds of VTE may be even higher with newer generations of OCs. The present meta-analysis was designed to evaluate the effect of different generation of OCs on the occurrence of VTE. Methods: Two researchers independently ran a thorough search in Pubmed, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, CINAHL and Scopus databases regarding study keywords including thromboembolic event, thromboembolism, embolism, thromboembolic, thrombotic and thrombosis, combined with oral contraceptive. The outcomes were the incidence of diagnosed thromboembolism, such as deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and cerebral venous thrombosis. Based on the heterogeneity of the studies, random effect model was used and pooled odds ratio was reported. Results: Three cohort and 17 case-control studies with 13,265,228 subjects were entered into meta-analysis. Analysis showed that the odds of VTE in women taking OCs are more than three-fold (OR=3.13; 95% CI: 2.61-3.65. The risk of VTE in women taking first-, second- and third-generation OCs are 3.5 fold (OR=3.48; 95% CI: 2.01-4.94, 3 fold (OR=3.08; 95% CI: 2.43-3.74 and 4.3 fold (OR=4.35; CI: 3.69‒5.01, respectively. Conclusion: It seems that the risk of VTE is not same between different generations of OCs, so that third-generation has highest risk. Taking second and third-generation OCs increases the risk of VTE up to 3 and 4.3 fold, respectively. The researchers of the present study suggest that more clinical trials be designed in relation to the effect of newer generations of OCs in different communities. 

  6. Low molecular weight heparin for prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients with lower-limb immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zee, Aniek Ag; van Lieshout, Kelly; van der Heide, Maaike; Janssen, Loes; Janzing, Heinrich Mj

    2017-08-06

    Immobilization of the lower limb is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs) are anticoagulants, which might be used in adult patients with lower-limb immobilization to prevent deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and its complications. This is an update of the review first published in 2008. To assess the effectiveness of low molecular weight heparin for the prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients with lower-limb immobilization in an ambulatory setting. For this update, the Cochrane Vascular Information Specialist searched the Specialised Register, CENTRAL, and three trials registers (April 2017). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) that described thromboprophylaxis by means of LMWH compared with no prophylaxis or placebo in adult patients with lower-limb immobilization. Immobilization was by means of a plaster cast or brace. Two review authors independently selected trials, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. The review authors contacted the trial authors for additional information if required. Statistical analysis was carried out using Review Manager 5. We included eight RCTs that fulfilled our criteria, with a total of 3680 participants. The quality of evidence, according GRADE, varied by outcome and ranged from low to moderate. We found an incidence of DVT ranging from 4.3% to 40% in patients who had a leg injury that had been immobilized in a plaster cast or a brace for at least one week, and who received no prophylaxis, or placebo. This number was significantly lower in patients who received daily subcutaneous injections of LMWH during immobilization, with event rates ranging from 0% to 37% (odds ratio (OR) 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.33 to 0.61; with minimal evidence of heterogeneity: I² = 26%, P = 0.23; seven studies; 1676 participants, moderate-quality evidence). Comparable results were seen in the following groups of participants: patients with below

  7. Risk of Venous Thromboembolism Among Otolaryngology Patients vs General Surgery and Plastic Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, John D; Dilger, Amanda E; Schneider, Alex; Smith, Stephanie Shintani; Samant, Sandeep; Patel, Urjeet A

    2017-10-19

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, is the number 1 cause of preventable death in surgical patients. Current guidelines from the American College of Chest Physicians provide VTE prevention recommendations that are specific to individual surgical subspecialties; however, no guidelines exist for otolaryngology. To examine the rate of VTE for various otolaryngology procedures compared with an established average-risk field (general surgery) and low-risk field (plastic surgery). This cohort study compared the rate of VTE after different otolaryngology procedures with those of general and plastic surgery in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2013. We used univariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis of clinical characteristics, cancer status, and Caprini score to compare different risk stratification of patients. Data analysis was performed from May 1, 2016, to April 1, 2017. Surgery. Thirty-day rate of VTE. A total of 1 295 291 patients, including 31 896 otolaryngology patients (mean [SD] age, 53.9 [16.7] years; 14 260 [44.7%] male; 21 603 [67.7%] white), 27 280 plastic surgery patients (mean [SD] age, 50.5 [13.9] years; 4835 [17.7%] male; 17 983 [65.9%] white), and 1 236 115 general surgery patients (mean [SD] age, 54.9 [17.2] years; 484 985 [39.2%] male; 867 913 [70.2%] white) were compared. The overall 30-day rate of VTE was 0.5% for otolaryngology compared with 0.7% for plastic surgery and 1.2% for general surgery. We identified a high-risk group for VTE in otolaryngology (n = 3625) that included free or regional tissue transfer, laryngectomy, composite resection, skull base surgery, and incision and drainage. High-risk otolaryngology patients experienced similar rates of VTE as general surgery patients across all Caprini risk levels. Low-risk otolaryngology patients (n = 28 271) experienced

  8. Efficacy and safety outcomes of oral anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs in the secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism: systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, Lana A; Cameron, Chris; Le Gal, Grégoire; Rodger, Marc A; Coyle, Doug; Wells, Philip S; Clifford, Tammy; Gandara, Esteban; Wells, George; Carrier, Marc

    2013-08-30

    To summarise and compare the efficacy and safety of various oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and vitamin K antagonists) and antiplatelet agents (acetylsalicylic acid) for the secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism. Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Literature search using Medline (1950 to present), Embase (1980 to present), and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials using the OVID interface. Publications from potentially relevant journals were also searched by hand. Randomised controlled trials of patients receiving anticoagulants, antiplatelet drugs, or placebo or observation for secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism. Selected outcomes were rates of recurrent venous thromboembolism and major bleeding. Two reviewers independently extracted data onto standardised forms. 12 articles met our inclusion criteria, with 11,999 patients evaluated for efficacy and 12,167 for safety. All treatments reduced the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism. Compared with placebo or observation, vitamin K antagonists at a standard adjusted dose (target international normalised ratio 2.0-3.0) showed the highest risk difference (odds ratio 0.07; 95% credible interval 0.03 to 0.15) and acetylsalicylic acid showed the lowest risk difference (0.65; 0.39 to 1.03). Risk of major bleeding was higher with a standard adjusted dose of vitamin K antagonists (5.24; 1.78 to 18.25) than with placebo or observation. Fatal recurrent venous thromboembolism and fatal bleeding were rare. Detailed subgroup and individual patient level data were not available. All oral anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents investigated in this analysis were associated with a reduced recurrence of venous thromboembolism compared with placebo or observation, although acetylsalicylic acid was associated with the lowest risk reduction. Vitamin K antagonists given at a standard adjusted dose was associated with the greatest risk reduction in recurrent venous

  9. Effect of post-discharge venous thromboembolism on hospital quality comparisons following hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kester, Benjamin S; Merkow, Ryan P; Ju, Mila H; Peabody, Terrance D; Bentrem, David J; Ko, Clifford Y; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2014-09-03

    Symptomatic pre-discharge venous thromboembolism (VTE) rates after total or partial hip or knee arthroplasty have been proposed as patient safety indicators. However, assessing only pre-discharge VTE rates may be suboptimal for quality measurement as the duration of stay is relatively short and the VTE risk extends beyond the inpatient setting. Patients who underwent total or partial hip or knee arthroplasty were identified in the 2008 through 2010 American College of Surgeons (ACS) National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database. Outcomes of interest were the deep venous thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), and overall VTE rates within thirty days after surgery and the rates during the pre-discharge and post-discharge portions of this time period. Risk-adjusted hospital rankings based on only pre-discharge (inpatient) events were compared with those based on both pre-discharge and post-discharge events within thirty days of surgery. A total of 23,924 patients underwent total or partial hip arthroplasty (8499) or knee arthroplasty (15,425) at ninety-five hospitals. For hip arthroplasty, the VTE rate was 0.9%, with 57.9% of the events occurring after discharge. For knee arthroplasty, the VTE rate was 1.9%, with 38.3% of the events occurring after discharge. The median time of VTE occurrence was eleven days postoperatively for hip arthroplasty and three days for knee arthroplasty. The median duration of stay was three days for both hip and knee arthroplasty. When hospitals were ranked according to VTE rates, hospital outlier status designations changed when post-discharge events were included (κ = 0.386; 44% false-positive rate for low outliers). The median change in hospital quality ranking was 7 (interquartile range, 2 to 17), with a rank correlation of r = 0.82. Nearly twice as many VTE complications were captured if both pre-discharge and post-discharge events were considered, and inclusion of post-discharge events changed hospital quality

  10. Thrombophilia testing in people with venous thromboembolism: systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E L; Stevenson, M D; Rawdin, A; Papaioannou, D

    2009-01-01

    To assess whether thrombophilia testing following a venous thrombotic event is clinically effective and cost-effective in the management of thrombosis compared with no testing for thrombophilia. Major electronic databases were searched from September to November 2006. A systematic review of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness literature was undertaken according to standard methods. A discrete event simulation model was constructed to assess the cost-effectiveness of changing the standard 3-month duration of warfarin treatment to 10 years, 20 years or lifelong. No clinical studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review. Further literature searches and clinical opinion were therefore used to inform the cost-effectiveness analysis. Thrombophilia testing in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) had an estimated mean cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) of below 20,000 pounds regardless of sex or age. In patients with a previous deep vein thrombosis (DVT), thrombophilia testing had an estimated mean cost per QALY of below 20,000 pounds in men aged 69 years or less and in women aged 49 years or less. The estimated duration of warfarin treatment (lifelong, 20 years, 10 years or no extended treatment) that was most cost-effective is presented for each age, sex, initial venous thromboembolism (VTE) event and type of thrombophilia. In terms of determining the duration of anticoagulation management, scenarios were found in which the cost per QALY of thrombophilia testing was below 20,000 pounds. However, these results are subject to great uncertainty, largely because of lack of knowledge about the increased risk of recurrence with each type of thrombophilia. Results are influenced by the fact that men have a greater risk of recurrence than women and by the fact that the frequency of adverse events associated with warfarin treatment increases with age. Further research, for example on the likely sensitivity and specificity

  11. Risk of Venous Thromboembolism in Patients by Albuminuria and Estimated GFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massicotte-Azarniouch, David; Bader Eddeen, Anan; LazoLanger, Alejandro; Molnar, Amber O; Lam, Ngan N; McCallum, Megan K; Bota, Sarah; Zimmerman, Deborah; Garg, Amit X; Harel, Ziv; Perl, Jeffery; Wald, Ron; Sood, Manish M

    2017-12-01

    The risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) is elevated with albuminuria or a low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). However, the VTE risk due to the combined effects of eGFR and albuminuria are unknown. Population-based cohort study. 694,956 adults in Ontario, Canada, from 2002 to 2012. eGFR and albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR). VTE. 15,180 (2.2%) VTE events occurred during the study period. Both albuminuria and eGFR were independently associated with VTE. The association of albuminuria and VTE differed by level of eGFR (P for ACR × eGFR interaction 90mL/min/1.73m 2 ) and heavy albuminuria (ACR>300mg/g) compared with those with normal eGFRs and no albuminuria (subdistribution HR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.38-1.89). Among those with reduced kidney function (eGFR, 15-29mL/min/1.73m 2 ), the risk for VTE was only minimally increased, irrespective of albuminuria (subdistribution HRs of 1.23 [95% CI, 1-1.5] and 1.09 [95% CI, 0.82-1.45] for ACR300mg/g, respectively). Only single determinations of ACR and eGFR were used. Diagnostic/International Classification of Diseases codes were used to define VTE. Albuminuria increases the risk for VTE markedly in patients with normal eGFRs compared with those with lower eGFRs. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Predicting risk of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized cancer patients: Utility of a risk assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patell, Rushad; Rybicki, Lisa; McCrae, Keith R; Khorana, Alok A

    2017-06-01

    Inpatient venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a priority preventable illness; risk in cancer varies and prophylaxis is inconsistently used. A previously validated tool (Khorana Score, [KS]) identifies VTE risk in cancer outpatients with 5 easily available variables but has not been studied in the inpatient setting. We evaluated the validity of KS in predicting VTE risk in hospitalized cancer patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of consecutive oncology inpatients at the Cleveland Clinic from 11/2012 to 12/2014 (n = 3531). Patients were excluded for VTE on admission (n = 304), incomplete KS data (n = 439) or other reasons (n = 8). Data collected included demographics, cancer type, length of stay (LOS), anticoagulant use, and laboratory values. Multivariate risk factors were identified with stepwise logistic regression, confirmed with bootstrap analysis. Of 2780 patients included, 106 (3.8%) developed VTE during hospitalization. Median age was 62 (range, 19-98) years and 56% were male. Median LOS was 5 (range, 0-152) days. High risk KS (≥ 3) was significantly associated with VTE in uni- and multivariate analyses (OR 2.5, 95% [confidence interval] CI 1.3-4.9). Other significant variables included male gender (OR 1.67, 1.1-2.53), older age (OR 0.86, 0.75-0.99) and use of anticoagulants (OR 0.57, 0.39-0.85). Recursive partitioning analysis suggested optimal cut point for KS is 2 (OR 1.82, 1.23-2.69). This is the first report validating KS as a risk tool to predict VTE in hospitalized cancer patients. Using this tool could lead to more consistent and successful application of inpatient thromboprophylaxis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Fatal Events in Cancer Patients Receiving Anticoagulant Therapy for Venous Thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farge, Dominique; Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Debourdeau, Philippe; Bura-Riviere, Alessandra; Rodriguez-Beltrán, Eva Maria; Nieto, Jose Antonio; Peris, Maria Luisa; Zeltser, David; Mazzolai, Lucia; Hij, Adrian; Monreal, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In cancer patients treated for venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), analyzing mortality associated with recurrent VTE or major bleeding is needed to determine the optimal duration of anticoagulation. This was a cohort study using the Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad TromboEmbólica (RIETE) Registry database to compare rates of fatal recurrent PE and fatal bleeding in cancer patients receiving anticoagulation for VTE. As of January 2013, 44,794 patients were enrolled in RIETE, of whom 7911 (18%) had active cancer. During the course of anticoagulant therapy (mean, 181 ± 210 days), 178 cancer patients (4.3%) developed recurrent PE (5.5 per 100 patient-years; 95% CI: 4.8–6.4), 194 (4.7%) had recurrent DVT (6.2 per 100 patient-years; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.3–7.1), and 367 (8.9%) bled (11.3 per 100 patient-years; 95% CI: 10.2–12.5). Of 4125 patients initially presenting with PE, 43 (1.0%) died of recurrent PE and 45 (1.1%) of bleeding; of 3786 patients with DVT, 19 (0.5%) died of PE, and 55 (1.3%) of bleeding. During the first 3 months of anticoagulation, there were 59 (1.4%) fatal PE recurrences and 77 (1.9%) fatal bleeds. Beyond the third month, there were 3 fatal PE recurrences and 23 fatal bleeds. In RIETE cancer patients, the rate of fatal recurrent PE or fatal bleeding was much higher within the first 3 months of anticoagulation therapy. PMID:26266353

  14. Feasibility of intermittent pneumatic compression for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis during magnetic resonance imaging-guided interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maybody, Majid, E-mail: maybodym@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Taslakian, Bedros, E-mail: bt05@aub.edu.lb [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Riad El-Solh, 1107 2020 Beirut (Lebanon); Durack, Jeremy C., E-mail: durackj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Kaye, Elena A., E-mail: kayee@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Erinjeri, Joseph P., E-mail: erinjerj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan, E-mail: srimaths@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •The controller of a standard SCD is labeled as an “MR-unsafe”. •No commercially available “MR-safe” SCDs. •Standard SCDs can be used in iMRI by placing the device outside the MRI scanner room. •Using serial extension tubing did not cause device failure. -- Abstract: Purpose: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized and surgical patients. To reduce risk, perioperative VTE prophylaxis is recommended for cancer patients undergoing surgical or interventional procedures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used in interventional oncology when alternative imaging modalities do not adequately delineate malignancies. Extended periods of immobilization during MRI-guided interventions necessitate an MR compatible sequential compression device (SCD) for intra-procedural mechanical VTE prophylaxis. Such devices are not commercially available. Materials and methods: A standard SCD routinely used at our institution for VTE prophylaxis during interventional procedures was used. To satisfy MR safety requirements, the SCD controller was placed in the MR control room and connected to the compression sleeves in the magnet room through the wave guide using tubing extensions. The controller pressure sensor was used to monitor adequate pressure delivery and detect ineffective low or abnormal high pressure delivery. VTE prophylaxis was provided using the above mentioned device for 38 patients undergoing MR-guided ablations. Results: There was no evidence of device failure due to loss of pressure in the extension tubing assembly. No interference with the anesthesia or interventional procedures was documented. Conclusion: Although the controller of a standard SCD is labeled as “MR-unsafe”, the SCD can be used in interventional MR settings by placing the device outside the MR scanner room. Using serial tubing extensions did not cause device failure. The described method can be used to provide

  15. Aspirin and the prevention of venous thromboembolism following total joint arthroplasty: commonly asked questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azboy, I; Barrack, R; Thomas, A M; Haddad, F S; Parvizi, J

    2017-11-01

    The number of arthroplasties being performed increases each year. Patients undergoing an arthroplasty are at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and appropriate prophylaxis has been recommended. However, the optimal protocol and the best agent to minimise VTE under these circumstances are not known. Although many agents may be used, there is a difference in their efficacy and the risk of bleeding. Thus, the selection of a particular agent relies on the balance between the desire to minimise VTE and the attempt to reduce the risk of bleeding, with its undesirable, and occasionally fatal, consequences. Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is an agent for VTE prophylaxis following arthroplasty. Many studies have shown its efficacy in minimising VTE under these circumstances. It is inexpensive and well-tolerated, and its use does not require routine blood tests. It is also a 'milder' agent and unlikely to result in haematoma formation, which may increase both the risk of infection and the need for further surgery. Aspirin is also unlikely to result in persistent wound drainage, which has been shown to be associated with the use of agents such as low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) and other more aggressive agents. The main objective of this review was to summarise the current evidence relating to the efficacy of aspirin as a VTE prophylaxis following arthroplasty, and to address some of the common questions about its use. There is convincing evidence that, taking all factors into account, aspirin is an effective, inexpensive, and safe form of VTE following arthroplasty in patients without a major risk factor for VTE, such as previous VTE. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1420-30. ©2017 Azboy et al.

  16. The Importance of Homozygous Polymorphisms of Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Gene in Romanian Patients with Idiopathic Venous Thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Hotoleanu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR polymorphisms have recently raised the interest as a possible thrombophilic factors. Aims: We aimed to assess the frequency of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms in idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE in a Romanian population and the associated risk of VTE. Study Design: We performed a case-control transversal study including 90 patients diagnosed with VTE and 75 sex- and age-matched controls. Methods: MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms were detected using PCR-RFLP method. Results: The homozygous MTHFR 677TT genotype, present in 18.8% of patients with VTE versus 6.6% of controls, was significantly associated with VTE (p= 0.021, OR= 3.26, 95%CI (1.141-9.313. The heterozygous MTHFR A1298C genotype, presenting the highest prevalence in the VTE group (34.4% as well as in controls (37.3%, was not associated with VTE (p=0.7. No associations were found for heterozygous MTHFR C677T (with a frequency of 32.2% in VTE and 37.3% in controls, p=0.492, respective homozygous MTHFR A1298C genotype (with a frequency of 1.1% in VTE and 2.6% in controls, p=0.456. Conclusion: Among MTHFR polymorphisms, only homozygosity for MTHFR 677TT may be considered a risk factor for VTE; the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism is not significantly associated with an increased risk of VTE.

  17. Venous thromboembolism and desogestrel- or gestodene-containing combination oral contraceptives: what are the facts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The UK's prescription drug regulatory agency warned the public and health care providers about the possible increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) among users of the combined oral contraceptives (OCs) containing desogestrel or gestodene. Data from three large not-yet-published studies served as the basis for the warning. The studies found about a 2-fold increased risk of VTE for these OC users when compared to users of OCs with other progestins. Yet the observational studies are subject to inherent biases (e.g., hospitalized cases and selection bias), which may explain the increased risk. Assuming the increased risk to be true, the risk of VTE is still lower than that linked to pregnancy (30 vs. 60 VTE cases per 100,000). The risk of VTE for users of OCs containing older progestins is about 15 VTE cases and that among healthy, nonpregnant, nonusers is about 4 VTE cases. The mortality risk associated with VTE among users of OCs containing desogestrel or gestodene is 1-1.5 deaths/1 million woman-years. The US Food and Drug Administration has examined the data and has concluded that the risk is not high enough to justify switching to other OCs or stopping use of OCs containing desogestrel or gestodene. It recommends that users of the OCs in question discuss the OCs with their providers and make an informed choice based on the benefits and risks and individual preferences. It might consider changes in labeling, but not pulling the OCs off the market. In Germany, women aged less than 30 were temporarily advised not to begin use of desogestrel- or gestodene-containing OCs. Women using them were advised to continue their use, however. The European Union announced that bias or chance could account for the findings and thus did not recommend changes in prescribing desogestrel- or gestodene-containing OCs.

  18. Managing venous thromboembolism in Asia: winds of change in the era of new oral anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alexander; Chiu, Kuan Ming; Park, Kihyuk; Jeyaindran, Sinnadurai; Tambunan, Karmel L; Ward, Christopher; Wong, Raymond; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2012-09-01

    Despite advances in the management of venous thromboembolism (VTE), treatment of many patients worldwide, especially in Asia, remains inadequate and/or discordant with prevailing guidelines. Although epidemiological studies consistently report lower incidences of VTE in Asians than Caucasians, VTE rates in Asia have probably been gravely underestimated, partly due to comparatively lesser ascertainment. It is becoming evident that Asians are at much higher risk of VTE than was hitherto supposed. Nevertheless, VTE risk-assessment is not routine in Asia and thromboprophylaxis rates are much lower than in Western nations. It is important to base decisions about anticoagulation on individual circumstances and weigh the potential benefits and risks. The conventional VTE management paradigm is not ideal. New oral anticoagulants offer advantages over current modalities that may help to streamline patient care and reduce healthcare costs. Initially, they will be mainly used in uncomplicated cases and, in the absence of clear differences in efficacy or safety, convenience, tolerability/adherence and cost will determine treatment choice. There is clear scope to improve VTE prevention and treatment in Asia. Key priorities are raising awareness of best practice and properly implementing guidelines. Uncertainty about the burden of VTE and concern about bleeding are barriers. High-quality Asian epidemiological data are needed to guide healthcare policy and evidence-based practice. More data on the occurrence and management of bleeding complications in Asian patients are also required. Meanwhile, physicians should remain vigilant and strive to act early, decisively and appropriately to diagnose and treat VTE, particularly in patients at high risk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein N-linked homocysteine is associated with recurrence of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlauer, Anastazja; Mielimonka, Aleksandra; Głowacki, Rafał; Borowczyk, Kamila; Stachniuk, Justyna; Undas, Anetta

    2015-11-01

    Recently, protein N-linked homocysteine (Hcy) has been measured in healthy subjects and patients with marked hyperhomocysteinemia. Since elevated total Hcy (tHcy) levels are associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), we aimed to investigate protein N-linked Hcy levels in patients with VTE. We studied 200 consecutive patients with VTE (89 men, 111 women, aged from 17 to 83 years), including 57 subjects with a subsequent episode of VTE (recurrent VTE) during 24 months of follow-up. Protein N-linked Hcy was assayed using high-performance liquid chromatography with an on-column derivatization with o-phthaldialdehyde and fluorescence detection. The median protein N-linked Hcy was 1.404 μM (interquartile range [IQR] 0.859-2.066), while the median tHcy (IQR) was 9.1 μM (6.8-11.2). In the whole group protein N-linked Hcy correlated only with C-reactive protein (CRP; r = 0.44, p linked Hcy correlated with C-reactive protein (r = 0.43, p linked Hcy. Patients with recurrent VTE had higher levels of protein N-linked Hcy compared to those who experienced a single episode of VTE (1.553 μM, 1.157-2.445 vs. 1.27 μM, 0.826-1.884; p = 0.002). Multiple regression adjusted for potential confounders showed that the only independent predictor of protein N-linked Hcy in the upper quartile was CRP > 3mg/L (odds ratio 3.04, 95% confidence interval 2.12-4.36, p linked Hcy concentrations, indicating enhanced protein homocysteinylation in vivo, characterize patients with recurrent VTE and this phenomenon is associated with enhanced inflammatory state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Patterns and outcomes of prescribing venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in hospitalized older adults: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, Mark; Cohen, Jessica; Makhnevich, Alex; Mulvany, Colm; Akerman, Meredith; Sinvani, Liron

    2018-01-12

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Hospitalized, medically ill older adults have increased risk; despite guidelines, data suggest suboptimal pharmacologic prophylaxis rates. Factors influencing provider prescribing non-compliance are unclear. We aimed to describe VTE prophylaxis practices and identify risk factors for, and outcomes of, prescribing non-compliance. A retrospective study was conducted of hospitalized adults aged ≥ 75 years, admitted to the medicine service of a large academic tertiary center from May 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015. The primary outcome was non-compliance, defined as the absence of an order for VTE prophylaxis for the duration of hospitalization or an interruption of prophylaxis exceeding 24 h. Secondary measures included in-hospital mortality, length of stay (LOS), and 30-day readmissions. Of 3751 patients (mean age 84.7 years), 97.6% of charts had prophylaxis orders; 11.0% showed non-compliance. Pharmacologic prophylaxis was prescribed in 83.3% of patients and mechanical prophylaxis alone in 14.3%. Factors associated with non-compliance included: higher body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.04), myocardial infarction (p = 0.01), congestive heart failure (p = 0.001), metastatic tumor (p = 0.01). Low mobility was not significantly associated with compliance. Subcutaneous unfractionated heparin was associated with compliance (p non-compliance. Non-compliance was associated with increased mortality (p = 0.01), LOS (p risk factors (mobility, BMI, comorbidities) were not associated with prescriber compliance patterns. Integrating risk assessment models into provider practice may improve compliance.

  1. Risk factors and prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism in hospitals in the city of Manaus, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Edson de Oliveira; Bindá, Fábio Arruda; Silva, Angela Maria Melo da; Costa, Thais Ditolvo Alves da; Fernandes, Marcélio Costa; Fernandes, Márcio Costa

    2009-02-01

    To identify and classify risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in hospitalized patients, as well as to evaluate medical practices regarding prophylaxis for the disease. An observational cross-sectional study, carried out between January and March of 2006, involving inpatients at three hospitals in the city of Manaus, Brazil. Risk stratification for VTE was based on the criteria established by the Brazilian Society of Angiology and Vascular Surgery and by the International Union of Angiology. Clinical, surgical and medication-related risk factors were analyzed. The statistical analysis of the data obtained was conducted, adopting an alpha error of 5% and 95% CI. Qualitative data were analyzed using the chi-square test, whereas quantitative data were analyzed using Student's t-test. Of the 1,036 patients included (total number of admissions, 1,051), 515 (49.7%) were male, and 521 (50.3%) were female. A total of 23 risk factors for VTE were identified (total number of occurrences, 2,319). The stratified risk for VTE was 50.6%, 16.6% and 30.8% among the admissions of high-, moderate- and low-risk cases, respectively. In 73.3% of the admissions, nonpharmacological prophylaxis was not employed at any point during the study period. In 74% of those classified as high- or moderate-risk cases, no prophylactic medications were administered. This study showed that, in the population studied, risk factors were common and that prophylactic measures were not employed in patients prone to developing VTE and its complications.

  2. Risk factors for recurrent venous thromboembolism after unprovoked pulmonary embolism: the PADIS-PE randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromeur, Cécile; Sanchez, Olivier; Presles, Emilie; Pernod, Gilles; Bertoletti, Laurent; Jego, Patrick; Duhamel, Elisabeth; Provost, Karine; Parent, Florence; Robin, Philippe; Deloire, Lucile; Leven, Florent; Mingant, Fanny; Bressollette, Luc; Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Salaun, Pierre-Yves; Nonent, Michel; Pan-Petesch, Brigitte; Planquette, Benjamin; Girard, Philippe; Lacut, Karine; Melac, Solen; Mismetti, Patrick; Laporte, Silvy; Meyer, Guy; Mottier, Dominique; Leroyer, Christophe; Couturaud, Francis

    2018-01-01

    We aimed to identify risk factors for recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) after unprovoked pulmonary embolism.Analyses were based on the double-blind randomised PADIS-PE trial, which included 371 patients with a first unprovoked pulmonary embolism initially treated during 6 months who were randomised to receive an additional 18 months of warfarin or placebo and followed up for 2 years after study treatment discontinuation. All patients had ventilation/perfusion lung scan at inclusion (i.e. at 6 months of anticoagulation).During a median follow-up of 41 months, recurrent VTE occurred in 67 out of 371 patients (6.8 events per 100 person-years). In main multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for recurrence was 3.65 (95% CI 1.33-9.99) for age 50-65 years, 4.70 (95% CI 1.78-12.40) for age >65 years, 2.06 (95% CI 1.14-3.72) for patients with pulmonary vascular obstruction index (PVOI) ≥5% at 6 months and 2.38 (95% CI 1.15-4.89) for patients with antiphospholipid antibodies. When considering that PVOI at 6 months would not be available in practice, PVOI ≥40% at pulmonary embolism diagnosis (present in 40% of patients) was also associated with a 2-fold increased risk of recurrence.After a first unprovoked pulmonary embolism, age, PVOI at pulmonary embolism diagnosis or after 6 months of anticoagulation and antiphospholipid antibodies were found to be independent predictors for recurrence. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  3. Family history of venous thromboembolism predicts the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Christopher; Agy, Chad; Carlson, Margaret; Steenblik, Jacob; Bledsoe, Joseph; Hartsell, Stephen; Madsen, Troy

    2018-01-06

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) clinical decision rules do not consider a patient's family history of venous thromboembolism (VTE). We evaluated whether a family history of VTE predicts acute PE in the emergency department (ED). Over a 5.5-year study period, we enrolled a prospective convenience sample of patients presenting to an academic emergency department with chest pain and/or shortness of breath. We defined a family history of VTE as a first-degree relative with previous PE or deep vein thrombosis (DVT). We noted outcomes of testing during the patient's ED stay, including the diagnosis of acute PE by either computed tomography (CT) or ventilation/perfusion (VQ) scan. Of the 3024 study patients, 19.4% reported a family history of VTE and 1.9% were diagnosed with an acute PE during the ED visit. Patients with a family history of VTE were more likely to be diagnosed with a PE: 3.2% vs. 1.6% (p = 0.009). 82.3% of patients were Pulmonary Embolism Rule-out Criteria (PERC) positive, and among PERC-positive patients, those with a family history of VTE were more likely to be diagnosed with a PE: 3.6% vs. 1.9% (p = 0.016). Of patients who underwent testing for PE (33.7%), patients with a family history of VTE were more likely to be diagnosed with a PE: 9.4% vs. 4.9% (p = 0.032). Patients with a self-reported family history of VTE in a first-degree relative are more likely to be diagnosed with an acute PE in the ED, even among those patients considered to have a higher likelihood of PE. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Management of cancer-associated venous thromboembolism - a case-based practical approach.

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    Voigtlaender, Minna; Langer, Florian

    2018-01-12

    In patients with solid tumours or haematological malignancies, venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a leading cause of death and significantly contributes to morbidity and healthcare resource utilization. Current practice guidelines recommend long-term anticoagulation with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) as the treatment of choice for cancer-associated VTE, based on clinical trial data showing an overall improved safety and efficacy profile of LMWH compared to vitamin K antagonists. However, several open questions remain, e. g. with regard to the intensity and duration of LMWH therapy; moreover, recent real-world evidence indicates that adherence to parenteral anticoagulation with LMWH over the course of treatment is poor in clinical practice. In this regard, the direct oral factor Xa or thrombin inhibitors (DOACs) have emerged as potential alternatives in the management of patients with cancer-associated VTE, albeit findings from randomized controlled studies with a direct head-to-head comparison of DOACs with LMWH, the current standard of care, are still lacking. Based on the case of a lymphoma patient experiencing symptomatic pulmonary embolism during immunochemotherapy, this article aims at both highlighting the current state-of-the-art approach to cancer-associated VTE and pointing out some of the unresolved, controversial issues clinicians have to face when taking care of haematology and oncology patients with already established or with high risk of developing VTE. These issues include the management of patients with incidental pulmonary embolism or thrombocytopenia, the use of DOACs, and the initiation of pharmacological thromboprophylaxis in non-surgical cancer patients.

  5. Natural history of venous thromboembolism in patients from the Mediterranean region. A systematic review.

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    Sánchez Muñoz-Torrero, J F; Lorenzo-Hernández, A; Trujillo-Santos, J; Fernández-Capitán, C; Zamorano, J; Monreal, M

    2014-05-01

    Patients with cardiovascular diseases living in the Mediterranean area have a better outcome than those in other parts of the world, but it is not known whether these differences also occur with venous thromboembolism (VTE). We searched the Medline and EMBASE databases to identify clinical trials and cohort studies of patients with VTE who had been treated with anticoagulant therapy for 3 months. Two reviewers independently extracted the data in a standardized manner. A total of 24 studies that included 7,225 patients (2,414 from the Mediterranean region and 4,811 from other regions) were analyzed. The patients from the Mediterranean area were predominately women and older, and the idiopathic VTE was less frequent than in other regions. Compared with patients from other regions, patients from the Mediterranean region had an increased rate of recurrent deep vein thrombosis (4.35% vs. 2.68%; odds ratio [OR], 1.65; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.27-2.15), fatal recurrent VTE (0.75% vs. 0.35%; OR, 2.11; 95% CI 1.09-4.12) and fatal bleeding (0.25% vs. 0.06%; odds ratio: 3.99; 95% CI 1.00-16.0). The case-fatality rate (CFR) for recurrent VTE was 12.8% (95% CI 7.99-19.1) in the Mediterranean region and 8.41% (5.15-12.9) in other areas. The CFR for major bleeding was 11.3% (95% CI 4.72-22.1) and 3.22% (95% CI 0.83-8.53), respectively. Compared to other regions, patients with VTE from the Mediterranean region have greater mortality during the first 3 months of treatment due to a greater incidence of recurrent VTE and severe hemorrhaging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of recent immobilization or surgery on mortality in cancer patients with venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Gussoni, Gualberto; Gadelha, Telma; Sänchez Muñoz-Torrero, Juan Francisco; Barron, Manuel; Lopez, Luciano; Ruiz-Ruiz, Justo; Fernandez-Capitan, Carmen; Lorente, Manuel; Monreal, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    The influence of recent immobilization or surgery on mortality in cancer patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been thoroughly studied. We used the RIETE Registry data to compare the 3-month mortality rate in cancer patients with VTE, with patients categorized according to the presence of recent immobilization, surgery or neither. The major outcomes were fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) and fatal bleeding within the first 3 months. Of 6,746 patients with active cancer and acute VTE, 1,224 (18%) had recent immobilization, 1,055 (16%) recent surgery, and 4,467 (66%) had neither. The all-cause mortality was 23.4% (95% CI: 22.4-24.5), and the PE-related mortality: 2.5% (95% CI: 2.1-2.9). Four in every ten patients dying of PE had recent immobilization (37%) or surgery (5.4%). Only 28% of patients with immobilization had received prophylaxis, as compared with 67% of the surgical. Fatal PE was more common in patients with recent immobilization (5.0%; 95% CI: 3.9-6.3) than in those with surgery (0.8%; 95% CI: 0.4-1.6) or neither (2.2%; 95% CI: 1.8-2.6). On multivariate analysis, patients with immobilization were at an increased risk for fatal PE (odds ratio: 1.8; 95% CI: 1.2-2.5). One in every three cancer patients dying of PE had recent immobilization for ≥ 4 days. Many of these deaths could have been prevented with adequate thromboprophylaxis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Repair of Chronic Achilles Ruptures Has a High Incidence of Venous Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Mark J; DeCarbo, William T; Hofbauer, Mark H; Thun, Joshua D

    2017-10-01

    Despite the low incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in foot and ankle surgery, some authors report a high incidence of symptomatic DVT following Achilles tendon rupture. The purpose of this study was to identify DVT risk factors inherent to Achilles tendon repair to determine which patients may benefit from prophylaxis. One hundred and thirteen patient charts were reviewed following elective and nonelective Achilles tendon repair. For elective repair of insertional or noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy, parameters examined included lateral versus prone positioning and the presence versus absence of a flexor hallucis longus transfer. For nonelective repair, acute Achilles tendon ruptures were compared to chronic Achilles tendon ruptures. Of 113 Achilles tendon repairs, 3 venous thromboembolism (VTE) events (2.65%) occurred including 2 pulmonary emboli (1.77%). Seventeen of these repairs were chronic Achilles tendon ruptures, and all 3 VTE events (17.6%) occurred within this subgroup. Elevated body mass index was associated with VTE in patients with chronic Achilles ruptures although this did not reach significance ( P = .064). No VTE events were reported after repair of 28 acute tendon ruptures or after 68 elective repairs of tendinopathy. Two patients with misdiagnosed partial Achilles tendon tears were excluded because they experienced a VTE event 3 weeks and 5 weeks after injury, prior to surgery. In our retrospective review, chronic Achilles ruptures had a statistically significant higher incidence of VTE compared with acute Achilles ruptures ( P = .048) or elective repair ( P = .0069). Pharmaceutical anticoagulation may be considered for repair of chronic ruptures. Repair of acute ruptures and elective repair may not warrant routine prophylaxis due to a lower incidence of VTE. Prognostic, Level III: Case Control Study.

  8. Alcohol consumption, types of alcoholic beverages and risk of venous thromboembolism - the Tromsø Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Krone, Ida J; Brækkan, Sigrid K; Enga, Kristin F; Wilsgaard, Tom; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2011-08-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption has been shown to protect against cardiovascular diseases. The association between alcohol consumption, especially types of alcoholic beverages, and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is less well described. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of alcohol consumption and different alcoholic beverages on risk of VTE. Information on alcohol consumption was collected by a self-administrated questionnaire in 26,662 subjects, aged 25-97 years, who participated in the Tromsø Study, in 1994-1995. Subjects were followed through September 1, 2007 with incident VTE as the primary outcome. There were 460 incident VTE-events during a median of 12.5 years of follow-up. Total alcohol consumption was not associated with risk of incident VTE. However, subjects consuming ≥ 3 units of liquor per week had 53% increased risk of VTE compared to teetotalers in analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, cancer, previous cardiovascular disease, physical activity and higher education (HR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.00-2.33). Contrary, subjects with a wine intake of ≥ 3 units/week had 22% reduced risk of VTE (HR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.47-1.30), further adjustment for liquor and beer intake strengthened the protective effect of wine (HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.30-1.00). Frequent binge drinkers (≥ 1/week) had a 17% increased risk of VTE compared to teetotallers (HR 1.17, 95% CI: 0.66-2.09), and a 47% increased risk compared to non-binge drinkers (HR 1.47, 95% CI: 0.85-2.54). In conclusion, liquor consumption and binge drinking was associated with increased risk of VTE, whereas wine consumption was possibly associated with reduced risk of VTE.

  9. Venous thromboembolism in assisted reproductive technologies: comparison between unsuccessful versus successful cycles in an Italian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Michela; Favuzzi, Giovanni; Totaro, Pasquale; Chinni, Elena; Vecchione, Gennaro; Vergura, Patrizia; Fischetti, Lucia; Margaglione, Maurizio; Grandone, Elvira

    2017-11-23

    Pregnancies after assisted reproductive technologies (ART) have been associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). On the contrary, the magnitude of this risk in unsuccessful ART cycles (not resulting in a clinical pregnancy) has not yet been clearly defined. In this study, we evaluated the incidence of VTE in unsuccessful cycles and compared it with that recorded in successful cycles in the same study population. From a cohort of 998 women consecutively referred by local Fertility Clinics to our Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis Unit (April 2002-July 2011), we identified and included women with at least one cycle of ovarian stimulation and a negative history for VTE. Overall, 661 women undergone 1518 unsuccessful and 318 successful cycles of ovarian stimulation, respectively, were analysed. VTE events occurred in 2/1518 (1.3‰) unsuccessful cycles compared with 3/318 (9.4‰) successful cycles, (Two-tailed Fisher exact test, p = 0.04, OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.02-1.02). Both cases observed in unsuccessful cycles were isolated pulmonary embolism occurred after OHSS; no antithrombotic prophylaxis had been prescribed. At logistic regression analysis, the occurrence of successful cycle and BMI were significantly and independently associated with the occurrence of VTE with an OR of 13.94 (95% CI 1.41-137.45) and 1.23 (95% CI 1.01-1.49), respectively. VTE incidence is significantly lower in unsuccessful cycles as compared to that of successful ones. However, although rare, thrombotic risk during ovarian stimulation cannot be excluded and, when it occurs, can be life-threatening. Therefore, particular attention should be paid to these women, independently of ART outcome.

  10. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in hospitalized elderly patients: Time to consider a 'MUST' strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kwok M; Litton, Edward

    2011-06-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the commonest cause of preventable death in hospitalized patients. Elderly patients have higher risk of VTE because of the high prevalence of predisposing co-morbidities and acute illnesses. Clinical diagnosis of VTE in the elderly patient is particularly difficult and, as such, adequate VTE prophylaxis is of pivotal importance in reducing the mortality and morbidities of VTE. Omission of VTE prophylaxis is, however, very common despite continuous education. A simple way to overcome this problem is to implement universal VTE prophylaxis for all hospitalized elderly patients instead of selective prophylaxis for some patients only according to individual's risk of VTE. Although pharmacological VTE prophylaxis is effective for most patients, a high prevalence of renal impairment and drug interactions in the hospitalized elderly patients suggests that a multimodality approach may be more appropriate. Mechanical VTE prophylaxis, including calf and thigh compression devices and/or an inferior vena cava filter, are often underutilized in hospitalized elderly patients who are at high-risk of bleeding and VTE. Because pneumatic compression devices and thigh length stockings are virtually risk free, mechanical VTE prophylaxis may allow early or immediate implementation of VTE prophylaxis for all hospitalized elderly patients, regardless of their bleeding and VTE risk. Although the cost-effectiveness of this Multimodality Universal STat ('MUST') VTE prophylaxis approach for hospitalized elderly patients remains uncertain, this strategy appears to offer some advantages over the traditional 'selective and single-modal' VTE prophylaxis approach, which often becomes 'hit or miss' or not implemented promptly in many hospitalized elderly patients. A large clustered randomized controlled trial is, however, needed to assess whether early, multimodality, universal VTE prophylaxis can improve important clinical outcomes of hospitalized elderly patients.

  11. Venous Thromboembolism in Critically Ill Cirrhotic Patients: Practices of Prophylaxis and Incidence

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    Hasan M. Al-Dorzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We compared venous thromboembolism (VTE prophylaxis practices and incidence in critically ill cirrhotic versus noncirrhotic patients and evaluated cirrhosis as a VTE risk factor. Methods. A cohort of 798 critically ill patients followed for the development of clinically detected VTE were categorized according to the diagnosis of cirrhosis. VTE prophylaxis practices and incidence were compared. Results. Seventy-five (9.4% patients had cirrhosis with significantly higher INR (2.2 ± 0.9 versus 1.3 ± 0.6, P<0.0001, lower platelet counts (115,000 ± 90,000 versus 258,000 ± 155,000/μL, P<0.0001, and higher creatinine compared to noncirrhotic patients. Among cirrhotics, 31 patients received only mechanical prophylaxis, 24 received pharmacologic prophylaxis, and 20 did not have any prophylaxis. Cirrhotic patients were less likely to receive pharmacologic prophylaxis (odds ratio, 0.08; 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.04–0.14. VTE occurred in only two (2.7% cirrhotic patients compared to 7.6% in noncirrhotic patients (P=0.11. The incidence rate was 2.2 events per 1000 patient-ICU days for cirrhotic patients and 3.6 events per 1000 patient-ICU days for noncirrhotics (incidence rate ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.15–2.52. On multivariate Cox regression analysis, cirrhosis was not associated with VTE risk (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.10–1.67. Conclusions. In critically ill cirrhotic patients, VTE incidence did not statistically differ from that in noncirrhotic patients.

  12. Translating evidence-based guidelines into performance measures for venous thromboembolism and acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groce, James B

    2007-06-01

    The evolution of evidence-based quality measures in healthcare, specific performance measures that have been developed by various groups for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE), the objectives and potential benefits of a national quality improvement initiative designed to improve the care of high-risk patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), the reporting of performance data to the public to guide consumer choice, and the recent growth in pay-for-performance programs are described. Efforts to develop evidence-based quality measures began in the mid to late 1990s and have led to the creation of various safe practices, indicators, standards, and quality measures and initiatives. The prevention and treatment of VTE and the management of ACS have been the focus of some of these initiatives. Reporting of data for two surgery-related VTE process measures to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services began January 1, 2007, and two additional measures may be used in the future. The Joint Commission and National Quality Forum have proposed eight core measures for the prevention and care of VTE that could eventually be used in hospital accreditation decisions. A national quality improvement initiative, CRUSADE, provides participating hospitals with feedback about performance in caring for high-risk patients with non-ST-segment elevation ACS. Reporting of performance data to the public facilitates healthcare decision making by consumers. The use of pay-for-performance programs that provide incentives and rewards for meeting quality goals has grown rapidly in recent years. The various initiatives under way using evidence-based performance measures to evaluate quality of care for VTE and ACS have the potential to improve patient outcomes.

  13. Associations between polymorphisms in coagulation-related genes and venous thromboembolism

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    Jiang, Jun; Liu, Kang; Zou, Junjie; Ma, Hao; Yang, Hongyu; Zhang, Xiwei; Jiao, Yuanyong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Recently, several studies showed that the polymorphisms in the coagulation-related genes might be associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE); however, the results were still controversial. We performed a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis to investigate the associations between the endothelial cell-activated protein C receptor (EPCR) rs9574, F11 rs2289252, F11 rs2036914, FGG rs2066865, FGG rs1049636, CYP4V2 rs13146272, SERPINC1 rs2227589, and GP6 rs1613662 polymorphisms with the risk of VTE. Methods: We searched both the common English-language databases and the Chinese literature databases. Two authors selected studies according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Crude odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to estimate the strength of this association. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed with the chi-square-based Q test and the I2 statistic. Results: Overall, a total of 20 studies were included. The meta-analysis revealed that the F11 rs2289252, F11 rs2036914, FGG rs2066865, and CYP4V2 rs13146272 polymorphisms were closely related to the development of VTE in the white race under the best genetic models after multiple testing adjustments. The EPCR rs9574, FGG rs1049636, SERPINC1 rs2227589, and GP6 rs1613662 polymorphisms might be potential candidates in the pathogenesis of VTE, but trial sequential analyses and sensitivity analyses indicated that the evidences were limited. Larger scale studies were demanded to avoid false-positive outcomes. Conclusions: Finally, our study demonstrated the important role of rs2289252, rs2036914, rs2066865, and rs13146272 polymorphisms in the development of VTE in the white race. Rs9574, rs1049636, rs2227589 and rs1613662 polymorphisms might be risk factors of VTE. However, more studies involving diverse races are needed to probe the ethnic difference and the underlying mechanisms of significant associations. PMID:28353616

  14. Prediction of venous thromboembolism using semantic and sentiment analyses of clinical narratives.

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    Sabra, Susan; Mahmood Malik, Khalid; Alobaidi, Mazen

    2018-01-03

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the third most common cardiovascular disorder. It affects people of both genders at ages as young as 20 years. The increased number of VTE cases with a high fatality rate of 25% at first occurrence makes preventive measures essential. Clinical narratives are a rich source of knowledge and should be included in the diagnosis and treatment processes, as they may contain critical information on risk factors. It is very important to make such narrative blocks of information usable for searching, health analytics, and decision-making. This paper proposes a Semantic Extraction and Sentiment Assessment of Risk Factors (SESARF) framework. Unlike traditional machine-learning approaches, SESARF, which consists of two main algorithms, namely, ExtractRiskFactor and FindSeverity, prepares a feature vector as the input to a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to make a diagnosis. SESARF matches and maps the concepts of VTE risk factors and finds adjectives and adverbs that reflect their levels of severity. SESARF uses a semantic- and sentiment-based approach to analyze clinical narratives of electronic health records (EHR) and then predict a diagnosis of VTE. We use a dataset of 150 clinical narratives, 80% of which are used to train our prediction classifier support vector machine, with the remaining 20% used for testing. Semantic extraction and sentiment analysis results yielded precisions of 81% and 70%, respectively. Using a support vector machine, prediction of patients with VTE yielded precision and recall values of 54.5% and 85.7%, respectively. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with splenic injury and splenectomy. A nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiun-Nong; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lai, Chung-Hsu; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Yang, Chih-Hui; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    The spleen is a crucial organ in humans. However, little is known about the association of venous thromboembolism (VTE) with splenic injury and splenectomy in trauma patients. The aim of this study was to determine the subsequent risk of VTE following splenic injury and splenectomy. A nationwide retrospective cohort study was conducted by analysing data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included 6,162 splenic injury patients (3,033 splenectomised and 3,129 nonsplenectomised patients) and 24,648 comparison patients who were selected by frequency match based on sex, age, and the index year during 2000-2006. All patients were followed until the occurrence of VTE, 31 December, 2011, death, or withdrawal from the insurance program. The age of patients with splenic injury was 41.93 ± 16.44 years. The incidence rates of VTE were 11.81, 8.46, and 5.21 per 10,000 person-years in the splenic injury patients with splenectomy, splenic injury patients without splenectomy, and comparison patients, respectively. Compared with the comparison cohort, splenic injury patients with splenectomy exhibited a 2.21-fold risk of VTE (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.43-3.43), whereas those without splenectomy exhibited a 1.71-fold risk of VTE (95% CI, 1.05-2.80). The overall incidence rate of VTE was 1.97-fold higher in the splenic injury cohort than the comparison cohort (95% CI, 1.38-2.81). Although splenectomy increased the risk of VTE 1.35-fold compared with no splenectomy, the difference was not statistically significant (95% CI, 0.74-2.45). These results may alert physicians and patients to the complications of splenic injury and splenectomy.

  16. Contribution of novel anticoagulants fondaparinux and dabigatran to venous thromboembolism prevention

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    Antonijević Nebojša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The data that episodes and sequels of venous thromboembolism (VTE are recorded in a significant percentage of patients receiving standard anticoagulants as VTE prophylaxis (unfractionated, low-molecular-weight heparin and vitamin K inhibitors as well as the fact that these drugs have significant limitations and that they may cause serious side-effects in some patients indicate the need for the introduction of new anticoagulant drugs. Fondaparinux, a selective inhibitor of Factor Xa, administered following major orthopedic surgeries having a high risk for the development of VTE, is more efficient than enoxaparin sodium used in European and North-American approved doses. The increased incidence of major bleeding (excluding fatal due to fondaparinux could be perhaps lowered by dosage reduction in patients with a mildly decreased creatinine clearance. Dabigatran, a peroral direct thrombin inhibitor, administered for VTE prophylaxis in elective hip and knee surgery, showed in to date studies the efficacy comparable (if dabigatran is given in both dosage regimes of 150 mg and 220 mg daily or superior (if dabigatran is given at a dose of 220 mg daily to enoxaparin administered in European-approved doses, while North American-approved doses of enoxaparin were superior than dabigatran in VTE reduction. No significant differences in bleeding rates were determined in any of the study groups. We consider that the introduction of new anticoagulants, including fondaparinux and dabigatran, will contribute to the establishment of a better safety profile and efficacy, and will also enable adequate therapy individualization for each patient depending on his/hers clinical characteristics. The introduction of novel peroral anticoagulants will, inter alia, significantly contribute to improvement in the quality of life, release the patient from numerous limitations in nutrition, interreaction, frequent laboratory monitoring, and also significantly improve therapeutic

  17. European guidelines on perioperative venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: Day surgery and fast-track surgery.

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    Venclauskas, Linas; Llau, Juan V; Jenny, Jean-Yves; Kjaersgaard-Andersen, Per; Jans, Øivind

    2017-11-06

    : In recent years, day surgery and fast-track surgery have experienced a continuous increase in volume. Many procedures are now performed on an outpatient protocol, including general, orthopaedic, oncological, reconstructive or vascular surgery. The management of these patients is safe, but the incidence of venous thromboembolism in this population remains unknown. Several risk factors can be identified and stratified derived from studies of inpatient surgical management (e.g. Caprini score). Recommendations for thromboprophylaxis should be tailored from the assessment of both personal and procedure-related risk factors, although with a lack of evidence for application in outpatient management. For patients undergoing a low-risk procedure without additional risk factors, we recommend only general measures of thromboprophylaxis (early ambulation, optimal hydration) (Grade 1B). For patients undergoing a low-risk procedure with additional risk factors, or a high-risk procedure without additional risk factors, we recommend general measures of thromboprophylaxis (Grade 1B) and we suggest the administration of pharmacological prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparins (Grade 2B). For patients undergoing a high-risk procedure with additional risk factors we recommend general measures of thromboprophylaxis (Grade 1B) and pharmacological prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparins over other drugs (Grade 1B), or suggest specific mechanical measures in case of increased bleeding risk (Grade 2C). Pharmacological prophylaxis should last a minimum of 7 days (Grade 1B), although in selected cases of fast-track surgery, thromboprophylaxis could be limited to hospitalisation only (Grade 2C) and in specific cases of high-risk procedures, thromboprophylaxis could be extended for up to 4 weeks (Grade 2B).

  18. Venous thromboembolism in patients with renal insufficiency: findings from the RIETE Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal, Manuel; Falgá, Conxita; Valle, Reina; Barba, Raquel; Bosco, Juan; Beato, José Luís; Maestre, Ana

    2006-12-01

    Current guidelines make no specific recommendations for venous thromboembolism (VTE) treatment in patients with renal insufficiency, but some experts recommend some reduction in heparin dose. Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad TromboEmbólica (RIETE) is an ongoing, prospective registry of consecutively enrolled patients with objectively confirmed, symptomatic, acute VTE. In this analysis we retrospectively analyzed the effect of renal insufficiency on the incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) and fatal bleeding within 15 days of diagnosis. Up to March 2005, 10,526 patients with acute VTE were enrolled in RIETE, of whom 9234 (88%) had a creatinine clearance (CrCl) greater than 60 mL/min, 704 (6.7%) had a CrCl 30 to 60 mL/min, and 588 (5.6%) had a CrCl less than 30 mL/min. The incidence of fatal PE during the study period was 1.0%, 2.6%, and 6.6%, respectively. Fatal bleeding occurred in 0.2%, 0.3%, and 1.2% of the patients, respectively. On multivariate analysis, patients with a CrCl less than 30 mL/min were independently associated with an increased risk for fatal PE and fatal bleeding. In addition, initial diagnosis of PE, immobility for 4 days or more, cancer, and initial therapy with unfractionated heparin were independent predictors of fatal PE; whereas immobility for 4 days or more and cancer were independent predictors of fatal bleeding. Patients with VTE who have renal insufficiency had an increased incidence of both fatal PE and fatal bleeding, but the risk of fatal PE far exceeded that of fatal bleeding. Our data support the use of full-dose anticoagulant therapy, even in patients with a CrCl less than 30 mL/min.

  19. Determinants of venous thromboembolism among hospitalizations of US adults: a multilevel analysis.

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    James Tsai

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a significant clinical and public health concern. We evaluated a variety of multilevel factors--demographics, clinical and insurance status, preexisting comorbid conditions, and hospital characteristics--for VTE diagnosis among hospitalizations of US adults.We generated adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs and determined sources of outcome variation by conducting multilevel logistic regression analysis of data from the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample that included 6,710,066 hospitalizations of US adults nested within 1,039 hospitals.Among hospitalizations of adults, age, sex, race or ethnicity, total days of hospital stay, status of health insurance, and operating room procedure were important determinants of VTE diagnosis; each of the following preexisting comorbid conditions--acquired immune deficiency syndrome, anemia, arthritis, congestive heart failure, coagulopathy, hypertension, lymphoma, metastatic cancer, other neurological disorders, obesity, paralysis, pulmonary circulation disorders, renal failure, solid tumor without metastasis, and weight loss--was associated independently with 1.04 (95% CI: 1.02-1.06 to 2.91 (95% CI: 2.81-3.00 times increased likelihood of VTE diagnosis than among hospitalizations of adults without any of these corresponding conditions. The presence of 2 or more of such conditions was associated a 180%-450% increased likelihood of a VTE diagnosis. Hospitalizations of adults who were treated in urban hospitals were associated with a 14%-15% increased likelihood of having a VTE diagnosis than those treated in rural hospitals. Approximately 7.4% of the total variation in VTE diagnosis occurred between hospitals.The presence of certain comorbidities and hospital contextual factors is associated with significantly elevated likelihood of VTE diagnosis among hospitalizations of adults. The findings of this study underscore the importance of clinical risk assessment and

  20. Prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility and risk of venous thromboembolism.

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    Healy, Bridget; Levin, Erik; Perrin, Kyle; Weatherall, Mark; Beasley, Richard

    2010-11-01

    To determine the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) associated with prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility. Case-control study in which cases were patients aged 18-65 years attending outpatient VTE clinics, and controls were patients aged 18-65 years admitted to CCU with a condition other than VTE. Interviewer-administered questionnaires obtained detailed information on VTE risk factors and clinical details. VTE Clinics and Coronary Care Unit (CCU), Wellington and Kenepuru Hospitals, Wellington between February 2007 and February 2009. The relative risk of VTE associated with prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility, defined as being seated at work and on the computer at home, at least 10 hours in a 24-hour period and at least 2 hours at a time without getting up, during the four weeks prior to the onset of symptoms that led to VTE diagnosis or CCU admission. There were 197 cases and 197 controls. Prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility was present in 33/197 (16.8%) and 19/197 (9.6%) cases and controls, respectively. In multivariate analyses, prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility was associated with an increased risk of VTE, odds ratio 2.8 (95% CI 1.2-6.1, P=0.013). The maximum and average number of hours seated in a 24-hour period were associated with an increased risk of VTE, with odds ratios of 1.1 (95% CI 1.0-1.2, P=0.008) and 1.1 (95% CI 1.0-1.2, P=0.014) per additional hour seated. Prolonged work- and computer-related seated immobility increases the risk of VTE. We suggest that there needs to be both a greater awareness of the role of prolonged work-related seated immobility in the pathogenesis of VTE, and the development of occupational strategies to decrease the risk.

  1. Hereditary risk factors for thrombophilia and probability of venous thromboembolism during pregnancy and the puerperium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Andrea; Scharf, Rüdiger E; Greer, Ian A; Zotz, Rainer B

    2016-11-10

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a leading cause of maternal mortality. Few studies have evaluated the individual risk of gestational VTE associated with heritable thrombophilia, and current recommendations for antenatal thromboprophylaxis in women with severe thrombophilia such as homozygous factor V Leiden mutation (FVL) depend on a positive family history of VTE. To better stratify thromboprophylaxis in pregnancy, we aimed to estimate the individual probability (absolute risk) of gestational VTE associated with thrombophilia and to see whether these risk factors are independent of a family history of VTE in first-degree relatives. We studied 243 women with the first VTE during pregnancy and the puerperium and 243 age-matched normal women. Baseline incidence of VTE of 1:483 pregnancies in women ≥35 years and 1:741 deliveries in women <35 years was assumed, according to a recent population-based study. In women ≥35 years (<35 years), the individual probability of gestational VTE was as follows: 0.7% (0.5%) for heterozygous FVL; 3.4% (2.2%) for homozygous FVL; 0.6% (0.4%) for heterozygous prothrombin G20210A; 8.2% (5.5%) for compound heterozygotes for FVL and prothrombin G20210A; 9.0% (6.1%) for antithrombin deficiency; 1.1% (0.7%) for protein C deficiency; and 1.0% (0.7%) for protein S deficiency. These results were independent of a positive family history of VTE. We provide evidence that unselected women with these thrombophilias have an increased risk of gestational VTE independent of a positive family history of VTE. In contrast to current guidelines, these data suggest that women with high-risk thrombophilia should be considered for antenatal thromboprophylaxis regardless of family history of VTE. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. Perioperative bleeding and blood transfusion are major risk factors for venous thromboembolism following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Alexander W; Helm, Melissa C; Kindel, Tammy; Higgins, Rana; Lak, Kathleen; Helmen, Zachary M; Gould, Jon C

    2017-11-03

    Morbidly obese patients are at increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) after bariatric surgery. Perioperative chemoprophylaxis is used routinely with bariatric surgery to decrease the risk of VTE. When bleeding occurs, routine chemoprophylaxis is often withheld due to concerns about inciting another bleeding event. We sought to evaluate the relationship between perioperative bleeding and postoperative VTE in bariatric surgery. The American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) dataset between 2012 and 2014 was queried to identify patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Gastric bypass (n = 28,145), sleeve gastrectomy (n = 30,080), bariatric revision (n = 324), and biliopancreatic diversion procedures (n = 492) were included. Univariate and multivariate regressions were used to determine perioperative factors predictive of postoperative VTE within 30 days in patients who experience a bleeding complication necessitating transfusion. The rate of bleeding necessitating transfusion was 1.3%. Bleeding was significantly more likely to occur in gastric bypass compared to sleeve gastrectomy (1.6 vs. 1.0%) (p surgeries, increased age, length of stay, operative time, and comorbidities including hypertension, dyspnea with moderate exertion, partially dependent functional status, bleeding disorder, transfusion prior to surgery, ASA class III/IV, and metabolic syndrome increased the perioperative bleeding risk (p Bariatric surgery patients who receive postoperative blood transfusion are at a significantly increased risk for VTE. The etiology of VTE in those who are transfused is likely multifactorial and possibly related to withholding chemoprophylaxis and the potential of a hypercoagulable state induced by the transfusion. In those who bleed, consideration should be given to reinitiating chemoprophylaxis when safe, extending treatment after discharge, and screening ultrasound.

  3. Soluble endothelial cell molecules and circulating endothelial cells in patients with venous thromboembolism.

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    Torres, Cláudia; Matos, Rui; Morais, Sara; Campos, Manuel; Lima, Margarida

    2017-12-01

    : To evaluate the plasma levels of soluble endothelial cell molecules in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) out of the acute phase as compared with healthy individuals. We also investigated the possible associations of the soluble endothelial cell molecules among them, as well as with other clinical and laboratory data, including the numbers of circulating endothelial cells (CEC), circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEP), and CEC expressing activation-related [cluster of differentiation (CD)54 and CD62E] and procoagulant (CD142) markers. In total, 15 patients with VTE and 20 normal individuals were studied. The CEC and CEP were quantified and characterized by flow cytometry. The soluble molecules studied included P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and tissue factor (ELISA), and von Willebrand factor antigen (immunoturbidimetry). VTE patients had significantly higher levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and von Willebrand factor antigen and lower levels of soluble E-selectin than controls. They also showed significantly higher numbers of CEC, as of activated/procoagulant CEC and lower numbers of CEP, compared with controls. We did not find any correlation between the levels of soluble molecules and the numbers of endothelial cell in circulation, but there was with several clinical and laboratory data in VTE patients. Our results would suggest that in VTE patients, the endothelium remains activated and in some hypercoagulable state. The levels of soluble endothelial cell molecules did not seem to be directly related to the numbers of CEC and CEP neither reflected the number of activated CEC, which may be because of the different function that surface and soluble molecules may have.

  4. Venous thromboembolism management in Northeast Melbourne: how does it compare to international guidelines and data?

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    Lim, Hui Y; Chua, Chong C; Tacey, Mark; Sleeman, Matthew; Donnan, Geoffrey; Nandurkar, Harshal; Ho, Prahlad

    2017-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality with significant heterogeneity in its management, both within our local practice and in international guidelines. To provide a holistic evaluation of 'real-world' Australian experience in the warfarin era, including how we compare to international guidelines. Retrospective evaluation of VTE from July 2011 to December 2012 at two major hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. These results were compared to recommendations in the international guidelines. A total of 752 episodes involving 742 patients was identified. Contrary to international guidelines, an unwarranted heritable thrombophilia screen was performed in 22.0% of patients, amounting to a cost of AU$29 000. The duration of anticoagulation was longer compared to international recommendations, although the overall recurrence (3.2/100 person-years) and clinically significant bleeding rates (2.4/100 person-years) were comparable to 'real-world' data. Unprovoked VTE (hazard ratio 2.06; P = 0.01) was a risk factor for recurrence, and there was no difference in recurrence between major VTE (proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and/or pulmonary embolism) and isolated distal DVT (3.02 vs 3.94/100 person-years; P = 0.25). Fourteen patients were subsequently diagnosed with malignancy, and patients with recurrent VTE had increased risk of prospective cancer diagnosis (relative risk 6.68; P international guidelines, there remains heterogeneity in the management strategies, including excessive thrombophilia screening and longer duration of anticoagulation. This audit highlights the need for national VTE guidelines, as well as prospective auditing of VTE management, in the direct oral anticoagulant era for future comparison. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  5. Risk-assessment algorithm and recommendations for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in medical patients

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    Ana T Rocha

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Ana T Rocha1, Edison F Paiva2, Arnaldo Lichtenstein2, Rodolfo Milani Jr2, Cyrillo Cavalheiro-Filho3, Francisco H Maffei41Hospital Universitario Professor Edgard Santos da Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil; 2Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 3Instituto do Coracao do Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 4Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Botucatu, Sao Paulo, BrazilAbstract: The risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE in medical patients is high, but risk assessment is rarely performed because there is not yet a good method to identify candidates for prophylaxis.Purpose: To perform a systematic review about VTE risk factors (RFs in hospitalized medical patients and generate recommendations (RECs for prophylaxis that can be implemented into practice.Data sources: A multidisciplinary group of experts from 12 Brazilian Medical Societies searched MEDLINE, Cochrane, and LILACS.Study selection: Two experts independently classified the evidence for each RF by its scientific quality in a standardized manner. A risk-assessment algorithm was created based on the results of the review.Data synthesis: Several VTE RFs have enough evidence to support RECs for prophylaxis in hospitalized medical patients (eg, increasing age, heart failure, and stroke. Other factors are considered adjuncts of risk (eg, varices, obesity, and infections. According to the algorithm, hospitalized medical patients ≥40 years-old with decreased mobility, and ≥1 RFs should receive chemoprophylaxis with heparin, provided they don’t have contraindications. High prophylactic doses of unfractionated heparin or low-molecular-weight-heparin must be administered and maintained for 6–14 days.Conclusions: A multidisciplinary group generated evidence-based RECs and an easy-to-use algorithm to facilitate VTE prophylaxis in medical patients

  6. Risk factors associated with venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Keaton; Algattas, Hanna; DeAndrea-Lazarus, Ian A; Kimmell, Kristopher T; Li, Yan Michael; Walter, Kevin A; Silberstein, Howard J; Vates, G Edward

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients undergoing spinal surgery are at risk for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). The authors sought to identify risk factors for VTE in these patients. METHODS The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database for the years 2006-2010 was reviewed for patients who had undergone spinal surgery according to their primary Current Procedural Terminology code(s). Clinical factors were analyzed to identify associations with VTE. RESULTS Patients who underwent spinal surgery (n = 22,434) were identified. The rate of VTE in the cohort was 1.1% (pulmonary embolism 0.4%; deep vein thrombosis 0.8%). Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis revealed 13 factors associated with VTE. Preoperative factors included dependent functional status, paraplegia, quadriplegia, disseminated cancer, inpatient status, hypertension, history of transient ischemic attack, sepsis, and African American race. Operative factors included surgery duration > 4 hours, emergency presentation, and American Society of Anesthesiologists Class III-V, whereas postoperative sepsis was the only significant postoperative factor. A risk score was developed based on the number of factors present in each patient. Patients with a score of ≥ 7 had a 100-fold increased risk of developing VTE over patients with a score of 0. The receiver-operating-characteristic curve of the risk score generated an area under the curve of 0.756 (95% CI 0.726-0.787). CONCLUSIONS A risk score based on race, preoperative comorbidities, and operative characteristics of patients undergoing spinal surgery predicts the postoperative VTE rate. Many of these risks can be identified before surgery. Future protocols should focus on VTE prevention in patients who are predisposed to it.

  7. Menstrual Cycle Control in Female Astronauts and the Associated Risk of Venous Thromboembolism

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    Jain, Varsha; Wotring, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common and serious condition affecting approximately 1-2 per 1000 people in the USA every year. There have been no documented case reports of VTE in female astronauts during spaceflight in the published literature. Some female astronauts use hormonal contraception to control their menstrual cycles and it is currently unknown how this affects their risk of VTE. Current terrestrial risk prediction models do not account for the spaceflight environment and the physiological changes associated with it. We therefore aim to estimate a specific risk score for female astronauts who are taking hormonal contraception for menstrual cycle control, to deduce whether they are at an elevated risk of VTE. A systematic review of the literature was conducted in order to identify and quantify known terrestrial risk factors for VTE. Studies involving analogues for the female astronaut population were also reviewed, for example, military personnel who use the oral contraceptive pill for menstrual suppression. Well known terrestrial risk factors, for example, obesity or smoking would not be applicable to our study population as these candidates would have been excluded during astronaut selection processes. Other risk factors for VTE include hormonal therapy, lower limb paralysis, physical inactivity, hyperhomocysteinemia, low methylfolate levels and minor injuries, all of which potentially apply to crew members LSAH data will be assessed to identify which of these risk factors are applicable to our astronaut population. Using known terrestrial risk data, an overall estimated risk of VTE for female astronauts using menstrual cycle control methods will therefore be calculated. We predict this will be higher than the general population but not significantly higher requiring thromboprophylaxis. This study attempts to delineate what is assumed to be true of our astronaut population, for example, they are known to be a healthy fit cohort of individuals, and

  8. Prevention of venous thromboembolism and safe use of heparin in Spanish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturno, Pedro J; Gama, Zenewton A S; Fonseca, Yadira A

    2011-04-01

    To assess compliance with basic and actionable indicators in relation to prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and safe use of heparin. We built, pilot tested and measured a set of evidence-based structure (existence of guidelines) and process (risk assessment for VTE, and dose adjustment to patient weight and renal function when prescribing heparin) indicators in a nation-wide random sample of 22 hospitals. Compliance with process indicators is estimated at national level and by groups of hospitals (stratified by size). At hospital level, compliance is assessed with Lot Quality Acceptance Sampling, for 85% compliance standard (α ≤ 0.05), 55% threshold (β ≤ 0.10). Contents of existing guidelines are analyzed, and their influence on performance is assessed using logistic regression. Acute care hospitals in Spain. None Problem identification through indicators assessment. Less than half of hospitals have guidelines and their contents are very variable and incomplete. No hospital complies with the standard for VTE prevention and only one for heparin dose adjustment. Nationally, VTE risk assessment is performed in 5.8% of patients (95% CI: 5.6-6.0), and heparin dose is explicitly adjusted in 17.5% (95% CI: 16.8-18.2). Performance is relatively higher in large hospitals and it is associated with the existence of guidelines for VTE prevention (OR: 8.3; 95% CI: 2.1-32.1). We have identified some actionable contributing factors to safety problems using evidence-based structure and process indicators. Explicit process design and key clinical interventions (risk assessment for VTE and heparin dose adjustment) should be addressed to improve the current situation.

  9. [Incidence and risk factors of venous thromboembolism in major spinal surgery with no chemical or mechanical prophylaxis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Tomba, F; Gormaz-Talavera, I; Menéndez-Quintanilla, I E; Moriel-Durán, J; García de Quevedo-Puerta, D; Villanueva-Pareja, F

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of venous thromboembolism in spine surgery with no chemical and mechanical prophylaxis, and to determine the specific risk factors for this complication. A historical cohort was analysed. All patients subjected to major spinal surgery, between January 2010 and September 2014, were included. No chemical or mechanical prophylaxis was administered in any patient. Active mobilisation of lower limbs was indicated immediately after surgery, and early ambulation started in the first 24-48 hours after surgery. Clinically symptomatic cases were confirmed by Doppler ultrasound of the lower limbs or chest CT angiography. A sample of 1092 cases was studied. Thromboembolic events were observed in 6 cases (.54%); 3 cases (.27%) with deep venous thrombosis and 3 cases (.27%) with pulmonary thromboembolism. A lethal case was identified (.09%). There were no cases of major bleeding or epidural haematoma. The following risk factors were identified: a multilevel fusion at more than 4 levels, surgeries longer than 130 minutes, patients older than 70 years of age, hypertension, and degenerative scoliosis. There is little scientific evidence on the prevention of thromboembolic events in spinal surgery. In addition to the disparity of prophylactic methods indicated by different specialists, it is important to weigh the risk-benefit of intra- and post-operative bleeding, and even the appearance of an epidural haematoma. Prophylaxis should be assessed in elderly patients over 70 years old, who are subjected to surgeries longer than 130 minutes, when 4 or more levels are involved. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Thrombocalc: implementation and uptake of personalized postpartum venous thromboembolism risk assessment in a high-throughput obstetric environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, Fergal; Donnelly, Jennifer C; Cooley, Sharon M; Deering, Mary; Raman, Ajita; Gannon, Geraldine; Hickey, Jane; Holland, Alan; Hayes, Niamh; Bennett, Kathleen; Ní Áinle, Fionnuala; Cleary, Brian J

    2017-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism risk assessment (VTERA) is recommended in all pregnant and postpartum women. Our objective was to develop, pilot and implement a user-friendly electronic VTERA tool. We developed "Thrombocalc", an electronic VTERA tool using Microsoft EXCEL™ . Thrombocalc was designed as a score-based tool to facilitate rapid assessment of all women after childbirth. Calculation of a total score estimated risk of venous thromboembolism in line with consensus guidelines. Recommendations for thromboprophylaxis were included in the VTERA output. Implementation was phased. Uptake of the VTERA tool was assessed prospectively by monitoring the proportion of women who gave birth in our institution and had a completed risk assessment. Factors affecting completion and accuracy of risk assessments were also assessed. Thrombocalc was used prospectively to risk-assess 8380 women between September 2014 and December 2015. Compliance with this tool increased dramatically throughout the study period; over 92% of women were risk-assessed in the last quarter of data collection. Compliance was not adversely affected if delivery took place out of working hours [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93-1.14]. Risk assessment was less likely in the case of cesarean deliveries (aOR 0.66, 95% CI 0.60-0.73) and stillborn infants (aOR 0.48, 95% CI 0.29-0.79). Misclassification of risk factors led to approximately 207 (2.5%) inaccurate thromboprophylaxis recommendations. Our electronic, score-based VTERA tool provides a highly effective mechanism for rapid assessment of individual postpartum venous thromboembolism risk in a high-throughput environment. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  11. New oral antithrombotics: focus on dabigatran, an oral, reversible direct thrombin inhibitor for the prevention and treatment of venous and arterial thromboembolic disorders

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    Dahl OE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ola E Dahl1,21Department of Orthopaedics, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Elverum Central Hospital, Elverum, Norway; 2Thrombosis Research Institute, London, UKAbstract: Venous thromboembolism, presenting as deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, is a major challenge for health care systems. It is the third most common vascular disease after coronary heart disease and stroke, and many hospitalized patients have at least one risk factor. In particular, patients undergoing hip or knee replacement are at risk, with an incidence of asymptomatic deep vein thrombosis of 40%–60% without thromboprophylaxis. Venous thromboembolism is associated with significant mortality and morbidity, with patients being at risk of recurrence, post-thrombotic syndrome, and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Arterial thromboembolism is even more frequent, and atrial fibrillation, the most common embolic source (cardiac arrhythmia, is associated with a five-fold increase in the risk of stroke. Strokes due to atrial fibrillation tend to be more severe and disabling and are more often fatal than strokes due to other causes. Currently, recommended management of both venous and arterial thromboembolism involves the use of anticoagulants such as coumarin and heparin derivatives. These agents are effective, although have characteristics that prevent them from providing optimal anticoagulation and convenience. Hence, new improved oral anticoagulants are being investigated. Dabigatran is a reversible, direct thrombin inhibitor, which is administered as dabigatran etexilate, the oral prodrug. Because it is the first new oral anticoagulant that has been licensed in many countries worldwide for thromboprophylaxis following orthopedic surgery and for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation, this compound will be the main focus of this review. Dabigatran has been investigated for the treatment of established venous thromboembolism and prevention of

  12. Third generation oral contraceptives and risk of venous thromboembolic disorders: an international case-control study. Transnational Research Group on Oral Contraceptives and the Health of Young Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, W. O.; Lewis, M. A.; Heinemann, L. A.; Thorogood, M.; MacRae, K. D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test whether use of combined oral contraceptives containing third generation progestogens is associated with altered risk of venous thromboembolism. DESIGN--Matched case-control study. SETTING--10 centres in Germany and United Kingdom. SUBJECTS--Cases were 471 women aged 16-44 who had a venous thromboembolism. Controls were 1772 women (at least 3 controls per case) unaffected by venous thromboembolism who were matched with corresponding case for age and for hospital or community setting. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Odds ratios derived with stratified analyses and unconditional logistic regression to adjust for potential confounding variables. RESULTS--Odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for venous thromboembolism were: for any oral contraceptives versus no use, 4.0 (3.1 to 5.3); for second generation products (low dose ethinyl-oestradiol, no gestodene or desogestrel) versus no use, 3.2 (2.3 to 4.3); for third generation products (low dose ethinyloestradiol, gestodene or desogestrel) versus no use, 4.8 (3.4 to 6.7); for third generation products versus second generation products, 1.5 (1.1 to 2.1); for products containing gestodene versus second generation products, 1.5 (1.0 to 2.2); and for products containing desogestrel versus second generation products, 1.5 (1.1 to 2.2). Probability of death due to venous thromboembolism for women using third generation products is about 20 per million users per year, for women using second generation products it is about 14 per million users per year, and for non-users it is five per million per year. CONCLUSIONS--Risk of venous thromboembolism was slightly increased in users of third generation oral contraceptives compared with users of second generation products. PMID:8555935

  13. Profilaxia para tromboembolia venosa em um hospital geral Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in a general hospital

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    Fernanda Fuzinatto

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prática de profilaxia para tromboembolia venosa (TEV em pacientes em um hospital geral. MÉTODOS: Estudo de coorte transversal conduzido no Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceição, localizado na cidade de Porto Alegre (RS, com uma amostra constituída de pacientes internados selecionados randomicamente entre outubro de 2008 e fevereiro de 2009. Foram incluídos pacientes maiores de 18 anos e internados por mais de 48 h. Os critérios de exclusão foram pacientes em uso de anticoagulantes, história de doença tromboembólica, gestação e puerpério. A adequação da profilaxia foi avaliada seguindo as recomendações de um protocolo criado pela instituição e tendo como base principal a diretriz da American College of Chest Physician, oitava edição. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos 262 pacientes com média de idade de 59,1 ± 16,6 anos. Os fatores de risco mais comuns foram imobilização (70,6%, infecção (44,3%, câncer (27,5%, obesidade (23,3% e cirurgia maior (14,1%. Na avaliação do nível de risco para TEV, 143 (54,6% e 117 pacientes (44,7%, respectivamente, foram classificados como de risco alto e moderado. No geral, 46,2% dos pacientes tiveram profilaxia adequada, assim como 25% dos pacientes com três ou mais fatores de risco e 18% dos pacientes com câncer, e houve diferenças estatisticamente significativas entre esses grupos quando comparados àqueles com menos de três fatores de risco e sem câncer (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of venous thromboembolism (VTE prophylaxis in a general hospital. METHODS: A cross-sectional cohort study at the Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceição, located in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil, involving a random sample of patients admitted between October of 2008 and February of 2009. We included patients over 18 years of age and hospitalized for more than 48 h. The exclusion criteria were anticoagulant use, pregnancy, puerperium, and a history of thromboembolic disease. The

  14. Cost-effectiveness of new oral anticoagulants in the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism

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    A. V. Rudakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the cost-effectiveness of apixaban in the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE compared with low molecular weight heparin (LMWH/warfarin and other new oral anticoagulants (NOACs. Material and methods. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using a Markov model, developed on the basis of the results of AMPLIFY AMPLIFY-Ext trials, and network meta-analyzes on the use of antithrombotic drugs in acute VTE and long-term administration after VTE. Markov cycle duration was 3 months. The duration of therapy in the simulation was 6 and 12 months. The time horizon of the study was 5 years. Life expectancy and costs were discounted by 3.5% per year. The costs on drugs were estimated based on the registered marginal cost price. Besides, the analysis was performed to the weighted average auctions prices for NOACs. The costs of monitoring and treatment of complications were calculated on the basis of the collective agreement of compulsory health insurance system (St. Petersburg, 2015. Results. Apixaban provided significant cost savings compared with other modes of anticoagulant therapy for hospital treatment. Apixaban provided cost savings compared with other NOACs with a minimal increase in life expectancy with regard to quality in long-term analysis. Apixaban provided an increase in life expectancy compared with the appointment of LMWH/warfarin, but required some increase in costs. At therapy duration of 6 months, the costs per one additional year of life with regard to quality and to one additional calendar year of life were 309.8-403.7 and 481.6-627.4 thousand rubles, respectively; at therapy duration of 12 months – 1254.4-1476.9 and 649.0-764.1 thousand rubles, respectively. Conclusion. Apixaban provided a reduction in the incidence of bleeding compared with other NOACs and LMWH/warfarin with comparable efficacy in treatment and secondary prevention of VTE. Apixaban therapy costs were lower than these

  15. Adherence to thromboprophylaxis guidelines in elderly patients with hospital acquired venous thromboembolism: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Jason; Desai, Amishi; Desai, Anish; Cruz, Josephine Dela; Mariampillai, Anusiyanthan; Hindenburg, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) remains the number one preventable cause of hospital acquired mortality and morbidity. Each year, more than 12 million patients are at risk for VTE. The delivery of appropriate and timely VTE prophylaxis is still suboptimal in many healthcare institutions and can lead to increased readmissions, morbidity, as well as costs. To clarify this issue further, we performed a retrospective case control study at our institution to determine if poor adherence to the VTE prophylaxis guidelines could lead to an increase in VTE events. This was a retrospective case control study conducted at Winthrop-University Hospital from January 2007 to December 2011. Exclusion criteria were age < 18 and concurrent use of anticoagulant agents. Out of 322 cases of hospital acquired VTE or readmission with VTE within 30 days of discharge, 289 cases were selected for final analysis and paired with age and sex matched controls. Patients with a hospital acquired VTE or a readmission for VTE within 30 days of discharge had a significantly reduced rate of VTE prophylaxis when compared to the control group (54.0 vs. 79.2 %, p < 0.0001). The VTE risk assessment rate was also lower in the VTE group (77.2 vs. 85.5 %, p = 0.035). No difference was noted in the time to prophylaxis administration between the two groups (34.8 vs. 33.1 h, p = 0.34). Lastly, sequential compression device (SCD) documentation rate was not different: 68/116 (58.6 %) vs. 44/87 (50.6 %), p = 0.32, between the two arms. Low adherence to the American College of Chest Physician (ACCP) guidelines for VTE prophylaxis correlated with an increase in hospital acquired VTE. The decreased adherence may be linked to a lower VTE risk assessment rate, and other barriers including incorrect identification of contraindications to pharmacologic prophylaxis, and poor documentation of mechanical prophylaxis. There was no difference in SCD documentation rate and timeliness to

  16. European Union-28: An annualised cost-of-illness model for venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, Stefano; Woersching, Alex L; Spyropoulos, Alex C; Piovella, Franco; Mahan, Charles E

    2016-04-01

    Annual costs for venous thromboembolism (VTE) have been defined within the United States (US) demonstrating a large opportunity for cost savings. Costs for the European Union-28 (EU-28) have never been defined. A literature search was conducted to evaluate EU-28 cost sources. Median costs were defined for each cost input and costs were inflated to 2014 Euros (€) in the study country and adjusted for Purchasing Power Parity between EU countries. Adjusted costs were used to populate previously published cost-models based on adult incidence-based events. In the base model, annual expenditures for total, hospital-associated, preventable, and indirect costs were €1.5-2.2 billion, €1.0-1.5 billion, €0.5-1.1 billion and €0.2-0.3 billion, respectively (indirect costs: 12 % of expenditures). In the long-term attack rate model, total, hospital-associated, preventable, and indirect costs were €1.8-3.3 billion, €1.2-2.4 billion, €0.6-1.8 billion and €0.2-0.7 billion (indirect costs: 13 % of expenditures). In the multiway sensitivity analysis, annual expenditures for total, hospital-associated, preventable, and indirect costs were €3.0-8.5 billion, €2.2-6.2 billion, €1.1-4.6 billion and €0.5-1.4 billion (indirect costs: 22 % of expenditures). When the value of a premature life-lost increased slightly, aggregate costs rose considerably since these costs are higher than the direct medical costs. When evaluating the models aggregately for costs, the results suggests total, hospital-associated, preventable, and indirect costs ranging from €1.5-13.2 billion, €1.0-9.7 billion, €0.5-7.3 billion and €0.2-6.1 billion, respectively. Our study demonstrates that VTE costs have a large financial impact upon the EU-28's healthcare systems and that significant savings could be realised if better preventive measures are applied.

  17. Early thrombin formation capacity in trauma patients and association with venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voils, Stacy A; Lemon, Stephen J; Jordan, Janeen; Riley, Paul; Frye, Reginald

    2016-11-01

    Incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in adult trauma patients is high despite mechanical and pharmacologic prophylaxis. We hypothesized that thrombin formation capacity as measured by calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) is increased early in hospitalization and is associated with the development of VTE. We conducted a prospective study in adult, critically ill trauma patients. Plasma was generated from whole blood samples collected within the first 3days of hospital admission. CAT was used to determine lag time, thrombin peak, time to thrombin peak, endogenous thrombin potential (ETP), and velocity index in plasma samples from patients, and in control samples of platelet-poor, pooled normal plasma. There were 35 trauma patients and 35 controls included in this pilot analysis. Patients were a mean (SD) age of 45 (19) years, and 23 (66%) were male. The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle crash followed by falls, and the median (IQR) injury severity score was 17 (12-27). Three patients (8.6%) had deep vein thrombosis (DVT) confirmed by Doppler ultrasound on median hospital day 7. Compared to control samples, patients had significantly longer lag times (3.1min vs. 2.7min, p=0.02) and significantly higher ETP (1136nM∗min vs. 1019nM∗min, p=0.007), peak thrombin generation (239nM vs. 176nM, pthrombin generation between the two groups (5.5min vs. 5.7min, p=0.22). In the 3 patients with VTE compared to controls, lag times were shorter and velocity index was higher while ETP and peak thrombin generation were similar. There were no statistically significant differences in thrombin generation parameters in patients with or without VTE, but lag time was numerically shorter, and thrombin peak, time to peak and area-under-the-curve (ETP) were numerically lower in patients with DVT. We observed a thrombin generation profile in critically ill trauma patients consistent with an early hypercoagulable state; however, thrombin generation parameters did not

  18. Thrombophilic Gene Mutations in Relation to Different Manifestations of Venous Thromboembolism: A Single Tertiary Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezgin, Tahir; Kaymaz, Cihangir; Akbal, Özgür; Yılmaz, Fatih; Tokgöz, Hacer Ceren; Özdemir, Nihal

    2018-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common and potentially lethal disorder that manifests mainly as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the extremities or pulmonary embolism (PE) and occurs as a consequence of genetic and environmental risk factors. We aimed to assess the role of inherited thrombophilia as a causative or additive factor in the development of VTE. The study included 310 patients (female: 154; mean age: 52.3 ± 16.9 years) with a first episode of VTE and 289 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. All participants underwent screening for thrombophilia-associated polymorphisms including factor V Leiden (FVL), prothrombin G20210A (PTG), factor V H1299 R (factor V HR2), factor XIII V34 L, β-fibrinogen-455 G>A, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G, human platelet antigen-1 a/b, methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677 T, MTHFR A1298C, angiotensin-converting enzyme I/D, apolipoprotein B R3500Q, and apolipoprotein E (Apo E). In addition, serum homocysteine (Hcy) levels were measured. In the patient group, 247 (80%) had isolated DVT, 43 (14%) had DVT plus PE, and 20 (6%) had isolated PE. The mean Hcy levels were similar in VTE subgroups and controls. Compared to controls, patients with isolated DVT, DVT plus PE, and isolated PE showed significantly higher frequencies for the following-heterozygous FVL mutation, isolated DVT (28.3%), DVT plus PE (44.2%), isolated PE (50%), controls (8.3%; P < .001); heterozygous PTG mutation, isolated DVT (11.3%), DVT plus PE (20.9%), isolated PE (25%), controls (5.9%; P < .01); Apo E 2/4, isolated DVT (9.7%), DVT plus PE (9.3%), isolated PE (5%), controls (1%; P < .01).The MTHFR A1298C mutation showed a significantly higher frequency in isolated patients with PE than in those with isolated DVT ( P = .006) and in controls ( P = .008). The frequencies of other genetic mutations or polymorphisms showed similar frequencies in all comparisons. In logistic regression analysis, heterozygous FVL mutation was the only

  19. Risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Freesia Horsted

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: People with cancer are known to be at increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE, and this risk is believed to vary according to cancer type, stage of disease, and treatment modality. Our purpose was to summarise the existing literature to determine precisely and accurately the absolute risk of VTE in cancer patients, stratified by malignancy site and background risk of VTE. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched the Medline and Embase databases from 1 January 1966 to 14 July 2011 to identify cohort studies comprising people diagnosed with one of eight specified cancer types or where participants were judged to be representative of all people with cancer. For each included study, the number of patients who developed clinically apparent VTE, and the total person-years of follow-up were extracted. Incidence rates of VTE were pooled across studies using the generic inverse variance method. In total, data from 38 individual studies were included. Among average-risk patients, the overall risk of VTE was estimated to be 13 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI, 7 to 23, with the highest risk among patients with cancers of the pancreas, brain, and lung. Among patients judged to be at high risk (due to metastatic disease or receipt of high-risk treatments, the risk of VTE was 68 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI, 48 to 96, with the highest risk among patients with brain cancer (200 per 1,000 person-years; 95% CI, 162 to 247. Our results need to be considered in light of high levels of heterogeneity, which exist due to differences in study population, outcome definition, and average duration of follow-up between studies. CONCLUSIONS: VTE occurs in greater than 1% of cancer patients each year, but this varies widely by cancer type and time since diagnosis. The absolute VTE risks obtained from this review can aid in clinical decision-making about which people with cancer should receive anticoagulant prophylaxis and at what times.

  20. Risk factors for perioperative venous thromboembolism: A retrospective study in Japanese women with gynecologic diseases

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    Yoshimatsu Misako

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with gynecologic cancer have a high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE like patients with other cancers. However, there is little information on risk factors for VTE during gynecologic surgery and no uniform preventive strategy. Our objectives were to identify risk factors for perioperative VTE in gynecologic patients and establish methods for prevention. Methods We analyzed 1,232 patients who underwent surgery at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of St. Marianna University School of Medicine between January 2005 and June 2008. We investigated (1 risk factors for preoperative VTE, (2 use of an inferior vena cava (IVC filter, and (3 risk factors for postoperative VTE. Results There were 39 confirmed cases of perioperative VTE (3.17%, including 25 patients with preoperative VTE and 14 with postoperative VTE. Thirty-two patients had cancer and seven patients had benign diseases. Twenty-two of the 32 cancer patients (68.7% had preoperative VTE, while postoperative VTE occurred in 10 cancer patients. Multivariate analysis indicated that ovarian cancer, tumor diameter ≥10 cm, and previous of VTE were independent risk factors for preoperative VTE. Among ovarian cancer patients, multivariate analysis showed that an age ≥50 years, the presence of heart disease, clear cell adenocarcinoma, and tumor diameter ≥20 cm were independent risk factors for preoperative VTE. The factors significantly related to preoperative VTE in patients with benign disease included previous VTE, age ≥55 years, tumor diameter ≥20 cm, and a history of allergic-immunologic disease. Thirteen of the 25 patients (52% with preoperative VTE had an IVC filter inserted preoperatively. Postoperative screening (interview and D-dimer measurement revealed VTE in 14/1,232 patients (1.14%. Multivariate analysis indicated that cancer surgery, a history of allergic-immunologic disease, and blood transfusion ≥2,000 ml were independent risk

  1. [The investigation of angiotensin converting enzyme I/D and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphisms in venous thromboembolism patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Halide; Karkucak, Mutlu; Salifoğlu, Hatice; Torun, Deniz; Kozan, Salih; Tunca, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, known as venous thromboembolism and seen as a fairly common multifactorial diseases. Differ between populations due to genetic factors, several polymorphisms associated with venous thromboembolism was conducted. As a result of these studies the relationship between disease development and polymorphism is not clear yet. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of angiotensin converting enzyme insersion/deletion (ACE I/D) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G (PAI-1 4G/5G) polymorphism in the development of disease. In our study, DNA isolated from 80 venous thromboembolism patients and 79 control groups was used. While the classical polymerase chain reaction method used to investigate the ACE I/D polymorphism, the polymerase chain reaction based on allele-specific amplification was used for the detection of PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism. As a result, there were no significant statistical differences for ACE I/D and PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism among patient and control groups (p> 0.05). These findings revealed that there is no relationship between these polymorphisms and the development of venous thromboembolism, but large-scale studies are need to be done.

  2. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis After TKA: Aspirin, Warfarin, Enoxaparin, or Factor Xa Inhibitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Abiram; Huddleston, James I; Goodman, Stuart B; Maloney, William J; Amanatullah, Derek F

    2017-09-01

    There is considerable debate regarding the ideal agent for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis after TKA. Numerous studies and meta-analyses have yet to provide a clear answer and often omit one or more of the commonly used agents such as aspirin, warfarin, enoxaparin, and factor Xa inhibitors. Using a large database analysis, we asked: (1) What are the differences in VTE incidence in primary TKA after administration of aspirin, warfarin, enoxaparin, or factor Xa inhibitors? (2) What are the differences in bleeding risk among these four agents? (3) How has use of these agents changed with time? We queried a combined Humana and Medicare database between 2007 and Quarter 1 of 2016, and identified all primary TKAs performed using ICD-9 and Current Procedural Terminology codes. All patients who had any form of antiplatelet or anticoagulation prescribed within 1 year before TKA were excluded from our study cohort. We then identified patients who had either aspirin, warfarin, enoxaparin, or factor Xa inhibitors prescribed within 2 weeks of primary TKA. Each cohort was matched by age and sex. Elixhauser comorbidities and Charlson Comorbidity Index for each group were calculated. We identified 1016 patients with aspirin, and age- and sex-matched 6096 patients with enoxaparin, 6096 patients with warfarin, and 5080 patients with factor Xa inhibitors. Using ICD-9 codes, with the understanding that patients at greater risk may have had more-attentive surveillance, the incidence of postoperative deep venous thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), bleeding-related complications (bleeding requiring surgical intervention, hemorrhage, hematoma, hemarthrosis), postoperative anemia, and transfusion were identified at 2 weeks, 30 days, 6 weeks, and 90 days postoperatively. A four-way chi-squared test was used to determine statistical significance. Utilization was calculated using compound annual growth rate. There was a difference in the incidence of DVT at 90 days (p aspirin

  3. Incident venous thromboembolic events in the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER

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    Ford Ian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolic events (VTE, including deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, are common in older age. It has been suggested that statins might reduce the risk of VTE however positive results from studies of middle aged subjects may not be generalisable to elderly people. We aimed to determine the effect of pravastatin on incident VTE in older people; we also studied the impact of clinical and plasma risk variables. Methods This study was an analysis of incident VTE using data from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of pravastatin in men and women aged 70-82. Mean follow-up was 3.2 years. Risk for VTE was examined in non-warfarin treated pravastatin (n = 2834 and placebo (n = 2865 patients using a Cox's proportional hazard model, and the impact of other risk factors assessed in a multivariate forward stepwise regression analysis. Baseline clinical characteristics, blood biochemistry and hematology variables, plasma levels of lipids and lipoproteins, and plasma markers of inflammation and adiposity were compared. Plasma markers of thrombosis and hemostasis were assessed in a nested case (n = 48 control (n = 93 study where the cohort was those participants, not on warfarin, for whom data were available. Results There were 28 definite cases (1.0% of incident VTE in the pravastatin group recipients and 20 cases (0.70% in placebo recipients. Pravastatin did not reduce VTE in PROSPER compared to placebo [unadjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval 1.42 (0.80, 2.52 p = 0.23]. Higher body mass index (BMI [1.09 (1.02, 1.15 p = 0.0075], country [Scotland vs Netherlands 4.26 (1.00, 18.21 p = 0.050 and Ireland vs Netherlands 6.16 (1.46, 26.00 p = 0.013], lower systolic blood pressure [1.35 (1.03, 1.75 p = 0.027] and lower baseline Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE score [1.19 (1.01, 1.41 p = 0.034] were associated with an

  4. Prothrombin and risk of venous thromboembolism, ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischer, Maren; Juul, Klaus; Zacho, Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypotheses that Prothrombin G20210A heterozygosity associate with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and ischemic cerebrovascular disease (ICVD) in the general population and re-tested risk of IHD and ICVD in two case-control stu......OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypotheses that Prothrombin G20210A heterozygosity associate with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and ischemic cerebrovascular disease (ICVD) in the general population and re-tested risk of IHD and ICVD in two case...... ICVD cases. RESULTS: In the general population, Prothrombin G20210A heterozygotes had1.3 (95% CI:0.6-2.9) fold risk for VTE, 0.6 (0.2-2.0) for DVT, 1.7(0.6-4.8) for PE, 1.5(1.1-2.1) for IHD, 1.7(1.1-2.7) for MI, 1.1(0.6-1.9) for ICVD, and 1.1(0.5-2.1) for IS compared to non-carriers. Double...... heterozygotes for Prothrombin G20210A and Factor V Leiden versus double non-carriers had a multifactorially adjusted hazard ratio for IHD of 6.0(2.0-19). In case-control studies, multifactorially adjusted odds ratios for Prothrombin G20210A heterozygotes versus non-carriers were 2.0(1.1-3.4) for IHD, 2...

  5. Arterial complications, venous thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.P.A. (Rob Paulus Augustinus); M. Reijman (Max); Janssen, D.M. (Daan Martijn); van Mourik, J.B.A. (Jan Bernardus Antonius); Janssen, D.M. (Daan Martijn); van Mourik, J.B.A. (Jan Bernardus Antonius)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAIM To summarize the current knowledge on vascular complications and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. METHODS A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and

  6. Oral contraception and menstrual bleeding during treatment of venous thromboembolism: Expert opinion versus current practice Combined results of a systematic review, expert panel opinion and an international survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, F. A.; Schreiber, K.; Stach, K.; Ageno, W.; Middeldorp, S.; Eichinger, S.; Delluc, A.; Blondon, M.; Ay, C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The optimal management of oral contraception and menstrual bleeding during treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is largely unknown. We aimed to elicit expert opinion and compare that to current practice as assessed by a world-wide international web-based survey among physicians.

  7. Risk of venous thromboembolism associated with single and combined effects of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin 20210A and Methylenetethraydrofolate reductase C677T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Benedetto; De Stefano, Valerio; Leoncini, Emanuele

    2013-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors interact in determining the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The risk associated with the polymorphic variants G1691A of factor V (Factor V Leiden, FVL), G20210A of prothrombin (PT20210A) and C677T of methylentetrahydrofolate reductase (C677T MTHFR) genes ha...

  8. High long-term absolute risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism in patients with hereditary deficiencies of protein S, protein C or antithrombin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Jan-Leendert P.; Lijfering, Willem M.; ten Kate, Min Ki; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; van der Meer, Jan

    Hereditary deficiencies of protein S, protein C and antithrombin are known risk factors for first venous thromboembolism. We assessed the absolute risk of recurrence, and the contribution of concomitant thrombophilic defects in a large cohort of families with these deficiencies. Annual incidence of

  9. Independent predictors of poor vitamin K antagonist control in venous thromboembolism patients Data from the EINSTEIN-DVT and PE studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, Hilde A. M.; Gebel, Martin; Sahin, Kurtulus; Lensing, Anthonie W. A.; Meijer, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are used to prevent recurrent disease in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). Their efficacy and safety depend on individual time in therapeutic range (iTTR) and variability of International Normalised Ratios (INR). We aimed to identify independent predictors of

  10. Instrumental variable analysis as a complementary analysis in studies of adverse effects : venous thromboembolism and second-generation versus third-generation oral contraceptives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boef, Anna G C; Souverein, Patrick C; Vandenbroucke, Jan P; van Hylckama Vlieg, Astrid; de Boer, Anthonius; le Cessie, Saskia; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: A potentially useful role for instrumental variable (IV) analysis may be as a complementary analysis to assess the presence of confounding when studying adverse drug effects. There has been discussion on whether the observed increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) for

  11. Oral contraceptives and the absolute risk of venous thromboembolism in women with single or multiple thrombophilic defects - Results from a retrospective family cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vlijmen, Elizabeth F. W.; Brouwer, Jan-Leendert P.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Eskes, Tom K. A. B.; de Graeff, Pieter A.; van der Meer, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Background: The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in women taking combined oral contraceptives (COCs) is attributed to changes in coagulation and fibrinolysis. Their impact may be greater in women with preexistent thrombophilic defects. Methods: We assessed the effects of COCs on absolute VTE

  12. A genome-wide association study for venous thromboembolism: the extended cohorts for heart and aging research in genomic epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, W.; Teichert, M.; Chasman, D.I.; Heit, J.A.; Morange, P.E.; Li, G.; Pankratz, N.; Leebeek, F.W.; Pare, G.; Andrade, M. de; Tzourio, C.; Psaty, B.M.; Basu, S.; Ruiter, R. de; Rose, L.; Armasu, S.M.; Lumley, T.; Heckbert, S.R.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Lathrop, M.; Rice, K.M.; Cushman, M.; Hofman, A.; Lambert, J.C.; Glazer, N.L.; Pankow, J.S.; Witteman, J.C.; Amouyel, P.; Bis, J.C.; Bovill, E.G.; Kong, X.; Tracy, R.P.; Boerwinkle, E.; Rotter, J.I.; Tregouet, D.A.; Loth, D.W.; Stricker, B.H.; Ridker, P.M.; Folsom, A.R.; Smith, N.L.

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common, heritable disease resulting in high rates of hospitalization and mortality. Yet few associations between VTE and genetic variants, all in the coagulation pathway, have been established. To identify additional genetic determinants of VTE, we conducted a

  13. Safety and efficacy of direct oral anticoagulants compared to warfarin for extended treatment of venous thromboembolism -a systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindet-Pedersen, Caroline; Pallisgaard, Jannik Langtved; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine and compare the safety and efficacy of extended treatment with dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban and warfarin in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism. METHODS: PubMed and Embase were searched for randomized clinical trials reporting on the use of direct oral...

  14. Use of the SAMe-TT2R2 score to predict anticoagulation control in atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism patients treated with vitamin K antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zulkifly, Hanis; Lip, Gregory Y H; Lane, Deirdre A

    2017-01-01

    Identifying patients who are likely to achieve and maintain a therapeutic INR when prescribed a vitamin K antagonist (VKA) for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF) and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is challenging. The SAMe-TT2R2 score was developed based on common clinical factors that can...

  15. Extended duration of anticoagulation with edoxaban in patients with venous thromboembolism: a post-hoc analysis of the Hokusai-VTE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raskob, Gary; Ageno, Walter; Cohen, Alexander T.; Brekelmans, Marjolein P. A.; Grosso, Michael A.; Segers, Annelise; Meyer, Guy; Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Philip S.; Lin, Min; Winters, Shannon M.; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Büller, Harry R.

    2016-01-01

    There are few data on the relative efficacy and safety of direct oral anticoagulants, such as edoxaban, compared with vitamin K antagonists during extended therapy for venous thromboembolism. This analysis evaluates the risk-benefit of extended treatment for up to 12 months with edoxaban compared

  16. Ximelagatran for the prevention of venous thromboembolism following elective hip or knee replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Clifford; Mouret, Patrick

    2005-08-01

    Patients undergoing major lower-extremity orthopedic surgery such as total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) are at an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Routine prophylaxis is necessary to reduce the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which may progress to potentially fatal pulmonary embolism and secondary complications such as postthrombotic syndrome, recurrent DVT, and chronic pulmonary hypertension. Prophylaxis in patients undergoing TKR, THR, and hip fracture surgery is now standard practice and generally involves anticoagulant treatment with either low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) or warfarin for a period of 7 to 10 days, with extended prophylaxis in those with ongoing risk factors such as obesity, cancer, or previous VTE. Data from clinical practice suggest that there is a general trend toward longer postsurgical prophylaxis and shorter hospital stays, making practicality of treatment an important consideration. LMWH is effective for the prophylaxis of VTE, but the parenteral route of administration is not convenient for use in the outpatient setting. Warfarin, on the other hand, can be administered orally but requires the infrastructure for careful patient monitoring and dose adjustments because of its unpredictable dose-response relationship. The development of new anticoagulants has been pursued with the aim of improving efficacy, predictability, consistency of response, safety, and convenience. A recently approved anticoagulant, fondaparinux, has been proven to provide superior efficacy for the prevention of VTE compared with LMWH, but this agent requires parenteral administration and does not overcome the convenience issue. Ximelagatran is the oral form of the direct thrombin inhibitor melagatran, which is available for subcutaneous administration. Ximelagatran has a consistent anticoagulant response allowing fixed oral dosing without the need for coagulation monitoring. The efficacy and safety profile of melagatran

  17. Incremental Health Care Burden of Bleeding Among Patients with Venous Thromboembolism in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Alpesh; Bruno, Amanda; Trocio, Jeffrey; Lin, Jay; Lingohr-Smith, Melissa

    2015-10-01

    The health care and economic burden of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been evaluated in regard to acute VTE, VTE recurrence, and some VTE complications, such as postthrombotic syndrome, but the cost burden attributed to bleedings is not well understood. To evaluate health care resource utilization and costs associated with major bleeding (MB) and clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding (CRNMB) among a large U.S. commercially and Medicare-insured population with VTE. Patients (≥ 18 years of age, continuously insured) with a diagnosis of VTE between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2011, were identified from the Truven Health Analytics Commercial and Medicare MarketScan databases. Patients who did not have any bleedings during the study period were grouped into a no-bleedings cohort and a random date after VTE diagnosis was selected as the index date. VTE patients who experienced MB within 1 year of the initial VTE diagnosis were grouped into a MB cohort, and patients without MB but with CRNMB were grouped into a CRNMB cohort. Baseline patient demographics and clinical characteristics were determined for study cohorts. All-cause and bleeding-related health care resource utilization and costs (inflation adjusted to 2013 level) during a 12-month follow-up period after the index date of the initial bleeding event were measured and compared. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate differences in demographics, clinical characteristics, and unadjusted health care resource utilization and costs of patient cohorts. Multivariable generalized linear models were used to evaluate incremental health care costs of bleedings after adjusting for key patient characteristics.   Among the 112,885 patients identified with a VTE diagnosis, 14% (n = 15,897) had MB and 14% (n = 15,842) had CRNMB; 72% (n = 81,146) had neither of these events occur during the study period. The mean ages of the MB and CRNMB cohorts were both 63.6 years, while the mean age of the no

  18. Use of combined oral contraceptives and risk of venous thromboembolism: nested case-control studies using the QResearch and CPRD databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupland, Carol; Hippisley-Cox, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between use of combined oral contraceptives and risk of venous thromboembolism, taking the type of progestogen into account. Design Two nested case-control studies. Setting General practices in the United Kingdom contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD; 618 practices) and QResearch primary care database (722 practices). Participants Women aged 15-49 years with a first diagnosis of venous thromboembolism in 2001-13, each matched with up to five controls by age, practice, and calendar year. Main outcome measures Odds ratios for incident venous thromboembolism and use of combined oral contraceptives in the previous year, adjusted for smoking status, alcohol consumption, ethnic group, body mass index, comorbidities, and other contraceptive drugs. Results were combined across the two datasets. Results 5062 cases of venous thromboembolism from CPRD and 5500 from QResearch were analysed. Current exposure to any combined oral contraceptive was associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (adjusted odds ratio 2.97, 95% confidence interval 2.78 to 3.17) compared with no exposure in the previous year. Corresponding risks associated with current exposure to desogestrel (4.28, 3.66 to 5.01), gestodene (3.64, 3.00 to 4.43), drospirenone (4.12, 3.43 to 4.96), and cyproterone (4.27, 3.57 to 5.11) were significantly higher than those for second generation contraceptives levonorgestrel (2.38, 2.18 to 2.59) and norethisterone (2.56, 2.15 to 3.06), and for norgestimate (2.53, 2.17 to 2.96). The number of extra cases of venous thromboembolism per year per 10 000 treated women was lowest for levonorgestrel (6, 95% confidence interval 5 to 7) and norgestimate (6, 5 to 8), and highest for desogestrel (14, 11 to 17) and cyproterone (14, 11 to 17). Conclusions In these population based, case-control studies using two large primary care databases, risks of venous thromboembolism associated with combined oral

  19. Pregnancy-associated venous thromboembolism in combined heterozygous factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egle Couto

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Pregnancy and puerperium raise the risk of thromboembolic events, and these risks are increased in women who are carriers of thrombophilia factors. Prothrombin (FII G20210A and factor V Leiden heterozygous mutations are associated with moderate risk of thrombosis. The association of these thrombophilic conditions is very rare in pregnancy, and the real risk of thrombosis is unknown. CASE REPORT: We describe a case of a pregnant woman who was found to be carrier of heterozygous factor V Leiden and prothrombin (FII G20210A mutations. Five years before pregnancy she had had an episode of extensive deep venous thrombosis in the ileofemoral region, while using hormonal contraceptives. Anticardiolipin antibody (ACA, lupus anticoagulant and deficiencies of protein C, protein S and antithrombin III were evaluated by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, dilute Russell Viper Venom time (dRVVT, coagulometric and chromogenic methods. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR to study the factor V Leiden and G20210A mutations in the prothrombin gene and C677T mutation in the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene. In the sixth week of her first pregnancy, she developed another episode of deep venous thrombosis in the femoropopliteal veins of the right leg. She was treated with low-molecular weight heparin (nadroparin until parturition (0.3 ml or 2,850 UI/day. The pregnancy evolved without any significant obstetric morbidity. The patient delivered a healthy baby by cesarean section. During the puerperium, she used prophylactic doses of nadroparin for (0.3 ml or 2,850 UI/day six weeks and had no complications. We suggest that women who have an association of thrombophilia factors and a prior episode of venous thromboembolism must have antepartum anticoagulation management using unfractioned or low-molecular weight heparin and postpartum management using low-molecular weight heparin or

  20. Diagnostic Indication for Venous Echo-Doppler of the Lower Limbs in the Diagnosis of Thromboembolic; Indicacion de eco-Doppler venosa de extremidades inferiores en el diagnostico de la enfermedad tromboembolica ante una sospecha de tromboembolismo pulmonar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolado, A. G.; Barcena, M. V.; Cura, J. L. del; Gorrno, O.; Grande, D. [Hospital de Basurto. Bilbao (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    To study the effectiveness of Doppler echography in the deep venous system of the lower limbs for deep venous thrombosis detection in patients suspected of having pulmonary thromboembolism. There were received 341 consecutive suspected pulmonary thromboembolism patients, all of whom were emergency room attended. All were submitted to CT pulmonary angiography in order to evaluate thrombus presence in the pulmonary tree. Without knowing the results of the previous exploration, we studied 301 of the patients using Doppler echography in deep venous system of the lower limbs in order to evaluate thrombus presence. In the group of CT-detected pulmonary thromboembolism patients, the percentage of Doppler echography-detected deep venous thrombosis was 46.3%, while in the group of non-detected patients this percentage decreased to 4.7%. Additional deep venous system exploration in clinically suspected pulmonary thiolcarbamate patients is useful, since it can increase the detection rate of venous thromboembolic disease, thereby leading to early treatment and prevention of the disease's manifestation in the lungs. Realization of Doppler echography is especially beneficial in those patients who exhibit no factors which predispose them to thromboembolic disease, as well as in patients who have previously had venous thrombosis. This exploration account for 4.7% of non-detected pulmonary embolism patients being added to the ranks of those with thromboembolic disease, an important percentage when taking into consideration the high pulmonary thromboembolism morbimortality rate. (Author) 30 refs.

  1. Association between the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 4G/5G polymorphism and risk of venous thromboembolism: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Chengdi; Chen, Nan; Shu, Chi; Guo, Xiaojiang; He, Yazhou; Zhou, Yanhong

    2014-12-01

    The plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) 4G/5G polymorphism was considered to be associated with risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), while evidence remains inadequate. To provide a more accurate estimation of this relationship, we performed an updated meta-analysis of all eligible studies. A systematical search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, Wanfang, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Cqvip databases to identify relevant studies published before March 6(th) 2014. The odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using the fixed/random-effects model using Review Manager 5.1 and STATA 12.0. A total of 34 studies with 3561 cases and 5693 controls were analyzed. Overall, significant association between the PAI-1 4G/5G variant and VTE risk in total population (dominant model: OR=1.32, 95%CI: 1.13-1.54) was observed. And this variant was also related to the deep vein thrombosis risk (dominant model: OR=1.60, 95%CI: 1.24-2.06, P=0.0003). In the subgroup analyses on ethnicity, significant results were obtained in both Asians (dominant model: OR=2.08, 95%CI: 1.29-3.35, P=0.003) and Caucasians (dominant model: OR=1.31, 95%CI: 1.10-1.56, P=0.003). However, no significant association was found in patients with provoked VTE. In terms of subgroup analyses on co-existence of other thrombotic risk factors, the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was significantly associated with VTE risk in patients with factor V Leiden mutation (dominant model: OR=1.72, 95%CI: 1.17-2.53), but not in patients with cancer or surgery. Our findings demonstrate the role of PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism being a risk candidate locus for VTE susceptibility, especially in patients with other genetic thrombophilic disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Perioperative venous thromboembolic disease and the emerging role of the novel oral anticoagulants: An analysis of the implications for perioperative management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Mookadam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism includes 2 inter-related conditions: Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Heparin and low-molecular-weight heparin followed by oral anticoagulation with vitamin K agonists is the first line and current accepted standard therapy with good efficacy. However, this therapeutic strategy has many limitations including the significant risk of bleeding and drug, food and disease interactions that require frequent monitoring. Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban are the novel oral anticoagulants that are available for use in stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for the treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism (HYPERLINK\\l "1. Recent prospective randomized trials comparing the NOACs with warfarin have shown similar efficacy between the treatment strategies but fewer bleeding episodes with the NOACs. This paper presents an evidence-based review describing the efficacy and safety of the new anticoagulants compared to warfarin.

  3. Perioperative venous thromboembolic disease and the emerging role of the novel oral anticoagulants: an analysis of the implications for perioperative management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookadam, Martina; Shamoun, Fadi E; Ramakrishna, Harish; Obeid, Hiba; Rife, Renee L; Mookadam, Farouk

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism includes 2 inter-related conditions: Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Heparin and low-molecular-weight heparin followed by oral anticoagulation with vitamin K agonists is the first line and current accepted standard therapy with good efficacy. However, this therapeutic strategy has many limitations including the significant risk of bleeding and drug, food and disease interactions that require frequent monitoring. Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban are the novel oral anticoagulants that are available for use in stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and for the treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism (HYPERLINK\\l "1). Recent prospective randomized trials comparing the NOACs with warfarin have shown similar efficacy between the treatment strategies but fewer bleeding episodes with the NOACs. This paper presents an evidence-based review describing the efficacy and safety of the new anticoagulants compared to warfarin.

  4. Management of Venous Thromboembolism in Patients with Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancers: What Is the Role of Novel Oral Anticoagulants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Katherine Martin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a frequent complication of gastrointestinal cancers that increases morbidity and may impact mortality. Low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs are standard anticoagulation options for the ambulatory gastrointestinal cancer patient with VTE, but both of these agents are challenging to use for various reasons. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOAs are new, orally available anticoagulants designed to be easier to administer with more reliable pharmacokinetics that eliminate the need for frequent monitoring of various laboratory parameters. This paper reviews the existing efficacy and safety data for the use of NOAs dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, and apixaban and discusses the potential role of these agents in the management of gastrointestinal cancer-related VTE.

  5. Risk of venous thromboembolism in women taking the combined oral contraceptive: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateson, Deborah; Butcher, Belinda E; Donovan, Catherine; Farrell, Louise; Kovacs, Gab; Mezzini, Tonia; Raynes-Greenow, Camille; Pecoraro, Gino; Read, Christine; Baber, Rod

    2016-01-01

    Much scientific, media and patient interest surrounds the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in women taking combined oral contraceptives (COCs). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess VTE risk in women taking COCs, focusing on drospirenone. Literature searches of clinical studies on COCs in which VTE was reported were undertaken in May 2015. No overall estimate of VTE risk between drospirenone-containing COCs and other COCs was produced because of heterogeneity of the study designs. The final review and meta-analysis included 15 studies. No increased risk of VTE with drospirenone was seen in prospective or case control studies, but the risk of VTE was increased in retrospective cohort and nested case control studies. The difference in risk of VTE based on the choice of progestin in COCs is, at worst, very small in absolute terms and should not be the sole factor considered when choosing the 'right' COC for each woman.

  6. The Anti-Clot Treatment Scale (ACTS in clinical trials: cross-cultural validation in venous thromboembolism patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Stefan J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Anti-Clot Treatment Scale (ACTS is a 15-item patient-reported instrument of satisfaction with anticoagulant treatment. It includes a 12-item ACTS Burdens scale and a 3-item ACTS Benefits scale. Its role in clinical trials and other settings should be supported by evidence that it is both clinically meaningful and scientifically sound. The aim of the study was to evaluate the measurement performance of the ACTS (Dutch, Italian, French, German and English language versions in patients with venous thromboembolism based on traditional psychometric methods. Methods ACTS Burdens and Benefits scale data from a large clinical trial (EINSTEIN DVT involving 1336 people with venous thromboembolism were analysed at both the scale and item level. Five key psychometric properties were examined using traditional psychometric methods: acceptability, scaling assumptions, reliability (including internal consistency reliability, test-retest reproducibility; validity (including known groups and discriminant validity; and responsiveness. These methods of examination underpin the US Food and Drug Administration recommendations for patient-reported outcome instrument evaluation. Results Overall, the 12-item ACTS Burdens scale and 3-item ACTS Benefits scale met the psychometric criteria evaluated at both item and scale levels, with the exception of some relatively minor issues in the Dutch language version, which were just below reliability criteria (i.e. alpha = 0.72, test-retest intraclass correlation = 0.79. A consistent finding from item-level evaluations of aggregate endorsement frequencies and skewness suggested that response scales may be improved by reducing the number of response options from five to four. Conclusions Both the ACTS Burdens and ACTS Benefits scales consistently satisfied traditional reliability and validity criteria across multiple language datasets, supporting it as a clinically useful patient

  7. Hormonal contraception and risk of venous thromboembolism: national follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidegaard, Øjvind; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Svendsen, Anne Louise

    2009-01-01

    -49 with no history of cardiovascular or malignant disease. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adjusted rate ratios for all first time deep venous thrombosis, portal thrombosis, thrombosis of caval vein, thrombosis of renal vein, unspecified deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism during the study period. RESULTS: 10......OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk of venous thrombosis in current users of different types of hormonal contraception, focusing on regimen, oestrogen dose, type of progestogen, and route of administration. DESIGN: National cohort study. SETTING: Denmark, 1995-2005. PARTICIPANTS: Danish women aged 15.......4 million woman years were recorded, 3.3 million woman years in receipt of oral contraceptives. In total, 4213 venous thrombotic events were observed, 2045 in current users of oral contraceptives. The overall absolute risk of venous thrombosis per 10 000 woman years in non-users of oral contraceptives was 3...

  8. Cancer Screening in Patients with Idiopathic Venous Thromboembolism--a Position Paper of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology Working Group on Hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzdorff, Axel; Riess, Hanno; Bergmann, Frauke; Bisping, Guido; Koschmieder, Steffen; Parmentier, Stefani; Petrides, Petro E; Sosada, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Cancer can trigger thromboembolism. There is a 4-10% chance of finding an asymptomatic occult cancer in patients with idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE). Current guidelines recommend limited cancer screening with history, physical examination, and screening examinations according to age after idiopathic VTE. Recent studies found that a more extensive screening program, including endoscopy and computed tomography, may increase the cancer detection rate. The Hemostasis Working Group of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology recommends a more extensive screening program after idiopathic VTE. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  9. Venous thromboembolism in overt hyperthyroidism - a direct association with clinical implications?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, L. P. B.; van Zaane, B.; Gerdes, V. E. A.; Coutinho, J. M.; Bisschop, P. H.; Fliers, E.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is associated with procoagulant changes in the haemostatic system. At present, it is uncertain whether this leads to an increased risk of venous and/or arterial thrombosis. Only a few small studies have investigated this association but due to methodological limitations it is not

  10. Meta-analysis to assess the quality of international normalized ratio control and associated outcomes in venous thromboembolism patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearns, Elizabeth S; Kohn, Christine G; Song, Ju-Sung; Hawthorne, Jessica; Meng, Joy; White, C Michael; Raut, Monika K; Schein, Jeff R; Coleman, Craig I

    2014-08-01

    Patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) frequently require vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) to prevent recurrent events, but their use increases hemorrhage risk. We performed a meta-analysis to assess the quality of international normalized ratio (INR) control, identify study-level predictors of poor control and to examine the relationship between INR control and adverse outcomes in VTE patients. We searched bibliographic databases (1990-June 2013) for studies of VTE patients receiving adjusted-dose VKAs that reported time in range (2.0-3.0) or proportion of INRs in range and/or reported INR measurements coinciding with thromboembolic or hemorrhagic events. Meta-analysis and meta-regression analysis was performed. Upon meta-analysis, studies found 59% (95%CI: 54-64%) of INRs measured and 61% (95%CI: 59-63%) of the time patients were treated were spent outside the target range of 2.0-3.0; with a tendency for under- versus over-anticoagulation. Moreover, this poor INR control resulted in a greater chance of recurrent VTE (beta-coefficient=-0.46, p=0.01) and major bleeding (beta-coefficient=-0.30, p=0.02). Patients with an INR3.0 made up 48% (95%CI: 34-61%) of major hemorrhage cases. Upon meta-regression, being VKA-naïve (-14%, p=0.04) and treated in the community (-7%, p<0.001) were associated with less time in range, while being treated in Europe/United Kingdom (compared to North America) was associated with (11%, p=0.003) greater time. Strategies to improve INR control or alternative anticoagulants, including the newer oral agents, should be widely implemented in VTE patients to reduce the rate of recurrent events and bleeding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk of Venous Thromboembolism Following Hemorrhagic Fever With Renal Syndrome: A Self-controlled Case Series Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly-Andersen, Anne-Marie; Whitaker, Heather; Klingström, Jonas; Ahlm, Clas

    2018-01-06

    Bleeding is associated with viral hemorrhagic fevers; however, thromboembolic complications have received less attention. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) is a mild viral hemorrhagic fever caused by Puumala hantavirus. We previously identified HFRS as a risk factor for myocardial infarction and stroke, but the risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is unknown. Personal identity numbers from the Swedish HFRS database were cross-linked with the National Patient register to obtain information on all causes for hospitalization during 1964 to 2013. The self-controlled case series method was used to calculate the incidence rate ratio (IRR) for first VTE, DVT, and PE during 1998 to 2013. From 7244 HFRS patients, there were 146 with a first VTE of which 74 were DVT and 78 were PE, and 6 patients had both DVT and PE. The overall risk for a VTE was significantly higher during the first 2 weeks following HFRS onset, with an IRR of 64.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 36.3-114). The corresponding risk for a DVT was 45.9 (95% CI, 18-117.1) and for PE, 76.8 (95% CI, 37.1-159). Sex interacted significantly with the association between HFRS and VTE, with females having a higher risk compared with males. A significantly increased risk for VTE was found in the time period following HFRS onset. It is important to keep this in mind and monitor HFRS patients, and possibly other viral hemorrhagic fever patients, for early symptoms of VTE.

  12. Enfermedad tromboembólica venosa y cirrosis hepática Venous thromboembolism and liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. García-Fuster

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: la enfermedad tromboembólica venosa (ETV es poco frecuente en la cirrosis hepática, no estando su tratamiento contemplado en las guías del American College of Chest Physicians. El objetivo del presente trabajo es aportar la experiencia de pacientes cirróticos con ETV hospitalizados en nuestro centro en los últimos 15 años. Material y método: de enero de 1992 a diciembre de 2007 fueron hospitalizados en nuestro centro 2.074 pacientes con cirrosis hepática. Presentaron una ETV no esplácnica 17, siendo ellos la población a estudio. Se recogen datos epidemiológicos y analíticos: hemograma, VSG, química hemática, coagulación, trombofilia congénita, anticuerpos antifosfolípidos (AAFL y homocisteinemia. Se valoran factores de riesgo adquiridos, características de la trombosis, el tratamiento y las complicaciones. Resultados y conclusiones: la ETV no esplácnica se observa en el 0,8% de pacientes cirróticos. En ellos es frecuente observar hipoalbuminemia, disminución de factores anticoagulantes (ATIII, PC, y PS, presencia de AAFL e hiperhomocisteinemia, así como la presencia de factores de riesgo adquiridos: intervenciones quirúrgicas, insuficiencia venosa, inmovilización e infecciones. Tras la anticoagulación, se observan complicaciones hemorrágicas mayores en el 35% de los pacientes.Objective: despite the endogenous coagulopathy of cirrhosis, some patients do experience thrombophilic states. The American College of Chest Physicians failed to address the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE occurring among these patients. This study aims to describe the characteristics of cirrhotics patients hospitalized in the last 15 years, and to use the experience gained. Material and method: we retrospectively reviewed all admissions for cirrhosis in our hospital from 1992 to 2007. A total of 17 patients had non-portal venous thromboembolic disease. We recorded risk factors, epidemiological and laboratory data

  13. Clinical predictors for fatal pulmonary embolism in 15,520 patients with venous thromboembolism: findings from the Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad TromboEmbolica venosa (RIETE) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, Silvy; Mismetti, Patrick; Décousus, Hervé; Uresandi, Fernando; Otero, Remedios; Lobo, Jose Luis; Monreal, Manuel

    2008-04-01

    Clinical predictors for fatal pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients with venous thromboembolism have never been studied. Using data from the international prospective Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad TromboEmbolica venosa (RIETE) registry about patients with objectively confirmed symptomatic acute venous thromboembolism, we determined independent predictive factors for fatal PE. Between March 2001 and July 2006, 15 520 consecutive patients (mean age+/-SD, 66.3+/-16.9 years; 49.7% men) with acute venous thromboembolism were included. Symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis without symptomatic PE was observed in 58.0% (n=9008) of patients, symptomatic nonmassive PE in 40.4% (n=6264), and symptomatic massive PE in 1.6% (n=248). At 3 months, the cumulative rates of overall mortality and fatal PE were 8.65% and 1.68%, respectively. On multivariable analysis, patients with symptomatic nonmassive PE at presentation exhibited a 5.42-fold higher risk of fatal PE compared with patients with deep-vein thrombosis without symptomatic PE (P75 years, and cancer. PE remains a potentially fatal disease. The clinical predictors identified in the present study should be included in any clinical risk stratification scheme to optimally adapt the treatment of PE to the risk of the fatal outcome.

  14. Venous thromboembolism in pregnancy: prophylaxis and treatment with low molecular weight heparin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anita Sylvest; Berthelsen, Jørgen G.; Bergholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    side effects of treatment and no osteoporotic fractures or episodes of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. The 166 pregnancies resulted in 159 live infants. There was a significantly higher risk of preterm delivery (13% vs. 6%) and intrauterine growth restriction (4.4% vs. 3.5%). Delivery by cesarean......-induced thrombocytopenia. The 166 pregnancies resulted in 159 live infants. There was a significantly higher risk of preterm delivery (13% vs. 6%) and intrauterine growth restriction (4.4% vs. 3.5%). Delivery by cesarean section was more common in these high-risk LMWH-treated pregnancies (33.1%) than in untreated......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety of individually dosed low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic complications in pregnancy. DESIGN: Cohort study with a chronologic register-based control group. SETTING: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hiller...

  15. Venous thromboembolism in pregnancy: prophylaxis and treatment with low molecular weight heparin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anita Sylvest; Berthelsen, Jørgen G; Bergholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    side effects of treatment and no osteoporotic fractures or episodes of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. The 166 pregnancies resulted in 159 live infants. There was a significantly higher risk of preterm delivery (13% vs. 6%) and intrauterine growth restriction (4.4% vs. 3.5%). Delivery by cesarean......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety of individually dosed low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) for prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic complications in pregnancy. DESIGN: Cohort study with a chronologic register-based control group. SETTING: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hillerød...... Hospital, Denmark. POPULATION: All 166 women treated with LMWH in pregnancy between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2005. METHODS: Women treated with LMWH in pregnancy were identified and individual case records reviewed retrospectively. General data on the LMWH-treated women were compared to the 18...

  16. Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism as the Initial Clinical Presentation of Gastric Cancer: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Rezaeetalab

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE is a clinically critical disease, misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis of which can lead to increased rate of mortality. For prevention of recurrence of PTE, recognition of its risk factors or underlying diseases is of great importance. PTE is common in patients with cancer and has high morbidity and mortality rates. Although cancer is a lethal condition, PTE accelerates death in these patients. In the current study, we reported the case of a 50-year-old male presenting with dyspnea, pleuritic chest pain, and non-massive hemoptysis indicating pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulant therapy was initiated, but after 12 days of treatment, new deep vein thromboses in the left upper and right lower limbs were diagnosed. However, no specific risk factors or laboratory abnormalities were detected. History of weight loss during the recent months encouraged further investigation for ruling out malignancy, which led a diagnosis of gastric adenocarcinoma. He did not have any complaints of gastrointestinal disorders.

  17. Genetics University of Toronto Thrombophilia Study in Women (GUTTSI: genetic and other risk factors for venous thromboembolism in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrovski Jovan

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Women may be at increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE as compared with men. We studied the effects of genetic and biochemical markers of thrombophilia in women, in conjunction with other established risk factors for VTE. Method The present retrospective case-control study was conducted in a thrombosis treatment programme at a large Toronto hospital. The cases were 129 women aged 16-79 years with objectively confirmed VTE. Age-matched control individuals were women who were free of venous thrombosis. Neither cases nor control individuals had known cardiovascular disease. Participants were interviewed regarding personal risk factors for VTE, including smoking, history of malignancy, pregnancy, and oestrogen or oral contraceptive use. Blood specimens were analyzed for common single nucleotide polymorphisms of prothrombin, factor V and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR; C677T, A1298C and T1317C, and the A66G polymorphism for methionine synthase reductase (MTRR.Fasting plasma homocysteine was also analyzed. Results Women with VTE were significantly more likely than female control individuals to carry the prothrombin polymorphism and the factor V polymorphism, or to have fasting hyperhomocysteinaemia. Homozygosity for the C677T MTHFR gene was not a significant risk factor for VTE, or were the A1298C or T1317C MTHFR homozygous variants. Also, the A66G MTRR homozygous state did not confer an increased risk for VTE. Conclusion Prothrombin and factor V polymorphisms increased the risk for VTE in women, independent from other established risk factors. Although hyperhomocysteinaemia also heightens this risk, common polymorphisms in two genes that are responsible for homocysteine remethylation do not. These findings are consistent with previous studies that included both men and women.

  18. Venous thromboembolism and intracranial hemorrhage after craniotomy for primary malignant brain tumors: a National Surgical Quality Improvement Program analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senders, Joeky T; Goldhaber, Nicole H; Cote, David J; Muskens, Ivo S; Dawood, Hassan Y; De Vos, Filip Y F L; Gormley, William B; Smith, Timothy R; Broekman, Marike L D

    2018-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), frequently complicates the postoperative course of primary malignant brain tumor patients. Thromboprophylactic anticoagulation is commonly used to prevent VTE at the risk of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). We extracted all patients who underwent craniotomy for a primary malignant brain tumor from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) registry (2005-2015) to perform a time-to-event analysis and identify relevant predictors of DVT, PE, and ICH within 30 days after surgery. Among the 7376 identified patients, the complication rates were 2.6, 1.5, and 1.3% for DVT, PE, and ICH, respectively. VTE was the second-most common major complication and third-most common reason for readmission. ICH was the most common reason for reoperation. The increased risk of VTE extends beyond the period of hospitalization, especially for PE, whereas ICH occurred predominantly within the first days after surgery. Older age and higher BMI were overall predictors of VTE. Dependent functional status and longer operative times were predictive for VTE during hospitalization, but not for post-discharge events. Admission two or more days before surgery was predictive for DVT, but not for PE. Preoperative steroid usage and male gender were predictive for post-discharge DVT and PE, respectively. ICH was associated with various comorbidities and longer operative times. This multicenter study demonstrates distinct critical time periods for the development of thrombotic and hemorrhagic events after craniotomy. Furthermore, the VTE risk profile depends on the type of VTE (DVT vs. PE) and clinical setting (hospitalized vs. post-discharge patients).

  19. The performance of age-adjusted D-dimer cut-off in Chinese outpatients with suspected venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chengwu; Zhao, Yongqiang; Cheng, Wenli; Yang, Jing; Yuan, Jie; Zheng, Yuehong; Yu, Xueying; Zhu, Tienan

    2015-10-01

    D-dimer testing has been widely used in the exclusion of venous thromboembolism (VTE), but its clinical usefulness is limited in older patients because of a lower specificity. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of STA-Liatest D-dimer assay and validate the age-adjusted cut-off value in Chinese outpatients with suspected VTE in a prospective non-interventional study. Symptomatic patients suspected of having deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism were recruited from 2 participating centers. STA-Liatest D-dimer assay, clinical pretest probability assessment and diagnostic imaging test including complete compression ultrasonography or computed tomography pulmonary angiography were performed among all participants. The performance of D-dimer test was assessed with an age-adjusted D-dimer cut-off (age×0.01μg/ml in patients aged>50years) and with conventional cut-off (0.5μg/ml at all ages). A total of 594 eligible outpatients were included in this study and VTE was diagnosed in 195 (32.8%) patients. In those patients with a low or moderate pretest probability (n=373), the increase in the proportion of patients with a D-dimer below the age-adjusted cut-off value compared with the conventional cut-off value was 5.9% (95% confidence interval; 3.8%-8.7%). The sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive value of STA-Liatest D-dimer test were 95.0% (83.5% - 98.6%), 84.1%(79.8%-87.6%) and 99.3%(97.5% - 99.8%), respectively, using the age-adapted diagnostic strategy. The application of age-adjusted cut-off of D-dimer test combined with clinical probability greatly increases the proportion of Chinese older outpatients in whom VTE can be safely excluded. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cost Effectiveness of Apixaban and Enoxaparin for the Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism After Total Knee Replacement in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Gu, Xiaohua; Zhou, Lei; Lin, Houweng; Wu, Bin

    2016-12-01

    Apixaban and enoxaparin are indicated for preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE). The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost effectiveness of apixaban versus enoxaparin for the prophylaxis of VTE and associated long-term complications in Chinese patients after total knee replacement (TKR). A decision model, which included both acute VTE (represented as a decision tree) and the long-term complications of VTE (represented as a Markov model), was developed to assess the economic outcomes of the two prophylactic strategies for Chinese patients after TKR. Transition probabilities, costs, and utilities were derived from published literature. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to test the uncertainty concerning the model parameters. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and direct medical costs were reported over a 5-year horizon. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were also calculated. Thromboprophylaxis with apixaban was estimated to have a higher cost (US$68) and more health benefits (0.0006 QALYs) than thromboprophylaxis with enoxaparin over a 5.5-year time horizon, resulting in an ICER of US$108,497 per QALY gained. One-way sensitivity analyses found that the cost of apixaban and the probability of pulmonary embolism when taking either apixaban or enoxaparin had a considerable impact on the model outcomes. Overall, the analysis found that the use of enoxaparin in Chinese patients after TKR was likely to be more cost effective than the use of apixaban.

  1. Has incentive payment improved venous thrombo-embolism risk assessment and treatment of hospital in-patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Sue; Sheaff, Rod; Boiko, Olga; Bateman, Alice; Gericke, Christian A

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on financial incentives rewarding successful implementation of guidelines in the UK National Health Service (NHS). In particular, it assesses the implementation of National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) venous thrombo-embolism (VTE) guidance in 2010 on the risk assessment and secondary prevention of VTE in hospital in-patients and the financial incentives driving successful implementation introduced by the Commissioning for Quality and Innovation for Payment Framework (CQUIN) for 2010-2011. We systematically compared the implementation of evidence-based national guidance on VTE prevention across two specialities (general medicine and orthopaedics) in four hospital sites in the greater South West of England by auditing and evaluating VTE prevention activity for 2009 (i.e. before the 2010 NICE guideline) and late 2010 (almost a year after the guideline was published). Analysis of VTE prevention activity reported in 816 randomly selected orthopaedic and general medical in-patient medical records was complemented by a qualitative study into the practical responses to revised national guidance. This paper's contribution to knowledge is to suggest that by financially rewarding the implementation of national guidance on VTE prevention, paradoxes and contradictions have become apparent between the 'payment by volume system' of Healthcare Resource Groups and the 'payment by results' system of CQUIN.

  2. Impact of risk factors on the timing of first postpartum venous thromboembolism: a population-based cohort study from England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainge, Matthew J.; West, Joe; Fleming, Kate M.; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Tata, Laila J.

    2014-01-01

    Impact on the timing of first postpartum venous thromboembolism (VTE) for women with specific risk factors is of crucial importance when planning the duration of thromboprophylaxis regimen. We observed this using a large linked primary and secondary care database containing 222 334 pregnancies resulting in live and stillbirth births between 1997 and 2010. We assessed the impact of risk factors on the timing of postpartum VTE in term of absolute rates (ARs) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) using a Poisson regression model. Women with preeclampsia/eclampsia and postpartum acute systemic infection had the highest risk of VTE during the first 3 weeks postpartum (ARs ≥2263/100 000 person-years; IRR ≥2.5) and at 4-6 weeks postpartum (AR ≥1360; IRR ≥3.5). Women with body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m2 or those having cesarean delivery also had elevated rates up to 6 weeks (AR ≥1425 at 1-3 weeks and ≥722 at 4-6 weeks). Women with postpartum hemorrhage or preterm birth, had significantly increased VTE rates only in the first 3 weeks (AR ≥1736; IRR ≥2). Our findings suggest that the duration of the increased VTE risk after childbirth varies based on the type of risk factors and can extend up to the first 3 to 6 weeks postpartum. PMID:25157182

  3. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the epidemiology and burden of venous thromboembolism among pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourlaba, Georgia; Relakis, John; Kontodimas, Stathis; Holm, Majbrit V; Maniadakis, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism (VTE) is one of the leading causes of maternal morbidity and mortality. To review the epidemiology, and humanistic and economic burden of pregnancy-related VTE. Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Econlit, Science Direct, JSTOR, Oxford Journals, and Cambridge Journals were searched for reports published between January 2000 and December 2012. Keywords related to VTE, pregnancy, and epidemiology and the humanistic and economic burdens were combined. Eligible studies evaluated the incidence, mortality, recurrence, complications, quality-of-life, and economic burden of VTE among pregnant women, and had been published in English. Background information of the study, participants' characteristics, and study outcomes were collected. Meta-analyses of data were performed. Twenty studies were included, none of which investigated the economic burden. The pooled overall incidence of pregnancy-related VTE was 1.2 per 1000 deliveries. The pooled VTE case fatality rate was 0.68% and the recurrence rate was 4.27%. The pooled risk of major bleeding was 1.05%. Post-thrombotic syndrome seemed to have a negative effect on quality of life. Although the incidence of VTE was found to be relatively low during pregnancy and the postpartum period, the clinical burden is high. Further research is required to assess the economic burden of pregnancy-relate VTE. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. The recent clinical trials on use of the novel direct oral anticoagulants in patients with venous thromboembolism: a review

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    Gualtiero Palareti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE, encompassing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, requires an immediate anticoagulation, that has been carried out so far by administering a parenteral anticoagulant drug (heparin or derivatives overlapped with an oral vitamin K antagonist (VKA, more often warfarin. Several new direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs, with a mechanism of action completely different than VKA, have been developed in recent years. Recent clinical trials have investigated their use in VTE patients showing results at least equal for efficacy and safety, and sometime even better, as the standard anticoagulant treatment. There are differences in the design of the trials. In two cases the involved DOAC was administered immediately after VTE diagnosis as a single drug treatment (rivaroxaban and apixaban, whereas in the other trials (involving dabigatran and edoxaban the DOAC was administered after an initial course of approximately 7 days with heparin or derivatives. Some clinical trials have also investigated the use of DOACs for extended anticoagulant treatment after the acute phase. Aim of this article is to review the results of the currently available clinical trials that have compared the use of DOACs versus the standard of care in patients with VTE.

  5. The strong but nonspecific relationship between 18F-FDG uptake in the lower-extremity veins and venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Hongyun June; Hess, Søren; Rubello, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can present as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and/or acute pulmonary embolism (PE). In fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) PET/CT, F-FDG activity along the deep veins of the lower extremities (LE) is often observed and, unless it is associated with focal intense activity......-FDG uptake visualized in the LE was scored as the number of positive LE veins and the extent of the radiotracer uptake. The time intervals between the VTE event and the F-FDG-PET scan(s) were recorded. The time intervals between the most remote and the closest F-FDG-PET before a VTE event averaged 79......±101 and 49±82 days, respectively, and the closest and the most remote F-FDG-PET after the VTE event averaged 58±50 and 122±124 days. The extent of uptake in the LE veins averaged 7±2 for the patients with an acute DVT on LE duplex and 5±3 for those with negative or chronic DVT on LE duplex (P...

  6. The effects of an informational video on patient knowledge, satisfaction and compliance with venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Bernard L; Funk, Kylee; Kraft, Michael D; Fong, Jessica M; Naanos, Roxanne; Stout, Stephen M; Wagner, Deborah

    2014-08-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the leading cause of preventable death in hospitalized patients. Educational videos have been effectively used to increase patient satisfaction and knowledge. This study examined possible benefits of an educational video about VTE. Medical patients receiving VTE prophylaxis were screened within 48 h of admission. Upon enrollment, patients were randomly assigned to either watch a 5 min educational video on VTE or not, in addition to standard VTE education. Within 24-48 h after randomization, all patients completed a survey assessing VTE prophylaxis knowledge and satisfaction. Patients who watched the video averaged 83% correct responses to knowledge-based questions (regarding VTE risk, symptoms, and preventative measures) versus an average score of 62% for patients in the no video group (pPatients who watched the video were more satisfied with their VTE education (4.8 vs. 3.4 out of 5, ppatients about VTE and improved patient satisfaction. A VTE educational video can be an effective tool for improving patient knowledge of the condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The use of enoxaparin to prevent venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing radical retropubic prostatectomy: feasibility and utility

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    Kogenta Nakamura

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the utility of enoxaparin in prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE in men poorly compliant with pneumatic compression stockings (PCS in the immediate postoperative period after a radical retropubic prostatectomy (RP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective study included 47 men who underwent RP at an inner-city tertiary care hospital. All patients were started on enoxaparin 40 mg subcutaneously 6-8 hours postoperatively and daily while hospitalized. Preoperative, operative, and postoperative data were collected and analyzed. Median follow-up was 18 months. RESULTS: Median patient age was 64 ± 7 years, median prostate-specific antigen level was 4.9 ng/mL and median prostate biopsy-determined Gleason score was 6. Forty-one men (87% underwent a pelvic lymph node dissection. Median operative time was 181 minutes (range 164-450 minutes. Median estimated blood loss was 700 mL. Approximately 36% of the men wore PCS the recommended > 19 hours/day. On average PCS were worn 10.3 ± 7.5 hours/day. Postoperative complications were not increased in this cohort. Two patients developed pulmonary embolism requiring long-term anticoagulation. There were no mortalities. CONCLUSIONS: In men non-compliant with PCS, initiation of enoxaparin in the immediate postoperative setting was well-tolerated and maintained a low (4% rate of VTE. Thus, enoxaparin may be useful in adjunct with PCS in these patients.

  8. A case-cohort study with propensity score matching to evaluate the effects of mannitol on venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jeffrey J; Kade, Allison M; Sheehan, Kyle M; Wilson, Thomas J

    2014-08-01

    Mannitol has been shown to damage endothelial cells and activate coagulation pathways leading to intravascular thrombosis. Dehydration and hemagglutination have also been associated with mannitol use, although the risk of clinically evident venous thromboembolism (VTE) disease is not well-defined. The aim of this study was to compare the risk of VTE in critically ill neurological patients who received mannitol compared to only hypertonic saline. A case-cohort study design with propensity score matching was used to evaluate the risk of VTE among patients who received mannitol compared to those who received hypertonic saline alone. The odds of thrombosis were evaluated by the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel method and conditional logistic regression was used to adjust for year of treatment. Ninety-one of 330 patients (27.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 23-33%) developed a VTE; however, the yearly proportion remained unchanged over the 8 year study period. Cumulative use of mannitol declined and use of hypertonic saline increased significantly. The odds of thrombosis for those exposed to mannitol compared to hypertonic saline alone was 1.11 (95% CI 0.65-1.73; p=0.75). This remained insignificant after adjusting for year of injury. In conclusion, despite a significant change in the pattern of osmotic therapy used at our institution, the proportion of patients with VTE remained unchanged. We found no evidence that mannitol use was associated with VTE compared to hypertonic saline alone. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. The role of antiphospholipid antibodies toward the protein C/protein S system in venous thromboembolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Valeria; Spiezia, Luca; Franz, Francesca; Salmaso, Laura; Pozza, Laura Visonà Dalla; Gavasso, Sabrina; Simioni, Paolo

    2009-09-01

    The association between venous thromboembolism (VTE) and antibodies anti-Protein C (PC)/Protein S (PS) is still uncertain. We performed a case-control study to determine the risk of VTE related to the presence of these auto-antibodies considered independently of the presence of lupus anticoagulant (LAC) or anti-cardiolipin antibodies (ACA). One hundred thirty-five patients with idiopathic VTE and 164 healthy subjects were enrolled. Anti-PC and anti-PS antibodies (both IgG and IgM) were assessed using commercially available ELISA kits. Among cases there was a higher prevalence of elevated anti-PC IgM antibodies than in controls (OR 2.44, 95%CI 1.00-5.94). The presence of anti-PC IgG and anti-PS IgG and IgM antibodies was also higher in cases than in controls, but the difference was not statistically significant. Only five patients had both anti-PC or anti-PS antibodies and LAC or ACA. We performed a stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis showing that anti-PC IgM>958 percentile was a significant predictor of VTE after adjustment for LAC or ACA (OR 2.52, 95%CI 1.01-6.24)). Larger prospective studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  10. Endothelin-1 Gene Polymorphism and Its Level Predict the Risk of Venous Thromboembolism in Male Indian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Babita; Prabhakar, Amit; Sahu, Anita; Chatterjee, Tathagata; Tyagi, Tarun; Gupta, Neha; Nair, Velu; Ashraf, Mohammad Zahid

    2017-07-01

    Genes related to endothelial function are responsible for the regulation of vascular functions. The aim of this study is to investigate whether endothelial gene-associated polymorphism and their plasma levels can be used to predict the risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). We studied 133 patients with VTE and 164 healthy controls. Endothelin (EDN) G8002A, EDN T1370G, EDN 3A/4A, eNOSG894T, angiotensin-converting enzyme I/D, vascular endothelial growth factor C936T, and endothelial cell protein C receptor A6936G polymorphism was genotyped by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Plasma levels of endothelin 1 (EDN1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and angiotensin-converting enzyme were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay kit. The genotype and allele frequency between control and patients with VTE were significantly altered only for EDN T1370G polymorphism. The plasma EDN1 concentration was relatively higher in patients with VTE ( P = .0017) compared to healthy controls and showed an association with the EDN1 gene polymorphism in male Indian population. Logistic regression model analysis for EDN T1370G indicated a significant association between EDN G allele and occurrence of VTE. The EDN1 gene polymorphism may play a significant role in predicting individual's susceptibility toward VTE and its clinical progression.

  11. Venous thromboembolism: Additional diagnostic value and radiation dose of pelvic CT venography in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, Miriam, E-mail: Miriam.Reichert@umm.de [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim - Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Henzler, Thomas; Krissak, Radko; Apfaltrer, Paul [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim - Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Huck, Kurt [1st Department of Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Buesing, Karen [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim - Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Sueselbeck, Tim [1st Department of Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Fink, Christian [Department of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim - Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To assess the additional diagnostic value of indirect CT venography (CTV) of the pelvis and upper thighs performed after pulmonary CT angiography (CTA) for the diagnosis of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Materials and methods: In a retrospective analysis, the radiology information system entries between January 2003 and December 2007 were searched for patients who received pulmonary CTA and additional CTV of the pelvis and upper thighs. Of those patients, the radiology reports were reviewed for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the pelvic veins and veins of the upper thighs. In cases with an isolated pelvic thrombosis at CTV (i.e. which only had a thrombosis in the pelvic veins but not in the veins of the upper thigh) ultrasound reports were reviewed for the presence of DVT of the legs. The estimated radiation dose was calculated for pulmonary CTA and for CTV of the pelvis. Results: In the defined period 3670 patients were referred to our institution for exclusion of PE. Of those, 642 patients (353 men, 289 women; mean age, 65 {+-} 15 years, age range 18-98 years) underwent combined pulmonary CTA and CTV. Among them, PE was found in 227 patients (35.4%). In patients without PE CTV was negative in all cases. In patients with PE, CTV demonstrated pelvic thrombosis in 24 patients (3.7%) and thrombosis of the upper thighs in 43 patients (6.6%). Of those patients 14 (2.1%) had DVT in the pelvis and upper thighs. In 10 patients (1.5%) CTV showed an isolated pelvic thrombosis. Of those patients ultrasound reports were available in 7 patients, which revealed DVT of the leg veins in 5 cases (1%). Thus, the estimated prevalence of isolated pelvic thrombosis detected only by pelvic CTV ranges between 1-5/642 patients (0.1-0.7%). Radiation dose ranges between 4.8 and 9.7 mSv for additional CTV of the pelvis. Conclusion: CTV of the pelvis performed after pulmonary CTA is of neglectable additional diagnostic value for the

  12. European guidelines on perioperative venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: Inferior vena cava filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comes, Raquel Ferrandis; Mismetti, Patrick; Afshari, Arash

    2018-02-01

    : The indications for the use of an inferior vena cava filter (IVCF) in the context of deep venous thrombosis to prevent pulmonary embolism remain controversial. Despite wide use in clinical practice, great variation exists in national and international guidelines in regard to the indications. In addition, clinical practice is based on poor-quality data from trauma and bariatric surgery with a high incidence of complications. It is often difficult to assess their efficacy and lack of filter retrieval appears to be a substantial issue compared with a potential benefit by insertion of these devices. Complications usually refer to increased risk of deep venous thrombosis, filter perforation, filter penetration, filter migration, inferior vena cava occlusion and subsequently failure in pulmonary embolism prevention. Evidence from low-quality studies or registries, with small numbers of patients and conflicting findings, does not allow for a strong recommendation for or against the use of IVCFs. IVCFs should only be considered in cases of very high risk of pulmonary embolism and in perioperative situations at very high risk of bleeding, resulting in a prolonged contra-indication to pharmacological prophylaxis.

  13. A sazonalidade do tromboembolismo venoso no clima subtropical de São Paulo Seasonal variation of venous thromboembolism in the subtropical climate of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Kleinfelder

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Os fatores desencadeantes da doença tromboembólica venosa vêm sendo cada vez melhor identificados. Causas externas podem influir na sua ocorrência, e algum destaque tem sido dado a fatores climáticos. Nada se sabe quanto a essa interferência em nossa latitude. OBJETIVOS: Analisar se há diferença na incidência do tromboembolismo venoso de acordo com as estações do ano, num hospital da cidade de São Paulo, Brasil, cujo clima é categorizado como subtropical. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado trabalho retrospectivo de levantamento de dados a partir de prontuários de pacientes cujo diagnóstico de internação ou óbito foi de trombose venosa profunda ou tromboembolismo pulmonar, no período de janeiro de 1996 a outubro de 2003, no Hospital da Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo. Para comparação e estudo, os casos foram agrupados em trimestres (primeiro trimestre = janeiro, fevereiro e março; segundo trimestre = abril, maio e junho; terceiro trimestre = julho, agosto e setembro; e quarto trimestre = outubro, novembro e dezembro e conforme sua ocorrência nos chamados meses quentes e frios, de acordo com a média de temperatura mensal (meses quentes = outubro a abril; meses frios = maio a setembro. RESULTADOS: Foram encontrados 955 casos de tromboembolismo venoso no período analisado. Foi utilizado o teste ANOVA para análise, que não revelou diferença estatisticamente significativa na incidência do tromboembolismo venoso de acordo com os trimestres. Quando analisados separadamente, também não se evidenciou significância estatística em relação ao tromboembolismo pulmonar e à trombose venosa profunda. Quando comparados os meses quentes e frios, observou-se aumento da incidência de trombose venosa profunda nos meses quentes (p BACKGROUND: The triggering factors of venous thromboembolic disease have been increasingly clarified. External causes may influence its occurrence, and some climactic factors have stood out. Nothing

  14. Profilaxia para tromboembolismo venoso em um hospital de ensino Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis at a teaching hospital

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    Rafael de Melo Franco

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar se a profilaxia da trombose venosa profunda está sendo utilizada de maneira correta e rotineira em um hospital de ensino. MÉTODOS E CASUÍSTICA: Foi realizado um estudo transversal de pacientes internados em sete setores (enfermarias do Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba (Hospital de Ensino, no período de agosto de 2004 a agosto de 2005. Para estratificação do risco de trombose venosa profunda de cada paciente, foram pesquisados fatores clínicos e cirúrgicos, segundo o protocolo preconizado pela Sociedade Brasileira de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular. No período estudado, foram analisados 216 prontuários, dos quais 30 eram da cirurgia abdominal, 30 da cirurgia vascular, 30 da urologia, 31 da clínica médica, 31 da unidade de terapia intensiva, 31 da ortopedia e 33 da ginecologia/obstetrícia. RESULTADOS: Do total de pacientes, foi efetuada profilaxia para trombose venosa profunda em 57 (26%, sendo que, em 51 (89%, a execução foi de maneira correta e, em 6 (11%, não-preconizada. O método profilático mais utilizado foi o medicamentoso; 49 de 57 pacientes fizeram uso de heparina de baixo peso molecular. Também foi verificada a utilização de meias elásticas em cinco pacientes e deambulação precoce em sete. Já a compressão pneumática intermitente não foi utilizada em nenhum deles. CONCLUSÃO: De acordo com os resultados e com base no protocolo, concluiu-se que, no período da pesquisa, a profilaxia para trombose venosa profunda, no Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba, foi executada rotineiramente e de forma adequada em apenas 23,6% (51 do total de 216 pacientes.OBJECTIVE: To verify whether deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis is being correctly and routinely used at a teaching hospital. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of hospitalized patients on seven sectors at Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba (Hospital de Ensino was performed from August 2004 to August 2005. For the deep venous thrombosis risk stratification of

  15. Improvement of the safety of a clinical process using failure mode and effects analysis: Prevention of venous thromboembolic disease in critical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viejo Moreno, R; Sánchez-Izquierdo Riera, J Á; Molano Álvarez, E; Barea Mendoza, J A; Temprano Vázquez, S; Díaz Castellano, L; Montejo González, J C

    2016-11-01

    To improve critical patient safety in the prevention of venous thromboembolic disease, using failure mode and effects analysis as safety tool. A contemporaneous cohort study covering the period January 2014-March 2015 was made in 4 phases: phase 1) prior to failure mode and effects analysis; phase 2) conduction of mode analysis and implementation of the detected improvements; phase 3) evaluation of outcomes, and phase 4) (post-checklist introduction impact. Patients admitted to the adult polyvalent ICU of a third-level hospital center. A total of 196 patients, older than 18 years, without thromboembolic disease upon admission to the ICU and with no prior anticoagulant treatment. A series of interventions were implemented following mode analysis: training, and introduction of a protocol and checklist to increase preventive measures in relation to thromboembolic disease. Indication and prescription of venous thrombosis prevention measures before and after introduction of the measures derived from the failure mode and effects analysis. A total of 59, 97 and 40 patients were included in phase 1, 3 and 4, respectively, with an analysis of the percentage of subjects who received thromboprophylaxis. The failure mode and effects analysis was used to detect potential errors associated to a lack of training and protocols referred to thromboembolic disease. An awareness-enhancing campaign was developed, with staff training and the adoption of a protocol for the prevention of venous thromboembolic disease. The prescription of preventive measures increased in the phase 3 group (91.7 vs. 71.2%, P=.001). In the post-checklist group, prophylaxis was prescribed in 97.5% of the patients, with an increase in the indication of dual prophylactic measures (4.7, 6.7 and 41%; P<.05). There were no differences in complications rate associated to the increase in prophylactic measures. The failure mode and effects analysis allowed us to identify improvements in the prevention of

  16. Imaging techniques used in the diagnostic workup of acute venous thromboembolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilve-Gómez, A; Rodríguez-Fernández, P; Trillo-Fandiño, L; Plasencia-Martínez, J M

    Early diagnosis is one of the most important factors affecting the prognosis of pulmonary embolism (PE); however, the clinical presentation of PE is often very unspecific and it can simulate other diseases. For these reasons, imaging tests, especially computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the pulmonary arteries, have become the keystone in the diagnostic workup of PE. The wide availability and high diagnostic performance of pulmonary CTA has led to an increase in the number of examinations done and a consequent increase in the population's exposure to radiation and iodinated contrast material. Thus, other techniques such as scintigraphy and venous ultrasonography of the lower limbs, although less accurate, continue to be used in certain circumstances, and optimized protocols have been developed for CTA to reduce the dose of radiation (by decreasing the kilovoltage) and the dose of contrast agents. We describe the technical characteristics and interpretation of the findings for each imaging technique used to diagnose PE and discuss their advantages and limitations; this knowledge will help the best technique to be chosen for each case. Finally, we comment on some data about the increased use of CTA, its clinical repercussions, its "overuse", and doubts about its cost-effectiveness. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. A randomized trial of rosuvastatin in the prevention of venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glynn, Robert J; Danielson, Eleanor; Fonseca, Francisco A H

    2009-01-01

    -reactive protein levels of 2.0 mg per liter or higher to receive rosuvastatin, 20 mg per day, or placebo. We followed participants for the first occurrence of pulmonary embolism or deep-vein thrombosis and performed analyses of the data on an intention-to-treat basis. RESULTS: During a median follow-up period of 1.......12 in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.41 to 1.45; P=0.42), whereas the rates of deep-vein thrombosis only were 0.09 and 0.20, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.79; P=0.004). Consistent effects were observed in all the subgroups examined. No significant differences were seen......BACKGROUND: Controversy persists regarding the extent of shared pathways between arterial and venous thrombosis and whether treatments of known efficacy for one disease process have consistent benefits for the other. Observational studies have yielded variable estimates of the effect of statin...

  18. A Case Report: Cushing’s Disease Presenting with Polycythemia and Venous Thromboembolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnan Anaforoğlu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a woman with Cushing’s disease who had originally received a diagnosis of primary polycythemia. Her major complaints were headache, weakness, and blushing of the face. She had been admitted to another hospital about 6 months previously for same symptoms, and she received a diagnosis of polycythemia vera. Before planned bone marrow aspiration and biopsy could be performed, the patient developed a popliteal vein thrombosis; heterozygotic mutation of factor V Leiden (1691 GA had been identified. She was admitted to our hospital for bone marrow biopsy. Considering her physical examination and medical history which revealed facial plethora, moon-face, supraclavicular fullness, central obesity, purple striae at her abdomen, shoulder, and thighs, in addition to frontal balding, acne, hirsutism and infertility, she was evaluated for possible Cushing’s disease. A diagnosis of Cushing’s disease was made. Her haematological situation and clinical symptoms resolved after she underwent hypophysectomy for Cushing’s disease. Cushing’s disease is a possible cause of secondary erythrocytosis. Venous thrombosis can occur during the course of both Cushing’s syndrome and primary polycythemias. It is important to exclude such secondary causes of polycythemia before making a final diagnosis. Turk Jem 2012; 16: 43-5

  19. The timing of venous thromboembolic events after spine surgery: a single-center experience with 6869 consecutive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloney, Michael B; Hopkins, Benjamin; Dhillon, Ekamjeet S; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Venous thromboembolic events (VTEs), including both deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality after spine surgery. Prophylactic anticoagulation, or chemoprophylaxis, can prevent VTE. However, the timing of VTEs after spine surgery and the effect of chemoprophylaxis on VTE timing remain underinvestigated. METHODS The records of 6869 consecutive spine surgeries were retrospectively examined. Data on patient demographics, surgical variables, hospital course, and timing of VTEs were collected. Patients who received chemoprophylaxis were compared with those who did not. Appropriate regression models were used to examine selection for chemoprophylaxis and the timing of VTEs. RESULTS Age (OR 1.037, 95% CI 1.023-1.051; p < 0.001), longer surgery (OR 1.003, 95% CI 1.002-1.004; p < 0.001), history of DVT (OR 1.697, 95% CI 1.038-2.776; p = 0.035), and fusion surgery (OR 1.917, 95% CI 1.356-2.709; p < 0.001) predicted selection for chemoprophylaxis. Chemoprophylaxis patients experienced more VTEs (3.62% vs 2.03% of patients, respectively; p < 0.001), and also required longer hospital stays (5.0 days vs 1.0 days; HR 0.5107; p < 0.0001) and had a greater time to the occurrence of VTE (median 6.8 days vs 3.6 days; HR 0.6847; p = 0.0003). The cumulative incidence of VTEs correlated with the postoperative day in both groups (Spearman r = 0.9746, 95% CI 0.9457-0.9883, and p < 0.0001 for the chemoprophylaxis group; Spearman r = 0.9061, 95% CI 0.8065-0.9557, and p < 0.0001 for the nonchemoprophylaxis group), and the cumulative incidence of VTEs was higher in the nonchemoprophylaxis group throughout the 30-day postoperative period. Cumulative VTE incidence and postoperative day were linearly correlated in the first 2 postoperative weeks (R = 0.9396 and p < 0.0001 for the chemoprophylaxis group; R = 0.8190 and p = 0.0003 for the nonchemoprophylaxis group) and the remainder of the 30-day postoperative period (R = 0

  20. Outpatient treatment of low-risk venous thromboembolism with monotherapy oral anticoagulation: patient quality of life outcomes and clinician acceptance

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    Kline JA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey A Kline,1,2 Zachary P Kahler,1,3 Daren M Beam1,2 1Department of Emergency Medicine, 2Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, University of South Carolina Greenville School of Medicine, Greenville, SC, USA Background: Oral monotherapy anticoagulation has facilitated home treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE in outpatients. Objectives: The aim of this study was to measure efficacy, safety, as well as patient and physician perceptions produced by a protocol that selected VTE patients as low-risk patients by the Hestia criteria, and initiated home anticoagulation with an oral factor Xa antagonist. Methods: Patients were administered the Venous Insufficiency Epidemiological and Economic Study Quality of life/Symptoms ques­tionnaire [VEINEs QoL/Sym] and the physical component summary [PCS] from the Rand 36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF36]. The primary outcomes were VTE recurrence and hemorrhage at 30 days. Secondary outcomes compared psychometric test scores between patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT to those with pulmonary embolism (PE. Patient perceptions were abstracted from written comments and physician perceptions specific to PE outpatient treatment obtained from structured survey. Results: From April 2013 to September 2015, 253 patients were treated, including 67 with PE. Within 30 days, 2/ 253 patients had recurrent DVT and 2/253 had major hemor­rhage; all four had DVT at enrollment. The initial PCS scores did not differ between DVT and PE patients (37.2±13.9 and 38.0±12.1, respectively and both DVT and PE patients had similar improvement over the treatment period (42.2±12.9 and 43.4±12.7, respectively, consistent with prior literature. The most common adverse event was menorrhagia, present in 15% of women. Themes from patient-written responses reflected satisfaction with increased autonomy. Physicians’ (N=116

  1. Cost-Effectiveness of Different Strategies for the Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism After Total Hip Replacement in China.

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    Yan, Xiaoyu; Gu, Xiaohua; Xu, Zhenxing; Lin, Houweng; Wu, Bin

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of rivaroxaban and apixaban versus enoxaparin for the universal prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and associated long-term complications in Chinese patients after total hip replacement (THR). A decision model, which included both acute VTE (represented as a decision tree) and the long-term complications of VTE (represented as a Markov model), was developed to assess the economic outcomes of the three prophylactic strategies for Chinese patients after THR. Transition probabilities for acute VTE were derived from two randomized controlled studies, RECORD1 and ADVANCE3, of patients after THR. The transition probabilities of long-term complications after acute VTE, utilities, and costs were derived from the published literature and local healthcare settings. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses (PSA) were performed to test the uncertainty concerning the model parameters. The quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and direct medical costs were reported over a 5-year horizon, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were also calculated. Thromboprophylaxis with apixaban was estimated to have a higher cost (US $178.70) and more health benefits (0.0025 QALY) than thromboprophylaxis with enoxaparin over a 5-year time horizon, which resulted in an ICER of US $71,244 per QALY gained and was more than three times the GDP per capita of China in 2014 (US $22,140). Owing to the higher cost and lower generated QALYs, rivaroxaban was inferior to enoxaparin among post-THR patients. The sensitivity analyses confirmed these results. The analysis found that apixaban was not cost-effective and that rivaroxaban was inferior to enoxaparin. This finding indicates that compared with enoxaparin, the use of apixaban for VTE prophylaxis after THR does not represent a good value for the cost at the acceptable threshold in China; in addition, the cost of rivaroxaban was higher with lower QALYs.

  2. Activated protein C plasma levels in the fasting and postprandial states among patients with previous unprovoked venous thromboembolism.

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    Hansen, John-Bjarne; Fernández, José A; Borch, Knut H; Griffin, John H; Brox, Jan H; Braekkan, Sigrid K

    2012-04-01

    The protein C anticoagulant system is of major importance in the regulation of thrombotic risk, but it is not known whether low plasma levels of activated protein C (APC) in vivo reflect a compromised anticoagulant situation with increased thrombotic risk. Previous studies have reported low, normal or increased plasma APC levels in unselected patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). We performed a population-based, case-control study in patients with a previous history of unprovoked VTE and subjected the participants to a standard fat tolerance test (1g fat/kg body weight) in order to promote physiological coagulation activation. VTE patients had higher BMI (28.3 ± 4.4 kg/m(2) versus 26.3 ± 3.9 kg/m(2), p=0.045) and greater waist circumference (98.2 ± 12.5 cm versus 93.4 ± 13.4 cm, p=0.041) than age and sex matched controls. APC levels were equal in fasting plasma (3.00 ± 0.74 ng/ml and 2.99 ± 0.60 ng/ml, p=0.66) but higher in postprandial plasma (3.18 ± 0.57 ng/ml and 2.81 ± 0.38 ng/ml, p=0.008) collected from VTE patients and controls, respectively. Endogenous thrombin generation in plasma following a standardized meal, assessed by thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT), increased similarly in both groups, whereas APC increased only among the VTE patients during the postprandial state. Plasma levels of APC increased linearly with TAT in the postprandial state (p for linear trend=0.012). Our findings fail to support the hypothesis that low APC levels are linked to increased thrombotic risk in unprovoked VTE, and they suggest that plasma APC is a biomarker of thrombin generation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasma fibrin clot properties in the G20210A prothrombin mutation carriers following venous thromboembolism: the effect of rivaroxaban.

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    Janion-Sadowska, Agnieszka; Natorska, Joanna; Siudut, Jakub; Ząbczyk, Michal; Stanisz, Andrzej; Undas, Anetta

    2017-08-30

    We sought to investigate whether the G20210A prothrombin mutation modifies plasma fibrin clot properties in patients after venous thromboembolism (VTE) and how rivaroxaban treatment affects these alterations. We studied 34 prothrombin mutation heterozygous carriers and sex- and age-matched 34 non-carriers, all at least three months since the first VTE episode, before and during treatment with rivaroxaban. Clot permeability (Ks) and clot lysis time (CLT) with or without elimination of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) were assessed at baseline, 2-6 hours (h) after and 20-25 h after intake of rivaroxaban (20 mg/day). At baseline, the prothrombin mutation group formed denser clots (Ks -12 %, p=0.0006) and had impaired fibrinolysis (CLT +14 %, p=0.004, and CLT-TAFI +13 %, p=0.03) compared with the no mutation group and were similar to those observed in 15 healthy unrelated prothrombin mutation carriers. The G20210A prothrombin mutation was the independent predictor for Ks and CLT before rivaroxaban intake. At 2-6 h after rivaroxaban intake, clot properties improved in both G20210A carriers and non-carriers (Ks +38 %, and +37 %, CLT -25 % and -25 %, CLT-TAFI -20 % and -24 %, respectively, all p<0.001), but those parameters were worse in the prothrombin mutation group (Ks -12.8 %, CLT +17 %, CLT-TAFI +13 %, all p<0.001). Rivaroxaban concentration correlated with fibrin clot properties. After 20-25 h since rivaroxaban intake most clot properties returned to baseline. Rivaroxaban-related differences in clot structure were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy images. In conclusion, rivaroxaban treatment, though improves fibrin clot properties, cannot abolish more prothrombotic fibrin clot phenotype observed in prothrombin mutation carriers following VTE.

  4. Adjudication-related processes are underreported and lack standardization in clinical trials of venous thromboembolism: a systematic review.

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    Stuck, Anna K; Fuhrer, Evelyn; Limacher, Andreas; Méan, Marie; Aujesky, Drahomir

    2014-03-01

    Although the use of an adjudication committee (AC) for outcomes is recommended in randomized controlled trials, there are limited data on the process of adjudication. We therefore aimed to assess whether the reporting of the adjudication process in venous thromboembolism (VTE) trials meets existing quality standards and which characteristics of trials influence the use of an AC. We systematically searched MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library from January 1, 2003, to June 1, 2012, for randomized controlled trials on VTE. We abstracted information about characteristics and quality of trials and reporting of adjudication processes. We used stepwise backward logistic regression model to identify trial characteristics independently associated with the use of an AC. We included 161 trials. Of these, 68.9% (111 of 161) reported the use of an AC. Overall, 99.1% (110 of 111) of trials with an AC used independent or blinded ACs, 14.4% (16 of 111) reported how the adjudication decision was reached within the AC, and 4.5% (5 of 111) reported on whether the reliability of adjudication was assessed. In multivariate analyses, multicenter trials [odds ratio (OR), 8.6; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.7, 27.8], use of a data safety-monitoring board (OR, 3.7; 95% CI: 1.2, 11.6), and VTE as the primary outcome (OR, 5.7; 95% CI: 1.7, 19.4) were associated with the use of an AC. Trials without random allocation concealment (OR, 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1, 0.8) and open-label trials (OR, 0.3; 95% CI: 0.1, 1.0) were less likely to report an AC. Recommended processes of adjudication are underreported and lack standardization in VTE-related clinical trials. The use of an AC varies substantially by trial characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A worldwide survey to assess the current approach to the treatment of patients with cancer and venous thromboembolism.

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    Kleinjan, A; Aggarwal, A; Van de Geer, A; Faselis, C; Büller, H R; Di Nisio, M; Rickles, F R; Kamphuisen, P W

    2013-11-01

    Low-molecular-weight heparin (LWMH) is recommended as the preferred anticoagulant treatment over vitamin K antagonists (VKA) for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with cancer. However, there is uncertainty about the duration and dose of LMWH treatment. Therefore, we designed this multinational survey to assess the current approach to the treatment of patients with cancer and VTE. An electronic survey tool was used to disseminate a survey containing 49 questions on different aspects of the treatment of patients with cancer and VTE, among both thrombosis and non-thrombosis specialists. A total of 229 invitations were sent, and 141 completed the survey (60% of the total). Fifty-eight percent of the respondents were from Europe, 35% from the US and the remaining 7% from other countries. Respondent's specialties included haematology (23%), oncology (18%), pulmonology (15%) and general internal medicine (15%). LMWH was indicated as the first choice for the long-term treatment by 82% of the respondents, of whom 60% used full therapeutic doses and 40% chose a dose reduction. When continuing anticoagulants after the long-term treatment period, 44% of respondents preferred LMWH, 10% VKA, while the remaining 45% chose per individual patient for either LMWH or VKA. In conclusion, we observed a relatively high observance rate of the guidelines with respect to the use of LMWH for the long-term treatment of VTE in cancer. In contrast, the dose of LMWH and the type of anticoagulant chosen after the initial 3-12 months varied substantially, probably reflecting the limited available evidence.

  6. Comparison of characteristics from White- and Black-Americans with venous thromboembolism: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, John A; Beckman, Michele G; Bockenstedt, Paula L; Grant, Althea M; Key, Nigel S; Kulkarni, Roshni; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Moll, Stephan; Ortel, Thomas L; Philipp, Claire S

    2010-07-01

    When compared with Whites, Black-Americans may have a 40% higher incidence venous thromboembolism (VTE) incidence. However, whether other VTE characteristics and risk factors vary by race is uncertain. To compare demographic and baseline characteristics among White- and Black-Americans with VTE, we used data prospectively collected from consecutive consenting adults enrolled in seven Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Thrombosis and Hemostasis Centers from August 2003 to March 2009. These characteristics were compared among Whites (n = 2002) and Blacks (n = 395) with objectively diagnosed VTE, both overall, and by age and gender. When compared with Whites, Blacks had a significantly higher proportion with pulmonary embolism (PE), including idiopathic PE among Black women, and a significantly higher proportion of Blacks were women. Blacks had a significantly higher mean BMI and a significantly lower proportion with recent surgery, trauma or infection, family history of VTE, and documented thrombophilia (solely from reduced factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A prevalence). Conversely, Blacks had a significantly higher proportion with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease and dialysis, HIV, and sickle cell disease. When compared with White women, Black women had a significantly lower proportion with recent oral contraceptive use or hormone therapy. We conclude that Whites and Blacks differ significantly regarding demographic and baseline characteristics that may be risk factors for VTE. The prevalence of transient VTE risk factors and idiopathic VTE among Blacks appears to be lower and higher, respectively, suggesting that heritability may be important in the etiology of VTE among Black-Americans. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Educational Level, Anticoagulation Quality, and Clinical Outcomes in Elderly Patients with Acute Venous Thromboembolism: A Prospective Cohort Study.

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    Hofmann, Eveline; Faller, Nicolas; Limacher, Andreas; Méan, Marie; Tritschler, Tobias; Rodondi, Nicolas; Aujesky, Drahomir

    2016-01-01

    Whether the level of education is associated with anticoagulation quality and clinical outcomes in patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) is uncertain. We thus aimed to investigate the association between educational level and anticoagulation quality and clinical outcomes in elderly patients with acute VTE. We studied 817 patients aged ≥65 years with acute VTE from a Swiss prospective multicenter cohort study (09/2009-12/2013). We defined three educational levels: 1) less than high school, 2) high school, and 3) post-secondary degree. The primary outcome was the anticoagulation quality, expressed as the percentage of time spent in the therapeutic INR range (TTR). Secondary outcomes were the time to a first recurrent VTE and major bleeding. We adjusted for potential confounders and periods of anticoagulation. Overall, 56% of patients had less than high school, 25% a high school degree, and 18% a post-secondary degree. The mean percentage of TTR was similar across educational levels (less than high school, 61%; high school, 64%; and post-secondary, 63%; P = 0.36). Within three years of follow-up, patients with less than high school, high school, and a post-secondary degree had a cumulative incidence of recurrent VTE of 14.2%, 12.9%, and 16.4%, and a cumulative incidence of major bleeding of 13.3%, 15.1%, and 15.4%, respectively. After adjustment, educational level was neither associated with anticoagulation quality nor with recurrent VTE or major bleeding. In elderly patients with VTE, we did not find an association between educational level and anticoagulation quality or clinical outcomes.

  8. Role of the pharmacist in achieving performance measures to improve the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobesh, Paul P; Trujillo, Toby C; Finks, Shannon W

    2013-06-01

    Current prescribing practices for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis and treatment are suboptimal, particularly regarding the use of appropriate prophylaxis in accordance with evidence-based guidelines. Failure to prevent avoidable VTE is associated with a substantial clinical and economic burden, due not only to the initial event, but also to VTE recurrence and long-term sequelae. Quality improvement initiatives such as the Surgical Care Improvement Project, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the National Quality Forum, and The Joint Commission have developed performance measures to address the shortfall and improve adherence with best-practice recommendations. Several studies have highlighted the benefits of pharmacist-led anticoagulation services for reducing the occurrence of VTE and bleeding complications while reducing excess hospitalization and health care costs. By assuming responsibility for anticoagulation management, pharmacists can ensure that at-risk patients receive the correct drug at the correct dose for the correct duration, from initial presentation to outpatient follow-up. Increasing continuity of care in this manner will ultimately improve patient outcomes and reduce costs. Pharmacists can also play a key role in helping hospitals achieve performance measures by aiding in the development and implementation of local VTE guidelines, policies, and other quality improvement initiatives; by helping to establish critical pathways with protocols; and by providing valuable education for other health care professionals and patients alike. Pharmacists are in an ideal position to facilitate achievement of VTE-related performance measures and can thus substantially contribute to the much-needed improvement in current VTE prevention and care. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  9. Clinical significance of recurrent venous thromboembolism Significância clínica de tromboembolismo venoso recorrente

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    Nicos Labropoulos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent venous thromboembolism is a significant problem leading to increased morbidity and mortality. It has a high impact on patients' quality of life and imposes a great financial burden on society. Cumulative recurrence has been reported as 40% at 10 years, while the chance of developing postthrombotic signs and symptoms in the lower extremities almost quadruples when ipsilateral. There is also a higher chance of developing pulmonary hypertension. Important factors for recurrence are unprovoked episodes of deep vein thrombosis, malignancy and older age. The evidence for other factors is controversial. Accurate diagnosis and treatment tailored to the patients' history, thrombotic events and risk factors are necessary to optimize management and prevent recurrence.O tromboembolismo venoso recorrente é um problema importante que leva ao aumento da morbimortalidade. Impõe forte impacto à qualidade de vida dos pacientes e grande carga financeira para a sociedade. Acredita-se que a recorrência cumulativa atinja 40% em 10 anos, enquanto que a chance de desenvolver sinais e sintomas pós-trombóticos nas extremidades inferiores quase quadruplica no caso de trombose ipsilateral. Há também uma maior chance do desenvolvimento de hipertensão pulmonar. Fatores importantes para a recorrência são: episódios não provocados de trombose venosa profunda, malignidade e idade avançada. As evidências relacionadas a outros fatores são controversas. Diagnóstico preciso e tratamento adaptado ao histórico dos pacientes, aos eventos trombóticos e aos fatores de risco são necessários para otimizar o manejo e prevenir a recorrência.

  10. A Qualitative Study to Appraise Patients and Family Members Perceptions, Knowledge, and Attitudes towards Venous Thromboembolism Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxaire, Claudie; Tromeur, Cécile; Couturaud, Francis; Leroyer, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine perception, knowledge and concerns developed by patients and their family as regards venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk. We conducted a qualitative study. Participants were: (1) patients with unprovoked VTE with either factor V Leiden mutation or G20210A prothrombin gene mutation or not; and (2) their first-degree relatives. Interviews took place mostly at Brest University Hospital. Participants produced narratives of the patient's illness, stressing their perception of the disorder, its mechanisms, etiology, circumstances and risk factors. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. On an ongoing basis, central themes were identified and data from narratives were categorized by these themes. A total of ten patients and 25 first-degree relatives were interviewed. Analyses of patient's narratives suggested 4 main themes: (1) concerns about initial symptoms and suspicion of VTE. The longer the duration of the initial phase, the more likely anxiety took place and persisted after diagnosis; (2) underestimation of potential life-threatening episode once being managed in emergency; (3) possible biographical disruption with inability to cope with the event; and (4) secondary prevention attitudes motivated by remains of the episode and favoring general prevention attitudes. Analyses of the first-degree relatives narratives suggested 3 main themes: (1) common interpretation of the VTE episode shared within the family; (2) diverse and sometimes confusing interpretation of the genetic status; and, (3) interpretation of clinical signs linked to VTE transmission within the family. Construction of the risk of VTE is based on patient's initial experience and shared within the family. Collection of narratives illustrates the gap between these perceptions and current medical knowledge. These results support the need to collect the perceptions of the VTE episode and its consequences, as a prerequisite to any health education process.

  11. Efficacy and safety of the new oral anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolic complications: meta-analysis

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    V. I. Petrov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Analysis of the efficacy and safety of the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs in the management of venous thromboembolism (VTE.Material and methods. This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs was made in accordance with the instructions “Preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA”.Results. The meta-analysis included 5 RCTs. NOACs were as effective as vitamin K antagonists (VKAs in preventing recurrent symptomatic VTE (RR=0.93; 95% CI 0.77-1.12; p=0.44. The incidence of recurrent thrombosis (RR=0.82; 95% CI 0.63-1.08; p=0.16 and deep vein thrombosis ± fatal or nonfatal pulmonary embolism (RR=1.06; 95% CI 0.81-1.40; p=0.66 was comparable in the groups of comparison. Meta-analysis of the safety of the NOACs suggested significant reduction of risk of major bleeding as compared with standard therapy (RR=0.54; 95% CI 0.42-0.69; р<0.00001. The incidence of all types of bleeding was significantly lower with NOACs (RR=0.70; 95% CI 0.51-0.95; p=0.02. All-cause mortality rate was comparable between the groups (RR=0.93; 95% CI 0.76-1.13; p=0.46.Conclusions. NOACs are as effective as the standard therapy, at that they are much safer in VTE treatment.

  12. Risk of venous thromboembolism in people admitted to hospital with selected immune-mediated diseases: record-linkage study

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    Handel Adam E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a common complication during and after a hospital admission. Although it is mainly considered a complication of surgery, it often occurs in people who have not undergone surgery, with recent evidence suggesting that immune-mediated diseases may play a role in VTE risk. We, therefore, decided to study the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE in people admitted to hospital with a range of immune-mediated diseases. Methods We analysed databases of linked statistical records of hospital admissions and death certificates for the Oxford Record Linkage Study area (ORLS1:1968 to 1998 and ORLS2:1999 to 2008 and the whole of England (1999 to 2008. Rate ratios for VTE were determined, comparing immune-mediated disease cohorts with comparison cohorts. Results Significantly elevated risks of VTE were found, in all three populations studied, in people with a hospital record of admission for autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, chronic active hepatitis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, myxoedema, pemphigus/pemphigoid, polyarteritis nodosa, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Rate ratios were considerably higher for some of these diseases than others: for example, for systemic lupus erythematosus the rate ratios were 3.61 (2.36 to 5.31 in the ORLS1 population, 4.60 (3.19 to 6.43 in ORLS2 and 3.71 (3.43 to 4.02 in the England dataset. Conclusions People admitted to hospital with immune-mediated diseases may be at an increased risk of subsequent VTE. Our findings need independent confirmation or refutation; but, if confirmed, there may be a role for thromboprophylaxis in some patients with these diseases.

  13. Associations between polymorphisms in coagulation-related genes and venous thromboembolism: A meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Liu, Kang; Zou, Junjie; Ma, Hao; Yang, Hongyu; Zhang, Xiwei; Jiao, Yuanyong

    2017-03-01

    Recently, several studies showed that the polymorphisms in the coagulation-related genes might be associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE); however, the results were still controversial. We performed a meta-analysis with trial sequential analysis to investigate the associations between the endothelial cell-activated protein C receptor (EPCR) rs9574, F11 rs2289252, F11 rs2036914, FGG rs2066865, FGG rs1049636, CYP4V2 rs13146272, SERPINC1 rs2227589, and GP6 rs1613662 polymorphisms with the risk of VTE. We searched both the common English-language databases and the Chinese literature databases. Two authors selected studies according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Crude odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to estimate the strength of this association. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed with the chi-square-based Q test and the I statistic. Overall, a total of 20 studies were included. The meta-analysis revealed that the F11 rs2289252, F11 rs2036914, FGG rs2066865, and CYP4V2 rs13146272 polymorphisms were closely related to the development of VTE in the white race under the best genetic models after multiple testing adjustments. The EPCR rs9574, FGG rs1049636, SERPINC1 rs2227589, and GP6 rs1613662 polymorphisms might be potential candidates in the pathogenesis of VTE, but trial sequential analyses and sensitivity analyses indicated that the evidences were limited. Larger scale studies were demanded to avoid false-positive outcomes. Finally, our study demonstrated the important role of rs2289252, rs2036914, rs2066865, and rs13146272 polymorphisms in the development of VTE in the white race. Rs9574, rs1049636, rs2227589 and rs1613662 polymorphisms might be risk factors of VTE. However, more studies involving diverse races are needed to probe the ethnic difference and the underlying mechanisms of significant associations.

  14. Reduced proliferation of endothelial colony-forming cells in unprovoked venous thromboembolic disease as a consequence of endothelial dysfunction

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    Hernandez-Lopez, Rubicel; Chavez-Gonzalez, Antonieta; Torres-Barrera, Patricia; Moreno-Lorenzana, Dafne; Lopez-DiazGuerrero, Norma; Santiago-German, David; Isordia-Salas, Irma; Smadja, David; C. Yoder, Mervin; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolic disease (VTD) is a public health problem. We recently reported that endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) derived from endothelial cells (EC) (ECFC-ECs) from patients with VTD have a dysfunctional state. For this study, we proposed that a dysfunctional status of these cells generates a reduction of its proliferative ability, which is also associated with senescence and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Methods and results Human mononuclear cells (MNCs) were obtained from peripheral blood from 40 healthy human volunteers (controls) and 50 patients with VTD matched by age (20−50 years) and sex to obtain ECFCs. We assayed their proliferative ability with plasma of patients and controls and supernatants of cultures from ECFC-ECs, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), ROS, and expression of ephrin-B2/Eph-B4 receptor. Compared with cells from controls, cells from VTD patients showed an 8-fold increase of ECFCs that emerged 1 week earlier, reduced proliferation at long term (39%) and, in passages 4 and 10, a highly senescent rate (30±1.05% vs. 91.3±15.07%, respectively) with an increase of ROS and impaired expression of ephrin-B2/Eph-4 genes. Proliferation potential of cells from VTD patients was reduced in endothelial medium [1.4±0.22 doubling population (DP)], control plasma (1.18±0.31 DP), or plasma from VTD patients (1.65±0.27 DP). Conclusions As compared with controls, ECFC-ECs from individuals with VTD have higher oxidative stress, proliferation stress, cellular senescence, and low proliferative potential. These findings suggest that patients with a history of VTD are ECFC-ECs dysfunctional that could be associated to permanent risk for new thrombotic events. PMID:28910333

  15. Exploring the impact of route of administration on medication acceptance in hospitalized patients: Implications for venous thromboembolism prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoola, Victor O; Tavakoli, Farrah; Lau, Brandyn D; Lankiewicz, Matthew; Ross, Patricia; Kraus, Peggy; Shaffer, Dauryne; Hobson, Deborah B; Aboagye, Jonathan K; Farrow, Norma A; Haut, Elliott R; Streiff, Michael B

    2017-12-01

    Non-administration of venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis contributes to preventable patient harm. We hypothesized that non-administration would be more common for parenteral VTE prophylaxis than oral infectious disease or cardiac prophylaxis or for treatment medications. The primary study goal was to determine if non-administration of parenteral VTE prophylaxis is more frequent than other prophylactic or treatment medications. In this retrospective cohort study of consecutive admissions we used descriptive statistics and risk ratios (RR) to compare the number of non-administered doses of VTE prophylaxis, oral infectious disease and cardiovascular prophylaxis and treatment medications. To quantify the influence of demographic and clinical characteristics on non-administration, we estimated incidence rate ratios from Poisson regression models. 645 patients were admitted from July 1, 2014 through March 31, 2015. Median age was 52years (Interquartile range 43-57) and 365 (56.6%) were male. Subcutaneous VTE prophylaxis doses were not administered nearly 4-fold more frequently than oral infectious disease and cardiovascular prophylaxis (RR=3.93; 95% CI 3.36-4.59) and 3-fold more frequently than treatment medications (RR=3.06; 95% CI 2.91-3.22). Ninety percent of non-administered doses of VTE prophylaxis were refused. Risk factors for non-administration included younger age (age 18-35years), male sex, uninsured status, HIV-positivity and high VTE risk status. Subcutaneous VTE prophylaxis is not administered more frequently than oral infectious diseases or cardiac prophylaxis and treatment medications. These data suggest that availability of an oral medication could improve the effectiveness of VTE prophylaxis in real world settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Post-discharge compliance to venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in high-risk orthopaedic surgery: results from the ETHOS registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, David; Arcelus, Juan I; Felicissimo, Paulo

    2012-02-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk persists for several weeks following high-risk orthopaedic surgery (HROS). The ETHOS registry evaluated post-operative VTE prophylaxis prescribed, and actual VTE prophylaxis received, compared with the 2004 American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines in HROS patients. We performed a subanalysis of ETHOS to assess patient compliance with ACCP-adherent prophylaxis after discharge and the factors predicting poor compliance. Consecutive patients undergoing hip fracture surgery, total hip arthroplasty, or knee arthroplasty were enrolled at discharge from 161 centres in 17 European countries if they had received adequate in-hospital VTE prophylaxis. Data on prescribed and actual prophylaxis received were obtained from hospital charts and patient post-discharge diaries. Good compliance was defined as percentage treatment intake ≥80% with no more than two consecutive days without treatment. A total of 3,484 patients (79.4%) received ACCP-adherent anticoagulant prescription at discharge and 2,999 (86.0%) had an evaluable patient diary. In total, 87.7% of evaluable patients were compliant with prescribed treatment after discharge. The most common reason for non-compliance (33.4%) was "drug was not bought". Injection of treatment was not a barrier to good compliance. Main factors affecting compliance related to purchase of and access to treatment, patient education, the person responsible for administering injections, country, and type of hospital ward at discharge. Within our study population, patient compliance with ACCP-adherent thromboprophylaxis prescribed at discharge was good. Improvements in patient education and prescribing practices at discharge may be important in further raising compliance levels in high-risk orthopaedic surgery patients.

  17. [Rivaroxaban versus standard of care in venous thromboembolism prevention following hip or knee arthroplasty in daily clinical practice (Spanish data from the international study XAMOS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero, J; Díaz de Rada, P; Lozano, L M; Martínez, J; Herrera, A

    2016-01-01

    To analyse the effectiveness and safety of rivaroxaban vs. standard treatment (ST) in the prevention of venous thromboembolism after hip or knee replacement in daily clinical practice in Spain. A sub-analysis of the Spanish data in the XAMOS international observational study that included patients>18 years who received 10mg o.d. rivaroxaban or ST. up to 3 months after surgery. incidence of symptomatic/asymptomatic thromboembolic events, bleeding, mortality, and other adverse events; use of health resources and satisfaction after hospital discharge. Of the total 801 patients included, 410 received rivaroxaban and 391 ST (64.7% heparin, 24.0% fondaparinux, 11% dabigatran). The incidence of symptomatic thromboembolic events and major bleeding was similar in both groups (0.2% vs. 0.8% wit ST and 0.7% vs. 1.3% with ST [EMA criteria]/0.0% vs. 0.3% with ST [RECORD criteria]). The adverse events incidence associated with the drug was significantly higher rivaroxaban (overall: 4.4% vs. 0.8% with ST, P=.001; serious: 1.5% vs. 0.0% with ST, P=.03). The rivaroxaban used less health resources after discharge, and the majority considered the tolerability as «very good« and the treatment as «very comfortable». Rivaroxaban is at least as effective as ST in the prevention of venous thromboembolism prevention in daily clinical practice, with a similar incidence of haemorrhages. It provides greater satisfaction/comfort, and less health resources after discharge. These results should be interpreted taking into account the limitations inherent in observational studies. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphism (C677T), hyperhomocysteinemia, and risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease and venous thromboembolism: prospective and case-control studies from the Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jeppe; Juul, Klaus; Grande, Peer

    2004-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with ischemic cardiovascular disease (ICD) and venous thromboembolism (VTE). We tested the hypothesis that methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T homozygosity with hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with ICD and VTE. First, 9238 randomly selected whites......) and 19% in ICD/VTE cases versus controls (P MTHFR C677T homozygosity was not associated with increased risk of ICD or VTE in subgroups after stratification...... in homozygotes versus noncarriers did not differ from 1.0. In conclusion, MTHFR C677T homozygosity with hyperhomocysteinemia is not associated with ICD or VTE; however, ICD/VTE is associated with hyperhomocysteinemia. Therefore, ICD and VTE may cause hyperhomocysteinemia, rather than vice versa....

  19. Successful Application of Edoxaban in the Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism Recurrence in a Patient with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer after Tumor Shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Tetsuaki; Mizugaki, Hidenori; Ikezawa, Yasuyuki; Furuta, Megumi; Takashima, Yuta; Kikuchi, Hajime; Goudarzi, Houman; Asahina, Hajime; Kikuchi, Junko; Kikuchi, Eiki; Sakakibara-Konishi, Jun; Shinagawa, Naofumi; Tsujino, Ichizo; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2018-02-09

    This report describes the case of a 66-year-old man with non-small cell lung cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE). Unfractionated heparin (UFH) was initially used to control VTE before chemotherapy. However, switching UFH to warfarin or edoxaban, a novel oral anticoagulant (NOAC), failed. Chemotherapy was then administered to control the tumor which was thought to have been the main cause of VTE, which had been treated by UFH. After tumor shrinkage was achieved by chemotherapy, we were able to successfully switch from UFH to edoxaban. Controlling the tumor size and activity enabled the use of edoxaban as maintenance therapy for VTE.

  20. Maternal smoking, obesity, and risk of venous thromboembolism during pregnancy and the puerperium: a population-based nested case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben Bjerregaard; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Gislum, Mette

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Smoking and obesity are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between smoking, obesity (BMI>30), and risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy and the puerperium. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a population......) for VTE as a measure of relative risk. RESULTS: Smoking and obesity were associated with increased risk of VTE during pregnancy and the puerperium (adjusted OR 2.7 (95% CI: 1.5, 4.9) and 5.3 (95% CI: 2.1, 13.5), respectively). Obesity appeared to be associated with a higher risk of pulmonary embolism...... (adjusted OR: 14.9 (95% CI: 3.0, 74.8) than of deep venous thrombosis (adjusted OR: 4.4, 95% CI: 1.6, 11.9). CONCLUSION: Smoking and obesity are risk factors for VTE in pregnancy and the puerperium....

  1. Risk of venous thromboembolism among users of third generation oral contraceptives compared with users of oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel before and after 1995: cohort and case-control analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jick, Hershel; Kaye, James A; Vasilakis-Scaramozza, Catherine; Jick, Susan S

    2000-01-01

    Objective To compare the risk of idiopathic venous thromboembolism among women taking third generation oral contraceptives (with gestodene or desogestrel) with that among women taking oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel. Design Cohort and case-control analyses derived from the General Practice Research Database. Setting UK general practices, January 1993 to December 1999. Participants Women aged 15-39 taking third generation oral contraceptives or oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel. Main outcome measures Relative incidence (cohort study) and odds ratios (case-control study) as measures of the relative risk of venous thromboembolism. Results The adjusted estimates of relative risk for venous thromboembolism associated with third generation oral contraceptives compared with oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel was 1.9 (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 2.8) in the cohort analysis and 2.3 (1.3 to 3.9) in the case-control study. The estimates for the two types of oral contraceptives were similar before and after the warning issued by the Committee on Safety of Medicines in October 1995. A shift away from the use of third generation oral contraceptives after the scare was more pronounced among younger women (who have a lower risk of venous thromboembolism) than among older women. Fewer cases of venous thromboembolism occurred in 1996 and later than would have been expected if the use of oral contraceptives had remained unchanged. Conclusions These findings are consistent with previously reported studies, which found that compared with oral contraceptives with levonorgestrel, third generation oral contraceptives are associated with around twice the risk of venous thromboembolism. PMID:11073511

  2. Towards evidence-based guidelines for the prevention of venous thromboembolism: systematic reviews of mechanical methods, oral anticoagulation, dextran and regional anaesthesia as thromboprophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roderick, P; Ferris, G; Wilson, K; Halls, H; Jackson, D; Collins, R; Baigent, C

    2005-12-01

    major bleeding. Dextran reduced the risk of DVT and of PVT by about half, again irrespective of the type of surgery, but too few studies had reported PE to provide reliable estimates of effect on this outcome. Dextran appeared to be less effective at preventing DVT than the heparin regimens studied. Dextran was associated with an increased risk of bleeding, but too few bleeds had occurred for the size of this excess risk to be estimated reliably. Compared with general anaesthesia, regional anaesthesia reduced the risk of DVT by about half, and this benefit appeared similar in each of the surgical settings studied. Regional anaesthesia was associated with less major bleeding than general anaesthesia. In the absence of a clear contraindication (such as severe peripheral arterial disease), patients undergoing a surgical procedure would be expected to derive net benefit from a mechanical compression method of thromboprophylaxis (such as graduated compression stockings), irrespective of their absolute risk of venous thromboembolism. Patients who are considered to be at particularly high risk of venous thromboembolism may also benefit from a pharmacological thromboprophylactic agent, but since oral anticoagulant and dextran regimens appear less effective at preventing DVT than standard low-dose unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin regimens, they may be less suitable for patients at high risk of venous thromboembolism, even though they are associated with less bleeding. Whenever feasible, the use of regional anaesthesia as an alternative to general anaesthesia may also provide additional protection against venous thromboembolism. There is little information on the prevention of venous thromboembolism among high-risk medical patients (such as those with stroke), so further randomised trials in this area would be helpful.

  3. Measures of vitamin K antagonist control reported in atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism studies: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearns, Elizabeth S; Hawthorne, Jessica; Song, Ju-Sung; Coleman, Craig I

    2014-06-20

    To aid trialists, systematic reviewers and others, we evaluated the degree of standardisation of control measure reporting that has occurred in atrial fibrillation (AF) and venous thromboembolism (VTE) studies since 2000; and attempted to determine whether the prior recommendation of reporting ≥2 measures per study has been employed. Systematic review. We searched bibliographic databases (2000 to June 2013) to identify AF and VTE studies evaluating dose-adjusted vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and reporting ≥1 control measure. The types of measures reported, proportion of studies reporting ≥2 measures and mean (±SD) number of measures per study were determined for all studies and compared between subgroups. Through the use of a standardised data extraction tool, we independently extracted all data, with disagreements resolved by a separate investigator. 148 studies were included, 57% of which reported ≥2 control measures (mean/study=2.13±1.36). The proportion of time spent in the target international normalised ratio range (TTR) was most commonly reported (79%), and was frequently accompanied by time above/below range (52%). AF studies more frequently reported ≥2 control measures compared with VTE studies (63% vs 37%; p=0.004), and reported a greater number of measures per study (mean=2.36 vs 1.53; pstudies were more likely to provide ≥2 measures compared with randomised trials (76% vs 33%; pstudies (2004-2013) reported ≥2 measures more often than older (2000-2003) studies (59% vs 35%; p=0.05) and reported more measures per study (mean=2.23 vs 1.48; p=0.02). While TTR was often utilised, studies reported ≥2 measures of VKA control only about half of the time and lacked consistency in the types of measures reported. A trend towards studies reporting greater numbers of VKA control measures over time was observed over our review time horizon, particularly, with AF and observational studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  4. A Canadian study of the cost-effectiveness of apixaban compared with enoxaparin for post-surgical venous thromboembolism prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revankar, Nikhil; Patterson, John; Kadambi, Ananth; Raymond, Vincent; El-Hadi, Wissam

    2013-07-01

    Occurrence of a venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery who are not given thromboprophylactic therapy presents considerable danger to patient medical outcomes and a significant economic burden to the health care system at large. Apixaban is a direct factor Xa inhibitor that has been shown in clinical trial use to safely reduce the composite of VTE and mortality rates in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA); however, the cost-effectiveness of apixaban treatment in Canadian settings has not been studied. Our study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of apixaban compared with enoxaparin as VTE preventive therapy in patients undergoing elective THA or TKA in Canada. An economic model, including both a decision-tree component and a Markov model, was created. The decision tree considered VTE, bleeding, and mortality incidence that occurred in patients within 90 days post-surgery using data from the Apixaban Versus Enoxaparin for Thromboprophylaxis After Knee or Hip Replacement (ADVANCE) trials, which compared apixaban therapy with 30-mg twice daily and 40-mg daily enoxaparin treatment. The Markov model provided the option to simulate events that may occur over the long term, such as recurrent VTE and post-thrombotic syndrome. Outcomes during the short-term phase directly impact the risk of events occurring during the long-term phase (5 years post-surgery). The results of our analysis indicated that apixaban is dominant (ie, more effective and less expensive) than enoxaparin in treating patients undergoing THA and TKA. There were fewer occurrences of VTEs, bleeding events, recurrent VTEs, and post-thrombotic syndrome events in the TKA population with apixaban therapy. Similar results were seen in patients undergoing THA, with the exception of bleeding events, which were more common with apixaban treatment. Savings of $180 to $270 per patient are expected with apixaban treatment compared with

  5. [Risk factors of venous thromboembolism recurrence and the predictive value of simplified pulmonary embolism severity index in medical inpatients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, C L; Zhou, H X; Tang, Y J; Wang, L; Yi, Q; Liang, Z A

    2016-04-12

    To explore the risk factors of venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence and the predictive value of simplified pulmonary embolism severity index (sPESI) in medical inpatients. A total of 149 consecutive patients with first diagnosed VTE from the medical departments of West China Hospital of Sichuan University from January 2011 and December 2012 were enrolled and followed-up for 24 months. The VTE recurrence rate was calculated and univariate and multivariate cox proportional hazards regression analysis were performed to identify the risk factors associated with VTE recurrence. All the patients were evaluated by sPESI, and survival analysis was used to explore its value in predicting VTE recurrence in these medical patients. Out of the included 149 patients, 23(15.4%) patients had VTE recurrence during the 2 years' follow-up and median recurrence time was 167 days. The univariate analysis showed bed rest, severe lung disease, nephrotic syndrome, inappropriate anticoagulant therapy, smoking, diabetes, and malignant neoplasm might be associated with VTE recurrence (P=0.043, 0.006, 0.009, 0.032, 0.098, 0.048, 0.021). Among these risk factors, the multivariate analysis revealed severe lung disease, nephrotic syndrome, and malignant neoplasm were the independent risk factors (HR=3.45, 5.67, 3.60; P=0.020, 0.020, 0.047); while for inappropriate anticoagulant therapy, the P value was marginal (HR=3.94, 95% CI: 0.99-15.63, P=0.051). The median sPESI scores of the patients with VTE recurrence was higher than that of the patients without VTE recurrence[1(1, 2) vs 0(0, 1), P=0.001], and patients with sPESI≥1 were associated with 5.57-fold increased risk of VTE recurrence compared with patients with sPESI=0 (95%CI: 1.79-17.30, P=0.001). Survival analysis also showed that the 2-year cumulative VTE recurrence rate of patients with sPESI≥1 was significant higher than that of patients with sPESI=0 (38.4% vs 5.7%, P=0.001). The medical VTE patients have high VTE recurrence risk

  6. Venous thromboembolism in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Group, ESHRE Capri Workshop; Skouby, Sven Olaf

    2013-01-01

    . In pregnancy, the risk of VTE is increased ~5-fold, while the use of combined hormonal contraception (CHC) doubles the risk and this relative risk is higher with the more recent pills containing desogestrel, gestodene and drospirenone when compared with those with levonorgestrel. Similarly, hormone replacement...

  7. Venous Thromboembolism (VTE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How are DVTs and PEs treated? Treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis has four goals: 1) to ... help to reduce leg pain, swelling, discoloration and ulcers commonly ... new treatments. New oral medications that will require less monitoring are soon ...

  8. Is diabetes mellitus a risk factor for venous thromboembolism? A systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control and cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariani, Karim; Mavrakanas, Thomas; Combescure, Christophe; Perrier, Arnaud; Marti, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a well-established risk factor for atherosclerotic disease, but its role in the occurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been elucidated. We conducted a meta-analysis of published cohort and case-control studies to assess whether diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for VTE. We systematically searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for case-control and prospective cohort studies assessing association between the risk of venous thromboembolism and diabetes. Odds ratios (OR) from case-control studies were combined while for prospective studies hazard ratios (HR) were combined. Models with random effects were used. Meta-analyses were conducted separately for raw and adjusted measures of association. 24 studies were identified including 10 cohort studies (274,501 patients) and 14 case-control studies (1,157,086 patients). Meta-analysis of the prospective cohort studies demonstrated a significant association between diabetes and VTE (HR 1.60; 95% CI 1.35 to 1.89). This association was no longer present after analysis of multi-adjusted HRs (HR 1.10; 95% CI 0.77 to 1.56). Meta-analysis of case-control studies showed a significant association between diabetes and VTE (OR 1.57; 95%CI 1.17 to 2.12), but this association was no longer present when adjusted ORs were used (OR 1.18; 95%CI 0.89 to 1.56). The increased risk of VTE associated with diabetes mainly results from confounders rather than an intrinsic effect of diabetes on venous thrombotic risk. Therefore, no specific recommendations should apply for the management of diabetic patients at risk for VTE. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The use of long-term low-molecular weight heparin for the treatment of venous thromboembolism in palliative care patients with advanced cancer : a case series of sixty two patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noble, Sir; Hood, K.; Finlay, I. G.

    2007-01-01

    The advantages of low-molecular weight heparin (LMVVH) over warfarin, in the treatment of cancer associated venous thromboembolism (VTE) are well reported. However the studies supporting LMWH include few patients representative of the palliative care population. Although LMWH has advantages over

  10. A prospective cohort study on the absolute risks of venous thromboembolism and predictive value of screening asymptomatic relatives of patients with hereditary deficiencies of protein S, protein C or antithrombin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoodi, B. K.; Brouwer, J-L P.; Ten Kate, M. K.; Lijfering, W. M.; Veeger, N. J. G. M.; Mulder, A. B.; Kluin-Nelemans, H. C.; van der Meer, J.

    Background: Absolute risks of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in protein S-, protein C-, or antithrombin-deficient subjects are mainly based on retrospective data. Screening asymptomatic relatives of these patients is disputed, though studies addressing this issue have yet to be conducted. Methods: We

  11. Pulmonary thromboembolism in AIDS patient with chronic venous insufficiency, pulmonary tuberculosis and breast cancer: a case report and pathophysiology review

    OpenAIRE

    Juan José Cortez-Escalante; Cleudson Castro; Gustavo Adolfo Sierra Romero; Luiza Matos; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2006-01-01

    Recent literature reports thrombotic episodes occurring in patients with HIV infection associated with other abnormalities including neoplasms and infections predisposing to a hypercoagulable state. We report a 47-year-old woman who developed pulmonary thromboembolism in association with HIV infection, pulmonary tuberculosis and breast cancer. She was treated with rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide; heparin, phenprocoumon, zidovudine, lamivudine and efavirenz. Acid fast bacilli were visualized...

  12. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase polymorphism (C677T), hyperhomocysteinemia, and risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease and venous thromboembolism: prospective and case-control studies from the Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jeppe; Juul, Klaus; Grande, Peer

    2004-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with ischemic cardiovascular disease (ICD) and venous thromboembolism (VTE). We tested the hypothesis that methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T homozygosity with hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with ICD and VTE. First, 9238 randomly selected whites...... for sex, age, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), fibrinogen, triglycerides, body mass index, smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and factor V Leiden genotype. Finally, in case-control studies odds ratios for ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease...... from the general population were followed for 23 years. Second, 2125 whites with ischemic heart disease and 836 whites with ischemic cerebrovascular disease were compared with 7568 controls from the general population. Plasma homocysteine was elevated 25% in homozygotes versus noncarriers (P

  13. Venous thrombo-embolism as a complication of cross-sex hormone treatment of male-to-female transsexual subjects: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asscheman, H; T'Sjoen, G; Lemaire, A; Mas, M; Meriggiola, M C; Mueller, A; Kuhn, A; Dhejne, C; Morel-Journel, N; Gooren, L J

    2014-09-01

    Administration of cross-sex hormones to male-to-female transsexual subjects, usually oestrogens + often anti-androgens, such as cyproterone acetate, carries a risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). VTE usually occurs in the first year of oestrogen administration. Ethinyl oestradiol, due to its chemical structure, was in 2003 identified as a major factor in the occurrence of VTE. Most clinics do not prescribe ethinyl oestradiol any longer, but people who take hormones without medical supervision use often oral contraceptives containing ethinyl oestradiol, many times in overdose. Cessation of use of ethinyl oestradiol and peri-operative thrombosis prophylaxis for surgery have reduced prevalence rate of VTE. Other oral oestrogens should not be overdosed, and transdermal oestrogen is to be preferred. Thrombosis prophylaxis for surgery is mandatory. It seems advisable to stop hormone use at least 2 weeks before major surgery, to be resumed only after 3 weeks following full mobilisation. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Comparison of Venous Thromboembolism after Total Artificial Joint Replacement between Musculoskeletal Tumors and Osteoarthritis of the Knee by a Single Surgeon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Fu

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare and evaluate the event of VTE (Venous Thromboembolism Event after total artificial joint replacement between two groups diagnosed with either musculoskeletal tumors or osteoarthritis (OA of the knee. From 2004 to 2014, a total of 1,402 patients (308 in tumor group, 1,094 in OA group were involved in this study. The rate of asymptomatic DVT (Deep vein thrombosis was significantly higher in tumor group when compared with OA group. Though both the incidence of symptomatic DVT and PE (Pulmonary embolism were slightly higher in tumor group, no significant difference was detected. Tumor patients suffered an almost equal risk of VTE compared with OA patients except a higher rate of asymptomatic DVT after total artificial joint replacement. For patients with tumor, no significant association was observed between any potential risk factor and DVT.

  15. Novos anticoagulantes orais no tromboembolismo venoso e fibrilhação auricular New oral anticoagulants in the treatment of venous thromboembolism and atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Silvestre

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Os antagonistas da vitamina K foram, durante mais de 50 anos, os únicos anticoagulantes orais disponiveis. A imprevisibilidade da farmacocinética e farmacodinâmica desta classe de fármacos, responsável pela dificuldade na sua utilização, conduziu à necessidade do desenvolvimento de novas moléculas anticoagulantes. Estão actualmente diponíveis os resultados dos estudos de novos anticoagulantes orais no tromboembolismo venoso e na fibrilhação auricular, que se revêem neste trabalho.For more than 50 years, vitamin K antagonists were the only oral anticoagulants available. The unpredictability of its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, responsible for its difficult clinical management, has raised the need of new anticoagulants. Results of trials involving the new anticoagulants in venous thromboembolism and atrial fibrillation are now available and reviewed in this paper.

  16. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in meningioma surgery - a population based comparative effectiveness study of routine mechanical prophylaxis with or without preoperative low molecular weight heparin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjåvik, Kristin; Bartek, Jiri; Solheim, Ole

    2015-01-01

    OBJECT: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a serious complication after intracranial meningioma surgery. To what extent systemic prophylaxis with pharmacotherapy is beneficial with respect to VTE risk, or associated with increased risk of bleeding and postoperative hemorrhage, remains debated....... The current study aimed to clarify the risk-benefit of prophylactic pharmacotherapy initiated the evening before craniotomy for meningioma. METHODS: In a Scandinavian population-based cohort we conducted a retrospective review of 979 operations for intracranial meningioma between 2007 and 2013 at three...... intracranial meningioma surgery. Neither could we for primary outcomes detect a significant increase in clinically relevant postoperative hematomas secondary to this regimen. We suggest that "as-needed" perioperative administration of LMWH, reserved for patients with excess risk due to delayed mobilization...

  17. Urinary Prothrombin Fragment 1+2 in relation to Development of Non-Symptomatic and Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolic Events following Total Knee Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borris, Lars Carl; Breindahl, Morten; Rud-Lassen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Prothrombin fragment 1+2 is excreted in urine (uF1+2) as a result of in vivo thrombin generation and can be a marker of coagulation status after an operative procedure. This study compared uF1+2 levels in patients with symptomatic and non-symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total knee...... replacement (TKR) and in event-free sex- and age-matched controls. Significantly higher median uF1+2 levels were seen in the VTE patients on days 1, 3, and the day of venography (mostly day 7) after TKR compared with controls. The uF1+2 levels tended to be high in some patients with symptomatic VTE; however...

  18. Clozapine-Induced Late Agranulocytosis and Severe Neutropenia Complicated with Streptococcus pneumonia, Venous Thromboembolism, and Allergic Vasculitis in Treatment-Resistant Female Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Voulgari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clozapine is a second-generation antipsychotic agent from the benzodiazepine group indicated for treatment-resistant schizophrenia and other psychotic conditions. Using clozapine earlier on once a case appears to be refractory limits both social and personal morbidity of chronic psychosis. However treatment with second-generation antipsychotics is often complicated by adverse effects. We present a case of a 33-year-old Caucasian woman with a 25-year history of refractory psychotic mania after switching to a 2-year clozapine therapy. She presented clozapine-induced absolute neutropenia, agranulocytosis, which were complicated by Streptococcus pneumonia and sepsis. Clozapine-induced thromboembolism of the common femoral and right proximal iliac vein, as well as allergic vasculitis, was diagnosed. She achieved full remission on granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and specific antibiotic treatment. Early detection of severe clozapine-induced absolute neutropenia and agranulocytosis enabled the effective treatment of two among its most severe complications. Additional evidence to the previously reported possible causal relation between clozapine and venous thromboembolism is offered. Finally, clozapine-induced allergic vasculitis is confirmed as a late adverse effect of clozapine therapy.

  19. Rivaroxaban for Preventing Venous Thromboembolism in High-Risk Ambulatory Patients with Cancer: Rationale and Design of the CASSINI Trial. Rationale and Design of the CASSINI Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorana, Alok A; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Kuderer, Nicole M; Wun, Ted; Liebman, Howard; Soff, Gerald; Belani, Chandra; O'Reilly, Eileen M; McBane, Robert; Eikelboom, John; Damaraju, C V; Beyers, Karen; Dietrich, Flavia; Kakkar, Ajay K; Riess, Hanno; Peixoto, Renata D'Alpino; Lyman, Gary H

    2017-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent complication of cancer associated with morbidity, mortality, increased hospitalizations and higher health care costs. Cancer patients at increased risk for VTE can be identified using a validated risk assessment score, and the incidence of VTE can be reduced in high-risk settings using anticoagulation. Rivaroxaban is a potent, oral, direct, factor Xa inhibitor approved for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic events, including VTE. CASSINI is a double-blind, randomized, parallel-group, multicentre study comparing rivaroxaban with placebo in adult ambulatory patients with various cancers who are initiating systemic cancer therapy and are at high risk of VTE (Khorana score ≥ 2). Patients with primary brain tumours or those at risk for bleeding are excluded. Approximately 700 patients will be randomized 1:1 to rivaroxaban 10 mg daily or placebo for up to 6 months if there is no evidence of VTE from compression ultrasonography (CU) during screening or from routine care imaging within 30 days prior to randomization. Mandatory CU will also be performed at weeks 8 and 16 (±7 days), and at study end (±3 days). The primary efficacy hypothesis is that anticoagulation with rivaroxaban reduces the composite of objectively confirmed symptomatic or asymptomatic, lower-extremity, proximal deep-vein thrombosis (DVT); symptomatic, upper-extremity DVT; symptomatic or incidental pulmonary embolism; and VTE-related death compared with placebo. The primary safety objective is to assess major bleeding events (Clinical trial information: NCT02555878).

  20. Spinal anesthesia increases the risk of venous thromboembolism in total arthroplasty: Secondary analysis of a J-PSVT cohort study on anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Mashio; Kamei, Masataka; Bito, Seiji; Migita, Kiyoshi; Miyata, Shigeki; Kumagai, Kenji; Abe, Isao; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Nakayama, Yuichiro; Saito, Masanobu; Tanaka, Takaaki; Motokawa, Satoru

    2017-05-01

    Clinical guidance on the choice of anesthetic modality vis-à-vis the risk of perioperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) is largely lacking because of a paucity of recent evidence. A comparative effect of general anesthesia and neuraxial blockade on the perioperative incidence of VTE has not been well-investigated.We compared the effects of different types of anesthetic modalities on the risk of VTE after total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA).This is a secondary analysis of the Japanese Study of Prevention and Actual Situation of Venous Thromboembolism after Total Arthroplasty (J-PSVT). Data pertaining to a total of 2162 patients who underwent THA and TKA at 34 hospitals were included in this analysis. We compared the different anesthetic modalities with respect to the incidence of VTE. The composite end-point was asymptomatic/symptomatic deep vein thrombosis detected using scheduled bilateral ultrasonography up to postoperative day (POD) 10 and fatal/non-fatal pulmonary embolism up to POD 10.The study groups were as follows: general anesthesia (n = 646), combined epidural/general anesthesia (n = 1004), epidural anesthesia (n = 87), and spinal anesthesia (n = 425). On multivariate analysis, only spinal anesthesia was associated with a significant increase in the risk of VTE as compared with that associated with general anesthesia. Propensity score-matched analysis for "combined epidural/general anesthesia group" versus "spinal anesthesia group" demonstrated a 48% higher incidence of VTE (relative risk = 1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-1.85) in the latter.Spinal anesthesia was associated with a higher risk of postoperative VTE, as compared with that associated with combined epidural/general anesthesia, in patients undergoing total arthroplasty.

  1. Multicentre validation of the Geneva Risk Score for hospitalised medical patients at risk of venous thromboembolism. Explicit ASsessment of Thromboembolic RIsk and Prophylaxis for Medical PATients in SwitzErland (ESTIMATE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nendaz, M; Spirk, D; Kucher, N; Aujesky, D; Hayoz, D; Beer, J H; Husmann, M; Frauchiger, B; Korte, W; Wuillemin, W A; Jäger, K; Righini, M; Bounameaux, H

    2014-03-03

    There is a need to validate risk assessment tools for hospitalised medical patients at risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). We investigated whether a predefined cut-off of the Geneva Risk Score, as compared to the Padua Prediction Score, accurately distinguishes low-risk from high-risk patients regardless of the use of thromboprophylaxis. In the multicentre, prospective Explicit ASsessment of Thromboembolic RIsk and Prophylaxis for Medical PATients in SwitzErland (ESTIMATE) cohort study, 1,478 hospitalised medical patients were enrolled of whom 637 (43%) did not receive thromboprophylaxis. The primary endpoint was symptomatic VTE or VTE-related death at 90 days. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01277536. According to the Geneva Risk Score, the cumulative rate of the primary endpoint was 3.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.2-4.6%) in 962 high-risk vs 0.6% (95% CI 0.2-1.9%) in 516 low-risk patients (p=0.002); among patients without prophylaxis, this rate was 3.5% vs 0.8% (p=0.029), respectively. In comparison, the Padua Prediction Score yielded a cumulative rate of the primary endpoint of 3.5% (95% CI 2.3-5.3%) in 714 high-risk vs 1.1% (95% CI 0.6-2.3%) in 764 low-risk patients (p=0.002); among patients without prophylaxis, this rate was 3.2% vs 1.5% (p=0.130), respectively. Negative likelihood ratio was 0.28 (95% CI 0.10-0.83) for the Geneva Risk Score and 0.51 (95% CI 0.28-0.93) for the Padua Prediction Score. In conclusion, among hospitalised medical patients, the Geneva Risk Score predicted VTE and VTE-related mortality and compared favourably with the Padua Prediction Score, particularly for its accuracy to identify low-risk patients who do not require thromboprophylaxis.

  2. Intermittent pneumatic compression in combination with low-molecular weight heparin in the prevention of venous thromboembolic events in esophageal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Kevin; Sadeghi, Amir-Hossein; van der Horst, Sylvia; Westerink, Jan; Ruurda, Jelle P; van Hillegersberg, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the use of Intermittent Pneumatic Compression (IPC) in the prevention of symptomatic venous thromboembolic events (VTE) in patients undergoing esophagectomy for cancer. From a prospective database, all patients operated between 2010 and 2014 received IPC in addition to LMWH and were compared to a historical cohort of patients treated LMWH only (2004-2009). Of the 313 included patients, 195 (62%) received IPC. Patients with IPC received neoadjuvant chemoradiation more often (45% vs. 3%, P IPC had a longer hospital stay (18 vs. 15 days, P = 0.014). Overall, 12 clinical VTE's occurred in 11 patients, which consisted of two deep venous thromboses and 10 pulmonary embolisms. In the group of patients, who received IPC 1.5% developed a symptomatic VTE compared to 6.8% in patients without IPC (OR = 0.215; 95% CI = 0.06-0.83). Multivariate analysis identified IPC as the only independent prognostic factor correlated with a reduction in postoperative VTE's (OR = 0.225; 95% CI = 0.06-0.88). The addition of IPC in patients undergoing esophagectomy for cancer was associated with a reduction in symptomatic VTE's. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:181-185. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Venous Thromboembolism Due to Oral Contraceptive Intake and Spending Nights in a Vehicle -A Case from the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueta, Daisuke; Akahoshi, Rika; Okamura, Yoshinori; Kojima, Sunao; Ikemoto, Tomokazu; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Tsujita, Kenichi; Kaikita, Koichi; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Hokimoto, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman experiencing sudden dyspnea went to her personal doctor for advice. She was previously diagnosed with endometriosis and prescribed oral contraceptives for treatment. During earthquakes, she spent 7 nights sleeping in a vehicle. The patient had swelling and pain in her left leg and high D-dimer concentration levels. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan revealed a contrast deficit in the bilateral pulmonary artery and in the left lower extremity. She was diagnosed with pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE), and anticoagulation therapy was initiated. This present case is the first report of PTE attributed to the use of oral contraceptives after earthquakes.

  4. Elevated plasma vitamin B12 levels and risk of venous thromboembolism among cancer patients: A population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt, Johan Frederik Håkonsen; Farkas, Dora Kormendine; Pedersen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    and categorised as either cancer-associated if no other provoking factors were present before VTE or provoked by other risk factors (surgery, trauma, or pregnancy). We calculated cumulative incidence proportions and adjusted hazard ratios computed from Cox regression analysis (reference: plasma Cbl of 200-600pmol....../L) for the risk of VTE before and after the cancer diagnosis date (index date). RESULTS: The risk of cancer-associated VTE 30days after index date increased with higher Cbl levels. The cumulative incidence (95% CI) by Cbl levels was: 200-600pmol/L: 0.24 (0.18-0.31); 601-800pmol/L: 0.63 (0.34-1.09); >800pmol/L: 0...

  5. Risk of venous thromboembolism and myocardial infarction associated with factor V Leiden and prothrombin mutations and blood type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Birgitte F; Allin, Kristine H; Dahl, Morten

    2013-01-01

    ABO blood type locus has been reported to be an important genetic determinant of venous and arterial thrombosis in genome-wide association studies. We tested the hypothesis that ABO blood type alone and in combination with mutations in factor V Leiden R506Q and prothrombin G20210A is associated...

  6. Management of provoked seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Usha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A provoked seizure may be due to structural damage (resulting from traumatic brain injury, brain tumor, stroke, tuberculosis, or neurocysticercosis or due to metabolic abnormalities (such as alcohol withdrawal and renal or hepatic failure. This article is a part of the Guidelines for Epilepsy in India. This article reviews the problem of provoked seizure and its management and also provides recommendations based on currently available information. Seizure provoked by metabolic disturbances requires correction of the triggering factors. Benzodiazepines are recommended for treatment of seizure due to alcohol withdrawal; gabapentin for seizure seen in porphyria; and antiepileptic drugs (AED, that are not inducer of hepatic enzymes, in the seizures seen in hepatic dysfunction. In severe traumatic brain injury, with or without seizure, phenytoin (PHT may be given for 7 days. In ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke one may individualize the AED therapy. In cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST, AED may be prescribed if there is seizure or computed tomographic (CT abnormalities or focal weakness; the treatment, in these cases, has to be continued for 1 year. Prophylactic AED is not recommended in cases of brain tumor and neurosurgical procedures and if patient is on an AED it can be stopped after 1 week.

  7. Management of provoked seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee

    2011-01-01

    A provoked seizure may be due to structural damage (resulting from traumatic brain injury, brain tumor, stroke, tuberculosis, or neurocysticercosis) or due to metabolic abnormalities (such as alcohol withdrawal and renal or hepatic failure). This article is a part of the Guidelines for Epilepsy in India. This article reviews the problem of provoked seizure and its management and also provides recommendations based on currently available information. Seizure provoked by metabolic disturbances requires correction of the triggering factors. Benzodiazepines are recommended for treatment of seizure due to alcohol withdrawal; gabapentin for seizure seen in porphyria; and antiepileptic drugs (AED), that are not inducer of hepatic enzymes, in the seizures seen in hepatic dysfunction. In severe traumatic brain injury, with or without seizure, phenytoin (PHT) may be given for 7 days. In ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke one may individualize the AED therapy. In cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST), AED may be prescribed if there is seizure or computed tomographic (CT) abnormalities or focal weakness; the treatment, in these cases, has to be continued for 1 year. Prophylactic AED is not recommended in cases of brain tumor and neurosurgical procedures and if patient is on an AED it can be stopped after 1 week.

  8. Evaluation of a nurse-led intervention to improve adherence to recommended guidelines for prevention of venous thromboembolism for hip and knee arthroplasty patients: A Quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Rosemarie; Kable, Ashley; Hunter, Sharyn

    2017-10-27

    The aim of this study was to measure adherence to a nurse-led evidence based venous thromboembolism prevention program (intervention) compared to usual care in hip and knee arthroplasty patients, and associated clinical outcomes. Venous thromboembolism morbidity and mortality of hospitalised patients is a major concern for health professionals. Venous thromboembolism prevention guidelines have been developed, however adherence to guidelines is variable. There were 410 potential participants who were adult patients that were booked for elective hip or knee arthroplasty at the two study sites during a two year period (2011-2013). Of these, 27 did not meet the inclusion criteria, and the remainder were eligible for inclusion in the study (intervention site n=196 and control site n=187, total population n=383). This study adopted a quasi-experimental design, using an intervention and control study site, conducted in two private hospitals in a regional area in Australia. The intervention group had a mean compliance score of 11.09; higher than the control group score of 7.19. This is equivalent to a compliance rate of 85% and 55% respectively, and indicates that adherence at the study site was significantly higher. Patient adherence and outcomes in the post-discharge period were not significantly different between the study sites. This study demonstrated a nurse-led intervention achieved high adherence with translating evidence based guidelines into routine patient care for hip and knee arthroplasty patients. Nurses can be critical to implementing clinical practice guidelines and adopting preventive programs in acute care to improve patient outcomes and reduce postoperative venous thromboembolism in arthroplasty patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk of venous thromboembolism after total hip and knee replacement in older adults with comorbidity and co-occurring comorbidities in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2003-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz Jeffrey N

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolism is a common, fatal, and costly injury which complicates major surgery in older adults. The American College of Chest Physicians recommends high potency prophylaxis regimens for individuals undergoing total hip or knee replacement (THR or TKR, but surgeons are reluctant to prescribe them due to fear of excess bleeding. Identifying a high risk cohort such as older adults with comorbidities and co-occurring comorbidities who might benefit most from high potency prophylaxis would improve how we currently perform preoperative assessment. Methods Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we identified older adults who underwent THR or TKR in the U.S. between 2003 and 2006. Our outcome was VTE, including any pulmonary embolus or deep venous thrombosis. We performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess the effects of comorbidities on VTE occurrence. Comorbidities under consideration included coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure (CHF, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, diabetes, and cerebrovascular disease. We also examined the impact of co-occurring comorbidities on VTE rates. Results CHF increased odds of VTE in both the THR cohort (OR = 3.08 95% CI 2.05-4.65 and TKR cohort (OR = 2.47 95% CI 1.95-3.14. COPD led to a 50% increase in odds in the TKR cohort (OR = 1.49 95% CI 1.31-1.70. The data did not support synergistic effect of co-occurring comorbidities with respect to VTE occurrence. Conclusions Older adults with CHF undergoing THR or TKR and with COPD undergoing TKR are at increased risk of VTE. If confirmed in other datasets, these older adults may benefit from higher potency prophylaxis.

  10. Urinary Prothrombin Fragment 1+2 in relation to Development of Non-Symptomatic and Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolic Events following Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars C. Borris

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prothrombin fragment 1+2 is excreted in urine (uF1+2 as a result of in vivo thrombin generation and can be a marker of coagulation status after an operative procedure. This study compared uF1+2 levels in patients with symptomatic and non-symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE after total knee replacement (TKR and in event-free sex- and age-matched controls. Significantly higher median uF1+2 levels were seen in the VTE patients on days 1, 3, and the day of venography (mostly day 7 after TKR compared with controls. The uF1+2 levels tended to be high in some patients with symptomatic VTE; however, the discriminatory efficacy of the test could not be evaluated. In conclusion, this study showed that patients with VTE tend to have significantly higher uF1+2 levels compared with patients without events between days 1 and 7 after TKR surgery. Measurement of uF1+2 could provide a simple, non-invasive clinical test to identify patients at risk of VTE.

  11. Form of presentation, natural history and course of postoperative venous thromboembolism in patients operated on for pelvic and abdominal cancer. Analysis of the RIETE registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos Merlo, Ana Belén; Arcelus Martínez, Juan Ignacio; Turiño Luque, Jesús Damián; Valero, Beatriz; Villalobos, Aurora; Aibar, Miguel Ángel; Monreal Bosch, Manuel

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) represents a serious complication after oncologic surgery. Recent studies have shown that the risk of VTE persists several weeks after surgery. This study assesses the form of presentation and time course of VTE after abdominal and pelvic cancer surgery. Prospective, multicenter, observational study that analyzes data from an international registry (RIETE) that includes consecutive patients with symptomatic VTE. Our study assesses the form and time of presentation of postoperative VTE, as well as main outcomes, in patients operated for abdominopelvic cancer 8 weeks prior to VTE diagnosis. Variables related to the presentation of VTE after hospital discharge are identified. Out of the 766 analyzed patients with VTE, 395 (52%) presented pulmonary embolism (PE). Most VTE cases (84%) were detected after the first postoperative week, and 38% after one month. Among patients with VTE in the first postoperative week, 70% presented PE. VTE presented after hospital discharge in 54% of cases. Colorectal, urologic, and gynecologic tumors, the use of radiotherapy, and blood hemoglobin levels were independently associated with VTE diagnosis after hospital discharge. Complications (thrombosis recurrence, bleeding, and death) occurred in 34% of patients with VTE detected before hospital discharge, compared to 24% in VTE after hospital discharge (P<0.01). VTE occurs after hospital discharge in most patients, particularly in those operated for colorectal, urologic, and gynecologic cancer. Pulmonary embolism is more frequent in patients who develop early VTE, who also have worse prognosis. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of venous thromboembolism – effects of different therapeutic strategies on bleeding and recurrence rates and considerations for future anticoagulant management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hass Bastian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Effective treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE strikes a balance between prevention of recurrence and bleeding complications. The current standard of care is heparin followed by a vitamin K antagonist such as warfarin. However, this option is not without its limitations, as the anticoagulant effect of warfarin is associated with high inter- and intra-patient variability and patients must be regularly monitored to ensure that anticoagulation is within the narrow target therapeutic range. Several novel oral anticoagulant agents are in the advanced stages of development for VTE treatment, some of which are given after an initial period of heparin treatment, in line with current practice, while others switch from high to low doses after the initial phase of treatment. In this review we assess the critical considerations for treating VTE in light of emerging clinical data for new oral agents and discuss the merits of novel treatment regimens for patients who have experienced an episode of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism.

  13. Oral rivaroxaban versus standard therapy for the treatment of symptomatic venous thromboembolism: a pooled analysis of the EINSTEIN-DVT and PE randomized studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Martin H; Lensing, Anthonie Wa; Bauersachs, Rupert; van Bellen, Bonno; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A; Cohen, Alexander T; Davidson, Bruce L; Decousus, Hervé; Raskob, Gary E; Berkowitz, Scott D; Wells, Philip S

    2013-09-20

    Standard treatment for venous thromboembolism (VTE) consists of a heparin combined with vitamin K antagonists. Direct oral anticoagulants have been investigated for acute and extended treatment of symptomatic VTE; their use could avoid parenteral treatment and/or laboratory monitoring of anticoagulant effects. A prespecified pooled analysis of the EINSTEIN-DVT and EINSTEIN-PE studies compared the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban (15 mg twice-daily for 21 days, followed by 20 mg once-daily) with standard-therapy (enoxaparin 1.0 mg/kg twice-daily and warfarin or acenocoumarol). Patients were treated for 3, 6, or 12 months and followed for suspected recurrent VTE and bleeding. The prespecified noninferiority margin was 1.75. A total of 8282 patients were enrolled; 4151 received rivaroxaban and 4131 received standard-therapy. The primary efficacy outcome occurred in 86 (2.1%) rivaroxaban-treated patients compared with 95 (2.3%) standard-therapy-treated patients (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-1.19; pnoninferiority EINSTEIN-DVT: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00440193.

  14. Two doses of rivaroxaban versus aspirin for prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism. Rationale for and design of the EINSTEIN CHOICE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Jeffrey I; Bauersachs, Rupert; Beyer-Westendorf, Jan; Bounameaux, Henri; Brighton, Timothy A; Cohen, Alexander T; Davidson, Bruce L; Holberg, Gerlind; Kakkar, Ajay; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Prins, Martin; Haskell, Lloyd; van Bellen, Bonno; Verhamme, Peter; Wells, Philip S; Prandoni, Paolo

    2015-08-31

    Patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) are at high risk for recurrence. Although rivaroxaban is effective for extended VTE treatment at a dose of 20 mg once daily, use of the 10 mg dose may further improve its benefit-to-risk ratio. Low-dose aspirin also reduces rates of recurrent VTE, but has not been compared with anticoagulant therapy. The EINSTEIN CHOICE study is a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, active-controlled, event-driven study comparing the efficacy and safety of two once daily doses of rivaroxaban (20 and 10 mg) with aspirin (100 mg daily) for the prevention of recurrent VTE in patients who completed 6-12 months of anticoagulant therapy for their index acute VTE event. All treatments will be given for 12 months. The primary efficacy objective is to determine whether both doses of rivaroxaban are superior to aspirin for the prevention of symptomatic recurrent VTE, while the principal safety outcome is the incidence of major bleeding. The trial is anticipated to enrol 2,850 patients from 230 sites in 31 countries over a period of 27 months. In conclusion, the EINSTEIN CHOICE study will provide new insights into the optimal antithrombotic strategy for extended VTE treatment by comparing two doses of rivaroxaban with aspirin (clinicaltrials.gov NCT02064439).

  15. Thirty-day mortality rate in women with cancer and venous thromboembolism. Findings from the Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad Trombo Embólica Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Santos, Javier; Monreal, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    Cancer patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) are at increased risk of mortality. Estimating the risks for specific causes of death may help to weigh the risks and benefits of different therapeutic strategies in an individual patient. In the Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad Trombo Embólica Registry of 15 520 consecutive patients with VTE, cancer was present in 20% and was associated with a two-fold increase in the risk of fatal pulmonary embolism. In a subsequent study including 2474 women with cancer, 329 (13%) died during the first month. The incidence of fatal pulmonary embolism (n = 71) exceeded that of fatal bleeding (n = 22), except in women with cancer of the bladder or vulva. Then, we compared the mortality rate according to initial presentation in 3978 women with cancer and VTE, of whom 438 (11%) died during the first month. The risk of fatal bleeding was twice as high as the risk of fatal pulmonary embolism (12 vs. 5 deaths) in those with deep-vein thrombosis alone. The higher risk of dying from bleeding than from pulmonary embolism in some women with cancer and VTE suggests that a less aggressive anticoagulant strategy might reduce fatal bleeding more than it would increase fatal pulmonary embolism during this period.

  16. [A multicentre randomised clinical trial to evaluate the benefit of testing for thrombophilia following a first venous thromboembolism: the NOSTRADAMUS study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, D M; Middeldorp, S

    2007-02-10

    It is unknown whether testing patients for thrombophilia after a first episode of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and prolonging anticoagulant treatment in those with thrombophilia is justified. The NOSTRADAMUS trial, a multicentre randomised controlled trial, is being conducted to assess whether this strategy is beneficial in terms of clinical outcomes, quality of life and costs. Patients with a first VTE will be randomly assigned to one of two groups. The first group will be tested for thrombophilia and subsequently receive the test results; those in the second group will be tested but the results will not be disclosed. A total of 1336 patients will be included. Additional anticoagulant treatment for a predefined period will be initiated in patients found to have thrombophilia, while others will receive a standard predefined duration oftreatment. Primary outcomes are the risk of recurrent VTE, clinically important bleeding and the composite outcome of both. Other outcomes include overall quality of life and costs associated with outcome measures 18 months after the initial episode of VTE.

  17. Adherence to guideline-directed venous thromboembolism prophylaxis among medical and surgical inpatients at 33 academic medical centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, Anneliese M; Schreuder, Astrid B; Jarman, Kenneth M; Logerfo, James P; Goss, J Richard

    2011-01-01

    This study's purpose was to describe compliance with established venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis guidelines in medical and surgical inpatients at US academic medical centers (AMCs). Data were collected for a 2007 University HealthSystem Consortium Deep Vein Thrombosis/Pulmonary Embolism (DVT/PE) Benchmarking Project that explored VTE in AMCs. Prophylaxis was considered appropriate based on 2004 American College of Chest Physicians guidelines. A total of 33 AMCs from 30 states participated. In all, 48% of patients received guideline-directed prophylaxis-59% were medical and 41% were surgical patients. VTE history was more common among medical patients with guideline-directed prophylaxis. Surgical patients admitted from the emergency department and with higher illness severity were more likely to receive appropriate prophylaxis. Despite guidelines, VTE prophylaxis remains underutilized in these US AMCs, particularly among surgical patients. Because AMCs provide the majority of physician training and should reflect and set care standards, this appears to be an opportunity for practice and quality improvement and for education.

  18. Incidence, determinants and the transient impact of cancer treatments on venous thromboembolism risk among lymphoma patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jennifer L; Østgård, Lene Sofie; Prandoni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    - and 2-year incidence accounting for competing risks. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we identified factors associated with VTE risk. In a nested self-controlled design, we evaluated the transient effect of chemotherapy, radiation, central venous catheter use and rituximab on VTE risk using...... diagnosed from 2000 to 2010, we examined the incidence and risk factors for VTE and evaluated the transient impact of cancer treatments on VTE risk. METHODS: Medical databases contained cancer, comorbidity, treatment, and VTE information. We computed VTE incidence rates (IRs) per 1000person-years and 1...

  19. Postoperative Melagatran/Ximelagatran for the Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism following Major Elective Orthopaedic Surgery : Effects of Timing of First Dose and Risk Factors for Thromboembolism and Bleeding Complications on Efficacy and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Ola E; Eriksson, Bengt I; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Cohen, Alexander T; Mouret, Patrick; Rosencher, Nadia; Panfilov, Seva; Bylock, Anders; Andersson, Magnus

    2005-01-01

    To examine the influence of timing of postoperative initiation of subcutaneous melagatran followed by oral ximelagatran, and of risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE; including deep vein thrombosis [DVT] and pulmonary embolism [PE]) and bleeding complications, on the efficacy and safety of this regimen, compared with preoperative enoxaparin sodium, following total hip replacement (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR) surgery. Statistical analyses of efficacy and safety in subgroups of the METHRO III intention-to-treat population. Main efficacy outcome measures were major VTE (proximal DVT, PE or VTE-related death) and total VTE (distal or proximal DVT, fatal or non-fatal PE). The main safety outcome measures were blood transfusion, severe bleeding events, blood loss, bleeding-related adverse events and need for reoperation. In the combined THR and TKR population, melagatran initiated 4 - postoperatively was non-inferior to enoxaparin sodium with respect to the risks of total VTE (absolute risk reduction [ARR] 0; 95% confidence interval [CI] -4.4, 4.4) and major VTE (ARR -0.63; 95% CI -2.94, 1.67). The rate of major VTE was unaffected by the different risk factors. In the combined THR and TKR population, blood transfusion requirements were lower with melagatran/ximelagatran than enoxaparin sodium (odds ratio 0.83; 95% CI 0.71, 0.96; p = 0.016). Melagatran/ximelagatran initiated 4 - postoperatively provided a comparable level of protection against total and major VTE to preoperative enoxaparin sodium. Major VTE rates and safety were consistent across different patient subgroups. Subcutaneous melagatran followed by fixed-dose oral ximelagatran offers an alternative to the standard European low molecular-weight heparin regimen in a wide range of patients.

  20. Prevalence of venous thromboembolic events and diagnostic performance of the wells score and revised geneva scores for pulmonary embolism in patients with interstitial lung disease: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qun; Xie, Jiaxing; Han, Qian; Tang, Chunli; Chen, Xiaobo; Wu, Lulu; Chen, Rongchang

    2014-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with connective tissue disease-related interstitial lung diseases (CTD-ILD) and idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) and to further evaluate associated risk factors. To also examine the diagnostic performance of the Wells score and the revised Geneva scores for diagnosing pulmonary embolism (PE) in ILD patients. Fifty-seven patients with CTD-ILD and IIP were prospectively enrolled. Plasma D-dimer was measured by ELISA. Deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) was examined by venous ultrasonography and PE by computed tomography pulmonary angiography. PE prevalence was further assessed by the Wells score and the revised Geneva score. VTE was diagnosed in 15 (26.3%, 15/57) patients. Bivariate analysis revealed that dyspnoea (OR 3.750, 95%CI 1.095-12.842, P=0.035), lower extremity oedema (OR 8.667, 95%CI1.814-41.408, P=0.007), palpitations (OR 4.75, 95%CI1.073-21.032, P=0.040), and positive D-dimer (OR 5.087, 95%CI 1.015-25.485, P=0.048) were associated with VTE. Using the Wells Score, 46 (80.70%), eight (14.4%) and three (5.26%) patients had a low, intermediate and high probability of PE, respectively, with seven (15.22%), three (37.5%) and two (66.67%) of the respective cases confirmed. By the revised Geneva score, 23 (40.35%), 32 (56.14%) and two (3.51%) patients had a low, intermediate and high probability of PE, respectively, with two (8.70%), nine (28.13%) and one (50.00%) of the respective cases confirmed. The AUC for the Wells score and the revised Geneva score was 0.720±0.083 (CI 0.586 to 0.831) and 0.704± 0.081 (CI 0.568 to 0.817), respectively. VTE can be seen in approximately one fourth of patients with CTD-ILD or IIP and the Wells score and the revised Geneva score can be used for categorising PE risk. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  1. The predictive value of factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A and MTHFR C677T Gene mutations on the location of venous thromboembolism

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    Muammer Bilici

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the present study, we aimed to consider the relation between the manifestations of venous thromboembolism (VTE and gene mutations including factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin G20210A and MTHFR C677T. Methods: One hundred and forty four patients with idiopathic VTE were enrolled in this study. The data of patients were obtained from the medical records in hospital information system. The patients were grouped according to the location of VTE. In all subjects FVL, prothrombin G20210A, and MTHFR C677T were analyzed by specific polymerase chain reactions and restriction enzymes. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to evaluate the relation between the groups and the gene mutations including factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin G20210A and MTHFR C677T. Results: The mean age of patients was 41.16 ± 13.23 years and the male / female ratio was 1.18. Among the patients with VTE, 44 (30.6% had only DVT, 41 (28.5% had only PE, 26 (18.1% had both DVT and PE, 23 (16% had cerebral veins thrombosis (CVT and 10 (6.9% had abdominal vein thrombosis The prevalence was found to be 46.5% for FVL, 13.2% for prothrombin G20210A and 45.1% for MTHFR C677T gene mutation among patients. There was no statistically difference between the manifestations of VTE regarding the gene mutations (p>0,05. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that gene mutations including factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin G20210A and MTHFR C677T are not sufficient to determine the location of VTE.

  2. Reduction of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in hospitalized patients: aligning continuing education with interprofessional team-based quality improvement in an academic medical center.

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    Pingleton, Susan K; Carlton, Elizabeth; Wilkinson, Samaneh; Beasley, Jeffrey; King, Theresa; Wittkopp, Chris; Moncure, Michael; Williamson, Tim

    2013-10-01

    Despite clear prophylactic guidelines and national quality emphasis, a minority of hospitalized patients receive appropriate prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Data from the University of Kansas Hospital (KUH) revealed an unacceptably high incidence of VTE. The authors aligned continuing education with quality improvement through formation of an interprofessional, multidisciplinary team to develop strategic educational and system operational plans to decrease VTE incidence. The authors reviewed 261 charts with the secondary diagnosis of VTE for identification of themes or causes of VTE to develop multipronged educational and system-based action plans. The authors reviewed a "menu" of evidence-based content delivery techniques to develop the educational plan. Multiple noneducational adjunct system strategies were also developed and implemented. After implementation of all specific action plans, the KUH VTE incidence decreased 51% from November 2010 to June 2012 (from 12.68 to 6.10 per 1,000 patients). Insertion of peripherally inserted central catheters, a common identified theme, dropped from almost 360 insertions in December of 2010 to less than 200 insertions in April 2012. Aligning continuing education with quality improvement through an interprofessional, multidisciplinary team approach was associated with a decrease in VTE. The authors describe challenges and lessons learned to inform implementation of similar quality-improvement-driven continuing education initiatives elsewhere. Challenges included time, resources, multiple service lines, and departments with variable acceptance of data. Lessons learned included the value of leadership commitment, interprofessional team work, assessing individual data, expertise of continuing education, using multiple educational methods, and the need for overall champions.

  3. Platelet Count and Major Bleeding in Patients Receiving Vitamin K Antagonists for Acute Venous Thromboembolism, Findings From Real World Clinical Practice

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    Giorgi-Pierfranceschi, Matteo; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Cattabiani, Chiara; Guida, Anna; Pagán, Barbara; Morales, Maria del Valle; Salgado, Estuardo; Suriñach, José Maria; Tolosa, Carles; Monreal, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The outcome of patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) and abnormal platelet count (PlC) at baseline has not been consistently studied. In real-world clinical practice, a number of patients with abnormal PlC receive vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) to treat acute VTE despite their higher risk of bleeding. We used the Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad TromboEmbólica registry database to compare the rate of major bleeding in patients receiving VKA for long-term therapy of acute VTE according to PlC levels at baseline. Patients were categorized as having very low (450,000/μL) PlC at baseline. Of 55,369 patients recruited as of January 2015, 37,000 (67%) received long-term therapy with VKA. Of these, 611 patients (1.6%) had very low PlC, 4006 (10.8%) had low PlC, 25,598 (69%) had normal PlC, 5801 (15.6%) had high PlC, and 984 (2.6%) had very high PlC at baseline. During the course of VKA therapy (mean, 192 days), there were no differences in the duration or intensity (as measured by international normalized ratio levels) of treatment between subgroups. The rate of major bleeding was 3.6%, 2.1%, 1.9%, 2.1%, and 3.7%, respectively, and the rate of fatal bleeding was 0.98%, 0.17%, 0.29%, 0.34%, and 0.50%, respectively. Patients with very low or very high PlC levels were more likely to have severe comorbidities. We found a nonlinear “U-shaped” relationship between PlC at baseline and major bleeding during therapy with VKA for VTE. Consistent alteration of PlC values at baseline suggested a greater frailty. PMID:26632687

  4. Risk of venous thromboembolism from oral contraceptives containing gestodene and desogestrel versus levonorgestrel: a meta-analysis and formal sensitivity analysis.

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    Hennessy, S; Berlin, J A; Kinman, J L; Margolis, D J; Marcus, S M; Strom, B L

    2001-08-01

    Controversy exists regarding whether oral contraceptives (OCs) containing desogestrel and gestodene are associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) versus OCs containing levonorgestrel. We were interested in synthesizing the available data, exploring explanations for mixed results, and characterizing the degree of uncontrolled confounding that could have produced a spurious association. We performed a meta-analysis and formal sensitivity analysis of studies that examined the relative risk of VTE for desogestrel and gestodene versus levonorgestrel. Twelve studies, all observational, were included. The summary relative risk (95% CI) was 1.7 (1.3-2.1; heterogeneity p = 0.09). If real, the incremental risk of VTE would be about 11 per 100,000 women per year. An association was present when accounting for duration of use and when restricted to the first year of use in new users. However, in the sensitivity analysis, the association abated in many, but not all, scenarios in which an unmeasured confounding factor increased the risk of VTE three to fivefold and in nearly all examined scenarios in which the factor increased the risk 10-fold. The summary relative risk of 1.7 does not appear to be caused by depletion of susceptibles, but is sensitive to a modest degree of unmeasured confounding. Whether such confounding occurred is unknown. However, given this sensitivity, this issue probably cannot be settled unequivocally with observational data. In the absence of a definitive answer, this apparent increased risk, together with its uncertainty and small magnitude and its important consequences, should be considered when selecting an OC for a given woman.

  5. Predictive accuracy of 29-comorbidity index for in-hospital deaths in US adult hospitalizations with a diagnosis of venous thromboembolism.

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    James Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism (VTE, comprising deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE, is a significant source of mortality and morbidity worldwide. By analyzing data of the 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ, we evaluated the predictive accuracy of the AHRQ's 29-comorbidity index with in-hospital death among US adult hospitalizations with a diagnosis of VTE. METHODS: We assessed the case-fatality and prevalence of comorbidities among a sample of 153,518 adult hospitalizations with a diagnosis of VTE that comprised 87,605 DVTs and 65,913 PEs (with and without DVT. We estimated adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals with multivariable logistic regression models by using comorbidities as predictors and status of in-hospital death as an outcome variable. We assessed the c-statistics for the predictive accuracy of the logistic regression models. RESULTS: In 2010, approximately 41,944 in-hospital deaths (20,212 with DVT and 21,732 with PE occurred among 770,137 hospitalizations with a diagnosis of VTE. When compared separately to hospitalizations with VTE, DVT, or PE that had no corresponding comorbidities, congestive heart failure, chronic pulmonary disease, coagulopathy, liver disease, lymphoma, fluid and electrolyte disorders, metastatic cancer, other neurological disorders, peripheral vascular disorders, pulmonary circulation disorders, renal failure, solid tumor without metastasis, and weight loss were positively and independently associated with 10%-125% increased likelihoods of in-hospital death. The c-statistic values ranged from 0.776 to 0.802. CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicated that comorbidity was associated independently with risk of death among hospitalizations with VTE and among hospitalizations with DVT or PE. The AHRQ 29-comorbidity index provides acceptable to excellent predictive accuracy for in-hospital deaths among adult

  6. A prospective multicenter study of venous thromboembolism in patients with newly-diagnosed high-grade glioma: hazard rate and risk factors.

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    Streiff, Michael B; Ye, Xiaobu; Kickler, Thomas S; Desideri, Serena; Jani, Jayesh; Fisher, Joy; Grossman, Stuart A

    2015-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in patients with high-grade gliomas. The purpose of this prospective multicenter study was to determine the hazard rate of first symptomatic VTE in newly-diagnosed glioma patients and identify clinical and laboratory risk factors. On enrollment, demographic and clinical information were recorded and a comprehensive coagulation evaluation was performed. Patients were followed until death. The study end point was objectively-documented symptomatic VTE. One hundred seven patients were enrolled with a median age of 57 years (range 29-85) between June 2005 and April 2008. Ninety-one (85 %) had glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). During an average survival of 17.7 months, 26 patients (24 %) (95 % CI 17-34 %) developed VTE (hazard rate 0.15 per person-year) and 94 patients (88 %) died. Median time to VTE was 14.2 weeks post-operation (range 3-126). Patients with an initial tumor biopsy were 3.0 fold more likely to suffer VTE (p = 0.02). Patients with an elevated factor VIII activity (>147 %) were 2.1-fold more likely to develop VTE. ABO blood group, D dimer and thrombin generation were not associated with VTE. No fatal VTE occurred. VTE is a common complication in patients with newly-diagnosed high grade gliomas, particularly in the first six months after diagnosis. Patients with an initial tumor biopsy and elevated factor VIII levels are at increased risk. However, VTE was not judged to be primarily responsible for any patient deaths. Therefore, outpatient primary VTE prophylaxis remains investigational until more effective primary prophylaxis strategies and therapies for glioma are identified.

  7. Net clinical benefit of dabigatran vs. warfarin in venous thromboembolism: analyses from RE-COVER(®), RE-COVER™ II, and RE-MEDY™.

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    Feuring, Martin; Schulman, Sam; Eriksson, Henry; Kakkar, Ajay J; Schellong, Sebastian; Hantel, Stefan; Schueler, Elke; Kreuzer, Jörg; Goldhaber, Samuel Z

    2017-05-01

    The direct oral anticoagulants, e.g., dabigatran etexilate (DE), are effective and well tolerated treatments for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Net clinical benefit (NCB) is a useful concept in weighing potential benefits against potential harm of comparator drugs. The NCB of DE vs. warfarin in VTE treatment was compared. Post-hoc analyses were performed on pooled data from the 6-month RE-COVER® and RE-COVER™ II trials, and data from the RE-MEDY™ trial (up to 36 months), to compare the NCB of DE (150 mg twice daily) and warfarin [target international normalized ratio (INR) 2.0-3.0]. Patients (≥18 years old) had symptomatic proximal deep vein thrombosis and/or pulmonary embolism. NCB was the composite of cardiovascular endpoints (non-fatal events of recurrent VTE, myocardial infarction, stroke or systemic embolism), all-cause death, and bleeding outcomes, all weighted equally. A broad definition of NCB included major bleeding events (MBE) and clinically relevant non-major bleeding events as bleeding outcomes, while a narrow definition included just MBE. The pooled dataset totalled 5107 patients from RE-COVER/RE-COVER II and 2856 patients from RE-MEDY. When NCB was narrowly defined, NCB was similar between DE and warfarin. When broadly defined, NCB was superior with DE vs. warfarin [RE-COVER/RE-COVER II, hazard ratio (HR) 0.80; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.68-0.95 and RE-MEDY, HR 0.73; 95% CI 0.59-0.91]. These findings were unaffected by warfarin time in therapeutic range. The NCB of DE was similar or superior to warfarin, depending on the NCB definition used, regardless of the quality of INR control.

  8. A post hoc analysis of dalteparin versus oral anticoagulant (VKA) therapy for the prevention of recurrent venous thromboembolism (rVTE) in patients with cancer and renal impairment.

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    Woodruff, Seth; Feugère, Guillaume; Abreu, Paula; Heissler, Joseph; Ruiz, Marcia T; Jen, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common and serious complication in patients with cancer; treatment guidelines recommend extended therapy of ≥6 months with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for treatment and prevention of recurrent VTE (rVTE) in this population. This post hoc analysis used data from the CLOT study-a phase III, randomized, open-label, controlled study (N = 676)-to compare the efficacy and safety of dalteparin, a LMWH, versus vitamin K antagonist (VKA) for prevention of rVTE in patients with cancer and renal impairment (creatinine clearance renal impairment at baseline. Patients received subcutaneous dalteparin 200 IU/kg once daily during month 1, followed by 150 IU/kg once daily for months 2-6; or VKA once daily for 6 months, with initial overlapping subcutaneous dalteparin 200 IU/kg once daily for ≥5 days until international normalized ratio was 2.0-3.0 for 2 consecutive days. Endpoints included the rates of rVTE (primary) and bleeding events. Overall, fewer dalteparin-treated patients (2/74 [2.7 %]) experienced ≥1 adjudicated symptomatic rVTE compared with VKA-treated patients (15/88 [17.0 %]; hazard ratio = 0.15 [95 % confidence interval 0.03-0.65]; p = 0.01). Bleeding event rates for both treatments were similar (p = 0.47). In summary, compared with VKA, dalteparin significantly reduced risk of rVTE in patients with cancer and renal impairment (p = 0.01) while exhibiting a comparable safety profile. This analysis supports dosing patients with renal impairment in accordance with patients with normal renal function; however, anti-Xa monitoring could be considered to further support safety in selected patients, particularly those with very severe renal impairment.

  9. Evolution of Prophylaxis Protocols for Venous Thromboembolism in Neurosurgery: Results from a Prospective Comparative Study on Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin, Elastic Stockings, and Intermittent Pneumatic Compression Devices.

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    Chibbaro, Salvatore; Cebula, Helene; Todeschi, Julien; Fricia, Marco; Vigouroux, Doris; Abid, Houssem; Kourbanhoussen, Houssen; Pop, Raoul; Nannavecchia, Beniamino; Gubian, Arthur; Prisco, Lara; Ligarotti, Gianfranco K I; Proust, Francois; Ganau, Mario

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of venous thromboembolism (VT) in neurosurgical practice is astonishingly high, representing a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Prophylaxis strategies include elastic stockings, low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), and intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) devices. To assess the safety and efficacy of 2 different VT prophylaxis protocols implemented in a European neurosurgical center. All patients admitted for neurosurgical intervention between 2012 and 2016 were stratified as low, moderate, and high risk of VT and received a combination of elastic stockings and LMWH. The protocol was modified in 2014 with the inclusion of perioperative IPC devices for all patients and only in the high-risk group also postoperatively. At time of post-hoc analysis, data obtained from patients included in this study before 2014 (Protocol A, 3169 patients) were compared with those obtained after the introduction of IPC (Protocol B, 3818 patients). Among patients assigned to protocol A, 73 (2.3%) developed deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and 28 (0.9%) developed pulmonary embolism (PE), 9 of which were fatal (0.3%). Among patients assigned to protocol B, 32 developed DVT (0.8%) and 7 (0.18%) developed PE, with 2 eventually resulting in the death of the patient. A post-hoc analysis confirmed that the use of preoperative LMWH was not associated with a statistically significant greater risk of postoperative bleeding. This study, despite its limitations of the nonrandomized design, seems to suggest that perioperative IPC devices are a non-negligible support in the prophylaxis of clinically symptomatic DVT and PE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Single-dose TB-402 or rivaroxaban for the prevention of venous thromboembolism after total hip replacement. A randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhamme, Peter; Gunn, Sophie; Sonesson, Elisabeth; Peerlinck, Kathelijne; Vanassche, Thomas; Vandenbriele, Christophe; Ageno, Walter; Glazer, Steven; Prins, Martin; Buller, Harry; Tangelder, Marco

    2013-06-01

    TB-402 is a long-acting monoclonal antibody that partially inhibits factor VIII. A single administration of TB-402 was effective and well-tolerated for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total knee replacement. In this study, the efficacy and safety of a single administration of TB-402 for the extended prophylaxis of VTE after total hip replacement (THR) was investigated. This was a phase II, randomised, active-controlled, double-blind study that included patients undergoing elective THR surgery. Patients were randomised to TB-402 25 mg or TB-402 50 mg, administered as a single intravenous administration 2-4 hours postoperatively, or to rivaroxaban 10 mg once daily for 35 days. The primary efficacy outcome was total VTE defined as symptomatic VTE and asymptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) detected by bilateral venography at day 35. The principal safety outcome was the incidence of major bleeding and clinically relevant non-major bleeding until day 35. Total VTE was similar in all groups: 5.3% (95%CI 2.9-9.6), 5.2% (95%CI 2.8-9.3) and 4.7% (95%CI 2.5-8.7) for TB-402 25 mg, TB-402 50 mg and rivaroxaban, respectively. All were asymptomatic DVTs. Major or clinically relevant non-major bleedings were observed in 5.8% (95%CI 3.3-9.9), 7.2% (95%CI 4.4-11.6) and 1.4% (95%CI 0.5-4.2) for TB-402 25 mg, TB-402 50 mg and rivaroxaban, respectively. In conclusion, TB-402, administered as a single postoperative dose, had a similar efficacy compared to rivaroxaban for the prevention of VTE after THR. The incidence of major and clinically relevant non-major bleeding was higher in the TB-402 groups than in the rivaroxaban group.

  11. Cost effectiveness of the addition of a comprehensive CT scan to the abdomen and pelvis for the detection of cancer after unprovoked venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Kathryn; Carrier, Marc; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro; Shivakumar, Sudeep; Zarychanski, Ryan; Tagalakis, Vicky; Solymoss, Susan; Routhier, Nathalie; Douketis, James; Coyle, Douglas

    2017-03-01

    Unprovoked venous thromboembolism (VTE) can be the first manifestation of cancer. It is unclear if extensive screening for occult cancer including a comprehensive computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen/pelvis is cost-effective in this patient population. To assess the health care related costs, number of missed cancer cases and health related utility values of a limited screening strategy with and without the addition of a comprehensive CT scan of the abdomen/pelvis and to identify to what extent testing should be done in these circumstances to allow early detection of occult cancers. Cost effectiveness analysis using data that was collected alongside the SOME randomized controlled trial which compared an extensive occult cancer screening including a CT of the abdomen/pelvis to a more limited screening strategy in patients with a first unprovoked VTE, was used for the current analyses. Analyses were conducted with a one-year time horizon from a Canadian health care perspective. Primary analysis was based on complete cases, with sensitivity analysis using appropriate multiple imputation methods to account for missing data. Data from a total of 854 patients with a first unprovoked VTE were included in these analyses. The addition of a comprehensive CT scan was associated with higher costs ($551 CDN) with no improvement in utility values or number of missed cancers. Results were consistent when adopting multiple imputation methods. The addition of a comprehensive CT scan of the abdomen/pelvis for the screening of occult cancer in patients with unprovoked VTE is not cost effective, as it is both more costly and not more effective in detecting occult cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A genome-wide association study for venous thromboembolism: the extended cohorts for heart and aging research in genomic epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weihong; Teichert, Martina; Chasman, Daniel I; Heit, John A; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Li, Guo; Pankratz, Nathan; Leebeek, Frank W; Paré, Guillaume; de Andrade, Mariza; Tzourio, Christophe; Psaty, Bruce M; Basu, Saonli; Ruiter, Rikje; Rose, Lynda; Armasu, Sebastian M; Lumley, Thomas; Heckbert, Susan R; Uitterlinden, André G; Lathrop, Mark; Rice, Kenneth M; Cushman, Mary; Hofman, Albert; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Glazer, Nicole L; Pankow, James S; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Amouyel, Philippe; Bis, Joshua C; Bovill, Edwin G; Kong, Xiaoxiao; Tracy, Russell P; Boerwinkle, Eric; Rotter, Jerome I; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Loth, Daan W; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Ridker, Paul M; Folsom, Aaron R; Smith, Nicholas L

    2013-07-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common, heritable disease resulting in high rates of hospitalization and mortality. Yet few associations between VTE and genetic variants, all in the coagulation pathway, have been established. To identify additional genetic determinants of VTE, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) among individuals of European ancestry in the extended cohorts for heart and aging research in genomic epidemiology (CHARGE) VTE consortium. The discovery GWAS comprised 1,618 incident VTE cases out of 44,499 participants from six community-based studies. Genotypes for genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were imputed to approximately 2.5 million SNPs in HapMap and association with VTE assessed using study-design appropriate regression methods. Meta-analysis of these results identified two known loci, in F5 and ABO. Top 1,047 tag SNPs (P ≤ 0.0016) from the discovery GWAS were tested for association in an additional 3,231 cases and 3,536 controls from three case-control studies. In the combined data from these two stages, additional genome-wide significant associations were observed on 4q35 at F11 (top SNP rs4253399, intronic to F11) and on 4q28 at FGG (rs6536024, 9.7 kb from FGG; P FGG locus were not completely explained by previously reported variants. Loci at or near SUSD1 and OTUD7A showed borderline yet novel associations (P FGG loci for VTE. Future studies are warranted to better characterize the associations with F11 and FGG and to replicate the new candidate associations. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  13. Genetic screening for the predisposition to venous thromboembolism: a cost-utility analysis of clinical practice in the Italian health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compagni, Amelia; Melegaro, Alessia; Tarricone, Rosanna

    2013-01-01

    In the Italian health care system, genetic tests for factor V Leiden and factor II are routinely prescribed to assess the predisposition to venous thromboembolism (VTE) of women who request oral contraception. With specific reference to two subpopulations of women already at risk (i.e., familial history or previous event of VTE), the study aimed to assess whether current screening practices in Italy are cost-effective. Two decisional models accrued costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) annually from the perspective of the National Health Service. The two models were derived from a decision analysis exercise concerning testing practices and consequent prescribing behavior for oral contraception conducted with 250 Italian gynecologists. Health care costs were compiled on the basis of 10-year hospital discharge records and the activities of a thrombosis center. Whenever possible, input data were based on the Italian context; otherwise, the data were taken from the international literature. Current testing practices on women with a familial history of VTE generate an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of €72,412/QALY, which is well above the acceptable threshold of cost-effectiveness of €40,000 to €50,000/QALY. In the case of women with a previous event of VTE, the most frequently used testing strategy is cost-ineffective and leads to an overall loss of QALY. This study represents the first attempt to conduct a cost-utility analysis of genetic screening practices for the predisposition to VTE in the Italian setting. The results indicate that there is an urgent need to better monitor the indications for which tests for factor V Leiden and factor II are prescribed. Copyright © 2013, International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Has time come for the use of direct oral anticoagulants in the extended prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in acutely ill medical patients? Yes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageno, Walter

    2017-08-14

    Betrixaban is a direct factor Xa inhibitor with a renal excretion of only approximately 5-7%. On June 23rd 2017, it became the first direct oral anticoagulant to receive Food and Drug Administration approval for the prevention of venous thromboembolism in acutely ill medical patients, and the first anticoagulant agent to be approved for extended-duration thromboprophylaxis after hospital discharge in this setting. Approval followed the results of the APEX trial, a phase III clinical trial comparing betrixaban (80 mg) administered for 35-42 days with enoxaparin (40 mg) administered for 10 ± 4 days. This study for the first time applied a risk assessment model, integrating clinical factors and a laboratory marker to identify high risk patients. To improve safety, a dose reduction was used for patients with creatinine clearance between 15 and 30 mL/min (betrixaban 40 mg and enoxaparin 20 mg) and for patients receiving concomitant treatment with potent P-glycoprotein inhibitors (betrixaban 40 mg). The primary prespecified analysis tested the hypothesis that the benefit of extended thromboprophylaxis with betrixaban was greatest in patients with elevated D-dimer, but the 21% relative risk reduction failed to meet the prespecified threshold for statistical significance. However, the analysis of the overall study population showed a favorable net clinical benefit with betrixaban, with a statistically significant reduction in all efficacy outcomes and no increase in major bleeding rates. An ongoing trial, MARINER, is also assessing a combined approach for risk stratification comparing extended-duration rivaroxaban with standard duration low molecular weight heparin.

  15. Depressive symptoms as a novel risk factor for recurrent venous thromboembolism: a longitudinal observational study in patients referred for thrombophilia investigation.

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    Roland von Känel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence suggests that psychosocial factors, including depression predict incident venous thromboembolism (VTE against a background of genetic and acquired risk factors. The role of psychosocial factors for the risk of recurrent VTE has not previously been examined. We hypothesized that depressive symptoms in patients with prior VTE are associated with an increased risk of recurrent VTE. METHODS: In this longitudinal observational study, we investigated 271 consecutive patients, aged 18 years or older, referred for thrombophilia investigation with an objectively diagnosed episode of VTE. Patients completed the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D. During the observation period, they were contacted by phone and information on recurrent VTE, anticoagulation therapy, and thromboprophylaxis in risk situations was collected. RESULTS: Clinically relevant depressive symptoms (HADS-D score ≥ 8 were present in 10% of patients. During a median observation period of 13 months (range 5-48, 27 (10% patients experienced recurrent VTE. After controlling for sociodemographic and clinical factors, a 3-point increase on the HADS-D score was associated with a 44% greater risk of recurrent VTE (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.02, 2.06. Compared to patients with lower levels of depressive symptoms (HADS-D score: range 0-2, those with higher levels (HADS-D score: range 3-16 had a 4.1-times greater risk of recurrent VTE (OR 4.07, 95% CI 1.55, 10.66. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that depressive symptoms might contribute to an increased risk of recurrent VTE independent of other prognostic factors. An increased risk might already be present at subclinical levels of depressive symptoms.

  16. Effectiveness of two distinct web-based education tools for bedside nurses on medication administration practice for venous thromboembolism prevention: A randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandyn D Lau

    Full Text Available Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a common cause of preventable harm in hospitalized patients. While numerous successful interventions have been implemented to improve prescription of VTE prophylaxis, a substantial proportion of doses of prescribed preventive medications are not administered to hospitalized patients. The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of nurse education on medication administration practice.This was a double-blinded, cluster randomized trial in 21 medical or surgical floors of 933 nurses at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, an academic medical center, from April 1, 2014 -March 31, 2015. Nurses were cluster-randomized by hospital floor to receive either a linear static education (Static module with voiceover or an interactive learner-centric dynamic scenario-based education (Dynamic module. The primary and secondary outcomes were non-administration of prescribed VTE prophylaxis medication and nurse-reported satisfaction with education modules, respectively.Overall, non-administration improved significantly following education (12.4% vs. 11.1%, conditional OR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.80-0.95, p = 0.002 achieving our primary objective. The reduction in non-administration was greater for those randomized to the Dynamic arm (10.8% vs. 9.2%, conditional OR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.72-0.95 versus the Static arm (14.5% vs. 13.5%, conditional OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.81-1.03, although the difference between arms was not statistically significant (p = 0.26. Satisfaction scores were significantly higher (p<0.05 for all survey items for nurses in the Dynamic arm.Education for nurses significantly improves medication administration practice. Dynamic learner-centered education is more effective at engaging nurses. These findings suggest that education should be tailored to the learner.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02301793.

  17. Fat mass and obesity-associated gene rs9939609 polymorphism is a potential biomarker of recurrent venous thromboembolism in male but not in female patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Abrar; Memon, Ashfaque A; Sundquist, Jan; Svensson, Peter J; Zöller, Bengt; Sundquist, Kristina

    2018-01-08

    Multiple genetic variations have been identified in FTO (fat mass and obesity-associated) gene. Among them, FTO rs9939609 polymorphism is shown to be associated with the risk of primary venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, its role in recurrent VTE is not known. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between FTO rs9939609 polymorphism and the risk of VTE recurrence in a prospective follow-up study in both male and female patients. FTO rs9939609 polymorphism (T/A) was analyzed in the Malmö thrombophilia study (MATS, followed for ~10 years) by using TaqMan PCR. MATS patients (n = 1050) were followed from the discontinuation of anticoagulant treatment until diagnosis of VTE recurrence or the end of follow-up. A total of 126 patients (12%) had VTE recurrence during follow-up. Cox regression analyses showed that sex modified the potential effect of FTO rs9939609 polymorphism on VTE recurrence. Male patients with the AA genotype for the FTO rs9939609 polymorphism had significantly higher risk of VTE recurrence as compared to the TT or AT genotypes (univariate hazard ratio [HR] = 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-3.5, P = 0.009 and adjusted HR = 2.03, 95% CI 1.2-3.6, P = 0.013). There was no association between FTO rs9939609 polymorphism and VTE recurrence in female patients. In conclusion, our results show that FTO rs9939609 polymorphism in recurrent VTE may differ according to gender and FTO polymorphism may predict VTE recurrence in male patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Increased anaesthesia duration increases venous thromboembolism risk in plastic surgery: A 6-year analysis of over 19,000 cases using the NSQIP dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlodinow, Alexei S; Khavanin, Nima; Ver Halen, Jon P; Rambachan, Aksharananda; Gutowski, Karol A; Kim, John Y S

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the postoperative setting. Various risk stratification schema exist in the plastic surgery literature, but do not take into account variations in procedure length. The putative risk of VTE conferred by increased length of time under anaesthesia has never been rigorously explored. The goal of this study is to assess this relationship and to benchmark VTE rates in plastic surgery. A large, multi-institutional quality-improvement database was queried for plastic and reconstructive surgery procedures performed under general anaesthesia between 2005-2011. In total, 19,276 cases were abstracted from the database. Z-scores were calculated based on procedure-specific mean surgical durations, to assess each case's length in comparison to the mean for that procedure. A total of 70 patients (0.36%) experienced a post-operative VTE. Patients with and without post-operative VTE were compared with respect to a variety of demographics, comorbidities, and intraoperative characteristics. Potential confounders for VTE were included in a regression model, along with the Z-scores. VTE occurred in both cosmetic and reconstructive procedures. Longer surgery time, relative to procedural means, was associated with increased VTE rates. Further, regression analysis showed increase in Z-score to be an independent risk factor for post-operative VTE (Odds Ratio of 1.772 per unit, p-value plastic surgery procedures. While this in itself does not suggest an intervention, surgical time under general anaesthesia would be a useful addition to existing risk models in plastic surgery.

  19. Venous thromboembolism and bleeding in critically ill patients with severe renal insufficiency receiving dalteparin thromboprophylaxis: prevalence, incidence and risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Deborah; Douketis, James; Meade, Maureen; Guyatt, Gordon; Zytaruk, Nicole; Granton, John; Skrobik, Yoanna; Albert, Martin; Fowler, Robert; Hebert, Paul; Pagliarello, Guiseppe; Friedrich, Jan; Freitag, Andreas; Karachi, Tim; Rabbat, Christian; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Geerts, William; Crowther, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients with renal insufficiency are predisposed to both deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and bleeding. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence, incidence and predictors of DVT and the incidence of bleeding in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with estimated creatinine clearance insufficiency or dialysis receiving subcutaneous dalteparin 5,000 IU once daily, we estimated the prevalence of proximal DVT by screening compression venous ultrasound of the lower limbs within 48 hours of ICU admission. DVT incidence was assessed on twice-weekly ultrasound testing. We estimated the incidence of major and minor bleeding by daily clinical assessments. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to identify independent predictors of both DVT and major bleeding. Results Of 156 patients with a mean (standard deviation) creatinine clearance of 18.9 (6.5) ml/min, 18 had DVT or pulmonary embolism within 48 hours of ICU admission, died or were discharged before ultrasound testing – leaving 138 evaluable patients who received at least one dose of dalteparin. The median duration of dalteparin administration was 7 days (interquartile range, 4 to 12 days). DVT developed in seven patients (5.1%; 95% confidence interval, 2.5 to 10.1). The only independent risk factor for DVT was an elevated baseline Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (hazard ratio for 10-point increase, 2.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 4.91). Major bleeding developed in 10 patients (7.2%; 95% confidence interval, 4.0 to 12.8), all with trough anti-activated factor X levels ≤ 0.18 IU/ml. Independent risk factors for major bleeding were aspirin use (hazard ratio, 6.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.35 to 29.4) and a high International Normalized Ratio (hazard ratio for 0.5-unit increase, 1.68; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 2.66). Conclusion In ICU patients with renal insufficiency, the incidence of DVT and major bleeding are considerable but

  20. Pharmacoeconomic study on rivaroxaban vs conventional venous thromboembolism prophylaxis following elective total hip or knee replacement surgery in Serbia: Single centre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perović Saša R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is often clinically unobservable, showing the first symptoms only after the patient has been discharged from the hospital, owing to which symptoms may not be recognized in time and serious complications may arise after hip or knee replacement surgery. The outcome for a patient who has had a symptomatic episode of VTE may be bad due to a risk of recurrent VTE and the development of postthrombotic syndrome. The annual incidence of VTE is around 80-180 cases in 100.000, based on population studies. Worldwide, orthopaedists and anaesthesiologists mostly refer to ACCP guidelines from America, or guidance from NICE and Scottish Medicines Consortium in Europe. All the guidelines include rivaroxaban as a therapy of choice for the prevention of VTE following elective arthroplasty as the therapy with rivaroxaban has shown both effectiveness and cost-savings. Many countries have included rivaroxaban as a medicine of first choice in the therapy for the above described indication. Aim: The objective of this analysis is to demonstrate cost-effectiveness of the new therapy with rivaroxaban versus conventional in VTE prophylaxis for patients undergoing elective hip or knee replacement surgery. Methodology: This paper is a part of the academic IV phase pharmacoecconomic study using extrapolation datas (RECORD 1, RECORD 2, RECORD 3 done in Serbia as single center expirience of Institute for Orthopaedic Surgery 'Banjica', in 2015. Information on drug prices, basic pharmacological characteristics, and on services of health institutions, are taken from the List of Drugs and Pricelist of the Republic Health Insurance Fund, as well as the Thromboembolism Prophylaxis Guide of the Institute 'Banjica'. The Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER and Cost-utility analysis (CUA have also been used in relation to the Quality-adjusted life-year (QALY. Furthermore, in the calculation the proposed price of a defined daily dose (DDD

  1. Risk of Post-Discharge Venous Thromboembolism and Associated Mortality in General Surgery: A Population-Based Cohort Study Using Linked Hospital and Primary Care Data in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouras, George; Burns, Elaine Marie; Howell, Ann-Marie; Bottle, Alex; Athanasiou, Thanos; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Trends towards day case surgery and enhanced recovery mean that postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) may increasingly arise after hospital discharge. However, hospital data alone are unable to capture adverse events that occur outside of the hospital setting. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has suggested the use of primary care data to quantify hospital care-related VTE. Data in surgical patients using these resources is lacking. The aim of this study was to measure VTE risk and associated mortality in general surgery using linked primary care and hospital databases, to improve our understanding of harm from VTE that arises beyond hospital stay. This was a longitudinal cohort study using nationally linked primary care (Clinical Practice Research Datalink, CPRD), hospital administrative (Hospital Episodes Statistics, HES), population statistics (Office of National Statistics, ONS) and National Cancer Intelligence Network databases. Routinely collected information was used to quantify 90-day in-hospital VTE, 90-day post-discharge VTE and 90-day mortality in adults undergoing one of twelve general surgical procedures between 1st April 1997 and 31st March 2012. The earliest postoperative recording of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism in CPRD, HES and ONS was counted in each patient. Covariates from multiple datasets were combined to derive detailed prediction models for VTE and mortality. Limitation included the capture of VTE presenting to healthcare only and the lack of information on adherence to pharmacological thromboprophylaxis as there was no data linkage to hospital pharmacy records. There were 981 VTE events captured within 90 days of surgery in 168005 procedures (23.7/1000 patient-years). Overall, primary care data increased the detection of postoperative VTE by a factor of 1.38 (981/710) when compared with using HES and ONS only. Total VTE rates ranged between 3.2/1000 patient-years in haemorrhoidectomy to 118

  2. Influence of statin use on the incidence of recurrent venous thromboembolism and major bleeding in patients receiving rivaroxaban or standard anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Philip S; Gebel, Martin; Prins, Martin H; Davidson, Bruce L; Lensing, Anthonie Wa

    2014-01-01

    Statins may reduce the risk of first and recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE). No data are available on their potential benefit in patients treated with the oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban. The EINSTEIN DVT/PE and EINSTEIN Extension studies compared rivaroxaban with standard of care (n=8280) and placebo (n=1188), respectively. The incidences of recurrent VTE and major bleeding per 100 patient-years for exposure (or not) to statins were calculated. A Cox proportional hazards model was constructed, stratified by index event and intended treatment duration, with statin use as a time-dependent variable, for each treatment group (rivaroxaban vs enoxaparin/vitamin K antagonist or placebo) and adjusted for relevant variables. In EINSTEIN DVT/PE, 1509 (18.3%) patients used statins during the at-risk period, and 6731 (81.7%) did not. Overall, 2.6 recurrent VTEs occurred per 100 patient-years with statin use compared with 3.8 per 100 patient-years without statins (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46-1.25). HRs for recurrent VTE were similar for concomitant use of rivaroxaban-statin and enoxaparin/VKA-statin. Major bleeding events occurred in 3.0 per 100 patient-years with statin use compared with 2.3 per 100 patient-years without statins (adjusted HR 0.77; 95% CI 0.46-1.29). Due to adjustments in the Cox regression model, the direction of this HR is in contrast to the crude comparison. In EINSTEIN Extension, no recurrent VTEs occurred with statin use in the rivaroxaban group compared with 1.6 per 100 patient-years without statins. In the placebo group, 12.2 recurrent VTEs occurred per 100 patient-years with statin use compared with 13.2 per 100 patient-years without (adjusted HR 0.81; 95% CI 0.35-1.86). The effect of statins in this secondary analysis of the EINSTEIN VTE treatment program is consistent with other studies that suggest a reduced risk of recurrent VTE, but conclusive evidence of this benefit is lacking. Statins are simple to use

  3. Use of oral contraceptives containing gestodene and risk of venous thromboembolism: outlook 10 years after the third-generation "pill scare".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Lothar A J; Dinger, Jürgen C; Assmann, Anita; Minh, Thai Do

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated whether gestodene-containing oral contraceptives (OCs) carry a higher risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) than OCs containing progestins other than desogestrel and gestodene. The study was conducted based on the hypothesis that the biases and confounding factors that were present initially after the introduction of new so-called "third-generation" OCs (i.e., those containing desogestrel and gestodene) in the 1990s, which likely contributed to the alleged increased risk of VTE, may have vanished after 10 years. This was a matched case-control study using data identified for women (aged 15-49 years) with suspected or diagnosed VTE (deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism) that occurred between January 2002 and February 2006 in Austria. All VTE cases were validated by an attending/relevant physician(s), a detailed review of medical records and patient-completed questionnaires. Data were analyzed using an unconditional logistic regression model with adjustment for relevant confounders. Overall, 451 VTE cases and 1,920 controls without VTE were identified. The adjusted odds ratios for confirmed VTE with OC use versus nonuse were: 3.39 (95% CI 2.36-4.87) for OCs containing gestodene and 3.14 (2.1-4.47) for OCs containing progestins other than desogestrel and gestodene. Adjusted odds ratios for a head-to-head comparison of OCs containing gestodene versus OCs containing progestins other than desogestrel and gestodene were: 0.99 (0.68-1.45) for all cases; 1.01 (0.69-1.47) for confirmed cases and 1.11 (0.73-1.69) for confirmed and idiopathic VTE cases, respectively. The risk of VTE is not elevated in users of gestodene-containing OCs relative to users of OCs containing progestins other than desogestrel and gestodene. Our study supports the view that (i) the majority of previous results may be explained by differences in the user populations of so-called "third-generation" OCs (containing desogestrel and gestodene) and "second-generation" OCs

  4. Frecuencia e incidencia de la tromboembolia venosa en un hospital general Frequency and incidence of venous thromboembolism in a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Mazzei

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar la frecuencia y la incidencia de la tromboembolia venosa (TEV, objetivamente diagnosticada, en un hospital universitario argentino. Se utilizó un diseño retrospectivo, observacional y longitudinal. Se analizaron las historias clínicas de todos los pacientes mayores de 16 años que habían egresado o fallecido en las unidades de internación clínica, obstétrica y quirúrgica del Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín con el diagnóstico de TEV durante un período de 24 meses. La frecuencia y la incidencia de TEV fueron 0.92% y 0.40% (intervalo de confianza de 95% (IC95%: 0.37 a 0.42% respectivamente. La incidencia más alta de TEV se presentó en la novena década de la vida (0.80%; IC95%: 0.78% a 0.82%. Solamente el 31% de los pacientes que desarrollaron TEV durante la internación habían recibido tromboprofilaxis con heparina. La mortalidad intrahospitalaria global de los pacientes con TEV fue 19%.The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE in an Argentine universitary hospital. We used a longitudinal, retrospective, observational design. Participants were all over-16 year patients who were discharged or died in clinical, obstetrical and surgical units in the Hospital de Clínicas José de San Martín during a 24 month period between July 1, 2001 and June 30, 2003, with a diagnosis on release of VTE. VTE frequency reached 0.92% and incidence was 0.40%; 95% confidence interval (95% CI: 0.37 to 0.42%. Incidence was highest in the 9th decade of life (0.80%; 95% CI: 0.78% to 0.82%. Only 31% of patients who developed VTE during hospitalization had received thromboprophylaxis. Total in-hospital mortality of VTE patients was 19%.

  5. Early chemoprophylaxis is associated with decreased venous thromboembolism risk without concomitant increase in intraspinal hematoma expansion after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ronald; Scerbo, Michelle H; Schmitt, Karl M; Adams, Sasha D; Choi, Timothy J; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B

    2017-12-01

    After traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), there is increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), but chemoprophylaxis (PPX) may cause expansion of intraspinal hematoma (ISH). Single-center retrospective study of adult trauma patients from 2012 to 2015 with SCI. VTE diagnosis, death, or discharge within 48 hours. Patients were dichotomized based on early (≤48 hours) heparinoid and/or aspirin PPX. Intraspinal hematoma expansion was diagnosed intraoperatively or by follow-up radiology. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards to estimate the effect of PPX on risk of VTE and ISH expansion controlling for age, injury severity score (ISS), complete SCI, and mechanism as static covariates and operative spine procedure as a time-varying covariate. Five hundred one patients with SCI were dichotomized into early PPX (n = 260 [52%]) and no early PPX (n = 241 [48%]). Early PPX patients were less likely blunt injured (91% vs 97%) and had fewer operative spine interventions (65% vs 80%), but age (median, 43 vs 49 years), ISS (median 24 vs 21), admission ISH (47% vs 44%), and VTE (5% vs 9%) were similar. Cox analysis found that early heparinoids was associated with reduced VTE (hazard ratio [HR], 0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.16-0.84) and reduced pulmonary embolism (PE) (HR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.06-0.69). The estimated number needed to treat with heparinoids was 10 to prevent one VTE and 13 to prevent one PE at 30 days. Early aspirin was not associated with reduced VTE or PE. Seven patients (1%) had ISH expansion, of which four were on PPX at the time of expansion. Using heparinoid and aspirin as time-varying covariates, neither heparinoids (HR, 1.90; 95% CI, 0.32-11.41) nor aspirin (HR, 3.67; 95% CI, 0.64-20.88) was associated with ISH expansion. Early heparinoid therapy was associated with decreased VTE and PE risk in SCI patients without concomitant increase in ISH expansion. Therapeutic, level IV.

  6. Post-Discharge Adherence With Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis After Orthopedic Trauma: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial of Aspirin vs. Low Molecular Weight Heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haac, Bryce E; Van Besien, Richard; OʼHara, Nathan N; Slobogean, Gerard P; Manson, Theodore T; OʼToole, Robert V; Johal, Herman; Berger, Peter Z; Reahl, George B; Marinos, Dimitrius; Degani, Yasmin; Mascarenhas, Daniel; Connelly, Daniel; Scalea, Thomas M; Stein, Deborah M

    2017-12-14

    Orthopedic trauma patients are often treated with venous thromboembolism (VTE) chemoprophylaxis with aspirin or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) after discharge from their index admission, but adherence patterns are not known. We hypothesized that overall adherence would be moderate and greater with aspirin compared to LMWH. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of adult trauma patients with an operative extremity fracture or any pelvic/acetabular fracture requiring VTE prophylaxis. Patients were randomized to receive either LMWH 30mg BID or aspirin 81mg BID. Patients prescribed outpatient prophylaxis were contacted between 10 to 21 days after discharge to assess adherence measured by the validated Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8). Adherence scores were compared between the two treatment arms with similar results for intention-to-treat and as-treated analyses. As-treated multivariable logistic regression was performed to determine factors associated with low-medium adherence scores. 150 patients (64 on LMWH, 86 on aspirin) on chemoprophylaxis at time of follow-up completed the questionnaire. As-treated analysis showed that adherence was high overall (mean MMAS 7.2 out of 8, SD 1.5) and similar for the two regimens (LMWH: 7.4 vs. aspirin: 7.0, p=0.13). However, patients on LMWH were more likely to feel hassled by their regimen (23% vs. 9%, p=0.02). In a multivariable model, low-medium adherence was associated with taking LMWH as the prophylaxis medication (aOR 2.34, CI 1.06 - 5.18, p=0.04), having to self-administer the prophylaxis (aOR 4.44, CI 1.45 - 13.61, p<0.01), being of male sex (aOR 2.46, CI 1.10 - 5.49, p=0.03) and of younger age (aOR 0.72 per additional 10 years of age, CI 0.57-0.91, p<0.01). Overall post-discharge adherence with VTE prophylaxis was high. Several factors, including prophylaxis by LMWH, were associated with decreased adherence. These factors should be considered when managing patients and designing efficacy trials. Level

  7. Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants and major bleeding-related fatality in patients with atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Daniel; Rodrigues, Filipe B; Barra, Márcio; Santos, Ana Teresa; de Abreu, Daisy; Gonçalves, Nilza; Pinto, Fausto J; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Costa, João

    2015-08-01

    Non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are efficacious and safe antithrombotic drugs but the non-availability of an antidote for potential fatal haemorrhagic events is clinically perceived as a strong limitation. We aimed at evaluating the risk of haemorrhage-related fatalities associated with NOACs in patients requiring long-term anticoagulation. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library and Web of Science databases were searched in November 2014 for atrial fibrillation (AF) or venous thromboembolism (VTE) phase III randomised controlled trials (RCT) comparing NOACs with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) or low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) followed by VKAs. Pooled OR and 95% CIs were estimated through meta-analysis. Heterogeneity was assessed with the I(2) test. Eleven studies were included: 5 on AF and 6 on VTE. A total of 100 324 patients were evaluated in 4 rivaroxaban, 3 dabigatran, 2 apixaban and 2 edoxaban studies. NOAC-treated patients had a 47% odds reduction compared with VKA (OR 0.53; 95% CI 0.42 to 0.68; I(2)=0%; 3 events avoided per 1000 patients) and 64% odds reduction compared with LMWH